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Sample records for interferon induced thyroiditis

  1. Interferon induced thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Yaron; Menconi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is used for the treatment of various disorders, most notable chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. One of the commonest side effects of IFNalpha therapy is thyroiditis, with up to 40% of HCV patients on IFNalpha developing clinical or subclinical disease. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. IIT can manifest as clinical autoimmune thyroiditis, presenting with symptoms of classical Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease, or as non-autoimmune thyroiditis. Non-autoimmune thyroiditis can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, with early thyrotoxicosis and later hypothyroidism, or as non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of IIT have been well characterized the mechanisms causing IIT are still poorly understood. It is likely that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) itself plays a role in the disease, as the association between HCV infection and thyroiditis is well established. It is believed that IFNalpha induces thyroiditis by both immune stimulatory effects and by direct effects on the thyroid. Early detection and therapy of this condition are important in order to avoid complications of thyroid disease such as cardiac arrhythmias.

  2. Interferon-induced thyroiditis during treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Kozielewicz, Dorota; Halota, Waldemar

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid function disorders affect between 5% and 15% of patients treated with IFNα and RBV for chronic hepatitis C. Women and patients with thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) found before the treatment are at risk of developing the disorders (46.1% vs. 5.4%). The spectrum of IFNα-induced thyroiditis (IIT) includes two groups. Disorders with an autoimmune background are: presence of thyroid autoantibodies without clinical disease, Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease. The second group comprises diseases caused by the direct toxic effect of IFNα on the thyroid gland, i.e. destructive thyroiditis and non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. Thyroid diseases are not an absolute contraindication for IFNα and RBV therapy. In patients diagnosed with thyroid dysfunction, before the antiviral therapy it is necessary to achieve euthyreosis. Thyroid function disorders may occur at any moment of the therapy. The earliest have been observed in the 4th week of treatment, and the latest 12 months after its termination. During the therapy, in order to diagnose IIT early, it is recommended to determine TSH level every 2-3 months depending on the presence of TPOAb before the treatment. The diagnosis and treatment of thyroid function disorders should be conducted in co-operation with an endocrinologist.

  3. Genetic analysis of interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT): evidence for a key role for MHC and apoptosis related genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Hasham, Alia; Zhang, Weijia; Lotay, Vaneet; Haggerty, Shannon; Stefan, Mihaela; Concepcion, Erlinda; Dieterich, Douglas T; Tomer, Yaron

    2013-08-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) have become increasingly recognized as a complication of interferon-alpha (IFNα) therapy in patients with chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Interferon-induced thyroiditis (IIT) can manifest as clinical thyroiditis in approximately 15% of HCV patients receiving IFNα and subclinical thyroiditis in up to 40% of patients, possibly resulting in either dose reduction or discontinuation of IFNα treatment. However, the exact mechanisms that lead to the development of IIT are unknown and may include IFNα-mediated immune-recruitment as well as direct toxic effects on thyroid follicular cells. We hypothesized that IIT develops in genetically predisposed individuals whose threshold for developing thyroiditis is lowered by IFNα. Therefore, our aim was to identify the susceptibility genes for IIT. We used a genomic convergence approach combining genetic association data with transcriptome analysis of genes upregulated by IFNα. Integrating results of genetic association, transcriptome data, pathway, and haplotype analyses enabled the identification of 3 putative loci, SP100/110/140 (2q37.1), HLA (6p21.3), and TAP1 (6p21.3) that may be involved in the pathogenesis of IIT. Immune-regulation and apoptosis emerged as the predominant mechanisms underlying the etiology of IIT.

  4. Interferon-alpha-induced destructive thyroiditis followed by Graves' disease in a patient with chronic hepatitis C: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bu Kyung; Choi, Young Sik; Park, Yo Han; Lee, Sang Uk

    2011-12-01

    Interferon-induced thyroiditis (IIT) is a major clinical problem for patients receiving interferon-alpha (IFN-α) therapy. But, destructive thyroiditis followed by Graves' disease associated with IFN-α therapy is very rarely reported. Herein, we report a rare case of pegylated IFN-α (pegIFN-α) induced destructive thyroiditis followed by Graves' disease in a patient with HCV infection. A 31-yr-old woman suffered from chronic active hepatitis C and was treated with pegIFN-α and ribavirin for 12 months. Results of a thyroid function test and autoantibody levels were normal before IFN-α therapy was initiated. Destructive thyrotoxicosis appeared seven months after the initiation of IFN-α therapy, followed by Graves' thyrotoxicosis two months after the cessation of therapy. The diagnoses of destructive thyroiditis and Graves' disease were confirmed by the presence of TSH receptor antibodies in addition to Tc-99m scintigraphy findings. The patient's antithyroglobulin antibody titer increased gradually during IFN-α therapy and remained weakly positive after IFN-α therapy was discontinued.

  5. Environmental triggers of thyroiditis: hepatitis C and interferon-α.

    PubMed

    Menconi, F; Hasham, A; Tomer, Y

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are postulated to develop as a result of a complex interplay between several genetic and environmental influences. The pathogenesis of AITD is still not clearly defined. However, among the implicated triggers (e.g. iodine, infections, medications), more recent data confirmed strong associations of AITD with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and interferon-α (IFNα) therapy. Moreover, it is likely that HCV and IFN act in synergism to trigger AITD in patients. Indeed, approximately 40% of HCV patients develop either clinical or subclinical disease while receiving IFNα. Interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) can manifest as non-autoimmune thyroiditis (presenting as destructive thyroiditis, or non-autoimmune hypothyroidism), or autoimmune thyroiditis [presenting with clinical features of Graves' disease (GD) or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT)]. Although not yet clearly understood, it is thought that IFNα can induce thyroiditis via both immune stimulatory and direct toxic effects on the thyroid. In view of the high frequency of IIT, routine screening and surveillance of HCV patients receiving IFNα is recommended to avoid the complications, such as cardiac arrhythmias, associated with thyrotoxicosis. In summary, IIT is a common clinical problem that can be readily diagnosed with routine thyroid function screening of HCV patients receiving IFN. The treatment of IIT consists of the standard therapy for differing clinical manifestations of IIT such as GD, HT, or destructive thyroiditis. However, anti-thyroid medications are not recommended in this setting since they can potentially be hepatotoxic.

  6. Thyroid dysfunction in hepatitis C individuals treated with interferon-alpha and ribavirin--a review.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Luis Jesuíno de Oliveira; Atta, Ajax Mercês; D'Almeida Junior, Argemiro; Paraná, Raymundo

    2008-04-01

    Hepatitis C (HCV) is now the main cause of chronic hepatic disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Several extrahepatic diseases have been associated with chronic HCV infection, and in most cases appear to be directly related to the viral infection. Thyroid disorders are common in patients with chronic HCV. Some patients with chronic hepatitis C experience thyroid problems, and thyroid dysfunction may also be a side effect of interferon-based treatment. The principal risk factor for developing thyroid disease in the course of antiviral therapy is the previous positivity for anti-thyroid antibodies (anti-thyroid peroxidase) especially in older women. Screening for autoantibodies and serum thyroid-stimulating hormone is recommended before, during and after interferon-alpha treatment, and patients should be informed of the risk of thyroid dysfunction. This review includes a summary of thyroid disease associated with chronic HCV infection, interferon-alpha and ribavirin for treatment of HCV and potential to induce thyroid dysfunction.

  7. Interferon Induced Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bayram Kayar, Nuket; Alpay, Nadir; Hamdard, Jamshid; Emegil, Sebnem; Bag Soydas, Rabia; Baysal, Birol

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology which involves recurring oral and genital aphthous ulcers and ocular lesions as well as articular, vascular, and nervous system involvement. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is usually seen in viral infections, immune deficiency syndrome, sickle cell anemia, and hyperfiltration and secondary to interferon therapy. Here, we present a case of FSGS identified with kidney biopsy in a patient who had been diagnosed with Behçet's disease and received interferon-alpha treatment for uveitis and presented with acute renal failure and nephrotic syndrome associated with interferon. PMID:27847659

  8. Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible.

  9. Chronic hepatitis B with type I diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroiditis development during interferon alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Kose, Sukran; Gozaydin, Ayhan; Akkoclu, Gulgun; Ece, Gulfem

    2012-04-13

    Interferon alpha is a molecule frequently used in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B, C, and D, with immunomodulatory and antiviral activity. It is also used in some cancer types. It has been widely claimed that interferon alpha triggers autoimmunity, with its broad adverse effect profile. Here we present the case of a 29-year-old male patient with chronic hepatitis B diagnosis who developed type 1 diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroiditis during treatment with interferon alfa-2b. Within four months of initiation of treatment with interferon alfa-2b, the patient presented to our clinic with dry mouth, urinary frequency (8 to 10 times per day), drinking plenty of water, night time urination, and tiredness. He was admitted to the clinic when his fasting blood glucose level was detected to be high. After examinations, the patient was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroiditis and began to receive treatment with insulin and propranolol. Fasting blood glucose levels were controlled and thyroid hormones decreased to normal levels within one month after the treatments began. For patients who will receive treatment with interferon alpha, especially those individuals with chronic hepatitis, pancreatic autoantibodies should be checked and close monitoring should be performed as there may be glucose tolerance impairment in patients with high titers. In addition, follow-up with thyroid function tests should be performed prior to and during the treatment.

  10. Occurrence of thyroid autoimmunity and dysfunction throughout a nine-month follow-up in patients undergoing interferon-beta therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rotondi, M; Oliviero, A; Profice, P; Mone, C M; Biondi, B; Del Buono, A; Mazziotti, G; Sinisi, A M; Bellastella, A; Carella, C

    1998-12-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity and dysfunction are a well known side effect of IFN alpha therapy for viral hepatitis and tumors, while the IFN beta effects on the thyroid gland in neurological patients have not been studied. The aim of this longitudinal study was to look for the appearance of thyroid autoimmunity as well as for the occurrence of overt thyroid disease in the patients affected by multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with IFN beta 1b. Eight patients (4 males, 4 females) undergoing r-IFN beta 1b treatment (8 M.U. every other day for 9 months) for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis entered the study. We have analyzed thyroid function parameters and auto antibody levels before and after 1, 2, 3, 6 and 9 months of therapy. None of them referred to familiar thyroid pathology or presented clinically overt thyroid disease except for one patient (case 4) who showed TPO-Ab pretreatment positivity and another (case 8) who was in therapy with Levothyroxine 100 microg/die for multinodular goiter. The number of patients with appearance of thyroid antibodies has slowly increased, until the third month of therapy with 3 patients out of 7 positive for TPO-Ab. The only case of overt thyroid dysfunction reported by us appeared after nine months of therapy and consisted of a hypothyroidism. Our data suggest that short-term interferon beta treatment is able to induce thyroid autoimmunity (42.8%) and dysfunction (12.5%).

  11. Interferon Induced Transfer of Viral Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    interferon induction (27). Reaction kinetics plus the falure of soluble factors in the medium to induce interferon suggested that the inducing factor...staining. Only NDV infected lymphocytes stained with the anti-ACTHa (1-13) or anti-Y-endorphin sera. The staining reaction of the anti-ACTHa (1-13) sera was...reasons. First, a cross reaction between human immunoglobulin class IgGl, and O-endorphin and ACTH has been reported (46). It seems that this is not the

  12. [Thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  13. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Graves' Disease in One Patient: The Extremes of Thyroid Dysfunction Associated with Interferon Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, R. C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease associated with interferon therapy can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, Graves' Hyperthyroidism, and autoimmune (often subclinical) hypothyroidism, the latter persisting in many patients. There are scare reports of a single patient developing extremes of autoimmune thyroid disease activated by the immunomodulatory effects of interferon. A 60-year-old man received 48 weeks of pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy for chronic HCV. Six months into treatment, he reported fatigue, weight gain, and slowed cognition. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was 58.8 mIU/L [0.27–4.2], fT4 11.1 pmol/L [12–25], and fT3 4.2 pmol/L [2.5–6.0] with elevated anti-TPO (983 IU/mL [<35]) and anti-TG (733 U/mL [<80]) antibodies. He commenced thyroxine with initial clinical and biochemical resolution but developed symptoms of hyperthyroidism with weight loss and tremor 14 months later. Serum TSH was <0.02 mIU/L, fT4 54.3 pmol/L, and fT3 20.2 pmol/L, with an elevated TSH receptor (TRAb, 4.0 U/L [<1.0]), anti-TPO (1,163 IU/mL) and anti-TG (114 U/mL) antibodies. Technetium scan confirmed Graves' Disease with bilateral diffuse increased tracer uptake (5.9% [0.5–3.5%]). The patient commenced carbimazole therapy for 6 months. Treatment was ceased following spontaneous clinical and biochemical remission (TSH 3.84 mIU/L, fT4 17pmol/L, fT3 4.5 pmol/L, and TRAb <1 U/L). This raises the need to monitor thyroid function closely in patients both during and following completion of interferon treatment. PMID:27042364

  14. Interferon Induced Transfer of Viral Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Cell contact is required between inducer cells and effector lymphocytes for interferon induction (27). Reaction kinetics plus the falure of soluble...endorphin sera. The staining reaction of the anti-ACTHa (1-13) sera was blocked by absorption with porcine ACTH (1-39) but not with NOV or noninfected...endorphin sera at 18 hr post infection is important for a number of reasons. First, a cross reaction between human immunoglobulin class IgGl, and a-endorphin

  15. Inhibition of sup 125 I organification and thyroid hormone release by interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma in human thyrocytes in suspension culture

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.; Satoh, T.; Shizume, K.; Ozawa, M.; Han, D.C.; Imamura, H.; Tsushima, T.; Demura, H.; Kanaji, Y.; Ito, Y. )

    1990-06-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in patients with subacute thyroiditis and painless thyroiditis, human thyroid follicles were cultured with interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), and/or interferon-gamma (IFN gamma), and the effects of these cytokines on thyroid function were studied in vitro. When human thyrocytes were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium containing 0.5% fetal calf serum and TSH for 5-8 days, the cells incorporated 125I, synthesized de novo (125I)iodotyrosines and (125I)iodothyronines, and secreted (125I)T4 and (125I)T3 into the medium. IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta inhibited 125I incorporation and (125I)iodothyronine release in a concentration-dependent manner. The minimal inhibitory effect was detected at 10 pg/ml. Electron microscopic examination revealed a marked decrease in lysosome formation in IL-1-treated thyrocytes. TNF alpha and IFN gamma also inhibited thyroid function in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, when thyrocytes were cultured with IL-1, TNF alpha and IFN gamma, these cytokines more than additively inhibited thyroid function. Although the main mechanism of 131I uptake suppression in the thyroid gland in subacute thyroiditis is due to cellular damage and suppression of TSH release, our present findings suggest that IL-1, TNF alpha, and IFN gamma produced in the inflammatory process within the thyroid gland further inhibit iodine incorporation and at least partly account for the decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in destruction-induced hyperthyroidism.

  16. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  17. A quantitative assessment of depression and thyroid dysfunction secondary to interferon-alpha therapy in patients with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Loftis, J M; Wall, J M; Linardatos, E; Benvenga, S; Hauser, P

    2004-01-01

    The most effective treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) is interferon-alpha (IFN) therapy in combination with ribavirin. Although symptoms of depression are among the most common side effects of IFN therapy in treating patients with HCV, the mechanisms by which IFN produces these neuropsychiatric side effects remain unclear. In the brain, IFNs are involved in a number of regulatory functions, including but not limited to regulation of the endocrine system via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and -thyroid axes. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of IFN therapy on thyroid function and to characterize the relationship between thyroid dysfunction and major depressive disorder during IFN therapy in patients with hepatitis C. Thirty-three patients with HCV were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) Axis I Disorders (SCID) and completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Patients were on IFN for an average of 6 to 12 months depending on their viral genotype. Serum samples were collected at baseline, during and after IFN therapy, and measured for free thryoxine (FT4) and TSH levels. Patients who developed IFN-induced depression were treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants. Only one patient developed transient IFN-induced overt hypothyroidism, but he did not develop depression. Analysis of variance showed that there were no significant differences in either FT4 or TSH serum levels between patients who developed major depressive disorder (MDD) (no.= 10) during IFN therapy and those who did not (no.=23). These results illustrate the frequency and severity of depressive symptoms associated with IFN therapy and the apparent absence of a relationship between IFN-induced MDD and changes in thyroid function.

  18. Prevalence of thyroid disorders in hepatitis C virus positive patients on interferon and antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Gitanjali; Panag, KMDS; Garg, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common worldwide. The treatment typically involves a combination of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) and ribavirin (RBV) therapy; however, the use of IFN-α is well documented to be associated with thyroid disease, the most common autoimmune disorder associated with IFN-α. Aim: The aim of the present study was to know the prevalence of thyroid abnormality in the HCV-positive patients on IFN and antiviral therapy. Materials and Methods: Fifty known HCV positive patients were enrolled for the study. All the patients were on IFN (3 million unit subcutaneously 3 times/week) and antiviral therapy (oral RBV 1000–1200 mg/day). Thyroid function tests were performed first at the start of treatment and then after 12 weeks of treatment. Results: 13 (26%) of the patients were found to develop hypothyroidism, and 1 (2%) patient developed hyperthyroidism in the course of 12 weeks therapy. Conclusion: HCV patients on IFN and antiviral therapy have an effect on the thyroid gland, so these patients should be regularly screened for thyroid disorders and appropriately treated to maintain euthyroid status. PMID:27857890

  19. Treatment of trypanosome-infected mice with exogenous interferon, interferon inducers, or antibody to interferon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated that mice resistant to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (the B10.BR/SgSnJ strain) produces, upon infection by this parasite, two peaks of serum interferon (IFN), while the susceptible mice (C3HeB/FeJ) produces no IFN. In the present study, survival times were compared for B10.BR/SgSnJ, C3HeB/FeJ, and CBA/J (an intermediately resistant strain) mice that were injected, prior to infection with the parasite, with either of the following three preparations (1) IFN-gamma, (2) an antibody to IFN-gamma and (3) polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (to induce IFN-alpha/beta). No effect on the survival times of mice by any of these preparations could be demonstrated, contrary to some previous reports.

  20. Interferon Induced Transfer of Viral Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    interferon: We decided that rather than first studying induction of tyrosinase in melanoma cells or plasminogen activator in ovarian granulosa cells as...177-184 (HP Publishing, New York). 14. Lockhart, R.Z. (1973). Criteria for acceptance of a viral inhibitor as an interferon and a general

  1. Radiation-induced thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maxon, H.R.

    1985-09-01

    Ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to result in a number of changes in the human thyroid gland. At lower radiation dose levels (between 10 and 1500 rads), benign and malignant neoplasms appear to be the dominant effect, whereas at higher dose levels functional changes and thyroiditis become more prevalent. In all instances, the likelihood of the effect is related to the amount and type of radiation exposure, time since exposure, and host factors such as age, sex, and heredity. The author's current approach to the evaluation of patients with past external radiation therapy to the thyroid is discussed. The use of prophylactic thyroxine (T4) therapy is controversial. While T4 therapy may not be useful in preventing carcinogenesis when instituted many years after radiation exposure, theoretically T4 may block TSH secretion and stimulation of damaged cells to undergo malignant transformation when instituted soon after radiation exposure.

  2. Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies in Non-Interferon Treated Hepatitis C Patients in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, Muhammad Imtiaz; Gauhar, Amna; Akram, Muhammad; Elahi, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Interferon therapy of HCV infected patients is associated with development of thyroid dysfunctions. Patients with pretreatment presence of antithyroid peroxidase (TPO-Ab) are at greater risk. This study, probably the first in Pakistan, was planned to determine TPO-Ab in sera of treatment-naive local HCV patients. Setting. Centre for Nuclear Medicine (CENUM), Mayo Hospital, Lahore. Patients and Methods. During July to December 2012, 190 patients (140 females, 50 males) newly diagnosed for HCV infection were selected for this study. Their age range was 15–55 years (mean: 35.3 ± 9.1 years). 262 age matched healthy subjects (211 females and 50 males) were recruited as control. Serum-free thyroxin (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were detected by radioimmunoassay techniques. Serum TPO-Ab titer was determined by ELISA method using commercial kits. Results. Serum FT4 and TSH levels in HCV patients and controls were within normal range. Between two groups there was no significant difference in mean value of FT4 (16.0 ± 3.0 versus 16.2 ± 3.9; P = 0.619) but mean TSH value was significantly lower in HCV patients (1.5 ± 0.8 versus 1.8 ± 0.9; P = 0.003). Among HCV patients 51 (26.8%) were TPO-Ab positive and among control subjects 18 (6.9%) were TPO-Ab positive. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Further analysis showed that among HCV patients 39 (27.8%) females and 12 (24.0%) males were TPO-Ab positive, respectively, and difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.873). Moreover, TPO-Ab positive patients were older and had significantly higher serum TSH as compared to TPO-Ab negative HCV patients. Conclusion. Independent of patient's gender and increasing with advancing age, about one-fourth of local untreated HCV patients are TPO-Ab positive and are at greater risk of developing thyroid disorders during and after interferon treatment. PMID:26613079

  3. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IF stimulated ...

  4. Clinical application of interferons and their inducers: Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfellow, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the clinical uses of interferons, specifically discussed are: uses of interferons in viral diseases; double stranded RNA and its analogs for clinical applications; interferons uses in cancer patients in Europe; Recombinant DNA technology; Gamma interferon and its role as a lymphokine and clinical trials of interferon in Japan and U.S.A.

  5. Interferon induces natural killer cell blastogenesis in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, C. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Welsh, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN), types beta and gamma, and IFN inducers polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, all stimulated the generation of blast-natural killer (NK) cells in mouse spleens, Blast-NK cells were characterized on the basis of size, 3H-thymidine uptake, and NK cell markers These data indicate that in addition to augmenting NK cell-mediated lysis, IFN may regulate NK cell proliferation in vivo.

  6. STUDIES INTO THE MECHANISMS OF POTASSIUM BROMATE INDUCED THYROID CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies into the Mechanisms of Potassium Bromate Induced Thyroid Carcinogenesis.

    Potassium bromate (KBrO3) occurs in finished drinking water as a by-product of the ozonation disinfection process and has been found to induce thyroid follicular cell tumors in the rat after ...

  7. A case of chronic hepatitis C developing insulin-dependent diabetes, thyroid autoimmunity and stiff-person syndrome as complications of interferon therapy.

    PubMed

    Scavone, G; Zaccardi, F; Manto, A; Caputo, S; Pitocco, D; Ghirlanda, G

    2010-08-01

    We describe the case of a 66-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C who developed type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and thyroid autoimmunity during Interferon alpha (INFalpha) therapy and then stiff-person syndrome (SPS). This is the first reported case in which SPS has appeared as complication of IFNalpha therapy.

  8. Comparative genomic analysis of eutherian interferon-γ-inducible GTPases.

    PubMed

    Premzl, Marko

    2012-11-01

    The interferon-γ-inducible GTPases, IFGGs, are intracellular proteins involved in immune response against pathogens. A comprehensive comparative genomic review and analysis of eutherian IFGGs was carried out using public genomic sequences. The 64 eutherian IFGG genes were examined in detail and annotated. The eutherian IFGG promoter types were first catalogued followed by a phylogenetic analysis of eutherian IFGGs, which described five major IFGG clusters. The patterns of differential gene expansions and protein regions that may regulate IFGG catalytic features suggested a new classification of eutherian IFGGs. This mini-review has also provided new tests of reliability of public genomic sequences as well as tests of protein molecular evolution.

  9. Interferon-inducible effector mechanisms in cell-autonomous immunity.

    PubMed

    MacMicking, John D

    2012-04-25

    Interferons (IFNs) induce the expression of hundreds of genes as part of an elaborate antimicrobial programme designed to combat infection in all nucleated cells - a process termed cell-autonomous immunity. As described in this Review, recent genomic and subgenomic analyses have begun to assign functional properties to novel IFN-inducible effector proteins that restrict bacteria, protozoa and viruses in different subcellular compartments and at different stages of the pathogen life cycle. Several newly described host defence factors also participate in canonical oxidative and autophagic pathways by spatially coordinating their activities to enhance microbial killing. Together, these IFN-induced effector networks help to confer vertebrate host resistance to a vast and complex microbial world.

  10. Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. Postpartum thyroiditis, which causes ... hormone levels in the blood) followed by temporary hypothyroidism, is a common cause of thyroid problems after ...

  11. Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid is used to treat the symptoms of hypothyroidism (a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone). Symptoms of hypothyroidism include lack of energy, depression, constipation, weight gain, ...

  12. Inhibition by interferon of biochemical transformation induced by cloned herpesvirus thymidine kinase genes.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, H; Qavi, H; Kit, S

    1982-10-01

    To learn whether interferon could prevent the biochemical transformations induced by cloned herpesvirus thymidine kinase (TK) genes, LM(TK-) mouse fibroblast cultures were pretreated for 24 h with 2.4-40 international units (I.U.)/ml mouse alpha + beta interferon, and subsequently transformed to the TK+ phenotype with recombinant plasmids containing the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) TK gene (pAGO and pMH110) and the marmoset herpesvirus (MarHV) TK gene (pMAR035). Mouse alpha + beta interferon inhibited transformation and the inhibition was interferon dose-dependent. Transformation was also inhibited when LM(TK-) cells were pretreated for 2-5 h with 40 I.U./ml interferon. Maximal inhibitions of TK+ colony formation were observed following a 9-20 h pretreatment period with interferon. In contrast, 40 I.U./ml interferon treatment for 20 h did not reduce the rate or extent of LM(TK-) cell growth. Experiments in which cultures were first treated with plasmid pAGO and only afterwards treated with interferon also showed that, as the interferon concentration used, interferon did not inhibit the outgrowth of transformated colonies. Enzyme assays showed that pretreatment with interferon inhibited the induction of TK activity in cells that had been transfected with pAGO DNA.

  13. Interferon-Inducible GTPases in Host Resistance, Inflammation and Disease.

    PubMed

    Pilla-Moffett, Danielle; Barber, Matthew F; Taylor, Gregory A; Coers, Jörn

    2016-08-28

    Cell-autonomous immunity is essential for host organisms to defend themselves against invasive microbes. In vertebrates, both the adaptive and the innate branches of the immune system operate cell-autonomous defenses as key effector mechanisms that are induced by pro-inflammatory interferons (IFNs). IFNs can activate cell-intrinsic host defenses in virtually any cell type ranging from professional phagocytes to mucosal epithelial cells. Much of this IFN-induced host resistance program is dependent on four families of IFN-inducible GTPases: the myxovirus resistance proteins, the immunity-related GTPases, the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), and the very large IFN-inducible GTPases. These GTPase families provide host resistance to a variety of viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens through the sequestration of microbial proteins, manipulation of vesicle trafficking, regulation of antimicrobial autophagy (xenophagy), execution of intracellular membranolytic pathways, and the activation of inflammasomes. This review discusses our current knowledge of the molecular function of IFN-inducible GTPases in providing host resistance, as well as their role in the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory Crohn's disease. While substantial advances were made in the recent past, few of the known functions of IFN-inducible GTPases have been explored in any depth, and new functions await discovery. This review will therefore highlight key areas of future exploration that promise to advance our understanding of the role of IFN-inducible GTPases in human diseases.

  14. Thyroid hormones induce browning of white fat

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Moreno-Navarrete, José M; Contreras, Cristina; Rial-Pensado, Eva; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The canonical view about the effect of thyroid hormones (THs) on thermogenesis assumes that the hypothalamus acts merely as a modulator of the sympathetic outflow on brown adipose tissue (BAT). Recent data have challenged that vision by demonstrating that THs act on the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) to inhibit AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which regulates the thermogenic program in BAT, leading to increased thermogenesis and weight loss. Current data have shown that in addition to activation of brown fat, the browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) might also be an important thermogenic mechanism. However, the possible central effects of THs on the browning of white fat remain unclear. Here, we show that 3,3′,5,5′ tetraiodothyroxyne (T4)-induced hyperthyroidism promotes a marked browning of WAT. Of note, central or VMH-specific administration of 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3) recapitulates that effect. The specific genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the VMH reversed the central effect of T3 on browning. Finally, we also showed that the expression of browning genes in human WAT correlates with serum T4. Overall, these data indicate that THs induce browning of WAT and that this mechanism is mediated via the central effects of THs on energy balance. PMID:27913573

  15. Radiation induced thyroid neoplasms 1920 to 1987: A vanishing problem

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, M.P.; Goetowski, P.G.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1989-06-01

    Radiation for benign diseases has been implicated as an etiologic factor in thyroid cancer. From 1930-60, over 2 million children may have been exposed to therapeutic radiation and it is estimated that up to 7% may develop thyroid cancer after a 5-40 year latency. Thyroid stimulating hormone, secondary to radioinduced hypothyroidism, has been implicated as causative in animals. Such data has led to expensive screening programs in high risk patients. Because of a decline in irradiation for benign diseases in children over the last 2 decades, we questioned whether the incidence of radiation induced thyroid neoplasms (RITN) was also decreasing. Twenty-six of 227 patients (11%) with thyroid malignancies seen at our institution from 1974-87 had a history of previous head and neck irradiation. These included 13 papillary, 3 follicular, and 7 mixed carcinomas as well as 2 lymphomas and 1 synovial cell sarcoma. None of these 26 patients had abnormal thyroid function tests at presentation. Mean latency from irradiation to the diagnosis of thyroid cancer was 25.4 years (6-55 year range). Compared to the reported increasing incidence of RITN from 1940-70, there appears to be a significant decrease since 1970. Based on our analysis, the use of expensive screening programs in high risk populations may no longer be warranted. Additionally, the routine use of thyroid replacement in previously irradiated chemically hypothyroid patients is not recommended.30 references.

  16. Component(s) of Sendai virus that can induce interferon in mouse spleen cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Y; Hosaka, Y

    1983-01-01

    To identify the active component of Sendai virus that induces interferon in mouse spleen cells, infectious and noninfectious viruses, envelope particles derived from them, and isolated hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoproteins were examined for interferon induction. The interaction between membranous structures containing Sendai virus HN glycoprotein and the receptors on the cell surface was shown to be sufficient for interferon induction in mouse spleen cells, suggesting that the actual inducer of interferon in mouse spleen cells is the HN glycoprotein of Sendai virus. When mouse spleen cells were stimulated in vitro with Sendai virus grown in eggs or LLC-MK2 cells or with membranous structures containing glycoproteins obtained from these viruses, interferon could be detected in the culture fluid. Furthermore, isolated HN glycoprotein per se could induce interferon in the cells. A linear correlation was found between the titer of interferon induced and the hemagglutinating activity of the membranous structure containing the HN glycoprotein. It was concluded from these findings that HN glycoprotein was the active component of Sendai virus responsible for interferon induction in mouse spleen cells and that viral RNA and F glycoprotein were not required. The results also showed that the interaction between HN glycoprotein and receptors on the cell surface triggered production of type I interferon (IFN-alpha and IFN-beta). Although when Sendai virus was incubated at 56 degrees C for 5 min it lost its hemolytic and hemagglutinating activities, it induced a considerable amount of interferon in the culture fluid of mouse spleen cells. The interferon-inducing ability of heat-inactivated virus could be absorbed with mouse spleen cells but not with sheep erythrocytes or mouse erythrocytes, indicating that the inactivated virus retained ability to bind to mouse lymphoid cells. PMID:6301988

  17. Endogenous interferon-β-inducible gene expression and interferon-β-treatment are associated with reduced T cell responses to myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Börnsen, Lars; Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Ratzer, Rikke; Hedegaard, Chris; Søndergaard, Helle B; Krakauer, Martin; Hesse, Dan; Nielsen, Claus H; Sorensen, Per S; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2015-01-01

    Autoreactive CD4+ T-cells are considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis, exogenous and endogenous type I interferons restrict disease severity. Recombinant interferon-β is used for treatment of multiple sclerosis, and some untreated multiple sclerosis patients have increased expression levels of type I interferon-inducible genes in immune cells. The role of endogenous type I interferons in multiple sclerosis is controversial: some studies found an association of high expression levels of interferon-β-inducible genes with an increased expression of interleukin-10 and a milder disease course in untreated multiple sclerosis patients, whereas other studies reported an association with a poor response to treatment with interferon-β. In the present study, we found that untreated multiple sclerosis patients with an increased expression of interferon-β-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had decreased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to the autoantigen myelin basic protein ex vivo. Interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had increased IL10 and IL27 gene expression levels in monocytes in vivo. In vitro, neutralization of interleukin-10 and monocyte depletion increased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic protein while interleukin-10, in the presence or absence of monocytes, inhibited CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic protein. Our findings suggest that spontaneous expression of interferon-β-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from untreated multiple sclerosis patients and treatment with interferon-β are associated with reduced myelin basic protein-induced T-cell responses. Reduced myelin basic protein-induced CD4+ T-cell autoreactivity in interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients may be mediated by monocyte-derived interleukin-10.

  18. Thyroid autoimmunity and dysfunction in multiple sclerosis patients during long-term treatment with interferon beta or glatiramer acetate: an Italian multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Frisullo, Giovanni; Calabrese, Massimiliano; Tortorella, Carla; Paolicelli, Damiano; Ragonese, Paolo; Annovazzi, Pietro; Radaelli, Marta; Malucchi, Simona; Gallo, Antonio; Tomassini, Valentina; Nociti, Viviana; D'Onghia, Mariangela; Lo Re, Vincenzina; Rodegher, Mariemma; Solaro, Claudio; Gasperini, Claudio

    2014-08-01

    Few long-term follow-up data are available on thyroid dysfunction (TD) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with glatiramer acetate (GA) or with interferon-beta (IFNb). In a cohort of 787 relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients whom were followed up for 8 years, we observed an increased prevalence of TD and thyroid autoimmunity (TA) within the first year of IFNb treatment, regardless of the dose or frequency of administration, while no change was observed with GA treatment. The increased prevalence of TD and TA within the first year of IFNb treatment suggested the need for close monitoring of thyroid function and autoimmunity, though only during the first year of IFNb treatment.

  19. Interferon-inducible GTPases in cell autonomous and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2016-02-01

    Detection and clearance of invading pathogens requires a coordinated response of the adaptive and innate immune system. Host cell, however, also features different mechanisms that restrict pathogen replication in a cell-intrinsic manner, collectively referred to as cell-autonomous immunity. In immune cells, the ability to unleash those mechanisms strongly depends on the activation state of the cell, which is controlled by cytokines or the detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors. The interferon (IFN) class of cytokines is one of the strongest inducers of antimicrobial effector mechanisms and acts against viral, bacterial and parasitic intracellular pathogens. This has been linked to the upregulation of several hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes, among them the so-called IFN-inducible GTPases. Two subfamilies of IFN-inducible GTPases, the immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), have gained attention due to their exceptional ability to specifically target intracellular vacuolar pathogens and restrict their replication by destroying their vacuolar compartment. Their repertoire has recently been expanded to the regulation of inflammasome complexes, which are cytosolic multi-protein complexes that control an inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis and the release of cytokines like interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the function, the targeting and regulation of IRG and GBP proteins during microbial infections.

  20. Recurrence of depressive disorders after interferon-induced depression.

    PubMed

    Chiu, W-C; Su, Y-P; Su, K-P; Chen, P-C

    2017-02-07

    Interferon alpha (IFN-α)-treated patients commonly develop depression during the therapy period. Although most IFN-α-induced depressive disorders achieve remission after IFN-α therapy, no studies have examined the long-term mood effects of IFN-α treatment. We conducted a 12-year population-based cohort study of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients who were older than 20 years and had received IFN-α therapy. The sample was obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The cohort included patients with and without IFN-α-induced depression, matched randomly by age, sex and depression history, at a ratio of 1:10. The follow-up started after the last administration of IFN-α and was designed to determine the incidence of recurrent depressive disorder after IFN-α therapy. A total of 156 subjects were identified as having IFN-α-induced depression and achieving full remission after IFN-α therapy. The overall incidence of recurrent depressive disorders among patients with and without IFN-α-induced depression was 56.8 (95% confidence interval (CI), 42.4-76.1) and 4.1 (95% CI, 2.9-5.8) cases, respectively, per 100 000 person-years, P<0.001. The adjusted hazard ratios for recurrent depressive disorder were 13.5 (95% CI, 9.9-18.3) in the IFN-α-treated cohort and 22.2 (95% CI, 11.2-44.2) in the matched cohort for IFN-α-induced depression patients after adjusting for age, sex, income, urbanization and comorbid diseases. IFN-α-induced depression was associated with a high risk of recurrent depression. It was not a transient disease and might be considered an episode of depressive disorder. Continuation therapy might be considered, and further research is needed.

  1. TRAIL and DR5 promote thyroid follicular cell apoptosis in iodine excess-induced experimental autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiujie; Li, Lanying; Li, Qingxin; Zang, Xiaoyi; Liu, Zebing

    2011-11-01

    Death receptor-mediated apoptosis has been implicated in target organ destruction in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Several apoptosis signaling pathways, such as Fas ligand and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), have been shown to be active in thyroid cells and may be involved in destructive thyroiditis. Thyroid toxicity of iodide excess has been demonstrated in animals fed with an iodide-rich diet, but its pathogenic role remains unclear. The effects of excessive iodine on TRAIL and its death receptor expression in thyroid were investigated. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) was induced by excessive iodine and thyroglobulin (Tg) in non-obese diabetic mice. The expression of TRAIL and its death receptor DR5 was detected by immunofluorescence staining. Following administration of excessive iodine alone, Tg, and excessive iodine combined with Tg, TRAIL-positive cells appear not only in follicular cells but also in lymphocytes infiltrated in the thyroid, whereas DR5-positive cells appear only in follicular cells. Large numbers of CD3-positive cells and a few CD22-positive cells were detected in thyroid. A great amount of follicular cells were labeled specifically by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated deoxynucleotide triphosphate nick-end labeling assay. Taken together, our results suggest that excessive iodine could induce TRAIL and DR5 abnormal expression in thyroid. TRAIL band with DR5 to promote follicular cells apoptosis thus mediate thyroid destruction in EAT.

  2. Interferon-induced 2'-5' adenylate synthetase in vivo and interferon production in vitro by lymphocytes from systemic lupus erythematosus patients with and without circulating interferon

    SciTech Connect

    Preble, O.T.; Rothko, K.; Klippel, J.H.; Friedman, R.M.; Johnston, M.I.

    1983-06-01

    The interferon (IFN)-induced enzyme 2-5A synthetase was elevated in mononuclear cells from both serum IFN-positive and -negative systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. This suggests that a much higher percentage of patients than previously thought produce endogenous IFN. These results may partly explain findings that mononuclear cells from SLE patients are deficient in IFN production in vitro in response to certain IFN inducers. Although normal lymphocytes can produce an acid-labile alpha IFN after stimulation with C. parvum in vitro, the reason for endogenous production of this unusual alpha IFN by SLE patients remains unknown.

  3. Probable involvement of p11 with interferon alpha induced depression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiqiang; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Lili; Ding, Huaxia; Zhang, Jingjing; Song, Chen; Zhang, Yanfei; Xia, Namei; Li, Mingfang; Liang, Yinming; Hu, Xianzhang; Luan, Haojiang; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Depression is one of the major side effects of interferon alpha (IFN-α) treatment, but the molecular mechanism underlying IFN-α-induced depression remains unclear. Several studies have shown that the serotonin receptors 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4 play key roles in the anti-depression effects associated with p11 (S100A10). We investigated the effects of IFN-α on the regulation of p11, 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4 in mice and human neuroblastoma cells (SH-sy5y). We found that intraperitoneal injection with IFN-α in Balb/c mice resulted in an increased immobility in FST and TST, and potently lowered the protein levels of p11, 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4 in the hippocampus or cingulate gyrus. IFN-α significantly down-regulated the protein levels of p11, 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4 in SH-sy5y cells, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Our study revealed that over-expression of p11 could prevent the IFN-α-induced down-regulation of 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4. The results indicated that IFN-α treatment resulted in p11 down-regulation, which subsequently decreased 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4 in vitro or in vivo. Our findings suggested that p11 might be a potential regulator on 5-HTR1b and 5-HTR4 as well as a predictor of or a therapeutic target for IFN-α-induced depression. PMID:26821757

  4. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Watad, Abdulla; David, Paula; Brown, Stav; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    The autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA), presented by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin in 2011, is an entity that incorporates diverse autoimmune conditions induced by the exposure to various adjuvants. Adjuvants are agents that entail the capability to induce immune reactions. Adjuvants are found in many vaccines and used mainly to increase the response to vaccination in the general population. Silicone has also been reported to be able to induce diverse immune reactions. Clinical cases and series of heterogeneous autoimmune conditions including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis have been reported to be induced by several adjuvants. However, only a small number of cases of autoimmune thyroid disorder have been included under the umbrella of ASIA syndrome. Indeed, clinical cases of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and/or subacute thyroiditis were observed after the exposure to vaccines as well as silicone implantation. In our review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge on ASIA syndrome presented as endocrinopathies, focusing on autoimmune thyroid disorders associated with the various adjuvants. PMID:28167927

  5. Interferon-γ-induced protein 10 in Dengue Virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, P; Elia, G

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, or dengue shock syndrome. Interferons (IFNs), and IFN-γ dependent chemokines, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10/IFN-γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10), CXCL9/MIG and CXCL11/I-TAC, and their common receptor chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor (CXCR)3 are induced by DENV infection; however it has been shown that the latter two could not compensate for the absence of IP-10. This paper reviews studies about DENV and IP-10. Evidences show the importance of IP-10 induction during DENV infection, in macrophages, lymphocytes, hepatic cells, denritic cells, in skin and in the brain. Furthermore it has been shown that chemokines IP-10, I-TAC and their receptor CXCR3 are involved in severity of dengue; in fact, pulmonary effusion or ascites, painful hepatomegaly or aspartate aminotransferase increase, are correlated with IP-10 levels. It has been also demonstrated that IP-10 was more elevated in subjects who subsequently developed dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. It has been also shown that IP-10 has a direct action in control of dengue viral replication. Furthermore IP-10 circulating levels may be used to discriminate dengue fever from other febbrile diseases. This is of particular importance in certain situations, for example to discriminate occupationally acquired dengue, in patients with febbrile disorders coming from endemic countries. These studies suggested that these chemokines can be used as potential biomarkers for differential diagnosis and the disease progression, while others can be used to control dengue viral replication, thus representing a viable targets for drug therapy.

  6. Correlation of Immunomodulatory and Therapeutic Activities of Interferon and Interferon Inducers in Metastatic Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    acid solubilized with poly-L-Iysine in carboxy methyl cellulose (pICLC) in treating metastatic disease was investigated by comparing effector cell...polycytidylic acid, poly(l.C)-LC or pICLC, poly(lC) solubilized with poly-L- lysine in carboxymethyl cellulose . Paul L. Black’s present address is Virology...with poly-L-lysine and solubilized with carboxymethyl cellulose [poly(IC)-LC] alleviates this problem [44,45]. Both recombinant murine interferon-gamma

  7. A Recombinant Adenovirus Expressing Ovine Interferon Tau Prevents Influenza Virus-Induced Lethality in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, E.; Avia, M.; Rangel, G.; de Molina, A.; Alejo, A.; Sevilla, N.

    2016-01-01

    Ovine interferon tau (IFN-τ) is a unique type I interferon with low toxicity and a broad host range in vivo. We report the generation of a nonreplicative recombinant adenovirus expressing biologically active IFN-τ. Using the B6.A2G-Mx1 mouse model, we showed that single-dose intranasal administration of recombinant Ad5-IFN-τ can effectively prevent lethality and disease induced by highly virulent hv-PR8 influenza virus by activating the interferon response and preventing viral replication. PMID:26739058

  8. Mechanisms of fever induced by recombinant human interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Dinarello, C A; Bernheim, H A; Duff, G W; Le, H V; Nagabhushan, T L; Hamilton, N C; Coceani, F

    1984-01-01

    Since the early trials using human interferon (hIFN) derived from blood leukocytes or cell lines, fever has been a prominent component of IFN therapy. Human protein impurities might account for the fever to cell-derived hIFN, but recombinant hIFN, free of extraneous human proteins, has produced fever in nearly all recipients during clinical trials. Our present studies were carried out to determine the mechanisms of fever due to recombinant hIFN currently being used in humans. Because recombinant hIFN is produced in Escherichia coli, in these experiments we considered contaminating endotoxin as the cause of fever. Polymyxin B, which blocks endotoxin, had no effect on the pyrogenicity of hIFN in rabbits. In addition, hIFN injected into an endotoxin-resistant strain of mice produced fever. The pyrogenicity of hIFN does not appear to involve production of leukocytic pyrogen (LP), since no circulating LP was detected in rabbits during IFN fever. Furthermore, human mononuclear cells incubated with hIFN in vitro at 10(4)-10(6) U/ml did not release LP. However, hIFN stimulated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release from rabbit hypothalamic tissue in vitro. Intracerebroventricular injection of hIFN into the awake cat also produced fever and a rise in PGE2 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid; both effects were reversed by treatment with indomethacin. We conclude that the fever of recombinant hIFN is not due to endotoxin but that hIFN is intrinsically pyrogenic by inducing PGE2 in the hypothalamus. PMID:6590569

  9. Adenovirus infection reverses the antiviral state induced by human interferon.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1987-04-06

    HeLa cells treated with human lymphoblastoid interferon do not synthesize poliovirus proteins. The antiviral state against poliovirus is reversed if cells are previously infected with adenovirus type 5. A late gene product seems to be involved in this reversion, since no effect is observed at early stages of infection or in the presence of aphidicolin.

  10. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process.

  11. NADPH Oxidase Inhibitor Apocynin Attenuates PCB153-Induced Thyroid Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abliz, Ablikim; Chen, Chen; Deng, Wenhong; Sun, Rongze

    2016-01-01

    PCBs, widespread endocrine disruptors, cause the disturbance of thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis in humans and animals. However, the exact mechanism of thyroid dysfunction caused by PCBs is still unknown. In order to clarify the hypotheses that NADPH oxidase (NOX) and subsequent NF-κB pathway may play roles in thyroid dysfunction, sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: control group, PCB153 treated (PCB) group, received apocynin with PCB153 treatment (APO + PCB) group, and drug control (APO) group. Serum thyroid hormone levels were evaluated. The morphological change of thyroid tissue was analyzed under the light and transmission electron microscopy. NOX2, 8-OHdG, and NF-κB expression in the thyroid tissue was evaluated by immune-histochemical staining. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were detected. The following results were reduced after apocynin treatment: (1) serum thyroid hormone, (2) thyroid pathological injuries, (3) thyroid MDA, (4) thyroid ultrastructural change, (5) serum inflammatory cytokines, and (6) thyroid expression of NOX2, 8-OHdG, and NF-κB. These results suggested that NOX inhibition attenuates thyroid dysfunction induced by PCB in rats, presumably because of its role in preventing ROS generation and inhibiting the activation of NF-κB pathway. Our findings may provide new therapeutic targets for PCBs induced thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27047545

  12. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins in inflammasome activation and host defense.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Chee, Jonathan D; Bradfield, Clinton J; Park, Eui-Soon; Kumar, Pradeep; MacMicking, John D

    2016-05-01

    Traditional views of the inflammasome highlight the assembly of pre-existing core components shortly after infection or tissue damage. Emerging work, however, suggests that the inflammasome machinery is also subject to 'tunable' or inducible signals that might accelerate its autocatalytic properties and dictate where inflammasome assembly takes place in the cell. Many of these signals operate downstream of interferon receptors to elicit inflammasome regulators, including a new family of interferon-induced GTPases called 'guanylate-binding proteins' (GBPs). Here we investigate the critical roles of interferon-induced GBPs in directing inflammasome subtype-specific responses and their consequences for cell-autonomous immunity to a wide variety of microbial pathogens. We discuss emerging mechanisms of action and the potential effect of these GBPs on predisposition to sepsis and other infectious or inflammatory diseases.

  13. Localization of type I interferon receptor limits interferon-induced TLR-3 in epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to expand on the role of type I IFNs in the influenza-induced upregulation of TLR3 and determine whether and how the localization of the IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR) in respiratory epithelial cells could modify IFN-induced responses. Using differentiated prima...

  14. Interferon-alpha, -beta and -gamma induce CXCL9 and CXCL10 secretion by human thyrocytes: modulation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonists.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Ghiri, Emiliano; Crescioli, Clara; Romagnani, Paola; Vitti, Paolo; Serio, Mario; Ferrannini, Ele

    2010-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that interferon (IFN) alpha and beta cause autoimmune thyroid dysfunctions by changing the Th1/Th2 balance, but the mechanisms involved are not yet known. The aims of this study were: (a) to test the effect of IFNalpha, IFNbeta and IFNgamma on the secretion of the Th1 chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10, in "primary cultures of human thyroid follicular cells" (TFC); (b) to assess the effect of PPARgamma activation on CXCL9 and CXCL10 secretion. In TFC, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were undetectable in the supernatant. IFNgamma, IFNalpha and IFNbeta, dose dependently induced CXCL9 and CXCL10 release. TNFalpha alone had no effect. The combination of each of the IFNs with TNFalpha had a significant synergistic effect on CXCL9 and CXCL10 secretion. Treatment of TFC with rosiglitazone dose dependently inhibited the IFNs-stimulated CXCL9 and CXCL10 release. Compared with IFNalpha and IFNbeta, IFNgamma was the most potent stimulus of CXCL9 and CXCL10 secretion. In conclusion, IFNalpha, IFNbeta, IFNgamma and TNFalpha (synergistically with IFNs) dose-dependently induce the release of CXCL9 and CXCL10 by TFC, suggesting that this process may be related, at least in part, to the appearance of thyroid dysfunction during IFNs therapy. Furthermore, PPARgamma activation partially inhibits this process.

  15. A developmental switch induced by thyroid hormone: Xenopus laevis metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Furlow, J David; Neff, Eric S

    2006-03-01

    Thyroid hormone induces the complete metamorphosis of anuran tadpoles into juvenile frogs. Arguably, anuran metamorphosis is the most dramatic effect of a hormone in any vertebrate. Recent advances in pharmacology and molecular biology have made the study of this remarkable process in the frog Xenopus laevis attractive to developmental biologists and endocrinologists alike. In particular, the availability of a straightforward transgenesis assay and the near completion of the Xenopus tropicalis genome are enabling significant advances to be made in our understanding of the major remaining problems of metamorphosis: the extraordinary tissue specificity of responses, the precise timing of morphological changes, the degree of cell autonomy of hormone responses and developmental competence. We argue that X. laevis metamorphosis presents an exciting opportunity for understanding the role of thyroid hormone in vertebrate development.

  16. Enhancement of basophil chemotaxis in vitro by virus-induced interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Lett-Brown, M A; Aelvoet, M; Hooks, J J; Georgiades, J A; Thueson, D O; Grant, J A

    1981-01-01

    It is well established that viral infections may precipitate or worsen attacks of bronchial asthma. Furthermore, in symptomatic atopic subjects, the local accumulation of basophils and the production of a basophil chemotactic factor have been reported. We have investigated the effect of cell-free supernates from viral stimulated cultures of human mononuclear cells on the in vitro migration of human basophils. Our results show the presence of a factor in these culture supernates that enhances the migration of basophils toward two separate chemoattractants, a peptide from C5 and a lymphokine. The enhancing activity, while affecting basophil migration, did not change the response of monocytes. The enhancing activity resembled viral-induced interferon when (a) pH 2 stability, (b) heat resistance, (c) trypsin sensitivity, and (d) species-specificity were compared. Finally, the enhancing activity for basophil chemotaxis and the interferon titer were highly correlated in preparations with a 10(4)-fold difference in interferon specific activity. Our studies show that viral-induced interferon can augment the in vitro chemotactic response of basophils. Because mediators present in basophils may be involved in the pathogenesis of immediate hypersensitivity, the modulation of basophil movement by interferon suggests a possible mechanism for the association between viral infections and atopic disorders. PMID:6161946

  17. Breaking Tolerance to Thyroid Antigens: Changing Concepts in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity involves loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins in genetically susceptible individuals in association with environmental factors. In central tolerance, intrathymic autoantigen presentation deletes immature T cells with high affinity for autoantigen-derived peptides. Regulatory T cells provide an alternative mechanism to silence autoimmune T cells in the periphery. The TSH receptor (TSHR), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and thyroglobulin (Tg) have unusual properties (“immunogenicity”) that contribute to breaking tolerance, including size, abundance, membrane association, glycosylation, and polymorphisms. Insight into loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins comes from spontaneous and induced animal models: 1) intrathymic expression controls self-tolerance to the TSHR, not TPO or Tg; 2) regulatory T cells are not involved in TSHR self-tolerance and instead control the balance between Graves' disease and thyroiditis; 3) breaking TSHR tolerance involves contributions from major histocompatibility complex molecules (humans and induced mouse models), TSHR polymorphism(s) (humans), and alternative splicing (mice); 4) loss of tolerance to Tg before TPO indicates that greater Tg immunogenicity vs TPO dominates central tolerance expectations; 5) tolerance is induced by thyroid autoantigen administration before autoimmunity is established; 6) interferon-α therapy for hepatitis C infection enhances thyroid autoimmunity in patients with intact immunity; Graves' disease developing after T-cell depletion reflects reconstitution autoimmunity; and 7) most environmental factors (including excess iodine) “reveal,” but do not induce, thyroid autoimmunity. Micro-organisms likely exert their effects via bystander stimulation. Finally, no single mechanism explains the loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins. The goal of inducing self-tolerance to prevent autoimmune thyroid disease will require accurate prediction of at-risk individuals together with an antigen

  18. Interferon-gamma-induced local leukocytoclastic vasculitis at the subcutaneous injection site*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Liu, Juan-Hua; Zhao, Yu-Kun; Luo, Di-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous reactions associated with interferons (IFNs) treatment are either localized or generalized. The most common presentation of localized reactions at IFNs injection site is usually an erythematous patch or plaque. Local leukocytoclastic vasculitis presenting with cutaneous necrosis is extremely rare. We report a 19-year-old man with hepatitis B who had local leukocytoclastic vasculitis induced by interferon-gama injection at the injection site. After changing the injection sites and using the combined treatment of prednisone and colchicine, the previous lesion healed and no other cutaneous lesion occurred. We also made a mini review of such cases.

  19. Gallium uptake in the thyroid gland in amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, M.C.; Dake, M.D.; Okerlund, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Amiodarone is an iodinated antiarrhythmic agent that is effective in the treatment of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. A number of side effects are seen, including pulmonary toxicity and thyroid dysfunction. A patient with both amiodarone-induced pneumonitis and hyperthyroidism who exhibited abnormal gallium activity in the lungs, as well as diffuse gallium uptake in the thyroid gland is presented. The latter has not been previously reported and supports the concept of iodide-induced thyroiditis with gallium uptake reflecting the inflammatory response.

  20. Type I interferons induce apoptosis by balancing cFLIP and caspase-8 independent of death ligands.

    PubMed

    Apelbaum, Amir; Yarden, Ganit; Warszawski, Shira; Harari, Daniel; Schreiber, Gideon

    2013-02-01

    Interferons induce a pleiotropy of responses through binding the same cell surface receptor. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism driving interferon-induced apoptosis. Using a nonbiased small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen, we show that silencing genes whose products are directly engaged in the initiation of interferon signaling completely abrogate the interferon antiproliferative response. Apoptosis-related genes such as the caspase-8, cFLIP, and DR5 genes specifically interfere with interferon-induced apoptosis, which we found to be independent of the activity of death ligands. The one gene for which silencing resulted in the strongest proapoptotic effect upon interferon signaling is the cFLIP gene, where silencing shortened the time of initiation of apoptosis from days to hours and increased dramatically the population of apoptotic cells. Thus, cFLIP serves as a regulator for interferon-induced apoptosis. A shift over time in the balance between cFLIP and caspase-8 results in downstream caspase activation and apoptosis. While gamma interferon (IFN-γ) also causes caspase-8 upregulation, we suggest that it follows a different path to apoptosis.

  1. Interferoninduced severe thrombocytopenia: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Han, Da-Kang; Lu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of severe thrombocytopenia following pegylated interferon-α 2a (Peg-IFN-α 2a) treatment of hepatitis C virus infection and summarize the clinical characteristics of 16 cases of IFN-α induced severe thrombocytopenia and its immune-mediated mechanism. Discontinuation of IFN-α and early administration of immunosuppressants are the effective therapy for IFN-α induced severe thrombocytopenia. PMID:20238410

  2. Mode of carcinogenic action of pesticides inducing thyroid follicular cell tumors in rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, P M

    1998-01-01

    Of 240 pesticides screened for carcinogenicity by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pesticide Programs, at least 24 (10%) produce thyroid follicular cell tumors in rodents. Thirteen of the thyroid carcinogens also induce liver tumors, mainly in mice, and 9 chemicals produce tumors at other sites. Some mutagenic data are available on all 24 pesticides producing thyroid tumors. Mutagenicity does not seem to be a major determinant in thyroid carcinogenicity, except for possibly acetochlor; evidence is less convincing for ethylene thiourea and etridiazole. Studies on thyroid-pituitary functioning, including indications of thyroid cell growth and/or changes in thyroxine, triiodothyronine, or thyroid-stimulating hormone levels, are available on 19 pesticides. No such antithyroid information is available for etridiazole, N-octyl bicycloheptene dicarboximide, terbutryn, triadimefon, and trifluralin. Of the studied chemicals, only bromacil lacks antithyroid activity under study conditions. Intrathyroidal and extrathyroidal sites of action are found: amitrole, ethylene thiourea, and mancozeb are thyroid peroxidase inhibitors; and acetochlor, clofentezine, fenbuconazole, fipronil, pendimethalin, pentachloronitrobenzene, prodiamine, pyrimethanil, and thiazopyr seem to enhance the hepatic metabolism and excretion of thyroid hormone. Thus, with 12 pesticides that mode of action judgments can be made, 11 disrupt thyroid-pituitary homeostasis only; no chemical is mutagenic only; and acetochlor may have both antithyroid and some mutagenic activity. More information is needed to identify other potential antithyroid modes of thyroid carcinogenic action. PMID:9681970

  3. Type I Interferons Induce T Regulatory 1 Responses and Restrict Humoral Immunity during Experimental Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Ryan A.; Guthmiller, Jenna J.; Graham, Amy C.; Burke, Bradly E.; Carr, Daniel J.J.

    2016-01-01

    CD4 T cell-dependent antibody responses are essential for limiting Plasmodium parasite replication and the severity of malaria; however, the factors that regulate humoral immunity during highly inflammatory, Th1-biased systemic infections are poorly understood. Using genetic and biochemical approaches, we show that Plasmodium infection-induced type I interferons limit T follicular helper accumulation and constrain anti-malarial humoral immunity. Mechanistically we show that CD4 T cell-intrinsic type I interferon signaling induces T-bet and Blimp-1 expression, thereby promoting T regulatory 1 responses. We further show that the secreted effector cytokines of T regulatory 1 cells, IL-10 and IFN-γ, collaborate to restrict T follicular helper accumulation, limit parasite-specific antibody responses, and diminish parasite control. This circuit of interferon-mediated Blimp-1 induction is also operational during chronic virus infection and can occur independently of IL-2 signaling. Thus, type I interferon-mediated induction of Blimp-1 and subsequent expansion of T regulatory 1 cells represent generalizable features of systemic, inflammatory Th1-biased viral and parasitic infections that are associated with suppression of humoral immunity. PMID:27732671

  4. Interferon alpha-inducible protein 6 regulates NRASQ61K-induced melanomagenesis and growth

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Romi; Forloni, Matteo; Bisserier, Malik; Dogra, Shaillay Kumar; Yang, Qiaohong; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the NRAS oncogene are present in up to 20% of melanoma. Here, we show that interferon alpha-inducible protein 6 (IFI6) is necessary for NRASQ61K-induced transformation and melanoma growth. IFI6 was transcriptionally upregulated by NRASQ61K, and knockdown of IFI6 resulted in DNA replication stress due to dysregulated DNA replication via E2F2. This stress consequentially inhibited cellular transformation and melanoma growth via senescence or apoptosis induction depending on the RB and p53 pathway status of the cells. NRAS-mutant melanoma were significantly more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of DNA replication stress-inducing drugs, and knockdown of IFI6 increased sensitivity to these drugs. Pharmacological inhibition of IFI6 expression by the MEK inhibitor trametinib, when combined with DNA replication stress-inducing drugs, blocked NRAS-mutant melanoma growth. Collectively, we demonstrate that IFI6, via E2F2 regulates DNA replication and melanoma development and growth, and this pathway can be pharmacologically targeted to inhibit NRAS-mutant melanoma. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16432.001 PMID:27608486

  5. TIR-Domain-Containing Adaptor-Inducing Interferon-β (TRIF) Mediates Antibacterial Defense during Gram-Negative Pneumonia by Inducing Interferon-x03B3.

    PubMed

    van Lieshout, Miriam H P; Florquin, Sandrine; Vanʼt Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of Gram-negative pneumonia and sepsis. Mice deficient for TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) demonstrate enhanced bacterial growth and dissemination during Klebsiella pneumonia. We show here that the impaired antibacterial defense of TRIF mutant mice is associated with absent interferon (IFN)-x03B3; production in the lungs. IFN-x03B3; production by splenocytes in response to K. pneumoniae in vitro was critically dependent on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), the common TLR adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response gene (MyD88) and TRIF. Reconstitution of TRIF mutant mice with recombinant IFN-x03B3; via the airways reduced bacterial loads in lungs and distant body sites to levels measured in wild-type mice, and partially restored pulmonary cytokine levels. The IFN-x03B3;-induced, improved, enhanced antibacterial response in TRIF mutant mice occurred at the expense of increased hepatocellular injury. These data indicate that TRIF mediates antibacterial defense during Gram-negative pneumonia, at least in part, by inducing IFN-x03B3; at the primary site of infection.

  6. Attenuation of kindling-induced decreases in NT-3 mRNA by thyroid hormone depletion.

    PubMed

    Kim, S Y; Smith, M A; Post, R M; Rosen, J B

    1998-02-01

    The expression of neurotrophins is altered by amygdala kindled seizures. Because thyroid hormone can regulate the transcription of neurotrophins, we asked whether thyroid hormone regulates neurotrophin mRNA expression following amygdala kindling. Rats with electrodes implanted in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala were either depleted of thyroid hormone or given excess thyroid hormone. The rats were then kindled daily until they had one generalized seizure. The brains were removed 4 h after the seizure and processed for in situ hybridization of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) mRNAs. In non-kindled rats, thyroid hormone depletion increased the levels of BDNF mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. NGF and NT-3 mRNA expression was not altered. In addition, thyroid hormone manipulations had no effect on kindling or on kindling-induced BDNF and NGF mRNA. However, the kindling-induced decrease in NT-3 mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer was significantly attenuated by thyroid hormone depletion. These effects were reversed by thyroid hormone replacement. The results indicate that thyroid hormone plays a modulatory role in the seizure-induced changes of NT-3 mRNA expression found in the dentate gyrus.

  7. Interferon induced with helicase C domain 1 (IFIH1) and virus-induced autoimmunity: a review.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A

    2010-02-01

    In addition to genetic factors, environmental triggers, including viruses and other pathogens, are thought to play a major role in the development of autoimmune disease. Recent findings have shown that viral-induced autoimmunity is likely to be genetically determined. In large-scale genetic analyses, an association of interferon induced with helicase C domain 1 (IFIH1) gene variants encoding a viral RNA-sensing helicase with susceptibility to several autoimmune diseases was found. To date, the precise role of IFIH1 in pathogenic mechanisms of viral-induced autoimmunity has yet to be fully elucidated. However, recent reports suggest that IFIH1 may play a role in the etiology of type 1 diabetes. Rare IFIH1 alleles have been shown to be protective against diabetes, and their carriage correlates with lower production of this helicase and its functional disruption. In contrast, upregulation of IFIH1 expression by viruses is associated with more severe disease, and could exacerbate the autoimmune process in susceptible individuals.

  8. Interferon-induced ISG15 pathway: an ongoing virus–host battle

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Collins, Mark; Hsiang, Tien-Ying; Krug, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon-induced ubiquitin-like protein that is conjugated to target proteins via the sequential action of three enzymes that are also induced by interferon. Unlike ubiquitin, which is highly conserved, the sequence of ISG15 varies between species. ISG15 conjugation inhibits many viruses, and free (unconjugated) ISG15 can also act as an antiviral protein. Here we focus on the antiviral role of ISG15 conjugation and on countermeasures employed by several viruses. The countermeasure by influenza B virus is unique in that it exhibits species-specificity. Only the antiviral activity of human and non-human primate ISG15s can be blocked, providing one possible explanation for the restriction of influenza B virus to humans. PMID:23414970

  9. Severe duodenal hemorrhage induced by Lugol's solution administered for thyroid crisis treatment.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Mutsuko; Furumoto, Youhei; Watanabe, Naoko; Horiuchi, Takao; Murayama, Minekazu; Kitamura, Mari; Kaneko, Shingo; Inoshita, Seiji; Maruyama, Yasuki; Suenaga, Matsuhiko; Fujita, Hiroshi; Fujiki, Kazuhiko; Yakushiji, Fumiatsu

    2010-01-01

    Lugol's solution is an iodinated agent used for treating thyroid crisis. It is primarily used in diagnostic tests for esophageal diseases. However, Lugol's solution can cause local mucosal injury and hemorrhage. We report, for the first time, a case of 34-year-old man who exhibited severe duodenal hemorrhage induced by Lugol's solution that was used to treat thyroid crisis. The quantity of Lugol's solution used for treating thyroid crisis is much higher than that used for mucosal disease investigation. Clinical practitioners should be aware of gastrointestinal hemorrhage when using Lugol's solution for the treatment of thyroid crisis.

  10. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis induced by interferon-alpha 2a.

    PubMed

    Kocyigit, P; Akay, B N; Karaosmanoglu, N

    2009-07-01

    Linear Ig A bullous dermatosis (LABD) is an acquired autoimmune subepidermal blistering disorder with linear deposits of IgA along the basement membrane zone. Its cause is unclear, although it appears to have an immune-mediated basis. Idiopathic, systemic disorder-related, and rarely drug-induced forms of LABD have been described. We describe a case of LABD associated with interferon-alpha 2A used for the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma.

  11. Interferon-induced human protein with homology to protein Mx of influenza virus-resistant mice.

    PubMed Central

    Staeheli, P; Haller, O

    1985-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies with specificity for protein Mx (a karyophilic 75,000-dalton protein induced by interferon [IFN] in mouse cells carrying the influenza virus resistance allele Mx+) detected an IFN-induced 80,000-dalton protein in peripheral blood lymphocytes and in fibroblasts of healthy human donors. The human protein, like protein Mx, was induced by IFN-alpha but not by IFN-gamma. Unlike the mouse protein, it was predominantly localized in the cell cytoplasm. Images PMID:3939324

  12. Stimulation of hematopoietic stem cells by interferon inducer in nonhuman primates receiving fractionated total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lvovsky, E.A.; Levine, P.H.; Bengali, Z.; Leiseca, S.A.; Cicmanec, J.L.; Robinson, J.E.; Bautro, N.; Levy, H.B.; Scott, R.M.

    1982-10-01

    Interferon response and hematopoietic stem cells (spleen colony forming units-CFU-S) were studied in rhesus monkeys subjected to fractionated total body irradiation (FTBI). An interferon inducer, a nuclease resistant complex of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid with poly-L-lysine and carboxmethylcellulose(-poly(ICLC)) was used. Poly(ICLC) at 3.75 mg/m/sup 2/ was given I.V. to 7 monkeys, 5 of which, starting 24 hours later, received 50 rad of 4 MV X rays twice a week for 2.5 weeks (total of 250 rad). Another group of 4 monkeys received FTBI only. Although the initial interferon response was similar in both groups treated with poly(ICLC)-800 international units (IU), the animals receiving FTBI showed reduced interferon levels after 100 rad. These animals, however, did not develop the hyporesponsiveness to subsequent poly(ICLC) injections that was observed in non-irradiated monkeys. Stabile interferon response (30-100 IU) in the FTBI group paralleled the prolonged persistence of the drug in their serum. Bone marrow (BM) aspirates from animals receiving FTBI and poly(ICLC) contained more CFU-S per 10/sup 6/ nucleated cells than those treated with poly(ICLC) alone or FTBI alone. FTBI with and without poly(ICLC) led to thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Lower white blood cell (WBC) count was found in irradiated animals treated with poly(ICLC). Partial alopecia was observed in animals receiving poly(ICLC). Two animals--one in the poly(ICLC) and FTBI group and the other receiving FTBI alone, died with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia.

  13. Stimulation of hematopoietic stem cells by interferon inducer in nonhuman primates receiving fractionated total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lvovsky, E.A.; Levine, P.H.; Bengali, Z.; Leiseca, S.A.; Cicmanec, J.L.; Robinson, J.E.; Bautro, N.; Levy, H.B.; Scott, R.M.

    1982-10-01

    Interferon response and hematopoietic stem cells (spleen colony forming units--CFU-S) were studied in rhesus monkeys subjected to fractionated total body irradiation (FTBI). An interferon inducer, a nuclease resistant complex of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid with poly-L-lysine and carboxmethylcellulose(-poly(ICLC)) was used. Poly(ICLC) at 3.75 mg/m/sup 2/ was given I.V. to 7 monkeys, 5 of which, starting 24 hours later, received 50 rad of 4 MV X rays twice a week at 2.5 weeks (total of 250 rad). Another group of 4 monkeys received FTBI only. Although the initial interferon response was similar in both groups treated wih poly(ICLC)--800 international units (IU), the animals that receiving FTBI showed reduced interferon levels after 100 rad. These animals, however, did not develop the hyporesponsiveness to subsequent poly(ICLC) injections that was observed in non-irradiated monkeys. Stabile interferon response (30-100 IU) in the FTBI group paralleled the prolonged persistence of the drug in their serum. Bone marrow (BM) aspirates from animals receiving FTBI and poly(ICLC) contained more CFU-S per 10/sup 6/ nucleated cells than those treated with poly(ICLC) along or FTBI with and without poly(ICLC) lead to thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Lower white blood cell (WBC) count was found in irradiated animals treated with poly(ICLC). Partial alopecia was observed in animals receiving poly(ICLC). Two animals--one in the poly(ICLC) and FTBI group and the other receiving FTBI along, died with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia.

  14. The Envelope Gene of Transmitted HIV-1 Resists a Late Interferon Gamma-Induced Block

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Suzannah J.; Foster, Toshana L.; Busnadiego, Idoia; Aziz, Muhamad Afiq; Hughes, Joseph; Neil, Stuart J. D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I interferon (IFN) signaling engenders an antiviral state that likely plays an important role in constraining HIV-1 transmission and contributes to defining subsequent AIDS pathogenesis. Type II IFN (IFN-γ) also induces an antiviral state but is often primarily considered to be an immunomodulatory cytokine. We report that IFN-γ stimulation can induce an antiviral state that can be both distinct from that of type I interferon and can potently inhibit HIV-1 in primary CD4+ T cells and a number of human cell lines. Strikingly, we find that transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 viruses can resist a late block that is induced by type II IFN, and the use of chimeric IFN-γ-sensitive/resistant viruses indicates that interferon resistance maps to the env gene. Simultaneously, in vitro evolution also revealed that just a single amino acid substitution in the envelope can confer substantial resistance to IFN-mediated inhibition. Thus, the env gene of transmitted HIV-1 confers resistance to a late block that is phenotypically distinct from blocks previously described to be resisted by env and is therefore mediated by unknown IFN-γ-stimulated factor(s) in human CD4+ T cells and cell lines. This important unidentified block could play a key role in constraining HIV-1 transmission. IMPORTANCE The human immune system can hinder invading pathogens through interferon (IFN) signaling. One consequence of this signaling is that cells enter an antiviral state, increasing the levels of hundreds of defenses that can inhibit the replication and spread of viruses. The majority of HIV-1 infections result from a single virus particle (the transmitted/founder) that makes it past these defenses and colonizes the host. Thus, the founder virus is hypothesized to be a relatively interferon-resistant entity. Here, we show that certain HIV-1 envelope genes have the unanticipated ability to resist specific human defenses mediated by different types of interferons. Strikingly, the envelope

  15. Thyroid iodine content and serum thyroglobulin: cues to the natural history of destruction-induced thyroiditis

    SciTech Connect

    Smallridge, R.C.; De Keyser, F.M.; Van Herle, A.J.; Butkus, N.E.; Wartofsky, L.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-eight patients with destructive thyroiditis were followed to study the natural history of healing of thyroid gland injury. All had sequential measurements of thyroidal iodine (/sup 127/I) content by fluorescent scanning (normal mean, 10.1 mg), 17 had serial serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurements (normal, less than 21 ng/ml), and 13 had perchlorate discharge studies during the recovery phase. Seventeen patients had painful subacute thyroiditis (SAT), 9 had painless thyroiditis with thyrotoxicosis (PTT), and 2 had postpartum thyroiditis with thyrotoxicosis (PPT). Thyroidal iodine content decreased from a mean of 9.8 to a nadir of 3.8 mg in patients with SAT and from 8.5 to a nadir of 3.5 mg in patients with PTT. Mean serum Tg concentrations were highest (approximately 165 ng/ml) in both groups 1-3 months after the onset of symptoms. Abnormalities in both /sup 127/I content and Tg levels persisted for 2 or more yr in some individuals. No patient had detectable Tg antibodies by hemagglutination, but low titers were detected intermittently by sensitive RIA in 5 PTT patients. Microsomal antibodies were positive in only 1 of 16 SAT patients, but in 4 of 7 PTT patients and in both PPT patients. Three patients had positive perchlorate discharge tests (2 of 8 with SAT, 0 of 4 with PTT, and 1 of 1 with PPT). Permanent hypothyroidism occurred in 3 patients (2 with PTT; 1 with SAT and positive antibodies), but did not correlate with perchlorate results. HLA typing and serum immunoglobulin measurements were not useful for predicting the clinical course. These data indicate that several years may be necessary for complete resolution of destructive thyroiditis; many patients have evidence of thyroid injury persisting long after serum thyroid hormone and TSH levels become normal.

  16. Rat p67 GBP is induced by interferon-gamma and isoprenoid-modified in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vestal, D J; Buss, J E; Kelner, G S; Maciejewski, D; Asundi, V K; Maki, R A

    1996-07-16

    The guanylate binding proteins, GBPs, are a family of interferon-induced GTP-binding proteins that include the rat p67. We report here that rat p67, for which interferon regulation had not previously been demonstrated, is induced by IFN-gamma and also by LPS in both cultured bone marrow-derived macrophages and microglia. The basal level of rat p67 in macrophages is low but increases dramatically between 2 and 4 hours after treating cells with either IFN-gamma or LPS. It then remains elevated over the next 24 hours. Rat p67 is isoprenoid modified. The isoprenoid modification was detected in p67 isolated both from primary IFN-gamma-activated macrophages and when the gene for p67 was transfected into COS cells. This is the first demonstration of in vivo prenylation of a GBP. The interferon regulation and prenylation of rat p67 point toward this protein being significant in the functions of both activated macrophages and microglia.

  17. Interferons induce the expression of IFITM1 and IFITM3 and suppress the proliferation of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lau, Samantha Lai-Yee; Yuen, Man-Leuk; Kou, Cecy Ying-Chuck; Au, Ka-Wing; Zhou, Junwei; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing

    2012-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases have been one of the leading killers among the human population worldwide. During the heart development, cardiomyocytes undergo a transition from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth with an unclear underlying mechanism. In this study, we aim to investigate how interferons differentially stimulate the interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) family proteins and further be involved in the process of heart development. The expression levels of three IFITM family members, IFITM1, IFITM2, and IFITM3 were investigated during Sprague-Dawley rat myocardial development and differentiation of H9C2 cardiomyocytes. The effects of interferon-α, -β, and -γ on DNA synthesis in H9C2 cells were also characterized. Up-regulation of IFITM1 and IFITM3 were observed during the heart development of Sprague-Dawley rat and the differentiation of H9C2 cells. Moreover, interferon-α and -β induce the expression of IFITM3 while interferon-γ up-regulates IFITM1. Finally, interferon-α and -β were demonstrated to inhibit DNA synthesis during H9C2 cell differentiation. Our results indicated interferons are potentially involved in the differentiation and cell proliferation during heart development.

  18. Carbofuran-induced histophysiological changes in thyroid of the teleost fish, Channa punctatus (Bloch)

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, R.N.

    1988-10-01

    The long-term toxic effects of continuous exposure for 6 months, from January to June, to a safe dose (4.5 ppm) of a commercial carbamate pesticide, carbofuran, on the histophysiology of thyroid in adult and young (yearling) Channa punctatus, are described in this investigation. In both the experimental groups, thyroid histology exhibited various abnormalities, including hypertrophy, hyperplasia and degeneration of follicular epithelial cells, and reduction in colloid content. Apart from this, in young experimentals, fibrosis of thyroid components, formation of cystic cellular masses, and rupture of blood vessels resulting in hemorrhage can also be seen and suggest direct action of this pesticide on the thyroid. On the other hand, in both treated groups, retardation of thyroid function was also evidenced by significantly reduced thyroidal radioiodine (/sup 131/I) uptake and CR (conversion ratio of PB/sup 131/I in blood serum in relation to total serum /sup 131/I uptake) values. Apparently, these histopathological and physiological changes were markedly pronounced in young experimentals, suggesting greater susceptibility of this group to chronic toxicity of carbofuran than that of adults. Thus, on the basis of these results, it can be inferred that carbofuran pesticide, which is washed into water systems in small quantities, induces adverse histophysiological alterations in thyroid, in an age- and size-dependent manner, possibly by acting directly on thyroid and/or through the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis, in this species.

  19. Mode of action and human relevance of pronamide-induced rat thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Papineni, Sabitha; Marty, M Sue; Rasoulpour, Reza J; LeBaron, Matthew J; Pottenger, Lynn H; Eisenbrandt, David L

    2015-04-01

    Pronamide, a selective, systemic, pre- and post-emergence herbicide, caused an increased incidence of thyroid follicular cell adenomas in a rat carcinogenicity study. Thyroid tumors, as well as liver and pituitary changes, were limited only to the high-dose group. The evidence for and against specific potential modes of action (MoAs) for rat thyroid follicular cell adenomas and their relevance to humans is discussed. Pronamide is not mutagenic and therefore, direct DNA reactivity is not relevant as a MoA. The hypothesized MoA for this effect is altered homeostasis of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis mediated by the induction of hepatic enzymes, including uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT). Evaluation of data from a series of regulatory guideline and MoA studies aimed at identifying the causative and associated key events supported a UGT-mediated MoA in the development of thyroid follicular tumors. This MoA for pronamide-induced thyroid tumors in rats, which involves increased thyroid hormone metabolism/clearance, altered thyroid hormone homeostasis and HPT stimulation is not considered relevant to humans based on quantitative species differences, making rats markedly more sensitive than humans to thyroid perturbations.

  20. Baculovirus-mediated interferon alleviates dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver cirrhosis symptoms in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Nishibe, Y; Kaneko, H; Suzuki, H; Abe, T; Matsuura, Y; Takaku, H

    2008-07-01

    The wild-type baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) infects a range of mammalian cell types in vitro but does not replicate in these cells. The current study investigated the in vivo effect of AcMNPV in the mouse model of liver cirrhosis induced by the mutagen dimethylnitrosamine. Intraperitoneal injection of AcMNPV induced an immune response. The baculovirus was taken up by the liver and spleen where it suppressed liver injury and fibrosis through the induction of interferons. This study presents the first evidence of the feasibility of using baculovirus to treat liver cirrhosis.

  1. Gene expression signature discriminates sporadic from post-radiotherapy-induced thyroid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ory, Catherine; Ugolin, Nicolas; Levalois, Céline; Lacroix, Ludovic; Caillou, Bernard; Bidart, Jean-Michel; Schlumberger, Martin; Diallo, Ibrahima; de Vathaire, Florent; Hofman, Paul; Santini, José; Malfoy, Bernard; Chevillard, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Both external and internal exposure to ionizing radiation are strong risk factors for the development of thyroid tumors. Until now, the diagnosis of radiation-induced thyroid tumors has been deduced from a network of arguments taken together with the individual history of radiation exposure. Neither the histological features nor the genetic alterations observed in these tumors have been shown to be specific fingerprints of an exposure to radiation. The aim of our work is to define ionizing radiation-related molecular specificities in a series of secondary thyroid tumors developed in the radiation field of patients treated by radiotherapy. To identify molecular markers that could represent a radiation-induction signature, we compared 25K microarray transcriptome profiles of a learning set of 28 thyroid tumors, which comprised 14 follicular thyroid adenomas (FTA) and 14 papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), either sporadic or consecutive to external radiotherapy in childhood. We identified a signature composed of 322 genes which discriminates radiation-induced tumors (FTA and PTC) from their sporadic counterparts. The robustness of this signature was further confirmed by blind case-by-case classification of an independent set of 29 tumors (16 FTA and 13 PTC). After the histology code break by the clinicians, 26/29 tumors were well classified regarding tumor etiology, 1 was undetermined, and 2 were misclassified. Our results help shed light on radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis, since specific molecular pathways are deregulated in radiation-induced tumors. PMID:21148326

  2. Effects of a Model Inducer, Phenobarbital, on Thyroid Hormone Glucuronidation in Rat Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vivo, hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations. This decrease in circulating TH occurs in part through extrathyroidal mechanisms. Specifically, through the induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes...

  3. Impact of Low-Level Thyroid Hormone Disruption Induced by Propylthiouracil on Brain Development and Function.*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The critical role of thyroid hormone (TH) in brain development is well established, severe deficiencies leading to significant neurological dysfunction. Much less information is available on more modest perturbations of TH on brain function. The present study induced varying degr...

  4. Dengue virus infection induces interferon-lambda1 to facilitate cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Lin; Wang, Mei-Yi; Ho, Ling-Jun; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2016-01-01

    A marked increase in the rate of dengue virus (DENV) infection has resulted in more than 212 deaths in Taiwan since the beginning of 2015, mostly from fatal outcomes such as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The pathogenic mechanisms of these fatal manifestations are poorly understood. Cytokines induce an overwhelming immune reaction and thus have crucial roles. Interferon-lambda (IFN-λ), a newly identified IFN subtype, has antiviral effects, but its immunologic effects in DENV infection have not been investigated. In the present study, we show that DENV infection preferentially induced production of IFN-λ1 in human dendritic cells (DCs) and human lung epithelial cells. Virus nonstructural 1 (NS1) glycoprotein was responsible for the effect. DENV-induced production of IFN-λ1 was dependent on signaling pathways involving toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, interferon regulation factor (IRF)-3, and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). Blocking interaction between IFN-λ1 and its receptor IFN-λR1 through siRNA interference reduced DENV-induced DC migration towards the chemoattractants CCL19 and CCL21, by inhibiting CCR7 expression. Furthermore, IFN-λ1 itself induced CCR7 expression and DC migration. Our study presents the first evidence of the mechanisms and effects of IFN-λ1 induction in DENV-infected DCs and highlights the role of this cytokine in the immunopathogenesis of DENV infection. PMID:27456172

  5. Stress-induced alterations in interferon production and class II histocompatibility antigen expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Cunnick, J. E.; Armfield, A. V.; Wood, P. G.; Rabin, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    Mild electric foot-shock has been shown to be a stressor that can alter immune responses. Male Lewis rats were exposed to one session of 16 5.0-s 1.6-mA foot-shocks. Production of interferon-gamma by splenocytes in response to concanavalin-A was decreased in spleens from the shocked rats compared to control spleens. Spleen cells from rats treated with nadolol, a peripherally acting beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, and then shocked, showed dose-dependent attenuation of the suppression of interferon-gamma production. This suggests that catecholamines mediate shock-induced suppression of interferon-gamma production. The percentage of splenic mononuclear cells expressing class II histocompatibility (Ia) antigens on their surfaces from spleens of shocked rats was determined by flow cytometry. Significantly decreased class II positive mononuclear cells were present in the spleens of shocked rats in comparison to the spleens of control rats. This may reflect an alteration of cell trafficking or decreased production of class II antigens.

  6. Dissecting Interferon-Induced Transcriptional Programs in Human Peripheral Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Simon J.; Popper, Stephen J.; Rubins, Kathleen H.; Griffiths, Michael J.; Brown, Patrick O.; Levin, Michael; Relman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Interferons are key modulators of the immune system, and are central to the control of many diseases. The response of immune cells to stimuli in complex populations is the product of direct and indirect effects, and of homotypic and heterotypic cell interactions. Dissecting the global transcriptional profiles of immune cell populations may provide insights into this regulatory interplay. The host transcriptional response may also be useful in discriminating between disease states, and in understanding pathophysiology. The transcriptional programs of cell populations in health therefore provide a paradigm for deconvoluting disease-associated gene expression profiles. We used human cDNA microarrays to (1) compare the gene expression programs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) elicited by 6 major mediators of the immune response: interferons α, β, ω and γ, IL12 and TNFα; and (2) characterize the transcriptional responses of purified immune cell populations (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, NK cells and monocytes) to IFNγ stimulation. We defined a highly stereotyped response to type I interferons, while responses to IFNγ and IL12 were largely restricted to a subset of type I interferon-inducible genes. TNFα stimulation resulted in a distinct pattern of gene expression. Cell type-specific transcriptional programs were identified, highlighting the pronounced response of monocytes to IFNγ, and emergent properties associated with IFN-mediated activation of mixed cell populations. This information provides a detailed view of cellular activation by immune mediators, and contributes an interpretive framework for the definition of host immune responses in a variety of disease settings. PMID:20339534

  7. Iodide-induced thyrotoxicosis in a thyroidectomized patient with metastatic thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshinari, M.; Tokuyama, T.; Okamura, K.; Sato, K.; Kusuda, K.; Fujishima, M.

    1988-04-15

    An unusual case of iodide-induced thyrotoxicosis is documented in this article. The patient was a 64-year-old euthyroid man with acromegaly. He also had multiple follicular and papillary thyroid carcinomas with a metastatic lesion in the lumbar vertebrae. After a total thyroidectomy, he became slightly hypothyroid, and the lumbar lesion began to incorporate /sup 131/I by scintigraphy. When an iodine-containing contrast medium happened to be injected, a transient increase of serum thyroid hormone level was observed. After complete thyroid ablation with 83 mCi of /sup 131/I, the oral administration of 100 mg of potassium iodide for 7 days induced a prominent increase of serum thyroid hormone level. These findings indicated that the metastatic thyroid carcinoma could produce excess thyroid hormone insofar as a sufficient amount of iodide was given. Although this is the first report of such a case, iodide-induced thyrotoxicosis may not be rare in patients with thyroid carcinomas because the Wolff-Chaikoff effect is thought to be lost, and the organic iodinating activity and lysosomal protease activity are well-preserved.

  8. Robust Thyroid Gene Expression and Radioiodine Uptake Induced by Simultaneous Suppression of BRAF V600E and Histone Deacetylase in Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Weiwei; Liu, Rengyun; Zhu, Guangwu; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Context: Use of BRAF V600E inhibitors to restore thyroid iodide-handling gene expression and radioactive iodine (RAI) avidity is an attractive therapeutic strategy for RAI-refractory thyroid cancer, but recent initial clinical responses were modest. Given histone deacetylation at the sodium/iodide symporter promoter by histone deacetylase (HDAC) as a mechanism, simultaneously targeting BRAF V600E and HDAC could be a more effective strategy. Objectives: The objective of the study was to test whether suppressing both BRAF V600E and HDAC could more effectively induce thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells. Research Design: We tested the BRAF V600E inhibitor PLX4032 (vemurafenib) and the HDAC inhibitor SAHA (vorinostat), two major anticancer drugs currently approved for clinical use, in inducing thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells. Results: PLX4032 alone induced a modest expression of thyroid genes and RAI uptake preferentially in thyroid cancer cells harboring BRAF V600E. SAHA showed an effect in a genetic-independent manner in all the cells. A robust synergistic effect on thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake was observed in BRAF V600E-positive thyroid cancer cells when the two inhibitors were simultaneously used. This was dramatically enhanced further by TSH; triple combination of PLX4032, SAHA, and TSH showed the most robust effect on thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in cells harboring BRAF V600E. Abundant sodium/iodide symporter protein expression in thyroid cancer cells under these conditions was confirmed by immunofluorescent microscopy. Conclusions: Simultaneously suppressing BRAF V600E and HDAC, particularly when cotreated with TSH, induced a far more robust expression of thyroid genes and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells than suppressing BRAF V600E alone. Triple combination of PLX4032, SAHA, and TSH is a specific robust regimen to restore RAI avidity in RAI-refractory BRAF V600E-positive thyroid

  9. STRAIN ELASTOGRAPHY USING DOBUTAMINE-INDUCED CAROTID ARTERY PULSATION IN CANINE THYROID GLAND.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gahyun; Jeon, Sunghoon; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Kim, Hyunwoo; Yu, Dohyeon; Choi, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease is common in dogs and conventional ultrasonography is a standard diagnostic test for diagnosis and treatment planning. Strain elastography can provide additional information about tissue stiffness noninvasively after applying external or internal compression. However, natural carotid artery pulsations in the canine thyroid gland are too weak to maintain sufficient internal compression force. The objective of the present study was to describe the feasibility of strain elastography for evaluating the canine thyroid gland and the repeatability of dobutamine-induced carotid artery pulsation as an internal compression method. In seven healthy Beagle dogs, strain on each thyroid lobe was induced by external compression using the ultrasound probe and internal compression using carotid artery pulsation after dobutamine infusion. The thyroid appeared homogeneously green and the subcutaneous fat superficial to the thyroid lobe appeared blue. Strain values and strain ratios did not differ among dogs or between the left and right lobes. Interobserver repeatability was excellent for both compression methods. Intraobserver repeatability of the strain ratio measured using the carotid artery pulsation method (intraclass coefficient correlation = 0.933) was higher than that measured using the external compression method (0.760). Mean strain values of thyroid lobes for the external compression method (142.93 ± 6.67) differed from the internal method (147.31 ± 8.24; P < 0.05). Strain ratios between the two methods did not differ. Strain elastography was feasible for estimating thyroid stiffness in dogs. Carotid artery pulsation induced by dobutamine infusion can be used for canine thyroid strain elastography with excellent repeatability.

  10. Ameliorative effect of resveratrol against fluoride-induced alteration of thyroid function in male wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Chaitali; Pal, Sudipta

    2014-12-01

    Resveratrol (3,4,5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenol and well-known natural antioxidant has been evaluated for its protective effect against fluoride-induced metabolic dysfunctions in rat thyroid gland. Fluoride, the most abundant anions present in groundwater throughout the world, creates a major problem in safe drinking water and causes metabolic, structural, and functional injuries in different organ systems. Sub-acute exposure to sodium fluoride at a dose of 20 mg/kg b.w./day orally to rat for 30 days induces thyroidal dysfunction including suppressed synthetic machinery of the thyroid gland to produce nucleic acids and thyroid hormones, mainly T3 and T4. Other functional changes are alteration of certain metabolic enzyme activities like Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, thyroid peroxidase, and 5,5'-deiodinase. Structural abnormality of thyroid follicles by fluoride intoxication clearly indicates its thyrotoxic manifestation. Resveratrol supplementation in fluoride-exposed animals appreciably prevented metabolic toxicity caused by fluoride and restored both functional status and ultra-structural organization of the thyroid gland towards normalcy. This study first establishes the therapeutic efficacy of resveratrol as a natural antioxidant in thyroprotection against toxic insult caused by fluoride.

  11. Importance of interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins and retinoic acid inducible gene I for influenza virus replication: A review.

    PubMed

    Suo, Siqingaowa; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between Influenza viruses and host cells is key to elucidating the pathogenesis of these viruses. Several host factors have been identified that exert antiviral functions; however, influenza viruses continue to replicate utilizing host cell machinery. Herein, we review the mechanisms of action of two host-derived proteins on conferring cellular resistance to the influenza virus; (1) the interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins, 1, 2 and 3, a recently identified family of early restriction factors; and (2) retinoic acid inducible gene I, a key mediator of antiviral immunity. These data may contribute to the design of novel and efficient anti-influenza treatments.

  12. Spatiotemporally restricted arenavirus replication induces immune surveillance and type I interferon-dependent tumour regression

    PubMed Central

    Kalkavan, Halime; Sharma, Piyush; Kasper, Stefan; Helfrich, Iris; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Gassa, Asmae; Virchow, Isabel; Flatz, Lukas; Brandenburg, Tim; Namineni, Sukumar; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Höchst, Bastian; Knolle, Percy A.; Wollmann, Guido; von Laer, Dorothee; Drexler, Ingo; Rathbun, Jessica; Cannon, Paula M.; Scheu, Stefanie; Bauer, Jens; Chauhan, Jagat; Häussinger, Dieter; Willimsky, Gerald; Löhning, Max; Schadendorf, Dirk; Brandau, Sven; Schuler, Martin; Lang, Philipp A.; Lang, Karl S.

    2017-01-01

    Immune-mediated effector molecules can limit cancer growth, but lack of sustained immune activation in the tumour microenvironment restricts antitumour immunity. New therapeutic approaches that induce a strong and prolonged immune activation would represent a major immunotherapeutic advance. Here we show that the arenaviruses lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the clinically used Junin virus vaccine (Candid#1) preferentially replicate in tumour cells in a variety of murine and human cancer models. Viral replication leads to prolonged local immune activation, rapid regression of localized and metastatic cancers, and long-term disease control. Mechanistically, LCMV induces antitumour immunity, which depends on the recruitment of interferon-producing Ly6C+ monocytes and additionally enhances tumour-specific CD8+ T cells. In comparison with other clinically evaluated oncolytic viruses and to PD-1 blockade, LCMV treatment shows promising antitumoural benefits. In conclusion, therapeutically administered arenavirus replicates in cancer cells and induces tumour regression by enhancing local immune responses. PMID:28248314

  13. Carfilzomib potentiates CUDC-101-induced apoptosis in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lisa; Boufraqech, Myriem; Lake, Ross; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-03-29

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with no effective treatment currently available. Previously, we identified agents active against ATC cells, both in vitro and in vivo, using quantitative high-throughput screening of 3282 clinically approved drugs and small molecules. Here, we report that combining two of these active agents, carfilzomib, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, and CUDC-101, a histone deacetylase and multi-kinase inhibitor, results in increased, synergistic activity in ATC cells. The combination of carfilzomib and CUDC-101 synergistically inhibited cellular proliferation and caused cell death in multiple ATC cell lines harboring various driver mutations observed in human ATC tumors. This increased anti-ATC effect was associated with a synergistically enhanced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased caspase 3/7 activity induced by the drug combination. Mechanistically, treatment with carfilzomib and CUDC-101 increased p21 expression and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase protein cleavage. Our results suggest that combining carfilzomib and CUDC-101 would offer an effective therapeutic strategy to treat ATC.

  14. Infection-induced type I interferons activate CD11b on B-1 cells for subsequent lymph node accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Waffarn, Elizabeth E.; Hastey, Christine J.; Dixit, Neha; Choi, Youn Soo; Cherry, Simon; Kalinke, Ulrich; Simon, Scott I.; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Innate-like B-1a lymphocytes rapidly redistribute to regional mediastinal lymph nodes (MedLN) during influenza infection to generate protective IgM. Here we demonstrate that influenza infection-induced type I interferons directly stimulate body cavity B-1 cells and are a necessary signal required for B-1 cell accumulation in MedLN. Vascular mimetic flow chamber studies show that type I interferons increase ligand-mediated B-1 cell adhesion under shear stress by inducing high-affinity conformation shifts of surface-expressed integrins. In vivo trafficking experiments identify CD11b as the non-redundant, interferon-activated integrin required for B-1 cell accumulation in MedLN. Thus CD11b on B-1 cells senses infection-induced innate signals and facilitates their rapid sequester into secondary lymphoid tissues, thereby regulating the accumulation of polyreactive IgM producers at sites of infection. PMID:26612263

  15. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  16. Transcriptional profile of Ki-Ras-induced transformation of thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Roberta; Federico, Antonella; Coppola, Valeria; Pentimalli, Francesca; Berlingieri, Maria Teresa; Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Kruhoffer, Mogens; Orntoft, Torben F; Fusco, Alfredo

    2007-06-01

    In the last years, an increasing number of experiments has provided compelling evidence for a casual role of Ras protein mutations, resulting in their constitutive activation, in thyroid carcinogenesis. However, despite the clear involvement of Ras proteins in thyroid carcinogenesis, the nature of most of the target genes, whose expression is modulated by the Ras-induced signaling pathways and that are ultimately responsible for Ras-induced cellular transformation, remains largely unknown. To analyze Ras-dependent modulation of gene expression in thyroid cells we took advantage of a differentiated rat thyroid cell line, FRTL-5. As a model for Ras-dependent thyroid transformation, we used FRTL-5 cells infected with the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus, carrying the v-Ki-Ras oncogene. The infected cells (FRTL-5 v-Ki-Ras) have lost expression of the thyroid differentiation markers and also are completely transformed. We hybridized two different Affimetrix chips containing probe sets interrogating both known rat genes and ESTs for a total of more than 17,000 sequences using mRNA extracted from FRTL-5 and FRTL-5 v-Ki-Ras cell lines. We identified about 50 genes whose expression was induced and about 40 genes whose expression was downregulated more than 10-fold by Ras. We confirmed the differential expression of many of these genes in FRTL-5 v-Ki-Ras as compared to parental cells by using alternative techniques. Remarkably, we investigated the expression of some of the Ras-regulated genes in human thyroid carcinoma cell lines and tumor samples, our results, therefore, providing a new molecular profile of the genes involved in thyroid neoplastic transformation.

  17. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins promote cytosolic lipopolysaccharide detection by caspase-11.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria is a classical pathogen-associated molecular pattern and a strong inducer of immune responses. While the detection of LPS on the cell surface and in the endosome by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been studied for some time, it has only recently been discovered that LPS can also be sensed in the cytosol of cells by a noncanonical inflammasome pathway, resulting in the activation of the cysteine protease caspase-11. Intriguingly, activation of this pathway requires the production of interferons (IFNs) and the induction of a class of IFN-induced GTPases called guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), which have previously been linked to cell-autonomous killing of intracellular microbes. In this study, we review the recent advances in our understanding of cytosolic LPS sensing and the function of mammalian GBPs.

  18. Aging. Aging-induced type I interferon response at the choroid plexus negatively affects brain function.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; David, Eyal; Castellano, Joseph M; Miller, Omer; Kertser, Alexander; Berkutzki, Tamara; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Bezalel, Dana; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Amit, Ido; Schwartz, Michal

    2014-10-03

    Aging-associated cognitive decline is affected by factors produced inside and outside the brain. By using multiorgan genome-wide analysis of aged mice, we found that the choroid plexus, an interface between the brain and the circulation, shows a type I interferon (IFN-I)-dependent gene expression profile that was also found in aged human brains. In aged mice, this response was induced by brain-derived signals, present in the cerebrospinal fluid. Blocking IFN-I signaling within the aged brain partially restored cognitive function and hippocampal neurogenesis and reestablished IFN-II-dependent choroid plexus activity, which is lost in aging. Our data identify a chronic aging-induced IFN-I signature, often associated with antiviral response, at the brain's choroid plexus and demonstrate its negative influence on brain function, thereby suggesting a target for ameliorating cognitive decline in aging.

  19. Interferon-α and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor cooperatively mediates TRAIL-induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Chaohui; Qiu, Xiaoxin; Liu, Nianli; Yang, Darong; Xia, Man; Liu, Jingshi; Wang, Xiaohong; and others

    2015-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) has recently been recognized to harbor therapeutic potential in the prevention and treatment of HCC, but it remains controversial as to whether IFN-α exerts direct cytotoxicity against HCC. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is overexpressed in HCC and is considered to play a role in hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, we aimed to elucidate the combined effect of a COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, and IFN-α on in vitro growth suppression of HCC using the hepatoma cell line HLCZ01 and the in vivo nude mouse xenotransplantation model using HLCZ01 cells. Treatment with celecoxib and IFN-α synergistically inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptosis was identified by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride and fluorescent staining. IFN-α upregulated the expression of TRAIL, while celecoxib increased the expression of TRAIL receptors. The combined regimen with celecoxib and IFN-α reduced the growth of xenotransplanted HCCs in nude mice. The regulation of IFN-α- and COX-2 inhibitor-induced cell death is impaired in a subset of TRAIL-resistant cells. The molecular mechanisms of HCC cells resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis were explored using molecular biological and immunological methods. Interferon-α and the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib synergistically increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma. These data suggest that IFN-α and celecoxib may offer a novel role with important implications in designing new therapeutics for TRAIL-resistant tumors. - Highlights: ●The cytotoxic effect of TRAIL on a developed HCC HLCZ01 cells infected with HBV. ●IFN-α and celecoxib induced apoptosis in HLCZ01 cells infected with HBV. ●The combined regime reduced the growth of xenotransplanted HCCs in nude mice model.

  20. Interferon gamma immunoreactivity in iris nerve fibres during endotoxin induced uveitis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Yang, P.; de Vos, A. F; Kijlstra, A.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—Previous studies have implied that interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is involved in the pathogenesis of endotoxin induced uveitis (EIU) in the rat. This study investigated the source of IFN-γ in the iris during EIU.
METHODS—Whole mounts of iris were isolated from Lewis rats before and at different times (from 4 hours to 14 days) after foot pad injection of 200 µg Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Immunohistological analysis was performed using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to rat IFN-γ (DB12 and DB13). mAbs specific to monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells and MHC class II were used to asses the inflammatory response in the eye (ED-1, ED-2, and OX-6). An antibody specific to neurofilaments (2H3) was used to stain nerve fibres in the normal iris.
RESULTS—LPS administration induced acute intraocular inflammation, characterised by a massive infiltration of monocytes/macrophages and increased numbers of MHC class II positive cells in the iris. IFN-γ immunoreactive cells were not detected in iris whole mounts of control rats. Strikingly, IFN-γ immunoreactivity was found in fibres from 4 hours until 10 days after LPS injection, with the most intense staining at 48-72 hours. Other DB12 or DB13 positive cells were not detected in the iris. The pattern of DB12 and DB13 staining in the inflamed iris was similar to the 2H3 staining of neurons in the iris of control rats.
CONCLUSION—These results show that systemic LPS administration induces IFN-γ immunoreactivity in iris fibres and suggest that iris nerve fibres may be a source of IFN-γ during EIU. The IFN-γ immunoreactive material in the iris nerve fibres may be identical to neuronal IFN-γ.

 Keywords: endotoxin induced uveitis; cytokines; interferon gamma; rat PMID:9797675

  1. Thyroid expression of an A2 adenosine receptor transgene induces thyroid hyperplasia and hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Ledent, C; Dumont, J E; Vassart, G; Parmentier, M

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is the major intracellular second messenger of thyrotropin (TSH) action on thyroid cells. It stimulates growth as well as the function and differentiation of cultured thyrocytes. The adenosine A2 receptor, which activates adenylyl cyclase via coupling to the stimulating G protein (Gs), has been shown to promote constitutive activation of the cAMP cascade when transfected into various cell types. In order to test whether the A2 receptor was able to function similarly in vivo and to investigate the possible consequences of permanent adenylyl cyclase activation in thyroid cells, lines of transgenic mice were generated expressing the canine A2 adenosine receptor under control of the bovine thyroglobulin gene promoter. Thyroid-specific expression of the A2 adenosine receptor transgene promoted gland hyperplasia and severe hyperthyroidism causing premature death of the animals. The resulting goitre represents a model of hyperfunctioning adenomas: it demonstrates that constitutive activation of the cAMP cascade in such differentiated epithelial cells is sufficient to stimulate autonomous and uncontrolled function and growth. Images PMID:1371462

  2. [Non-autoimmune thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Leonardo F L; Mana, Daniela L; Bruno, Oscar D

    2014-01-01

    The term thyroiditis comprises a group of thyroid diseases characterized by the presence of inflammation, including autoimmune and non-autoimmune entities. It may manifest as an acute illness with severe thyroid pain (subacute thyroiditis and infectious thyroiditis), and conditions in which the inflammation is not clinically evident evolving without pain and presenting primarily thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter (drug-induced thyroiditis and Riedel thyroiditis). The aim of this review is to provide an updated approach on non-autoimmune thyroiditis and its clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  3. Interferon-β gene transfer induces a strong cytotoxic bystander effect on melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Úrsula A; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Villaverde, Marcela S; Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2015-05-01

    A local gene therapy scheme for the delivery of type I interferons could be an alternative for the treatment of melanoma. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of interferon-β (IFNβ) gene lipofection on tumor cell lines derived from three human cutaneous and four canine mucosal melanomas. The cytotoxicity of human IFNβ gene lipofection resulted higher or equivalent to that of the corresponding addition of the recombinant protein (rhIFNβ) to human cells. IFNβ gene lipofection was not cytotoxic for only one canine melanoma cell line. When cultured as monolayers, three human and three canine IFNβ-lipofected melanoma cell lines displayed a remarkable bystander effect. As spheroids, the same six cell lines were sensitive to IFNβ gene transfer, two displaying a significant multicell resistance phenotype. The effects of conditioned IFNβ-lipofected canine melanoma cell culture media suggested the release of at least one soluble thermolabile cytotoxic factor that could not be detected in human melanoma cells. By using a secretion signal-free truncated human IFNβ, we showed that its intracellular expression was enough to induce cytotoxicity in two human melanoma cell lines. The lower cytoplasmatic levels of reactive oxygen species detected after intracellular IFNβ expression could be related to the resistance displayed by one human melanoma cell line. As IFNβ gene transfer was effective against most of the assayed melanomas in a way not limited by relatively low lipofection efficiencies, the clinical potential of this approach is strongly supported.

  4. The interferon-inducible HIN-200 gene family in apoptosis and inflammation: implication for autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mondini, Michele; Costa, Silvia; Sponza, Simone; Gugliesi, Francesca; Gariglio, Marisa; Landolfo, Santo

    2010-04-01

    The Ifi-200/HIN-200 gene family encodes highly homologous human (IFI16, myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen, absent in melanoma 2, and IFIX) and murine proteins (Ifi202a, Ifi202b, Ifi203, Ifi204, Ifi205, and Ifi206), which are induced by type I and II interferons (IFN). These proteins have been described as regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation and, more recently, several reports have suggested their involvement in both apoptotic and inflammatory processes. The relevance of HIN-200 proteins in human disease is beginning to be clarified, and emerging experimental data indicate their role in autoimmunity. Autoimmune disorders are sustained by perpetual activation of inflammatory process and a link between autoimmunity and apoptosis has been clearly established. Moreover, the interferon system is now considered as a key player in autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythemathosus, systemic sclerosis, and Sjögren's syndrome, and it is therefore conceivable to hypothesize that HIN-200 may be among the pivotal mediators of IFN activity in autoimmune disease. In particular, the participation of HIN-200 proteins in apoptosis and inflammation could support their potential role in autoimmunity.

  5. TIR Domain-Containing Adapter-Inducing Beta Interferon (TRIF) Mediates Immunological Memory against Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Termini, J. M.; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Ruiz, Jose; Arditi, Moshe; Schesser, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Induction of adaptive immunity leads to the establishment of immunological memory; however, how innate immunity regulates memory T cell function remains obscure. Here we show a previously undefined mechanism in which innate and adaptive immunity are linked by TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF) during establishment and reactivation of memory T cells against Gram-negative enteropathogens. Absence of TRIF in macrophages (Mϕs) but not dendritic cells led to a predominant generation of CD4+ central memory T cells that express IL-17 during enteric bacterial infection in mice. TRIF-dependent type I interferon (IFN) signaling in T cells was essential to Th1 lineage differentiation and reactivation of memory T cells. TRIF activated memory T cells to facilitate local neutrophil influx and enhance bacterial elimination. These results highlight the importance of TRIF as a mediator of the innate and adaptive immune interactions in achieving the protective properties of memory immunity against Gram-negative bacteria and suggest TRIF as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26351279

  6. TIR Domain-Containing Adapter-Inducing Beta Interferon (TRIF) Mediates Immunological Memory against Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Termini, J M; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Ruiz, Jose; Arditi, Moshe; Schesser, Kurt; Fukata, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Induction of adaptive immunity leads to the establishment of immunological memory; however, how innate immunity regulates memory T cell function remains obscure. Here we show a previously undefined mechanism in which innate and adaptive immunity are linked by TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF) during establishment and reactivation of memory T cells against Gram-negative enteropathogens. Absence of TRIF in macrophages (Mϕs) but not dendritic cells led to a predominant generation of CD4(+) central memory T cells that express IL-17 during enteric bacterial infection in mice. TRIF-dependent type I interferon (IFN) signaling in T cells was essential to Th1 lineage differentiation and reactivation of memory T cells. TRIF activated memory T cells to facilitate local neutrophil influx and enhance bacterial elimination. These results highlight the importance of TRIF as a mediator of the innate and adaptive immune interactions in achieving the protective properties of memory immunity against Gram-negative bacteria and suggest TRIF as a potential therapeutic target.

  7. Induction of T(4) UDP-GT activity, serum thyroid stimulating hormone, and thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice treated with microsomal enzyme inducers.

    PubMed

    Hood, Alan; Allen, Marcia L; Liu, YaPing; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2003-04-01

    The microsomal enzyme inducers phenobarbital (PB), pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), and Aroclor 1254 (PCB) are known to induce thyroxine (T(4)) glucuronidation and reduce serum T(4) concentrations in rats. Also, microsomal enzyme inducers that increase serum TSH (i.e., PB and PCN) also increase thyroid follicular cell proliferation in rats. Little is known about the effects of these microsomal enzyme inducers on T(4) glucuronidation, serum thyroid hormone concentrations, serum TSH, and thyroid gland growth in mice. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that microsomal enzyme inducers induce T(4) UDP-GT activity, resulting in reduced serum T(4) concentrations, as well as increased serum TSH and thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice. B6C3F male mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing PB (600, 1200, 1800, or 2400 ppm), PCN (250, 500, 1000, or 2000 ppm), 3MC (62.5, 125, 250, or 500 ppm), or PCB (10, 30, 100, or 300 ppm) for 21 days. All four inducers increased liver weight and hepatic microsomal UDP-GT activity toward chloramphenicol, alpha-naphthol, and T(4). PB and PCB decreased serum total T(4), but PCN and 3MC did not. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone was markedly increased by PCN and 3MC treatments, and slightly increased by PB and PCB treatments. All four microsomal enzyme inducers dramatically increased thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice. The findings suggest that PB, PCN, 3MC, and PCB disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis in mice.

  8. Ikkepsilon regulates viral-induced interferon regulatory factor-3 activation via a redox-sensitive pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Indukuri, Hemalatha; Castro, Shawn M.; Liao, S.-M.; Feeney, Lee Ann; Dorsch, Marion; Coyle, Anthony J.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Brasier, Allan R.; Casola, Antonella . E-mail: ancasola@utmb.edu

    2006-09-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced chemokine gene expression occurs through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF)-3. In this study, we have investigated the signaling pathway leading to RSV-induced IRF-3 activation and whether it is mediated by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Our results show that RSV infection induces expression and catalytic activity of IKK{epsilon}, a noncanonical IKK-like kinase. Expression of a kinase-inactive IKK{epsilon} blocks RSV-induced IRF-3 serine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and DNA-binding, leading to inhibition of RANTES gene transcription, mRNA expression and protein synthesis. Treatment of alveolar epithelial cells with antioxidants or with NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors abrogates RSV-induced chemokine secretion, IRF-3 phosphorylation and IKK{epsilon} induction, indicating that ROS generation plays a fundamental role in the signaling pathway leading to IRF-3 activation, therefore, identifying a novel molecular target for the development of strategies aimed to modify the inflammatory response associated with RSV infection of the lung.

  9. GTPase properties of the interferon-induced human guanylate-binding protein 2.

    PubMed

    Neun, R; Richter, M F; Staeheli, P; Schwemmle, M

    1996-07-15

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were originally described as proteins that are strongly induced by interferons and are capable of binding to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides. hGBP1, the first of two members of this protein family in humans, was recently shown to represent a novel type of GTPase that hydrolyzes GTP predominantly to GMP. We now report that purified recombinant hGBP2 also hydrolyzes GTP very efficiently, although GDP rather than GMP was the major reaction product. The biochemical parameters of this reaction were as follows: Km = 313 microM, turnover number = 22 min-1. Both hGBP1 and hGBP2 failed to hydrolyze GDP, however, GDP was an effective inhibitor of the hGBP2- but not the hGBP1-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis reaction. Thus, hGBP1 and hGBP2 have similar biochemical properties, but show pronounced differences in product specificity.

  10. Secreted Interferon-Inducible Factors Restrict Hepatitis B and C Virus Entry In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoming; Blossey, Christoph K.; Wisskirchen, Karin; Esser, Knud; Protzer, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Interferon-α (IFN-α) has been used for more than 20 years as the first-line therapy for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, because it has a number of antiviral effects. In this study, we describe a novel mode of its antiviral action. We demonstrate that the supernatant from IFN-α-treated cultured cells restricted HBV and HCV infection by inhibiting viral entry into hepatoma cells. The factors contained in the supernatant competed with the virus for binding to heparan glycosaminoglycans—the nonspecific attachment step shared by HBV and HCV. Secreted factors of high molecular mass that bind to heparin columns elicited the antiviral effect. In conclusion, IFN-α is able to induce soluble factors that can bind to heparan glycosaminoglycans thus leading to the inhibition of viral binding. PMID:28367455

  11. Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1) is required for the progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phi, Lan Thi Hanh; Kim, Hyungjoo; Baek, Moo Jun; Jeong, Dongjun; Kwon, Hyog Young

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1) has been shown to be implicated in multiple cancers, yet little is known about biological significance of IFITM1 in colorectal cancer. Here, we show that IFITM1 is highly expressed in metastatic colorectal cancer cell lines as well as colorectal patient-derived tumor samples, and its expression is associated with a poor prognosis of the disease. Also, IFITM1 depletion resulted in a significant reduction in the mobility of cancer cell lines, whereas ectopic expression of IFITM1 promoted the migration of cancer cells. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) signature was dysregulated by both loss and gain of function of IFITM1, which was partially reverted by Caveolin-1 (CAV1). Therefore, these results suggest that IFITM1 may be a prognostic marker and an attractive target to achieve better therapeutic outcomes in colorectal cancer. PMID:27852071

  12. The effect of thymic inoculation to induce tolerance of allogeneic thyroid grafts in the outbred rabbit.

    PubMed

    Torchia, M G; Aitken, R M; Thliveris, A

    1998-10-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that allograft tolerance can be achieved in inbred rats and mice following intrathymic injection of donor cells or antigen and treatment with antilymphocyte serum (ALS). In outbred dogs, xenografts, and inbred rat strains with major MHC antigen difference, tolerance has not similarly been induced. The focus of this study was to determine whether allogeneic thyroid graft tolerance could be achieved in outbred rabbits. In the experimental group (n = 5), recipients received an intrathymic injection of donor lymphocytes and a single treatment of ALS. Controls (n = 5) received intrathymic cell culture medium and ALS treatment. Donor-recipient allogenicity was monitored with mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) over 18 weeks. Donor thyroid tissue was placed into recipient gluteal muscle fibres one week following the last MLC measurement. A third group of rabbits (n = 4) received thyroid autografts without any other treatment. There were no differences in MLC stimulation indices (SI) between the control and experimental group nor did MLC (SI) change within groups. All thyroid autografts survived the two week monitoring period and demonstrated normal appearing thyroid follicles on histologic examination. All thyroid allografts showed severe acute rejection reactions on biopsy within one week. Further studies using outbred animals to examine the role of thymic inoculation are required to determine whether similar techniques might be successful in the human.

  13. Novel leptin OB3 peptide-induced signaling and progression in thyroid cancers: Comparison with leptin

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Lai, Hsuan-Yu; Ke, Chien-Chih; Crawford, Dana R.; Lee, Oscar K.; Fu, Earl; Mousa, Shaker A.; Grasso, Patricia; Liu, Leroy F.; Chang, Heng-Yu; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity results in increased secretion of cytokines from adipose tissue and is a risk factor for various cancers. Leptin is largely produced by adipose tissue and cancer cells. It induces cell proliferation and may serve to induce various cancers. OB3-leptin peptide (OB3) is a new class of functional leptin peptide. However, its mitogenic effect has not been determined. In the present study, because of a close link between leptin and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, OB3 was compared with leptin in different thyroid cancer cells for gene expression, proliferation and invasion. Neither agent stimulated cell proliferation. Leptin stimulated cell invasion, but reduced adhesion in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Activated ERK1/2 and STAT3 contributed to leptin-induced invasion. In contrast, OB3 did not affect expression of genes involved in proliferation and invasion. In vivo studies in the mouse showed that leptin, but not OB3, significantly increased circulating levels of thyrotropin (TSH), a growth factor for thyroid cancer. In summary, OB3 is a derivative of leptin that importantly lacks the mitogenic effects of leptin on thyroid cancer cells. PMID:27050378

  14. Retinoic acid induces expression of the thyroid hormone transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8).

    PubMed

    Kogai, Takahiko; Liu, Yan-Yun; Richter, Laura L; Mody, Kaizeen; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Brent, Gregory A

    2010-08-27

    Retinoic acid (RA) and thyroid hormone are critical for differentiation and organogenesis in the embryo. Mct8 (monocarboxylate transporter 8), expressed predominantly in the brain and placenta, mediates thyroid hormone uptake from the circulation and is required for normal neural development. RA induces differentiation of F9 mouse teratocarcinoma cells toward neurons as well as extraembryonal endoderm. We hypothesized that Mct8 is functionally expressed in F9 cells and induced by RA. All-trans-RA (tRA) and other RA receptor (RAR) agonists dramatically (>300-fold) induced Mct8. tRA treatment significantly increased uptake of triiodothyronine and thyroxine (4.1- and 4.3-fold, respectively), which was abolished by a selective Mct8 inhibitor, bromosulfophthalein. Sequence inspection of the Mct8 promoter region and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR analysis in F9 cells identified 11 transcription start sites and a proximal Sp1 site but no TATA box. tRA significantly enhanced Mct8 promoter activity through a consensus RA-responsive element located 6.6 kilobases upstream of the coding region. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated binding of RAR and retinoid X receptor to the RA response element. The promotion of thyroid hormone uptake through the transcriptional up-regulation of Mct8 by RAR is likely to be important for extraembryonic endoderm development and neural differentiation. This finding demonstrates cross-talk between RA signaling and thyroid hormone signaling in early development at the level of the thyroid hormone transporter.

  15. Identification and characterization of interferon-induced proteins that inhibit alphavirus replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yugen; Burke, Crystal W; Ryman, Kate D; Klimstra, William B

    2007-10-01

    Alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) produces antiviral effects through upregulation of many interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) whose protein products are effectors of the antiviral state. Previous data from our laboratory have shown that IFN-alpha/beta can limit Sindbis virus (SB) replication through protein kinase R (PKR)-dependent and PKR-independent mechanisms and that one PKR-independent mechanism inhibits translation of the infecting virus genome (K. D. Ryman et al., J. Virol. 79:1487-1499, 2005). Further, using Affymetrix microarray technology, we identified 44 genes as candidates for PKR/RNase L-independent IFN-induced antiviral activities. In the current studies, we have begun analyzing these gene products for antialphavirus activity using three techniques: (i) overexpression of the protein from SB vectors and assessment of virulence attenuation in mice; (ii) overexpression of the proteins in a stable tetracycline-inducible murine fibroblast culture system and assessment of effects upon SB replication; and (iii) small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of gene mRNA in fibroblast cultures followed by SB replication assessment as above. Tested proteins included those we hypothesized had potential to affect virus genome translation and included murine ISG20, ISG15, the zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP), viperin, p56, p54, and p49. Interestingly, the pattern of antiviral activity for some gene products was different between in vitro and in vivo assays. Viperin and ZAP attenuated virulence most profoundly in mice. However, ISG20 and ZAP potently inhibited SB replication in vitro, whereas and viperin, p56, and ISG15 exhibited modest replication inhibition in vitro. In contrast, p54 and p49 had little to no effect in any assay.

  16. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  17. Doxycycline Induces Mitophagy and Suppresses Production of Interferon-β in IPEC-J2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yang; Liqi, Zhu; Jian, Lin; Qinghua, Yu; Qian, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that the second-generation tetracycline derivative doxycycline (DOX) interrupts mitochondrial proteostasis and physiology, inhibits proliferation of many cell types, and induces apoptosis. However, the effects of DOX, which is widely used in porcine husbandry by feed, on the porcine intestinal epithelium are unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that DOX damaged mitochondrial morphology and induced the co-localization of mitochondria with autophagosomes, suggesting that DOX induces mitophagy in IPEC-J2 cells. We also found evidence that DOX increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or mitochondrial-specific ROS in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, 50 μg/ml DOX significantly decreased production of interferon-β and facilitated replication of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus in IPEC-J2 cells. These results demonstrated that DOX induced mitophagy and ROS production, which damaged the intestinal epithelium. As DOX is used extensively in pig husbandry, uncontrolled application poses a significant threat of viral infection, so stricter policies on its usage should be required. PMID:28203548

  18. Thyroid iodine content measured by x-ray fluorescence in amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Leger, A.F.; Fragu, P.; Rougier, P.; Laurent, M.F.; Tubiana, M.; Savole, J.C.

    1983-07-01

    Iodine-induced thyrotoxicosis (IiT) is characterized by (a) a low radioiodine uptake, increased by exogenous TSH, and (b) a spontaneous evolution towards cure within a few months. An hypothetical pathogenesis of IiT is an initial inflation in the stores of thyroid hormones during iodine excess, followed by their sudden discharge into the circulation. Thyroid iodine content was measured by fluorescent scanning in 10 patients with amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis and in various control groups. Results were found to be high at the onset of the disease and to decrease during its course. The data agree with the hypothetical pathogenesis. Furthermore they may permit exclusion of a painless subacute thyroiditis, which is the main differential diagnosis of IiT.

  19. Neddylation is required for herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1)-induced early phase interferon-beta production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueying; Ye, Zhenjie; Pei, Yujun; Qiu, Guihua; Wang, Qingyang; Xu, Yunlu; Shen, Beifen; Zhang, Jiyan

    2016-09-01

    Type I interferons such as interferon-beta (IFN-β) play essential roles in the host innate immune response to herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) infection. The transcription of type I interferon genes is controlled by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members including IRF3. NF-κB activation depends on the phosphorylation of inhibitor of κB (IκB), which triggers its ubiqitination and degradation. It has been reported that neddylation inhibition by a pharmacological agent MLN4924 potently suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine production with the accumulation of phosphorylated IκBα. However, the role of neddylation in type I interferon expression remains unknown. Here, we report that neddylation inhibition with MLN4924 or upon UBA3 deficiency led to accumulation of phosphorylated IκBα, impaired IκBα degradation, and impaired NF-κB nuclear translocation in the early phase of HSV-1 infection even though phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 were not affected. The blockade of NF-κB nuclear translocation by neddylation inhibition becomes less efficient at the later time points of HSV-1 infection. Consequently, HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production significantly decreased upon MLN4924 treatment and UBA3 deficiency. NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23 mimicked the effects of neddylation inhibition in the early phase of HSV-1 infection. Moreover, the effects of neddylation inhibition on HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production diminished in the presence of NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23. Thus, neddylation contributes to HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production through, at least partially, promoting NF-κB activation.

  20. Interferons alpha and gamma induce p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis, respectively.

    PubMed

    Porta, Chiara; Hadj-Slimane, Reda; Nejmeddine, Mohamed; Pampin, Mathieu; Tovey, Michael G; Espert, Lucile; Alvarez, Sandra; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K

    2005-01-20

    Type I interferon (IFN) enhances the transcription of the tumor suppressor gene p53. To elucidate the molecular mechanism mediating IFN-induced apoptosis, we analysed programmed cell death in response to type I (IFNalpha) or type II (IFNgamma) treatment in relation to p53 status. In two cell lines (MCF-7, SKNSH), IFNalpha, but not IFNgamma, enhanced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, only IFNalpha upregulated p53 as well as p53 target genes (Noxa, Mdm2 and CD95). The apoptotic response to IFNalpha decreased in the presence of ZB4, an anti-CD95 antibody, suggesting that CD95 is involved in this process. When p53 was inactivated by the E6 viral protein or the expression of a p53 mutant, IFNalpha-induced apoptosis and p53 target genes upregulation were abrogated. Altogether these results demonstrate that p53 plays a pivotal role in the IFNalpha-induced apoptotic response. IFNalpha-induced PML was unable to recruit p53 into nuclear bodies and its downregulation by siRNA did not alter CD95 expression. In contrast, IFNgamma-induced apoptosis is p53-independent. CD95 and IFN-regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) are directly upregulated by this cytokine. Apoptotic response to IFNgamma is decreased in the presence of ZB4 and strongly diminished by IRF1 siRNA, implicating both CD95 and IRF1 in IFNgamma-induced apoptotic response. Taken together, these results show that in two different cell lines, IFNalpha and IFNgamma, induce p53-dependent -independent apoptosis, respectively.

  1. ADAR1 deletion induces NFκB and interferon signaling dependent liver inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shoshan, Shirley Oren; Kagan, Polina; Sultan, Maya; Barabash, Zohar; Dor, Chen; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Harmelin, Alon; Pappo, Orit; Marcu-Malina, Victoria; Ben-Ari, Ziv; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; Goldstein, Itamar; Safran, Michal

    2016-06-30

    Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) 1 binds and edits double-stranded (ds) RNA secondary structures found mainly within untranslated regions of many transcripts. In the current research, our aim was to study the role of ADAR1 in liver homeostasis. As previous studies show a conserved immunoregulatory function for ADAR1 in mammalians, we focused on its role in preventing chronic hepatic inflammation and the associated activation of hepatic stellate cells to produce extracellular matrix and promote fibrosis. We show that hepatocytes specific ADAR1 knock out (KO) mice display massive liver damage with multifocal inflammation and fibrogenesis. The bioinformatics analysis of the microarray gene-expression datasets of ADAR1 KO livers reveled a type-I interferons signature and an enrichment for immune response genes compared to control littermate livers. Furthermore, we found that in vitro silencing of ADAR1 expression in HepG2 cells leads to enhanced transcription of NFκB target genes, foremost of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL6 and IL8. We also discovered immune cell-independent paracrine signaling among ADAR1-depleted HepG2 cells and hepatic stellate cells, leading to the activation of the latter cell type to adopt a profibrogenic phenotype. This paracrine communication dependent mainly on the production and secretion of the cytokine IL6 induced by ADAR1 silencing in hepatocytes. Thus, our findings shed a new light on the vital regulatory role of ADAR1 in hepatic immune homeostasis, chiefly its inhibitory function on the crosstalk between the NFκB and type-I interferons signaling cascades, restraining the development of liver inflammation and fibrosis.

  2. Interferon-γ Protects from Staphylococcal Alpha Toxin-Induced Keratinocyte Death through Apolipoprotein L1.

    PubMed

    Brauweiler, Anne M; Goleva, Elena; Leung, Donald Y M

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterial pathogen that frequently infects the skin, causing lesions and cell destruction through its primary virulence factor, alpha toxin. Here we show that interferon gamma (IFN-?) protects human keratinocytes from cell death induced by staphylococcal alpha toxin. We find that IFN-? prevents alpha toxin binding and reduces expression of the alpha toxin receptor, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10). We determine that the mechanism for IFN-?-mediated resistance to alpha toxin involves the induction of autophagy, a process of cellular adaptation to sublethal damage. We find that IFN-? potently stimulates activation of the primary autophagy effector, light chain 3 (LC3). This process is dependent on upregulation of apolipoprotein L1. Depletion of apolipoprotein L1 by small interfering RNA significantly increases alpha toxin-induced lethality and inhibits activation of light chain 3. We conclude that IFN-? plays a significant role in protecting human keratinocytes from the lethal effects of staphylococcal alpha toxin through apolipoprotein L1-induced autophagy.

  3. Radioiodine-induced thyroid storm. Case report and literature review

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, M.T.; Kidd, G.S.; Dodson, L.E. Jr.; Hofeldt, F.D.

    1983-08-01

    Thyroid storm developed following radioiodine therapy in a 43-year-old man with Graves' disease, weight loss, myopathy, severe thyrotoxic hypercalcemia, and a pituitary adenoma. The hypercalcemia may have been a significant, and previously unreported, predisposing factor for the radioiodine-associated thyroid storm. This case and 15 other well-documented cases of radioiodine-associated storm found in the literature are reviewed, as are several other cases of less severe exacerbations of thyrotoxicosis associated with radioiodine therapy. Although not often seen, these complications are often fatal. High-risk patients, such as the elderly, those with severe thyrotoxicosis, and those with significant underlying diseases, may benefit from preventive measures such as the judicious use of thyrostatic medications during the periods before and after isotope administration.

  4. Cell-Cell Fusion Induced by Measles Virus Amplifies the Type I Interferon Response▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Herschke, F.; Plumet, S.; Duhen, T.; Azocar, O.; Druelle, J.; Laine, D.; Wild, T. F.; Rabourdin-Combe, C.; Gerlier, D.; Valentin, H.

    2007-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) infection is characterized by the formation of multinuclear giant cells (MGC). We report that beta interferon (IFN-β) production is amplified in vitro by the formation of virus-induced MGC derived from human epithelial cells or mature conventional dendritic cells. Both fusion and IFN-β response amplification were inhibited in a dose-dependent way by a fusion-inhibitory peptide after MeV infection of epithelial cells. This effect was observed at both low and high multiplicities of infection. While in the absence of virus replication, the cell-cell fusion mediated by MeV H/F glycoproteins did not activate any IFN-α/β production, an amplified IFN-β response was observed when H/F-induced MGC were infected with a nonfusogenic recombinant chimerical virus. Time lapse microscopy studies revealed that MeV-infected MGC from epithelial cells have a highly dynamic behavior and an unexpected long life span. Following cell-cell fusion, both of the RIG-I and IFN-β gene deficiencies were trans complemented to induce IFN-β production. Production of IFN-β and IFN-α was also observed in MeV-infected immature dendritic cells (iDC) and mature dendritic cells (mDC). In contrast to iDC, MeV infection of mDC induced MGC, which produced enhanced amounts of IFN-α/β. The amplification of IFN-β production was associated with a sustained nuclear localization of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) in MeV-induced MGC derived from both epithelial cells and mDC, while the IRF-7 up-regulation was poorly sensitive to the fusion process. Therefore, MeV-induced cell-cell fusion amplifies IFN-α/β production in infected cells, and this indicates that MGC contribute to the antiviral immune response. PMID:17898060

  5. Inhibitory activity for the interferon-induced protein kinase is associated with the reovirus serotype 1 sigma 3 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Imani, F; Jacobs, B L

    1988-01-01

    In this report we demonstrate that reovirus serotype 1-infected cells contain an inhibitor of the interferon-induced, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase. We provide evidence that suggests that the virus-encoded sigma 3 protein is likely responsible for this kinase inhibitory activity. We could not detect activation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase in extracts prepared from either interferon-treated or untreated reovirus serotype 1-infected mouse L cells under conditions that led to activation of the kinase in extracts prepared from either interferon-treated or untreated, uninfected cells. Extracts from reovirus-infected cells blocked activation of kinase in extracts from interferon-treated cells when the two were mixed prior to assay. The kinase inhibitory activity in extracts of reovirus-infected cells could be overcome by adding approximately 100-fold excess of dsRNA over the amount required to activate kinase in extracts of uninfected cells. Kinase inhibitory activity in extracts of interferon-treated, virus-infected cells could be overcome with somewhat less dsRNA (approximately 10-fold excess). Most of the inhibitory activity in the extracts could be removed by adsorption with immobilized anti-reovirus sigma 3 serum or immobilized dsRNA, suggesting that the dsRNA-binding sigma 3 protein is necessary for kinase inhibitory activity. Purified sigma 3 protein, when added to reaction mixtures containing partially purified kinase, inhibited enzyme activation. Control of activation of this kinase, which can modify eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 2, may be relevant to the sensitivity of reovirus replication to treatment of cells with interferon and to the shutoff of host protein synthesis in reovirus-infected cells. Images PMID:2460857

  6. Human papillomavirus E6 proteins mediate resistance to interferon-induced growth arrest through inhibition of p53 acetylation.

    PubMed

    Hebner, Christy; Beglin, Melanie; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2007-12-01

    The high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 proteins act cooperatively to mediate multiple activities in viral pathogenesis. For instance, E7 acts to increase p53 levels while E6 accelerates its rate of turnover through the binding of the cellular ubiquitin ligase E6AP. Interferons are important antiviral agents that modulate both the initial and persistent phases of viral infection. The expression of HPV type 16 E7 was found to sensitize keratinocytes to the growth-inhibitory effects of interferon, while coexpression of E6 abrogates this inhibition. Treatment of E7-expressing cells with interferon ultimately resulted in cellular senescence through a process that is dependent upon acetylation of p53 by p300/CBP at lysine 382. Cells expressing mutant forms of E6 that are unable to bind p300/CBP or bind p53 failed to block acetylation of p53 at lysine 382 and were sensitive to growth arrest by interferon. In contrast, mutant forms of E6 that are unable to bind E6AP remain resistant to the effects of interferon, demonstrating that the absolute levels of p53 are not the major determinants of this activity. Finally, p53 acetylation at lysine 382 was found not to be an essential determinant of other types of senescence such as that induced by overexpression of Ras in human fibroblasts. This study identifies an important physiological role for E6 binding to p300/CBP in blocking growth arrest of human keratinocytes in the presence of interferon and so contributes to the persistence of HPV-infected cells.

  7. Valproic acid induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Maria G; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Pugliese, Mariateresa; Costantino, Lucia; Poli, Roberta; Bosco, Ornella; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe

    2005-03-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma is an aggressive human cancer that is resistant to conventional therapy. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are a promising class of drugs, acting as antiproliferative agents by promoting differentiation, as well as inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Valproic acid (VPA), a class I selective histone deacetylase inhibitor widely used as an anticonvulsant, promotes differentiation in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells by inducing Na(+)/I(-) symporter and increasing iodine uptake. Here, we show that it is also highly effective at suppressing growth in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cell lines (N-PA and BHT-101). Apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest are the underlying mechanisms of VPA's effect on cell growth. It induces apoptosis by activating the intrinsic pathway; caspases 3 and 9 are activated but not caspase 8. Cell cycle is selectively arrested in G(1) and is associated with the increased expression of p21 and the reduced expression of cyclin A. Both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are induced by treatment with 1 mm VPA, a dose that promotes cell redifferentiation and that is slightly above the serum concentration reached in patients treated for epilepsy. These multifaceted properties make VPA of clinical interest as a new approach to treating poorly differentiated thyroid cancer.

  8. Highly Pathogenic New World and Old World Human Arenaviruses Induce Distinct Interferon Responses in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng; Kolokoltsova, Olga A.; Yun, Nadezhda E.; Seregin, Alexey V.; Ronca, Shannon; Koma, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arenavirus family includes several important pathogens that cause severe and sometimes fatal diseases in humans. The highly pathogenic Old World (OW) arenavirus Lassa fever virus (LASV) is the causative agent of Lassa fever (LF) disease in humans. LASV infections in severe cases are generally immunosuppressive without stimulating interferon (IFN) induction, a proinflammatory response, or T cell activation. However, the host innate immune responses to highly pathogenic New World (NW) arenaviruses are not well understood. We have previously shown that the highly pathogenic NW arenavirus, Junin virus (JUNV), induced an IFN response in human A549 cells. Here, we report that Machupo virus (MACV), another highly pathogenic NW arenavirus, also induces an IFN response. Importantly, both pathogenic NW arenaviruses, in contrast to the OW highly pathogenic arenavirus LASV, readily elicited an IFN response in human primary dendritic cells and A549 cells. Coinfection experiments revealed that LASV could potently inhibit MACV-activated IFN responses even at 6 h after MACV infection, while the replication levels of MACV and LASV were not affected by virus coinfection. Our results clearly demonstrated that although all viruses studied herein are highly pathogenic to humans, the host IFN responses toward infections with the NW arenaviruses JUNV and MACV are quite different from responses to infections with the OW arenavirus LASV, a discovery that needs to be further investigated in relevant animal models. This finding might help us better understand various interplays between the host immune system and highly pathogenic arenaviruses as well as distinct mechanisms underlying viral pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Infections of humans with the highly pathogenic OW LASV are accompanied by potent suppression of interferon or proinflammatory cytokine production. In contrast, infections with the highly pathogenic NW arenavirus JUNV are associated with high levels of IFNs and

  9. Uninhibited thyroidal uptake of radioiodine despite iodine excess in amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Wiersinga, W M; Touber, J L; Trip, M D; van Royen, E A

    1986-08-01

    Iodine excess is associated with a low thyroidal radioiodine uptake due to dilution of the radioisotope by the increased stable iodide pool. We studied thyroidal uptake of radioisotopes in cardiac patients with iodine excess due to amiodarone treatment. 99mTc-pertechnetate scintigraphy was performed in 13 patients receiving long term amiodarone therapy. Five patients had a clearly visible thyroid gland, and 8 patients had no or a very faint thyroid image. All patients with positive scans had an increased plasma TSH level, whereas all patients with negative scans had a normal or absent TSH response to TRH. Thyroidal uptake and discharge of 123I were studied in 30 other patients. Group I (n = 11) had normal plasma TSH responses to TRH and no iodine excess, group II (n = 7) had normal TSH responses to TRH and excess iodine from metrizoate angiography in the previous month, group III (n = 7) had normal or decreased TSH responses to TRH while receiving long term amiodarone therapy, and group IV (n = 5) had increased TSH responses to TRH while receiving long term amiodarone therapy. The mean radioiodine uptake value in group I [5.4 +/- 0.8% (+/- SE) at 60 min] was higher than those in group II (2.3 +/- 0.7%; P = 0.009) and group III (0.8 +/- 0.3%; P = 0.0005), but not different from that in group IV (5.3 +/- 1.2%; P = NS). Radioiodine discharge after perchlorate (expressed as a percentage of the 60 min uptake) in group I (10.1 +/- 2.2%) was lower than those in group II (24.9 +/- 10.6%; P = 0.05) and group III (28.8 +/- 5.3%; P less than 0.005), whereas discharge in group IV (58.0 +/- 6.1%) was greater than those in group II (P less than 0.05) and group III (P less than 0.01). In conclusion, 1) thyroid visualization by 99mTc-pertechnetate and thyroid radioiodine uptake during iodine excess are decreased in euthyroid and hyperthyroid patients, but preserved in hypothyroid patients. 2) The organification defect induced by iodine excess is greater in iodide-induced

  10. TRIADIMEFON INDUCES RAT THYROID TUMORS THROUGH A NON-TSH MEDIATED MODE OF ACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are a class of fungicides used as agricultural and pharmaceutical products which inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis. Members of this class are hepatotoxic and cause mouse hepatocellular tumors and/or rat thyroid follicular cell tumors. Triadimefon-induced rat thyroid tumor...

  11. [Gamma interferon induced in human leukocytes by phytohemagglutinin: its production and biological characteristics].

    PubMed

    Danielescu, G; Maniu, H; Georgescu, T; Cajal, N

    1988-01-01

    Human gamma type interferon (IFN) preparations were obtained through phytohemagglutinin stimulation of leukocytes from the peripheral blood. Biological value of these preparations varied between 160 u and 800 u/ml, depending on leukocyte incubation medium, culture system and inductor conservation. The rising of the antiviral activity through association between gamma (3 u) and alpha (27 u) interferons was revealed by the virus quantity reduction (in this case the vesicular stomatitis virus was used) during a 24-hour multiplication cycle. The protection ensured by the mixture of the two types of interferon was about ten times higher than the additive effect of the two preparations. Study of the antiproliferative activity of a gamma interferon preparation was conducted on two human cell lines of tumoral origin (T-10 from a glioblastoma, and HEp-2) and revealed the difficulties to quantify precisely this property of the crude gamma interferon preparations.

  12. Combination of OK432 and human interferon-alpha for treating viral-induced diabetes mellitus in mice.

    PubMed

    Kanda, T; Kogure, S; Nara, M; Tsukui, S; Utsugi, T; Tomono, S; Kawazu, S; Nagai, R; Kobayashi, I

    1998-01-26

    We investigated the therapeutic effects of OK432 (picibanil; CAS39325-1-4), an immunomodulator that is derived from the Su strain of Streptococcus pyogenes. This agent was administered alone or combined with human interferon-alpha in a murine model of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Interferon-alpha inhibits viral replication, reducing the incidence of virus-induced IDDM. Groups of DBA/2 mice (N = 25 per group) received an intraperitoneal injection of OK432 and interferon-alpha daily for 16 d beginning 1 d after inoculation with 500 plaque-forming units of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV). The dose of OK432 was one clinical unit (corresponding to 0.1 mg dried cells) per mouse, and that of interferon-alpha was 1 x 10(4) u/g. The animals were killed at random at 3 or 7 d after inoculation with EMCV. The survival rate of mice treated with the combination of OK432 and with interferon-alpha was significantly greater than that of the non-treated infected control animals (P < 0.01). Fasting levels of blood glucose were significantly lower in the mice administered the combination, than in the controls, both on day 3 (68 +/- 21 mg/dl vs. 270 +/- 135 mg/dl, P < 0.01) and on day 7 (101 +/- 29 mg/dl vs. 219 +/- 112 mg/dl, P < 0.01). Serum levels of insulin were significantly higher in the treated mice than in the controls (65 +/- 5 vs. 55 +/- 1 microU/ml, P < 0.05). However, in the mice treated with OK432 or interferon-alpha alone, the survival rate and the blood level of glucose and insulin did not differ from those of infected controls. Natural killer (NK) cell activity was significantly higher in the mice treated with the drug combination than in the controls on both days evaluated: day 3, 65 +/- 5 vs. 55 +/- 1%, n = 3, P < 0.05; day 7, 44 +/- 3 vs. 22 +/- 8%, n = 3, P < 0.05). Serum levels of murine interferon in the treated mice exceeded those in controls on both days evaluated (day 3, 671 U/ml vs. 442 U/ml; day 7, 57 U/ml vs. 43 U/ml). There were no significant

  13. Interferon Gamma Induces Protective Non-Canonical Signaling Pathways in Primary Neurons

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Lauren A.; Henkins, Kristen M.; Kulkarni, Apurva; Matullo, Christine M.; Balachandran, Siddharth; Pattisapu, Anil K.; Rall, Glenn F.

    2016-01-01

    The signal transduction molecule, Stat1, is critical for the expression of type I and II interferon (IFN)-responsive genes in most cells; however, we previously showed that primary hippocampal mouse neurons express low basal Stat1, with delayed and attenuated expression of IFN-responsive genes. Moreover, IFNγ-dependent resolution of a neurotropic viral challenge in permissive mice is Stat1-independent. Here, we show that exogenous INFγ has no deleterious impact on neuronal viability, and staurosporine-induced apoptosis in neurons is significantly blunted by the addition of INFγ, suggesting that INFγ confers a pro-survival signal in neurons. To identify the pathways induced by INFγ in neurons, the activation of alternative signal transducers associated with INFγ signaling was assessed. Rapid and pronounced activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (Erk1/2) was observed in neurons, compared to a modest response in fibroblasts. Moreover, the absence of Stat1 in primary fibroblasts led to enhanced Erk activation following IFNγ addition, implying that the cell-specific availability of signal transducers can diversify the cellular response following IFN engagement. PMID:26190522

  14. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Induce DNA Damage-Dependent Interferon Responses Circumventing Ebola Virus Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Priya; Aguirre, Sebastian; Yen, Benjamin C.; Pietzsch, Colette A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Maria T.; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Morlock, Lorraine K.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Leung, Daisy W.; Williams, Noelle S.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ebola virus (EBOV) protein VP35 inhibits production of interferon alpha/beta (IFN) by blocking RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways, thereby promoting virus replication and pathogenesis. A high-throughput screening assay, developed to identify compounds that either inhibit or bypass VP35 IFN-antagonist function, identified five DNA intercalators as reproducible hits from a library of bioactive compounds. Four, including doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are anthracycline antibiotics that inhibit topoisomerase II and are used clinically as chemotherapeutic drugs. These compounds were demonstrated to induce IFN responses in an ATM kinase-dependent manner and to also trigger the DNA-sensing cGAS-STING pathway of IFN induction. These compounds also suppress EBOV replication in vitro and induce IFN in the presence of IFN-antagonist proteins from multiple negative-sense RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into signaling pathways activated by important chemotherapy drugs and identify a novel therapeutic approach for IFN induction that may be exploited to inhibit RNA virus replication. PMID:28377530

  15. Radiation-induced senescence-like terminal growth arrest in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Podtcheko, Alexei; Namba, Hiroyuki; Saenko, Vladimir; Ohtsuru, Akira; Starenki, Dmitriy; Meirmanov, Serik; Polona, Iryna; Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2005-04-01

    Premature senescence may play an important role as an acute, drug-, or ionizing radiation (IR)-inducible growth arrest program along with interphase apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether IR can induce senescence-like phenotype (SLP) associated with terminal growth arrest in the thyroid cells, and if so, to evaluate impact of terminal growth arrest associated with SLP in intrinsic radiosensitivity of various thyroid carcinomas. The induction of SLP in thyroid cells were identified by: (1) senescence associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-Gal) staining method, (2) dual-flow cytometric analysis of cell proliferation and side light scatter using vital staining with PKH-2 fluorescent dye, (3) double labeling for 5-bromodeoxyuridine and SA- beta-Gal, (4) Staining for SA-beta-Gal with consequent antithyroglobulin immunohistochemistry. IR induced SLP associated with terminal growth arrest in four thyroid cancer cells lines and in primary thyrocytes in time- and dose-dependent manner. Analysis of relationship between induction of SLP and radiosensitivity revealed a trend in which more radioresistant cell lines strongly tended to show lower specific SLP yields (r = -0.93, p = 0.068). We find out that SA-beta-Gal staining is detectable in irradiated ARO xenotransplants, but not in control tumors. We, therefore, conclude that induction of SLP with terminal growth arrest contribute to the elimination of clonogenic populations after IR.

  16. The effects and underlying mechanism of excessive iodide on excessive fluoride-induced thyroid cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongliang; Zeng, Qiang; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Zhao, Liang; Hou, Changchun; Zhang, Shun; Zhang, Lei; Fu, Gang; Liu, Yeming; Jiang, Chunyang; Chen, Xuemin; Wang, Aiguo

    2014-07-01

    In many regions, excessive fluoride and excessive iodide coexist in groundwater, which may lead to biphasic hazards to human thyroid. To explore fluoride-induced thyroid cytotoxicity and the mechanism underlying the effects of excessive iodide on fluoride-induced cytotoxicity, a thyroid cell line (Nthy-ori 3-1) was exposed to excessive fluoride and/or excessive iodide. Cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, apoptosis, and the expression levels of inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) pathway-related molecules were detected. Fluoride and/or iodide decreased cell viability and increased LDH leakage and apoptosis. ROS, the expression levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), IRE1, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and spliced X-box-binding protein-1 (sXBP-1) were enhanced by fluoride or the combination of the two elements. Collectively, excessive fluoride and excessive iodide have detrimental influences on human thyroid cells. Furthermore, an antagonistic interaction between fluoride and excessive iodide exists, and cytotoxicity may be related to IRE1 pathway-induced apoptosis.

  17. Enhancement of cytosolic tyrosine kinase activity by propylthiouracil-induced hyperplasia in the rat thyroid.

    PubMed

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R; Fantus, I G

    1989-01-01

    Hyperplasia of the thyroid gland induced by propylthiouracil (PTU) is a well established model of rapid cell proliferation in vivo. Recent evidence indicates that tyrosine kinase activity is associated with growth factor receptors and oncogene protein products and may have an important regulatory action in the control of cell growth. Thus, we examined tyrosine kinase activity in rat thyroid membrane and cytosol preparations at rest and during PTU-induced hyperplasia. Although kinase activity was present in a crude microsomal membrane preparation, no change was observed during thyroid growth. In contrast, tyrosine kinase activity assayed with the artificial substrate poly(Glu,Na:Tyr) 4:1 was present in normal rat thyroid cytosol and increased 2- to 6-fold during the rapid phase of hyperplasia in the first 5-10 days of PTU treatment. It declined to control values by day 15, when the size and DNA content of the thyroid reached a plateau. Preincubation of the cytosolic preparations with several peptides known to bind to and activate growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases failed to enhance the activity, suggesting, along with the cytosolic localization, that the activity was distinct from these receptors. By gel filtration chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, tyrosine kinase activity was associated with a 55 kDa protein. Partial purification over a poly(Glu,Na:Tyr)4:1-Sepharose column, yielded a protein that appeared capable of autophosphorylation. It is suggested that this tyrosine kinase plays a role in mediating the growth-promoting effects of this model of thyroid cell hyperplasia.

  18. Interferon-gamma - Inducible Inflammation: Contribution to Aging and Aging-Associated Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Oxenkrug, Gregory

    2011-12-01

    Aging is associated with the chronic, low grade, Th-1 type inflammation. The key Th-1 type, pro-inflammatory cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFNG), transcriptionally induces the rate-limiting enzyme of tryptophan (TRY) - kynurenine (KYN) pathway, indoleamine 2,3- dioxygenase (IDO). Activation of IDO shunts TRY metabolism from production of serotonin (substrate of antidepressant effect) and its derivatives: N-acetylserotonin (an agonist to the receptors of brain derived neurotropic factor), and melatonin (regulator of sleep and other circadian rhythms), towards production of KYN and its derivatives (anxiogenic, neurotoxic and pro-oxidant factors). Some of kynurenines up-regulate nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Concurrently with activation of IDO, IFNG induces guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), the rate limiting enzyme of GTP conversion into BH2 (and increases formation of a stable derivative of BH2, neopterin, at the expense of production of BH4, the mandatory co-factor of NOS). Combination of increased NOS activity (by kynurenines) with decreased formation of BH4 leads to the uncoupling of NOS with consequent shift of arginine metabolism from biosynthesis of NO to formation of superoxide anion and other free radicals, and exacerbation of depression, anxiety and cognitive impairment caused by kynurenines. Polymorphism of IFNG (+874) T/A gene, that encodes production of IFNG protein, impacts the IDO and GTPCH activity that might be assessed in humans by KYN/TRY ratio and neopterin concentrations in biological fluids (e.g., blood, urine and spinal fluid). The hypothesis of IFNG inducible IDO/GTPCH inflammation cascade helps to understand the increased association between aging, inflammation and aging-associated psychiatric and medical (insulin resistance, obesity) disorders. Evaluation of markers of IFNG-inducible inflammation cascade might be used to assess the severity of corresponding behavioral and cognitive changes and the efficacy of pharmacological

  19. Role of interferon-gamma in interleukin 12-induced pathology in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Car, B. D.; Eng, V. M.; Schnyder, B.; LeHir, M.; Shakhov, A. N.; Woerly, G.; Huang, S.; Aguet, M.; Anderson, T. D.; Ryffel, B.

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL-12) activates natural killer (NK) and T cells with the secondary synthesis and release of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and other cytokines. IL-12-induced organ alterations are reported for mice and the pathogenetic role of IFN-gamma is investigated by the use of mice deficient in the IFN-gamma receptor (IFN-gamma R-/-). IL-12 caused a rapid infiltration of liver and splenic red pulp with activated macrophages; this and increased NK cells resulted in a fivefold increase of splenic weight in wild-type mice. Splenomegaly was associated with myelosuppression and decreasing peripheral leukocyte counts. IL-12-induced changes in wild-type mice were associated with markedly increased IFN-gamma serum levels and up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II expression in various epithelia. IL-12 induced a qualitatively similar macrophage infiltration in IFN-gamma R-/- mice, less marked splenomegaly (to 2 x normal), and no MHC upregulation. Strikingly increased vascular endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression was apparent in both IFN-gamma R-/- and IFN-gamma R+/+ mice. Restricted to mutant mice was a severe, invariably lethal, interstitial, and perivascular pulmonary macrophage infiltration with diffuse pulmonary edema. Extensive quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed an increase of only IL-6 and IL-10 pulmonary gene transcripts in IFN-gamma R-/- mice compared with wild-type mice. IL-12-induced myelosuppression is due to IFN-gamma-release from NK cells and T cells, and is associated with macrophage activation and distinct MHC class I and II antigen upregulation. The pulmonary pathology in IFN-gamma R-/- mice, however, reveals a toxic potential for IL-12 and suggests that endogenous IFN-gamma plays a protective role in preventing fatal pulmonary disease in these mice. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7495294

  20. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R. . E-mail: nerurkar@pbrc.hawaii.edu

    2006-02-20

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML.

  1. C7L Family of Poxvirus Host Range Genes Inhibits Antiviral Activities Induced by Type I Interferons and Interferon Regulatory Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Schoggins, John; Rose, Lloyd; Cao, Jingxin; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) K1L and C7L function equivalently in many mammalian cells to support VACV replication and antagonize antiviral activities induced by type I interferons (IFNs). While K1L is limited to orthopoxviruses, genes that are homologous to C7L are found in diverse mammalian poxviruses. In this study, we showed that the C7L homologues from sheeppox virus and swinepox virus could rescue the replication defect of a VACV mutant deleted of both K1L and C7L (vK1L−C7L−). Interestingly, the sheeppox virus C7L homologue could rescue the replication of vK1L−C7L− in human HeLa cells but not in murine 3T3 and LA-4 cells, in contrast to all other C7L homologues. Replacing amino acids 134 and 135 of the sheeppox virus C7L homologue, however, made it functional in the two murine cell lines, suggesting that these two residues are critical for antagonizing a putative host restriction factor which has some subtle sequence variation in human and murine cells. Furthermore, the C7L family of host range genes from diverse mammalian poxviruses were all capable of antagonizing type I IFN-induced antiviral activities against VACV. Screening of a library of more than 350 IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) identified interferon-regulated factor 1 (IRF1) as an inhibitor of vK1L−C7L− but not wild-type VACV. Expression of either K1L or C7L, however, rendered vK1L−C7L− resistant to IRF1-induced antiviral activities. Altogether, our data show that K1L and C7L antagonize IRF1-induced antiviral activities and that the host modulation function of C7L is evolutionally conserved in all poxviruses that can readily replicate in tissue-cultured mammalian cells. PMID:22345458

  2. Interferon gamma-induced human guanylate binding protein 1 inhibits mammary tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Lipnik, Karoline; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Gonin-Laurent, Nathalie; Kodajova, Petra; Petznek, Helga; Rungaldier, Stefanie; Astigiano, Simonetta; Ferrini, Silvano; Stürzl, Michael; Hohenadl, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) has recently been implicated in cancer immunosurveillance. Among the most abundant proteins induced by IFN-gamma are guanylate binding proteins (GBPs), which belong to the superfamily of large GTPases and are widely expressed in various species. Here, we investigated whether the well-known human GBP-1 (hGBP-1), which has been shown to exert antiangiogenic activities and was described as a prognostic marker in colorectal carcinomas, may contribute to an IFN-gamma-mediated tumor defense. To this end, an IFN-independent, inducible hGBP-1 expression system was established in murine mammary carcinoma (TS/A) cells, which were then transplanted into syngeneic immune-competent Balb/c mice. Animals carrying TS/A cells that had been given doxycycline for induction of hGBP-1 expression revealed a significantly reduced tumor growth compared with mock-treated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of the respective tumors demonstrated a tightly regulated, high-level expression of hGBP-1. No signs of an enhanced immunosurveillance were observed by investigating the number of infiltrating B and T cells. However, hemoglobin levels as well as the number of proliferating tumor cells were shown to be significantly reduced in hGBP-1-expressing tumors. This finding corresponded to reduced amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) released by hGBP-1-expressing TS/A cells in vitro and reduced VEGF-A protein levels in the corresponding mammary tumors in vivo. The results suggest that hGBP-1 may contribute to IFN-gamma-mediated antitumorigenic activities by inhibiting paracrine effects of tumor cells on angiogenesis. Consequently, owing to these activities GBPs might be considered as potent members in an innate, IFN-gamma-induced antitumoral defense system.

  3. Interferon-Induced Genes of the Expanded IFIT Family Show Conserved Antiviral Activities in Non-Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    Pereiro, Patricia; Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Costa, Maria M.; Dios, Sonia; Romero, Alejandro; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) are involved in the protective response to viral infection, although the precise mechanism of IFITs for reducing viral proliferation is currently unknown. The interaction with the translation initiation factor eIF-3 or viral proteins and the sequestering of viral RNA have been proposed as potential antiviral functions for these proteins. In humans, four members of this family have been characterized. Nevertheless, information about these proteins in fish is almost non-existent. Exploiting the conservation of synteny between human and zebrafish genomes, we have identified ten members of the IFIT family located on four different chromosomes. The induction of these genes was examined both in vitro and in vivo after interferon (IFN) administration and rhabdovirus challenge. Whereas an induction of IFIT genes was observed after interferon treatments (IFNΦ1, IFNΦ2 and IFNΦ3), the viral infection did not affect these IFN-induced genes in vitro, and even reduced the IFN-induced expression of these genes. The response was largely different in vivo, with a broad up-regulation of IFIT genes after viral challenge. In addition, three selected IFITs were cloned in an expression vector and microinjected into zebrafish larvae to examine the protective effect of IFITs upon viral infection. Reduction in the mortality rate was observed confirming a conserved antiviral function in non-mammalian species. PMID:24950240

  4. Early thyroid hormone-induced gene expression changes in N2a-β neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bedó, Gabriela; Pascual, Angel; Aranda, Ana

    2011-10-01

    Thyroid hormone has long been known to regulate neural development. Hypothyroidism during pregnancy and early postnatal period has severe neurological consequences including even mental retardation. The purpose of this study was to characterize gene expression pattern during thyroid hormone-induced differentiation of neuro-2a β cells in order to select "direct response genes" for further analysis. In this neuroblastoma cell line, thyroid hormone blocks proliferation and induces differentiation. Changes in gene expression level were examined after a T3 treatment of 3 and 24 h using cDNA arrays. Sixteen genes were significantly up-regulated and 79 down-regulated by T3 treatment. Five up-regulated genes not previously described as regulated by thyroid hormone and selected for their putative significance to understand T3 action on cell differentiation, were verified by RT-PCR analysis. The transcription factors Phox2a and basic helix-loop-helix domain containing, class B2 mRNAs exhibited a clear increase after 3- and 24-h treatment. The guanine-nucleotide exchange factor RalGDS was greatly up-regulated after 3-h treatment but not 24 h after. The results suggest an early involvement of these genes in T3 action during neuroblastoma cell differentiation probably mediating later changes in gene expression pattern.

  5. Functional immobilization of interferon-gamma induces neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Leipzig, Nic D; Xu, Changchang; Zahir, Tasneem; Shoichet, Molly S

    2010-05-01

    Stem cell transplantation provides significant promise to regenerative strategies after injury in the central nervous system. Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) have been studied in terms of their regenerative capacity and their ability to differentiate into neurons when exposed to various soluble factors. In this study, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was compared with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and erythropoietin and was shown to be the best single growth factor for inducing neuronal differentiation from adult rat brain-derived NSPCs. Next, IFN-gamma was surface immobilized to a methacrylamide chitosan (MAC) scaffold that was specifically designed to match the modulus of brain tissue and neuronal differentiation of NSPCs was examined in vitro by immunohistochemistry. Bioactive IFN-gamma was successfully immobilized and quantified by ELISA. Both soluble and immobilized IFN-gamma on MAC surfaces showed dose dependent neuronal differentiation with soluble saturation occurring at 100 ng/mL and the most effective immobilized IFN-gamma dose at 37.5 ng/cm(2), where significantly more neurons resulted compared with controls including soluble IFN-gamma.

  6. Interferon-induced inhibition of Chlamydia trachomatis: dissociation from antiviral and antiproliferative effects.

    PubMed Central

    de la Maza, L M; Peterson, E M; Goebel, J M; Fennie, C W; Czarniecki, C W

    1985-01-01

    The yield of infectious Chlamydia trachomatis was analyzed in human (HeLa) and mouse (McCoy) cell lines treated with the human interferon (IFN) subtypes IFN-alpha A and IFN-alpha D, with their hybrids [IFN-alpha AD (BglII), IFN-alpha AD (PvuII), and IFN-alpha DA (BglII)] constructed in vitro from their expression plasmids, or with IFN-beta 1 or buffy coat IFN. In HeLa cells, a significant inhibition of Chlamydia infectivity was obtained with IFN-alpha D, IFN-alpha DA (BglII), and buffy coat IFN. In McCoy cells, IFN-alpha AD (BglII) and IFN-alpha AD (PvuII) induced a strong degree of inhibition of Chlamydia infectivity. In McCoy cells, there was a correlation among the antichlamydial, antiviral, and antiproliferative activities of the different IFNs tested. In HeLa cells, however, the ability of a particular IFN subtype to inhibit Chlamydia infectivity did not always correlate with its inhibitory effects on encephalomyocarditis virus replication or with its antiproliferative activity. PMID:3972450

  7. Guanylate Binding Protein (GBP) 5 Is an Interferon-Inducible Inhibitor of HIV-1 Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Krapp, Christian; Hotter, Dominik; Gawanbacht, Ali; McLaren, Paul J; Kluge, Silvia F; Stürzel, Christina M; Mack, Katharina; Reith, Elisabeth; Engelhart, Susanne; Ciuffi, Angela; Hornung, Veit; Sauter, Daniel; Telenti, Amalio; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2016-04-13

    Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are an interferon (IFN)-inducible subfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) with well-established activity against intracellular bacteria and parasites. Here we show that GBP5 potently restricts HIV-1 and other retroviruses. GBP5 is expressed in the primary target cells of HIV-1, where it impairs viral infectivity by interfering with the processing and virion incorporation of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). GBP5 levels in macrophages determine and inversely correlate with infectious HIV-1 yield over several orders of magnitude, which may explain the high donor variability in macrophage susceptibility to HIV. Antiviral activity requires Golgi localization of GBP5, but not its GTPase activity. Start codon mutations in the accessory vpu gene from macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains conferred partial resistance to GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression. Our results identify GBP5 as an antiviral effector of the IFN response and may explain the increased frequency of defective vpu genes in primary HIV-1 strains.

  8. Protective role of interferon-induced Mx GTPases against influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Haller, O; Staeheli, P; Kochs, G

    2009-04-01

    Mx proteins are interferon-induced large GTPases with antiviral activities. They inhibit a wide range of viruses by blocking early stages of the replication cycles. Importantly, Mx GTPases also suppress the growth of highly pathogenic influenza A viruses, such as currently circulating H5N1 viruses or the pandemic H1N1 virus strain of 1918. In this paper, the authors review the properties of Mx proteins and discuss their role in host defence against highly pathogenic viruses. The authors further suggest that mammalian Mx proteins may normally provide a barrier against zoonotic transmission of avian influenza A viruses and that acquired resistance to the antiviral action of human MxA may be one factor, among many others, that facilitates the spread of pandemic strains in human populations. The presently available evidence suggests that Mx proteins of domestic chickens lack the ability to efficiently combat avian influenza viruses known to cause devastating infections in this species. The deliberate introduction of an antivirally active Mx gene originating from resistant birds or mammals may confer some degree of protection and thus stop commercial birds from serving as amplifying hosts of potentially pandemic influenza virus strains.

  9. Interferon-Inducible Protein 16: Insight into the Interaction with Tumor Suppressor p53

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jack C.C.; Lam, Robert; Brazda, Vaclav; Duan, Shili; Ravichandran, Mani; Ma, Justin; Xiao, Ting; Tempel, Wolfram; Zuo, Xiaobing; Wang, Yun-Xing; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2011-08-24

    IFI16 is a member of the interferon-inducible HIN-200 family of nuclear proteins. It has been implicated in transcriptional regulation by modulating protein-protein interactions with p53 tumor suppressor protein and other transcription factors. However, the mechanisms of interaction remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structures of both HIN-A and HIN-B domains of IFI16 determined at 2.0 and 2.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Each HIN domain comprises a pair of tightly packed OB-fold subdomains that appear to act as a single unit. We show that both HIN domains of IFI16 are capable of enhancing p53-DNA complex formation and transcriptional activation via distinctive means. HIN-A domain binds to the basic C terminus of p53, whereas the HIN-B domain binds to the core DNA-binding region of p53. Both interactions are compatible with the DNA-bound state of p53 and together contribute to the effect of full-length IFI16 on p53-DNA complex formation and transcriptional activation.

  10. Elevated serum interferon γ-induced protein 10 kDa is associated with TAFRO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Noriko; Gion, Yuka; Kondo, Eisei; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Masunari, Taro; Moro, Hiroshi; Nikkuni, Koji; Takai, Kazue; Hagihara, Masao; Hashimoto, Yuko; Yokota, Kenji; Okamoto, Masataka; Nakao, Shinji; Yoshino, Tadashi; Sato, Yasuharu

    2017-02-13

    Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder. It is characterized by inflammatory symptoms, and interleukin (IL)-6 contributes to the disease pathogenesis. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) often drives hypercytokinemia in MCD, although the etiology of HHV-8-negative MCD is idiopathic (iMCD). A distinct subtype of iMCD that shares a constellation of clinical features including thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O) has been reported as TAFRO-iMCD, however the differences in cytokine profiles between TAFRO-iMCD and iMCD have not been established. We retrospectively compared levels of serum interferon γ-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA, interleukin (IL)-10, and other cytokines between 11 cases of TAFRO-iMCD, 6 cases of plasma cell type iMCD, and 21 healthy controls. During flare-ups, patients with TAFRO-iMCD had significantly higher serum IP-10 and tended to have lower PDGF-AA levels than the other 2 groups. In addition, serum IL-10, IL-23, and vascular endothelial growth factor-A were elevated in both TAFRO-iMCD and iMCD. Elevated serum IP-10 is associated with inflammatory diseases including infectious diseases. There was a strong correlation between high serum IP-10 and the presence of TAFRO-iMCD, suggesting that IP-10 might be involved in the pathogenesis of TAFRO-iMCD.

  11. Interferon alpha (IFNα)-induced TRIM22 interrupts HCV replication by ubiquitinating NS5A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Zhao, Xinhao; Sun, Dakang; Yang, Leilei; Chong, Chang; Pan, Yu; Chi, Xiumei; Gao, Yanhang; Wang, Moli; Shi, Xiaodong; Sun, Haibo; Lv, Juan; Gao, Yuanda; Zhong, Jin; Niu, Junqi; Sun, Bing

    2016-01-01

    TRIM22, a tripartite-motif (TRIM) protein, is upregulated upon interferon alpha (IFNα) administration to hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients. However, the physiological role of TRIM22 upregulation remains unclear. Here, we describe a potential antiviral function of TRIM22's targeting of the HCV NS5A protein. NS5A is important for HCV replication and for resistance to IFNα therapy. During the first 24 h following the initiation of IFNα treatment, upregulation of TRIM22 in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HCV patients correlated with a decrease in viral titer. This phenomenon was confirmed in the hepatocyte-derived cell line Huh-7, which is highly permissive for HCV infection. TRIM22 over-expression inhibited HCV replication, and Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of TRIM22 diminished IFNα-induced anti-HCV function. Furthermore, we determined that TRIM22 ubiquitinates NS5A in a concentration-dependent manner. In summary, our results suggest that TRIM22 upregulation is associated with HCV decline during IFNα treatment and plays an important role in controlling HCV replication in vitro.

  12. Mechanisms Underlying Interferon-γ-Induced Priming of Microglial Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nicholas G.; Schilling, Tom; Miralles, Francesc; Eder, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Microglial priming and enhanced reactivity to secondary insults cause substantial neuronal damage and are hallmarks of brain aging, traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. It is, thus, of particular interest to identify mechanisms involved in microglial priming. Here, we demonstrate that priming of microglia with interferon-γ (IFN γ) substantially enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) following stimulation of microglia with ATP. Priming of microglial ROS production was substantially reduced by inhibition of p38 MAPK activity with SB203580, by increases in intracellular glutathione levels with N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, by blockade of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 activity with gp91ds-tat or by inhibition of nitric oxide production with L-NAME. Together, our data indicate that priming of microglial ROS production involves reduction of intracellular glutathione levels, upregulation of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 and increases in nitric oxide production, and suggest that these simultaneously occurring processes result in enhanced production of neurotoxic peroxynitrite. Furthermore, IFNγ-induced priming of microglial ROS production was reduced upon blockade of Kir2.1 inward rectifier K+ channels with ML133. Inhibitory effects of ML133 on microglial priming were mediated via regulation of intracellular glutathione levels and nitric oxide production. These data suggest that microglial Kir2.1 channels may represent novel therapeutic targets to inhibit excessive ROS production by primed microglia in brain pathology. PMID:27598576

  13. Interferon-γ-inducible Rab20 regulates endosomal morphology and EGFR degradation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pei, Gang; Schnettger, Laura; Bronietzki, Marc; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the molecular players that regulate changes in the endocytic pathway during immune activation. Here we investigate the role of Rab20 in the endocytic pathway during activation of macrophages. Rab20 is associated with endocytic structures, but the function of this Rab GTPase in the endocytic pathway remains poorly characterized. We find that in macrophages, Rab20 expression and endosomal association significantly increase after interferon-γ (IFN-γ) treatment. Moreover, IFN-γ and Rab20 expression induce a dramatic enlargement of endosomes. These enlarged endosomes are the result of homotypic fusion promoted by Rab20 expression. The expression of Rab20 or the dominant-negative mutant Rab20T19N does not affect transferrin or dextran 70 kDa uptake. However, knockdown of Rab20 accelerates epidermal growth factor (EGF) trafficking to LAMP-2-positive compartments and EGF receptor degradation. Thus this work defines a function for Rab20 in the endocytic pathway during immune activation of macrophages.

  14. Chronic dietary exposure to environmental organochlorine contaminants induces thyroid gland lesions in Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus).

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Wolkers, Hans; Leifsson, Pall S; Iburg, Tine; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Fuglei, Eva; Ahlstrøm, Oystein; Dietz, Rune; Kirkegaard, Maja; Muir, Derek C G; Jørgensen, Even H

    2009-08-01

    The impact of dietary organochlorine (OC) exposure on thyroid gland pathology was studied in farmed male Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus). The exposed group (n=16) was fed a diet based on wild minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) blubber as a main fat source in order to mimic the exposure to OC cocktails in the Artic environment. This resulted in an exposure of approximately 17 microg Sigma OC/kg day and a Sigma OC residue adipose tissue and liver concentration of 1700 and 4470 ng/gl.w., respectively, after 16 months of exposure. Control foxes (n=13) were fed a diet with pork (Sus scrofa) fat as a main fat source containing significantly lower OC concentrations. The food composition fed to the control and exposed group was standardized for nutrient contents. Four OC-related histopathological changes were found: (1) flat-epithelial-cell true thyroid cysts (TC) characterized by neutral content; (2) remnants of simple squamous epithelial-cell embryonic ducts containing neutral debris (EDN); (3) remnants of stratified squamous epithelial-cell embryonic ducts containing acid mucins often accompanied with debris of leukocyte inflammatory nature (EDM) and (4) disseminated thyroid C-cell hyperplasia (HPC). Of these, the prevalence of TC, EDN and HPC was significantly highest in the exposed group (chi(2) test: all p<0.04). The study shows that the OC mixture in minke whale blubber may cause development of thyroid gland cysts, C-cell hyperplasia and increase the prevalence of cystic remnants of embryonic ducts. The mechanism causing these effects could include endocrine disruption of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, a disturbance of the calcium homeostasis/metabolism or energy metabolism or immune suppression. Because concentrations of OCs are higher in wild Arctic foxes, it is likely that these animals could suffer from similar OC-induced thyroid gland pathological and functional changes.

  15. Infectious salmon anemia virus is a powerful inducer of key genes of the type I interferon system of Atlantic salmon, but is not inhibited by interferon.

    PubMed

    Kileng, Øyvind; Brundtland, Marthe Iren; Robertsen, Børre

    2007-08-01

    Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is an aquatic orthomyxovirus causing disease and high mortality in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). The virus is thus apparently able to initiate replication without being hampered by the host's immune system. In this work we have studied the role of the type I interferon (IFN) system of Atlantic salmon in protection against ISAV. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study the expression of type I IFN and the IFN stimulated genes Mx and ISG15 in TO cells and live fish in response to infection with ISAV. The in vitro studies showed that ISAV was a powerful inducer of Mx and ISG15 genes in TO cells and that induction started relatively early during infection. In contrast, IFN transcripts were induced later than both Mx and ISG15 transcripts in the ISAV infected cells indicating that Mx and ISG15 are induced through IFN-independent pathways in the early stages of ISAV infection. A cohabitee infection trial with ISAV in Atlantic salmon resulted in high mortality, even though elevated levels of IFN, Mx and ISG15 transcripts in the head kidney and liver were observed. Immunoblotting confirmed the presence of Mx and ISG15 proteins in the liver of infected salmon. In order to evaluate whether the type I IFN system is able to inhibit replication of ISAV, TO cells were stimulated with recombinant salmon IFN-alpha1 (rSasaIFN-alpha1) and subsequently infected with virus. The rSasaIFN-alpha1 showed no protection of TO cells against ISAV, but full protection against IPNV. These data demonstrate that key proteins of the type I IFN system are induced during an ISAV infection, but that they are unable to inhibit the replication of ISAV in vitro and in vivo. ISAV must thus encode genes that enable the virus to counteract IFN induced antiviral proteins of the host.

  16. Increased depressive ratings in patients with hepatitis C receiving interferon-alpha-based immunotherapy are related to interferon-alpha-induced changes in the serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Stefania; Marino, Valentina; Puzella, Antonella; Pasquini, Massimo; Biondi, Massimo; Artini, Marco; Almerighi, Cristiana; Verkerk, Robert; Meltzer, Herbert; Maes, Michael

    2002-02-01

    There is now evidence that repeated administration of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) to patients with chronic active hepatitis and cancers induces depressive symptoms. There is also evidence that induction of the cytokine network modulates the serotonergic system and that major depression is related to activation of the cytokine network and disturbances in the serotonergic metabolism. The aims of this study were to examine the effects of IFN-alpha-based immunotherapy on the development of depressive symptoms in relation to its effects on plasma tryptophan and kynurenine and serum serotonin (5-HT). Eighteen patients affected by chronic active hepatitis C were treated with IFN-alpha (3-6 million units subcutaneously three to six times a week for 6 months) and had measurements of the previous parameters before starting immunotherapy and 2, 4, 16, and 24 weeks later. Severity of depression and anxiety were measured with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A) scale, respectively. Immunochemotherapy with IFN-alpha (1) significantly increased the MADRS and HAM-A scores and serum kynurenine concentrations and (2) significantly reduced plasma tryptophan and serum 5-HT concentrations. IFN-alpha-based immunotherapy significantly increased the kynurenine per tryptophan quotient, which estimates the activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, the major tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme, which is induced by IFNs. There are significant relationships between the IFN-alpha-induced changes in the MADRS score and serum kynurenine (positive) and 5-HT (negative) concentrations. Immunotherapy with IFN-alpha significantly increases the severity of depressive symptoms. The latter is related to changes in the serotonergic system, such as depletion of serum 5-HT and induction of the catabolism of tryptophan to kynurenine. It is suggested that the IFN-alpha-induced changes in the serotonergic turnover could play a role in the

  17. Iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in horse and dog thyroid.

    PubMed

    Cochaux, P; Van Sande, J; Swillens, S; Dumont, J E

    1987-12-30

    The characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in dog thyroid slices have been previously described [Van Sande, J., Cochaux, P. and Dumont, J. E. (1985) Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 40, 181-192]. In the present study we investigated the characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in dog and horse thyroid. The inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation by iodide in stimulated horse thyroid slices was similar to that observed in dog thyroid slices. The inhibition was observed in slices stimulated by thyroid-stimulating hormone, cholera toxin and forskolin. Increasing the concentration of the stimulators did not overcome the iodide-induced inhibition. Adenylate cyclase activity, assayed in crude homogenates or in plasma-membrane-containing particulates (100,000 x g pellets), was lower in homogenates or in particulates prepared from iodide-treated slices than from control slices. This inhibition was observed on the cyclase activity stimulated by forskolin, fluoride or guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imino]triphosphate, but also on the basal activity. It was relieved when the homogenate was prepared from slices incubated with iodide and methimazole. Similar results were obtained with dog thyroid. The inhibition persisted when the particulate fraction was washed three times during 1 h at 100,000 x g, in the presence of bovine serum albumin or increasing concentration of KCl. It was similar whatever the duration of the cyclase assay, in a large range of protein concentration. These results indicate that a stable modification of adenylate cyclase activity, closely related to the plasma membrane, was induced when slices were incubated with iodide. Iodide inhibition did not modify the affinity of adenylate cyclase for its substrate (MgATP), but induced a decrease of the maximal velocity of the enzyme. The percentage inhibition was slightly decreased when Mg2+ concentration increased, and markedly decreased when Mn2

  18. Alpha Lipoic Acid Attenuates Radiation-Induced Thyroid Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jung Hwa; Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Woo, Seung Hoon; Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae-Kwon; Jung, Myeong Hee; Kim, Jin Hyun; Hahm, Jong Ryeal

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the thyroid to radiation during radiotherapy of the head and neck is often unavoidable. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of α-lipoic acid (ALA) on radiation-induced thyroid injury in rats. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: healthy controls (CTL), irradiated (RT), received ALA before irradiation (ALA + RT), and received ALA only (ALA, 100 mg/kg, i.p.). ALA was treated at 24 h and 30 minutes prior to irradiation. The neck area including the thyroid gland was evenly irradiated with 2 Gy per minute (total dose of 18 Gy) using a photon 6-MV linear accelerator. Greater numbers of abnormal and unusually small follicles in the irradiated thyroid tissues were observed compared to the controls and the ALA group on days 4 and 7 after irradiation. However, all pathologies were decreased by ALA pretreatment. The quantity of small follicles in the irradiated rats was greater on day 7 than day 4 after irradiation. However, in the ALA-treated irradiated rats, the numbers of small and medium follicles were significantly decreased to a similar degree as in the control and ALA-only groups. The PAS-positive density of the colloid in RT group was decreased significantly compared with all other groups and reversed by ALA pretreatment. The high activity index in the irradiated rats was lowered by ALA treatment. TGF-ß1 immunoreactivity was enhanced in irradiated rats and was more severe on the day 7 after radiation exposure than on day 4. Expression of TGF-ß1 was reduced in the thyroid that had undergone ALA pretreatment. Levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1ß and IL-6) did not differ significantly between the all groups. This study provides that pretreatment with ALA decreased the severity of radiation-induced thyroid injury by reducing inflammation and fibrotic infiltration and lowering the activity index. Thus, ALA could be used to ameliorate radiation-induced thyroid injury. PMID:25401725

  19. Donor dependent, interferoninduced HLA-DR expression on human neutrophils in vivo

    PubMed Central

    REINISCH, W; LICHTENBERGER, C; STEGER, G; TILLINGER, W; SCHEINER, O; GANGL, A; MAURER, D; WILLHEIM, M

    2003-01-01

    Neutrophils are effector cells of innate immune responses. Stimulated by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) to express HLA-DR, neutrophils acquire accessory cell functions for superantigen-mediated T cell activation. In vitro HLA-DR induction on neutrophils varies in a functionally relevant way as levels of MHC class II expression and magnitude of neutrophil induced T cell responses are correlated functions. The aim of this study was to assess whether IFN-γ induces HLA-DR on human neutrophils in a donor dependent fashion in vivo and to define regulatory events operative in MHC class II expression of neutrophils. In vivo administration of rhIFN-γ in 55 patients with renal cell carcinoma resulted in a varying increase of HLA-DR on neutrophils. By setting a cut-off for response at>10% HLA-DR positive neutrophils, HLA-DR responders (51%) were as frequent as nonresponders (49%). In vivo kinetic studies revealed a peak expression of HLA-DR on neutrophils 48 h after rhIFN-γ application, while nonresponders remained HLA-DR negative over a 72-h period. In vitro IFN-γ stimulated neutrophils recapitulated the response profiles observed in vivo. No differences in IFN-γ dependent CD64 and invariant chain expression, and IFN-γ serum levels were observed among the response subgroups. HLA-DR mRNA was detected in neutrophils from rhIFN-γ treated responders and nonresponders, HLA-DR protein solely in lysates of responder neutrophils. IFN-γ stimulated HLA-DR expression on neutrophils is subject to donor dependent variations in vivo, which result from rather post-transcriptional than transcriptional regulation. Due to their abundance in inflammatory reactions heterogeneous HLA-DR expression by neutrophils could determine the outcome of superantigen-driven diseases. PMID:12930377

  20. Experimental Neuromyelitis Optica Induces a Type I Interferon Signature in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Nathalie; Zeka, Bleranda; Schanda, Kathrin; Fujihara, Kazuo; Illes, Zsolt; Dahle, Charlotte; Reindl, Markus; Lassmann, Hans; Bradl, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an acute inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) which predominantly affects spinal cord and optic nerves. Most patients harbor pathogenic autoantibodies, the so-called NMO-IgGs, which are directed against the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4) on astrocytes. When these antibodies gain access to the CNS, they mediate astrocyte destruction by complement-dependent and by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In contrast to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who benefit from therapies involving type I interferons (I-IFN), NMO patients typically do not profit from such treatments. How is I-IFN involved in NMO pathogenesis? To address this question, we made gene expression profiles of spinal cords from Lewis rat models of experimental neuromyelitis optica (ENMO) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We found an upregulation of I-IFN signature genes in EAE spinal cords, and a further upregulation of these genes in ENMO. To learn whether the local I-IFN signature is harmful or beneficial, we induced ENMO by transfer of CNS antigen-specific T cells and NMO-IgG, and treated the animals with I-IFN at the very onset of clinical symptoms, when the blood-brain barrier was open. With this treatment regimen, we could amplify possible effects of the I-IFN induced genes on the transmigration of infiltrating cells through the blood brain barrier, and on lesion formation and expansion, but could avoid effects of I-IFN on the differentiation of pathogenic T and B cells in the lymph nodes. We observed that I-IFN treated ENMO rats had spinal cord lesions with fewer T cells, macrophages/activated microglia and activated neutrophils, and less astrocyte damage than their vehicle treated counterparts, suggesting beneficial effects of I-IFN. PMID:26990978

  1. Role of the interferon-inducible IFI16 gene in the induction of ICAM-1 by TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Sponza, Simone; De Andrea, Marco; Mondini, Michele; Gugliesi, Francesca; Gariglio, Marisa; Landolfo, Santo

    2009-01-01

    The Interferon-inducible gene IFI16, a member of the HIN200 family, is activated by oxidative stress and cell density, in addition to Interferons, and it is implicated in the regulation of endothelial cell proliferation and vessel formation in vitro. We have previously shown that IFI16 is required for proinflammatory gene stimulation by IFN-gamma through the NF-kappaB complex. To examine whether IFI16 induction might be extended to other proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, we used the strategy of the RNA interference to knock down IFI16 expression, and analyze the capability of TNF-alpha to stimulate intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 or CD54) expression in the absence of functional IFI16. Our studies demonstrate that IFI16 mediates ICAM-1 stimulation by TNF-alpha through the NF-kappaB pathway, thus reinforcing the role of the IFI16 molecule in the inflammation process.

  2. Hyperexpression of interferon-gamma-induced MHC class II genes associated with reorganization of the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Ulevitch, R. J.; Kline, L.; Schreiber, R. D.; Pingel, J.; Amaldi, I.; Reith, W.; Mach, B.

    1991-01-01

    Class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products are key recognition units in the induction and regulation of the immune response. Expression of class I and class II may be constitutive or inducible by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). A key step in the induction of MHC genes is recognition of IFN-gamma by its membrane receptor. The work described here examines the regulation of the occupied IFN-gamma receptor by the cytoskeleton. To do this the authors have used the fungal metabolites dihydrocytochalasin B (DHCB) and cytochalasin D (CD), substances that bind to actin filaments and thereby disrupt the cytoskeleton. The authors have studied the effect of DHCB and CD on IFN-gamma-induced MHC gene expression in 143 B cells, a human osteosarcoma-derived cell line. Herein the authors demonstrate that alterations in the cytoskeleton induced by DHCB and CD can lead to increases in IFN-gamma-induced MHC gene expression. Dihydrocytochalasin B added up to 3 hours after IFN-gamma results in a threefold to sixfold increase in levels of class II mRNA while producing minimal enhancement of class I gene expression. In contrast, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA expression was unaltered by IFN-gamma or by the cytochalasins. The increased amount of class II mRNA can be accounted for by a concomitant increase in transcription rate of this gene. Studies using 125I-IFN-gamma demonstrate that the occupied IFN-gamma receptor associates with a Triton X-100 insoluble fraction of 143 B cells and that DHCB and CD markedly inhibit this association. The results described here provide evidence that is consistent with the hypothesis that the activity of the occupied IFN-gamma receptor may be modulated by interactions with the cytoskeleton of the cell. This receptor may be one of a group of plasma membrane receptors that are sensitive to the action of cytochalasins after ligand binding. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1907805

  3. Expression of interferon and interferon--induced genes in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar cell lines SHK-1 and TO following infection with Salmon AlphaVirus SAV.

    PubMed

    Gahlawat, Suresh K; Ellis, Anthony E; Collet, Bertrand

    2009-04-01

    Salmon AlphaVirus (SAV) is the aetiological agent of Salmon Pancreas Disease (SPD), a serious disease in farmed Atlantic salmon. Currently there is no available information on the ability of this virus to stimulate or suppress aspects of innate immunity in host cells. Two different Atlantic salmon cell lines (SHK-1 and TO), both derived from head kidney leucocytes, were infected with SAV and the kinetics and magnitude of gene expression were studied by real-time quantitative PCR. SAV nsP1 gene transcripts for strain P42P increased rapidly in TO cells with subsequent development of a cytopathic effect (CPE) while this virus strain hardly replicated at all SHK-1 cells causing no CPE. SAV P42P induced strong expression of type I IFN (IFN) and the antiviral IFN-induced gene MX transcripts in SHK-1 cells. Although the IFN response in infected TO cells was higher than in SHK-1 cells, the level of MX transcripts was lower. This may be because the virus was able to interfere with IFN-signaling and suppress MX transcription or that the TO cells are less able to transcribe the MX gene. Either way, it may account for why the SHK-1 cells suppress SAV replication while the TO cells are highly susceptible and succumb to the virus. The present results provide the first evidence for differential induction of expression of the interferon-induced antiviral gene, MX, correlating with resistant (SHK-1) and susceptible (TO) Atlantic salmon cell lines in response to infection by SAV.

  4. Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy in treatment of recurrent nodular goiter and thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliverstov, Oleg V.; Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Demidov, A. K.; Faizrakhmanov, Alexey B.; Yarovoy, Nicolay N.

    2001-10-01

    Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy was performed in 29 patients with recurrent nodular and multinodular goiter, and in 3 patients with recurrent inoperable thyroid cancer. There were used transcutaneous puncture under ultrasonic control, diode lasers with wavelength 805, 980, and 1060 nm, quartz monofibers, special computerized thermometer with microthermocouples. Disappearance or significant reduction of nodes in the most goiter cases, and regress of tumor in the cancer cases were marked during observation period (0.5 - 2.5 years).

  5. Equine arteritis virus does not induce interferon production in equine endothelial cells: identification of nonstructural protein 1 as a main interferon antagonist.

    PubMed

    Go, Yun Young; Li, Yanhua; Chen, Zhenhai; Han, Mingyuan; Yoo, Dongwan; Fang, Ying; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of equine arteritis virus (EAV) on type I interferon (IFN) production. Equine endothelial cells (EECs) were infected with the virulent Bucyrus strain (VBS) of EAV and expression of IFN-β was measured at mRNA and protein levels by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and IFN bioassay using vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the green fluorescence protein (VSV-GFP), respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that IFN-β mRNA levels in EECs infected with EAV VBS were not increased compared to those in mock-infected cells. Consistent with quantitative RT-PCR, Sendai virus- (SeV-) induced type I IFN production was inhibited by EAV infection. Using an IFN-β promoter-luciferase reporter assay, we subsequently demonstrated that EAV nsps 1, 2, and 11 had the capability to inhibit type I IFN activation. Of these three nsps, nsp1 exhibited the strongest inhibitory effect. Taken together, these data demonstrate that EAV has the ability to suppress the type I IFN production in EECs and nsp1 may play a critical role to subvert the equine innate immune response.

  6. Elevated serum interferon γ-induced protein 10 kDa is associated with TAFRO syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Noriko; Gion, Yuka; Kondo, Eisei; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Masunari, Taro; Moro, Hiroshi; Nikkuni, Koji; Takai, Kazue; Hagihara, Masao; Hashimoto, Yuko; Yokota, Kenji; Okamoto, Masataka; Nakao, Shinji; Yoshino, Tadashi; Sato, Yasuharu

    2017-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder. It is characterized by inflammatory symptoms, and interleukin (IL)-6 contributes to the disease pathogenesis. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) often drives hypercytokinemia in MCD, although the etiology of HHV-8-negative MCD is idiopathic (iMCD). A distinct subtype of iMCD that shares a constellation of clinical features including thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O) has been reported as TAFRO-iMCD, however the differences in cytokine profiles between TAFRO-iMCD and iMCD have not been established. We retrospectively compared levels of serum interferon γ-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA, interleukin (IL)-10, and other cytokines between 11 cases of TAFRO-iMCD, 6 cases of plasma cell type iMCD, and 21 healthy controls. During flare-ups, patients with TAFRO-iMCD had significantly higher serum IP-10 and tended to have lower PDGF-AA levels than the other 2 groups. In addition, serum IL-10, IL-23, and vascular endothelial growth factor-A were elevated in both TAFRO-iMCD and iMCD. Elevated serum IP-10 is associated with inflammatory diseases including infectious diseases. There was a strong correlation between high serum IP-10 and the presence of TAFRO-iMCD, suggesting that IP-10 might be involved in the pathogenesis of TAFRO-iMCD. PMID:28205564

  7. Risperidone significantly inhibits interferon-gamma-induced microglial activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takahiro; Monji, Akira; Hashioka, Sadayuki; Kanba, Shigenobu

    2007-05-01

    Microglia has recently been regarded to be a mediator of neuroinflammation via the release of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the central nervous system (CNS). Microglia has thus been reported to play an important role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). The pathological mechanisms of schizophrenia remain unclear while some recent neuroimaging studies suggest even schizophrenia may be a kind of neurodegenerative disease. Risperidone has been reported to decrease the reduction of MRI volume during the clinical course of schizophrenia. Many recent studies have demonstrated that immunological mechanisms via such as interferon (IFN)-gamma and cytokines might be relevant to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In the present study, we thus investigated the effects of risperidone on the generation of nitric oxide, inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression and inflammatory cytokines: interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by IFN-gamma-activated microglia by using Griess assay, Western blotting and ELISA, respectively. In comparison with haloperidol, risperidone significantly inhibited the production of NO and proinflammatory cytokines by activated microglia. The iNOS levels of risperidone-treated cells were much lower than those of the haloperidol-treated cells. Antipsychotics, especially risperidone may have an anti-inflammatory effect via the inhibition of microglial activation, which is not only directly toxic to neurons but also has an inhibitory effect on neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis, both of which have been reported to play a crucial role in the pathology of schizophrenia.

  8. Guanylate-binding protein 5 is a marker of interferon-γ-induced classically activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Hizukuri, Yoshiyuki; Yamashiro, Kyoko; Makita, Naoyuki; Ohnishi, Koji; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation is the main immunological process occurring during the development of several diseases, and the heterogeneity of macrophage activation or differentiation has been suggested to be involved in disease progression. In the present study, we attempted to identify molecules specifically expressed on human classically activated macrophages (M1) to investigate the significance of the M1-like phenotype in human diseases. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were differentiated into M1, M2a, M2b and M2c phenotypes, and also M1(−) (the M1 phenotype differentiated with interferon-γ) to eliminate the strong effects of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the gene expression profile. The gene expression profiles of those macrophage phenotypes were analyzed by a cDNA microarray analysis and were used for a bioinformatics examination to identify the markers of the M1 phenotype that are expressed in both M1 and M1(−). The gene expression profiles of murine macrophages were also evaluated. We identified guanylate-binding protein 5 (GBP5), which is associated nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)-mediated inflammasome assembly in the M1 macrophages of both humans and mice. Notably, the expression of GBP5 protein was detected in cultured M1(−) as well as in M1 macrophages by western blotting, which means that GBP5 is a more generalized marker of the M1 phenotype compared with the M1 markers that can be induced by LPS stimulation. GBP5 is a useful candidate marker of the M1 phenotype. PMID:27990286

  9. Guanylate-binding protein 5 is a marker of interferon-γ-induced classically activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Hizukuri, Yoshiyuki; Yamashiro, Kyoko; Makita, Naoyuki; Ohnishi, Koji; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Macrophage activation is the main immunological process occurring during the development of several diseases, and the heterogeneity of macrophage activation or differentiation has been suggested to be involved in disease progression. In the present study, we attempted to identify molecules specifically expressed on human classically activated macrophages (M1) to investigate the significance of the M1-like phenotype in human diseases. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were differentiated into M1, M2a, M2b and M2c phenotypes, and also M1(-) (the M1 phenotype differentiated with interferon-γ) to eliminate the strong effects of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the gene expression profile. The gene expression profiles of those macrophage phenotypes were analyzed by a cDNA microarray analysis and were used for a bioinformatics examination to identify the markers of the M1 phenotype that are expressed in both M1 and M1(-). The gene expression profiles of murine macrophages were also evaluated. We identified guanylate-binding protein 5 (GBP5), which is associated nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)-mediated inflammasome assembly in the M1 macrophages of both humans and mice. Notably, the expression of GBP5 protein was detected in cultured M1(-) as well as in M1 macrophages by western blotting, which means that GBP5 is a more generalized marker of the M1 phenotype compared with the M1 markers that can be induced by LPS stimulation. GBP5 is a useful candidate marker of the M1 phenotype.

  10. Cumulus cell-expressed type I interferons induce cumulus expansion in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, You-Jee; Park, Jae-Il; Moon, Won-Jin; Dam, Phuong T M; Cho, Moon-Kyoung; Chun, Sang-Young

    2015-01-01

    Ovulation resembles the inflammatory response. The purpose of the present study was to examine the expression and role of type I interferons (IFNs) Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta in mouse ovaries during the process of ovulation. An in vivo injection of equine chorionic gonadotropin (CG)-human CG (hCG) stimulated Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta mRNA in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) within 6 h. Type I IFN receptor (Ifnar1 and Ifnar2) genes were also expressed in preovulatory follicles without a change by hCG. Immunofluorescent study revealed the expression of protein signals of Ifnalpha, Ifnbeta, and Ifnar1 in cumulus cells. Treatment of COCs with Ifnalpha or Ifnbeta in vitro induced cumulus expansion that was comparable to that mediated by epiregulin. In cultured COCs, the levels of Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta mRNA increased by epiregulin and follicle-stimulating hormone, but not by prostaglandin E2. Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta activated multiple signaling events (signal transducer and activator of transcription-1/3, Akt, and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/2) and stimulated the expression of genes known to impact COC expansion (Has2, Ptx3, Tnfaip6, and Ptgs2). Interestingly, treatment of COCs with Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 ligands (lipopolysaccharides, Pam3Cys, and hyaluronan fragments) increased Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta mRNA, while coculture with anti-TLR2/4 neutralizing antibody abolished these effects. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the type I IFN system is operating in mouse cumulus cells and plays a role in the induction of cumulus expansion during the ovulatory process in mice.

  11. Antimicrobial effects of interferon-inducible CXC chemokines against Bacillus anthracis spores and bacilli.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Matthew A; Zhu, Yinghua; Green, Candace S; Burdick, Marie D; Sanz, Patrick; Alem, Farhang; O'Brien, Alison D; Mehrad, Borna; Strieter, Robert M; Hughes, Molly A

    2009-04-01

    Based on previous studies showing that host chemokines exert antimicrobial activities against bacteria, we sought to determine whether the interferon-inducible Glu-Leu-Arg-negative CXC chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 exhibit antimicrobial activities against Bacillus anthracis. In vitro analysis demonstrated that all three CXC chemokines exerted direct antimicrobial effects against B. anthracis spores and bacilli including marked reductions in spore and bacillus viability as determined using a fluorometric assay of bacterial viability and CFU determinations. Electron microscopy studies revealed that CXCL10-treated spores failed to undergo germination as judged by an absence of cytological changes in spore structure that occur during the process of germination. Immunogold labeling of CXCL10-treated spores demonstrated that the chemokine was located internal to the exosporium in association primarily with the spore coat and its interface with the cortex. To begin examining the potential biological relevance of chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity, we used a murine model of inhalational anthrax. Upon spore challenge, the lungs of C57BL/6 mice (resistant to inhalational B. anthracis infection) had significantly higher levels of CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 than did the lungs of A/J mice (highly susceptible to infection). Increased CXC chemokine levels were associated with significantly reduced levels of spore germination within the lungs as determined by in vivo imaging. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel antimicrobial role for host chemokines against B. anthracis that provides unique insight into host defense against inhalational anthrax; these data also support the notion for an innovative approach in treating B. anthracis infection as well as infections caused by other spore-forming organisms.

  12. Understanding the molecular mechanism(s) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) induced interferon resistance.

    PubMed

    Qashqari, Hanadi; Al-Mars, Amany; Chaudhary, Adeel; Abuzenadah, Adel; Damanhouri, Ghazi; Alqahtani, Mohammed; Mahmoud, Maged; El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the foremost causes of chronic liver disease affecting over 300 million globally. HCV contains a positive-stranded RNA of ~9600 nt and is surrounded by the 5' and 3'untranslated regions (UTR). The only successful treatment regimen includes interferon (IFN) and ribavirin. Like many other viruses, HCV has also evolved various mechanisms to circumvent the IFN response by blocking (1) downstream signaling actions via STAT1, STAT2, IRF9 and JAK-STAT pathways and (2) repertoire of IFN Stimulatory Genes (ISGs). Several studies have identified complex host demographic and genetic factors as well as viral genetic heterogeneity associated with outcomes of IFN therapy. The genetic predispositions of over 2000 ISGS may render the patients to become resistant, thus identification of such parameters within a subset of population are necessary for management corollary. The ability of various HCV genotypes to diminish IFN antiviral responses plays critical role in the establishment of chronic infection at the acute stage of infection, thus highlighting importance of the resistance in HCV treated groups. The recently defined role of viral protein such as C, E2, NS3/NS4 and NS5A proteins in inducing the IFN resistance are discussed in this article. How the viral and host genetic composition and epistatic connectivity among polymorphic genomic sites synchronizes the evolutionary IFN resistance trend remains under investigation. However, these signals may have the potential to be employed for accurate prediction of therapeutic outcomes. In this review article, we accentuate the significance of host and viral components in IFN resistance with the aim to determine the successful outcome in patients.

  13. Interferon-γ-Induced Nitric Oxide Causes Intrinsic Intestinal Denervation in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arantes, Rosa M.E.; Marche, Homero H.F.; Bahia, Maria T.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Rossi, Marcos A.; Silva, João S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in neuronal destruction during acute-phase Trypanosoma cruzi infection was evaluated in male C57BL/6 (WT, wild-type) mice and knockout mice [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)−/− and interferon (IFN)−/−]. Selected animals were infected by intraperitoneal injection of 100 trypomastigote forms of the Y strain of T. cruzi. Others were injected intraperitoneally with an equal volume of saline solution and served as controls. Our findings support those of previous studies regarding myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection. In addition, we clearly demonstrate that, despite the fact that parasite nests and similar inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall were more pronounced in infected iNOS−/− mice than in infected WT mice, the former presented no reduction in myenteric plexus neuron numbers. Neuronal nerve profile expression, as revealed by the general nerve marker PGP 9.5, was preserved in all knockout animals. Infected IFN−/− mice suffered no significant neuronal loss and there was no inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall. On days 5 and 10 after infection, iNOS activity was greater in infected WT mice than in controls, whereas iNOS activity in infected knockout mice remained unchanged. These findings clearly demonstrate that neuronal damage does not occur in NO-impaired infected knockout mice, regardless of whether inflammatory infiltrate is present (iNOS−/−) or absent (IFN−/−). In conclusion, our observations strongly indicate that myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection is because of IFN-γ-elicited NO production resulting from iNOS activation in the inflammatory foci along the intestinal wall. PMID:15039223

  14. Interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 as a potential biomarker in localized scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence and levels of interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) in the plasma and skin of pediatric localized scleroderma (LS) patients compared to those of healthy pediatric controls and to determine if IP-10 levels correlate to clinical disease activity measures. Methods The presence of IP-10 in the plasma was analyzed using a Luminex panel in 69 pediatric patients with LS and compared to 71 healthy pediatric controls. Of these patients, five had available skin biopsy specimens with concurrent clinical and serological data during the active disease phase, which were used to analyze the presence and location of IP-10 in the skin by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results IP-10 levels were significantly elevated in the plasma of LS patients compared to that of healthy controls and correlated to clinical disease activity measures in LS. Immunohistochemistry staining of IP-10 was present in the dermal infiltrate of LS patients and was similar to that found in psoriasis skin specimens, the positive disease control. Conclusions Elevation of IP-10 levels in the plasma compared to those of healthy controls and the presence of IP-10 staining in the affected skin of LS patients indicates that IP-10 is a potential biomarker in LS. Furthermore, significant elevation of IP-10 in LS patients with active versus inactive disease and correlations between IP-10 levels and standardized disease outcome measures of activity in LS strongly suggest that IP-10 may be a biomarker for disease activity in LS. PMID:24499523

  15. Herpes Simplex Virus and Interferon Signaling Induce Novel Autophagic Clusters in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Katzenell, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes lifelong infection in the neurons of trigeminal ganglia (TG), cycling between productive infection and latency. Neuronal antiviral responses are driven by type I interferon (IFN) and are crucial to controlling HSV-1 virulence. Autophagy also plays a role in this neuronal antiviral response, but the mechanism remains obscure. In this study, HSV-1 infection of murine TG neurons triggered unusual clusters of autophagosomes, predominantly in neurons lacking detectable HSV-1 antigen. Treatment of neurons with IFN-β induced a similar response, and cluster formation by infection or IFN treatment was dependent upon an intact IFN-signaling pathway. The autophagic clusters were decorated with both ISG15, an essential effecter of the antiviral response, and p62, a selective autophagy receptor. The autophagic clusters were not induced by rapamycin or starvation, consistent with a process of selective autophagy. While clusters were triggered by other neurotropic herpesviruses, infection with unrelated viruses failed to induce this response. Following ocular infection in vivo, clusters formed exclusively in the infected ophthalmic branch of the TG. Taken together, our results show that infection with HSV and antiviral signaling in TG neurons produce an unorthodox autophagic response. This autophagic clustering is associated with antiviral signaling, the presence of viral genome, and the absence of HSV protein expression and may therefore represent an important neuronal response to HSV infection and the establishment of latency. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous virus and a significant cause of morbidity and some mortality. It is the causative agent of benign cold sores, but it can also cause blindness and life-threatening encephalitis. The success of HSV-1 is largely due to its ability to establish lifelong latent infections in neurons and to occasionally reactivate. The exact mechanisms by which

  16. Interferon regulatory factor 3 is a key regulation factor for inducing the expression of SAMHD1 in antiviral innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shen; Zhan, Yuan; Zhou, Yanjun; Jiang, Yifeng; Zheng, Xuchen; Yu, Lingxue; Tong, Wu; Gao, Fei; Li, Liwei; Huang, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhiyong; Tong, Guangzhi

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a type I interferon (IFN) inducible host innate immunity restriction factor that inhibits an early step of the viral life cycle. The underlying mechanisms of SAMHD1 transcriptional regulation remains elusive. Here, we report that inducing SAMHD1 upregulation is part of an early intrinsic immune response via TLR3 and RIG-I/MDA5 agonists that ultimately induce the nuclear translocation of the interferon regulation factor 3 (IRF3) protein. Further studies show that IRF3 plays a major role in upregulating endogenous SAMHD1 expression in a mechanism that is independent of the classical IFN-induced JAK-STAT pathway. Both overexpression and activation of IRF3 enhanced the SAMHD1 promoter luciferase activity, and activated IRF3 was necessary for upregulating SAMHD1 expression in a type I IFN cascade. We also show that the SAMHD1 promoter is a direct target of IRF3 and an IRF3 binding site is sufficient to render this promoter responsive to stimulation. Collectively, these findings indicate that upregulation of endogenous SAMHD1 expression is attributed to the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 and we suggest that type I IFN induction and induced SAMHD1 expression are coordinated. PMID:27411355

  17. The Interferon-induced Transmembrane Proteins, IFITM1, IFITM2, and IFITM3 Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus Entry.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Sumudu K; Helbig, Karla J; McCartney, Erin M; Eyre, Nicholas S; Bull, Rowena A; Eltahla, Auda; Lloyd, Andrew R; Beard, Michael R

    2015-10-23

    The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) family of proteins have recently been identified as important host effector molecules of the type I interferon response against viruses. IFITM1 has been identified as a potent antiviral effector against hepatitis C virus (HCV), whereas the related family members IFITM2 and IFITM3 have been described to have antiviral effects against a broad range of RNA viruses. Here, we demonstrate that IFITM2 and IFITM3 play an integral role in the interferon response against HCV and act at the level of late entry stages of HCV infection. We have established that in hepatocytes, IFITM2 and IFITM3 localize to the late and early endosomes, respectively, as well as the lysosome. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that S-palmitoylation of all three IFITM proteins is essential for anti-HCV activity, whereas the conserved tyrosine residue in the N-terminal domain of IFITM2 and IFITM3 plays a significant role in protein localization. However, this tyrosine was found to be dispensable for anti-HCV activity, with mutation of the tyrosine resulting in an IFITM1-like phenotype with the retention of anti-HCV activity and co-localization of IFITM2 and IFITM3 with CD81. In conclusion, we propose that the IFITM proteins act in a coordinated manner to restrict HCV infection by targeting the endocytosed HCV virion for lysosomal degradation and demonstrate that the actions of the IFITM proteins are indeed virus and cell-type specific.

  18. Thyroid ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... The thyroid feels big or irregular, called a goiter . You have abnormal lymph nodes near your thyroid. ... due to: Cysts Enlargement of the thyroid gland ( goiter ) Thyroid nodules Thyroiditis, or inflammation of the thyroid ( ...

  19. Neurodevelopmental Consequences of Low-Level Thyroid Hormone Disruption Induced by Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inadequate levels of thyroid hormone during critical developmental periods lead to stunted growth, mental retardation, and neurological 'cretinism'. Animal models of developmental thyroid hormone deficiency mirror well the impact of severe insults to the thyroid system. However, ...

  20. Quantum dots induced interferon beta expression via TRIF-dependent signaling pathways by promoting endocytosis of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chia-Chi; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien; Lin, Pinpin

    2016-02-17

    Quantum dots (QDs) are nano-sized semiconductors. Previously, intratracheal instillation of QD705s induces persistent inflammation and remodeling in the mouse lung. Expression of interferon beta (IFN-β), involved in tissue remodeling, was induced in the mouse lung. The objective of this study was to understand the mechanism of QD705 induced interferon beta (IFN-β) expression. QD705-COOH and QD705-PEG increased IFN-β and IP-10 mRNA levels during day 1 to 90 post-exposure in mouse lungs. QD705-COOH increased IFN-β expression via Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adapter protein (TRIF) dependent Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways in macrophages RAW264.7. Silencing TRIF expression with siRNA or co-treatment with a TRIF inhibitor tremendously abolished QD705s-induced IFN-β expression. Co-treatment with a TLR4 inhibitor completely prevented IFN-β induction by QD705-COOH. QD705-COOH readily entered cells, and co-treatment with either inhibitors of endocytosis or intracellular TLRs prevented IFN-β induction. Thus, activation of the TRIF dependent TLRs pathway by promoting endocytosis of TLR4 is one of the mechanisms for immunomodulatory effects of nanoparticles.

  1. Apigenin induces autophagic cell death in human papillary thyroid carcinoma BCPAP cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Cheng, Xian; Gao, Yanyan; Zheng, Jie; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Guan, Haixia; Yu, Huixin; Sun, Zhen

    2015-11-01

    Apigenin, abundantly present in fruits and vegetables, is recognized as a flavonoid with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer properties. In this study, we first investigated the anti-neoplastic effects of apigenin on papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cell line BCPAP cells. Our results show that apigenin inhibited the viability of BCPAP cells in a dose-dependent manner. A large body of evidence demonstrates that autophagy contributes to cell death in certain contexts. In the present study, autophagy was induced by apigenin treatment in BCPAP cells, as evidenced by Beclin-1 accumulation, conversion of LC3 protein, p62 degradation as well as the significantly increased formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) compared to the control group. 3-MA, an autophagy inhibitor, rescued the cells from apigenin-induced cell death. Notably, apigenin enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and subsequent induction of significant DNA damage as monitored by the TUNEL assay. In addition, apigenin treatment caused a significant accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase via down-regulation of Cdc25C expression. Our findings reveal that apigenin inhibits papillary thyroid cancer cell viability by the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, induction of DNA damage, leading to G2/M cell cycle arrest followed by autophagic cell death. Thus, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying apigenin-mediated autophagic cell death and suggest apigenin as a potential chemotherapeutic agent which is able to fight against papillary thyroid cancer.

  2. Curcumin inhibits hypoxia-induced migration in K1 papillary thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cheng; Zhang, Li; Cheng, Xian; Lin, Xiu-Feng; Lu, Rong-Rong; Bao, Jian-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, traditionally used as food and medicinal purposes, has recently been reported to have protective efficacy against hypoxia. Hypoxia is one of the important reactive factors in tumor metastasis, which is a key problem in clinical thyroid cancer therapy. In present study, we investigate the anti-metastatic effect of curcumin on the K1 papillary thyroid cancer cells as well as its potential mechanisms. The results show that curcumin effectively inhibits hypoxia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) upregulation and significantly decreases the mRNA and protein expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in K1 cells. Curcumin also decreases the DNA binding ability of HIF-1α to hypoxia response element (HRE). Furthermore, curcumin enhances E-cadherin expression, inhibits metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) enzyme activity, and weakens K1 cells migration under hypoxic conditions. In summary, these results indicate that curcumin possesses a potent anti-metastatic effect and might be an effective tumoristatic agent for the treatment of aggressive papillary thyroid cancers. PMID:25349216

  3. Illness-induced changes in thyroid hormone metabolism: focus on the tissue level.

    PubMed

    Kwakkel, J; Fliers, E; Boelen, A

    2011-05-01

    During illness changes in thyroid hormone metabolism occur, collectively known as the non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). NTIS is characterised by low serum thyroid hormone levels without the expected rise in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, indicating a major change in thyroid hormone feedback regulation. Recent studies have made clear that during NTIS differential changes in thyroid hormone metabolism occur in various tissues, the net effect of which may be either activation or inhibition of thyroid hormone action. In this review we discuss systemic and local changes in thyroid hormone metabolism during illness, highlighting their physiological implications in terms of disease course.

  4. Myasthenia Crisis Induced by Pegylated-Interferon in Patient With Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Su Jung; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Hye In; Rhie, Jeong Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis is occasionally associated with thymoma that needs surgical resection and may progress to severe respiratory failure. We experienced a rare case of myasthenia crisis during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C, in whom mediastinal thymoma was discovered and successfully managed with surgical thymectomy and meticulous medical care. A 47-year-old-male patient complained of sudden diplopia 1 week after stopping 11-week administration of pegylated-interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed ptosis on the right eyelid and restricted right eye movement. Myasthenia gravis was confirmed by positive repetitive nerve stimulation test and positive serum antiacetylcholine receptor antibody test, and mediastinal thymoma was found on chest CT scan. The ocular myasthenia gravis progressed to respiratory failure even after discontinuing antiviral treatment but eventually recovered with thymectomy, anticholinesterase administration, steroid pulse therapy, and prolonged ventilator care. We describe the clinical features of this life-threatening complication of interferon treatment along with previous myasthenia crisis cases by interferon for chronic hepatitis C. In patients with chronic hepatitis C who is going to receive interferon-based antiviral treatment, physicians need to keep in mind the potential life-threatening manifestations of myasthenia gravis before and during antiviral treatment especially when patients complain of muscular weakness and easy fatigability. PMID:27227948

  5. Effect of thyroid hormone status and concomitant medication on statin induced adverse effects in hyperlipidemic patients.

    PubMed

    Berta, E; Harangi, M; Zsíros, N; Nagy, E V; Paragh, G; Bodor, M

    2014-06-01

    Statins are effective treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and used extensively worldwide. However, adverse effects induced by statins are the major barrier of maximalizing cardiovascular risk reduction. Hypothyroidism and administration of drugs metabolized on the same cytochrome P450 (CYPP450) pathways where statin biotransformation occurs represent a significant risk factor for statin induced adverse effects including myopathy. Simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin are metabolized by CYP3A4, fluvastatin by CYP2C9, while rosuvastatin by CYP2C9 and 2C19. We investigated the levels of the free thyroid hormones and CYP metabolism of concomitant medication in 101 hyperlipidemic patients (age 61.3 +/- 9.9 ys) with statin induced adverse effects including myopathy (56 cases; 55.4%), hepatopathy (39 cases; 38.6%) and gastrointestinal adverse effects (24 cases; 23.8%). Abnormal thyroid hormone levels were found in 5 patients (4.95%); clinical hypothyroidism in 2 and hyperthyroidism in 3 cases. 11 patients had a positive history for hypothyroidism (10.9%). Myopathy occured in one patient with hypothyroidism and two patients with hyperthyroidism. There were no significant differences in the TSH, fT4 and fT3 levels between patients with statin induced myopathy and patients with other types of adverse effects. 78 patients (77.2%) were administered drugs metabolized by CYP isoforms also used by statins (3A4: 66 cases (65.3%); 2C9: 67 cases (66.3%); 2C19: 54 cases (53.5%)). Patients with myopathy took significantly more drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 compared to patients with other types of adverse effects (p < 0.05). More myopathy cases were found in patients on simvastatin treatment (52% vs. 38%, ns.), while significantly less patients with myopathy were on fluvastatin treatment (13% vs. 33%, p < 0.05) compared to patients with other types of statin induced adverse effects. Both abnormal thyroid hormone status and administration of drugs metabolized by CYP

  6. Evolutionary Dynamics of the Interferon-Induced Transmembrane Gene Family in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhao; Liu, Jun; Li, Meng; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Chiyu

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) genes have been demonstrated to have extensive and diverse functions, playing important roles in the evolution of vertebrates. Despite observance of their functionality, the evolutionary dynamics of this gene family are complex and currently unknown. Here, we performed detailed evolutionary analyses to unravel the evolutionary history of the vertebrate IFITM family. A total of 174 IFITM orthologous genes and 112 pseudogenes were identified from 27 vertebrate genome sequences. The vertebrate IFITM family can be divided into immunity-related IFITM (IR-IFITM), IFITM5 and IFITM10 sub-families in phylogeny, implying origins from three different progenitors. In general, vertebrate IFITM genes are located in two loci, one containing the IFITM10 gene, and the other locus containing IFITM5 and various numbers of IR-IFITM genes. Conservation of evolutionary synteny was observed in these IFITM genes. Significant functional divergence was detected among the three IFITM sub-families. No gene duplication or positive selection was found in IFITM5 sub-family, implying the functional conservation of IFITM5 in vertebrate evolution, which is involved in bone formation. No IFITM5 locus was identified in the marmoset genome, suggesting a potential association with the tiny size of this monkey. The IFITM10 sub-family was divided into two groups: aquatic and terrestrial types. Functional divergence was detected between the two groups, and five IFITM10-like genes from frog were dispersed into the two groups. Both gene duplication and positive selection were observed in aquatic vertebrate IFITM10-like genes, indicating that IFITM10 might be associated with the adaptation to aquatic environments. A large number of lineage- and species-specific gene duplications were observed in IR-IFITM sub-family and positive selection was detected in IR-IFITM of primates and rodents. Because primates have experienced a long history of viral infection

  7. A comparison of potency differences among thyroid peroxidase (TPO) inhibitors to induce developmental toxicity and other thyroid gland-linked toxicities in humans and rats.

    PubMed

    Motonaga, Kozo; Ota, Mika; Odawara, Kyoko; Saito, Shoji; Welsch, Frank

    2016-10-01

    The potencies of resorcinol, 6-propylthiouracil (PTU) and methimazole (MMI) for inducing developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity were compared in pregnant rats, regarded as valid model for human thyroid toxicity. Profound differences on maternal thyroid hormone levels (THs), maternal toxicity as well as developmental and neurotoxicity sequelae occurred. Resorcinol affected none of those end points. PTU and MMI caused significant effects. Therapy with either PTU or MMI during the first trimester of human pregnancy can cause reductions of maternal THs, accompanied by disruptions of prenatal development. Clinical MMI studies show sporadic evidence of teratogenic effects, with equivocal relation to thyroid peroxidase (TPO) inhibition. In recent decades no MMI associated prenatal toxicity has been reported, an outcome possibly related to carefully managed therapy. Orally administered resorcinol was rapidly absorbed, metabolized and excreted and was undetectable in the thyroid. In contrast, PTU or MMI accumulated. Resorcinol's potency to inhibit TPO was profoundly lower than that of PTU or MMI. Quantum chemical calculations may explain low resorcinol reactivity with TPO. Thus, distinctions in the target organ and the TPO inhibitory potency between these chemicals are likely contributing to different reductions of maternal THs levels and affecting the potency to cause developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity.

  8. Involvement of mTOR and Regulation by AMPK in Early Iodine Deficiency-Induced Thyroid Microvascular Activation.

    PubMed

    Craps, J; Joris, V; De Jongh, B; Sonveaux, P; Horman, S; Lengelé, B; Bertrand, L; Many, M-C; Colin, I M; Gérard, A-C

    2016-06-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) induces TSH-independent microvascular activation in the thyroid via the reactive oxygen species/nitric oxide-hypoxia-inducible factor-1α/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway. We hypothesized the additional involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a positive regulator of this pathway and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as a negative feedback regulator to explain the transient nature of ID-induced microvascular changes under nonmalignant conditions. mTOR and AMPK involvement was investigated using an in vitro model (human thyrocytes in primary cultures) and 2 murine models of goitrogenesis (normal NMRI and RET-PTC mice [a papillary thyroid cancer model]). In NMRI mice, ID had no effect on the phosphorylation of ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K), a downstream target of mTOR. However, rapamycin inhibited ID-induced thyroid blood flow and VEGF protein expression. In the RET-PTC model, ID strongly increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K, whereas rapamycin completely inhibited the ID-induced increase in p70S6K phosphorylation, thyroid blood flow, and VEGF-A expression. In vitro, although ID increased p70S6K phosphorylation, the ID-stimulated hypoxia-inducible factor/VEGF pathway was inhibited by rapamycin. Activation of AMPK by metformin inhibited ID effects both in vivo and in vitro. In AMPK-α1 knockout mice, the ID-induced increase in thyroid blood flow and VEGF-A protein expression persisted throughout the treatment, whereas both parameters returned to control values in wild-type mice after 4 days of ID. In conclusion, mTOR is required for early ID-induced thyroid microvascular activation. AMPK negatively regulates this pathway, which may account for the transient nature of ID-induced TSH-independent vascular effects under benign conditions.

  9. Expression of interferon-inducible recombinant human RNase L causes RNA degradation and inhibition of cell growth in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Mitali; Rath, Pramod C

    2004-04-30

    Interferon-inducible ribonuclease L (RNase L) is a unique ankyrin-repeat containing endoribonuclease activated by 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) cofactor leading to RNA degradation and apoptosis during antiviral response in mammalian cells. We report that expression of recombinant human RNase L (1-741 a.a.) caused RNA degradation and inhibition of cell growth in Escherichia coli in absence of exogenous 2-5A. On the contrary, expression of a homologous but dominant negative form of murine RNase L (1-656 a.a.), lacking the RNA binding and ribonuclease domain, did not show RNA degradation, rather it stimulated cell growth. Upon computational analysis by pBLAST search, a putative transcription factor (yahD, F64758, and NP_414852) from the E. coli genome showed highest homology (E value=1e(-17)) with 90-259 a.a. region of human RNase L due to ankyrin repeats with conserved GKT motifs. Ankyrin repeats 6-9 of RNase L are involved in 2-5A binding, dimerization, and activation of the ribonuclease. Thus, a biochemically active human RNase L in E. coli strongly suggests for a prokaryotic cell growth-inhibitory mechanism possibly through ankyrin-ankyrin interaction of YahD and RNase L leading to RNA degradation. The mammalian interferon-inducible RNase L and E. coli yahD protein may have common origin for the ankyrin repeats with 2-5A binding sites. Thus, RNA degradation and cell growth inhibition by recombinant human RNase L biochemically reconstituted mammalian cellular response to interferon in E. coli. RNase L has prokaryotic evolutionary history, it is not only an antiviral but also an antibacterial gene.

  10. Effect of BMAP-28 on human thyroid cancer TT cells is mediated by inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, DAQI; WAN, LANLAN; ZHANG, JINNAN; LIU, CHANG; SUN, HUI

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignant endocrine tumor, with significant morbidity and mortality. Bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 28 (BMAP-28) is a cathelicidin that is found in bovine neutrophils. In the present study, the effect and relative mechanism of BMAP-28 on the human thyroid cancer TT cell line in vitro and in vivo were investigated. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, flow cytometry and a TT-xenograft mouse model were used in this study. The data obtained indicated that BMAP-28 significantly inhibited the proliferation of the TT cells in vitro. In addition, the Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay detected that BMAP-28 induced apoptotic effects in the TT cells. Moreover, the expression of activated caspase-3 and -9 was upregulated at the transcriptional and translational levels. Simultaneously, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)3 and MMP9 was downregulated following BMAP-28 treatment. Finally, BMAP-28 significantly prevented the tumor growth in the TT-xenograft mouse model. These results indicated that BMAP-28 could be a potential agent for the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:26622900

  11. Nitric oxide-repressed Forkhead factor FoxE1 expression is involved in the inhibition of TSH-induced thyroid peroxidase levels.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, María del Mar; Nicola, Juan Pablo; Nazar, Magalí; Peyret, Victoria; Lucero, Ariel Maximiliano; Pellizas, Claudia Gabriela; Masini-Repiso, Ana María

    2016-01-15

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is essential for thyroid hormone synthesis mediating the covalent incorporation of iodine into tyrosine residues of thyroglobulin process known as organification. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) via cAMP signaling is the main hormonal regulator of TPO gene expression. In thyroid cells, TSH-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production inhibits TSH-induced thyroid-specific gene expression, suggesting a potential autocrine role of NO in modulating thyroid function. Indeed, NO donors downregulate TSH-induced iodide accumulation and organification in thyroid cells. Here, using FRTL-5 thyroid cells as model, we obtained insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the inhibitory effects of NO on iodide organification. We demonstrated that NO donors inhibited TSH-stimulated TPO expression by inducing a cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase-mediated transcriptional repression of the TPO gene. Moreover, we characterized the FoxE1 binding site Z as mediator of the NO-inhibited TPO expression. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that NO decreases TSH-induced FoxE1 expression, thus repressing the transcripcional activation of TPO gene. Taken together, we provide novel evidence reinforcing the inhibitory role of NO on thyroid cell function, an observation of potential pathophysiological relevance associated with human thyroid pathologies that come along with changes in the NO production.

  12. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenen, Antje; Gillespie, Leah; Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der; Khromykh, Alexander; Mackenzie, Jason

    2014-01-05

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV{sub KUN} particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV{sub KUN} under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV{sub KUN} assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV{sub KUN} assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition.

  13. Environmental Issues in Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors are determinant for the appearance of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) in susceptible subjects. Increased iodine intake, selenium, and vitamin D deficiency, exposure to radiation, from nuclear fallout or due to medical radiation, are environmental factors increasing AITD. Cigarette smoking is associated with Graves’ disease and Graves’ ophthalmopathy, while it decreases the risk of hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. Viral infections are important environmental factors in the pathogenesis of AITD, too, particularly human parvovirus B19 (EVB19) and hepatitis C virus. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably disrupt thyroid function. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites and polybrominated diethyl ethers bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Among drugs, interferon- and iodine-containing drugs have been associated with AITD. Moreover intestinal dysbiosis causes autoimmune thyroiditis. To reduce the risk to populations and also in each patient, it is necessary to comprehend the association between environmental agents and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:28373861

  14. Environmental Issues in Thyroid Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors are determinant for the appearance of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) in susceptible subjects. Increased iodine intake, selenium, and vitamin D deficiency, exposure to radiation, from nuclear fallout or due to medical radiation, are environmental factors increasing AITD. Cigarette smoking is associated with Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy, while it decreases the risk of hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. Viral infections are important environmental factors in the pathogenesis of AITD, too, particularly human parvovirus B19 (EVB19) and hepatitis C virus. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably disrupt thyroid function. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites and polybrominated diethyl ethers bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Among drugs, interferon- and iodine-containing drugs have been associated with AITD. Moreover intestinal dysbiosis causes autoimmune thyroiditis. To reduce the risk to populations and also in each patient, it is necessary to comprehend the association between environmental agents and thyroid dysfunction.

  15. Promotion of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced thyroid tumors by iodine deficiency in F344/NCr rats.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, M; Ward, J M

    1984-07-01

    Six-week-old male F344 rats were each given an injection once iv of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea [(MNU) CAS: 684-93-5] at a dose of 41.2 mg/kg body weight. Two weeks later, groups of rats were placed on iodine-deficient (ID) or iodine-adequate (IA) diets and then sacrificed at 20 and 33 weeks. Other groups received ID or IA diets without MNU. For localizing thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and prolactin, sections of pituitary glands were stained by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex technique with the use of anti-rat TSH or prolactin antibody. At 20 weeks, rats receiving MNU and ID diets had a 100% incidence of diffuse follicular goiter and multiple follicular adenomas of the thyroid. Focal proliferative thyroid follicular lesions including focal hyperplasias and adenomas per square centimeter of thyroid gland were significantly increased in rats given MNU and ID diets in comparison with rats given MNU and IA diets. At 33 weeks, all MNU rats on ID diets had a significantly increased incidence of thyroid carcinoma of the follicular or papillary types and diffuse pituitary thyrotroph hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and vacuolar degeneration. Rats fed ID diets without MNU had diffuse follicular goiter but no tumors at any time period. MNU given alone in rats fed IA diets induced a 10% incidence of single thyroid adenomas at 20 weeks and 70% at 33 weeks and a 10% incidence of thyroid carcinoma at 33 weeks. Tumors induced in other organs by MNU were not affected by the ID diets. Thus this experiment provided evidence that ID diets are potent promoters of thyroid tumors in this system, but the ID diet itself without carcinogen was not carcinogenic under the conditions of the study.

  16. TSH-induced cyclic AMP production in an ovine thyroid cell line: OVNIS 5H.

    PubMed

    Fayet, G; Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S

    1986-01-06

    The TSH-induced cyclic AMP response was studied using a 3-year-old ovine thyroid cell line TSH-independent for growth: OVNIS 5H. The kinetics of cyclic AMP production was followed both in cell layers and in cell culture media, with or without phosphodiesterase inhibitor. It is noteworthy that following the first wave in cyclic AMP obtained within minutes, we observed later a sustained exponential increase in cyclic AMP during the 5 days following TSH stimulation. A bioassay of TSH was derived allowing measurement of 1 microU/ml TSH from a crude bTSH preparation.

  17. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a family history of thyroid cancer and chronic goiter (enlarged thyroid). There are several types of thyroid ... Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Breathing difficulty Cancer Goiter - simple Metastasis Radiation therapy Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma ...

  18. The effect of Anethum graveolens L. (dill) on corticosteroid induced diabetes mellitus: involvement of thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Panda, Sunanda

    2008-12-01

    An investigation was made to evaluate the role of Anethum graveolens L. (dill) leaf extract in the regulation of corticosteroid-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus in female rats. In dexamethasone-treated animals (1 mg/kg for 22 days) an increase in serum concentration of insulin and glucose and in hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO) was observed. However, there was a decrease in serum concentration of thyroid hormones and in the endogenous antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH) in liver. In animals treated with an equivalent amount of dexamethasone for a similar period (22 days) when received the leaf extract (100 mg/kg b.wt/d.) for last 15 days a decrease in the concentration of both serum glucose and insulin was observed, indicating the potential of the plant extract in the regulation of corticosteroid-induced diabetes. Dexamethasone-induced alterations in the levels of thyroid hormones as well as in hepatic LPO, SOD, CAT and GSH were also reversed by the plant extract.

  19. Automatic removal of manually induced artefacts in ultrasound images of thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Nikhil S; Marziliano, Pina; Hobbs, Christopher G L

    2013-01-01

    Manually induced artefacts, like caliper marks and anatomical labels, render an ultrasound (US) image incapable of being subjected to further processes of Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD). In this paper, we propose a technique to remove these artefacts and restore the image as accurately as possible. The technique finds application as a pre-processing step when developing unsupervised segmentation algorithms for US images that deal with automatic estimation of the number of segments and clustering. The novelty of the algorithm lies in the image processing pipeline chosen to automatically identify the artefacts and is developed based on the histogram properties of the artefacts. The algorithm was able to successfully restore the images to a high quality when it was executed on a dataset of 18 US images of the thyroid gland on which the artefacts were induced manually by a doctor. Further experiments on an additional dataset of 10 unmarked US images of the thyroid gland on which the artefacts were simulated using Matlab showed that the restored images were again of high quality with a PSNR > 38 dB and free of any manually induced artefacts.

  20. 5HT4 agonists inhibit interferon-gamma-induced MHC class II and B7 costimulatory molecules expression on cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zeinstra, Esther M; Wilczak, Nadine; Wilschut, Jan C; Glazenburg, Lisa; Chesik, Daniel; Kroese, Frans G M; De Keyser, Jacques

    2006-10-01

    A failure of tight control of MHC class II expression on astrocytes may play a role in the development of autoimmune responses in multiple sclerosis. The 5-HT(4) serotonin receptor agonists cisapride and prucalopride, at concentrations between 10(-10) M and 10(-8) M, reduced interferon-gamma-induced MHC class II immunostaining in cultured astrocytes derived from newborn Wistar rats by approximately 50-60%. The magnitude of MHC class II inhibition by 5-HT(4) agonists was comparable to that of interferon-beta. The alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine was without effect. Cisapride (10(-9) M) also prevented interferon-gamma-induced B7-1 and B7-2 immunostaining. Our results suggest that 5-HT(4) agonists may have therapeutic potential in multiple sclerosis by inhibiting the up-regulation of immune responsiveness of astrocytes in the central nervous system.

  1. Characterization of xenobiotic-induced hepatocellular enzyme induction in rats: anticipated thyroid effects and unique pituitary gland findings.

    PubMed

    Zabka, Tanja S; Fielden, Mark R; Garrido, Rosario; Tao, Jianhua; Fretland, Adrian J; Fretland, Jennifer L; Albassam, Mudher A; Singer, Thomas; Kolaja, Kyle L

    2011-06-01

    During routine safety evaluation of RO2910, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor for HIV infection, histopathology findings concurrent with robust hepatocellular induction occurred in multiple organs, including a unique, albeit related, finding in the pituitary gland. For fourteen days, male and female rats were administered, by oral gavage vehicle, 100, 300, or 1000 mg/kg/day of RO2910. Treated groups had elevated serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and decreased total thyroxine, and hypertrophy in the liver, thyroid gland, and pituitary pars distalis. These were considered consequences of hepatocellular induction and often were dose dependent and more pronounced in males than in females. Hepatocellular centrilobular hypertrophy corresponded with increased expression of cytochrome P450s 2B1/2, 3A1, and 3A2 and UGT 2B1. Bilateral thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy occurred concurrent to increased mitotic activity and sometimes colloid depletion, which were attributed to changes in thyroid hormone levels. Males had hypertrophy of thyroid-stimulating hormone-producing cells (thyrotrophs) in the pituitary pars distalis. All findings were consistent with the well-established adaptive physiologic response of rodents to xenobiotic-induced hepatocellular microsomal enzyme induction. Although the effects on the pituitary gland following hepatic enzyme induction-mediated hypothyroidism have not been reported previously, other models of stress and thyroid depletion leading to pituitary stimulation support such a shared pathogenesis.

  2. Gene expression profiling in undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma induced by high-dose radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun Soon; Choi, Moo Hyun; Kim, Cha Soon; Choi, Seung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Published gene expression studies for radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis have used various methodologies. In this study, we identified differential gene expression in a human thyroid epithelial cell line after exposure to high-dose γ-radiation. HTori-3 cells were exposed to 5 or 10 Gy of ionizing radiation using two dose rates (high-dose rate: 4.68 Gy/min, and low-dose rate: 40 mGy/h) and then implanted into the backs of BALB/c nude mice after 4 (10 Gy) or 5 weeks (5 Gy). Decreases in cell viability, increases in giant cell frequency, anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo were observed. Particularly, the cells irradiated with 5 Gy at the high-dose rate or 10 Gy at the low-dose rate demonstrated more prominent tumorigenicity. Gene expression profiling was analyzed via microarray. Numerous genes that were significantly altered by a fold-change of >50% following irradiation were identified in each group. Gene expression analysis identified six commonly misregulated genes, including CRYAB, IL-18, ZNF845, CYP24A1, OR4N4 and VN1R4, at all doses. These genes involve apoptosis, the immune response, regulation of transcription, and receptor signaling pathways. Overall, the altered genes in high-dose rate (HDR) 5 Gy and low-dose rate (LDR) 10 Gy were more than those of LDR 5 Gy and HDR 10 Gy. Thus, we investigated genes associated with aggressive tumor development using the two dosage treatments. In this study, the identified gene expression profiles reflect the molecular response following high doses of external radiation exposure and may provide helpful information about radiation-induced thyroid tumors in the high-dose range. PMID:27006382

  3. Interferon-alpha preserves erythrocyte and hepatocyte ATPase activities from liver damage induced by prolonged bile duct ligation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Muriel, P

    1995-01-01

    Interferons have been used to treat chronic hepatitis owing to their antiviral properties. However, now interferons are recognized to inhibit collagen production. Because fibrosis has been associated with liver damage and dysfunction, the effects of interferon-alpha 2b on biliary obstruction-induced cirrhosis were investigated. Obstructive jaundice was induced in male Wistar rats (ca. 200 g) by double ligation and division of the common bile duct. Control rats were sham operated. Interferon-alpha 2b (IFN-alpha; 1000 000 IU per rat) was administered subcutaneously daily after surgery. The animals were sacrificed after 4 weeks of bile duct ligation (BDL) or sham operation. Bilirubins and serum enzyme activities of alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (determined as markers of liver damage) increased several-fold after BDL. Erythrocyte and hepatocyte plasma membrane Na+/K+- and Ca2+-ATPase activities decreased significantly in the BDL group. Administration of IFN-alpha to BDL rats resulted in a partial normalization of serum markers of liver damage. The normal activity of both ATPases on erythrocyte and hepatocyte plasma membranes was completely preserved by IFN-alpha. It is concluded that interferons possess interesting hepatoprotective effects not related to their antiviral properties but probably associated with their antifibrogenic effect.

  4. Interferoninducible protein 6 impairs EGFR activation by CD81 and inhibits hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Keith; Kwon, Young-Chan; Liu, Shuanghu; Hagedorn, Curt H; Ray, Ratna B; Ray, Ranjit

    2015-03-11

    Viral entry requires co-operative interactions of several host cell factors. Interferon (IFN) and the IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) play a central role in antiviral responses against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We examined the effect of interferoninducible protein 6 (IFI6) against HCV infection in human hepatoma cells. HCV RNA level or infectious foci were inhibited significantly by ectopic expression of IFI6. IFI6 impaired CD81 co-localization with claudin-1 (CLDN1) upon HCV infection or CD81 cross-linking by specific antibody. Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a co-factor involved in CD81/CLDN1 interactions, was reduced in IFI6 expressing cells in response to HCV infection or CD81 cross linking by antibody, but not by treatment with EGF. Taken together, the results from our study support a model where IFI6 inhibits HCV entry by impairing EGFR mediated CD81/CLDN1 interactions. This may be relevant to other virus entry processes employing EGFR.

  5. Spatiotemporal control of interferon-induced JAK/STAT signalling and gene transcription by the retromer complex

    PubMed Central

    Chmiest, Daniela; Sharma, Nanaocha; Zanin, Natacha; Viaris de Lesegno, Christine; Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Sibut, Vonick; Dingli, Florent; Hupé, Philippe; Wilmes, Stephan; Piehler, Jacob; Loew, Damarys; Johannes, Ludger; Schreiber, Gideon; Lamaze, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Type-I interferons (IFNs) play a key role in the immune defences against viral and bacterial infections, and in cancer immunosurveillance. We have established that clathrin-dependent endocytosis of the type-I interferon (IFN-α/β) receptor (IFNAR) is required for JAK/STAT signalling. Here we show that the internalized IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 subunits of the IFNAR complex are differentially sorted by the retromer at the early endosome. Binding of the retromer VPS35 subunit to IFNAR2 results in IFNAR2 recycling to the plasma membrane, whereas IFNAR1 is sorted to the lysosome for degradation. Depletion of VPS35 leads to abnormally prolonged residency and association of the IFNAR subunits at the early endosome, resulting in increased activation of STAT1- and IFN-dependent gene transcription. These experimental data establish the retromer complex as a key spatiotemporal regulator of IFNAR endosomal sorting and a new factor in type-I IFN-induced JAK/STAT signalling and gene transcription. PMID:27917878

  6. Aloe-emodin is an interferon-inducing agent with antiviral activity against Japanese encephalitis virus and enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Chia-Fang; Hsiao, Nai-Wan; Chang, Ching-Yao; Li, Shih-Wein; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lin, Wei-Yong

    2008-10-01

    In this study, aloe-emodin was identified as a potential interferon (IFN)-inducer by screening compounds from Chinese herbal medicine. Aloe-emodin showed low cytotoxicity to human HL-CZ promonocyte cells and TE-671 medulloblastoma cells and significantly activated interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) and gamma-activated sequence (GAS)-driven cis-reporting systems. Moreover, aloe-emodin upregulated expression of IFN-stimulated genes such as dsRNA-activated protein kinase and 2',5'-oligoisoadenylate synthase. Aloe-emodin resulted in significant activation of nitric oxide production. The antiviral activity of aloe-emodin against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) was evaluated using dose- and time-dependent plaque reduction assays in HL-CZ cells and TE-671 cells. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of aloe-emodin ranged from 0.50microg/mL to 1.51microg/mL for JEV and from 0.14microg/mL to 0.52microg/mL for EV71. Aloe-emodin showed clearly potent virus inhibitory abilities and achieved high therapeutic indices, in particular for HL-CZ cells. Therefore, the study demonstrated dose- and time-dependent actions of aloe-emodin on the inhibition of JEV and EV71 replication via IFN signalling responses.

  7. Interferon-alpha treatment induces depression-like behaviour accompanied by elevated hippocampal quinolinic acid levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Christina Weide; Eskelund, Amanda; Budac, David P; Tillmann, Sandra; Liebenberg, Nico; Elfving, Betina; Wegener, Gregers

    2015-10-15

    Immunotherapy with the cytokine interferon-alpha (IFN-α) can induce symptoms of depression, and it is likely that the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway may be involved in this regard. In this study we investigated the effects of IFN-α on depression-like behaviour and central metabolites of the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway in rats. Secondly, we explored the modulating effects of an antidepressant (imipramine) and anti-inflammatory drug (celecoxib) on IFN-α-induced behavioural and pathophysiological changes in the brain. The following treatment groups were used: Control (saline), IFN-α (6×10(4)IU/kg s.c.), IFN-α+imipramine or IFN-α+celecoxib. Drugs were administered daily for 1 week. IFN-α treatment induced depression-like behaviour by increasing immobility in the forced swim test (FST), and decreased tryptophan levels in the brain. There was a trend for an increased kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, indicative of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activation, and increased quinolinic acid in the hippocampus. Imipramine decreased immobility in the FST, but did not reverse the IFN-α-induced changes in the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway. There was a trend for celecoxib to decrease immobility and to reverse the IFN-α-induced increase in the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio. Thus, our study provides further evidence for IFN-α-induced depression-like behaviour through central changes of the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway.

  8. Interferon-resistant Daudi cells are deficient in interferon-alpha-induced ISGF3 alpha activation, but remain sensitive to the interferon-alpha-induced increase in ISGF3 gamma content.

    PubMed

    Dron, M; Tovey, M G

    1993-10-01

    Low levels of the transcription factor ISGF3 alpha were detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus of untreated Daudi cells, which increased markedly following interferon (IFN) treatment. In contrast no ISGF3 alpha was detected in an IFN-resistant clone of Daudi cells, DIF8, and only low levels were detected in these cells after IFN-alpha treatment. High levels of ISGF3 were produced in vitro, however, by the addition of ISGF3 alpha to extracts of IFN-treated DIF8 cells, indicating that IFN is unable to produce substantial amounts of functional ISGF3 alpha in DIF8 cells. A second clone of IFN-resistant Daudi cells, DIF3, also exhibited defective ISGF3 alpha production, which was restored to normal in the subclone DIF3REV5 that had reverted to high IFN sensitivity. Thus, the antiproliferative effect of IFN on Daudi cells and derived clones is closely related to the level of ISGF3 present in the nucleus of these cells. IFN-alpha, however, also enhances the content of ISGF3 gamma in IFN-resistant cells as well as certain proteins of unknown function, raising the possibility that a second pathway of IFN-alpha signal transduction, distinct from the ISGF3 pathway, remains functional in both DIF8 and DIF3 cells.

  9. The thyroid hormone receptor β induces DNA damage and premature senescence

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Alberto; García-Carpizo, Verónica; Gallardo, María Esther; Villamuera, Raquel; Gómez-Ferrería, Maria Ana; Pascual, Angel; Buisine, Nicolas; Sachs, Laurent M.; Garesse, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the thyroid hormone (TH) receptors (THRs) can play a role in aging, cancer and degenerative diseases. In this paper, we demonstrate that binding of TH T3 (triiodothyronine) to THRB induces senescence and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage in cultured cells and in tissues of young hyperthyroid mice. T3 induces a rapid activation of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)/PRKAA (adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase) signal transduction and recruitment of the NRF1 (nuclear respiratory factor 1) and THRB to the promoters of genes with a key role on mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiration leads to production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which in turn causes oxidative stress and DNA double-strand breaks and triggers a DNA damage response that ultimately leads to premature senescence of susceptible cells. Our findings provide a mechanism for integrating metabolic effects of THs with the tumor suppressor activity of THRB, the effect of thyroidal status on longevity, and the occurrence of tissue damage in hyperthyroidism. PMID:24395638

  10. Delayed luminescence to monitor programmed cell death induced by berberine on thyroid cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scordino, Agata; Campisi, Agata; Grasso, Rosaria; Bonfanti, Roberta; Gulino, Marisa; Iauk, Liliana; Parenti, Rosalba; Musumeci, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Correlation between apoptosis and UVA-induced ultraweak photon emission delayed luminescence (DL) from tumor thyroid cell lines was investigated. In particular, the effects of berberine, an alkaloid that has been reported to have anticancer activities, on two cancer cell lines were studied. The FTC-133 and 8305C cell lines, as representative of follicular and anaplastic thyroid human cancer, respectively, were chosen. The results show that berberine is able to arrest cell cycle and activate apoptotic pathway as shown in both cell lines by deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, caspase-3 cleavage, p53 and p27 protein overexpression. In parallel, changes in DL spectral components after berberine treatment support the hypothesis that DL from human cells originates mainly from mitochondria, since berberine acts especially at the mitochondrial level. The decrease of DL blue component for both cell lines could be related to the decrease of intra-mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and may be a hallmark of induced apoptosis. In contrast, the response in the red spectral range is different for the two cell lines and may be ascribed to a different iron homeostasis.

  11. Interferon-α, -β and -γ induce CXCL11 secretion in human thyrocytes: modulation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonists.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Mancusi, Caterina; Mazzi, Valeria; Pupilli, Cinzia; Centanni, Marco; Ferri, Clodoveo; Ferrannini, Ele; Fallahi, Poupak

    2013-05-01

    It has been previously shown IFN-α, -β, -γ and TNF-α (synergically with IFNs) dose-dependently induce the release of CXCL9 and CXCL10 chemokines by thyroid follicular cells, suggesting that this process may be related, at least in part, to the appearance of thyroid dysfunction during IFNs therapy. No study has evaluated the effect of IFN-α and -β on CXCL11 chemokine production in thyrocytes. The aims of this study were: (a) to test the effect of IFN-α, -β and -γ on the secretion of the Th1 chemokine CXCL11, in primary cultures of human thyroid follicular cells; (b) to assess the effect of PPAR-γ activation on CXCL11 secretion. In primary cultures of human thyroid follicular cells, CXCL11 was undetectable in the supernatant. IFN-γ, -α and -β dose dependently induced CXCL11 release. TNF-α alone had no effect. The combination of each of the IFNs with TNF-α had a significant synergistic effect on CXCL11 secretion. Treatment of primary cultures of human thyroid follicular cells with rosiglitazone dose dependently inhibited the IFNs stimulated CXCL11 release. Compared with IFN-α and -β, IFN-γ was the most potent stimulus of CXCL11 secretion. In conclusion, we first show that IFN-α, -β and -γ and TNF-α (synergically with IFNs) dose-dependently induce the release of CXCL11 by primary cultures of human thyroid follicular cells, suggesting that this process may be related to the appearance of thyroid dysfunction during IFNs therapy. Furthermore, PPAR-γ activation partially inhibits this process.

  12. Discriminating Gene Expression Signature of Radiation-Induced Thyroid Tumors after Either External Exposure or Internal Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Ory, Catherine; Ugolin, Nicolas; Schlumberger, Martin; Hofman, Paul; Chevillard, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Both external radiation exposure and internal radionuclide contamination are well known risk factors in the development of thyroid epithelial tumors. The identification of specific molecular markers deregulated in radiation-induced thyroid tumors is important for the etiological diagnosis since neither histological features nor genetic alterations can discriminate between sporadic and radiation-induced tumors. Identification of highly discriminating markers in radiation-induced tumors is challenging as it relies on the ability to identify marker deregulation which is associated with a cellular stress that occurred many years before in the thyroid cells. The existence of such a signature is still controversial, as it was not found in several studies while a highly discriminating signature was found in both post-radiotherapy and post-Chernobyl series in other studies. Overall, published studies searching for radiation-induced thyroid tumor specificities, using transcriptomic, proteomic and comparative genomic hybridization approaches, and bearing in mind the analytical constraints required to analyze such small series of tumors, suggest that such a molecular signature could be found. In comparison with sporadic tumors, we highlight molecular similarities and specificities in tumors occurring after high-dose external radiation exposure, such as radiotherapy, and in post-Chernobyl tumors that occurred after internal 131I contamination. We discuss the relevance of signature extrapolation from series of tumors developing after high and low doses in the identification of tumors induced at very low doses of radiation. PMID:24704841

  13. Di2-ethylhexyl phthalate disrupts thyroid hormone homeostasis through activating the Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and inducing hepatic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hanfeng; Ha, Mei; Yang, Min; Yue, Ping; Xie, Zhengyuan; Liu, Changjiang

    2017-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), as a widespread environmental pollutant and an endocrine disruptor, can disturb the homeostasis of thyroid hormones (THs). In order to elucidate roles of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways and hepatic enzymes in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage for 30 consecutive days; Nthy-ori 3-1 cells were treated with DEHP with NAC, k-Ras siRNA or inhibitors (U0126 and wortmannin). Results showed that DEHP led to histopathologic changes in rat thyroid and liver, such as the decrease in thyroid follicular cavity diameter, hepatocyte edema. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were reduced. DEHP caused ROS production, oxidative stress and k-Ras upregulation, thereby activating the ERK and Akt pathways in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, TRH receptor (TRHr) level was elevated after the activation of the Akt pathway and was downregulated after the inhibition of the Akt pathway. However, TRHr was not modulated by the ERK pathway. Additionally, hepatic enzymes, including Ugt1a1, CYP2b1, Sult1e1, and Sult2b1, were significantly induced after DEHP exposure. Taken together, DEHP can perturb TH homeostasis and reduce TH levels. The activated Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and induced hepatic enzymes play vital roles in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP. PMID:28065941

  14. Di2-ethylhexyl phthalate disrupts thyroid hormone homeostasis through activating the Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and inducing hepatic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hanfeng; Ha, Mei; Yang, Min; Yue, Ping; Xie, Zhengyuan; Liu, Changjiang

    2017-01-09

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), as a widespread environmental pollutant and an endocrine disruptor, can disturb the homeostasis of thyroid hormones (THs). In order to elucidate roles of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways and hepatic enzymes in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage for 30 consecutive days; Nthy-ori 3-1 cells were treated with DEHP with NAC, k-Ras siRNA or inhibitors (U0126 and wortmannin). Results showed that DEHP led to histopathologic changes in rat thyroid and liver, such as the decrease in thyroid follicular cavity diameter, hepatocyte edema. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were reduced. DEHP caused ROS production, oxidative stress and k-Ras upregulation, thereby activating the ERK and Akt pathways in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, TRH receptor (TRHr) level was elevated after the activation of the Akt pathway and was downregulated after the inhibition of the Akt pathway. However, TRHr was not modulated by the ERK pathway. Additionally, hepatic enzymes, including Ugt1a1, CYP2b1, Sult1e1, and Sult2b1, were significantly induced after DEHP exposure. Taken together, DEHP can perturb TH homeostasis and reduce TH levels. The activated Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and induced hepatic enzymes play vital roles in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP.

  15. The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor modulator FTY720 prevents iodide-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Kazuki; Osone, Michiko; Yoshida, Katsumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Hoshikawa, Saeko; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yurie; Ito, Sadayoshi; Mori, Kouki

    2011-09-01

    FTY720 is an immunomodulator that alters migration and homing of lymphocytes via sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. This compound has been shown to be effective in suppressing autoimmune diseases in experimental and clinical settings. In the present study, we tested whether FTY720 prevented autoimmune thyroiditis in iodide-treated non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in humans. Mice were given 0.05% iodide water for 8 weeks, and this treatment effectively induced thyroiditis. Iodide-treated mice were injected intraperitoneally with either saline or FTY720 during the iodide treatment. FTY720 clearly suppressed the development of thyroiditis and reduced serum anti-thyroglobulin antibody levels. The number of circulating lymphocytes and spleen cells including CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells was decreased in FTY720-treated mice. Our results indicate that FTY720 has immunomodulatory effects on iodide-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD mice and may be a potential candidate for use in the prevention of HT.

  16. Evaluation of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced protein 10 (IP-10) responses for detection of cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis: comparisons to IFN-gamma responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced protein 10 (IP-10) has recently shown promise as a diagnostic biomarker of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of humans. The aim of the current study was to compare IP-10 and IFN-gamma responses upon Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle using archived sample...

  17. Genetic control of interferon action: mouse strain distribution and inheritance of an induced protein with guanylate-binding property.

    PubMed

    Staeheli, P; Prochazka, M; Steigmeier, P A; Haller, O

    1984-08-01

    Interferons (IFNs) induce in responsive cells the synthesis of various proteins including a set with high binding affinities to guanylates. These guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were analyzed in cells from 46 inbred mouse strains using GMP-agarose affinity chromatography. In cells of 11 strains, including A/J, BALB/cJ, and C3H/HeJ, type I and II IFNs induced the synthesis of a major GBP of Mr 65,000, designated here GBP-1, and of at least three minor GBPs. In contrast, cells of the remaining 35 strains, including DBA/2J, C57BL/6J, and A2G, failed to synthesize GBP-1 in response to both types of IFNs. Induction of the minor GBPs was comparable in cells of both groups of mice, confirming that they were all responsive to IFNs. Analysis of F1, F2, and BC1 offspring of crosses between GBP-1 inducible (A/J) and noninducible (DBA/2J or A2G) strains showed that inducibility of GBP-1 was inherited as a single autosomal gene. The symbol Gbp-1 is proposed for this locus, designated Gbp-1a for the allele causing inducibility and Gbp-1b for the other allele.

  18. The interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Toy, J L

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the interferons is presented. A description of something of what is known about them is given, including: their genes; their protein structures and characteristics; their mechanisms of actions; and their varied biological effects emphasising particularly their immunomodulatory actions. Finally, a brief summary is made of the current status of human clinical studies that have been conducted with interferons in the oncological and viral fields, mentioning also recent findings in patients who have the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:6193915

  19. In the eye of the storm: iodinated contrast medium induced thyroid storm presenting as cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Alkhuja, Samer; Pyram, Ronald; Odeyemi, Olutunde

    2013-01-01

    The administration of iodinated contrast medium may lead to excess free thyroid hormone release and cause thyroid storm. A woman presented to the emergency department with dyspnea, hemoptysis, and intermittent bilateral lower extremities edema. Physical examination revealed mildly enlarged thyroid. Patient underwent a computed tomography scan of the chest with intravenous iodinated contrast medium to rule out pulmonary embolism, the patient developed a thyroid storm second to iodinated contrast medium injection. Proper treatment was provided and the patient had a good outcome. We present this case of an unusual presentation of a thyroid storm with cardiac arrest. This case illustrates that evaluating thyroid function tests in patients with an enlarged thyroid prior to the administration of iodinated contrast medium could prevent the development of thyroid storm.

  20. Influenza virus-induced encephalopathy in mice: interferon production and natural killer cell activity during acute infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wabuke-Bunoti, M A; Bennink, J R; Plotkin, S A

    1986-01-01

    Mice injected intracerebrally with infectious influenza virus (60 hemagglutinin units) developed lethargy, seizures, comas, and died 2 to 5 days postinfection. As early as 6 h after infection, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in these animals was infiltrated with polymorphonuclear cells, mononuclear leukocytes, and large granular lymphocytes. Potent natural killer (NK) cell activity was observed for both CSF and spleen cell populations over the same period. This NK cell activity correlated with interferon (IFN) levels in the CSF and serum. Treatment of lethally infected mice with either anti-IFN alpha-IFN beta or anti-ganglio-n-tetraoglyceramide antiserum ameliorated the disease, reduced mortality, and effected changes in the relative proportions of inflammatory cell populations infiltrating the CSF. The possible significance of IFN and NK cell activity in the development of this influenza virus-induced encephalopathy is discussed. PMID:2431159

  1. A putative GTP binding protein homologous to interferon-inducible Mx proteins performs an essential function in yeast protein sorting.

    PubMed

    Rothman, J H; Raymond, C K; Gilbert, T; O'Hara, P J; Stevens, T H

    1990-06-15

    Members of the Mx protein family promote interferon-inducible resistance to viral infection in mammals and act by unknown mechanisms. We identified an Mx-like protein in yeast and present genetic evidence for its cellular function. This protein, the VPS1 product, is essential for vacuolar protein sorting, normal organization of intracellular membranes, and growth at high temperature, implying that Mx-like proteins are engaged in fundamental cellular processes in eukaryotes. Vps1p contains a tripartite GTP binding motif, which suggests that binding to GTP is essential to its role in protein sorting. Vps1p-specific antibody labels punctate cytoplasmic structures that condense to larger structures in a Golgi-accumulating sec7 mutant; thus, Vps1p may associate with an intermediate organelle of the secretory pathway.

  2. The interferon-induced gene ISG15 blocks retrovirus release from cells late in the budding process.

    PubMed

    Pincetic, Andrew; Kuang, Zhizhou; Seo, Eun Joo; Leis, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    The release of retroviruses from cells requires ubiquitination of Gag and recruitment of cellular proteins involved in endosome sorting, including the ESCRT-III proteins and the Vps4 ATPase. In response to infection, cells have evolved an interferon-induced mechanism to block virus replication through expression of the interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), a dimer homologue of ubiquitin, which interferes with ubiquitin pathways in cells. Previously, it has been reported that ISG15 expression inhibited the E3 ubiquitin ligase, Nedd4, and prevented association of the ESCRT-I protein Tsg101 with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag. The budding of avian sarcoma leukosis virus and HIV-1 Gag virus-like particles containing L-domain mutations can be rescued by fusion to ESCRT proteins, which cause entry into the budding pathway beyond these early steps. The release of these fusions from cells was susceptible to inhibition by ISG15, indicating that there was a block late in the budding process. We now demonstrate that the Vps4 protein does not associate with the avian sarcoma leukosis virus or the HIV-1 budding complexes when ISG15 is expressed. This is caused by a loss in interaction between Vps4 with its coactivator protein LIP5 needed to promote the formation of the ESCRT-III-Vps4 double-hexamer complex required for membrane scission and virus release. The inability of LIP5 to interact with Vps4 is the probable result of ISG15 conjugation to the ESCRT-III protein, CHMP5, which regulates the availability of LIP5. Thus, there appear to be multiple levels of ISG15-induced inhibition acting at different stages of the virus release process.

  3. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paijo, Jennifer; Döring, Marius; Spanier, Julia; Grabski, Elena; Nooruzzaman, Mohammed; Schmidt, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Messerle, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Kaever, Volkhard; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages. PMID:27058035

  4. Imatinib-induced thyroiditis in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surjit; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a case of chronic myeloid leukemia for which imatinib therapy was initated. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone was normal, and thyroid microsomal autoantibodies (TMA) were positive and patient was diagnosed as thyroiditis treated with corticosteroids for 1½ months which lead to resolution. PMID:27756963

  5. Mechanism of inhibition of retrovirus release from cells by interferon-induced gene ISG15.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Zhizhou; Seo, Eun Joo; Leis, Jonathan

    2011-07-01

    Budding of retroviruses from cell membranes requires ubiquitination of Gag and recruitment of cellular proteins involved in endosome sorting, including endosome sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III) protein complex and vacuolar protein sorting 4 (VPS4) and its ATPase. In response to infection, a cellular mechanism has evolved that blocks virus replication early and late in the budding process through expression of interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), a dimer homologue of ubiquitin. Interferon treatment of DF-1 cells blocks avian sarcoma/leukosis virus release, demonstrating that this mechanism is functional under physiological conditions. The late block to release is caused in part by a loss in interaction between VPS4 and its coactivator protein LIP5, which is required to promote the formation of the ESCRT III-VPS4 double-hexamer complex to activate its ATPase. ISG15 is conjugated to two different LIP5-ESCRT-III-binding charged multivesicular body proteins, CHMP2A and CHMP5. Upon ISGylation of each, interaction with LIP5 is no longer detected. Two other ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP4B and CHMP6, are also conjugated to ISG15. ISGylation of CHMP2A, CHMP4B, and CHMP6 weakens their binding directly to VPS4, thereby facilitating the release of this protein from the membrane into the cytosol. The remaining budding complex fails to release particles from the cell membrane. Introducing a mutant of ISG15 into cells that cannot be conjugated to proteins prevents the ISG15-dependent mechanism from blocking virus release. CHMP5 is the primary switch to initiate the antiviral mechanism, because removal of CHMP5 from cells prevents ISGylation of CHMP2A and CHMP6.

  6. TLR2/6 agonists and interferon-gamma induce human melanoma cells to produce CXCL10

    PubMed Central

    Mauldin, Ileana S.; Wang, Ena; Deacon, Donna H.; Olson, Walter C.; Bao, Yongde; Slingluff, Craig L.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical approaches to treat advanced melanoma include immune therapies, whose benefits depend on tumor-reactive T-cell infiltration of metastases. However, most tumors lack significant immune infiltration prior to therapy. Selected chemokines promote T-cell migration into tumors; thus, agents that induce these chemokines in the tumor microenvironment (TME) may improve responses to systemic immune therapy. CXCL10 has been implicated as a critical chemokine supporting T-cell infiltration into the TME. Here we show that toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists can induce chemokine production directly from melanoma cells when combined with IFNγ treatment. We find that TLR2 and TLR6 are widely expressed on human melanoma cells, and that TLR2/6 agonists (MALP-2 or FSL-1) synergize with interferon-gamma (IFNγ) to induce production of CXCL10 from melanoma cells. Furthermore, melanoma cells and immune cells from surgical specimens also respond to TLR2/6 agonists and IFNγ by upregulating CXCL10 production, compared to treatment with either agent alone. Collectively, these data identify a novel mechanism for inducing CXCL10 production directly from melanoma cells, with TLR2/6 agonists +IFNγ and raise the possibility that intratumoral administration of these agents may improve immune signatures in melanoma and have value in combination with other immune therapies, by supporting T-cell migration into melanoma metastases. PMID:25765738

  7. Results of space experiment program "interferon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tálas, Margarita; Bátkai, László; Stöger, Ivana; Nagy, Károly; Hiros, László; Konstantinova, Irina; Rykova, Marina; Mozgovaya, Irina; Guseva, Olga; Kozharinov, Valerii

    The results of the biological space experiment "Interferon" performed by two international cosmonaut teams (26 May 1980, and 16 May 1981) aboard space laboratory Solyut-6 are reported: (1) Human lymphocytes separated from blood of healthy donors and placed into "Interferon I" equipment could be kept for 7 days in suspension culture under spaceflight conditons. Interferon production could be induced in human lymphocytes by preparations of different origin: virus, synthetic polyribonucleotides, bacterial protein and plant pigment. An increased lymphocyte interferon production in space laboratory compared to ground control was observed. (2) Human interferon preparations and interferon inducers placed in space laboratory at room temperature for 7 days maintained their biological activity. (3) A decrease of induced interferon production and natural killer activity of lymphocytes isolated from peripheral blood of cosmonauts was observed on the 1st day on Earth after 7-days spaceflight.

  8. Transient thyrotoxicosis from thyroiditis induced by sibutramine overdose: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, S K; Lee, S M; Yoo, S S; Hahm, J R; Jung, J H; Kim, H S; Kim, S; Chung, S I; Jung, T S

    2013-08-01

    Sibutramine is an antiobesity drug that inhibits the reuptake of serotonin and noradrenalin in the hypothalamus. A 37-year-old Korean man presented to the emergency room for the oral intake of 280 mg of sibutramine. The patient was in thyrotoxic state. The (99m)Technetium-pertechnetate thyroid scan showed irregular uptake of radioisotope and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody and thyroperoxidase antibody were negative. Thyroid function normalized after that. The patient had transient thyrotoxicosis with thyroiditis. We report a case of thyrotoxicosis accompanied by thyroiditis resulting from the intentional overdose of sibutramine.

  9. Therapeutic Potential of Date Palm Pollen for Testicular Dysfunction Induced by Thyroid Disorders in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Kashlan, Akram M.; Nooh, Mohammed M.; Hassan, Wafaa A.; Rizk, Sherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Hyper- or hypothyroidism can impair testicular function leading to infertility. The present study was designed to examine the protective effect of date palm pollen (DPP) extract on thyroid disorder-induced testicular dysfunction. Rats were divided into six groups. Group I was normal control. Group II received oral DPP extract (150 mg kg-1), group III (hyperthyroid group) received intraperitoneal injection of L-thyroxine (L-T4, 300μg kg-1; i.p.), group IV received L-T4 plus DPP extract, group V (hypothyroid group) received propylthiouracil (PTU, 10 mg kg-1; i.p.) and group VI received PTU plus DPP extract. All treatments were given every day for 56 days. L-T4 or PTU lowered genital sex organs weight, sperm count and motility, serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T), testicular function markers and activities of testicular 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD). Moreover, L-T4 or PTU increased estradiol (E2) serum level, testicular oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptotic markers. Morphometric and histopathologic studies backed these observations. Treatment with DPP extract prevented LT4- or PTU induced changes. In addition, supplementation of DPP extract to normal rats augmented sperm count and motility, serum levels of LH, T and E2 paralleled with increased activities of 3β-HSD and 17β-HSD as well as testicular antioxidant status. These results provide evidence that DPP extract may have potential protective effects on testicular dysfunction induced by altered thyroid hormones. PMID:26425844

  10. Cloning and expression analysis of interferon-gamma-inducible-lysosomal thiol reductase gene in large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenbiao; Chen, Xinhua

    2006-05-01

    In mammals, interferon-gamma-inducible-lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) has been demonstrated to play a key role in the processing and presentation of MHC class II-restricted antigen (Ag) by catalyzing disulfide bond reduction, thus unfolding native protein Ag and facilitating subsequent cleavage by proteases. Here, we reported the cloning of a GILT gene homologue from the spleen of large yellow croaker, a marine fish (LycGILT). The full-length cDNA of LycGILT gene is 1033 nucleotides (nt) encoding a protein of 256 amino acids (aa), with a putative molecular weight of 28.9 kDa. The deduced protein is highly homologous to that of mammalian and zebrafish GILTs and shares 54.1% sequence identity to that of zebrafish and 43.2-39.2% sequence identity to that of various mammals. The deduced LycGILT possesses the typical structural feature of mammalian GILT, including an active-site CXXC motif, a GILT signature sequence CQHGX2ECX2NX4C, and other six cysteines responsible for the formation of disulfide bonds in the C-terminus. Genomic analysis revealed that LycGILT gene, spanning a 3159nt fragment, contained seven exons interrupted by six introns and exhibited a similar exon-intron organization to human and mouse GILT genes except for a slightly more compact intron arrangement. The LycGILT expression is obviously up-regulated in spleen and kidney after immunization with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccine consisting of Vibrio alginolyticus, V. paraphaemolyticus, and Aeromonas hydrophila although it also is constitutively expressed in liver, gills, brain, and heart, suggesting that LycGILT may be involved in the immune response to bacterial challenge in large yellow croaker. A search of NCBI sequence data with LycGILT cDNA identified a pufferfish (fugu rubrides) GILT homologue cDNA and its genomic DNA sequence, where two putative interferon-gamma activation sites (GAS) were found within the promoter region. This provided evidence that a fish GILT homologue like

  11. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S. Silvestre, Diego H.; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  12. Neurotropic arboviruses induce interferon regulatory factor 3-mediated neuronal responses that are cytoprotective, interferon independent, and inhibited by Western equine encephalitis virus capsid.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Daniel C; Lazear, Helen M; Farmer, Jocelyn R; Diamond, Michael S; Miller, David J

    2013-02-01

    Cell-intrinsic innate immune responses mediated by the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) are often vital for early pathogen control, and effective responses in neurons may be crucial to prevent the irreversible loss of these critical central nervous system cells after infection with neurotropic pathogens. To investigate this hypothesis, we used targeted molecular and genetic approaches with cultured neurons to study cell-intrinsic host defense pathways primarily using the neurotropic alphavirus western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV). We found that WEEV activated IRF-3-mediated neuronal innate immune pathways in a replication-dependent manner, and abrogation of IRF-3 function enhanced virus-mediated injury by WEEV and the unrelated flavivirus St. Louis encephalitis virus. Furthermore, IRF-3-dependent neuronal protection from virus-mediated cytopathology occurred independently of autocrine or paracrine type I interferon activity. Despite being partially controlled by IRF-3-dependent signals, WEEV also disrupted antiviral responses by inhibiting pattern recognition receptor pathways. This antagonist activity was mapped to the WEEV capsid gene, which disrupted signal transduction downstream of IRF-3 activation and was independent of capsid-mediated inhibition of host macromolecular synthesis. Overall, these results indicate that innate immune pathways have important cytoprotective activity in neurons and contribute to limiting injury associated with infection by neurotropic arboviruses.

  13. Sonic hedgehog-induced type 3 deiodinase blocks thyroid hormone action enhancing proliferation of normal and malignant keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dentice, Monica; Luongo, Cristina; Huang, Stephen; Ambrosio, Raffaele; Elefante, Antonia; Mirebeau-Prunier, Delphine; Zavacki, Ann Marie; Fenzi, Gianfranco; Grachtchouk, Marina; Hutchin, Mark; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Bianco, Antonio C; Missero, Caterina; Larsen, P Reed; Salvatore, Domenico

    2007-09-04

    The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway plays a critical role in hair follicle physiology and is constitutively active in basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), the most common human malignancy. Type 3 iodothyronine deiodinase (D3), the thyroid hormone-inactivating enzyme, is frequently expressed in proliferating and neoplastic cells, but its role in this context is unknown. Here we show that Shh, through Gli2, directly induces D3 in proliferating keratinocytes and in mouse and human BCCs. We demonstrate that Gli-induced D3 reduces intracellular active thyroid hormone, thus resulting in increased cyclin D1 and keratinocyte proliferation. D3 knockdown caused a 5-fold reduction in the growth of BCC xenografts in nude mice. Shh-induced thyroid hormone degradation via D3 synergizes with the Shh-mediated reduction of the type 2 deiodinase, the thyroxine-activating enzyme, and both effects are reversed by cAMP. This previously unrecognized functional cross-talk between Shh/Gli2 and thyroid hormone in keratinocytes is a pathway by which Shh produces its proliferative effects and offers a potential therapeutic approach to BCC.

  14. Perchlorate exposure induces hypothyroidism and affects thyroid-responsive genes in liver but not brain of quail chicks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; McNabb, F M Anne; Sible, Jill C

    2009-10-01

    Ground-dwelling birds in perchlorate-contaminated areas are exposed to perchlorate ion, a known thyroid disruptor, and might be vulnerable to the developmental effects of perchlorate-induced hypothyroidism. We hypothesized that perchlorate-induced hypothyroidism would alter the expression of thyroid-responsive genes involved in thyroid hormone (TH) regulation and in the development of target organ function. Japanese quail chicks were exposed to 2000 mg/L ammonium perchlorate in drinking water for 7.5 weeks beginning on day 5 posthatch. Hypothyroidism was evident after 2 weeks of exposure as lower plasma THs and lower TH content in exposed chicks than in controls. The degree of hypothyroidism was increased at 7.5 weeks, as indicated by significant thyroid gland hypertrophy and sustained changes in thyroid function. After 2 weeks of exposure, hypothyroidism increased type 2 5'-deiodinase (D2) mRNA level and decreased Spot 14 (SP14) mRNA level in the liver, whereas D2 mRNA and RC3 mRNA levels in brain were not affected. After 7.5 weeks of exposure, mRNA levels in the exposed group did not differ from those in controls in either the liver or brain, suggesting the responsiveness of these genes to THs decreased during development. These results suggest that the brain, but not the liver, was protected from the effects of hypothyroidism, probably by changes in D2 activity at the protein level and/or regulation of TH entry and exit from the brain. We concluded that perchlorate exposure caused hypothyroidism in young Japanese quail and affected the expression of thyroid-responsive genes during early posthatch development.

  15. Postpartum Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... high thyroid hormone levels in the blood) and hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone levels in the blood). In postpartum thyroiditis, thyrotoxicosis occurs first followed by hypothyroidism. What causes postpartum thyroiditis? The exact cause is ...

  16. Thyroid Nodules

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Body in Balance › Thyroid Nodules Fact Sheet Thyroid Nodules March 2010 Download PDFs English Espanol Hindi ... Singer, MD Leonard Wartofsky, MD What is the thyroid gland? The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped ...

  17. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... calories and how fast your heart beats. Thyroid tests check how well your thyroid is working. They ... thyroid diseases such as hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Thyroid tests include blood tests and imaging tests. Blood tests ...

  18. Transcriptional basis for hyporesponsiveness of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase gene to lipopolysaccharide/interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Laubach, V E; Alley, E W; Edwards, K A; Sherman, P A; Russell, S W; Murphy, W J

    1996-04-01

    The work reported here resolves, at the level of gene regulation, the controversy as to whether or not human monocytes/macrophages can produce nitric oxide (NO) when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), with or without co-stimulation by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Studies included structural comparison of the promoters for human and mouse inducible NO synthase (iNOS) genes, transfection and assay of human and mouse iNOS promoter regions in response to LPS +/- IFN-gamma, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays of kappa B response elements. Two explanations for hyporesponsiveness of the human iNOS promoter to LPS +/- IFN-gamma were found: (1) multiple inactivating nucleotide substitutions in the human counterpart of the enhancer element that has been shown to regulate LPS/IFN-gamma induced expression of the mouse iNOS gene; and (2) and absence of one or more nuclear factors in human macrophages (e.g., an LPS-inducible nuclear factor-kappa B/Rel complex), that is (are) required for maximal expression of the gene. The importance of resolution of this controversy is that future research in this area should be directed toward the understanding of alternative mechanisms that can result in the successful production of NO.

  19. Avian influenza A virus PB2 promotes interferon type I inducing properties of a swine strain in porcine dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ocana-Macchi, Manuela; Ricklin, Meret E.; Python, Sylvie; Monika, Gsell-Albert; Stech, Juergen; Stech, Olga; Summerfield, Artur

    2012-05-25

    The 2009 influenza A virus (IAV) pandemic resulted from reassortment of avian, human and swine strains probably in pigs. To elucidate the role of viral genes in host adaptation regarding innate immune responses, we focussed on the effect of genes from an avian H5N1 and a porcine H1N1 IAV on infectivity and activation of porcine GM-CSF-induced dendritic cells (DC). The highest interferon type I responses were achieved by the porcine virus reassortant containing the avian polymerase gene PB2. This finding was not due to differential tropism since all viruses infected DC equally. All viruses equally induced MHC class II, but porcine H1N1 expressing the avian viral PB2 induced more prominent nuclear NF-{kappa}B translocation compared to its parent IAV. The enhanced activation of DC may be detrimental or beneficial. An over-stimulation of innate responses could result in either pronounced tissue damage or increased resistance against IAV reassortants carrying avian PB2.

  20. Suppression of Type I Interferon Signaling Overcomes Oncogene-Induced Senescence and Mediates Melanoma Development and Progression.

    PubMed

    Katlinskaya, Yuliya V; Katlinski, Kanstantsin V; Yu, Qiujing; Ortiz, Angelica; Beiting, Daniel P; Brice, Angela; Davar, Diwakar; Sanders, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M; Rui, Hallgeir; Xu, Xiaowei; Koumenis, Constantinos; Diehl, J Alan; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2016-04-05

    Oncogene activation induces DNA damage responses and cell senescence. We report a key role of type I interferons (IFNs) in oncogene-induced senescence. IFN signaling-deficient melanocytes expressing activated Braf do not exhibit senescence and develop aggressive melanomas. Restoration of IFN signaling in IFN-deficient melanoma cells induces senescence and suppresses melanoma progression. Additional data from human melanoma patients and mouse transplanted tumor models suggest the importance of non-cell-autonomous IFN signaling. Inactivation of the IFN pathway is mediated by the IFN receptor IFNAR1 downregulation that invariably occurs during melanoma development. Mice harboring an IFNAR1 mutant, which is partially resistant to downregulation, delay melanoma development, suppress metastatic disease, and better respond to BRAF or PD-1 inhibitors. These results suggest that IFN signaling is an important tumor-suppressive pathway that inhibits melanoma development and progression and argue for targeting IFNAR1 downregulation to prevent metastatic disease and improve the efficacy of molecularly target and immune-targeted melanoma therapies.

  1. Interferon-γ-induced p27KIP1 binds to and targets MYC for proteasome-mediated degradation

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Siti Mariam; Frings, Oliver; Fahlén, Sara; Nilsson, Helén; Goodwin, Jacob; von der Lehr, Natalie; Su, Yingtao; Lüscher, Bernhard; Castell, Alina; Larsson, Lars-Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    The Myc oncoprotein is tightly regulated at multiple levels including ubiquitin-mediated protein turnover. We recently demonstrated that inhibition of Cdk2-mediated phosphorylation of Myc at Ser-62 pharmacologically or through interferon (IFN)-γ-induced expression of p27Kip1 (p27) repressed Myc's activity to suppress cellular senescence and differentiation. In this study we identified an additional activity of p27 to interfere with Myc independent of Ser-62 phosphorylation. p27 is required and sufficient for IFN-γ-induced turnover of Myc. p27 interacted with Myc in the nucleus involving the C-termini of the two proteins, including Myc box 4 of Myc. The C-terminus but not the Cdk2 binding fragment of p27 was sufficient for inducing Myc degradation. Protein expression data of The Cancer Genome Atlas breast invasive carcinoma set revealed significantly lower Myc protein levels in tumors with highly expressed p27 lacking phosphorylation at Thr-157 - a marker for active p27 localized in the nucleus. Further, these conditions correlated with favorable tumor stage and patient outcome. This novel regulation of Myc by IFN-γ/p27KIP1 potentially offers new possibilities for therapeutic intervention in tumors with deregulated Myc. PMID:26701207

  2. Infectious Bronchitis Coronavirus Limits Interferon Production by Inducing a Host Shutoff That Requires Accessory Protein 5b

    PubMed Central

    Kint, Joeri; Langereis, Martijn A.; Maier, Helena J.; Britton, Paul; van Kuppeveld, Frank J.; Koumans, Joseph; Wiegertjes, Geert F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During infection of their host cells, viruses often inhibit the production of host proteins, a process that is referred to as host shutoff. By doing this, viruses limit the production of antiviral proteins and increase production capacity for viral proteins. Coronaviruses from the genera Alphacoronavirus and Betacoronavirus, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), establish host shutoff via their nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1). The Gammacoronavirus and Deltacoronavirus genomes, however, do not encode nsp1, and it has been suggested that these viruses do not induce host shutoff. Here, we show that the Gammacoronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) does induce host shutoff, and we find that its accessory protein 5b is indispensable for this function. Importantly, we found that 5b-null viruses, unlike wild-type viruses, induce production of high concentrations of type I interferon protein in vitro, indicating that host shutoff by IBV plays an important role in antagonizing the host's innate immune response. Altogether, we demonstrate that 5b is a functional equivalent of nsp1, thereby answering the longstanding question of whether lack of nsp1 in gammacoronaviruses is compensated for by another viral protein. As such, our study is a significant step forward in the understanding of coronavirus biology and closes a gap in the understanding of some IBV virulence strategies. IMPORTANCE Many viruses inhibit protein synthesis by their host cell to enhance virus replication and to antagonize antiviral defense mechanisms. This process is referred to as host shutoff. We studied gene expression and protein synthesis in chicken cells infected with the important poultry pathogen infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). We show that IBV inhibits synthesis of host proteins, including that of type I interferon, a key component of the antiviral response. The IBV-induced host shutoff, however, does not require degradation of host RNA. Furthermore, we

  3. Eimeria tenella infection induces local gamma interferon production and intestinal lymphocyte subpopulation changes.

    PubMed

    Yun, C H; Lillehoj, H S; Choi, K D

    2000-03-01

    The role of intestinal lymphocytes and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production in protective immunity to Eimeria tenella infection was evaluated in two inbred strains of chickens (SC and TK) that display different patterns of susceptibility to coccidiosis. Oral inoculation of either strain with E. tenella led to parasite invasion of the intestinal cecum and cecal tonsils. Greater fecal oocyst shedding was seen in TK chickens. Flow cytometric analyses of cecal tonsil lymphocytes demonstrated greater numbers of CD4(+) and T-cell receptor gammadelta-positive (TCR1(+)) cells in SC chickens and elevated numbers of CD8(+) and TCR2(+) cells in TK chickens following primary infection. IFN-gamma mRNA expression was significantly increased in cecal tonsil and intraepithelial lymphocytes at days 6 and 8, respectively, after primary infection in SC compared to TK chickens. While no differences were noted between cecal tonsil lymphocytes of the two strains following secondary infection, TK chickens showed elevated IFN-gamma transcript levels in intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes at this time. Selective depletion of CD4(+), but not CD8(+), cecal tonsil lymphocytes in SC chickens resulted in a reduced IFN-gamma mRNA expression, indicating that CD4(+) cells are the primary source of this cytokine. Collectively, these results indicate that local lymphocyte responses and production of IFN-gamma are influenced by host genetic factors.

  4. Interferon-Inducible Cholesterol-25-Hydroxylase Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Replication via Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongzhi; Wang, Shanshan; Yi, Zhaohong; Tian, Huabin; Aliyari, Roghiyh; Li, Yanhua; Chen, Gang; Liu, Ping; Zhong, Jin; Chen, Xinwen; Du, Peishuang; Su, Lishan; Qin, F. Xiao-Feng; Deng, Hongyu; Cheng, Genhong

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) as an interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) has recently been shown to exert broad antiviral activity through the production of 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), which is believed to inhibit the virus-cell membrane fusion during viral entry. However, little is known about the function of CH25H on HCV infection and replication and whether antiviral function of CH25H is exclusively mediated by 25HC. In the present study, we have found that although 25HC produced by CH25H can inhibit HCV replication, CH25H mutants lacking the hydroxylase activity still carry the antiviral activity against HCV but not other viruses such as MHV-68. Further studies have revealed that CH25H can interact with the NS5A protein of HCV and inhibit its dimer formation, which is essential for HCV replication. Thus, our work has uncovered a novel mechanism by which CH25H restricts HCV replication, suggesting that CH25H inhibits viral infection through both 25HC-dependent and independent events. PMID:25467815

  5. Catechin induced modulation in the activities of thyroid hormone synthesizing enzymes leading to hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Amar K; De, Neela

    2013-02-01

    Catechins, the flavonoids found in abundance in green tea, have many beneficial health effects such as antioxidative, anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, and hypotensive properties. However, flavonoids have antithyroid/goitrogenic effect, although less information is available about the effect of pure catechin on thyroid physiology. The present investigation has been undertaken to explore the effect of catechin administration on thyroid physiology in rat model. For the in vivo experiment catechin was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 10, 20 and 30 mg/kg body to male albino rats for 15 and 30 days, respectively, and thyroid activities were evaluated with respect to determination of serum levels of thyroid hormones, thyroid peroxidase, 5'-deiodinase I (5'-DI), and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activities that are involved in the synthesis of thyroid hormone. Catechin decreased the activities of thyroid peroxidase and thyroidal 5'-deiodinase I, while Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity significantly increased in dose-dependent manner; substantial decrease in serum T3 and T4 levels coupled with significant elevation of serum TSH were also noted. Histological examinations of the thyroid gland revealed marked hypertrophy and/or hyperplasia of the thyroid follicles with depleted colloid content. In in vitro study, short-term exposure of rat thyroid tissue to catechin at the concentrations of 0.10, 0.20, and 0.30 mg/ml leads to decrease in the activities of thyroid peroxidase and 5'-deiodinase I, while the activity of thyroidal Na(+), K(+)-ATPase remains unaltered even at high concentration of catechin treatment. The present study reinforces the concept that catechin, tea flavonoids possess potent antithyroid activity as evidenced from in vivo and in vitro studies.

  6. Role of nitric oxide in the central interferon-alpha-induced inhibition of gastric acid secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Czimmer, Jozsef; Király, Ágnes; Szabó, Imre Laszlo; Mózsik, Gyula; Sütő, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play a key role in regulation of gastric functions. Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) has been published to impair gastric motility. Aims of this study were to clarify effect of IFN-α on gastric acid secretion (GAS) and determine role of nitric oxide (NO) in the process. Both subcutaneous (1000, 10000, 100 000 IU, s.c.) and intracisternal (10, 100, 1000 IU, i.c.) injections of IFN-α dose-dependently inhibited GAS induced by pylorus ligation in male SD rats in 2 hrs (370±40, 233±39, 208±50 micromol vs control 415±59 micromol and 481±50, 249±75, 141±25 micromol vs control 485±65 micromol, respectively). Central doses inducing same level inhibition were 100 times lower. NOS inhibitor L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.v.) blocked the inhibitory effect of i.c. ED(50) dose 100 IU IFN-α (507±75 micromol/2 hrs), while L-arginine, the substrate of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) prevented L-NAME action (266±82 micromol/2 hrs). D-arginine failed to prevent L-NAME action on IFN-α-induced inhibition of GAS. Aminoguanidine, a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (iNOS) failed to block IFN-α induced inhibition of GAS. Results suggest that IFN-α inhibits GAS centrally through nitric oxide pathways probably mediated by continuous isoform of NOS that can be important in regulation of GAS in healthy or pathological conditions.

  7. TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) regulates Th17-mediated intestinal immunopathology in colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanagavelu, S; Flores, C; Termini, J M; Riveron, R; Romero, L; Chung, K; Ruiz, J; Hyun, J; Yuan, X; Dagvadorj, J; Fukata, M

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mucosa reserves abundant Th17 cells where host response to commensal bacteria maintains Th17-cell generation. Although functional heterogeneity and dynamic plasticity of Th17 cells appear to be involved in chronic inflammatory disorders, how their plasticity is regulated in intestinal mucosa is unknown. Here we show that innate TRIF signaling regulates intestinal Th17-cell generation and plasticity during colitis. Absence of TRIF in mice resulted in increased severity of experimental colitis, which was associated with aberrant generation of Th17 cells especially of interferon (IFN)-γ-expressing Th17 cells in the lamina propria. The abnormal generation and plasticity of Th17 cells involved impaired expression of interleukin (IL)-27p28 by lamina propria macrophages but not dendritic cells. Treatment of TRIF-deficient mice with IL-27p28 during colitis reduced the number and IFN-γ expression of Th17 cells in the intestine. In vitro, TRIF-deficient macrophages induced more Th17 cells than wild-type (WT) macrophages during co-culture with WT naive T cells in response to cecal bacterial antigen. Many of Th17 cells induced by TRIF-deficient macrophages expressed IFN-γ due to impaired expression of IL-27p28 by macrophages and defective activation of STAT1 in T cells. These results outline TRIF-dependent regulatory mechanism by which host response to intestinal bacteria maintains Th17-cell-mediated pathology during colitis. PMID:25073675

  8. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins: mapping of the murine Gbp-1 locus to chromosome 3.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, M; Staeheli, P; Holmes, R S; Haller, O

    1985-09-01

    GBP-1 is the predominant species of a family of guanylate-binding proteins synthesized in mouse cells in response to interferons (IFNs) alpha, beta, or gamma. IFN inducibility of this 65,000-Da protein is controlled by alleles at a single autosomal locus, Gbp-1, with allele a encoding inducibility and allele b noninducibility. Here, we present evidence suggesting that both alleles occur in outbred populations of wild mice. Using recombinant inbred strains and classical linkage analysis of offspring of two-point and three-point backcrosses we demonstrate that Gbp-1 is linked to Adh-3 (encoding alcohol dehydrogenase C2) and VaJ (varitintwaddler-Jackson) located on the distal part of chromosome 3. The relevant recombination frequencies (RFs) (+/- SE) were 3.5 (+/- 1.1) and 11.7 (+/- 2.8)%, respectively. We further show that strain B6.C-H-23c/By(HW 53), congenic for a small segment of chromosome 3, carries the BALB/c alleles at both the Gbp-1 and the Adh-3 locus and not the alleles of the B6 background strain confirming the chromosomal location and close linkage of the two loci.

  9. Expression of IP-10, a lipopolysaccharide- and interferon-gamma-inducible protein, in murine mesangial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Chiarri, M.; Hamilton, T. A.; Egido, J.; Emancipator, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    IP-10 is an early gene induced in multiple cell types by a variety of proinflammatory agents, notably interferons (IFNs) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To determine whether this protein might play a role in amplifying immune-mediated glomerular injury, we cultured mouse mesangial cells with several stimuli for various times. Increasing amounts of IFN-gamma (to 100 units/ml) elicited increasing levels of IP-10 messenger RNA (mRNA), sustained to 24 hours, but had no effect on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA. LPS induced transient IP-10 mRNA expression that peaked at 8 hours; TNF-alpha mRNA was also increased. TNF-alpha at doses up to 10 ng/ml and soluble immune complexes up to 150 micrograms/ml antibody evoked 3- to 5-fold increases in IP-10 mRNA expression, much less than the 30- to 70-fold increases seen with IFN-gamma and LPS. We conclude that IFN-gamma, LPS, and other agonists can amplify glomerular immune injury, perhaps via elevated expression of IP-10. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8434640

  10. STING-Dependent Cytosolic DNA Sensing Promotes Radiation-Induced Type I Interferon-Dependent Antitumor Immunity in Immunogenic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Liufu; Liang, Hua; Xu, Meng; Yang, Xuanming; Burnette, Byron; Arina, Ainhoa; Li, Xiao-Dong; Mauceri, Helena; Beckett, Michael; Darga, Thomas; Huang, Xiaona; Gajewski, Thomas F; Chen, Zhijian J; Fu, Yang-Xin; Weichselbaum, Ralph R

    2014-11-20

    Ionizing radiation-mediated tumor regression depends on type I interferon (IFN) and the adaptive immune response, but several pathways control I IFN induction. Here, we demonstrate that adaptor protein STING, but not MyD88, is required for type I IFN-dependent antitumor effects of radiation. In dendritic cells (DCs), STING was required for IFN-? induction in response to irradiated-tumor cells. The cytosolic DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) mediated sensing of irradiated-tumor cells in DCs. Moreover, STING was essential for radiation-induced adaptive immune responses, which relied on type I IFN signaling on DCs. Exogenous IFN-? treatment rescued the cross-priming by cGAS or STING-deficient DCs. Accordingly, activation of STING by a second messenger cGAMP administration enhanced antitumor immunity induced by radiation. Thus radiation-mediated antitumor immunity in immunogenic tumors requires a functional cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway and suggests that cGAMP treatment might provide a new strategy to improve radiotherapy.

  11. Polymorphisms of interferon-inducible genes OAS-1 and MxA associated with SARS in the Vietnamese population.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Emi; Hijikata, Minako; Itoyama, Satoru; Quy, Tran; Phi, Nguyen Chi; Long, Hoang Thuy; Ha, Le Dang; Ban, Vo Van; Matsushita, Ikumi; Yanai, Hideki; Kirikae, Fumiko; Kirikae, Teruo; Kuratsuji, Tadatoshi; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Keicho, Naoto

    2005-04-22

    We hypothesized that host antiviral genes induced by type I interferons might affect the natural course of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS-1), myxovirus resistance-A (MxA), and double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase in 44 Vietnamese SARS patients with 103 controls. The G-allele of non-synonymous A/G SNP in exon 3 of OAS-1 gene showed association with SARS (p=0.0090). The G-allele in exon 3 of OAS-1 and the one in exon 6 were in strong linkage disequilibrium and both of them were associated with SARS infection. The GG genotype and G-allele of G/T SNP at position -88 in the MxA gene promoter were found more frequently in hypoxemic group than in non-hypoxemic group of SARS (p=0.0195). Our findings suggest that polymorphisms of two IFN-inducible genes OAS-1 and MxA might affect susceptibility to the disease and progression of SARS at each level.

  12. Interferon-α-inducible Dendritic Cells Matured with OK-432 Exhibit TRAIL and Fas Ligand Pathway-mediated Killer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Koya, Terutsugu; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Higuchi, Yumiko; Sano, Kenji; Shimodaira, Shigetaka

    2017-01-01

    Active human dendritic cells (DCs), which efficiently induce immune responses through their functions as antigen-presenting cells, exhibit direct anti-tumour killing activity in response to some pathogens and cytokines. These antigen-presenting and tumour killing abilities may provide a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy. However, the mechanisms underlying this killer DC activity have not been fully proven, despite the establishment of interferon-α (IFN-α)-generated killer DCs (IFN-DCs). Here mature IFN-DCs (mIFN-DCs), generated from IFN-DCs primed with OK-432 (streptococcal preparation), exhibited elevated expression of CD86 and human leukocyte antigen-DR (minimum criteria for DC vaccine clinical trials) as well as antigen-presenting abilities comparable with those of mature IL-4-DCs (mIL-4-DCs). Interestingly, the killing activity of mIFN-DCs, which correlated with the expression of CD56 (natural killer cell marker) and was activated via the tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas ligand pathway, was stronger than that of IFN-DCs and remarkably stronger than that of mIL-4-DCs. Therefore, mIFN-DCs exhibit great potential as an anti-cancer vaccine that would promote both acquired immunity and direct tumour killing. PMID:28191816

  13. Antitumor efficacy of combination of interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 gene with gemcitabine, a study in murine model

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Kai; Wang, Lian; Tian, Ling; Yu, Jingrui; Zhang, Zhixuan; Wei, Yuquan

    2008-01-01

    Background Interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) is a potent inhibitor of tumor angiogenesis. It has been reported that the antiangiogenic therapy combined with chemotherapy has synergistic effects. Methods To elucidate the mechanisms of IP-10 gene combined with a chemotherapy agent, we intramuscularly injected pBLAST-IP-10 expression plasmid combined with gemcitabine into tumor-bearing mice. Results The proliferation of endothelial cells was effectively inhibited by IP-10 combined with gemcitabine in vitro. Treatment with pBLAST-IP-10 twice a week for 4 weeks combined with gemcitabine 10 mg/kg (once a week) resulted in sustained high level of IP-10 protein in serum, inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Compared with administration of IP-10 plasmid or gemcitabine alone, the angiogenesis in tumors were apparently inhibited, and the numbers of apoptotic cells and lymphocytes in tumor increased in the combination therapy group. Conclusion Our data indicate that the gene therapy of antiangiogenesis by intramuscular delivery of plasmid DNA encoding IP-10 combined with gemcitabine has synergistic effects on tomor by inhibiting the proliferation of endothelail cells, inducing the apoptosis of tumor cells, and recruiting lymphocytes to tumor in murine models. The present findings provided evidence of antitumor effects of genetherapy combined with chemotherapy. PMID:18983688

  14. Type I interferon production induced by Streptococcus pyogenes-derived nucleic acids is required for host protection.

    PubMed

    Gratz, Nina; Hartweger, Harald; Matt, Ulrich; Kratochvill, Franz; Janos, Marton; Sigel, Stefanie; Drobits, Barbara; Li, Xiao-Dong; Knapp, Sylvia; Kovarik, Pavel

    2011-05-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a Gram-positive human pathogen that is recognized by yet unknown pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Engagement of these receptor molecules during infection with S. pyogenes, a largely extracellular bacterium with limited capacity for intracellular survival, causes innate immune cells to produce inflammatory mediators such as TNF, but also type I interferon (IFN). Here we show that signaling elicited by type I IFNs is required for successful defense of mice against lethal subcutaneous cellulitis caused by S. pyogenes. Type I IFN signaling was accompanied with reduced neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection. Mechanistic analysis revealed that macrophages and conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) employ different signaling pathways leading to IFN-beta production. Macrophages required IRF3, STING, TBK1 and partially MyD88, whereas in cDCs the IFN-beta production was fully dependent on IRF5 and MyD88. Furthermore, IFN-beta production by macrophages was dependent on the endosomal delivery of streptococcal DNA, while in cDCs streptococcal RNA was identified as the IFN-beta inducer. Despite a role of MyD88 in both cell types, the known IFN-inducing TLRs were individually not required for generation of the IFN-beta response. These results demonstrate that the innate immune system employs several strategies to efficiently recognize S. pyogenes, a pathogenic bacterium that succeeded in avoiding recognition by the standard arsenal of TLRs.

  15. Small-molecule interferon inducers. Toward the comprehension of the molecular determinants through ligand-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Musmuca, Ira; Simeoni, Silvia; Caroli, Antonia; Ragno, Rino

    2009-07-01

    Hepatitis C is becoming an increasingly common cause of mortality especially in the HIV-coinfected group. Due to the efficacy of interferon (IFN) based therapy in the treatment of hepatitis C, various compounds possessing IFN-inducing activity have been hitherto reported. In the present study, we describe how steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen-bonding interactions might influence the biological activity of a published set of IFN inducers, using a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3-D QSAR) approach. Analyses were conducted evaluating different series of compounds structurally related to 8-hydroxyadenines and 1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinolines. A ligand-based alignment protocol in combination with the GRID/GOLPE approach was applied: 62 3-D QSAR models were derived using different GRID probes and several training sets. Performed 3-D QSAR investigations proved to be of good statistical value displaying r2, q2CV-LOO, and cross-validated SDEP values of 0.73, 0.61, 0.61 and 0.89, 0.64, 0.58 using the OH or the DRY probe, respectively. Additionally, the predictive performance was evaluated using an external test set of 20 compounds. Analyses of the resulting models led to the definition of a pharmacophore model that can be of interest to explain the observed affinities of known compounds as well as to design novel low molecular weight IFN inducers (IFNIs). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first 3-D QSAR application on IFN-inducing agents.

  16. Control of type I interferon-induced cell death by Orai1-mediated calcium entry in T cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Chanyu; Soboloff, Jonathan; Gamero, Ana M

    2012-01-27

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is an essential process in T cell activation. SOCE is controlled by the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel encoded by the gene Orai1 that is expressed on the plasma membrane and activated by STIM1 when ER Ca(2+) stores are depleted. Our earlier work showed that a somatic T-cell line Jurkat mutant H123 bearing a defect in Ca(2+) signaling was susceptible to the apoptotic effects of type I interferons (IFN-α/β). The nature of the mutation and whether this mutation was linked to IFN-α/β apoptotic susceptibility was unknown. Here we show that H123 cells lacked Orai1 and exhibit reduced STIM1 protein. Reconstitution of both Orai1 and STIM1 in H123 cells rescued SOCE in response to thapsigargin and ionomycin and abrogated IFN-α/β-induced apoptosis. Reciprocally, overexpression of the dominant negative Orai1-E106A in either parental Jurkat cells or an unrelated human T cell line (CEM391) inhibited SOCE and led to sensitization to IFN-α/β-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we showed that the Ca(2+) response pathway antagonized the IFN-α/β -induced transcriptional responses; in the absence of SOCE, this negative regulatory effect was lost. However, the inhibitory effect of Ca(2+) on type I IFN-induced gene transcription was diminished by pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB in cells with intact SOCE. Our findings reveal an unexpected and novel regulatory crosstalk mechanism between type I IFNs and store-operated Ca(2+) signaling pathways mediated at least in part by NF-κB activity with significant clinical implications to both viral and tumor immunology.

  17. Bat Mx1 and Oas1, but not Pkr are highly induced by bat interferon and viral infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Cowled, Christopher; Wang, Lin-Fa; Baker, Michelle L

    2013-01-01

    Bats harbour many emerging and re-emerging viruses, several of which are highly pathogenic in other mammals but cause no diseases in bats. As the interferon (IFN) response represents a first line of defence against viral infection, the ability of bats to control viral replication may be linked to the activation of the IFN system. The three most studied antiviral IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in other mammals; Pkr, Mx1 and Oas1 were examined in our model bat species, Pteropus alecto. Our results demonstrate that the three ISGs from P. alecto are highly conserved in their functional domains and promoter elements compared to corresponding genes from other mammals. However, P. alecto Oas1 contains two IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE) in its promoter region compared with the single ISRE present in human OAS1 which may lead to higher IFN inducibility of the bat gene. Both Oas1 and Mx1 were induced in a highly IFN-dependent manner following stimulation with IFN or synthetic double-strand RNA (dsRNA) whereas Pkr showed evidence of being induced in an IFN-independent manner. Furthermore, bat Oas1 appeared to be the most inducible of the three ISGs following either IFN stimulation or viral infection, providing evidence that Oas1 may play a more important role in antiviral activity in bats compared with Mx1 or Pkr. Our results have important implications for the different roles of ISGs in bats and provide the first step in understanding the role of these molecules in the ability of bats to coexist with viruses.

  18. (+)-Nootkatone inhibits tumor necrosis factor α/interferon γ-induced production of chemokines in HaCaT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyeon-Jae; Lee, Jin-Hwee; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression in HaCaT cells. • PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB mediate TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression. • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB. • (+)-Nootkatone suppresses chemokine expression by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 pathways. - Abstract: Chemokines are important mediators of cell migration, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22) are well-known typical inflammatory chemokines involved in atopic dermatitis (AD). (+)-Nootkatone is the major component of Cyperus rotundus. (+)-Nootkatone has antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of (+)-nootkatone on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)/interferon γ (IFN-γ)-induced expression of Th2 chemokines in HaCaT cells. We found that (+)-nootkatone inhibited the TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 mRNA in HaCaT cells. It also significantly inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). Furthermore, we showed that PKCζ and p38 MAPK contributed to the inhibition of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression by blocking IκBα degradation in HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that (+)-nootkatone may suppress TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression in HaCaT cells by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 MAPK signaling pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB. We propose that (+)-nootkatone may be a useful therapeutic candidate for inflammatory skin diseases such as AD.

  19. The roles of interferon-inducible p200 family members IFI16 and p204 in innate immune responses, cell differentiation and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Gonzalezgugel, Elena; Cheng, Lei; Richbourgh, Brendon; Nie, Lin; Liu, Chuanju

    2014-01-01

    p204 is a member of the interferon-inducible p200 family proteins in mice. The p200 family has been reported to be multifunctional regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and senescence. Interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) is regarded as the human ortholog of p204 in several studies. This is possibly due to the similarity of their structures. However the consistency of their functions is still elusive. Currently, an emerging focus has been placed upon the role of the p200 proteins as sensors for microbial DNA in innate immune responses and provides new insights into infections as well as autoimmune diseases. This review specially focuses on IFI16 and p204, the member of p200 family in human and murine respectively, and their pathophysiological roles in innate immune responses, cell differentiation and proliferation. PMID:25815367

  20. Concomitant Interferon Alpha Stimulation and TLR3 Activation Induces Neuronal Expression of Depression-Related Genes That Are Elevated in the Brain of Suicidal Persons

    PubMed Central

    Trippler, Martin; Lutterbeck, Melanie; Liu, Zijian J.; Truebner, Kurt; Bajanowski, Thomas; Gerken, Guido; Hermann, Dirk M.; Schlaak, Joerg F.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified 15 genes that are associated with the development of severe depressive side effects during the standard therapy with interferon alpha and ribavirin in the peripheral blood of hepatitis C virus infected patients. An enhanced expression of these genes was also found in the blood of psychiatric patients suffering severe depressive episode. Herein, we demonstrate that the same depression-related interferon-inducible genes (DRIIs) are also upregulated in post-mortem brains of suicidal individuals. Using cultured mouse hippocampal and prefrontal neurons we show that costimulation with murine IFN (mIFN) and the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) promotes the expression of the described DRIIs, at the same time inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine expression through Stat1 and Stat3 activation, promoting neuronal apoptosis. Consequently, the upregulation of selective DRIIs, production of inflammatory cytokines and inhibition of neuronal plasticity may be involved in the pathogenesis of IFN-associated depression. PMID:24391741

  1. PEG-Interferon-α ribavirin-induced HCV viral clearance: a pharmacogenetic multicenter Spanish study.

    PubMed

    Milara, Javier; Outeda-Macias, Maria; Aumente-Rubio, M Dolores; Más-Serrano, Patricio; Aldaz, Azucena; Calvo, M Victoria; García-Simón, M Sergia; Martin-Barbero, Marisa; Padullés-Zamora, Núria; Schoenenberger, Juan Antonio; Saavedra-Aldrich, Marianne; Tévar-Alfonso, Enrique; Saval, Ana; Pastor-Clerigues, Alfonso; García, Marta; Margusino-Framiñan, Luis; Montero-Alvarez, Jose Luis; Merino, Esperanza; Herrero, Jose Ignacio; Beunza, Mónica; Conesa-Zamora, Pablo; Gimenez-Manzorro, Alvaro; Comas-Sugrañes, Dolors; Cano-Marron, Manuel; Jiménez-Mutiloa, Elena; Díaz-Ruíz, Pilar; Cortijo, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: El interferon-pegilado (IFN-PEG) junto a ribavirina ha sido el principal tratamiento de la infeccion por el virus de la hepatitis C (VHC) de la ultima decada. Los agentes antivirales de accion directa actuales han mejorado los resultados de la terapia, pero tambien han aumentado el costo y la gestion de la complejidad del tratamiento. El presente estudio analiza factores geneticos de los pacientes, asi como predictores virales y clinicos de respuesta sostenida viral (RSV) al tratamiento con IFN-PEG y ribavirina en poblacion Espanola. Métodos: Estudio farmacogenetico, multicentrico, prospectivo, observacional de cohortes realizado en 12 hospitales diferentes de 12 comunidades autonomas diferentes. Se incluyeron un total de 98 pacientes con RVS y 106 sin SVR al tratamiento con IFNPEG y ribavirina. Se seleccionaron 33 polimorfismos de nucleotido unico ubicados en 24 genes diferentes relacionados con la respuesta inflamatoria, inmunologica y viral. Los datos clinicos y virales tambien se analizaron como candidatos predictores de RVS. Resultados: Los genotipos IL-28B (rs12979860, rs7248668, rs8105790, rs8099917) y TNFRSF1B (rs1061622), asi como los haplotipos TNFRSF1B / IL-10 / TNF(-308) no-TTG y TNFRSF1B / IL-10 / IL-4 no-TTC junto con la menor edad, menor carga de ARN-VHC basal, valores elevados de colesterol LDL en suero basal, genotipos VHC2 y 3 y bajo grado de fibrosis basal (0-2) se asociaron con una RVS en el analisis univariante. Los predictores independientes de RVS en el analisis multivariante fueron el genotipo IL-28B rs12979860 CC, el haplotipo TNFRSF1B / IL-10 / IL-4 no-TTC junto con los bajos niveles basales de VHCARN y los genotipos virales VHC2 y 3. Conclusiones: El genotipo IL-28B rs12979860 CC, el haplotipo TNFRSF1B / IL-10 / IL-4 haplotipos no-TTC, la carga viral basal baja y los genotipos del VHC2 y 3 pueden ayudar a predecir una buena respuesta a la terapia con IFN-PEG y ribavirina en poblacion espanola.

  2. Thyroid hormone alleviates demyelination induced by cuprizone through its role in remyelination during the remission period.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mao; Zhan, Xiao L; Ma, Zi Y; Chen, Xing S; Cai, Qi Y; Yao, Zhong X

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease induced by demyelination in the central nervous system, and the remission period of MS is crucial for remyelination. In addition, abnormal levels of thyroid hormone (TH) have been identified in MS. However, in the clinic, insufficient attention has been paid to the role of TH in the remission period. Indeed, TH not only functions in the development of the brain but also affects myelination. Therefore, it is necessary to observe the effect of TH on remyelination during this period. A model of demyelination induced by cuprizone (CPZ) was used to observe the function of TH in remyelination during the remission period of MS. Through weighing and behavioral tests, we found that TH improved the physical symptoms of mice impaired by CPZ. Supplementation of TH led to the repair of myelin as detected by immunohistochemistry and western blot. In addition, a sufficient TH supply resulted in an increase in myelinated axons without affecting myelin thickness and g ratio in the corpus callosum, as detected by electron microscopy. Double immunostaining with myelin basic protein and neurofilament 200 (NF200) showed that the CPZ-induced impairment of axons was alleviated by TH. Conversely, insufficient TH induced by 6-propyl-2-thiouracil resulted in the enlargement of mitochondria. Furthermore, we found that an adequate supply of TH promoted the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte lineage cells by immunofluorescence, which was beneficial to remyelination. Further, we found that TH reduced the number of astrocytes without affecting microglia. Conclusively, it was shown that TH alleviated demyelination induced by CPZ by promoting the development of oligodendrocyte lineage cells and remyelination. The critical time for remyelination is the remission period of MS. TH plays a significant role in alleviating demyelination during the remission period in the clinical treatment of MS.

  3. Toll-like receptor 7-mediated Type I Interferon signaling prevents cholestasis- and hepatotoxin-induced liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Yoon Seok; Park, Surim; Kim, Jong Won; Lim, Chae Woong; Seki, Ekihiro; Kim, Bumseok

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) signaling predominantly regulates production of type I Interferons (IFNs), which has been suggested in clinical studies to be anti-fibrotic. However, the mechanistic role of the TLR7-type I IFN axis in liver fibrosis has not been elucidated. In the present study, liver fibrosis was induced in wild-type (WT), TLR7-deficient, and IFN-α/β receptor-1 (IFNAR1)-deficient mice and TLR7-mediated signaling was assessed in liver cells isolated from these mice. TLR7-deficient and IFNAR1-deficient mice were more susceptible to liver fibrosis than WT mice, indicating that TLR7-type I IFN signaling exerts a protective effect against liver fibrosis. Notably, the hepatic expression of IL-1ra was suppressed in TLR7- or IFNAR1-deficient mice compared with respective WT mice, and treatment with recombinant IL-1ra reduced liver fibrosis. In vivo activation of TLR7 significantly increased IFNa4 and IL-1ra expression in the liver. Interestingly, each cytokine had different cellular source showing that dendritic cells (DCs) are responsible cell type for production of type I IFN, while Kupffer cells (KCs) mainly produce IL-1ra in response to type I IFN. Furthermore, TLR7 activation by R848 injection suppressed liver fibrosis and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and these effects were dependent on type I IFN signaling. Consistent with in vivo data, IFNα significantly induced IL-1ra production in primary KCs. Conclusions TLR7 signaling activates DCs to produce type I IFN, which in turn induces anti-fibrogenic IL-1ra production in KCs. Thus, manipulation of the TLR7-type I IFN-IL-1ra axis may be a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:24375615

  4. The effect of interferon gamma on conventional fractionated radiation-induced damage and fibrosis in the pelvic tissue of rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunyi; Liu, Zi; Wang, Juan; Chai, Yanlan; Su, Jin; Shi, Fan; Wang, Jiquan; Che, Shao Min

    2016-01-01

    We aim to investigate the effect of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) on conventional fractionated radiation–induced damage and fibrosis in ureter and colorectal mucosa. Fifty-two rabbits were randomly divided into three groups comprising a conventional radiation group, an IFN-γ group, and a control group. X-rays were used to irradiate the pelvic tissues of the rabbits in the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. Five days after radiation exposure, the rabbits in the IFN-γ group were administered 250,000 U/kg IFN-γ intramuscularly once a week for 5 weeks. The rabbits in the conventional radiation group received 5.0 mL/kg saline. The rabbits were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, and the rectal and ureteral tissues within the radiation areas were collected. The results showed that the morphology of rectal and ureteral tissues was changed by X-ray radiation. The degree of damage at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, but not at 16 weeks, postradiation was significantly different between the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. The expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA in the ureter and colorectal mucosa of the IFN-γ group was significantly lower than that in the conventional radiation group at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, but it was still higher than that in the control group. There were significant differences in the expression of collagen III among the three groups. IFN-γ can inhibit the radiation-induced upregulation of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA and collagen III protein in the ureter and colorectal mucosa and attenuate radiation-induced damage and fibrosis. PMID:27274263

  5. Prenylation of an interferon-gamma-induced GTP-binding protein: the human guanylate binding protein, huGBP1.

    PubMed

    Nantais, D E; Schwemmle, M; Stickney, J T; Vestal, D J; Buss, J E

    1996-09-01

    Interferons (IFN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause multiple changes in isoprenoid-modified proteins in murine macrophages, the most dramatic being the expression of a prenyl protein of 65 kDa. The guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are IFN-inducible GTP-binding proteins of approximately 65 kDa that possess a CaaX motif at their C-terminus, indicating that they might be substrates for prenyltransferases. The human GBP1 protein, when expressed in transfected COS-1 cells, incorporates radioactivity from the isoprenoid precursor [3H]mevalonate. In addition, huGBPs expressed from the endogenous genes in IFN-gamma-treated human fibroblasts or monocytic cells were also found to be isoprenoid modified. IFN-gamma-induced huGBPs in HL-60 cells were not labeled by the specific C20 isoprenoid, [3H]geranylgeraniol, but did show decreased isoprenoid incorporation in cells treated with the farnesyl transferase inhibitor BZA-5B, indicating that huGBPs in HL-60 cells are probably modified by a C15 farnesyl rather than the more common C20 lipid. Differentiated HL-60 cells treated with IFN-gamma/LPS showed no change in the profile of constitutive isoprenylated proteins and the IFN-gamma/LPS-induced huGBPs remained prenylated. Despite being prenylated, huGBP1 in COS cells and endogenous huGBPs in HL-60 cells were primarily (approximately 85%) cytosolic. Human GBPs are thus among the select group of prenyl proteins whose synthesis is tightly regulated by a cytokine. HuGBP1 is an abundant protein whose prenylation may be vulnerable to farnesyl transferase inhibitors that are designed to prevent farnesylation of Ras proteins.

  6. Molecular and expression analysis of an interferon-gamma-inducible guanylate-binding protein from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Robertsen, Børre; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Chris; Leong, Jo-Ann

    2006-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are some of the most abundant proteins accumulating in mammalian cells in response to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). GBPs have been suggested to function in antiviral activity, macrophage activation, fibroblast proliferation and inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and invasiveness. Here we confirm that IFN-gamma-inducible GBP also exist in fish. A 2 kb GBP cDNA was cloned from head kidney of rainbow trout treated with an IFN-inducing compound. The open reading frame predicts a 635 amino acid protein (rbtGBP) of 72.7 kDa possessing a tripartite GTP binding motif and a secondary structure similar to human GBP1. Like most mammalian GBPs, rbtGBP possesses an isoprenylation motif at the C-terminal end. The overall amino acid sequence identity between rbtGBP and mammalian GBPs is only 41-47%, however. The rainbow trout macrophage cell line RTS11 showed a dose-dependent increase in rbtGBP transcripts in response to IFN-gamma after 6h of stimulation, with rbtGBP being undetectable in non-treated RTS11 cells. Moreover, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) induced increased GBP transcript levels in RTS11 and RTG2 cells after 4-6 h of stimulation, and in head kidney and liver of live fish after 24 h. These studies suggest that rbtGBP is an early response gene in rainbow trout, which may have similar functions in IFN-gamma mediated responses as mammalian GBPs.

  7. Protective effects of Sonchus asper (L.) Hill, (Asteraceae) against CCl4-induced oxidative stress in the thyroid tissue of rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sonchus asper (L.) Hill, (Asteraceae) is used in Pakistan as a traditional (“folk”) medicine for the treatment of hormonal disorders and oxidative stress. The present study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Sonchus asper (L.) Hill, (Asteraceae) methanolic extract (SAME) on hormonal dysfunction in thyroid tissue after carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced oxidative stress. Methods To examine the effects of SAME against the oxidative stress of CCl4 in thyroid tissue, 30 male albino rats were used. Protective effects of SAME were observed on thyroid hormonal levels, activities of antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and DNA damage. Results Treatment with CCl4 significantly (P<0.01) reduced the levels of T3 and T4 and increased TSH levels. CCl4 exposure in rats reduced the activities of antioxidant enzymes but increased lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. Co-administration of SAME significantly (P<0.01) improved these alterations with respect to hormonal levels, activities of antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation close to those seen in control rats. Conclusion These results suggest that SAME can protect thyroid tissue against oxidative damage, possibly through the antioxidant effects of its bioactive compounds. PMID:23043630

  8. Intracellular Signal Transduction and Modification of the Tumor Microenvironment Induced by RET/PTCs in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Menicali, Elisa; Moretti, Sonia; Voce, Pasquale; Romagnoli, Serena; Avenia, Nicola; Puxeddu, Efisio

    2012-01-01

    RET gene rearrangements (RET/PTCs) represent together with BRAF point mutations the two major groups of mutations involved in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) initiation and progression. In this review, we will examine the mechanisms involved in RET/PTC-induced thyroid cell transformation. In detail, we will summarize the data on the molecular mechanisms involved in RET/PTC formation and in its function as a dominant oncogene, on the activated signal transduction pathways and on the induced gene expression modifications. Moreover, we will report on the effects of RET/PTCs on the tumor microenvironment. Finally, a short review of the literature on RET/PTC prognostic significance will be presented. PMID:22661970

  9. Gamma interferon induces Fas-dependent apoptosis of Peyer's patch T cells in mice following peroral infection with Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Liesenfeld, O; Kosek, J C; Suzuki, Y

    1997-01-01

    Since we previously observed a remarkable decrease in the numbers of T cells in the Peyer's patches of the small intestines in C57BL/6 mice following peroral infection with Toxoplasma gondii, we performed studies to examine the mechanism(s) whereby this decrease in numbers of the T cells occurs. We found that apoptotic cell death of CD4+ and CD8+ alphabeta T cells occurred in Peyer's patches following infection. Upregulation of Fas expression was observed in these T cells. C57BL/6-background mutant mice which lack functional Fas antigen did not develop apoptosis in their Peyer's patches following infection. Treatment of infected C57BL/6 mice with anti-gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) monoclonal antibodies prevented the upregulation of Fas on their Peyer's patch T cells and inhibited the occurrence of apoptosis of these T cells. These results indicate that IFN-gamma induces Fas-dependent apoptosis in CD4+ and CD8+ alphabeta T cells in Peyer's patches in C57BL/6 mice following peroral infection with T. gondii. PMID:9353050

  10. The Cytosolic Sensor cGAS Detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA to Induce Type I Interferons and Activate Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Watson, Robert O; Bell, Samantha L; MacDuff, Donna A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Diner, Elie J; Olivas, Joanna; Vance, Russell E; Stallings, Christina L; Virgin, Herbert W; Cox, Jeffery S

    2015-06-10

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are critical mediators of antiviral defense, but their elicitation by bacterial pathogens can be detrimental to hosts. Many intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, induce type I IFNs following phagosomal membrane perturbations. Cytosolic M. tuberculosis DNA has been implicated as a trigger for IFN production, but the mechanisms remain obscure. We report that the cytosolic DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), is required for activating IFN production via the STING/TBK1/IRF3 pathway during M. tuberculosis and L. pneumophila infection of macrophages, whereas L. monocytogenes short-circuits this pathway by producing the STING agonist, c-di-AMP. Upon sensing cytosolic DNA, cGAS also activates cell-intrinsic antibacterial defenses, promoting autophagic targeting of M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we show that cGAS binds M. tuberculosis DNA during infection, providing direct evidence that this unique host-pathogen interaction occurs in vivo. These data uncover a mechanism by which IFN is likely elicited during active human infections.

  11. FoxO1 deacetylation regulates thyroid hormone-induced transcription of key hepatic gluconeogenic genes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Zhou, Jin; Xie, Sherwin Ying; You, Seo-Hee; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul Michael

    2013-10-18

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is a concerted process that integrates transcriptional regulation with hormonal signals. A major regulator is thyroid hormone (TH), which acts through its nuclear receptor (TR) to induce the expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC). Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 also is an important regulator of these genes; however, its functional interactions with TR are not known. Here, we report that TR-mediated transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in human hepatic cells and mouse liver was FoxO1-dependent and furthermore required FoxO1 deacetylation by the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, SirT1. siRNA knockdown of FoxO1 decreased, whereas overexpression of FoxO1 increased, TH-dependent transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in cultured hepatic cells. FoxO1 siRNA knockdown also decreased TH-mediated transcription in vivo. Additionally, TH was unable to induce FoxO1 deacetylation or hepatic PCK1 gene expression in TH receptor β-null (TRβ(-/-)) mice. Moreover, TH stimulated FoxO1 recruitment to the PCK1 and G6PC gene promoters in a SirT1-dependent manner. In summary, our results show that TH-dependent deacetylation of a second metabolically regulated transcription factor represents a novel mechanism for transcriptional integration of nuclear hormone action with cellular energy status.

  12. Acetyl-L-carnitine suppresses thyroid hormone-induced and spontaneous anuran tadpole tail shortening.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Hideki; Kobuchi, Hirotsugu; Yamamoto, Masanao; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Katsu, Kenjiro; Utsumi, Toshihiko; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Sasaki, Junzo; Inoue, Masayasu; Utsumi, Kozo

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT) plays a crucial role in apoptotic tail shortening during anuran metamorphosis. L-carnitine is known to shuttle free fatty acids (FFAs) from the cytosol into mitochondria matrix for β-oxidation and energy production, and in a previous study we found that treatment with L-carnitine suppresses 3, 3', 5-triiodothyronine (T3 ) and FFA-induced MPT by reducing the level of FFAs. In the present study we focus on acetyl-L-carnitine, which is also involved in fatty acid oxidation, to determine its effect on T3 -induced tail regression in Rana rugosa tadpoles and spontaneous tail regression in Xenopus laevis tadpoles. The ladder-like DNA profile and increases in caspase-3 and caspase-9 indicative of apoptosis in the tails of T3 -treated tadpoles were found to be suppressed by the addition of acetyl-L-carnitine. Likewise, acetyl-L-carnitine was found to inhibit thyroid hormone regulated spontaneous metamorphosis in X. laevis tadpoles, accompanied by decreases in caspase and phospholipase A2 activity, as well as non-ladder-like DNA profiles. These findings support our previous conclusion that elevated levels of FFAs initiate MPT and activate the signaling pathway controlling apoptotic cell death in tadpole tails during anuran metamorphosis.

  13. A model of transcriptional and morphological changes during thyroid hormone-induced metamorphosis of the axolotl.

    PubMed

    Page, Robert B; Monaghan, James R; Walker, John A; Voss, S Randal

    2009-06-01

    Anuran (frog) metamorphosis has long-served as a model of how thyroid hormones regulate post-embryonic development in vertebrates. However, comparatively little is known about urodele (salamander) metamorphosis. We conducted a detailed time-course study of induced metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that probed metamorphic changes in morphology and gene expression in the skin. Using morphometrics, quantitative PCR, histology, and in situ hybridization we demonstrate that the development of transcriptional markers is fundamental to the resolution of early metamorphic events in axolotls. We then use linear and piecewise linear models to identify a sequence of morphological and transcriptional changes that define larval to adult remodeling events throughout metamorphosis. In addition, we show that transcriptional biomarkers are expressed in specific larval and adult cell populations of the skin and that temporal changes in these biomarkers correlate with tissue remodeling. We compare our results with other studies of natural and induced metamorphosis in urodeles and highlight what appear to be conserved features between urodele and anuran metamorphosis.

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress protects human thyroid carcinoma cell lines against ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin-Yu; Fan, Rui-Tai; Yan, Xin-Hui; Cui, Jing; Xu, Jun-Ling; Gu, Hao; Gao, Yong-Ju

    2015-03-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most effective forms of cancer treatment, used in the treatment of a number of malignant tumors. However, the resistance of tumor cells to ionizing radiation remains a major therapeutic problem and the critical mechanisms determining radiation resistance are poorly defined. In the present study, a cellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress microenvironment was established through the pretreatment of cultured thyroid cancer cells with tunicamycin (TM) and thapsigargin (TG), in order to mimic the ER stress response in a tumor microenvironment. This microenviroment was confirmed through the X‑box binding protein 1 splice process, glucose‑regulated protein 78 kD and ER degradation‑enhancing α‑mannosidase‑like mRNA expression. A clonogenic assay was used to measure cancer cell resistance to 60Co‑γ following TM pretreatment; in addition, human C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) mRNA expression was determined and apoptosis assays were performed. The results showed that TM or TG pretreatment inhibited CHOP expression and reduced the apoptotic rate of cells. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that the induced ER stress response rendered cancer cells more resistant to ionizing radiation‑induced apoptosis. Therefore, the ER stress pathway may be a potential therapeutic target in order to improve the clinical efficiency of radiotherapy.

  15. A model of transcriptional and morphological changes during thyroid hormone-induced metamorphosis of the axolotl

    PubMed Central

    Page, Robert B.; Monaghan, James R.; Walker, John A.; Voss, S. Randal

    2009-01-01

    Anuran (frog) metamorphosis has long-served as a model of how thyroid hormones regulate post-embryonic development in vertebrates. However, comparatively little is known about urodele (salamander) metamorphosis. We conducted a detailed time-course study of induced metamorphosis in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that probed metamorphic changes in morphology and gene expression in the skin. Using morphometrics, quantitative PCR, histology, and in situ hybridization we demonstrate that the development of transcriptional markers is fundamental to the resolution of early metamorphic events in axolotls. We then use linear and piecewise linear models to identify a sequence of morphological and transcriptional changes that define larval to adult remodeling events throughout metamorphosis. In addition, we show that transcriptional biomarkers are expressed in specific larval and adult cell populations of the skin and that temporal changes in these biomarkers correlate with tissue remodeling. We compare our results with other studies of natural and induced metamorphosis in urodeles and highlight what appear to be conserved features between urodele and anuran metamorphosis. PMID:19275901

  16. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kroetz, Danielle N.; Allen, Ronald M.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Cavallaro, Cleyton; Ito, Toshihiro; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ) are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I) potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and alveolar Mϕ in the

  17. Histone H2B-IFI16 Recognition of Nuclear Herpesviral Genome Induces Cytoplasmic Interferon-β Responses

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Jawed; Ansari, Mairaj Ahmed; Kumar, Binod; Dutta, Dipanjan; Roy, Arunava; Chikoti, Leela; Pisano, Gina; Dutta, Sujoy; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Chandran, Bala

    2016-01-01

    IFI16 (gamma-interferon-inducible protein 16), a predominantly nuclear protein involved in transcriptional regulation, also functions as an innate immune response DNA sensor and induces the IL-1β and antiviral type-1 interferon-β (IFN-β) cytokines. We have shown that IFI16, in association with BRCA1, functions as a sequence independent nuclear sensor of episomal dsDNA genomes of KSHV, EBV and HSV-1. Recognition of these herpesvirus genomes resulted in IFI16 acetylation, BRCA1-IFI16-ASC-procaspase-1 inflammasome formation, cytoplasmic translocation, and IL-1β generation. Acetylated IFI16 also interacted with cytoplasmic STING and induced IFN-β. However, the identity of IFI16 associated nuclear proteins involved in STING activation and the mechanism is not known. Mass spectrometry of proteins precipitated by anti-IFI16 antibodies from uninfected endothelial cell nuclear lysate revealed that histone H2B interacts with IFI16. Single and double proximity ligation microscopy, immunoprecipitation, EdU-genome labeled virus infection, and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that H2B is associated with IFI16 and BRCA1 in the nucleus in physiological conditions. De novo KSHV and HSV-1 infection as well as latent KSHV and EBV infection induces the cytoplasmic distribution of H2B-IFI16, H2B-BRCA1 and IFI16-ASC complexes. Vaccinia virus (dsDNA) cytoplasmic replication didn’t induce the redistribution of nuclear H2B-IFI16 or H2B into the cytoplasm. H2B is critical in KSHV and HSV-1 genome recognition by IFI16 during de novo infection. Viral genome sensing by IFI16-H2B-BRCA1 leads to BRCA1 dependent recruitment of p300, and acetylation of H2B and IFI16. BRCA1 knockdown or inhibition of p300 abrogated the acetylation of H2B-IFI16 or H2B. Ran-GTP protein mediated the translocation of acetylated H2B and IFI16 to the cytoplasm along with BRCA1 that is independent of IFI16-ASC inflammasome. ASC knockdown didn’t affect the acetylation of H2B, its cytoplasmic

  18. Characterization of Breast Cancer Cell Death Induced by Interferons and Retinoids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    responses in several human tumor cells. In particular this combination induces cell death similar to apoptosis in vitro, which could not be observed with...individual agents. Preliminary studies identified no changes in the levels of known regulators of cell death such as p53, cyclin D and Bc12. Thus it...products that mediate the growth inhibitory/ cell death inducing activities of the combination of IFN and RA in human tumor cells. To directly identify these

  19. Characterization of Breast Cancer Cell Death induced by interferons and Retinoids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    earlier that IFNBeta/RA combination causes cell death of human breast carcinoma cells. Since we could not find a correlation between expression of known...regulators and cell death , we employed the antisense technical knock-out strategy to isolate genes that participate in IFN/RA induced pathways. We...episomal vector pTKO1. Following transfection of these libraries the breast tumor cells were selected for resistance to IFN/RA induced cell death . Using

  20. Haemophilus ducreyi lipooligosaccharides induce expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase via type I interferons and tumor necrosis factor alpha in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, a genital ulcer disease. In human inoculation experiments, most volunteers fail to clear the bacteria despite the infiltration of innate and adaptive immune cells to the infected sites. The immunosuppressive protein indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the L-tryptophan-kynurenine metabolic pathway. Tryptophan depletion and tryptophan metabolites contribute to pathogen persistence by inhibiting T cell proliferation, inducing T cell apoptosis, and promoting the expansion of FOXP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells. We previously found that FOXP3(+) Treg cells are enriched in experimental lesions and that H. ducreyi induced IDO transcription in dendritic cells (DC) derived from blood of infected volunteers who developed pustules. Here, we showed that enzymatically active IDO was induced in DC by H. ducreyi. Neutralizing antibodies against interferon alpha/beta receptor 2 chain (IFNAR2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibited IDO induction. Inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) also inhibited IDO expression. Neither bacterial contact with nor uptake by DC was required for IDO activation. H. ducreyi culture supernatant and H. ducreyi lipooligosaccharides (LOS) induced IDO expression, which required type I interferons, TNF-α, and the three MAPK (p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and extracellular signal regulated kinase) and NF-κB pathways. In addition, LOS-induced IFN-β activated the JAK-STAT pathway. Blocking the LOS/Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway greatly reduced H. ducreyi-induced IDO production. These findings indicate that H. ducreyi-induced IDO expression in DC is largely mediated by LOS via type I interferon- and TNF-α-dependent mechanisms and the MAPK, NF-κB, and JAK-STAT pathways.

  1. Upregulation of interferon-induced genes in infants with virus-associated acute bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Scagnolari, Carolina; Midulla, Fabio; Trombetti, Simona; Pierangeli, Alessandra; Tromba, Valeria; Grossi, Rosanna; Di Marco, Paola; Dianzani, Caterina; Girardi, Enrico; Antonelli, Guido

    2007-11-01

    To determine whether there is an airway IFN response in infants with acute bronchiolitis and to establish whether the rate of such a response is related to the severity of illness, the expression of some IFN-induced genes was measured in nasopharyngeal washes from 39 infants with acute bronchiolitis. The results indicate that in infants with a virus-associated acute bronchiolitis there is a strong activation of IFN system and that the severity of illness is inversely related to the level of expression of IFN-induced genes. This suggests that the IFN response plays an important role in determining virus-associated respiratory disease in early life.

  2. Comparison of Interferon gamma inducible protein-10 and Interferon gamma based QuantiFERON TB Gold assays with tuberculin skin test in HIV infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    Basirudeen, S; Rajasekaran, S; Alamelu, R

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to compare the positivity of the QuantiFERON TB gold in-tube (QFT-IT antigens) specific Interferon gamma (IFN-γ/QFT-IT) and IFN-γ nducible protein-10 (IP-10/QFT-IT) assays with tuberculin skin test (TST) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals in a TB endemic setting. A total of 180 HIV infected subjects, with no evidence of active TB were recruited. IFN-γ nd IP-10 levels specific to QFT-IT antigens were measured in plasma from QFT-IT tubes. The overall positivity of TST at 5mm cut-off point (19%) was significantly lower when compared to IFN-γ/QFT-IT (38%) and IP-10/QFT-IT (45%) assays. The positivity of IP-10/QFT-IT was significantly higher than IFN-γ/QFT-IT (p=0.038). Indeterminate results for IFN-γ/QFT-IT and IP-10/QFT-IT were more frequent in subjects with CD4 count <100 cells/µl, than those with >100 cells/µl. IFN-γ/QFT-IT (9%) yielded significantly higher number of indeterminate results than IP-10/QFT-IT (5%). The frequency of these responses is higher than the proportion of individuals with positive TST results. However, 6 IFN-γ/QFT-IT or IP-10/QFT-IT negative subjects were positive for TST at 5mm cut-off point. Prospective and prognostic studies are required to clarify the significance of these data. PMID:21996360

  3. Ectoine and hydroxyectoine inhibit thermal-induced aggregation and increase thermostability of recombinant human interferon Alfa2b.

    PubMed

    Salmannejad, Faranak; Nafissi-Varcheh, Nastaran

    2017-01-15

    This study is to investigate whether ectoines (ectoine and hydroxyectoine) can reduce aggregation of rhIFNα2b in aqueous solutions on thermal stress. The effect of thermal stress condition on the stability was therefore investigated using size exclusion-high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC), different spectroscopic measurements, dynamic light scattering (DLS), electrophoresis, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). All experiments were performed in a sodium phosphate buffer system (100mM, pH7). The protein samples (100μg/ml) were incubated at 50°C for 14days in the absence or presence (1, 10, 20, and 100mM) of ectoines. In summary, thermal-induced aggregation was reduced in the presence of ectoines, regardless of the ectoines concentration in different periods of incubation time by analyzing with SE-HPLC and turbidity measurement. The inhibitory effect of ectoines on the aggregation was shown by other techniques used. The optimal ectoines concentration was 10mM for aggregation reduction, so samples containing of 10mM of ectoines were selected for further evaluation. Secondary structural and conformational stability increased in presence of ectoines as measured by far-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. DSC showed slight increase in Tm of interferon in the presence of ectoines. Hydroxyectoine had superior protein-stabilizing properties than ectoine. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that ectoine and hydroxyectoine are highly effective excipients which can significantly reduce the thermal-induced aggregation of rhIFNα2b at low concentration.

  4. Inducible Interleukin 32 (IL-32) Exerts Extensive Antiviral Function via Selective Stimulation of Interferon λ1 (IFN-λ1)*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongkui; Xie, Jiajia; Xu, Xiupeng; Liu, Li; Wan, Yushun; Liu, Yingle; Zhu, Chengliang; Zhu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-32 has been recognized as a proinflammatory cytokine that participates in responses to viral infection. However, little is known about how IL-32 is induced in response to viral infection and the mechanisms of IL-32-mediated antiviral activities. We discovered that IL-32 is elevated by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection both in vitro and in vivo and that HBV induced IL-32 expression at the level of both transcription and post-transcription. Furthermore, microRNA-29b was found to be a key factor in HBV-regulated IL-32 expression by directly targeting the mRNA 3′-untranslated region of IL-32. Antiviral analysis showed that IL-32 was not sufficient to alter HBV replication in HepG2.2.15 cells. To mimic the viremic phase of viral infection, freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with IL-32γ, the secretory isoform, and the supernatants were used for antiviral assays. Surprisingly, these supernatants exhibited extensive antiviral activity against multiplex viruses besides HBV. Thus, we speculated that the IL-32γ-treated peripheral blood mononuclear cells produced and secreted an unknown antiviral factor. Using antibody neutralization assays, we identified the factor as interferon (IFN)-λ1 and not IFN-α. Further studies indicated that IL-32γ effectively inhibited HBV replication in a hydrodynamic injection mouse model. Clinical data showed that elevated levels of IFN-λ1 both in serum and liver tissue of HBV patients were positively correlated to the increased levels of IL-32. Our results demonstrate that elevated IL-32 levels during viral infection mediate antiviral effects by stimulating the expression of IFN-λ1. PMID:23729669

  5. A Novel Small Molecule Inhibitor of Influenza A Viruses that Targets Polymerase Function and Indirectly Induces Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Ortigoza, Mila Brum; Dibben, Oliver; Maamary, Jad; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Leyva-Grado, Victor H.; Abreu, Pablo; Ayllon, Juan; Palese, Peter; Shaw, Megan L.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses continue to pose a major public health threat worldwide and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The antiviral cytokine, interferon (IFN) is an essential mediator of the innate immune response and influenza viruses, like many viruses, have evolved strategies to evade this response, resulting in increased replication and enhanced pathogenicity. A cell-based assay that monitors IFN production was developed and applied in a high-throughput compound screen to identify molecules that restore the IFN response to influenza virus infected cells. We report the identification of compound ASN2, which induces IFN only in the presence of influenza virus infection. ASN2 preferentially inhibits the growth of influenza A viruses, including the 1918 H1N1, 1968 H3N2 and 2009 H1N1 pandemic strains and avian H5N1 virus. In vivo, ASN2 partially protects mice challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. Surprisingly, we found that the antiviral activity of ASN2 is not dependent on IFN production and signaling. Rather, its IFN-inducing property appears to be an indirect effect resulting from ASN2-mediated inhibition of viral polymerase function, and subsequent loss of the expression of the viral IFN antagonist, NS1. Moreover, we identified a single amino acid mutation at position 499 of the influenza virus PB1 protein that confers resistance to ASN2, suggesting that PB1 is the direct target. This two-pronged antiviral mechanism, consisting of direct inhibition of virus replication and simultaneous activation of the host innate immune response, is a unique property not previously described for any single antiviral molecule. PMID:22577360

  6. A novel small molecule inhibitor of influenza A viruses that targets polymerase function and indirectly induces interferon.

    PubMed

    Ortigoza, Mila Brum; Dibben, Oliver; Maamary, Jad; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Leyva-Grado, Victor H; Abreu, Pablo; Ayllon, Juan; Palese, Peter; Shaw, Megan L

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses continue to pose a major public health threat worldwide and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The antiviral cytokine, interferon (IFN) is an essential mediator of the innate immune response and influenza viruses, like many viruses, have evolved strategies to evade this response, resulting in increased replication and enhanced pathogenicity. A cell-based assay that monitors IFN production was developed and applied in a high-throughput compound screen to identify molecules that restore the IFN response to influenza virus infected cells. We report the identification of compound ASN2, which induces IFN only in the presence of influenza virus infection. ASN2 preferentially inhibits the growth of influenza A viruses, including the 1918 H1N1, 1968 H3N2 and 2009 H1N1 pandemic strains and avian H5N1 virus. In vivo, ASN2 partially protects mice challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. Surprisingly, we found that the antiviral activity of ASN2 is not dependent on IFN production and signaling. Rather, its IFN-inducing property appears to be an indirect effect resulting from ASN2-mediated inhibition of viral polymerase function, and subsequent loss of the expression of the viral IFN antagonist, NS1. Moreover, we identified a single amino acid mutation at position 499 of the influenza virus PB1 protein that confers resistance to ASN2, suggesting that PB1 is the direct target. This two-pronged antiviral mechanism, consisting of direct inhibition of virus replication and simultaneous activation of the host innate immune response, is a unique property not previously described for any single antiviral molecule.

  7. Interferon Production by Human Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Spina, Celsa A.; Chang, R. Shihman; Mishra, L.; Golden, H. Dean

    1972-01-01

    The relative capacity of several types of human cells and tissue to produce interferon was studied. Types of cells and tissue included were fibroblasts from embryos, foreskins, and biopsied skins; amnion cells; peripheral leukocytes; established lymphoid cell lines; established heteroploid cell lines; and chorioamniotic membrane. When Newcastle disease virus was used as the inducer, fibroblasts and amnion cells produced more interferon per 106 cells than leukocytes, lymphoid cells, and heteroploid cells. Only minor variations in interferon-producing capacity were observed among fibroblasts from 36 persons. Culture passage level, cell concentration, and inducer were factors that significantly affected interferon production. PMID:4344957

  8. Aurora kinase A induces papillary thyroid cancer lymph node metastasis by promoting cofilin-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Maimaiti, Yusufu; Jie, Tan; Jing, Zhou; Changwen, Wang; Pan, Yu; Chen, Chen; Tao, Huang

    2016-04-22

    Aurora-A (Aur-A), a member of the serine/threonine Aurora kinase family, plays an important role in ensuring genetic stability during cell division. Previous studies indicated that Aur-A possesses oncogenic activity and may be a valuable therapeutic target in cancer therapy. However, the role of Aur-A in the most common thyroid cancer, papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), remains largely unknown. In patients with PTC, cancer cell migration and invasion account for most of the metastasis, recurrence, and cancer-related deaths. Cofilin-1 (CFL-1) is the most important effector of actin polymerization and depolymerization, determining the direction of cell migration. Here, we assessed the correlation between Aur-A and CFL-1 in PTC with lymph node metastasis. Tissue microarray data showed that simultaneous overexpression of Aur-A and CFL-1 correlated with lymph node metastasis in thyroid cancer tissue. Inhibition of Aur-A suppressed thyroid cancer cell migration in vitro and decreased lymph node metastasis in nude mice. Importantly, Aur-A increased the non-phosphorylated, active form of CFL-1 in TPC-1 cells, thus promoting cancer cell migration and thyroid cancer lymph node metastasis. Our findings indicate that the combination of Aur-A and CFL-1 may be useful as a molecular prediction model for lymph node metastasis in thyroid cancer and raise the possibility of targeting Aur-A and CFL-1 for more effective treatment of thyroid cancer.

  9. [Effects of neuropeptides on interferon production in vitro].

    PubMed

    Kul'chikov, A E; Makarenko, A N

    2008-01-01

    The study of an interferon-inducing action of neuropeptides (a cerebrolysin model) on production of interferons by human blood leukocytes has shown that neuropeptides induce gamma-interferon production in the titer 267 IU/ml that determines one of the mechanisms of a neuroimmunocorrecting effect of cerebrolysin (Ebewe, Austria) in many neurological diseases (acute stroke, brain traumas and different neuroinfectious diseases).

  10. Silent thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland. The disorder can cause hyperthyroidism, followed by hypothyroidism. The thyroid gland is located in the neck, ... Later symptoms may be of an underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ), including fatigue and cold intolerance, until the thyroid ...

  11. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... test is done to: Evaluate thyroid nodules or goiter Find the cause of an overactive thyroid gland ... chap 11. Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Cancer Goiter - simple Hyperthyroidism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II PET ...

  12. Thyroid Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... your menstrual period. Your thyroid helps control your menstrual cycle. Too much or too little thyroid hormone can ... Problems getting pregnant. When thyroid disease affects the menstrual cycle, it also affects ovulation. This can make it ...

  13. Interferons and Interferon Regulatory Factors in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Claser, Carla; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei; Rénia, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most serious infectious diseases in humans and responsible for approximately 500 million clinical cases and 500 thousand deaths annually. Acquired adaptive immune responses control parasite replication and infection-induced pathologies. Most infections are clinically silent which reflects on the ability of adaptive immune mechanisms to prevent the disease. However, a minority of these can become severe and life-threatening, manifesting a range of overlapping syndromes of complex origins which could be induced by uncontrolled immune responses. Major players of the innate and adaptive responses are interferons. Here, we review their roles and the signaling pathways involved in their production and protection against infection and induced immunopathologies. PMID:25157202

  14. Multielemental analysis of human thyroid glands using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, K.; Yokode, Y.; Sasa, Y.; Kusuyama, H.; Uda, M.

    1987-03-01

    PIXE spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of human thyroid glands. Nontumor thyroid tissues taken from different patients showed almost the same composition which fell into the range of the data for normal thyroids given in the literature. On the other hand, a deficiency of iodine and iron was observed in all of the malignant and benign tumor tissues examined here. In some injured tissues considerable deviations of K and Ca from normal concentration levels were also recognized. This work demonstrates an important advantage of PIXE to analyze fugacious elements together with other elements simultaneously.

  15. Interferon γ-induced protein 10 kinetics in treatment-naive versus treatment-experienced patients receiving interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C virus infection: implications for the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jennifer C; Habersetzer, François; Rodriguez-Torres, Maribel; Afdhal, Nezam; Lawitz, Eric J; Paulson, Matthew S; Zhu, Yanni; Subramanian, Gangadharan Mani; McHutchison, John G; Sulkowski, Mark; Wyles, David L; Schooley, Robert T

    2014-12-15

    We measured interferon γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10) levels in 428 patients at baseline, week 1, and week 2 of all-oral treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. An increased baseline IP-10 level was associated with a T allele in the IL28B gene, an increased alanine aminotransferase level in treatment-naive but not experienced patients, and an increased body mass index. At week 1, the mean decline in plasma IP-10 levels was the same in treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients (-49%), whereas during week 2 the mean decline in IP-10 levels in treatment-naive patients (-14%) was significantly larger than in treatment-experienced patients (-2%; P = .0176). IP-10 thus may be a surrogate marker of the rate of intracellular viral replication complex decay.

  16. Δγ₁134.5 herpes simplex viruses encoding human cytomegalovirus IRS1 or TRS1 induce interferon regulatory factor 3 phosphorylation and an interferon-stimulated gene response.

    PubMed

    Cassady, Kevin A; Saunders, Ute; Shimamura, Masako

    2012-01-01

    The chimeric herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are Δγ₁34.5 vectors encoding the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IRS1 or TRS1 genes. They are capable of late viral protein synthesis and are superior to Δγ₁34.5 HSVs in oncolytic activity. The interferon (IFN) response limits efficient HSV gene expression and replication. HCMV TRS1 and IRS1 restore one γ₁34.5 gene function: evasion of IFN-inducible protein kinase R, allowing late viral protein synthesis. Here we show that, unlike wild-type HSV, the chimeric HSV do not restore another γ₁34.5 function, the suppression of early IFN signaling mediated by IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3).

  17. Sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selectively inhibits interferon-{gamma}-induced expression of the chemokine CXCL9 gene in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaeda, Yoshiichi; Hiroi, Miki; Shimojima, Takahiro; Iguchi, Mayumi; Kanegae, Haruhide; Ohmori, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp

    2006-11-17

    Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to exert an anti-tumor effect on several types of cancer. To determine the effect of sulindac on intracellular signaling pathways in host immune cells such as macrophages, we investigated the effect of the drug on interferon gamma (IFN{gamma})-induced expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and other genes in mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Sulindac, but not aspirin or sodium salicylate, inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced expression of the CXC ligand 9 (CXCL9) mRNA, a chemokine for activated T cells, whereas the interferon-induced expression of CXCL10 or IFN regulatory factor-1 was not affected by sulindac. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that sulindac inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced promoter activity of the CXCL9 gene. Surprisingly, sulindac had no inhibitory effect on IFN{gamma}-induced STAT1 activation; however, constitutive nuclear factor {kappa}B activity was suppressed by the drug. These results indicate that sulindac selectively inhibited IFN{gamma}-inducible gene expression without inhibiting STAT1 activation.

  18. Effect of Interferon-γ on the Basal and the TNFα-Stimulated Secretion of CXCL8 in Thyroid Cancer Cell Lines Bearing Either the RET/PTC Rearrangement Or the BRAF V600e Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Rotondi, Mario; Coperchini, Francesca; Awwad, Oriana; Di Buduo, Christian A.; Abbonante, Vittorio; Magri, Flavia; Balduini, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    CXCL8 displays several tumor-promoting effects. Targeting and/or lowering CXCL8 concentrations within the tumor microenvironment would produce a therapeutic benefit. Aim of this study was to test the effect of IFNγ on the basal and TNFα-stimulated secretion of CXCL8 in TCP-1 and BCPAP thyroid cancer cell lines (harboring RET/PTC rearrangement and BRAF V600e mutation, resp.). Cells were incubated with IFNγ (1, 10, 100, and 1000 U/mL) alone or in combination with TNF-α (10 ng/mL) for 24 hours. CXCL8 and CXCL10 concentrations were measured in the cell supernatants. IFNγ inhibited in a dose-dependent and significant manner both the basal (ANOVA F: 22.759; p < 0.00001) and the TNFα-stimulated (ANOVA F: 15.309; p < 0.00001) CXCL8 secretions in BCPAP but not in TPC-1 cells (NS). On the other hand, IFNγ and IFNγ + TNF-α induced a significant secretion of CXCL10 in both BCPAP (p < 0.05) and TPC-1 (p < 0.05) cells. Transwell migration assay showed that (i) CXCL8 increased cell migration in both TPC-1 and BCPAP cells; (ii) IFNγ significantly reduced the migration only of BCPAP cells; and (iii) CXCL8 reverted the effect of IFNγ. These results constitute the first demonstration that IFNγ inhibits CXCL8 secretion and in turn the migration of a BRAF V600e mutated thyroid cell line. PMID:27555670

  19. Organ Atrophy Induced by Sorafenib and Sunitinib – Quantitative Computed Tomography (CT) Evaluation of the Pancreas, Thyroid Gland and Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hiroaki; Nasu, Katsuhiro; Minami, Manabu; Kojima, Takahiro; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Ishiguro, Toshitaka; Konishi, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate organ atrophy induced by sorafenib and sunitinib, we retrospectively reviewed the CT scans of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients receiving molecular targeted therapy (MTT) using sorafenib or sunitinib, and performed volumetric analysis of the pancreas, thyroid gland, and spleen. Material/Methods Thirteen RCC patients receiving MTT were assigned as the evaluation cases (MTT group), while thirteen additional RCC patients not receiving MTT were retrieved as the Control group. We evaluated the baseline and follow-up CT studies. The volume of the three organs estimated by CT volumetry was compared between the baseline and follow-up CTs. The atrophic ratio of the organ volume in the follow-up CT to that in the baseline CT was calculated, and compared between the MTT and Control groups. Results All measured organs in the MTT group showed statistically significant volume loss, while no significant change was observed in the Control group. Mean atrophic ratio in the MTT group was 0.74, 0.58, and 0.82 for the pancreas, thyroid and spleen, respectively. The differences in atrophic ratios between both groups were all statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusions Single-agent sorafenib or sunitinib therapy induced statistically significant atrophy in the pancreas, thyroid, and spleen. PMID:27956943

  20. Recombinant human gamma interferon inhibits simian malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, R K; Czarniecki, C W; Dutta, G P; Puri, S K; Dhawan, B N; Friedman, R M

    1986-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment with 0.1 mg of human gamma interferon per kg (body weight) per day completely suppressed experimental infection with Plasmodium cynomolgi B sporozoites in rhesus monkeys. Treatment with lower doses partially suppressed this infection. Prophylactic treatment with human gamma interferon, however, had no protective effect against trophozoite-induced infection, suggesting that the interferon effect was limited to the exoerythrocytic stage of parasitic development. PMID:3091507

  1. Type I interferons regulate susceptibility to inflammation-induced preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, Monica; Presicce, Pietro; Lawson, Matthew J; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Stankiewicz, Traci E; Vanoni, Simone; Harley, Isaac T W; McAlees, Jaclyn W; Giles, Daniel A; Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E; Rueda, Cesar M; Senthamaraikannan, Paranth; Sun, Xiaofei; Karns, Rebekah; Hoebe, Kasper; Janssen, Edith M; Karp, Christopher L; Hildeman, David A; Hogan, Simon P; Kallapur, Suhas G; Chougnet, Claire A; Way, Sing Sing; Divanovic, Senad

    2017-03-09

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a leading worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in infants. Maternal inflammation induced by microbial infection is a critical predisposing factor for PTB. However, biological processes associated with competency of pathogens, including viruses, to induce PTB or sensitize for secondary bacterial infection-driven PTB are unknown. We show that pathogen/pathogen-associated molecular pattern-driven activation of type I IFN/IFN receptor (IFNAR) was sufficient to prime for systemic and uterine proinflammatory chemokine and cytokine production and induction of PTB. Similarly, treatment with recombinant type I IFNs recapitulated such effects by exacerbating proinflammatory cytokine production and reducing the dose of secondary inflammatory challenge required for induction of PTB. Inflammatory challenge-driven induction of PTB was eliminated by defects in type I IFN, TLR, or IL-6 responsiveness, whereas the sequence of type I IFN sensing by IFNAR on hematopoietic cells was essential for regulation of proinflammatory cytokine production. Importantly, we also show that type I IFN priming effects are conserved from mice to nonhuman primates and humans, and expression of both type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines is upregulated in human PTB. Thus, activation of the type I IFN/IFNAR axis in pregnancy primes for inflammation-driven PTB and provides an actionable biomarker and therapeutic target for mitigating PTB risk.

  2. Type I interferons regulate susceptibility to inflammation-induced preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, Monica; Presicce, Pietro; Lawson, Matthew J.; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Stankiewicz, Traci E.; Vanoni, Simone; Harley, Isaac T.W.; McAlees, Jaclyn W.; Giles, Daniel A.; Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E.; Rueda, Cesar M.; Senthamaraikannan, Paranth; Karns, Rebekah; Hoebe, Kasper; Janssen, Edith M.; Karp, Christopher L.; Hildeman, David A.; Hogan, Simon P.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Chougnet, Claire A.; Way, Sing Sing

    2017-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a leading worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in infants. Maternal inflammation induced by microbial infection is a critical predisposing factor for PTB. However, biological processes associated with competency of pathogens, including viruses, to induce PTB or sensitize for secondary bacterial infection–driven PTB are unknown. We show that pathogen/pathogen-associated molecular pattern–driven activation of type I IFN/IFN receptor (IFNAR) was sufficient to prime for systemic and uterine proinflammatory chemokine and cytokine production and induction of PTB. Similarly, treatment with recombinant type I IFNs recapitulated such effects by exacerbating proinflammatory cytokine production and reducing the dose of secondary inflammatory challenge required for induction of PTB. Inflammatory challenge–driven induction of PTB was eliminated by defects in type I IFN, TLR, or IL-6 responsiveness, whereas the sequence of type I IFN sensing by IFNAR on hematopoietic cells was essential for regulation of proinflammatory cytokine production. Importantly, we also show that type I IFN priming effects are conserved from mice to nonhuman primates and humans, and expression of both type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines is upregulated in human PTB. Thus, activation of the type I IFN/IFNAR axis in pregnancy primes for inflammation-driven PTB and provides an actionable biomarker and therapeutic target for mitigating PTB risk. PMID:28289719

  3. Local anesthetics induce apoptosis in human thyroid cancer cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuan-Ching; Hsu, Yi-Chiung; Liu, Chien-Liang; Huang, Shih-Yuan; Hu, Meng-Chun; Cheng, Shih-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Local anesthetics are frequently used in fine-needle aspiration of thyroid lesions and locoregional control of persistent or recurrent thyroid cancer. Recent evidence suggests that local anesthetics have a broad spectrum of effects including inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in neuronal and other types of cells. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment with lidocaine and bupivacaine resulted in decreased cell viability and colony formation of both 8505C and K1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Lidocaine and bupivacaine induced apoptosis, and necrosis in high concentrations, as determined by flow cytometry. Lidocaine and bupivacaine caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, accompanied by activation of caspase 3 and 7, PARP cleavage, and induction of a higher ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. Based on microarray and pathway analysis, apoptosis is the prominent transcriptional change common to lidocaine and bupivacaine treatment. Furthermore, lidocaine and bupivacaine attenuated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity and induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-jun N-terminal kinase. Pharmacological inhibitors of MAPK/ERK kinase and p38 MAPK suppressed caspase 3 activation and PARP cleavage. Taken together, our results for the first time demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of local anesthetics on thyroid cancer cells and implicate the MAPK pathways as an important mechanism. Our findings have potential clinical relevance in that the use of local anesthetics may confer previously unrecognized benefits in the management of patients with thyroid cancer.

  4. Cloning and expression analysis of interferon-γ-inducible-lysosomal thiol reductase gene in South African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis).

    PubMed

    Cui, Xian-wei; Xiao, Wen; Ke, Zhen; Liu, Xia; Xu, Xing-zhou; Zhang, Shuang-quan

    2011-12-01

    In this study, an interferon-γ-inducible-lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) homologue has been cloned and identified from South African clawed frog Xenopus laevis (designated XlGILT). The open reading frame (ORF) of XlGILT consists of 771 bases encoding a protein of 256 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 28.76kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 5.12. The N-terminus of the XlGILT was found to have a putative signal peptide with a cleavage site amino acid position at 15-16. SMART analysis showed that the XlGILT contained a GILT active-site C(69)GGC(72) motif and a GILT signature motif C(114)QHGKEECIGNLIETC(129). The expression levels of XlGILT mRNA were higher in spleen and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), moderate in liver, intestine, heart and kidney, and lower in lung. The XlGILT mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated in spleen in vivo and PBMCs in vitro after LPS stimulation. The soluble X. laevis GILT (XlsGILT) was inserted into a pET28a vector and expressed in BL21 (DE3) cells as a His-tag fusion enzyme. After purification, further study revealed that XlsGILT was capable of catalyzing the reduction of the interchain disulfide bonds intact IgG. These results will allow for further investigation to unravel the role of this key enzyme in class II MHC-restricted antigen processing and to use X. laevis as an in vivo model for related studies.

  5. Cytotoxic activity of interferon alpha induced dendritic cells as a biomarker of glioblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishinov, S. V.; Stupak, V. V.; Tyrinova, T. V.; Leplina, O. Yu.; Ostanin, A. A.; Chernykh, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells that can play direct role in anti-tumor immune response as killer cells. DC tumoricidal activity can be stimulated greatly by type I IFN (IFNα and IFNβ). In the present study, we examined cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of monocyte-derived IFNα-induced DCs generated from patients with brain glioma and evaluated the potential use of these parameters in diagnostics of high-grade gliomas. Herein, we demonstrated that patient DCs do not possess the ability to inhibit the growth of tumor HEp-2 cell line but low-grade and high-grade glioma patients do not differ significantly in DC cytostatic activity. However, glioma patient DCs are characterized by reduced cytotoxic activity against HEp-2 cells. The impairment of DC cytotoxic function is observed mainly in glioblastoma patients. The cytotoxic activity of DCs against HEp-2 cells below 9% is an informative marker for glioblastomas.

  6. Thyroid storm induced by TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fujio, Shingo; Ashari; Habu, Mika; Yamahata, Hitoshi; Moinuddin, F M; Bohara, Manoj; Arimura, Hiroshi; Nishijima, Yui; Arita, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas (TSHomas) are uncommon tumors of the anterior pituitary gland. Patients with TSHomas may present with hyperthyroidism, but the incidence of thyroid storm due to TSHomas has yet to be determined. We report a rare case of thyroid storm caused by TSHoma in a 54-year-old woman. Preoperatively she had symptoms of excessive sweating and palpitation. Blood tests showed inappropriate secretion of TSH with blood TSH 6.86 μ U/mL, fT3 19.8 pg/mL, and fT4 5.95 ng/dL. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a pituitary tumor with maximum diameter of 13 mm that was extirpated through transsphenoidal route. After operation the patient was stuporous and thyroid storm occurred presenting with hyperthermia, hypertension, and tachycardia. It was well managed with nicardipine, midazolam, steroids, and potassium iodide. Immunohistochemical staining of tumor specimen was positive for TSH and growth hormone (GH). One year after operation, fT3 and fT4 levels were still high. As her tumor was diagnosed to be GH- and TSH-producing adenoma, octreotide injection therapy was started, which normalized thyroid hormone levels. This is the second reported case with thyroid storm due to TSHoma and emphasizes the importance of strategies with interdisciplinary cooperation for prevention of such emergency conditions.

  7. Failure of thyroid hormone treatment to prevent inflammation-induced white matter injury in the immature brain

    PubMed Central

    Schang, Anne-Laure; Van Steenwinckel, Juliette; Chevenne, Didier; Alkmark, Marten; Hagberg, Henrik; Gressens, Pierre; Fleiss, Bobbi

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is very strongly associated with maternal/foetal inflammation and leads to permanent neurological deficits. These deficits correlate with the severity of white matter injury, including maturational arrest of oligodendrocytes and hypomyelination. Preterm birth and exposure to inflammation causes hypothyroxinemia. As such, supplementation with thyroxine (T4) seems a good candidate therapy for reducing white matter damage in preterm infants as oligodendrocyte maturation and myelination is regulated by thyroid hormones. We report on a model of preterm inflammation-induced white matter damage, in which induction of systemic inflammation by exposure from P1 to P5 to interleukin-1β (IL-1β) causes oligodendrocyte maturational arrest and hypomyelination. This model identified transient hypothyroidism and wide-ranging dysfunction in thyroid hormone signalling pathways. To test whether a clinically relevant dose of T4 could reduce inflammation-induced white matter damage we concurrently treated mice exposed to IL-1β from P1 to P5 with T4 (20 μg/kg/day). At P10, we isolated O4-positive pre-oligodendrocytes and gene expression analysis revealed that T4 treatment did not recover the IL-1β-induced blockade of oligodendrocyte maturation. Moreover, at P10 and P30 immunohistochemistry for markers of oligodendrocyte lineage (NG2, PDGFRα and APC) and myelin (MBP) similarly indicated that T4 treatment did not recover IL-1β-induced deficits in the white matter. In summary, in this model of preterm inflammation-induced white matter injury, a clinical dose of T4 had no therapeutic efficacy. We suggest that additional pre-clinical trials with T4 covering the breadth and scope of causes and outcomes of perinatal brain injury are required before we can correctly evaluate clinical trials data and understand the potential for thyroid hormone as a widely implementable clinical therapy. PMID:24240022

  8. Interferon-Induced Transmembrane Protein 3 Inhibits Hantaan Virus Infection, and Its Single Nucleotide Polymorphism rs12252 Influences the Severity of Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu-yang, Zheng; Pei-yu, Bian; Chuan-tao, Ye; Wei, Ye; Hong-wei, Ma; Kang, Tang; Chun-mei, Zhang; Ying-feng, Lei; Xin, Wei; Ping-zhong, Wang; Chang-xing, Huang; Xue-fan, Bai; Ying, Zhang; Zhan-sheng, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Previous studies have identified interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) as an interferon-stimulated gene family. However, the role of IFITMs in HTNV infection is unclear. In this study, we observed that IFITM3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) rs12252 C allele and CC genotype associated with the disease severity and HTNV load in the plasma of HFRS patients. In vitro experiments showed that the truncated protein produced by the rs12252 C allele exhibited an impaired anti-HTNV activity. We also proved that IFITM3 was able to inhibit HTNV infection in both HUVEC and A549 cells by overexpression and RNAi assays, likely via a mechanism of inhibiting virus entry demonstrated by binding and entry assay. Localization of IFITM3 in late endosomes was also observed. In addition, we demonstrated that the transcription of IFITM3 is negatively regulated by an lncRNA negative regulator of interferon response (NRIR). Taken together, we conclude that IFITM3, negatively regulated by NRIR, inhibits HTNV infection, and its SNP rs12252 correlates with the plasma HTNV load and the disease severity of patients with HFRS. PMID:28096800

  9. MMP2 and MMP9 participate in S1P-induced invasion of follicular ML-1 thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kalhori, Veronica; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-03-15

    The bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has emerged as a potent inducer of cancer cell migration and invasion. Previously, we have shown that S1P induces invasion of ML-1 follicular thyroid cancer cells via S1P receptors 1 and 3 (S1P1,3). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent proteolytic enzymes used by cells for degradation of the extracellular matrix during invasion and migration. In the present study, we examined the role of MMP2 and MMP9 for S1P-induced invasion of ML-1 cells, and found that S1P regulates the secretion and activity of MMP2 and MMP9 via S1P1,3. Both pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA knockdown of MMP2 and MMP9 could attenuate S1P-induced invasion. Additionally, we show that calpains and Rac1 mediate S1P-induced secretion of MMP2 and MMP9. In conclusion, MMP2 and MMP9 participate in S1P-evoked follicular ML-1 thyroid cancer cell invasion.

  10. Interferon-induced mechanosensing defects impede apoptotic cell clearance in lupus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Fu, Yang-Xin; Wu, Qi; Zhou, Yong; Crossman, David K.; Yang, PingAr; Li, Jun; Luo, Bao; Morel, Laurence M.; Kabarowski, Janusz H.; Yagita, Hideo; Ware, Carl F.; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Mountz, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a severe autoimmune disease that is associated with increased circulating apoptotic cell autoantigens (AC-Ags) as well as increased type I IFN signaling. Here, we describe a pathogenic mechanism in which follicular translocation of marginal zone (MZ) B cells in the spleens of BXD2 lupus mice disrupts marginal zone macrophages (MZMs), which normally clear AC debris and prevent follicular entry of AC-Ags. Phagocytosis of ACs by splenic MZMs required the megakaryoblastic leukemia 1 (MKL1) transcriptional coactivator–mediated mechanosensing pathway, which was maintained by MZ B cells through expression of membrane lymphotoxin-α1β2 (mLT). Specifically, type I IFN–induced follicular shuttling of mLT-expressing MZ B cells disengaged interactions between these MZ B cells and LTβ receptor–expressing MZMs, thereby downregulating MKL1 in MZMs. Loss of MKL1 expression in MZMs led to defective F-actin polymerization, inability to clear ACs, and, eventually, MZM dissipation. Aggregation of plasmacytoid DCs in the splenic perifollicular region, follicular translocation of MZ B cells, and loss of MKL1 and MZMs were also observed in an additional murine lupus model and in the spleens of patients with SLE. Collectively, the results suggest that lupus might be interrupted by strategies that maintain or enhance mechanosensing signaling in the MZM barrier to prevent follicular entry of AC-Ags. PMID:26098211

  11. Extensive Psoriasis Induced by Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2a and Ribavirin in the Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gun-Wook; Jwa, Seung-Wook; Song, Margaret; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C was treated with pegylated interferon alfa-2a in combination with ribavirin. However, psoriatic lesions appeared and worsened dramatically during therapy. Because of the extensive skin eruptions, he stopped therapy for chronic hepatitis C and subsequently started narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy and topical calcipotriol/betamethasone dipropionate ointment. After this, the psoriasis improved in a slow but comprehensive manner. Our case suggests that physicians should keep in mind the possibility of psoriasis as a side effect of interferon treatment for chronic hepatitis C. PMID:24371397

  12. Thyroid Growth and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dillwyn

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that most papillary thyroid cancers originate in infancy and childhood, based on the early rise in sporadic thyroid carcinoma incidence, the pattern of radiation-induced risk (highest in those exposed as infants), and the high prevalence of sporadic papillary thyroid cancers in children and adolescents (ultrasound screening after the Fukushima accident). The early origin can be linked to the growth pattern of follicular cells, with a high mitotic rate in infancy falling to very low replacement levels in adult life. The cell of origin of thyroid cancers, the differentiated follicular cell, has a limited growth potential. Unlike cancers originating in stem cells, loss of the usually tight link between differentiation and replicative senescence is required for immortalisation. It is suggested that this loss distinguishes larger clinically significant papillary thyroid cancers from micro-papillary thyroid cancers of little clinical significance. Papillary carcinogenesis can then be divided into 3 stages: (1) initiation, the first mutation in the carcinogenic cascade, for radiation-induced papillary thyroid cancers usually a RET rearrangement, (2) progression, acquisition of the additional mutations needed for low-grade malignancy, and (3) escape, further mutations giving immortality and a higher net growth rate. Most papillary thyroid cancers will not have achieved full immortality by adulthood, and remain as so-called micro-carcinomas with a very low growth rate. The use of the term ‘cancer’ to describe micro-papillary thyroid cancers in older patients encourages overtreatment and alarms patients. Invasive papillary thyroid tumours show a spectrum of malignancy, which at its lowest poses no threat to life. The treatment protocols and nomenclature for small papillary carcinomas need to be reconsidered in the light of the new evidence available, the continuing discovery of smaller lesions, and the model of thyroid carcinogenesis proposed. PMID

  13. [Thyroid and radiation].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, S; Namba, H; Nagataki, S

    1993-11-20

    The topic "Thyroid and Radiation" is both an old and a new area to be solved by human beings. The thyroid is an organ that is usually susceptible to exposure to ionizing radiation, both by virtue of its ability to concentrate radioiodine (internal radiation) and by routine medical examination: Chest X-ray, Dental X-ray, X-irradiation of cervical lymphnodes etc. (external radiation). Iodine-131 is widely used for the therapy of Graves' disease and thyroid cancers, of which the disadvantage is radiation-induced hypothyroidism but not complications of thyroid tumor. The thyroid gland is comparatively radioresistant, however, the data obtained from Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Marshall islands indicates a high incidence of external radiation-induced thyroid tumors as well as hypothyroidism. The different biological effects of internal and external radiation remains to be further clarified. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrate the increased number of thyroid cancer in children around Chernobyl in Belarus. In this review, we would like to introduce the effect of radiation on the thyroid gland at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. Furthermore the clinical usefulness of iodine-131, including the safety-control for radiation exposure will be discussed.

  14. Interleukin-28B polymorphisms and interferon gamma inducible protein-10 serum levels in seronegative occult hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bartolomé, Javier; Castillo, Inmaculada; Quiroga, Juan Antonio; Carreño, Vicente

    2016-02-01

    Polymorphisms upstream interleukin (IL)-28B gene and serum levels of interferon gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) are associated with spontaneous and treatment-induced hepatitis C virus (HCV) clearance. Patients with seronegative occult HCV infection are anti-HCV and serum HCV-RNA negative but have viral RNA in liver and abnormal values of liver enzymes. We examined if the rs12979860 polymorphism of IL-28B and serum IP-10 levels differ between chronic and seronegative occult CV infection. IL-28B polymorphism was determined with allele specific TaqMan probes in total DNA isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and IP-10 by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serum from 99 patients with seronegative occult HCV infection and 130 untreated patients with chronic hepatitis C. IL-28B genotypes were also determined in 54 healthy volunteers. Prevalence of the IL-28B CC genotype was significantly higher in seronegative occult HCV infection (52/99; 52.5%) than in chronic hepatitis C (32/130; 24.6%, P < 0.0001) or healthy controls (19/54: 32.5%, P = 0.039). Among patients with seronegative occult HCV infection, HCV-RNA load in liver was significantly lower in those with the IL-28B CC genotype than in those with CT + TT genotypes (2.8 × 10(5)  ± 5.8 × 10(4) vs. 4.1 × 10(5)  ± 5.9 × 10(4)  copies/μg of total RNA respectively; P = 0.023). Mean serum IP-10 levels were significantly lower in patients with seronegative occult HCV infection than in patients with chronic hepatitis C (160.8 ± 17.9 vs. 288.7 ± 13.3 pg/ml respectively; P < 0.0001). These findings suggest that the host immune response plays an important role in seronegative occult HCV infection in comparison with chronic hepatitis C.

  15. Effects of ZnO nanoparticles on perfluorooctane sulfonate induced thyroid-disrupting on zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Du, Jia; Wang, Shutao; You, Hong; Liu, Zhongqiang

    2016-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and ZnO nanoparticles (nano-ZnO) are widely distributed in the environment. However, the potential toxicity of co-exposure to PFOS and nano-ZnO remains to be fully elucidated. The test investigated the effects of co-exposure to PFOS and nano-ZnO on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis in zebrafish. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to a combination of PFOS (0.2, 0.4, 0.8mg/L) and nano-ZnO (50mg/L) from their early stages of life (0-14days). The whole-body content of TH and the expression of genes and proteins related to the HPT axis were analyzed. The co-exposure decreased the body length and increased the malformation rates compared with exposure to PFOS alone. Co-exposure also increased the triiodothyronine (T3) levels, whereas the thyroxine (T4) content remained unchanged. Compared with the exposure to PFOS alone, exposure to both PFOS (0.8mg/L) and nano-ZnO (50mg/L) significantly up-regulated the expression of corticotropin-releasing factor, sodium/iodidesymporter, iodothyronine deiodinases and thyroid receptors and significantly down-regulated the expression of thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroglobulin (TG), transthyretin (TTR) and thyroid receptors. The protein expression levels of TG and TTR were also significantly down-regulated in the co-exposure groups. In addition, the expression of the thyroid peroxidase gene was unchanged in all groups. The results demonstrated that PFOS and nano-ZnO co-exposure could cause more serious thyroid-disrupting effects in zebrafish than exposure to PFOS alone. Our results also provide insight into the mechanism of disruption of the thyroid status by PFOS and nano-ZnO.

  16. pol-miR-731, a teleost miRNA upregulated by megalocytivirus, negatively regulates virus-induced type I interferon response, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bao-cun; Zhou, Ze-jun; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Megalocytivirus is a DNA virus that is highly infectious in a wide variety of marine and freshwater fish, including Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), a flatfish that is farmed worldwide. However, the infection mechanism of megalocytivirus remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the function of a flounder microRNA, pol-miR-731, in virus-host interaction. We found that pol-miR-731 was induced in expression by megalocytivirus and promoted viral replication at the early infection stage. In vivo and in vitro studies revealed that pol-miR-731 (i) specifically suppresses the expression of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) and cellular tumor antigen p53 in a manner that depended on the integrity of the pol-miR-731 complementary sequences in the 3′ untranslated regions of IRF7 and p53, (ii) disrupts megalocytivirus-induced Type I interferon response through IRF7, (iii) inhibits megalocytivirus-induced splenocyte apoptosis and cell cycle arrest through p53. Furthermore, overexpression of IRF7 and p53 abolished both the inhibitory effects of pol-miR-731 on these biological processes and its stimulatory effect on viral replication. These results disclosed a novel evasion mechanism of megalocytivirus mediated by a host miRNA. This study also provides the first evidence that a virus-induced host miRNA can facilitate viral infection by simultaneously suppressing several antiviral pathways. PMID:27311682

  17. Antagonism of the interferon-induced OAS-RNase L pathway by murine coronavirus ns2 protein is required for virus replication and liver pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Jha, Babal K; Wu, Ashley; Elliott, Ruth; Ziebuhr, John; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Silverman, Robert H; Weiss, Susan R

    2012-06-14

    Many viruses induce hepatitis in humans, highlighting the need to understand the underlying mechanisms of virus-induced liver pathology. The murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), causes acute hepatitis in its natural host and provides a useful model for understanding virus interaction with liver cells. The MHV accessory protein, ns2, antagonizes the type I interferon response and promotes hepatitis. We show that ns2 has 2',5'-phosphodiesterase activity, which blocks the interferon inducible 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS)-RNase L pathway to facilitate hepatitis development. Ns2 cleaves 2',5'-oligoadenylate, the product of OAS, to prevent activation of the cellular endoribonuclease RNase L and consequently block viral RNA degradation. An ns2 mutant virus was unable to replicate in the liver or induce hepatitis in wild-type mice, but was highly pathogenic in RNase L deficient mice. Thus, RNase L is a critical cellular factor for protection against viral infection of the liver and the resulting hepatitis.

  18. Interferon α Induces the Apoptosis of Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells by Activating both the Intrinsic Mitochondrial Pathway and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Ye; Cao, Cheng; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The interferon α (IFN-α) has been often used as a sensitizing agent for the treatment of various malignancies such as hepatocellular carcinoma, malignant melanoma, and renal cell cancer by promoting the apoptosis of thesetumor cell types. However, the effect of IFN-α on cervical cancer remains unknown. In this study, HeLa cells were used as a testing model for the treatment of IFN-α on cervical cancer. The results indicate that IFN-α markedly inhibits the proliferation and induces the apoptosis of HeLa cells. The activation of caspase 3, the up-regulation of both Bim and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1, the down-regulation of Bcl-xL, as well as the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria were significantly induced upon IFN-α treatment, indicating that the intrinsic apoptotic pathway could be activated by IFN-α treatment. In addition, caspase 4—which is involved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis—was activated in response to IFN-α treatment. Knocking down caspase 4 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) markedly reduced the IFN-α-mediated cell apoptosis. However, no significant changes in the expressions of caspases 8 and 10 were observed upon IFN-α treatment, indicating that the apoptosis caused by IFN-α might be independent of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. These findings suggest that IFN-α may possess anti-cervical cancer capacity by activating cell apoptosis via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway and caspase-4-related ER stress-induced pathway. PMID:27827850

  19. THYROID HORMONE REVERSES AGING-INDUCED MYOCARDIAL FATTY ACID OXIDATION DEFECTS AND IMPROVES THE RESPONSE TO ACUTELY INCREASED AFTERLOAD

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena; Portman, Michael A.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron

    2013-06-07

    Background: Subclinical hypothyroidism occurs during aging in humans and mice and may contribute to development of heart failure. Aging also impairs myocardial fatty acid oxidation, causing increased reliance on flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) to maintain function. We hypothesize that the metabolic changes in aged hearts make them less tolerant to acutely increased work and that thyroid hormone reverses these defects. Methods: Studies were performed on young (Young, 4-6 months) and aged (Old, 22-24 months) C57/BL6 mice at standard (50 mmHg) and high afterload (80 mmHg). Another aged group received thyroid hormone for 3 weeks (Old-TH, high afterload only). Function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle (CAC) using perfusate with 13C labeled lactate, pyruvate, glucose and unlabeled palmitate and insulin. Results: Cardiac function was similar between Young and Old mice at standard afterload. Palmitate Fc was reduced but no individual carbohydrate contributions differed. CAC and individual substrate fluxes decreased in aged. At high afterload, -dP/dT was decreased in Old versus Young. Similar to low afterload, palmitate Fc was decreased in Old. Thyroid hormone reversed aging-induced changes in palmitate Fc and flux while significantly improving cardiac function. Conclusion: The aged heart shows diminished ability to increase cardiac work due to substrate limitations, primarily impaired fatty acid oxidation. The heart accommodates slightly by increasing efficiency through oxidation of carbohydrate substrates. Thyroid hormone supplementation in aged mice significantly improves cardiac function potentially through restoration of fatty acid oxidation.

  20. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms and ...

  1. Impact of low-level thyroid hormone disruption induced by propylthiouracil on brain development and function.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Mary E

    2011-12-01

    The critical role of thyroid hormone (TH) in brain development is well-established. Evidence shows that severe deficiencies lead to significant neurological dysfunction. Much less information is available on more modest perturbations of TH on brain function. The present study induced varying degrees of developmental hypothyroidism by administration of low doses of the TH synthesis inhibitor, propylthiouracil (PTU 0, 1, 2, and 3 ppm) to the drinking water of pregnant rats. This regimen produced dose-dependent reductions in circulating levels of T4 in dams and offspring on postnatal days (PN) 15 and 22, with return to control levels in adulthood upon termination of treatment at weaning. Modest reductions in T3 were observed in the high-dose group on PN15. Synaptic function in the dentate gyrus was examined in adult euthyroid offspring using in vivo field potentials. Excitatory synaptic transmission (excitatory postsynaptic potential [EPSP] slope amplitude) was significantly reduced at 2 and 3 ppm PTU, with no statistically reliable effect detected in the population spike. Paired-pulse functions estimating the integrity of inhibitory synaptic processing were modestly reduced by 3 ppm PTU. Long-term potentiation (LTP) of the EPSP slope was impaired at all dose levels. Trace fear conditioning to context and to cue was impaired at the highest dose level when a distractor stimulus was present, whereas conditioning in a standard trace fear paradigm paradoxically revealed "enhanced" performance at the intermediate dose and a return to control values in the high-dose group. Biphasic dose-response profiles were evident in some measures (trace fear conditioning and LTP) but not others and serve to exemplify the complexity of the role of TH in brain development and its consequences for brain function.

  2. 2-methoxyestradiol induces apoptosis in cultured human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Roswall, Pernilla; Bu, Shizhong; Rubin, Kristofer; Landström, Maréne; Heldin, Nils-Erik

    2006-02-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most malignant tumors in humans, and currently there is no effective treatment. In the present study we investigated the effect of an endogenous estrogen metabolite, 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME), on the growth of human ATC cells. 2-ME treatment had a strong growth inhibitory effect on five human ATC cell lines (HTh7, HTh 74, HTh83, C643, and SW1736), but showed no effect on one cell line (KAT-4). Cell cycle analysis of the growth-inhibited cells showed that 2-ME induced a G2/M-arrest, followed by an increased fraction of cells in sub-G1. Analysis of internucleosomal DNA laddering as well as DNA fragmentation in a terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay demonstrated a high number of cells undergoing apoptosis after 2-ME treatment. An increased activation of caspase-3 and caspase-8 by 2-ME was observed, and inhibition of caspase-3 decreased the apoptotic effect. Addition of 2-ME increased activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the sensitive HTh7 as well as the refractory KAT-4 cells, however, activation of stress-activated protein kinase/c-jun aminoterminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) was seen only in the HTh7 cells. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK and SAPK/JNK significantly attenuated the 2-ME effect. Taken together, our data demonstrate an antiproliferative and apoptotic effect of 2-ME on ATC cells involving activation of MAPKs.

  3. Examing the mechanisms of interferon-induced protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interferons (IFNs) are the first line of the host innate immune defense against viral infection and natural killer (NK) cells, and dendritic cells (DCs), play a key role in the initiation and regulation of both the innate and adaptive immune response. Previously we demonstrated that type I IFN or a ...

  4. Curcumin inhibits interferon-{alpha} induced NF-{kappa}B and COX-2 in human A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeeyun |; Im, Young-Hyuck | E-mail: imyh@smc.samsung.co.kr; Jung, Hae Hyun; Kim, Joo Hyun; Park, Joon Oh |; Kim, Kihyun |; Kim, Won Seog |; Ahn, Jin Seok

    2005-08-26

    The A549 cells, non-small cell lung cancer cell line from human, were resistant to interferon (IFN)-{alpha} treatment. The IFN-{alpha}-treated A549 cells showed increase in protein expression levels of NF-{kappa}B and COX-2. IFN-{alpha} induced NF-{kappa}B binding activity within 30 min and this increased binding activity was markedly suppressed with inclusion of curcumin. Curcumin also inhibited IFN-{alpha}-induced COX-2 expression in A549 cells. Within 10 min, IFN-{alpha} rapidly induced the binding activity of a {gamma}-{sup 32}P-labeled consensus GAS oligonucleotide probe, which was profoundly reversed by curcumin. Taken together, IFN-{alpha}-induced activations of NF-{kappa}B and COX-2 were inhibited by the addition of curcumin in A549 cells.

  5. Up-regulation of NG2 proteoglycan and interferon-induced transmembrane proteins 1 and 3 in mouse astrocytoma: a membrane proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Nicholas T; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; Atwood, James A; Xia, Qiangwei; Seyfried, Thomas N; Orlando, Ron

    2008-05-18

    Although brain tumors are classified as if their lineage were well understood, the relationship between the molecular events that specify neural cell lineage and brain tumors remains enigmatic. Traditionally, cell surface membrane antigens have served as biomarkers that distinguish brain tumor origin and malignancy. In this study, membrane proteins were identified from a terminally differentiated mouse astrocyte (AC) and CT-2A astrocytoma (CT-2A) cell line using liquid-chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 321 and 297 protein groups with at least one unique peptide were identified in the AC and CT-2A cells. Using a label-free quantitative MS approach, 25 plasma membrane proteins in CT-2A were found significantly up- or down-regulated compared with those in AC. Three of the up-regulated proteins, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-4 (Cspg4), interferon-induced transmembrane protein-2 (IFITM2) and -3 (IFITM3) were further validated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. In addition, a third member of the IFITM family, interferon-induced transmembrane protein-1 (IFITM1) was also analyzed. Expression of Cspg4, IFITM1 and IFITM3 was significantly greater in the CT-2A cells than that in the AC cells. Interestingly, Cspg4, also known as neuronal/glial 2 (NG2) proteoglycan in human, is an oligodendrocyte progenitor marker. Therefore, our data suggest that the CT-2A tumor may be derived from NG2 glia rather than from fully differentiated astrocytes. Moreover, the CT-2A cells also express a series of interferon-induced signature proteins that may be specific to this tumor. These data highlight the utility of LC-MS/MS for the identification of brain tumor membrane biomarkers.

  6. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  7. Glucocorticoid Receptors, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Serotonin and Dopamine Neurotransmission are Associated with Interferon-Induced Depression

    PubMed Central

    Udina, M; Navinés, R; Egmond, E; Oriolo, G; Langohr, K; Gimenez, D; Valdés, M; Gómez-Gil, E; Grande, I; Gratacós, M; Kapczinski, F; Artigas, F; Vieta, E; Solà, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: The role of inflammation in mood disorders has received increased attention. There is substantial evidence that cytokine therapies, such as interferon alpha (IFN-alpha), can induce depressive symptoms. Indeed, proinflammatory cytokines change brain function in several ways, such as altering neurotransmitters, the glucocorticoid axis, and apoptotic mechanisms. This study aimed to evaluate the impact on mood of initiating IFN-alpha and ribavirin treatment in a cohort of patients with chronic hepatitis C. We investigated clinical, personality, and functional genetic variants associated with cytokine-induced depression. Methods: We recruited 344 Caucasian outpatients with chronic hepatitis C, initiating IFN-alpha and ribavirin therapy. All patients were euthymic at baseline according to DSM-IV-R criteria. Patients were assessed at baseline and 4, 12, 24, and 48 weeks after treatment initiation using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). We genotyped several functional polymorphisms of interleukin-28 (IL28B), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1), serotonin receptor-1A (HTR1A), catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT), glucocorticoid receptors (GCR1 and GCR2), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5) genes. A survival analysis was performed, and the Cox proportional hazards model was used for the multivariate analysis. Results: The cumulative incidence of depression was 0.35 at week 24 and 0.46 at week 48. The genotypic distributions were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Older age (p = 0.018, hazard ratio [HR] per 5 years = 1.21), presence of depression history (p = 0.0001, HR = 2.38), and subthreshold depressive symptoms at baseline (p = 0.005, HR = 1.13) increased the risk of IFN-induced depression. So too did TCI personality traits, with high scores on fatigability (p = 0.0037, HR = 1.17), impulsiveness (p = 0.0200 HR = 1

  8. Risk assessment of thyroid follicular cell tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, R N; Crisp, T M; Hurley, P M; Rosenthal, S L; Singh, D V

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid follicular cell tumors arise in rodents from mutations, perturbations of thyroid and pituitary hormone status with increased stimulation of thyroid cell growth by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), or a combination of the two. The only known human thyroid carcinogen is ionizing radiation. It is not known for certain whether chemicals that affect thyroid cell growth lead to human thyroid cancer. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency applies the following science policy positions: 1) chemically induced rodent thyroid tumors are presumed to be relevant to humans; 2) when interspecies information is lacking, the default is to assume comparable carcinogenic sensitivity in rodents and humans; 3) adverse rodent noncancer thyroid effects due to chemically induced thyroid-pituitary disruption are presumed to be relevant to humans; 4) linear dose-response considerations are applied to thyroid cancer induced by chemical substances that either do not disrupt thyroid functioning or lack mode of action information; 5) nonlinear thyroid cancer dose-response considerations are applied to chemicals that reduce thyroid hormone levels, increase TSH and thyroid cell division, and are judged to lack mutagenic activity; and 6) nonlinear considerations may be applied in thyroid cancer dose-response assessments on a case-by-case basis for chemicals that disrupt thyroid-pituitary functioning and demonstrate some mutagenic activity. Required data for risk assessment purposes is mode of action information on mutagenicity, increases in follicular cell growth (cell size and number) and thyroid gland weight, thyroid-pituitary hormones, site of action, correlations between doses producing thyroid effects and cancer, and reversibility of effects when dosing ceases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9681971

  9. Lead nitrate induced changes in the thyroid physiology of the catfish Clarias batrachus (L)

    SciTech Connect

    Katti, S.R.; Sathyanesan, A.G.

    1987-02-01

    Chronic exposure of Clarias batrachus to sublethal dose of 5 ppm lead nitrate for a period of 150 days impaired thyroid function. Histological observations revealed hypertrophy, increased cell height, vacuolation, and reduction of colloid. The thyrotrophs of the pituitary also exhibited hypertrophy. Radioiodine (/sup 131/I) uptake was significantly lowered. Fish exposed to 5, 10, and 25 ppm of lead nitrate for 7 days also exhibited significant reduction in /sup 131/I uptake which was dose dependent. These findings suggest that lead nitrate impairs thyroid function involving the hypothalamohypophysiothyroid axis.

  10. Effects of bone marrow cell transplant on thyroid function in an I131-induced low T4 and elevated TSH rat model

    PubMed Central

    Guajardo-Salinas, Gustavo E; Carvajal, Juan A; Gaytan-Ramos, Ángel A; Arroyo, Luis; López-Reyes, Alberto G; Islas, José F; Cano, Beiman G; Arroyo-Currás, Netzahualcoyótl; Dávalos, Alfredo; Madrid, Gloria; Moreno-Cuevas, Jorge E

    2007-01-01

    Background We developed a study using low dose radioactive iodine creating an animal model of transient elevation of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Male derived bone marrow cells were transplanted to asses their effect on thyroid function and their capability to repair the thyroid parenchyma. Results At 40 an 80 days after I131 treatment, the study groups TSH and T4 serum values both increased and decreased significantly respectively compared to the negative control group. Eight weeks after cell transplantation, neither TSH nor T4 showed a significant difference in any group. The mean number of SRY gene copies found in group I (Left Intracardiac Transplant) was 523.3 and those in group II (Intrathyroid Transplant) were only 73. Group III (No Transplant) and IV had no copies. Group I presented a partial restore of the histological pattern of rat thyroid with approximately 20% – 30% of normal-sized follicles. Group II did not show any histological differences compared to group III (Positive control). Conclusion Both a significant increase of TSH and decrease of T4 can be induced as early as day 40 after a low dose of I131 in rats. Restore of normal thyroid function can be spontaneously achieved after using a low dose RAI in a rat model. The use of BM derived cells did not affect the re-establishment of thyroid function and might help restore the normal architecture after treatment with RAI. PMID:17233913

  11. Effects of Inula racemosa root and Gymnema sylvestre leaf extracts in the regulation of corticosteroid induced diabetes mellitus: involvement of thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Gholap, S; Kar, A

    2003-06-01

    The efficacy of Inula racemosa (root) and Gymnema sylvestre (leaf) extracts either alone or in combination was evaluated in the amelioration of corticosteroid-induced hyperglycaemia in mice. Simultaneously thyroid hormone levels were estimated by radio-immunoassay (RIA) in order to ascertain whether the effects are mediated through thyroid hormones or not. While the corticosteroid (dexamethasone) administration increased the serum glucose concentration, it decreased serum concentrations of the thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Administration of the two plant extracts either alone or in combination decreased the serum glucose concentration in dexamethasone induced hyperglycaemic animals. However, the administration of Inula racemosa and Gymnema sylvestre extracts in combination proved to be more effective than the individual extracts. These effects were comparable to a standard corticosteroid-inhibiting drug, ketoconazole. As no marked changes in thyroid hormone concentrations were observed by the administration of any of the plant extracts in dexamethasone treated animals, it is further suggested that these plant extracts may not prove to be effective in thyroid hormone mediated type II diabetes, but for steroid induced diabetes.

  12. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate as a Regulator of Hypoxia-Induced Factor-1α in Thyroid Follicular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Muhammad Yasir; Bergelin, Nina; Jaakkola, Panu; Törnquist, Kid

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid, which regulates several cancer-related processes including migration and angiogenesis. We have previously shown S1P to induce migration of follicular ML-1 thyroid cancer cells. Hypoxia-induced factor-1 (HIF-1) is an oxygen-sensitive transcription factor, which adapts cells to hypoxic conditions through increased survival, motility and angiogenesis. Due to these properties and its increased expression in response to intratumoral hypoxia, HIF-1 is considered a significant regulator of tumor biology. We found S1P to increase expression of the regulatory HIF-1α subunit in normoxic ML-1 cells. S1P also increased HIF-1 activity and expression of HIF-1 target genes. Importantly, inhibition or knockdown of HIF-1α attenuated the S1P-induced migration of ML-1 cells. S1P-induced HIF-1α expression was mediated by S1P receptor 3 (S1P3), Gi proteins and their downstream effectors MEK, PI3K, mTOR and PKCβI. Half-life measurements with cycloheximide indicated that S1P treatment stabilized the HIF-1α protein. On the other hand, S1P activated translational regulators eIF-4E and p70S6K, which are known to control HIF-1α synthesis. In conclusion, we have identified S1P as a non-hypoxic regulator of HIF-1 activity in thyroid cancer cells, studied the signaling involved in S1P-induced HIF-1α expression and shown S1P-induced migration to be mediated by HIF-1. PMID:23824493

  13. Uninhibited thyroidal uptake of radioiodine despite iodine excess in amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersinga, W.M.; Touber, J.L.; Trip, M.D.; van Royen, E.A.

    1986-08-01

    Iodine excess is associated with a low thyroidal radioiodine uptake due to dilution of the radioisotope by the increased stable iodide pool. We studied thyroidal uptake of radioisotopes in cardiac patients with iodine excess due to amiodarone treatment. /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate scintigraphy was performed in 13 patients receiving long term amiodarone therapy. Five patients had a clearly visible thyroid gland, and 8 patients had no or a very faint thyroid image. All patients with positive scans had an increased plasma TSH level, whereas all patients with negative scans had a normal or absent TSH response to TRH. Thyroidal uptake and discharge of 123I were studied in 30 other patients. Group I (n = 11) had normal plasma TSH responses to TRH and no iodine excess, group II (n = 7) had normal TSH responses to TRH and excess iodine from metrizoate angiography in the previous month, group III (n = 7) had normal or decreased TSH responses to TRH while receiving long term amiodarone therapy, and group IV (n = 5) had increased TSH responses to TRH while receiving long term amiodarone therapy. The mean radioiodine uptake value in group I (5.4 +/- 0.8% (+/- SE) at 60 min) was higher than those in group II (2.3 +/- 0.7%; P = 0.009) and group III (0.8 +/- 0.3%; P = 0.0005), but not different from that in group IV (5.3 +/- 1.2%; P = NS). Radioiodine discharge after perchlorate (expressed as a percentage of the 60 min uptake) in group I (10.1 +/- 2.2%) was lower than those in group II (24.9 +/- 10.6%; P = 0.05) and group III (28.8 +/- 5.3%; P less than 0.005), whereas discharge in group IV (58.0 +/- 6.1%) was greater than those in group II (P less than 0.05) and group III (P less than 0.01). In conclusion, 1) thyroid visualization by /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate and thyroid radioiodine uptake during iodine excess are decreased in euthyroid and hyperthyroid patients, but preserved in hypothyroid patients.

  14. Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage Thyroid Cancer Treating Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy (chemo) uses anti-cancer drugs that are ... Thyroid Cancer, by Type and Stage More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  15. Interferon induction of fibroblast proteins with guanylate binding activity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y S; Colonno, R J; Yin, F H

    1983-06-25

    Treatment of human diploid fibroblastic cells with interferon induces the synthesis of two guanylate binding proteins (GBP) with molecular weights of 67,000 and 56,000. The Mr = 67,000 protein (67K GBP) is synthesized upon treatment with either alpha-, beta-, or gamma-interferon. Among these interferons, gamma-interferon induces a higher level of 67K GBP synthesis. The 67K GBP synthesized in either beta- or gamma-interferon-treated cells has two charge forms with isoelectric points of 6.0 and 5.8, respectively. The synthesis of the Mr = 56,000 protein is induced by the treatment using either alpha- or beta-interferon, but its synthesis in gamma-interferon-treated cells is undetectable. The amounts of the radioactive GBPs synthesized in human fibroblasts are proportional to the amounts of the purified beta-interferon used for the inductions. Syntheses of GBPs require the transcription of cellular genes because their syntheses are completely blocked by actinomycin D treatments. The mRNA for the 67K GBP is found in fibroblasts that are treated by either alpha-, beta-, or gamma-interferon, but it is not detected in untreated cells. More 67K GBP mRNA is accumulated in the gamma-interferon-treated than in alpha- or beta-interferon-treated fibroblasts. This is consistent with more 67K GBP synthesis found in gamma-interferon-treated fibroblasts.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, but not HTLV-I tax, are likely factors in the epidermotropism of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma via induction of interferon-inducible protein-10.

    PubMed

    Daliani, D; Ulmer, R A; Jackow, C; Pugh, W; Gansbacher, B; Cabanillas, F; Duvic, M; Sarris, A H

    1998-04-01

    We have previously shown that Interferon-Inducible Protein-10 (IP-10), a cytokine chemotactic for CD4-positive lymphocytes, is overexpressed by lesional epidermal keratinocytes and probably accounts for the epidermotropism of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). The tax gene of human T-lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I) immortalizes CD4-positive lymphocytes, induces IFN-gamma, and has been detected in patients with classical CTCL who are seronegative for HTLV-I. TNF-alpha is synergistic with IFN-gamma for the induction of IP-10. We therefore decided to define the presence of tax, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IP-10 in lesions of 19 adults with classical CTCL who were seronegative for HTLV-I. Lesional mRNAs for actin, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and tax were detected by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification. In addition IP-10, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma were detected and localized with immunocytochemistry of frozen sections. In agreement with previous observations IP-10 was overexpressed in lesional keratinocytes of all 19 patients. By RT-PCR, mRNA for IFN-gamma was detected in lesions of 8, and for TNF-alpha in lesions of 13 patients. By immunocytochemistry, TNF-alpha was expressed by lesional keratinocytes in 10 of 13 tested patients, whereas IFN-gamma was focally expressed by lesional lymphocytes and faintly by lesional keratinocytes in 9 of 13 tested patients. tax mRNA was not detected in lesions of any patient, but was easily detectable in cutaneous lesions or peripheral blood of control patients who were seropositive for HTLV-I. We conclude that TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma may cause epidermotropism by inducing IP-10. However, the tax gene of HTLV-I does not appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of classical CTCL.

  17. Effects of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents on Thyroid Hormone Receptor Action and Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ariyani, Winda; Iwasaki, Toshiharu; Miyazaki, Wataru; Khongorzul, Erdene; Nakajima, Takahito; Kameo, Satomi; Koyama, Hiroshi; Tsushima, Yoshito; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used in diagnostic imaging to enhance the quality of magnetic resonance imaging or angiography. After intravenous injection, GBCAs can accumulate in the brain. Thyroid hormones (THs) are critical for the development and functional maintenance of the central nervous system. TH actions in brain are mainly exerted through nuclear TH receptors (TRs). We examined the effects of GBCAs on TR-mediated transcription in CV-1 cells using transient transfection-based reporter assay and TH-mediated cerebellar Purkinje cell morphogenesis in primary culture. We also measured the cellular accumulation and viability of Gd after representative GBCA treatments in cultured CV-1 cells. Both linear (Gd-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-bis methyl acid, Gd-DTPA-BMA) and macrocyclic (Gd-tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid, Gd-DOTA) GBCAs were accumulated without inducing cell death in CV-1 cells. By contrast, Gd chloride (GdCl3) treatment induced approximately 100 times higher Gd accumulation and significantly reduced the number of cells. Low doses of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−8 to 10−6M) augmented TR-mediated transcription, but the transcription was suppressed at higher dose (10−5 to 10−4M), with decreased β-galactosidase activity indicating cellular toxicity. TR-mediated transcription was not altered by Gd-DOTA or GdCl3, but the latter induced a significant reduction in β-galactosidase activity at high doses, indicating cellular toxicity. In cerebellar cultures, the dendrite arborization of Purkinje cells induced by 10−9M T4 was augmented by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−7M) but was suppressed by higher dose (10−5M). Such augmentation by low-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA was not observed with 10−9M T3, probably because of the greater dendrite arborization by T3; however, the arborization by T3 was suppressed by a higher dose of Gd-DTPA-BMA (10−5M) as seen in T4 treatment. The effect of Gd-DOTA on dendrite arborization was much weaker

  18. Cytokine-inducing activity and antitumor effect of a liposome-incorporated interferon-gamma-inducing molecule derived from OK-432, a streptococcal preparation.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, M; Gohda, H; Ohe, G; Yoshida, H; Matsuno, T; Saito, M; Sato, M

    2000-01-01

    An interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-inducing molecule (OK-PSA) has been purified from OK-432 by an affinity chromatographic technique performed on cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B-bound TS-2 monoclonal antibody, which neutralizes IFN-gamma-inducing activity of OK-432. OK-PSA has striking anti-tumor activity in vivo and in vitro. In the current study, the liposomes were used to improve the delivery of the agent (OK-PSA) to effector cells and to increase the therapeutic effect. Significantly less OK-PSA encapsulated into liposomes (Lipo-OK-PSA) than OK-PSA alone (1/100 or less of OK-PSA alone) was required to induce IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), TNF-beta, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), natural killer, and lymphokine-activated killer activities by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mouse spleen cells. Furthermore, higher levels of these activities were detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mouse spleen cells treated with Lipo-OK-PSA than in those treated with OK-PSA. All of these activities induced by Lipo-OK-PSA were almost completely neutralized by anti-asialo-GM1 antibody and complement (p < 0.001). In in vivo experiments, Lipo-OK-PSA elicited striking anti-tumor activity on syngeneic Meth-A tumor-bearing and colon 26-bearing BALB/c mice and on salivary gland tumor-bearing nude mice far better than did OK-PSA. Furthermore, high levels of natural killer and lymphokine-activated killer activities and a significant increase in the number of cells positive for asialo-GM1, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, or IL-1 beta were detected in the spleen cells derived from the animals given Lipo-OK-PSA compared with those given saline. These findings clearly indicate that OK-PSA plays an important role in the anti-tumor efficiency of OK-432, and that, for the most part, liposome encapsulation of this molecule markedly accelerates its effect mediated by asialo-GM1-positive cells (mainly natural killer cells).

  19. Immunity Related GTPase Irgm1 promotes expansion of activated CD4+ T cell populations by preventing interferon-γ-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Carl G.; Zheng, Lixin; Jankovic, Dragana; Báfica, André; Cannons, Jennifer L.; Watford, Wendy T.; Chaussabel, Damien; Hieny, Sara; Caspar, Patricia; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Lenardo, Michael J.; Sher, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Summary Mice deficient in interferon-γ (IFN-γ) inducible immunity-related GTPase, Irgm1, display defective host resistance to a variety of intracellular pathogens. This increased susceptibility to infection is associated with impaired IFN-γ-dependent macrophage microbicidal activity in vitro. Here, we show that Irgm1 also regulated the survival of mature effector CD4+ T lymphocytes by protecting them from IFN-γ-induced autophagic cell death. Mice deficient in both IFN-γ and Irgm1 were rescued from the lymphocyte depletion and increased mortality that occurs in single Irgm1–/– animals following mycobacterial infection. These studies reveal a feedback mechanism in the TH1 response that limits the detrimental effects of IFN-γ on effector T lymphocyte survival while promoting the anti-microbial functions of IFN-γ. PMID:18806793

  20. Peripheral blood and intrathyroidal T cell clones from patients with thyroid autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Massart, C; Caroff, G; Maugendre, D; Genetet, N; Gibassier, J

    1999-01-01

    For a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thyroid autoimmune diseases, we have studied morphological and functional properties of T clones from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and from intrathyroidal lymphocytes (ITL) obtained from 3 patients with Graves' disease or 1 Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Investigations were carried out on clones cultured alone or cocultured with autologous thyrocytes. Clonage efficiency ranged from 30% to 33% for PBL and 10% to 36% for ITL. A predominance of CD4-positive clones was observed whatever the origin of the lymphocytes or the autoimmune pathology. Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) was detected in the majority (17/19) of the clones tested. Intracytoplasmic interleukin (IL-4) was secreted in 7/19 clones and both cytokines were produced in 5/19 clones. In coculture a proliferative response and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) production were observed with 6 clones (4 from Graves thyrocytes and 2 from thyroiditis). No cytotoxic clone was derived from Graves or thyroiditis tissues. These data demonstrate that the large majority of T clones are principally CD4-T cells; all the clones secreted TNF-alpha and a large majority produced IFN-gamma. Only a few clones produced IL-4 alone or associated with IFN-gamma. Six T clones induced proliferative response and of TNF-alpha secretion in coculture. Further investigations must be performed on these antigen-reactive T clones to analyse their role in the pathogenesis of the human thyroid autoimmune diseases.

  1. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... the thyroid, a computerized tomography (CT) scan, or nuclear medicine tests, to diagnose and find the cause ... is having the scan for other health problems. Nuclear medicine tests. Nuclear medicine tests of the thyroid ...

  2. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  3. Thyroid Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated differently. Common thyroid disorders and problems include: Hypothyroidism Hypothyroidism is a disorder in which your thyroid doesn’ ... normal after you get better. If you have hypothyroidism, however, the levels of T4 in your blood ...

  4. Thyroid Antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... blocking production of thyroid hormones and resulting in hypothyroidism . TBII is not routinely tested, but TSI is ... autoimmune disease . A low level of thyroid hormones ( hypothyroidism ) can cause symptoms, such as: Weight gain Fatigue ...

  5. Interferon gamma regulates antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment into the mouse airways by inhibiting the infiltration of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have previously shown that antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment into the tissue of sensitized mice is mediated by CD4+ T cells and interleukin 5. To determine whether interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) regulates antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment into the tissue, we studied the effect of recombinant (r) murine IFN-gamma and of anti-IFN- gamma monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the eosinophil infiltration of the trachea induced by antigen inhalation in mice. The intraperitoneal administration of rIFN-gamma prevented antigen-induced eosinophil infiltration in the trachea of sensitized mice. The administration of rIFN-gamma also decreased antigen-induced CD4+ T cell but not CD8+ T cell infiltration in the trachea. On the other hand, pretreatment with anti-IFN-gamma mAb enhanced antigen-induced eosinophil and CD4+ T cell infiltration in the trachea. These results indicate that IFN-gamma regulates antigen-induced eosinophil recruitment into the tissue by inhibiting CD4+ T cell infiltration. PMID:8093895

  6. InterferonInduces Neurotoxicity Through Activation of the Type I Receptor and the GluN2A Subunit of the NMDA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kessing, Cari F.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of interferon-alpha (IFNα) in the central nervous system (CNS) are linked to cognitive dysfunction in patients with inflammatory CNS diseases such as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Increased CNS IFNα has also been found to be associated with cognitive dysfunction in a HAND mouse model. Here, we corroborate previous studies showing a dose-dependent decrease in dendritic branching and length caused by IFNα treatment and extend those studies. Because both direct and indirect mechanisms of IFNα-induced neurotoxicity are likely involved, the cell signaling pathway involving the IFNα receptor (IFNAR) was initially evaluated. Rat neuronal cultures exposed to IFNα demonstrate increased phosphorylation of STAT1 and increased interferon stimulating gene 15 (ISG15) expression, indicators of IFNAR engagement. However, specific blocking antibodies to the IFNAR were found to only partially protect neurons from IFNα-induced neurotoxicity. Additionally, inhibiting the GluN2A subunit of N-methyl-D-asparate receptor (NMDAR) was also found to be partially protective against IFNα-induced neurotoxicity compared with the GluN2B subunit. Neurotoxicity is evident in neurons extracted from IFNAR KO mice treated with IFNα as well, further indicating that IFNAR signaling is not required for IFNα neurotoxicity. The neurotoxic actions of IFNα are mediated through both the IFNAR as well as the GluN2A subunit of the NMDAR to reduce dendritic arborization in neurons. Complete protection from IFNα-induced neurotoxicity was demonstrated when both pathways were blocked. Blocking these pathways could lead to potential therapies for cognitive dysfunction during neuroinflammation and specifically lead to better treatments for HAND. PMID:25517826

  7. Toxoplasma gondii Inhibits gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and IFN-β-induced host cell STAT1 transcriptional activity by increasing the association of STAT1 with DNA.

    PubMed

    Rosowski, Emily E; Nguyen, Quynh P; Camejo, Ana; Spooner, Eric; Saeij, Jeroen P J

    2014-02-01

    The gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response, mediated by the STAT1 transcription factor, is crucial for host defense against the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, but prior infection with Toxoplasma can inhibit this response. Recently, it was reported that the Toxoplasma type II NTE strain prevents the recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes containing Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG-1) to promoters of IFN-γ-induced secondary response genes such as Ciita and major histocompatibility complex class II genes in murine macrophages, thereby inhibiting their expression. We report here that a type I strain of Toxoplasma inhibits the expression of primary IFN-γ response genes such as IRF1 through a distinct mechanism not dependent on the activity of histone deacetylases. Instead, infection with a type I, II, or III strain of Toxoplasma inhibits the dissociation of STAT1 from DNA, preventing its recycling and further rounds of STAT1-mediated transcriptional activation. This leads to increased IFN-γ-induced binding of STAT1 at the IRF1 promoter in host cells and increased global IFN-γ-induced association of STAT1 with chromatin. Toxoplasma type I infection also inhibits IFN-β-induced interferon-stimulated gene factor 3-mediated gene expression, and this inhibition is also linked to increased association of STAT1 with chromatin. The secretion of proteins into the host cell by a type I strain of Toxoplasma without complete parasite invasion is not sufficient to block STAT1-mediated expression, suggesting that the effector protein responsible for this inhibition is not derived from the rhoptries.

  8. MODEST THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY DURING DEVELOPMENT INDUCES A CELLULAR MALFORMATION IN THE CORPUS CALLOSUM: A MODEL OF CORTICAL DYSPLASIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing body of evidence that subtle decreases in maternal thyroid hormone during gestation can impact fetal brain development. The present study examined the impact of graded levels of thyroid hormone insufficiency on brain development in rodents. Maternal thyroid ho...

  9. The guanylate-binding proteins: emerging insights into the biochemical properties and functions of this family of large interferon-induced guanosine triphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Vestal, Deborah J; Jeyaratnam, Jonathan A

    2011-01-01

    Originally identified by their unusual ability to bind guanosine monophosphate (GMP) nucleotide agarose, the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were used extensively to promote our understanding of interferon-induced gene transcription and as markers of interferon responsiveness. Structural and biochemical analyses of human GBP-1 subsequently demonstrated that the GBPs are a unique subfamily of guanosine triphosphatase (GTPases) that hydrolyze guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to both guanosine diphosphate (GDP) and GMP. As members of the larger dynamin superfamily of GTPases, GBPs exhibit such properties as nucleotide-dependent oligomerization and concentration-dependent GTPase activity. Recently, progress has been made in assigning functions to members of the GBP family. While many of these functions involve protection against intracellular pathogens, a growing number of them are not directly related to pathogen protection. It is currently unclear how the unusual properties of GBPs contribute to this growing list of functions. As future studies uncover the molecular mechanism(s) of action of the GBPs, we will gain a greater understanding of how individual GBPs can mediate what currently appears to be a divergent set of functions.

  10. ATP1B3: a virus-induced host factor against EV71 replication by up-regulating the production of type-I interferons.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanfang; Hou, Hongyan; Wang, Feng; Qiao, Long; Wang, Xiong; Yu, Jing; Liu, Weiyong; Sun, Ziyong

    2016-09-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection can cause severe diseases, and is becoming increasingly common in children. In the current study, we carried out yeast two-hybrid assays to screen human proteins that could interact with 3A protein of EV71. Human β3 subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (ATP1B3) protein was demonstrated to interact with the 3A protein of EV71. Although 3A protein had no effect on the expression of ATP1B3, EV71 infection resulted in elevated expression of ATP1B3 in RD cell line, both on messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels. Interestingly, knockdown of ATP1B3 could significantly increase the replication of EV71, whereas overexpression of ATP1B3 significantly suppressed the replication of EV71 in RD cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the expression of ATP1B3 could induce the production of type-I interferons. Our study demonstrated that ATP1B3 inhibit EV71 replication by enhancing the production of type-I interferons, which could act as a potential therapeutic target in EV71 infection.

  11. β-Catenin Upregulates the Constitutive and Virus-Induced Transcriptional Capacity of the Interferon Beta Promoter through T-Cell Factor Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Marcato, Vasco; Luron, Lionel; Laqueuvre, Lucie M; Simon, Dominique; Mansuroglu, Zeyni; Flamand, Marie; Panthier, Jean-Jacques; Souès, Sylvie; Massaad, Charbel; Bonnefoy, Eliette

    2016-01-01

    Rapid upregulation of interferon beta (IFN-β) expression following virus infection is essential to set up an efficient innate antiviral response. Biological roles related to the antiviral and immune response have also been associated with the constitutive production of IFN-β in naive cells. However, the mechanisms capable of modulating constitutive IFN-β expression in the absence of infection remain largely unknown. In this work, we demonstrate that inhibition of the kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) leads to the upregulation of the constitutive level of IFN-β expression in noninfected cells, provided that GSK-3 inhibition is correlated with the binding of β-catenin to the IFN-β promoter. Under these conditions, IFN-β expression occurred through the T-cell factor (TCF) binding sites present on the IFN-β promoter independently of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Enhancement of the constitutive level of IFN-β per se was able to confer an efficient antiviral state to naive cells and acted in synergy with virus infection to stimulate virus-induced IFN-β expression. Further emphasizing the role of β-catenin in the innate antiviral response, we show here that highly pathogenic Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) targets the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the formation of active TCF/β-catenin complexes at the transcriptional and protein level in RVFV-infected cells and mice.

  12. [Gamma (or immune) interferon].

    PubMed

    Maniu, H

    1987-01-01

    Research on interferon progressed very much during the last years, especially studies on the gamma type of interferon. Historical data about the research conducted on the gamma interferon, its inductors, its physical, chemical and biological properties, the methods of preparation and purification, as well as the perspective of therapeutical utilisation of this type of interferon, in spite of some reversible side effects, are presented and discussed.

  13. Optimization of the T3-induced Xenopus metamorphosis assay for detecting thyroid hormone signaling disruption of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaofang; Chen, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yinfeng; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yao; Zheng, Zongming; Qin, Zhanfen; Zhang, Qingdong

    2017-02-01

    T3-induced Xenopus metamorphosis is an ideal model for detecting thyroid hormone (TH) signaling disruption of chemicals. To optimize the T3-induced Xenopus assay and improve its sensitivity and reproducibility, we intend to develop quantitatively morphological endpoints and choose appropriate concentrations and exposure durations for T3 induction. Xenopus laevis at stage 52 were exposed to series of concentrations of T3 (0.31-2.5nmol/L) for 6days. By comparing morphological changes induced by T3, we propose head area, mouth width, unilateral brain width/brain length, and hindlimb length/snout-vent length as quantitative parameters for characterizing T3-induced morphological changes, with body weight as a parameter for indicating integrated changes. By analyzing time-response curves, we found that following 4-day exposure, T3-induced grossly morphological changes displayed linear concentration-response curves, with moderate morphological changes resulting from 1.25nmol/L T3 exposure. When using grossly morphological endpoints to detect TH signaling disruption, we propose 4days as exposure duration of T3, with concentrations close to 1.25nmol/L as induction concentrations. However, it is appropriate to examine morphological and molecular changes of the intestine on day 2 due to their early response to T3. The quantitative endpoints and T3 induction concentrations and durations we determined would improve the sensitivity and the reproducibility of the T3-induced Xenopus metamorphosis assay.

  14. Androgen-mediated development of irradiation-induced thyroid tumors in rats: dependence on animal age during interval of androgen replacement in castrated males

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, C.; Oslapas, R.; Nayyar, R.; Paloyan, E.

    1986-07-01

    When male Long-Evans rats at age 8 weeks were radiation treated (40 microCi Na131I), thyroid follicular adenomas and carcinomas were observed at age 24 months with a high incidence of 94%. Castration of males prior to irradiation significantly reduced this tumor incidence to 60%. When testosterone (T) was replaced in castrated, irradiated male rats, differentially increased incidences of thyroid tumors occurred. Immediate (age 2-6 mo) or early (age 6-12 mo) T replacement at approximate physiologic levels led to thyroid follicular tumor incidences of 100 and 82%, respectively, whereas intermediate (12-18 mo) or late (18-24 mo) T treatment led to only 70 and 73% incidences, respectively. Continuous T replacement (2-24 mo) in castrated irradiated male rats raised thyroid tumor incidence to 100%. Since elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is a reported requisite for development of radiation-associated thyroid tumors, the effects of T on serum TSH levels were examined. Mean serum TSH values in all irradiated animal groups were significantly elevated above age-matched nonirradiated animals at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Serum TSH levels were higher in continuous T-replaced irradiated castrates than in intact, irradiated males, whereas such intact male TSH levels were greater than those for irradiated castrates without T treatment. Interval T replacement in castrated male rats was associated with increased serum TSH levels during the treatment interval and with lowered TSH levels after discontinuation of T treatment, particularly in irradiated rats. However, when irradiated, castrated males received late T replacement (age 18-24 mo), there was no elevation of TSH at the end of the treatment interval. An indirect effect of T via early stimulation of TSH may be partly responsible for the high incidence of irradiation-induced thyroid tumors in rats.

  15. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins lack an N(T)KXD consensus motif and bind GMP in addition to GDP and GTP.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y S; Patterson, C E; Staeheli, P

    1991-09-01

    The primary structures of interferon (IFN)-induced guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were deduced from cloned human and murine cDNAs. These proteins contained only two of the three sequence motifs typically found in GTP/GDP-binding proteins. The N(T)KXD motif, which is believed to confer guanine specificity in other nucleotide-binding proteins, was absent. Nevertheless, the IFN-induced GBPs exhibited a high degree of selectivity for binding to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides. An interesting feature of IFN-induced GBPs is that they strongly bound to GMP agarose in addition to GDP and GTP agaroses but failed to bind to ATP agarose and all other nucleotide agaroses tested. Both GTP and GMP, but not ATP, competed for binding of murine GBP-1 to agarose-immobilized GMP. The IFN-induced GBPs thus define a distinct novel family of proteins with GTP-binding activity. We further demonstrate that human and murine cells contain at least two genes encoding IFN-induced GBPs. The cloned murine cDNA codes for GBP-1, an IFN-induced protein previously shown to be absent from mice of Gbp-1b genotype.

  16. Thyroid-induced alterations in myocardial sodium-potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase, monovalent cation active transport, and cardiac glycoside binding.

    PubMed Central

    Curfman, G D; Crowley, T J; Smith, T W

    1977-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormone on guinea pig myocardial NaK-ATPase activity, transmembrane monovalent cation active transport, and cardiac glycoside binding were were examined. NaK-ATPase activities of left atrial and left ventricular homogenates of control and triiodothyronine (T3)-treated animals were determined, and compared to activities of skeletal muscle and liver. T3 administration was associated with a significant increase of 18% in left atrial and left ventricular NaK-ATPase specific activities. This increment was less than that noted in skeletal muscle (+42%) and liver (+30%). To determine if enhanced NaK-ATPase activity was accompanied by increased monovalent cation active transport, in vitro 86Rb+ uptake by left atrial strips and hemidiaphragms was measured. Transition from the euthyroid to the hyperthyroid state resulted in a 68% increase in active 86Rb+ uptake by left atrium, and a 62% increase in active uptake by diaphragm. Passive 86Rb+ uptake was not affected in either tissue. Ouabain binding by atrial and ventricular homogenates of T3-treated animals was increased by 19 and 17%, respectively, compared to controls, in close agreement with thyroid-induced increments in NaK-ATPase activiey. Taken together, these results are consistent with enhanced myocardial NaK-ATPase activity and monovalent cation activt transport due to an increase in the number of functional enzyme complexes. PMID:138689

  17. Resveratrol improved the spatial learning and memory in subclinical hypothyroidism rat induced by hemi-thyroid electrocauterization.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jin-Fang; Xu, Ya-Yun; Li, Ning; Zhang, Yue; Qiu, Guo-Liang; Chu, Cheng-Hao; Wang, Cai-Yun; Qin, Gan; Chen, Fei-Hu

    2015-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol (RES) on the spatial learning and memory ability in subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) rat model and the potential mechanism. A SCH rat model was induced by hemi-thyroid electrocauterization and the activity of hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis was detected. The spatial learning and memory ability was tested using Morris water maze (MWM) and Y-maze. The protein expressions of synaptotagmin-1 (syt-1) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus were measured via western blot. The results showed that SCH rat model was successfully duplicated. The SCH rats showed impaired learning and memory in the behavioral tests. However, these changes were reversed by the treatment of RES (15mg/kg) and levothyroxine (LT4). Moreover, RES treated rats exhibited reduced plasma TSH level and hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) mRNA expression, which suggested that the imbalance of HPT axis in the SCH rats could be reversed by RES treatment. Furthermore, RES treatment up-regulated the protein levels of syt-1 and BDNF in hippocampus. These findings indicated an amelioration effect of RES on the spatial learning and memory in the SCH rats, the mechanism of which might be involved with its ability of modifying the hyperactive HPT axis and up-regulating the hippocampal hypo-expression of syt-1 and BDNF.

  18. Intracranial Injection of Dengue Virus Induces Interferon Stimulated Genes and CD8+ T Cell Infiltration by Sphingosine Kinase 1 Independent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Jennifer N.; Davies, Lorena T.; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Pitson, Stuart M.; Carr, Jillian M.

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported that the absence of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) affects both dengue virus (DENV) infection and innate immune responses in vitro. Here we aimed to define SK1-dependancy of DENV-induced disease and the associated innate responses in vivo. The lack of a reliable mouse model with a fully competent interferon response for DENV infection is a challenge, and here we use an experimental model of DENV infection in the brain of immunocompetent mice. Intracranial injection of DENV-2 into C57BL/6 mice induced body weight loss and neurological symptoms which was associated with a high level of DENV RNA in the brain. Body weight loss and DENV RNA level tended to be greater in SK1-/- compared with wildtype (WT) mice. Brain infection with DENV-2 is associated with the induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression including viperin, Ifi27l2a, IRF7, and CXCL10 without any significant differences between WT and SK1-/- mice. The SK2 and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) levels in the brain were unchanged by DENV infection or the lack of SK1. Histological analysis demonstrated the presence of a cellular infiltrate in DENV-infected brain with a significant increase in mRNA for CD8 but not CD4 suggesting this infiltrate is likely CD8+ but not CD4+ T-lymphocytes. This increase in T-cell infiltration was not affected by the lack of SK1. Overall, DENV-infection in the brain induces IFN and T-cell responses but does not influence the SK/S1P axis. In contrast to our observations in vitro, SK1 has no major influence on these responses following DENV-infection in the mouse brain. PMID:28095439

  19. Intracranial Injection of Dengue Virus Induces Interferon Stimulated Genes and CD8+ T Cell Infiltration by Sphingosine Kinase 1 Independent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Al-Shujairi, Wisam H; Clarke, Jennifer N; Davies, Lorena T; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Pitson, Stuart M; Carr, Jillian M

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported that the absence of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) affects both dengue virus (DENV) infection and innate immune responses in vitro. Here we aimed to define SK1-dependancy of DENV-induced disease and the associated innate responses in vivo. The lack of a reliable mouse model with a fully competent interferon response for DENV infection is a challenge, and here we use an experimental model of DENV infection in the brain of immunocompetent mice. Intracranial injection of DENV-2 into C57BL/6 mice induced body weight loss and neurological symptoms which was associated with a high level of DENV RNA in the brain. Body weight loss and DENV RNA level tended to be greater in SK1-/- compared with wildtype (WT) mice. Brain infection with DENV-2 is associated with the induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression including viperin, Ifi27l2a, IRF7, and CXCL10 without any significant differences between WT and SK1-/- mice. The SK2 and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) levels in the brain were unchanged by DENV infection or the lack of SK1. Histological analysis demonstrated the presence of a cellular infiltrate in DENV-infected brain with a significant increase in mRNA for CD8 but not CD4 suggesting this infiltrate is likely CD8+ but not CD4+ T-lymphocytes. This increase in T-cell infiltration was not affected by the lack of SK1. Overall, DENV-infection in the brain induces IFN and T-cell responses but does not influence the SK/S1P axis. In contrast to our observations in vitro, SK1 has no major influence on these responses following DENV-infection in the mouse brain.

  20. Incidence of and risk factors for thyroid dysfunction during peginterferon α and ribavirin treatment in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yong; Kim, Won; Kwon, So Young; Yu, Hyung Min; Kim, Jeong Han; Choe, Won Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Thyroid dysfunction (TD) is more likely to occur in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and is particularly associated with interferon (IFN) treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence, outcomes, and risk factors for TD during pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) combined therapy in patients with CHC. Methods: A total of 242 euthyroid patients with CHC treated with PEG-IFN/RBV were included. Thyroid function and autoantibodies were measured at baseline, and virologic response and thyroid function were assessed every 3 months during therapy. Results: TD developed in 67 patients (27.7%) during the PEG-IFN/RBV treatment. The types of TD were subclinical hypothyroidism (50.7%), hypothyroidism (14.9%), thyroiditis (11.9%), subclinical hyperthyroidism (10.4%), and hyperthyroidism (10.4%). Most of the patients with TD recovered spontaneously; however, seven patients (10.4%) needed thyroid treatment. The sustained virological response rate was higher in patients with TD than those without (65.7% vs. 49.1%, p = 0.02). Baseline thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations (odds ratio [OR], 2.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.96 to 8.77; p < 0.001), presence of the thyroid peroxidase antibody (OR, 8.81; 95% CI, 1.74 to 44.6; p = 0.009), and PEG-IFNα-2b (OR, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.43 to 6.39; p = 0.004) were independent risk factors for the development of TD. Conclusions: TD developed in 27.7% of patients with CHC during PEG-IFN/RBV treatment, and 10.4% of these patients needed thyroid treatment. TD is associated with a favorable virologic response to PEG-IFN/RBV. Assessment of TSH and thyroid autoantibodies at baseline and close monitoring of thyroid function during PEG-IFN/RBV therapy are necessary for early detection and management of IFN-induced TD. PMID:26552454

  1. Honokiol, a potential therapeutic agent, induces cell cycle arrest and program cell death in vitro and in vivo in human thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chieh-Hsiang; Chen, Shu-Hsin; Chang, Yi-Sheng; Liu, Yi-Wen; Wu, Jin-Yi; Lim, Yun-Ping; Yu, Hui-I; Lee, Ying-Ray

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, the global incidence rate of which is rapidly rising. Surgery and radioiodine therapies are common and effective treatments only for nonmetastasized primary tumors. Therefore, effective treatment modalities are imperative for patients with radioiodine-resistant thyroid cancer. Honokiol, a biophenolic compound derived from Magnolia spp., has been shown have diverse biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, antiangiogenic, and anticancer properties. In the present study, three human thyroid cancer cell lines, namely anaplastic, follicular, and poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells, were used to evaluate the chemotherapeutic activity of honokiol. Cell viability, cell cycle, apoptosis, and autophagy induction were determined through flow cytometry and western blot analysis. We found that honokiol treatment can suppress cell growth, induce cell cycle arrest, and enhance the induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells. Moreover, honokiol treatment modulated signaling pathways including Akt/mTOR, ERK, JNK, and p38 in the studied cells. In addition, the antitumorigenic activity of honokiol was also confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Our data provide evidence that honokiol has a unique application in chemotherapy for human thyroid cancers.

  2. CARD6 is interferon inducible but not involved in nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein signaling leading to NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Dufner, Almut; Duncan, Gordon S; Wakeham, Andrew; Elford, Alisha R; Hall, Håkan T; Ohashi, Pamela S; Mak, Tak W

    2008-03-01

    We have previously reported the cloning and characterization of CARD6, a caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing protein that is structurally related to the interferon (IFN)-inducible GTPases. CARD6 associates with microtubules and with receptor-interacting protein 2 (RIP2). RIP2 mediates NF-kappaB activation induced by the intracellular nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) receptors that sense bacterial peptidoglycan. Here we report that the expression of CARD6 and RIP2 in bone marrow-derived macrophages is rapidly induced by beta IFN and gamma IFN. This IFN-induced upregulation of CARD6 is suppressed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in contrast to LPS's enhancement of IFN-induced RIP2 upregulation. We generated CARD6-deficient (CARD6(-/-)) mice and carried out extensive analyses of signaling pathways mediating innate and adaptive immune responses, including the NOD pathways, but did not detect any abnormalities. Moreover, CARD6(-/-) mice were just as susceptible as wild-type mice to infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Candida albicans, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, or mouse adenovirus type 1. Thus, although structural and in vitro analyses strongly suggest an important role for CARD6 in immune defense, the physiological function of CARD6 remains obscure.

  3. Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE)-induced alterations in vitamin A and thyroid hormone concentrations in the rat during lactation and early postnatal development

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis-Hutchings, Robert G.; Cherr, Gary N.; Hanna, Lynn A.; Keen, Carl L. . E-mail: clkeen@ucdavis.edu

    2006-09-01

    In experimental animals fed standard laboratory diets, penta-BDE mixtures can decrease circulating thyroid hormone and liver vitamin A concentrations. A substantial number of pregnant women and their children have marginal vitamin A status, potentially increasing their risk of adverse effects to penta-BDE exposure. The current study investigated the effects of maternal gestational and lactational penta-BDE exposure on thyroid hormone and vitamin A homeostasis in rats of sufficient vitamin A (VAS) or marginal vitamin A (VAM) status and their offspring. Dams were administered daily oral doses of 18 mg/kg DE-71 (a penta-BDE mixture) or a corn oil vehicle from gestation day 6 through lactation day (LD) 18. Thyroid hormone and vitamin A homeostasis were assessed in plasma and tissues of LD 19 dams and postnatal day (PND) 12, 18, and 31 pups. DE-71 exposure induced hepatomegaly in VAS and VAM pups at all timepoints and increased testes weights at PND 31. While liver vitamin A concentrations were low in DE-71 treated dams and pups, plasma retinol concentrations and plasma retinol binding protein levels were only low in VAM animals exposed to DE-71. DE-71 exposure lowered plasma thyroxine concentrations in VAS and VAM dams and pups. Plasma thyroid stimulating hormone concentrations were high in VAM dams exposed to DE-71, suggesting that marginal vitamin A status enhances the susceptibility to thyroid hormone axis disruption by DE-71. These results support the concept that marginal vitamin A status in pregnant women may increase the risk for PBDE-induced disruptions in vitamin A and thyroid hormone homeostasis.

  4. Interferon response factor 3 is crucial to poly-I:C induced NK cell activity and control of B16 melanoma growth.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tyler C; Kumm, Phyllis M; Brown, Deborah M; Petro, Thomas M

    2014-04-28

    Interferon Response Factor 3 (IRF3) induces several NK-cell activating factors, is activated by poly-I:C, an experimental cancer therapeutic, but is suppressed during many viral infections. IRF3 Knockout (KO) mice exhibited enhanced B16 melanoma growth, impaired intratumoral NK cell infiltration, but not an impaired poly-I:C therapeutic effect due to direct suppression of B16 growth. IRF3 was responsible for poly-I:C decrease in TIM-3 expression by intratumoral dendritic cells, induction of NK-cell Granzyme B and IFN-γ, and induction of macrophage IL-12, IL-15, IL-6, and IRF3-dependent NK-activating molecule (INAM). Thus, IRF3 is a key factor controlling melanoma growth through NK-cell activities, especially during poly-I:C therapy.

  5. Guanylate-Binding Protein 1, an Interferon-Induced GTPase, Exerts an Antiviral Activity against Classical Swine Fever Virus Depending on Its GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lian-Feng; Yu, Jiahui; Li, Yongfeng; Wang, Jinghan; Li, Su; Zhang, Lingkai; Xia, Shui-Li; Yang, Qian; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shaoxiong; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Zhu, Yan; Munir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many viruses trigger the type I interferon (IFN) pathway upon infection, resulting in the transcription of hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), which define the antiviral state of the host. Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious viral disease endangering the pig industry in many countries. However, anti-CSFV ISGs are poorly documented. Here we screened 20 ISGs that are commonly induced by type I IFNs against CSFV in lentivirus-delivered cell lines, resulting in the identification of guanylate-binding protein 1 (GBP1) as a potent anti-CSFV ISG. We observed that overexpression of GBP1, an IFN-induced GTPase, remarkably suppressed CSFV replication, whereas knockdown of endogenous GBP1 expression by small interfering RNAs significantly promoted CSFV growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GBP1 acted mainly on the early phase of CSFV replication and inhibited the translation efficiency of the internal ribosome entry site of CSFV. In addition, we found that GBP1 was upregulated at the transcriptional level in CSFV-infected PK-15 cells and in various organs of CSFV-infected pigs. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays revealed that GBP1 interacted with the NS5A protein of CSFV, and this interaction was mapped in the N-terminal globular GTPase domain of GBP1. Interestingly, the K51 of GBP1, which is crucial for its GTPase activity, was essential for the inhibition of CSFV replication. We showed further that the NS5A-GBP1 interaction inhibited GTPase activity, which was critical for its antiviral effect. Taking our findings together, GBP1 is an anti-CSFV ISG whose action depends on its GTPase activity. IMPORTANCE Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), an economically important viral disease affecting the pig industry in many countries. To date, only a few host restriction factors against CSFV

  6. [Risk factors and pathogenesis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Paknys, Gintaras; Kondrotas, Anatolijus Juozas; Kevelaitis, Egidijus

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on Hashimoto's thyroiditis and its pathogenesis and to introduce the readers to the basic concept of autoimmune thyroid disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease are different expressions of a basically similar autoimmune process, and the clinical appearance reflects the spectrum of the immune response in a particular patient. During this response, cytotoxic autoantibodies, stimulatory autoantibodies, blocking autoantibodies, or cell-mediated autoimmunity may be observed. Persons with classic Hashimoto's thyroiditis have serum antibodies reacting with thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase. These antibodies (particularly antibodies against thyroid peroxidase) are complement-fixing immunoglobulins and may be cytotoxic. In addition, many patients have cell-mediated immunity directed against thyroid antigens. Cell mediated-immunity is also a feature of experimental thyroiditis induced in animals by injection of thyroid antigen with adjuvants. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is predominantly the clinical expression of cell-mediated immunity leading to destruction of thyroid cells, which in its severest form causes thyroid failure. The significance of genetic component and nongenetic risk factors (pregnancy, drugs, age, sex, infection, and irradiation) in the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is also reviewed. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that the genetic component is important in the pathogenesis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, although the pattern of inheritance is non-Mendelian and is likely to be influenced by subtle variations in the functions of multiple genes. Nongenetic risk factors (environmental factors) are also etiologically important, because the concordance rate in monozygotic twins is below 1.

  7. Dysregulated Erythropoietin, Hepcidin, and Bone Marrow Iron Metabolism Contribute to Interferon-Induced Anemia in Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    van Rijnsoever, Marius; Galhenage, Sumedha; Mollison, Lindsay; Gummer, Joel; Trengove, Robert; Olynyk, John K

    2016-11-01

    Anemia is a complication of interferon-containing hepatitis C treatments. We characterized effects of interferon-based therapy on hepcidin and erythropoietin (EPO) production, iron metabolism, hemolysis, and hematopoiesis. Standard hemopoiesis [reticulocyte hemoglobin (Hb), reticulocyte production index (RPI), free Hb, and haptoglobin], iron biochemistry, hepcidin, and EPO levels were measured in 10 subjects over 12 weeks. There was a rapid decline in Hb during treatment, from a mean pretreatment (t = 0 weeks) Hb of 158.6 to 125.2 g/L at week 4 (P = 0.003) and 122.8 g/L at week 12 (P = 0.005). Paradoxically, the RPI (a measure of bone marrow responsiveness to EPO) decreased on initiation of hepatitis C virus treatment from 0.78% to 0.53% (P = 0.04). Despite worsening anemia, there was no significant increase in EPO levels. Hepcidin levels increased to >20 nM in 3 subjects from 5.8 to 27.5 nM (P = 0.009) compared with 9.6 to 12.3 nM (P = 0.5) for the remainder of subjects. Hepcidin levels peaked at week 1 before returning to baseline levels at week 4. Subjects who responded with a rise in serum hepcidin levels to >20 nM had a significantly greater drop in Hb (27.2 g/L, P = 0.008) and reticulocyte Hb (-1.4 g/L, P = 0.013) compared with the subjects who did not exhibit any change in hepcidin production. In conclusion, 30% of subjects treated with interferon exhibited significant transient increase in serum hepcidin levels, which was associated with more extreme anemia and decreased iron availability as evidenced by decreased reticulocyte Hb. In addition, there was a failure to upregulate EPO production in response to anemia and hemolysis ( https://clinicaltrials.gov trial NCT01726400).

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of 2, 3′, 4, 4′, 5-Pentachlorobiphenyl-Induced Thyroid Dysfunction in FRTL-5 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongwei; Li, Wen; Tang, Jinmei; Xu, Bojin; Sun, Minne; Ding, Guoxian; Jiang, Lin; Cui, Dai; Zheng, Xuqin; Duan, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can severely interfere with multiple animals and human systems. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying 2, 3′, 4, 4′, 5- pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB118)-induced thyroid dysfunction, Fischer rat thyroid cell line-5(FRTL-5) cells were treated with either different concentrations of PCB118 or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The effects of PCB118 on FRTL-5 cells viability and apoptosis were assessed by using a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and apoptosis assays, respectively. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify protein kinase B (Akt), Forkhead box protein O3a (FoxO3a), and sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) mRNA expression levels. Western blotting was used to detect Akt, phospho-Akt (p-Akt), FoxO3a, phospho-FoxO3a (p-FoxO3a), and NIS protein levels. Luciferase reporter gene technology was used to detect the transcriptional activities of FoxO3a and NIS promoters. The effects of the constitutively active Akt (CA-Akt) and dominant-negative Akt (DN-Akt) plasmids on p-Akt, p-FoxO3a, and NIS levels were examined in PCB118-treated FRTL-5 cells. The effects of FoxO3a siRNA on FoxO3a, p-FoxO3a, and NIS protein levels were examined in the PCB118-treated FRTL-5 cells. The effects of pcDNA3 (plsmid vectors designed for high-level stable and transient expression in mammalian host)-FoxO3a on NIS promoter activity were examined in the PCB118-treated FRTL-5 cells. Our results indicated that relatively higher PCB118 concentrations can inhibit cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Akt, p-Akt, and p-FoxO3a protein or mRNA levels increased significantly in PCB118-treated groups and NIS protein and mRNA levels decreased considerably compared with the control groups. FoxO3a promoter activity increased significantly, whereas NIS promoter activity decreased. These effects on p-FoxO3a and NIS could be decreased by the DN-Akt plasmid, enhanced by the CA-Akt plasmid, and blocked by FoxO3a siRNA. The overexpressed

  9. What Is Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer What Is Thyroid Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... cell) Medullary Anaplastic (an aggressive undifferentiated tumor) Differentiated thyroid cancers Most thyroid cancers are differentiated cancers. The cells ...

  10. Thyroid Disorders (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Thyroid Disorders KidsHealth > For Kids > Thyroid Disorders A A ... the world is a thyroid? What Is the Thyroid? The thyroid (say: THYE-royd) is a gland, ...

  11. Infection of cultured bovine cells with bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) or Sendai virus induces different beta interferon subtypes

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Leticia Frizzo

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to mice or humans, cattle contain three beta interferon (IFN-β) genes with distinct transcriptional promoters suggesting IFN-β gene expression is not stimulated the same by different viruses. To test this hypothesis, we compared expression of the three IFN-β subtypes after infection with a RNA virus, Sendai, versus a large DNA virus, bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1). Infection of low passage bovine kidney (BK) or established bovine kidney cells (CRIB) with Sendai virus has consistently led to high levels of IFN-β1 RNA. Conversely, infection of CRIB cells, but not BK cells, with BHV-1 increased IFN-β3 RNA levels and to a lesser extent the other two IFN-β subtypes. Inhibition of de novo protein synthesis with cycloheximide resulted in higher levels of IFN-β1 and IFN-β2 RNA levels after BHV-1 infection. Further studies demonstrated that BHV-1 immediate early and/or early genes were primarily responsible for inhibiting the IFN response in BK cells. The three bovine IFN-β promoters were cloned upstream of a reporter gene construct, and their properties analyzed in transient transfection assays. Only the IFN-β3 promoter was trans-activated by IRF3 (interferon responsive factor 3). IRF7 and double stranded RNA (polyIC) stimulated IFN-β1 and IFN-β3 promoter activity, but not IFN-β2. Relative to the human IFN-β promoter, the IFN-β3 promoter contained fewer nucleotide differences in the positive regulatory domain III (PRD III), PRD IV, and PRD I compared to the IFN-β1 and IFN-β2 promoter. Collectively, these studies provide evidence that virus infection differentially stimulates expression of the three bovine IFN-β genes. PMID:21316405

  12. IPS-1 differentially induces TRAIL, BCL2, BIRC3 and PRKCE in type I interferons-dependent and -independent anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Ingle, H; Mishra, S; Mahla, R S; Kumar, A; Kawai, T; Akira, S; Takaoka, A; Raut, A A; Kumar, H

    2015-05-07

    RIG-I-like receptors are the key cytosolic sensors for RNA viruses and induce the production of type I interferons (IFN) and pro-inflammatory cytokines through a sole adaptor IFN-β promoter stimulator-1 (IPS-1) (also known as Cardif, MAVS and VISA) in antiviral innate immunity. These sensors also have a pivotal role in anticancer activity through induction of apoptosis. However, the mechanism for their anticancer activity is poorly understood. Here, we show that anticancer vaccine adjuvant, PolyIC (primarily sensed by MDA5) and the oncolytic virus, Newcastle disease virus (NDV) (sensed by RIG-I), induce anticancer activity. The ectopic expression of IPS-1 into type I IFN-responsive and non-responsive cancer cells induces anticancer activity. PolyIC transfection and NDV infection upregulate pro-apoptotic gene TRAIL and downregulate the anti-apoptotic genes BCL2, BIRC3 and PRKCE. Furthermore, stable knockdown of IPS-1, IRF3 or IRF7 in IFN-non-responsive cancer cells show reduced anticancer activity by suppressing apoptosis via TRAIL and anti-apoptotic genes. Collectively, our study shows that IPS-1 induces anticancer activity through upregulation of pro-apoptotic gene TRAIL and downregulation of the anti-apoptotic genes BCL2, BIRC3 and PRKCE via IRF3 and IRF7 in type I IFN-dependent and -independent manners.

  13. Downstream mediators of the intratumoral interferon response suppress antitumor immunity, induce gemcitabine resistance and associate with poor survival in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Delitto, Daniel; Perez, Chelsey; Han, Song; Gonzalo, David H; Pham, Kien; Knowlton, Andrea E; Graves, Christina L; Behrns, Kevin E; Moldawer, Lyle L; Thomas, Ryan M; Liu, Chen; George, Thomas J; Trevino, Jose G; Wallet, Shannon M; Hughes, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    The cancer microenvironment allows tumor cells to evade immune surveillance through a variety of mechanisms. While interferon-γ (IFNγ) is central to effective antitumor immunity, its effects on the microenvironment are not as clear and have in some cancers been shown to induce immune checkpoint ligands. The heterogeneity of these responses to IFNγ remains poorly characterized in desmoplastic malignancies with minimal inflammatory cell infiltration, such as pancreatic cancer (PC). Thus, the IFNγ response within and on key cells of the PC microenvironment was evaluated. IFNγ induced expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II on PC cell lines, primary pancreatic cancer epithelial cells (PPCE) and patient-derived tumor-associated stroma, concomitant with an upregulation of PDL1 in the absence of CD80 and CD86 expression. As expected, IFNγ also induced high levels of CXCL10 from all cell types. In addition, significantly higher levels of CXCL10 were observed in PC specimens compared to those from chronic pancreatitis, whereby intratumoral CXCL10 concentration was an independent predictor of poor survival. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a subset of CXCR3-positive cancer cells in over 90 % of PC specimens, as well as on a subset of cultured PC cell lines and PPCE, whereby exposure to CXCL10 induced resistance to the chemotherapeutic gemcitabine. These findings suggest that IFNγ has multiple effects on many cell types within the PC microenvironment that may lead to immune evasion, chemoresistance and shortened survival.

  14. Listeria monocytogenes induces an interferon-enhanced activation of the integrated stress response that is detrimental for resolution of infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Carolina; Clark, Amy; Urano, Fumihiko; Unanue, Emil R; Carrero, Javier A

    2017-03-07

    Type I interferons (IFNs) induce a detrimental response during Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) infection. We were interested in identifying mechanisms linking IFN signaling to negative host responses against L. monocytogenes infection. Herein we found that infection of myeloid cells with L. monocytogenes led to a coordinated induction of type I IFNs and activation of the integrated stress response (ISR). Infected cells did not induce Xbp1 splicing or BiP upregulation, indicating that the unfolded protein response was not triggered. CHOP (Ddit3) gene expression was upregulated during the ISR activation induced by L. monocytogenes. Myeloid cells deficient in either type I IFN signaling or PKR activation had less upregulation of CHOP following infection. CHOP deficient mice showed lower expression of innate immune cytokines and were more resistant than wild-type counterparts following L. monocytogenes infection. These findings indicate that L. monocytogenes infection induces type I IFNs, which activate the ISR through PKR, which contributes to a detrimental outcome in the infected host. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. The Chernobyl Tissue Bank: integrating research on radiation-induced thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G A

    2012-03-01

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. Cancer is a complicated disease and it is unclear whether the mechanism by which radiation gives rise to cancer differs from that involved in the generation of cancers of the same type by other environmental stimuli. The Chernobyl Tissue Bank was established in response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer after Chernobyl to address this question. The project is supported by the governments of Ukraine and Russia, and financially supported (in total around US$3 million) by the European Commission, the National Cancer Institute of the USA and the Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation of Japan. The project began collecting a variety of biological samples from patients on 1 October 1988, and has supplied material to 23 research projects in Japan, the USA and Europe. The establishment of the Chernobyl Tissue Bank has facilitated co-operation between these research projects and the combination of clinical and research data provides a paradigm for cancer research in the molecular biological age.

  16. Pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activities in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid and hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary axes of rats with mammary gland cancer induced by N-methyl nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Carrera, M P; Ramírez-Expósito, M J; Valenzuela, M T; García, M J; Mayas, M D; Arias de Saavedra, J M; Sánchez, R; Pérez, M C; Martínez-Martos, J M

    2005-02-01

    Pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase is an omega-peptidase that hydrolyses N-terminal pyroglutamyl residues from biologically active peptides such as gonadotropin-releasing and thyrotrophin-releasing hormones. We previously described a decrease in both rat and human pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity with breast cancer, suggesting that gonadotropin-releasing hormone may be an important local intracrine, autocrine and/or paracrine hormonal factor in the pathogenesis of breast cancer while playing a role in the tumoral process. However, the other susceptible substrate of pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase, thyrotrophin-releasing hormone, may also be modified with breast cancer, supporting an association between breast cancer and thyroid disorders. The present work analyses soluble and membrane-bound pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activities in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid and hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary axes in N-methyl nitrosourea-induced breast cancer in rats. Our aim was to determine the possible relationship between gonadotropin-releasing hormone and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone regulation through pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity. We propose that pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity dysregulation at various local and systemic levels may participate in the initiation, promotion and progression of breast cancer induced in rat by N-methyl nitrosourea through the increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Since pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity also acts on thyrotrophin-releasing hormone, the dysregulation of this enzyme's activity could indirectly affect hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis function, and thus potentially represent a link between the diseases of thyroid and breast cancer.

  17. Protein kinase C and the antiviral effect of human interferon.

    PubMed

    Cernescu, C; Constantinescu, S N; Baltă, F; Popescu, L M; Cajal, N

    1989-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors: Hidaka's compounds H-7 (10 microM) and H-8 (20 microM), palmitoyl-carnitine (10 microM) and phloretin (50 microM), did not modify the antiviral effect of human natural or recombinant interferon alpha and of natural interferon beta. The tumor promoter 12-o-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (200 nM), known as activator of PKC induced an antiviral state when tested on human embryo fibroblasts challenged with the vesicular stomatitis virus. The battery of PKC inhibitors used inhibited the antiviral effect induced by TPA. Palmitoyl-carnitine (10 microM) exerted a toxic effect that was reversed by interferon treatment (2,000 IU/ml interferon alpha). These results suggest that PKC, possibly activated by interferon-receptor interaction, is not essential for inducing the antiviral effect of interferon, but, probably, mediates the antiviral effect of TPA.

  18. Diverse intracellular pathogens activate type III interferon expression from peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Odendall, Charlotte; Dixit, Evelyn; Stavru, Fabrizia; Bierne, Helene; Franz, Kate M; Durbin, Ann Fiegen; Boulant, Steeve; Gehrke, Lee; Cossart, Pascale; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    Type I interferon responses are considered the primary means by which viral infections are controlled in mammals. Despite this view, several pathogens activate antiviral responses in the absence of type I interferons. The mechanisms controlling type I interferon-independent responses are undefined. We found that RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) induce type III interferon expression in a variety of human cell types, and identified factors that differentially regulate expression of type I and type III interferons. We identified peroxisomes as a primary site of initiation of type III interferon expression, and revealed that the process of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation upregulates peroxisome biogenesis and promotes robust type III interferon responses in human cells. These findings highlight the importance of different intracellular organelles in specific innate immune responses.

  19. Interferon-γ promotes double-stranded RNA-induced TLR3-dependent apoptosis via upregulation of transcription factor Runx3 in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gan, Huachen; Hao, Qin; Idell, Steven; Tang, Hua

    2016-12-01

    Viral respiratory tract infections are the most common illness in humans. Infection of the respiratory viruses results in accumulation of viral replicative double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is one of the important components of infecting viruses for the induction of lung epithelial cell apoptosis and innate immune response, including the production of interferon (IFN). In the present study, we have investigated the regulation of dsRNA-induced airway epithelial cell apoptosis by IFN. We found that transcription factor Runx3 was strongly induced by type-II IFNγ, slightly by type-III IFNλ, but essentially not by type-I IFNα in airway epithelial cells. IFNγ-induced expression of Runx3 was predominantly mediated by JAK-STAT1 pathway and partially by NF-κB pathway. Interestingly, Runx3 can be synergistically induced by IFNγ with a synthetic analog of viral dsRNA polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) through both JAK-STAT1 and NF-κB pathways. We further found that dsRNA poly(I:C)-induced apoptosis of airway epithelial cells was mediated by dsRNA receptor toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and was markedly augmented by IFNγ through the enhanced expression of TLR3 and subsequent activation of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways. Last, we demonstrated that upregulation of Runx3 by IFNγ promoted TLR3 expression, thus amplifying the dsRNA-induced apoptosis in airway epithelial cells. These novel findings indicate that IFNγ promotes dsRNA-induced TLR3-dependent apoptosis via upregulation of transcription factor Runx3 in airway epithelial cells. Findings from our study may provide new insights into the regulation of airway epithelial cell apoptosis by IFNγ during viral respiratory tract infection.

  20. Sphingosine kinase inhibitor suppresses IL-18-induced interferon-gamma production through inhibition of p38 MAPK activation in human NK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, Soyoung; Song, Seok Bean; Jung, Minkyung; Park, Yoorim; Bang, Jung-Wook; Kim, Tae Sung; Park, Hyunjeong; Kim, Cherl-hyun; Yang, Yool-hee; Bang, Sa Ik; Cho, Daeho

    2008-09-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the innate immune response. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a well-known interferon-gamma (IFN-{gamma} inducing factor, which stimulates immune response in NK and T cells. Sphingosine kinase (SPHK) catalyzes the formation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which acts as a second messenger to function as an anti-apoptotic factor and proliferation stimulator of immune cells. In this study, to elucidate whether SPHK is involved in IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production, we measured IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production after pre-treatment with SPHK inhibitor (SKI) in NK-92MI cells. We found that IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} expression was blocked by SKI pre-treatment in both mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the increased IFN-{gamma} production by stimulation with IL-18 is mediated through both SPHK and p38 MAPK. To determine the upstream signals of SKI and p38 MAPK in IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production, phosphorylation levels of p38 MAPK was measured after SKI pre-treatment. As a result, inhibition of SPHK by SKI blocked phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, showing that SPHK activation by IL-18 is an upstream signal of p38 MAPK activation. Inhibition of SPHK by SKI also inhibited IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production in human primary NK cells. In conclusion, SPHK activation is an essential factor for IL-18-induced IFN-{gamma} production via p38 MAPK.

  1. CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 ameliorates thyroid damage in autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD.H‑2h⁴ mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Mao, Jinyuan; Han, Cheng; Peng, Shiqiao; Li, Chenyan; Jin, Ting; Fan, Chenling; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2016-04-01

    CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) and its receptor, CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), are upregulated in mice with autoimmune thyroid diseases. However, whether this interaction is involved in the pathophysiology of autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the effects of the CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, in an iodine‑induced autoimmune thyroiditis model were investigated. NOD.H‑2h4 mice were randomly separated into a control, AIT and AIT+AMD3100 groups. The mice were fed with 0.05% sodium iodide water for 8 weeks to induce AIT. The AMD3100‑treated mice were administered with the CXCR4 antagonist at a dose of 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times a week during the experimental period. The percentages of CD19+interleukin (IL)10+ B cells and CD4+IL10+ T cells, and the mRNA expression levels of IL10 in the splenocytes were reduced in the AIT group, compared with the control group, however, they increased following AMD3100 treatment, compared with the untreated AIT group. The percentages of CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD19+ B cells and CD8+ interferon (IFN)γ+ T cells, and the mRNA expression levels of IFNγ increased in the AIT group, compared with the control group, however, these were reduced in the AMD3100 group, compared with the AIT group. The AMD3100‑treated mice also had lower serum thyroglobulin antibody titers and reduced lymphocytic infiltration in the thyroid, compared with the untreated AIT mice. These results suggested that inhibition of this chemokine axis may offer potential as a therapeutic target for the treatment of AIT.

  2. Effects of microsomal enzyme inducers on outer-ring deiodinase activity toward thyroid hormones in various rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Hood, A; Klaassen, C D

    2000-03-15

    Microsomal enzyme inducers, such as phenobarbital (PB), pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), and Aroclor 1254 (PCB) are more effective at reducing serum thyroxine (T(4)) than serum triiodothyronine (T(3)). It is possible that rats treated with PB and PCN maintain serum T(3) by increasing serum TSH, which stimulates the thyroid gland to synthesize more T(3). However, it is unclear how serum T(3) is maintained in rats treated with 3MC or PCB, because serum TSH is not increased in these rats. We hypothesized that increased conversion of T(4) to T(3), catalyzed by outer-ring deiodinases (ORD) type-I and -II, is the reason serum T(3) is maintained in rats treated with 3MC or PCB. Furthermore, 3MC and PCB do not increase serum TSH, whereas PB and PCN do, because type-II ORD activity in the pituitary of 3MC- and PCB-treated rats is increased greater than in rats treated with PB or PCN. To test these two hypotheses, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a basal diet or a diet containing PB (300, 600, 1200, or 2400 ppm), PCN (200, 400, 800, or 1600 ppm), 3MC (50, 100, 200, or 400 ppm), or PCB (25, 50, 100, or 200 ppm) for 7 days. Type-I ORD activity was measured in thyroid, kidney, and liver, whereas type-II ORD activity was measured in brown adipose tissue, pituitary, and brain. Type-I ORD activity in thyroid was not affected by PB, 3MC, or PCB treatments, and was slightly increased by PCN. Type-I ORD activity in kidney was not affected by PB, PCN, or 3MC treatments, and was reduced by PCB treatment. Type-I ORD activity in liver was reduced by PB, PCN, 3MC, and PCB treatments. Type-II ORD activity in brown adipose tissue was unaffected by any of the four treatments. Type-II ORD activity in pituitary was unaffected by PB or 3MC treatments, and was increased by PCN or PCB treatments. Type-II ORD activity in brain was unaffected by PB treatment, and was increased by PCN, 3MC, and PCB treatments. Overall, total ORD activity, calculated by

  3. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Bum; Seronello, Scott; Mayer, Wasima; Ojcius, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) actively evades host interferon (IFN) responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP) from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and poly(IC). The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain) were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity. PMID:27404108

  4. IL28B polymorphisms influence stage of fibrosis and spontaneous or interferon-induced viral clearance in thalassemia patients with hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, Vito; Bronte, Fabrizio; Calvaruso, Vincenza; Capra, Marcello; Borsellino, Zelia; Maggio, Aurelio; Renda, Maria Concetta; Pitrolo, Lorella; Lo Pinto, Maria Carmela; Rizzo, Michele; Fiorenza, Flavia; Gerardi, Calogera; Grimaudo, Stefania; Di Cristina, Antonietta; Levrero, Massimo; Craxì, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms in the interleukin-28B are important determinants in the spontaneous and drug-induced control of hepatitis C virus infection. Design and Methods We assessed the association of rs8099917 and rs12979860 polymorphisms with spontaneous viral clearance, severity of liver fibrosis, and response to interferon-monotherapy in 245 thalassemia major patients with hepatitis C virus infection. Results Ninety-eight patients (40%) had a spontaneous viral clearance while 147 patients (60%) developed a chronic infection. Spontaneous viral clearance was more frequent among patients with the T/T genotype of rs8099917 polymorphism (OR 2.130; P=0.008) or C/C genotype of rs12979860 polymorphism (OR 2.425; P=0.001). During observation, 131 patients with chronic infection underwent a liver biopsy; age (OR 1.058; P=0.01) G/T or G/G genotypes of rs8099917 polymorphism (OR 3.962; P=0.001), and C/T or T/T genotypes of rs12979860 polymorphism (OR 3.494; P=0.005) were associated with severe liver fibrosis, independent of liver iron concentration. Finally, T/T genotype of rs8099917 polymorphism (OR 3.014; P=0.03) or C/C genotype of rs12979860 polymorphism (OR 3.285; P=0.01), age (OR 0.902; P=0.001), female gender (OR 3.418; P=0.01) and 2 or 3 virus C genotypes (OR 4.700; P=0.007) were independently associated with sustained virological response in 114 patients treated with alpha-interferon. Conclusions Polymorphisms in the interleukin-28B are associated with the control of hepatitis C virus infection in thalassemia major patients, and understanding allelic patterns has an important role in determining prognosis and therapeutic management. PMID:22180419

  5. Polymorphisms in interferon-induced genes and the outcome of hepatitis C virus infection: roles of MxA, OAS-1 and PKR.

    PubMed

    Knapp, S; Yee, L J; Frodsham, A J; Hennig, B J W; Hellier, S; Zhang, L; Wright, M; Chiaramonte, M; Graves, M; Thomas, H C; Hill, A V S; Thursz, M R

    2003-09-01

    Interferon stimulates the expression of a number of genes encoding enzymes with antiviral activities, including myxovirus resistance-1 (MxA), 2-5-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS-1) and double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). We examined whether polymorphisms in these genes influenced the outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We observed a lower frequency of the GG genotype at position -88 in the MxA gene promoter in self-limiting HCV infection (OR=0.56; 95% CI: 0.35-0.8; P=0.010) and in nonresponders to therapy (OR=0.49; 95% CI: 0.25-0.95; P=0.020). This genotype predominantly influenced the outcome of treatment in patients with viral genotype 1 (OR=0.22 95% CI: 0.07-0.67; P=0.002). A polymorphism in the 3'-untranslated region of the OAS-1 gene was associated with outcome of infection (GG genotype less frequent in self-limiting infection: OR=0.43; 95% CI: 0.21-0.86; P=0.010). A polymorphism at position -168 in the promoter region of the PKR gene was associated with self-limiting infection (CT genotype: OR=2.75; 95% CI: 1.45-5.24; P=0.002). Further associations were found with a CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5'UTR region of the PKR gene. Polymorphisms in the interferon-induced genes, MxA, OAS-1 and PKR appear thus associated with HCV outcome.

  6. Interferon-induced inhibition of parainfluenza virus type 5; the roles of MxA, PKR and oligo A synthetase/RNase L.

    PubMed

    Carlos, T S; Young, D; Stertz, S; Kochs, G; Randall, R E

    2007-06-20

    We have previously reported that the addition of interferon (IFN) to the culture medium of Vero cells (which cannot produce IFN) that were infected with the CPI- strain of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5, formally known as SV5), that fails to block IFN signaling, rapidly induces alterations in the relative levels of virus mRNA and protein synthesis. In addition, IFN treatment also caused a rapid redistribution of virus proteins and enhanced the formation of cytoplasmic viral inclusion bodies. The most studied IFN-induced genes with known anti-viral activity are MxA, PKR and the Oligo A synthetase/RNase L system. We therefore examined the effects of these proteins on the replication cycle of PIV5. These studies revealed that while these proteins had some anti-viral activity against PIV5 they were not primarily responsible for the very rapid alteration in virus protein synthesis observed following IFN treatment, nor for the IFN-induced formation of virus inclusion bodies, in CPI- infected cells.

  7. A member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, orange-spotted grouper novel immune gene EcVig, is induced by immune stimulants and type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ying-Chun; Wang, Ting-Yu; Chou, Hsin-Yiu; Lin, Han-You; Chen, Tzong-Yueh; Aoki, Takashi; Wang, Han-Ching

    2016-11-01

    A novel grouper immune gene, EcVig was identified in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). We recently determined that EcVig expression can be induced by infection with nervous necrosis virus (NNV, an RNA virus), whereas NNV replication may be suppressed when EcVig was overexpressed. Although EcVig appeared to be involved in grouper antiviral activity, its immune effects have not been well characterized. In the present study, two PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns; lipopolysaccharides [LPS] and synthetic double-stranded RNA polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I:C)]), as well as fish DNA virus (red sea bream iridovirus, RSIV; grouper iridovirus, GIV), were used to study EcVig responses in orange-spotted grouper. In addition, groupers were given recombinant type I interferon to determine whether EcVig expression was induced. Poly(I:C) rapidly induced substantial expression of EcVig, whereas LPS stimulation did not appear to have any effect in grouper intestine. Expression levels of total EcVig and other IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) were all significantly increased after RSIV and GIV infection. Furthermore, stimulation of recombinant type I IFN also increased EcVig expression. We conclude that EcVig may be a novel IFN-stimulated gene that demonstrates an antiviral immune response.

  8. Cell death of gamma interferon-stimulated human fibroblasts upon Toxoplasma gondii infection induces early parasite egress and limits parasite replication.

    PubMed

    Niedelman, Wendy; Sprokholt, Joris K; Clough, Barbara; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Saeij, Jeroen P J

    2013-12-01

    The intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is a major food-borne illness and opportunistic infection for the immunosuppressed. Resistance to Toxoplasma is dependent on gamma interferon (IFN-γ) activation of both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. Although IFN-γ-induced innate immunity in nonhematopoietic cells has been extensively studied in mice, it remains unclear what resistance mechanisms are relied on in nonhematopoietic human cells. Here, we report an IFN-γ-induced mechanism of resistance to Toxoplasma in primary human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) that does not depend on the deprivation of tryptophan or iron. In addition, infection is still controlled in HFFs deficient in the p65 guanylate binding proteins GBP1 or GBP2 and the autophagic protein ATG5. Resistance is coincident with host cell death that is not dependent on the necroptosis mediator RIPK3 or caspases and is correlated with early egress of the parasite before replication. This IFN-γ-induced cell death and early egress limits replication in HFFs and could promote clearance of the parasite by immune cells.

  9. Parainfluenza virus 5 genomes are located in viral cytoplasmic bodies whilst the virus dismantles the interferon-induced antiviral state of cells.

    PubMed

    Carlos, T S; Young, D F; Schneider, M; Simas, J P; Randall, R E

    2009-09-01

    Although the replication cycle of parainfluenza virus type 5 (PIV5) is initially severely impaired in cells in an interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral state, the virus still targets STAT1 for degradation. As a consequence, the cells can no longer respond to IFN and after 24-48 h, they go out of the antiviral state and normal virus replication is established. Following infection of cells in an IFN-induced antiviral state, viral nucleocapsid proteins are initially localized within small cytoplasmic bodies, and appearance of these cytoplasmic bodies correlates with the loss of STAT1 from infected cells. In situ hybridization, using probes specific for the NP and L genes, demonstrated the presence of virus genomes within these cytoplasmic bodies. These viral cytoplasmic bodies do not co-localize with cellular markers for stress granules, cytoplasmic P-bodies or autophagosomes. Furthermore, they are not large insoluble aggregates of viral proteins and/or nucleocapsids, as they can simply and easily be dispersed by 'cold-shocking' live cells, a process that disrupts the cytoskeleton. Given that during in vivo infections, PIV5 will inevitably infect cells in an IFN-induced antiviral state, we suggest that these cytoplasmic bodies are areas in which PIV5 genomes reside whilst the virus dismantles the antiviral state of the cells. Consequently, viral cytoplasmic bodies may play an important part in the strategy that PIV5 uses to circumvent the IFN system.

  10. Nitric oxide-mediated antiplasmodial activity in human and murine hepatocytes induced by gamma interferon and the parasite itself: enhancement by exogenous tetrahydrobiopterin.

    PubMed Central

    Mellouk, S; Hoffman, S L; Liu, Z Z; de la Vega, P; Billiar, T R; Nussler, A K

    1994-01-01

    Expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase has been shown to inhibit the development of several pathogens, including fungi, bacteria, parasites, and viruses. However, there is still controversy as to whether this effector mechanism can inhibit the development of human pathogens. We now report that gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) induces the elimination of Plasmodium falciparum-infected primary human hepatocytes from cultures and that the antimalarial activity is dependent on NO. Infection with the parasite alone in the absence of added IFN-gamma caused a 10-fold increase in NO formation. Both spontaneous inhibition and IFN-gamma-induced inhibition of Plasmodium yoelii-infected murine hepatocytes were increased with the addition of the NO synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin, or sepiapterin, which is converted to tetrahydrobiopterin. These results indicate that under in vitro conditions the parasite itself provides a signal that triggers induction of the NO pathway in human and murine hepatocytes and that NO formation in infected hepatocytes is limited by tetrahydrobiopterin availability. PMID:8063424

  11. Interferon-gamma Inhibits Melanogenesis and Induces Apoptosis in Melanocytes: A Pivotal Role of CD8+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Wei, Yi; Sun, Yue; Shi, Weimin; Yang, Ji; Zhu, Lubing; Li, Ming

    2015-07-01

    Increased expression of the cytokine interferon (IFN)-γ plays a pivotal role in vitiligo-induced depigmentation. However, the major source of IFN-γ in vitiligo patients and the mechanisms underlying melanocyte destruction are unknown. In this study, a large number of skin infiltrating IFN-γ+ cells and CD8+ T cells were detected in progressive vitiligo. Among the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of vitiligo patients, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that express IFN-γ exhibited significant expansion, which suggests that activated CTLs are the main source of increased IFN-γ in progressive vitiligo. An in vitro analysis demonstrated that IFN-γ inhibits melanogenesis in primary cultured human melanocytes by altering melanogenic enzyme mRNA expression and, more importantly, that IFN-γ directly induces melanocyte apoptosis. Our data indicate that vitiligo pathophysiology may be linked to globally activated CD8+ CTL subpopulations, which produce increased IFN-γ and induce melanocyte dysfunction and apoptosis.

  12. Interferon-induced 56,000 Mr protein and its mRNA in human cells: molecular cloning and partial sequence of the cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chebath, J; Merlin, G; Metz, R; Benech, P; Revel, M

    1983-01-01

    Treatment of responsive cells by interferons (IFNs) induces within a few hours a rise in the concentration of several proteins and mRNAs. In order to characterize these IFN-induced mRNA species, we have cloned in E. coli the cDNA made from a 17-18S poly(A)+ RNA of human fibroblastoid cells (SV80) treated with IFN-beta. We describe here a pBR322 recombinant plasmid (C56) which contains a 400 bp cDNA insert corresponding to a 18S mRNA species newly induced by IFN. The C56 mRNA codes for a 56,000 dalton protein easily detectable by hybridization-translation experiments. The sequence of 66 of the carboxy-terminal amino-acids of the protein can be deduced from the cDNA sequence. IFNs-alpha, beta or gamma are able to activate the expression of this gene in human fibroblasts as well as lymphoblastoid cells. The mRNA is not detectable without IFN; it reaches maximum levels (0.1% of the total poly(A)+ RNA) within 4-8 hrs and decreases after 16 hrs. Images PMID:6186990

  13. Re-evaluation of thyroid hormone signaling antagonism of tetrabromobisphenol A for validating the T3-induced Xenopus metamorphosis assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Li, Yuanyuan; Qin, Zhanfen; Wei, Wuji

    2017-02-01

    We developed the T3-induced Xenopus metamorphosis assay, which is supposed to be able to sensitively detect thyroid hormone (TH) signaling disruption of chemicals. The present study aimed to validate the T3-induced Xenopus metamorphosis assay by re-evaluating the TH signaling antagonism of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a known TH signaling disruptor. According to the assay we developed, Xenopus tadpoles at stage 52 were exposed to 10-500nmol/L TBBPA in the presence of 1nmol/L T3. After 96hr of exposure, TBBPA in the range of 10-500nmol/L was found to significantly inhibit T3-induced morphological changes of Xenopus tadpoles in a concentration-dependent manner in term of body weight and four morphological endpoints including head area (HA), mouth width (MW), unilateral brain width/brain length (ULBW/BL), and hind-limb length/snout-vent length (HLL/SVL). The results show that these endpoints we developed are sensitive for characterizing the antagonistic effects of TBBPA on T3-induced metamorphosis. Following a 24-hr exposure, we found that TBBPA antagonized expression of T3-induced TH-response genes in the tail, which is consistent with previous findings in the intestine. We propose that the tail can be used as an alternative tissue to the intestine for examining molecular endpoints for evaluating TH signaling disruption. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the T3-induced Xenopus metamorphosis assay we developed is an ideal in vivo assay for detecting TH signaling disruption.

  14. A misdiagnosed Riedel's thyroiditis successfully treated by thyroidectomy and tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Jung; Wu, Ta-Jen; Lee, Chung-Ta; Huang, Shih-Ming

    2012-12-01

    Riedel's thyroiditis, known as invasive fibrous thyroiditis, is a very rare form of chronic thyroiditis. It is hard to make the diagnosis without surgical biopsy. We present a case of Riedel's thyroiditis in a 52-year-old female with past history of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. She suffered from bilateral neck pain, which radiated to both lower jaws. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 125 mm/hour. Subacute thyroiditis superimposed on Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed and treated with steroid. However the response was poor and she had a history of severe peptic ulcer. To avoid inducing the peptic ulcer by steroid, she received bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy. During surgery, the thyroid had severe adhesion to surrounding soft tissue and the pathology showed Riedel's thyroiditis. The neck pain improved after thyroidectomy. Tamoxifen has been given for 8 months and the size of remnant thyroid decreased to 8 mm. We concluded that combined thyroidectomy and tamoxifen successfully cured a patient with Riedel's thyroiditis.

  15. Ursolic acid from Trailliaedoxa gracilis induces apoptosis in medullary thyroid carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    AGUIRIANO-MOSER, VICTOR; SVEJDA, BERNHARD; LI, ZENG-XIA; STURM, SONJA; STUPPNER, HERMANN; INGOLIC, ELISABETH; HÖGER, HARALD; SIEGL, VERONIKA; MEIER-ALLARD, NATHALIE; SADJAK, ANTON; PFRAGNER, ROSWITHA

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) originates from the C-cells of the thyroid and is not sensitive to radiation or chemotherapy. Therefore, surgical removal of the tumor tissue in its entirety is the only curative treatment for MTC. The present study aimed to examine the potential mechanisms of action of extracts of Trailliaedoxa gracilis (TG; WW Smith & Forrest), a plant from the province of Sichuan, China, and of ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpen present in TG, on the MTC-SK MTC cell line. A total of 13 TG fractions and UA were examined in vitro for their effects on cell morphology, cell number, proliferation and rates of apoptosis. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction of nuclear factor-κB essential modifier (NEMO) was performed to delineate the role of the apoptotic pathway following treatment with UA. TG and UA were examined in vivo in xenotransplanted MTC-bearing severe combined immunodeficient mice. The TG fractions exhibited antiproliferative effects, with inhibition of mitochondrial activity in the tumor cells at concentrations, which caused no impairment of the normal control cells. The apoptotic rates of the MTC-SK cells treated with the TG fractions and UA were determined, in which no marked tumor inhibition was observed in the treated MTC-mice, and no change in the expression of NEMO was detected in the treated MTC-SK cells. The observation of early-onset activation of caspase 8 suggested that the responsible factor was linked to NEMO, an anti-apoptotic protein. However, no differences in the mRNA transcription levels of NEMO were detected in MTC-SK cells treated with UA, suggesting that this protein was not associated with the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway. PMID:26151624

  16. Lack of effect of recombinant bovine interferon alpha I1 in the treatment of experimentally-induced bovine warts.

    PubMed Central

    Lassauzet, M L; Salamin, P A

    1993-01-01

    Fifteen four-month old calves were inoculated, on five scarified sites on each side of the neck, with a suspension of ground wart tissue from a steer naturally infected with bovine papilloma virus 1. Warts started to appear about one month postinfection and were measurable in ten calves two months postinfection, when the trial started. After stratification on the size of the warts, all fifteen calves were allocated randomly to one of the following treatment groups: twice weekly intramuscular injections of 5 mg recombinant bovine interferon alpha I1 (rBoIFN alpha I1), weekly injection of 5 mg of rBoIFN alpha I1 or placebo, for three weeks. The biggest wart on each calf at the beginning of the trial was measured and photographs of all warts were taken weekly for five weeks. An analysis of covariance on the log of the volumes of warts during the five weeks of the trial showed a significant difference between groups (p = 0.026). Warts in treated groups tended to grow faster than in the placebo group. PMID:8358676

  17. Dimeric structure of pseudokinase RNase L bound to 2-5A reveals a basis for interferon induced antiviral activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Zeqiraj, Elton; Dong, Beihua; Jha, Babal Kant; Duffy, Nicole; Orlicky, Stephen; Thevakumaran, Neroshan; Talukdar, Manisha; Pillon, Monica C.; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Wan, Leo; Juang, Yu-Chi; Mao, Daniel Y.L.; Gaughan, Christina; Brinton, Margo A.; Perelygin, Andrey A.; Kourinov, Igor; Guarné, Alba; Silverman, Robert H.; Sicheri, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Summary RNase L is an ankyrin repeat domain containing dual endoribonuclease-pseudokinase that is activated by unusual 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A) second messengers and which impedes viral infections in higher vertebrates. Despite its importance in interferon regulated antiviral innate immunity, relatively little is known about its precise mechanism of action. Here, we present a functional characterization of 2.5 Å and 3.25 Å X-ray crystal and small angle x-ray scattering structures of RNase L bound to a natural 2-5A activator with and without ADP or the non-hydrolysable ATP mimetic AMP-PNP. These studies reveal how recognition of 2-5A through interactions with the ankyrin repeat domain and the pseudokinase domain together with nucleotide binding, impose a rigid intertwined dimer configuration that is essential for RNase catalytic and anti-viral functions. The involvement of the pseudokinase domain of RNase L in 2-5A sensing, nucleotide binding, dimerization, and ribonuclease functions highlights the evolutionary adaptability of the eukaryotic protein kinase fold. PMID:24462203

  18. Thyroid active agents T3 and PTU differentially affect immune gene transcripts in the head kidney of rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Quesada-García, Alba; Encinas, Paloma; Valdehita, Ana; Baumann, Lisa; Segner, Helmut; Coll, Julio M; Navas, José M

    2016-05-01

    In mammals, numerous reports describe an immunomodulating effect of thyroid-active compounds. In contrast, only few reports have been published on this subject in fish. We previously demonstrated that immune cells of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) possess thyroid hormone receptors (THRs) and that exposure of trout to the thyroid hormone 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) or the antithyroid drug propylthiouracil (PTU) alters immune cell transcript levels of THR and several immune genes. The present study aims to further characterize the immunomodulating action of thyroid-active compounds in trout immune cells. We report here the use of a custom-designed 60-mer oligo immune-targeted microarray for rainbow trout to analyze the gene expression profiles induced in the head kidney by T3 and PTU. Morphometric analyses of the thyroid showed that PTU exposure increased the size of the epithelial cells, whereas T3 induced no significant effects. Both T3 and PTU had diverse and partly contrasting effects on immune transcript profiles. The strongest differential effects of T3 and PTU on gene expressions were those targeting the Mitogen Associated Protein Kinase (MAPK), NFkB, Natural Killer (NK) and Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) pathways, a number of multipath genes (MPG) such as those encoding pleiotropic transcription factors (atf1, junb, myc), as well as important pro-inflammatory genes (tnfa, tnf6, il1b) and interferon-related genes (ifng, irf10). With these results we show for the first time in a fish species that the in vivo thyroidal status modulates a diversity of immune genes and pathways. This knowledge provides the basis to investigate both mechanisms and consequences of thyroid hormone- and thyroid disruptor-mediated immunomodulation for the immunocompetence of fish.

  19. Histone Deacetylase Activity Represses Gamma Interferon-Inducible HLA-DR Gene Expression following the Establishment of a DNase I-Hypersensitive Chromatin Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Aaron; Zhang, Hongquan; Yang, Wen-Ming; Seto, Edward; Blanck, George

    2001-01-01

    Expression of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) is required for gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-inducible major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression and transcriptionally productive HLA-DRA promoter occupancy in several human tumor cell lines. Treatment of these Rb-defective tumor cell lines with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors rescued IFN-γ-inducible HLA-DRA and -DRB mRNA and cell surface protein expression, demonstrating repression of these genes by endogenous cellular HDAC activity. Additionally, Rb-defective, transcriptionally incompetent tumor cells retained the HLA-DRA promoter DNase I-hypersensitive site. Thus, HDAC-mediated repression of the HLA-DRA promoter occurs following the establishment of an apparent nucleosome-free promoter region and before transcriptionally productive occupancy of the promoter by the required transactivators. Repression of HLA-DRA promoter activation by HDAC activity likely involves a YY1 binding element located in the first exon of the HLA-DRA gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments localized YY1 to the HLA-DRA gene in Rb-defective tumor cells. Additionally, mutation of the YY1 binding site prevented repression of the promoter by HDAC1 and partially prevented activation of the promoter by trichostatin A. Mutation of the octamer element also significantly reduced the ability of HDAC1 to confer repression of inducible HLA-DRA promoter activation. Treatment of Rb-defective tumor cells with HDAC inhibitors greatly reduced the DNA binding activity of Oct-1, a repressor of inducible HLA-DRA promoter activation. These findings represent the first evidence that HDAC activity can repress IFN-γ-inducible HLA class II gene expression and also demonstrate that HDAC activity can contribute to promoter repression following the establishment of a DNase I-hypersensitive chromatin conformation. PMID:11533238

  20. Selective STAT protein degradation induced by paramyxoviruses requires both STAT1 and STAT2 but is independent of alpha/beta interferon signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Parisien, Jean-Patrick; Lau, Joe F; Rodriguez, Jason J; Ulane, Christina M; Horvath, Curt M

    2002-05-01

    The alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta)-induced STAT signal transduction pathway leading to activation of the ISGF3 transcription complex and subsequent antiviral responses is the target of viral pathogenesis strategies. Members of the Rubulavirus genus of the Paramyxovirus family of RNA viruses have acquired the ability to specifically target either STAT1 or STAT2 for proteolytic degradation as a countermeasure for evading IFN responses. While type II human parainfluenza virus induces STAT2 degradation, simian virus 5 induces STAT1 degradation. The components of the IFN signaling system that are required for STAT protein degradation by these paramyxoviruses have been investigated in a series of human somatic cell lines deficient in IFN signaling proteins. Results indicate that neither the IFN-alpha/beta receptor, the tyrosine kinases Jak1 or Tyk2, nor the ISGF3 DNA-binding subunit, IFN regulatory factor 9 (IRF9), is required for STAT protein degradation induced by either virus. Nonetheless, both STAT1 and STAT2 are strictly required in the host cell to establish a degradation-permissive environment enabling both viruses to target their respective STAT protein. Complementation studies reveal that STAT protein-activating tyrosine phosphorylation and functional src homology 2 (SH2) domains are dispensable for creating a permissive STAT degradation environment in degradation-incompetent cells, but the N terminus of the missing STAT protein is essential. Protein-protein interaction analysis indicates that V and STAT proteins interact physically in vitro and in vivo. These results constitute genetic and biochemical evidence supporting a virus-induced, IFN-independent STAT protein degradation complex that contains at least STAT1 and STAT2.

  1. N-Formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine Inhibits both Gamma Interferon- and Interleukin-10-Induced Expression of FcγRI on Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Barrionuevo, Paula; Alves-Rosa, Fernanda; Rubel, Carolina J.; Palermo, Marina S.; Isturiz, Martín A.

    2001-01-01

    Three different classes of receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (FcγRs), FcγRI, FcγRII, and FcγRIII, have been identified on human leukocytes. One of them, FcγRI, is a high-affinity receptor capable of induction of functions that include phagocytosis, respiratory burst, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), and secretion of cytokines. This receptor is expressed on mononuclear phagocytes, and this expression is regulated by cytokines and hormones such as gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IFN-β, interleukin-10 (IL-10), and glucocorticoids. We have recently demonstrated that the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) is capable of inducing a time-dependent downregulation of both FcγRIIIB and FcγRII in human neutrophils, altering FcγR-dependent functions. Considering the biological relevance of the regulation of FcγRI, we investigated the effect of FMLP on the overexpression of FcγRI induced by both IFN-γ and IL-10 on human monocytes. We demonstrate that FMLP significantly abrogated IFN-γ- and IL-10-induced FcγRI expression, although its basal level of expression was not altered. However, other IFN-γ-mediated effects such as the overexpression of the major histocompatibility complex class II antigens and the enhancement of lipopolysaccharide-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha were not affected by FMLP treatment. The formyl peptide completely inhibited the IFN-γ- and IL-10-induced enhancement of ADCC and phagocytosis carried out by adherent cells. The inhibitory effect of FMLP on FcγRI upregulation could exert an important regulatory effect during the evolution of bacterial infections. PMID:11238229

  2. Helicobacter pylori VacA Suppresses Lactobacillus acidophilus-Induced Interferon Beta Signaling in Macrophages via Alterations in the Endocytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Gudrun; Forster, Sam; Irving, Aaron; Tate, Michelle; Ferrero, Richard L.; Hertzog, Paul; Frøkiær, Hanne; Kaparakis-Liaskos, Maria

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastritis and avoids elimination by the immune system of the infected host. The commensal bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus has been suggested to exert beneficial effects as a supplement during H. pylori eradication therapy. In the present study, we applied whole-genome microarray analysis to compare the immune responses induced in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated with L. acidophilus, H. pylori, or both bacteria in combination. While L. acidophilus induced a Th1-polarizing response characterized by high expression of interferon beta (IFN-β) and interleukin 12 (IL-12), H. pylori strongly induced the innate cytokines IL-1β and IL-1α. In BMDMs prestimulated with L. acidophilus, H. pylori blocked the expression of L. acidophilus-induced IFN-β and IL-12 and suppressed the expression of key regulators of the Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 GTPases. The inhibition of L. acidophilus-induced IFN-β was independent of H. pylori viability and the virulence factor CagPAI; however, a vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA) mutant was unable to block IFN-β. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the addition of H. pylori to L. acidophilus-stimulated BMDMs redirects intracellular processing, leading to an accumulation of L. acidophilus in the endosomal and lysosomal compartments. Thus, our findings indicate that H. pylori inhibits the development of a strong Th1-polarizing response in BMDMs stimulated with L. acidophilus by blocking the production of IFN-β in a VacA-dependent manner. We suggest that this abrogation is caused by a redirection of the endocytotic pathway in the processing of L. acidophilus. PMID:23760466

  3. Glucocorticoid-induced S-adenosylmethionine enhances the interferon signaling pathway by restoring STAT1 protein methylation in hepatitis B virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Bing, Yuntao; Zhu, Siying; Yu, Guozheng; Li, Ting; Liu, Weijun; Li, Changsheng; Wang, Yitao; Qi, Haolong; Guo, Tao; Yuan, Yufeng; He, Yueming; Liu, Zhisu; Liu, Quanyan

    2014-11-21

    Patients with chronic hepatitis B usually exhibit a low response to treatment with interferon α (IFN-α). An alternative approach to increase the response rate of IFN-α might be to immunologically stimulate the host with glucocorticoids (GCs) before treatment with IFN-α, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesized that the GCs enhance IFN signaling by inducing S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) when hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication was effectively suppressed by IFN-α. Here, we investigated the effect of GCs and IFN-α on AdoMet production and methionine adenosyltransferase 1A (MAT1A) expression in vitro. Furthermore, we determined whether post-transcriptional regulation is involved in HBV-repressed MAT1A expression and AdoMet production induced by dexamethasone (Dex). We found that AdoMet homeostasis was disrupted by Dex and that Dex directly regulated MAT1A expression by enhancing the binding of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to the glucocorticoid-response element (GRE) of the MAT1A promoter. HBV reduced AdoMet production by increasing methylation at GRE sites within the MAT1A promoter. The X protein of hepatitis B virus led to hypermethylation in the MAT1A promoter by recruiting DNA methyltransferase 1, and it inhibited GR binding to the GRE in the MAT1A promoter. Dex could increase an antiviral effect by inducing AdoMet production via a positive feedback loop when HBV is effectively suppressed by IFN-α, and the mechanism that involves Dex-induced AdoMet could increase STAT1 methylation rather than STAT1 phosphorylation. These findings provide a possible mechanism by which GC-induced AdoMet enhances the antiviral activity of IFN-α by restoring STAT1 methylation in HBV-infected cells.

  4. Porcine circovirus type 2 induces type I interferon production via MyD88-IKKα-IRFs signaling rather than NF-κB in porcine alveolar macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengmeng; Han, Junyuan; Zhang, Yaqun; Duan, Dianning; Zhang, Shuxia

    2016-02-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-I) plays important roles in host antiviral responses. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) and NF-κB transcription factors are thought to be important in the processes of viral secretion and triggering of interferon production. Recently, studies have shown that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) can induce IFN-I production in vivo and in vitro, but the mechanisms underlying the production of PAMs infected with PCV2 remains unknown. Treatment of these cells with BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of NF-κB activation, allowed us to study the secretion of IFN-α and IFN-β in PAMs infected with PCV2. We found that IFN-α expression was induced following virus infection of PAMs. Notably, even after inhibitor treatment of PAMs infected with PCV2, secretion of IFN-α was significantly higher (P<0.05) compared with the PCV2 infection alone group. Our findings suggest that NF-κB plays a minor role in PCV2-induced type I interferon responses. To further characterize the signaling pathway that drives IFN-I expression in PAMs in response to PCV2, we used siRNA to silence the expression of Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and study the role of MyD88-IKKα-IRF signaling in IFN-I production in PAMs induced by PCV2. Our findings show that PCV2 induced IFN-α mRNA transcription, which is associated with the activities of MyD88, IRF7, and IRF3. Thus, PCV2 can induce IFN-I transcription via the MyD88-IKKα-IRF signaling axis.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of luteolin on experimental autoimmune thyroiditis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Nan; Chen, Gang; Liu, Min; Ye, Xiaozhen; Pan, Yahui; Ge, Jiuyu; Mao, Yanting; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jian; Xie, Sijing

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is the most common organ-specific autoimmune disease and is believed to be a predominately T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 is a crucial transcription factor of T cell-mediated immunity, with key roles in the proliferation and migration of T helper (Th) cells, differentiation of Th cells into Th17 cells, and the balance between Treg cells and Th17 cells. Flavonoid luteolin has been shown to markedly inhibit Tyr705 activation/phosphorylation of STAT3 and exert anti-inflammatory effects in multiple sclerosis. In the present study, the effect of luteolin on experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) was analyzed in C57BL/6 mice. Hematoxylin and eosin examination showed that luteolin attenuated lymphocytic infiltration and follicle destruction in thyroid glands. Immunohistochemistry results demonstrated that luteolin significantly reduced the phosphorylation of STAT3 within the thyroid. An in vitro study was carried out in a RAW264.7 macrophage cell line. Western blot findings demonstrated that luteolin significantly inhibited interferon-γ-induced increases in cyclooxygenase 2, phosphorylated STAT1 and phosphorylated STAT3 expression levels and the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α in supernatants. The present findings indicated that luteolin may exert potent anti-inflammatory effects on murine EAT, which may provide a novel therapeutic medication strategy for the early intervention of HT. PMID:28101184

  6. NF2 loss promotes oncogenic RAS-induced thyroid cancers via YAP-dependent transactivation of RAS proteins and sensitizes them to MEK inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E.R.; Ricarte-Filho, Julio C.; Untch, Brian R.; Landa, Iňigo; Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Voza, Francesca; Smith, Vicki E.; Ganly, Ian; Taylor, Barry S.; Persaud, Yogindra; Oler, Gisele; Fang, Yuqiang; Jhanwar, Suresh C.; Viale, Agnes; Heguy, Adriana; Huberman, Kety H.; Giancotti, Filippo; Ghossein, Ronald; Fagin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Ch22q LOH is preferentially associated with RAS mutations in papillary and in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC). The 22q tumor suppressor NF2, encoding merlin, is implicated in this interaction because of its frequent loss of function in human thyroid cancer cell lines. Nf2 deletion or Hras mutation are insufficient for transformation, whereas their combined disruption leads to murine PDTC with increased MAPK signaling. Merlin loss induces RAS signaling in part through inactivation of Hippo, which activates a YAP-TEAD transcriptional program. We find that the three RAS genes are themselves YAP-TEAD1 transcriptional targets, providing a novel mechanism of promotion of RAS-induced tumorigenesis. Moreover, pharmacological disruption of YAP-TEAD with verteporfin blocks RAS transcription and signaling, and inhibits cell growth. The increased MAPK output generated by NF2 loss in RAS-mutant cancers may inform therapeutic strategies, as it generates greater dependency on the MAPK pathway for viability. PMID:26359368

  7. Stimulation of TLR4 by LMW-HA induces metastasis in human papillary thyroid carcinoma through CXCR7.

    PubMed

    Dang, Shipeng; Peng, Yongde; Ye, Lei; Wang, Yanan; Qian, Zhongqing; Chen, Yuqing; Wang, Xiaojing; Lin, Yunzhi; Zhang, Xiaomei; Sun, Xiyan; Wu, Qiong; Cheng, Yiji; Nie, Hong; Jin, Min; Xu, Huanbai

    2013-01-01

    In inflammatory sites, high molecular weight hyaluronan fragments are degraded into lower molecular weight hyaluronan fragments (LMW-HA) to regulate immune responses. However, the function of LMW-HA in PTC progression remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that receptor of LMW-HA, TLR4, was aberrantly overexpressed in PTC tissues and cell line W3. Exposure of W3 cells to LMW-HA promoted cell proliferation and migration via TLR4. Knockdown of TLR4 has provided evidence that TLR4 is essential for LMW-HA-induced CXCR7 expression, which is responsible for LMW-HA-induced proliferation and migration of W3 cells. In tumor-bearing adult nude mice, stimulation of LMW-HA on W3 cells promotes CXCR7 expression in tumor masses (P = 0.002) and tumor growth (P < 0.001). To further confirm our findings, we investigated the clinicopathologic significance of TLR4 and CXCR7 expression using immumohistochemistry in 135 human PTC tissues and 56 normal thyroid tissue samples. Higher rates of TLR4 (53%) and CXCR7 (24%) expression were found in PTC tissues than in normal tissues. Expression of TLR4 or CXCR7 is associated with tumor size and lymph node metastasis. Therefore, LMW-HA may contribute to the development of PTC via TLR4/CXCR7 pathway, which may be a novel target for PTC immunomodulatory therapy.

  8. Interferon-γ-induced activation of JAK1 and JAK2 suppresses tumor cell susceptibility to NK cells through upregulation of PD-L1 expression.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Roberto; Martin, Allison; Bommarito, Davide; Wang, Kathy; Hansen, Steen H; Freeman, Gordon J; Ritz, Jerome

    2015-06-01

    Inhibition of JAK1 or JAK2 in human tumor cells was previously shown to increase susceptibility of these cells to NK cell lysis. In the present study, we examined the cellular mechanisms that mediate this effect in hematopoietic tumor cell lines and primary tumor cells. Incubation of tumor cells with supernatant from activated NK cells or interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-induced activation of pSTAT1 and increased expression of PD-L1 without altering expression of other activating or inhibitory NK cell ligands. These functional effects were blocked by chemical JAK inhibition or shRNAs targeting JAK1, JAK2 or STAT1. Inhibition of IFNγ signaling also prevented the upregulation of PD-L1 and blocking PD-L1 resulted in increased tumor lysis by NK cells. These results show that NK cell activation and secretion of IFNγ results in activation of JAK1, JAK2 and STAT1 in tumor cells, resulting in rapid up-regulation of PD-L1 expression. Increased expression of PD-L1 results in increased resistance to NK cell lysis. Blockade of JAK pathway activation prevents increased PD-L1 expression resulting in increased susceptibility of tumor cells to NK cell activity. These observations suggest that JAK pathway inhibitors as well as PD-1 and PD-L1 antibodies may work synergistically with other immune therapies by preventing IFN-induced inhibition of NK cell-mediated tumor cell lysis.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Immunotherapy with Interferon-Gamma in the Management of Chronic Sulfur Mustard-Induced Cutaneous Complications: Comparison with Topical Betamethasone 1%

    PubMed Central

    Panahi, Yunes; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Davoudi, Seyyed Masoud; Amiri, Mojtaba; Beiraghdar, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    The present trial investigated the efficacy of immunotherapy with interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in the treatment of sulfur mustard (SM)-induced chronic skin complications. Forty subjects who were suffering from chronic skin complications of SM and were diagnosed to have severe atopic dermatitis, were assigned to IFN-γ (50 μg/m2) subcutaneously three times per week (n = 20) or betamethasone valerate topical cream 0.1% (n = 20) every night for 30 days. Extent and intensity of cutaneous complications was evaluated using scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) index, and quality of life using dermatology life quality index (DLQI) at baseline and at the end of trial. SCORAD-A and SCORAD-B scores were significantly decreased in both IFN-γ and betamethasone. However, SCORAD-C score was decreased only in the IFN-γ group. There were significant reductions in overall as well as objective SCORAD scores in both groups. As for the magnitude of changes, treatment with IFN-γ was associated with greater reductions in overall, objective and segmented SCORAD scores compared to betamethasone. DLQI reduction was found to be significantly greater in the IFN-γ group. Promising improvements in quality life and clinical symptoms that was observed in the present study suggest the application of IFN-γ as an effective therapy for the management of SM-induced chronic skin complications. PMID:22536131

  10. Different subcellular localizations for the related interferon-induced GTPases, MuGBP-1 and MuGBP-2: implications for different functions?

    PubMed

    Vestal, D J; Gorbacheva, V Y; Sen, G C

    2000-11-01

    The guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are a family of 65-67-kDa proteins induced by both type I and type II interferons (IFN). Members of the GBP family of GTPases are among the most abundant IFN-gamma-induced proteins. GBPs contain an unusual GTP binding site, which is consistent with GBP hydrolysis of GTP to both GDP and GMP. In addition, six of the eight known GBPs have a carboxy-terminal CaaX motif for the addition of isoprenyl lipids. Despite their abundance, however, little is known about the biologic function or cellular location of GBPs. We report here on studies to localize both a newly identified murine GBP (MuGBP-2) and its closely related family member, MuGBP-1. In both IFN-treated macrophages and fibroblasts, MuGBP-2 is found in both a granular distribution throughout the cytoplasm and localized to vesicle populations of heterogeneous sizes. The localization of MuGBP-2 to vesicles is dependent on its isoprenylation. Despite a high degree of sequence identity and the presence of an identical CaaX sequence, MuGBP-1 has a very homogeneous cytoplasmic distribution and fails to localize to intracellular vesicles. The different intracellular distribution of these two closely related family members suggests differential function(s).

  11. MicroRNA profiling of Sendai virus-infected A549 cells identifies miR-203 as an interferon-inducible regulator of IFIT1/ISG56.

    PubMed

    Buggele, William A; Horvath, Curt M

    2013-08-01

    The mammalian type I interferon (IFN) response is a primary barrier for virus infection and is essential for complete innate and adaptive immunity. Both IFN production and IFN-mediated antiviral signaling are the result of differential cellular gene expression, a process that is tightly controlled at transcriptional and translational levels. To determine the potential for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation of the antiviral response, small-RNA profiling was used to analyze the miRNA content of human A549 cells at steady state and following infection with the Cantell strain of Sendai virus, a potent inducer of IFN and cellular antiviral responses. While the miRNA content of the cells was largely unaltered by infection, specific changes in miRNA abundance were identified during Sendai virus infection. One miRNA, miR-203, was found to accumulate in infected cells and in response to IFN treatment. Results indicate that miR-203 is an IFN-inducible miRNA that can negatively regulate a number of cellular mRNAs, including an IFN-stimulated gene target, IFIT1/ISG56, by destabilizing its mRNA transcript.

  12. STAT1, STAT3 and p38MAPK are involved in the apoptotic effect induced by a chimeric cyclic interferon-{alpha}2b peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Viviana C.; Pena, Clara; Roguin, Leonor P.

    2010-02-15

    In the search of mimetic peptides of the interferon-{alpha}2b molecule (IFN-{alpha}2b), we have previously designed and synthesized a chimeric cyclic peptide of the IFN-{alpha}2b that inhibits WISH cell proliferation by inducing an apoptotic response. Here, we first studied the ability of this peptide to activate intracellular signaling pathways and then evaluated the participation of some signals in the induction of apoptosis. Stimulation of WISH cells with the cyclic peptide showed tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak1 and Tyk2 kinases, tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 transcription factors and activation of p38 MAPK pathway, although phosphorylation levels or kinetics were in some conditions different to those obtained under IFN-{alpha}2b stimulus. JNK and p44/42 pathways were not activated by the peptide in WISH cells. We also showed that STAT1 and STAT3 downregulation by RNA interference decreased the antiproliferative activity and the amount of apoptotic cells induced by the peptide. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAPK also reduced the peptide growth inhibitory activity and the apoptotic effect. Thus, we demonstrated that the cyclic peptide regulates WISH cell proliferation through the activation of Jak/STAT signaling pathway. In addition, our results indicate that p38 MAPK may also be involved in cell growth regulation. This study suggests that STAT1, STAT3 and p38 MAPK would be mediating the antitumor and apoptotic response triggered by the cyclic peptide in WISH cells.

  13. Energy dialogue technique in healing and health: relieving side effects and thyroid dysfunction in a male with hemophilia receiving pegylated interferon and ribavirin treatment for hepatitis C virus--an anecdotal case study.

    PubMed

    Krug, Phyllis; Kramer, Deborah; Bukatman, Rochelle; Gordon, Phyllis; Mermelstein, Pamela

    2013-09-01

    This article describes the use of energy dialogue technique (EDT), a healing intervention that provides awareness of imbalances in the energetic field that affect patients' health and guide the practitioner to sense and direct the frequency, vibration, intention, awareness, or consciousness to correct these imbalances. The authors document the effectiveness of this technique as it was used to treat side effects of the medical intervention for hepatitis C in a male with hemophilia. Following EDT, the client's symptoms of fatigue and pain improved by 30% to 40%; moreover, thyroid function returned to normal. The authors suggest that EDT be studied and explored for inclusion as a treatment modality.

  14. Effectiveness of various thermal ablation techniques for the treatment of nodular thyroid disease--comparison of laser-induced thermotherapy and bipolar radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Jörg-Peter; Lehmann, Kai S; Schumann, Thomas; Knappe, Verena; Zurbuchen, Urte; Buhr, Heinz J; Holmer, Christoph

    2011-07-01

    Alternative minimally invasive treatment options such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) are at present under investigation for achieving a nonsurgical targeted cytoreduction in benign and malignant thyroid lesions. So far, studies have not been able to show a secure advantage for neither LITT nor RFA. The aim of this study was to compare the two ablation procedures in terms of their effectiveness. Thermal lesions were induced in porcine thyroid glands either by LITT or bipolar RFA ex vivo (n = 110 each) and in vivo (n = 10 each) using power settings between 10 and 20 W. Temperature spread during application was documented in 5- and 10-mm distance of the applicator. Postinterventional lesion diameters were measured and lesion size was calculated. Furthermore, enzyme histochemical analysis of the thyroid tissue was performed in vivo. Lesion volumes induced by LITT ranged between 0.74 ± 0.18 cm(3) (10 W) and 3.80 ± 0.41 cm(3) (20 W) with a maximum of 5.13 ± 0.16 cm(3) at 18 W. The inducible lesion volumes by RFA were between 2.43 ± 0.68 cm(3) (10 W) and 0.91 ± 0.71 cm(3) (20 W) with a maximum of 2.80 ± 0.85 cm(3) at 14 W. The maximum temperatures were 112.9 ± 9.2°C (LITT) and 61.6 ± 13.9°C (RFA) at a distance of 5 mm and 73.2 ± 6.7°C (LITT) and 53.5 ± 8.6°C (RFA) at a distance of 10 mm. The histochemical analysis demonstrates a complete loss of NADPH dehydrogenase activity in thermal lesions as a sign of irreversible cell damage both for LITT and RFA. This study is the first to compare the effectiveness of laser-induced thermotherapy and radiofrequency ablation of thyroid tissue. LITT as well as RFA are suitable for singular thyroid nodules and induces reproducible clinically relevant lesions in an appropriate application time. The maximum inducible lesion volumes by LITT are significantly larger than by RFA with the devices used herein.

  15. CD8+ T Cell Exhaustion, Suppressed Gamma Interferon Production, and Delayed Memory Response Induced by Chronic Brucella melitensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Durward-Diioia, Marina; Harms, Jerome; Khan, Mike; Hall, Cherisse; Smith, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is a well-adapted zoonotic pathogen considered a scourge of mankind since recorded history. In some cases, initial infection leads to chronic and reactivating brucellosis, incurring significant morbidity and economic loss. The mechanism by which B. melitensis subverts adaptive immunological memory is poorly understood. Previous work has shown that Brucella-specific CD8+ T cells express gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and can transition to long-lived memory cells but are not polyfunctional. In this study, chronic infection of mice with B. melitensis led to CD8+ T cell exhaustion, manifested by programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) expression and a lack of IFN-γ production. The B. melitensis-specific CD8+ T cells that produced IFN-γ expressed less IFN-γ per cell than did CD8+ cells from uninfected mice. Both memory precursor (CD8+ LFA1HI CD127HI KLRG1LO) and long-lived memory (CD8+ CD27HI CD127HI KLRG1LO) cells were identified during chronic infection. Interestingly, after adoptive transfer, mice receiving cells from chronically infected animals were able to contain infection more rapidly than recipients of cells from acutely infected or uninfected donors, although the proportions of exhausted CD8+ T cells increased after adoptive transfer in both challenged and unchallenged recipients. CD8+ T cells of challenged recipients initially retained the stunted IFN-γ production found prior to transfer, and cells from acutely infected mice were never seen to transition to either memory subset at all time points tested, up to 30 days post-primary infection, suggesting a delay in the generation of memory. Here we have identified defects in Brucella-responsive CD8+ T cells that allow chronic persistence of infection. PMID:26416901

  16. CD8+ T cell exhaustion, suppressed gamma interferon production, and delayed memory response induced by chronic Brucella melitensis infection.

    PubMed

    Durward-Diioia, Marina; Harms, Jerome; Khan, Mike; Hall, Cherisse; Smith, Judith A; Splitter, Gary A

    2015-12-01

    Brucella melitensis is a well-adapted zoonotic pathogen considered a scourge of mankind since recorded history. In some cases, initial infection leads to chronic and reactivating brucellosis, incurring significant morbidity and economic loss. The mechanism by which B. melitensis subverts adaptive immunological memory is poorly understood. Previous work has shown that Brucella-specific CD8(+) T cells express gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and can transition to long-lived memory cells but are not polyfunctional. In this study, chronic infection of mice with B. melitensis led to CD8(+) T cell exhaustion, manifested by programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) expression and a lack of IFN-γ production. The B. melitensis-specific CD8(+) T cells that produced IFN-γ expressed less IFN-γ per cell than did CD8(+) cells from uninfected mice. Both memory precursor (CD8(+) LFA1(HI) CD127(HI) KLRG1(LO)) and long-lived memory (CD8(+) CD27(HI) CD127(HI) KLRG1(LO)) cells were identified during chronic infection. Interestingly, after adoptive transfer, mice receiving cells from chronically infected animals were able to contain infection more rapidly than recipients of cells from acutely infected or uninfected donors, although the proportions of exhausted CD8(+) T cells increased after adoptive transfer in both challenged and unchallenged recipients. CD8(+) T cells of challenged recipients initially retained the stunted IFN-γ production found prior to transfer, and cells from acutely infected mice were never seen to transition to either memory subset at all time points tested, up to 30 days post-primary infection, suggesting a delay in the generation of memory. Here we have identified defects in Brucella-responsive CD8(+) T cells that allow chronic persistence of infection.

  17. Interferon-inducer polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid: a potent anti-gastric ulcer agent and inhibitor of the gastric proton pump in rats.

    PubMed

    Nath, C; Rastogi, L; Dikshit, M; Patnaik, G K; Saxena, R C; Gupta, M B

    1998-01-01

    1. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (Poly I:Poly C), an interferon inducer was studied for its effect on gastric ulceration in rats. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg, i.m.) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of gastric ulcers induced by aspirin, cold restraint stress and pylorus ligation (Shay's model). Protective dose (PD50) +/- SEM values of Poly I:Poly C on these models of ulcers were 1.9 +/- 0.2, 2.3 +/- 0.4 and 2.8 +/- 0.4 (mg/kg, i.m.) respectively. 2. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (10-60 micrograms) produced dose-dependent inhibition of gastric proton pump (H+/K(+)-ATPase) activity in the gastric parietal microsomal fraction. The concentration of Poly I:Poly C causing a 50% inhibition (IC50) +/- SEM was found to be 17.6 +/- 1.2 micrograms. 3. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid caused a significant decrease in free and total acid and pepsin and an increase in mucin content in Shay (pylorus-ligated) rat. 4. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid did not exert a significant influence on isolated tissue preparations for anti-cholinergic (acetylcholine-induced contraction of guinea-pig ileum) and H2-anti-histaminic (histamine-induced contraction of rat uterus and guinea-pig auricle) activities. 5. Thus, the present study indicates that Poly I:Poly C may possess anti-gastric ulcer activity as a result of inhibition of the gastric proton pump.

  18. Recurrent Pericarditis, an Unexpected Effect of Adjuvant Interferon Chemotherapy for Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Marmoush, Fady; Shafi, Muhammad Ismail; Shah, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced pericarditis is a well-described cardiac pathology that can result from a variety of medications; however, interferon-mediated pericarditis is extremely rare. We present a case of a young female with recurrent pericarditis due to interferon therapy. The role of interferon in adjuvant chemotherapy is well known and yields good effect, but this case highlights the very uncommon phenomena of interferon induced pericarditis and the significant distress it can cause. PMID:27418981

  19. Cooccurrence of Metastatic Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma and Salmonella Induced Neck Abscess in a Cervical Lymph Node

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Myung; Jung, Eun Jung; Song, Eun Jin; Kim, Dong Chul; Jeong, Chi-Young; Ju, Young-Tae; Lee, Young-Joon; Hong, Soon-Chan; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Ha, Woo-Song

    2017-01-01

    Cervical lymph node metastasis is common in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Salmonella species are rarely reported as causative agents in focal infections of the head and neck. The cooccurrence of lymph node metastasis from PTC and a bacterial infection is rare. This report describes a 76-year-old woman with a cervical lymph node metastasis from PTC and Salmonella infection of the same lymph node. The patient presented with painful swelling in her left lateral neck region for 15 days, and neck ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a cystic mass along left levels II–IV. The cystic mass was suspected of being a metastatic lymph node; modified radical neck dissection was performed. Histopathological examination confirmed the presence of PTC in the resected node and laboratory examination of the combined abscess cavity confirmed the presence of Salmonella Typhi. Following antibiotic sensitivity testing of the cultured Salmonella Typhi, she was treated with proper antibiotics. Cystic lesions in lymph nodes with metastatic cancer may indicate the presence of cooccurring bacterial infection. Thus, culturing of specimen can be option to make accurate diagnosis and to provide proper postoperative management. PMID:28261270

  20. [Fundamentals of interferon system function in pathology and molecular biological peculiarities of interferon production].

    PubMed

    Spivak, M Ia; Didenko, L F; Lazarenko, L M; Zholobak, N M

    2008-01-01

    Molecular biological peculiarities of interferon system function in PV-infected persons have been found. It is evident that the interferon production, anti-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors and also defensines play an important role in the mechanism of virus interaction with sensitive cells of macroorganism with development of pathological process. The new conception of expediency for the use of interferons and their inducers as the polyfunctional regulators with a broad spectrum of activity for the treatment of PV-infected patients was suggested. Patents for the method of treatment of PV-infected patients were obtained. New inducers of interferon as well as recombinant IFN-alpha-2b was developed. Our results were introduced in the medical practice.

  1. The Repression Domain of the E1B 55-Kilodalton Protein Participates in Countering Interferon-Induced Inhibition of Adenovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Jasdave S.; Gallagher, Courtney; DeHart, Caroline J.

    2013-01-01

    To begin to investigate the mechanism by which the human adenovirus type 5 E1B 55-kDa protein protects against the antiviral effects of type 1 interferon (IFN) (J. S. Chahal, J. Qi, and S. J. Flint, PLoS Pathog. 8:e1002853, 2012 [doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002853]), we examined the effects of precise amino acid substitution in this protein on resistance of viral replication to the cytokine. Only substitution of residues 443 to 448 of E1B for alanine (E1B Sub19) specifically impaired production of progeny virus and resulted in a large defect in viral DNA synthesis in IFN-treated normal human fibroblasts. Untreated or IFN-treated cells infected by this mutant virus (AdEasyE1Sub19) contained much higher steady-state concentrations of IFN-inducible GBP1 and IFIT2 mRNAs than did wild-type-infected cells and of the corresponding newly transcribed pre-mRNAs, isolated exploiting 5′-ethynyluridine labeling and click chemistry. These results indicated that the mutations created by substitution of residues 443 to 448 for alanine (Sub19) impair repression of transcription of IFN-inducible genes, by the E1B, 55-kDa protein, consistent with their location in a segment required for repression of p53-dependent transcription. However, when synthesized alone, the E1B 55-kDa protein inhibited expression of the p53-regulated genes BAX and MDM2 but had no impact whatsoever on induction of IFIT2 and GBP1 expression by IFN. These observations correlate repression of transcription of IFN-inducible genes by the E1B 55-kDa protein with protection against inhibition of viral genome replication and indicate that the E1B 55-kDa protein is not sufficient to establish such transcriptional repression. PMID:23388716

  2. The repression domain of the E1B 55-kilodalton protein participates in countering interferon-induced inhibition of adenovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Jasdave S; Gallagher, Courtney; DeHart, Caroline J; Flint, S J

    2013-04-01

    To begin to investigate the mechanism by which the human adenovirus type 5 E1B 55-kDa protein protects against the antiviral effects of type 1 interferon (IFN) (J. S. Chahal, J. Qi, and S. J. Flint, PLoS Pathog. 8:e1002853, 2012 [doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002853]), we examined the effects of precise amino acid substitution in this protein on resistance of viral replication to the cytokine. Only substitution of residues 443 to 448 of E1B for alanine (E1B Sub19) specifically impaired production of progeny virus and resulted in a large defect in viral DNA synthesis in IFN-treated normal human fibroblasts. Untreated or IFN-treated cells infected by this mutant virus (AdEasyE1Sub19) contained much higher steady-state concentrations of IFN-inducible GBP1 and IFIT2 mRNAs than did wild-type-infected cells and of the corresponding newly transcribed pre-mRNAs, isolated exploiting 5'-ethynyluridine labeling and click chemistry. These results indicated that the mutations created by substitution of residues 443 to 448 for alanine (Sub19) impair repression of transcription of IFN-inducible genes, by the E1B, 55-kDa protein, consistent with their location in a segment required for repression of p53-dependent transcription. However, when synthesized alone, the E1B 55-kDa protein inhibited expression of the p53-regulated genes BAX and MDM2 but had no impact whatsoever on induction of IFIT2 and GBP1 expression by IFN. These observations correlate repression of transcription of IFN-inducible genes by the E1B 55-kDa protein with protection against inhibition of viral genome replication and indicate that the E1B 55-kDa protein is not sufficient to establish such transcriptional repression.

  3. Oral Combination Vaccine, Comprising Bifidobacterium Displaying Hepatitis C Virus Nonstructural Protein 3 and Interferon-α, Induces Strong Cellular Immunity Specific to Nonstructural Protein 3 in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Koichi; Omoto, Chika; Oda, Tsugumi; Araki, Ayame; Saito, Hiroki; Shigemura, Katsumi; Katayama, Takane; Hotta, Hak; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2017-01-23

    We previously generated an oral hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine using Bifidobacterium displaying the HCV nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) polypeptide. NS3-specific cellular immunity is important for viral clearance and recovery from HCV infection. In this study, we enhanced the cellular immune responses induced by our oral HCV vaccine, Bifidobacterium longum 2165 (B. longum 2165), by combining interferon-α (IFN-α) as an adjuvant with the vaccine in a mouse experimental model. IFN-α is a widely used cytokine meeting the standard of care (SOC) for HCV infection and plays various immunoregulatory roles. We treated C57BL/6N mice with B. longum 2165 every other day and/or IFN-α twice a week for a month and then analyzed the immune responses using spleen cells. We determined the induction of NS3-specific cellular immunity by cytokine quantification, intracellular cytokine staining, and a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) assay targeting EL4 tumor cells expressing NS3/4A protein (EL4-NS3/4A). We also treated mice bearing EL4-NS3/4A tumor with the combination therapy in vivo. The results confirmed that the combination therapy of B. longum 2165 and IFN-α induced significantly higher IFN-γ secretion, higher population of CD4(+)T and CD8(+)T cells secreting IFN-γ, and higher CTL activity against EL4-NS3/4A cells compared with the control groups of phosphate-buffered saline, B. longum 2165 alone, and IFN-α alone (p < 0.05). We also confirmed that the combination therapy strongly enhanced tumor growth inhibitory effects in vivo with no serious adverse effects (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the combination of B. longum 2165 and IFN-α could induce a strong cellular immunity specific to NS3 protein as a combination therapy augmenting the current SOC immunotherapy against chronic HCV infection.

  4. Murine Coronavirus Mouse Hepatitis Virus Is Recognized by MDA5 and Induces Type I Interferon in Brain Macrophages/Microglia ▿

    PubMed Central

    Roth-Cross, Jessica K.; Bender, Susan J.; Weiss, Susan R.

    2008-01-01

    The coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) induces a minimal type I interferon (IFN) response in several cell types in vitro despite the fact that the type I IFN response is important in protecting the mouse from infection in vivo. When infected with MHV, mice deficient in IFN-associated receptor expression (IFNAR−/−) became moribund by 48 h postinfection. MHV also replicated to higher titers and exhibited a more broad tissue tropism in these mice, which lack a type I IFN response. Interestingly, MHV induced IFN-β in the brains and livers, two main targets of MHV replication, of infected wild-type mice. MHV infection of primary cell cultures indicates that hepatocytes are not responsible for the IFN-β production in the liver during MHV infection. Furthermore, macrophages and microglia, but not neurons or astrocytes, are responsible for IFN-β production in the brain. To determine the pathway by which MHV is recognized in macrophages, IFN-β mRNA expression was quantified following MHV infection of a panel of primary bone marrow-derived macrophages generated from mice lacking different pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Interestingly, MDA5, a PRR thought to recognize primarily picornaviruses, was required for recognition of MHV. Thus, MHV induces type I IFN in macrophages and microglia in the brains of infected animals and is recognized by an MDA5-dependent pathway in macrophages. These findings suggest that secretion of IFN-β by macrophages and microglia plays a role in protecting the host from MHV infection of the central nervous system. PMID:18667505

  5. The Impact of the Interferon/TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand Signaling Axis on Disease Progression in Respiratory Viral Infection and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are well described to be rapidly induced upon pathogen-associated pattern recognition. After binding to their respective IFN receptors and activation of the cellular JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling cascade, they stimulate the transcription of a plethora of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in infected as well as bystander cells such as the non-infected epithelium and cells of the immune system. ISGs may directly act on the invading pathogen or can either positively or negatively regulate the innate and adaptive immune response. However, IFNs and ISGs do not only play a key role in the limitation of pathogen spread but have also been recently found to provoke an unbalanced, overshooting inflammatory response causing tissue injury and hampering repair processes. A prominent regulator of disease outcome, especially in—but not limited to—respiratory viral infection, is the IFN-dependent mediator TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) produced by several cell types including immune cells such as macrophages or T cells. First described as an apoptosis-inducing agent in transformed cells, it is now also well established to rapidly evoke cellular stress pathways in epithelial cells, finally leading to caspase-dependent or -independent cell death. Hereby, pathogen spread is limited; however in some cases, also the surrounding tissue is severely harmed, thus augmenting disease severity. Interestingly, the lack of a strictly controlled and well balanced IFN/TRAIL signaling response has not only been implicated in viral infection but might furthermore be an important determinant of disease progression in bacterial superinfections and in chronic respiratory illness. Conclusively, the IFN/TRAIL signaling axis is subjected to a complex modulation and might be exploited for the evaluation of new therapeutic concepts aiming at attenuation of tissue injury. PMID:28382038

  6. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... THE THYROID GLAND? The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped endocrine gland that is normally located in ... the thyroid gland? The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped endocrine gland that is normally located in ...

  7. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000352.htm Anaplastic thyroid cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... of cancer of the thyroid gland. Causes Anaplastic thyroid cancer is an invasive type of thyroid cancer that ...

  8. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  9. Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC; Thyroid nodule - medullary ... in children and adults. Unlike other types of thyroid cancer, MTC is less likely to be caused by ...

  10. Thyroid and Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meetings ATA Publications ATA Professional Guidelines Research Grants Thyroid Cancer Trainees Corner ATA Career Link Continuing Medical Education THYROID Calculators Thyroid Cancer Staging (CEA) Doubling Time Calculator Change In Thyroid ...

  11. Thyroid gland removal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... will make your scar show less. Thyroid Hormone Replacement You may need to take thyroid hormone medicine ... natural thyroid hormone. You may not need hormone replacement if only part of your thyroid was removed. ...

  12. A novel subtilisin-like serine protease of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is induced by thyroid hormone and degrades antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Thekkiniath, Jose C; Zabet-Moghaddam, Masoud; San Francisco, Susan K; San Francisco, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (B. dendrobatidis), a chytrid fungus, is one of the major contributors to the global amphibian decline. The fungus infects both tadpoles and adult amphibians. Tadpoles are infected in their keratinized mouthparts, and infected adults exhibit hyperkeratosis and loss of righting reflex. Infections of adults may result in death from cardiac arrest in susceptible species. Thyroid hormone plays a key role in amphibian metamorphosis. The occurrence of B. dendrobatidis in tadpoles during metamorphosis may result in exposure of the fungus to host morphogens including TH. This exposure may induce gene expression in the fungus contributing to invasion and colonization of the host. Here, we demonstrate movement of fungal zoospores toward TH. Additionally, expression of a subtilisin-like serine protease is up-regulated in B. dendrobatidis cells exposed to TH. A gene encoding this protease was cloned from B. dendrobatidis and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was partially purified and characterized. The similarity between subtilases of human dermatophytes and the B. dendrobatidis subtilisin-like serine protease suggests the importance of this enzyme in B. dendrobatidis pathogenicity. Cleavage of frog skin antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) by this B. dendrobatidis subtilisin-like serine protease suggests a role for this enzyme in fungal survival and colonization.

  13. Evaluation of interferon-induced transmembrane protein-3 (IFITM3) rs7478728 and rs3888188 polymorphisms and the risk of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Mohammad; Hashemi, Mohammad; Abedipour, Fatemeh; Bahari, Gholamreza; Rezaei, Maryam; Taheri, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to examine the possible association between the interferon-induced transmembrane protein-3 (IFITM3) gene polymorphisms and risk of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in a sample population. This case-control study was conducted on 188 PTB patients and 169 healthy subjects. The rs7478728 and rs3888188 variants of IFITM3 were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The findings showed no significant association between rs7478728 polymorphism and risk of PTB. Regarding rs3888188 polymorphism, the TG genotype as well as G allele significantly increased the risk of PTB [odds ratio (OR)=2.48, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.42–4.53; P=0.002, and OR=2.26, 95% CI: 1.33–3.86; P=0.003, respectively]. In conclusion, the findings revealed that rs3888188 polymorphism increased the risk of PTB in a sample of Iranian population. Additional investigation with larger sample sizes and different ethnicities are needed to verify our findings. PMID:27882230

  14. Targeting Attenuated Interferon-α to Myeloma Cells with a CD38 Antibody Induces Potent Tumor Regression with Reduced Off-Target Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pogue, Sarah L.; Taura, Tetsuya; Bi, Mingying; Yun, Yong; Sho, Angela; Mikesell, Glen; Behrens, Collette; Sokolovsky, Maya; Hallak, Hussein; Rosenstock, Moti; Sanchez, Eric; Chen, Haiming; Berenson, James; Doyle, Anthony; Nock, Steffen; Wilson, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-α (IFNα) has been prescribed to effectively treat multiple myeloma (MM) and other malignancies for decades. Its use has waned in recent years, however, due to significant toxicity and a narrow therapeutic index (TI). We sought to improve IFNα’s TI by, first, attaching it to an anti-CD38 antibody, thereby directly targeting it to MM cells, and, second, by introducing an attenuating mutation into the IFNα portion of the fusion protein rendering it relatively inactive on normal, CD38 negative cells. This anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) immunocytokine, or CD38-Attenukine™, exhibits 10,000-fold increased specificity for CD38 positive cells in vitro compared to native IFNα and, significantly, is ~6,000-fold less toxic to normal bone marrow cells in vitro than native IFNα. Moreover, the attenuating mutation significantly decreases IFNα biomarker activity in cynomolgus macaques indicating that this approach may yield a better safety profile in humans than native IFNα or a non-attenuated IFNα immunocytokine. In human xenograft MM tumor models, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) exerts potent anti-tumor activity in mice, inducing complete tumor regression in most cases. Furthermore, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) is more efficacious than standard MM treatments (lenalidomide, bortezomib, dexamethasone) and exhibits strong synergy with lenalidomide and with bortezomib in xenograft models. Our findings suggest that tumor-targeted attenuated cytokines such as IFNα can promote robust tumor killing while minimizing systemic toxicity. PMID:27611189

  15. A prosurvival DNA damage-induced cytoplasmic interferon response is mediated by end resection factors and is limited by Trex1

    PubMed Central

    Erdal, Erkin; Haider, Syed; Rehwinkel, Jan; Harris, Adrian L.

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are effective treatment methods for many types of cancer, but resistance is common. Recent findings indicate that antiviral type I interferon (IFN) signaling is induced by these treatments. However, the underlying mechanisms still need to be elucidated. Expression of a set of IFN-stimulated genes comprises an IFN-related DNA damage resistance signature (IRDS), which correlates strongly with resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy across different tumors. Classically, during viral infection, the presence of foreign DNA in the cytoplasm of host cells can initiate type I IFN signaling. Here, we demonstrate that DNA-damaging modalities used during cancer therapy lead to the release of ssDNA fragments from the cell nucleus into the cytosol, engaging this innate immune response. We found that the factors that control DNA end resection during double-strand break repair, including the Bloom syndrome (BLM) helicase and exonuclease 1 (EXO1), play a major role in generating these DNA fragments and that the cytoplasmic 3′–5′ exonuclease Trex1 is required for their degradation. Analysis of mRNA expression profiles in breast tumors demonstrates that those with lower Trex1 and higher BLM and EXO1 expression levels are associated with poor prognosis. Targeting BLM and EXO1 could therefore represent a novel approach for circumventing the IRDS produced in response to cancer therapeutics. PMID:28279982

  16. The Interferon-Inducible Host Factor Bone Marrow Stromal Antigen 2/Tetherin Restricts Virion Release, but Is It Actually a Viral Restriction Factor?

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Viruses face a variety of obstacles when infecting a new host. The past few years have brought exciting new insights into the function of restriction factors, which form part of the host's innate immune system. One of the most recently identified restriction factors is bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2)/tetherin. BST-2 is an interferon-inducible gene whose expression dramatically reduces the release of viruses from infected cells. This effect of BST-2 is not specific to human immunodeficiency virus but affects a broad range of enveloped viruses. Since the identification of BST-2 as a restriction factor in 2008, much progress has been made in understanding the molecular properties and functional characteristics of this host factor. The goal of this review was to provide an update on our current understanding of the role of BST-2 in regulating virus release and to discuss its role in controlling virus spread during productive infection with special emphasis on human immunodeficiency virus-1. PMID:21166593

  17. Swine interferon-induced transmembrane protein, sIFITM3, inhibits foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinfang; Qian, Ping; Wu, Qunfeng; Liu, Shasha; Fan, Wenchun; Zhang, Keshan; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Huawei; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2014-09-01

    The interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3) is a widely expressed potent antiviral effector of the host innate immune system. It restricts a diverse group of pathogenic, enveloped viruses, by interfering with endosomal fusion. In this report, the swine IFITM3 (sIFITM3) gene was cloned. It shares the functionally conserved CD225 domain and multiple critical amino acid residues (Y19, F74, F77, R86 and Y98) with its human ortholog, which are essential for antiviral activity. Ectopic expression of sIFITM3 significantly inhibited non-enveloped foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in BHK-21 cells. Furthermore, sIFITM3 blocked FMDV infection at early steps in the virus life cycle by disrupting viral attachment to the host cell surface. Importantly, inoculation of 2-day-old suckling mice with a plasmid expressing sIFITM3 conferred protection against lethal challenge with FMDV. These results suggest that sIFITM3 is a promising antiviral agent and that can safeguard the host from infection with FMDV.

  18. Low levels of interleukin-8 and interferon-inducible protein-10 in serum are associated with fatal infections in acute Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Mahanty, S; Bausch, D G; Thomas, R L; Goba, A; Bah, A; Peters, C J; Rollin, P E

    2001-06-15

    To investigate the role of inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of Lassa fever, the levels of a number of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in serum samples collected from hospitalized patients with fatal and nonfatal acute Lassa fever were compared with those from 2 control groups: patients with other febrile illnesses and uninfected individuals. Serum interleukin (IL)-8 and interferon (IFN)-inducible protein (IP)-10 levels were significantly higher in patients with acute nonfatal Lassa fever than in control subjects. In striking contrast, levels of these chemokines were low or undetectable in patients with fatal Lassa fever. IFN-gamma, IL-12, IL-6, and RANTES levels were elevated in all the febrile study groups. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels were not elevated in patients with fatal or nonfatal Lassa fever. These data indicate that acute nonfatal Lassa fever is associated with high levels of circulating IL-8 and IP-10 and that low levels or absence of these mediators correlates with a poor outcome.

  19. Interferon-α-induced CD100 on naïve CD8(+) T cells enhances antiviral responses to hepatitis C infection through CD72 signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing Jie; He, Yu; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Yong Hong; Zhou, Yun; Zhang, Pei Xin; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Jie Ru; Li, Jin Ge; Zuo, Wei Ze; Fan, Chao; Jia, Zhan Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Objectives We investigated the effects of CD100 on naïve CD8(+) T cells during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after interferon-α (IFN-α) therapy to clarify the mechanism underlying the effect of IFN-α in enhancing the antiviral response. Methods The CD100 molecules on subsets of CD8(+) T cells were analysed with flow cytometry. The effects of CD100-overexpressing naïve CD8(+) T cells were determined with ELISAs and an MTT cytotoxicity assay. The role of CD100-CD72 signal transduction was analysed with a neutralization and transwell assays. Results HCV infection reduced CD100 expression on CD8(+) T cells, whereas IFN-α treatment significantly increased CD100 expression on naïve CD8(+) T cells. The increased CD100 interacted with the CD72 receptor and enhanced PBMC cytokine secretion (IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α) and cytotoxicity. Conclusions IFN-α-induced CD100 on naïve CD8(+) T cells promotes PBMC cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity through CD100-CD72 signalling during HCV infection.

  20. Role of Toll-like receptors and retinoic acid inducible gene I in endogenous production of type I interferon in dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Dai, Tingjun; Lv, Jingwei; Ji, Kunqian; Liu, Junling; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2015-08-15

    To explore the possible mechanisms implicated in the endogenous production of type I interferons within the muscle tissue of dermatomyositis (DM) patients. We detected the co-localization of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) with Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid inducible gene (RIG)-I by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Western blotting confirmed the expression of TLRs and RIG-I. TLR-3 and RIG-I was preferentially expressed in the perifascicular atrophy fibers of DM. TLR-7 was only in inflammatory infiltrates of a few DM patients. TLR-4 and TLR-9 was expressed mainly in inflammatory infiltrates. Immunofluorescence showed extensive co-localization of BDCA-2 with TLR-9 and little co-localization with TLR-7. Western blotting showed upregulation of expression of TLRs and RIG-I in DM compared with the controls. Our findings indicate that endogenous production of type I IFN in DM is generated by pDCs, mainly through the TLR-9 pathway and in part by TLR-7. TLR-3 and RIG-I are implicated in the formation of perifascicular atrophy in DM.

  1. Hepatitis E genotype 4 virus from feces of monkeys infected experimentally can be cultured in PLC/PRF/5 cells and upregulate host interferon-inducible genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Qi, Ying; Harrison, Tim J; Luo, Baobin; Zhou, Yan; Li, Xiuhua; Song, Aijing; Huang, Weijin; Wang, Youchun

    2014-10-01

    The understanding of the interaction between hepatitis E virus (HEV) and its host cells has been impeded greatly by the absence of a cell culture system. In this study, an efficient cultivation method was developed in PLC/PRF/5 cells for HEV genotype 4 from the feces of monkeys infected experimentally. Compared to minimal essential medium (MEM), mixed Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM)/M199 improved the infection efficiency of HEV in PLC/PRF/5 cells. The incubation time and temperature were set at 6 hr and 40°C, respectively. Compared to a 100% ELISA positive ratio (EPR) of 1 × 10(6)  copies/ml HEV inoculated flasks, the ELISA positive ratio was 100%, 75%, 37.5%, and 100% for flasks inoculated with HEV incubated for 30 min under the conditions of pH 3.0, pH 11.0, 56°C and delipidation treatment, respectively. Gene expression profiles of HEV inoculated and control PLC/PRF/5 cells were assayed using a microarray. Four interferon-inducible genes, IFI27, IFI6, Mx1, and CMPK2, were up-regulated during HEV-infection. Furthermore, the replication of HEV was inhibited at 3-14 days after treatment with 500 IU/ml IFN-α2b.

  2. Double-Stranded Ribonucleic Acid from Mengo Virus: Production, Characterization, and Interferon-Inducing and Antiviral Activities in Comparison with Polyriboinosinic · Polyribocytidylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Falcoff, E.; Falcoff, R.; Cherby, J.; Florent, J.; Lunel, J.; Ninet, L.; De Ratuld, Y.; Tissier, R.; Vuillemin, B.; Werner, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Mengo virus double-stranded ribonucleic acid (dsRNA) was obtained on a semi-industrial scale from infected cultures of BHK-21 cells grown in suspension. Yield of the extraction and purification operations was small (about 22 mg from 1011 cells in a 100-liter culture). Physicochemical characterization of this dsRNA gave an estimated molecular weight close to 4 × 106, a density of 1.59 (similar to that of the poliovirus dsRNA), and a thermal transition midpoint of 94 C. This product was a little more toxic for the mouse, by the intravenous route, than polyriboinosinic · polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C) and strictly comparable in this respect to poliovirus dsRNA. The interferon-inducing capacity in the mouse and the antiviral activities in the mouse (infected with encephalomyocarditis, Semliki Forest, influenza, foot-and-mouth disease, and murine hepatitis viruses) and in the rabbit (Shope fibroma virus) of the ultraviolet light-inactivated product were practically identical, on a quantitative basis, with those of poly I:C. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed the dsRNA from Mengo virus to be slightly but significantly more resistant than poly I:C to the inactivating effect of human serum. PMID:4364180

  3. Characterization and expression analysis of an interferon-γ2 induced chemokine receptor CXCR3 in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Chadzinska, M; Golbach, L; Pijanowski, L; Scheer, M; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M L

    2014-11-01

    Chemokine and chemokine receptor signalling pairs play a crucial role in regulation of cell migration, morphogenesis, and cell activation. Expressed in mammals on activated T and NK cells, chemokine receptor CXCR3 binds interferoninducible chemokines CXCL9-11 and CCL21. Here we sequenced the carp CXCR3 chemokine receptor and showed its relationship to CXCR3a receptors found in other teleosts. We found high expression of the CXCR3 gene in most of the organs and tissues of the immune system and in immune-related tissues such as gills and gut, corroborating a predominantly immune-related function. The very high expression in gill and gut moreover indicates a role for CXCR3 in cell recruitment during infection. High in vivo expression of CXCR3 at later stages of inflammation, as well as its in vitro sensitivity to IFN-γ2 stimulation indicate that in carp, CXCR3 is involved in macrophage-mediated responses. Moreover, as expression of the CXCR3 and CXCb genes coincides in the focus of inflammation and as both the CXCb chemokines and the CXCR3 receptor are significantly up-regulated upon IFN-γ stimulation it is hypothesized that CXCb chemokines may be putative ligands for CXCR3.

  4. Synthetic oligonucleotides with particular base sequences from the cDNA encoding proteins of Mycobacterium bovis BCG induce interferons and activate natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, T; Yano, O; Kuramoto, E; Kimura, Y; Yamamoto, T; Kataoka, T; Yamamoto, S

    1992-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of 45-mer single-stranded oligonucleotide, having sequence randomly selected from the known cDNA encoding BCG proteins, were tested for their capability to augment natural killer (NK) cell activity of mouse spleen cells in vitro. Six out of the 13 oligonucleotides showed the activity, while the others did not. In order to know the minimal and essential sequence(s) responsible for the biological activity, 2 kinds of 30-mer and 5 kinds of 15-mer oligonucleotide fragments of an active 45-mer nucleotide were tested for their activity. One of the 30-mer oligonucleotides, designated BCG-A4a, was active, but the other 30-mer was inactive. All of the 15-mer oligonucleotide fragments were inactive. The BCG-A4a also stimulated the spleen cells to produce interferon (IFN)-alpha and -gamma. An experiment using anti-IFN antisera showed that the NK cell activation by the oligonucleotide was ascribed to the IFN-alpha produced. It was noticed that all of the biologically active oligonucleotides possessed one or more palindrome sequence(s), and the inactive ones did not, with an exception of a 45-mer inactive oligonucleotide containing overlapping palindrome sequences (GGGCCCGGG). These findings strongly suggest that certain palindrome sequences, like GACGTC, GGCGCC and TGCGCA, are essential for 30-mer oligonucleotides, like BCG-A4a, to induce IFNs.

  5. Thyroid gland removal

    MedlinePlus

    Total thyroidectomy; Partial thyroidectomy; Thyroidectomy; Subtotal thyroidectomy; Thyroid cancer - thyroidectomy; Papillary cancer - thyroidectomy; Goiter - thyroidectomy; Thyroid nodules - thyroidectomy

  6. Helicobacter pylori VacA suppresses Lactobacillus acidophilus-induced interferon beta signaling in macrophages via alterations in the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Gudrun; Forster, Sam; Irving, Aaron; Tate, Michelle; Ferrero, Richard L; Hertzog, Paul; Frøkiær, Hanne; Kaparakis-Liaskos, Maria

    2013-06-11

    Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastritis and avoids elimination by the immune system of the infected host. The commensal bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus has been suggested to exert beneficial effects as a supplement during H. pylori eradication therapy. In the present study, we applied whole-genome microarray analysis to compare the immune responses induced in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated with L. acidophilus, H. pylori, or both bacteria in combination. While L. acidophilus induced a Th1-polarizing response characterized by high expression of interferon beta (IFN-β) and interleukin 12 (IL-12), H. pylori strongly induced the innate cytokines IL-1β and IL-1α. In BMDMs prestimulated with L. acidophilus, H. pylori blocked the expression of L. acidophilus-induced IFN-β and IL-12 and suppressed the expression of key regulators of the Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 GTPases. The inhibition of L. acidophilus-induced IFN-β was independent of H. pylori viability and the virulence factor CagPAI; however, a vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA) mutant was unable to block IFN-β. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the addition of H. pylori to L. acidophilus-stimulated BMDMs redirects intracellular processing, leading to an accumulation of L. acidophilus in the endosomal and lysosomal compartments. Thus, our findings indicate that H. pylori inhibits the development of a strong Th1-polarizing response in BMDMs stimulated with L. acidophilus by blocking the production of IFN-β in a VacA-dependent manner. We suggest that this abrogation is caused by a redirection of the endocytotic pathway in the processing of L. acidophilus. IMPORTANCE Approximately half of the world's population is infected with Helicobacter pylori. The factors that allow this pathogen to persist in the stomach and cause chronic infections have not yet been fully elucidated. In particular, how H. pylori avoids killing by macrophages, one of the main types of immune cell underlying the

  7. A rare case of thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Brock; Dhillon, Manvinder Shelley; Yong-Yow, Sabrina

    2016-04-18

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening state of thyroid hormone excess. Rapid recognition of thyroid storm is key to decreasing the morbidity and mortality of this condition. Clinical manifestations of thyroid storm include unexplained weight loss, hyperactivity and irritability. The most common causes of thyrotoxicosis are Graves' disease, toxic multinodular goitre and toxic adenoma. We present a rare case of thyroid storm induced by dual nivolumab and ipilimumab immunotherapy in a patient receiving treatment for advanced melanoma. In this case, our patient was admitted for thyroid storm 1 month after initiating treatment with nivolumab and ipilimumab immunotherapy. The patient was treated with β-blockers, antithyroid medications and systemic steroids resulting in an improvement in thyroid function testing and symptoms.

  8. Protective effects of basic fibroblast growth factor in the development of emphysema induced by interferon-γ.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Jae; Moon, Hyung-Geun; Shin, Tae-Seop; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Lee, Eun-Young; Gho, Yong Song; Lee, Chun Geun; Zhu, Zhou; Elias, Jack A; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2011-04-30

    Recent clinical evidence indicates that the non-eosinophilic subtype of severe asthma is characterized by fixed airway obstruction, which may be related to emphysema. Transgenic studies have demonstrated that high levels of IFN-γ in the airways induce emphysema. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), which is the downstream mediator of TGF-β, is important in wound healing. We investigated the role of FGF2 in IFN-γ-induced emphysema and the therapeutic effects of recombinant FGF2 in the prevention of emphysema in a severe non-eosinophilic asthma model. To evaluate the role of FGF2 in IFN-γ-induced emphysema, lung targeted IFN-γ transgenic mice were cross-bred with FGF2-deficient mice. A severe non-eosinophilic asthma model was generated by airway application of LPS-containing allergens twice a week for 4 weeks. To evaluate protective effects of FGF2, recombinant FGF2 (10 μg) was injected subcutaneously during allergen challenge in the severe asthma model. We found that non-eosinophilic inflammation and emphysema induced by transgenic overexpression of IFN-γ in the airways were aggravated by the absence of FGF2. Airway challenge with LPS-containing allergens induced more inflammation in mice sensitized with LPS-containing allergens compared to challenge with allergens alone. In addition, LPS-induced lung inflammation and emphysema depended on IFN-γ but not on IL-13. Interestingly, emphysema in the severe asthma model was significantly inhibited by treatment with recombinant FGF2 during allergen challenge, whereas lung inflammation was unaffected. Therefore, our present data suggest that FGF2 may help protect against IFN-γ-induced emphysema, and that recombinant FGF2 may help lessen the severity of emphysema.

  9. Structural Abnormalities and Learning Impairments Induced by Low Level Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency: A Cross-Fostering Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Severe reductions in thyroid hormones (TH) during development alter brain structure and impair learning. Uncertainty surrounds both the impact oflower levels of TH disruption and the sensitivity of available metrics to detect neurodevelopmental deficits of this disruption. We ha...

  10. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? Most people with thyroid cancer have ... Cancer? Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented? More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  11. Thyroid inferno.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amit; Kaur, Manmeet

    2014-01-01

    The key to uncovering the etiology of hyperthyroidism lies in a careful history and physical examination. Autoimmune markers provide additive information, but should not solely be used to make a diagnosis. Concern has been raised that the overzealous use of thyroid ultrasound, following abnormal thyroid function tests, diverts attention from the workup of the biochemical abnormality to the workup of an incidentally found thyroid nodule. If further imaging is needed, the use ofathyroidscanhas been suggestedbythe Endocrine Society and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. However, in certain scenarios, this may be contraindicated. We present the case of a 28-year-old female with hyperthyroidism, as aplatform to discuss an important clinical sign present on Doppler ultrasound of the thyroid. By recognizing the clinical information gained from a Doppler ultrasound, physicians can avoid additional invasive workup and apply the use of ultrasound where most appropriate.

  12. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... The coming of age of ultrasound-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation of selected neck nodal metastases in well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 2011;96:2717. Caprelsa (prescribing information). Wilmington, Del.: ...

  13. Thyroid Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... when they believe that subsequent treatment with radioactive iodine might be necessary. For patients with larger (>1. ... if there are plans for treatment with radioactive iodine. FNA Biopsy of Thyroid Nodules Goiter Graves’ Disease ...

  14. Effects of phenobarbital on thyroid hormone contabolism in rat hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in rodents. PB induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes increases thyroid hormones catabolism and biliary elimination. This study examines the catabolism and cl...

  15. Thyroid Hormone-Induced Activation of Notch Signaling is Required for Adult Intestinal Stem Cell Development During Xenopus Laevis Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Takashi; Fujimoto, Kenta; Kajita, Mitsuko; Fu, Liezhen; Shi, Yun-Bo; Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko

    2016-11-21

    In Xenopus laevis intestine during metamorphosis, the larval epithelial cells are removed by apoptosis, and the adult epithelial stem (AE) cells appear concomitantly. They proliferate and differentiate to form the adult epithelium (Ep). Thyroid hormone (TH) is well established to trigger this remodeling by regulating the expression of various genes including Notch receptor. To study the role of Notch signaling, we have analyzed the expression of its components, including the ligands (DLL and Jag), receptor (Notch), and targets (Hairy), in the metamorphosing intestine by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry. We show that they are up-regulated during both natural and TH-induced metamorphosis in a tissue-specific manner. Particularly, Hairy1 is specifically expressed in the AE cells. Moreover, up-regulation of Hairy1 and Hairy2b by TH was prevented by treating tadpoles with a γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI), which inhibits Notch signaling. More importantly, TH-induced up-regulation of LGR5, an adult intestinal stem cell marker, was suppressed by GSI treatment. Our results suggest that Notch signaling plays a role in stem cell development by regulating the expression of Hairy genes during intestinal remodeling. Furthermore, we show with organ culture experiments that prolonged exposure of tadpole intestine to TH plus GSI leads to hyperplasia of secretory cells and reduction of absorptive cells. Our findings here thus provide evidence for evolutionarily conserved role of Notch signaling in intestinal cell fate determination but more importantly reveal, for the first time, an important role of Notch pathway in the formation of adult intestinal stem cells during vertebrate development. Stem Cells 2016.

  16. Fasting-induced changes in hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism in male rats are independent of autonomic nervous input to the liver.

    PubMed

    de Vries, E M; Eggels, L; van Beeren, H C; Ackermans, M T; Kalsbeek, A; Fliers, E; Boelen, A

    2014-12-01

    During fasting, profound changes in the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis occur in order to save energy and limit catabolism. In this setting, serum T3 and T4 are decreased without an appropriate TSH and TRH response reflecting central down-regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. Hepatic thyroid hormone (TH) metabolism is also affected by fasting, because type 3 deiodinase (D3) is increased, which is mediated by serum leptin concentrations. A recent study showed that fasting-induced changes in liver TH sulfotransferases (Sults) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (Ugts) depend on a functional melanocortin system in the hypothalamus. However, the pathways connecting the hypothalamus and the liver that induce these changes are currently unknown. In the present study, we investigated in rats whether the fasting-induced changes in hepatic TH metabolism are regulated by the autonomic nervous system. We selectively cut either the sympathetic or the parasympathetic input to the liver. Serum and liver TH concentrations, deiodinase expression, and activity and Sult and Ugt expression were measured in rats that had been fasted for 36 hours or were fed ad libitum. Fasting decreased serum T3 and T4 concentrations, whereas intrahepatic TH concentrations remained unchanged. D3 expression and activity increased, as was the expression of constitutive androstane receptor, Sult1b1, and Ugt1a1, whereas liver D1 was unaffected. Neither sympathetic nor parasympathetic denervation affected the fasting-induced alterations. We conclude that fasting-induced changes in liver TH metabolism are not regulated via the hepatic autonomic input in a major way and more likely reflect a direct effect of humoral factors on the hepatocyte.

  17. Suppression of Tregs by anti-glucocorticoid induced TNF receptor antibody enhances the antitumor immunity of interferon-α gene therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Aida, Kouichirou; Miyakawa, Reina; Suzuki, Koji; Narumi, Kenta; Udagawa, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Yuki; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-02-01

    We have reported that interferon (IFN)-α can attack cancer cells by multiple antitumor mechanisms including the induction of direct cancer cell death and the enhancement of an immune response in several pancreatic cancer models. However, an immunotolerant microenvironment in the tumors is often responsible for the failure of the cancer immunotherapy. Here we examined whether the suppression of regulatory T cells (Tregs) within tumors can enhance an antitumor immunity induced by an intratumoral IFN-α gene transfer. First we showed that an intraperitoneal administration of an agonistic anti-glucocorticoid induced TNF receptor (GITR) monoclonal antibody (mAb), which is reported to suppress the function of Tregs, significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor growth in a murine pancreatic cancer model. The anti-GITR mAb was then combined with the intratumoral injection of the IFN-α-adenovirus vector. The treatment with the antibody synergistically augmented the antitumor effect of IFN-α gene therapy not only in the vector-injected tumors but also in the vector-uninjected tumors. Immunostaining showed that the anti-GITR mAb decreased Foxp3(+) cells infiltrating in the tumors, while the intratumoral IFN-α gene transfer increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the tumors. Therefore, the combination therapy strongly inclined the immune balance of the tumor microenvironment in an antitumor direction, leading to a marked systemic antitumor effect. The CCR5 expression on Tregs was downregulated in the antibody-treated mice, which may explain the decrease of tumor-infiltrating Tregs. The combination of Treg-suppression by GITR mAb and the tumor immunity induction by IFN-α gene therapy could be a promising therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer.

  18. Interferon-Tau has Antiproliferative effects, Represses the Expression of E6 and E7 Oncogenes, Induces Apoptosis in Cell Lines Transformed with HPV16 and Inhibits Tumor Growth In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Quirarte, Herbey Oswaldo; Trejo-Moreno, Cesar; Fierros-Zarate, Geny; Castañeda, Jhoseline Carnalla; Palma-Irizarry, Marie; Hernández-Márquez, Eva; Burguete-Garcia, Ana Isabel; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Interferon tau (IFN-τ) is a promising alternative antiviral and immunotherapeutic agent in a wide variety of diseases including infectious, neurodegenerative, autoimmune and cancer due to its low toxicity in comparison with other type I interferon´s. The objective of our study was established the effect of the bovine IFN-τ on human (SiHa) and murine (BMK-16/myc) cells transformed with HPV 16 and evaluates the antitumor effect in a murine tumor model HPV 16 positive. We determine that bovine IFN-τ has antiproliferative effects, pro-apoptotic activity and induces repression of viral E6 and E7 oncogenes (time- and dose-dependent) on human and murine cells transformed with HPV 16 similar to the effects of IFN-β. However, IFN-τ induces greater antiproliferative effect, apoptosis and repression of both oncogenes in BMK-16/myc cells compared to SiHa cells. The differences were explained by the presence and abundance of the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR) in each cell line. On the other hand, we treated groups of tumor-bearing mice (HPV16 positive) with IFN-τ and showed the inhibition tumor growth effect in vivo. Our finding indicates that bovine IFN-τ may be a good candidate for immunotherapy against cervical cancer. PMID:27994659

  19. Organization of the murine and human interleukin-7 receptor genes: Two mRNAs: Two mRNAs generated by differential splicing and presence of a type I-interferon-inducible promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Pleiman, C.M.; Gimpel, S.D.; Ziegler, S.F.; Park, L.S. ); Harada, Hisashi; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu )

    1991-06-01

    To better understand the regulation of interleukin-7 receptor (IL-7R) expression, the authors have pursued a detailed analysis of the structure of the murine and human IL-7R genes. The genes consist of eight exons, the sizes of which are conserved in mouse and human cells, spread out over 24 kbp (murine) and 19 kbp (human). A differential splicing event results in an mRNA encoding a secreted form of the human IL-7R gene. Primer extension and S1 nuclease analysis show a single transcriptional start site for the murine IL-7R gene. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the murine IL-7R gene contains TATA- and CAAT-like sequences. The promoter region also contains a functional interferon regulatory element, to which the interferon-induced nuclear factors IRF-1 and IRF-2 are capable of binding and which is able to confer interferon-inducible expression on a heterologous gene. There are also potential binding sites for the transcription factors Ap-1 and Ap-2 as well as multiple glucocorticoid response elements. Comparison of the murine and human IL-7R exon/intron boundaries with those of other hematopoietin receptor superfamily members whose exon/intron boundaries are also known reveals a conserved evolutionary structure.

  20. Interferon Alfacon-1 Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... or pharmacist) may measure the effectiveness and side effects of your treatment using laboratory tests and physical ... of infection. If you experience any of these effects near the site where you administer your interferon ...

  1. miR-221 suppresses ICAM-1 translation and regulates interferon-γ-induced ICAM-1 expression in human cholangiocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoku; Gong, Ai-Yu; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Rui; Deng, Caishu

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant cholangiocyte reactions in response to inflammatory stimuli are important pathogenic factors for the persistent biliary inflammation in patients with cholangiopathies. Overexpression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in cholangiocytes is a common pathological feature in inflammatory cholangiopathies and can promote cholangiocyte interactions with effector lymphocytes in the portal region. In this study, we tested the involvement of miRNA-mediated posttranscriptional regulation in IFN-γ-induced ICAM-1 expression in cholangiocytes. Using both immortalized and nonimmortalized human cholangiocyte cell lines, we found that IFN-γ activated ICAM-1 transcription and increased ICAM-1 protein expression. Inhibition of ICAM-1 transcription could only partially block IFN-γ-induced ICAM-1 expression at the protein level. In silico target prediction analysis revealed complementarity of miR-221 to the 3′-untranslated region of ICAM-1 mRNA. Targeting of ICAM-1 3′-untranslated region by miR-221 resulted in translational repression in cholangiocytes but not ICAM-1 mRNA degradation. Functional inhibition of miR-221 with anti-miR-221 induced ICAM-1 protein expression. Moreover, IFN-γ stimulation decreased miR-221 expression in cholangiocytes in a signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-dependent manner. Transfection of miR-221 precursor abolished IFN-γ-stimulated ICAM-1 protein expression. In addition, miR-221-mediated expression of ICAM-1 on cholangiocytes showed a significant influence on the adherence of cocultured T cells. These findings indicate that both transcriptional and miRNA-mediated posttranscriptional mechanisms are involved in IFN-γ-induced ICAM-1 expression in human cholangiocytes, suggesting an important role for miRNAs in the regulation of cholangiocyte inflammatory responses. PMID:20110463

  2. Type I Interferons Function as Autocrine and Paracrine Factors to Induce Autotaxin in Response to TLR Activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jianwen; Guan, Ming; Zhao, Zhenwen; Zhang, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an important phospholipid mediator in inflammation and immunity. However, the mechanism of LPA regulation during inflammatory response is largely unknown. Autotaxin (ATX) is the key enzyme to produce extracellular LPA from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In this study, we found that ATX was induced in monocytic THP-1 cells by TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS), TLR9 ligand CpG oligonucleotide, and TLR3 ligand poly(I:C), respectively. The ATX induction by TLR ligand was abolished by the neutralizing antibody against IFN-β or the knockdown of IFNAR1, indicating that type I IFN autocrine loop is responsible for the ATX induction upon TLR activation. Both IFN-β and IFN-α were able to induce ATX expression via the JAK-STAT and PI3K-AKT pathways but with different time-dependent manners. The ATX induction by IFN-β was dramatically enhanced by IFN-γ, which had no significant effect on ATX expression alone, suggesting a synergy effect between type I and type II IFNs in ATX induction. Extracellular LPA levels were significantly increased when THP-1 cells were treated with IFN-α/β or TLR ligands. In addition, the type I IFN-mediated ATX induction was identified in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) stimulated with LPS or poly(I:C), and IFN-α/β could induce ATX expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and monocytes isolated form blood samples. These results suggest that, in response to TLR activation, ATX is induced through a type I INF autocrine-paracrine loop to enhance LPA generation. PMID:26313906

  3. Viral Protein VP4 Is a Target of Human Antibodies Enhancing Coxsackievirus B4- and B3-Induced Synthesis of Alpha Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Chehadeh, Wassim; Lobert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Sauter, Pierre; Goffard, Anne; Lucas, Bernadette; Weill, Jacques; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Alm, Gunnar; Pigny, Pascal; Hober, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B4 (CVB4)-induced production of alpha interferon (IFN-α) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is enhanced in vitro by nonneutralizing anti-CVB4 antibodies from healthy subjects and, to a higher extent, from patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this study, we focused on identification of the viral target of these antibodies in CVB systems. High levels of IFN-α were obtained in supernatants of PBMC incubated with CVB4E2 or CVB3 and plasma from healthy subjects and, to a higher extent, from patients. The VP4 capsid proteins dissociated by heating at 56°C from CVB4E2 (VP4CVB4) and CVB3 (VP4CVB3) but not H antigen preincubated with plasma from healthy subjects or patients inhibited the plasma-dependent enhancement of CVB4E2- and CVB3-induced IFN-α synthesis. There was no cross-reaction between VP4CVB4 and VP4CVB3 in the inhibiting effect. IFN-α levels in culture supernatants showed dose-dependent correlation with anti-VP4 antibodies eluted from plasma specimens using VP4-coated plates. There were higher index values for anti-VP4 antibodies detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and higher proportions of positive detection in 40 patients than in 40 healthy subjects (80% versus 15% for anti-VP4CVB4). There was no relationship between the levels of anti-CVB neutralizing antibodies and the detection of anti-VP4 antibodies by ELISA. The CVB plasma-induced IFN-α levels obtained in PBMC cultures in the anti-VP4 antibody-positive groups were significantly higher than those obtained in the anti-VP4 antibody-negative groups regardless of the titers of anti-CVB neutralizing antibodies. These results show that VP4 is the target of antibodies involved in the plasma-dependent enhancement of CVB4E2- and CVB3-induced IFN-α synthesis by PBMC. PMID:16254324

  4. Transcriptome Profiling of the Virus-Induced Innate Immune Response in Pteropus vampyrus and Its Attenuation by Nipah Virus Interferon Antagonist Functions

    PubMed Central

    Glennon, Nicole B.; Jabado, Omar; Lo, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bats are important reservoirs for several viruses, many of which cause lethal infections in humans but have reduced pathogenicity in bats. As the innate immune response is critical for controlling viruses, the nature of this response in bats and how it may differ from that in other mammals are of great interest. Using next-generation transcriptome sequencing (mRNA-seq), we profiled the transcriptional response of Pteropus vampyrus bat kidney (PVK) cells to Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus known to elicit a strong innate immune response in mammalian cells. The Pteropus genus is a known reservoir of Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV). Analysis of the 200 to 300 regulated genes showed that genes for interferon (IFN) and antiviral pathways are highly upregulated in NDV-infected PVK cells, including genes for beta IFN, RIG-I, MDA5, ISG15, and IRF1. NDV-infected cells also upregulated several genes not previously characterized to be antiviral, such as RND1, SERTAD1, CHAC1, and MORC3. In fact, we show that MORC3 is induced by both IFN and NDV infection in PVK cells but is not induced by either stimulus in human A549 cells. In contrast to NDV infection, HeV and NiV infection of PVK cells failed to induce these innate immune response genes. Likewise, an attenuated response was observed in PVK cells infected with recombinant NDVs expressing the NiV IFN antagonist proteins V and W. This study provides the first global profile of a robust virus-induced innate immune response in bats and indicates that henipavirus IFN antagonist mechanisms are likely active in bat cells. IMPORTANCE Bats are the reservoir host for many highly pathogenic human viruses, including henipaviruses, lyssaviruses, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and filoviruses, and many other viruses have also been isolated from bats. Viral infections are reportedly asymptomatic or heavily attenuated in bat populations. Despite their ecological importance to viral

  5. Thyroid toxicants: assessing reproductive health effects.

    PubMed Central

    Jahnke, Gloria D; Choksi, Neepa Y; Moore, John A; Shelby, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    A thyroid toxicant workshop sponsored by the National Toxicology Program Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction convened on 28-29 April 2003 in Alexandria, Virginia. The purpose of this workshop was to examine and discuss chemical-induced thyroid dysfunction in experimental animals and the relevance of reproductive and developmental effects observed for prediction of adverse effects in humans. Presentations highlighted and compared reproductive and developmental effects of thyroid hormones in humans and rodents. Rodent models of thyroid system dysfunction were presented. Animal testing protocols were reviewed, taking into account protocol designs that allow extrapolation to possible human health effects. Potential screening methods to assess toxicant-induced thyroid dysfunction were outlined, and postnatal bioassays of thyroid-related effects were discussed. PMID:14998754

  6. Thyroid consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Pacini, F; Vorontsova, T; Molinaro, E; Shavrova, E; Agate, L; Kuchinskaya, E; Elisei, R; Demidchik, E P; Pinchera, A

    1999-12-01

    It is well recognized that the use of external irradiation of the head and neck to treat patients with various non-thyroid disorders increases their risk of developing papillary thyroid carcinoma years after radiation exposure. An increased risk of thyroid cancer has also been reported in survivors of the atomic bombs in Japan, as well as in Marshall Island residents exposed to radiation during the testing of hydrogen bombs. More recently, exposure to radioactive fallout as a result of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident has clearly caused an enormous increase in the incidence of childhood thyroid carcinoma in Belarus, Ukraine, and, to a lesser extent, in the Russian Federation, starting in 1990. When clinical and epidemiological features of thyroid carcinomas diagnosed in Belarus after the Chernobyl accident are compared with those of naturally occurring thyroid carcinomas in patients of the same age group in Italy and France, it becomes apparent that the post-Chernobyl thyroid carcinomas were much less influenced by gender, virtually always papillary (solid and follicular variants), more aggressive at presentation and more frequently associated with thyroid autoimmunity. Gene mutations involving the RET proto-oncogene, and less frequently TRK, have been shown to be causative events specific for papillary cancer. RET activation was found in nearly 70% of the patients who developed papillary thyroid carcinomas following the Chernobyl accident. In addition to thyroid cancer, radiation-induced thyroid diseases include benign thyroid nodules, hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis, with or without thyroid insufficiency, as observed in populations after environmental exposure to radioisotopes of iodine and in the survivors of atomic bomb explosions. On this basis, the authors evaluated thyroid autoimmune phenomena in normal children exposed to radiation after the Chernobyl accident. The results demonstrated an increased prevalence of circulating thyroid

  7. ABCG2/BCRP gene expression is related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition inducer genes in a papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line (TPC-1).

    PubMed

    Mato, E; González, C; Moral, A; Pérez, J I; Bell, O; Lerma, E; de Leiva, A

    2014-06-01

    Tumor malignancy is associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process and resistance to chemotherapy. However, little is known about the relationship between the EMT and the multidrug-resistance gene in thyroid tumor progression. We investigated whether the expression of the ABCG2/BCRP gene is associated with ZEB1 and other EMT inducer genes involved in tumor dedifferentiation. We established a subpopulation of cells that express the ABCG2/BCRP gene derived from the thyroid papillary carcinoma cell line (TPC-1), the so-called TPC-1 MITO-resistant subline. The most relevant findings in these TPC-1 selected cells were a statistically significant upregulation of ZEB1 and TWIST1 (35- and 15-fold change respectively), no changes in the relative expression of vimentin and SNAIL1, and no expression of E-cadherin. The TPC-1 MITO-resistant subline displayed a faster migration and greater invasive ability than parental cells in correlation with a significant upregulation of the survivin (BIRC5) gene (twofold change, P<0.05). The knockdown of ZEB1 promoted nuclear re-expression of E-cadherin, reduced expression of vimentin, N-cadherin, and BIRC5 genes, and reduced cell migration (P<0.05). Analysis of human thyroid carcinoma showed a slight overexpression of the ABCG2/BCRP at stages I and II (P<0.01), and a higher overexpression at stages III and IV (P<0.01). SNAIL1, TWIST1, and ZEB1 genes showed higher expression at stages III and IV than at stages I and II. E- and N-cadherin genes were upregulated at stages I and II of the disease (ninefold and tenfold change, respectively, P<0.01) but downregulated at stages III and IV (fourfold lower, P<0.01). These results could be a promising starting point for further study of the role of the ABCG2/BCRP gene in the progression of thyroid tumor.

  8. Early type I Interferon response induces upregulation of human β-defensin 1 during acute HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Antonella C.; Körner, Christian; Schiff, Abigail E.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Kwon, Douglas S.

    2017-01-01

    HIV-1 is able to evade innate antiviral responses during acute infection to establish a chronic systemic infection which, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART), typically progresses to severe immunodeficiency. Understanding these early innate immune responses against HIV-1 and their mechanisms of failure is relevant to the development of interventions to better prevent HIV-1 transmission. Human beta defensins (HBDs) are antibacterial peptides but have recently also been associated with control of viral replication. HBD1 and 2 are expressed in PBMCs as well as intestinal tissue, but their expression in vivo during HIV-1 infection has not been characterized. We demonstrate that during acute HIV-1 infection, HBD1 but not HBD2 is highly upregulated in circulating monocytes but returns to baseline levels during chronic infection. HBD1 expression in monocytes can be induced by HIV-1 in vitro, although direct infection may not entirely account for the increase in HBD1 during acute infection. We provide evidence that HIV-1 triggers antiviral IFN-α responses, which act as a potent inducer of HBD1. Our results show the first characterization of induction of an HBD during acute and chronic viral infection in humans. HBD1 has been reported to have low activity against HIV-1 compared to other defensins, suggesting that in vivo induced defensins may not significantly contribute to the robust early antiviral response against HIV-1. These data provide important insight into the in vivo kinetics of HBD expression, the mechanism of HBD1 induction by HIV-1, and the role of HBDs in the early innate response to HIV-1 during acute infection. PMID:28253319

  9. Involvement of cysteine-rich protein 61 in the epidermal growth factor-induced migration of human anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chin, Li-Han; Hsu, Sung-Po; Zhong, Wen-Bin; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2016-05-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is among the most aggressive types of malignant cancer. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of ATC, and patients with thyroid carcinoma typically exhibit increased cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61). In this study, we found that EGF treatment induced cell migration, stress fiber formation, Cyr61 mRNA and protein expressions, and Cyr61 protein secretion in ATC cells. The recombinant Cyr61 protein significantly induced cell migration; however, inhibition of Cyr61 activity by a Cyr61-specific antibody abrogated EGF-induced cell migration. EGF treatment also affected epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related marker protein expression, as evidenced by an increase in vimentin and a decrease in E-cadherin expression. Inhibition of Cyr61 expression by Cyr61 siRNA decreased cell migration and reversed the EMT-related marker protein expression. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and finally activated Cyr61 promoter plasmid activity. Our results suggest that Cyr61 is induced by EGF through the ERK/CREB signal pathway and that it plays a crucial role in the migration and invasion of ATC cells; moreover, Cyr61 might be a therapeutic target for metastatic ATC.

  10. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J.C.; Kong, Y.C. )

    1991-09-01

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT.

  11. Undifferentiated State Induced by Rb-p53 Double Inactivation in Mouse Thyroid Neuroendocrine Cells and Embryonic Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Shunsuke; Kohno, Susumu; Kondoh, Atsushi; Sasaki, Nobunari; Nishimoto, Yuuki; Li, Fengkai; Abdallah Mohammed, Mohammed Salah; Muranaka, Hayato; Nagatani, Naoko; Suzuki, Misa; Kido, Yukiharu; Takahashi, Chiaki

    2015-05-01

    Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB) is inactivated more frequently during tumor progression than during tumor initiation. However, its exact role in controlling the malignant features associated with tumor progression is