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Sample records for interferon induced thyroiditis

  1. Interferon induced thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Yaron; Menconi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is used for the treatment of various disorders, most notable chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. One of the commonest side effects of IFNalpha therapy is thyroiditis, with up to 40% of HCV patients on IFNalpha developing clinical or subclinical disease. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. IIT can manifest as clinical autoimmune thyroiditis, presenting with symptoms of classical Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease, or as non-autoimmune thyroiditis. Non-autoimmune thyroiditis can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, with early thyrotoxicosis and later hypothyroidism, or as non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of IIT have been well characterized the mechanisms causing IIT are still poorly understood. It is likely that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) itself plays a role in the disease, as the association between HCV infection and thyroiditis is well established. It is believed that IFNalpha induces thyroiditis by both immune stimulatory effects and by direct effects on the thyroid. Early detection and therapy of this condition are important in order to avoid complications of thyroid disease such as cardiac arrhythmias.

  2. Interferon-induced thyroiditis during treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Kozielewicz, Dorota; Halota, Waldemar

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid function disorders affect between 5% and 15% of patients treated with IFNα and RBV for chronic hepatitis C. Women and patients with thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) found before the treatment are at risk of developing the disorders (46.1% vs. 5.4%). The spectrum of IFNα-induced thyroiditis (IIT) includes two groups. Disorders with an autoimmune background are: presence of thyroid autoantibodies without clinical disease, Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease. The second group comprises diseases caused by the direct toxic effect of IFNα on the thyroid gland, i.e. destructive thyroiditis and non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. Thyroid diseases are not an absolute contraindication for IFNα and RBV therapy. In patients diagnosed with thyroid dysfunction, before the antiviral therapy it is necessary to achieve euthyreosis. Thyroid function disorders may occur at any moment of the therapy. The earliest have been observed in the 4th week of treatment, and the latest 12 months after its termination. During the therapy, in order to diagnose IIT early, it is recommended to determine TSH level every 2-3 months depending on the presence of TPOAb before the treatment. The diagnosis and treatment of thyroid function disorders should be conducted in co-operation with an endocrinologist.

  3. [Interferons and thyroid abnormalities: literature review].

    PubMed

    Deghima, S; Chentli, F

    2012-03-01

    Interferons are a large family of glycoproteins known as cytokines or substances released by lymphocytes that interfere with viral replication within host cells and activate the immune system. Nowadays, interferons are used as immunomodulators to treat many diseases, especially hepatitis. Among their side effects thyroidopathies are the most important. Their frequency varies from a study to another, and may reach 20%. Thyroid disorders may be an increase in thyroid antibodies or an abnormal function. Interferons can reveal or induce thyroid diseases whose mechanisms are still not understood. It seems that cytokines modify the immune system leading to an increase in stimulating or inhibiting antibodies production. A direct thyroid cells cytolysis is also possible. When stimulating antibodies are prevailing, hyperthyroidism is the resulting disease. This last situation is rarer than hypothyroidism resulting from an increase in inhibiting antibodies and/or thyroid cells cytolysis. When thyroid disease occurs under interferon therapy, overt hyper or hypothyroidism should be treated symptomatically without stopping interferons prescribed for a severe disease. However, after stopping interferons, control of thyroid function should be done to check if there is an ad integrum thyroid recovery.

  4. The Effect of Metformin on Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis Activity in Women with Interferon-Induced Hypothyroidism: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, R; Szkrobka, W; Okopien, B

    2016-02-01

    One of the most frequent adverse effects of interferon-α therapy is thyroiditis. Metformin was found to improve insulin sensitivity in hepatitis C patients, as well as to reduce elevated thyrotropin levels in patients with hypothyroidism. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of metformin on hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis activity in patients with interferon-induced thyroiditis. The study included 2 matched groups of women with type 2 diabetes and untreated subclinical hypothyroidism: patients with interferon-induced thyroiditis (n=8) and patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (n=12). Fasting plasma glucose, the homeostatic model assessment 1 of insulin resistance ratio (HOMA1-IR), glycated hemoglobin, the estimated glomerular filtration rate, as well as serum levels of thyrotropin, thyroid hormones, prolactin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were assessed at baseline and after 4 months of metformin treatment. Apart from reducing plasma glucose, HOMA1-IR and glycated hemoglobin, metformin decreased serum levels of thyrotropin. Circulating levels of thyroid hormones, prolactin and IGF-1 remained at a similar level throughout the study. The effect of metformin on serum thyrotropin was stronger in patients with interferon-induced thyroiditis than in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, as well as correlated with its impact on insulin sensitivity. Our results indicate that metformin may be an effective agent in patients with interferon-induced hypothyroidism. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Genetic analysis of interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT): evidence for a key role for MHC and apoptosis related genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Hasham, Alia; Zhang, Weijia; Lotay, Vaneet; Haggerty, Shannon; Stefan, Mihaela; Concepcion, Erlinda; Dieterich, Douglas T; Tomer, Yaron

    2013-08-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) have become increasingly recognized as a complication of interferon-alpha (IFNα) therapy in patients with chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Interferon-induced thyroiditis (IIT) can manifest as clinical thyroiditis in approximately 15% of HCV patients receiving IFNα and subclinical thyroiditis in up to 40% of patients, possibly resulting in either dose reduction or discontinuation of IFNα treatment. However, the exact mechanisms that lead to the development of IIT are unknown and may include IFNα-mediated immune-recruitment as well as direct toxic effects on thyroid follicular cells. We hypothesized that IIT develops in genetically predisposed individuals whose threshold for developing thyroiditis is lowered by IFNα. Therefore, our aim was to identify the susceptibility genes for IIT. We used a genomic convergence approach combining genetic association data with transcriptome analysis of genes upregulated by IFNα. Integrating results of genetic association, transcriptome data, pathway, and haplotype analyses enabled the identification of 3 putative loci, SP100/110/140 (2q37.1), HLA (6p21.3), and TAP1 (6p21.3) that may be involved in the pathogenesis of IIT. Immune-regulation and apoptosis emerged as the predominant mechanisms underlying the etiology of IIT.

  6. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF INTERFERON INDUCED THYROIDITIS (IIT): EVIDENCE FOR A KEY ROLE FOR MHC AND APOPTOSIS RELATED GENES AND PATHWAYS

    PubMed Central

    Hasham, Alia; Zhang, Weijia; Lotay, Vaneet; Haggerty, Shannon; Stefan, Mihaela; Concepcion, Erlinda; Dieterich, Douglas T.; Tomer, Yaron

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) have become increasingly recognized as a complication of interferon-alpha (IFNα) therapy in patients with chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Interferon-induced thyroiditis (IIT) can manifest as clinical thyroiditis in approximately 15% of HCV patients receiving IFNα and subclinical thyroiditis in up to 40% of patients, possibly resulting in either dose reduction or discontinuation of IFNα treatment. However, the exact mechanisms that lead to the development of IIT are unknown and may include IFNα-mediated immune-recruitment as well as direct toxic effects on thyroid follicular cells. We hypothesized that IIT develops in genetically predisposed individuals whose threshold for developing thyroiditis is lowered by IFNα. Therefore, our aim was to identify the susceptibility genes for IIT. We used a genomic convergence approach combining genetic association data with transcriptome analysis of genes upregulated by IFNα. Integrating results of genetic association, transcriptome data, pathway, and haplotype analyses enabled the identification of 3 putative loci, SP100/110/140 (2q37.1), HLA (6p21.3), and TAP1 (6p21.3) that may be involved in the pathogenesis of IIT. Immune-regulation and apoptosis emerged as the predominant mechanisms underlying the etiology of IIT. PMID:23683877

  7. Interferon-alpha-induced destructive thyroiditis followed by Graves' disease in a patient with chronic hepatitis C: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bu Kyung; Choi, Young Sik; Park, Yo Han; Lee, Sang Uk

    2011-12-01

    Interferon-induced thyroiditis (IIT) is a major clinical problem for patients receiving interferon-alpha (IFN-α) therapy. But, destructive thyroiditis followed by Graves' disease associated with IFN-α therapy is very rarely reported. Herein, we report a rare case of pegylated IFN-α (pegIFN-α) induced destructive thyroiditis followed by Graves' disease in a patient with HCV infection. A 31-yr-old woman suffered from chronic active hepatitis C and was treated with pegIFN-α and ribavirin for 12 months. Results of a thyroid function test and autoantibody levels were normal before IFN-α therapy was initiated. Destructive thyrotoxicosis appeared seven months after the initiation of IFN-α therapy, followed by Graves' thyrotoxicosis two months after the cessation of therapy. The diagnoses of destructive thyroiditis and Graves' disease were confirmed by the presence of TSH receptor antibodies in addition to Tc-99m scintigraphy findings. The patient's antithyroglobulin antibody titer increased gradually during IFN-α therapy and remained weakly positive after IFN-α therapy was discontinued.

  8. Environmental triggers of thyroiditis: hepatitis C and interferon-α.

    PubMed

    Menconi, F; Hasham, A; Tomer, Y

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are postulated to develop as a result of a complex interplay between several genetic and environmental influences. The pathogenesis of AITD is still not clearly defined. However, among the implicated triggers (e.g. iodine, infections, medications), more recent data confirmed strong associations of AITD with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and interferon-α (IFNα) therapy. Moreover, it is likely that HCV and IFN act in synergism to trigger AITD in patients. Indeed, approximately 40% of HCV patients develop either clinical or subclinical disease while receiving IFNα. Interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) can manifest as non-autoimmune thyroiditis (presenting as destructive thyroiditis, or non-autoimmune hypothyroidism), or autoimmune thyroiditis [presenting with clinical features of Graves' disease (GD) or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT)]. Although not yet clearly understood, it is thought that IFNα can induce thyroiditis via both immune stimulatory and direct toxic effects on the thyroid. In view of the high frequency of IIT, routine screening and surveillance of HCV patients receiving IFNα is recommended to avoid the complications, such as cardiac arrhythmias, associated with thyrotoxicosis. In summary, IIT is a common clinical problem that can be readily diagnosed with routine thyroid function screening of HCV patients receiving IFN. The treatment of IIT consists of the standard therapy for differing clinical manifestations of IIT such as GD, HT, or destructive thyroiditis. However, anti-thyroid medications are not recommended in this setting since they can potentially be hepatotoxic.

  9. Thyroid dysfunction in hepatitis C individuals treated with interferon-alpha and ribavirin--a review.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Luis Jesuíno de Oliveira; Atta, Ajax Mercês; D'Almeida Junior, Argemiro; Paraná, Raymundo

    2008-04-01

    Hepatitis C (HCV) is now the main cause of chronic hepatic disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Several extrahepatic diseases have been associated with chronic HCV infection, and in most cases appear to be directly related to the viral infection. Thyroid disorders are common in patients with chronic HCV. Some patients with chronic hepatitis C experience thyroid problems, and thyroid dysfunction may also be a side effect of interferon-based treatment. The principal risk factor for developing thyroid disease in the course of antiviral therapy is the previous positivity for anti-thyroid antibodies (anti-thyroid peroxidase) especially in older women. Screening for autoantibodies and serum thyroid-stimulating hormone is recommended before, during and after interferon-alpha treatment, and patients should be informed of the risk of thyroid dysfunction. This review includes a summary of thyroid disease associated with chronic HCV infection, interferon-alpha and ribavirin for treatment of HCV and potential to induce thyroid dysfunction.

  10. Interferon-induced Raynaud's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Daniel; Nahir, Abraham Menahem; Hadad, Nuhad

    2002-12-01

    To review the clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of interferon-induced Raynaud's phenomenon. The medical literature was reviewed from 1967 to November 2001 with the assistance of a MEDLINE search using the key words: Raynaud, Interferon, ischemia, thrombosis and necrosis. A qualitative review was performed after the articles were abstracted and the relevant information was summarized. Twenty-four cases of interferon-induced Raynaud's phenomenon (including our patient) are described. Interpheron-alpha was the most common causative agent (14 cases). The symptoms appeared weeks to years after beginning treatment and varied from mild vasospasm to occlusion of digital arteries and tissue necrosis (14 cases), sometimes necessitating finger amputation (6 patients). Digital plethysmography, arteriography and capillaroscopy were valuable diagnostic tools. In 4 cases, cardiac, ophthalmic, or central nervous system drug-induced ischemia accompanied the peripheral Raynaud's phenomenon. Of the 15 cases with a documented outcome, withdrawal of the drug alone resulted in complete (6 patients) or partial (1 patient) recovery. In the others, supportive therapy was needed. The recovery period lasted from 2 weeks to 3 months. In 2 patients, continuation of treatment was possible. Raynaud's phenomenon and related complications must be recognized as possible side effects of interferon therapy. Early diagnosis and withdrawal of the drug may prevent unnecessary morbidity and disability. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  11. Interferon Induced Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bayram Kayar, Nuket; Alpay, Nadir; Hamdard, Jamshid; Emegil, Sebnem; Bag Soydas, Rabia; Baysal, Birol

    2016-01-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology which involves recurring oral and genital aphthous ulcers and ocular lesions as well as articular, vascular, and nervous system involvement. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is usually seen in viral infections, immune deficiency syndrome, sickle cell anemia, and hyperfiltration and secondary to interferon therapy. Here, we present a case of FSGS identified with kidney biopsy in a patient who had been diagnosed with Behçet's disease and received interferon-alpha treatment for uveitis and presented with acute renal failure and nephrotic syndrome associated with interferon. PMID:27847659

  12. Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible.

  13. Chronic hepatitis B with type I diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroiditis development during interferon alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Kose, Sukran; Gozaydin, Ayhan; Akkoclu, Gulgun; Ece, Gulfem

    2012-04-13

    Interferon alpha is a molecule frequently used in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B, C, and D, with immunomodulatory and antiviral activity. It is also used in some cancer types. It has been widely claimed that interferon alpha triggers autoimmunity, with its broad adverse effect profile. Here we present the case of a 29-year-old male patient with chronic hepatitis B diagnosis who developed type 1 diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroiditis during treatment with interferon alfa-2b. Within four months of initiation of treatment with interferon alfa-2b, the patient presented to our clinic with dry mouth, urinary frequency (8 to 10 times per day), drinking plenty of water, night time urination, and tiredness. He was admitted to the clinic when his fasting blood glucose level was detected to be high. After examinations, the patient was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroiditis and began to receive treatment with insulin and propranolol. Fasting blood glucose levels were controlled and thyroid hormones decreased to normal levels within one month after the treatments began. For patients who will receive treatment with interferon alpha, especially those individuals with chronic hepatitis, pancreatic autoantibodies should be checked and close monitoring should be performed as there may be glucose tolerance impairment in patients with high titers. In addition, follow-up with thyroid function tests should be performed prior to and during the treatment.

  14. Interferon Induced Transfer of Viral Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    interferon induction (27). Reaction kinetics plus the falure of soluble factors in the medium to induce interferon suggested that the inducing factor...staining. Only NDV infected lymphocytes stained with the anti-ACTHa (1-13) or anti-Y-endorphin sera. The staining reaction of the anti-ACTHa (1-13) sera was...reasons. First, a cross reaction between human immunoglobulin class IgGl, and O-endorphin and ACTH has been reported (46). It seems that this is not the

  15. Occurrence of thyroid autoimmunity and dysfunction throughout a nine-month follow-up in patients undergoing interferon-beta therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rotondi, M; Oliviero, A; Profice, P; Mone, C M; Biondi, B; Del Buono, A; Mazziotti, G; Sinisi, A M; Bellastella, A; Carella, C

    1998-12-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity and dysfunction are a well known side effect of IFN alpha therapy for viral hepatitis and tumors, while the IFN beta effects on the thyroid gland in neurological patients have not been studied. The aim of this longitudinal study was to look for the appearance of thyroid autoimmunity as well as for the occurrence of overt thyroid disease in the patients affected by multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with IFN beta 1b. Eight patients (4 males, 4 females) undergoing r-IFN beta 1b treatment (8 M.U. every other day for 9 months) for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis entered the study. We have analyzed thyroid function parameters and auto antibody levels before and after 1, 2, 3, 6 and 9 months of therapy. None of them referred to familiar thyroid pathology or presented clinically overt thyroid disease except for one patient (case 4) who showed TPO-Ab pretreatment positivity and another (case 8) who was in therapy with Levothyroxine 100 microg/die for multinodular goiter. The number of patients with appearance of thyroid antibodies has slowly increased, until the third month of therapy with 3 patients out of 7 positive for TPO-Ab. The only case of overt thyroid dysfunction reported by us appeared after nine months of therapy and consisted of a hypothyroidism. Our data suggest that short-term interferon beta treatment is able to induce thyroid autoimmunity (42.8%) and dysfunction (12.5%).

  16. [Thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Buffet, Camille; Groussin, Lionel

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of thyroiditis encompasses a broad spectrum of thyroid disorders. Analysis of signs and symptoms, biochemical changes, neck ultrasound characteristics and radioactive iodine uptake values allows an accurate diagnosis. Recent studies of the whole genome have helped to identify many susceptibility genes for autoimmune thyroiditis. However, none of these genes contribute to a significant increase in risk of developing this thyroiditis. Clinical awareness of the characteristic presentations of exceptional thyroiditis (acute suppurative thyroiditis, Riedel's thyroiditis) is an important issue. Selenium administration seems to be beneficial for reducing the incidence of thyroiditis. Finally, certain drug-induced thyroiditis remains a therapeutic challenge for the physician.

  17. Results of space experiment program "Interferon". II. Influence of spaceflight conditions on the activity of interferon preparations and interferon inducers ("Interferon II").

    PubMed

    Tálas, M; Bátkai, L; Stöger, I; Nagy, K; Hiros, L; Konstantinova, I; Kozharinov, V

    1983-01-01

    The influence of spaceflight conditions on the biological activity of HuIFN-alpha preparations (lyophilized, in solution and in ointment) and interferon inducers was studied. In antiviral activity no difference was observed between the samples kept aboard the spaceship and the controls kept under ground conditions. The interferon inducers poly I:C, poly G:C and gossipol placed in the space laboratory for 7 days maintained their interferon-inducing capacity. The circulating interferon level in mice was the same irrespective of the induction being performed with flight or ground-control samples of inducers.

  18. Interaction of interferon alpha therapy with thyroid function tests in the management of hepatitis C: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gill, Gurmit; Bajwa, Hammad; Strouhal, Peter; Buch, Harit N

    2016-09-15

    Interferon alpha is a widely used therapeutic agent in the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection. Clinical thyroid disease is seen in nearly 15 % of patients receiving interferon alpha for hepatitis C virus infection. The mechanism of thyroid dysfunction with interferon alpha is either autoimmune or inflammatory. We report a case of young woman who developed biphasic thyroid dysfunction posing a diagnostic challenge, while receiving interferon alpha treatment for hepatitis C virus infection. A 29-year-old, Caucasian woman with type 1 diabetes and hepatitis C virus infection was referred with hyperthyroidism, while she was at 17 weeks of a planned 24-week course of interferon alpha therapy. A laboratory investigation revealed a thyroid stimulation hormone level of 0.005 mU/L (0.350-4.94), free thyroxine of 45.6 pmol/L (9.0-19.0) and free tri-iodothyronine of 12.6 pmol/L (2.6-5.7). She had a mild neutropenia and alanine aminotransferase at double the reference value. Her thyroid peroxidase antibody level was 497 ku/L (<5.6) and thyroid inhibitory factor 7 IU/L (>1.8 iu/l is positive). Thyroid scintigraphy with technetium99 scan confirmed a normal-sized thyroid gland with diffuse but normal overall uptake. A diagnosis of interferon alpha-triggered autoimmune hyperthyroidism as opposed to an inflammatory thyroiditis was made. She was offered radioactive iodine therapy, as thionamides were considered inappropriate in view of her liver disease and mild neutropenia. Due to our patient's personal circumstances, radioactive iodine therapy was delayed by 8 weeks and her thyrotoxic symptoms were controlled with beta-blockers alone. A repeat thyroid function test, 4 weeks post treatment with interferon alpha, indicated spontaneous conversion to hypothyroidism with a thyroid stimulation hormone level of 100 mU/L, free thyroxine of 5.2 pmol/L and free tri-iodothyronine of 1.7 pmol/L. She subsequently received levothyroxine for 4 months only and had remained euthyroid for the

  19. Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Graves' Disease in One Patient: The Extremes of Thyroid Dysfunction Associated with Interferon Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, R. C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease associated with interferon therapy can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, Graves' Hyperthyroidism, and autoimmune (often subclinical) hypothyroidism, the latter persisting in many patients. There are scare reports of a single patient developing extremes of autoimmune thyroid disease activated by the immunomodulatory effects of interferon. A 60-year-old man received 48 weeks of pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy for chronic HCV. Six months into treatment, he reported fatigue, weight gain, and slowed cognition. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was 58.8 mIU/L [0.27–4.2], fT4 11.1 pmol/L [12–25], and fT3 4.2 pmol/L [2.5–6.0] with elevated anti-TPO (983 IU/mL [<35]) and anti-TG (733 U/mL [<80]) antibodies. He commenced thyroxine with initial clinical and biochemical resolution but developed symptoms of hyperthyroidism with weight loss and tremor 14 months later. Serum TSH was <0.02 mIU/L, fT4 54.3 pmol/L, and fT3 20.2 pmol/L, with an elevated TSH receptor (TRAb, 4.0 U/L [<1.0]), anti-TPO (1,163 IU/mL) and anti-TG (114 U/mL) antibodies. Technetium scan confirmed Graves' Disease with bilateral diffuse increased tracer uptake (5.9% [0.5–3.5%]). The patient commenced carbimazole therapy for 6 months. Treatment was ceased following spontaneous clinical and biochemical remission (TSH 3.84 mIU/L, fT4 17pmol/L, fT3 4.5 pmol/L, and TRAb <1 U/L). This raises the need to monitor thyroid function closely in patients both during and following completion of interferon treatment. PMID:27042364

  20. Inhibition of sup 125 I organification and thyroid hormone release by interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma in human thyrocytes in suspension culture

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.; Satoh, T.; Shizume, K.; Ozawa, M.; Han, D.C.; Imamura, H.; Tsushima, T.; Demura, H.; Kanaji, Y.; Ito, Y. )

    1990-06-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in patients with subacute thyroiditis and painless thyroiditis, human thyroid follicles were cultured with interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), and/or interferon-gamma (IFN gamma), and the effects of these cytokines on thyroid function were studied in vitro. When human thyrocytes were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium containing 0.5% fetal calf serum and TSH for 5-8 days, the cells incorporated 125I, synthesized de novo (125I)iodotyrosines and (125I)iodothyronines, and secreted (125I)T4 and (125I)T3 into the medium. IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta inhibited 125I incorporation and (125I)iodothyronine release in a concentration-dependent manner. The minimal inhibitory effect was detected at 10 pg/ml. Electron microscopic examination revealed a marked decrease in lysosome formation in IL-1-treated thyrocytes. TNF alpha and IFN gamma also inhibited thyroid function in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, when thyrocytes were cultured with IL-1, TNF alpha and IFN gamma, these cytokines more than additively inhibited thyroid function. Although the main mechanism of 131I uptake suppression in the thyroid gland in subacute thyroiditis is due to cellular damage and suppression of TSH release, our present findings suggest that IL-1, TNF alpha, and IFN gamma produced in the inflammatory process within the thyroid gland further inhibit iodine incorporation and at least partly account for the decreased 131I uptake by the thyroid gland in destruction-induced hyperthyroidism.

  1. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  2. A quantitative assessment of depression and thyroid dysfunction secondary to interferon-alpha therapy in patients with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Loftis, J M; Wall, J M; Linardatos, E; Benvenga, S; Hauser, P

    2004-01-01

    The most effective treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) is interferon-alpha (IFN) therapy in combination with ribavirin. Although symptoms of depression are among the most common side effects of IFN therapy in treating patients with HCV, the mechanisms by which IFN produces these neuropsychiatric side effects remain unclear. In the brain, IFNs are involved in a number of regulatory functions, including but not limited to regulation of the endocrine system via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and -thyroid axes. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of IFN therapy on thyroid function and to characterize the relationship between thyroid dysfunction and major depressive disorder during IFN therapy in patients with hepatitis C. Thirty-three patients with HCV were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) Axis I Disorders (SCID) and completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Patients were on IFN for an average of 6 to 12 months depending on their viral genotype. Serum samples were collected at baseline, during and after IFN therapy, and measured for free thryoxine (FT4) and TSH levels. Patients who developed IFN-induced depression were treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants. Only one patient developed transient IFN-induced overt hypothyroidism, but he did not develop depression. Analysis of variance showed that there were no significant differences in either FT4 or TSH serum levels between patients who developed major depressive disorder (MDD) (no.= 10) during IFN therapy and those who did not (no.=23). These results illustrate the frequency and severity of depressive symptoms associated with IFN therapy and the apparent absence of a relationship between IFN-induced MDD and changes in thyroid function.

  3. Treatment of trypanosome-infected mice with exogenous interferon, interferon inducers, or antibody to interferon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated that mice resistant to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (the B10.BR/SgSnJ strain) produces, upon infection by this parasite, two peaks of serum interferon (IFN), while the susceptible mice (C3HeB/FeJ) produces no IFN. In the present study, survival times were compared for B10.BR/SgSnJ, C3HeB/FeJ, and CBA/J (an intermediately resistant strain) mice that were injected, prior to infection with the parasite, with either of the following three preparations (1) IFN-gamma, (2) an antibody to IFN-gamma and (3) polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (to induce IFN-alpha/beta). No effect on the survival times of mice by any of these preparations could be demonstrated, contrary to some previous reports.

  4. Prevalence of thyroid disorders in hepatitis C virus positive patients on interferon and antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Gitanjali; Panag, KMDS; Garg, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common worldwide. The treatment typically involves a combination of interferon-alpha (IFN-α) and ribavirin (RBV) therapy; however, the use of IFN-α is well documented to be associated with thyroid disease, the most common autoimmune disorder associated with IFN-α. Aim: The aim of the present study was to know the prevalence of thyroid abnormality in the HCV-positive patients on IFN and antiviral therapy. Materials and Methods: Fifty known HCV positive patients were enrolled for the study. All the patients were on IFN (3 million unit subcutaneously 3 times/week) and antiviral therapy (oral RBV 1000–1200 mg/day). Thyroid function tests were performed first at the start of treatment and then after 12 weeks of treatment. Results: 13 (26%) of the patients were found to develop hypothyroidism, and 1 (2%) patient developed hyperthyroidism in the course of 12 weeks therapy. Conclusion: HCV patients on IFN and antiviral therapy have an effect on the thyroid gland, so these patients should be regularly screened for thyroid disorders and appropriately treated to maintain euthyroid status. PMID:27857890

  5. Thyroid storm induced by strangulation.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Jesús I; Petrone, Patrizio; Kuncir, Eric J; Asensio, Juan A

    2004-06-01

    Thyroid storm most often occurs in patients with known thyrotoxicosis. This report discusses a severe case of thyroid storm developing as a direct result of strangulation in a patient without a preexisting history of thyroid disease. Classification and treatment of this entity are discussed.

  6. Interferon Induced Transfer of Viral Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    interferon: We decided that rather than first studying induction of tyrosinase in melanoma cells or plasminogen activator in ovarian granulosa cells as...177-184 (HP Publishing, New York). 14. Lockhart, R.Z. (1973). Criteria for acceptance of a viral inhibitor as an interferon and a general

  7. Radiation-induced thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maxon, H.R.

    1985-09-01

    Ionizing radiation has been demonstrated to result in a number of changes in the human thyroid gland. At lower radiation dose levels (between 10 and 1500 rads), benign and malignant neoplasms appear to be the dominant effect, whereas at higher dose levels functional changes and thyroiditis become more prevalent. In all instances, the likelihood of the effect is related to the amount and type of radiation exposure, time since exposure, and host factors such as age, sex, and heredity. The author's current approach to the evaluation of patients with past external radiation therapy to the thyroid is discussed. The use of prophylactic thyroxine (T4) therapy is controversial. While T4 therapy may not be useful in preventing carcinogenesis when instituted many years after radiation exposure, theoretically T4 may block TSH secretion and stimulation of damaged cells to undergo malignant transformation when instituted soon after radiation exposure.

  8. Lugol's solution-induced painless thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji Wei

    2017-01-01

    Lugol’s solution is usually employed for a limited period for thyroidectomy preparation in patients with Graves’ disease and for the control of severe thyrotoxicosis and thyroid storm. We describe a rare case of Lugol’s solution-induced painless thyroiditis. In November 2014, a 59-year-old woman was prescribed Lugol’s solution four drops per day for the alleviation of menopausal symptoms. She was referred to our clinic in June 2015 for fatigue, hair loss, and a 20-lb weight loss without thyroid pain or discomfort. Physical examination revealed a normal thyroid gland. On 7 May 2015, laboratory tests revealed a suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) 0.01 U/L with elevated free T4 3.31 ng/dL (42.54 pmol/L). Repeat testing on 25 May 2015 showed spontaneous normalization of the free thyroid hormone levels with persistently low TSH 0.10 U/L. Following these results, a family physician prescribed methimazole 10 mg PO TID and very soon after, the TSH concentration rose to >100 U/L along with subnormal free T4 and T3 levels. Methimazole was promptly discontinued, namely within 18 days of its initiation. Over the course of the next few months, the patient spontaneously achieved clinical and biochemical euthyroidism. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of painless thyroiditis induced by Lugol’s solution, which has not been reported before. Lugol’s solution is a short-term medication given for the preparation of thyroidectomy in patients with Graves’ disease and for the control of severe thyrotoxicosis. Iodine excess can cause both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Rarely, Lugol’s solution can cause acute painless thyroiditis. Learning points: Lugol’s solution is used for thyroidectomy preparation in patients with Graves’ disease and for the control of severe thyrotoxicosis and thyroid storm. Iodine excess can cause both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid glands with an underlying pathology are particularly susceptible to the

  9. Transient Hypothyroidism and Autoimmune Thyroiditis in Children with Chronic Hepatitis C Treated with Pegylated-Interferon-α-2b and Ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Serranti, Daniele; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Nebbia, Gabriella; Cananzi, Mara; D'Antiga, Lorenzo; Ricci, Silvia; Stagi, Stefano; Azzari, Chiara; Resti, Massimo

    2017-09-22

    Autoimmune thyroid disease and thyroid dysfunction are common in adults receiving interferon-based treatment for chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Few data are available in children with CHC. This study is aimed to evaluate the appearance and timing of thyroid dysfunction and anti-thyroid autoimmunity in children with CHC treated with pegylated interferon-α-2b and ribavirin. 61 otherwise healthy children with CHC, 3-17 years of age, infected perinatally and treatment naïve, receiving therapy with pegylated interferon-α-2b and ribavirin and 183 age- and sex-matched controls were included in a multicenter, prospective, case-control study. Thyroid-stimulating hormone, free thyroxine, anti-thyroglobulin antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies were assessed before, during and 24 weeks after the end of treatment. From baseline to the end of treatment subclinical hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis were diagnosed in 17/61 (27.94%) and in 4/61 (6.6%) of the children treated, respectively, and in 5/183 (2.7%) and in none of the controls [p < 0.0001, relative risk (RR): 10.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.9 to 26.5; p = 0.03, RR: 26.8, 95% CI: 1.5 to 489.1, respectively]. Twenty-four weeks after the end of treatment subclinical hypothyroidism persisted in only 4/61 (6.6%). Autoimmune thyroiditis persisted in 3/4 (75%) of the cases. Subclinical hypothyroidism is common in children with CHC receiving treatment with pegylated interferon-α-2b and ribavirin, but in most cases is transient. Autoimmune thyroiditis, which is less common, generally persists after treatment completion. Thyroid function should be carefully monitored in patients presenting with anti-thyroid autoantibodies and thyroid dysfunction during and after pegylated interferon-α based treatment.

  10. Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies in Non-Interferon Treated Hepatitis C Patients in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, Muhammad Imtiaz; Gauhar, Amna; Akram, Muhammad; Elahi, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Interferon therapy of HCV infected patients is associated with development of thyroid dysfunctions. Patients with pretreatment presence of antithyroid peroxidase (TPO-Ab) are at greater risk. This study, probably the first in Pakistan, was planned to determine TPO-Ab in sera of treatment-naive local HCV patients. Setting. Centre for Nuclear Medicine (CENUM), Mayo Hospital, Lahore. Patients and Methods. During July to December 2012, 190 patients (140 females, 50 males) newly diagnosed for HCV infection were selected for this study. Their age range was 15–55 years (mean: 35.3 ± 9.1 years). 262 age matched healthy subjects (211 females and 50 males) were recruited as control. Serum-free thyroxin (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were detected by radioimmunoassay techniques. Serum TPO-Ab titer was determined by ELISA method using commercial kits. Results. Serum FT4 and TSH levels in HCV patients and controls were within normal range. Between two groups there was no significant difference in mean value of FT4 (16.0 ± 3.0 versus 16.2 ± 3.9; P = 0.619) but mean TSH value was significantly lower in HCV patients (1.5 ± 0.8 versus 1.8 ± 0.9; P = 0.003). Among HCV patients 51 (26.8%) were TPO-Ab positive and among control subjects 18 (6.9%) were TPO-Ab positive. The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Further analysis showed that among HCV patients 39 (27.8%) females and 12 (24.0%) males were TPO-Ab positive, respectively, and difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.873). Moreover, TPO-Ab positive patients were older and had significantly higher serum TSH as compared to TPO-Ab negative HCV patients. Conclusion. Independent of patient's gender and increasing with advancing age, about one-fourth of local untreated HCV patients are TPO-Ab positive and are at greater risk of developing thyroid disorders during and after interferon treatment. PMID:26613079

  11. Thyroid disease in chronic hepatitis C infection treated with combination interferon-α and ribavirin: management strategies and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huy A; Jones, Tracey L; Ianna, Elizabeth A; Foy, Aidan; Reeves, Glenn E M

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the major epidemics afflicting young people in both developed and developing countries. The most common endocrine disorder associated with this infection, especially in conjunction with interferon-α (IFN-α)-based therapy, is thyroid disease (TD). This review examines the development of TD before, during, and after the completion of treatment with combination IFN-α and ribavirin (RBV) for chronic HCV infection. We also summarize the current understanding of the natural history of the condition and propose management and follow-up guidelines. PubMed was searched up to June 30, 2011 for English-language publications that contained the search terms "hepatitis C virus," "chronic hepatitis C," "HCV," "thyroid disease," "thyroiditis," "autoimmunity," "interferon-alpha," and "ribavirin." Additional publications were identified from the reference lists of identified papers. The included studies were original research publications and included combination IFN-α and RBV use in patients that developed TD. The prevalence of TD before combination IFN-α and RBV therapy ranges from 4.6 to 21.3%; during therapy, 1.1 to 21.3%; and after therapy, 6.7 to 21.3%. The most common TD is thyroiditis. Thyroid function testing (TFT) frequency and diagnostic criteria for various thyroid conditions are not standardized, and many of the existing studies are retrospective. Patients undergoing this therapy should be assessed with a standardized protocol to appropriately detect and manage developed TD. Based on the currently available literature, we recommend that patients receiving combination interferon-α and RBV therapy undergo monthly thyrotropin (TSH) level testing.

  12. Interferon-alpha induced Raynaud's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kruit, W H; Eggermont, A M; Stoter, G

    2000-11-01

    The cytokine interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) is increasingly prescribed for a number of indications, especially viral hepatitis and several malignancies. Two patients are described who developed Raynaud's syndrome during treatment with IFN-alpha as adjuvant therapy for high-risk melanoma. With a review of the available literature the symptomatology, possible pathophysiologic mechanisms and treatment options are discussed.

  13. Evolution and predictive factors of thyroid disorder due to interferon alpha in the treatment of hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Gelu-Simeon, Moana; Burlaud, Aurore; Young, Jacques; Pelletier, Gilles; Buffet, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study predictive factors of thyroid dysfunction associated with interferon-alpha (IFNα) therapy in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and to describe its long-term evolution in a large population without previous thyroid dysfunction. METHODS: We performed a follow-up of thyroid function and detection of thyroid antibodies in 301 patients treated for CHC with IFNα from 1999 to 2004. RESULTS: Thyroid disorder developed in 30/301 (10%) patients with a mean delay of 6 ± 3.75 mo: 13 patients had hyperthyroidism, 11 had hypothyroidism, and 6 had biphasic evolution. During a mean follow-up of 41.59 ± 15.39 mo, 9 patients with hyperthyroidism, 3 with hypothyroidism, and 4 with biphasic evolution normalized thyroid function in 7.88 ± 5.46 mo. Recovery rate of dysthyroidism was not modified by treatment discontinuation, but was better for patients with negative thyroid antibodies before antiviral treatment (P = 0.02). Women had significantly more dysthyroidism (P = 0.05). Positive thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies were more frequent before antiviral treatment in patients who developed dysthyroidism (P < 0.0003 and P = 0.0003, respectively). In a multivariate model, low fibrosis was found to be a predictive factor of dysthyroidism (P = 0.039). CONCLUSION: In this monocentric population of CHC, dysthyroidism, especially hyperthyroidism, developed in 10% of patients. Low fibrosis was found to be a predictive factor of dysthyroidism. Thyroid disorder recovered in 16/30 patients (53%) and recovery was better in the non-autoimmune form. PMID:19140232

  14. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IF stimulated ...

  15. Thyroid storm induced by blunt thyroid gland trauma.

    PubMed

    Delikoukos, Stylianos; Mantzos, Fotios

    2007-12-01

    Isolated thyroid gland injury due to blunt neck trauma is uncommon and rarely complicated by thyroid storm in patients without known hyperthyroidism. The aim of this study was to report our experience on blunt thyroid gland injury followed by massive gland hemorrhage, acute airway obstruction, and symptoms of thyroid storm. Among 231 patients with neck trauma, four patients appeared with isolated thyroid gland injury. In two of them, the diagnosis of simultaneous thyrotoxic crisis was made on the basis of clinical findings and confirmed on emergency laboratory tests. The diagnosis of thyroid gland injury was supposed by the history and physical examination and established after neck exploration. Therapy was directed at stabilizing the patients by correcting the hyperthyroid state, followed by operative treatment. Left lobectomy and total thyroidectomy were performed and, along with postoperative medical measures, led to uneventful recovery. This study demonstrates that thyroid gland injury due to blunt neck trauma, although uncommon, may result in potentially life-threatening thyroid storm due to rupture of acini and liberation of thyroid hormones into the bloodstream. This may occur in patients without known hyperthyroidism.

  16. Drug-induced thyroiditis and papillary carcinoma in a minocycline-pigmented black thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Tacon, Lyndal; Tan, Charles T K; Alvarado, Raul; Gill, Anthony J; Sywak, Mark; Fulcher, Greg

    2008-07-01

    We describe a 31-year-old woman who had ingested minocycline for 18 months prior to presenting with hyperthyroidism and a palpable thyroid nodule. There was no evidence of Graves' disease or autonomous nodule on thyroid scintigraphy, and a clinical diagnosis of thyroiditis was made. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the palpable lesion suggested papillary carcinoma, and the patient underwent a total thyroidectomy. Intraoperatively, the thyroid gland was found to have a striking black discoloration. Subsequent histological examination revealed the accumulation of pigment globules within the apical cytoplasm of the follicular cells, and associated findings of a drug-induced thyroiditis. The tumor nodule showed features of infarction and was felt to represent a necrotic papillary microcarcinoma. We postulate that in addition to causing black thyroid pigmentation, chronic minocycline use in our patient resulted in thyroiditis and subsequent hyperthyroidism. The papillary microcarcinoma was probably a coincidental finding.

  17. Differential effects of human interferon alpha and interferon gamma on xenografted human thyroid tissue in severe combined immunodeficient mice and nude mice.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Enomoto, T; Fornasier, V; Resetkova, E; Volpé, R

    1997-03-01

    We have studied the in vivo effects of human interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) administration on human thyroid tissue xenografted into two mouse strains: severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and nude mice. Human lymphocytes survive in SCID mice but are lysed in nude mice. Thyroid tissues from Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or paranodular [normal, (N)] tissue was xenografted into SCID mice (0.8 g/mouse) pretreated with anti-asialo GM-1 antiserum and radiation and also into nude mice. One week after xenografting, SCID and nude mice were divided into three groups. Group A was treated with IFN-alpha intraperitoneally (2,000 units/mouse) three times weekly; group B was treated with IFN-gamma similarly; group C was treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) only (control). Autologous human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were added to mice receiving N xenografts. Blood was taken every 2 weeks for levels of IgG and thyroid antibodies (TAb). After 6 weeks of treatment, mice were sacrificed, and xenograft thyrocyte histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) expression were measured. In addition, thyrocyte cultures were stimulated in vitro with 200 units/ml of either IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma or PBS (control). SCID mice xenografted with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in group A showed a significantly higher TAb production than group C, whereas in group B, TAb production was not statistically increased compared to control (group C). SCID mice xenografted with N did not produce TAb in any group, nor did nude mice xenografted with AITD. Thyrocyte HLA-DR expression was markedly increased in group A and B in SCID mice xenografted with Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and N tissue compared to group C. In contrast, only group B (IFN-gamma) showed an increase in thyrocyte HLA-DR in nude mice. In the in vitro studies, only IFN-gamma (not IFN-alpha) stimulated

  18. Clinical application of interferons and their inducers: Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfellow, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the clinical uses of interferons, specifically discussed are: uses of interferons in viral diseases; double stranded RNA and its analogs for clinical applications; interferons uses in cancer patients in Europe; Recombinant DNA technology; Gamma interferon and its role as a lymphokine and clinical trials of interferon in Japan and U.S.A.

  19. Interferon induces natural killer cell blastogenesis in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, C. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Welsh, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN), types beta and gamma, and IFN inducers polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, all stimulated the generation of blast-natural killer (NK) cells in mouse spleens, Blast-NK cells were characterized on the basis of size, 3H-thymidine uptake, and NK cell markers These data indicate that in addition to augmenting NK cell-mediated lysis, IFN may regulate NK cell proliferation in vivo.

  20. Interferon induces natural killer cell blastogenesis in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, C. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Welsh, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN), types beta and gamma, and IFN inducers polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, all stimulated the generation of blast-natural killer (NK) cells in mouse spleens, Blast-NK cells were characterized on the basis of size, 3H-thymidine uptake, and NK cell markers These data indicate that in addition to augmenting NK cell-mediated lysis, IFN may regulate NK cell proliferation in vivo.

  1. Effects of microsomal enzyme inducers on thyroid follicular cell proliferation and thyroid hormone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, C D; Hood, A M

    2001-01-01

    The effects of microsomal enzyme inducers on thyroid hormone homeostasis and the thyroid gland are of concern. We have investigated the effects of microsomal enzyme inducers on thyroid follicular cell proliferation and thyroid hormone metabolism in rats. We have shown that small increases in serum TSH can result in large increases in thyroid follicular cell proliferation. Furthermore, only those microsomal enzyme inducers that increase serum TSH--that is, phenobarbital (PB) and pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN)-increase thyroid follicular cell proliferation, whereas those microsomal enzyme inducers that do not increase serum TSH--that is, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) and Aroclor 1254 (PCB)-do not increase thyroid follicular cell proliferation. Deiodination does not appear to be the reason why serum T3 concentrations are maintained in microsomal enzyme inducer-treated rats. We have also shown that those microsomal enzyme inducers that increase serum TSH increase T3 UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity, whereas those microsomal enzyme inducers that do not increase serum TSH do not increase T3 UGT activity. This finding suggests that induction of T3 glucuronidation, rather than T4 glucuronidation, mediates increases in serum TSH of microsomal enzyme inducer treated rats.

  2. STUDIES INTO THE MECHANISMS OF POTASSIUM BROMATE INDUCED THYROID CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies into the Mechanisms of Potassium Bromate Induced Thyroid Carcinogenesis.

    Potassium bromate (KBrO3) occurs in finished drinking water as a by-product of the ozonation disinfection process and has been found to induce thyroid follicular cell tumors in the rat after ...

  3. Exposure to cold impairs interferon-induced antiviral defense.

    PubMed

    Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Sakorn, Kittima; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Auewarakul, Prasert

    2017-08-01

    It is commonly believed that exposure to low temperature increases susceptibility to viral infection in the human respiratory tract, but a molecular mechanism supporting this belief has yet to be discovered. In this study, we investigated the effect of low temperature on viral infection and innate defense in cell lines from the human respiratory tract and found that interferon-induced antiviral responses were impaired at low temperatures. Cells maintained at 25°C and 33°C expressed lower levels of myxovirus resistance protein 1 (MxA) and 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1) mRNAs when compared to cells maintained at 37°C after infection by seasonal influenza viruses. Exogenous β-interferon treatment reduced the viral replication at 37°C, but not at 25°C. Our results suggest that the impairment of interferon-induced antiviral responses by low temperature is one of several mechanisms that could explain an increase in host susceptibility to respiratory viruses after exposure to cold temperature.

  4. A case of chronic hepatitis C developing insulin-dependent diabetes, thyroid autoimmunity and stiff-person syndrome as complications of interferon therapy.

    PubMed

    Scavone, G; Zaccardi, F; Manto, A; Caputo, S; Pitocco, D; Ghirlanda, G

    2010-08-01

    We describe the case of a 66-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C who developed type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and thyroid autoimmunity during Interferon alpha (INFalpha) therapy and then stiff-person syndrome (SPS). This is the first reported case in which SPS has appeared as complication of IFNalpha therapy.

  5. A Review: Radiographic Iodinated Contrast Media-Induced Thyroid Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Braverman, Lewis E.; Brent, Gregory A.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Thyroid hormone production is dependent on adequate iodine intake. Excess iodine is generally well-tolerated, but thyroid dysfunction can occur in susceptible individuals after excess iodine exposure. Radiological iodinated contrast media represent an increasingly common source of excess iodine. Objective: This review will discuss the thyroidal response after acute exposure to excess iodine; contrast iodine-induced thyroid dysfunction; risks of iodine-induced thyroid dysfunction in vulnerable populations, such as the fetus, neonate, and patients with impaired renal function; and recommendations for the assessment and treatment of contrast iodine-induced thyroid dysfunction. Methods: Data for this review were identified by searching PubMed, Google Scholar, and references from relevant articles from 1948 to 2014. Conclusions: With the increase in the use of computed tomography scans in the United States, there is increasing risk of contrast-induced thyroid dysfunction. Patients at risk of developing iodine-induced thyroid dysfunction should be closely monitored after receiving iodinated contrast media and should be treated as needed. PMID:25375985

  6. A review: Radiographic iodinated contrast media-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Y; Rhee, Connie M; Leung, Angela M; Braverman, Lewis E; Brent, Gregory A; Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2015-02-01

    Thyroid hormone production is dependent on adequate iodine intake. Excess iodine is generally well-tolerated, but thyroid dysfunction can occur in susceptible individuals after excess iodine exposure. Radiological iodinated contrast media represent an increasingly common source of excess iodine. This review will discuss the thyroidal response after acute exposure to excess iodine; contrast iodine-induced thyroid dysfunction; risks of iodine-induced thyroid dysfunction in vulnerable populations, such as the fetus, neonate, and patients with impaired renal function; and recommendations for the assessment and treatment of contrast iodine-induced thyroid dysfunction. Data for this review were identified by searching PubMed, Google Scholar, and references from relevant articles from 1948 to 2014. With the increase in the use of computed tomography scans in the United States, there is increasing risk of contrast-induced thyroid dysfunction. Patients at risk of developing iodine-induced thyroid dysfunction should be closely monitored after receiving iodinated contrast media and should be treated as needed.

  7. Comparative genomic analysis of eutherian interferon-γ-inducible GTPases.

    PubMed

    Premzl, Marko

    2012-11-01

    The interferon-γ-inducible GTPases, IFGGs, are intracellular proteins involved in immune response against pathogens. A comprehensive comparative genomic review and analysis of eutherian IFGGs was carried out using public genomic sequences. The 64 eutherian IFGG genes were examined in detail and annotated. The eutherian IFGG promoter types were first catalogued followed by a phylogenetic analysis of eutherian IFGGs, which described five major IFGG clusters. The patterns of differential gene expansions and protein regions that may regulate IFGG catalytic features suggested a new classification of eutherian IFGGs. This mini-review has also provided new tests of reliability of public genomic sequences as well as tests of protein molecular evolution.

  8. Interferons as Inducers of Apoptosis in Malignant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kotredes, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    Discovered as antiviral cytokines, interferons (IFNs) are now also recognized for their capacity to inhibit the growth of malignant cells via activation of programmed cell death, better known as apoptosis. In this review, we will cover recent advances made in this field, as it pertains to the various proposed mechanisms of IFN-induced apoptosis and the characterization of IFN-responsive genes not previously known to have apoptotic function. Also mentioned here is a description of the activation and crosstalk of survival signaling pathways as a mode of IFN resistance that remains a persistent clinical adversary to overcome and the future of IFNs as antitumor agents. PMID:23570382

  9. Localization of Type I Interferon Receptor Limits Interferon-Induced TLR3 in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ciencewicki, Jonathan M.; Brighton, Luisa E.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that influenza infections increase Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) expression and that type I interferons (IFNs) may play a role in this response. This study aimed to expand on the role of type I IFNs in the influenza-induced upregulation of TLR3 and determine whether and how the localization of the IFN-α/β receptor (IFNAR) in respiratory epithelial cells could modify IFN-induced responses. Using differentiated primary human airway epithelial cells this study demonstrates that soluble mediators secreted in response to influenza infection upregulate TLR3 expression in naive cells. This response was associated with an upregulation of type I IFNs and stimulation with type I, but not type II, IFNs enhanced TLR3 expression. Interestingly, although influenza infection results in IFN-β release both toward the apical and basolateral sides of the epithelium, TLR3 expression is only enhanced in cells stimulated with IFN-β from the basolateral side. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrates that IFNAR expression is limited to the basolateral side of differentiated human airway epithelial cells. However, non- or poorly differentiated epithelial cells express IFNAR more toward the apical side. These data demonstrate that restricted expression of the IFNAR in the differentiated airway epithelium presents a potential mechanism of regulating type I IFN-induced TLR3 expression. PMID:19231996

  10. Interferon-inducible effector mechanisms in cell-autonomous immunity.

    PubMed

    MacMicking, John D

    2012-04-25

    Interferons (IFNs) induce the expression of hundreds of genes as part of an elaborate antimicrobial programme designed to combat infection in all nucleated cells - a process termed cell-autonomous immunity. As described in this Review, recent genomic and subgenomic analyses have begun to assign functional properties to novel IFN-inducible effector proteins that restrict bacteria, protozoa and viruses in different subcellular compartments and at different stages of the pathogen life cycle. Several newly described host defence factors also participate in canonical oxidative and autophagic pathways by spatially coordinating their activities to enhance microbial killing. Together, these IFN-induced effector networks help to confer vertebrate host resistance to a vast and complex microbial world.

  11. microRNA control of interferons and interferon induced anti-viral activity.

    PubMed

    Sedger, Lisa M

    2013-12-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that are spontaneously produced in response to virus infection. They act by binding to IFN-receptors (IFN-R), which trigger JAK/STAT cell signalling and the subsequent induction of hundreds of IFN-inducible genes, including both protein-coding and microRNA genes. IFN-induced genes then act synergistically to prevent virus replication and create an anti-viral state. miRNA are therefore integral to the innate response to virus infection and are important components of IFN-mediated biology. On the other hand viruses also encode miRNAs that in some cases interfere directly with the IFN response to infection. This review summarizes the important roles of miRNAs in virus infection acting both as IFN-stimulated anti-viral molecules and as critical regulators of IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes. It also highlights how recent knowledge in RNA editing influence miRNA control of virus infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interferon-Inducible GTPases in Host Resistance, Inflammation and Disease.

    PubMed

    Pilla-Moffett, Danielle; Barber, Matthew F; Taylor, Gregory A; Coers, Jörn

    2016-08-28

    Cell-autonomous immunity is essential for host organisms to defend themselves against invasive microbes. In vertebrates, both the adaptive and the innate branches of the immune system operate cell-autonomous defenses as key effector mechanisms that are induced by pro-inflammatory interferons (IFNs). IFNs can activate cell-intrinsic host defenses in virtually any cell type ranging from professional phagocytes to mucosal epithelial cells. Much of this IFN-induced host resistance program is dependent on four families of IFN-inducible GTPases: the myxovirus resistance proteins, the immunity-related GTPases, the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), and the very large IFN-inducible GTPases. These GTPase families provide host resistance to a variety of viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens through the sequestration of microbial proteins, manipulation of vesicle trafficking, regulation of antimicrobial autophagy (xenophagy), execution of intracellular membranolytic pathways, and the activation of inflammasomes. This review discusses our current knowledge of the molecular function of IFN-inducible GTPases in providing host resistance, as well as their role in the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory Crohn's disease. While substantial advances were made in the recent past, few of the known functions of IFN-inducible GTPases have been explored in any depth, and new functions await discovery. This review will therefore highlight key areas of future exploration that promise to advance our understanding of the role of IFN-inducible GTPases in human diseases.

  13. Inhibition by interferon of biochemical transformation induced by cloned herpesvirus thymidine kinase genes.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, H; Qavi, H; Kit, S

    1982-10-01

    To learn whether interferon could prevent the biochemical transformations induced by cloned herpesvirus thymidine kinase (TK) genes, LM(TK-) mouse fibroblast cultures were pretreated for 24 h with 2.4-40 international units (I.U.)/ml mouse alpha + beta interferon, and subsequently transformed to the TK+ phenotype with recombinant plasmids containing the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) TK gene (pAGO and pMH110) and the marmoset herpesvirus (MarHV) TK gene (pMAR035). Mouse alpha + beta interferon inhibited transformation and the inhibition was interferon dose-dependent. Transformation was also inhibited when LM(TK-) cells were pretreated for 2-5 h with 40 I.U./ml interferon. Maximal inhibitions of TK+ colony formation were observed following a 9-20 h pretreatment period with interferon. In contrast, 40 I.U./ml interferon treatment for 20 h did not reduce the rate or extent of LM(TK-) cell growth. Experiments in which cultures were first treated with plasmid pAGO and only afterwards treated with interferon also showed that, as the interferon concentration used, interferon did not inhibit the outgrowth of transformated colonies. Enzyme assays showed that pretreatment with interferon inhibited the induction of TK activity in cells that had been transfected with pAGO DNA.

  14. RelA-Induced Interferon Response Negatively Regulates Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kochupurakkal, Bose S.; Wang, Zhigang C.; Hua, Tony; Culhane, Aedin C.; Rodig, Scott J.; Rajkovic-Molek, Koraljka; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Richardson, Andrea L.; Biswas, Debajit K.; Iglehart, J. Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Both oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities are attributed to the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway. Moreover, NF-kB may positively or negatively regulate proliferation. The molecular determinants of these opposing roles of NF-kB are unclear. Using primary human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as a model, we show that increased RelA levels and consequent increase in basal transcriptional activity of RelA induces IRF1, a target gene. Induced IRF1 upregulates STAT1 and IRF7, and in consort, these factors induce the expression of interferon response genes. Activation of the interferon pathway down-regulates CDK4 and up-regulates p27 resulting in Rb hypo-phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. Stimulation of HMEC with IFN-γ elicits similar phenotypic and molecular changes suggesting that basal activity of RelA and IFN-γ converge on IRF1 to regulate proliferation. The anti-proliferative RelA-IRF1-CDK4 signaling axis is retained in ER+/HER2- breast tumors analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Using immuno-histochemical analysis of breast tumors, we confirm the negative correlation between RelA levels and proliferation rate in ER+/HER2- breast tumors. These findings attribute an anti-proliferative tumor-suppressor role to basal RelA activity. Inactivation of Rb, down-regulation of RelA or IRF1, or upregulation of CDK4 or IRF2 rescues the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 induced proliferation arrest in HMEC and are points of disruption in aggressive tumors. Activity of the RelA-IRF1-CDK4 axis may explain favorable response to CDK4/6 inhibition observed in patients with ER+ Rb competent tumors. PMID:26460486

  15. The HIN-200 family: More than interferon-inducible genes?

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, Louise E.A.; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Clarke, Christopher J.P. . E-mail: chris.clarke@petermac.org

    2005-08-01

    The HIN-200 family was initially grouped together based on their hemopoietic expression, interferon-inducibility, nuclear localization, and characteristic 200 amino-acid domains. In this review, we performed a comprehensive search of genome databases and determined the location of previously characterized and predicted genes within the human, mouse, and rat HIN-200 loci. Several novel proteins were predicted in the mouse and rat. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of this family of proteins and highlight the most important findings. In addition to a role in interferon biology, there is now good evidence supporting a role for these proteins as regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation. The activity of HIN-200 proteins is not restricted to the hemopoietic system as they are expressed and can function in a variety of other cells and tissues. The importance of HIN-200 proteins in disease now is beginning to be understood as they appear to be involved in autoimmunity and may act as tumor suppressor proteins.

  16. Over-the-counter-drug-induced thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thanh D; Mai, Vinh Q; Clyde, Patrick W; Shakir, Mohamed K M

    2013-01-01

    Excessive iodine ingestion may cause thyroid dysfunction. In this case series, we report four patients who developed significant thyroid dysfunction after ingesting over-the-counter (OTC) drugs containing large concentrations of iodine. Four patients from a tertiary medical center are reported. Case 1 involved acute exacerbation of thyrotoxicosis induced by taking OTC Tri-iodine™ in a 35-year-old woman while still on methimazole therapy. Case 2 involved thyroid-extract-induced thyrotoxicosis following ingestion of Thyromine™, and was confirmed by laboratory studies and ¹³¹I thyroid uptake. Cases 3 and 4 involved severe, symptomatic hypothyroidism induced in 2 patients with underlying autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) following ingestion of Iodoral™. In all cases, thyroid dysfunction resolved with appropriate management and discontinuation of the OTC drugs. These case reports demonstrate the significant risks associated with OTC preparations containing iodine in patients predisposed to thyroid dysfunction. There is no valid reason for taking high-dose OTC iodine supplements, which have been shown to cause harm and have no known benefit.

  17. Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. Postpartum thyroiditis, which causes ... hormone levels in the blood) followed by temporary hypothyroidism, is a common cause of thyroid problems after ...

  18. Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid is used to treat the symptoms of hypothyroidism (a condition where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone). Symptoms of hypothyroidism include lack of energy, depression, constipation, weight gain, ...

  19. Thyroid hormones induce browning of white fat

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Moreno-Navarrete, José M; Contreras, Cristina; Rial-Pensado, Eva; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The canonical view about the effect of thyroid hormones (THs) on thermogenesis assumes that the hypothalamus acts merely as a modulator of the sympathetic outflow on brown adipose tissue (BAT). Recent data have challenged that vision by demonstrating that THs act on the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) to inhibit AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which regulates the thermogenic program in BAT, leading to increased thermogenesis and weight loss. Current data have shown that in addition to activation of brown fat, the browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) might also be an important thermogenic mechanism. However, the possible central effects of THs on the browning of white fat remain unclear. Here, we show that 3,3′,5,5′ tetraiodothyroxyne (T4)-induced hyperthyroidism promotes a marked browning of WAT. Of note, central or VMH-specific administration of 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3) recapitulates that effect. The specific genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the VMH reversed the central effect of T3 on browning. Finally, we also showed that the expression of browning genes in human WAT correlates with serum T4. Overall, these data indicate that THs induce browning of WAT and that this mechanism is mediated via the central effects of THs on energy balance. PMID:27913573

  20. Radiation induced thyroid neoplasms 1920 to 1987: A vanishing problem

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, M.P.; Goetowski, P.G.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1989-06-01

    Radiation for benign diseases has been implicated as an etiologic factor in thyroid cancer. From 1930-60, over 2 million children may have been exposed to therapeutic radiation and it is estimated that up to 7% may develop thyroid cancer after a 5-40 year latency. Thyroid stimulating hormone, secondary to radioinduced hypothyroidism, has been implicated as causative in animals. Such data has led to expensive screening programs in high risk patients. Because of a decline in irradiation for benign diseases in children over the last 2 decades, we questioned whether the incidence of radiation induced thyroid neoplasms (RITN) was also decreasing. Twenty-six of 227 patients (11%) with thyroid malignancies seen at our institution from 1974-87 had a history of previous head and neck irradiation. These included 13 papillary, 3 follicular, and 7 mixed carcinomas as well as 2 lymphomas and 1 synovial cell sarcoma. None of these 26 patients had abnormal thyroid function tests at presentation. Mean latency from irradiation to the diagnosis of thyroid cancer was 25.4 years (6-55 year range). Compared to the reported increasing incidence of RITN from 1940-70, there appears to be a significant decrease since 1970. Based on our analysis, the use of expensive screening programs in high risk populations may no longer be warranted. Additionally, the routine use of thyroid replacement in previously irradiated chemically hypothyroid patients is not recommended.30 references.

  1. Component(s) of Sendai virus that can induce interferon in mouse spleen cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Y; Hosaka, Y

    1983-01-01

    To identify the active component of Sendai virus that induces interferon in mouse spleen cells, infectious and noninfectious viruses, envelope particles derived from them, and isolated hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoproteins were examined for interferon induction. The interaction between membranous structures containing Sendai virus HN glycoprotein and the receptors on the cell surface was shown to be sufficient for interferon induction in mouse spleen cells, suggesting that the actual inducer of interferon in mouse spleen cells is the HN glycoprotein of Sendai virus. When mouse spleen cells were stimulated in vitro with Sendai virus grown in eggs or LLC-MK2 cells or with membranous structures containing glycoproteins obtained from these viruses, interferon could be detected in the culture fluid. Furthermore, isolated HN glycoprotein per se could induce interferon in the cells. A linear correlation was found between the titer of interferon induced and the hemagglutinating activity of the membranous structure containing the HN glycoprotein. It was concluded from these findings that HN glycoprotein was the active component of Sendai virus responsible for interferon induction in mouse spleen cells and that viral RNA and F glycoprotein were not required. The results also showed that the interaction between HN glycoprotein and receptors on the cell surface triggered production of type I interferon (IFN-alpha and IFN-beta). Although when Sendai virus was incubated at 56 degrees C for 5 min it lost its hemolytic and hemagglutinating activities, it induced a considerable amount of interferon in the culture fluid of mouse spleen cells. The interferon-inducing ability of heat-inactivated virus could be absorbed with mouse spleen cells but not with sheep erythrocytes or mouse erythrocytes, indicating that the inactivated virus retained ability to bind to mouse lymphoid cells. PMID:6301988

  2. Endogenous interferon-β-inducible gene expression and interferon-β-treatment are associated with reduced T cell responses to myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Börnsen, Lars; Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Ratzer, Rikke; Hedegaard, Chris; Søndergaard, Helle B; Krakauer, Martin; Hesse, Dan; Nielsen, Claus H; Sorensen, Per S; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2015-01-01

    Autoreactive CD4+ T-cells are considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis, exogenous and endogenous type I interferons restrict disease severity. Recombinant interferon-β is used for treatment of multiple sclerosis, and some untreated multiple sclerosis patients have increased expression levels of type I interferon-inducible genes in immune cells. The role of endogenous type I interferons in multiple sclerosis is controversial: some studies found an association of high expression levels of interferon-β-inducible genes with an increased expression of interleukin-10 and a milder disease course in untreated multiple sclerosis patients, whereas other studies reported an association with a poor response to treatment with interferon-β. In the present study, we found that untreated multiple sclerosis patients with an increased expression of interferon-β-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had decreased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to the autoantigen myelin basic protein ex vivo. Interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had increased IL10 and IL27 gene expression levels in monocytes in vivo. In vitro, neutralization of interleukin-10 and monocyte depletion increased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic protein while interleukin-10, in the presence or absence of monocytes, inhibited CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic protein. Our findings suggest that spontaneous expression of interferon-β-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from untreated multiple sclerosis patients and treatment with interferon-β are associated with reduced myelin basic protein-induced T-cell responses. Reduced myelin basic protein-induced CD4+ T-cell autoreactivity in interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients may be mediated by monocyte-derived interleukin-10.

  3. Polyinosine-polycytidylic acid promotes excessive iodine intake induced thyroiditis in non-obese diabetic mice via Toll-like receptor 3 mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ya-nan; Liu, Feng-hua; Yu, Xiu-jie; Liu, Ze-bing; Li, Qing-xin; Yuan, Ji-hong; Zang, Xiao-yi; Li, Lan-ying

    2013-02-01

    Excessive iodine intake and viral infection are recognized as both critical factors associated with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been reported to play an important role in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. In this study, we aimed to clarify the possible mechanism of TLR3 involved in polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) promoting excessive iodine intake induced thyroiditis in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Both NOD and BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to four groups: control group (n = 5), high iodine intake (HI) group (n = 7), poly(I:C) group (n = 7) and combination of excessive iodine and poly(I:C) injection (HIP) group (n = 7). After 8 weeks, mice were weighed and blood samples were collected. All the mice were sacrificed before dissection of spleen and thyroid gland. Then, thyroid histology, thyroid secreted hormone, expression of CD3(+) cells and TLR3 as well as inflammatory mRNA level were evaluated. Both NOD and BALB/c mice from HI and HIP group represented goiter and increasing thyroid relative weight. Thyroid histology evidence indicated that only HIP group of NOD mice showed severe thyroiditis with lymphocytes infiltration in majority of thyroid tissue, severe damage of follicles and general fibrosis. Immunofluorescence staining results displayed a large number of CD3(+) cells in HIP NOD mice. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results suggested interferon (IFN)-α increased over 30 folds and IFN-γ expression was doubled compared with control group, but interleukin (IL)-4 remained unchanged in HIP group of NOD mice thyroid. Meanwhile, over one third decrease of blood total thyroxine (TT4) and increased thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was observed in HIP group of NOD mice. Only HIP group of NOD mice represented significantly elevation of TLR3 expression. Poly(I:C) enhanced excessive dietary iodine induced thyroiditis in NOD mice through increasing TLR3 mediated inflammation.

  4. [Clinical procedure in amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Różycka-Kosmalska, Monika; Michalak, Renata; Kosmalski, Marcin; Ptaszyński, Paweł; Wranicz, Jerzy Krzysztof; Zieleniewski, Wojciech; Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug frequently used in everyday clinical practice. Its mechanism of action involves the interaction with many receptors, including those in the cardiac conduction system. Amiodarone usefulness is protect in the treatment of a variety of tachyarrhythmias, both benign and life-threatening. In contrast to other antiarrhythmic drugs, amiodarone is characterized by high therapeutic efficacy, both in patients with normal and impaired left ventricular systolic function. A significant limitation of its is associated with side effects including thyroid gland dysfunction. Disturbances of this organ associated with amiodarone are an important diagnostic and therapeutic problem. They may contribute to the occurrence of both Amiodarone- Induced Thyrotoxicosis (AIT) and Amiodarone-Induced Hypothyroidism (AIH). The risk of such complications should be considered for each patient individually, taking into account thyroid function at the beginning of pharmacotherapy. Appropriate procedure, both before and after treatment allows a rapid diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disturbances. It seems that the best parameter used to assess the hormonal imbalance during amiodarone therapy is the concentration of the free triiodothyronine (fT3). The evaluation of thyroid function should be performed before starting pharmacotherapy, and then repeated every six months. In the case of a thyroid dysfunction, assessment must be performed immediately according to standard diagnostic and therapeutic regimens. Despite abnormal thyroid function, high efficiency of amiodarone and relatively small risk of thyroid damage allows continuation therapy. Amiodarone therapy requires a care from both cardiologist and endocrinologist. The aim of this paper is to present the state of art of evaluation of the thyroid function and procedures implemented in care of thyroid dysfunction before and during treatment with amiodarone. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  5. Interferon-inducible GTPases in cell autonomous and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2016-02-01

    Detection and clearance of invading pathogens requires a coordinated response of the adaptive and innate immune system. Host cell, however, also features different mechanisms that restrict pathogen replication in a cell-intrinsic manner, collectively referred to as cell-autonomous immunity. In immune cells, the ability to unleash those mechanisms strongly depends on the activation state of the cell, which is controlled by cytokines or the detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors. The interferon (IFN) class of cytokines is one of the strongest inducers of antimicrobial effector mechanisms and acts against viral, bacterial and parasitic intracellular pathogens. This has been linked to the upregulation of several hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes, among them the so-called IFN-inducible GTPases. Two subfamilies of IFN-inducible GTPases, the immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), have gained attention due to their exceptional ability to specifically target intracellular vacuolar pathogens and restrict their replication by destroying their vacuolar compartment. Their repertoire has recently been expanded to the regulation of inflammasome complexes, which are cytosolic multi-protein complexes that control an inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis and the release of cytokines like interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the function, the targeting and regulation of IRG and GBP proteins during microbial infections.

  6. Recurrence of depressive disorders after interferon-induced depression

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, W-C; Su, Y-P; Su, K-P; Chen, P-C

    2017-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFN-α)-treated patients commonly develop depression during the therapy period. Although most IFN-α-induced depressive disorders achieve remission after IFN-α therapy, no studies have examined the long-term mood effects of IFN-α treatment. We conducted a 12-year population-based cohort study of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients who were older than 20 years and had received IFN-α therapy. The sample was obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The cohort included patients with and without IFN-α-induced depression, matched randomly by age, sex and depression history, at a ratio of 1:10. The follow-up started after the last administration of IFN-α and was designed to determine the incidence of recurrent depressive disorder after IFN-α therapy. A total of 156 subjects were identified as having IFN-α-induced depression and achieving full remission after IFN-α therapy. The overall incidence of recurrent depressive disorders among patients with and without IFN-α-induced depression was 56.8 (95% confidence interval (CI), 42.4–76.1) and 4.1 (95% CI, 2.9–5.8) cases, respectively, per 100 000 person-years, P<0.001. The adjusted hazard ratios for recurrent depressive disorder were 13.5 (95% CI, 9.9–18.3) in the IFN-α-treated cohort and 22.2 (95% CI, 11.2–44.2) in the matched cohort for IFN-α-induced depression patients after adjusting for age, sex, income, urbanization and comorbid diseases. IFN-α-induced depression was associated with a high risk of recurrent depression. It was not a transient disease and might be considered an episode of depressive disorder. Continuation therapy might be considered, and further research is needed. PMID:28170005

  7. Recurrence of depressive disorders after interferon-induced depression.

    PubMed

    Chiu, W-C; Su, Y-P; Su, K-P; Chen, P-C

    2017-02-07

    Interferon alpha (IFN-α)-treated patients commonly develop depression during the therapy period. Although most IFN-α-induced depressive disorders achieve remission after IFN-α therapy, no studies have examined the long-term mood effects of IFN-α treatment. We conducted a 12-year population-based cohort study of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients who were older than 20 years and had received IFN-α therapy. The sample was obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The cohort included patients with and without IFN-α-induced depression, matched randomly by age, sex and depression history, at a ratio of 1:10. The follow-up started after the last administration of IFN-α and was designed to determine the incidence of recurrent depressive disorder after IFN-α therapy. A total of 156 subjects were identified as having IFN-α-induced depression and achieving full remission after IFN-α therapy. The overall incidence of recurrent depressive disorders among patients with and without IFN-α-induced depression was 56.8 (95% confidence interval (CI), 42.4-76.1) and 4.1 (95% CI, 2.9-5.8) cases, respectively, per 100 000 person-years, P<0.001. The adjusted hazard ratios for recurrent depressive disorder were 13.5 (95% CI, 9.9-18.3) in the IFN-α-treated cohort and 22.2 (95% CI, 11.2-44.2) in the matched cohort for IFN-α-induced depression patients after adjusting for age, sex, income, urbanization and comorbid diseases. IFN-α-induced depression was associated with a high risk of recurrent depression. It was not a transient disease and might be considered an episode of depressive disorder. Continuation therapy might be considered, and further research is needed.

  8. Thyroid autoimmunity and dysfunction in multiple sclerosis patients during long-term treatment with interferon beta or glatiramer acetate: an Italian multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Frisullo, Giovanni; Calabrese, Massimiliano; Tortorella, Carla; Paolicelli, Damiano; Ragonese, Paolo; Annovazzi, Pietro; Radaelli, Marta; Malucchi, Simona; Gallo, Antonio; Tomassini, Valentina; Nociti, Viviana; D'Onghia, Mariangela; Lo Re, Vincenzina; Rodegher, Mariemma; Solaro, Claudio; Gasperini, Claudio

    2014-08-01

    Few long-term follow-up data are available on thyroid dysfunction (TD) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with glatiramer acetate (GA) or with interferon-beta (IFNb). In a cohort of 787 relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients whom were followed up for 8 years, we observed an increased prevalence of TD and thyroid autoimmunity (TA) within the first year of IFNb treatment, regardless of the dose or frequency of administration, while no change was observed with GA treatment. The increased prevalence of TD and TA within the first year of IFNb treatment suggested the need for close monitoring of thyroid function and autoimmunity, though only during the first year of IFNb treatment.

  9. Interferon-induced 2'-5' adenylate synthetase in vivo and interferon production in vitro by lymphocytes from systemic lupus erythematosus patients with and without circulating interferon

    SciTech Connect

    Preble, O.T.; Rothko, K.; Klippel, J.H.; Friedman, R.M.; Johnston, M.I.

    1983-06-01

    The interferon (IFN)-induced enzyme 2-5A synthetase was elevated in mononuclear cells from both serum IFN-positive and -negative systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. This suggests that a much higher percentage of patients than previously thought produce endogenous IFN. These results may partly explain findings that mononuclear cells from SLE patients are deficient in IFN production in vitro in response to certain IFN inducers. Although normal lymphocytes can produce an acid-labile alpha IFN after stimulation with C. parvum in vitro, the reason for endogenous production of this unusual alpha IFN by SLE patients remains unknown.

  10. TRAIL and DR5 promote thyroid follicular cell apoptosis in iodine excess-induced experimental autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiujie; Li, Lanying; Li, Qingxin; Zang, Xiaoyi; Liu, Zebing

    2011-11-01

    Death receptor-mediated apoptosis has been implicated in target organ destruction in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Several apoptosis signaling pathways, such as Fas ligand and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), have been shown to be active in thyroid cells and may be involved in destructive thyroiditis. Thyroid toxicity of iodide excess has been demonstrated in animals fed with an iodide-rich diet, but its pathogenic role remains unclear. The effects of excessive iodine on TRAIL and its death receptor expression in thyroid were investigated. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) was induced by excessive iodine and thyroglobulin (Tg) in non-obese diabetic mice. The expression of TRAIL and its death receptor DR5 was detected by immunofluorescence staining. Following administration of excessive iodine alone, Tg, and excessive iodine combined with Tg, TRAIL-positive cells appear not only in follicular cells but also in lymphocytes infiltrated in the thyroid, whereas DR5-positive cells appear only in follicular cells. Large numbers of CD3-positive cells and a few CD22-positive cells were detected in thyroid. A great amount of follicular cells were labeled specifically by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated deoxynucleotide triphosphate nick-end labeling assay. Taken together, our results suggest that excessive iodine could induce TRAIL and DR5 abnormal expression in thyroid. TRAIL band with DR5 to promote follicular cells apoptosis thus mediate thyroid destruction in EAT.

  11. Interferoninduces senescence in normal human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suiquan; Zhou, Miaoni; Lin, Fuquan; Liu, Dongyin; Hong, Weisong; Lu, Liangjun; Zhu, Yiping; Xu, Aie

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) plays an important role in the proceedings of vitiligo through recruiting lymphocytes to the lesional skin. However, the potential effects of IFN-γ on skin melanocytes and the subsequent contribution to the vitiligo pathogenesis are still unclear. To investigate the effects of IFN-γ on viability and cellular functions of melanocytes. Primary human melanocytes were treated with IFN-γ. Cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle melanin content and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level were measured. mRNA expression was examined by real-time PCR. The release of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP-70) was monitored by ELISA. β-galactosidase staining was utilized to evaluate melanocyte senescence. Persistent IFN-γ treatment induced viability loss, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence in melanocytes. Melanocyte senescence was characterized as the changes in pigmentation and morphology, as well as the increase of β-galactosidase activity. Increase of p21Cip1/Waf1 protein was evident in melanocytes after IFN-γ treatment. IFN-γ induction of senescence was attenuated by siRNAs against p21, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) or signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), but not by JAK1 siRNA nor by p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α. IFN-γ treatment increased the accumulation of intracellular ROS in melanocytes, while ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) effectively inhibited IFN-γ induced p21 expression and melanocyte senescence. IL-6 and HSP-70 release was significantly induced by IFN-γ treatment, which was largely inhibited by NAC. The increase of IL-6 and HSP-70 release could also be observed in senescent melanocytes. IFN-γ can induce senescence in melanocytes and consequently enhance their immuno-competency, leading to a vitiligo-prone milieu.

  12. InterferonInduces Senescence in Normal Human Melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Suiquan; Zhou, Miaoni; Lin, Fuquan; Liu, Dongyin; Hong, Weisong; Lu, Liangjun; Zhu, Yiping; Xu, Aie

    2014-01-01

    Background Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) plays an important role in the proceedings of vitiligo through recruiting lymphocytes to the lesional skin. However, the potential effects of IFN-γ on skin melanocytes and the subsequent contribution to the vitiligo pathogenesis are still unclear. Objective To investigate the effects of IFN-γ on viability and cellular functions of melanocytes. Methods Primary human melanocytes were treated with IFN-γ. Cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle melanin content and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level were measured. mRNA expression was examined by real-time PCR. The release of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP-70) was monitored by ELISA. β-galactosidase staining was utilized to evaluate melanocyte senescence. Results Persistent IFN-γ treatment induced viability loss, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence in melanocytes. Melanocyte senescence was characterized as the changes in pigmentation and morphology, as well as the increase of β-galactosidase activity. Increase of p21Cip1/Waf1 protein was evident in melanocytes after IFN-γ treatment. IFN-γ induction of senescence was attenuated by siRNAs against p21, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) or signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), but not by JAK1 siRNA nor by p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α. IFN-γ treatment increased the accumulation of intracellular ROS in melanocytes, while ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) effectively inhibited IFN-γ induced p21 expression and melanocyte senescence. IL-6 and HSP-70 release was significantly induced by IFN-γ treatment, which was largely inhibited by NAC. The increase of IL-6 and HSP-70 release could also be observed in senescent melanocytes. Conclusion IFN-γ can induce senescence in melanocytes and consequently enhance their immuno-competency, leading to a vitiligo-prone milieu. PMID:24681574

  13. Interferon-γ-induced protein 10 in Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, P; Elia, G; Bonatti, A

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease is an infectious disease caused by bacteria of the Borrelia type, that affects about 300,000 people a year in the USA and 65,000 people a year in Europe. Borrelia infection, and Lyme disease, following occupational exposure has been frequently reported in USA, Europe and Asia. The manifestations of Lyme disease include erythema migrans (EM), arthritis, neuroborrelliosis (NB), and others. Cytokines and chemokines primarily orchestrate leukocyte recruitment to the areas of Borrelia infection, and they are critical mediators of immune and inflammatory responses, in particular of the induction of interferon (IFN)-γ and IFN-γ dependent chemokines. In EM high levels of T helper (Th) 1 cells chemoattranctants [monokine induced by IFN-γ (MIG), IFN-γ-induced protein 10 (IP- 10), and IFN-inducible T cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC)] have been shown. Synovial tissues and fluids of patients with Lyme Arthritis (LA) (overall with antibiotic-refractory LA) contained exceptionally high levels of Th1 chemoattractants and cytokines, particularly MIG and IFN-γ. In NB concentrations of IP-10 and I-TAC in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were significantly higher, suggesting that IP-10 and I-TAC create a chemokine gradient between the CSF and serum and recruite C-X-C chemokine receptor 3-expressing memory CD4+ T-cells into the CSF of these patients. A positive association between the disseminating capacity of B. burgdorferi and early type I IFN induction has also been shown. These results suggest that IFN-γ dependent chemokines are important biomarkers to monitor the progression and diffusion of the disease in patients with Borrelia infection; further larger studies are needed.

  14. Clinical Experiences with Radiation Induced Thyroid Cancer after Chernobyl

    PubMed Central

    Reiners, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The risk of developing thyroid cancer increases considerably after exposure to external or internal radiation, especially in children below the age of 10. After the Chernobyl reactor accident, the yearly incidence of childhood thyroid cancer in Belarus increased to approximately 40 per 1.000.000 in girls and to roughly 20 per 1.000.000 in boys compared to approximately 0.5 cases per 1.000.000 prior to the accident. Typically, young children with thyroid cancer after radiation exposure present in ≈95% of the cases as papillary cancers, in ≈50% as invasive tumors growing outside the thyroid capsule, in ≈65% with lymph node metastases and in ≈15% with distant metastases. A joint Belarusian-German project starting in April 1993 that combined treatment with surgery and radioiodine was organized in 237 selected children from Belarus who were exposed to the Chernobyl fallout and had advanced stages of thyroid cancer. The study group included 141 girls and 96 boys. Their median age at the time of the accident was 1.7 years; whereas the median age at the time of diagnosis was 12.4 years. With the exception of two cases with follicular histology, the majority of the patients had been diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancers. In 63%, the tumor had grown outside the thyroid capsule and invaded the tissue of the neck (pT4). Nearly all of the selected cases (96%) showed-up with lymph node metastases (pN1) and 43% of the patients with distant metastases mainly to the lungs (pM1). In 58% of the children, complete remissions of thyroid cancer could be achieved until December 31st 2010 and in 34% of the children, stable partial remissions; in the remaining 8% of the patients, partial remissions were observed. The risk of radiation-induced thyroid cancer increased considerably in children and adolescents who were affected by the Chernobyl reactor accident. In spite of the fact, that thyroid cancers in young children seem to behave more aggressively than in older patients, the

  15. Interferon-γ-induced protein 10 in Dengue Virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, P; Elia, G

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, or dengue shock syndrome. Interferons (IFNs), and IFN-γ dependent chemokines, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10/IFN-γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10), CXCL9/MIG and CXCL11/I-TAC, and their common receptor chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor (CXCR)3 are induced by DENV infection; however it has been shown that the latter two could not compensate for the absence of IP-10. This paper reviews studies about DENV and IP-10. Evidences show the importance of IP-10 induction during DENV infection, in macrophages, lymphocytes, hepatic cells, denritic cells, in skin and in the brain. Furthermore it has been shown that chemokines IP-10, I-TAC and their receptor CXCR3 are involved in severity of dengue; in fact, pulmonary effusion or ascites, painful hepatomegaly or aspartate aminotransferase increase, are correlated with IP-10 levels. It has been also demonstrated that IP-10 was more elevated in subjects who subsequently developed dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. It has been also shown that IP-10 has a direct action in control of dengue viral replication. Furthermore IP-10 circulating levels may be used to discriminate dengue fever from other febbrile diseases. This is of particular importance in certain situations, for example to discriminate occupationally acquired dengue, in patients with febbrile disorders coming from endemic countries. These studies suggested that these chemokines can be used as potential biomarkers for differential diagnosis and the disease progression, while others can be used to control dengue viral replication, thus representing a viable targets for drug therapy.

  16. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Watad, Abdulla; David, Paula; Brown, Stav; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    The autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA), presented by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin in 2011, is an entity that incorporates diverse autoimmune conditions induced by the exposure to various adjuvants. Adjuvants are agents that entail the capability to induce immune reactions. Adjuvants are found in many vaccines and used mainly to increase the response to vaccination in the general population. Silicone has also been reported to be able to induce diverse immune reactions. Clinical cases and series of heterogeneous autoimmune conditions including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis have been reported to be induced by several adjuvants. However, only a small number of cases of autoimmune thyroid disorder have been included under the umbrella of ASIA syndrome. Indeed, clinical cases of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and/or subacute thyroiditis were observed after the exposure to vaccines as well as silicone implantation. In our review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge on ASIA syndrome presented as endocrinopathies, focusing on autoimmune thyroid disorders associated with the various adjuvants. PMID:28167927

  17. Correlation of Immunomodulatory and Therapeutic Activities of Interferon and Interferon Inducers in Metastatic Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    acid solubilized with poly-L-Iysine in carboxy methyl cellulose (pICLC) in treating metastatic disease was investigated by comparing effector cell...polycytidylic acid, poly(l.C)-LC or pICLC, poly(lC) solubilized with poly-L- lysine in carboxymethyl cellulose . Paul L. Black’s present address is Virology...with poly-L-lysine and solubilized with carboxymethyl cellulose [poly(IC)-LC] alleviates this problem [44,45]. Both recombinant murine interferon-gamma

  18. A Recombinant Adenovirus Expressing Ovine Interferon Tau Prevents Influenza Virus-Induced Lethality in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, E.; Avia, M.; Rangel, G.; de Molina, A.; Alejo, A.; Sevilla, N.

    2016-01-01

    Ovine interferon tau (IFN-τ) is a unique type I interferon with low toxicity and a broad host range in vivo. We report the generation of a nonreplicative recombinant adenovirus expressing biologically active IFN-τ. Using the B6.A2G-Mx1 mouse model, we showed that single-dose intranasal administration of recombinant Ad5-IFN-τ can effectively prevent lethality and disease induced by highly virulent hv-PR8 influenza virus by activating the interferon response and preventing viral replication. PMID:26739058

  19. Mechanisms of fever induced by recombinant human interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Dinarello, C A; Bernheim, H A; Duff, G W; Le, H V; Nagabhushan, T L; Hamilton, N C; Coceani, F

    1984-01-01

    Since the early trials using human interferon (hIFN) derived from blood leukocytes or cell lines, fever has been a prominent component of IFN therapy. Human protein impurities might account for the fever to cell-derived hIFN, but recombinant hIFN, free of extraneous human proteins, has produced fever in nearly all recipients during clinical trials. Our present studies were carried out to determine the mechanisms of fever due to recombinant hIFN currently being used in humans. Because recombinant hIFN is produced in Escherichia coli, in these experiments we considered contaminating endotoxin as the cause of fever. Polymyxin B, which blocks endotoxin, had no effect on the pyrogenicity of hIFN in rabbits. In addition, hIFN injected into an endotoxin-resistant strain of mice produced fever. The pyrogenicity of hIFN does not appear to involve production of leukocytic pyrogen (LP), since no circulating LP was detected in rabbits during IFN fever. Furthermore, human mononuclear cells incubated with hIFN in vitro at 10(4)-10(6) U/ml did not release LP. However, hIFN stimulated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release from rabbit hypothalamic tissue in vitro. Intracerebroventricular injection of hIFN into the awake cat also produced fever and a rise in PGE2 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid; both effects were reversed by treatment with indomethacin. We conclude that the fever of recombinant hIFN is not due to endotoxin but that hIFN is intrinsically pyrogenic by inducing PGE2 in the hypothalamus. PMID:6590569

  20. Adenovirus infection reverses the antiviral state induced by human interferon.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1987-04-06

    HeLa cells treated with human lymphoblastoid interferon do not synthesize poliovirus proteins. The antiviral state against poliovirus is reversed if cells are previously infected with adenovirus type 5. A late gene product seems to be involved in this reversion, since no effect is observed at early stages of infection or in the presence of aphidicolin.

  1. Long-term therapy of interferon-alpha induced pulmonary arterial hypertension with different PDE-5 inhibitors: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Jochmann, Nicoline; Kiecker, Felix; Borges, Adrian C; Hofmann, Maja A; Eddicks, Stephan; Sterry, Wolfram; Baumann, Gert; Trefzer, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    background Interferon alpha2 is widely used in hepatitis and high-risk melanoma. Interferon-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension as a side effect is rare. Case presentation We describe a melanoma patient who developed severe pulmonary arterial hypertension 30 months after initiation of adjuvant interferon alpha2b therapy. Discontinuation of interferon did not improve pulmonary arterial hypertension. This patient could be treated successfully with phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy. Conclusion This is only the 5th case of interferon-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension and the first documented case where pulmonary arterial hypertension was not reversible after termination of interferon alpha2 therapy. If interferon alpha2 treated patients develop respiratory symptoms, pulmonary arterial hypertension should be considered in the differential diagnosis. For these patients phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, e.g. sildenafil or vardenafil, could be an effective therapeutic approach. PMID:16138923

  2. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process.

  3. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins in inflammasome activation and host defense.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Chee, Jonathan D; Bradfield, Clinton J; Park, Eui-Soon; Kumar, Pradeep; MacMicking, John D

    2016-05-01

    Traditional views of the inflammasome highlight the assembly of pre-existing core components shortly after infection or tissue damage. Emerging work, however, suggests that the inflammasome machinery is also subject to 'tunable' or inducible signals that might accelerate its autocatalytic properties and dictate where inflammasome assembly takes place in the cell. Many of these signals operate downstream of interferon receptors to elicit inflammasome regulators, including a new family of interferon-induced GTPases called 'guanylate-binding proteins' (GBPs). Here we investigate the critical roles of interferon-induced GBPs in directing inflammasome subtype-specific responses and their consequences for cell-autonomous immunity to a wide variety of microbial pathogens. We discuss emerging mechanisms of action and the potential effect of these GBPs on predisposition to sepsis and other infectious or inflammatory diseases.

  4. [Subtotal thyroid resection in severe, iodine-induced hyperthyroidism].

    PubMed

    Hintze, G; Lepsien, G; Becker, H D; Köbberling, J

    1985-09-01

    Iodine-induced thyrotoxicosis due to iodine application in high amounts in patients with circumscript or disseminated thyroid autonomy, is complicated by a prolonged course, mainly due to a resistance to conservative therapy with thiourea derivates. We therefore decided to perform an early subtotal thyroidectomy in 24 thyrotoxic patients. This measure is in contrast to the common opinion that surgery should only be performed after normalization of thyroid hormones. In all 24 patients with severe hyperthyroidism, including three patients with thyroid storm, hormone levels decreased within a few days after surgery to normal or subnormal values and the clinical picture of thyrotoxicosis disappeared. In the case of thyroid storm the signs of disorientation normalized within 1-3 days. One patient died five weeks after surgery due to severe concomitant diseases. One patient exhibited transitory respiration distress and another had postoperative hypocalcemia. In 13 patients L-thyroxine replacement became necessary due to subclinical or clinical hypothyroidism. Surgery as a early treatment for thyrotoxicosis should be reserved for patients with severe illness where conservative treatment has been shown to be ineffective. In rare selected cases, when a rapid normalization is required, surgery without preoperative treatment seems to be justified. The effect of surgery was impressive in all our cases and there were only minor perioperative complications.

  5. Interferon γ-inducible protein (IFI) 16 transcriptionally regulates type i interferons and other interferon-stimulated genes and controls the interferon response to both DNA and RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mikayla R; Sharma, Shruti; Atianand, Maninjay; Jensen, Søren B; Carpenter, Susan; Knipe, David M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A

    2014-08-22

    The interferon γ-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) has recently been linked to the detection of nuclear and cytosolic DNA during infection with herpes simplex virus-1 and HIV. IFI16 binds dsDNA via HIN200 domains and activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING), leading to TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator)-binding kinase-1 (TBK1)-dependent phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and transcription of type I interferons (IFNs) and related genes. To better understand the role of IFI16 in coordinating type I IFN gene regulation, we generated cell lines with stable knockdown of IFI16 and examined responses to DNA and RNA viruses as well as cyclic dinucleotides. As expected, stable knockdown of IFI16 led to a severely attenuated type I IFN response to DNA ligands and viruses. In contrast, expression of the NF-κB-regulated cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β was unaffected in IFI16 knockdown cells, suggesting that the role of IFI16 in sensing these triggers was unique to the type I IFN pathway. Surprisingly, we also found that knockdown of IFI16 led to a severe attenuation of IFN-α and the IFN-stimulated gene retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) in response to cyclic GMP-AMP, a second messenger produced by cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) as well as RNA ligands and viruses. Analysis of IFI16 knockdown cells revealed compromised occupancy of RNA polymerase II on the IFN-α promoter in these cells, suggesting that transcription of IFN-stimulated genes is dependent on IFI16. These results indicate a broader role for IFI16 in the regulation of the type I IFN response to RNA and DNA viruses in antiviral immunity. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. NADPH Oxidase Inhibitor Apocynin Attenuates PCB153-Induced Thyroid Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abliz, Ablikim; Chen, Chen; Deng, Wenhong; Sun, Rongze

    2016-01-01

    PCBs, widespread endocrine disruptors, cause the disturbance of thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis in humans and animals. However, the exact mechanism of thyroid dysfunction caused by PCBs is still unknown. In order to clarify the hypotheses that NADPH oxidase (NOX) and subsequent NF-κB pathway may play roles in thyroid dysfunction, sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: control group, PCB153 treated (PCB) group, received apocynin with PCB153 treatment (APO + PCB) group, and drug control (APO) group. Serum thyroid hormone levels were evaluated. The morphological change of thyroid tissue was analyzed under the light and transmission electron microscopy. NOX2, 8-OHdG, and NF-κB expression in the thyroid tissue was evaluated by immune-histochemical staining. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were detected. The following results were reduced after apocynin treatment: (1) serum thyroid hormone, (2) thyroid pathological injuries, (3) thyroid MDA, (4) thyroid ultrastructural change, (5) serum inflammatory cytokines, and (6) thyroid expression of NOX2, 8-OHdG, and NF-κB. These results suggested that NOX inhibition attenuates thyroid dysfunction induced by PCB in rats, presumably because of its role in preventing ROS generation and inhibiting the activation of NF-κB pathway. Our findings may provide new therapeutic targets for PCBs induced thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27047545

  7. Induction of interferon and interferon-induced antiviral effector genes following a primary bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Osman, Rahwa; Gonzalez-Cano, Patricia; Brownlie, Robert; Griebel, Philip J

    2017-07-01

    Invitro investigations have identified a variety of mechanisms by which herpesviruses evade interferon-stimulated antiviral effector mechanisms. However, these immune evasion mechanisms have not been evaluated during a bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) infection. This study investigated the transcription and secretion of type I and II interferons (IFNs) and the transcription of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) during a primary BHV-1 infection of the upper respiratory tract (URT) in naïve calves. IFN-α, -β and -γ transcription in nasal turbinates and protein levels in nasal secretions increased following infection. Increased IFN type I and II secretion was detected 3 days post-infection (p.i.) and IFN production increased in parallel with virus shedding. Expression of ISGs, including Mx1, OAS and BST-2, also increased significantly (P<0.05) in nasal turbinates on day 3 p.i. and elevated ISG expression persisted throughout the period of viral shedding. In contrast, RNAase L gene expression was not induced during the BHV-1 infection in the nasal turbinates, but was induced on day 10 p.i. in the trachea. In vitro studies confirmed that recombinant bovine (rBo)IFN-α, -β and -γ induced expression of Mx1, OAS and BST-2, but decreased RNAse L transcript in bovine epithelial cells. Relative to vesicular stomatitisvirus (VSV), BHV-1 was resistant to the antiviral activity of rBoIFN-α and -γ, but treatment of epithelial cells with 10 ng rBoIFN-β ml-1 effected an 80 % inhibition of BHV-1 replication and complete inhibition of VSV replication. These observations confirm that the transcription and translation of type I and II IFNs increase during BHV-1 infection, while the transcription of some ISGs is not inhibited.

  8. Localization of type I interferon receptor limits interferon-induced TLR-3 in epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to expand on the role of type I IFNs in the influenza-induced upregulation of TLR3 and determine whether and how the localization of the IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR) in respiratory epithelial cells could modify IFN-induced responses. Using differentiated prima...

  9. Localization of type I interferon receptor limits interferon-induced TLR-3 in epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to expand on the role of type I IFNs in the influenza-induced upregulation of TLR3 and determine whether and how the localization of the IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR) in respiratory epithelial cells could modify IFN-induced responses. Using differentiated prima...

  10. Effect of Thyroid Function on MNU-Induced Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vermey, Mackenzie L; Marks, Gregory T; Baldridge, Monika G

    2015-06-01

    Mammary cancer is a disease that affects many women. Extensive research has been conducted to elucidate which variables are involved in the development of this cancer. Studies have highlighted thyroid function as a modulator of tumor growth and development. Thyroxine and 3,3',5-triiodothyronine are responsible for regulating the development, differentiation, homeostasis, and metabolism of cells in the body including mammary tissue. Thyroid hormones also have estrogen-like effects on mammary cancer cell growth by regulating the estrogen receptor. The present study was designed to determine whether medically induced hyperthyroidism increases the multiplicity, prevalence, and mammary tumor burden in rats; and to elucidate whether surgically induced hypothyroidism conversely attenuates the rate of mammary cancer cell growth. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups (euthyroid-control, hyperthyroid, and hypothyroid). Hyperthyroidism was induced via oral administration of levothyroxine; whereas, hypothyroidism was induced by thyroidectomy. Mammary carcinogenesis was induced with a single intraperitoneal injection of N-methyl-N-nitrosurea (MNU). Rats were sacrificed at 38 weeks, and the mammary tumors were excised, fixed for histology and analyzed. Analysis included evaluation of malignancy and immunohistochemistry for ER. MNU-induced mammary carcinogenesis among the groups resulted in a significant difference in tumor burden. The hyperthyroid group had a statistically higher tumor burden than did the euthyroid group, and the hypothyroid group had no tumors of mammary tissue origin at 38 weeks. All excised mammary tumors were ER alpha negative. These data support the hypothesis that thyroid function is one of potentially many factors that contribute to modulation of MNU-induced mammary tumor growth.

  11. Interferon-alpha, -beta and -gamma induce CXCL9 and CXCL10 secretion by human thyrocytes: modulation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonists.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Ghiri, Emiliano; Crescioli, Clara; Romagnani, Paola; Vitti, Paolo; Serio, Mario; Ferrannini, Ele

    2010-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that interferon (IFN) alpha and beta cause autoimmune thyroid dysfunctions by changing the Th1/Th2 balance, but the mechanisms involved are not yet known. The aims of this study were: (a) to test the effect of IFNalpha, IFNbeta and IFNgamma on the secretion of the Th1 chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10, in "primary cultures of human thyroid follicular cells" (TFC); (b) to assess the effect of PPARgamma activation on CXCL9 and CXCL10 secretion. In TFC, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were undetectable in the supernatant. IFNgamma, IFNalpha and IFNbeta, dose dependently induced CXCL9 and CXCL10 release. TNFalpha alone had no effect. The combination of each of the IFNs with TNFalpha had a significant synergistic effect on CXCL9 and CXCL10 secretion. Treatment of TFC with rosiglitazone dose dependently inhibited the IFNs-stimulated CXCL9 and CXCL10 release. Compared with IFNalpha and IFNbeta, IFNgamma was the most potent stimulus of CXCL9 and CXCL10 secretion. In conclusion, IFNalpha, IFNbeta, IFNgamma and TNFalpha (synergistically with IFNs) dose-dependently induce the release of CXCL9 and CXCL10 by TFC, suggesting that this process may be related, at least in part, to the appearance of thyroid dysfunction during IFNs therapy. Furthermore, PPARgamma activation partially inhibits this process.

  12. Enhancement of basophil chemotaxis in vitro by virus-induced interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Lett-Brown, M A; Aelvoet, M; Hooks, J J; Georgiades, J A; Thueson, D O; Grant, J A

    1981-01-01

    It is well established that viral infections may precipitate or worsen attacks of bronchial asthma. Furthermore, in symptomatic atopic subjects, the local accumulation of basophils and the production of a basophil chemotactic factor have been reported. We have investigated the effect of cell-free supernates from viral stimulated cultures of human mononuclear cells on the in vitro migration of human basophils. Our results show the presence of a factor in these culture supernates that enhances the migration of basophils toward two separate chemoattractants, a peptide from C5 and a lymphokine. The enhancing activity, while affecting basophil migration, did not change the response of monocytes. The enhancing activity resembled viral-induced interferon when (a) pH 2 stability, (b) heat resistance, (c) trypsin sensitivity, and (d) species-specificity were compared. Finally, the enhancing activity for basophil chemotaxis and the interferon titer were highly correlated in preparations with a 10(4)-fold difference in interferon specific activity. Our studies show that viral-induced interferon can augment the in vitro chemotactic response of basophils. Because mediators present in basophils may be involved in the pathogenesis of immediate hypersensitivity, the modulation of basophil movement by interferon suggests a possible mechanism for the association between viral infections and atopic disorders. PMID:6161946

  13. A developmental switch induced by thyroid hormone: Xenopus laevis metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Furlow, J David; Neff, Eric S

    2006-03-01

    Thyroid hormone induces the complete metamorphosis of anuran tadpoles into juvenile frogs. Arguably, anuran metamorphosis is the most dramatic effect of a hormone in any vertebrate. Recent advances in pharmacology and molecular biology have made the study of this remarkable process in the frog Xenopus laevis attractive to developmental biologists and endocrinologists alike. In particular, the availability of a straightforward transgenesis assay and the near completion of the Xenopus tropicalis genome are enabling significant advances to be made in our understanding of the major remaining problems of metamorphosis: the extraordinary tissue specificity of responses, the precise timing of morphological changes, the degree of cell autonomy of hormone responses and developmental competence. We argue that X. laevis metamorphosis presents an exciting opportunity for understanding the role of thyroid hormone in vertebrate development.

  14. Differences in interferon alpha and beta signaling. Interferon beta selectively induces the interaction of the alpha and betaL subunits of the type I interferon receptor.

    PubMed

    Platanias, L C; Uddin, S; Domanski, P; Colamonici, O R

    1996-09-27

    All Type I interferons (IFNalpha, IFNbeta, IFNomega) bind to the Type I IFN receptor (IFNR) and elicit a common set of signaling events, including activation of the Jak/Stat and IRS pathways. However, IFNbeta selectively induces the association of the alpha subunit of the Type I IFNR with p100, a tyrosyl phosphoprotein, to transduce IFNbeta-specific signals. Using antibodies raised against the different components of the Type I IFNR, we identified p100 as the long form of the beta subunit (betaL subunit) of the Type I IFNR. This was also confirmed in experiments with mouse L-929 cells transfected with truncated forms of betaL. Thus, IFNbeta stimulation of human cells or mouse L-929 transfectants expressing the human alpha and betaL subunits, selectively induces the formation of a signaling complex containing the alpha and betaL subunits of the receptor. The IFNbeta-regulated interaction of the alpha and betaL chains is rapid and transient and follows a similar time course with the tyrosine phosphorylation of these receptor components. These data demonstrate that the signaling specificity for different Type I IFNs is established early in the signaling cascade, at the receptor level, and results from distinct interactions between components of the Type I IFNR.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of interferon resistance mediated by viral-directed inhibition of PKR, the interferon-induced protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Gale, M; Katze, M G

    1998-04-01

    The interferon (IFN)-induced cellular antiviral response is the first line of defense against viral infection within an animal host. In order to establish a productive infection, eukaryotic viruses must first overcome the IFN-induced blocks imposed on viral replication. The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) is a key component mediating the antiviral actions of IFN. This IFN-induced protein kinase can restrict viral replication through its ability to phosphorylate the protein synthesis initiation factor eukaryotic initiation factor-2 alpha-subunit and reduce levels of viral protein synthesis. Viruses, therefore, must block the function of PKR in order to avoid these deleterious antiviral effects associated with PKR activity. Indeed, many viruses have developed effective measures to repress PKR activity during infection. This review will focus primarily on an overview of the different molecular mechanisms employed by these viruses to meet a common goal: the inhibition of PKR function, uncompromised viral protein synthesis, and unrestricted virus replication. The past few years have seen exciting new advances in this area. Rather unexpectedly, this area of research has benefited from the use of the yeast system to study PKR. Other recent advances include studies on PKR regulation by the herpes simplex viruses and data from our laboratory on the medically important hepatitis C viruses. We speculate that IFN is ineffective as a therapeutic agent against hepatitis C virus because the virus can effectively repress PKR function. Finally, we will discuss briefly the future directions of this PKR field.

  16. Interferon-gamma-induced local leukocytoclastic vasculitis at the subcutaneous injection site*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Liu, Juan-Hua; Zhao, Yu-Kun; Luo, Di-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous reactions associated with interferons (IFNs) treatment are either localized or generalized. The most common presentation of localized reactions at IFNs injection site is usually an erythematous patch or plaque. Local leukocytoclastic vasculitis presenting with cutaneous necrosis is extremely rare. We report a 19-year-old man with hepatitis B who had local leukocytoclastic vasculitis induced by interferon-gama injection at the injection site. After changing the injection sites and using the combined treatment of prednisone and colchicine, the previous lesion healed and no other cutaneous lesion occurred. We also made a mini review of such cases.

  17. Thyroid storm induced by trauma due to spear fishing‐gun trident impaction in the neck

    PubMed Central

    Delikoukos, Stylianos; Mantzos, Fotis

    2007-01-01

    A rare case of thyroid storm induced by thyroid gland injury because of penetrating neck trauma is reported. The injury was because of a spear fishing‐gun trident impaction in the neck. The diagnosis of thyroid gland injury was suspected by preoperative clinical examination and established during neck exploration in the theatre. The gland injury led to thyroid storm owing to the rupture of acini and liberation of T4 into the bloodstream. Withdrawal of the impacted trident along with subtotal thyroid lobectomy and repair of soft tissue damage in addition to supported treatments, which corrected the hyperthyroid state, led to uneventful recovery. PMID:17452705

  18. Atherogenic diet induced diabetes mellitus: involvement of thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Hamendra Singh; Kar, Anand

    2007-09-10

    An investigation was made to reveal the possible involvement of thyroid hormones in the progression of diabetes mellitus in response to an atherogenic diet; CCT (4% cholesterol, 1% cholic acid and 0.5% 2-thiouracil). Following the intake of CCT diet for 14 consecutive days a decrease in the serum levels of insulin, both the thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T(3)) and thyroxine (T(4)); hepatic glycogen content, hepatic type-1 iodothyronine 5'-mono-deiodinase (5'D) and serum alpha-amylase activities were observed, while there was an increase in the levels of serum glucose and nitrite and in lipid peroxidation of heart, liver and kidney tissues as well as in serum. However, simultaneous administration of L-thyroxine (500 microg/kg/day, s.c.) to CCT-diet fed animals resulted in the amelioration of all the aforesaid adverse changes including that of serum glucose, insulin, alpha-amylase, hepatic glycogen content and nitrite levels, suggesting the involvement of thyroid hormones in the progression of CCT-diet induced diabetes mellitus.

  19. Gallium uptake in the thyroid gland in amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, M.C.; Dake, M.D.; Okerlund, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Amiodarone is an iodinated antiarrhythmic agent that is effective in the treatment of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. A number of side effects are seen, including pulmonary toxicity and thyroid dysfunction. A patient with both amiodarone-induced pneumonitis and hyperthyroidism who exhibited abnormal gallium activity in the lungs, as well as diffuse gallium uptake in the thyroid gland is presented. The latter has not been previously reported and supports the concept of iodide-induced thyroiditis with gallium uptake reflecting the inflammatory response.

  20. Breaking Tolerance to Thyroid Antigens: Changing Concepts in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity involves loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins in genetically susceptible individuals in association with environmental factors. In central tolerance, intrathymic autoantigen presentation deletes immature T cells with high affinity for autoantigen-derived peptides. Regulatory T cells provide an alternative mechanism to silence autoimmune T cells in the periphery. The TSH receptor (TSHR), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and thyroglobulin (Tg) have unusual properties (“immunogenicity”) that contribute to breaking tolerance, including size, abundance, membrane association, glycosylation, and polymorphisms. Insight into loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins comes from spontaneous and induced animal models: 1) intrathymic expression controls self-tolerance to the TSHR, not TPO or Tg; 2) regulatory T cells are not involved in TSHR self-tolerance and instead control the balance between Graves' disease and thyroiditis; 3) breaking TSHR tolerance involves contributions from major histocompatibility complex molecules (humans and induced mouse models), TSHR polymorphism(s) (humans), and alternative splicing (mice); 4) loss of tolerance to Tg before TPO indicates that greater Tg immunogenicity vs TPO dominates central tolerance expectations; 5) tolerance is induced by thyroid autoantigen administration before autoimmunity is established; 6) interferon-α therapy for hepatitis C infection enhances thyroid autoimmunity in patients with intact immunity; Graves' disease developing after T-cell depletion reflects reconstitution autoimmunity; and 7) most environmental factors (including excess iodine) “reveal,” but do not induce, thyroid autoimmunity. Micro-organisms likely exert their effects via bystander stimulation. Finally, no single mechanism explains the loss of tolerance to thyroid proteins. The goal of inducing self-tolerance to prevent autoimmune thyroid disease will require accurate prediction of at-risk individuals together with an antigen

  1. Excess iodine promotes apoptosis of thyroid follicular epithelial cells by inducing autophagy suppression and is associated with Hashimoto thyroiditis disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengcheng; Wu, Fei; Mao, Chaoming; Wang, Xuefeng; Zheng, Tingting; Bu, Ling; Mou, Xiao; Zhou, Yuepeng; Yuan, Guoyue; Wang, Shengjun; Xiao, Yichuan

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of the autoimmune thyroid disease Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) has increased in recent years, and increasing evidence supports the contribution of excess iodine intake to thyroid disease. In this study, we examined the status of autophagy and apoptosis in thyroid tissues obtained from patients with HT, and we determined the effects of excessive iodine on the autophagy and apoptosis of thyroid follicular cells (TFCs) in an attempt to elucidate the effects of excess iodine on HT development. Our results showed decreases in the autophagy-related protein LC3B-II, and increases in caspase-3 were observed in thyroid tissues from HT patients. Interestingly, the suppression of autophagy activity in TFCs was induced by excess iodine in vitro, and this process is mediated through transforming growth factor-β1 downregulation and activation of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. In addition, excess iodine induced autophagy suppression and enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis of TFCs, which could be rescued by the activation of autophagy. Taken together, our results demonstrated that excess iodine contributed to autophagy suppression and apoptosis of TFCs, which could be important factors predisposing to increased risk of HT development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Type I interferons induce apoptosis by balancing cFLIP and caspase-8 independent of death ligands.

    PubMed

    Apelbaum, Amir; Yarden, Ganit; Warszawski, Shira; Harari, Daniel; Schreiber, Gideon

    2013-02-01

    Interferons induce a pleiotropy of responses through binding the same cell surface receptor. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism driving interferon-induced apoptosis. Using a nonbiased small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen, we show that silencing genes whose products are directly engaged in the initiation of interferon signaling completely abrogate the interferon antiproliferative response. Apoptosis-related genes such as the caspase-8, cFLIP, and DR5 genes specifically interfere with interferon-induced apoptosis, which we found to be independent of the activity of death ligands. The one gene for which silencing resulted in the strongest proapoptotic effect upon interferon signaling is the cFLIP gene, where silencing shortened the time of initiation of apoptosis from days to hours and increased dramatically the population of apoptotic cells. Thus, cFLIP serves as a regulator for interferon-induced apoptosis. A shift over time in the balance between cFLIP and caspase-8 results in downstream caspase activation and apoptosis. While gamma interferon (IFN-γ) also causes caspase-8 upregulation, we suggest that it follows a different path to apoptosis.

  3. Interferoninduced severe thrombocytopenia: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Han, Da-Kang; Lu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of severe thrombocytopenia following pegylated interferon-α 2a (Peg-IFN-α 2a) treatment of hepatitis C virus infection and summarize the clinical characteristics of 16 cases of IFN-α induced severe thrombocytopenia and its immune-mediated mechanism. Discontinuation of IFN-α and early administration of immunosuppressants are the effective therapy for IFN-α induced severe thrombocytopenia. PMID:20238410

  4. Type I Interferons Induce T Regulatory 1 Responses and Restrict Humoral Immunity during Experimental Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Ryan A.; Guthmiller, Jenna J.; Graham, Amy C.; Burke, Bradly E.; Carr, Daniel J.J.

    2016-01-01

    CD4 T cell-dependent antibody responses are essential for limiting Plasmodium parasite replication and the severity of malaria; however, the factors that regulate humoral immunity during highly inflammatory, Th1-biased systemic infections are poorly understood. Using genetic and biochemical approaches, we show that Plasmodium infection-induced type I interferons limit T follicular helper accumulation and constrain anti-malarial humoral immunity. Mechanistically we show that CD4 T cell-intrinsic type I interferon signaling induces T-bet and Blimp-1 expression, thereby promoting T regulatory 1 responses. We further show that the secreted effector cytokines of T regulatory 1 cells, IL-10 and IFN-γ, collaborate to restrict T follicular helper accumulation, limit parasite-specific antibody responses, and diminish parasite control. This circuit of interferon-mediated Blimp-1 induction is also operational during chronic virus infection and can occur independently of IL-2 signaling. Thus, type I interferon-mediated induction of Blimp-1 and subsequent expansion of T regulatory 1 cells represent generalizable features of systemic, inflammatory Th1-biased viral and parasitic infections that are associated with suppression of humoral immunity. PMID:27732671

  5. Interferon alpha-inducible protein 6 regulates NRASQ61K-induced melanomagenesis and growth

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Romi; Forloni, Matteo; Bisserier, Malik; Dogra, Shaillay Kumar; Yang, Qiaohong; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the NRAS oncogene are present in up to 20% of melanoma. Here, we show that interferon alpha-inducible protein 6 (IFI6) is necessary for NRASQ61K-induced transformation and melanoma growth. IFI6 was transcriptionally upregulated by NRASQ61K, and knockdown of IFI6 resulted in DNA replication stress due to dysregulated DNA replication via E2F2. This stress consequentially inhibited cellular transformation and melanoma growth via senescence or apoptosis induction depending on the RB and p53 pathway status of the cells. NRAS-mutant melanoma were significantly more resistant to the cytotoxic effects of DNA replication stress-inducing drugs, and knockdown of IFI6 increased sensitivity to these drugs. Pharmacological inhibition of IFI6 expression by the MEK inhibitor trametinib, when combined with DNA replication stress-inducing drugs, blocked NRAS-mutant melanoma growth. Collectively, we demonstrate that IFI6, via E2F2 regulates DNA replication and melanoma development and growth, and this pathway can be pharmacologically targeted to inhibit NRAS-mutant melanoma. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16432.001 PMID:27608486

  6. Mode of carcinogenic action of pesticides inducing thyroid follicular cell tumors in rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, P M

    1998-01-01

    Of 240 pesticides screened for carcinogenicity by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pesticide Programs, at least 24 (10%) produce thyroid follicular cell tumors in rodents. Thirteen of the thyroid carcinogens also induce liver tumors, mainly in mice, and 9 chemicals produce tumors at other sites. Some mutagenic data are available on all 24 pesticides producing thyroid tumors. Mutagenicity does not seem to be a major determinant in thyroid carcinogenicity, except for possibly acetochlor; evidence is less convincing for ethylene thiourea and etridiazole. Studies on thyroid-pituitary functioning, including indications of thyroid cell growth and/or changes in thyroxine, triiodothyronine, or thyroid-stimulating hormone levels, are available on 19 pesticides. No such antithyroid information is available for etridiazole, N-octyl bicycloheptene dicarboximide, terbutryn, triadimefon, and trifluralin. Of the studied chemicals, only bromacil lacks antithyroid activity under study conditions. Intrathyroidal and extrathyroidal sites of action are found: amitrole, ethylene thiourea, and mancozeb are thyroid peroxidase inhibitors; and acetochlor, clofentezine, fenbuconazole, fipronil, pendimethalin, pentachloronitrobenzene, prodiamine, pyrimethanil, and thiazopyr seem to enhance the hepatic metabolism and excretion of thyroid hormone. Thus, with 12 pesticides that mode of action judgments can be made, 11 disrupt thyroid-pituitary homeostasis only; no chemical is mutagenic only; and acetochlor may have both antithyroid and some mutagenic activity. More information is needed to identify other potential antithyroid modes of thyroid carcinogenic action. PMID:9681970

  7. TIR-Domain-Containing Adaptor-Inducing Interferon-β (TRIF) Mediates Antibacterial Defense during Gram-Negative Pneumonia by Inducing Interferon-x03B3.

    PubMed

    van Lieshout, Miriam H P; Florquin, Sandrine; Vanʼt Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of Gram-negative pneumonia and sepsis. Mice deficient for TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) demonstrate enhanced bacterial growth and dissemination during Klebsiella pneumonia. We show here that the impaired antibacterial defense of TRIF mutant mice is associated with absent interferon (IFN)-x03B3; production in the lungs. IFN-x03B3; production by splenocytes in response to K. pneumoniae in vitro was critically dependent on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), the common TLR adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response gene (MyD88) and TRIF. Reconstitution of TRIF mutant mice with recombinant IFN-x03B3; via the airways reduced bacterial loads in lungs and distant body sites to levels measured in wild-type mice, and partially restored pulmonary cytokine levels. The IFN-x03B3;-induced, improved, enhanced antibacterial response in TRIF mutant mice occurred at the expense of increased hepatocellular injury. These data indicate that TRIF mediates antibacterial defense during Gram-negative pneumonia, at least in part, by inducing IFN-x03B3; at the primary site of infection.

  8. Interferon induced thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA): Analysis and concise review.

    PubMed

    Kundra, Ajay; Wang, Jen Chin

    2017-04-01

    Interferon (IFN) has been associated with development of thrombotic microangiopathy including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). We reviewed literature from the earliest reported association in 1993, to July 2016 and found 68 cases. Analysis of this data shows: (1) Mean age at diagnosis was 47 years (95% CI, 44-50). (2) Majority of cases were seen where IFN was used for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), multiple sclerosis (MS), chronic hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) and one case each for hairy cell leukemia (HCL) and Sezary syndrome. (3) There were no cases reported for polycythemia vera (PV) or lymphoma. (4) Sex distribution was nearly equivalent with the exception in patients with multiple sclerosis where there was female predominance (12 of 16 with reported data). (5) For pooled analysis, the average duration of treatment with IFN before TMA was diagnosed was 40.4 months. (6) Comparative analysis showed that patients with MS required the highest cumulative dose exposure before developing TMA (MS 68.6 months, CML 35.5 months, HCV 30.4 months). (7) Cases of confirmed TTP (where A disintegrin and Metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motif 13: ADAMTS 13 level was measured) showed presence of an inhibitor. (8) In all cases of confirmed TTP, moderate to severe thrombocytopenia was a striking clinical feature at presentation while this was not a consistent finding in all other cases of TMA. (9) Outcome analysis revealed complete remission in 27 (40%), persistent chronic kidney disease (CKD) in 28 (42%) and fatality in 12 patients (18%). (10) Treatment with corticosteroids, plasma exchange and rituximab resulted in durable responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Interferon induced with helicase C domain 1 (IFIH1) and virus-induced autoimmunity: a review.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A

    2010-02-01

    In addition to genetic factors, environmental triggers, including viruses and other pathogens, are thought to play a major role in the development of autoimmune disease. Recent findings have shown that viral-induced autoimmunity is likely to be genetically determined. In large-scale genetic analyses, an association of interferon induced with helicase C domain 1 (IFIH1) gene variants encoding a viral RNA-sensing helicase with susceptibility to several autoimmune diseases was found. To date, the precise role of IFIH1 in pathogenic mechanisms of viral-induced autoimmunity has yet to be fully elucidated. However, recent reports suggest that IFIH1 may play a role in the etiology of type 1 diabetes. Rare IFIH1 alleles have been shown to be protective against diabetes, and their carriage correlates with lower production of this helicase and its functional disruption. In contrast, upregulation of IFIH1 expression by viruses is associated with more severe disease, and could exacerbate the autoimmune process in susceptible individuals.

  10. Pimecrolimus increases the expression of interferon-inducible genes that modulate human coronary artery cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hussner, Janine; Sünwoldt, Juliane; Seibert, Isabell; Gliesche, Daniel G; Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E Meyer

    2016-08-05

    The pharmacodynamics of the loaded compounds defines clinical failure or success of a drug-eluting device. Various limus derivatives have entered clinics due to the observed positive outcome after stent implantation, which is explained by their antiproliferative activity resulting from inhibition of the cytosolic immunophilin FK506-binding protein 12. Although pimecrolimus also binds to this protein, pimecrolimus-eluting stents failed in clinics. However, despite its impact on T lymphocytes little is known about the pharmacodynamics of pimecrolimus in cultured human coronary artery cells. We were able to show that pimecrolimus exerts antiproliferative activity in human smooth muscle and endothelial cells. Furthermore in those cells pimecrolimus induced transcription of interferon-inducible genes which in part are known to modulate cell proliferation. Modulation of gene expression may be part of an interaction between calcineurin, the downstream target of the pimecrolimus/FK506-binding protein 12-complex, and the toll-like receptor 4. In accordance are our findings showing that silencing of toll-like receptor 4 by siRNA in A549 a lung carcinoma cell line reduced the activation of interferon-inducible genes upon pimecrolimus treatment in those cells. Based on our findings we hypothesize that calcineurin inhibition may induce the toll-like receptor 4 mediated activation of type I interferon signaling finally inducing the observed effect in endothelial and smooth muscle cells. The crosstalk of interferon and toll-like receptor signaling may be a molecular mechanism that contributed to the failure of pimecrolimus-eluting stents in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Attenuation of kindling-induced decreases in NT-3 mRNA by thyroid hormone depletion.

    PubMed

    Kim, S Y; Smith, M A; Post, R M; Rosen, J B

    1998-02-01

    The expression of neurotrophins is altered by amygdala kindled seizures. Because thyroid hormone can regulate the transcription of neurotrophins, we asked whether thyroid hormone regulates neurotrophin mRNA expression following amygdala kindling. Rats with electrodes implanted in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala were either depleted of thyroid hormone or given excess thyroid hormone. The rats were then kindled daily until they had one generalized seizure. The brains were removed 4 h after the seizure and processed for in situ hybridization of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) mRNAs. In non-kindled rats, thyroid hormone depletion increased the levels of BDNF mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. NGF and NT-3 mRNA expression was not altered. In addition, thyroid hormone manipulations had no effect on kindling or on kindling-induced BDNF and NGF mRNA. However, the kindling-induced decrease in NT-3 mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer was significantly attenuated by thyroid hormone depletion. These effects were reversed by thyroid hormone replacement. The results indicate that thyroid hormone plays a modulatory role in the seizure-induced changes of NT-3 mRNA expression found in the dentate gyrus.

  12. Chronic Methamphetamine Induces Structural Changes in Frontal Cortex Neurons and Upregulates Type I Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Alice; Flynn, Claudia; Burdo, Tricia H.; Mervis, Ronald F.; Fox, Howard S.

    2008-01-01

    While methamphetamine-induced changes in brain neurotransmitters, their receptors and transporters are well studied; the means by which methamphetamine abuse results in cognitive and behavioral abnormalities is unknown. Here we administered methamphetamine chronically, in doses relevant to recreational usage patterns, to nonhuman primates. Neurostructural analysis revealed decreased dendritic material and loss of spines in frontal lobe neurons. Molecular examination demonstrated that type I interferons (interferon-alpha and -beta) increased in the frontal lobe in response to chronic methamphetamine treatment, in correlation with the neuronal changes. Chronic methamphetamine thus results in significant changes in the primate brain, inducing cytokines and altering neuronal structure, both of which can contribute to functional abnormalities. PMID:18594991

  13. Interferon-induced ISG15 pathway: an ongoing virus–host battle

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Collins, Mark; Hsiang, Tien-Ying; Krug, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon-induced ubiquitin-like protein that is conjugated to target proteins via the sequential action of three enzymes that are also induced by interferon. Unlike ubiquitin, which is highly conserved, the sequence of ISG15 varies between species. ISG15 conjugation inhibits many viruses, and free (unconjugated) ISG15 can also act as an antiviral protein. Here we focus on the antiviral role of ISG15 conjugation and on countermeasures employed by several viruses. The countermeasure by influenza B virus is unique in that it exhibits species-specificity. Only the antiviral activity of human and non-human primate ISG15s can be blocked, providing one possible explanation for the restriction of influenza B virus to humans. PMID:23414970

  14. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis induced by interferon-alpha 2a.

    PubMed

    Kocyigit, P; Akay, B N; Karaosmanoglu, N

    2009-07-01

    Linear Ig A bullous dermatosis (LABD) is an acquired autoimmune subepidermal blistering disorder with linear deposits of IgA along the basement membrane zone. Its cause is unclear, although it appears to have an immune-mediated basis. Idiopathic, systemic disorder-related, and rarely drug-induced forms of LABD have been described. We describe a case of LABD associated with interferon-alpha 2A used for the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma.

  15. Interferon-induced human protein with homology to protein Mx of influenza virus-resistant mice.

    PubMed Central

    Staeheli, P; Haller, O

    1985-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies with specificity for protein Mx (a karyophilic 75,000-dalton protein induced by interferon [IFN] in mouse cells carrying the influenza virus resistance allele Mx+) detected an IFN-induced 80,000-dalton protein in peripheral blood lymphocytes and in fibroblasts of healthy human donors. The human protein, like protein Mx, was induced by IFN-alpha but not by IFN-gamma. Unlike the mouse protein, it was predominantly localized in the cell cytoplasm. Images PMID:3939324

  16. Novel interferon-{lambda}s induce antiproliferative effects in neuroendocrine tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zitzmann, Kathrin; Brand, Stephan; Baehs, Sebastian; Goeke, Burkhard; Meinecke, Jennifer; Spoettl, Gerald; Meyer, Heinrich; Auernhammer, Christoph J. . E-mail: Christoph.Auernhammer@med.uni-muenchen.de

    2006-06-16

    Interferon-{alpha} (IFN-{alpha}) is used for biotherapy of neuroendocrine carcinomas. The interferon-{lambda}s (IL-28A/B and IL-29) are a novel group of interferons. In this study, we investigated the effects of the IFN-{lambda}s IL-28A and IL-29 on human neuroendocrine BON1 tumor cells. Similar to IFN-{alpha}, incubation of BON1 cells with IL-28A (10 ng/ml) and IL-29 (10 ng/ml) induced phosphorylation of STAT1, STAT2, and STAT3, significantly decreased cell numbers in a proliferation assay, and induced apoptosis as demonstrated by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-cleavage, caspase-3-cleavage, and DNA-fragmentation. Stable overexpression of suppressor of cytokine signaling proteins (SOCS1 and SOCS3) completely abolished the aforementioned effects indicating that SOCS proteins act as negative regulators of IFN-{lambda} signaling in BON1 cells. In conclusion, the novel IFN-{lambda}s IL-28A and IL-29 potently induce STAT signaling and antiproliferative effects in neuroendocrine BON1 tumor cells. Thus, IFN-{lambda}s may hint a promising new approach in the antiproliferative therapy of neuroendocrine tumors.

  17. Stimulation of hematopoietic stem cells by interferon inducer in nonhuman primates receiving fractionated total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lvovsky, E.A.; Levine, P.H.; Bengali, Z.; Leiseca, S.A.; Cicmanec, J.L.; Robinson, J.E.; Bautro, N.; Levy, H.B.; Scott, R.M.

    1982-10-01

    Interferon response and hematopoietic stem cells (spleen colony forming units-CFU-S) were studied in rhesus monkeys subjected to fractionated total body irradiation (FTBI). An interferon inducer, a nuclease resistant complex of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid with poly-L-lysine and carboxmethylcellulose(-poly(ICLC)) was used. Poly(ICLC) at 3.75 mg/m/sup 2/ was given I.V. to 7 monkeys, 5 of which, starting 24 hours later, received 50 rad of 4 MV X rays twice a week for 2.5 weeks (total of 250 rad). Another group of 4 monkeys received FTBI only. Although the initial interferon response was similar in both groups treated with poly(ICLC)-800 international units (IU), the animals receiving FTBI showed reduced interferon levels after 100 rad. These animals, however, did not develop the hyporesponsiveness to subsequent poly(ICLC) injections that was observed in non-irradiated monkeys. Stabile interferon response (30-100 IU) in the FTBI group paralleled the prolonged persistence of the drug in their serum. Bone marrow (BM) aspirates from animals receiving FTBI and poly(ICLC) contained more CFU-S per 10/sup 6/ nucleated cells than those treated with poly(ICLC) alone or FTBI alone. FTBI with and without poly(ICLC) led to thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Lower white blood cell (WBC) count was found in irradiated animals treated with poly(ICLC). Partial alopecia was observed in animals receiving poly(ICLC). Two animals--one in the poly(ICLC) and FTBI group and the other receiving FTBI alone, died with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia.

  18. Stimulation of hematopoietic stem cells by interferon inducer in nonhuman primates receiving fractionated total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lvovsky, E.A.; Levine, P.H.; Bengali, Z.; Leiseca, S.A.; Cicmanec, J.L.; Robinson, J.E.; Bautro, N.; Levy, H.B.; Scott, R.M.

    1982-10-01

    Interferon response and hematopoietic stem cells (spleen colony forming units--CFU-S) were studied in rhesus monkeys subjected to fractionated total body irradiation (FTBI). An interferon inducer, a nuclease resistant complex of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid with poly-L-lysine and carboxmethylcellulose(-poly(ICLC)) was used. Poly(ICLC) at 3.75 mg/m/sup 2/ was given I.V. to 7 monkeys, 5 of which, starting 24 hours later, received 50 rad of 4 MV X rays twice a week at 2.5 weeks (total of 250 rad). Another group of 4 monkeys received FTBI only. Although the initial interferon response was similar in both groups treated wih poly(ICLC)--800 international units (IU), the animals that receiving FTBI showed reduced interferon levels after 100 rad. These animals, however, did not develop the hyporesponsiveness to subsequent poly(ICLC) injections that was observed in non-irradiated monkeys. Stabile interferon response (30-100 IU) in the FTBI group paralleled the prolonged persistence of the drug in their serum. Bone marrow (BM) aspirates from animals receiving FTBI and poly(ICLC) contained more CFU-S per 10/sup 6/ nucleated cells than those treated with poly(ICLC) along or FTBI with and without poly(ICLC) lead to thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Lower white blood cell (WBC) count was found in irradiated animals treated with poly(ICLC). Partial alopecia was observed in animals receiving poly(ICLC). Two animals--one in the poly(ICLC) and FTBI group and the other receiving FTBI along, died with thrombocytopenia and leukopenia.

  19. The Envelope Gene of Transmitted HIV-1 Resists a Late Interferon Gamma-Induced Block

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Suzannah J.; Foster, Toshana L.; Busnadiego, Idoia; Aziz, Muhamad Afiq; Hughes, Joseph; Neil, Stuart J. D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I interferon (IFN) signaling engenders an antiviral state that likely plays an important role in constraining HIV-1 transmission and contributes to defining subsequent AIDS pathogenesis. Type II IFN (IFN-γ) also induces an antiviral state but is often primarily considered to be an immunomodulatory cytokine. We report that IFN-γ stimulation can induce an antiviral state that can be both distinct from that of type I interferon and can potently inhibit HIV-1 in primary CD4+ T cells and a number of human cell lines. Strikingly, we find that transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 viruses can resist a late block that is induced by type II IFN, and the use of chimeric IFN-γ-sensitive/resistant viruses indicates that interferon resistance maps to the env gene. Simultaneously, in vitro evolution also revealed that just a single amino acid substitution in the envelope can confer substantial resistance to IFN-mediated inhibition. Thus, the env gene of transmitted HIV-1 confers resistance to a late block that is phenotypically distinct from blocks previously described to be resisted by env and is therefore mediated by unknown IFN-γ-stimulated factor(s) in human CD4+ T cells and cell lines. This important unidentified block could play a key role in constraining HIV-1 transmission. IMPORTANCE The human immune system can hinder invading pathogens through interferon (IFN) signaling. One consequence of this signaling is that cells enter an antiviral state, increasing the levels of hundreds of defenses that can inhibit the replication and spread of viruses. The majority of HIV-1 infections result from a single virus particle (the transmitted/founder) that makes it past these defenses and colonizes the host. Thus, the founder virus is hypothesized to be a relatively interferon-resistant entity. Here, we show that certain HIV-1 envelope genes have the unanticipated ability to resist specific human defenses mediated by different types of interferons. Strikingly, the envelope

  20. Severe duodenal hemorrhage induced by Lugol's solution administered for thyroid crisis treatment.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Mutsuko; Furumoto, Youhei; Watanabe, Naoko; Horiuchi, Takao; Murayama, Minekazu; Kitamura, Mari; Kaneko, Shingo; Inoshita, Seiji; Maruyama, Yasuki; Suenaga, Matsuhiko; Fujita, Hiroshi; Fujiki, Kazuhiko; Yakushiji, Fumiatsu

    2010-01-01

    Lugol's solution is an iodinated agent used for treating thyroid crisis. It is primarily used in diagnostic tests for esophageal diseases. However, Lugol's solution can cause local mucosal injury and hemorrhage. We report, for the first time, a case of 34-year-old man who exhibited severe duodenal hemorrhage induced by Lugol's solution that was used to treat thyroid crisis. The quantity of Lugol's solution used for treating thyroid crisis is much higher than that used for mucosal disease investigation. Clinical practitioners should be aware of gastrointestinal hemorrhage when using Lugol's solution for the treatment of thyroid crisis.

  1. Thyroid iodine content and serum thyroglobulin: cues to the natural history of destruction-induced thyroiditis

    SciTech Connect

    Smallridge, R.C.; De Keyser, F.M.; Van Herle, A.J.; Butkus, N.E.; Wartofsky, L.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-eight patients with destructive thyroiditis were followed to study the natural history of healing of thyroid gland injury. All had sequential measurements of thyroidal iodine (/sup 127/I) content by fluorescent scanning (normal mean, 10.1 mg), 17 had serial serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurements (normal, less than 21 ng/ml), and 13 had perchlorate discharge studies during the recovery phase. Seventeen patients had painful subacute thyroiditis (SAT), 9 had painless thyroiditis with thyrotoxicosis (PTT), and 2 had postpartum thyroiditis with thyrotoxicosis (PPT). Thyroidal iodine content decreased from a mean of 9.8 to a nadir of 3.8 mg in patients with SAT and from 8.5 to a nadir of 3.5 mg in patients with PTT. Mean serum Tg concentrations were highest (approximately 165 ng/ml) in both groups 1-3 months after the onset of symptoms. Abnormalities in both /sup 127/I content and Tg levels persisted for 2 or more yr in some individuals. No patient had detectable Tg antibodies by hemagglutination, but low titers were detected intermittently by sensitive RIA in 5 PTT patients. Microsomal antibodies were positive in only 1 of 16 SAT patients, but in 4 of 7 PTT patients and in both PPT patients. Three patients had positive perchlorate discharge tests (2 of 8 with SAT, 0 of 4 with PTT, and 1 of 1 with PPT). Permanent hypothyroidism occurred in 3 patients (2 with PTT; 1 with SAT and positive antibodies), but did not correlate with perchlorate results. HLA typing and serum immunoglobulin measurements were not useful for predicting the clinical course. These data indicate that several years may be necessary for complete resolution of destructive thyroiditis; many patients have evidence of thyroid injury persisting long after serum thyroid hormone and TSH levels become normal.

  2. Rat p67 GBP is induced by interferon-gamma and isoprenoid-modified in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vestal, D J; Buss, J E; Kelner, G S; Maciejewski, D; Asundi, V K; Maki, R A

    1996-07-16

    The guanylate binding proteins, GBPs, are a family of interferon-induced GTP-binding proteins that include the rat p67. We report here that rat p67, for which interferon regulation had not previously been demonstrated, is induced by IFN-gamma and also by LPS in both cultured bone marrow-derived macrophages and microglia. The basal level of rat p67 in macrophages is low but increases dramatically between 2 and 4 hours after treating cells with either IFN-gamma or LPS. It then remains elevated over the next 24 hours. Rat p67 is isoprenoid modified. The isoprenoid modification was detected in p67 isolated both from primary IFN-gamma-activated macrophages and when the gene for p67 was transfected into COS cells. This is the first demonstration of in vivo prenylation of a GBP. The interferon regulation and prenylation of rat p67 point toward this protein being significant in the functions of both activated macrophages and microglia.

  3. Interferon tau alleviates obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance by regulating macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wei; Kanameni, Srikanth; Chang, Cheng-An; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Safe, Stephen; Bazer, Fuller W; Zhou, Beiyan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic adipose tissue inflammation is a hallmark of obesity-induced insulin resistance and anti-inflammatory agents can benefit patients with obesity-associated syndromes. Currently available type I interferons for therapeutic immunomodulation are accompanied by high cytotoxicity and therefore in this study we have examined anti-inflammatory effects of interferon tau (IFNT), a member of the type I interferon family with low cellular toxicity even at high doses. Using a diet-induced obesity mouse model, we observed enhanced insulin sensitivity in obese mice administered IFNT compared to control mice, which was accompanied by a significant decrease in secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and elevated anti-inflammatory macrophages (M2) in adipose tissue. Further investigations revealed that IFNT is a potent regulator of macrophage activation that favors anti-inflammatory responses as evidenced by activation of associated surface antigens, production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and activation of selective cell signaling pathways. Thus, our study demonstrates, for the first time, that IFNT can significantly mitigate obesity-associated systemic insulin resistance and tissue inflammation by controlling macrophage polarization, and thus IFNT can be a novel bio-therapeutic agent for treating obesity-associated syndromes and type 2 diabetes.

  4. Interferons induce the expression of IFITM1 and IFITM3 and suppress the proliferation of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lau, Samantha Lai-Yee; Yuen, Man-Leuk; Kou, Cecy Ying-Chuck; Au, Ka-Wing; Zhou, Junwei; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing

    2012-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases have been one of the leading killers among the human population worldwide. During the heart development, cardiomyocytes undergo a transition from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth with an unclear underlying mechanism. In this study, we aim to investigate how interferons differentially stimulate the interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) family proteins and further be involved in the process of heart development. The expression levels of three IFITM family members, IFITM1, IFITM2, and IFITM3 were investigated during Sprague-Dawley rat myocardial development and differentiation of H9C2 cardiomyocytes. The effects of interferon-α, -β, and -γ on DNA synthesis in H9C2 cells were also characterized. Up-regulation of IFITM1 and IFITM3 were observed during the heart development of Sprague-Dawley rat and the differentiation of H9C2 cells. Moreover, interferon-α and -β induce the expression of IFITM3 while interferon-γ up-regulates IFITM1. Finally, interferon-α and -β were demonstrated to inhibit DNA synthesis during H9C2 cell differentiation. Our results indicated interferons are potentially involved in the differentiation and cell proliferation during heart development. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Baculovirus-mediated interferon alleviates dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver cirrhosis symptoms in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Nishibe, Y; Kaneko, H; Suzuki, H; Abe, T; Matsuura, Y; Takaku, H

    2008-07-01

    The wild-type baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) infects a range of mammalian cell types in vitro but does not replicate in these cells. The current study investigated the in vivo effect of AcMNPV in the mouse model of liver cirrhosis induced by the mutagen dimethylnitrosamine. Intraperitoneal injection of AcMNPV induced an immune response. The baculovirus was taken up by the liver and spleen where it suppressed liver injury and fibrosis through the induction of interferons. This study presents the first evidence of the feasibility of using baculovirus to treat liver cirrhosis.

  6. Thyroid Hormone T3 Counteracts STZ Induced Diabetes in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Madaro, Luca; Ranieri, Danilo; Lupoi, Lorenzo; Stigliano, Antonio; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Bouchè, Marina; Toscano, Vincenzo; Misiti, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    This study intended to demonstrate that the thyroid hormone T3 counteracts the onset of a Streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes in wild type mice. To test our hypothesis diabetes has been induced in Balb/c male mice by multiple low dose Streptozotocin injection; and a group of mice was contemporaneously injected with T3. After 48 h mice were tested for glucose tolerance test, insulin serum levels and then sacrified. Whole pancreata were utilized for morphological and biochemical analyses, while protein extracts and RNA were utilized for expression analyses of specific molecules. The results showed that islets from T3 treated mice were comparable to age- and sex-matched control, untreated mice in number, shape, dimension, consistency, ultrastructure, insulin and glucagon levels, Tunel positivity and caspases activation, while all the cited parameters and molecules were altered by STZ alone. The T3-induced pro survival effect was associated with a strong increase in phosphorylated Akt. Moreover, T3 administration prevented the STZ-dependent alterations in glucose blood level, both during fasting and after glucose challenge, as well as in insulin serum level. In conclusion we demonstrated that T3 could act as a protective factor against STZ induced diabetes. PMID:21637761

  7. Carbofuran-induced histophysiological changes in thyroid of the teleost fish, Channa punctatus (Bloch)

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, R.N.

    1988-10-01

    The long-term toxic effects of continuous exposure for 6 months, from January to June, to a safe dose (4.5 ppm) of a commercial carbamate pesticide, carbofuran, on the histophysiology of thyroid in adult and young (yearling) Channa punctatus, are described in this investigation. In both the experimental groups, thyroid histology exhibited various abnormalities, including hypertrophy, hyperplasia and degeneration of follicular epithelial cells, and reduction in colloid content. Apart from this, in young experimentals, fibrosis of thyroid components, formation of cystic cellular masses, and rupture of blood vessels resulting in hemorrhage can also be seen and suggest direct action of this pesticide on the thyroid. On the other hand, in both treated groups, retardation of thyroid function was also evidenced by significantly reduced thyroidal radioiodine (/sup 131/I) uptake and CR (conversion ratio of PB/sup 131/I in blood serum in relation to total serum /sup 131/I uptake) values. Apparently, these histopathological and physiological changes were markedly pronounced in young experimentals, suggesting greater susceptibility of this group to chronic toxicity of carbofuran than that of adults. Thus, on the basis of these results, it can be inferred that carbofuran pesticide, which is washed into water systems in small quantities, induces adverse histophysiological alterations in thyroid, in an age- and size-dependent manner, possibly by acting directly on thyroid and/or through the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis, in this species.

  8. Mode of action and human relevance of pronamide-induced rat thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Papineni, Sabitha; Marty, M Sue; Rasoulpour, Reza J; LeBaron, Matthew J; Pottenger, Lynn H; Eisenbrandt, David L

    2015-04-01

    Pronamide, a selective, systemic, pre- and post-emergence herbicide, caused an increased incidence of thyroid follicular cell adenomas in a rat carcinogenicity study. Thyroid tumors, as well as liver and pituitary changes, were limited only to the high-dose group. The evidence for and against specific potential modes of action (MoAs) for rat thyroid follicular cell adenomas and their relevance to humans is discussed. Pronamide is not mutagenic and therefore, direct DNA reactivity is not relevant as a MoA. The hypothesized MoA for this effect is altered homeostasis of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis mediated by the induction of hepatic enzymes, including uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT). Evaluation of data from a series of regulatory guideline and MoA studies aimed at identifying the causative and associated key events supported a UGT-mediated MoA in the development of thyroid follicular tumors. This MoA for pronamide-induced thyroid tumors in rats, which involves increased thyroid hormone metabolism/clearance, altered thyroid hormone homeostasis and HPT stimulation is not considered relevant to humans based on quantitative species differences, making rats markedly more sensitive than humans to thyroid perturbations.

  9. TLR3, TLR4 and TLRs7-9 Induced Interferons Are Not Impaired in Airway and Blood Cells in Well Controlled Asthma.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Annemarie; Edwards, Michael R; Macintyre, Jonathan; Del Rosario, Ajerico; Gielen, Vera; Haas, Jennifer; Kon, Onn Min; McHale, Mark; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2013-01-01

    Defective Rhinovirus induced interferon-β and interferon-λ production has been reported in bronchial epithelial cells from asthmatics but the mechanisms of defective interferon induction in asthma are unknown. Virus infection can induce interferon through Toll like Receptors (TLR)3, TLR7 and TLR8. The role of these TLRs in interferon induction in asthma is unclear. This objective of this study was to measure the type I and III interferon response to TLR in bronchial epithelial cells and peripheral blood cells from atopic asthmatics and non-atopic non-asthmatics. Bronchial epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from atopic asthmatic and non-atopic non-asthmatic subjects were stimulated with agonists to TLR3, TLR4 & TLRs7-9 and type I and III interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin(IL)-6 and IL-8, responses assessed. mRNA expression was analysed by qPCR. Interferon proteins were analysed by ELISA. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were induced by each TLR ligand in both cell types. Ligands to TLR3 and TLR7/8, but not other TLRs, induced interferon-β and interferon-λ in bronchial epithelial cells. The ligand to TLR7/8, but not those to other TLRs, induced only type I interferons in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. No difference was observed in TLR induced interferon or pro-inflammatory cytokine production between asthmatic and non-asthmatic subjects from either cell type. TLR3 and TLR7/8,, stimulation induced interferon in bronchial epithelial cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Interferon induction to TLR agonists was not observed to be different in asthmatics and non-asthmatics.

  10. Dengue virus infection induces interferon-lambda1 to facilitate cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Lin; Wang, Mei-Yi; Ho, Ling-Jun; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2016-01-01

    A marked increase in the rate of dengue virus (DENV) infection has resulted in more than 212 deaths in Taiwan since the beginning of 2015, mostly from fatal outcomes such as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The pathogenic mechanisms of these fatal manifestations are poorly understood. Cytokines induce an overwhelming immune reaction and thus have crucial roles. Interferon-lambda (IFN-λ), a newly identified IFN subtype, has antiviral effects, but its immunologic effects in DENV infection have not been investigated. In the present study, we show that DENV infection preferentially induced production of IFN-λ1 in human dendritic cells (DCs) and human lung epithelial cells. Virus nonstructural 1 (NS1) glycoprotein was responsible for the effect. DENV-induced production of IFN-λ1 was dependent on signaling pathways involving toll-like receptor (TLR)-3, interferon regulation factor (IRF)-3, and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). Blocking interaction between IFN-λ1 and its receptor IFN-λR1 through siRNA interference reduced DENV-induced DC migration towards the chemoattractants CCL19 and CCL21, by inhibiting CCR7 expression. Furthermore, IFN-λ1 itself induced CCR7 expression and DC migration. Our study presents the first evidence of the mechanisms and effects of IFN-λ1 induction in DENV-infected DCs and highlights the role of this cytokine in the immunopathogenesis of DENV infection. PMID:27456172

  11. Stress-induced alterations in interferon production and class II histocompatibility antigen expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Cunnick, J. E.; Armfield, A. V.; Wood, P. G.; Rabin, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    Mild electric foot-shock has been shown to be a stressor that can alter immune responses. Male Lewis rats were exposed to one session of 16 5.0-s 1.6-mA foot-shocks. Production of interferon-gamma by splenocytes in response to concanavalin-A was decreased in spleens from the shocked rats compared to control spleens. Spleen cells from rats treated with nadolol, a peripherally acting beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, and then shocked, showed dose-dependent attenuation of the suppression of interferon-gamma production. This suggests that catecholamines mediate shock-induced suppression of interferon-gamma production. The percentage of splenic mononuclear cells expressing class II histocompatibility (Ia) antigens on their surfaces from spleens of shocked rats was determined by flow cytometry. Significantly decreased class II positive mononuclear cells were present in the spleens of shocked rats in comparison to the spleens of control rats. This may reflect an alteration of cell trafficking or decreased production of class II antigens.

  12. Impact of Low-Level Thyroid Hormone Disruption Induced by Propylthiouracil on Brain Development and Function.*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The critical role of thyroid hormone (TH) in brain development is well established, severe deficiencies leading to significant neurological dysfunction. Much less information is available on more modest perturbations of TH on brain function. The present study induced varying degr...

  13. Impact of Low-Level Thyroid Hormone Disruption Induced by Propylthiouracil on Brain Development and Function.*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The critical role of thyroid hormone (TH) in brain development is well established, severe deficiencies leading to significant neurological dysfunction. Much less information is available on more modest perturbations of TH on brain function. The present study induced varying degr...

  14. Effects of a Model Inducer, Phenobarbital, on Thyroid Hormone Glucuronidation in Rat Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vivo, hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations. This decrease in circulating TH occurs in part through extrathyroidal mechanisms. Specifically, through the induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes...

  15. Effects of a Model Inducer, Phenobarbital, on Thyroid Hormone Glucuronidation in Rat Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vivo, hepatic enzyme inducers such as phenobarbital (PB) decrease circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations. This decrease in circulating TH occurs in part through extrathyroidal mechanisms. Specifically, through the induction of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes...

  16. Gene expression signature discriminates sporadic from post-radiotherapy-induced thyroid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ory, Catherine; Ugolin, Nicolas; Levalois, Céline; Lacroix, Ludovic; Caillou, Bernard; Bidart, Jean-Michel; Schlumberger, Martin; Diallo, Ibrahima; de Vathaire, Florent; Hofman, Paul; Santini, José; Malfoy, Bernard; Chevillard, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Both external and internal exposure to ionizing radiation are strong risk factors for the development of thyroid tumors. Until now, the diagnosis of radiation-induced thyroid tumors has been deduced from a network of arguments taken together with the individual history of radiation exposure. Neither the histological features nor the genetic alterations observed in these tumors have been shown to be specific fingerprints of an exposure to radiation. The aim of our work is to define ionizing radiation-related molecular specificities in a series of secondary thyroid tumors developed in the radiation field of patients treated by radiotherapy. To identify molecular markers that could represent a radiation-induction signature, we compared 25K microarray transcriptome profiles of a learning set of 28 thyroid tumors, which comprised 14 follicular thyroid adenomas (FTA) and 14 papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), either sporadic or consecutive to external radiotherapy in childhood. We identified a signature composed of 322 genes which discriminates radiation-induced tumors (FTA and PTC) from their sporadic counterparts. The robustness of this signature was further confirmed by blind case-by-case classification of an independent set of 29 tumors (16 FTA and 13 PTC). After the histology code break by the clinicians, 26/29 tumors were well classified regarding tumor etiology, 1 was undetermined, and 2 were misclassified. Our results help shed light on radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis, since specific molecular pathways are deregulated in radiation-induced tumors. PMID:21148326

  17. Dissecting Interferon-Induced Transcriptional Programs in Human Peripheral Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Simon J.; Popper, Stephen J.; Rubins, Kathleen H.; Griffiths, Michael J.; Brown, Patrick O.; Levin, Michael; Relman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Interferons are key modulators of the immune system, and are central to the control of many diseases. The response of immune cells to stimuli in complex populations is the product of direct and indirect effects, and of homotypic and heterotypic cell interactions. Dissecting the global transcriptional profiles of immune cell populations may provide insights into this regulatory interplay. The host transcriptional response may also be useful in discriminating between disease states, and in understanding pathophysiology. The transcriptional programs of cell populations in health therefore provide a paradigm for deconvoluting disease-associated gene expression profiles. We used human cDNA microarrays to (1) compare the gene expression programs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) elicited by 6 major mediators of the immune response: interferons α, β, ω and γ, IL12 and TNFα; and (2) characterize the transcriptional responses of purified immune cell populations (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, NK cells and monocytes) to IFNγ stimulation. We defined a highly stereotyped response to type I interferons, while responses to IFNγ and IL12 were largely restricted to a subset of type I interferon-inducible genes. TNFα stimulation resulted in a distinct pattern of gene expression. Cell type-specific transcriptional programs were identified, highlighting the pronounced response of monocytes to IFNγ, and emergent properties associated with IFN-mediated activation of mixed cell populations. This information provides a detailed view of cellular activation by immune mediators, and contributes an interpretive framework for the definition of host immune responses in a variety of disease settings. PMID:20339534

  18. [Safety of pegylated interferon in patients with hepatitis C virus induced cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Gasztonyi, Beáta; Pár, Gabriella; Pár, Alajos; Hunyady, Béla

    2005-11-27

    The authors described their experience with the therapy with pegylated interferon and its safety in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) induced liver cirrhosis treated at First Department of Medicine, Medical School, University of Pécs and at Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates. Twenty four (12 male, 12 female, average: 55.66 +/- 7. 02 years) anti-HCV and/or HCV-RNA PCR positive cirrhotic patients were examined. Liver cirrhosis was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasound and/or histological examination of liver biopsy. Different genotypes of HCV were detected: genotype 1 in 7 cases, genotype 2 in 1 person, genotype 3 in 3 cases. Genotype 4 was detected in 10 patients, all of them were treated out of Hungary. Thirteen of 24 patients were not treated earlier, 6 persons were non-responders to previous interferon monotherapy, pegylated interferon was administered to 5 patients because of relapse. Biochemical parameters showed improvement in 16 cases (16/24, 66.66%), but did not in 5 patients. Until now, virological response was achieved in 13 patients (13/24, 54.16%), while three patients remained HCV-PCR positive. Temporary dose reduction was needed in 13/24 cases (54.16%). Withdrawal of therapy became necessary in only 2 patients due to severe neutropenia, thrombocytopenia and/or signs of decompensation. Pegylated interferon treatment is well tolerated by patients with compensated liver cirrhosis (Child-Pough stage A). Frequent side-effects (half of all cases) were usually mild or moderate requiring discontinuation only in 2 of 24 patients. The incidence of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia emphasizes the need of frequent blood cell count tests and patients follow up.

  19. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shan-shan; Zhao, Yuan-fei; Song, Yong-feng; Xu, Chao; Yang, Jian-mei; Xuan, Shi-meng; Yan, Hui-li; Yu, Chun-xiao; Zhao, Meng; Xu, Jin; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2014-11-01

    Excess dietary fat intake can induce lipotoxicity in non-adipose tissues. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of dietary high-fat lard intake on thyroid in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat lard diet for 24 weeks, and then the rats were fed a normal control diet (acute dietary modification) or the high-fat lard diet for another 6 weeks. The serum lipid profile, total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were determined at the 12, 18, 24 and 30 weeks. High-frequency ultrasound scanning of the thyroid glands was performed at the 24 or 30 weeks. After the rats were sacrificed, the thyroid glands were collected for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. The high-fat lard diet significantly increased triglyceride levels in both the serum and thyroid, and decreased serum TT4 and FT4 levels in parallel with elevated serum TSH levels. Ultrasonic imaging revealed enlarged thyroid glands with lowered echotexture and relatively heterogeneous features in the high-fat lard fed rats. The thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats exhibited enlarged follicle cavities and flattened follicular epithelial cells under light microscopy, and dilated endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, twisted nuclei, fewer microvilli and secretory vesicles under transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats showed markedly low levels of thyroid hormone synthesis-related proteins TTF-1 and NIS. Acute dietary modification by withdrawal of the high-fat lard diet for 6 weeks failed to ameliorate the high-fat lard diet-induced thyroid changes. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces significant thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats, which can not be corrected by short-term dietary modification.

  20. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shan-shan; Zhao, Yuan-fei; Song, Yong-feng; Xu, Chao; Yang, Jian-mei; Xuan, Shi-meng; Yan, Hui-li; Yu, Chun-xiao; Zhao, Meng; Xu, Jin; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Excess dietary fat intake can induce lipotoxicity in non-adipose tissues. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of dietary high-fat lard intake on thyroid in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat lard diet for 24 weeks, and then the rats were fed a normal control diet (acute dietary modification) or the high-fat lard diet for another 6 weeks. The serum lipid profile, total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were determined at the 12, 18, 24 and 30 weeks. High-frequency ultrasound scanning of the thyroid glands was performed at the 24 or 30 weeks. After the rats were sacrificed, the thyroid glands were collected for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results: The high-fat lard diet significantly increased triglyceride levels in both the serum and thyroid, and decreased serum TT4 and FT4 levels in parallel with elevated serum TSH levels. Ultrasonic imaging revealed enlarged thyroid glands with lowered echotexture and relatively heterogeneous features in the high-fat lard fed rats. The thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats exhibited enlarged follicle cavities and flattened follicular epithelial cells under light microscopy, and dilated endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, twisted nuclei, fewer microvilli and secretory vesicles under transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats showed markedly low levels of thyroid hormone synthesis-related proteins TTF-1 and NIS. Acute dietary modification by withdrawal of the high-fat lard diet for 6 weeks failed to ameliorate the high-fat lard diet-induced thyroid changes. Conclusion: Dietary high-fat lard intake induces significant thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats, which can not be corrected by short-term dietary modification. PMID:25263336

  1. MicroRNA-138 enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through interferon-stimulated gene 15 downregulation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chaohui; Sheng, Xinyi; Liu, Zhuo; Ma, Min; Xiong, Shuhan; Deng, Hongyu; Li, Sha; Yang, Darong; Wang, Xiaohong; Xiao, Hua; Quan, Hu; Xia, Man

    2017-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) is a potential target for cancer therapy. However, many cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis and its mechanism is not well understood. In this study, to identify potential therapeutic targets for TRAIL-resistant cancer cells, we compared the expression levels of interferon-stimulated gene 15 in TRAIL-sensitive and TRAIL-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Western blot analysis showed that interferon-stimulated gene 15 expression levels were significantly higher in resistant HLCZ01and Huh7 cells than in sensitive LH86 and SMMC-7721 cells. Interferon-stimulated gene 15 knockdown in resistance cells led to TRAIL sensitivity. Conversely, interferon-stimulated gene 15 overexpression in sensitive cells resulted in TRAIL resistance. Our bioinformatics search detected a putative target sequence for microRNA miR-138 in the 3' untranslated region of the interferon-stimulated gene 15. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that miR-138 was significantly downregulated in TRAIL-resistant cells compared to TRAIL-sensitive cells. Forced expression of miR-138 in resistant cells decreased both messenger RNA and protein levels of interferon-stimulated gene 15, and when exposed to TRAIL, activated poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, indicating sensitization to TRAIL. The results suggested that miR-138 regulates the interferon-stimulated gene 15 expression by directly targeting the 3' untranslated region of interferon-stimulated gene 15 and modulates the sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. MiR-138 may be a target for therapeutic intervention in TRAIL-based drug treatments of resistant hepatocellular carcinoma or could be a biomarker to select patients who may benefit from the treatment.

  2. Resveratrol suppresses thyroid hormone‑induced osteocalcin synthesis in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kazuhiko; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kainuma, Shingo; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Yamamoto, Naohiro; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Harada, Atsushi; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2017-09-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenolic compound that is present in grape skins, berries and red wine, may be beneficial for human health through its anti‑inflammatory and anti‑oxidant effects. It has been previously demonstrated that resveratrol exerts its biological effects primarily via sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activation. We previously reported that triiodothyronine (T3) induces osteocalcin synthesis in osteoblast‑like MC3T3‑E1 cells, and that p38 mitogen‑activated protein (MAP) kinase mediates the T3‑stimulated synthesis of osteocalcin. The present study investigated the effect of resveratrol on T3‑induced osteocalcin synthesis and its underlying mechanism in MC3T3‑E1 cells. Cultured cells were stimulated with T3, and osteocalcin release from MC3T3‑E1 cells was measured by ELISA and phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase was analyzed by western blotting. Resveratrol significantly suppressed the release of osteocalcin stimulated by T3, and SRT1720, a SIRT1 activator, significantly reduced T3‑induced osteocalcin release. The expression level of osteocalcin mRNA stimulated by T3 was significantly attenuated by resveratrol and T3‑induced transactivation activity of the thyroid hormone‑responsive element was significantly diminished by resveratrol. However, only limited effects of resveratrol on the T3‑induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase were observed. The results of the present study demonstrated that resveratrol suppresses T3‑stimulated osteocalcin synthesis at a point upstream of transcription in osteoblasts, and that the inhibitory effect of resveratrol is mediated, at least partially, through SIRT1 activation. These results indicate that there may be a novel role for the polyphenol in the modulation of bone metabolism.

  3. Exogenous iodide ameliorates perchlorate-induced thyroid phenotypes in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Gardell, Alison M; von Hippel, Frank A; Adams, Elise M; Dillon, Danielle M; Petersen, Ann M; Postlethwait, John H; Cresko, William A; Buck, C Loren

    2017-03-01

    Perchlorate is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that has widespread endocrine disrupting effects in vertebrates, including threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). The target of perchlorate is thyroid tissue where it induces changes in the organization, activation, and morphology of thyroid follicles and surrounding tissues. To test the hypothesis that some phenotypes of perchlorate toxicity are not mediated by thyroid hormone, we chronically exposed stickleback beginning at fertilization to perchlorate (10, 30, 100ppm) or control water with and without supplementation of either iodide or thyroxine (T4). Stickleback were sampled across a one-year timespan to identify potential differences in responses to treatment combinations before and after sexual maturation. We found that most thyroid histomorphological phenotypes induced by perchlorate (follicle proliferation, reduced follicle area (adults only), colloid depletion, thyrocyte hypertrophy (subadults only)) were significantly ameliorated by exogenous iodide supplementation. In contrast, treatment with exogenous T4 did not correct any of the thyroid-specific histopathologies induced by perchlorate. Whole-body thyroid hormone concentrations were not significantly affected by perchlorate exposure; however, supplementation with iodide and T4 significantly increased T4 concentrations. This study also revealed an increased erythrocyte area in the thyroid region of perchlorate-exposed adults, while lipid droplet number increased in perchlorate-exposed subadults. Increased erythrocyte area was ameliorated by both iodide and T4, while neither supplement was able to correct lipid droplet number. Our finding on lipid droplets indicates that exposure to perchlorate in early development may have obesogenic effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Iodide-induced thyrotoxicosis in a thyroidectomized patient with metastatic thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshinari, M.; Tokuyama, T.; Okamura, K.; Sato, K.; Kusuda, K.; Fujishima, M.

    1988-04-15

    An unusual case of iodide-induced thyrotoxicosis is documented in this article. The patient was a 64-year-old euthyroid man with acromegaly. He also had multiple follicular and papillary thyroid carcinomas with a metastatic lesion in the lumbar vertebrae. After a total thyroidectomy, he became slightly hypothyroid, and the lumbar lesion began to incorporate /sup 131/I by scintigraphy. When an iodine-containing contrast medium happened to be injected, a transient increase of serum thyroid hormone level was observed. After complete thyroid ablation with 83 mCi of /sup 131/I, the oral administration of 100 mg of potassium iodide for 7 days induced a prominent increase of serum thyroid hormone level. These findings indicated that the metastatic thyroid carcinoma could produce excess thyroid hormone insofar as a sufficient amount of iodide was given. Although this is the first report of such a case, iodide-induced thyrotoxicosis may not be rare in patients with thyroid carcinomas because the Wolff-Chaikoff effect is thought to be lost, and the organic iodinating activity and lysosomal protease activity are well-preserved.

  5. Robust Thyroid Gene Expression and Radioiodine Uptake Induced by Simultaneous Suppression of BRAF V600E and Histone Deacetylase in Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Weiwei; Liu, Rengyun; Zhu, Guangwu; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Context: Use of BRAF V600E inhibitors to restore thyroid iodide-handling gene expression and radioactive iodine (RAI) avidity is an attractive therapeutic strategy for RAI-refractory thyroid cancer, but recent initial clinical responses were modest. Given histone deacetylation at the sodium/iodide symporter promoter by histone deacetylase (HDAC) as a mechanism, simultaneously targeting BRAF V600E and HDAC could be a more effective strategy. Objectives: The objective of the study was to test whether suppressing both BRAF V600E and HDAC could more effectively induce thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells. Research Design: We tested the BRAF V600E inhibitor PLX4032 (vemurafenib) and the HDAC inhibitor SAHA (vorinostat), two major anticancer drugs currently approved for clinical use, in inducing thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells. Results: PLX4032 alone induced a modest expression of thyroid genes and RAI uptake preferentially in thyroid cancer cells harboring BRAF V600E. SAHA showed an effect in a genetic-independent manner in all the cells. A robust synergistic effect on thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake was observed in BRAF V600E-positive thyroid cancer cells when the two inhibitors were simultaneously used. This was dramatically enhanced further by TSH; triple combination of PLX4032, SAHA, and TSH showed the most robust effect on thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in cells harboring BRAF V600E. Abundant sodium/iodide symporter protein expression in thyroid cancer cells under these conditions was confirmed by immunofluorescent microscopy. Conclusions: Simultaneously suppressing BRAF V600E and HDAC, particularly when cotreated with TSH, induced a far more robust expression of thyroid genes and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells than suppressing BRAF V600E alone. Triple combination of PLX4032, SAHA, and TSH is a specific robust regimen to restore RAI avidity in RAI-refractory BRAF V600E-positive thyroid

  6. Importance of interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins and retinoic acid inducible gene I for influenza virus replication: A review.

    PubMed

    Suo, Siqingaowa; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between Influenza viruses and host cells is key to elucidating the pathogenesis of these viruses. Several host factors have been identified that exert antiviral functions; however, influenza viruses continue to replicate utilizing host cell machinery. Herein, we review the mechanisms of action of two host-derived proteins on conferring cellular resistance to the influenza virus; (1) the interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins, 1, 2 and 3, a recently identified family of early restriction factors; and (2) retinoic acid inducible gene I, a key mediator of antiviral immunity. These data may contribute to the design of novel and efficient anti-influenza treatments.

  7. STRAIN ELASTOGRAPHY USING DOBUTAMINE-INDUCED CAROTID ARTERY PULSATION IN CANINE THYROID GLAND.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gahyun; Jeon, Sunghoon; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Kim, Hyunwoo; Yu, Dohyeon; Choi, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease is common in dogs and conventional ultrasonography is a standard diagnostic test for diagnosis and treatment planning. Strain elastography can provide additional information about tissue stiffness noninvasively after applying external or internal compression. However, natural carotid artery pulsations in the canine thyroid gland are too weak to maintain sufficient internal compression force. The objective of the present study was to describe the feasibility of strain elastography for evaluating the canine thyroid gland and the repeatability of dobutamine-induced carotid artery pulsation as an internal compression method. In seven healthy Beagle dogs, strain on each thyroid lobe was induced by external compression using the ultrasound probe and internal compression using carotid artery pulsation after dobutamine infusion. The thyroid appeared homogeneously green and the subcutaneous fat superficial to the thyroid lobe appeared blue. Strain values and strain ratios did not differ among dogs or between the left and right lobes. Interobserver repeatability was excellent for both compression methods. Intraobserver repeatability of the strain ratio measured using the carotid artery pulsation method (intraclass coefficient correlation = 0.933) was higher than that measured using the external compression method (0.760). Mean strain values of thyroid lobes for the external compression method (142.93 ± 6.67) differed from the internal method (147.31 ± 8.24; P < 0.05). Strain ratios between the two methods did not differ. Strain elastography was feasible for estimating thyroid stiffness in dogs. Carotid artery pulsation induced by dobutamine infusion can be used for canine thyroid strain elastography with excellent repeatability. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Spatiotemporally restricted arenavirus replication induces immune surveillance and type I interferon-dependent tumour regression

    PubMed Central

    Kalkavan, Halime; Sharma, Piyush; Kasper, Stefan; Helfrich, Iris; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Gassa, Asmae; Virchow, Isabel; Flatz, Lukas; Brandenburg, Tim; Namineni, Sukumar; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Höchst, Bastian; Knolle, Percy A.; Wollmann, Guido; von Laer, Dorothee; Drexler, Ingo; Rathbun, Jessica; Cannon, Paula M.; Scheu, Stefanie; Bauer, Jens; Chauhan, Jagat; Häussinger, Dieter; Willimsky, Gerald; Löhning, Max; Schadendorf, Dirk; Brandau, Sven; Schuler, Martin; Lang, Philipp A.; Lang, Karl S.

    2017-01-01

    Immune-mediated effector molecules can limit cancer growth, but lack of sustained immune activation in the tumour microenvironment restricts antitumour immunity. New therapeutic approaches that induce a strong and prolonged immune activation would represent a major immunotherapeutic advance. Here we show that the arenaviruses lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the clinically used Junin virus vaccine (Candid#1) preferentially replicate in tumour cells in a variety of murine and human cancer models. Viral replication leads to prolonged local immune activation, rapid regression of localized and metastatic cancers, and long-term disease control. Mechanistically, LCMV induces antitumour immunity, which depends on the recruitment of interferon-producing Ly6C+ monocytes and additionally enhances tumour-specific CD8+ T cells. In comparison with other clinically evaluated oncolytic viruses and to PD-1 blockade, LCMV treatment shows promising antitumoural benefits. In conclusion, therapeutically administered arenavirus replicates in cancer cells and induces tumour regression by enhancing local immune responses. PMID:28248314

  9. Ameliorative effect of resveratrol against fluoride-induced alteration of thyroid function in male wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Chaitali; Pal, Sudipta

    2014-12-01

    Resveratrol (3,4,5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenol and well-known natural antioxidant has been evaluated for its protective effect against fluoride-induced metabolic dysfunctions in rat thyroid gland. Fluoride, the most abundant anions present in groundwater throughout the world, creates a major problem in safe drinking water and causes metabolic, structural, and functional injuries in different organ systems. Sub-acute exposure to sodium fluoride at a dose of 20 mg/kg b.w./day orally to rat for 30 days induces thyroidal dysfunction including suppressed synthetic machinery of the thyroid gland to produce nucleic acids and thyroid hormones, mainly T3 and T4. Other functional changes are alteration of certain metabolic enzyme activities like Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, thyroid peroxidase, and 5,5'-deiodinase. Structural abnormality of thyroid follicles by fluoride intoxication clearly indicates its thyrotoxic manifestation. Resveratrol supplementation in fluoride-exposed animals appreciably prevented metabolic toxicity caused by fluoride and restored both functional status and ultra-structural organization of the thyroid gland towards normalcy. This study first establishes the therapeutic efficacy of resveratrol as a natural antioxidant in thyroprotection against toxic insult caused by fluoride.

  10. Inhibition of STAT3 activity delays obesity-induced thyroid carcinogenesis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Won; Han, Cho Rong; Zhao, Li; Willingham, Mark C; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2016-01-01

    Compelling epidemiologic studies indicate that obesity is a risk factor for many human cancers, including thyroid cancer. In recent decades, the incidence of thyroid cancer has dramatically increased along with a marked rise in obesity prevalence. We previously demonstrated that a high fat diet (HFD) effectively induced the obese phenotype in a mouse model of thyroid cancer (Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice). Moreover, HFD activates the STAT3 signal pathway to promote more aggressive tumor phenotypes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of S3I-201, a specific inhibitor of STAT3 activity, on HFD-induced aggressive cancer progression in the mouse model of thyroid cancer. WT and Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice were treated with HFD together with S3I-201 or vehicle-only as controls. We assessed the effects of S3I-201 on HFD-induced thyroid cancer progression, the leptin-JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway, and key regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). S3I-201 effectively inhibited HFD-induced aberrant activation of STAT3 and its downstream targets to markedly inhibit thyroid tumor growth and to prolong survival. Decreased protein levels of cyclins D1 and B1, cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), CDK6, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein led to the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation in S3I-201-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. Reduced occurrence of vascular invasion and blocking of anaplasia and lung metastasis in thyroid tumors of S3I-201-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice were mediated via decreased expression of vimentin and matrix metalloproteinases, two key effectors of EMT. The present findings suggest that inhibition of the STAT3 activity would be a novel treatment strategy for obesity-induced thyroid cancer. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  11. Infection-induced type I interferons activate CD11b on B-1 cells for subsequent lymph node accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Waffarn, Elizabeth E.; Hastey, Christine J.; Dixit, Neha; Choi, Youn Soo; Cherry, Simon; Kalinke, Ulrich; Simon, Scott I.; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Innate-like B-1a lymphocytes rapidly redistribute to regional mediastinal lymph nodes (MedLN) during influenza infection to generate protective IgM. Here we demonstrate that influenza infection-induced type I interferons directly stimulate body cavity B-1 cells and are a necessary signal required for B-1 cell accumulation in MedLN. Vascular mimetic flow chamber studies show that type I interferons increase ligand-mediated B-1 cell adhesion under shear stress by inducing high-affinity conformation shifts of surface-expressed integrins. In vivo trafficking experiments identify CD11b as the non-redundant, interferon-activated integrin required for B-1 cell accumulation in MedLN. Thus CD11b on B-1 cells senses infection-induced innate signals and facilitates their rapid sequester into secondary lymphoid tissues, thereby regulating the accumulation of polyreactive IgM producers at sites of infection. PMID:26612263

  12. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  13. Carfilzomib potentiates CUDC-101-induced apoptosis in anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lisa; Boufraqech, Myriem; Lake, Ross; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-03-29

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with no effective treatment currently available. Previously, we identified agents active against ATC cells, both in vitro and in vivo, using quantitative high-throughput screening of 3282 clinically approved drugs and small molecules. Here, we report that combining two of these active agents, carfilzomib, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, and CUDC-101, a histone deacetylase and multi-kinase inhibitor, results in increased, synergistic activity in ATC cells. The combination of carfilzomib and CUDC-101 synergistically inhibited cellular proliferation and caused cell death in multiple ATC cell lines harboring various driver mutations observed in human ATC tumors. This increased anti-ATC effect was associated with a synergistically enhanced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased caspase 3/7 activity induced by the drug combination. Mechanistically, treatment with carfilzomib and CUDC-101 increased p21 expression and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase protein cleavage. Our results suggest that combining carfilzomib and CUDC-101 would offer an effective therapeutic strategy to treat ATC.

  14. Tumor necrosis factor alpha acts as an autocrine second signal with gamma interferon to induce nitric oxide in group B streptococcus-treated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Goodrum, K J; Dierksheide, J; Yoder, B J

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide production by mouse macrophages treated with group B streptococci and gamma interferon was inhibited by cytochalasin B or by antibody neutralization of macrophage-derived tumor necrosis factor alpha. Phagocytosis-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha is responsible for group B streptococcus-induced nitric oxide production in interferon-treated macrophages. PMID:7642312

  15. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins promote cytosolic lipopolysaccharide detection by caspase-11.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria is a classical pathogen-associated molecular pattern and a strong inducer of immune responses. While the detection of LPS on the cell surface and in the endosome by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been studied for some time, it has only recently been discovered that LPS can also be sensed in the cytosol of cells by a noncanonical inflammasome pathway, resulting in the activation of the cysteine protease caspase-11. Intriguingly, activation of this pathway requires the production of interferons (IFNs) and the induction of a class of IFN-induced GTPases called guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), which have previously been linked to cell-autonomous killing of intracellular microbes. In this study, we review the recent advances in our understanding of cytosolic LPS sensing and the function of mammalian GBPs.

  16. Aging. Aging-induced type I interferon response at the choroid plexus negatively affects brain function.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; David, Eyal; Castellano, Joseph M; Miller, Omer; Kertser, Alexander; Berkutzki, Tamara; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Bezalel, Dana; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Amit, Ido; Schwartz, Michal

    2014-10-03

    Aging-associated cognitive decline is affected by factors produced inside and outside the brain. By using multiorgan genome-wide analysis of aged mice, we found that the choroid plexus, an interface between the brain and the circulation, shows a type I interferon (IFN-I)-dependent gene expression profile that was also found in aged human brains. In aged mice, this response was induced by brain-derived signals, present in the cerebrospinal fluid. Blocking IFN-I signaling within the aged brain partially restored cognitive function and hippocampal neurogenesis and reestablished IFN-II-dependent choroid plexus activity, which is lost in aging. Our data identify a chronic aging-induced IFN-I signature, often associated with antiviral response, at the brain's choroid plexus and demonstrate its negative influence on brain function, thereby suggesting a target for ameliorating cognitive decline in aging.

  17. Myricetin Induces Apoptosis of Human Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Cells via Mitochondria Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sunhyo; Ha, Tae Kwun; Han, Sang-Hun; Kim, Mi Eun; Jung, Inae; Lee, Hee-Woo; Bae, Sung Kwon; Lee, Jun Sik

    2017-04-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, with an increasing incidence worldwide. Most thyroid cancers are well differentiated and have a favorable outcome. However, undifferentiated thyroid cancers are one of the most lethal human malignancies. Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) accounts for 2% of all thyroid cancers, and its median survival rate is low. ATC is responsible for more than one-third of thyroid cancer-related deaths. Myricetin is a flavonol compound found in walnuts, herbs, and various berries and is known to induce apoptotic death of various types of cancer cells. However, an anticancer effect of myricetin against human anaplastic thyroid cancer (HATCs) cells has not been demonstrated. In the present study, the anticancer effects and mechanism of action of myricetin were examined using SNU-80 HATC cells. SNU-80 HATC cells were treated with various concentrations of myricetin and compared with untreated controls. Myricetin significantly reduced HATC cell proliferation, by approximately 70%. A substantial proportion of dead cells exhibited arrest in the sub-G1 phase. Myricetin also exhibited cytotoxicity and induced DNA condensation in SNU-80 HATC cells in a dose-dependent manner. The mechanism of myricetin-induced cell death involved an increase in the activation of caspase cascades and the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio at a concentration of 100 μM. Myricetin also induced the release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria into the cytosol and altered the mitochondrial membrane potential. Our results indicate that myricetin is a potent inducer of HATC cell death and may thus prove useful in the development of therapeutic agents for HATC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Interleukin-1β, C-x-C motif ligand 10, and interferon-gamma serum levels in mixed cryoglobulinemia with or without autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferri, Clodoveo; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; De Marco, Salvatore; Di Domenicantonio, Andrea; Centanni, Marco; Pupilli, Cinzia; Villa, Erica; Menichetti, Francesco; Fallahi, Poupak

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate serum levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10), and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in a series of patients with "mixed cryoglobulinemia and hepatitis C virus chronic infection" (MC + HCV) in the presence or absence of autoimmune thyroiditis (AT) and to relate them to the clinical phenotype of these patients. Serum IL-1β, IFN-γ, and CXCL10 were assayed in 30 patients with MC + HCV without AT, in 30 patients with MC + HCV and AT, and in 30 sex- and age-matched controls. Cryoglobulinemic patients showed significantly higher mean IL-1β and CXCL10 levels than controls (P < 0.01). Moreover, CXCL10 was significantly increased in patients with AT patients with respect to those without AT (P < 0.01). Serum IFN-γ levels were not significantly higher in MC + HCV patients than in controls. In conclusion, our study demonstrates significantly high serum levels of IL-1β in patients with MC + HCV with and without AT compared with healthy controls. Further, significantly high serum levels of CXCL10 in patients with MC + HCV compared with healthy controls were confirmed, overall in the presence of AT. Moreover, a pathophysiological association between high circulating levels of IL-1β and CXCL10 has been suggested. A possible therapeutic role of the anti-IL-1 receptor antagonist (Anakirna) in MC remains to be evaluated.

  19. Interferon-α and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor cooperatively mediates TRAIL-induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Chaohui; Qiu, Xiaoxin; Liu, Nianli; Yang, Darong; Xia, Man; Liu, Jingshi; Wang, Xiaohong; and others

    2015-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) has recently been recognized to harbor therapeutic potential in the prevention and treatment of HCC, but it remains controversial as to whether IFN-α exerts direct cytotoxicity against HCC. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is overexpressed in HCC and is considered to play a role in hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, we aimed to elucidate the combined effect of a COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, and IFN-α on in vitro growth suppression of HCC using the hepatoma cell line HLCZ01 and the in vivo nude mouse xenotransplantation model using HLCZ01 cells. Treatment with celecoxib and IFN-α synergistically inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptosis was identified by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride and fluorescent staining. IFN-α upregulated the expression of TRAIL, while celecoxib increased the expression of TRAIL receptors. The combined regimen with celecoxib and IFN-α reduced the growth of xenotransplanted HCCs in nude mice. The regulation of IFN-α- and COX-2 inhibitor-induced cell death is impaired in a subset of TRAIL-resistant cells. The molecular mechanisms of HCC cells resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis were explored using molecular biological and immunological methods. Interferon-α and the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib synergistically increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma. These data suggest that IFN-α and celecoxib may offer a novel role with important implications in designing new therapeutics for TRAIL-resistant tumors. - Highlights: ●The cytotoxic effect of TRAIL on a developed HCC HLCZ01 cells infected with HBV. ●IFN-α and celecoxib induced apoptosis in HLCZ01 cells infected with HBV. ●The combined regime reduced the growth of xenotransplanted HCCs in nude mice model.

  20. Interferon gamma immunoreactivity in iris nerve fibres during endotoxin induced uveitis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Yang, P.; de Vos, A. F; Kijlstra, A.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—Previous studies have implied that interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is involved in the pathogenesis of endotoxin induced uveitis (EIU) in the rat. This study investigated the source of IFN-γ in the iris during EIU.
METHODS—Whole mounts of iris were isolated from Lewis rats before and at different times (from 4 hours to 14 days) after foot pad injection of 200 µg Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Immunohistological analysis was performed using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to rat IFN-γ (DB12 and DB13). mAbs specific to monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells and MHC class II were used to asses the inflammatory response in the eye (ED-1, ED-2, and OX-6). An antibody specific to neurofilaments (2H3) was used to stain nerve fibres in the normal iris.
RESULTS—LPS administration induced acute intraocular inflammation, characterised by a massive infiltration of monocytes/macrophages and increased numbers of MHC class II positive cells in the iris. IFN-γ immunoreactive cells were not detected in iris whole mounts of control rats. Strikingly, IFN-γ immunoreactivity was found in fibres from 4 hours until 10 days after LPS injection, with the most intense staining at 48-72 hours. Other DB12 or DB13 positive cells were not detected in the iris. The pattern of DB12 and DB13 staining in the inflamed iris was similar to the 2H3 staining of neurons in the iris of control rats.
CONCLUSION—These results show that systemic LPS administration induces IFN-γ immunoreactivity in iris fibres and suggest that iris nerve fibres may be a source of IFN-γ during EIU. The IFN-γ immunoreactive material in the iris nerve fibres may be identical to neuronal IFN-γ.

 Keywords: endotoxin induced uveitis; cytokines; interferon gamma; rat PMID:9797675

  1. Transcriptional profile of Ki-Ras-induced transformation of thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Roberta; Federico, Antonella; Coppola, Valeria; Pentimalli, Francesca; Berlingieri, Maria Teresa; Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Kruhoffer, Mogens; Orntoft, Torben F; Fusco, Alfredo

    2007-06-01

    In the last years, an increasing number of experiments has provided compelling evidence for a casual role of Ras protein mutations, resulting in their constitutive activation, in thyroid carcinogenesis. However, despite the clear involvement of Ras proteins in thyroid carcinogenesis, the nature of most of the target genes, whose expression is modulated by the Ras-induced signaling pathways and that are ultimately responsible for Ras-induced cellular transformation, remains largely unknown. To analyze Ras-dependent modulation of gene expression in thyroid cells we took advantage of a differentiated rat thyroid cell line, FRTL-5. As a model for Ras-dependent thyroid transformation, we used FRTL-5 cells infected with the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus, carrying the v-Ki-Ras oncogene. The infected cells (FRTL-5 v-Ki-Ras) have lost expression of the thyroid differentiation markers and also are completely transformed. We hybridized two different Affimetrix chips containing probe sets interrogating both known rat genes and ESTs for a total of more than 17,000 sequences using mRNA extracted from FRTL-5 and FRTL-5 v-Ki-Ras cell lines. We identified about 50 genes whose expression was induced and about 40 genes whose expression was downregulated more than 10-fold by Ras. We confirmed the differential expression of many of these genes in FRTL-5 v-Ki-Ras as compared to parental cells by using alternative techniques. Remarkably, we investigated the expression of some of the Ras-regulated genes in human thyroid carcinoma cell lines and tumor samples, our results, therefore, providing a new molecular profile of the genes involved in thyroid neoplastic transformation.

  2. Interferon-β gene transfer induces a strong cytotoxic bystander effect on melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Úrsula A; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Villaverde, Marcela S; Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2015-05-01

    A local gene therapy scheme for the delivery of type I interferons could be an alternative for the treatment of melanoma. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of interferon-β (IFNβ) gene lipofection on tumor cell lines derived from three human cutaneous and four canine mucosal melanomas. The cytotoxicity of human IFNβ gene lipofection resulted higher or equivalent to that of the corresponding addition of the recombinant protein (rhIFNβ) to human cells. IFNβ gene lipofection was not cytotoxic for only one canine melanoma cell line. When cultured as monolayers, three human and three canine IFNβ-lipofected melanoma cell lines displayed a remarkable bystander effect. As spheroids, the same six cell lines were sensitive to IFNβ gene transfer, two displaying a significant multicell resistance phenotype. The effects of conditioned IFNβ-lipofected canine melanoma cell culture media suggested the release of at least one soluble thermolabile cytotoxic factor that could not be detected in human melanoma cells. By using a secretion signal-free truncated human IFNβ, we showed that its intracellular expression was enough to induce cytotoxicity in two human melanoma cell lines. The lower cytoplasmatic levels of reactive oxygen species detected after intracellular IFNβ expression could be related to the resistance displayed by one human melanoma cell line. As IFNβ gene transfer was effective against most of the assayed melanomas in a way not limited by relatively low lipofection efficiencies, the clinical potential of this approach is strongly supported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The interferon-inducible HIN-200 gene family in apoptosis and inflammation: implication for autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mondini, Michele; Costa, Silvia; Sponza, Simone; Gugliesi, Francesca; Gariglio, Marisa; Landolfo, Santo

    2010-04-01

    The Ifi-200/HIN-200 gene family encodes highly homologous human (IFI16, myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen, absent in melanoma 2, and IFIX) and murine proteins (Ifi202a, Ifi202b, Ifi203, Ifi204, Ifi205, and Ifi206), which are induced by type I and II interferons (IFN). These proteins have been described as regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation and, more recently, several reports have suggested their involvement in both apoptotic and inflammatory processes. The relevance of HIN-200 proteins in human disease is beginning to be clarified, and emerging experimental data indicate their role in autoimmunity. Autoimmune disorders are sustained by perpetual activation of inflammatory process and a link between autoimmunity and apoptosis has been clearly established. Moreover, the interferon system is now considered as a key player in autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythemathosus, systemic sclerosis, and Sjögren's syndrome, and it is therefore conceivable to hypothesize that HIN-200 may be among the pivotal mediators of IFN activity in autoimmune disease. In particular, the participation of HIN-200 proteins in apoptosis and inflammation could support their potential role in autoimmunity.

  4. TIR Domain-Containing Adapter-Inducing Beta Interferon (TRIF) Mediates Immunological Memory against Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Termini, J. M.; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Ruiz, Jose; Arditi, Moshe; Schesser, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Induction of adaptive immunity leads to the establishment of immunological memory; however, how innate immunity regulates memory T cell function remains obscure. Here we show a previously undefined mechanism in which innate and adaptive immunity are linked by TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF) during establishment and reactivation of memory T cells against Gram-negative enteropathogens. Absence of TRIF in macrophages (Mϕs) but not dendritic cells led to a predominant generation of CD4+ central memory T cells that express IL-17 during enteric bacterial infection in mice. TRIF-dependent type I interferon (IFN) signaling in T cells was essential to Th1 lineage differentiation and reactivation of memory T cells. TRIF activated memory T cells to facilitate local neutrophil influx and enhance bacterial elimination. These results highlight the importance of TRIF as a mediator of the innate and adaptive immune interactions in achieving the protective properties of memory immunity against Gram-negative bacteria and suggest TRIF as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26351279

  5. TIR Domain-Containing Adapter-Inducing Beta Interferon (TRIF) Mediates Immunological Memory against Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Termini, J M; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Ruiz, Jose; Arditi, Moshe; Schesser, Kurt; Fukata, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Induction of adaptive immunity leads to the establishment of immunological memory; however, how innate immunity regulates memory T cell function remains obscure. Here we show a previously undefined mechanism in which innate and adaptive immunity are linked by TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF) during establishment and reactivation of memory T cells against Gram-negative enteropathogens. Absence of TRIF in macrophages (Mϕs) but not dendritic cells led to a predominant generation of CD4(+) central memory T cells that express IL-17 during enteric bacterial infection in mice. TRIF-dependent type I interferon (IFN) signaling in T cells was essential to Th1 lineage differentiation and reactivation of memory T cells. TRIF activated memory T cells to facilitate local neutrophil influx and enhance bacterial elimination. These results highlight the importance of TRIF as a mediator of the innate and adaptive immune interactions in achieving the protective properties of memory immunity against Gram-negative bacteria and suggest TRIF as a potential therapeutic target.

  6. [Thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yuji

    2012-03-01

    The thyroid glands are a vulnerable organ to ionizing radiation. Indeed the epidemiological studies have revealed an increase in the incidences of thyroid cancer among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and radiation casualties in Chernobyl. The carcinogenic risk for the thyroids is dependent on radiation dose, and higher in younger people. Recent advances in molecular biology contribute to clarify the mechanisms for thyroid carcinogenesis at genetic and molecular levels. Here radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis is reviewed from epidemiological data to basic research.

  7. Plasma exchange in the treatment of thyroid storm secondary to type II amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling; Zainudin, Sueziani Binte; Kaushik, Manish; Khor, Li Yan; Chng, Chiaw Ling

    2016-01-01

    Type II amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) is an uncommon cause of thyroid storm. Due to the rarity of the condition, little is known about the role of plasma exchange in the treatment of severe AIT. A 56-year-old male presented with thyroid storm 2months following cessation of amiodarone. Despite conventional treatment, his condition deteriorated. He underwent two cycles of plasma exchange, which successfully controlled the severe hyperthyroidism. The thyroid hormone levels continued to fall up to 10h following plasma exchange. He subsequently underwent emergency total thyroidectomy and the histology of thyroid gland confirmed type II AIT. Management of thyroid storm secondary to type II AIT can be challenging as patients may not respond to conventional treatments, and thyroid storm may be more harmful in AIT patients owing to the underlying cardiac disease. If used appropriately, plasma exchange can effectively reduce circulating hormones, to allow stabilisation of patients in preparation for emergency thyroidectomy. Type II AIT is an uncommon cause of thyroid storm and may not respond well to conventional thyroid storm treatment.Prompt diagnosis and therapy are important, as patients may deteriorate rapidly.Plasma exchange can be used as an effective bridging therapy to emergency thyroidectomy.This case shows that in type II AIT, each cycle of plasma exchange can potentially lower free triiodothyronine levels for 10h.Important factors to consider when planning plasma exchange as a treatment for thyroid storm include timing of each session, type of exchange fluid to be used and timing of surgery.

  8. Plasma exchange in the treatment of thyroid storm secondary to type II amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Zainudin, Sueziani Binte; Kaushik, Manish; Khor, Li Yan; Chng, Chiaw Ling

    2016-01-01

    Summary Type II amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) is an uncommon cause of thyroid storm. Due to the rarity of the condition, little is known about the role of plasma exchange in the treatment of severe AIT. A 56-year-old male presented with thyroid storm 2months following cessation of amiodarone. Despite conventional treatment, his condition deteriorated. He underwent two cycles of plasma exchange, which successfully controlled the severe hyperthyroidism. The thyroid hormone levels continued to fall up to 10h following plasma exchange. He subsequently underwent emergency total thyroidectomy and the histology of thyroid gland confirmed type II AIT. Management of thyroid storm secondary to type II AIT can be challenging as patients may not respond to conventional treatments, and thyroid storm may be more harmful in AIT patients owing to the underlying cardiac disease. If used appropriately, plasma exchange can effectively reduce circulating hormones, to allow stabilisation of patients in preparation for emergency thyroidectomy. Learning points Type II AIT is an uncommon cause of thyroid storm and may not respond well to conventional thyroid storm treatment. Prompt diagnosis and therapy are important, as patients may deteriorate rapidly. Plasma exchange can be used as an effective bridging therapy to emergency thyroidectomy. This case shows that in type II AIT, each cycle of plasma exchange can potentially lower free triiodothyronine levels for 10h. Important factors to consider when planning plasma exchange as a treatment for thyroid storm include timing of each session, type of exchange fluid to be used and timing of surgery. PMID:27398220

  9. Thyroid expression of an A2 adenosine receptor transgene induces thyroid hyperplasia and hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Ledent, C; Dumont, J E; Vassart, G; Parmentier, M

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is the major intracellular second messenger of thyrotropin (TSH) action on thyroid cells. It stimulates growth as well as the function and differentiation of cultured thyrocytes. The adenosine A2 receptor, which activates adenylyl cyclase via coupling to the stimulating G protein (Gs), has been shown to promote constitutive activation of the cAMP cascade when transfected into various cell types. In order to test whether the A2 receptor was able to function similarly in vivo and to investigate the possible consequences of permanent adenylyl cyclase activation in thyroid cells, lines of transgenic mice were generated expressing the canine A2 adenosine receptor under control of the bovine thyroglobulin gene promoter. Thyroid-specific expression of the A2 adenosine receptor transgene promoted gland hyperplasia and severe hyperthyroidism causing premature death of the animals. The resulting goitre represents a model of hyperfunctioning adenomas: it demonstrates that constitutive activation of the cAMP cascade in such differentiated epithelial cells is sufficient to stimulate autonomous and uncontrolled function and growth. Images PMID:1371462

  10. [Non-autoimmune thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Leonardo F L; Mana, Daniela L; Bruno, Oscar D

    2014-01-01

    The term thyroiditis comprises a group of thyroid diseases characterized by the presence of inflammation, including autoimmune and non-autoimmune entities. It may manifest as an acute illness with severe thyroid pain (subacute thyroiditis and infectious thyroiditis), and conditions in which the inflammation is not clinically evident evolving without pain and presenting primarily thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter (drug-induced thyroiditis and Riedel thyroiditis). The aim of this review is to provide an updated approach on non-autoimmune thyroiditis and its clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  11. Plasma Interferon-Gamma-Inducible Protein 10 Level Associates With Abnormal Memory B Cells Phenotypes in Perinatal HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Contreras, German A; Murphy, James R; Heresi, Gloria P

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate for perinatally HIV-infected children and adolescents receiving combined antiretroviral therapy and in good clinical status with respect to HIV disease that high concentrations of interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 associate with increased exhausted memory B cells.

  12. Lectins as inducers of interferon-gamma production in human lymphocytes: lentil lectin is highly efficient.

    PubMed

    Rönnblom, L; Funa, K; Ersson, B; Alm, G V

    1982-10-01

    Several of many tested plant lectins induced interferon (IFN) production in cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes (PBL). The mannose-binding lectin obtained from Lens culinaris (LCL) was a particularly efficient inducer of trypsin-sensitive antiviral activity, which qualified as IFN-gamma because it was 90-95% destroyed by pH 2 treatment but not neutralized by anti-IFN-gamma antibodies. However, such antibodies neutralized the residual 5-10% pH 2-resistant IFN, which therefore represented IFN-alpha. Further evidence for the IFN-gamma nature of the LCL-induced IFN was that its production in PBL cultures required both T lymphocytes and macrophages and that its induction of antiviral resistance in human amnion cells was significantly delayed compared with IFN-alpha. Under optimal conditions LCL induced titres of IFN-gamma corresponding to more than 20,000 IFN-alpha units/ml medium, higher than observed with other tested, established IFN-gamma inducers. Other desirable properties of this lectin, as discussed, also suggest that it will be of value for efficient large-scale IFN-gamma production.

  13. Ikkepsilon regulates viral-induced interferon regulatory factor-3 activation via a redox-sensitive pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Indukuri, Hemalatha; Castro, Shawn M.; Liao, S.-M.; Feeney, Lee Ann; Dorsch, Marion; Coyle, Anthony J.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Brasier, Allan R.; Casola, Antonella . E-mail: ancasola@utmb.edu

    2006-09-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced chemokine gene expression occurs through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF)-3. In this study, we have investigated the signaling pathway leading to RSV-induced IRF-3 activation and whether it is mediated by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Our results show that RSV infection induces expression and catalytic activity of IKK{epsilon}, a noncanonical IKK-like kinase. Expression of a kinase-inactive IKK{epsilon} blocks RSV-induced IRF-3 serine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and DNA-binding, leading to inhibition of RANTES gene transcription, mRNA expression and protein synthesis. Treatment of alveolar epithelial cells with antioxidants or with NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors abrogates RSV-induced chemokine secretion, IRF-3 phosphorylation and IKK{epsilon} induction, indicating that ROS generation plays a fundamental role in the signaling pathway leading to IRF-3 activation, therefore, identifying a novel molecular target for the development of strategies aimed to modify the inflammatory response associated with RSV infection of the lung.

  14. Induction of T(4) UDP-GT activity, serum thyroid stimulating hormone, and thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice treated with microsomal enzyme inducers.

    PubMed

    Hood, Alan; Allen, Marcia L; Liu, YaPing; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2003-04-01

    The microsomal enzyme inducers phenobarbital (PB), pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), and Aroclor 1254 (PCB) are known to induce thyroxine (T(4)) glucuronidation and reduce serum T(4) concentrations in rats. Also, microsomal enzyme inducers that increase serum TSH (i.e., PB and PCN) also increase thyroid follicular cell proliferation in rats. Little is known about the effects of these microsomal enzyme inducers on T(4) glucuronidation, serum thyroid hormone concentrations, serum TSH, and thyroid gland growth in mice. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that microsomal enzyme inducers induce T(4) UDP-GT activity, resulting in reduced serum T(4) concentrations, as well as increased serum TSH and thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice. B6C3F male mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing PB (600, 1200, 1800, or 2400 ppm), PCN (250, 500, 1000, or 2000 ppm), 3MC (62.5, 125, 250, or 500 ppm), or PCB (10, 30, 100, or 300 ppm) for 21 days. All four inducers increased liver weight and hepatic microsomal UDP-GT activity toward chloramphenicol, alpha-naphthol, and T(4). PB and PCB decreased serum total T(4), but PCN and 3MC did not. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone was markedly increased by PCN and 3MC treatments, and slightly increased by PB and PCB treatments. All four microsomal enzyme inducers dramatically increased thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice. The findings suggest that PB, PCN, 3MC, and PCB disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis in mice.

  15. Interferon-induced protein Ifit2 protects mice from infection of the peripheral nervous system by vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Fensterl, Volker; Wetzel, Jaime L; Sen, Ganes C

    2014-09-01

    The interferon system provides the first line of host defense against virus infection. Mouse pathogenesis studies have revealed the importance of specific interferon-induced proteins in providing protection against specific viruses. We have previously reported that one such protein, Ifit2, protects neurons of the central nervous system from intranasal infection by the neurotropic rhabdovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Here, we demonstrate that Ifit2 protects the peripheral nervous system from VSV infection as well. In Ifit2(-/-) mice, VSV, injected subcutaneously into the footpad, entered the proximal lymph node, where it replicated and infected the nodal nerve endings. The infection spread to the sciatic nerve, the spinal cord, and the brain, causing paralysis. In contrast, in the wild-type mice, although VSV replicated equally well in the lymph node, infection of the sciatic nerve and the rest of the nervous system was impaired, thus preventing paralysis. Ifit2 protected only the nervous system from VSV infection; other tissues were well protected even in Ifit2(-/-) mice. These results indicate that Ifit2 is the interferon-induced protein that prevents VSV infection of neurons of both the peripheral and the central nervous systems, thus inhibiting the consequent neuropathy, but it is dispensable for protecting the cells of other tissues from VSV infection. Although viral infection is quite common, the immune system effectively protects us from viral diseases. A major part of this protection is mediated by interferon, the antiviral cytokine secreted by virus-infected cells. To empower the neighboring uninfected cells in combating the oncoming infection, interferon induces the synthesis of more than 200 new proteins, many of which have antiviral activities. The virus studied here, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), like its relative, rabies virus, can cause neuropathy in mice if it enters the peripheral nervous system through skin lesions; however

  16. Secreted Interferon-Inducible Factors Restrict Hepatitis B and C Virus Entry In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoming; Blossey, Christoph K.; Wisskirchen, Karin; Esser, Knud; Protzer, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Interferon-α (IFN-α) has been used for more than 20 years as the first-line therapy for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, because it has a number of antiviral effects. In this study, we describe a novel mode of its antiviral action. We demonstrate that the supernatant from IFN-α-treated cultured cells restricted HBV and HCV infection by inhibiting viral entry into hepatoma cells. The factors contained in the supernatant competed with the virus for binding to heparan glycosaminoglycans—the nonspecific attachment step shared by HBV and HCV. Secreted factors of high molecular mass that bind to heparin columns elicited the antiviral effect. In conclusion, IFN-α is able to induce soluble factors that can bind to heparan glycosaminoglycans thus leading to the inhibition of viral binding. PMID:28367455

  17. GTPase properties of the interferon-induced human guanylate-binding protein 2.

    PubMed

    Neun, R; Richter, M F; Staeheli, P; Schwemmle, M

    1996-07-15

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were originally described as proteins that are strongly induced by interferons and are capable of binding to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides. hGBP1, the first of two members of this protein family in humans, was recently shown to represent a novel type of GTPase that hydrolyzes GTP predominantly to GMP. We now report that purified recombinant hGBP2 also hydrolyzes GTP very efficiently, although GDP rather than GMP was the major reaction product. The biochemical parameters of this reaction were as follows: Km = 313 microM, turnover number = 22 min-1. Both hGBP1 and hGBP2 failed to hydrolyze GDP, however, GDP was an effective inhibitor of the hGBP2- but not the hGBP1-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis reaction. Thus, hGBP1 and hGBP2 have similar biochemical properties, but show pronounced differences in product specificity.

  18. Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1) is required for the progression of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phi, Lan Thi Hanh; Kim, Hyungjoo; Baek, Moo Jun; Jeong, Dongjun; Kwon, Hyog Young

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1) has been shown to be implicated in multiple cancers, yet little is known about biological significance of IFITM1 in colorectal cancer. Here, we show that IFITM1 is highly expressed in metastatic colorectal cancer cell lines as well as colorectal patient-derived tumor samples, and its expression is associated with a poor prognosis of the disease. Also, IFITM1 depletion resulted in a significant reduction in the mobility of cancer cell lines, whereas ectopic expression of IFITM1 promoted the migration of cancer cells. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) signature was dysregulated by both loss and gain of function of IFITM1, which was partially reverted by Caveolin-1 (CAV1). Therefore, these results suggest that IFITM1 may be a prognostic marker and an attractive target to achieve better therapeutic outcomes in colorectal cancer. PMID:27852071

  19. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  20. Cyclic di-AMP Released from Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Induces a Macrophage Type I Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Gries, Casey M.; Bruger, Eric L.; Moormeier, Derek E.; Scherr, Tyler D.; Waters, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of community- and nosocomial-acquired infections, with a propensity for biofilm formation. S. aureus biofilms actively skew the host immune response toward an anti-inflammatory state; however, the biofilm effector molecules and the mechanism(s) of action responsible for this phenomenon remain to be fully defined. The essential bacterial second messenger cyclic diadenylate monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is an emerging pathogen-associated molecular pattern during intracellular bacterial infections, as c-di-AMP secretion into the infected host cytosol induces a robust type I interferon (IFN) response. Type I IFNs have the potential to exacerbate infectious outcomes by promoting anti-inflammatory effects; however, the type I IFN response to S. aureus biofilms is unknown. Additionally, while several intracellular proteins function as c-di-AMP receptors in S. aureus, it has yet to be determined if any extracellular role for c-di-AMP exists and its release during biofilm formation has not yet been demonstrated. This study examined the possibility that c-di-AMP released during S. aureus biofilm growth polarizes macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory phenotype via type I interferon signaling. DacA, the enzyme responsible for c-di-AMP synthesis in S. aureus, was highly expressed during biofilm growth, and 30 to 50% of total c-di-AMP produced from S. aureus biofilm was released extracellularly due to autolytic activity. S. aureus biofilm c-di-AMP release induced macrophage type I IFN expression via a STING-dependent pathway and promoted S. aureus intracellular survival in macrophages. These findings identify c-di-AMP as another mechanism for how S. aureus biofilms promote macrophage anti-inflammatory activity, which likely contributes to biofilm persistence. PMID:27736778

  1. MX2 is an interferon-induced inhibitor of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kane, Melissa; Yadav, Shalini S; Bitzegeio, Julia; Kutluay, Sebla B; Zang, Trinity; Wilson, Sam J; Schoggins, John W; Rice, Charles M; Yamashita, Masahiro; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2013-10-24

    HIV-1 replication can be inhibited by type I interferon (IFN), and the expression of a number of gene products with anti-HIV-1 activity is induced by type I IFN. However, none of the known antiretroviral proteins can account for the ability of type I IFN to inhibit early, preintegration phases of the HIV-1 replication cycle in human cells. Here, by comparing gene expression profiles in cell lines that differ in their ability to support the inhibitory action of IFN-α at early steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle, we identify myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) as an interferon-induced inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. Expression of MX2 reduces permissiveness to a variety of lentiviruses, whereas depletion of MX2 using RNA interference reduces the anti-HIV-1 potency of IFN-α. HIV-1 reverse transcription proceeds normally in MX2-expressing cells, but 2-long terminal repeat circular forms of HIV-1 DNA are less abundant, suggesting that MX2 inhibits HIV-1 nuclear import, or destabilizes nuclear HIV-1 DNA. Consistent with this notion, mutations in the HIV-1 capsid protein that are known, or suspected, to alter the nuclear import pathways used by HIV-1 confer resistance to MX2, whereas preventing cell division increases MX2 potency. Overall, these findings indicate that MX2 is an effector of the anti-HIV-1 activity of type-I IFN, and suggest that MX2 inhibits HIV-1 infection by inhibiting capsid-dependent nuclear import of subviral complexes.

  2. Identification and characterization of interferon-induced proteins that inhibit alphavirus replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yugen; Burke, Crystal W; Ryman, Kate D; Klimstra, William B

    2007-10-01

    Alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) produces antiviral effects through upregulation of many interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) whose protein products are effectors of the antiviral state. Previous data from our laboratory have shown that IFN-alpha/beta can limit Sindbis virus (SB) replication through protein kinase R (PKR)-dependent and PKR-independent mechanisms and that one PKR-independent mechanism inhibits translation of the infecting virus genome (K. D. Ryman et al., J. Virol. 79:1487-1499, 2005). Further, using Affymetrix microarray technology, we identified 44 genes as candidates for PKR/RNase L-independent IFN-induced antiviral activities. In the current studies, we have begun analyzing these gene products for antialphavirus activity using three techniques: (i) overexpression of the protein from SB vectors and assessment of virulence attenuation in mice; (ii) overexpression of the proteins in a stable tetracycline-inducible murine fibroblast culture system and assessment of effects upon SB replication; and (iii) small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of gene mRNA in fibroblast cultures followed by SB replication assessment as above. Tested proteins included those we hypothesized had potential to affect virus genome translation and included murine ISG20, ISG15, the zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP), viperin, p56, p54, and p49. Interestingly, the pattern of antiviral activity for some gene products was different between in vitro and in vivo assays. Viperin and ZAP attenuated virulence most profoundly in mice. However, ISG20 and ZAP potently inhibited SB replication in vitro, whereas and viperin, p56, and ISG15 exhibited modest replication inhibition in vitro. In contrast, p54 and p49 had little to no effect in any assay.

  3. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  4. C7L family of poxvirus host range genes inhibits antiviral activities induced by type I interferons and interferon regulatory factor 1.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Schoggins, John; Rose, Lloyd; Cao, Jingxin; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M; Xiang, Yan

    2012-04-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) K1L and C7L function equivalently in many mammalian cells to support VACV replication and antagonize antiviral activities induced by type I interferons (IFNs). While K1L is limited to orthopoxviruses, genes that are homologous to C7L are found in diverse mammalian poxviruses. In this study, we showed that the C7L homologues from sheeppox virus and swinepox virus could rescue the replication defect of a VACV mutant deleted of both K1L and C7L (vK1L(-)C7L(-)). Interestingly, the sheeppox virus C7L homologue could rescue the replication of vK1L(-)C7L(-) in human HeLa cells but not in murine 3T3 and LA-4 cells, in contrast to all other C7L homologues. Replacing amino acids 134 and 135 of the sheeppox virus C7L homologue, however, made it functional in the two murine cell lines, suggesting that these two residues are critical for antagonizing a putative host restriction factor which has some subtle sequence variation in human and murine cells. Furthermore, the C7L family of host range genes from diverse mammalian poxviruses were all capable of antagonizing type I IFN-induced antiviral activities against VACV. Screening of a library of more than 350 IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) identified interferon-regulated factor 1 (IRF1) as an inhibitor of vK1L(-)C7L(-) but not wild-type VACV. Expression of either K1L or C7L, however, rendered vK1L(-)C7L(-) resistant to IRF1-induced antiviral activities. Altogether, our data show that K1L and C7L antagonize IRF1-induced antiviral activities and that the host modulation function of C7L is evolutionally conserved in all poxviruses that can readily replicate in tissue-cultured mammalian cells.

  5. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction--clinical picture. Study on 215 cases.

    PubMed

    Preda, Cristina; Aprotosoaie, Ana Clara; Petris, A; Costache, Irina Iuliana

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and the clinical-evolutionary implications of thyroid damage in patients treated with amiodarone in the Cardiology Clinic of the "Sf. Spiridon" University Hospital of Iasi. The study included a group of 215 patients, 90 men and 125 women with ages between 35 and 87, hospitalized in the Cardiology Clinic between 2004 and 2014, who received amiodarone treatment, in most cases for the prophylaxis of various arrhythmias, both supra-ventricular and ventricular. In 27.80% of the patients, the assessment of the thyroid function was imposed by the appearance of the clinical picture characteristic for hypo- and hyperthyroidism, and for 72.19% it was carried out as a routine examination. Amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism was clinically diagnosed in 20.85% of the patients. Hyperthyroidism occurring during treatment with Cordarone was found in 6.95% of the patients. The confirmation of the diagnosis of amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction was based on hormonal dosages (TSH, FT4 and even FT3 in some cases), on the endocrinological clinical consultation and on the imaging study--i.e. thyroid echography. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction is relatively rare compared to the number of patients treated with this anti-arrhythmic drug (27.8%) from the group under study. Thyroid dysfunction, regardless of the type (with hypo or hyper-function), represents a negative element in the evolution of patients with pre-existing heart diseases, not only by aggravating the clinical picture of the basic illness, but also by the necessity of permanently reviewing the therapeutic scheme imposed also by the association of thyroid dysfunction medication, according to case.

  6. Resistance to Virus Infection Conferred by the Interferon-Induced Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K.; Quignon, Frédérique; Pelicano, Luis; Koken, Marcel H. M.; de Thé, Hugues

    1998-01-01

    The interferon (IFN)-induced promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is specifically associated with nuclear bodies (NBs) whose functions are yet unknown. Two of the NB-associated proteins, PML and Sp100, are induced by IFN. Here we show that overexpression of PML and not Sp100 induces resistance to infections by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) (a rhabdovirus) and influenza A virus (an orthomyxovirus) but not by encephalomyocarditis virus (a picornavirus). Inhibition of viral multiplication was dependent on both the level of PML expression and the multiplicity of infection and reached 100-fold. PML was shown to interfere with VSV mRNA and protein synthesis. Compared to the IFN mediator MxA protein, PML had less powerful antiviral activity. While nuclear body localization of PML did not seem to be required for the antiviral effect, deletion of the PML coiled-coil domain completely abolished it. Taken together, these results suggest that PML can contribute to the antiviral state induced in IFN-treated cells. PMID:9444998

  7. Interferon gamma induces the myristoylation of a 48-kDa protein in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Aderem, A A; Marratta, D E; Cohn, Z A

    1988-01-01

    The lymphokine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) induces the selective myristoylation of a macrophage protein with an apparent molecular mass of 48 kDa. The myristic acid-protein bond is resistant to treatment with hydroxylamine, suggesting that the fatty acid moiety is in an amide linkage. As little as 1 unit of IFN-gamma per ml induces the myristoylation of the 48-kDa protein, with half-maximal myristoylation being observed with 4 units/ml. The effect is observed within 1 hr after exposure to IFN-gamma and is maximal by 3-4 hr, after which it declines. IFN-alpha does not induce the myristoylation of the 48-kDa protein, and IFN-beta does so very poorly. Neither IFN-alpha nor IFN-beta has any effect on IFN-gamma-induced myristoylation of the 48-kDa protein. The 48-kDa protein is constitutively myristoylated in murine macrophages that have been activated in vivo by intraperitoneal injection of Corynebacterium parvum, suggesting that it may be an early intermediate in the activation of macrophages. Images PMID:3137568

  8. Doxycycline Induces Mitophagy and Suppresses Production of Interferon-β in IPEC-J2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yang; Liqi, Zhu; Jian, Lin; Qinghua, Yu; Qian, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that the second-generation tetracycline derivative doxycycline (DOX) interrupts mitochondrial proteostasis and physiology, inhibits proliferation of many cell types, and induces apoptosis. However, the effects of DOX, which is widely used in porcine husbandry by feed, on the porcine intestinal epithelium are unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that DOX damaged mitochondrial morphology and induced the co-localization of mitochondria with autophagosomes, suggesting that DOX induces mitophagy in IPEC-J2 cells. We also found evidence that DOX increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or mitochondrial-specific ROS in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, 50 μg/ml DOX significantly decreased production of interferon-β and facilitated replication of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus in IPEC-J2 cells. These results demonstrated that DOX induced mitophagy and ROS production, which damaged the intestinal epithelium. As DOX is used extensively in pig husbandry, uncontrolled application poses a significant threat of viral infection, so stricter policies on its usage should be required. PMID:28203548

  9. Retinoic acid induces expression of the thyroid hormone transporter, monocarboxylate transporter 8 (Mct8).

    PubMed

    Kogai, Takahiko; Liu, Yan-Yun; Richter, Laura L; Mody, Kaizeen; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Brent, Gregory A

    2010-08-27

    Retinoic acid (RA) and thyroid hormone are critical for differentiation and organogenesis in the embryo. Mct8 (monocarboxylate transporter 8), expressed predominantly in the brain and placenta, mediates thyroid hormone uptake from the circulation and is required for normal neural development. RA induces differentiation of F9 mouse teratocarcinoma cells toward neurons as well as extraembryonal endoderm. We hypothesized that Mct8 is functionally expressed in F9 cells and induced by RA. All-trans-RA (tRA) and other RA receptor (RAR) agonists dramatically (>300-fold) induced Mct8. tRA treatment significantly increased uptake of triiodothyronine and thyroxine (4.1- and 4.3-fold, respectively), which was abolished by a selective Mct8 inhibitor, bromosulfophthalein. Sequence inspection of the Mct8 promoter region and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR analysis in F9 cells identified 11 transcription start sites and a proximal Sp1 site but no TATA box. tRA significantly enhanced Mct8 promoter activity through a consensus RA-responsive element located 6.6 kilobases upstream of the coding region. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated binding of RAR and retinoid X receptor to the RA response element. The promotion of thyroid hormone uptake through the transcriptional up-regulation of Mct8 by RAR is likely to be important for extraembryonic endoderm development and neural differentiation. This finding demonstrates cross-talk between RA signaling and thyroid hormone signaling in early development at the level of the thyroid hormone transporter.

  10. Novel leptin OB3 peptide-induced signaling and progression in thyroid cancers: Comparison with leptin

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Meng-Ti; Lai, Hsuan-Yu; Ke, Chien-Chih; Crawford, Dana R.; Lee, Oscar K.; Fu, Earl; Mousa, Shaker A.; Grasso, Patricia; Liu, Leroy F.; Chang, Heng-Yu; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity results in increased secretion of cytokines from adipose tissue and is a risk factor for various cancers. Leptin is largely produced by adipose tissue and cancer cells. It induces cell proliferation and may serve to induce various cancers. OB3-leptin peptide (OB3) is a new class of functional leptin peptide. However, its mitogenic effect has not been determined. In the present study, because of a close link between leptin and the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, OB3 was compared with leptin in different thyroid cancer cells for gene expression, proliferation and invasion. Neither agent stimulated cell proliferation. Leptin stimulated cell invasion, but reduced adhesion in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Activated ERK1/2 and STAT3 contributed to leptin-induced invasion. In contrast, OB3 did not affect expression of genes involved in proliferation and invasion. In vivo studies in the mouse showed that leptin, but not OB3, significantly increased circulating levels of thyrotropin (TSH), a growth factor for thyroid cancer. In summary, OB3 is a derivative of leptin that importantly lacks the mitogenic effects of leptin on thyroid cancer cells. PMID:27050378

  11. The effect of thymic inoculation to induce tolerance of allogeneic thyroid grafts in the outbred rabbit.

    PubMed

    Torchia, M G; Aitken, R M; Thliveris, A

    1998-10-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that allograft tolerance can be achieved in inbred rats and mice following intrathymic injection of donor cells or antigen and treatment with antilymphocyte serum (ALS). In outbred dogs, xenografts, and inbred rat strains with major MHC antigen difference, tolerance has not similarly been induced. The focus of this study was to determine whether allogeneic thyroid graft tolerance could be achieved in outbred rabbits. In the experimental group (n = 5), recipients received an intrathymic injection of donor lymphocytes and a single treatment of ALS. Controls (n = 5) received intrathymic cell culture medium and ALS treatment. Donor-recipient allogenicity was monitored with mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) over 18 weeks. Donor thyroid tissue was placed into recipient gluteal muscle fibres one week following the last MLC measurement. A third group of rabbits (n = 4) received thyroid autografts without any other treatment. There were no differences in MLC stimulation indices (SI) between the control and experimental group nor did MLC (SI) change within groups. All thyroid autografts survived the two week monitoring period and demonstrated normal appearing thyroid follicles on histologic examination. All thyroid allografts showed severe acute rejection reactions on biopsy within one week. Further studies using outbred animals to examine the role of thymic inoculation are required to determine whether similar techniques might be successful in the human.

  12. Parental exposure to microcystin-LR induced thyroid endocrine disruption in zebrafish offspring, a transgenerational toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Houcheng; Yan, Wei; Wu, Qin; Liu, Chunsheng; Gong, Xiuying; Hung, Tien-Chieh; Li, Guangyu

    2017-11-01

    Microcystin-LR is the most poisonous and commonly encountered hepatotoxin produced by cyanobacteria in an aquatic ecosystem, and it may cause thyroid dysfunction in fish. The present study aimed to reveal the effects of transgenerational toxicity of MCLR on the thyroid endocrine system under sub-chronic exposure conditions. Adult zebrafish (F0) were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations (1, 5 and 25 μg/L) of MCLR for 45 days. The produced F1 embryos were then tested without further MCLR treatment. In the F0 generation, exposure to 25 μg/L MCLR reduced thyroxine (T4) but not 3, 5, 3'-triiodothyronine (T3) levels in females, while the T4 and T3 levels were unchanged in males. After parental exposure to MCLR, we observed a decreased hatching and growth retardation correlated with reduced thyroid hormone levels in the F1 offspring. The gene transcription and protein expression along the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis were detected to further investigate the possible mechanisms of MCLR-induced thyroid disruption. Our results indicated MCLR could disturb the thyroid endocrine system under environmentally relevant concentrations and the disrupting effects could be remarkably transmitted to its F1 offspring. We regard these adverse effects as a parental transgenerational toxicity of MCLR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigating Chernobyl-induced thyroid cancer: Politics vs science

    SciTech Connect

    Kotz, D.

    1995-09-01

    Nearly ten years after the nuclear power plant disaster, scientists from around the world are trying to track the incidence of childhood thyroid cancer and treat the young victims. Their efforts seem promising, but a lack of coordination may stymie the research. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. [Adherent cell and T lymphocyte cooperation for the "in vitro" production of Brucella-induced interferon by murine spleen cells (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bousquet, C; Cannat, A; Ramuz, M; Serre, A

    1978-01-01

    Although Brucella is a good in vivo inducer of interferon, in vitro infection of murine spleen cells by Brucella suis has not, to the present time, led to in vitro synthesis. In the present work we show that normal spleen cells can however synthetize interferon in vitro when cultured together with adherent cells obtained from the spleens of syngeneic mice 45 min after in vivo inoculation. Induction and synthesis are thus shown to be distinct phenomena. Moreover soluble factors are shown to be involved in the induction phenomenon and T cells to be essential for synthesis. This in vitro brucella-induced interferon differs from in vivo brucella-induced interferon: its acid lability and its antigenic properties are characteristic of type II "immune" interferon.

  15. Interferons alpha and gamma induce p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis, respectively.

    PubMed

    Porta, Chiara; Hadj-Slimane, Reda; Nejmeddine, Mohamed; Pampin, Mathieu; Tovey, Michael G; Espert, Lucile; Alvarez, Sandra; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K

    2005-01-20

    Type I interferon (IFN) enhances the transcription of the tumor suppressor gene p53. To elucidate the molecular mechanism mediating IFN-induced apoptosis, we analysed programmed cell death in response to type I (IFNalpha) or type II (IFNgamma) treatment in relation to p53 status. In two cell lines (MCF-7, SKNSH), IFNalpha, but not IFNgamma, enhanced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, only IFNalpha upregulated p53 as well as p53 target genes (Noxa, Mdm2 and CD95). The apoptotic response to IFNalpha decreased in the presence of ZB4, an anti-CD95 antibody, suggesting that CD95 is involved in this process. When p53 was inactivated by the E6 viral protein or the expression of a p53 mutant, IFNalpha-induced apoptosis and p53 target genes upregulation were abrogated. Altogether these results demonstrate that p53 plays a pivotal role in the IFNalpha-induced apoptotic response. IFNalpha-induced PML was unable to recruit p53 into nuclear bodies and its downregulation by siRNA did not alter CD95 expression. In contrast, IFNgamma-induced apoptosis is p53-independent. CD95 and IFN-regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) are directly upregulated by this cytokine. Apoptotic response to IFNgamma is decreased in the presence of ZB4 and strongly diminished by IRF1 siRNA, implicating both CD95 and IRF1 in IFNgamma-induced apoptotic response. Taken together, these results show that in two different cell lines, IFNalpha and IFNgamma, induce p53-dependent -independent apoptosis, respectively.

  16. Neddylation is required for herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1)-induced early phase interferon-beta production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueying; Ye, Zhenjie; Pei, Yujun; Qiu, Guihua; Wang, Qingyang; Xu, Yunlu; Shen, Beifen; Zhang, Jiyan

    2016-09-01

    Type I interferons such as interferon-beta (IFN-β) play essential roles in the host innate immune response to herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) infection. The transcription of type I interferon genes is controlled by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members including IRF3. NF-κB activation depends on the phosphorylation of inhibitor of κB (IκB), which triggers its ubiqitination and degradation. It has been reported that neddylation inhibition by a pharmacological agent MLN4924 potently suppresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine production with the accumulation of phosphorylated IκBα. However, the role of neddylation in type I interferon expression remains unknown. Here, we report that neddylation inhibition with MLN4924 or upon UBA3 deficiency led to accumulation of phosphorylated IκBα, impaired IκBα degradation, and impaired NF-κB nuclear translocation in the early phase of HSV-1 infection even though phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 were not affected. The blockade of NF-κB nuclear translocation by neddylation inhibition becomes less efficient at the later time points of HSV-1 infection. Consequently, HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production significantly decreased upon MLN4924 treatment and UBA3 deficiency. NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23 mimicked the effects of neddylation inhibition in the early phase of HSV-1 infection. Moreover, the effects of neddylation inhibition on HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production diminished in the presence of NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23. Thus, neddylation contributes to HSV-1-induced early phase IFN-β production through, at least partially, promoting NF-κB activation.

  17. Ischemia/Reperfusion Induces Interferon-Stimulated Gene Expression in Microglia.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Ashley; Lee, Richard V; Noor, Shahani; Lee, Chungeun; Le, Thu; Iorga, Michael; Phillips, Jessica L H; Murphy, Sean; Möller, Thomas; Weinstein, Jonathan R

    2017-08-23

    Innate immune signaling is important in the pathophysiology of ischemia/reperfusion (stroke)-induced injury and recovery. Several lines of evidence support a central role for microglia in these processes. Recent work has identified Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and type I interferon (IFN) signaling in both ischemia/reperfusion-induced brain injury and ischemic preconditioning-mediated neuroprotection. To determine the effects of "ischemia/reperfusion-like" conditions on microglia, we performed genomic analyses on wild-type (WT) and TLR4(-/-) cultured microglia after sequential exposure to hypoxia/hypoglycemia and normoxia/normoglycemia (H/H-N/N). We observed increased expression of type 1 IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) as the predominant transcriptomal feature of H/H-N/N-exposed WT, but not TLR4(-/-), microglia. Microarray analysis on ex vivo sorted microglia from ipsilateral male mouse cortex after a transient in vivo ischemic pulse also demonstrated robust expression of ISGs. Type 1 IFNs, including the IFN-αs and IFN-β, activate the interferon-α/β receptor (IFNAR) complex. We confirmed both in vitro H/H-N/N- and in vivo ischemia/reperfusion-induced microglial ISG responses by quantitative real-time PCR and demonstrated that both were dependent on IFNAR1. We characterized the effects of hypoxia/hypoglycemia on phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), release of type 1 IFNs, and surface expression of IFNAR1 in microglia. We demonstrated that IFN-β induces dose-dependent secretion of ISG chemokines in cultured microglia and robust ISG expression in microglia both in vitro and in vivo Finally, we demonstrated that the microglial ISG chemokine responses to TLR4 agonists were dependent on TLR4 and IFNAR1. Together, these data suggest novel ischemia/reperfusion-induced pathways for both TLR4-dependent and -independent, IFNAR1-dependent, type 1 IFN signaling in microglia.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Stroke is the fifth leading cause of

  18. Thyroid iodine content measured by x-ray fluorescence in amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Leger, A.F.; Fragu, P.; Rougier, P.; Laurent, M.F.; Tubiana, M.; Savole, J.C.

    1983-07-01

    Iodine-induced thyrotoxicosis (IiT) is characterized by (a) a low radioiodine uptake, increased by exogenous TSH, and (b) a spontaneous evolution towards cure within a few months. An hypothetical pathogenesis of IiT is an initial inflation in the stores of thyroid hormones during iodine excess, followed by their sudden discharge into the circulation. Thyroid iodine content was measured by fluorescent scanning in 10 patients with amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis and in various control groups. Results were found to be high at the onset of the disease and to decrease during its course. The data agree with the hypothetical pathogenesis. Furthermore they may permit exclusion of a painless subacute thyroiditis, which is the main differential diagnosis of IiT.

  19. Chloroquine modulates HIV-1-induced plasmacytoid dendritic cell alpha interferon: implication for T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Jeffrey A; Montoya, Carlos J; Usuga, Xiomara; Ronquillo, Rollie; Landay, Alan L; Desai, Seema N

    2010-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) contribute to antiviral immunity mainly through recognition of microbial products and viruses via intracellular Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) or TLR9, resulting in the production of type I interferons (IFNs). Although interferons reduce the viral burden in the acute phase of infection, their role in the chronic phase is unclear. The presence of elevated plasma IFN-alpha levels in advanced HIV disease and its association with microbial translocation in chronic HIV infection lead us to hypothesize that IFN-alpha could contribute to immune activation. Blocking of IFN-alpha production using chloroquine, an endosomal inhibitor, was tested in a novel in vitro model system with the aim of characterizing the effects of chloroquine on HIV-1-mediated TLR signaling, IFN-alpha production, and T-cell activation. Our results indicate that chloroquine blocks TLR-mediated activation of pDC and MyD88 signaling, as shown by decreases in the levels of the downstream signaling molecules IRAK-4 and IRF-7 and by inhibition of IFN-alpha synthesis. Chloroquine decreased CD8 T-cell activation induced by aldrithiol-2-treated HIV-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. In addition to blocking pDC activation, chloroquine also blocked negative modulators of the T-cell response, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and programmed death ligand 1 (PDL-1). Our results indicate that TLR stimulation and production of IFN-alpha by pDC contribute to immune activation and that blocking of these pathways using chloroquine may interfere with events contributing to HIV pathogenesis. Our results suggests that a safe, well-tolerated drug such as chloroquine can be proposed as an adjuvant therapeutic candidate along with highly active antiretroviral therapy to control immune activation in HIV-1 infection.

  20. Chloroquine Modulates HIV-1-Induced Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Alpha Interferon: Implication for T-Cell Activation▿

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Jeffrey A.; Montoya, Carlos J.; Usuga, Xiomara; Ronquillo, Rollie; Landay, Alan L.; Desai, Seema N.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) contribute to antiviral immunity mainly through recognition of microbial products and viruses via intracellular Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) or TLR9, resulting in the production of type I interferons (IFNs). Although interferons reduce the viral burden in the acute phase of infection, their role in the chronic phase is unclear. The presence of elevated plasma IFN-α levels in advanced HIV disease and its association with microbial translocation in chronic HIV infection lead us to hypothesize that IFN-α could contribute to immune activation. Blocking of IFN-α production using chloroquine, an endosomal inhibitor, was tested in a novel in vitro model system with the aim of characterizing the effects of chloroquine on HIV-1-mediated TLR signaling, IFN-α production, and T-cell activation. Our results indicate that chloroquine blocks TLR-mediated activation of pDC and MyD88 signaling, as shown by decreases in the levels of the downstream signaling molecules IRAK-4 and IRF-7 and by inhibition of IFN-α synthesis. Chloroquine decreased CD8 T-cell activation induced by aldrithiol-2-treated HIV-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. In addition to blocking pDC activation, chloroquine also blocked negative modulators of the T-cell response, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and programmed death ligand 1 (PDL-1). Our results indicate that TLR stimulation and production of IFN-α by pDC contribute to immune activation and that blocking of these pathways using chloroquine may interfere with events contributing to HIV pathogenesis. Our results suggests that a safe, well-tolerated drug such as chloroquine can be proposed as an adjuvant therapeutic candidate along with highly active antiretroviral therapy to control immune activation in HIV-1 infection. PMID:19949061

  1. ADAR1 deletion induces NFκB and interferon signaling dependent liver inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shoshan, Shirley Oren; Kagan, Polina; Sultan, Maya; Barabash, Zohar; Dor, Chen; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Harmelin, Alon; Pappo, Orit; Marcu-Malina, Victoria; Ben-Ari, Ziv; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; Goldstein, Itamar; Safran, Michal

    2016-06-30

    Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) 1 binds and edits double-stranded (ds) RNA secondary structures found mainly within untranslated regions of many transcripts. In the current research, our aim was to study the role of ADAR1 in liver homeostasis. As previous studies show a conserved immunoregulatory function for ADAR1 in mammalians, we focused on its role in preventing chronic hepatic inflammation and the associated activation of hepatic stellate cells to produce extracellular matrix and promote fibrosis. We show that hepatocytes specific ADAR1 knock out (KO) mice display massive liver damage with multifocal inflammation and fibrogenesis. The bioinformatics analysis of the microarray gene-expression datasets of ADAR1 KO livers reveled a type-I interferons signature and an enrichment for immune response genes compared to control littermate livers. Furthermore, we found that in vitro silencing of ADAR1 expression in HepG2 cells leads to enhanced transcription of NFκB target genes, foremost of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL6 and IL8. We also discovered immune cell-independent paracrine signaling among ADAR1-depleted HepG2 cells and hepatic stellate cells, leading to the activation of the latter cell type to adopt a profibrogenic phenotype. This paracrine communication dependent mainly on the production and secretion of the cytokine IL6 induced by ADAR1 silencing in hepatocytes. Thus, our findings shed a new light on the vital regulatory role of ADAR1 in hepatic immune homeostasis, chiefly its inhibitory function on the crosstalk between the NFκB and type-I interferons signaling cascades, restraining the development of liver inflammation and fibrosis.

  2. Phospholipid scramblase 1 mediates type i interferon-induced protection against staphylococcal α-toxin.

    PubMed

    Lizak, Miroslaw; Yarovinsky, Timur O

    2012-01-19

    The opportunistic gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of pneumonia and sepsis. Staphylococcal α-toxin, a prototypical pore-forming toxin, is a major virulence factor of S. aureus clinical isolates, and lung epithelial cells are highly sensitive to α-toxin's cytolytic activity. Type I interferon (IFN) signaling activated in response to S. aureus increases pulmonary cell resistance to α-toxin, but the underlying mechanisms are uncharacterized. We show that IFNα protects human lung epithelial cells from α-toxin-induced intracellular ATP depletion and cell death by reducing extracellular ATP leakage. This effect depends on protein palmitoylation and induction of phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1). IFNα-induced PLSCR1 associates with the cytoskeleton after exposure to α-toxin, and cellular depletion of PLSCR1 negates IFN-induced protection from α-toxin. PLSCR1-deficient mice display enhanced sensitivity to inhaled α-toxin and an α-toxin-producing S. aureus strain. These results uncover PLSCR1 activity as part of an innate protective mechanism to a bacterial pore-forming toxin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Phospholipid scramblase 1 mediates type I interferon-induced protection against staphylococcal α-toxin

    PubMed Central

    Lizak, Miroslaw; Yarovinsky, Timur O.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The opportunistic gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of pneumonia and sepsis. Staphylococcal α-toxin, a prototypical pore-forming toxin, is a major virulence factor of S. aureus clinical isolates and lung epithelial cells are highly sensitive to α-toxin's cytolytic activity. Type I interferon (IFN) signaling activated in response to S. aureus increases pulmonary cell resistance to α-toxin but the underlying mechanisms are uncharacterized. We show that IFNα protects human lung epithelial cells from α-toxin-induced intracellular ATP depletion and cell death by reducing extracellular ATP leakage. This effect depends on protein palmitoylation and induction of phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1). IFNα-induced PLSCR1 associates with the cytoskeleton after exposure to α-toxin and cellular depletion of PLSCR1 negates IFN-induced protection from α-toxin. PLSCR1-deficient mice display enhanced sensitivity to inhaled α-toxin and an α-toxin-producing S. aureus strain. These results uncover PLSCR1 activity as part of an innate protective mechanism to a bacterial pore-forming toxin. PMID:22264514

  4. Gamma interferon-induced, nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of vaccinia virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, N; Buller, R M; Karupiah, G

    1995-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production in the murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells were previously shown to inhibit the replication of the poxviruses vaccinia virus (VV) and ectromelia virus and herpes simplex virus type 1. In the current study, we performed biochemical analyses to determine the stage in the viral life cycle blocked by IFN-gamma-induced NO. Antibodies specific for temporally expressed viral proteins, a VV-specific DNA probe, and transmission electron microscopy were used to show that the cytokine-induced NO inhibited late protein synthesis, DNA replication, and virus particle formation but not expression of the early proteins analyzed. Essentially similar results were obtained with hydroxyurea and cytosine arabinoside, inhibitors of DNA replication. Enzymatically active iNOS was detected in the lysates of IFN-gamma-treated but not in untreated RAW 264.7 cells. The IFN-gamma-treated RAW 264.7 cells which express iNOS not only were resistant to productive infection but also efficiently blocked the replication of VV in infected bystander cells of epithelial origin. This inhibition was arginine dependent, correlated with nitric production in cultures, and was reversible by the NOS inhibitor N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine. PMID:7529336

  5. Interferon-γ Protects from Staphylococcal Alpha Toxin-Induced Keratinocyte Death through Apolipoprotein L1.

    PubMed

    Brauweiler, Anne M; Goleva, Elena; Leung, Donald Y M

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterial pathogen that frequently infects the skin, causing lesions and cell destruction through its primary virulence factor, alpha toxin. Here we show that interferon gamma (IFN-?) protects human keratinocytes from cell death induced by staphylococcal alpha toxin. We find that IFN-? prevents alpha toxin binding and reduces expression of the alpha toxin receptor, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10). We determine that the mechanism for IFN-?-mediated resistance to alpha toxin involves the induction of autophagy, a process of cellular adaptation to sublethal damage. We find that IFN-? potently stimulates activation of the primary autophagy effector, light chain 3 (LC3). This process is dependent on upregulation of apolipoprotein L1. Depletion of apolipoprotein L1 by small interfering RNA significantly increases alpha toxin-induced lethality and inhibits activation of light chain 3. We conclude that IFN-? plays a significant role in protecting human keratinocytes from the lethal effects of staphylococcal alpha toxin through apolipoprotein L1-induced autophagy.

  6. Cell-Cell Fusion Induced by Measles Virus Amplifies the Type I Interferon Response▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Herschke, F.; Plumet, S.; Duhen, T.; Azocar, O.; Druelle, J.; Laine, D.; Wild, T. F.; Rabourdin-Combe, C.; Gerlier, D.; Valentin, H.

    2007-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) infection is characterized by the formation of multinuclear giant cells (MGC). We report that beta interferon (IFN-β) production is amplified in vitro by the formation of virus-induced MGC derived from human epithelial cells or mature conventional dendritic cells. Both fusion and IFN-β response amplification were inhibited in a dose-dependent way by a fusion-inhibitory peptide after MeV infection of epithelial cells. This effect was observed at both low and high multiplicities of infection. While in the absence of virus replication, the cell-cell fusion mediated by MeV H/F glycoproteins did not activate any IFN-α/β production, an amplified IFN-β response was observed when H/F-induced MGC were infected with a nonfusogenic recombinant chimerical virus. Time lapse microscopy studies revealed that MeV-infected MGC from epithelial cells have a highly dynamic behavior and an unexpected long life span. Following cell-cell fusion, both of the RIG-I and IFN-β gene deficiencies were trans complemented to induce IFN-β production. Production of IFN-β and IFN-α was also observed in MeV-infected immature dendritic cells (iDC) and mature dendritic cells (mDC). In contrast to iDC, MeV infection of mDC induced MGC, which produced enhanced amounts of IFN-α/β. The amplification of IFN-β production was associated with a sustained nuclear localization of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) in MeV-induced MGC derived from both epithelial cells and mDC, while the IRF-7 up-regulation was poorly sensitive to the fusion process. Therefore, MeV-induced cell-cell fusion amplifies IFN-α/β production in infected cells, and this indicates that MGC contribute to the antiviral immune response. PMID:17898060

  7. Peripheral Blood Cells from Patients with Autoimmune Addison's Disease Poorly Respond to Interferons In Vitro, Despite Elevated Serum Levels of Interferon-Inducible Chemokines.

    PubMed

    Edvardsen, Kine; Bjånesøy, Trine; Hellesen, Alexander; Breivik, Lars; Bakke, Marit; Husebye, Eystein S; Bratland, Eirik

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is a disorder caused by an immunological attack on the adrenal cortex. The interferon (IFN)-inducible chemokine CXCL10 is elevated in serum of AAD patients, suggesting a peripheral IFN signature. However, CXCL10 can also be induced in adrenocortical cells stimulated with IFNs, cytokines, or microbial components. We therefore investigated whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from AAD patients display an enhanced propensity to produce CXCL10 and the related chemokine CXCL9, after stimulation with type I or II IFNs or the IFN inducer poly (I:C). Although serum levels of CXCL10 and CXCL9 were significantly elevated in patients compared with controls, IFN stimulated patient PBMC produced significantly less CXCL10/CXCL9 than control PBMC. Low CXCL10 production was not significantly associated with medication, disease duration, or comorbidities, but the low production of poly (I:C)-induced CXCL10 among patients was associated with an AAD risk allele in the phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22) gene. PBMC levels of total STAT1 and -2, and IFN-induced phosphorylated STAT1 and -2, were not significantly different between patients and controls. We conclude that PBMC from patients with AAD are deficient in their response to IFNs, and that the adrenal cortex itself may be responsible for the increased serum levels of CXCL10.

  8. Peripheral Blood Cells from Patients with Autoimmune Addison's Disease Poorly Respond to Interferons In Vitro, Despite Elevated Serum Levels of Interferon-Inducible Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Bjånesøy, Trine; Hellesen, Alexander; Breivik, Lars; Bakke, Marit; Husebye, Eystein S.; Bratland, Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is a disorder caused by an immunological attack on the adrenal cortex. The interferon (IFN)-inducible chemokine CXCL10 is elevated in serum of AAD patients, suggesting a peripheral IFN signature. However, CXCL10 can also be induced in adrenocortical cells stimulated with IFNs, cytokines, or microbial components. We therefore investigated whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from AAD patients display an enhanced propensity to produce CXCL10 and the related chemokine CXCL9, after stimulation with type I or II IFNs or the IFN inducer poly (I:C). Although serum levels of CXCL10 and CXCL9 were significantly elevated in patients compared with controls, IFN stimulated patient PBMC produced significantly less CXCL10/CXCL9 than control PBMC. Low CXCL10 production was not significantly associated with medication, disease duration, or comorbidities, but the low production of poly (I:C)-induced CXCL10 among patients was associated with an AAD risk allele in the phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22) gene. PBMC levels of total STAT1 and -2, and IFN-induced phosphorylated STAT1 and -2, were not significantly different between patients and controls. We conclude that PBMC from patients with AAD are deficient in their response to IFNs, and that the adrenal cortex itself may be responsible for the increased serum levels of CXCL10. PMID:25978633

  9. Evaluation and management of radiation-induced thyroid and parathyroid abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilopoulou-Sellin, R.

    1995-05-01

    The recently published analaysis of radiation-induced hyperparathyroidism by Schneider brings to the foreground an important albeit little discussed clinical problem: namely, the prospective evaluation strategy for optimizing treatment of such patients, especially in the preoperative setting. As the authors point out, childhood irradation for benign conditions is a recognized risk factor for the development of both hyperparathyroidism and thyroid cancer. In addition, therapeutic irradiation for childhood malignancies predisposes longterm cancer survivors to increased risk for thyroid cancer. It is likely that such high-dose irradiation also predisposes the patients toward the development of hyperparathroidism, although available supporting data remain limited and conflicting. It is not clear whether the cohort of patients who develop irradiation-induced hyperparathyroidism overlaps with the cohort at risk for thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer. Given the paucity of available documentation for parathyroid dysfunction relative to the plethora of literature for thyroid diseases, it would appear that hyperparathroidism may be a less frequent complication, although supporting data are not available for such a conclusion. 6 refs.

  10. Inhibitory activity for the interferon-induced protein kinase is associated with the reovirus serotype 1 sigma 3 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Imani, F; Jacobs, B L

    1988-01-01

    In this report we demonstrate that reovirus serotype 1-infected cells contain an inhibitor of the interferon-induced, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase. We provide evidence that suggests that the virus-encoded sigma 3 protein is likely responsible for this kinase inhibitory activity. We could not detect activation of the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase in extracts prepared from either interferon-treated or untreated reovirus serotype 1-infected mouse L cells under conditions that led to activation of the kinase in extracts prepared from either interferon-treated or untreated, uninfected cells. Extracts from reovirus-infected cells blocked activation of kinase in extracts from interferon-treated cells when the two were mixed prior to assay. The kinase inhibitory activity in extracts of reovirus-infected cells could be overcome by adding approximately 100-fold excess of dsRNA over the amount required to activate kinase in extracts of uninfected cells. Kinase inhibitory activity in extracts of interferon-treated, virus-infected cells could be overcome with somewhat less dsRNA (approximately 10-fold excess). Most of the inhibitory activity in the extracts could be removed by adsorption with immobilized anti-reovirus sigma 3 serum or immobilized dsRNA, suggesting that the dsRNA-binding sigma 3 protein is necessary for kinase inhibitory activity. Purified sigma 3 protein, when added to reaction mixtures containing partially purified kinase, inhibited enzyme activation. Control of activation of this kinase, which can modify eukaryotic protein synthesis initiation factor 2, may be relevant to the sensitivity of reovirus replication to treatment of cells with interferon and to the shutoff of host protein synthesis in reovirus-infected cells. Images PMID:2460857

  11. Human papillomavirus E6 proteins mediate resistance to interferon-induced growth arrest through inhibition of p53 acetylation.

    PubMed

    Hebner, Christy; Beglin, Melanie; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2007-12-01

    The high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 proteins act cooperatively to mediate multiple activities in viral pathogenesis. For instance, E7 acts to increase p53 levels while E6 accelerates its rate of turnover through the binding of the cellular ubiquitin ligase E6AP. Interferons are important antiviral agents that modulate both the initial and persistent phases of viral infection. The expression of HPV type 16 E7 was found to sensitize keratinocytes to the growth-inhibitory effects of interferon, while coexpression of E6 abrogates this inhibition. Treatment of E7-expressing cells with interferon ultimately resulted in cellular senescence through a process that is dependent upon acetylation of p53 by p300/CBP at lysine 382. Cells expressing mutant forms of E6 that are unable to bind p300/CBP or bind p53 failed to block acetylation of p53 at lysine 382 and were sensitive to growth arrest by interferon. In contrast, mutant forms of E6 that are unable to bind E6AP remain resistant to the effects of interferon, demonstrating that the absolute levels of p53 are not the major determinants of this activity. Finally, p53 acetylation at lysine 382 was found not to be an essential determinant of other types of senescence such as that induced by overexpression of Ras in human fibroblasts. This study identifies an important physiological role for E6 binding to p300/CBP in blocking growth arrest of human keratinocytes in the presence of interferon and so contributes to the persistence of HPV-infected cells.

  12. [A review on thyroid autoimmune disorders and HCV chronic infection].

    PubMed

    Di Domenicantonio, A; Politti, U; Marchi, S; De Bortoli, N; Giuggioli, D; Antonelli, A; Ferri, C

    2014-01-01

    Frequently, patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic infection have high levels of serum anti-thyroperoxidase and/or anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies, ultrasonographical signs of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, and subclinical hypothyroidism, in female gender, vs healthy controls, or hepatitis B virus infected patients. In patients with "HCV-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia" (MC+HCV), a higher prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disorders was shown not only compared to controls, but also compared to HCV patients without cryoglobulinemia. Patients with MC+HCV or with HCV chronic infection, show an higher prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer than in controls, in particular in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. Patients with HCV chronic infection, or with MC+HCV, in presence of autoimmune thyroiditis, show higher serum levels of T-helper (Th)1 (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10) chemokine than patients without thyroiditis. Probably, HCV thyroid infection acts by upregulating CXCL10 gene expression and secretion in thyrocytes recruiting Th1 lymphocytes, that secrete interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. These cytokines might induce a further CXCL10 secretion by thyrocytes, thus perpetuating the immune cascade, that may lead into the appearance of autoimmune thyroid disorders in genetically predisposed subjects. A careful monitoring of thyroid function and nodules are recommanded in HCV patients.

  13. Radioiodine-induced thyroid storm. Case report and literature review

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, M.T.; Kidd, G.S.; Dodson, L.E. Jr.; Hofeldt, F.D.

    1983-08-01

    Thyroid storm developed following radioiodine therapy in a 43-year-old man with Graves' disease, weight loss, myopathy, severe thyrotoxic hypercalcemia, and a pituitary adenoma. The hypercalcemia may have been a significant, and previously unreported, predisposing factor for the radioiodine-associated thyroid storm. This case and 15 other well-documented cases of radioiodine-associated storm found in the literature are reviewed, as are several other cases of less severe exacerbations of thyrotoxicosis associated with radioiodine therapy. Although not often seen, these complications are often fatal. High-risk patients, such as the elderly, those with severe thyrotoxicosis, and those with significant underlying diseases, may benefit from preventive measures such as the judicious use of thyrostatic medications during the periods before and after isotope administration.

  14. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses Do Not Inhibit Interferon Synthesis in Infected Chickens but Can Override the Interferon-Induced Antiviral State ▿†

    PubMed Central

    Penski, Nicola; Härtle, Sonja; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Krohmann, Carsten; Ruggli, Nicolas; Schusser, Benjamin; Pfann, Michael; Reuter, Antje; Gohrbandt, Sandra; Hundt, Jana; Veits, Jutta; Breithaupt, Angele; Kochs, Georg; Stech, Jürgen; Summerfield, Artur; Vahlenkamp, Thomas; Kaspers, Bernd; Staeheli, Peter

    2011-01-01

    From infection studies with cultured chicken cells and experimental mammalian hosts, it is well known that influenza viruses use the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) to suppress the synthesis of interferon (IFN). However, our current knowledge regarding the in vivo role of virus-encoded NS1 in chickens is much more limited. Here, we report that highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of subtypes H5N1 and H7N7 lacking fully functional NS1 genes were attenuated in 5-week-old chickens. Surprisingly, in diseased birds infected with NS1 mutants, the IFN levels were not higher than in diseased birds infected with wild-type virus, suggesting that NS1 cannot suppress IFN gene expression in at least one cell population of infected chickens that produces large amounts of the cytokine in vivo. To address the question of why influenza viruses are highly pathogenic in chickens although they strongly activate the innate immune system, we determined whether recombinant chicken alpha interferon (IFN-α) can inhibit the growth of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in cultured chicken cells and whether it can ameliorate virus-induced disease in 5-week-old birds. We found that IFN treatment failed to confer substantial protection against challenge with highly pathogenic viruses, although it was effective against viruses with low pathogenic potential. Taken together, our data demonstrate that preventing the synthesis of IFN is not the primary role of the viral NS1 protein during infection of chickens. Our results further suggest that virus-induced IFN does not contribute substantially to resistance of chickens against highly pathogenic influenza viruses. PMID:21613402

  15. Highly Pathogenic New World and Old World Human Arenaviruses Induce Distinct Interferon Responses in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng; Kolokoltsova, Olga A.; Yun, Nadezhda E.; Seregin, Alexey V.; Ronca, Shannon; Koma, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arenavirus family includes several important pathogens that cause severe and sometimes fatal diseases in humans. The highly pathogenic Old World (OW) arenavirus Lassa fever virus (LASV) is the causative agent of Lassa fever (LF) disease in humans. LASV infections in severe cases are generally immunosuppressive without stimulating interferon (IFN) induction, a proinflammatory response, or T cell activation. However, the host innate immune responses to highly pathogenic New World (NW) arenaviruses are not well understood. We have previously shown that the highly pathogenic NW arenavirus, Junin virus (JUNV), induced an IFN response in human A549 cells. Here, we report that Machupo virus (MACV), another highly pathogenic NW arenavirus, also induces an IFN response. Importantly, both pathogenic NW arenaviruses, in contrast to the OW highly pathogenic arenavirus LASV, readily elicited an IFN response in human primary dendritic cells and A549 cells. Coinfection experiments revealed that LASV could potently inhibit MACV-activated IFN responses even at 6 h after MACV infection, while the replication levels of MACV and LASV were not affected by virus coinfection. Our results clearly demonstrated that although all viruses studied herein are highly pathogenic to humans, the host IFN responses toward infections with the NW arenaviruses JUNV and MACV are quite different from responses to infections with the OW arenavirus LASV, a discovery that needs to be further investigated in relevant animal models. This finding might help us better understand various interplays between the host immune system and highly pathogenic arenaviruses as well as distinct mechanisms underlying viral pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Infections of humans with the highly pathogenic OW LASV are accompanied by potent suppression of interferon or proinflammatory cytokine production. In contrast, infections with the highly pathogenic NW arenavirus JUNV are associated with high levels of IFNs and

  16. Specific expression of interferoninduced by synergistic activation mediator-derived (SAM) systems activates innate immunity and inhibits tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Yu, Xiao; Wang, Qiankun; Liu, Zhepeng; Xiao, Qiaoqiao; Hou, Panpan; Hu, Ying; Hou, Wei; Yang, Zhanqiu; Guo, Deyin; Chen, Shuliang

    2017-08-25

    The synergistic activation mediator (SAM) system can robustly activate endogenous gene expression by a single guide RNA (gRNA). This transcriptional modulation has been shown to enhance gene promoter activity and lead to epigenetic changes. Human interferon-γ is a common natural glycoprotein involved in anti-viral effects and inhibition of cancer cell growth. Large quantities of high-purity interferon-γ are important for medical research and clinical therapy. To investigate the possibility of employing the SAM system to enhance endogenous human interferon-γ with normal function in innate immunity, we designed ten single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) that target 200 bp upstream of the transcription start sites of the interferon-γ genome, which could significantly activate the interferon-γ promoter reporter. We confirmed the system can effectively and highly activate interferon-γ expression in several humanized cell lines. Moreover, we found that the interferoninduced by the SAM system could inhibit tumorigenesis. Taken together, our results reveal that the synergistic activation mediator (SAM) system can modulate epigenetic traits of non-immune cells through activating interferon-γ expression and triggering JAK-STAT signaling pathways. Thus, this strategy could offer a novel approach to inhibit tumorigenesis without using exogenous interferon-γ.

  17. [Gamma interferon induced in human leukocytes by phytohemagglutinin: its production and biological characteristics].

    PubMed

    Danielescu, G; Maniu, H; Georgescu, T; Cajal, N

    1988-01-01

    Human gamma type interferon (IFN) preparations were obtained through phytohemagglutinin stimulation of leukocytes from the peripheral blood. Biological value of these preparations varied between 160 u and 800 u/ml, depending on leukocyte incubation medium, culture system and inductor conservation. The rising of the antiviral activity through association between gamma (3 u) and alpha (27 u) interferons was revealed by the virus quantity reduction (in this case the vesicular stomatitis virus was used) during a 24-hour multiplication cycle. The protection ensured by the mixture of the two types of interferon was about ten times higher than the additive effect of the two preparations. Study of the antiproliferative activity of a gamma interferon preparation was conducted on two human cell lines of tumoral origin (T-10 from a glioblastoma, and HEp-2) and revealed the difficulties to quantify precisely this property of the crude gamma interferon preparations.

  18. Quercetin-Induced Cell Death in Human Papillary Thyroid Cancer (B-CPAP) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu Altundağ, Ergül; Kasacı, Tolga; Yılmaz, Ayşe Mine; Karademir, Betül; Koçtürk, Semra; Taga, Yavuz; Yalçın, A. Süha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the antiproliferative effect of quercetin on human papillary thyroid cancer cells and determined the apoptotic mechanisms underlying its actions. We have used different concentrations of quercetin to induce apoptosis and measured cell viability. Apoptosis and cell cycle analysis was determined by flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide. Finally, we have measured changes in caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein expression levels as hallmarks of apoptosis and Hsp90 protein expression level as a marker of proteasome activity in treated and control cells. Quercetin treatment of human papillary thyroid cancer cells resulted in decreased cell proliferation and increased rate of apoptosis by caspase activation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that quercetin induces cancer cell apoptosis by downregulating the levels of Hsp90. In conclusion, we have shown that quercetin induces downregulation of Hsp90 expression that may be involved in the decrease of chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity which, in order, induces inhibition of growth and causes cell death in thyroid cancer cells. Thus, quercetin appears to be a promising candidate drug for Hsp90 downregulation and apoptosis of thyroid cancer cells. PMID:27057371

  19. Valproic acid induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Maria G; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Pugliese, Mariateresa; Costantino, Lucia; Poli, Roberta; Bosco, Ornella; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe

    2005-03-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma is an aggressive human cancer that is resistant to conventional therapy. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are a promising class of drugs, acting as antiproliferative agents by promoting differentiation, as well as inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Valproic acid (VPA), a class I selective histone deacetylase inhibitor widely used as an anticonvulsant, promotes differentiation in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells by inducing Na(+)/I(-) symporter and increasing iodine uptake. Here, we show that it is also highly effective at suppressing growth in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cell lines (N-PA and BHT-101). Apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest are the underlying mechanisms of VPA's effect on cell growth. It induces apoptosis by activating the intrinsic pathway; caspases 3 and 9 are activated but not caspase 8. Cell cycle is selectively arrested in G(1) and is associated with the increased expression of p21 and the reduced expression of cyclin A. Both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are induced by treatment with 1 mm VPA, a dose that promotes cell redifferentiation and that is slightly above the serum concentration reached in patients treated for epilepsy. These multifaceted properties make VPA of clinical interest as a new approach to treating poorly differentiated thyroid cancer.

  20. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Induce DNA Damage-Dependent Interferon Responses Circumventing Ebola Virus Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Priya; Aguirre, Sebastian; Yen, Benjamin C.; Pietzsch, Colette A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Maria T.; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Morlock, Lorraine K.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Leung, Daisy W.; Williams, Noelle S.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ebola virus (EBOV) protein VP35 inhibits production of interferon alpha/beta (IFN) by blocking RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways, thereby promoting virus replication and pathogenesis. A high-throughput screening assay, developed to identify compounds that either inhibit or bypass VP35 IFN-antagonist function, identified five DNA intercalators as reproducible hits from a library of bioactive compounds. Four, including doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are anthracycline antibiotics that inhibit topoisomerase II and are used clinically as chemotherapeutic drugs. These compounds were demonstrated to induce IFN responses in an ATM kinase-dependent manner and to also trigger the DNA-sensing cGAS-STING pathway of IFN induction. These compounds also suppress EBOV replication in vitro and induce IFN in the presence of IFN-antagonist proteins from multiple negative-sense RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into signaling pathways activated by important chemotherapy drugs and identify a novel therapeutic approach for IFN induction that may be exploited to inhibit RNA virus replication. PMID:28377530

  1. Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 regulates endothelial lumen formation during angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Popson, Stephanie A.; Ziegler, Mary E.; Chen, Xiaofang; Holderfield, Matthew T.; Shaaban, Cameron I.; Fong, Ashley H.; Welch-Reardon, Katrina M.; Papkoff, Jackie; Hughes, Christopher C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective It is well established that angiogenesis is a complex and coordinated multi-step process. However, there remains a lack of information about the genes that regulate individual stages of vessel formation. Here, we aimed to define the role of human interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1) during blood vessel formation. Approach and Results We identified IFITM1 in a microarray screen for genes differentially regulated by endothelial cells (ECs) during an in vitro angiogenesis assay and found that IFITM1 expression was strongly induced as ECs sprouted and formed lumens. We showed by immunohistochemistry that human IFITM1 was expressed by stable blood vessels in multiple organs. siRNA-mediated knockdown of IFITM1 expression spared EC sprouting but completely disrupted lumen formation, both in vitro and in an in vivo xeno-transplant model. ECs lacking IFITM1 underwent early stages of lumenogenesis (i.e. intracellular vacuole formation) but failed to mature or expand lumens. Coimmunoprecipitation studies confirmed occludin as an IFITM1 binding partner in ECs and immunocytochemistry showed a lack of occludin at endothelial tight junctions in the absence of IFITM1. Finally, time-lapse video microscopy revealed that IFITM1 is required for the formation of stable cell-cell contacts during endothelial lumen formation. Conclusions IFITM1 is essential for the formation of functional blood vessels and stabilizes EC-EC interactions during endothelial lumen formation by regulating tight junction assembly. PMID:24603679

  2. Interferon Gamma Induces Protective Non-Canonical Signaling Pathways in Primary Neurons

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Lauren A.; Henkins, Kristen M.; Kulkarni, Apurva; Matullo, Christine M.; Balachandran, Siddharth; Pattisapu, Anil K.; Rall, Glenn F.

    2016-01-01

    The signal transduction molecule, Stat1, is critical for the expression of type I and II interferon (IFN)-responsive genes in most cells; however, we previously showed that primary hippocampal mouse neurons express low basal Stat1, with delayed and attenuated expression of IFN-responsive genes. Moreover, IFNγ-dependent resolution of a neurotropic viral challenge in permissive mice is Stat1-independent. Here, we show that exogenous INFγ has no deleterious impact on neuronal viability, and staurosporine-induced apoptosis in neurons is significantly blunted by the addition of INFγ, suggesting that INFγ confers a pro-survival signal in neurons. To identify the pathways induced by INFγ in neurons, the activation of alternative signal transducers associated with INFγ signaling was assessed. Rapid and pronounced activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (Erk1/2) was observed in neurons, compared to a modest response in fibroblasts. Moreover, the absence of Stat1 in primary fibroblasts led to enhanced Erk activation following IFNγ addition, implying that the cell-specific availability of signal transducers can diversify the cellular response following IFN engagement. PMID:26190522

  3. Combination of OK432 and human interferon-alpha for treating viral-induced diabetes mellitus in mice.

    PubMed

    Kanda, T; Kogure, S; Nara, M; Tsukui, S; Utsugi, T; Tomono, S; Kawazu, S; Nagai, R; Kobayashi, I

    1998-01-26

    We investigated the therapeutic effects of OK432 (picibanil; CAS39325-1-4), an immunomodulator that is derived from the Su strain of Streptococcus pyogenes. This agent was administered alone or combined with human interferon-alpha in a murine model of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Interferon-alpha inhibits viral replication, reducing the incidence of virus-induced IDDM. Groups of DBA/2 mice (N = 25 per group) received an intraperitoneal injection of OK432 and interferon-alpha daily for 16 d beginning 1 d after inoculation with 500 plaque-forming units of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV). The dose of OK432 was one clinical unit (corresponding to 0.1 mg dried cells) per mouse, and that of interferon-alpha was 1 x 10(4) u/g. The animals were killed at random at 3 or 7 d after inoculation with EMCV. The survival rate of mice treated with the combination of OK432 and with interferon-alpha was significantly greater than that of the non-treated infected control animals (P < 0.01). Fasting levels of blood glucose were significantly lower in the mice administered the combination, than in the controls, both on day 3 (68 +/- 21 mg/dl vs. 270 +/- 135 mg/dl, P < 0.01) and on day 7 (101 +/- 29 mg/dl vs. 219 +/- 112 mg/dl, P < 0.01). Serum levels of insulin were significantly higher in the treated mice than in the controls (65 +/- 5 vs. 55 +/- 1 microU/ml, P < 0.05). However, in the mice treated with OK432 or interferon-alpha alone, the survival rate and the blood level of glucose and insulin did not differ from those of infected controls. Natural killer (NK) cell activity was significantly higher in the mice treated with the drug combination than in the controls on both days evaluated: day 3, 65 +/- 5 vs. 55 +/- 1%, n = 3, P < 0.05; day 7, 44 +/- 3 vs. 22 +/- 8%, n = 3, P < 0.05). Serum levels of murine interferon in the treated mice exceeded those in controls on both days evaluated (day 3, 671 U/ml vs. 442 U/ml; day 7, 57 U/ml vs. 43 U/ml). There were no significant

  4. Uninhibited thyroidal uptake of radioiodine despite iodine excess in amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Wiersinga, W M; Touber, J L; Trip, M D; van Royen, E A

    1986-08-01

    Iodine excess is associated with a low thyroidal radioiodine uptake due to dilution of the radioisotope by the increased stable iodide pool. We studied thyroidal uptake of radioisotopes in cardiac patients with iodine excess due to amiodarone treatment. 99mTc-pertechnetate scintigraphy was performed in 13 patients receiving long term amiodarone therapy. Five patients had a clearly visible thyroid gland, and 8 patients had no or a very faint thyroid image. All patients with positive scans had an increased plasma TSH level, whereas all patients with negative scans had a normal or absent TSH response to TRH. Thyroidal uptake and discharge of 123I were studied in 30 other patients. Group I (n = 11) had normal plasma TSH responses to TRH and no iodine excess, group II (n = 7) had normal TSH responses to TRH and excess iodine from metrizoate angiography in the previous month, group III (n = 7) had normal or decreased TSH responses to TRH while receiving long term amiodarone therapy, and group IV (n = 5) had increased TSH responses to TRH while receiving long term amiodarone therapy. The mean radioiodine uptake value in group I [5.4 +/- 0.8% (+/- SE) at 60 min] was higher than those in group II (2.3 +/- 0.7%; P = 0.009) and group III (0.8 +/- 0.3%; P = 0.0005), but not different from that in group IV (5.3 +/- 1.2%; P = NS). Radioiodine discharge after perchlorate (expressed as a percentage of the 60 min uptake) in group I (10.1 +/- 2.2%) was lower than those in group II (24.9 +/- 10.6%; P = 0.05) and group III (28.8 +/- 5.3%; P less than 0.005), whereas discharge in group IV (58.0 +/- 6.1%) was greater than those in group II (P less than 0.05) and group III (P less than 0.01). In conclusion, 1) thyroid visualization by 99mTc-pertechnetate and thyroid radioiodine uptake during iodine excess are decreased in euthyroid and hyperthyroid patients, but preserved in hypothyroid patients. 2) The organification defect induced by iodine excess is greater in iodide-induced

  5. TRIADIMEFON INDUCES RAT THYROID TUMORS THROUGH A NON-TSH MEDIATED MODE OF ACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are a class of fungicides used as agricultural and pharmaceutical products which inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis. Members of this class are hepatotoxic and cause mouse hepatocellular tumors and/or rat thyroid follicular cell tumors. Triadimefon-induced rat thyroid tumor...

  6. TRIADIMEFON INDUCES RAT THYROID TUMORS THROUGH A NON-TSH MEDIATED MODE OF ACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are a class of fungicides used as agricultural and pharmaceutical products which inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis. Members of this class are hepatotoxic and cause mouse hepatocellular tumors and/or rat thyroid follicular cell tumors. Triadimefon-induced rat thyroid tumor...

  7. Role of interferon-gamma in interleukin 12-induced pathology in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Car, B. D.; Eng, V. M.; Schnyder, B.; LeHir, M.; Shakhov, A. N.; Woerly, G.; Huang, S.; Aguet, M.; Anderson, T. D.; Ryffel, B.

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL-12) activates natural killer (NK) and T cells with the secondary synthesis and release of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and other cytokines. IL-12-induced organ alterations are reported for mice and the pathogenetic role of IFN-gamma is investigated by the use of mice deficient in the IFN-gamma receptor (IFN-gamma R-/-). IL-12 caused a rapid infiltration of liver and splenic red pulp with activated macrophages; this and increased NK cells resulted in a fivefold increase of splenic weight in wild-type mice. Splenomegaly was associated with myelosuppression and decreasing peripheral leukocyte counts. IL-12-induced changes in wild-type mice were associated with markedly increased IFN-gamma serum levels and up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II expression in various epithelia. IL-12 induced a qualitatively similar macrophage infiltration in IFN-gamma R-/- mice, less marked splenomegaly (to 2 x normal), and no MHC upregulation. Strikingly increased vascular endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression was apparent in both IFN-gamma R-/- and IFN-gamma R+/+ mice. Restricted to mutant mice was a severe, invariably lethal, interstitial, and perivascular pulmonary macrophage infiltration with diffuse pulmonary edema. Extensive quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed an increase of only IL-6 and IL-10 pulmonary gene transcripts in IFN-gamma R-/- mice compared with wild-type mice. IL-12-induced myelosuppression is due to IFN-gamma-release from NK cells and T cells, and is associated with macrophage activation and distinct MHC class I and II antigen upregulation. The pulmonary pathology in IFN-gamma R-/- mice, however, reveals a toxic potential for IL-12 and suggests that endogenous IFN-gamma plays a protective role in preventing fatal pulmonary disease in these mice. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7495294

  8. Role of STAT1 in Chlamydia-Induced Type-1 Interferon Production in Oviduct Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hosey, Kristen Lynette; Hu, Sishun

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that Chlamydia muridarum-infected murine oviduct epithelial cells (OE cells) secrete interferon β (IFN-β) in a mostly TLR3-dependent manner. However, C. muridarum-infected TLR3-deficient OE cells were still able to secrete detectable levels of IFN-β into the supernatants, suggesting that other signaling pathways contribute to Chlamydia-induced IFN-β synthesis in these cells. We investigated the role of STAT1 as a possible contributor in the Chlamydia-induced type-1 IFN production in wild-type (WT) and TLR3-deficient OE cells to ascertain its putative role at early- and late-times during Chlamydia infection. Our data show that C. muridarum infection significantly increased STAT1 gene expression and protein activation in WT OE cells; however, TLR3-deficient OE cells showed diminished STAT1 protein activation and gene expression. There was significantly less IFN-β detected in the supernatants of C. muridarum-infected OE cells derived from mice deficient in STAT1 when compared with WT OE cells, which suggest that STAT1 is required for the optimal synthesis of IFN-β during infection. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses of signaling components of the type-1 IFN signaling pathway demonstrated equal upregulation in the expression of STAT2 and IRF7 genes in the WT and TLR3-deficient OE cells, but no upregulation in these genes in the STAT1-deficient OE cells. Finally, experiments in which INFAR1 was blocked with neutralizing antibody revealed that IFNAR1-mediated signaling was critical to the Chlamydia-induced upregulation in IFN-α gene transcription, but had no role in the Chlamydia-induced upregulation in IFN-β gene transcription. PMID:26262558

  9. Interferon-gamma - Inducible Inflammation: Contribution to Aging and Aging-Associated Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Oxenkrug, Gregory

    2011-12-01

    Aging is associated with the chronic, low grade, Th-1 type inflammation. The key Th-1 type, pro-inflammatory cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFNG), transcriptionally induces the rate-limiting enzyme of tryptophan (TRY) - kynurenine (KYN) pathway, indoleamine 2,3- dioxygenase (IDO). Activation of IDO shunts TRY metabolism from production of serotonin (substrate of antidepressant effect) and its derivatives: N-acetylserotonin (an agonist to the receptors of brain derived neurotropic factor), and melatonin (regulator of sleep and other circadian rhythms), towards production of KYN and its derivatives (anxiogenic, neurotoxic and pro-oxidant factors). Some of kynurenines up-regulate nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Concurrently with activation of IDO, IFNG induces guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), the rate limiting enzyme of GTP conversion into BH2 (and increases formation of a stable derivative of BH2, neopterin, at the expense of production of BH4, the mandatory co-factor of NOS). Combination of increased NOS activity (by kynurenines) with decreased formation of BH4 leads to the uncoupling of NOS with consequent shift of arginine metabolism from biosynthesis of NO to formation of superoxide anion and other free radicals, and exacerbation of depression, anxiety and cognitive impairment caused by kynurenines. Polymorphism of IFNG (+874) T/A gene, that encodes production of IFNG protein, impacts the IDO and GTPCH activity that might be assessed in humans by KYN/TRY ratio and neopterin concentrations in biological fluids (e.g., blood, urine and spinal fluid). The hypothesis of IFNG inducible IDO/GTPCH inflammation cascade helps to understand the increased association between aging, inflammation and aging-associated psychiatric and medical (insulin resistance, obesity) disorders. Evaluation of markers of IFNG-inducible inflammation cascade might be used to assess the severity of corresponding behavioral and cognitive changes and the efficacy of pharmacological

  10. The contribution of type I interferon signaling to immunity induced by alphavirus replicon vaccines.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Staats, Herman F; Johnston, Robert

    2008-09-15

    The type I interferon (IFN) system is critical for protecting the mammalian host from numerous virus infections and plays a key role in shaping the antiviral adaptive immune response. In this report, the importance of type I IFN signaling was assessed in a mouse model of alphavirus-induced humoral immune induction. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from influenza virus (HA-VRP) were used to vaccinate both wildtype (wt) and IFN alpha/beta receptor knockout (RKO) mice. HA-VRP vaccination induced equivalent levels of flu-specific systemic IgG, mucosal IgG, and systemic IgA antibodies in both wt and IFN RKO mice. In contrast, HA-VRP vaccination of IFN RKO mice failed to induce significant levels of flu-specific mucosal IgA antibodies at multiple mucosal surfaces. In the VRP adjuvant system, co-delivery of null VRP with ovalbumin (OVA) protein significantly increased the levels of OVA-specific serum IgG, fecal IgG, and fecal IgA antibodies in both wt and RKO mice, suggesting that type I IFN signaling plays a less significant role in the VRP adjuvant effect. Taken together, these results suggest that (1) at least in regard to IFN signaling, the mechanisms which regulate alphavirus-induced immunity differ when VRP are utilized as expression vectors as opposed to adjuvants, and (2) type I IFN signaling is required for the induction of mucosal IgA antibodies directed against VRP-expressed antigen. These results shed new light on the regulatory networks which promote immune induction, and specifically mucosal immune induction, with alphavirus vaccine vectors.

  11. THE CONTRIBUTION OF TYPE I INTERFERON SIGNALING TO IMMUNITY INDUCED BY ALPHAVIRUS REPLICON VACCINES

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) system is critical for protecting the mammalian host from numerous virus infections and plays a key role in shaping the anti-viral adaptive immune response. In this report, the importance of type I IFN signaling was assessed in a mouse model of alphavirus-induced humoral immune induction. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from influenza virus (HA-VRP) were used to vaccinate both wildtype (wt) and IFN α/β receptor knockout (RKO) mice. HA-VRP vaccination induced equivalent levels of flu-specific systemic IgG, mucosal IgG, and systemic IgA antibodies in both wt and IFN RKO mice. In contrast, HA-VRP vaccination of IFN RKO mice failed to induce significant levels of flu-specific mucosal IgA antibodies at multiple mucosal surfaces. In the VRP adjuvant system, co-delivery of null VRP with ovalbumin (OVA) protein significantly increased the levels of OVA-specific serum IgG, fecal IgG, and fecal IgA antibodies in both wt and RKO mice, suggesting that type I IFN signaling plays a less significant role in the VRP adjuvant effect. Taken together, these results suggest that, 1) at least in regard to IFN signaling, the mechanisms which regulate VRP-induced immunity differ when VRP are utilized as expression vectors as opposed to adjuvants, and 2) type I IFN signaling is required for the induction of mucosal IgA antibodies directed against VRP-expressed antigen. These results potentially shed new light on the regulatory networks which promote immune induction, and specifically mucosal immune induction, with alphavirus vaccine vectors. PMID:18656518

  12. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R. . E-mail: nerurkar@pbrc.hawaii.edu

    2006-02-20

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML.

  13. Radiation-induced senescence-like terminal growth arrest in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Podtcheko, Alexei; Namba, Hiroyuki; Saenko, Vladimir; Ohtsuru, Akira; Starenki, Dmitriy; Meirmanov, Serik; Polona, Iryna; Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2005-04-01

    Premature senescence may play an important role as an acute, drug-, or ionizing radiation (IR)-inducible growth arrest program along with interphase apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether IR can induce senescence-like phenotype (SLP) associated with terminal growth arrest in the thyroid cells, and if so, to evaluate impact of terminal growth arrest associated with SLP in intrinsic radiosensitivity of various thyroid carcinomas. The induction of SLP in thyroid cells were identified by: (1) senescence associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-Gal) staining method, (2) dual-flow cytometric analysis of cell proliferation and side light scatter using vital staining with PKH-2 fluorescent dye, (3) double labeling for 5-bromodeoxyuridine and SA- beta-Gal, (4) Staining for SA-beta-Gal with consequent antithyroglobulin immunohistochemistry. IR induced SLP associated with terminal growth arrest in four thyroid cancer cells lines and in primary thyrocytes in time- and dose-dependent manner. Analysis of relationship between induction of SLP and radiosensitivity revealed a trend in which more radioresistant cell lines strongly tended to show lower specific SLP yields (r = -0.93, p = 0.068). We find out that SA-beta-Gal staining is detectable in irradiated ARO xenotransplants, but not in control tumors. We, therefore, conclude that induction of SLP with terminal growth arrest contribute to the elimination of clonogenic populations after IR.

  14. The effects and underlying mechanism of excessive iodide on excessive fluoride-induced thyroid cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongliang; Zeng, Qiang; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Zhao, Liang; Hou, Changchun; Zhang, Shun; Zhang, Lei; Fu, Gang; Liu, Yeming; Jiang, Chunyang; Chen, Xuemin; Wang, Aiguo

    2014-07-01

    In many regions, excessive fluoride and excessive iodide coexist in groundwater, which may lead to biphasic hazards to human thyroid. To explore fluoride-induced thyroid cytotoxicity and the mechanism underlying the effects of excessive iodide on fluoride-induced cytotoxicity, a thyroid cell line (Nthy-ori 3-1) was exposed to excessive fluoride and/or excessive iodide. Cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, apoptosis, and the expression levels of inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) pathway-related molecules were detected. Fluoride and/or iodide decreased cell viability and increased LDH leakage and apoptosis. ROS, the expression levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), IRE1, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and spliced X-box-binding protein-1 (sXBP-1) were enhanced by fluoride or the combination of the two elements. Collectively, excessive fluoride and excessive iodide have detrimental influences on human thyroid cells. Furthermore, an antagonistic interaction between fluoride and excessive iodide exists, and cytotoxicity may be related to IRE1 pathway-induced apoptosis.

  15. Enhancement of cytosolic tyrosine kinase activity by propylthiouracil-induced hyperplasia in the rat thyroid.

    PubMed

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R; Fantus, I G

    1989-01-01

    Hyperplasia of the thyroid gland induced by propylthiouracil (PTU) is a well established model of rapid cell proliferation in vivo. Recent evidence indicates that tyrosine kinase activity is associated with growth factor receptors and oncogene protein products and may have an important regulatory action in the control of cell growth. Thus, we examined tyrosine kinase activity in rat thyroid membrane and cytosol preparations at rest and during PTU-induced hyperplasia. Although kinase activity was present in a crude microsomal membrane preparation, no change was observed during thyroid growth. In contrast, tyrosine kinase activity assayed with the artificial substrate poly(Glu,Na:Tyr) 4:1 was present in normal rat thyroid cytosol and increased 2- to 6-fold during the rapid phase of hyperplasia in the first 5-10 days of PTU treatment. It declined to control values by day 15, when the size and DNA content of the thyroid reached a plateau. Preincubation of the cytosolic preparations with several peptides known to bind to and activate growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases failed to enhance the activity, suggesting, along with the cytosolic localization, that the activity was distinct from these receptors. By gel filtration chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, tyrosine kinase activity was associated with a 55 kDa protein. Partial purification over a poly(Glu,Na:Tyr)4:1-Sepharose column, yielded a protein that appeared capable of autophosphorylation. It is suggested that this tyrosine kinase plays a role in mediating the growth-promoting effects of this model of thyroid cell hyperplasia.

  16. Generalized flare of pustular psoriasis induced by PEGylated interferon-α2b therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Chi; Lee, J Yu-Yun

    2012-11-01

    New onset or exacerbation of psoriasis vulgaris has been reported in a small number of patients after interferon (IFN)-α therapy. Herein, we report a case of generalized flare of pustular psoriasis induced by PEGylated IFN-α2b (PEG-IFN-α2b) in a 59-year-old woman with a 15-year history of pustular psoriasis and chronic hepatitis C. Interferon-α therapy was discontinued and the rash resolved after treatment with cyclosporin and systemic methylprednisolone. The potential side effect of PEG-IFN-α2b in inducing or exacerbating psoriasis should be kept in mind when treating patients with a history of psoriasis or pustular psoriasis. © 2011 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2011 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  17. C7L Family of Poxvirus Host Range Genes Inhibits Antiviral Activities Induced by Type I Interferons and Interferon Regulatory Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Schoggins, John; Rose, Lloyd; Cao, Jingxin; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) K1L and C7L function equivalently in many mammalian cells to support VACV replication and antagonize antiviral activities induced by type I interferons (IFNs). While K1L is limited to orthopoxviruses, genes that are homologous to C7L are found in diverse mammalian poxviruses. In this study, we showed that the C7L homologues from sheeppox virus and swinepox virus could rescue the replication defect of a VACV mutant deleted of both K1L and C7L (vK1L−C7L−). Interestingly, the sheeppox virus C7L homologue could rescue the replication of vK1L−C7L− in human HeLa cells but not in murine 3T3 and LA-4 cells, in contrast to all other C7L homologues. Replacing amino acids 134 and 135 of the sheeppox virus C7L homologue, however, made it functional in the two murine cell lines, suggesting that these two residues are critical for antagonizing a putative host restriction factor which has some subtle sequence variation in human and murine cells. Furthermore, the C7L family of host range genes from diverse mammalian poxviruses were all capable of antagonizing type I IFN-induced antiviral activities against VACV. Screening of a library of more than 350 IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) identified interferon-regulated factor 1 (IRF1) as an inhibitor of vK1L−C7L− but not wild-type VACV. Expression of either K1L or C7L, however, rendered vK1L−C7L− resistant to IRF1-induced antiviral activities. Altogether, our data show that K1L and C7L antagonize IRF1-induced antiviral activities and that the host modulation function of C7L is evolutionally conserved in all poxviruses that can readily replicate in tissue-cultured mammalian cells. PMID:22345458

  18. Prostaglandin E2 potentiates interferon-γ-induced nitric oxide production in cultured rat microglia.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Takayuki; Nishiyama, Ryo; Sanada, Ayaka; Mutaguchi, Yukiko; Ioku, Anna; Umeki, Hirohisa; Kishimoto, Satoshi; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Kimura, Shinya H; Takemura, Motohiko

    2017-02-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) plays crucial roles in managing microglial activation through the prostanoid EP2 receptor, a PGE2 receptor subtype. In this study, we report that PGE2 enhances interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-induced nitric oxide production in microglia. IFN-γ increased the release of nitrite, a metabolite of nitric oxide, which was augmented by PGE2 , although PGE2 by itself slightly affects nitrite release. The potentiating effect of PGE2 was positively associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase. In contrast to nitrite release induced by IFN-γ, lipopolysaccharide-induced nitrite release was not affected by PGE2 . An EP2 agonist, ONO-AE1-259-01 also augmented IFN-γ-induced nitrite release, while an EP1 agonist, ONO-DI-004, an EP3 agonist, ONO-AE-248, or an EP4 agonist, ONO-AE1-329, did not. In addition, the potentiating effect of PGE2 was inhibited by an EP2 antagonist, PF-04418948, but not by an EP1 antagonist, ONO-8713, an EP3 antagonist, ONO-AE3-240, or an EP4 antagonist, ONO-AE3-208, at 10(-6)  M. Among the EP agonists, ONO-AE1-259-01 alone was able to accumulate cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), and among the EP antagonists, PF-04418948 was the only one able to inhibit PGE2 -increased intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation. On the other hand, IFN-γ promoted phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1, which was not affected by PGE2 . Furthermore, other prostanoid receptor agonists, PGD2 , PGF2α , iloprost, and U-46119, slightly affected IFN-γ-induced nitrite release. These results indicate that PGE2 potentiates IFN-γ-induced nitric oxide production in microglia through the EP2 receptor, which may shed light on one of the pro-inflammatory aspects of PGE2 . © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  19. Interferon gamma-induced human guanylate binding protein 1 inhibits mammary tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Lipnik, Karoline; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Gonin-Laurent, Nathalie; Kodajova, Petra; Petznek, Helga; Rungaldier, Stefanie; Astigiano, Simonetta; Ferrini, Silvano; Stürzl, Michael; Hohenadl, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) has recently been implicated in cancer immunosurveillance. Among the most abundant proteins induced by IFN-gamma are guanylate binding proteins (GBPs), which belong to the superfamily of large GTPases and are widely expressed in various species. Here, we investigated whether the well-known human GBP-1 (hGBP-1), which has been shown to exert antiangiogenic activities and was described as a prognostic marker in colorectal carcinomas, may contribute to an IFN-gamma-mediated tumor defense. To this end, an IFN-independent, inducible hGBP-1 expression system was established in murine mammary carcinoma (TS/A) cells, which were then transplanted into syngeneic immune-competent Balb/c mice. Animals carrying TS/A cells that had been given doxycycline for induction of hGBP-1 expression revealed a significantly reduced tumor growth compared with mock-treated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of the respective tumors demonstrated a tightly regulated, high-level expression of hGBP-1. No signs of an enhanced immunosurveillance were observed by investigating the number of infiltrating B and T cells. However, hemoglobin levels as well as the number of proliferating tumor cells were shown to be significantly reduced in hGBP-1-expressing tumors. This finding corresponded to reduced amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) released by hGBP-1-expressing TS/A cells in vitro and reduced VEGF-A protein levels in the corresponding mammary tumors in vivo. The results suggest that hGBP-1 may contribute to IFN-gamma-mediated antitumorigenic activities by inhibiting paracrine effects of tumor cells on angiogenesis. Consequently, owing to these activities GBPs might be considered as potent members in an innate, IFN-gamma-induced antitumoral defense system.

  20. Minocycline attenuates interferon-α-induced impairments in rat fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Bi, Qiang; Shi, Lijuan; Yang, Pingting; Wang, Jianing; Qin, Ling

    2016-06-30

    Extinction of conditioned fear is an important brain function for animals to adapt to a new environment. Accumulating evidence suggests that innate immune cytokines are involved in the pathology of psychotic disorders. However, the involvement of cytokines in fear dysregulation remains less investigated. In the present study, we investigated how interferon (IFN)-α disrupts the extinction of conditioned fear and propose an approach to rescue IFN-α-induced neurologic impairment. We used a rat model of auditory fear conditioning to study the effect of IFN-α on the fear memory process. IFN-α was infused directly into the amygdala of rats and examined the rats' behavioral response (freezing) to fear-conditioned stimuli. Immunohistochemical staining was used to examine the glia activity status of glia in the amygdala. The levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the amygdala were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We also administrated minocycline, a microglial activation inhibitor, before the IFN-α infusion to testify the possibility to reverse the IFN-α-induced effects. Infusing the amygdala with IFN-α impaired the extinction of conditioned fear in rats and activated microglia and astrocytes in the amygdala. Administering minocycline prevented IFN-α from impairing fear extinction. The immunohistochemical and biochemical results show that minocycline inhibited IFN-α-induced microglial activation and reduced IL-1β and TNF-α production. Our findings suggest that IFN-α disrupts the extinction of auditory fear by activating glia in the amygdala and provides direction for clinical studies of novel treatments to modulate the innate immune system in patients with psychotic disorders.

  1. Guanylate Binding Protein (GBP) 5 Is an Interferon-Inducible Inhibitor of HIV-1 Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Krapp, Christian; Hotter, Dominik; Gawanbacht, Ali; McLaren, Paul J; Kluge, Silvia F; Stürzel, Christina M; Mack, Katharina; Reith, Elisabeth; Engelhart, Susanne; Ciuffi, Angela; Hornung, Veit; Sauter, Daniel; Telenti, Amalio; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2016-04-13

    Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are an interferon (IFN)-inducible subfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) with well-established activity against intracellular bacteria and parasites. Here we show that GBP5 potently restricts HIV-1 and other retroviruses. GBP5 is expressed in the primary target cells of HIV-1, where it impairs viral infectivity by interfering with the processing and virion incorporation of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). GBP5 levels in macrophages determine and inversely correlate with infectious HIV-1 yield over several orders of magnitude, which may explain the high donor variability in macrophage susceptibility to HIV. Antiviral activity requires Golgi localization of GBP5, but not its GTPase activity. Start codon mutations in the accessory vpu gene from macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains conferred partial resistance to GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression. Our results identify GBP5 as an antiviral effector of the IFN response and may explain the increased frequency of defective vpu genes in primary HIV-1 strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanisms Underlying Interferon-γ-Induced Priming of Microglial Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nicholas G.; Schilling, Tom; Miralles, Francesc; Eder, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Microglial priming and enhanced reactivity to secondary insults cause substantial neuronal damage and are hallmarks of brain aging, traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. It is, thus, of particular interest to identify mechanisms involved in microglial priming. Here, we demonstrate that priming of microglia with interferon-γ (IFN γ) substantially enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) following stimulation of microglia with ATP. Priming of microglial ROS production was substantially reduced by inhibition of p38 MAPK activity with SB203580, by increases in intracellular glutathione levels with N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, by blockade of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 activity with gp91ds-tat or by inhibition of nitric oxide production with L-NAME. Together, our data indicate that priming of microglial ROS production involves reduction of intracellular glutathione levels, upregulation of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 and increases in nitric oxide production, and suggest that these simultaneously occurring processes result in enhanced production of neurotoxic peroxynitrite. Furthermore, IFNγ-induced priming of microglial ROS production was reduced upon blockade of Kir2.1 inward rectifier K+ channels with ML133. Inhibitory effects of ML133 on microglial priming were mediated via regulation of intracellular glutathione levels and nitric oxide production. These data suggest that microglial Kir2.1 channels may represent novel therapeutic targets to inhibit excessive ROS production by primed microglia in brain pathology. PMID:27598576

  3. Interferon-Inducible Protein 16: Insight into the Interaction with Tumor Suppressor p53

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jack C.C.; Lam, Robert; Brazda, Vaclav; Duan, Shili; Ravichandran, Mani; Ma, Justin; Xiao, Ting; Tempel, Wolfram; Zuo, Xiaobing; Wang, Yun-Xing; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2011-08-24

    IFI16 is a member of the interferon-inducible HIN-200 family of nuclear proteins. It has been implicated in transcriptional regulation by modulating protein-protein interactions with p53 tumor suppressor protein and other transcription factors. However, the mechanisms of interaction remain unknown. Here, we report the crystal structures of both HIN-A and HIN-B domains of IFI16 determined at 2.0 and 2.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Each HIN domain comprises a pair of tightly packed OB-fold subdomains that appear to act as a single unit. We show that both HIN domains of IFI16 are capable of enhancing p53-DNA complex formation and transcriptional activation via distinctive means. HIN-A domain binds to the basic C terminus of p53, whereas the HIN-B domain binds to the core DNA-binding region of p53. Both interactions are compatible with the DNA-bound state of p53 and together contribute to the effect of full-length IFI16 on p53-DNA complex formation and transcriptional activation.

  4. In vitro effects of interleukin-4 on interferon-gamma-induced macrophage activation.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Orme, I M; Pinto de Sousa, M I; Silva, M T

    1992-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) have been shown to be secreted by distinct T-helper cell subsets which have different roles in the determination of host resistance to infection. We studied the activity of these two cytokines on effector mechanisms of mouse macrophages. In vitro cultured bone marrow-derived macrophages from C57BL/6 mice were treated with IFN-gamma, IL-4, or a combination of both cytokines and the ability to secrete superoxide or nitrite or to restrict growth of Mycobacterium avium and Toxoplasma gondii was then evaluated. We found that IL-4 could inhibit the priming of macrophages for enhanced superoxide production induced by IFN-gamma although IL-4 when used alone did have some enhancing effect of its own. This effect of IL-4 on IFN-gamma-primed superoxide production was dose dependent and could be observed even if the treatment by IL-4 was done 24 hr after treatment by IFN-gamma. IL-4 did not, however, influence the enhanced production of nitrogen reactive intermediates, the induction of bacteriostatic activity against M. avium, or the restriction of T. gondii by IFN-gamma-treated macrophages, and did not have any effect of its own regarding these latter functions. PMID:1328038

  5. Resistance of paramyxoviridae to type I interferon-induced Bos taurus Mx1 dynamin.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Michael; Baise, Etienne; Pire, Grégory; Gérardin, Joel; Desmecht, Daniel

    2005-04-01

    Typical targets of type I interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral Mx proteins known to date have been shown to share a common profile: single-stranded negative-sense RNA viruses. Among them, human MxA is known to interfere with the replication of measles, human, and bovine parainfluenza-3 viruses (BoPi3V), that is, three members of the Paramyxoviridae family. Recently, bovine Mx1 protein (BoMx1) was included in the group of Mx proteins with authenticated antiviral potential, as it dramatically represses the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). As replication in bovine cells of Pi3, respiratory syncytial (RS), and Sendai (Se) viruses, all members of the same family, is known to be reduced on IFN-alpha incorporation into the culture medium, it was hypothesized that the BoMx1 pathway possibly was involved, its antiviral spectrum thus probably extending to Paramyxoviridae. In this study, probing of BoMx1-inhibiting effects was carried out by infecting a transgenic Vero cell line that allows tightly regulated conditional expression of BoMx1 after doxycycline treatment with a wide array of Paramyxoviridae. Expressing and nonexpressing cells displayed similar viability, cytopathic effects (CPEs), and amounts of infectious virus yields, whatever the infecting virus or the multiplicity of infection (moi) imposed. It is, therefore, concluded that BoMx1 does not interfere with Paramyxoviridae.

  6. An Interferon-Induced Digital Vasculitis-Like Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Oksana; Reiser, Jochen; Hasler, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a patient with chronic hepatitis C undergoing therapy with interferon (IFN) alpha who developed bilateral ischemia of his fingers. We present a 43-year-old man with a failed renal transplant and chronic hepatitis C. He was treated with 6 months of IFN therapy with good reduction of his viral load. He presented with 2 days of pain and swelling in the second digits of both hands. Workup for extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C was initiated including assessment for vasculitis because of cryoglobulin- and noncryoglobulin-related causes. Extensive assessment with invasive and noninvasive vascular testing was performed. His workup for vasculitis did not reveal any specific reasons for the ischemic changes. Angiography of his fingers showed mild stenotic changes but no evidence of systemic vasculitis. IFN therapy was stopped and over several weeks his symptoms resolved. The ischemic changes were attributed to IFN therapy. The patient in this report is unique because although IFN has been historically reported to cause a variety of vascular syndromes, the reported experience in hepatitis C patients is small. In addition, the likelihood of encountering vasculitis and vasculitis-like syndromes in patients with hepatitis C is significant, and the increasing use of IFN in this population makes drug-induced vascular changes an essential consideration in this subset of patients.

  7. Interferon alpha (IFNα)-induced TRIM22 interrupts HCV replication by ubiquitinating NS5A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Zhao, Xinhao; Sun, Dakang; Yang, Leilei; Chong, Chang; Pan, Yu; Chi, Xiumei; Gao, Yanhang; Wang, Moli; Shi, Xiaodong; Sun, Haibo; Lv, Juan; Gao, Yuanda; Zhong, Jin; Niu, Junqi; Sun, Bing

    2016-01-01

    TRIM22, a tripartite-motif (TRIM) protein, is upregulated upon interferon alpha (IFNα) administration to hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients. However, the physiological role of TRIM22 upregulation remains unclear. Here, we describe a potential antiviral function of TRIM22's targeting of the HCV NS5A protein. NS5A is important for HCV replication and for resistance to IFNα therapy. During the first 24 h following the initiation of IFNα treatment, upregulation of TRIM22 in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HCV patients correlated with a decrease in viral titer. This phenomenon was confirmed in the hepatocyte-derived cell line Huh-7, which is highly permissive for HCV infection. TRIM22 over-expression inhibited HCV replication, and Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of TRIM22 diminished IFNα-induced anti-HCV function. Furthermore, we determined that TRIM22 ubiquitinates NS5A in a concentration-dependent manner. In summary, our results suggest that TRIM22 upregulation is associated with HCV decline during IFNα treatment and plays an important role in controlling HCV replication in vitro.

  8. Protective role of interferon-induced Mx GTPases against influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Haller, O; Staeheli, P; Kochs, G

    2009-04-01

    Mx proteins are interferon-induced large GTPases with antiviral activities. They inhibit a wide range of viruses by blocking early stages of the replication cycles. Importantly, Mx GTPases also suppress the growth of highly pathogenic influenza A viruses, such as currently circulating H5N1 viruses or the pandemic H1N1 virus strain of 1918. In this paper, the authors review the properties of Mx proteins and discuss their role in host defence against highly pathogenic viruses. The authors further suggest that mammalian Mx proteins may normally provide a barrier against zoonotic transmission of avian influenza A viruses and that acquired resistance to the antiviral action of human MxA may be one factor, among many others, that facilitates the spread of pandemic strains in human populations. The presently available evidence suggests that Mx proteins of domestic chickens lack the ability to efficiently combat avian influenza viruses known to cause devastating infections in this species. The deliberate introduction of an antivirally active Mx gene originating from resistant birds or mammals may confer some degree of protection and thus stop commercial birds from serving as amplifying hosts of potentially pandemic influenza virus strains.

  9. Functional immobilization of interferon-gamma induces neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Leipzig, Nic D; Xu, Changchang; Zahir, Tasneem; Shoichet, Molly S

    2010-05-01

    Stem cell transplantation provides significant promise to regenerative strategies after injury in the central nervous system. Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) have been studied in terms of their regenerative capacity and their ability to differentiate into neurons when exposed to various soluble factors. In this study, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was compared with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and erythropoietin and was shown to be the best single growth factor for inducing neuronal differentiation from adult rat brain-derived NSPCs. Next, IFN-gamma was surface immobilized to a methacrylamide chitosan (MAC) scaffold that was specifically designed to match the modulus of brain tissue and neuronal differentiation of NSPCs was examined in vitro by immunohistochemistry. Bioactive IFN-gamma was successfully immobilized and quantified by ELISA. Both soluble and immobilized IFN-gamma on MAC surfaces showed dose dependent neuronal differentiation with soluble saturation occurring at 100 ng/mL and the most effective immobilized IFN-gamma dose at 37.5 ng/cm(2), where significantly more neurons resulted compared with controls including soluble IFN-gamma.

  10. Elevated serum interferon γ-induced protein 10 kDa is associated with TAFRO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Noriko; Gion, Yuka; Kondo, Eisei; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Masunari, Taro; Moro, Hiroshi; Nikkuni, Koji; Takai, Kazue; Hagihara, Masao; Hashimoto, Yuko; Yokota, Kenji; Okamoto, Masataka; Nakao, Shinji; Yoshino, Tadashi; Sato, Yasuharu

    2017-02-13

    Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder. It is characterized by inflammatory symptoms, and interleukin (IL)-6 contributes to the disease pathogenesis. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) often drives hypercytokinemia in MCD, although the etiology of HHV-8-negative MCD is idiopathic (iMCD). A distinct subtype of iMCD that shares a constellation of clinical features including thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O) has been reported as TAFRO-iMCD, however the differences in cytokine profiles between TAFRO-iMCD and iMCD have not been established. We retrospectively compared levels of serum interferon γ-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA, interleukin (IL)-10, and other cytokines between 11 cases of TAFRO-iMCD, 6 cases of plasma cell type iMCD, and 21 healthy controls. During flare-ups, patients with TAFRO-iMCD had significantly higher serum IP-10 and tended to have lower PDGF-AA levels than the other 2 groups. In addition, serum IL-10, IL-23, and vascular endothelial growth factor-A were elevated in both TAFRO-iMCD and iMCD. Elevated serum IP-10 is associated with inflammatory diseases including infectious diseases. There was a strong correlation between high serum IP-10 and the presence of TAFRO-iMCD, suggesting that IP-10 might be involved in the pathogenesis of TAFRO-iMCD.

  11. Interferon-induced inhibition of Chlamydia trachomatis: dissociation from antiviral and antiproliferative effects.

    PubMed Central

    de la Maza, L M; Peterson, E M; Goebel, J M; Fennie, C W; Czarniecki, C W

    1985-01-01

    The yield of infectious Chlamydia trachomatis was analyzed in human (HeLa) and mouse (McCoy) cell lines treated with the human interferon (IFN) subtypes IFN-alpha A and IFN-alpha D, with their hybrids [IFN-alpha AD (BglII), IFN-alpha AD (PvuII), and IFN-alpha DA (BglII)] constructed in vitro from their expression plasmids, or with IFN-beta 1 or buffy coat IFN. In HeLa cells, a significant inhibition of Chlamydia infectivity was obtained with IFN-alpha D, IFN-alpha DA (BglII), and buffy coat IFN. In McCoy cells, IFN-alpha AD (BglII) and IFN-alpha AD (PvuII) induced a strong degree of inhibition of Chlamydia infectivity. In McCoy cells, there was a correlation among the antichlamydial, antiviral, and antiproliferative activities of the different IFNs tested. In HeLa cells, however, the ability of a particular IFN subtype to inhibit Chlamydia infectivity did not always correlate with its inhibitory effects on encephalomyocarditis virus replication or with its antiproliferative activity. PMID:3972450

  12. Interferon-γ-inducible Rab20 regulates endosomal morphology and EGFR degradation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pei, Gang; Schnettger, Laura; Bronietzki, Marc; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the molecular players that regulate changes in the endocytic pathway during immune activation. Here we investigate the role of Rab20 in the endocytic pathway during activation of macrophages. Rab20 is associated with endocytic structures, but the function of this Rab GTPase in the endocytic pathway remains poorly characterized. We find that in macrophages, Rab20 expression and endosomal association significantly increase after interferon-γ (IFN-γ) treatment. Moreover, IFN-γ and Rab20 expression induce a dramatic enlargement of endosomes. These enlarged endosomes are the result of homotypic fusion promoted by Rab20 expression. The expression of Rab20 or the dominant-negative mutant Rab20T19N does not affect transferrin or dextran 70 kDa uptake. However, knockdown of Rab20 accelerates epidermal growth factor (EGF) trafficking to LAMP-2-positive compartments and EGF receptor degradation. Thus this work defines a function for Rab20 in the endocytic pathway during immune activation of macrophages.

  13. Interferon-Induced Genes of the Expanded IFIT Family Show Conserved Antiviral Activities in Non-Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    Pereiro, Patricia; Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Costa, Maria M.; Dios, Sonia; Romero, Alejandro; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) are involved in the protective response to viral infection, although the precise mechanism of IFITs for reducing viral proliferation is currently unknown. The interaction with the translation initiation factor eIF-3 or viral proteins and the sequestering of viral RNA have been proposed as potential antiviral functions for these proteins. In humans, four members of this family have been characterized. Nevertheless, information about these proteins in fish is almost non-existent. Exploiting the conservation of synteny between human and zebrafish genomes, we have identified ten members of the IFIT family located on four different chromosomes. The induction of these genes was examined both in vitro and in vivo after interferon (IFN) administration and rhabdovirus challenge. Whereas an induction of IFIT genes was observed after interferon treatments (IFNΦ1, IFNΦ2 and IFNΦ3), the viral infection did not affect these IFN-induced genes in vitro, and even reduced the IFN-induced expression of these genes. The response was largely different in vivo, with a broad up-regulation of IFIT genes after viral challenge. In addition, three selected IFITs were cloned in an expression vector and microinjected into zebrafish larvae to examine the protective effect of IFITs upon viral infection. Reduction in the mortality rate was observed confirming a conserved antiviral function in non-mammalian species. PMID:24950240

  14. Increased depressive ratings in patients with hepatitis C receiving interferon-alpha-based immunotherapy are related to interferon-alpha-induced changes in the serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorso, Stefania; Marino, Valentina; Puzella, Antonella; Pasquini, Massimo; Biondi, Massimo; Artini, Marco; Almerighi, Cristiana; Verkerk, Robert; Meltzer, Herbert; Maes, Michael

    2002-02-01

    There is now evidence that repeated administration of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) to patients with chronic active hepatitis and cancers induces depressive symptoms. There is also evidence that induction of the cytokine network modulates the serotonergic system and that major depression is related to activation of the cytokine network and disturbances in the serotonergic metabolism. The aims of this study were to examine the effects of IFN-alpha-based immunotherapy on the development of depressive symptoms in relation to its effects on plasma tryptophan and kynurenine and serum serotonin (5-HT). Eighteen patients affected by chronic active hepatitis C were treated with IFN-alpha (3-6 million units subcutaneously three to six times a week for 6 months) and had measurements of the previous parameters before starting immunotherapy and 2, 4, 16, and 24 weeks later. Severity of depression and anxiety were measured with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A) scale, respectively. Immunochemotherapy with IFN-alpha (1) significantly increased the MADRS and HAM-A scores and serum kynurenine concentrations and (2) significantly reduced plasma tryptophan and serum 5-HT concentrations. IFN-alpha-based immunotherapy significantly increased the kynurenine per tryptophan quotient, which estimates the activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, the major tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme, which is induced by IFNs. There are significant relationships between the IFN-alpha-induced changes in the MADRS score and serum kynurenine (positive) and 5-HT (negative) concentrations. Immunotherapy with IFN-alpha significantly increases the severity of depressive symptoms. The latter is related to changes in the serotonergic system, such as depletion of serum 5-HT and induction of the catabolism of tryptophan to kynurenine. It is suggested that the IFN-alpha-induced changes in the serotonergic turnover could play a role in the

  15. Infectious salmon anemia virus is a powerful inducer of key genes of the type I interferon system of Atlantic salmon, but is not inhibited by interferon.

    PubMed

    Kileng, Øyvind; Brundtland, Marthe Iren; Robertsen, Børre

    2007-08-01

    Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is an aquatic orthomyxovirus causing disease and high mortality in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). The virus is thus apparently able to initiate replication without being hampered by the host's immune system. In this work we have studied the role of the type I interferon (IFN) system of Atlantic salmon in protection against ISAV. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study the expression of type I IFN and the IFN stimulated genes Mx and ISG15 in TO cells and live fish in response to infection with ISAV. The in vitro studies showed that ISAV was a powerful inducer of Mx and ISG15 genes in TO cells and that induction started relatively early during infection. In contrast, IFN transcripts were induced later than both Mx and ISG15 transcripts in the ISAV infected cells indicating that Mx and ISG15 are induced through IFN-independent pathways in the early stages of ISAV infection. A cohabitee infection trial with ISAV in Atlantic salmon resulted in high mortality, even though elevated levels of IFN, Mx and ISG15 transcripts in the head kidney and liver were observed. Immunoblotting confirmed the presence of Mx and ISG15 proteins in the liver of infected salmon. In order to evaluate whether the type I IFN system is able to inhibit replication of ISAV, TO cells were stimulated with recombinant salmon IFN-alpha1 (rSasaIFN-alpha1) and subsequently infected with virus. The rSasaIFN-alpha1 showed no protection of TO cells against ISAV, but full protection against IPNV. These data demonstrate that key proteins of the type I IFN system are induced during an ISAV infection, but that they are unable to inhibit the replication of ISAV in vitro and in vivo. ISAV must thus encode genes that enable the virus to counteract IFN induced antiviral proteins of the host.

  16. Early thyroid hormone-induced gene expression changes in N2a-β neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bedó, Gabriela; Pascual, Angel; Aranda, Ana

    2011-10-01

    Thyroid hormone has long been known to regulate neural development. Hypothyroidism during pregnancy and early postnatal period has severe neurological consequences including even mental retardation. The purpose of this study was to characterize gene expression pattern during thyroid hormone-induced differentiation of neuro-2a β cells in order to select "direct response genes" for further analysis. In this neuroblastoma cell line, thyroid hormone blocks proliferation and induces differentiation. Changes in gene expression level were examined after a T3 treatment of 3 and 24 h using cDNA arrays. Sixteen genes were significantly up-regulated and 79 down-regulated by T3 treatment. Five up-regulated genes not previously described as regulated by thyroid hormone and selected for their putative significance to understand T3 action on cell differentiation, were verified by RT-PCR analysis. The transcription factors Phox2a and basic helix-loop-helix domain containing, class B2 mRNAs exhibited a clear increase after 3- and 24-h treatment. The guanine-nucleotide exchange factor RalGDS was greatly up-regulated after 3-h treatment but not 24 h after. The results suggest an early involvement of these genes in T3 action during neuroblastoma cell differentiation probably mediating later changes in gene expression pattern.

  17. Complex Interplay between HIV-1 Capsid and MX2-Independent Alpha Interferon-Induced Antiviral Factors.

    PubMed

    Bulli, Lorenzo; Apolonia, Luis; Kutzner, Juliane; Pollpeter, Darja; Goujon, Caroline; Herold, Nikolas; Schwarz, Sarah-Marie; Giernat, Yannick; Keppler, Oliver T; Malim, Michael H; Schaller, Torsten

    2016-08-15

    Type I interferons (IFNs), including IFN-α, upregulate an array of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) and potently suppress Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infectivity in CD4(+) T cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and dendritic cells. Recently, we and others identified ISG myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) as an inhibitor of HIV-1 nuclear entry. However, additional antiviral blocks exist upstream of nuclear import, but the ISGs that suppress infection, e.g., prior to (or during) reverse transcription, remain to be defined. We show here that the HIV-1 CA mutations N74D and A105T, both of which allow escape from inhibition by MX2 and the truncated version of cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor 6 (CPSF6), as well as the cyclophilin A (CypA)-binding loop mutation P90A, all increase sensitivity to IFN-α-mediated inhibition. Using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 technology, we demonstrate that the IFN-α hypersensitivity of these mutants in THP-1 cells is independent of MX2 or CPSF6. As expected, CypA depletion had no additional effect on the behavior of the P90A mutant but modestly increased the IFN-α sensitivity of wild-type virus. Interestingly, the infectivity of wild-type or P90A virus could be rescued from the MX2-independent IFN-α-induced blocks in THP-1 cells by treatment with cyclosporine (Cs) or its nonimmunosuppressive analogue SDZ-NIM811, indicating that Cs-sensitive host cell cyclophilins other than CypA contribute to the activity of IFN-α-induced blocks. We propose that cellular interactions with incoming HIV-1 capsids help shield the virus from recognition by antiviral effector mechanisms. Thus, the CA protein is a fulcrum for the dynamic interplay between cell-encoded functions that inhibit or promote HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 is the causative agent of AIDS. During acute HIV-1 infection, numerous proinflammatory cytokines are produced, including type I interferons (IFNs). IFNs can limit HIV-1

  18. Retinoic Acid Induces Expression of the Thyroid Hormone Transporter, Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 (Mct8)*

    PubMed Central

    Kogai, Takahiko; Liu, Yan-Yun; Richter, Laura L.; Mody, Kaizeen; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Brent, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) and thyroid hormone are critical for differentiation and organogenesis in the embryo. Mct8 (monocarboxylate transporter 8), expressed predominantly in the brain and placenta, mediates thyroid hormone uptake from the circulation and is required for normal neural development. RA induces differentiation of F9 mouse teratocarcinoma cells toward neurons as well as extraembryonal endoderm. We hypothesized that Mct8 is functionally expressed in F9 cells and induced by RA. All-trans-RA (tRA) and other RA receptor (RAR) agonists dramatically (>300-fold) induced Mct8. tRA treatment significantly increased uptake of triiodothyronine and thyroxine (4.1- and 4.3-fold, respectively), which was abolished by a selective Mct8 inhibitor, bromosulfophthalein. Sequence inspection of the Mct8 promoter region and 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR analysis in F9 cells identified 11 transcription start sites and a proximal Sp1 site but no TATA box. tRA significantly enhanced Mct8 promoter activity through a consensus RA-responsive element located 6.6 kilobases upstream of the coding region. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated binding of RAR and retinoid X receptor to the RA response element. The promotion of thyroid hormone uptake through the transcriptional up-regulation of Mct8 by RAR is likely to be important for extraembryonic endoderm development and neural differentiation. This finding demonstrates cross-talk between RA signaling and thyroid hormone signaling in early development at the level of the thyroid hormone transporter. PMID:20573951

  19. Chronic dietary exposure to environmental organochlorine contaminants induces thyroid gland lesions in Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus).

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Wolkers, Hans; Leifsson, Pall S; Iburg, Tine; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Fuglei, Eva; Ahlstrøm, Oystein; Dietz, Rune; Kirkegaard, Maja; Muir, Derek C G; Jørgensen, Even H

    2009-08-01

    The impact of dietary organochlorine (OC) exposure on thyroid gland pathology was studied in farmed male Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus). The exposed group (n=16) was fed a diet based on wild minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) blubber as a main fat source in order to mimic the exposure to OC cocktails in the Artic environment. This resulted in an exposure of approximately 17 microg Sigma OC/kg day and a Sigma OC residue adipose tissue and liver concentration of 1700 and 4470 ng/gl.w., respectively, after 16 months of exposure. Control foxes (n=13) were fed a diet with pork (Sus scrofa) fat as a main fat source containing significantly lower OC concentrations. The food composition fed to the control and exposed group was standardized for nutrient contents. Four OC-related histopathological changes were found: (1) flat-epithelial-cell true thyroid cysts (TC) characterized by neutral content; (2) remnants of simple squamous epithelial-cell embryonic ducts containing neutral debris (EDN); (3) remnants of stratified squamous epithelial-cell embryonic ducts containing acid mucins often accompanied with debris of leukocyte inflammatory nature (EDM) and (4) disseminated thyroid C-cell hyperplasia (HPC). Of these, the prevalence of TC, EDN and HPC was significantly highest in the exposed group (chi(2) test: all p<0.04). The study shows that the OC mixture in minke whale blubber may cause development of thyroid gland cysts, C-cell hyperplasia and increase the prevalence of cystic remnants of embryonic ducts. The mechanism causing these effects could include endocrine disruption of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, a disturbance of the calcium homeostasis/metabolism or energy metabolism or immune suppression. Because concentrations of OCs are higher in wild Arctic foxes, it is likely that these animals could suffer from similar OC-induced thyroid gland pathological and functional changes.

  20. Donor dependent, interferoninduced HLA-DR expression on human neutrophils in vivo

    PubMed Central

    REINISCH, W; LICHTENBERGER, C; STEGER, G; TILLINGER, W; SCHEINER, O; GANGL, A; MAURER, D; WILLHEIM, M

    2003-01-01

    Neutrophils are effector cells of innate immune responses. Stimulated by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) to express HLA-DR, neutrophils acquire accessory cell functions for superantigen-mediated T cell activation. In vitro HLA-DR induction on neutrophils varies in a functionally relevant way as levels of MHC class II expression and magnitude of neutrophil induced T cell responses are correlated functions. The aim of this study was to assess whether IFN-γ induces HLA-DR on human neutrophils in a donor dependent fashion in vivo and to define regulatory events operative in MHC class II expression of neutrophils. In vivo administration of rhIFN-γ in 55 patients with renal cell carcinoma resulted in a varying increase of HLA-DR on neutrophils. By setting a cut-off for response at>10% HLA-DR positive neutrophils, HLA-DR responders (51%) were as frequent as nonresponders (49%). In vivo kinetic studies revealed a peak expression of HLA-DR on neutrophils 48 h after rhIFN-γ application, while nonresponders remained HLA-DR negative over a 72-h period. In vitro IFN-γ stimulated neutrophils recapitulated the response profiles observed in vivo. No differences in IFN-γ dependent CD64 and invariant chain expression, and IFN-γ serum levels were observed among the response subgroups. HLA-DR mRNA was detected in neutrophils from rhIFN-γ treated responders and nonresponders, HLA-DR protein solely in lysates of responder neutrophils. IFN-γ stimulated HLA-DR expression on neutrophils is subject to donor dependent variations in vivo, which result from rather post-transcriptional than transcriptional regulation. Due to their abundance in inflammatory reactions heterogeneous HLA-DR expression by neutrophils could determine the outcome of superantigen-driven diseases. PMID:12930377

  1. Experimental Neuromyelitis Optica Induces a Type I Interferon Signature in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Nathalie; Zeka, Bleranda; Schanda, Kathrin; Fujihara, Kazuo; Illes, Zsolt; Dahle, Charlotte; Reindl, Markus; Lassmann, Hans; Bradl, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an acute inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) which predominantly affects spinal cord and optic nerves. Most patients harbor pathogenic autoantibodies, the so-called NMO-IgGs, which are directed against the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4) on astrocytes. When these antibodies gain access to the CNS, they mediate astrocyte destruction by complement-dependent and by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In contrast to multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who benefit from therapies involving type I interferons (I-IFN), NMO patients typically do not profit from such treatments. How is I-IFN involved in NMO pathogenesis? To address this question, we made gene expression profiles of spinal cords from Lewis rat models of experimental neuromyelitis optica (ENMO) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We found an upregulation of I-IFN signature genes in EAE spinal cords, and a further upregulation of these genes in ENMO. To learn whether the local I-IFN signature is harmful or beneficial, we induced ENMO by transfer of CNS antigen-specific T cells and NMO-IgG, and treated the animals with I-IFN at the very onset of clinical symptoms, when the blood-brain barrier was open. With this treatment regimen, we could amplify possible effects of the I-IFN induced genes on the transmigration of infiltrating cells through the blood brain barrier, and on lesion formation and expansion, but could avoid effects of I-IFN on the differentiation of pathogenic T and B cells in the lymph nodes. We observed that I-IFN treated ENMO rats had spinal cord lesions with fewer T cells, macrophages/activated microglia and activated neutrophils, and less astrocyte damage than their vehicle treated counterparts, suggesting beneficial effects of I-IFN. PMID:26990978

  2. Iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in horse and dog thyroid.

    PubMed

    Cochaux, P; Van Sande, J; Swillens, S; Dumont, J E

    1987-12-30

    The characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in dog thyroid slices have been previously described [Van Sande, J., Cochaux, P. and Dumont, J. E. (1985) Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 40, 181-192]. In the present study we investigated the characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in dog and horse thyroid. The inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation by iodide in stimulated horse thyroid slices was similar to that observed in dog thyroid slices. The inhibition was observed in slices stimulated by thyroid-stimulating hormone, cholera toxin and forskolin. Increasing the concentration of the stimulators did not overcome the iodide-induced inhibition. Adenylate cyclase activity, assayed in crude homogenates or in plasma-membrane-containing particulates (100,000 x g pellets), was lower in homogenates or in particulates prepared from iodide-treated slices than from control slices. This inhibition was observed on the cyclase activity stimulated by forskolin, fluoride or guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imino]triphosphate, but also on the basal activity. It was relieved when the homogenate was prepared from slices incubated with iodide and methimazole. Similar results were obtained with dog thyroid. The inhibition persisted when the particulate fraction was washed three times during 1 h at 100,000 x g, in the presence of bovine serum albumin or increasing concentration of KCl. It was similar whatever the duration of the cyclase assay, in a large range of protein concentration. These results indicate that a stable modification of adenylate cyclase activity, closely related to the plasma membrane, was induced when slices were incubated with iodide. Iodide inhibition did not modify the affinity of adenylate cyclase for its substrate (MgATP), but induced a decrease of the maximal velocity of the enzyme. The percentage inhibition was slightly decreased when Mg2+ concentration increased, and markedly decreased when Mn2

  3. USP18-based negative feedback control is induced by type I and type III interferons and specifically inactivates interferon α response.

    PubMed

    François-Newton, Véronique; Magno de Freitas Almeida, Gabriel; Payelle-Brogard, Béatrice; Monneron, Danièle; Pichard-Garcia, Lydiane; Piehler, Jacob; Pellegrini, Sandra; Uzé, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN) are cytokines that are rapidly secreted upon microbial infections and regulate all aspects of the immune response. In humans 15 type I IFN subtypes exist, of which IFN α2 and IFN β are used in the clinic for treatment of different pathologies. IFN α2 and IFN β are non redundant in their expression and in their potency to exert specific bioactivities. The more recently identified type III IFNs (3 IFN λ or IL-28/IL-29) bind an unrelated cell-type restricted receptor. Downstream of these two receptor complexes is a shared Jak/Stat pathway. Several mechanisms that contribute to the shut down of the IFN-induced signaling have been described at the molecular level. In particular, it has long been known that type I IFN induces the establishment of a desensitized state. In this work we asked how the IFN-induced desensitization integrates into the network built by the multiple type I IFN subtypes and type III IFNs. We show that priming of cells with either type I IFN or type III IFN interferes with the cell's ability to further respond to all IFN α subtypes. Importantly, primed cells are differentially desensitized in that they retain sensitivity to IFN β. We show that USP18 is necessary and sufficient to induce differential desensitization, by impairing the formation of functional binding sites for IFN α2. Our data highlight a new type of differential between IFNs α and IFN β and underline a cross-talk between type I and type III IFN. This cross-talk could shed light on the reported genetic variation in the IFN λ loci, which has been associated with persistence of hepatitis C virus and patient's response to IFN α2 therapy.

  4. Interferon Beta and Interferon Alpha 2a Differentially Protect Head and Neck Cancer Cells from Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Induced Oncolysis.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Marlena M; Liu, Jingfang; Rajani, Karishma; D'Agostino, Ralph; Lyles, Douglas S; Porosnicu, Mercedes

    2015-08-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) preferentially kill cancer cells due in part to defects in their antiviral responses upon exposure to type I interferons (IFNs). However, IFN responsiveness of some tumor cells confers resistance to OV treatment. The human type I IFNs include one IFN-β and multiple IFN-α subtypes that share the same receptor but are capable of differentially inducing biological responses. The role of individual IFN subtypes in promoting tumor cell resistance to OV is addressed here. Two human IFNs which have been produced for clinical use, IFN-α2a and IFN-β, were compared for activity in protecting human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) lines from oncolysis by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Susceptibility of HNSCC lines to killing by VSV varied. VSV infection induced increased production of IFN-β in resistant HNSCC cells. When added exogenously, IFN-β was significantly more effective at protecting HNSCC cells from VSV oncolysis than was IFN-α2a. In contrast, normal keratinocytes and endothelial cells were protected equivalently by both IFN subtypes. Differential responsiveness of tumor cells to IFN-α and -β was further supported by the finding that autocrine IFN-β but not IFN-α promoted survival of HNSCC cells during persistent VSV infection. Therefore, IFN-α and -β differentially affect VSV oncolysis, justifying the evaluation and comparison of IFN subtypes for use in combination with VSV therapy. Pairing VSV with IFN-α2a may enhance selectivity of oncolytic VSV therapy for HNSCC by inhibiting VSV replication in normal cells without a corresponding inhibition in cancer cells. There has been a great deal of progress in the development of oncolytic viruses. However, a major problem is that individual cancers vary in their sensitivity to oncolytic viruses. In many cases this is due to differences in their production and response to interferons (IFNs). The experiments described here compared the responses of head and neck squamous

  5. Alpha Lipoic Acid Attenuates Radiation-Induced Thyroid Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jung Hwa; Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Woo, Seung Hoon; Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae-Kwon; Jung, Myeong Hee; Kim, Jin Hyun; Hahm, Jong Ryeal

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the thyroid to radiation during radiotherapy of the head and neck is often unavoidable. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of α-lipoic acid (ALA) on radiation-induced thyroid injury in rats. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: healthy controls (CTL), irradiated (RT), received ALA before irradiation (ALA + RT), and received ALA only (ALA, 100 mg/kg, i.p.). ALA was treated at 24 h and 30 minutes prior to irradiation. The neck area including the thyroid gland was evenly irradiated with 2 Gy per minute (total dose of 18 Gy) using a photon 6-MV linear accelerator. Greater numbers of abnormal and unusually small follicles in the irradiated thyroid tissues were observed compared to the controls and the ALA group on days 4 and 7 after irradiation. However, all pathologies were decreased by ALA pretreatment. The quantity of small follicles in the irradiated rats was greater on day 7 than day 4 after irradiation. However, in the ALA-treated irradiated rats, the numbers of small and medium follicles were significantly decreased to a similar degree as in the control and ALA-only groups. The PAS-positive density of the colloid in RT group was decreased significantly compared with all other groups and reversed by ALA pretreatment. The high activity index in the irradiated rats was lowered by ALA treatment. TGF-ß1 immunoreactivity was enhanced in irradiated rats and was more severe on the day 7 after radiation exposure than on day 4. Expression of TGF-ß1 was reduced in the thyroid that had undergone ALA pretreatment. Levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1ß and IL-6) did not differ significantly between the all groups. This study provides that pretreatment with ALA decreased the severity of radiation-induced thyroid injury by reducing inflammation and fibrotic infiltration and lowering the activity index. Thus, ALA could be used to ameliorate radiation-induced thyroid injury. PMID:25401725

  6. Role of the interferon-inducible IFI16 gene in the induction of ICAM-1 by TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Sponza, Simone; De Andrea, Marco; Mondini, Michele; Gugliesi, Francesca; Gariglio, Marisa; Landolfo, Santo

    2009-01-01

    The Interferon-inducible gene IFI16, a member of the HIN200 family, is activated by oxidative stress and cell density, in addition to Interferons, and it is implicated in the regulation of endothelial cell proliferation and vessel formation in vitro. We have previously shown that IFI16 is required for proinflammatory gene stimulation by IFN-gamma through the NF-kappaB complex. To examine whether IFI16 induction might be extended to other proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, we used the strategy of the RNA interference to knock down IFI16 expression, and analyze the capability of TNF-alpha to stimulate intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 or CD54) expression in the absence of functional IFI16. Our studies demonstrate that IFI16 mediates ICAM-1 stimulation by TNF-alpha through the NF-kappaB pathway, thus reinforcing the role of the IFI16 molecule in the inflammation process.

  7. Hyperexpression of interferon-gamma-induced MHC class II genes associated with reorganization of the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Ulevitch, R. J.; Kline, L.; Schreiber, R. D.; Pingel, J.; Amaldi, I.; Reith, W.; Mach, B.

    1991-01-01

    Class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products are key recognition units in the induction and regulation of the immune response. Expression of class I and class II may be constitutive or inducible by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). A key step in the induction of MHC genes is recognition of IFN-gamma by its membrane receptor. The work described here examines the regulation of the occupied IFN-gamma receptor by the cytoskeleton. To do this the authors have used the fungal metabolites dihydrocytochalasin B (DHCB) and cytochalasin D (CD), substances that bind to actin filaments and thereby disrupt the cytoskeleton. The authors have studied the effect of DHCB and CD on IFN-gamma-induced MHC gene expression in 143 B cells, a human osteosarcoma-derived cell line. Herein the authors demonstrate that alterations in the cytoskeleton induced by DHCB and CD can lead to increases in IFN-gamma-induced MHC gene expression. Dihydrocytochalasin B added up to 3 hours after IFN-gamma results in a threefold to sixfold increase in levels of class II mRNA while producing minimal enhancement of class I gene expression. In contrast, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA expression was unaltered by IFN-gamma or by the cytochalasins. The increased amount of class II mRNA can be accounted for by a concomitant increase in transcription rate of this gene. Studies using 125I-IFN-gamma demonstrate that the occupied IFN-gamma receptor associates with a Triton X-100 insoluble fraction of 143 B cells and that DHCB and CD markedly inhibit this association. The results described here provide evidence that is consistent with the hypothesis that the activity of the occupied IFN-gamma receptor may be modulated by interactions with the cytoskeleton of the cell. This receptor may be one of a group of plasma membrane receptors that are sensitive to the action of cytochalasins after ligand binding. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1907805

  8. RIG-I Signaling Is Essential for Influenza B Virus-Induced Rapid Interferon Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Österlund, Pamela; Westenius, Veera; Latvala, Sinikka; Diamond, Michael S.; Gale, Michael; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza B virus causes annual epidemics and, along with influenza A virus, accounts for substantial disease and economic burden throughout the world. Influenza B virus infects only humans and some marine mammals and is not responsible for pandemics, possibly due to a very low frequency of reassortment and a lower evolutionary rate than that of influenza A virus. Influenza B virus has been less studied than influenza A virus, and thus, a comparison of influenza A and B virus infection mechanisms may provide new insight into virus-host interactions. Here we analyzed the early events in influenza B virus infection and interferon (IFN) gene expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells. We show that influenza B virus induces IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) activation and IFN-λ1 gene expression with faster kinetics than does influenza A virus, without a requirement for viral protein synthesis or replication. Influenza B virus-induced activation of IRF3 required the fusion of viral and endosomal membranes, and nuclear accumulation of IRF3 and viral NP occurred concurrently. In comparison, immediate early IRF3 activation was not observed in influenza A virus-infected macrophages. Experiments with RIG-I-, MDA5-, and RIG-I/MDA5-deficient mouse fibroblasts showed that RIG-I is the critical pattern recognition receptor needed for the influenza B virus-induced activation of IRF3. Our results show that innate immune mechanisms are activated immediately after influenza B virus entry through the endocytic pathway, whereas influenza A virus avoids early IRF3 activation and IFN gene induction. IMPORTANCE Recently, a great deal of interest has been paid to identifying the ligands for RIG-I under conditions of natural infection, as many previous studies have been based on transfection of cells with different types of viral or synthetic RNA structures. We shed light on this question by analyzing the earliest step in innate immune recognition of

  9. Interferon Gene Expression in Sputum Cells Correlates with the Asthma Index Score During Virus-Induced Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Schwantes, Elizabeth A.; Manthei, David M.; Denlinger, Loren C.; Evans, Michael D.; Gern, James E.; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Mathur, Sameer K.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The majority of asthma exacerbations are related to viral respiratory infections. Some, but not all, previous studies have reported that low interferon responses in patients with asthma increase the risk for virus-induced exacerbations. Objective We sought to determine the relationship between lower airway inflammatory biomarkers, specifically interferon gene expression, and the severity or presence of an exacerbation in asthmatics experiencing a naturally occurring viral infection. Methods Sputum samples were analyzed from subjects in an asthma exacerbation study who experienced a confirmed viral infection. Subjects were monitored for daily symptoms, medication use, and peak expiratory flow rate until baseline. Sputum samples were assessed for cell counts and gene expression. Results IFN-γ expression was significantly greater in patients with asthma exacerbations compared to non-exacerbating patients (p=0.002). IFN-α1, IFN-β1, and IFN-γ mRNA levels correlated with the peak Asthma Index (r=0.58, p<0.001; r=0.57, p=0.001; and r=0.51, p=0.004, respectively). Additionally, IL-13, IL-10 and eosinophil major basic protein mRNA levels were greater in patients with asthma exacerbations compared to non-exacerbating patients (p=0.03, p=0.06, and p=0.02, respectively), and IL-13 mRNA correlated with the peak Asthma Index (p=0.006). Conclusions Our findings indicate that asthma exacerbations are associated with increased rather than decreased expression of interferons early in the course of infection. These findings raise the possibility that excessive virus-induced interferon production during acute infections can contribute to airway inflammation and exacerbations of asthma. PMID:24450586

  10. Expression of interferon and interferon--induced genes in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar cell lines SHK-1 and TO following infection with Salmon AlphaVirus SAV.

    PubMed

    Gahlawat, Suresh K; Ellis, Anthony E; Collet, Bertrand

    2009-04-01

    Salmon AlphaVirus (SAV) is the aetiological agent of Salmon Pancreas Disease (SPD), a serious disease in farmed Atlantic salmon. Currently there is no available information on the ability of this virus to stimulate or suppress aspects of innate immunity in host cells. Two different Atlantic salmon cell lines (SHK-1 and TO), both derived from head kidney leucocytes, were infected with SAV and the kinetics and magnitude of gene expression were studied by real-time quantitative PCR. SAV nsP1 gene transcripts for strain P42P increased rapidly in TO cells with subsequent development of a cytopathic effect (CPE) while this virus strain hardly replicated at all SHK-1 cells causing no CPE. SAV P42P induced strong expression of type I IFN (IFN) and the antiviral IFN-induced gene MX transcripts in SHK-1 cells. Although the IFN response in infected TO cells was higher than in SHK-1 cells, the level of MX transcripts was lower. This may be because the virus was able to interfere with IFN-signaling and suppress MX transcription or that the TO cells are less able to transcribe the MX gene. Either way, it may account for why the SHK-1 cells suppress SAV replication while the TO cells are highly susceptible and succumb to the virus. The present results provide the first evidence for differential induction of expression of the interferon-induced antiviral gene, MX, correlating with resistant (SHK-1) and susceptible (TO) Atlantic salmon cell lines in response to infection by SAV.

  11. Identification of kinase fusion oncogenes in post-Chernobyl radiation-induced thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Ricarte-Filho, Julio C; Li, Sheng; Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E R; Montero-Conde, Cristina; Voza, Francesca; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Heguy, Adriana; Viale, Agnes; Bogdanova, Tetyana; Thomas, Geraldine A; Mason, Christopher E; Fagin, James A

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation during childhood markedly increases the risk of developing papillary thyroid cancer. We examined tissues from 26 Ukrainian patients with thyroid cancer who were younger than 10 years of age and living in contaminated areas during the time of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. We identified nonoverlapping somatic driver mutations in all 26 cases through candidate gene assays and next-generation RNA sequencing. We found that 22 tumors harbored fusion oncogenes that arose primarily through intrachromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, 23 of the oncogenic drivers identified in this cohort aberrantly activate MAPK signaling, including the 2 somatic rearrangements resulting in fusion of transcription factor ETS variant 6 (ETV6) with neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 3 (NTRK3) and fusion of acylglycerol kinase (AGK) with BRAF. Two other tumors harbored distinct fusions leading to overexpression of the nuclear receptor PPARγ. Fusion oncogenes were less prevalent in tumors from a cohort of children with pediatric thyroid cancers that had not been exposed to radiation but were from the same geographical regions. Radiation-induced thyroid cancers provide a paradigm of tumorigenesis driven by fusion oncogenes that activate MAPK signaling or, less frequently, a PPARγ-driven transcriptional program.

  12. Identification of kinase fusion oncogenes in post-Chernobyl radiation-induced thyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ricarte-Filho, Julio C.; Li, Sheng; Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E.R.; Montero-Conde, Cristina; Voza, Francesca; Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Heguy, Adriana; Viale, Agnes; Bogdanova, Tetyana; Thomas, Geraldine A.; Mason, Christopher E.; Fagin, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation during childhood markedly increases the risk of developing papillary thyroid cancer. We examined tissues from 26 Ukrainian patients with thyroid cancer who were younger than 10 years of age and living in contaminated areas during the time of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. We identified nonoverlapping somatic driver mutations in all 26 cases through candidate gene assays and next-generation RNA sequencing. We found that 22 tumors harbored fusion oncogenes that arose primarily through intrachromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, 23 of the oncogenic drivers identified in this cohort aberrantly activate MAPK signaling, including the 2 somatic rearrangements resulting in fusion of transcription factor ETS variant 6 (ETV6) with neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 3 (NTRK3) and fusion of acylglycerol kinase (AGK) with BRAF. Two other tumors harbored distinct fusions leading to overexpression of the nuclear receptor PPARγ. Fusion oncogenes were less prevalent in tumors from a cohort of children with pediatric thyroid cancers that had not been exposed to radiation but were from the same geographical regions. Radiation-induced thyroid cancers provide a paradigm of tumorigenesis driven by fusion oncogenes that activate MAPK signaling or, less frequently, a PPARγ-driven transcriptional program. PMID:24135138

  13. Equine arteritis virus does not induce interferon production in equine endothelial cells: identification of nonstructural protein 1 as a main interferon antagonist.

    PubMed

    Go, Yun Young; Li, Yanhua; Chen, Zhenhai; Han, Mingyuan; Yoo, Dongwan; Fang, Ying; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of equine arteritis virus (EAV) on type I interferon (IFN) production. Equine endothelial cells (EECs) were infected with the virulent Bucyrus strain (VBS) of EAV and expression of IFN-β was measured at mRNA and protein levels by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and IFN bioassay using vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the green fluorescence protein (VSV-GFP), respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that IFN-β mRNA levels in EECs infected with EAV VBS were not increased compared to those in mock-infected cells. Consistent with quantitative RT-PCR, Sendai virus- (SeV-) induced type I IFN production was inhibited by EAV infection. Using an IFN-β promoter-luciferase reporter assay, we subsequently demonstrated that EAV nsps 1, 2, and 11 had the capability to inhibit type I IFN activation. Of these three nsps, nsp1 exhibited the strongest inhibitory effect. Taken together, these data demonstrate that EAV has the ability to suppress the type I IFN production in EECs and nsp1 may play a critical role to subvert the equine innate immune response.

  14. Inhibition of Rev-mediated HIV-1 expression by an RNA binding protein encoded by the interferon-inducible 9-27 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Constantoulakis, P.; Campbell, M.; Felber, B.K.; Nasioulas, G.; Afonina, E.; Pavlakis, G.N. )

    1993-02-26

    Interferon inhibits expression of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) through unknown mechanisms. A gene inducible by interferon-[alpha] (IFN-[alpha]) and interferon-[gamma] (IFN-[gamma]) was isolated by screening of a human complementary DNA library for proteins binding to the Rev-responsive element (RRE) of HIV-1. The product of this gene, RBP9-27, was shown to bind RNA in vitro and to inhibit HIV-1 expression after transfection into human cells. RBP9-27 primarily inhibited Rev-dependent posttransscriptional steps of viral gene expression. Thus, RBP9-27 is a cellular factor that antagonizes Rev function. These results suggest an inteferon-induced antiviral mechanism operating through the induction of RNA binding proteins such as RBP9-27. Elucidation of RBP9-27 function may lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of interferon action during HIV-1 infection. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Effects of interferon-γ knockdown on vaccine-induced immunity against Marek's disease in chickens.

    PubMed

    Haq, Kamran; Wootton, Sarah K; Barjesteh, Neda; Golovan, Serguei; Bendall, Andrew; Sharif, Shayan

    2015-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ has been shown to be associated with immunity to Marek's disease virus (MDV). The overall objective of this study was to investigate the causal relationship between IFN-γ and vaccine-conferred immunity against MDV in chickens. To this end, 3 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting chicken IFN-γ, which had previously been shown to reduce IFN-γ expression in vitro, and a control siRNA were selected to generate recombinant avian adeno-associated virus (rAAAV) expressing short-hairpin small interfering RNAs (shRNAs). An MDV challenge trial was then conducted: chickens were vaccinated with herpesvirus of turkey (HVT), administered the rAAAV expressing shRNA, and then challenged with MDV. Tumors were observed in 4 out of 10 birds that were vaccinated with HVT and challenged but did not receive any rAAAV, 5 out of 9 birds that were administered the rAAAV containing IFN-γ shRNA, and 2 out of 10 birds that were administered a control enhanced green fluorescent protein siRNA. There was no significant difference in MDV genome load in the feather follicle epithelium of the birds that were cotreated with the vaccine and the rAAAV compared with the vaccinated MDV-infected birds. These results suggest that AAAV-based vectors can be used for the delivery of shRNA into chicken cells. However, administration of the rAAAV expressing shRNA targeting chicken IFN-γ did not seem to fully abrogate vaccine-induced protection.

  16. Understanding the molecular mechanism(s) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) induced interferon resistance.

    PubMed

    Qashqari, Hanadi; Al-Mars, Amany; Chaudhary, Adeel; Abuzenadah, Adel; Damanhouri, Ghazi; Alqahtani, Mohammed; Mahmoud, Maged; El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the foremost causes of chronic liver disease affecting over 300 million globally. HCV contains a positive-stranded RNA of ~9600 nt and is surrounded by the 5' and 3'untranslated regions (UTR). The only successful treatment regimen includes interferon (IFN) and ribavirin. Like many other viruses, HCV has also evolved various mechanisms to circumvent the IFN response by blocking (1) downstream signaling actions via STAT1, STAT2, IRF9 and JAK-STAT pathways and (2) repertoire of IFN Stimulatory Genes (ISGs). Several studies have identified complex host demographic and genetic factors as well as viral genetic heterogeneity associated with outcomes of IFN therapy. The genetic predispositions of over 2000 ISGS may render the patients to become resistant, thus identification of such parameters within a subset of population are necessary for management corollary. The ability of various HCV genotypes to diminish IFN antiviral responses plays critical role in the establishment of chronic infection at the acute stage of infection, thus highlighting importance of the resistance in HCV treated groups. The recently defined role of viral protein such as C, E2, NS3/NS4 and NS5A proteins in inducing the IFN resistance are discussed in this article. How the viral and host genetic composition and epistatic connectivity among polymorphic genomic sites synchronizes the evolutionary IFN resistance trend remains under investigation. However, these signals may have the potential to be employed for accurate prediction of therapeutic outcomes. In this review article, we accentuate the significance of host and viral components in IFN resistance with the aim to determine the successful outcome in patients.

  17. Interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 as a potential biomarker in localized scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence and levels of interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) in the plasma and skin of pediatric localized scleroderma (LS) patients compared to those of healthy pediatric controls and to determine if IP-10 levels correlate to clinical disease activity measures. Methods The presence of IP-10 in the plasma was analyzed using a Luminex panel in 69 pediatric patients with LS and compared to 71 healthy pediatric controls. Of these patients, five had available skin biopsy specimens with concurrent clinical and serological data during the active disease phase, which were used to analyze the presence and location of IP-10 in the skin by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results IP-10 levels were significantly elevated in the plasma of LS patients compared to that of healthy controls and correlated to clinical disease activity measures in LS. Immunohistochemistry staining of IP-10 was present in the dermal infiltrate of LS patients and was similar to that found in psoriasis skin specimens, the positive disease control. Conclusions Elevation of IP-10 levels in the plasma compared to those of healthy controls and the presence of IP-10 staining in the affected skin of LS patients indicates that IP-10 is a potential biomarker in LS. Furthermore, significant elevation of IP-10 in LS patients with active versus inactive disease and correlations between IP-10 levels and standardized disease outcome measures of activity in LS strongly suggest that IP-10 may be a biomarker for disease activity in LS. PMID:24499523

  18. Cumulus cell-expressed type I interferons induce cumulus expansion in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, You-Jee; Park, Jae-Il; Moon, Won-Jin; Dam, Phuong T M; Cho, Moon-Kyoung; Chun, Sang-Young

    2015-01-01

    Ovulation resembles the inflammatory response. The purpose of the present study was to examine the expression and role of type I interferons (IFNs) Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta in mouse ovaries during the process of ovulation. An in vivo injection of equine chorionic gonadotropin (CG)-human CG (hCG) stimulated Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta mRNA in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) within 6 h. Type I IFN receptor (Ifnar1 and Ifnar2) genes were also expressed in preovulatory follicles without a change by hCG. Immunofluorescent study revealed the expression of protein signals of Ifnalpha, Ifnbeta, and Ifnar1 in cumulus cells. Treatment of COCs with Ifnalpha or Ifnbeta in vitro induced cumulus expansion that was comparable to that mediated by epiregulin. In cultured COCs, the levels of Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta mRNA increased by epiregulin and follicle-stimulating hormone, but not by prostaglandin E2. Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta activated multiple signaling events (signal transducer and activator of transcription-1/3, Akt, and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/2) and stimulated the expression of genes known to impact COC expansion (Has2, Ptx3, Tnfaip6, and Ptgs2). Interestingly, treatment of COCs with Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 ligands (lipopolysaccharides, Pam3Cys, and hyaluronan fragments) increased Ifnalpha and Ifnbeta mRNA, while coculture with anti-TLR2/4 neutralizing antibody abolished these effects. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the type I IFN system is operating in mouse cumulus cells and plays a role in the induction of cumulus expansion during the ovulatory process in mice.

  19. Antimicrobial effects of interferon-inducible CXC chemokines against Bacillus anthracis spores and bacilli.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Matthew A; Zhu, Yinghua; Green, Candace S; Burdick, Marie D; Sanz, Patrick; Alem, Farhang; O'Brien, Alison D; Mehrad, Borna; Strieter, Robert M; Hughes, Molly A

    2009-04-01

    Based on previous studies showing that host chemokines exert antimicrobial activities against bacteria, we sought to determine whether the interferon-inducible Glu-Leu-Arg-negative CXC chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 exhibit antimicrobial activities against Bacillus anthracis. In vitro analysis demonstrated that all three CXC chemokines exerted direct antimicrobial effects against B. anthracis spores and bacilli including marked reductions in spore and bacillus viability as determined using a fluorometric assay of bacterial viability and CFU determinations. Electron microscopy studies revealed that CXCL10-treated spores failed to undergo germination as judged by an absence of cytological changes in spore structure that occur during the process of germination. Immunogold labeling of CXCL10-treated spores demonstrated that the chemokine was located internal to the exosporium in association primarily with the spore coat and its interface with the cortex. To begin examining the potential biological relevance of chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity, we used a murine model of inhalational anthrax. Upon spore challenge, the lungs of C57BL/6 mice (resistant to inhalational B. anthracis infection) had significantly higher levels of CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 than did the lungs of A/J mice (highly susceptible to infection). Increased CXC chemokine levels were associated with significantly reduced levels of spore germination within the lungs as determined by in vivo imaging. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel antimicrobial role for host chemokines against B. anthracis that provides unique insight into host defense against inhalational anthrax; these data also support the notion for an innovative approach in treating B. anthracis infection as well as infections caused by other spore-forming organisms.

  20. Risperidone significantly inhibits interferon-gamma-induced microglial activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takahiro; Monji, Akira; Hashioka, Sadayuki; Kanba, Shigenobu

    2007-05-01

    Microglia has recently been regarded to be a mediator of neuroinflammation via the release of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the central nervous system (CNS). Microglia has thus been reported to play an important role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). The pathological mechanisms of schizophrenia remain unclear while some recent neuroimaging studies suggest even schizophrenia may be a kind of neurodegenerative disease. Risperidone has been reported to decrease the reduction of MRI volume during the clinical course of schizophrenia. Many recent studies have demonstrated that immunological mechanisms via such as interferon (IFN)-gamma and cytokines might be relevant to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In the present study, we thus investigated the effects of risperidone on the generation of nitric oxide, inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression and inflammatory cytokines: interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by IFN-gamma-activated microglia by using Griess assay, Western blotting and ELISA, respectively. In comparison with haloperidol, risperidone significantly inhibited the production of NO and proinflammatory cytokines by activated microglia. The iNOS levels of risperidone-treated cells were much lower than those of the haloperidol-treated cells. Antipsychotics, especially risperidone may have an anti-inflammatory effect via the inhibition of microglial activation, which is not only directly toxic to neurons but also has an inhibitory effect on neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis, both of which have been reported to play a crucial role in the pathology of schizophrenia.

  1. Elevated serum interferon γ-induced protein 10 kDa is associated with TAFRO syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Noriko; Gion, Yuka; Kondo, Eisei; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Masunari, Taro; Moro, Hiroshi; Nikkuni, Koji; Takai, Kazue; Hagihara, Masao; Hashimoto, Yuko; Yokota, Kenji; Okamoto, Masataka; Nakao, Shinji; Yoshino, Tadashi; Sato, Yasuharu

    2017-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder. It is characterized by inflammatory symptoms, and interleukin (IL)-6 contributes to the disease pathogenesis. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) often drives hypercytokinemia in MCD, although the etiology of HHV-8-negative MCD is idiopathic (iMCD). A distinct subtype of iMCD that shares a constellation of clinical features including thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O) has been reported as TAFRO-iMCD, however the differences in cytokine profiles between TAFRO-iMCD and iMCD have not been established. We retrospectively compared levels of serum interferon γ-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA, interleukin (IL)-10, and other cytokines between 11 cases of TAFRO-iMCD, 6 cases of plasma cell type iMCD, and 21 healthy controls. During flare-ups, patients with TAFRO-iMCD had significantly higher serum IP-10 and tended to have lower PDGF-AA levels than the other 2 groups. In addition, serum IL-10, IL-23, and vascular endothelial growth factor-A were elevated in both TAFRO-iMCD and iMCD. Elevated serum IP-10 is associated with inflammatory diseases including infectious diseases. There was a strong correlation between high serum IP-10 and the presence of TAFRO-iMCD, suggesting that IP-10 might be involved in the pathogenesis of TAFRO-iMCD. PMID:28205564

  2. Guanylate-binding protein 5 is a marker of interferon-γ-induced classically activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Hizukuri, Yoshiyuki; Yamashiro, Kyoko; Makita, Naoyuki; Ohnishi, Koji; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation is the main immunological process occurring during the development of several diseases, and the heterogeneity of macrophage activation or differentiation has been suggested to be involved in disease progression. In the present study, we attempted to identify molecules specifically expressed on human classically activated macrophages (M1) to investigate the significance of the M1-like phenotype in human diseases. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were differentiated into M1, M2a, M2b and M2c phenotypes, and also M1(−) (the M1 phenotype differentiated with interferon-γ) to eliminate the strong effects of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the gene expression profile. The gene expression profiles of those macrophage phenotypes were analyzed by a cDNA microarray analysis and were used for a bioinformatics examination to identify the markers of the M1 phenotype that are expressed in both M1 and M1(−). The gene expression profiles of murine macrophages were also evaluated. We identified guanylate-binding protein 5 (GBP5), which is associated nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)-mediated inflammasome assembly in the M1 macrophages of both humans and mice. Notably, the expression of GBP5 protein was detected in cultured M1(−) as well as in M1 macrophages by western blotting, which means that GBP5 is a more generalized marker of the M1 phenotype compared with the M1 markers that can be induced by LPS stimulation. GBP5 is a useful candidate marker of the M1 phenotype. PMID:27990286

  3. Guanylate-binding protein 5 is a marker of interferon-γ-induced classically activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Hizukuri, Yoshiyuki; Yamashiro, Kyoko; Makita, Naoyuki; Ohnishi, Koji; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Macrophage activation is the main immunological process occurring during the development of several diseases, and the heterogeneity of macrophage activation or differentiation has been suggested to be involved in disease progression. In the present study, we attempted to identify molecules specifically expressed on human classically activated macrophages (M1) to investigate the significance of the M1-like phenotype in human diseases. Human monocyte-derived macrophages were differentiated into M1, M2a, M2b and M2c phenotypes, and also M1(-) (the M1 phenotype differentiated with interferon-γ) to eliminate the strong effects of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the gene expression profile. The gene expression profiles of those macrophage phenotypes were analyzed by a cDNA microarray analysis and were used for a bioinformatics examination to identify the markers of the M1 phenotype that are expressed in both M1 and M1(-). The gene expression profiles of murine macrophages were also evaluated. We identified guanylate-binding protein 5 (GBP5), which is associated nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)-mediated inflammasome assembly in the M1 macrophages of both humans and mice. Notably, the expression of GBP5 protein was detected in cultured M1(-) as well as in M1 macrophages by western blotting, which means that GBP5 is a more generalized marker of the M1 phenotype compared with the M1 markers that can be induced by LPS stimulation. GBP5 is a useful candidate marker of the M1 phenotype.

  4. An Interferon-Inducible Neutrophil-Driven Blood Transcriptional Signature in Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Matthew P. R.; Graham, Christine M.; McNab, Finlay W.; Xu, Zhaohui; Bloch, Susannah A.A.; Oni, Tolu; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Banchereau, Romain; Skinner, Jason; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Quinn, Charles; Blankenship, Derek; Dhawan, Ranju; Cush, John J.; Mejias, Asuncion; Ramilo, Octavio; Kon, Onn M.; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; O'Garra, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and efforts to control TB are hampered by difficulties with diagnosis, prevention and treatment 1,2. Most people infected with M. tuberculosis remain asymptomatic, termed latent TB, with a 10% lifetime risk of developing active TB disease, but current tests cannot identify which individuals will develop disease 3. The immune response to M. tuberculosis is complex and incompletely characterized, hindering development of new diagnostics, therapies and vaccines 4,5. We identified a whole blood 393 transcript signature for active TB in intermediate and high burden settings, correlating with radiological extent of disease and reverting to that of healthy controls following treatment. A subset of latent TB patients had signatures similar to those in active TB patients. We also identified a specific 86-transcript signature that discriminated active TB from other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Modular and pathway analysis revealed that the TB signature was dominated by a neutrophil-driven interferon (IFN)-inducible gene profile, consisting of both IFN-γ and Type I IFNαβ signalling. Comparison with transcriptional signatures in purified cells and flow cytometric analysis, suggest that this TB signature reflects both changes in cellular composition and altered gene expression. Although an IFN signature was also observed in whole blood of patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), their complete modular signature differed from TB with increased abundance of plasma cell transcripts. Our studies demonstrate a hitherto under-appreciated role of Type I IFNαβ signalling in TB pathogenesis, which has implications for vaccine and therapeutic development. Our study also provides a broad range of transcriptional biomarkers with potential as diagnostic and prognostic tools to combat the TB epidemic. PMID:20725040

  5. Interferon-γ-Induced Nitric Oxide Causes Intrinsic Intestinal Denervation in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arantes, Rosa M.E.; Marche, Homero H.F.; Bahia, Maria T.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Rossi, Marcos A.; Silva, João S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in neuronal destruction during acute-phase Trypanosoma cruzi infection was evaluated in male C57BL/6 (WT, wild-type) mice and knockout mice [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)−/− and interferon (IFN)−/−]. Selected animals were infected by intraperitoneal injection of 100 trypomastigote forms of the Y strain of T. cruzi. Others were injected intraperitoneally with an equal volume of saline solution and served as controls. Our findings support those of previous studies regarding myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection. In addition, we clearly demonstrate that, despite the fact that parasite nests and similar inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall were more pronounced in infected iNOS−/− mice than in infected WT mice, the former presented no reduction in myenteric plexus neuron numbers. Neuronal nerve profile expression, as revealed by the general nerve marker PGP 9.5, was preserved in all knockout animals. Infected IFN−/− mice suffered no significant neuronal loss and there was no inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall. On days 5 and 10 after infection, iNOS activity was greater in infected WT mice than in controls, whereas iNOS activity in infected knockout mice remained unchanged. These findings clearly demonstrate that neuronal damage does not occur in NO-impaired infected knockout mice, regardless of whether inflammatory infiltrate is present (iNOS−/−) or absent (IFN−/−). In conclusion, our observations strongly indicate that myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection is because of IFN-γ-elicited NO production resulting from iNOS activation in the inflammatory foci along the intestinal wall. PMID:15039223

  6. Variability in detection and quantification of interferon β-1b–induced neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Interferon-beta (IFNB) therapy for multiple sclerosis can lead to the induction of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against IFNB. Various methods are used for detection and quantification of NAbs. Methods Blood samples from 125 IFNB-1b–treated patients, which were tested NAb negative or NAb positive after conclusion of a clinical study, were retested three years after first being assessed in four different laboratories that offer routine NAb testing to practicing neurologists. The myxovirus protein A (MxA) induction assay, the cytopathic effect (CPE) assay (two laboratories), or the luciferase assay were used. Intra- and inter-laboratory agreement between assays with respect to NAb detection and NAb titer quantification were evaluated. Results High agreement for NAb detection (kappa coefficient, 0.86) and for titer levels was observed for the intra-laboratory comparison in the laboratory using the MxA induction assay performed three years ago and now. A similarly high agreement for NAb detection (kappa coefficient, 0.87) and for titer quantification was noted for the MxA assay of this laboratory with one of two laboratories using the CPE assay. All other inter-laboratory comparisons showed kappa values between 0.57 and 0.68 and remarkable differences in individual titer levels. Conclusions There are considerable differences in the detection and quantification of IFNB-induced NAbs among laboratories offering NAb testing for clinical practice using different assay methods. It is important that these differences are considered when interpreting NAb results for clinical decision-making and when developing general recommendations for potentially clinically meaningful NAb titer levels. PMID:22703536

  7. Interferons modulate mitogen-induced protein synthesis in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Goncharova, Elena A.; Lim, Poay N.; Chisolm, Amelia; Fogle, Homer W.; Taylor, Jerome H.; Goncharov, Dmitry A.; Eszterhas, Andrew; Panettieri, Reynold A.

    2010-01-01

    Severe asthma is characterized by increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass due, in part, to ASM cell growth and contractile protein expression associated with increased protein synthesis. Little is known regarding the combined effects of mitogens and interferons on ASM cytosolic protein synthesis. We demonstrate that human ASM mitogens including PDGF, EGF, and thrombin stimulate protein synthesis. Surprisingly, pleiotropic cytokines IFN-β and IFN-γ, which inhibit ASM proliferation, also increased cytosolic protein content in ASM cells. Thus IFN-β alone significantly increased protein synthesis by 1.62 ± 0.09-fold that was further enhanced by EGF to 2.52 ± 0.17-fold. IFN-γ alone also stimulated protein synthesis by 1.91 ± 0.15-fold; treatment of cells with PDGF, EGF, and thrombin in the presence of IFN-γ stimulated protein synthesis by 2.24 ± 0.3-, 1.25 ± 0.17-, and 2.67 ± 0.34-fold, respectively, compared with growth factors alone. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) inhibition with rapamycin inhibited IFN- and EGF-induced protein synthesis, suggesting that IFN-induced protein synthesis is modulated by mTOR/S6K1 activation. Furthermore, overexpression of tumor suppressor protein tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2), which is an upstream negative regulator of mTOR/S6K1 signaling, also inhibited mitogen-induced protein synthesis in ASM cells. IFN-β and IFN-γ stimulated miR143/145 microRNA expression and increased SM α-actin accumulation but had little effect on ASM cell size. In contrast, EGF increased ASM cell size but had little effect on miR143/145 expression. Our data demonstrate that both IFNs and mitogens stimulate protein synthesis but have differential effects on cell size and contractile protein expression and suggest that combined effects of IFNs and mitogens may contribute to ASM cell growth, contractile protein expression, and ASM remodeling in asthma. PMID:20382746

  8. Herpes Simplex Virus and Interferon Signaling Induce Novel Autophagic Clusters in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Katzenell, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes lifelong infection in the neurons of trigeminal ganglia (TG), cycling between productive infection and latency. Neuronal antiviral responses are driven by type I interferon (IFN) and are crucial to controlling HSV-1 virulence. Autophagy also plays a role in this neuronal antiviral response, but the mechanism remains obscure. In this study, HSV-1 infection of murine TG neurons triggered unusual clusters of autophagosomes, predominantly in neurons lacking detectable HSV-1 antigen. Treatment of neurons with IFN-β induced a similar response, and cluster formation by infection or IFN treatment was dependent upon an intact IFN-signaling pathway. The autophagic clusters were decorated with both ISG15, an essential effecter of the antiviral response, and p62, a selective autophagy receptor. The autophagic clusters were not induced by rapamycin or starvation, consistent with a process of selective autophagy. While clusters were triggered by other neurotropic herpesviruses, infection with unrelated viruses failed to induce this response. Following ocular infection in vivo, clusters formed exclusively in the infected ophthalmic branch of the TG. Taken together, our results show that infection with HSV and antiviral signaling in TG neurons produce an unorthodox autophagic response. This autophagic clustering is associated with antiviral signaling, the presence of viral genome, and the absence of HSV protein expression and may therefore represent an important neuronal response to HSV infection and the establishment of latency. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous virus and a significant cause of morbidity and some mortality. It is the causative agent of benign cold sores, but it can also cause blindness and life-threatening encephalitis. The success of HSV-1 is largely due to its ability to establish lifelong latent infections in neurons and to occasionally reactivate. The exact mechanisms by which

  9. Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy in treatment of recurrent nodular goiter and thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliverstov, Oleg V.; Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Demidov, A. K.; Faizrakhmanov, Alexey B.; Yarovoy, Nicolay N.

    2001-10-01

    Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy was performed in 29 patients with recurrent nodular and multinodular goiter, and in 3 patients with recurrent inoperable thyroid cancer. There were used transcutaneous puncture under ultrasonic control, diode lasers with wavelength 805, 980, and 1060 nm, quartz monofibers, special computerized thermometer with microthermocouples. Disappearance or significant reduction of nodes in the most goiter cases, and regress of tumor in the cancer cases were marked during observation period (0.5 - 2.5 years).

  10. Interferon regulatory factor 3 is a key regulation factor for inducing the expression of SAMHD1 in antiviral innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shen; Zhan, Yuan; Zhou, Yanjun; Jiang, Yifeng; Zheng, Xuchen; Yu, Lingxue; Tong, Wu; Gao, Fei; Li, Liwei; Huang, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhiyong; Tong, Guangzhi

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a type I interferon (IFN) inducible host innate immunity restriction factor that inhibits an early step of the viral life cycle. The underlying mechanisms of SAMHD1 transcriptional regulation remains elusive. Here, we report that inducing SAMHD1 upregulation is part of an early intrinsic immune response via TLR3 and RIG-I/MDA5 agonists that ultimately induce the nuclear translocation of the interferon regulation factor 3 (IRF3) protein. Further studies show that IRF3 plays a major role in upregulating endogenous SAMHD1 expression in a mechanism that is independent of the classical IFN-induced JAK-STAT pathway. Both overexpression and activation of IRF3 enhanced the SAMHD1 promoter luciferase activity, and activated IRF3 was necessary for upregulating SAMHD1 expression in a type I IFN cascade. We also show that the SAMHD1 promoter is a direct target of IRF3 and an IRF3 binding site is sufficient to render this promoter responsive to stimulation. Collectively, these findings indicate that upregulation of endogenous SAMHD1 expression is attributed to the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 and we suggest that type I IFN induction and induced SAMHD1 expression are coordinated. PMID:27411355

  11. Oncogene-induced senescence and its evasion in a mouse model of thyroid neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bellelli, Roberto; Vitagliano, Donata; Federico, Giorgia; Marotta, Pina; Tamburrino, Anna; Salerno, Paolo; Paciello, Orlando; Papparella, Serenella; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Fagin, James A; Refetoff, Samuel; Troncone, Giancarlo; Santoro, Massimo

    2017-06-23

    Here we describe a conditional doxycycline-dependent mouse model of RET/PTC3 (NCOA4-RET) oncogene-induced thyroid tumorigenesis. In these mice, after 10 days of doxycycline (dox) administration, RET/PTC3 expression induced mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) stimulation and a proliferative response which resulted in the formation of hyperplastic thyroid lesions. This was followed, after 2 months, by growth arrest accompanied by typical features of oncogene-induced senescence (OIS), including upregulation of p16INK4A and p21CIP, positivity at the Sudan black B, activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) markers γH2AX and pChk2 T68, and induction of p53 and p19ARF. After 5 months, about half of thyroid lesions escaped OIS and formed tumors that remained dependent on RET/PTC3 expression. This progression was accompanied by activation of AKT-FOXO1/3a pathway and increased serum TSH levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Interferon-induced Transmembrane Proteins, IFITM1, IFITM2, and IFITM3 Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus Entry.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Sumudu K; Helbig, Karla J; McCartney, Erin M; Eyre, Nicholas S; Bull, Rowena A; Eltahla, Auda; Lloyd, Andrew R; Beard, Michael R

    2015-10-23

    The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) family of proteins have recently been identified as important host effector molecules of the type I interferon response against viruses. IFITM1 has been identified as a potent antiviral effector against hepatitis C virus (HCV), whereas the related family members IFITM2 and IFITM3 have been described to have antiviral effects against a broad range of RNA viruses. Here, we demonstrate that IFITM2 and IFITM3 play an integral role in the interferon response against HCV and act at the level of late entry stages of HCV infection. We have established that in hepatocytes, IFITM2 and IFITM3 localize to the late and early endosomes, respectively, as well as the lysosome. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that S-palmitoylation of all three IFITM proteins is essential for anti-HCV activity, whereas the conserved tyrosine residue in the N-terminal domain of IFITM2 and IFITM3 plays a significant role in protein localization. However, this tyrosine was found to be dispensable for anti-HCV activity, with mutation of the tyrosine resulting in an IFITM1-like phenotype with the retention of anti-HCV activity and co-localization of IFITM2 and IFITM3 with CD81. In conclusion, we propose that the IFITM proteins act in a coordinated manner to restrict HCV infection by targeting the endocytosed HCV virion for lysosomal degradation and demonstrate that the actions of the IFITM proteins are indeed virus and cell-type specific.

  13. The Interferon-induced Transmembrane Proteins, IFITM1, IFITM2, and IFITM3 Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus Entry*

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Sumudu K.; Helbig, Karla J.; McCartney, Erin M.; Eyre, Nicholas S.; Bull, Rowena A.; Eltahla, Auda; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Beard, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) family of proteins have recently been identified as important host effector molecules of the type I interferon response against viruses. IFITM1 has been identified as a potent antiviral effector against hepatitis C virus (HCV), whereas the related family members IFITM2 and IFITM3 have been described to have antiviral effects against a broad range of RNA viruses. Here, we demonstrate that IFITM2 and IFITM3 play an integral role in the interferon response against HCV and act at the level of late entry stages of HCV infection. We have established that in hepatocytes, IFITM2 and IFITM3 localize to the late and early endosomes, respectively, as well as the lysosome. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that S-palmitoylation of all three IFITM proteins is essential for anti-HCV activity, whereas the conserved tyrosine residue in the N-terminal domain of IFITM2 and IFITM3 plays a significant role in protein localization. However, this tyrosine was found to be dispensable for anti-HCV activity, with mutation of the tyrosine resulting in an IFITM1-like phenotype with the retention of anti-HCV activity and co-localization of IFITM2 and IFITM3 with CD81. In conclusion, we propose that the IFITM proteins act in a coordinated manner to restrict HCV infection by targeting the endocytosed HCV virion for lysosomal degradation and demonstrate that the actions of the IFITM proteins are indeed virus and cell-type specific. PMID:26354436

  14. Porous silicon microparticle potentiates anti-tumor immunity by enhancing cross-presentation and inducing type I interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaojun; Mai, Junhua; Xu, Rong; Perez, Jorge Enrique Tovar; Guevara, Maria L.; Shen, Qi; Mu, Chaofeng; Tung, Hui-Ying; Corry, David B.; Evans, Scott E.; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Li, Xian Chang; Wang, Rong-fu; Shen, Haifa

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Micro- and nano-meter size particles have become popular candidates for cancer vaccine adjuvants. However the mechanism by which such particles enhance immune responses remains unclear. Here we report a porous silicon microparticle (PSM)-based cancer vaccine that greatly enhances cross-presentation and activates type I interferon response in dendritic cells. PSM-loaded antigen exhibited prolonged early endosome localization and enhanced cross-presentation through both proteasome- and lysosome-dependent pathways. Phagocytosis of PSM by dendritic cells induced type I interferon responses through a TRIF- and MAVS-dependent pathway. Dendritic cells primed with PSM-loaded HER2 antigen produced robust CD8 T cell-dependent anti-tumor immunity in mice bearing HER2-positive mammary gland tumors. Importantly, this vaccination activated tumor immune microenvironment with elevated levels of intra-tumor type I interferon and MHC-II expression, abundant CD11c+ dendritic cell infiltration, and tumor-specific cytotoxic T cell responses. These findings highlight the potential for PSM as an immune adjuvant to potentiate dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25937283

  15. Interferon-Gamma Promotes UV-Induced Melanoma in Mice | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have made an unanticipated discovery in mice that interferon-gamma, a type of protein primarily used by the immune system for intercellular communication, acts as a promoter for the deadly form of skin cancer known as melanoma. This finding resulted from a series of experiments designed to understand how solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes melanoma. This study suggests that interferon-gamma, which has been thought to contribute to an innate defense system against cancer, under some circumstances, may instead promote melanoma and incite the development of tumors.

  16. Complementary Effects of Interleukin-15 and Alpha Interferon Induce Immunity in Hepatitis B Virus Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Marianna; Otano, Itziar; Gil-Fariña, Irene; Vanrell, Lucia; Hommel, Mirja; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, Africa; Galarraga, Miguel; Guembe, Laura; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Ghosh, Indrajit; Maini, Mala K; Prieto, Jesús; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-10-01

    In chronic hepatitis B (CHB), failure to control hepatitis B virus (HBV) is associated with T cell dysfunction. HBV transgenic mice mirror many features of the human disease, including T cell unresponsiveness, and thus represent an appropriate model in which to test novel therapeutic strategies. To date, the tolerant state of CD8(+) T cells in these animals could be altered only by strong immunogens or by immunization with HBV antigen-pulsed dendritic cells; however, the effectors induced were unable to suppress viral gene expression or replication. Because of the known stimulatory properties of alpha interferon (IFN-α) and interleukin-15 (IL-15), this study explored the therapeutic potential of liver-directed gene transfer of these cytokines in a murine model of CHB using adeno-associated virus (AAV) delivery. This combination not only resulted in a reduction in the viral load in the liver and the induction of an antibody response but also gave rise to functional and specific CD8(+) immunity. Furthermore, when splenic and intrahepatic lymphocytes from IFN-α- and IL-15-treated animals were transferred to new HBV carriers, partial antiviral immunity was achieved. In contrast to previous observations made using either cytokine alone, markedly attenuated PD-L1 induction in hepatic tissue was observed upon coadministration. An initial study with CHB patient samples also gave promising results. Hence, we demonstrated synergy between two stimulating cytokines, IL-15 and IFN-α, which, given together, constitute a potent approach to significantly enhance the CD8(+) T cell response in a state of immune hyporesponsiveness. Such an approach may be useful for treating chronic viral infections and neoplastic conditions. With 350 million people affected worldwide and 600,000 annual deaths due to HBV-induced liver cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma, chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is a major health problem. However, current treatment options are costly and not very effective

  17. Type-I interferons mediate the neuroinflammatory response and neurotoxicity induced by rotenone.

    PubMed

    Main, Bevan S; Zhang, Moses; Brody, Kate M; Kirby, Francis J; Crack, Peter J; Taylor, Juliet M

    2017-04-01

    Evidence from post-mortem human brains, animal studies and cell culture models has implicated neuroinflammation in the aetiology of chronic neuropathologies including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Although the neuroinflammatory response is considered detrimental in contributing to these pathologies, the underlying mechanisms are still not well understood. The type-I interferons (IFNs) have been well characterised in the periphery and are known to initiate/modulate the immune response. Recently, they have been implicated in ageing and we have also demonstrated increased type-I IFN expression in post-mortem human Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease brains. We hypothesise that the type-I IFNs are key drivers of the damaging, self-perpetuating pro-inflammatory response that contributes to these chronic neuropathologies. In support of this, we have recently confirmed in models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease that mice lacking the type-I IFN receptor (IFNAR1), display an attenuated neuroinflammatory response with subsequent neuroprotection. To further investigate type-I IFN-mediated neuroinflammation and the specific CNS cell types involved, this study treated primary cultured wild-type and IFNAR1(-/-) neurons or mixed glia with the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, rotenone. Wild-type neurons and glia treated with 3 nM and 25 nM rotenone, respectively, exhibited a pro-inflammatory response, including increased type-I IFN expression that was attenuated in cells lacking IFNAR1. Reduced type-I IFN signalling in IFNAR1(-/-) neurons also conferred protection against caspase-3-mediated rotenone-induced cell death. Further, this reduced pro-inflammatory response in the IFNAR1(-/-) glia subsequently diminished their neurotoxic effects to wild-type neurons. In support of this, we confirmed that therapeutically targeting the type-I IFN glial response to rotenone through a specific IFNAR1 blocking monoclonal antibody was neuroprotective. Our data has confirmed

  18. Interferon-γ Exacerbates Dry Eye–Induced Apoptosis in Conjunctiva through Dual Apoptotic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Wei; De Paiva, Cintia S.; Corrales, Rosa M.; Volpe, Eugene A.; McClellan, Andrew J.; Farley, William J.; Li, De-Quan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the role of interferon (IFN)-γ in dry eye–associated conjunctival apoptosis. Methods. Desiccating stress (DS) was created in C57BL/6 (B6) and C57BL/6 IFN-γ-knockout (B6γKO) mice. A separate group of mice of both strains also received subconjunctival injections of exogenous IFN-γ or vehicle control (BSA) at days 0, +2, and +4 after DS. Immunoreactivity to active (Ac)-caspase-3, -8, and -9 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL) were evaluated in cryosections. Goblet cell apoptosis was assessed by MUC5AC and TUNEL double staining. Levels of caspase-3, -8, -9, Fas, and Fas-associated protein with Death Domain (FADD) mRNA in conjunctiva were measured by real-time PCR. The activity of caspase-3, -8, or -9 was measured using fluorometric assay. Results. Increased Ac-caspase-3 and -8 and TUNEL immunoreactivity were noted in conjunctival epithelia in B6 mice compared with B6γKO mice after DS, and exogenous IFN-γ administration further increased these parameters. DS-induced conjunctival apoptosis was greatest in the goblet cell area and was accompanied by a decrease in MUC5AC expression in the B6 and B6-IFN-γ–injected groups compared with the B6γKO and B6-BSA–injected groups. B6γKO mice were resistant to DS-induced apoptosis; however, B6γKO receiving IFN-γ yielded results similar to those for B6 wild-type. Caspase-9 production and activity were not increased with DS in B6 or B6γKO mice; however, the administration of IFN-γ significantly increased caspase-9 production and activity in both strains compared with vehicle-injected mice. Conclusions. IFN-γ plays a pivotal role in exacerbating conjunctival apoptosis through dual apoptotic pathways with DS. PMID:21474767

  19. Quantum dots induced interferon beta expression via TRIF-dependent signaling pathways by promoting endocytosis of TLR4.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chia-Chi; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien; Lin, Pinpin

    2016-02-17

    Quantum dots (QDs) are nano-sized semiconductors. Previously, intratracheal instillation of QD705s induces persistent inflammation and remodeling in the mouse lung. Expression of interferon beta (IFN-β), involved in tissue remodeling, was induced in the mouse lung. The objective of this study was to understand the mechanism of QD705 induced interferon beta (IFN-β) expression. QD705-COOH and QD705-PEG increased IFN-β and IP-10 mRNA levels during day 1 to 90 post-exposure in mouse lungs. QD705-COOH increased IFN-β expression via Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adapter protein (TRIF) dependent Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways in macrophages RAW264.7. Silencing TRIF expression with siRNA or co-treatment with a TRIF inhibitor tremendously abolished QD705s-induced IFN-β expression. Co-treatment with a TLR4 inhibitor completely prevented IFN-β induction by QD705-COOH. QD705-COOH readily entered cells, and co-treatment with either inhibitors of endocytosis or intracellular TLRs prevented IFN-β induction. Thus, activation of the TRIF dependent TLRs pathway by promoting endocytosis of TLR4 is one of the mechanisms for immunomodulatory effects of nanoparticles.

  20. A longitudinal study on the radiation-induced thyroid gland changes after external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiong; Wu, Vincent Wing-Cheung; Lin, Jing; Feng, Huiting; Chen, Longhua

    2011-01-01

    Radiation-induced thyroid disorders have been reported in radiotherapy of head and neck cancers. This study evaluated the radiation-induced damages to thyroid gland in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Forty-five patients with NPC treated by radiotherapy underwent baseline thyroid hormones (free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine [fT4], and thyrotropin [TSH]) examination and CT scan before radiotherapy. The volume of the thyroid gland was calculated by delineating the structure in the corresponding CT slices using the radiotherapy treatment planning system. The thyroid doses were estimated using the treatment planning system. Subsequent CT scans were conducted at 6, 12, and 18 months after radiotherapy, whereas the hormone levels were assessed at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after radiotherapy. Trend lines of the volume and hormone level changes against time were plotted. The relationship between the dose and the change of thyroid volume and hormone levels were evaluated using the Pearson correlation test. An average of 20% thyroid volume reduction in the first 6 months and a further 8% shrinkage at 12 months after radiotherapy were observed. The volume reduction was dependent on the mean thyroid doses at 6, 12, and 18 months after radiotherapy (r = -0.399, -0.472, and -0.417, respectively). Serum free triiodothyronine and fT4 levels showed mild changes of <2.5% at 6 months, started to drop by 8.8% and 11.3%, respectively, at 12 months, and became stable at 18 months. The mean serum TSH level increased mildly at 6 months after radiotherapy and more steeply after 18 months. At 18 months after radiotherapy, 12 patients had primary hypothyroidism with an elevated serum TSH, in which 4 of them also presented with low serum fT4. There was a significant difference (p = 0.014) in the mean thyroid doses between patients with hypothyroidism and normal thyroid function. Radiotherapy for patients with NPC caused radiation-induced changes of the thyroid gland. The

  1. Neurodevelopmental Consequences of Low-Level Thyroid Hormone Disruption Induced by Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inadequate levels of thyroid hormone during critical developmental periods lead to stunted growth, mental retardation, and neurological 'cretinism'. Animal models of developmental thyroid hormone deficiency mirror well the impact of severe insults to the thyroid system. However, ...

  2. Neurodevelopmental Consequences of Low-Level Thyroid Hormone Disruption Induced by Environmental Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inadequate levels of thyroid hormone during critical developmental periods lead to stunted growth, mental retardation, and neurological 'cretinism'. Animal models of developmental thyroid hormone deficiency mirror well the impact of severe insults to the thyroid system. However, ...

  3. Myasthenia Crisis Induced by Pegylated-Interferon in Patient With Chronic Hepatitis C: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Baik, Su Jung; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Hye In; Rhie, Jeong Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis is occasionally associated with thymoma that needs surgical resection and may progress to severe respiratory failure. We experienced a rare case of myasthenia crisis during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C, in whom mediastinal thymoma was discovered and successfully managed with surgical thymectomy and meticulous medical care.A 47-year-old-male patient complained of sudden diplopia 1 week after stopping 11-week administration of pegylated-interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed ptosis on the right eyelid and restricted right eye movement. Myasthenia gravis was confirmed by positive repetitive nerve stimulation test and positive serum antiacetylcholine receptor antibody test, and mediastinal thymoma was found on chest CT scan. The ocular myasthenia gravis progressed to respiratory failure even after discontinuing antiviral treatment but eventually recovered with thymectomy, anticholinesterase administration, steroid pulse therapy, and prolonged ventilator care. We describe the clinical features of this life-threatening complication of interferon treatment along with previous myasthenia crisis cases by interferon for chronic hepatitis C.In patients with chronic hepatitis C who is going to receive interferon-based antiviral treatment, physicians need to keep in mind the potential life-threatening manifestations of myasthenia gravis before and during antiviral treatment especially when patients complain of muscular weakness and easy fatigability.

  4. Myasthenia Crisis Induced by Pegylated-Interferon in Patient With Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Su Jung; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Hye In; Rhie, Jeong Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis is occasionally associated with thymoma that needs surgical resection and may progress to severe respiratory failure. We experienced a rare case of myasthenia crisis during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C, in whom mediastinal thymoma was discovered and successfully managed with surgical thymectomy and meticulous medical care. A 47-year-old-male patient complained of sudden diplopia 1 week after stopping 11-week administration of pegylated-interferon and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed ptosis on the right eyelid and restricted right eye movement. Myasthenia gravis was confirmed by positive repetitive nerve stimulation test and positive serum antiacetylcholine receptor antibody test, and mediastinal thymoma was found on chest CT scan. The ocular myasthenia gravis progressed to respiratory failure even after discontinuing antiviral treatment but eventually recovered with thymectomy, anticholinesterase administration, steroid pulse therapy, and prolonged ventilator care. We describe the clinical features of this life-threatening complication of interferon treatment along with previous myasthenia crisis cases by interferon for chronic hepatitis C. In patients with chronic hepatitis C who is going to receive interferon-based antiviral treatment, physicians need to keep in mind the potential life-threatening manifestations of myasthenia gravis before and during antiviral treatment especially when patients complain of muscular weakness and easy fatigability. PMID:27227948

  5. Apigenin induces autophagic cell death in human papillary thyroid carcinoma BCPAP cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Cheng, Xian; Gao, Yanyan; Zheng, Jie; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Guan, Haixia; Yu, Huixin; Sun, Zhen

    2015-11-01

    Apigenin, abundantly present in fruits and vegetables, is recognized as a flavonoid with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer properties. In this study, we first investigated the anti-neoplastic effects of apigenin on papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cell line BCPAP cells. Our results show that apigenin inhibited the viability of BCPAP cells in a dose-dependent manner. A large body of evidence demonstrates that autophagy contributes to cell death in certain contexts. In the present study, autophagy was induced by apigenin treatment in BCPAP cells, as evidenced by Beclin-1 accumulation, conversion of LC3 protein, p62 degradation as well as the significantly increased formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) compared to the control group. 3-MA, an autophagy inhibitor, rescued the cells from apigenin-induced cell death. Notably, apigenin enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and subsequent induction of significant DNA damage as monitored by the TUNEL assay. In addition, apigenin treatment caused a significant accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase via down-regulation of Cdc25C expression. Our findings reveal that apigenin inhibits papillary thyroid cancer cell viability by the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, induction of DNA damage, leading to G2/M cell cycle arrest followed by autophagic cell death. Thus, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying apigenin-mediated autophagic cell death and suggest apigenin as a potential chemotherapeutic agent which is able to fight against papillary thyroid cancer.

  6. Curcumin inhibits hypoxia-induced migration in K1 papillary thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cheng; Zhang, Li; Cheng, Xian; Lin, Xiu-Feng; Lu, Rong-Rong; Bao, Jian-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, traditionally used as food and medicinal purposes, has recently been reported to have protective efficacy against hypoxia. Hypoxia is one of the important reactive factors in tumor metastasis, which is a key problem in clinical thyroid cancer therapy. In present study, we investigate the anti-metastatic effect of curcumin on the K1 papillary thyroid cancer cells as well as its potential mechanisms. The results show that curcumin effectively inhibits hypoxia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) upregulation and significantly decreases the mRNA and protein expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in K1 cells. Curcumin also decreases the DNA binding ability of HIF-1α to hypoxia response element (HRE). Furthermore, curcumin enhances E-cadherin expression, inhibits metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) enzyme activity, and weakens K1 cells migration under hypoxic conditions. In summary, these results indicate that curcumin possesses a potent anti-metastatic effect and might be an effective tumoristatic agent for the treatment of aggressive papillary thyroid cancers. PMID:25349216

  7. Alemtuzumab Induced Thyroid Disease in Multiple Sclerosis: A Review and Approach to Management.

    PubMed

    Mahzari, Moeber; Arnaout, Amel; Freedman, Mark S

    2015-09-01

    Alemtuzumab, an anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody, was recently approved for treatment of MS in Canada, having shown to significantly reduce relapses and disability in patients, particularly those who relapsed despite first line treatment. Offsetting its benefit however, is the development of novel secondary autoimmune disease, particularly affecting the thyroid gland in up to 36% of patients. The incidence of Alemtuzumab induced thyroid dysfunction (AITD) will likely rise as alemtuzumab becomes more widely used for treating MS. We review the clinical and investigational cues that help delineate the aetiology and management of thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism in ATID. AITD can be easily managed and we present a simple approach for its evaluation and management by neurologists that should be implemented prior to considering a referral to an internist or endocrinologist for further opinion or treatment.

  8. Illness-induced changes in thyroid hormone metabolism: focus on the tissue level.

    PubMed

    Kwakkel, J; Fliers, E; Boelen, A

    2011-05-01

    During illness changes in thyroid hormone metabolism occur, collectively known as the non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). NTIS is characterised by low serum thyroid hormone levels without the expected rise in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, indicating a major change in thyroid hormone feedback regulation. Recent studies have made clear that during NTIS differential changes in thyroid hormone metabolism occur in various tissues, the net effect of which may be either activation or inhibition of thyroid hormone action. In this review we discuss systemic and local changes in thyroid hormone metabolism during illness, highlighting their physiological implications in terms of disease course.

  9. Evolutionary Dynamics of the Interferon-Induced Transmembrane Gene Family in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhao; Liu, Jun; Li, Meng; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Chiyu

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) genes have been demonstrated to have extensive and diverse functions, playing important roles in the evolution of vertebrates. Despite observance of their functionality, the evolutionary dynamics of this gene family are complex and currently unknown. Here, we performed detailed evolutionary analyses to unravel the evolutionary history of the vertebrate IFITM family. A total of 174 IFITM orthologous genes and 112 pseudogenes were identified from 27 vertebrate genome sequences. The vertebrate IFITM family can be divided into immunity-related IFITM (IR-IFITM), IFITM5 and IFITM10 sub-families in phylogeny, implying origins from three different progenitors. In general, vertebrate IFITM genes are located in two loci, one containing the IFITM10 gene, and the other locus containing IFITM5 and various numbers of IR-IFITM genes. Conservation of evolutionary synteny was observed in these IFITM genes. Significant functional divergence was detected among the three IFITM sub-families. No gene duplication or positive selection was found in IFITM5 sub-family, implying the functional conservation of IFITM5 in vertebrate evolution, which is involved in bone formation. No IFITM5 locus was identified in the marmoset genome, suggesting a potential association with the tiny size of this monkey. The IFITM10 sub-family was divided into two groups: aquatic and terrestrial types. Functional divergence was detected between the two groups, and five IFITM10-like genes from frog were dispersed into the two groups. Both gene duplication and positive selection were observed in aquatic vertebrate IFITM10-like genes, indicating that IFITM10 might be associated with the adaptation to aquatic environments. A large number of lineage- and species-specific gene duplications were observed in IR-IFITM sub-family and positive selection was detected in IR-IFITM of primates and rodents. Because primates have experienced a long history of viral infection

  10. Effect of thyroid hormone status and concomitant medication on statin induced adverse effects in hyperlipidemic patients.

    PubMed

    Berta, E; Harangi, M; Zsíros, N; Nagy, E V; Paragh, G; Bodor, M

    2014-06-01

    Statins are effective treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and used extensively worldwide. However, adverse effects induced by statins are the major barrier of maximalizing cardiovascular risk reduction. Hypothyroidism and administration of drugs metabolized on the same cytochrome P450 (CYPP450) pathways where statin biotransformation occurs represent a significant risk factor for statin induced adverse effects including myopathy. Simvastatin, atorvastatin and lovastatin are metabolized by CYP3A4, fluvastatin by CYP2C9, while rosuvastatin by CYP2C9 and 2C19. We investigated the levels of the free thyroid hormones and CYP metabolism of concomitant medication in 101 hyperlipidemic patients (age 61.3 +/- 9.9 ys) with statin induced adverse effects including myopathy (56 cases; 55.4%), hepatopathy (39 cases; 38.6%) and gastrointestinal adverse effects (24 cases; 23.8%). Abnormal thyroid hormone levels were found in 5 patients (4.95%); clinical hypothyroidism in 2 and hyperthyroidism in 3 cases. 11 patients had a positive history for hypothyroidism (10.9%). Myopathy occured in one patient with hypothyroidism and two patients with hyperthyroidism. There were no significant differences in the TSH, fT4 and fT3 levels between patients with statin induced myopathy and patients with other types of adverse effects. 78 patients (77.2%) were administered drugs metabolized by CYP isoforms also used by statins (3A4: 66 cases (65.3%); 2C9: 67 cases (66.3%); 2C19: 54 cases (53.5%)). Patients with myopathy took significantly more drugs metabolized by CYP3A4 compared to patients with other types of adverse effects (p < 0.05). More myopathy cases were found in patients on simvastatin treatment (52% vs. 38%, ns.), while significantly less patients with myopathy were on fluvastatin treatment (13% vs. 33%, p < 0.05) compared to patients with other types of statin induced adverse effects. Both abnormal thyroid hormone status and administration of drugs metabolized by CYP

  11. Inhibitory oligodeoxynucleotide down regulate herpes simplex virus induced plasmacytoid dendritic cell type I interferon production and modulate cell function

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wen-Ming; Yu, Chun-Feng; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Oldenburg, Johannes; Bieber, Thomas; Hoch, Jochen; Eis-Hübinger, Anna-Maria; Novak, Natalija

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of nucleic acids by TLR9 expressed by human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) plays a key role in the defense against viral infections. Upon microbial pathogen stimulation, PDC secret large amounts of type I interferon and attend thereby both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Unmethylated CpG motifs, which are an integral part of bacterial or viral DNA are used in vitro and in vivo to activate the TLR9 pathway, while inhibitory oligodeoxynucleotide (iODN) are capable to depress TLR9 signaling. In this study we show that TTAGGG motif containing iODN efficiently block the TLR9 signaling in terms of herpes simplex virus (HSV) induced type I interferon production by PDC. However, iODN as well as control ODN still promote PDC maturation with upregulated expression of costimulatory molecules, major histocompatibility complex molecules and other signs for PDC maturation. Furthermore, iODN and control ODN incubated PDC show increased T cell stimulatory functions. Co-culture experiments with autologous T cells indicate that iODN treated PDC induce more CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells from naïve CD4+ T cells and preincubation of HSV stimulated PDC with iODN upregulated T cells’ IFN-γ production. These data indicate that iODN while blocking type I interferon production by PDC, modify PDC activation and maturation as well as T cell priming and stimulation. The knowledge about the different functions of iODN on PDC elucidated here might be crucial for immunotherapeutic strategies in which iODN motifs are used to prevent the interaction of CpG-DNA with TLR9 to calm down specific immunological responses, since our data show that iODN might not only have inhibitory functions but moreover be effective activators of immune cells. PMID:18082566

  12. Expression of interferon-inducible recombinant human RNase L causes RNA degradation and inhibition of cell growth in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Mitali; Rath, Pramod C

    2004-04-30

    Interferon-inducible ribonuclease L (RNase L) is a unique ankyrin-repeat containing endoribonuclease activated by 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) cofactor leading to RNA degradation and apoptosis during antiviral response in mammalian cells. We report that expression of recombinant human RNase L (1-741 a.a.) caused RNA degradation and inhibition of cell growth in Escherichia coli in absence of exogenous 2-5A. On the contrary, expression of a homologous but dominant negative form of murine RNase L (1-656 a.a.), lacking the RNA binding and ribonuclease domain, did not show RNA degradation, rather it stimulated cell growth. Upon computational analysis by pBLAST search, a putative transcription factor (yahD, F64758, and NP_414852) from the E. coli genome showed highest homology (E value=1e(-17)) with 90-259 a.a. region of human RNase L due to ankyrin repeats with conserved GKT motifs. Ankyrin repeats 6-9 of RNase L are involved in 2-5A binding, dimerization, and activation of the ribonuclease. Thus, a biochemically active human RNase L in E. coli strongly suggests for a prokaryotic cell growth-inhibitory mechanism possibly through ankyrin-ankyrin interaction of YahD and RNase L leading to RNA degradation. The mammalian interferon-inducible RNase L and E. coli yahD protein may have common origin for the ankyrin repeats with 2-5A binding sites. Thus, RNA degradation and cell growth inhibition by recombinant human RNase L biochemically reconstituted mammalian cellular response to interferon in E. coli. RNase L has prokaryotic evolutionary history, it is not only an antiviral but also an antibacterial gene.

  13. A comparison of potency differences among thyroid peroxidase (TPO) inhibitors to induce developmental toxicity and other thyroid gland-linked toxicities in humans and rats.

    PubMed

    Motonaga, Kozo; Ota, Mika; Odawara, Kyoko; Saito, Shoji; Welsch, Frank

    2016-10-01

    The potencies of resorcinol, 6-propylthiouracil (PTU) and methimazole (MMI) for inducing developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity were compared in pregnant rats, regarded as valid model for human thyroid toxicity. Profound differences on maternal thyroid hormone levels (THs), maternal toxicity as well as developmental and neurotoxicity sequelae occurred. Resorcinol affected none of those end points. PTU and MMI caused significant effects. Therapy with either PTU or MMI during the first trimester of human pregnancy can cause reductions of maternal THs, accompanied by disruptions of prenatal development. Clinical MMI studies show sporadic evidence of teratogenic effects, with equivocal relation to thyroid peroxidase (TPO) inhibition. In recent decades no MMI associated prenatal toxicity has been reported, an outcome possibly related to carefully managed therapy. Orally administered resorcinol was rapidly absorbed, metabolized and excreted and was undetectable in the thyroid. In contrast, PTU or MMI accumulated. Resorcinol's potency to inhibit TPO was profoundly lower than that of PTU or MMI. Quantum chemical calculations may explain low resorcinol reactivity with TPO. Thus, distinctions in the target organ and the TPO inhibitory potency between these chemicals are likely contributing to different reductions of maternal THs levels and affecting the potency to cause developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Involvement of mTOR and Regulation by AMPK in Early Iodine Deficiency-Induced Thyroid Microvascular Activation.

    PubMed

    Craps, J; Joris, V; De Jongh, B; Sonveaux, P; Horman, S; Lengelé, B; Bertrand, L; Many, M-C; Colin, I M; Gérard, A-C

    2016-06-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) induces TSH-independent microvascular activation in the thyroid via the reactive oxygen species/nitric oxide-hypoxia-inducible factor-1α/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway. We hypothesized the additional involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a positive regulator of this pathway and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as a negative feedback regulator to explain the transient nature of ID-induced microvascular changes under nonmalignant conditions. mTOR and AMPK involvement was investigated using an in vitro model (human thyrocytes in primary cultures) and 2 murine models of goitrogenesis (normal NMRI and RET-PTC mice [a papillary thyroid cancer model]). In NMRI mice, ID had no effect on the phosphorylation of ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K), a downstream target of mTOR. However, rapamycin inhibited ID-induced thyroid blood flow and VEGF protein expression. In the RET-PTC model, ID strongly increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K, whereas rapamycin completely inhibited the ID-induced increase in p70S6K phosphorylation, thyroid blood flow, and VEGF-A expression. In vitro, although ID increased p70S6K phosphorylation, the ID-stimulated hypoxia-inducible factor/VEGF pathway was inhibited by rapamycin. Activation of AMPK by metformin inhibited ID effects both in vivo and in vitro. In AMPK-α1 knockout mice, the ID-induced increase in thyroid blood flow and VEGF-A protein expression persisted throughout the treatment, whereas both parameters returned to control values in wild-type mice after 4 days of ID. In conclusion, mTOR is required for early ID-induced thyroid microvascular activation. AMPK negatively regulates this pathway, which may account for the transient nature of ID-induced TSH-independent vascular effects under benign conditions.

  15. Autoimmune and Neoplastic Thyroid Diseases Associated with Hepatitis C Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, Poupak; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Politti, Ugo; Giuggioli, Dilia; Ferri, Clodoveo

    2014-01-01

    Frequently, patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic infection have high levels of serum anti-thyroperoxidase and/or anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies, ultrasonographic signs of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, and subclinical hypothyroidism, in female gender versus healthy controls, or hepatitis B virus infected patients. In patients with “HCV-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia” (MC + HCV), a higher prevalence of thyroid autoimmune disorders was shown not only compared to controls, but also versus HCV patients without cryoglobulinemia. Patients with MC + HCV or HCV chronic infection show a higher prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer than controls, in particular in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. Patients with HCV chronic infection, or with MC + HCV, in presence of autoimmune thyroiditis, show higher serum levels of T-helper (Th)1 (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10) chemokine, but normal levels of Th2 (C-C motif) ligand 2 chemokine, than patients without thyroiditis. HCV thyroid infection could act by upregulating CXCL10 gene expression and secretion in thyrocytes recruiting Th1 lymphocytes that secrete interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. These cytokines might induce a further CXCL10 secretion by thyrocytes, thus perpetuating the immune cascade, which may lead to the appearance of autoimmune thyroid disorders in genetically predisposed subjects. A careful monitoring of thyroid function, particularly where nodules occur, is recommended in HCV patients. PMID:25374602

  16. Autoimmune and neoplastic thyroid diseases associated with hepatitis C chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Poupak; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Politti, Ugo; Giuggioli, Dilia; Ferri, Clodoveo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Frequently, patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic infection have high levels of serum anti-thyroperoxidase and/or anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies, ultrasonographic signs of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, and subclinical hypothyroidism, in female gender versus healthy controls, or hepatitis B virus infected patients. In patients with "HCV-associated mixed cryoglobulinemia" (MC + HCV), a higher prevalence of thyroid autoimmune disorders was shown not only compared to controls, but also versus HCV patients without cryoglobulinemia. Patients with MC + HCV or HCV chronic infection show a higher prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer than controls, in particular in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. Patients with HCV chronic infection, or with MC + HCV, in presence of autoimmune thyroiditis, show higher serum levels of T-helper (Th)1 (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10) chemokine, but normal levels of Th2 (C-C motif) ligand 2 chemokine, than patients without thyroiditis. HCV thyroid infection could act by upregulating CXCL10 gene expression and secretion in thyrocytes recruiting Th1 lymphocytes that secrete interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. These cytokines might induce a further CXCL10 secretion by thyrocytes, thus perpetuating the immune cascade, which may lead to the appearance of autoimmune thyroid disorders in genetically predisposed subjects. A careful monitoring of thyroid function, particularly where nodules occur, is recommended in HCV patients.

  17. Characterization of Breast Cancer Cell Death Induced by Interferons and Retinoids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    negative mutants. Dominant negative mutants were azelaic acid (AZ), dithiothreitol, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, Triton X, imi- constructed by PCR with...Schallreuter, K. U., and J. M. Wood. 1987. Azelaic acid as a competitive tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Clin. Cancer Res. 3:931-937. inhibitor of...Research and Materiel Command, 504 Scott Street, Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Interferons (IFNs) and retinoic acid

  18. Effect of BMAP-28 on human thyroid cancer TT cells is mediated by inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, DAQI; WAN, LANLAN; ZHANG, JINNAN; LIU, CHANG; SUN, HUI

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignant endocrine tumor, with significant morbidity and mortality. Bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 28 (BMAP-28) is a cathelicidin that is found in bovine neutrophils. In the present study, the effect and relative mechanism of BMAP-28 on the human thyroid cancer TT cell line in vitro and in vivo were investigated. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, flow cytometry and a TT-xenograft mouse model were used in this study. The data obtained indicated that BMAP-28 significantly inhibited the proliferation of the TT cells in vitro. In addition, the Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay detected that BMAP-28 induced apoptotic effects in the TT cells. Moreover, the expression of activated caspase-3 and -9 was upregulated at the transcriptional and translational levels. Simultaneously, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)3 and MMP9 was downregulated following BMAP-28 treatment. Finally, BMAP-28 significantly prevented the tumor growth in the TT-xenograft mouse model. These results indicated that BMAP-28 could be a potential agent for the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:26622900

  19. Antibodies specific for human thyrotropin receptor induce MHC antigen expression in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Ropars, A; Marion, S; Takorabet, L; Braun, J; Charreire, J

    1994-10-01

    Autoantibodies (AAbs) to hormone receptors are found in autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease (GD) or myasthenia gravis. A structural link between hormone receptor and MHC genes has been documented, suggesting a possible co-regulation of MHC and hormone receptor genes. Thus, in vitro experiments were designed to search for a pathologic role for AAbs. In a model study, we investigated whether adding murine anti-human thyrotropin receptor mAbs would affect MHC gene expression in either cloned human thyroid epithelial cell or primary murine thyroid epithelial cell cultures. We found that two anti-human thyrotropin receptor monoclonal AAbs, 11E7 and 34A, induced, with an intensity comparable to that of IFN-gamma, transcription and expression of class I and class II/Ii chain proteins in human and murine thyroid epithelial cells. Two other anti-human thyrotropin receptor mAbs, 12E3 and 243-3, were ineffective. These data suggest a new role for autoantibodies in the pathology of autoimmune endocrinopathies.

  20. The West Nile virus assembly process evades the conserved antiviral mechanism of the interferon-induced MxA protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenen, Antje; Gillespie, Leah; Morgan, Garry; Heide, Peter van der; Khromykh, Alexander; Mackenzie, Jason

    2014-01-05

    Flaviviruses have evolved means to evade host innate immune responses. Recent evidence suggests this is due to prevention of interferon production and signaling in flavivirus-infected cells. Here we show that the interferon-induced MxA protein can sequester the West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) capsid protein in cytoplasmic tubular structures in an expression-replication system. This sequestering resulted in reduced titers of secreted WNV{sub KUN} particles. We show by electron microscopy, tomography and 3D modeling that these cytoplasmic tubular structures form organized bundles. Additionally we show that recombinant ER-targeted MxA can restrict production of infectious WNV{sub KUN} under conditions of virus infection. Our results indicate a co-ordinated and compartmentalized WNV{sub KUN} assembly process may prevent recognition of viral components by MxA, particularly the capsid protein. This recognition can be exploited if MxA is targeted to intracellular sites of WNV{sub KUN} assembly. This results in further understanding of the mechanisms of flavivirus evasion from the immune system. - Highlights: • We show that the ISG MxA can recognize the West Nile virus capsid protein. • Interaction between WNV C protein and MxA induces cytoplasmic fibrils. • MxA can be retargeted to the ER to restrict WNV particle release. • WNV assembly process is a strategy to avoid MxA recognition.

  1. Nitric oxide-repressed Forkhead factor FoxE1 expression is involved in the inhibition of TSH-induced thyroid peroxidase levels.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, María del Mar; Nicola, Juan Pablo; Nazar, Magalí; Peyret, Victoria; Lucero, Ariel Maximiliano; Pellizas, Claudia Gabriela; Masini-Repiso, Ana María

    2016-01-15

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is essential for thyroid hormone synthesis mediating the covalent incorporation of iodine into tyrosine residues of thyroglobulin process known as organification. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) via cAMP signaling is the main hormonal regulator of TPO gene expression. In thyroid cells, TSH-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production inhibits TSH-induced thyroid-specific gene expression, suggesting a potential autocrine role of NO in modulating thyroid function. Indeed, NO donors downregulate TSH-induced iodide accumulation and organification in thyroid cells. Here, using FRTL-5 thyroid cells as model, we obtained insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the inhibitory effects of NO on iodide organification. We demonstrated that NO donors inhibited TSH-stimulated TPO expression by inducing a cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase-mediated transcriptional repression of the TPO gene. Moreover, we characterized the FoxE1 binding site Z as mediator of the NO-inhibited TPO expression. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that NO decreases TSH-induced FoxE1 expression, thus repressing the transcripcional activation of TPO gene. Taken together, we provide novel evidence reinforcing the inhibitory role of NO on thyroid cell function, an observation of potential pathophysiological relevance associated with human thyroid pathologies that come along with changes in the NO production.

  2. HCV Infection Induces Autocrine Interferon Signaling by Human Liver Endothelial Cell and Release of Exosomes, Which Inhibits Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Giugliano, Silvia; Kriss, Michael; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Stone, Amy E.L.; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Mitchell, Angela; Khetani, Salman R.; Yamane, Daisuke; Stoddard, Mark; Li, Hui; Shaw, George M.; Edwards, Michael G.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Gale, Michael; Shah, Vijay H.; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) make up a large proportion of the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. LSECs are involved in induction of immune tolerance, but little is known about their functions during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Methods Primary human LSECs (HLSECs) and immortalized liver endothelial cells (TMNK-1) were exposed to various forms of HCV, including full-length transmitted/founder virus, sucrose-purified Japanese Fulminant Hepatitis-1 (JFH-1), a virus encoding a luciferase reporter, and the HCV-specific pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules. Cells were analyzed by confocal immunofluorescence, immunohistochemical, and PCR assays. Results HLSECs internalized HCV, independent of cell–cell contacts; HCV RNA was translated but not replicated. Through pattern recognition receptors (TLR7 and retinoic acid inducible gene 1), HCV RNA induced consistent and broad transcription of multiple interferons (IFNs); supernatants from primary HLSECs transfected with HCV-specific pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules increased induction of IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes in HLSECs. Recombinant type I and type III IFNs strongly up-regulated HLSEC transcription of interferon λ 3 (IFNL3) and viperin (RSAD2), which inhibit replication of HCV. Compared to CD8+ T cells, HLSECs suppressed HCV replication within Huh7.5.1 cells, also inducing IFN-stimulated genes in co-culture. Conditioned media from IFN-stimulated HLSECs induced expression of antiviral genes by uninfected primary human hepatocytes. Exosomes, derived from HLSECs following stimulation with either type I or type III IFNs, controlled HCV replication in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions Cultured HLSECs produce factors that mediate immunity against HCV. HLSECs induce self-amplifying IFN-mediated responses and release of exosomes with antiviral activity. PMID:25447848

  3. Promotion of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced thyroid tumors by iodine deficiency in F344/NCr rats.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, M; Ward, J M

    1984-07-01

    Six-week-old male F344 rats were each given an injection once iv of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea [(MNU) CAS: 684-93-5] at a dose of 41.2 mg/kg body weight. Two weeks later, groups of rats were placed on iodine-deficient (ID) or iodine-adequate (IA) diets and then sacrificed at 20 and 33 weeks. Other groups received ID or IA diets without MNU. For localizing thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and prolactin, sections of pituitary glands were stained by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex technique with the use of anti-rat TSH or prolactin antibody. At 20 weeks, rats receiving MNU and ID diets had a 100% incidence of diffuse follicular goiter and multiple follicular adenomas of the thyroid. Focal proliferative thyroid follicular lesions including focal hyperplasias and adenomas per square centimeter of thyroid gland were significantly increased in rats given MNU and ID diets in comparison with rats given MNU and IA diets. At 33 weeks, all MNU rats on ID diets had a significantly increased incidence of thyroid carcinoma of the follicular or papillary types and diffuse pituitary thyrotroph hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and vacuolar degeneration. Rats fed ID diets without MNU had diffuse follicular goiter but no tumors at any time period. MNU given alone in rats fed IA diets induced a 10% incidence of single thyroid adenomas at 20 weeks and 70% at 33 weeks and a 10% incidence of thyroid carcinoma at 33 weeks. Tumors induced in other organs by MNU were not affected by the ID diets. Thus this experiment provided evidence that ID diets are potent promoters of thyroid tumors in this system, but the ID diet itself without carcinogen was not carcinogenic under the conditions of the study.

  4. Exercise induced hypercoagulability, increased von Willebrand factor and decreased thyroid hormone concentrations in sled dogs.

    PubMed

    Krogh, Anne K H; Legind, Pernille; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Bochsen, Louise; Kristensen, Annemarie T

    2014-02-07

    Sled dogs performing endurance races have been reported to have a high incidence of gastric erosions or ulcerations and an increased risk of gastro intestinal bleeding leading to death in some cases. In addition, these dogs also become hypothyroid during training and exercise. Canine hypothyroidism has been shown to correlate with decreased von Willebrand factor antigen and potentially increased bleeding tendency. Whether increased gastro intestinal bleeding risk is exacerbated due to changes in the hemostatic balance is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the hemostatic balance in sled dogs before and after exercise and in addition evaluate any correlation to thyroid status. Twenty sled dogs have been assessed in untrained and trained condition and immediately after exercise. The first sample was collected in the autumn following a resting period, and subsequently the dogs were exposed to increased intensity of training. After four months the peak of physical condition was reached and a 68 km long sled pulling exercise was performed. Samples were collected before and immediately after the exercise. Evaluated parameters were: plasma thromboelastographic (TEG) R, SP, α and MA, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT), fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor (vWf), D-dimer, platelet number, thyroid hormones, hematocrit and C-reactive protein (CRP). Exercise induced an overall hypercoagulable state characterized by significant decreases of TEG R and SP and an increase of α, increased concentrations of plasma vWf and decreased aPTT. In addition, a proinflammatory status was seen by a significant increase of serum CRP concentrations. Thyroid status was confirmed to be hypothyroid as training and exercise induced significant decrease of thyroxin (T4), free thyroxin (fT4) and thyroxin stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations. Fibrinogen decreased significantly and PT increased. The training-induced changes showed correlation between T

  5. TSH-induced cyclic AMP production in an ovine thyroid cell line: OVNIS 5H.

    PubMed

    Fayet, G; Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S

    1986-01-06

    The TSH-induced cyclic AMP response was studied using a 3-year-old ovine thyroid cell line TSH-independent for growth: OVNIS 5H. The kinetics of cyclic AMP production was followed both in cell layers and in cell culture media, with or without phosphodiesterase inhibitor. It is noteworthy that following the first wave in cyclic AMP obtained within minutes, we observed later a sustained exponential increase in cyclic AMP during the 5 days following TSH stimulation. A bioassay of TSH was derived allowing measurement of 1 microU/ml TSH from a crude bTSH preparation.

  6. Environmental Issues in Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors are determinant for the appearance of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) in susceptible subjects. Increased iodine intake, selenium, and vitamin D deficiency, exposure to radiation, from nuclear fallout or due to medical radiation, are environmental factors increasing AITD. Cigarette smoking is associated with Graves’ disease and Graves’ ophthalmopathy, while it decreases the risk of hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. Viral infections are important environmental factors in the pathogenesis of AITD, too, particularly human parvovirus B19 (EVB19) and hepatitis C virus. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably disrupt thyroid function. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites and polybrominated diethyl ethers bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Among drugs, interferon- and iodine-containing drugs have been associated with AITD. Moreover intestinal dysbiosis causes autoimmune thyroiditis. To reduce the risk to populations and also in each patient, it is necessary to comprehend the association between environmental agents and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:28373861

  7. Environmental Issues in Thyroid Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors are determinant for the appearance of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) in susceptible subjects. Increased iodine intake, selenium, and vitamin D deficiency, exposure to radiation, from nuclear fallout or due to medical radiation, are environmental factors increasing AITD. Cigarette smoking is associated with Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy, while it decreases the risk of hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity. Viral infections are important environmental factors in the pathogenesis of AITD, too, particularly human parvovirus B19 (EVB19) and hepatitis C virus. Among the many chemical contaminants, halogenated organochlorines and pesticides variably disrupt thyroid function. Polychlorinated biphenyls and their metabolites and polybrominated diethyl ethers bind to thyroid transport proteins, such as transthyretin, displace thyroxine, and disrupt thyroid function. Among drugs, interferon- and iodine-containing drugs have been associated with AITD. Moreover intestinal dysbiosis causes autoimmune thyroiditis. To reduce the risk to populations and also in each patient, it is necessary to comprehend the association between environmental agents and thyroid dysfunction.

  8. Camptothecin induces the ubiquitin-like protein, ISG15, and enhances ISG15 conjugation in response to interferon.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingjuan; Hummer, B Timothy; Li, Xiaoling; Hassel, Bret A

    2004-11-01

    Interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (15 kDa) (ISG15) is a ubiquitin-like protein that forms covalent conjugates with cellular proteins. ISG15 is induced by IFN, microbial challenge, and p53, suggesting that it represents a genetic response that is shared among diverse stress stimuli. To investigate the regulation of this posttranslational modification pathway by a genotoxic chemotherapeutic agent, we examined ISG15 induction and conjugation in cells treated with the topoisomerase I (topoI) poison, camptothecin (CPT). CPT induced ISG15mRNA, and induction required protein synthesis and a functional p53 protein. However, IFN and the Jak-Stat components of the IFN signaling pathway were dispensable for CPT induction of ISG15. CPT induced free ISG15 and conjugates in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. A single 55-kDa protein was the prominent CPT-induced ISG15 conjugate and localized to the nuclear compartment. CPT-induced ISG15 conjugates were distinct from those induced by IFN; however, CPT treatment dramatically enhanced ISG15 conjugation in response to IFN. These findings provide the first evidence of a stimulus-specific induction of discrete ISG15 conjugate species and demonstrate that treatment with a combination of cancer therapeutic agents can cooperate to enhance ISG15 conjugation. Identification of the specific ISG15 conjugates induced by chemotherapeutic agents may reveal novel molecular targets.

  9. Role of Oxidative Stress in Thyroid Hormone-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Associated Cardiac Dysfunction: An Undisclosed Story

    PubMed Central

    Elnakish, Mohammad T.; Ahmed, Amany A. E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is the most documented cardiomyopathy following hyperthyroidism in experimental animals. Thyroid hormone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is described as a relative ventricular hypertrophy that encompasses the whole heart and is linked with contractile abnormalities in both right and left ventricles. The increase in oxidative stress that takes place in experimental hyperthyroidism proposes that reactive oxygen species are key players in the cardiomyopathy frequently reported in this endocrine disorder. The goal of this review is to shed light on the effects of thyroid hormones on the development of oxidative stress in the heart along with the subsequent cellular and molecular changes. In particular, we will review the role of thyroid hormone-induced oxidative stress in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and associated cardiac dysfunction, as well as the potential effectiveness of antioxidant treatments in attenuating these hyperthyroidism-induced abnormalities in experimental animal models. PMID:26146529

  10. 5HT4 agonists inhibit interferon-gamma-induced MHC class II and B7 costimulatory molecules expression on cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zeinstra, Esther M; Wilczak, Nadine; Wilschut, Jan C; Glazenburg, Lisa; Chesik, Daniel; Kroese, Frans G M; De Keyser, Jacques

    2006-10-01

    A failure of tight control of MHC class II expression on astrocytes may play a role in the development of autoimmune responses in multiple sclerosis. The 5-HT(4) serotonin receptor agonists cisapride and prucalopride, at concentrations between 10(-10) M and 10(-8) M, reduced interferon-gamma-induced MHC class II immunostaining in cultured astrocytes derived from newborn Wistar rats by approximately 50-60%. The magnitude of MHC class II inhibition by 5-HT(4) agonists was comparable to that of interferon-beta. The alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine was without effect. Cisapride (10(-9) M) also prevented interferon-gamma-induced B7-1 and B7-2 immunostaining. Our results suggest that 5-HT(4) agonists may have therapeutic potential in multiple sclerosis by inhibiting the up-regulation of immune responsiveness of astrocytes in the central nervous system.

  11. Automatic removal of manually induced artefacts in ultrasound images of thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Nikhil S; Marziliano, Pina; Hobbs, Christopher G L

    2013-01-01

    Manually induced artefacts, like caliper marks and anatomical labels, render an ultrasound (US) image incapable of being subjected to further processes of Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD). In this paper, we propose a technique to remove these artefacts and restore the image as accurately as possible. The technique finds application as a pre-processing step when developing unsupervised segmentation algorithms for US images that deal with automatic estimation of the number of segments and clustering. The novelty of the algorithm lies in the image processing pipeline chosen to automatically identify the artefacts and is developed based on the histogram properties of the artefacts. The algorithm was able to successfully restore the images to a high quality when it was executed on a dataset of 18 US images of the thyroid gland on which the artefacts were induced manually by a doctor. Further experiments on an additional dataset of 10 unmarked US images of the thyroid gland on which the artefacts were simulated using Matlab showed that the restored images were again of high quality with a PSNR > 38 dB and free of any manually induced artefacts.

  12. The effect of Anethum graveolens L. (dill) on corticosteroid induced diabetes mellitus: involvement of thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Panda, Sunanda

    2008-12-01

    An investigation was made to evaluate the role of Anethum graveolens L. (dill) leaf extract in the regulation of corticosteroid-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus in female rats. In dexamethasone-treated animals (1 mg/kg for 22 days) an increase in serum concentration of insulin and glucose and in hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO) was observed. However, there was a decrease in serum concentration of thyroid hormones and in the endogenous antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH) in liver. In animals treated with an equivalent amount of dexamethasone for a similar period (22 days) when received the leaf extract (100 mg/kg b.wt/d.) for last 15 days a decrease in the concentration of both serum glucose and insulin was observed, indicating the potential of the plant extract in the regulation of corticosteroid-induced diabetes. Dexamethasone-induced alterations in the levels of thyroid hormones as well as in hepatic LPO, SOD, CAT and GSH were also reversed by the plant extract. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Interferoninducible protein 6 impairs EGFR activation by CD81 and inhibits hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Keith; Kwon, Young-Chan; Liu, Shuanghu; Hagedorn, Curt H; Ray, Ratna B; Ray, Ranjit

    2015-03-11

    Viral entry requires co-operative interactions of several host cell factors. Interferon (IFN) and the IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) play a central role in antiviral responses against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We examined the effect of interferoninducible protein 6 (IFI6) against HCV infection in human hepatoma cells. HCV RNA level or infectious foci were inhibited significantly by ectopic expression of IFI6. IFI6 impaired CD81 co-localization with claudin-1 (CLDN1) upon HCV infection or CD81 cross-linking by specific antibody. Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a co-factor involved in CD81/CLDN1 interactions, was reduced in IFI6 expressing cells in response to HCV infection or CD81 cross linking by antibody, but not by treatment with EGF. Taken together, the results from our study support a model where IFI6 inhibits HCV entry by impairing EGFR mediated CD81/CLDN1 interactions. This may be relevant to other virus entry processes employing EGFR.

  14. Spatiotemporal control of interferon-induced JAK/STAT signalling and gene transcription by the retromer complex

    PubMed Central

    Chmiest, Daniela; Sharma, Nanaocha; Zanin, Natacha; Viaris de Lesegno, Christine; Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Sibut, Vonick; Dingli, Florent; Hupé, Philippe; Wilmes, Stephan; Piehler, Jacob; Loew, Damarys; Johannes, Ludger; Schreiber, Gideon; Lamaze, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Type-I interferons (IFNs) play a key role in the immune defences against viral and bacterial infections, and in cancer immunosurveillance. We have established that clathrin-dependent endocytosis of the type-I interferon (IFN-α/β) receptor (IFNAR) is required for JAK/STAT signalling. Here we show that the internalized IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 subunits of the IFNAR complex are differentially sorted by the retromer at the early endosome. Binding of the retromer VPS35 subunit to IFNAR2 results in IFNAR2 recycling to the plasma membrane, whereas IFNAR1 is sorted to the lysosome for degradation. Depletion of VPS35 leads to abnormally prolonged residency and association of the IFNAR subunits at the early endosome, resulting in increased activation of STAT1- and IFN-dependent gene transcription. These experimental data establish the retromer complex as a key spatiotemporal regulator of IFNAR endosomal sorting and a new factor in type-I IFN-induced JAK/STAT signalling and gene transcription. PMID:27917878

  15. Aloe-emodin is an interferon-inducing agent with antiviral activity against Japanese encephalitis virus and enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Chia-Fang; Hsiao, Nai-Wan; Chang, Ching-Yao; Li, Shih-Wein; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lin, Wei-Yong

    2008-10-01

    In this study, aloe-emodin was identified as a potential interferon (IFN)-inducer by screening compounds from Chinese herbal medicine. Aloe-emodin showed low cytotoxicity to human HL-CZ promonocyte cells and TE-671 medulloblastoma cells and significantly activated interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) and gamma-activated sequence (GAS)-driven cis-reporting systems. Moreover, aloe-emodin upregulated expression of IFN-stimulated genes such as dsRNA-activated protein kinase and 2',5'-oligoisoadenylate synthase. Aloe-emodin resulted in significant activation of nitric oxide production. The antiviral activity of aloe-emodin against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) was evaluated using dose- and time-dependent plaque reduction assays in HL-CZ cells and TE-671 cells. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of aloe-emodin ranged from 0.50microg/mL to 1.51microg/mL for JEV and from 0.14microg/mL to 0.52microg/mL for EV71. Aloe-emodin showed clearly potent virus inhibitory abilities and achieved high therapeutic indices, in particular for HL-CZ cells. Therefore, the study demonstrated dose- and time-dependent actions of aloe-emodin on the inhibition of JEV and EV71 replication via IFN signalling responses.

  16. Interferon-mediated host response in experimentally induced salmonid alphavirus 1 infection in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Herath, Tharangani K; Thompson, Kim D; Adams, Alexandra; Richards, Randolph H

    2013-09-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) infection in cultured salmonids causes severe economic losses across Europe. Immune protection and antiviral mechanisms of the host against SAV are poorly characterised in vivo. Analysis of immune gene expression in head kidney of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) experimentally infected with SAV 1, using a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), revealed rapid induction of interferon I (INF-I), interferon II (INF-II) and INF-I associated Mx genes in SAV 1 infected fish compared to control fish injected with tissue culture supernatant. Mx protein was found to be highly expressed in the heart and mucosal membranes of infected fish by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Interestingly, the pathological changes that were observed in the target tissues of the virus became visible some time after peak expression of genes associated with the INF-I-pathway in head kidney tissue. These findings suggest that a non-specific antiviral immune response is rapidly induced during the early stages of SAV infection in salmon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Thyroid cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a family history of thyroid cancer and chronic goiter (enlarged thyroid). There are several types of thyroid ... Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Breathing difficulty Cancer Goiter - simple Metastasis Radiation therapy Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma ...

  18. Interferon-alpha treatment induces depression-like behaviour accompanied by elevated hippocampal quinolinic acid levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Christina Weide; Eskelund, Amanda; Budac, David P; Tillmann, Sandra; Liebenberg, Nico; Elfving, Betina; Wegener, Gregers

    2015-10-15

    Immunotherapy with the cytokine interferon-alpha (IFN-α) can induce symptoms of depression, and it is likely that the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway may be involved in this regard. In this study we investigated the effects of IFN-α on depression-like behaviour and central metabolites of the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway in rats. Secondly, we explored the modulating effects of an antidepressant (imipramine) and anti-inflammatory drug (celecoxib) on IFN-α-induced behavioural and pathophysiological changes in the brain. The following treatment groups were used: Control (saline), IFN-α (6×10(4)IU/kg s.c.), IFN-α+imipramine or IFN-α+celecoxib. Drugs were administered daily for 1 week. IFN-α treatment induced depression-like behaviour by increasing immobility in the forced swim test (FST), and decreased tryptophan levels in the brain. There was a trend for an increased kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, indicative of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activation, and increased quinolinic acid in the hippocampus. Imipramine decreased immobility in the FST, but did not reverse the IFN-α-induced changes in the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway. There was a trend for celecoxib to decrease immobility and to reverse the IFN-α-induced increase in the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio. Thus, our study provides further evidence for IFN-α-induced depression-like behaviour through central changes of the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway.

  19. Immune interferon and leukocyte-conditioned medium induce normal and leukemic myeloid cells to differentiate along the monocytic pathway

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Conditioned medium from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human leukocytes contains a factor that can induce promyelocytic cell lines and certain acute myelogenous leukemia cells to differentiate along the monocytic pathway. In this report, we show that immature myeloid cells from normal bone marrow or the peripheral blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia can be induced to differentiate to monocyte-like cells by immune gamma interferon (IFN gamma). We have identified IFN gamma as the predominant differentiation factor contained in the conditioned medium. Purified or recombinant IFN gamma, but not various preparations of IFN alpha or beta, can induce monocytic differentiation in myeloid cells. In cultures containing conditioned medium, the cells fail to continue myeloid maturation, and are induced to express monocyte markers and functions, such as monocyte-specific surface antigens, HLA-DR antigens, Fc receptors for monomeric immunoglobulins, nonspecific esterase, and the ability to mediate antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Even myeloid cells as mature as metamyelocytes or band cells can be induced by IFN gamma to undergo monocyte differentiation, but monocyte-specific or HLA-DR antigens are not induced in mature neutrophils. These findings reveal a previously unknown, specific function of human IFN gamma and offer new insights to the regulation of monocyte recruitment and differentiation during a virus infection or immune response. PMID:6417261

  20. Gene expression profiling in undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma induced by high-dose radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun Soon; Choi, Moo Hyun; Kim, Cha Soon; Choi, Seung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Published gene expression studies for radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis have used various methodologies. In this study, we identified differential gene expression in a human thyroid epithelial cell line after exposure to high-dose γ-radiation. HTori-3 cells were exposed to 5 or 10 Gy of ionizing radiation using two dose rates (high-dose rate: 4.68 Gy/min, and low-dose rate: 40 mGy/h) and then implanted into the backs of BALB/c nude mice after 4 (10 Gy) or 5 weeks (5 Gy). Decreases in cell viability, increases in giant cell frequency, anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo were observed. Particularly, the cells irradiated with 5 Gy at the high-dose rate or 10 Gy at the low-dose rate demonstrated more prominent tumorigenicity. Gene expression profiling was analyzed via microarray. Numerous genes that were significantly altered by a fold-change of >50% following irradiation were identified in each group. Gene expression analysis identified six commonly misregulated genes, including CRYAB, IL-18, ZNF845, CYP24A1, OR4N4 and VN1R4, at all doses. These genes involve apoptosis, the immune response, regulation of transcription, and receptor signaling pathways. Overall, the altered genes in high-dose rate (HDR) 5 Gy and low-dose rate (LDR) 10 Gy were more than those of LDR 5 Gy and HDR 10 Gy. Thus, we investigated genes associated with aggressive tumor development using the two dosage treatments. In this study, the identified gene expression profiles reflect the molecular response following high doses of external radiation exposure and may provide helpful information about radiation-induced thyroid tumors in the high-dose range. PMID:27006382

  1. Characterization of xenobiotic-induced hepatocellular enzyme induction in rats: anticipated thyroid effects and unique pituitary gland findings.

    PubMed

    Zabka, Tanja S; Fielden, Mark R; Garrido, Rosario; Tao, Jianhua; Fretland, Adrian J; Fretland, Jennifer L; Albassam, Mudher A; Singer, Thomas; Kolaja, Kyle L

    2011-06-01

    During routine safety evaluation of RO2910, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor for HIV infection, histopathology findings concurrent with robust hepatocellular induction occurred in multiple organs, including a unique, albeit related, finding in the pituitary gland. For fourteen days, male and female rats were administered, by oral gavage vehicle, 100, 300, or 1000 mg/kg/day of RO2910. Treated groups had elevated serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and decreased total thyroxine, and hypertrophy in the liver, thyroid gland, and pituitary pars distalis. These were considered consequences of hepatocellular induction and often were dose dependent and more pronounced in males than in females. Hepatocellular centrilobular hypertrophy corresponded with increased expression of cytochrome P450s 2B1/2, 3A1, and 3A2 and UGT 2B1. Bilateral thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy occurred concurrent to increased mitotic activity and sometimes colloid depletion, which were attributed to changes in thyroid hormone levels. Males had hypertrophy of thyroid-stimulating hormone-producing cells (thyrotrophs) in the pituitary pars distalis. All findings were consistent with the well-established adaptive physiologic response of rodents to xenobiotic-induced hepatocellular microsomal enzyme induction. Although the effects on the pituitary gland following hepatic enzyme induction-mediated hypothyroidism have not been reported previously, other models of stress and thyroid depletion leading to pituitary stimulation support such a shared pathogenesis.

  2. Interferon-resistant Daudi cells are deficient in interferon-alpha-induced ISGF3 alpha activation, but remain sensitive to the interferon-alpha-induced increase in ISGF3 gamma content.

    PubMed

    Dron, M; Tovey, M G

    1993-10-01

    Low levels of the transcription factor ISGF3 alpha were detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus of untreated Daudi cells, which increased markedly following interferon (IFN) treatment. In contrast no ISGF3 alpha was detected in an IFN-resistant clone of Daudi cells, DIF8, and only low levels were detected in these cells after IFN-alpha treatment. High levels of ISGF3 were produced in vitro, however, by the addition of ISGF3 alpha to extracts of IFN-treated DIF8 cells, indicating that IFN is unable to produce substantial amounts of functional ISGF3 alpha in DIF8 cells. A second clone of IFN-resistant Daudi cells, DIF3, also exhibited defective ISGF3 alpha production, which was restored to normal in the subclone DIF3REV5 that had reverted to high IFN sensitivity. Thus, the antiproliferative effect of IFN on Daudi cells and derived clones is closely related to the level of ISGF3 present in the nucleus of these cells. IFN-alpha, however, also enhances the content of ISGF3 gamma in IFN-resistant cells as well as certain proteins of unknown function, raising the possibility that a second pathway of IFN-alpha signal transduction, distinct from the ISGF3 pathway, remains functional in both DIF8 and DIF3 cells.

  3. Interferon-α, -β and -γ induce CXCL11 secretion in human thyrocytes: modulation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonists.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Mancusi, Caterina; Mazzi, Valeria; Pupilli, Cinzia; Centanni, Marco; Ferri, Clodoveo; Ferrannini, Ele; Fallahi, Poupak

    2013-05-01

    It has been previously shown IFN-α, -β, -γ and TNF-α (synergically with IFNs) dose-dependently induce the release of CXCL9 and CXCL10 chemokines by thyroid follicular cells, suggesting that this process may be related, at least in part, to the appearance of thyroid dysfunction during IFNs therapy. No study has evaluated the effect of IFN-α and -β on CXCL11 chemokine production in thyrocytes. The aims of this study were: (a) to test the effect of IFN-α, -β and -γ on the secretion of the Th1 chemokine CXCL11, in primary cultures of human thyroid follicular cells; (b) to assess the effect of PPAR-γ activation on CXCL11 secretion. In primary cultures of human thyroid follicular cells, CXCL11 was undetectable in the supernatant. IFN-γ, -α and -β dose dependently induced CXCL11 release. TNF-α alone had no effect. The combination of each of the IFNs with TNF-α had a significant synergistic effect on CXCL11 secretion. Treatment of primary cultures of human thyroid follicular cells with rosiglitazone dose dependently inhibited the IFNs stimulated CXCL11 release. Compared with IFN-α and -β, IFN-γ was the most potent stimulus of CXCL11 secretion. In conclusion, we first show that IFN-α, -β and -γ and TNF-α (synergically with IFNs) dose-dependently induce the release of CXCL11 by primary cultures of human thyroid follicular cells, suggesting that this process may be related to the appearance of thyroid dysfunction during IFNs therapy. Furthermore, PPAR-γ activation partially inhibits this process.

  4. Human endogenous retrovirus expression is inversely related with the up-regulation of interferon-inducible genes in the skin of patients with lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Marcelle Almeida de Sousa; Gavioli, Camila Fátima Biancardi; Pereira, Nátalli Zanete; de Carvalho, Gabriel Costa; Domingues, Rosana; Aoki, Valéria; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2015-04-01

    Lichen planus (LP) is a common inflammatory skin disease of unknown etiology. Reports of a common transactivation of quiescent human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) support the connection of viruses to the disease. HERVs are ancient retroviral sequences in the human genome and their transcription is often deregulated in cancer and autoimmune diseases. We explored the transcriptional activity of HERV sequences as well as the antiviral restriction factor and interferon-inducible genes in the skin from LP patients and healthy control (HC) donors. The study included 13 skin biopsies from patients with LP and 12 controls. Real-time PCR assay identified significant decrease in the HERV-K gag and env mRNA expression levels in LP subjects, when compared to control group. The expressions of HERV-K18 and HERV-W env were also inhibited in the skin of LP patients. We observed a strong correlation between HERV-K gag with other HERV sequences, regardless the down-modulation of transcripts levels in LP group. In contrast, a significant up-regulation of the cytidine deaminase APOBEC 3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing), and the GTPase MxA (Myxovirus resistance A) mRNA expression level was identified in the LP skin specimens. Other transcript expressions, such as the master regulator of type I interferon-dependent immune responses, STING (stimulator of interferon genes) and IRF-7 (interferon regulatory factor 7), IFN-β and the inflammassome NALP3, had increased levels in LP, when compared to HC group. Our study suggests that interferon-inducible factors, in addition to their role in innate immunity against exogenous pathogens, contribute to the immune control of HERVs. Evaluation of the balance between HERV and interferon-inducible factor expression could possibly contribute to surveillance of inflammatory/malignant status of skin diseases.

  5. The thyroid hormone receptor β induces DNA damage and premature senescence

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Alberto; García-Carpizo, Verónica; Gallardo, María Esther; Villamuera, Raquel; Gómez-Ferrería, Maria Ana; Pascual, Angel; Buisine, Nicolas; Sachs, Laurent M.; Garesse, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the thyroid hormone (TH) receptors (THRs) can play a role in aging, cancer and degenerative diseases. In this paper, we demonstrate that binding of TH T3 (triiodothyronine) to THRB induces senescence and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage in cultured cells and in tissues of young hyperthyroid mice. T3 induces a rapid activation of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)/PRKAA (adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase) signal transduction and recruitment of the NRF1 (nuclear respiratory factor 1) and THRB to the promoters of genes with a key role on mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiration leads to production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which in turn causes oxidative stress and DNA double-strand breaks and triggers a DNA damage response that ultimately leads to premature senescence of susceptible cells. Our findings provide a mechanism for integrating metabolic effects of THs with the tumor suppressor activity of THRB, the effect of thyroidal status on longevity, and the occurrence of tissue damage in hyperthyroidism. PMID:24395638

  6. Human thyroglobulin peptide p2340 induces autoimmune thyroiditis in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Karras, Evangelos; Yang, Huan; Lymberi, Peggy; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2005-06-01

    In a previous study we demonstrated that the human thyroglobulin (hTg) peptide p2340 (aa 2340-2359) can stimulate a T cell response and elicit experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) in AKR/J (H-2(k)) mice. In the present study we examined whether p2340 can induce EAT in single HLA class II DR3 transgenic mice. This peptide was found to be immunogenic at the T cell level in DR3 mice, since it induced specific proliferative responses, as well as IL-2 and IFN-gamma secretion in secondary cultures of peptide-primed lymph node cells (LNC). Immunization of HLA-DR3 mice with p2340 in CFA elicited EAT (infiltration index of 1 to 2) in eight of nine mice. Peptide-primed LNC responded to intact hTg, whereas, hTg-primed LNC did not respond to p2340 in culture, suggesting that p2340 contains subdominant T cell epitope(s). P2340 was also found to be immunogenic at the B cell level, since strong p2340-specific IgG response was detected in all transgenic mice tested. Thus, we provide evidence for a pathogenic role of an hTg peptide in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. Therefore, p2340 could be presented by DR3 molecule in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and participate in the development of the disease.

  7. Delayed luminescence to monitor programmed cell death induced by berberine on thyroid cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scordino, Agata; Campisi, Agata; Grasso, Rosaria; Bonfanti, Roberta; Gulino, Marisa; Iauk, Liliana; Parenti, Rosalba; Musumeci, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Correlation between apoptosis and UVA-induced ultraweak photon emission delayed luminescence (DL) from tumor thyroid cell lines was investigated. In particular, the effects of berberine, an alkaloid that has been reported to have anticancer activities, on two cancer cell lines were studied. The FTC-133 and 8305C cell lines, as representative of follicular and anaplastic thyroid human cancer, respectively, were chosen. The results show that berberine is able to arrest cell cycle and activate apoptotic pathway as shown in both cell lines by deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, caspase-3 cleavage, p53 and p27 protein overexpression. In parallel, changes in DL spectral components after berberine treatment support the hypothesis that DL from human cells originates mainly from mitochondria, since berberine acts especially at the mitochondrial level. The decrease of DL blue component for both cell lines could be related to the decrease of intra-mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and may be a hallmark of induced apoptosis. In contrast, the response in the red spectral range is different for the two cell lines and may be ascribed to a different iron homeostasis.

  8. Evaluation of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced protein 10 (IP-10) responses for detection of cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis: comparisons to IFN-gamma responses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced protein 10 (IP-10) has recently shown promise as a diagnostic biomarker of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of humans. The aim of the current study was to compare IP-10 and IFN-gamma responses upon Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle using archived sample...

  9. Evolutionary characterization of pig interferon-inducible transmembrane gene family and member expression dynamics in tracheobronchial lymph nodes of pigs infected with swine respiratory disease viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies have found that a cluster of duplicated gene loci encoding the interferon26 inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) family have antiviral activity against several viruses, including influenza A virus. The gene family has 5 and 7 members in humans and mice, respectively. Here, we confirm th...

  10. Evolutionary characterization of pig interferon-inducible transmembrane gene family and member expression dynamics in tracheobronchial lymph nodes of pigs infected with swine respiratory disease viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies have found that a cluster of duplicated gene loci encoding the interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) family have antiviral activity against several viruses, including influenza A virus. The gene family has 5 and 7 members in humans and mice, respectively. Here, we confirm the...

  11. Evolutionary characterization of pig interferon-inducible transmembrane gene family and member expression dynamics in tracheobronchial lymph nodes of pigs infected with influenza A virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies have found that a cluster of duplicated gene loci encoding the interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) family have antiviral activity against several viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV). Whether the duplicated members have selective viral targets, recognition patterns and...

  12. Evolutionary characterization of pig interferon-inducible transmembrane gene family and member expression dynamics in tracheobronchial lymph nodes of pigs infected with swine respiratory disease viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies have found that a cluster of duplicated gene loci encoding the interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) family have antiviral activity against several viruses, including influenza A virus. The gene family has 5 and 7 members in humans and mice, respectively. Here, we confirm the ...

  13. Interleukin-29 Functions Cooperatively with Interferon to Induce Antiviral Gene Expression and Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Pagliaccetti, Nicole E.; Eduardo, Roger; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Bandi, Prasanthi; Robek, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    The interferon (IFN)-related cytokine interleukin (IL)-29 (also known as IFN-λ1) inhibits virus replication by inducing a cellular antiviral response similar to that activated by IFN-α/β. However, because it binds to a unique receptor, this cytokine may function cooperatively with IFN-α/β or IFN-γ during natural infections to inhibit virus replication, and might also be useful therapeutically in combination with other cytokines to treat chronic viral infections such as hepatitis C (HCV). We therefore investigated the ability of IL-29 and IFN-α or IFN-γ to cooperatively inhibit virus replication and induce antiviral gene expression. Compared with the individual cytokines alone, the combination of IL-29 with IFN-α or IFN-γ was more effective at blocking vesicular stomatitis virus and HCV replication, and this cooperative antiviral activity correlated with the magnitude of induced antiviral gene expression. Although the combined effects of IL-29 and IFN-α were primarily additive, the IL-29/IFN-γ combination synergistically induced multiple genes and had the greatest antiviral activity. Two different mechanisms contributed to the enhanced gene expression induced by the cytokine combinations: increased activation of ISRE promoter elements and simultaneous activation of both ISRE and GAS elements within the same promoter. These findings provide new insight into the coregulation of a critical innate immune response by functionally distinct cytokine families. PMID:18757365

  14. Genetic control of interferon action: mouse strain distribution and inheritance of an induced protein with guanylate-binding property.

    PubMed

    Staeheli, P; Prochazka, M; Steigmeier, P A; Haller, O

    1984-08-01

    Interferons (IFNs) induce in responsive cells the synthesis of various proteins including a set with high binding affinities to guanylates. These guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) were analyzed in cells from 46 inbred mouse strains using GMP-agarose affinity chromatography. In cells of 11 strains, including A/J, BALB/cJ, and C3H/HeJ, type I and II IFNs induced the synthesis of a major GBP of Mr 65,000, designated here GBP-1, and of at least three minor GBPs. In contrast, cells of the remaining 35 strains, including DBA/2J, C57BL/6J, and A2G, failed to synthesize GBP-1 in response to both types of IFNs. Induction of the minor GBPs was comparable in cells of both groups of mice, confirming that they were all responsive to IFNs. Analysis of F1, F2, and BC1 offspring of crosses between GBP-1 inducible (A/J) and noninducible (DBA/2J or A2G) strains showed that inducibility of GBP-1 was inherited as a single autosomal gene. The symbol Gbp-1 is proposed for this locus, designated Gbp-1a for the allele causing inducibility and Gbp-1b for the other allele.

  15. Influenza A whole virion vaccine induces a rapid reduction of peripheral blood leukocytes via interferon-α-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ato, Manabu; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Fujii, Hideki; Hashimoto, Shu-ichi; Kaji, Tomohiro; Itamura, Shigeyuki; Horiuchi, Yoshinobu; Arakawa, Yoshichika; Tashiro, Masato; Takemori, Toshitada

    2013-04-19

    Infection with single strand RNA (ssRNA) viruses, such as influenza A virus, is known to induce protective acquired immune responses, including the production of neutralizing antibodies. Vaccination also causes a reduction in the number of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) shortly after inoculation, a result which may have undesirable adverse effects. The cellular mechanisms for this response have not been elucidated so far. Here we report that formalin-inactivated influenza A whole virus vaccine (whole virion) induces a significant decrease in PBL in mice 5-16 h after administration, whereas an ether-split vaccine (HA split) made from the same influenza virus strain does not induce a similar loss of PBL. Concordant with this reduction in the number of PBL, a rapidly induced and massive production of interferon (IFN)-α is observed when mice are injected with whole virion, but not with HA split vaccines. The role of Toll-like receptors (TLR), which are involved in signal transduction of influenza virus, and the subsequent induction of IFNα were confirmed using mice lacking TLR7, MyD-88, or IFNα/β receptor. We further demonstrated that the observed PBL loss is caused by apoptosis in an IFNα-dependent manner, and not by leukocyte redistribution due to chemokine signaling failure. These findings indicate that RNA-encapsulated whole virion vaccines can rapidly induce a loss of leukocytes from peripheral blood by apoptosis, which may modulate the subsequent immune response.

  16. TWIST1/miR-584/TUSC2 pathway induces resistance to apoptosis in thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Orlandella, Francesca Maria; Di Maro, Gennaro; Ugolini, Clara; Basolo, Fulvio; Salvatore, Giuliana

    2016-10-25

    TWIST1, a transcription factor, plays a pivotal role in cancer initiation and progression. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the deadliest human malignancies; TWIST1 is overexpressed in ATC and increases thyroid cancer cell survival, migration and invasion. The molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of TWIST1 are partially known. Here, using miRNome profiling of papillary thyroid cancer cells (TPC-1) ectopically expressing TWIST1, we identified miR-584. We showed that TWIST1 directly binds miR-584 using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Importantly, miR-584 was up-regulated in human ATC compared to papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and normal thyroid samples. Overexpression of miR-584 in TPC cells induced resistance to apoptosis, whereas stable transfection of anti-miR-584 in TPC-TWIST1 and 8505C cells increased the sensitivity to apoptosis. Using bioinformatics programs, we identified TUSC2 (tumor suppressor candidate 2) as a novel target of miR-584. TUSC2 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in TPC miR-584 and increased in TPC-TWIST1 anti-miR-584 cells. Luciferase assays demonstrated direct targeting. Restored expression of TUSC2 rescued the inhibition of apoptosis induced by miR-584. Finally, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis showed that TUSC2 was down-regulated in ATC and PTC samples compared to normal thyroids. In conclusion, our study identified a novel TWIST1/miR-584/TUSC2 pathway that plays a role in resistance to apoptosis of thyroid cancer cells.

  17. Isolation of scFv fragments specific for monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG) using phage display.

    PubMed

    Eteshola, Edward

    2010-06-30

    Iterative affinity selection procedures were used to isolate a number of single chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragment clones from naïve Tomlinson I+J phage display libraries that specifically recognize and bind a chemokine, monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG/CXCL9). MIG is an important transplant rejection/biology chemokine protein. ELISA-based affinity characterization results indicate that selectants preferentially bind to MIG in the presence of key biopanning component materials and closely related chemokine proteins. These novel antibody fragments may find utility as molecular affinity interface receptors in various electrochemical biosensor platforms to provide specific MIG binding capability with potential applications in transplant rejection monitoring, and other biomedical applications where detection of MIG level is important. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Influenza virus-induced encephalopathy in mice: interferon production and natural killer cell activity during acute infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wabuke-Bunoti, M A; Bennink, J R; Plotkin, S A

    1986-01-01

    Mice injected intracerebrally with infectious influenza virus (60 hemagglutinin units) developed lethargy, seizures, comas, and died 2 to 5 days postinfection. As early as 6 h after infection, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in these animals was infiltrated with polymorphonuclear cells, mononuclear leukocytes, and large granular lymphocytes. Potent natural killer (NK) cell activity was observed for both CSF and spleen cell populations over the same period. This NK cell activity correlated with interferon (IFN) levels in the CSF and serum. Treatment of lethally infected mice with either anti-IFN alpha-IFN beta or anti-ganglio-n-tetraoglyceramide antiserum ameliorated the disease, reduced mortality, and effected changes in the relative proportions of inflammatory cell populations infiltrating the CSF. The possible significance of IFN and NK cell activity in the development of this influenza virus-induced encephalopathy is discussed. PMID:2431159

  19. Interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor induce expression of major histocompatibility complex antigen on rat retinal astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    el-Asrar, A M; Maimone, D; Morse, P H; Lascola, C; Reder, A T

    1991-01-01

    Cultured rat retinal astrocytes were tested by indirect immunofluorescence staining for their ability to express class I and II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens under basal culture conditions and after three days of stimulation with two recombinant cytokines, rat interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and human tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). Under basal culture conditions low levels of class I antigens were detected on a small percentage of cells, but there was no visible class II. IFN-gamma and TNF alpha stimulation enhanced class I expression. TNF alpha had no effect on class II expression, whereas IFN-gamma induced the expression of class II in a dose dependent manner. These findings suggest that retinal astrocytes might play a part in immunological events occurring in the retina. Images PMID:1908315

  20. Interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor induce expression of major histocompatibility complex antigen on rat retinal astrocytes.

    PubMed

    el-Asrar, A M; Maimone, D; Morse, P H; Lascola, C; Reder, A T

    1991-08-01

    Cultured rat retinal astrocytes were tested by indirect immunofluorescence staining for their ability to express class I and II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens under basal culture conditions and after three days of stimulation with two recombinant cytokines, rat interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and human tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). Under basal culture conditions low levels of class I antigens were detected on a small percentage of cells, but there was no visible class II. IFN-gamma and TNF alpha stimulation enhanced class I expression. TNF alpha had no effect on class II expression, whereas IFN-gamma induced the expression of class II in a dose dependent manner. These findings suggest that retinal astrocytes might play a part in immunological events occurring in the retina.

  1. A putative GTP binding protein homologous to interferon-inducible Mx proteins performs an essential function in yeast protein sorting.

    PubMed

    Rothman, J H; Raymond, C K; Gilbert, T; O'Hara, P J; Stevens, T H

    1990-06-15

    Members of the Mx protein family promote interferon-inducible resistance to viral infection in mammals and act by unknown mechanisms. We identified an Mx-like protein in yeast and present genetic evidence for its cellular function. This protein, the VPS1 product, is essential for vacuolar protein sorting, normal organization of intracellular membranes, and growth at high temperature, implying that Mx-like proteins are engaged in fundamental cellular processes in eukaryotes. Vps1p contains a tripartite GTP binding motif, which suggests that binding to GTP is essential to its role in protein sorting. Vps1p-specific antibody labels punctate cytoplasmic structures that condense to larger structures in a Golgi-accumulating sec7 mutant; thus, Vps1p may associate with an intermediate organelle of the secretory pathway.

  2. Evolution and Antiviral Specificities of Interferon-Induced Mx Proteins of Bats against Ebola, Influenza, and Other RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jonas; Hölzer, Martin; Schilling, Mirjam; Patzina, Corinna; Schoen, Andreas; Hoenen, Thomas; Zimmer, Gert; Marz, Manja; Weber, Friedemann; Müller, Marcel A; Kochs, Georg

    2017-08-01

    Bats serve as a reservoir for various, often zoonotic viruses, including significant human pathogens such as Ebola and influenza viruses. However, for unknown reasons, viral infections rarely cause clinical symptoms in bats. A tight control of viral replication by the host innate immune defense might contribute to this phenomenon. Transcriptomic studies revealed the presence of the interferon-induced antiviral myxovirus resistance (Mx) proteins in bats, but detailed functional aspects have not been assessed. To provide evidence that bat Mx proteins might act as key factors to control viral replication we cloned Mx1 cDNAs from three bat families, Pteropodidae, Phyllostomidae, and Vespertilionidae. Phylogenetically these bat Mx1 genes cluster closely with their human ortholog MxA. Using transfected cell cultures, minireplicon systems, virus-like particles, and virus infections, we determined the antiviral potential of the bat Mx1 proteins. Bat Mx1 significantly reduced the polymerase activity of viruses circulating in bats, including Ebola and influenza A-like viruses. The related Thogoto virus, however, which is not known to infect bats, was not inhibited by bat Mx1. Further, we provide evidence for positive selection in bat Mx1 genes that might explain species-specific antiviral activities of these proteins. Together, our data suggest a role for Mx1 in controlling these viruses in their bat hosts.IMPORTANCE Bats are a natural reservoir for various viruses that rarely cause clinical symptoms in bats but are dangerous zoonotic pathogens, like Ebola or rabies virus. It has been hypothesized that the interferon system might play a key role in controlling viral replication in bats. We speculate that the interferon-induced Mx proteins might be key antiviral factors of bats and have coevolved with bat-borne viruses. This study evaluated for the first time a large set of bat Mx1 proteins spanning three major bat families for their antiviral potential, including activity

  3. The interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Toy, J L

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the interferons is presented. A description of something of what is known about them is given, including: their genes; their protein structures and characteristics; their mechanisms of actions; and their varied biological effects emphasising particularly their immunomodulatory actions. Finally, a brief summary is made of the current status of human clinical studies that have been conducted with interferons in the oncological and viral fields, mentioning also recent findings in patients who have the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:6193915

  4. Discriminating Gene Expression Signature of Radiation-Induced Thyroid Tumors after Either External Exposure or Internal Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Ory, Catherine; Ugolin, Nicolas; Schlumberger, Martin; Hofman, Paul; Chevillard, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Both external radiation exposure and internal radionuclide contamination are well known risk factors in the development of thyroid epithelial tumors. The identification of specific molecular markers deregulated in radiation-induced thyroid tumors is important for the etiological diagnosis since neither histological features nor genetic alterations can discriminate between sporadic and radiation-induced tumors. Identification of highly discriminating markers in radiation-induced tumors is challenging as it relies on the ability to identify marker deregulation which is associated with a cellular stress that occurred many years before in the thyroid cells. The existence of such a signature is still controversial, as it was not found in several studies while a highly discriminating signature was found in both post-radiotherapy and post-Chernobyl series in other studies. Overall, published studies searching for radiation-induced thyroid tumor specificities, using transcriptomic, proteomic and comparative genomic hybridization approaches, and bearing in mind the analytical constraints required to analyze such small series of tumors, suggest that such a molecular signature could be found. In comparison with sporadic tumors, we highlight molecular similarities and specificities in tumors occurring after high-dose external radiation exposure, such as radiotherapy, and in post-Chernobyl tumors that occurred after internal 131I contamination. We discuss the relevance of signature extrapolation from series of tumors developing after high and low doses in the identification of tumors induced at very low doses of radiation. PMID:24704841

  5. Di2-ethylhexyl phthalate disrupts thyroid hormone homeostasis through activating the Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and inducing hepatic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hanfeng; Ha, Mei; Yang, Min; Yue, Ping; Xie, Zhengyuan; Liu, Changjiang

    2017-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), as a widespread environmental pollutant and an endocrine disruptor, can disturb the homeostasis of thyroid hormones (THs). In order to elucidate roles of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways and hepatic enzymes in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage for 30 consecutive days; Nthy-ori 3-1 cells were treated with DEHP with NAC, k-Ras siRNA or inhibitors (U0126 and wortmannin). Results showed that DEHP led to histopathologic changes in rat thyroid and liver, such as the decrease in thyroid follicular cavity diameter, hepatocyte edema. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were reduced. DEHP caused ROS production, oxidative stress and k-Ras upregulation, thereby activating the ERK and Akt pathways in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, TRH receptor (TRHr) level was elevated after the activation of the Akt pathway and was downregulated after the inhibition of the Akt pathway. However, TRHr was not modulated by the ERK pathway. Additionally, hepatic enzymes, including Ugt1a1, CYP2b1, Sult1e1, and Sult2b1, were significantly induced after DEHP exposure. Taken together, DEHP can perturb TH homeostasis and reduce TH levels. The activated Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and induced hepatic enzymes play vital roles in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP. PMID:28065941

  6. Di2-ethylhexyl phthalate disrupts thyroid hormone homeostasis through activating the Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and inducing hepatic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hanfeng; Ha, Mei; Yang, Min; Yue, Ping; Xie, Zhengyuan; Liu, Changjiang

    2017-01-09

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), as a widespread environmental pollutant and an endocrine disruptor, can disturb the homeostasis of thyroid hormones (THs). In order to elucidate roles of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways and hepatic enzymes in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP, Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with DEHP by gavage for 30 consecutive days; Nthy-ori 3-1 cells were treated with DEHP with NAC, k-Ras siRNA or inhibitors (U0126 and wortmannin). Results showed that DEHP led to histopathologic changes in rat thyroid and liver, such as the decrease in thyroid follicular cavity diameter, hepatocyte edema. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) were reduced. DEHP caused ROS production, oxidative stress and k-Ras upregulation, thereby activating the ERK and Akt pathways in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, TRH receptor (TRHr) level was elevated after the activation of the Akt pathway and was downregulated after the inhibition of the Akt pathway. However, TRHr was not modulated by the ERK pathway. Additionally, hepatic enzymes, including Ugt1a1, CYP2b1, Sult1e1, and Sult2b1, were significantly induced after DEHP exposure. Taken together, DEHP can perturb TH homeostasis and reduce TH levels. The activated Ras/Akt/TRHr pathway and induced hepatic enzymes play vital roles in thyroid-disrupting effects of DEHP.

  7. The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor modulator FTY720 prevents iodide-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Kazuki; Osone, Michiko; Yoshida, Katsumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Hoshikawa, Saeko; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yurie; Ito, Sadayoshi; Mori, Kouki

    2011-09-01

    FTY720 is an immunomodulator that alters migration and homing of lymphocytes via sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. This compound has been shown to be effective in suppressing autoimmune diseases in experimental and clinical settings. In the present study, we tested whether FTY720 prevented autoimmune thyroiditis in iodide-treated non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, a model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) in humans. Mice were given 0.05% iodide water for 8 weeks, and this treatment effectively induced thyroiditis. Iodide-treated mice were injected intraperitoneally with either saline or FTY720 during the iodide treatment. FTY720 clearly suppressed the development of thyroiditis and reduced serum anti-thyroglobulin antibody levels. The number of circulating lymphocytes and spleen cells including CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells was decreased in FTY720-treated mice. Our results indicate that FTY720 has immunomodulatory effects on iodide-induced autoimmune thyroiditis in NOD mice and may be a potential candidate for use in the prevention of HT.

  8. The interferon-induced gene ISG15 blocks retrovirus release from cells late in the budding process.

    PubMed

    Pincetic, Andrew; Kuang, Zhizhou; Seo, Eun Joo; Leis, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    The release of retroviruses from cells requires ubiquitination of Gag and recruitment of cellular proteins involved in endosome sorting, including the ESCRT-III proteins and the Vps4 ATPase. In response to infection, cells have evolved an interferon-induced mechanism to block virus replication through expression of the interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), a dimer homologue of ubiquitin, which interferes with ubiquitin pathways in cells. Previously, it has been reported that ISG15 expression inhibited the E3 ubiquitin ligase, Nedd4, and prevented association of the ESCRT-I protein Tsg101 with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag. The budding of avian sarcoma leukosis virus and HIV-1 Gag virus-like particles containing L-domain mutations can be rescued by fusion to ESCRT proteins, which cause entry into the budding pathway beyond these early steps. The release of these fusions from cells was susceptible to inhibition by ISG15, indicating that there was a block late in the budding process. We now demonstrate that the Vps4 protein does not associate with the avian sarcoma leukosis virus or the HIV-1 budding complexes when ISG15 is expressed. This is caused by a loss in interaction between Vps4 with its coactivator protein LIP5 needed to promote the formation of the ESCRT-III-Vps4 double-hexamer complex required for membrane scission and virus release. The inability of LIP5 to interact with Vps4 is the probable result of ISG15 conjugation to the ESCRT-III protein, CHMP5, which regulates the availability of LIP5. Thus, there appear to be multiple levels of ISG15-induced inhibition acting at different stages of the virus release process.

  9. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paijo, Jennifer; Döring, Marius; Spanier, Julia; Grabski, Elena; Nooruzzaman, Mohammed; Schmidt, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Messerle, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Kaever, Volkhard; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages. PMID:27058035

  10. In the eye of the storm: iodinated contrast medium induced thyroid storm presenting as cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Alkhuja, Samer; Pyram, Ronald; Odeyemi, Olutunde

    2013-01-01

    The administration of iodinated contrast medium may lead to excess free thyroid hormone release and cause thyroid storm. A woman presented to the emergency department with dyspnea, hemoptysis, and intermittent bilateral lower extremities edema. Physical examination revealed mildly enlarged thyroid. Patient underwent a computed tomography scan of the chest with intravenous iodinated contrast medium to rule out pulmonary embolism, the patient developed a thyroid storm second to iodinated contrast medium injection. Proper treatment was provided and the patient had a good outcome. We present this case of an unusual presentation of a thyroid storm with cardiac arrest. This case illustrates that evaluating thyroid function tests in patients with an enlarged thyroid prior to the administration of iodinated contrast medium could prevent the development of thyroid storm.

  11. Mechanism of inhibition of retrovirus release from cells by interferon-induced gene ISG15.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Zhizhou; Seo, Eun Joo; Leis, Jonathan

    2011-07-01

    Budding of retroviruses from cell membranes requires ubiquitination of Gag and recruitment of cellular proteins involved in endosome sorting, including endosome sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III) protein complex and vacuolar protein sorting 4 (VPS4) and its ATPase. In response to infection, a cellular mechanism has evolved that blocks virus replication early and late in the budding process through expression of interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), a dimer homologue of ubiquitin. Interferon treatment of DF-1 cells blocks avian sarcoma/leukosis virus release, demonstrating that this mechanism is functional under physiological conditions. The late block to release is caused in part by a loss in interaction between VPS4 and its coactivator protein LIP5, which is required to promote the formation of the ESCRT III-VPS4 double-hexamer complex to activate its ATPase. ISG15 is conjugated to two different LIP5-ESCRT-III-binding charged multivesicular body proteins, CHMP2A and CHMP5. Upon ISGylation of each, interaction with LIP5 is no longer detected. Two other ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP4B and CHMP6, are also conjugated to ISG15. ISGylation of CHMP2A, CHMP4B, and CHMP6 weakens their binding directly to VPS4, thereby facilitating the release of this protein from the membrane into the cytosol. The remaining budding complex fails to release particles from the cell membrane. Introducing a mutant of ISG15 into cells that cannot be conjugated to proteins prevents the ISG15-dependent mechanism from blocking virus release. CHMP5 is the primary switch to initiate the antiviral mechanism, because removal of CHMP5 from cells prevents ISGylation of CHMP2A and CHMP6.

  12. Anisakis pegreffii-induced airway hyperresponsiveness is mediated by gamma interferon in the absence of interleukin-4 receptor alpha responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Kirstein, Frank; Horsnell, William G C; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Lopata, Andreas L; Brombacher, Frank

    2010-09-01

    Infection with the fish parasite Anisakis following exposure to contaminated fish can lead to allergic reactions in humans. The present study examined the immunological mechanisms underlying the development of allergic airway inflammation in mice after different routes of sensitization to Anisakis. Wild-type and interleukin-4 receptor alpha (IL-4Ralpha)-deficient BALB/c mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with live or heat-killed Anisakis larvae or by intranasal administration of an Anisakis extract and were subsequently challenged intranasally with an Anisakis extract. Both routes of sensitization induced IL-4Ralpha-dependent allergic airway responses, whereas allergen-specific antibody responses developed only when mice were sensitized intraperitoneally. Intranasal sensitization induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in wild-type mice only, showing that AHR was IL-4/IL-13 dependent. Unexpectedly, infection with Anisakis larvae induced AHR in both wild-type and IL-4Ralpha-deficient mice. IL-4Ralpha-independent AHR was mediated by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), as evidenced by the fact that in vivo neutralization of IFN-gamma abrogated AHR. Together, these results demonstrate that both infection with larvae and inhalational exposure to Anisakis proteins are potent routes of allergic sensitization to Anisakis, explaining food- and work-related allergies in humans. Importantly for diagnosis, allergic airway inflammation can be independent of detectable Anisakis-specific antibodies. Moreover, depending on the route of sensitization, AHR can be induced either by IL-4/IL-13 or by IFN-gamma.

  13. Anisakis pegreffii-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness Is Mediated by Gamma Interferon in the Absence of Interleukin-4 Receptor Alpha Responsiveness▿

    PubMed Central

    Kirstein, Frank; Horsnell, William G. C.; Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Lopata, Andreas L.; Brombacher, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Infection with the fish parasite Anisakis following exposure to contaminated fish can lead to allergic reactions in humans. The present study examined the immunological mechanisms underlying the development of allergic airway inflammation in mice after different routes of sensitization to Anisakis. Wild-type and interleukin-4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα)-deficient BALB/c mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with live or heat-killed Anisakis larvae or by intranasal administration of an Anisakis extract and were subsequently challenged intranasally with an Anisakis extract. Both routes of sensitization induced IL-4Rα-dependent allergic airway responses, whereas allergen-specific antibody responses developed only when mice were sensitized intraperitoneally. Intranasal sensitization induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in wild-type mice only, showing that AHR was IL-4/IL-13 dependent. Unexpectedly, infection with Anisakis larvae induced AHR in both wild-type and IL-4Rα-deficient mice. IL-4Rα-independent AHR was mediated by gamma interferon (IFN-γ), as evidenced by the fact that in vivo neutralization of IFN-γ abrogated AHR. Together, these results demonstrate that both infection with larvae and inhalational exposure to Anisakis proteins are potent routes of allergic sensitization to Anisakis, explaining food- and work-related allergies in humans. Importantly for diagnosis, allergic airway inflammation can be independent of detectable Anisakis-specific antibodies. Moreover, depending on the route of sensitization, AHR can be induced either by IL-4/IL-13 or by IFN-γ. PMID:20605987

  14. Beyond Tryptophan Synthase: Identification of Genes That Contribute to Chlamydia trachomatis Survival during Gamma Interferon-Induced Persistence and Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Matthew K.; Brothwell, Julie A.; Stein, Barry D.; Putman, Timothy E.; Rockey, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis can enter a viable but nonculturable state in vitro termed persistence. A common feature of C. trachomatis persistence models is that reticulate bodies fail to divide and make few infectious progeny until the persistence-inducing stressor is removed. One model of persistence that has relevance to human disease involves tryptophan limitation mediated by the host enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, which converts l-tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine. Genital C. trachomatis strains can counter tryptophan limitation because they encode a tryptophan-synthesizing enzyme. Tryptophan synthase is the only enzyme that has been confirmed to play a role in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-induced persistence, although profound changes in chlamydial physiology and gene expression occur in the presence of persistence-inducing stressors. Thus, we screened a population of mutagenized C. trachomatis strains for mutants that failed to reactivate from IFN-γ-induced persistence. Six mutants were identified, and the mutations linked to the persistence phenotype in three of these were successfully mapped. One mutant had a missense mutation in tryptophan synthase; however, this mutant behaved differently from previously described synthase null mutants. Two hypothetical genes of unknown function, ctl0225 and ctl0694, were also identified and may be involved in amino acid transport and DNA damage repair, respectively. Our results indicate that C. trachomatis utilizes functionally diverse genes to mediate survival during and reactivation from persistence in HeLa cells. PMID:27430273

  15. TLR2/6 agonists and interferon-gamma induce human melanoma cells to produce CXCL10

    PubMed Central

    Mauldin, Ileana S.; Wang, Ena; Deacon, Donna H.; Olson, Walter C.; Bao, Yongde; Slingluff, Craig L.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical approaches to treat advanced melanoma include immune therapies, whose benefits depend on tumor-reactive T-cell infiltration of metastases. However, most tumors lack significant immune infiltration prior to therapy. Selected chemokines promote T-cell migration into tumors; thus, agents that induce these chemokines in the tumor microenvironment (TME) may improve responses to systemic immune therapy. CXCL10 has been implicated as a critical chemokine supporting T-cell infiltration into the TME. Here we show that toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists can induce chemokine production directly from melanoma cells when combined with IFNγ treatment. We find that TLR2 and TLR6 are widely expressed on human melanoma cells, and that TLR2/6 agonists (MALP-2 or FSL-1) synergize with interferon-gamma (IFNγ) to induce production of CXCL10 from melanoma cells. Furthermore, melanoma cells and immune cells from surgical specimens also respond to TLR2/6 agonists and IFNγ by upregulating CXCL10 production, compared to treatment with either agent alone. Collectively, these data identify a novel mechanism for inducing CXCL10 production directly from melanoma cells, with TLR2/6 agonists +IFNγ and raise the possibility that intratumoral administration of these agents may improve immune signatures in melanoma and have value in combination with other immune therapies, by supporting T-cell migration into melanoma metastases. PMID:25765738

  16. Beyond Tryptophan Synthase: Identification of Genes That Contribute to Chlamydia trachomatis Survival during Gamma Interferon-Induced Persistence and Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Matthew K; Brothwell, Julie A; Stein, Barry D; Putman, Timothy E; Rockey, Daniel D; Nelson, David E

    2016-10-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis can enter a viable but nonculturable state in vitro termed persistence. A common feature of C. trachomatis persistence models is that reticulate bodies fail to divide and make few infectious progeny until the persistence-inducing stressor is removed. One model of persistence that has relevance to human disease involves tryptophan limitation mediated by the host enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, which converts l-tryptophan to N-formylkynurenine. Genital C. trachomatis strains can counter tryptophan limitation because they encode a tryptophan-synthesizing enzyme. Tryptophan synthase is the only enzyme that has been confirmed to play a role in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-induced persistence, although profound changes in chlamydial physiology and gene expression occur in the presence of persistence-inducing stressors. Thus, we screened a population of mutagenized C. trachomatis strains for mutants that failed to reactivate from IFN-γ-induced persistence. Six mutants were identified, and the mutations linked to the persistence phenotype in three of these were successfully mapped. One mutant had a missense mutation in tryptophan synthase; however, this mutant behaved differently from previously described synthase null mutants. Two hypothetical genes of unknown function, ctl0225 and ctl0694, were also identified and may be involved in amino acid transport and DNA damage repair, respectively. Our results indicate that C. trachomatis utilizes functionally diverse genes to mediate survival during and reactivation from persistence in HeLa cells. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. EXPERIMENTAL THYROIDISM

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R. H.

    1898-01-01

    From the results of the various experiments already detailed I feel justified in drawing the following conclusions: (1) Absolutely fresh thyroid gland is not poisonous, in the usual sense of the term, when absorbed through the alimentary canal. (2) The symptoms of induced thyroidism are manifestations of an intoxication resulting from the ingestion of decomposed thyroid material, a conclusion that agrees in part with the previously related observations of Lanz. (3) The so-called experimental thyroidism is not specific for the thyroid only, for the ingestion of many substances derived from animal tissues other than the thyroid gland may produce an intoxication strikingly similar in every respect to that of experimental thyroidism. (4) Most, if not all, animal tissues yield substances which, if injected in large quantities directly into the circulation or beneath the skin, will produce an intoxication often very similar to that produced by injections of various substances derived from the fresh thyroid tissue. (5) The effects resulting from the intravascular or subcutaneous injections of aqueous extracts, decoctions and the concentrated extractives of the thyroid tissue, of the thymus, of muscle, etc., are by no means necessarily indicative of the function and the action of the hypothetical internal secretions of the same tissues during life. (6) The utilization of the fact that ingestion of decomposed thyroid material produces on certain occasions an intoxication with certain symptoms similar to some of those of G-raves' disease is not justifiable for the furtherance of the theory that the symptoms of exophthalmic goitre result from an over-production of the thyroid secretion. (7) Our results lead us to conclude with Drechsel that the fresh thyroid tissue yields at least probably two substances that are capable of palliating the symptoms of the acute cachexia in totally thyroidless dogs. (8) The thymus tissue also yields one and probably two substances that are as

  18. EXPERIMENTAL THYROIDISM.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, R H

    1898-03-01

    FROM THE RESULTS OF THE VARIOUS EXPERIMENTS ALREADY DETAILED I FEEL JUSTIFIED IN DRAWING THE FOLLOWING CONCLUSIONS: (1) Absolutely fresh thyroid gland is not poisonous, in the usual sense of the term, when absorbed through the alimentary canal. (2) The symptoms of induced thyroidism are manifestations of an intoxication resulting from the ingestion of decomposed thyroid material, a conclusion that agrees in part with the previously related observations of Lanz. (3) The so-called experimental thyroidism is not specific for the thyroid only, for the ingestion of many substances derived from animal tissues other than the thyroid gland may produce an intoxication strikingly similar in every respect to that of experimental thyroidism. (4) Most, if not all, animal tissues yield substances which, if injected in large quantities directly into the circulation or beneath the skin, will produce an intoxication often very similar to that produced by injections of various substances derived from the fresh thyroid tissue. (5) The effects resulting from the intravascular or subcutaneous injections of aqueous extracts, decoctions and the concentrated extractives of the thyroid tissue, of the thymus, of muscle, etc., are by no means necessarily indicative of the function and the action of the hypothetical internal secretions of the same tissues during life. (6) The utilization of the fact that ingestion of decomposed thyroid material produces on certain occasions an intoxication with certain symptoms similar to some of those of G-raves' disease is not justifiable for the furtherance of the theory that the symptoms of exophthalmic goitre result from an over-production of the thyroid secretion. (7) Our results lead us to conclude with Drechsel that the fresh thyroid tissue yields at least probably two substances that are capable of palliating the symptoms of the acute cachexia in totally thyroidless dogs. (8) The thymus tissue also yields one and probably two substances that are as

  19. Imatinib-induced thyroiditis in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surjit; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a case of chronic myeloid leukemia for which imatinib therapy was initated. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone was normal, and thyroid microsomal autoantibodies (TMA) were positive and patient was diagnosed as thyroiditis treated with corticosteroids for 1½ months which lead to resolution. PMID:27756963

  20. Interferons and interferon regulatory factors in malaria.

    PubMed

    Gun, Sin Yee; Claser, Carla; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei; Rénia, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most serious infectious diseases in humans and responsible for approximately 500 million clinical cases and 500 thousand deaths annually. Acquired adaptive immune responses control parasite replication and infection-induced pathologies. Most infections are clinically silent which reflects on the ability of adaptive immune mechanisms to prevent the disease. However, a minority of these can become severe and life-threatening, manifesting a range of overlapping syndromes of complex origins which could be induced by uncontrolled immune responses. Major players of the innate and adaptive responses are interferons. Here, we review their roles and the signaling pathways involved in their production and protection against infection and induced immunopathologies.

  1. Pazopanib Enhances Paclitaxel-Induced Mitotic Catastrophe in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Isham, Crescent R.; Bossou, Ayoko R.; Negron, Vivian; Fisher, Kelly E.; Kumar, Rakesh; Marlow, Laura; Lingle, Wilma L.; Smallridge, Robert C.; Sherman, Eric J.; Suman, Vera J.; Copland, John A.; Bible, Keith C.

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) has perhaps the worst prognosis of any cancer, with a median survival of only about 5 months regardless of stage. Pazopanib monotherapy has promising clinical activity in differentiated thyroid cancers (generally attributed to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibition), yet has less effective single-agent activity in ATC. We now report that combining pazopanib with microtubule inhibitors such as paclitaxel produced heightened and synergistic antitumor effects in ATC cells and xenografts that were associated with potentiated mitotic catastrophe. We hypothesized that combined effects may reflect enhanced paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity mediated by cell cycle regulatory kinase inhibition by pazopanib. Indeed, pazopanib potently inhibited aurora A, with pazopanib/paclitaxel synergy recapitulated by aurora A short hairpin RNA knockdown or by specific aurora A pharmacological inhibition. Pazopanib/paclitaxel synergy was reversed by aurora A knockdown. Moreover, aurora A (but not B or C) message and protein levels were significantly increased in patient ATCs, and durable benefit resulted from pilot clinical translation of pazopanib/paclitaxel therapy in a patient with metastatic ATC. Collectively, these results suggest that the pazopanib/paclitaxel combination is a promising candidate therapeutic approach in ATC and that aurora A may represent a potentially viable therapeutic molecular target in ATC. PMID:23283368

  2. Cloning and expression analysis of interferon-gamma-inducible-lysosomal thiol reductase gene in large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenbiao; Chen, Xinhua

    2006-05-01

    In mammals, interferon-gamma-inducible-lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) has been demonstrated to play a key role in the processing and presentation of MHC class II-restricted antigen (Ag) by catalyzing disulfide bond reduction, thus unfolding native protein Ag and facilitating subsequent cleavage by proteases. Here, we reported the cloning of a GILT gene homologue from the spleen of large yellow croaker, a marine fish (LycGILT). The full-length cDNA of LycGILT gene is 1033 nucleotides (nt) encoding a protein of 256 amino acids (aa), with a putative molecular weight of 28.9 kDa. The deduced protein is highly homologous to that of mammalian and zebrafish GILTs and shares 54.1% sequence identity to that of zebrafish and 43.2-39.2% sequence identity to that of various mammals. The deduced LycGILT possesses the typical structural feature of mammalian GILT, including an active-site CXXC motif, a GILT signature sequence CQHGX2ECX2NX4C, and other six cysteines responsible for the formation of disulfide bonds in the C-terminus. Genomic analysis revealed that LycGILT gene, spanning a 3159nt fragment, contained seven exons interrupted by six introns and exhibited a similar exon-intron organization to human and mouse GILT genes except for a slightly more compact intron arrangement. The LycGILT expression is obviously up-regulated in spleen and kidney after immunization with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccine consisting of Vibrio alginolyticus, V. paraphaemolyticus, and Aeromonas hydrophila although it also is constitutively expressed in liver, gills, brain, and heart, suggesting that LycGILT may be involved in the immune response to bacterial challenge in large yellow croaker. A search of NCBI sequence data with LycGILT cDNA identified a pufferfish (fugu rubrides) GILT homologue cDNA and its genomic DNA sequence, where two putative interferon-gamma activation sites (GAS) were found within the promoter region. This provided evidence that a fish GILT homologue like

  3. Role of QuantiFERON-TB Gold, Interferon Gamma Inducible Protein-10 and Tuberculin Skin Test in Active Tuberculosis Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Syed Ahamed Kabeer, Basirudeen; Raman, Balambal; Thomas, Aleyamma; Perumal, Venkatesan; Raja, Alamelu

    2010-01-01

    Background The measurement of Interferon gamma or Interferon gamma inducible protein (IP)-10 in antigen stimulated blood samples is suggested as an alternative method for latent tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis. Nonetheless, their role in active TB diagnosis, particularly in TB endemic settings is yet to be defined. In this study, the sensitivities and specificities of Interferon gamma release assay (IGRA), IP-10 assay and tuberculin skin test (TST) in detecting active TB cases were assessed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) sero-negative TB patients and healthy controls respectively. Methods/Principal Findings A total of 177 adult TB patients and 100 healthy controls were included for this study. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube (QFT-IT) method was used to analyze the sensitivity and specificity of IGRA. QFT-IT, IP-10 and TST yielded the diagnostic sensitivities of 90.6% (95%CI: 86.3%–94.9%), 92.5% (95%CI: 88.6%–96.4%) and 68.9% (95%CI: 60.6%–77.2%) and specificities of 55% (95% CI: 35.2%–54.8%), 48% (95% CI: 38.2%–57.8%) and 75.5% (95% CI: 66.8%–84.2%), respectively. The extent of pulmonary involvement or presence of diabetes mellitus did not appear to influence the sensitivities of any of these tests. The combination of any of the two tests among QFT-IT, IP-10 and TST showed >98% sensitivity among smear negative cases and particularly the combination of IP-10, TST and smear microscopy showed 100% sensitivity, however, the specificity was decreased to 44.8%. Conclusions/Significance QFT-IT and IP-10 were highly sensitive in detecting active TB cases. The combination with TST improved the sensitivity of QFT-IT and IP-10 significantly. Although the higher sensitivity of combination of QFT-IT/IP-10 and TST may be useful in active TB diagnosis, they are limited by their poor specificity due to the high prevalence of latent TB in our settings. PMID:20140219

  4. Results of space experiment program "interferon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tálas, Margarita; Bátkai, László; Stöger, Ivana; Nagy, Károly; Hiros, László; Konstantinova, Irina; Rykova, Marina; Mozgovaya, Irina; Guseva, Olga; Kozharinov, Valerii

    The results of the biological space experiment "Interferon" performed by two international cosmonaut teams (26 May 1980, and 16 May 1981) aboard space laboratory Solyut-6 are reported: (1) Human lymphocytes separated from blood of healthy donors and placed into "Interferon I" equipment could be kept for 7 days in suspension culture under spaceflight conditons. Interferon production could be induced in human lymphocytes by preparations of different origin: virus, synthetic polyribonucleotides, bacterial protein and plant pigment. An increased lymphocyte interferon production in space laboratory compared to ground control was observed. (2) Human interferon preparations and interferon inducers placed in space laboratory at room temperature for 7 days maintained their biological activity. (3) A decrease of induced interferon production and natural killer activity of lymphocytes isolated from peripheral blood of cosmonauts was observed on the 1st day on Earth after 7-days spaceflight.

  5. Therapeutic Potential of Date Palm Pollen for Testicular Dysfunction Induced by Thyroid Disorders in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Kashlan, Akram M.; Nooh, Mohammed M.; Hassan, Wafaa A.; Rizk, Sherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Hyper- or hypothyroidism can impair testicular function leading to infertility. The present study was designed to examine the protective effect of date palm pollen (DPP) extract on thyroid disorder-induced testicular dysfunction. Rats were divided into six groups. Group I was normal control. Group II received oral DPP extract (150 mg kg-1), group III (hyperthyroid group) received intraperitoneal injection of L-thyroxine (L-T4, 300μg kg-1; i.p.), group IV received L-T4 plus DPP extract, group V (hypothyroid group) received propylthiouracil (PTU, 10 mg kg-1; i.p.) and group VI received PTU plus DPP extract. All treatments were given every day for 56 days. L-T4 or PTU lowered genital sex organs weight, sperm count and motility, serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T), testicular function markers and activities of testicular 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD). Moreover, L-T4 or PTU increased estradiol (E2) serum level, testicular oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptotic markers. Morphometric and histopathologic studies backed these observations. Treatment with DPP extract prevented LT4- or PTU induced changes. In addition, supplementation of DPP extract to normal rats augmented sperm count and motility, serum levels of LH, T and E2 paralleled with increased activities of 3β-HSD and 17β-HSD as well as testicular antioxidant status. These results provide evidence that DPP extract may have potential protective effects on testicular dysfunction induced by altered thyroid hormones. PMID:26425844

  6. Hepatitis C Virus E2 Protein Induces Upregulation of IL-8 Pathways and Production of Heat Shock Proteins in Human Thyroid Cells.

    PubMed

    Hammerstad, Sara Salehi; Stefan, Mihaela; Blackard, Jason; Owen, Randall P; Lee, Hanna J; Concepcion, Erlinda; Yi, Zhengzi; Zhang, Weijia; Tomer, Yaron

    2017-02-01

    Thyroiditis is one of the most common extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. By binding to surface cell receptor CD81, HCV envelope glycoprotein E2 mediates entry of HCV into cells. Studies have shown that different viral proteins may individually induce host responses to infection. We hypothesized that HCV E2 protein binding to CD81 expressed on thyroid cells activates a cascade of inflammatory responses that can trigger autoimmune thyroiditis in susceptible individuals. Human thyroid cell lines ML-1 and human thyrocytes in primary cell culture were treated with HCV recombinant E2 protein. The expression of major proinflammatory cytokines was measured at the messenger RNA and protein levels. Next-generation transcriptome analysis was used to identify early changes in gene expression in thyroid cells induced by E2. HCV envelope protein E2 induced strong inflammatory responses in human thyrocytes, resulting in production of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, the E2 protein induced production of several heat shock proteins including HSP60, HSP70p12A, and HSP10, in human primary thyrocytes. In thyroid cell line ML-1, RNA sequencing identified upregulation of molecules involved in innate immune pathways with high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines and increased expression of costimulatory molecules, specifically CD40, known to be a major thyroid autoimmunity gene. Our data support a key role for HCV envelope protein E2 in triggering thyroid autoimmunity through activation of cytokine pathways by bystander mechanisms.

  7. Neurotropic arboviruses induce interferon regulatory factor 3-mediated neuronal responses that are cytoprotective, interferon independent, and inhibited by Western equine encephalitis virus capsid.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Daniel C; Lazear, Helen M; Farmer, Jocelyn R; Diamond, Michael S; Miller, David J

    2013-02-01

    Cell-intrinsic innate immune responses mediated by the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) are often vital for early pathogen control, and effective responses in neurons may be crucial to prevent the irreversible loss of these critical central nervous system cells after infection with neurotropic pathogens. To investigate this hypothesis, we used targeted molecular and genetic approaches with cultured neurons to study cell-intrinsic host defense pathways primarily using the neurotropic alphavirus western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV). We found that WEEV activated IRF-3-mediated neuronal innate immune pathways in a replication-dependent manner, and abrogation of IRF-3 function enhanced virus-mediated injury by WEEV and the unrelated flavivirus St. Louis encephalitis virus. Furthermore, IRF-3-dependent neuronal protection from virus-mediated cytopathology occurred independently of autocrine or paracrine type I interferon activity. Despite being partially controlled by IRF-3-dependent signals, WEEV also disrupted antiviral responses by inhibiting pattern recognition receptor pathways. This antagonist activity was mapped to the WEEV capsid gene, which disrupted signal transduction downstream of IRF-3 activation and was independent of capsid-mediated inhibition of host macromolecular synthesis. Overall, these results indicate that innate immune pathways have important cytoprotective activity in neurons and contribute to limiting injury associated with infection by neurotropic arboviruses.

  8. Transient thyrotoxicosis from thyroiditis induced by sibutramine overdose: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, S K; Lee, S M; Yoo, S S; Hahm, J R; Jung, J H; Kim, H S; Kim, S; Chung, S I; Jung, T S

    2013-08-01

    Sibutramine is an antiobesity drug that inhibits the reuptake of serotonin and noradrenalin in the hypothalamus. A 37-year-old Korean man presented to the emergency room for the oral intake of 280 mg of sibutramine. The patient was in thyrotoxic state. The (99m)Technetium-pertechnetate thyroid scan showed irregular uptake of radioisotope and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody and thyroperoxidase antibody were negative. Thyroid function normalized after that. The patient had transient thyrotoxicosis with thyroiditis. We report a case of thyrotoxicosis accompanied by thyroiditis resulting from the intentional overdose of sibutramine.

  9. RNA polymerase III detects cytosolic DNA and induces type I interferons through the RIG-I pathway.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Macmillan, John B; Chen, Zhijian J

    2009-08-07

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are important for antiviral and autoimmune responses. Retinoic acid-induced gene I (RIG-I) and mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) proteins mediate IFN production in response to cytosolic double-stranded RNA or single-stranded RNA containing 5'-triphosphate (5'-ppp). Cytosolic B form double-stranded DNA, such as poly(dA-dT)*poly(dA-dT) [poly(dA-dT)], can also induce IFN-beta, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that the cytosolic poly(dA-dT) DNA is converted into 5'-ppp RNA to induce IFN-beta through the RIG-I pathway. Biochemical purification led to the identification of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase III (Pol-III) as the enzyme responsible for synthesizing 5'-ppp RNA from the poly(dA-dT) template. Inhibition of RNA Pol-III prevents IFN-beta induction by transfection of DNA or infection with DNA viruses. Furthermore, Pol-III inhibition abrogates IFN-beta induction by the intracellular bacterium Legionella pneumophila and promotes the bacterial growth. These results suggest that RNA Pol-III is a cytosolic DNA sensor involved in innate immune responses.

  10. Avian influenza A virus PB2 promotes interferon type I inducing properties of a swine strain in porcine dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ocana-Macchi, Manuela; Ricklin, Meret E.; Python, Sylvie; Monika, Gsell-Albert; Stech, Juergen; Stech, Olga; Summerfield, Artur

    2012-05-25

    The 2009 influenza A virus (IAV) pandemic resulted from reassortment of avian, human and swine strains probably in pigs. To elucidate the role of viral genes in host adaptation regarding innate immune responses, we focussed on the effect of genes from an avian H5N1 and a porcine H1N1 IAV on infectivity and activation of porcine GM-CSF-induced dendritic cells (DC). The highest interferon type I responses were achieved by the porcine virus reassortant containing the avian polymerase gene PB2. This finding was not due to differential tropism since all viruses infected DC equally. All viruses equally induced MHC class II, but porcine H1N1 expressing the avian viral PB2 induced more prominent nuclear NF-{kappa}B translocation compared to its parent IAV. The enhanced activation of DC may be detrimental or beneficial. An over-stimulation of innate responses could result in either pronounced tissue damage or increased resistance against IAV reassortants carrying avian PB2.

  11. Interferon-γ facilitates hepatic antiviral T cell retention for the maintenance of liver-induced systemic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhutian; Li, Lu; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Persistent exposure to liver pathogens leads to systemic antigen-specific tolerance, a major cause of chronicity during hepatotropic infection. The mechanism regarding how this systemic tolerance is maintained remains poorly elucidated. In a well established mouse model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistence–induced systemic tolerance, we observed that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) deficiency led to complete loss of tolerance, resulting in robust anti-HBV responses upon peripheral vaccination. The recovery of vaccine-induced anti-HBV responses was mainly caused by the retained antigen-specific CD4+ T cells rather than decreased functional inhibitory cells in the periphery. Mechanistically, HBV persistence induced sustained hepatic CD4+ T cell–derived IFN-γ production. IFN-γ was found to promote CXCL9 secretion from liver-resident macrophages. This T cell chemokine facilitated the retention of antiviral CD4+ T cells in the liver in a CXCR3-dependent manner. Hepatic sequestrated antiviral CD4+ T cells subsequently underwent local apoptotic elimination partially via cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated protein 4 ligation. These findings reveal an unexpected tolerogenic role for IFN-γ during viral persistence in the liver, providing new mechanistic insights regarding the maintenance of systemic antigen-specific tolerance during HBV persistence. PMID:27139489

  12. Transcriptional basis for hyporesponsiveness of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase gene to lipopolysaccharide/interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Laubach, V E; Alley, E W; Edwards, K A; Sherman, P A; Russell, S W; Murphy, W J

    1996-04-01

    The work reported here resolves, at the level of gene regulation, the controversy as to whether or not human monocytes/macrophages can produce nitric oxide (NO) when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), with or without co-stimulation by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Studies included structural comparison of the promoters for human and mouse inducible NO synthase (iNOS) genes, transfection and assay of human and mouse iNOS promoter regions in response to LPS +/- IFN-gamma, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays of kappa B response elements. Two explanations for hyporesponsiveness of the human iNOS promoter to LPS +/- IFN-gamma were found: (1) multiple inactivating nucleotide substitutions in the human counterpart of the enhancer element that has been shown to regulate LPS/IFN-gamma induced expression of the mouse iNOS gene; and (2) and absence of one or more nuclear factors in human macrophages (e.g., an LPS-inducible nuclear factor-kappa B/Rel complex), that is (are) required for maximal expression of the gene. The importance of resolution of this controversy is that future research in this area should be directed toward the understanding of alternative mechanisms that can result in the successful production of NO.

  13. Avian influenza A virus PB2 promotes interferon type I inducing properties of a swine strain in porcine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ocaña-Macchi, Manuela; Ricklin, Meret E; Python, Sylvie; Monika, Gsell-Albert; Stech, Jürgen; Stech, Olga; Summerfield, Artur

    2012-05-25

    The 2009 influenza A virus (IAV) pandemic resulted from reassortment of avian, human and swine strains probably in pigs. To elucidate the role of viral genes in host adaptation regarding innate immune responses, we focussed on the effect of genes from an avian H5N1 and a porcine H1N1 IAV on infectivity and activation of porcine GM-CSF-induced dendritic cells (DC). The highest interferon type I responses were achieved by the porcine virus reassortant containing the avian polymerase gene PB2. This finding was not due to differential tropism since all viruses infected DC equally. All viruses equally induced MHC class II, but porcine H1N1 expressing the avian viral PB2 induced more prominent nuclear NF-κB translocation compared to its parent IAV. The enhanced activation of DC may be detrimental or beneficial. An over-stimulation of innate responses could result in either pronounced tissue damage or increased resistance against IAV reassortants carrying avian PB2. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Suppression of Type I Interferon Signaling Overcomes Oncogene-Induced Senescence and Mediates Melanoma Development and Progression.

    PubMed

    Katlinskaya, Yuliya V; Katlinski, Kanstantsin V; Yu, Qiujing; Ortiz, Angelica; Beiting, Daniel P; Brice, Angela; Davar, Diwakar; Sanders, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M; Rui, Hallgeir; Xu, Xiaowei; Koumenis, Constantinos; Diehl, J Alan; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2016-04-05

    Oncogene activation induces DNA damage responses and cell senescence. We report a key role of type I interferons (IFNs) in oncogene-induced senescence. IFN signaling-deficient melanocytes expressing activated Braf do not exhibit senescence and develop aggressive melanomas. Restoration of IFN signaling in IFN-deficient melanoma cells induces senescence and suppresses melanoma progression. Additional data from human melanoma patients and mouse transplanted tumor models suggest the importance of non-cell-autonomous IFN signaling. Inactivation of the IFN pathway is mediated by the IFN receptor IFNAR1 downregulation that invariably occurs during melanoma development. Mice harboring an IFNAR1 mutant, which is partially resistant to downregulation, delay melanoma development, suppress metastatic disease, and better respond to BRAF or PD-1 inhibitors. These results suggest that IFN signaling is an important tumor-suppressive pathway that inhibits melanoma development and progression and argue for targeting IFNAR1 downregulation to prevent metastatic disease and improve the efficacy of molecularly target and immune-targeted melanoma therapies.

  15. Brain Endothelial- and Epithelial-Specific Interferon Receptor Chain 1 Drives Virus-Induced Sickness Behavior and Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Blank, Thomas; Detje, Claudia N; Spieß, Alena; Hagemeyer, Nora; Brendecke, Stefanie M; Wolfart, Jakob; Staszewski, Ori; Zöller, Tanja; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Schneider, Justus; Paricio-Montesinos, Ricardo; Eisel, Ulrich L M; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise; Jansen, Stephan; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Lu, Bao; Imai, Yumiko; Müller, Marcus; Goelz, Susan E; Baker, Darren P; Schwaninger, Markus; Kann, Oliver; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Kalinke, Ulrich; Prinz, Marco

    2016-04-19

    Sickness behavior and cognitive dysfunction occur frequently by unknown mechanisms in virus-infected individuals with malignancies treated with type I interferons (IFNs) and in patients with autoimmune disorders. We found that during sickness behavior, single-stranded RNA viruses, double-stranded RNA ligands, and IFNs shared pathways involving engagement of melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5), retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I), and mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), and subsequently induced IFN responses specifically in brain endothelia and epithelia of mice. Behavioral alterations were specifically dependent on brain endothelial and epithelial IFN receptor chain 1 (IFNAR). Using gene profiling, we identified that the endothelia-derived chemokine ligand CXCL10 mediated behavioral changes through impairment of synaptic plasticity. These results identified brain endothelial and epithelial cells as natural gatekeepers for virus-induced sickness behavior, demonstrated tissue specific IFNAR engagement, and established the CXCL10-CXCR3 axis as target for the treatment of behavioral changes during virus infection and type I IFN therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Interferon-γ-induced p27KIP1 binds to and targets MYC for proteasome-mediated degradation

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Siti Mariam; Frings, Oliver; Fahlén, Sara; Nilsson, Helén; Goodwin, Jacob; von der Lehr, Natalie; Su, Yingtao; Lüscher, Bernhard; Castell, Alina; Larsson, Lars-Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    The Myc oncoprotein is tightly regulated at multiple levels including ubiquitin-mediated protein turnover. We recently demonstrated that inhibition of Cdk2-mediated phosphorylation of Myc at Ser-62 pharmacologically or through interferon (IFN)-γ-induced expression of p27Kip1 (p27) repressed Myc's activity to suppress cellular senescence and differentiation. In this study we identified an additional activity of p27 to interfere with Myc independent of Ser-62 phosphorylation. p27 is required and sufficient for IFN-γ-induced turnover of Myc. p27 interacted with Myc in the nucleus involving the C-termini of the two proteins, including Myc box 4 of Myc. The C-terminus but not the Cdk2 binding fragment of p27 was sufficient for inducing Myc degradation. Protein expression data of The Cancer Genome Atlas breast invasive carcinoma set revealed significantly lower Myc protein levels in tumors with highly expressed p27 lacking phosphorylation at Thr-157 - a marker for active p27 localized in the nucleus. Further, these conditions correlated with favorable tumor stage and patient outcome. This novel regulation of Myc by IFN-γ/p27KIP1 potentially offers new possibilities for therapeutic intervention in tumors with deregulated Myc. PMID:26701207

  17. Chemokine, cytokine and type I interferon production induced by Toll-like receptor activation in common variable immune deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lollo, Camila de; de Moraes Vasconcelos, Dewton; Oliveira, Luanda Mara da Silva; Domingues, Rosana; Carvalho, Gabriel Costa de; Duarte, Alberto José da Silva; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2016-08-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary antibody deficiency and is associated with recurrent infections and chronic inflammatory diseases. We evaluated the ability of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands to induce secretion of chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from CVID patients. High levels of CXCL10, CCL2, CXCL9, CCL5, CXCL8, and IL-6 were detected in sera of CVID patients compared with healthy controls. Increased chemokine levels were observed in unstimulated PBMCs, but after stimulation with TLR2 and TLR4 agonists, equivalent chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, as in healthy controls, was observed, whereas TLR4 agonist induced a decreased secretion of CCL2 and CXCL8 and increased secretion of TNF. Decreased IFN-α secretion induced by TLR7/TLR8 activation was observed in CVID, which was recovered with TLR9 signaling. Our findings revealed that TLR9 activation has an adjuvant effect on the altered type I response in CVID. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Infectious Bronchitis Coronavirus Limits Interferon Production by Inducing a Host Shutoff That Requires Accessory Protein 5b

    PubMed Central

    Kint, Joeri; Langereis, Martijn A.; Maier, Helena J.; Britton, Paul; van Kuppeveld, Frank J.; Koumans, Joseph; Wiegertjes, Geert F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During infection of their host cells, viruses often inhibit the production of host proteins, a process that is referred to as host shutoff. By doing this, viruses limit the production of antiviral proteins and increase production capacity for viral proteins. Coronaviruses from the genera Alphacoronavirus and Betacoronavirus, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), establish host shutoff via their nonstructural protein 1 (nsp1). The Gammacoronavirus and Deltacoronavirus genomes, however, do not encode nsp1, and it has been suggested that these viruses do not induce host shutoff. Here, we show that the Gammacoronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) does induce host shutoff, and we find that its accessory protein 5b is indispensable for this function. Importantly, we found that 5b-null viruses, unlike wild-type viruses, induce production of high concentrations of type I interferon protein in vitro, indicating that host shutoff by IBV plays an important role in antagonizing the host's innate immune response. Altogether, we demonstrate that 5b is a functional equivalent of nsp1, thereby answering the longstanding question of whether lack of nsp1 in gammacoronaviruses is compensated for by another viral protein. As such, our study is a significant step forward in the understanding of coronavirus biology and closes a gap in the understanding of some IBV virulence strategies. IMPORTANCE Many viruses inhibit protein synthesis by their host cell to enhance virus replication and to antagonize antiviral defense mechanisms. This process is referred to as host shutoff. We studied gene expression and protein synthesis in chicken cells infected with the important poultry pathogen infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). We show that IBV inhibits synthesis of host proteins, including that of type I interferon, a key component of the antiviral response. The IBV-induced host shutoff, however, does not require degradation of host RNA. Furthermore, we

  19. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S Silvestre, Diego H; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade; Carvalho, Denise P; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response.

  20. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S. Silvestre, Diego H.; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  1. Sonic hedgehog-induced type 3 deiodinase blocks thyroid hormone action enhancing proliferation of normal and malignant keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dentice, Monica; Luongo, Cristina; Huang, Stephen; Ambrosio, Raffaele; Elefante, Antonia; Mirebeau-Prunier, Delphine; Zavacki, Ann Marie; Fenzi, Gianfranco; Grachtchouk, Marina; Hutchin, Mark; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Bianco, Antonio C; Missero, Caterina; Larsen, P Reed; Salvatore, Domenico

    2007-09-04

    The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway plays a critical role in hair follicle physiology and is constitutively active in basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), the most common human malignancy. Type 3 iodothyronine deiodinase (D3), the thyroid hormone-inactivating enzyme, is frequently expressed in proliferating and neoplastic cells, but its role in this context is unknown. Here we show that Shh, through Gli2, directly induces D3 in proliferating keratinocytes and in mouse and human BCCs. We demonstrate that Gli-induced D3 reduces intracellular active thyroid hormone, thus resulting in increased cyclin D1 and keratinocyte proliferation. D3 knockdown caused a 5-fold reduction in the growth of BCC xenografts in nude mice. Shh-induced thyroid hormone degradation via D3 synergizes with the Shh-mediated reduction of the type 2 deiodinase, the thyroxine-activating enzyme, and both effects are reversed by cAMP. This previously unrecognized functional cross-talk between Shh/Gli2 and thyroid hormone in keratinocytes is a pathway by which Shh produces its proliferative effects and offers a potential therapeutic approach to BCC.

  2. Perchlorate exposure induces hypothyroidism and affects thyroid-responsive genes in liver but not brain of quail chicks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; McNabb, F M Anne; Sible, Jill C

    2009-10-01

    Ground-dwelling birds in perchlorate-contaminated areas are exposed to perchlorate ion, a known thyroid disruptor, and might be vulnerable to the developmental effects of perchlorate-induced hypothyroidism. We hypothesized that perchlorate-induced hypothyroidism would alter the expression of thyroid-responsive genes involved in thyroid hormone (TH) regulation and in the development of target organ function. Japanese quail chicks were exposed to 2000 mg/L ammonium perchlorate in drinking water for 7.5 weeks beginning on day 5 posthatch. Hypothyroidism was evident after 2 weeks of exposure as lower plasma THs and lower TH content in exposed chicks than in controls. The degree of hypothyroidism was increased at 7.5 weeks, as indicated by significant thyroid gland hypertrophy and sustained changes in thyroid function. After 2 weeks of exposure, hypothyroidism increased type 2 5'-deiodinase (D2) mRNA level and decreased Spot 14 (SP14) mRNA level in the liver, whereas D2 mRNA and RC3 mRNA levels in brain were not affected. After 7.5 weeks of exposure, mRNA levels in the exposed group did not differ from those in controls in either the liver or brain, suggesting the responsiveness of these genes to THs decreased during development. These results suggest that the brain, but not the liver, was protected from the effects of hypothyroidism, probably by changes in D2 activity at the protein level and/or regulation of TH entry and exit from the brain. We concluded that perchlorate exposure caused hypothyroidism in young Japanese quail and affected the expression of thyroid-responsive genes during early posthatch development.

  3. Interferon-Inducible Cholesterol-25-Hydroxylase Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Replication via Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongzhi; Wang, Shanshan; Yi, Zhaohong; Tian, Huabin; Aliyari, Roghiyh; Li, Yanhua; Chen, Gang; Liu, Ping; Zhong, Jin; Chen, Xinwen; Du, Peishuang; Su, Lishan; Qin, F. Xiao-Feng; Deng, Hongyu; Cheng, Genhong

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) as an interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) has recently been shown to exert broad antiviral activity through the production of 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), which is believed to inhibit the virus-cell membrane fusion during viral entry. However, little is known about the function of CH25H on HCV infection and replication and whether antiviral function of CH25H is exclusively mediated by 25HC. In the present study, we have found that although 25HC produced by CH25H can inhibit HCV replication, CH25H mutants lacking the hydroxylase activity still carry the antiviral activity against HCV but not other viruses such as MHV-68. Further studies have revealed that CH25H can interact with the NS5A protein of HCV and inhibit its dimer formation, which is essential for HCV replication. Thus, our work has uncovered a novel mechanism by which CH25H restricts HCV replication, suggesting that CH25H inhibits viral infection through both 25HC-dependent and independent events. PMID:25467815

  4. Dynamic regulation of microRNA expression following interferon-γ-induced gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Reinsbach, Susanne; Nazarov, Petr V; Philippidou, Demetra; Schmitt, Martina; Wienecke-Baldacchino, Anke; Muller, Arnaud; Vallar, Laurent; Behrmann, Iris; Kreis, Stephanie

    2012-07-01

    MicroRNAs are major players in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Even small changes in miRNA levels may have profound consequences for the expression levels of target genes. Hence, miRNAs themselves need to be tightly, albeit dynamically, regulated. Here, we investigated the dynamic behavior of miRNAs over a wide time range following stimulation of melanoma cells with interferon-γ (IFN-γ), which activates the transcription factor STAT1. By applying several bioinformatic and statistical software tools for visualization and identification of differentially expressed miRNAs derived from time-series microarray experiments, 8.9% of 1105 miRNAs appeared to be directly or indirectly regulated by STAT1. Focusing on distinct dynamic expression patterns, we found that the majority of robust miRNA expression changes occurred in the intermediate time range (24-48 h). Three miRNAs (miR-27a, miR-30a, miR-34a) had a delayed regulation occurring at 72 h while none showed significant expression changes at early time points between 30 min and 6 h. Expression patterns of individual miRNAs were altered gradually over time or abruptly increased or decreased between two time points. Furthermore, we observed coordinated dynamic transcription of most miRNA clusters while few were found to be regulated independently of their genetic cluster. Most interestingly, several "star" or passenger strand sequences were specifically regulated over time while their "guide" strands were not.

  5. Repression of Virus-Induced Interferon A Promoters by Homeodomain Transcription Factor Ptx1

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Sébastien; Island, Marie-Laure; Drouin, Jacques; Bandu, Marie-Thérese; Christeff, Nicolas; Darracq, Nicole; Barbey, Régine; Doly, Janine; Thomas, Dominique; Navarro, Sébastien

    2000-01-01

    Interferon A (IFN-A) genes are differentially expressed after virus induction. The differential expression of individual IFN-A genes is modulated by substitutions in the proximal positive virus responsive element A (VRE-A) of their promoters and by the presence or absence of a distal negative regulatory element (DNRE). The functional feature of the DNRE is to specifically act by repression of VRE-A activity. With the use of the yeast one-hybrid system, we describe here the identification of a specific DNRE-binding protein, the pituitary homeobox 1 (Ptx1 or Pitx1). Ptx1 is detectable in different cell types that differentially express IFN-A genes, and the endogenous Ptx1 protein binds specifically to the DNRE. Upon virus induction, Ptx1 negatively regulates the transcription of DNRE-containing IFN-A promoters, and the C-terminal region, as well as the homeodomain of the Ptx1 protein, is required for this repression. After virus induction, the expression of the Ptx1 antisense RNA leads to a significant increase of endogenous IFN-A gene transcription and is able to modify the pattern of differential expression of individual IFN-A genes. These studies suggest that Ptx1 contributes to the differential transcriptional strength of the promoters of different IFN-A genes and that these genes may provide new targets for transcriptional regulation by a homeodomain transcription factor. PMID:11003649

  6. Eimeria tenella infection induces local gamma interferon production and intestinal lymphocyte subpopulation changes.

    PubMed

    Yun, C H; Lillehoj, H S; Choi, K D

    2000-03-01

    The role of intestinal lymphocytes and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production in protective immunity to Eimeria tenella infection was evaluated in two inbred strains of chickens (SC and TK) that display different patterns of susceptibility to coccidiosis. Oral inoculation of either strain with E. tenella led to parasite invasion of the intestinal cecum and cecal tonsils. Greater fecal oocyst shedding was seen in TK chickens. Flow cytometric analyses of cecal tonsil lymphocytes demonstrated greater numbers of CD4(+) and T-cell receptor gammadelta-positive (TCR1(+)) cells in SC chickens and elevated numbers of CD8(+) and TCR2(+) cells in TK chickens following primary infection. IFN-gamma mRNA expression was significantly increased in cecal tonsil and intraepithelial lymphocytes at days 6 and 8, respectively, after primary infection in SC compared to TK chickens. While no differences were noted between cecal tonsil lymphocytes of the two strains following secondary infection, TK chickens showed elevated IFN-gamma transcript levels in intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes at this time. Selective depletion of CD4(+), but not CD8(+), cecal tonsil lymphocytes in SC chickens resulted in a reduced IFN-gamma mRNA expression, indicating that CD4(+) cells are the primary source of this cytokine. Collectively, these results indicate that local lymphocyte responses and production of IFN-gamma are influenced by host genetic factors.

  7. Role of nitric oxide in the central interferon-alpha-induced inhibition of gastric acid secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Czimmer, Jozsef; Király, Ágnes; Szabó, Imre Laszlo; Mózsik, Gyula; Sütő, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play a key role in regulation of gastric functions. Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) has been published to impair gastric motility. Aims of this study were to clarify effect of IFN-α on gastric acid secretion (GAS) and determine role of nitric oxide (NO) in the process. Both subcutaneous (1000, 10000, 100 000 IU, s.c.) and intracisternal (10, 100, 1000 IU, i.c.) injections of IFN-α dose-dependently inhibited GAS induced by pylorus ligation in male SD rats in 2 hrs (370±40, 233±39, 208±50 micromol vs control 415±59 micromol and 481±50, 249±75, 141±25 micromol vs control 485±65 micromol, respectively). Central doses inducing same level inhibition were 100 times lower. NOS inhibitor L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.v.) blocked the inhibitory effect of i.c. ED(50) dose 100 IU IFN-α (507±75 micromol/2 hrs), while L-arginine, the substrate of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) prevented L-NAME action (266±82 micromol/2 hrs). D-arginine failed to prevent L-NAME action on IFN-α-induced inhibition of GAS. Aminoguanidine, a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (iNOS) failed to block IFN-α induced inhibition of GAS. Results suggest that IFN-α inhibits GAS centrally through nitric oxide pathways probably mediated by continuous isoform of NOS that can be important in regulation of GAS in healthy or pathological conditions.

  8. Interferon (IFN)-beta induces apoptotic cell death in DHL-4 diffuse large B cell lymphoma cells through tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL).

    PubMed

    Oehadian, Amaylia; Koide, Naoki; Mu, Mya Mya; Hassan, Ferdaus; Islam, Shamima; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2005-07-08

    The effect of interferon (IFN)-alpha, beta and gamma on the growth of DHL-4 diffuse large B cell lymphoma cells was studied. IFN-beta significantly inhibited the cell growth, and the effect was stronger than that of IFN-alpha. IFN-gamma did not inhibit the cell growth because of lack of IFN-gamma receptors. IFN-beta caused apoptotic cell death which was accompanied by DNA fragmentation, caspase 3 activation and annexin V binding. IFN-beta lead to the expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA. Anti-TRAIL antibody significantly prevented IFN-beta-induced apoptosis. It was suggested that IFN-beta might cause apoptosis in DHL-4 cells through TRAIL.

  9. Postpartum Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... high thyroid hormone levels in the blood) and hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone levels in the blood). In postpartum thyroiditis, thyrotoxicosis occurs first followed by hypothyroidism. What causes postpartum thyroiditis? The exact cause is ...

  10. Postpartum Thyroiditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... high thyroid hormone levels in the blood) and hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone levels in the blood). In postpartum thyroiditis, thyrotoxicosis occurs first followed by hypothyroidism. What causes postpartum thyroiditis? The exact cause is ...

  11. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nsp1β Inhibits Interferon-Activated JAK/STAT Signal Transduction by Inducing Karyopherin-α1 Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong; Nan, Yuchen; Yu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) inhibits the interferon-mediated antiviral response. Type I interferons (IFNs) induce the expression of IFN-stimulated genes by activating phosphorylation of both signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2, which form heterotrimers (interferon-stimulated gene factor 3 [ISGF3]) with interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) and translocate to the nucleus. PRRSV Nsp1β blocks the nuclear translocation of the ISGF3 complex by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we discovered that Nsp1β induced the degradation of karyopherin-α1 (KPNA1, also called importin-α5), which is known to mediate the nuclear import of ISGF3. Overexpression of Nsp1β resulted in a reduction of KPNA1 levels in a dose-dependent manner, and treatment of the cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 restored KPNA1 levels. Furthermore, the presence of Nsp1β induced an elevation of KPNA1 ubiquitination and a shortening of its half-life. Our analysis of Nsp1β deletion constructs showed that the N-terminal domain of Nsp1β was involved in the ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation of KPNA1. A nucleotide substitution resulting in an amino acid change from valine to isoleucine at residue 19 of Nsp1β diminished its ability to induce KPNA1 degradation and to inhibit IFN-mediated signaling. Interestingly, infection of MARC-145 cells by PRRSV strains VR-2332 and VR-2385 also resulted in KPNA1 reduction, whereas infection by an avirulent strain, Ingelvac PRRS modified live virus (MLV), did not. MLV Nsp1β had no effect on KPNA1; however, a mutant with an amino acid change at residue 19 from isoleucine to valine induced KPNA1 degradation. These results indicate that Nsp1β blocks ISGF3 nuclear translocation by inducing KPNA1 degradation and that valine-19 in Nsp1β correlates with the inhibition. PMID:23449802

  12. Catechin induced modulation in the activities of thyroid hormone synthesizing enzymes leading to hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Amar K; De, Neela

    2013-02-01

    Catechins, the flavonoids found in abundance in green tea, have many beneficial health effects such as antioxidative, anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, and hypotensive properties. However, flavonoids have antithyroid/goitrogenic effect, although less information is available about the effect of pure catechin on thyroid physiology. The present investigation has been undertaken to explore the effect of catechin administration on thyroid physiology in rat model. For the in vivo experiment catechin was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) at doses of 10, 20 and 30 mg/kg body to male albino rats for 15 and 30 days, respectively, and thyroid activities were evaluated with respect to determination of serum levels of thyroid hormones, thyroid peroxidase, 5'-deiodinase I (5'-DI), and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activities that are involved in the synthesis of thyroid hormone. Catechin decreased the activities of thyroid peroxidase and thyroidal 5'-deiodinase I, while Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity significantly increased in dose-dependent manner; substantial decrease in serum T3 and T4 levels coupled with significant elevation of serum TSH were also noted. Histological examinations of the thyroid gland revealed marked hypertrophy and/or hyperplasia of the thyroid follicles with depleted colloid content. In in vitro study, short-term exposure of rat thyroid tissue to catechin at the concentrations of 0.10, 0.20, and 0.30 mg/ml leads to decrease in the activities of thyroid peroxidase and 5'-deiodinase I, while the activity of thyroidal Na(+), K(+)-ATPase remains unaltered even at high concentration of catechin treatment. The present study reinforces the concept that catechin, tea flavonoids possess potent antithyroid activity as evidenced from in vivo and in vitro studies.

  13. Interferon-α-inducible Dendritic Cells Matured with OK-432 Exhibit TRAIL and Fas Ligand Pathway-mediated Killer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Koya, Terutsugu; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Higuchi, Yumiko; Sano, Kenji; Shimodaira, Shigetaka

    2017-01-01

    Active human dendritic cells (DCs), which efficiently induce immune responses through their functions as antigen-presenting cells, exhibit direct anti-tumour killing activity in response to some pathogens and cytokines. These antigen-presenting and tumour killing abilities may provide a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy. However, the mechanisms underlying this killer DC activity have not been fully proven, despite the establishment of interferon-α (IFN-α)-generated killer DCs (IFN-DCs). Here mature IFN-DCs (mIFN-DCs), generated from IFN-DCs primed with OK-432 (streptococcal preparation), exhibited elevated expression of CD86 and human leukocyte antigen-DR (minimum criteria for DC vaccine clinical trials) as well as antigen-presenting abilities comparable with those of mature IL-4-DCs (mIL-4-DCs). Interestingly, the killing activity of mIFN-DCs, which correlated with the expression of CD56 (natural killer cell marker) and was activated via the tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Fas ligand pathway, was stronger than that of IFN-DCs and remarkably stronger than that of mIL-4-DCs. Therefore, mIFN-DCs exhibit great potential as an anti-cancer vaccine that would promote both acquired immunity and direct tumour killing. PMID:28191816

  14. Polymorphisms of interferon-inducible genes OAS-1 and MxA associated with SARS in the Vietnamese population.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Emi; Hijikata, Minako; Itoyama, Satoru; Quy, Tran; Phi, Nguyen Chi; Long, Hoang Thuy; Ha, Le Dang; Ban, Vo Van; Matsushita, Ikumi; Yanai, Hideki; Kirikae, Fumiko; Kirikae, Teruo; Kuratsuji, Tadatoshi; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Keicho, Naoto

    2005-04-22

    We hypothesized that host antiviral genes induced by type I interferons might affect the natural course of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS-1), myxovirus resistance-A (MxA), and double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase in 44 Vietnamese SARS patients with 103 controls. The G-allele of non-synonymous A/G SNP in exon 3 of OAS-1 gene showed association with SARS (p=0.0090). The G-allele in exon 3 of OAS-1 and the one in exon 6 were in strong linkage disequilibrium and both of them were associated with SARS infection. The GG genotype and G-allele of G/T SNP at position -88 in the MxA gene promoter were found more frequently in hypoxemic group than in non-hypoxemic group of SARS (p=0.0195). Our findings suggest that polymorphisms of two IFN-inducible genes OAS-1 and MxA might affect susceptibility to the disease and progression of SARS at each level.

  15. STING-Dependent Cytosolic DNA Sensing Promotes Radiation-Induced Type I Interferon-Dependent Antitumor Immunity in Immunogenic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Liufu; Liang, Hua; Xu, Meng; Yang, Xuanming; Burnette, Byron; Arina, Ainhoa; Li, Xiao-Dong; Mauceri, Helena; Beckett, Michael; Darga, Thomas; Huang, Xiaona; Gajewski, Thomas F; Chen, Zhijian J; Fu, Yang-Xin; Weichselbaum, Ralph R

    2014-11-20

    Ionizing radiation-mediated tumor regression depends on type I interferon (IFN) and the adaptive immune response, but several pathways control I IFN induction. Here, we demonstrate that adaptor protein STING, but not MyD88, is required for type I IFN-dependent antitumor effects of radiation. In dendritic cells (DCs), STING was required for IFN-? induction in response to irradiated-tumor cells. The cytosolic DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) mediated sensing of irradiated-tumor cells in DCs. Moreover, STING was essential for radiation-induced adaptive immune responses, which relied on type I IFN signaling on DCs. Exogenous IFN-? treatment rescued the cross-priming by cGAS or STING-deficient DCs. Accordingly, activation of STING by a second messenger cGAMP administration enhanced antitumor immunity induced by radiation. Thus radiation-mediated antitumor immunity in immunogenic tumors requires a functional cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway and suggests that cGAMP treatment might provide a new strategy to improve radiotherapy.

  16. Expression of IP-10, a lipopolysaccharide- and interferon-gamma-inducible protein, in murine mesangial cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Chiarri, M.; Hamilton, T. A.; Egido, J.; Emancipator, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    IP-10 is an early gene induced in multiple cell types by a variety of proinflammatory agents, notably interferons (IFNs) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To determine whether this protein might play a role in amplifying immune-mediated glomerular injury, we cultured mouse mesangial cells with several stimuli for various times. Increasing amounts of IFN-gamma (to 100 units/ml) elicited increasing levels of IP-10 messenger RNA (mRNA), sustained to 24 hours, but had no effect on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA. LPS induced transient IP-10 mRNA expression that peaked at 8 hours; TNF-alpha mRNA was also increased. TNF-alpha at doses up to 10 ng/ml and soluble immune complexes up to 150 micrograms/ml antibody evoked 3- to 5-fold increases in IP-10 mRNA expression, much less than the 30- to 70-fold increases seen with IFN-gamma and LPS. We conclude that IFN-gamma, LPS, and other agonists can amplify glomerular immune injury, perhaps via elevated expression of IP-10. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8434640

  17. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins: mapping of the murine Gbp-1 locus to chromosome 3.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, M; Staeheli, P; Holmes, R S; Haller, O

    1985-09-01

    GBP-1 is the predominant species of a family of guanylate-binding proteins synthesized in mouse cells in response to interferons (IFNs) alpha, beta, or gamma. IFN inducibility of this 65,000-Da protein is controlled by alleles at a single autosomal locus, Gbp-1, with allele a encoding inducibility and allele b noninducibility. Here, we present evidence suggesting that both alleles occur in outbred populations of wild mice. Using recombinant inbred strains and classical linkage analysis of offspring of two-point and three-point backcrosses we demonstrate that Gbp-1 is linked to Adh-3 (encoding alcohol dehydrogenase C2) and VaJ (varitintwaddler-Jackson) located on the distal part of chromosome 3. The relevant recombination frequencies (RFs) (+/- SE) were 3.5 (+/- 1.1) and 11.7 (+/- 2.8)%, respectively. We further show that strain B6.C-H-23c/By(HW 53), congenic for a small segment of chromosome 3, carries the BALB/c alleles at both the Gbp-1 and the Adh-3 locus and not the alleles of the B6 background strain confirming the chromosomal location and close linkage of the two loci.

  18. Interferon-induced, antiviral human MxA protein localizes to a distinct subcompartment of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Stertz, Silke; Reichelt, Mike; Krijnse-Locker, Jacomine; Mackenzie, Jason; Simpson, Jeremy C; Haller, Otto; Kochs, Georg

    2006-09-01

    Human MxA protein belongs to the superfamily of dynamin-like large GTPases that are involved in intracellular membrane trafficking. MxA is induced by interferons-alpha/beta (IFN-alpha/beta) and is a key component of the antiviral response against RNA viruses. Here, we show that MxA localizes to membranes that are positive for specific markers of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum, such as Syntaxin17, but is excluded from other membrane compartments. Overexpression of MxA leads to a characteristic reorganization of the associated membranes. Interestingly, Hook3, mannose-6-phosphate receptor, and Lamp-1, which normally accumulate in cis- Golgi, endosomes, and lysosomes, respectively, also colocalized with MxA, indicating that these markers were redistributed to the MxA-positive compartment. Functional assays, however, did not show any effect of MxA on endocytosis or the secretory pathway. The present results demonstrate that MxA is an IFN-induced antiviral effector protein that resembles the constitutively expressed large GTPase family members in its capacity to localize to and reorganize intracellular membranes.

  19. TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) regulates Th17-mediated intestinal immunopathology in colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanagavelu, S; Flores, C; Termini, J M; Riveron, R; Romero, L; Chung, K; Ruiz, J; Hyun, J; Yuan, X; Dagvadorj, J; Fukata, M

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mucosa reserves abundant Th17 cells where host response to commensal bacteria maintains Th17-cell generation. Although functional heterogeneity and dynamic plasticity of Th17 cells appear to be involved in chronic inflammatory disorders, how their plasticity is regulated in intestinal mucosa is unknown. Here we show that innate TRIF signaling regulates intestinal Th17-cell generation and plasticity during colitis. Absence of TRIF in mice resulted in increased severity of experimental colitis, which was associated with aberrant generation of Th17 cells especially of interferon (IFN)-γ-expressing Th17 cells in the lamina propria. The abnormal generation and plasticity of Th17 cells involved impaired expression of interleukin (IL)-27p28 by lamina propria macrophages but not dendritic cells. Treatment of TRIF-deficient mice with IL-27p28 during colitis reduced the number and IFN-γ expression of Th17 cells in the intestine. In vitro, TRIF-deficient macrophages induced more Th17 cells than wild-type (WT) macrophages during co-culture with WT naive T cells in response to cecal bacterial antigen. Many of Th17 cells induced by TRIF-deficient macrophages expressed IFN-γ due to impaired expression of IL-27p28 by macrophages and defective activation of STAT1 in T cells. These results outline TRIF-dependent regulatory mechanism by which host response to intestinal bacteria maintains Th17-cell-mediated pathology during colitis. PMID:25073675

  20. Antitumor efficacy of combination of interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 gene with gemcitabine, a study in murine model

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Kai; Wang, Lian; Tian, Ling; Yu, Jingrui; Zhang, Zhixuan; Wei, Yuquan

    2008-01-01

    Background Interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) is a potent inhibitor of tumor angiogenesis. It has been reported that the antiangiogenic therapy combined with chemotherapy has synergistic effects. Methods To elucidate the mechanisms of IP-10 gene combined with a chemotherapy agent, we intramuscularly injected pBLAST-IP-10 expression plasmid combined with gemcitabine into tumor-bearing mice. Results The proliferation of endothelial cells was effectively inhibited by IP-10 combined with gemcitabine in vitro. Treatment with pBLAST-IP-10 twice a week for 4 weeks combined with gemcitabine 10 mg/kg (once a week) resulted in sustained high level of IP-10 protein in serum, inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Compared with administration of IP-10 plasmid or gemcitabine alone, the angiogenesis in tumors were apparently inhibited, and the numbers of apoptotic cells and lymphocytes in tumor increased in the combination therapy group. Conclusion Our data indicate that the gene therapy of antiangiogenesis by intramuscular delivery of plasmid DNA encoding IP-10 combined with gemcitabine has synergistic effects on tomor by inhibiting the proliferation of endothelail cells, inducing the apoptosis of tumor cells, and recruiting lymphocytes to tumor in murine models. The present findings provided evidence of antitumor effects of genetherapy combined with chemotherapy. PMID:18983688

  1. Type I interferon production induced by Streptococcus pyogenes-derived nucleic acids is required for host protection.

    PubMed

    Gratz, Nina; Hartweger, Harald; Matt, Ulrich; Kratochvill, Franz; Janos, Marton; Sigel, Stefanie; Drobits, Barbara; Li, Xiao-Dong; Knapp, Sylvia; Kovarik, Pavel

    2011-05-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a Gram-positive human pathogen that is recognized by yet unknown pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Engagement of these receptor molecules during infection with S. pyogenes, a largely extracellular bacterium with limited capacity for intracellular survival, causes innate immune cells to produce inflammatory mediators such as TNF, but also type I interferon (IFN). Here we show that signaling elicited by type I IFNs is required for successful defense of mice against lethal subcutaneous cellulitis caused by S. pyogenes. Type I IFN signaling was accompanied with reduced neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection. Mechanistic analysis revealed that macrophages and conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) employ different signaling pathways leading to IFN-beta production. Macrophages required IRF3, STING, TBK1 and partially MyD88, whereas in cDCs the IFN-beta production was fully dependent on IRF5 and MyD88. Furthermore, IFN-beta production by macrophages was dependent on the endosomal delivery of streptococcal DNA, while in cDCs streptococcal RNA was identified as the IFN-beta inducer. Despite a role of MyD88 in both cell types, the known IFN-inducing TLRs were individually not required for generation of the IFN-beta response. These results demonstrate that the innate immune system employs several strategies to efficiently recognize S. pyogenes, a pathogenic bacterium that succeeded in avoiding recognition by the standard arsenal of TLRs.

  2. Control of type I interferon-induced cell death by Orai1-mediated calcium entry in T cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Chanyu; Soboloff, Jonathan; Gamero, Ana M

    2012-01-27

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is an essential process in T cell activation. SOCE is controlled by the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel encoded by the gene Orai1 that is expressed on the plasma membrane and activated by STIM1 when ER Ca(2+) stores are depleted. Our earlier work showed that a somatic T-cell line Jurkat mutant H123 bearing a defect in Ca(2+) signaling was susceptible to the apoptotic effects of type I interferons (IFN-α/β). The nature of the mutation and whether this mutation was linked to IFN-α/β apoptotic susceptibility was unknown. Here we show that H123 cells lacked Orai1 and exhibit reduced STIM1 protein. Reconstitution of both Orai1 and STIM1 in H123 cells rescued SOCE in response to thapsigargin and ionomycin and abrogated IFN-α/β-induced apoptosis. Reciprocally, overexpression of the dominant negative Orai1-E106A in either parental Jurkat cells or an unrelated human T cell line (CEM391) inhibited SOCE and led to sensitization to IFN-α/β-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we showed that the Ca(2+) response pathway antagonized the IFN-α/β -induced transcriptional responses; in the absence of SOCE, this negative regulatory effect was lost. However, the inhibitory effect of Ca(2+) on type I IFN-induced gene transcription was diminished by pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB in cells with intact SOCE. Our findings reveal an unexpected and novel regulatory crosstalk mechanism between type I IFNs and store-operated Ca(2+) signaling pathways mediated at least in part by NF-κB activity with significant clinical implications to both viral and tumor immunology.

  3. Bat Mx1 and Oas1, but not Pkr are highly induced by bat interferon and viral infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Cowled, Christopher; Wang, Lin-Fa; Baker, Michelle L

    2013-01-01

    Bats harbour many emerging and re-emerging viruses, several of which are highly pathogenic in other mammals but cause no diseases in bats. As the interferon (IFN) response represents a first line of defence against viral infection, the ability of bats to control viral replication may be linked to the activation of the IFN system. The three most studied antiviral IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in other mammals; Pkr, Mx1 and Oas1 were examined in our model bat species, Pteropus alecto. Our results demonstrate that the three ISGs from P. alecto are highly conserved in their functional domains and promoter elements compared to corresponding genes from other mammals. However, P. alecto Oas1 contains two IFN-stimulated response elements (ISRE) in its promoter region compared with the single ISRE present in human OAS1 which may lead to higher IFN inducibility of the bat gene. Both Oas1 and Mx1 were induced in a highly IFN-dependent manner following stimulation with IFN or synthetic double-strand RNA (dsRNA) whereas Pkr showed evidence of being induced in an IFN-independent manner. Furthermore, bat Oas1 appeared to be the most inducible of the three ISGs following either IFN stimulation or viral infection, providing evidence that Oas1 may play a more important role in antiviral activity in bats compared with Mx1 or Pkr. Our results have important implications for the different roles of ISGs in bats and provide the first step in understanding the role of these molecules in the ability of bats to coexist with viruses.

  4. Small-molecule interferon inducers. Toward the comprehension of the molecular determinants through ligand-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Musmuca, Ira; Simeoni, Silvia; Caroli, Antonia; Ragno, Rino

    2009-07-01

    Hepatitis C is becoming an increasingly common cause of mortality especially in the HIV-coinfected group. Due to the efficacy of interferon (IFN) based therapy in the treatment of hepatitis C, various compounds possessing IFN-inducing activity have been hitherto reported. In the present study, we describe how steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen-bonding interactions might influence the biological activity of a published set of IFN inducers, using a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3-D QSAR) approach. Analyses were conducted evaluating different series of compounds structurally related to 8-hydroxyadenines and 1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinolines. A ligand-based alignment protocol in combination with the GRID/GOLPE approach was applied: 62 3-D QSAR models were derived using different GRID probes and several training sets. Performed 3-D QSAR investigations proved to be of good statistical value displaying r2, q2CV-LOO, and cross-validated SDEP values of 0.73, 0.61, 0.61 and 0.89, 0.64, 0.58 using the OH or the DRY probe, respectively. Additionally, the predictive performance was evaluated using an external test set of 20 compounds. Analyses of the resulting models led to the definition of a pharmacophore model that can be of interest to explain the observed affinities of known compounds as well as to design novel low molecular weight IFN inducers (IFNIs). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first 3-D QSAR application on IFN-inducing agents.

  5. Type-1 interferons contribute to oxygen glucose deprivation induced neuro-inflammation in BE(2)M17 human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Minter, Myles Robert; Zhang, Moses; Ates, Robert Charles; Taylor, Juliet Marie; Crack, Peter John

    2014-03-06

    Hypoxic-ischaemic injuries such as stroke and traumatic brain injury exhibit features of a distinct neuro-inflammatory response in the hours and days post-injury. Microglial activation, elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines and macrophage infiltration contribute to core tissue damage and contribute to secondary injury within a region termed the penumbra. Type-1 interferons (IFNs) are a super-family of pleiotropic cytokines that regulate pro-inflammatory gene transcription via the classical Jak/Stat pathway; however their role in hypoxia-ischaemia and central nervous system neuro-inflammation remains unknown. Using an in vitro approach, this study investigated the role of type-1 IFN signalling in an inflammatory setting induced by oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD). Human BE(2)M17 neuroblastoma cells or cells expressing a type-1 interferon-α receptor 1 (IFNAR1) shRNA or negative control shRNA knockdown construct were subjected to 4.5 h OGD and a time-course reperfusion period (0 to 24 h). Q-PCR was used to evaluate IFNα, IFNβ, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α cytokine expression levels. Phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)-1, STAT-3 and cleavage of caspase-3 was detected by western blot analysis. Post-OGD cellular viability was measured using a MTT assay. Elevated IFNα and IFNβ expression was detected during reperfusion post-OGD in parental M17 cells. This correlated with enhanced phosphorylation of STAT-1, a downstream type-1 IFN signalling mediator. Significantly, ablation of type-1 IFN signalling, through IFNAR1 knockdown, reduced IFNα, IFNβ, IL-6 and TNF-α expression in response to OGD. In addition, MTT assay confirmed the IFNAR1 knockdown cells were protected against OGD compared to negative control cells with reduced pro-apoptotic cleaved caspase-3 levels. This study confirms a role for type-1 IFN signalling in the neuro-inflammatory response following OGD in vitro and suggests its modulation through therapeutic blockade of

  6. Type-1 interferons contribute to oxygen glucose deprivation induced neuro-inflammation in BE(2)M17 human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypoxic-ischaemic injuries such as stroke and traumatic brain injury exhibit features of a distinct neuro-inflammatory response in the hours and days post-injury. Microglial activation, elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines and macrophage infiltration contribute to core tissue damage and contribute to secondary injury within a region termed the penumbra. Type-1 interferons (IFNs) are a super-family of pleiotropic cytokines that regulate pro-inflammatory gene transcription via the classical Jak/Stat pathway; however their role in hypoxia-ischaemia and central nervous system neuro-inflammation remains unknown. Using an in vitro approach, this study investigated the role of type-1 IFN signalling in an inflammatory setting induced by oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD). Methods Human BE(2)M17 neuroblastoma cells or cells expressing a type-1 interferon-α receptor 1 (IFNAR1) shRNA or negative control shRNA knockdown construct were subjected to 4.5 h OGD and a time-course reperfusion period (0 to 24 h). Q-PCR was used to evaluate IFNα, IFNβ, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α cytokine expression levels. Phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)-1, STAT-3 and cleavage of caspase-3 was detected by western blot analysis. Post-OGD cellular viability was measured using a MTT assay. Results Elevated IFNα and IFNβ expression was detected during reperfusion post-OGD in parental M17 cells. This correlated with enhanced phosphorylation of STAT-1, a downstream type-1 IFN signalling mediator. Significantly, ablation of type-1 IFN signalling, through IFNAR1 knockdown, reduced IFNα, IFNβ, IL-6 and TNF-α expression in response to OGD. In addition, MTT assay confirmed the IFNAR1 knockdown cells were protected against OGD compared to negative control cells with reduced pro-apoptotic cleaved caspase-3 levels. Conclusions This study confirms a role for type-1 IFN signalling in the neuro-inflammatory response following OGD in vitro and suggests its

  7. In vitro generation of human cytotoxic lymphocytes by virus. Viral glycoproteins induce nonspecific cell-mediated cytotoxicity without release of interferon

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Purified hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins of measles virus either in soluble form or inserted in artifical membranes bind to human peripheral blood lymphocytes and induce cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) in a dose-response fashion. Both autologous and heterologous noninfected target cells are lysed in vitro. The expression of CMC is not inhibited by anti-measles virus antibody added to lymphocytes previously exposed to viral glycoproteins. THe killer lymphocytes are Fc receptor positive, both erythrocyte-rosetting and non-erythrocyte- rosetting, as assessed by both positive and negative selection experiments. The induction of nonspecific CMC by viral glycoproteins either in the soluble state or inserted into artificial membranes could be segregated from the CMC associated with whole virions. First, on kinetics studies, purified viral glycoproteins induced CMC more rapidly than did whole virus. Second, viral glycoprotein-produced response occurred in the absence of detectable release of interferon into the culture medium, whereas CMC activity due to whole virions was associated with interferon release. The fact that purified measles virus glycoproteins integrated into artificial membrane bilayers were as efficient as their soluble counterparts in inducing CMC suggests that the hydrophobic portion of the glycoproteins was not involved in the induction and expression of the lytic activity. Purified glycoproteins from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus behave similarly, although this virus is unrelated to measles virus. It is inferred that interferon-independent CMC induced by viral glycoproteins might account for some of the biological reactions occurring early in the control of a viral infection. PMID:7276828

  8. In vitro generation of human cytotoxic lymphocytes by virus. Viral glycoproteins induce nonspecific cell-mediated cytotoxicity without release of interferon.

    PubMed

    Casali, P; Sissons, J G; Buchmeier, M J; Oldstone, M B

    1981-09-01

    Purified hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins of measles virus either in soluble form or inserted in artifical membranes bind to human peripheral blood lymphocytes and induce cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) in a dose-response fashion. Both autologous and heterologous noninfected target cells are lysed in vitro. The expression of CMC is not inhibited by anti-measles virus antibody added to lymphocytes previously exposed to viral glycoproteins. THe killer lymphocytes are Fc receptor positive, both erythrocyte-rosetting and non-erythrocyte-rosetting, as assessed by both positive and negative selection experiments. The induction of nonspecific CMC by viral glycoproteins either in the soluble state or inserted into artificial membranes could be segregated from the CMC associated with whole virions. First, on kinetics studies, purified viral glycoproteins induced CMC more rapidly than did whole virus. Second, viral glycoprotein-produced response occurred in the absence of detectable release of interferon into the culture medium, whereas CMC activity due to whole virions was associated with interferon release. The fact that purified measles virus glycoproteins integrated into artificial membrane bilayers were as efficient as their soluble counterparts in inducing CMC suggests that the hydrophobic portion of the glycoproteins was not involved in the induction and expression of the lytic activity. Purified glycoproteins from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus behave similarly, although this virus is unrelated to measles virus. It is inferred that interferon-independent CMC induced by viral glycoproteins might account for some of the biological reactions occurring early in the control of a viral infection.

  9. (+)-Nootkatone inhibits tumor necrosis factor α/interferon γ-induced production of chemokines in HaCaT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyeon-Jae; Lee, Jin-Hwee; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression in HaCaT cells. • PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB mediate TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression. • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB. • (+)-Nootkatone suppresses chemokine expression by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 pathways. - Abstract: Chemokines are important mediators of cell migration, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22) are well-known typical inflammatory chemokines involved in atopic dermatitis (AD). (+)-Nootkatone is the major component of Cyperus rotundus. (+)-Nootkatone has antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of (+)-nootkatone on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)/interferon γ (IFN-γ)-induced expression of Th2 chemokines in HaCaT cells. We found that (+)-nootkatone inhibited the TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 mRNA in HaCaT cells. It also significantly inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). Furthermore, we showed that PKCζ and p38 MAPK contributed to the inhibition of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression by blocking IκBα degradation in HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that (+)-nootkatone may suppress TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression in HaCaT cells by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 MAPK signaling pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB. We propose that (+)-nootkatone may be a useful therapeutic candidate for inflammatory skin diseases such as AD.

  10. Concomitant Interferon Alpha Stimulation and TLR3 Activation Induces Neuronal Expression of Depression-Related Genes That Are Elevated in the Brain of Suicidal Persons

    PubMed Central

    Trippler, Martin; Lutterbeck, Melanie; Liu, Zijian J.; Truebner, Kurt; Bajanowski, Thomas; Gerken, Guido; Hermann, Dirk M.; Schlaak, Joerg F.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified 15 genes that are associated with the development of severe depressive side effects during the standard therapy with interferon alpha and ribavirin in the peripheral blood of hepatitis C virus infected patients. An enhanced expression of these genes was also found in the blood of psychiatric patients suffering severe depressive episode. Herein, we demonstrate that the same depression-related interferon-inducible genes (DRIIs) are also upregulated in post-mortem brains of suicidal individuals. Using cultured mouse hippocampal and prefrontal neurons we show that costimulation with murine IFN (mIFN) and the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) promotes the expression of the described DRIIs, at the same time inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine expression through Stat1 and Stat3 activation, promoting neuronal apoptosis. Consequently, the upregulation of selective DRIIs, production of inflammatory cytokines and inhibition of neuronal plasticity may be involved in the pathogenesis of IFN-associated depression. PMID:24391741

  11. The roles of interferon-inducible p200 family members IFI16 and p204 in innate immune responses, cell differentiation and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Gonzalezgugel, Elena; Cheng, Lei; Richbourgh, Brendon; Nie, Lin; Liu, Chuanju

    2014-01-01

    p204 is a member of the interferon-inducible p200 family proteins in mice. The p200 family has been reported to be multifunctional regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and senescence. Interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) is regarded as the human ortholog of p204 in several studies. This is possibly due to the similarity of their structures. However the consistency of their functions is still elusive. Currently, an emerging focus has been placed upon the role of the p200 proteins as sensors for microbial DNA in innate immune responses and provides new insights into infections as well as autoimmune diseases. This review specially focuses on IFI16 and p204, the member of p200 family in human and murine respectively, and their pathophysiological roles in innate immune responses, cell differentiation and proliferation. PMID:25815367

  12. Notch3 expression correlates with thyroid cancer differentiation, induces apoptosis, and predicts disease prognosis.

    PubMed

    Somnay, Yash R; Yu, Xiao-Min; Lloyd, Ricardo V; Leverson, Glen; Aburjania, Zviadi; Jang, Samuel; Jaskula-Sztul, Renata; Chen, Herbert

    2017-03-01

    Thyroid tumorigenesis is characterized by a progressive loss of differentiation exhibited by a range of disease variants. The Notch receptor family (1-4) regulates developmental progression in both normal and cancerous tissues. This study sought to characterize the third Notch isoform (Notch3) across the various differentiated states of thyroid cancer, and determine its clinical impact. Notch3 expression was analyzed in a tissue microarray of normal and pathologic thyroid biopsies from 155 patients. The functional role of Notch3 was then investigated by upregulating its expression in a follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) cell line. Notch3 expression regressed across decreasingly differentiated, increasingly malignant thyroid specimens, correlated with clinicopathological attributes reflecting poor prognosis, and independently predicted survival following univariate and multivariate analyses. Overexpression of the active Notch3 intracellular domain (NICD3) in a gain-of-function FTC line led to functional activation of centromere-binding protein 1, while increasing thyroid-specific gene transcription. NICD3 induction also reduced tumor burden in vivo and initiated the intrinsic apoptotic cascade, alongside suppressing cyclin and B-cell lymphoma 2 family expression. Loss of Notch3 expression may be fundamental to the process of dedifferentiation that accompanies thyroid oncogenesis. Conversely, activation of Notch3 in thyroid cancer exerts an antiproliferative effect and restores elements of a differentiated phenotype. These findings provide preclinical rationale for evaluating Notch3 as a disease prognosticator and therapeutic target in advanced thyroid cancer. Cancer 2017;123:769-82. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  13. PEG-Interferon-α ribavirin-induced HCV viral clearance: a pharmacogenetic multicenter Spanish study.

    PubMed

    Milara, Javier; Outeda-Macias, Maria; Aumente-Rubio, M Dolores; Más-Serrano, Patricio; Aldaz, Azucena; Calvo, M Victoria; García-Simón, M Sergia; Martin-Barbero, Marisa; Padullés-Zamora, Núria; Schoenenberger, Juan Antonio; Saavedra-Aldrich, Marianne; Tévar-Alfonso, Enrique; Saval, Ana; Pastor-Clerigues, Alfonso; García, Marta; Margusino-Framiñan, Luis; Montero-Alvarez, Jose Luis; Merino, Esperanza; Herrero, Jose Ignacio; Beunza, Mónica; Conesa-Zamora, Pablo; Gimenez-Manzorro, Alvaro; Comas-Sugrañes, Dolors; Cano-Marron, Manuel; Jiménez-Mutiloa, Elena; Díaz-Ruíz, Pilar; Cortijo, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: El interferon-pegilado (IFN-PEG) junto a ribavirina ha sido el principal tratamiento de la infeccion por el virus de la hepatitis C (VHC) de la ultima decada. Los agentes antivirales de accion directa actuales han mejorado los resultados de la terapia, pero tambien han aumentado el costo y la gestion de la complejidad del tratamiento. El presente estudio analiza factores geneticos de los pacientes, asi como predictores virales y clinicos de respuesta sostenida viral (RSV) al tratamiento con IFN-PEG y ribavirina en poblacion Espanola. Métodos: Estudio farmacogenetico, multicentrico, prospectivo, observacional de cohortes realizado en 12 hospitales diferentes de 12 comunidades autonomas diferentes. Se incluyeron un total de 98 pacientes con RVS y 106 sin SVR al tratamiento con IFNPEG y ribavirina. Se seleccionaron 33 polimorfismos de nucleotido unico ubicados en 24 genes diferentes relacionados con la respuesta inflamatoria, inmunologica y viral. Los datos clinicos y virales tambien se analizaron como candidatos predictores de RVS. Resultados: Los genotipos IL-28B (rs12979860, rs7248668, rs8105790, rs8099917) y TNFRSF1B (rs1061622), asi como los haplotipos TNFRSF1B / IL-10 / TNF(-308) no-TTG y TNFRSF1B / IL-10 / IL-4 no-TTC junto con la menor edad, menor carga de ARN-VHC basal, valores elevados de colesterol LDL en suero basal, genotipos VHC2 y 3 y bajo grado de fibrosis basal (0-2) se asociaron con una RVS en el analisis univariante. Los predictores independientes de RVS en el analisis multivariante fueron el genotipo IL-28B rs12979860 CC, el haplotipo TNFRSF1B / IL-10 / IL-4 no-TTC junto con los bajos niveles basales de VHCARN y los genotipos virales VHC2 y 3. Conclusiones: El genotipo IL-28B rs12979860 CC, el haplotipo TNFRSF1B / IL-10 / IL-4 haplotipos no-TTC, la carga viral basal baja y los genotipos del VHC2 y 3 pueden ayudar a predecir una buena respuesta a la terapia con IFN-PEG y ribavirina en poblacion espanola.

  14. Natural Killer Cells and Helicobacter pylori Infection: Bacterial Antigens and Interleukin-12 Act Synergistically To Induce Gamma Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Cheol H.; Lundgren, Anna; Azem, Josef; Sjöling, Åsa; Holmgren, Jan; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Lundin, B. Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is known to induce a local immune response, which is characterized by activation of lymphocytes and the production of IFN-γ in the stomach mucosa. Since not only T cells, but also natural killer (NK) cells, are potent producers of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), we investigated whether NK cells play a role in the immune response to H. pylori infection. Our results showed that NK cells were present in both the gastric and duodenal mucosae but that H. pylori infection did not affect the infiltration of NK cells into the gastrointestinal area. Furthermore, we could show that NK cells could be activated directly by H. pylori antigens, as H. pylori bacteria, as well as lysate from H. pylori, induced the secretion of IFN-γ by NK cells. NK cells were also activated without direct contact when separated from the bacteria by an epithelial cell layer, indicating that the activation of NK cells by H. pylori can also occur in vivo, in the infected stomach mucosa. Moreover, the production of IFN-γ by NK cells was greatly enhanced when a small amount of interleukin-12 (IL-12) was added, and this synergistic effect was associated with increased expression of the IL-12 receptor β2. It was further evident that bacterial lysate alone was sufficient to induce the activation of cytotoxicity-related molecules. In conclusion, we demonstrated that NK cells are present in the gastroduodenal mucosa of humans and that NK cells produce high levels of IFN-γ when stimulated with a combination of H. pylori antigen and IL-12. We propose that NK cells play an active role in the local immune response to H. pylori infection. PMID:15731046

  15. Prenylation of an interferon-gamma-induced GTP-binding protein: the human guanylate binding protein, huGBP1.

    PubMed

    Nantais, D E; Schwemmle, M; Stickney, J T; Vestal, D J; Buss, J E

    1996-09-01

    Interferons (IFN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause multiple changes in isoprenoid-modified proteins in murine macrophages, the most dramatic being the expression of a prenyl protein of 65 kDa. The guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are IFN-inducible GTP-binding proteins of approximately 65 kDa that possess a CaaX motif at their C-terminus, indicating that they might be substrates for prenyltransferases. The human GBP1 protein, when expressed in transfected COS-1 cells, incorporates radioactivity from the isoprenoid precursor [3H]mevalonate. In addition, huGBPs expressed from the endogenous genes in IFN-gamma-treated human fibroblasts or monocytic cells were also found to be isoprenoid modified. IFN-gamma-induced huGBPs in HL-60 cells were not labeled by the specific C20 isoprenoid, [3H]geranylgeraniol, but did show decreased isoprenoid incorporation in cells treated with the farnesyl transferase inhibitor BZA-5B, indicating that huGBPs in HL-60 cells are probably modified by a C15 farnesyl rather than the more common C20 lipid. Differentiated HL-60 cells treated with IFN-gamma/LPS showed no change in the profile of constitutive isoprenylated proteins and the IFN-gamma/LPS-induced huGBPs remained prenylated. Despite being prenylated, huGBP1 in COS cells and endogenous huGBPs in HL-60 cells were primarily (approximately 85%) cytosolic. Human GBPs are thus among the select group of prenyl proteins whose synthesis is tightly regulated by a cytokine. HuGBP1 is an abundant protein whose prenylation may be vulnerable to farnesyl transferase inhibitors that are designed to prevent farnesylation of Ras proteins.

  16. Molecular and expression analysis of an interferon-gamma-inducible guanylate-binding protein from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Robertsen, Børre; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Chris; Leong, Jo-Ann

    2006-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are some of the most abundant proteins accumulating in mammalian cells in response to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). GBPs have been suggested to function in antiviral activity, macrophage activation, fibroblast proliferation and inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and invasiveness. Here we confirm that IFN-gamma-inducible GBP also exist in fish. A 2 kb GBP cDNA was cloned from head kidney of rainbow trout treated with an IFN-inducing compound. The open reading frame predicts a 635 amino acid protein (rbtGBP) of 72.7 kDa possessing a tripartite GTP binding motif and a secondary structure similar to human GBP1. Like most mammalian GBPs, rbtGBP possesses an isoprenylation motif at the C-terminal end. The overall amino acid sequence identity between rbtGBP and mammalian GBPs is only 41-47%, however. The rainbow trout macrophage cell line RTS11 showed a dose-dependent increase in rbtGBP transcripts in response to IFN-gamma after 6h of stimulation, with rbtGBP being undetectable in non-treated RTS11 cells. Moreover, polyinosinic polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) induced increased GBP transcript levels in RTS11 and RTG2 cells after 4-6 h of stimulation, and in head kidney and liver of live fish after 24 h. These studies suggest that rbtGBP is an early response gene in rainbow trout, which may have similar functions in IFN-gamma mediated responses as mammalian GBPs.

  17. Toll-like receptor 7-mediated Type I Interferon signaling prevents cholestasis- and hepatotoxin-induced liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Yoon Seok; Park, Surim; Kim, Jong Won; Lim, Chae Woong; Seki, Ekihiro; Kim, Bumseok

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) signaling predominantly regulates production of type I Interferons (IFNs), which has been suggested in clinical studies to be anti-fibrotic. However, the mechanistic role of the TLR7-type I IFN axis in liver fibrosis has not been elucidated. In the present study, liver fibrosis was induced in wild-type (WT), TLR7-deficient, and IFN-α/β receptor-1 (IFNAR1)-deficient mice and TLR7-mediated signaling was assessed in liver cells isolated from these mice. TLR7-deficient and IFNAR1-deficient mice were more susceptible to liver fibrosis than WT mice, indicating that TLR7-type I IFN signaling exerts a protective effect against liver fibrosis. Notably, the hepatic expression of IL-1ra was suppressed in TLR7- or IFNAR1-deficient mice compared with respective WT mice, and treatment with recombinant IL-1ra reduced liver fibrosis. In vivo activation of TLR7 significantly increased IFNa4 and IL-1ra expression in the liver. Interestingly, each cytokine had different cellular source showing that dendritic cells (DCs) are responsible cell type for production of type I IFN, while Kupffer cells (KCs) mainly produce IL-1ra in response to type I IFN. Furthermore, TLR7 activation by R848 injection suppressed liver fibrosis and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and these effects were dependent on type I IFN signaling. Consistent with in vivo data, IFNα significantly induced IL-1ra production in primary KCs. Conclusions TLR7 signaling activates DCs to produce type I IFN, which in turn induces anti-fibrogenic IL-1ra production in KCs. Thus, manipulation of the TLR7-type I IFN-IL-1ra axis may be a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:24375615

  18. The effect of interferon gamma on conventional fractionated radiation-induced damage and fibrosis in the pelvic tissue of rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunyi; Liu, Zi; Wang, Juan; Chai, Yanlan; Su, Jin; Shi, Fan; Wang, Jiquan; Che, Shao Min

    2016-01-01

    We aim to investigate the effect of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) on conventional fractionated radiation–induced damage and fibrosis in ureter and colorectal mucosa. Fifty-two rabbits were randomly divided into three groups comprising a conventional radiation group, an IFN-γ group, and a control group. X-rays were used to irradiate the pelvic tissues of the rabbits in the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. Five days after radiation exposure, the rabbits in the IFN-γ group were administered 250,000 U/kg IFN-γ intramuscularly once a week for 5 weeks. The rabbits in the conventional radiation group received 5.0 mL/kg saline. The rabbits were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, and the rectal and ureteral tissues within the radiation areas were collected. The results showed that the morphology of rectal and ureteral tissues was changed by X-ray radiation. The degree of damage at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, but not at 16 weeks, postradiation was significantly different between the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. The expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA in the ureter and colorectal mucosa of the IFN-γ group was significantly lower than that in the conventional radiation group at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, but it was still higher than that in the control group. There were significant differences in the expression of collagen III among the three groups. IFN-γ can inhibit the radiation-induced upregulation of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA and collagen III protein in the ureter and colorectal mucosa and attenuate radiation-induced damage and fibrosis. PMID:27274263

  19. Increased levels of monokine induced by interferon-gamma (Mig) in the vitreous of patients with diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Y; Usui, Y; Okunuki, Y; Takeuchi, M; Kezuka, T; Iwasaki, T; Goto, H

    2008-07-01

    To determine the intravitreous concentration of monokine induced by interferon-gamma (Mig) in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and the relation between Mig and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Vitreous samples were obtained at the time of vitrectomy from 41 eyes of 38 DR patients (30 with active DR and 11 with inactive DR) and from 15 eyes of 15 non-diabetic patients who had macular disease (control subjects). Human Mig and VEGF were quantified using a FACS Caliber flow cytometer. The vitreous concentration of Mig was increased significantly in patients with both active and inactive DR [148.0 (31.6-997.2; median range) and 82.3 (25.7-347.7) pg/ml, respectively] compared with control subjects [21.0 (5.2-74.3) pg/ml; P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively]. In DR patients, a significant (P < 0.01) correlation was observed between vitreous concentrations of Mig and VEGF. Our results suggest that Mig may play an important role in the pathogenesis of DR and works in consort with VEGF in the progression of pathological angiogenesis in DR.

  20. Monokine induced by interferon gamma (MIG/CXCL9) is an independent prognostic factor in newly diagnosed myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bolomsky, Arnold; Schreder, Martin; Hübl, Wolfgang; Zojer, Niklas; Hilbe, Wolfgang; Ludwig, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Immune suppression is a hallmark of multiple myeloma (MM), but data on soluble factors involved in the fate of immune effector cells are limited. The CXCR3-binding chemokine monokine induced by interferon-gamma (MIG/CXCL9) has been associated with tumor progression, immune escape, and angiogenesis in several malignancies. We here aimed to evaluate the prognostic relevance of MIG in MM. MIG serum levels were significantly elevated in newly diagnosed MM patients (n = 105) compared to patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS; n = 17) and healthy controls (n = 37). MIG expression in stromal compartments but not purified MM cells correlated with serum levels. High MIG serum levels were significantly associated with established prognostic markers (international staging system: R = 0.25, p = 0.001; age: R = 0.47, p < 0.0001; lactate-dehydrogenase: R = 0.34, p = 0.0005) and poor overall survival (OS) (median OS 17.0 months vs. not reached, p < 0.001). A similar association was found for CXCL10 and CXCL11. Multivariate regression analysis indicated MIG as an independent prognostic factor of OS.

  1. Elevated Concentration of Interferon-Inducible Protein of 10 kD (IP-10) Is Associated With Coronary Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Niki, Toshiyuki; Soeki, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Koji; Taketani, Yoshio; Yagi, Shusuke; Iwase, Takashi; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Wakatsuki, Tetsuzo; Shimabukuro, Michio; Sata, Masataka

    2015-05-13

    Several studies have shown that various chemokines are more highly expressed in atherosclerotic plaques than in normal vessel walls. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between coronary atherosclerosis and noteworthy chemokines, including interferon-inducible protein of 10 kD (IP-10); monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1); regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES); and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), an established marker of atherosclerotic disease. We studied 28 patients who underwent coronary angiography because of suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). CAD was defined as stenosis of more than 50% of the vessel diameter on coronary angiograms. Blood samples were obtained both from the aorta and the coronary sinus (CS) just before coronary angiography. Relative to CAD (-) patients, those who were CAD (+) tended to have higher plasma concentrations of IP-10 in the aorta, as well as significantly higher transcoronary concentration gradients of circulating IP-10. There were no significant differences between the two groups in aortic plasma concentrations or transcoronary concentration gradients of MCP-1, RANTES, and hsCRP. Furthermore, both the aortic plasma concentrations and transcoronary concentration gradients of IP-10 correlated with the Gensini score (r = 0.58 and r = 0.63, respectively, P < 0.01), while the plasma MCP-1, RANTES, and serum hsCRP concentrations did not. This study suggests that IP-10 is a good surrogate marker of coronary atherosclerosis.

  2. The Cytosolic Sensor cGAS Detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA to Induce Type I Interferons and Activate Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Watson, Robert O; Bell, Samantha L; MacDuff, Donna A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Diner, Elie J; Olivas, Joanna; Vance, Russell E; Stallings, Christina L; Virgin, Herbert W; Cox, Jeffery S

    2015-06-10

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are critical mediators of antiviral defense, but their elicitation by bacterial pathogens can be detrimental to hosts. Many intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, induce type I IFNs following phagosomal membrane perturbations. Cytosolic M. tuberculosis DNA has been implicated as a trigger for IFN production, but the mechanisms remain obscure. We report that the cytosolic DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), is required for activating IFN production via the STING/TBK1/IRF3 pathway during M. tuberculosis and L. pneumophila infection of macrophages, whereas L. monocytogenes short-circuits this pathway by producing the STING agonist, c-di-AMP. Upon sensing cytosolic DNA, cGAS also activates cell-intrinsic antibacterial defenses, promoting autophagic targeting of M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we show that cGAS binds M. tuberculosis DNA during infection, providing direct evidence that this unique host-pathogen interaction occurs in vivo. These data uncover a mechanism by which IFN is likely elicited during active human infections.

  3. Gamma interferon induces Fas-dependent apoptosis of Peyer's patch T cells in mice following peroral infection with Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Liesenfeld, O; Kosek, J C; Suzuki, Y

    1997-01-01

    Since we previously observed a remarkable decrease in the numbers of T cells in the Peyer's patches of the small intestines in C57BL/6 mice following peroral infection with Toxoplasma gondii, we performed studies to examine the mechanism(s) whereby this decrease in numbers of the T cells occurs. We found that apoptotic cell death of CD4+ and CD8+ alphabeta T cells occurred in Peyer's patches following infection. Upregulation of Fas expression was observed in these T cells. C57BL/6-background mutant mice which lack functional Fas antigen did not develop apoptosis in their Peyer's patches following infection. Treatment of infected C57BL/6 mice with anti-gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) monoclonal antibodies prevented the upregulation of Fas on their Peyer's patch T cells and inhibited the occurrence of apoptosis of these T cells. These results indicate that IFN-gamma induces Fas-dependent apoptosis in CD4+ and CD8+ alphabeta T cells in Peyer's patches in C57BL/6 mice following peroral infection with T. gondii. PMID:9353050

  4. Vaccinia virus and Cowpox virus are not susceptible to the interferon-induced antiviral protein MxA.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, María M; Sanchez-Puig, Juana M; Blasco, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    MxA protein is expressed in response to type I and type III Interferon and constitute an important antiviral factor with broad antiviral activity to diverse RNA viruses. In addition, some studies expand the range of MxA antiviral activity to include particular DNA viruses like Monkeypox virus (MPXV) and African Swine Fever virus (ASFV). However, a broad profile of activity of MxA to large DNA viruses has not been established to date. Here, we investigated if some well characterized DNA viruses belonging to the Poxviridae family are sensitive to human MxA. A cell line inducibly expressing MxA to inhibitory levels showed no anti-Vaccinia virus (VACV) virus activity, indicating either lack of susceptibility of the virus, or the existence of viral factors capable of counteracting MxA inhibition. To determine if VACV resistance to MxA was due to a virus-encoded anti-MxA activity, we performed coinfections of VACV and the MxA-sensitive Vesicular Stomatitis virus (VSV), and show that VACV does not protect VSV from MxA inhibition in trans. Those results were extended to several VACV strains and two CPXV strains, thus confirming that those Orthopoxviruses do not block MxA action. Overall, these results point to a lack of susceptibility of the Poxviridae to MxA antiviral activity.

  5. Interferon beta overexpression attenuates adipose tissue inflammation and high-fat diet-induced obesity and maintains glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Alsaggar, M; Mills, M; Liu, D

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity is increasing, raising health concerns regarding obesity-related complications. Chronic inflammation has been characterized as a major contributor to the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. The purpose of the current study is to assess whether the overexpression of interferon beta (IFNβ1), an immune-modulating cytokine, will attenuate high-fat diet-induced adipose inflammation and protect animals against obesity development. Using hydrodynamic gene transfer to elevate and sustain blood concentration of IFNβ1 in mice fed a high-fat diet, we showed that the overexpression of Ifnβ1 gene markedly suppressed immune cell infiltration into adipose tissue, and attenuated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Systemically, IFNβ1 blocked adipose tissue expansion and body weight gain, independent of food intake. Possible browning of white adipose tissue might also contribute to blockade of weight gain. More importantly, IFNβ1 improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. These results suggest that targeting inflammation represents a practical strategy to block the development of obesity and its related pathologies. In addition, IFNβ1-based therapies have promising potential for clinical applications for the prevention and treatment of various inflammation-driven pathologies.

  6. Characterization of Breast Cancer Cell Death Induced by Interferons and Retinoids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    responses in several human tumor cells. In particular this combination induces cell death similar to apoptosis in vitro, which could not be observed with...individual agents. Preliminary studies identified no changes in the levels of known regulators of cell death such as p53, cyclin D and Bc12. Thus it...products that mediate the growth inhibitory/ cell death inducing activities of the combination of IFN and RA in human tumor cells. To directly identify these

  7. Characterization of Breast Cancer Cell Death induced by interferons and Retinoids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    earlier that IFNBeta/RA combination causes cell death of human breast carcinoma cells. Since we could not find a correlation between expression of known...regulators and cell death , we employed the antisense technical knock-out strategy to isolate genes that participate in IFN/RA induced pathways. We...episomal vector pTKO1. Following transfection of these libraries the breast tumor cells were selected for resistance to IFN/RA induced cell death . Using

  8. Thyroid hormone alleviates demyelination induced by cuprizone through its role in remyelination during the remission period.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mao; Zhan, Xiao L; Ma, Zi Y; Chen, Xing S; Cai, Qi Y; Yao, Zhong X

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease induced by demyelination in the central nervous system, and the remission period of MS is crucial for remyelination. In addition, abnormal levels of thyroid hormone (TH) have been identified in MS. However, in the clinic, insufficient attention has been paid to the role of TH in the remission period. Indeed, TH not only functions in the development of the brain but also affects myelination. Therefore, it is necessary to observe the effect of TH on remyelination during this period. A model of demyelination induced by cuprizone (CPZ) was used to observe the function of TH in remyelination during the remission period of MS. Through weighing and behavioral tests, we found that TH improved the physical symptoms of mice impaired by CPZ. Supplementation of TH led to the repair of myelin as detected by immunohistochemistry and western blot. In addition, a sufficient TH supply resulted in an increase in myelinated axons without affecting myelin thickness and g ratio in the corpus callosum, as detected by electron microscopy. Double immunostaining with myelin basic protein and neurofilament 200 (NF200) showed that the CPZ-induced impairment of axons was alleviated by TH. Conversely, insufficient TH induced by 6-propyl-2-thiouracil resulted in the enlargement of mitochondria. Furthermore, we found that an adequate supply of TH promoted the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte lineage cells by immunofluorescence, which was beneficial to remyelination. Further, we found that TH reduced the number of astrocytes without affecting microglia. Conclusively, it was shown that TH alleviated demyelination induced by CPZ by promoting the development of oligodendrocyte lineage cells and remyelination. The critical time for remyelination is the remission period of MS. TH plays a significant role in alleviating demyelination during the remission period in the clinical treatment of MS.

  9. Histone H2B-IFI16 Recognition of Nuclear Herpesviral Genome Induces Cytoplasmic Interferon-β Responses

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Jawed; Ansari, Mairaj Ahmed; Kumar, Binod; Dutta, Dipanjan; Roy, Arunava; Chikoti, Leela; Pisano, Gina; Dutta, Sujoy; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Chandran, Bala

    2016-01-01

    IFI16 (gamma-interferon-inducible protein 16), a predominantly nuclear protein involved in transcriptional regulation, also functions as an innate immune response DNA sensor and induces the IL-1β and antiviral type-1 interferon-β (IFN-β) cytokines. We have shown that IFI16, in association with BRCA1, functions as a sequence independent nuclear sensor of episomal dsDNA genomes of KSHV, EBV and HSV-1. Recognition of these herpesvirus genomes resulted in IFI16 acetylation, BRCA1-IFI16-ASC-procaspase-1 inflammasome formation, cytoplasmic translocation, and IL-1β generation. Acetylated IFI16 also interacted with cytoplasmic STING and induced IFN-β. However, the identity of IFI16 associated nuclear proteins involved in STING activation and the mechanism is not known. Mass spectrometry of proteins precipitated by anti-IFI16 antibodies from uninfected endothelial cell nuclear lysate revealed that histone H2B interacts with IFI16. Single and double proximity ligation microscopy, immunoprecipitation, EdU-genome labeled virus infection, and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that H2B is associated with IFI16 and BRCA1 in the nucleus in physiological conditions. De novo KSHV and HSV-1 infection as well as latent KSHV and EBV infection induces the cytoplasmic distribution of H2B-IFI16, H2B-BRCA1 and IFI16-ASC complexes. Vaccinia virus (dsDNA) cytoplasmic replication didn’t induce the redistribution of nuclear H2B-IFI16 or H2B into the cytoplasm. H2B is critical in KSHV and HSV-1 genome recognition by IFI16 during de novo infection. Viral genome sensing by IFI16-H2B-BRCA1 leads to BRCA1 dependent recruitment of p300, and acetylation of H2B and IFI16. BRCA1 knockdown or inhibition of p300 abrogated the acetylation of H2B-IFI16 or H2B. Ran-GTP protein mediated the translocation of acetylated H2B and IFI16 to the cytoplasm along with BRCA1 that is independent of IFI16-ASC inflammasome. ASC knockdown didn’t affect the acetylation of H2B, its cytoplasmic

  10. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kroetz, Danielle N.; Allen, Ronald M.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Cavallaro, Cleyton; Ito, Toshihiro; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ) are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I) potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and alveolar Mϕ in the