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Sample records for interferon responsive gene

  1. Expression of Interferon Effector Gene SART1 Correlates with Interferon Treatment Response against Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Zhu, Chuanlong; Wang, Faxi; Zhu, Tiantian; Liu, Shufeng

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-α (IFN-α) has limited response rate in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB). The underlying mechanism of differential responsiveness to IFN remains elusive. It has been recently reported that SART1 mediates antiviral effects of IFN-α in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) cell culture model. In this study, we investigated the role of SART1 in antiviral activity of IFN-α against hepatitis B virus (HBV) using blood and liver biopsy samples from chronic hepatitis B patients treated with pegylated IFN-α and HepG2 cells transfected with cloned HBV DNA. We observed that the basal SART1 expression in liver and PBMCs before IFN treatment was significantly higher in responders than in nonresponders. Furthermore, baseline SART1 expression level positively correlated with the degree of HBV DNA and HBeAg decline after IFN treatment. Mechanistically, silencing SART1 abrogated the antiviral activity of IFN-α, reduced the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) Mx, OAS, and PKR, and attenuated JAK-STAT signaling in HepG2 cells, suggesting that SART1 regulates IFN-mediated antiviral activity through JAK-STAT signaling and ISG expression. Our study elucidates the important role of SART1 in IFN-mediated anti-HBV response and provides new insights into understanding variation of IFN treatment response in CHB patients. PMID:28077916

  2. Endogenous interferon-β-inducible gene expression and interferon-β-treatment are associated with reduced T cell responses to myelin basic protein in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Börnsen, Lars; Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Ratzer, Rikke; Hedegaard, Chris; Søndergaard, Helle B; Krakauer, Martin; Hesse, Dan; Nielsen, Claus H; Sorensen, Per S; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2015-01-01

    Autoreactive CD4+ T-cells are considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis, exogenous and endogenous type I interferons restrict disease severity. Recombinant interferon-β is used for treatment of multiple sclerosis, and some untreated multiple sclerosis patients have increased expression levels of type I interferon-inducible genes in immune cells. The role of endogenous type I interferons in multiple sclerosis is controversial: some studies found an association of high expression levels of interferon-β-inducible genes with an increased expression of interleukin-10 and a milder disease course in untreated multiple sclerosis patients, whereas other studies reported an association with a poor response to treatment with interferon-β. In the present study, we found that untreated multiple sclerosis patients with an increased expression of interferon-β-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had decreased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to the autoantigen myelin basic protein ex vivo. Interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients had increased IL10 and IL27 gene expression levels in monocytes in vivo. In vitro, neutralization of interleukin-10 and monocyte depletion increased CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic protein while interleukin-10, in the presence or absence of monocytes, inhibited CD4+ T-cell reactivity to myelin basic protein. Our findings suggest that spontaneous expression of interferon-β-inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from untreated multiple sclerosis patients and treatment with interferon-β are associated with reduced myelin basic protein-induced T-cell responses. Reduced myelin basic protein-induced CD4+ T-cell autoreactivity in interferon-β-treated multiple sclerosis patients may be mediated by monocyte-derived interleukin-10.

  3. Characterization of feline TRIM genes: molecular cloning, expression in tissues, and response to type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Koba, Ryota; Kokaji, Chika; Fujisaki, Gentoku; Oguma, Keisuke; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2013-05-15

    Members of the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein family in mammals are responsible for various cellular processes. Previous studies have revealed that several TRIM proteins were induced by interferons (IFN) and that these proteins were involved in innate immune response against retroviral infection. Although retroviral infection is prevalent in domestic cats, the expression profiles and roles of feline TRIM genes against these viral infections are not well understood. In the present study, we examined tissue expression and IFN inducibility of nine feline TRIM genes. In addition, the complete coding sequences of six cloned TRIM genes were determined, and their structures were analyzed. Nine TRIM genes were expressed in feline tissues and five were up-regulated by type I IFN. The predicted amino acid sequence of six feline TRIM proteins showed high sequence similarities to other mammalian TRIM proteins, and suggest that feline TRIM genes are potentially involved in antiviral reactivity in IFN-mediated immune response.

  4. Viral microRNAs Target a Gene Network, Inhibit STAT Activation, and Suppress Interferon Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Dhivya; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 pre-microRNAs during latency that are processed to yield ~25 mature microRNAs (miRNAs). We were interested in identifying cellular networks that were targeted by KSHV-miRNAs and employed network building strategies using validated KSHV miRNA targets. Here, we report the identification of a gene network centering on the transcription factor- signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) that is targeted by KSHV miRNAs. KSHV miRNAs suppressed STAT3 and STAT5 activation and inhibited STAT3-dependent reporter activation upon IL6-treatment. KSHV miRNAs also repressed the induction of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes upon IFNα- treatment. Finally, we observed increased lytic reactivation of KSHV from latently infected cells upon STAT3 repression with siRNAs or a small molecule inhibitor. Our data suggest that treatment of infected cells with a STAT3 inhibitor and a viral replication inhibitor, ganciclovir, represents a possible strategy to eliminate latently infected cells without increasing virion production. Together, we show that KSHV miRNAs suppress a network of targets associated with STAT3, deregulate cytokine-mediated gene activation, suppress an interferon response, and influence the transition into the lytic phase of viral replication. PMID:28102325

  5. Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15 in the Control of Cellular Responses to Genotoxic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young Joo; Park, Jong Ho; Chung, Chin Ha

    2017-01-01

    Error-free replication and repair of DNA are pivotal to organisms for faithful transmission of their genetic information. Cells orchestrate complex signaling networks that sense and resolve DNA damage. Post-translational protein modifications by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins, including SUMO and NEDD8, are critically involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA damage tolerance (DDT). The expression of interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), the first identified ubiquitin-like protein, has recently been shown to be induced under various DNA damage conditions, such as exposure to UV, camptothecin, and doxorubicin. Here we overview the recent findings on the role of ISG15 and its conjugation to target proteins (e.g., p53, ΔNp63α, and PCNA) in the control of cellular responses to genotoxic stress, such as the inhibition of cell growth and tumorigenesis. PMID:28241406

  6. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-07-29

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits.

  7. The interferon α-responsive gene, Ifrg15, plays vital roles during mouse early embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Wang, Jiayi; Zhao, Chun; Chen, Xiaojiao; Chen, Li; Zhang, Junqiang; Huo, Ran; Liu, Chang; Tong, Hua; Ling, Xiufeng

    2016-08-01

    The interferon alpha-responsive gene (Ifrg15) mRNA is highly expressed in various stages during preimplantation mammalian embryo development. Unfortunately, few studies have investigated the effect of Ifrg15 in this process. In mammals, the fusion of male and female pronuclei generates a diploid zygote, and is an important step for subsequent cleavage and blastocyst formation. Here, by using RNA interference, rescue experiments, immunofluorescence staining and live cell observations, we found that preimplantation embryo development was arrested at the 1-cell stage after knocking down Ifrg15 expression. This induced DNA damage and prevented the cleavage of embryos. Furthermore, the effect of Ifrg15 deficiency in arresting preimplantation embryo development produced by specific short interfering RNA microinjection was concentration-dependent. Using transcriptome expression profiles, gene ontogeny functional annotation and enrichment analysis, we gained 197 enriched pathways based on 1445 differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Of these, 12 pathways and about one third of the DEGs were involved in DNA damage, DNA repair, cell cycle, and developmental processes. Thus, the IFRG15 protein might be an important molecule for maintaining genomic integrity and stability through upregulating or downregulating a cascade of genes to permit normal preimplantation embryo development.

  8. Transcriptional induction of IFN-gamma-responsive genes is modulated by DNA surrounding the interferon stimulation response element.

    PubMed Central

    Strehlow, I; Decker, T

    1992-01-01

    The 9/27 and GBP mRNAs are both inducible by Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). The promoters of both genes contain an Interferon Stimulation Response Element (ISRE), but while the GBP gene is strongly induced transcriptionally by IFN-gamma the response of the 9/27 promoter is very weak. We investigated the molecular basis for this difference. The different IFN-gamma-responsiveness was found to have more than one reason. First, 9/27 promoter DNA was unable to bind the Gamma Interferon Activation Factor (GAF) with a single high affinity site. It efficiently competed for the association of the GAF with the GBP promoter but this competition was due to the presence of two low affinity sites, the ISRE and an ISRE-like sequence, suggesting that the GAS and ISRE, though both having clear preferences for specific proteins, may nevertheless share a certain degree of structural homology. Second, the 9/27 and GBP ISREs differed markedly in their affinities for regulatory proteins (ISGFs 1,2,3) and the GBP ISRE was more potent in mediating IFN-gamma-induced promoter activity in transient transfection. Third and most importantly, however, the strong difference between the IFN-gamma response of the two promoters was mainly due to the sequences surrounding the ISRE: the positive-acting GAS on one side and sequences with silencing properties 5' and 3' of the 9/27 ISRE on the other side. The data thus show mechanisms to both up- and down-regulate the activity of the ISRE. Images PMID:1508672

  9. Transcription of interferon stimulated genes in response to Porcine rubulavirus infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Ocelotl, María del Rosario; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora Hilda; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Santos-López, Gerardo

    2011-01-01

    Porcine rubulavirus (PoRV) is an emerging virus causing meningo-encephalitis and reproductive failures in pigs. Little is known about the pathogenesis and immune evasion of this virus; therefore research on the mechanisms underlying tissue damage during infection is essential. To explore these mechanisms, the effect of PoRV on the transcription of interferon (IFN) pathway members was analyzed in vitro by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Ten TCID50 of PoRV stimulated transcription of IFNα, IFNβ, STAT1, STAT2, p48 and OAS genes in neuroblastoma cells, whereas infection with 100 TCID50 did not stimulate transcription levels more than non-infected cells. When the cells were primed with IFNα, infection with 1 TCDI50 of PoRV sufficed to stimulate the transcription of the same genes, but 10 and 100 TCID50 did not modify the transcription level of those genes as compared with non-infected and primed controls. MxA gene transcription was observed only when the cells were primed with IFNα and stimulated with 10 TCID50, whereas 100 TCID50 of PoRV did not modify the MxA transcription level as compared to non-infected and primed cells. Our results show that PoRV replication at low titers stimulates the expression of IFN-responsive genes in neuroblastoma cells, and suggest that replication of PoRV at higher titers inhibits the transcription of several members of the IFN pathway. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of PoRV. PMID:24031738

  10. Transcription of interferon stimulated genes in response to Porcine rubulavirus infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Flores-Ocelotl, María Del Rosario; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora Hilda; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Herrera-Camacho, Irma; Santos-López, Gerardo

    2011-07-01

    Porcine rubulavirus (PoRV) is an emerging virus causing meningo-encephalitis and reproductive failures in pigs. Little is known about the pathogenesis and immune evasion of this virus; therefore research on the mechanisms underlying tissue damage during infection is essential. To explore these mechanisms, the effect of PoRV on the transcription of interferon (IFN) pathway members was analyzed in vitro by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Ten TCID50 of PoRV stimulated transcription of IFNα, IFNβ, STAT1, STAT2, p48 and OAS genes in neuroblastoma cells, whereas infection with 100 TCID50 did not stimulate transcription levels more than non-infected cells. When the cells were primed with IFNα, infection with 1 TCDI50 of PoRV sufficed to stimulate the transcription of the same genes, but 10 and 100 TCID50 did not modify the transcription level of those genes as compared with non-infected and primed controls. MxA gene transcription was observed only when the cells were primed with IFNα and stimulated with 10 TCID50, whereas 100 TCID50 of PoRV did not modify the MxA transcription level as compared to non-infected and primed cells. Our results show that PoRV replication at low titers stimulates the expression of IFN-responsive genes in neuroblastoma cells, and suggest that replication of PoRV at higher titers inhibits the transcription of several members of the IFN pathway. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of PoRV.

  11. Polymorphisms of interferon-inducible genes OAS associated with interferon-α treatment response in chronic HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shan; Yu, Haibin; Zhang, Hongwei; Liu, Ying; Huang, Yanxiang; Ma, Lina; Wei, Lai; Wu, Hao; Chen, Xinyue

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the role of host single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) in predicting IFN response in patients with HBV infection, OAS gene and four SNPs were examined in 363 patients with chronic HBV infection (including 41 patients with HBsAg seroconversion) and 57 healthy controls. One SNP and three haplotypes were identified after adjustment for age, sex, HBV DNA. The frequency of OAS3T/C heterozygotes is 52.2% in responders (R) and 38.2% in non-responders (NR), with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.511 (P = 0.018). For complete responders (CR) and NR, the OR reached 2.323(P = 0.023). Haplotype analyses revealed significant association between three OAS haplotypes and response to IFN-α treatment. Genotype combination and interaction between gene-gene analyses disclosed that there was a positive interaction between OAS2/OAS3 and OAS3/OASL, and the rate of OR was 2.46 (likelihood test, P = 0.004) and 4.46 (likelihood test, P = 0.004), respectively. Our results suggest that OAS gene variations may play an important role in response to IFN-α and provide a novel strategy for the resolution of HBV infection.

  12. Molecular cloning of ADIR, a novel interferon responsive gene encoding a protein related to the torsins.

    PubMed

    Dron, Michel; Meritet, Jean François; Dandoy-Dron, Françoise; Meyniel, Jean-Philippe; Maury, Chantal; Tovey, Michael G

    2002-03-01

    The expression of the previously uncharacterized gene Adir (for ATP dependent interferon responsive gene) was increased by 5- to 15-fold in tissue of the oral cavity or in spleen and liver of mice treated orally or intraperitoneally with IFN-alpha, and in mouse cells treated in vitro with IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma. The level of Adir mRNA was also increased 20- to 40-fold in the brains of animals infected with encephalomyocarditis virus. Adir is expressed ubiquitously in mouse tissues as 1.9-, 2.4-, and 3.5-kb mRNA transcripts encoding a 385-amino-acid protein with a conserved ATP binding domain containing typical nucleotide and Mg(2+) binding sites. We also characterized the human ortholog, ADIR, which is located on chromosome 1q25-q31 and contains six exons encoding a 397-amino-acid protein with 80% homology to the mouse protein. A single 2.3-kb mRNA was detected in all human tissues examined, except for placenta, which also contained a 1.25-kb tissue-specific transcript generated by alternative splicing and encoding a putative 336-amino-acid protein. Although ADIR exhibits low homology to DYT1 and TOR1B, the deduced ADIR protein sequences are highly homologous to torsin A and torsin B and more distantly related to members of the Clp/HSP100 family of proteins, suggesting that ADIR, like torsins, is related to the AAA chaperone-like family of ATPases. An ADIR-EGFP fusion protein expressed in HeLa cells was shown to be associated with the endoplasmic reticulum.

  13. Association of SCARB1 Gene Polymorphisms with Virological Response in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients Receiving Pegylated Interferon plus Ribavirin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ching-Sheng; Hsu, Shih-Jer; Liu, Wei-Liang; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2016-01-01

    The scavenger receptor type B class I(SR-BI) is a receptor for high-density lipoproteins(HDL) and one of entry factors for hepatitis C virus(HCV). We examined the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) of the SCARB1 gene, which encodes SR-BI, with virologic responses to pegylated interferon-based treatment in Asian chronic hepatitis C(CHC) patients. Human genomic and clinical data were collected from 156 consecutive Taiwanese HCV genotype 1 or 2 patients who received pegylated interferon plus ribavirin therapy and 153 non-HCV healthy subjects. Three SNPs(rs10846744, rs5888, and rs3782287) of the SCARB1 gene that have been linked to humans diseases were investigated. rs10846744 rather than rs5888 or rs3782287 was associated with serum HCV RNA level and sustained virologic response(SVR) to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin therapy in CHC patients(GG vs. non-GG genotype, Adjusted Odds Ratio, 95% CI: 0.32, 0.11–0.95, P = 0.039). Among patients with IL28B rs8099917 non-TT genotypes, those with rs10846744 non-GG genotype had a higher SVR rate than those with GG genotypes. In addition, patients with GG genotype had a higher fasting blood glucose level than those with CC genotype. In conclusion, SCARB1 gene polymorphisms may serve as a potential predictor of treatment responses in CHC patients receiving interferon-based therapy. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02714712). PMID:27561198

  14. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-01-01

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16220.001 PMID:27472900

  15. Interferon stimulated exonuclease gene 20kDa links psychiatric events to distinct Hepatitis C Virus responses in Human Immunodeficiency Virus positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Katsounas, Antonios; Rasimas, Joseph J.; Schlaak, Joerg F.; Lempicki, Richard A.; Rosenstein, Donald L.; Kottilil, Shyam

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection occurs frequently in patients with preexisting mental illness. Treatment for chronic hepatitis C using interferon formulations often increases risk for neuropsychiatric symptoms. Pegylated-Interferon-α (PegIFN-α) remains crucial for attaining sustained virologic response (SVR); however, PegIFN-α based treatment is associated with psychiatric adverse effects, which require dose reduction and/or interruption. This study's main objective was to identify genes induced by PegIFN-α and expressed in the central nervous system and immune system, which could mediate the development of psychiatric toxicity in association with antiviral outcome. Using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/HCV co-infected donors (N=28), DNA microarray analysis was performed and 21 differentially regulated genes were identified in patients with psychiatric toxicity vs. those without. Using these 21 expression profiles a two-way-ANOVA was performed to select genes based on antiviral outcome and occurrence of neuropsychiatric adverse events. Microarray analysis demonstrated that Interferon-stimulated-exonuclease-gene 20kDa (ISG20) and Interferon-alpha-inducible-protein 27 (IFI27) were the most regulated genes (P<0.05) between three groups that were built by combining antiviral outcome and neuropsychiatric toxicity. Validation by bDNA assay confirmed that ISG20 expression levels were significantly associated with these outcomes (P<0.035). Baseline levels and induction of ISG20 correlated independently with no occurrence of psychiatric adverse events and non-response to therapy (P<0.001). Among the 21 genes that were associated with psychiatric adverse events and 20 Interferon-inducible genes (IFIGs) used as controls, only ISG20 expression was able to link PegIFN-α related neuropsychiatric toxicity to distinct HCV-responses in patients co-infected with HIV and HCV in vivo. PMID:24782267

  16. The hematopoietic regulator, ELF-1, enhances the transcriptional response to Interferon-β of the OAS1 anti-viral gene.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Steven; Kawamoto, Shota; Tanuma, Sei-ichi; Uchiumi, Fumiaki

    2015-12-08

    Interferon (IFN) therapy is effective in treating cancers, haematological and virus induced diseases. The classical Jak/Stat pathway of IFN signal transduction leading to changes in transcriptional activity is well established but alone does not explain the whole spectrum of cellular responses to IFN. Gene promoters contain cis-acting sequences that allow precise and contextual binding of transcription factors, which control gene expression. Using the transcriptional response to IFN as a starting point we report a high frequency of tandem GGAA motifs in the proximal promoters of Interferon stimulated genes, suggesting a key regulatory action. Utilizing the well-characterized anti-viral gene, OAS1, as an example Interferon stimulated gene promoter containing such a duplicated GGAA motif, we have demonstrated a regulatory role of this promoter in response to IFN by mutation analysis. Furthermore, we identified ELF-1 as a direct binding factor at this motif. Additionally, recruitment of RB1 and SP1 factors to the promoter following IFN stimulation is shown. ELF-1 overexpression enhanced and knockdown of ELF-1 inhibited full activation of OAS1 by IFN stimulation. Collectively, ELF-1 binds an important duplicated GGAA cis-acting element at the OAS1 promoter and in cooperation with RB1 and SP1 recruitment contributes to regulation in response to IFN stimulation.

  17. Sendai Virus and Simian Virus 5 Block Activation of Interferon-Responsive Genes: Importance for Virus Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Didcock, L.; Young, D. F.; Goodbourn, S.; Randall, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Sendai virus (SeV) is highly pathogenic for mice. In contrast, mice (including SCID mice) infected with simian virus 5 (SV5) showed no overt signs of disease. Evidence is presented that a major factor which prevented SV5 from productively infecting mice was its inability to circumvent the interferon (IFN) response in mice. Thus, in murine cells that produce and respond to IFN, SV5 protein synthesis was rapidly switched off. In marked contrast, once SeV protein synthesis began, it continued, even if the culture medium was supplemented with alpha/beta IFN (IFN-α/β). However, in human cells, IFN-α/β did not inhibit the replication of either SV5 or SeV once virus protein synthesis was established. To begin to address the molecular basis for these observations, the effects of SeV and SV5 infections on the activation of an IFN-α/β-responsive promoter and on that of the IFN-β promoter were examined in transient transfection experiments. The results demonstrated that (i) SeV, but not SV5, inhibited an IFN-α/β-responsive promoter in murine cells; (ii) both SV5 and SeV inhibited the activation of an IFN-α/β-responsive promoter in human cells; and (iii) in both human and murine cells, SeV was a strong inducer of the IFN-β promoter, whereas SV5 was a poor inducer. The ability of SeV and SV5 to inhibit the activation of IFN-responsive genes in human cells was confirmed by RNase protection experiments. The importance of these results in terms of paramyxovirus pathogenesis is discussed. PMID:10074164

  18. Interferon regulatory factor 3 in adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ysebrant de Lendonck, Laure; Martinet, Valerie; Goriely, Stanislas

    2014-10-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 plays a key role in innate responses against viruses. Indeed, activation of this transcription factor triggers the expression of type I interferons and downstream interferon-stimulated genes in infected cells. Recent evidences indicate that this pathway also modulates adaptive immune responses. This review focuses on the different mechanisms that are implicated in this process. We discuss the role of IRF3 within antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes in the polarization of the cellular immune response and its implication in the pathogenesis of immune disorders.

  19. Δγ₁134.5 herpes simplex viruses encoding human cytomegalovirus IRS1 or TRS1 induce interferon regulatory factor 3 phosphorylation and an interferon-stimulated gene response.

    PubMed

    Cassady, Kevin A; Saunders, Ute; Shimamura, Masako

    2012-01-01

    The chimeric herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are Δγ₁34.5 vectors encoding the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IRS1 or TRS1 genes. They are capable of late viral protein synthesis and are superior to Δγ₁34.5 HSVs in oncolytic activity. The interferon (IFN) response limits efficient HSV gene expression and replication. HCMV TRS1 and IRS1 restore one γ₁34.5 gene function: evasion of IFN-inducible protein kinase R, allowing late viral protein synthesis. Here we show that, unlike wild-type HSV, the chimeric HSV do not restore another γ₁34.5 function, the suppression of early IFN signaling mediated by IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3).

  20. Hepatic IFNL4 expression is associated with non-response to interferon-based therapy through the regulation of basal interferon-stimulated gene expression in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Murakawa, Miyako; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Nakagawa, Mina; Nitta, Sayuri; Otani, Satoshi; Nagata, Hiroko; Kaneko, Shun; Asano, Yu; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Miyoshi, Masato; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Azuma, Seishin; Kakinuma, Sei; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Iijima, Sayuki; Tsuchiya, Kaoru; Izumi, Namiki; Tohda, Shuji; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-12-30

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within or near interferon lambda 4 (IFNL4) gene located upstream of IFNL3 are associated with response to anti-HCV therapy both in interferon (IFN)-based and IFN-free regimens. IFNL4 encodes IFNλ4, a newly discovered type III IFN, and its expression is controlled by rs368234815-TT/ΔG, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with other tag SNPs within or near IFNL4 such as rs12979860 and rs8099917. Intrahepatic expression levels of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) affect the responsiveness to IFNα and are also associated with IFNL4 genotype. However, IFNL4 expressions and its role in intrinsic antiviral innate immunity remain unclear. This study evaluated the effect of IFNL4 on intrahepatic ISG expression and investigated its relationship with treatment outcomes in liver samples obtained from 49 chronic hepatitis C patients treated with pegylated (PEG)-IFN/ribavirin therapy. IFNL4 mRNA was detected in 11 of 22 patients with IFNL4-unfavorable SNPs but not in patients with favorable genotypes. IFNL4 expression was associated with non-response to PEG-IFN/ribavirin therapy. Intrahepatic expression of antiviral ISGs (ISG15 and MX1) was significantly higher in IFNL4-unfavorable patients with detectable IFNL4 mRNA than in patients with undetectable IFNL4 mRNA, whereas the expression of suppressive ISGs (RNF125, SOCS1, SOCS3, and RNF11) was lower in patients with detectable IFNL4 mRNA. In summary, intrahepatic expression of IFNL4 was associated with increased antiviral ISG expression and decreased suppressive ISG expression at baseline, resulting in poor responsiveness to IFNα-based therapy in HCV infection.

  1. Different Expression of Interferon Stimulated Genes in Response to HIV-1 Infection in Dendritic Cells According to Their Maturation State.

    PubMed

    Calonge, Esther; Bermejo, Mercedes; Diez-Fuertes, Francisco; Mangeot, Isabelle; Gonzalez, Nuria; Coiras, Mayte; Jimenez Tormo, Laura; García-Perez, Javier; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Le Grand, Roger; Alcamí, José

    2017-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells whose functions are dependent on their degree of differentiation. In their immature state, DCs, capture pathogens and migrate to the lymph nodes. During this process DCs become resident mature cells specialized in antigen presentation. DCs are characterized by a highly limiting environment to HIV-1 replication due to the expression of restriction factors as SAMHD1 and APOBEC3G. However, uninfected DCs capture and transfer viral particles to CD4 lymphocytes through a trans-enhancement mechanism in which chemokines are involved. We analyzed changes in gene expression with whole-genome-microarray when immature (IDCs) or mature (MDCs) dendritic cells were productively infected using Vpx-loaded HIV-1 particles. Whereas productive HIV infection of IDCs induced expression of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), such induction was not produced in MDCs in which a sharp decrease in ISG and CXCR3-binding chemokines was observed lessening trans-infection of CD4 lymphocytes. Similar patterns of gene expression were found when DCs were infected with HIV-2 that naturally express Vpx. Differences were also observed in conditions of restrictive HIV-1 infection, in the absence of Vpx. ISGs expression was not modified in IDCs whereas an increase of ISG and CXCR3-binding chemokines was observed in MDCs. Overall these results suggest that sensing and restriction of HIV-1 infection are different between IDCs and MDCs. We propose that restrictive infection results in increased virulence through different mechanisms. In IDC avoiding sensing and induction of ISGs whereas in MDC increased production of CXCR3-binding chemokines would result in lymphocyte attraction and enhanced infection at the immune synapse.

  2. Impact of IL28B and OAS gene family polymorphisms on interferon treatment response in Caucasian children chronically infected with hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Domagalski, Krzysztof; Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Zaleśna, Agnieszka; Pilarczyk, Małgorzata; Rajewski, Paweł; Halota, Waldemar; Tretyn, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the impact of IL28B and OAS gene polymorphisms on interferon treatment responses in children with chronic hepatitis B. METHODS We enrolled 52 children (between the ages of 4 and 18) with hepatitis B e antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B (CHB), who were treated with pegylated interferon alfa for 48 wk. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the OAS1 (rs1131476), OAS2 (rs1293747), OAS3 (rs2072136), OASL (rs10849829) and IL28B (rs12979860, rs12980275 and rs8099917) genes were studied to examine their associations with responses to IFN treatment in paediatric patients. We adopted two criteria for the therapeutic response, achieving an hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA level < 2000 IU/mL and normalization of ALT activity (< 40 IU/L). To perform the analyses, we compared the patients in terms of achieving a partial response (PR) and a complete response (CR) upon measurement at the 24-wk post-treatment follow-up. RESULTS The PR and CR rates were 80.8% and 42.3%, respectively. Factors such as age, gender and liver histology had no impact on the type of response (partial or complete). A statistically significant relationship between higher baseline HBV DNA and ALT activity levels and lower rates of PR and CR was shown (P < 0.05). The allele association analysis revealed that only the IL-28B rs12979860 (C vs T) and IL28B rs12980275 (A vs G) markers significantly affected the achievement of PR (P = 0.021, OR = 3.3, 95%CI: 1.2-9.2 and P = 0.014, OR = 3.7, 95%CI: 1.3-10.1, respectively). However, in the genotype analysis, only IL-28B rs12980275 was significantly associated with PR (AA vs AG-GG, P = 0.014, OR = 10.9, 95%CI: 1.3-93.9). The association analysis for CR showed that the TT genotype of IL28B rs12979860 was present only in the no-CR group (P = 0.033) and the AA genotype of OASL rs10849829 was significantly more frequent in the no-CR group (P = 0.044, OR = 0.26, 95%CI: 0.07-0.88). The haplotype analysis revealed significant associations between PR and CR and

  3. Virus infection and interferon can activate gene expression through a single synthetic element, but endogenous genes show distinct regulation.

    PubMed

    Raj, N B; Engelhardt, J; Au, W C; Levy, D E; Pitha, P M

    1989-10-05

    Virus inducible elements (IE) in promoters of mouse alpha-interferon and human beta 1-interferon genes contain multiple copies of the hexanucleotide sequence AGT-GAA or its variants which are also found in the interferon-stimulated response element of genes transcriptionally induced by interferon. We have examined the similarities between virus and interferon induction of gene expression and the role of AGTGAA and AAT-GAA hexamers in these responses. Hybrid plasmids were constructed by inserting the IE region, the alpha 4 promoter, or the multiple copies of AGTGAA or AAT-GAA 5' to the inactive-45 human immunodeficiency-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase hybrid gene, and their inducible expression was studied in a transient expression assay. In L-cells, multiple hexamers were efficiently induced both by infection with Newcastle disease virus and by interferon treatment; while the alpha 4 promoter and the IE inducible region were induced predominantly by virus rather than by interferon. In order to dissociate the effect of virus and endogenous interferon on the induction process, we examined the gene expression in Vero cells, which have undergone homozygous deletion of type 1 interferon genes, and in VNPT-159 cells, which were derived from Vero cells by insertion of an inducible human interferon beta 1 gene. The results show that while the alpha 4 promoter was efficiently induced only by virus in both cell types, the constructs containing shorter segments of the IE were induced by both virus and interferon in Vero cells. However, the inducibility by interferon was not detected in VNPT-159 cells, suggesting that the presence of endogenous interferon suppresses interferon-induced expression of hexanucleotide repeats and the short inducible region. In contrast, virus inducibility of endogenous interferon-stimulated genes, ISG-15 and ISG-54, was about 100-fold more efficient in VNPT-159 cells than in Vero cells, suggesting that this induction is largely mediated through

  4. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Bum; Seronello, Scott; Mayer, Wasima; Ojcius, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) actively evades host interferon (IFN) responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP) from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and poly(IC). The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain) were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity. PMID:27404108

  5. Candidate Gene Study of TRAIL and TRAIL Receptors: Association with Response to Interferon Beta Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Órpez-Zafra, Teresa; Pinto-Medel, María Jesús; Oliver-Martos, Begoña; Ortega-Pinazo, Jesús; Arnáiz, Carlos; Guijarro-Castro, Cristina; Varadé, Jezabel; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Urcelay, Elena; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    TRAIL and TRAIL Receptor genes have been implicated in Multiple Sclerosis pathology as well as in the response to IFN beta therapy. The objective of our study was to evaluate the association of these genes in relation to the age at disease onset (AAO) and to the clinical response upon IFN beta treatment in Spanish MS patients. We carried out a candidate gene study of TRAIL, TRAILR-1, TRAILR-2, TRAILR-3 and TRAILR-4 genes. A total of 54 SNPs were analysed in 509 MS patients under IFN beta treatment, and an additional cohort of 226 MS patients was used to validate the results. Associations of rs1047275 in TRAILR-2 and rs7011559 in TRAILR-4 genes with AAO under an additive model did not withstand Bonferroni correction. In contrast, patients with the TRAILR-1 rs20576-CC genotype showed a better clinical response to IFN beta therapy compared with patients carrying the A-allele (recessive model: p = 8.88×10−4, pc = 0.048, OR = 0.30). This SNP resulted in a non synonymous substitution of Glutamic acid to Alanine in position 228 (E228A), a change previously associated with susceptibility to different cancer types and risk of metastases, suggesting a lack of functionality of TRAILR-1. In order to unravel how this amino acid change in TRAILR-1 would affect to death signal, we performed a molecular modelling with both alleles. Neither TRAIL binding sites in the receptor nor the expression levels of TRAILR-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets (monocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells) were modified, suggesting that this SNP may be altering the death signal by some other mechanism. These findings show a role for TRAILR-1 gene variations in the clinical outcome of IFN beta therapy that might have relevance as a biomarker to predict the response to IFN beta in MS. PMID:23658636

  6. Genome-wide profiling identifies associations between lupus nephritis and differential methylation of genes regulating tissue hypoxia and type 1 interferon responses

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Amanda; Solomon, Olivia; Nayak, Renuka R; Coit, Patrick; Quach, Hong L; Nititham, Joanne; Sawalha, Amr H; Barcellos, Lisa F; Criswell, Lindsey A; Chung, Sharon A

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have shown that differential DNA methylation is associated with SLE susceptibility. How DNA methylation affects the clinical heterogeneity of SLE has not been fully defined. We conducted this study to identify differentially methylated CpG sites associated with nephritis among women with SLE. Methods The methylation status of 428 229 CpG sites across the genome was characterised for peripheral blood cells from 322 women of European descent with SLE, 80 of whom had lupus nephritis, using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Multivariable linear regression adjusting for population substructure and leucocyte cell proportions was used to identify differentially methylated sites associated with lupus nephritis. The influence of genetic variation on methylation status was investigated using data from a genome-wide association study of SLE. Pathway analyses were used to identify biological processes associated with lupus nephritis. Results We identified differential methylation of 19 sites in 18 genomic regions that was associated with nephritis among patients with SLE (false discovery rate q<0.05). Associations for four sites in HIF3A, IFI44 and PRR4 were replicated when examining methylation data derived from CD4+ T cells collected from an independent set of patients with SLE. These associations were not driven by genetic variation within or around the genomic regions. In addition, genes associated with lupus nephritis in a prior genome-wide association study were not differentially methylated in this epigenome-wide study. Pathway analysis indicated that biological processes involving type 1 interferon responses and the development of the immune system were associated with nephritis in patients with SLE. Conclusions Differential methylation of genes regulating the response to tissue hypoxia and interferon-mediated signalling is associated with lupus nephritis among women with SLE. These findings have not been identified in genetic

  7. Association of Myxovirus Resistance Gene Promoter Polymorphism with Response to Combined Interferon Treatment and Progression of Liver Disease in Chronic HCV Egyptian Patients.

    PubMed

    Bader El Din, Noha Gamal; Salum, Ghada M; Anany, Mohamed A; Ibrahim, Marwa Khalil; Dawood, Reham Mohamed; Zayed, Naglaa; El Abd, Yasmine S; El-Shenawy, Reem; El Awady, Mostafa K

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the frequency of single-nucleotide polymorphism at the -88 myxovirus resistance (MxA) gene promoter region in relation to the status of hepatitis C virus (HCV) progression and response to combined interferon (IFN) in chronic HCV Egyptian patients. One hundred ten subjects were enrolled in the study; 60 HCV genotype 4-infected patients who underwent combined IFN therapy and 50 healthy individuals. All subjects were genotyped for -88 MxA polymorphism by the restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. There was an increasing trend of response to combined IFN treatment as 34.9% of GG, 64.3% of GT, and 66.7% of TT genotypes were sustained responders (P=0.05). The T allele was significantly affecting the response rate more than G allele (P=0.032). Moreover, the hepatic fibrosis score and hepatitis activity were higher in GG genotypes compared with the GT and TT genotypes. The multivariate analysis showed that the MxA GG genotype was an independent factor increasing the no response to IFN therapy (P=0.04, odds ratio [OR] 3.822, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.056-11.092), also MxA G allele (P=0.0372, OR 2.905, 95% CI 1.066-7.919). MxA -88 polymorphism might be a potential biomarker to predict response to IFN and disease progression in chronic HCV-infected patients.

  8. Genetic variants in the apoptosis gene BCL2L1 improve response to interferon-based treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 3 infection.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Louise Nygaard; Weis, Nina; Ladelund, Steen; Madsen, Lone; Lunding, Suzanne; Tarp, Britta; Christensen, Peer Brehm; Krarup, Henrik Bygum; Møller, Axel; Gerstoft, Jan; Clausen, Mette Rye; Benfield, Thomas

    2015-02-02

    Genetic variation upstream of the apoptosis pathway has been associated with outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We investigated genetic polymorphisms in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway to assess their influence on sustained virological response (SVR) to pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin (pegIFN/RBV) treatment of HCV genotypes 1 and 3 infections. We conducted a candidate gene association study in a prospective cohort of 201 chronic HCV-infected individuals undergoing treatment with pegIFN/RBV. Differences between groups were compared in logistic regression adjusted for age, HCV viral load and interleukin 28B genotypes. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the B-cell lymphoma 2-like 1 (BCL2L1) gene were significantly associated with SVR. SVR rates were significantly higher for carriers of the beneficial rs1484994 CC genotypes. In multivariate logistic regression, the rs1484994 SNP combined CC+TC genotypes were associated with a 3.4 higher odds ratio (OR) in SVR for the HCV genotype 3 (p=0.02). The effect estimate was similar for genotype 1, but the association did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, anti-apoptotic SNPs in the BCL2L1 gene were predictive of SVR to pegIFN/RBV treatment in HCV genotypes 1 and 3 infected individuals. These SNPs may be used in prediction of SVR, but further studies are needed.

  9. CDK9-dependent transcriptional elongation in the innate interferon-stimulated gene response to respiratory syncytial virus infection in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Zhao, Yingxin; Kalita, Mridul; Edeh, Chukwudi B; Paessler, Slobodan; Casola, Antonella; Teng, Michael N; Garofalo, Roberto P; Brasier, Allan R

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus responsible for lower respiratory tract infections. During infection, the presence of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) activates the interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) transcription factor, an event triggering expression of immediate early, IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). We examine the role of transcriptional elongation in control of IRF3-dependent ISG expression. RSV infection induces ISG54, ISG56, and CIG5 gene expression in an IRF3-dependent manner demonstrated by IRF3 small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing in both A549 epithelial cells and IRF3(-/-) MEFs. ISG expression was mediated by the recruitment of IRF3, CDK9, polymerase II (Pol II), and phospho-Ser(2) carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) Pol II to the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) binding sites of the IRF3-dependent ISG promoters in native chromatin. We find that RSV infection enhances the activated fraction of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) by promoting its association with bromodomain 4 (BRD4) and disrupting its association with the inhibitory 7SK small nuclear RNA. The requirement of CDK9 activity for ISG expression was shown by siRNA-mediated silencing of CDK9 and by a selective CDK9 inhibitor in A549 cells. In contrast, RSV-induced beta interferon (IFN-β) expression is not influenced by CDK9 inhibition. Using transcript-selective quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) assays for the ISG54 gene, we observed that RSV induces transition from short to fully spliced mRNA transcripts and that this transition is blocked by CDK9 inhibition in both A549 and primary human small airway epithelial cells. These data indicate that transcription elongation plays a major role in RSV-induced ISG expression and is mediated by IRF3-dependent recruitment of activated CDK9. CDK9 activity may be a target for immunomodulation in RSV-induced lung disease.

  10. Regulation of 2', 5'-oligoadenylate synthetase gene expression by interferons and platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Blanco, M.A. ); Lengyel, P. . Dept. of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry); Morrison, E.; BrownLee, C.; Stiles, C.D. ); Williams, B.R.G. )

    1989-03-01

    In murine BALB/c 3T3 cell cultures, either beta interferon or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) enhanced expression of the 2', 5-oligoadenylate synthetase mRNA and protein. The time course of induction in response to beta inteferon was similar to that in response to PDGF. Of several growth factors known to be present in clotted blood serum (i.e., epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, and PDGF), only PDGF enhanced expression of 2', 5-oligoadenylate synthetase. The linkage of an interferon response element-containing segment from the 5'-flanking region of a human or murine 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase gene made a heterologous gene responsive to interferon. The expression of such a gene construct in transfected cells was also induced by PDGF. Induction by PDGF was inhibited by mono- or polyclonal antibodies to murine interferon, which suggested that induction by PDGF requires interferon. Both PDGF and interferon induced nuclear factors that bound to this interferon response element-containing segment in vitro.

  11. Axonal interferon responses and alphaherpesvirus neuroinvasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ren

    Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at a peripheral epithelial surface and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS) that innervates this tissue. Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to viral invasion of the PNS. PNS neurons are highly polarized cells with long axonal processes that connect to distant targets. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which include type I interferon (e.g. IFNbeta) and type II interferon (i.e. IFNgamma). IFNbeta can be produced by all types of cells, while IFNgamma is secreted by some specific types of immune cells. And both types of IFN induce antiviral responses in surrounding cells that express the IFN receptors. The fundamental question is how do PNS neurons respond to the inflammatory milieu experienced only by their axons. Axons must act as potential front-line barriers to prevent PNS infection and damage. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, I found that pretreating isolated axons with IFNbeta or IFNgamma significantly diminished the number of HSV-1 and PRV particles moving from axons to the cell bodies in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, I found the responses in axons are activated differentially by the two types of IFNs. The response to IFNbeta is a rapid, axon-only response, while the response to IFNgamma involves long distance signaling to the PNS cell body. For example, exposing axons to IFNbeta induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFNgamma induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated IFNgamma-, but not IFNbeta-mediated antiviral effects. Proteomic analysis of IFNbeta- or IFNgamma-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore

  12. Role of Leptin and SOCS3 in Inhibiting the Type I Interferon Response During Obesity.

    PubMed

    Terán-Cabanillas, Elí; Hernández, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    Obesity provokes an imbalance in the immune system, including an aberrant type I interferon response during some viral infections and after TLR stimulation. SOCS3 overexpression and altered systemic leptin levels could be responsible for the reduced type I interferon production in people with obesity and, eventually, significantly increase the risk of viral infection. The aim of this study was to determine whether SOCS3- and leptin-induced tolerance are responsible for the reduced type I interferon production in people with obesity. SOCS3 overexpression in PBMCs from people with obesity was inhibited with the small interfering RNA (siRNA) assay, and leptin-induced tolerance was evaluated in PBMCs from non-obese volunte\\ers and U937 cells treated with TLR ligands. SOCS3, but not SOCS1, gene silencing via siRNA increased the type I interferon response in PBMCs obtained from people with obesity. On the other hand, leptin induced SOCS3 expression and inhibited type I interferons in PBMCs from healthy donors and in U937 monocytes stimulated with TLR ligands. Taken together, these results demonstrate that reduced type I interferon production in obesity is caused by SOCS3 overexpression as well as tolerance induced by leptin. Here, we demonstrate a key role of leptin and SOCS3 in inhibiting the type I interferon response during obesity.

  13. Mice devoid of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) show normal expression of type I interferon genes.

    PubMed Central

    Reis, L F; Ruffner, H; Stark, G; Aguet, M; Weissmann, C

    1994-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) binds tightly to the interferon (IFN)-beta promoter and has been implicated in the induction of type I IFNs. We generated mice devoid of functional IRF-1 by targeted gene disruption. As reported by others, IRF-1-deficient mice showed a discrete phenotype: the CD4/CD8 ratio was increased and IFN-gamma-induced levels of macrophage iNO synthase mRNA were strongly diminished. However, type I IFN induction in vivo by virus or double-stranded RNA was unimpaired, as evidenced by serum IFN titers and IFN mRNA levels in spleen, liver and lung. There was also no impairment in the response of type I IFN-inducible genes. Therefore, IRF-1 is not essential for these processes in vivo. Images PMID:7957048

  14. Rationale for stimulator of interferon genes-targeted cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rivera Vargas, Thaiz; Benoit-Lizon, Isis; Apetoh, Lionel

    2017-02-17

    The efficacy of checkpoint inhibitor therapy illustrates that cancer immunotherapy, which aims to foster the host immune response against cancer to achieve durable anticancer responses, can be successfully implemented in a routine clinical practice. However, a substantial proportion of patients does not benefit from this treatment, underscoring the need to identify alternative strategies to defeat cancer. Despite the demonstration in the 1990's that the detection of danger signals, including the nucleic acids DNA and RNA, by dendritic cells (DCs) in a cancer setting is essential for eliciting host defence, the molecular sensors responsible for recognising these danger signals and eliciting anticancer immune responses remain incompletely characterised, possibly explaining the disappointing results obtained so far upon the clinical implementation of DC-based cancer vaccines. In 2008, STING (stimulator of interferon genes), was identified as a protein that is indispensable for the recognition of cytosolic DNA. The central role of STING in controlling anticancer immune responses was exemplified by observations that spontaneous and radiation-induced adaptive anticancer immunity was reduced in the absence of STING, illustrating the potential of STING-targeting for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we will discuss the relevance of manipulating the STING signalling pathway for cancer treatment and integrating STING-targeting based strategies into combinatorial therapies to obtain long-lasting anticancer immune responses.

  15. Stochastic expression of the interferongene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingwei; Zhang, Jiangwen; Phatnani, Hemali; Scheu, Stefanie; Maniatis, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Virus infection of mammalian cells induces the production of high levels of type I interferons (IFNα and β), cytokines that orchestrate antiviral innate and adaptive immunity. Previous studies have shown that only a fraction of the infected cells produce IFN. However, the mechanisms responsible for this stochastic expression are poorly understood. Here we report an in depth analysis of IFN-expressing and non-expressing mouse cells infected with Sendai virus. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts in which an internal ribosome entry site/yellow fluorescent protein gene was inserted downstream from the endogenous IFNβ gene were used to distinguish between the two cell types, and they were isolated from each other using fluorescence-activated cell sorting methods. Analysis of the separated cells revealed that stochastic IFNβ expression is a consequence of cell-to-cell variability in the levels and/or activities of limiting components at every level of the virus induction process, ranging from viral replication and expression, to the sensing of viral RNA by host factors, to activation of the signaling pathway, to the levels of activated transcription factors. We propose that this highly complex stochastic IFNβ gene expression evolved to optimize both the level and distribution of type I IFNs in response to virus infection.

  16. Mechanisms of mRNA translation of interferon stimulated genes.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sonali; Kaur, Surinder; Kroczynska, Barbara; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, a lot of research work has been focused on the interferon (IFN)-regulated JAK-STAT pathway and understanding the mechanisms governing the transcription of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). Evidence suggests that the JAK-STAT pathway alone does not account in its entirety for mediating cellular responses to IFNs. There is emerging evidence that non-Stat pathways play important roles in mediating signals for the generation of IFN-responses. Various studies have underscored the importance of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), especially p38 and ERK1/2, as well as the PI 3'K/AKT pathway in transmitting signals that are of critical importance for the biological effects of IFNs. Besides regulating the transcription of ISGs in some cases, engagement of these signaling pathways by the IFN-receptor (IFNR) associated complexes also plays an important role in mediating the translation of ISGs. The mechanisms regulating mRNA translation of ISGs is an area of ongoing active research and a lot more efforts will be required to complete our understanding of the various cellular elements involved in this process. In this review we highlight the mechanisms regulating translation of ISGs. We focus on the proteins regulated by the PI 3'K/AKT pathway, their role in mediating mRNA translation of ISGs and the functional consequences of this regulation. In addition, MAPKs are known to regulate the phosphorylation of various eukaryotic initiation factors and we summarize the roles of eIF4B and eIF4E phosphorylations on the translation of ISGs. The emerging roles of microRNAs in mRNA translation of ISGs are also discussed.

  17. MDP up-regulates the gene expression of type I interferons in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qingshan; Yang, Mei; Liu, Xueting; Zhou, Lina; Xiao, Zhilin; Chen, Xiaobin; Chen, Meifang; Xie, Xiumei; Hu, Jinyue

    2012-03-23

    Muramyldipeptide (MDP), the minimum essential structure responsible for the immuno-adjuvant activity of peptidoglycan, is recognized by intracellular nuclear-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2). Here, we obtained evidence that the treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) with MDP up-regulated the gene expression of type I interferons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MDP also up-regulated the expression of the receptor NOD2, suggesting that MDP may induce a positive feedback response. The up-regulation of interferons was not dependent on the TNFa signaling, as HAECs did not express TNFa with the stimulation of MDP, and TNFa neutralizing antibody did not decrease the induction of IFNs induced by MDP. RT-PCR results showed that HAECs expressed the gene transcripts of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 1, 2, 3, 9. The western blot results showed that MDP induced the phosphorylation of IRF3. These results suggested that MDP induced the up-regulation of gene transcript of interferons through the activation of IRF3 signaling pathway. Meanwhile, MDP induced the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1ß, IL-8, and MCP-1. Taken together, these results suggested that HAECs may play roles in the anti-infection immune response and in the induction of innate immunity.

  18. Role of a distal enhancer in the transcriptional responsiveness of the human CD200 gene to interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqi; Marsden, Philip A; Gorczynski, Reginald M

    2009-06-01

    CD200 plays an important role in prevention of graft rejection, autoimmune diseases and spontaneous abortion by delivering an immunoregulatory signal through interaction with its receptor. It also plays a role in regulating tumor immunity. We previously documented evidence for C/EBP beta as being important in the regulation of constitutive expression of CD200. However, the molecular mechanism(s) controlling inducible expression of CD200 are yet to be explored. Here we address the regulated expression of human CD200 by T cells in response to Con A, IFN-gamma or/and TNF-alpha. A prominent DNase I hypersensitivity site (DHS) was localized approximately 5.4 kb upstream of the major transcriptional start site. Four cis-elements were identified within this genomic region: one nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) site, one IFN-gamma activation site (GAS) element and two IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) for binding of interferon-regulatory factors (IRFs), respectively. Mutation of the NF-kappaB site, GAS or one but not the other of ISREs dramatically reduced the luciferase activity. These findings were further confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays using antibodies against NF-kappaB p65, STAT1alpha, and IRF-1. All the above findings suggest that IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha induce CD200 expression through a 5' upstream enhancer and that NF-kappaB, STAT1 and IRF-1 play pivotal roles in this process.

  19. Gamma-interferon alters globin gene expression in neonatal and adult erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.A.; Perrine, S.P.; Antognetti, G.; Perlmutter, D.H.; Emerson, S.G.; Sieff, C.; Faller, D.V.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of gamma-interferon on fetal hemoglobin synthesis by purified cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors was studied with a radioligand assay to measure hemoglobin production by BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Coculture with recombinant gamma-interferon resulted in a significant and dose-dependent decrease in fetal hemoglobin production by neonatal and adult, but not fetal, BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Accumulation of fetal hemoglobin by cord blood BFU-E-derived erythroblasts decreased up to 38.1% of control cultures (erythropoietin only). Synthesis of both G gamma/A gamma globin was decreased, since the G gamma/A gamma ratio was unchanged. Picograms fetal hemoglobin per cell was decreased by gamma-interferon addition, but picograms total hemoglobin was unchanged, demonstrating that a reciprocal increase in beta-globin production occurred in cultures treated with gamma-interferon. No toxic effect of gamma-interferon on colony growth was noted. The addition of gamma-interferon to cultures resulted in a decrease in the percentage of HbF produced by adult BFU-E-derived cells to 45.6% of control. Fetal hemoglobin production by cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors, was not significantly affected by the addition of recombinant GM-CSF, recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), recombinant IL-2, or recombinant alpha-interferon. Although fetal progenitor cells appear unable to alter their fetal hemoglobin program in response to any of the growth factors added here, the interaction of neonatal and adult erythroid progenitors with gamma-interferon results in an altered expression of globin genes.

  20. Enhanced protection against pulmonary mycobacterial challenge by chitosan-formulated polyepitope gene vaccine is associated with increased pulmonary secretory IgA and gamma-interferon(+) T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Ai, Wenqing; Yue, Yan; Xiong, Sidong; Xu, Wei

    2013-03-01

    Induction of local (pulmonary) immunity plays a critical role in preventing dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) during the early infection stage. To induce specific mucosal immunity, chitosan, a natural cationic polysaccharide, was employed as a mucosal gene carrier and complexed with pHSP65pep, our previously constructed multi-epitope gene vaccine, which induces splenic gamma-interferon (IFN-γ)(+) T helper cell 1 responses. The resultant chitosan-pHSP65pep was administered intranasally to BALB/c mice with four doses of 50 μg DNA followed by mycobacterial challenge 4 weeks after the final immunization. It was found that the chitosan formulation significantly induced production of secretory immunoglobulin A (P < 0.05) as determined by measuring its concentrations in lung lavage fluid and enhanced pulmonary CD4(+) and CD8(+) IFN-γ(+) T cell responses (P < 0.001) compared with naked gene vaccine. Improved protection against Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) challenge was consistently achieved by the chitosan-DNA formulation both as the vaccine alone or in a BCG prime-vaccine boost immunization scenario. Our study shows that mucosal delivery of gene vaccine in a chitosan formulation remarkably enhances specific SIgA concentrations and mucosal IFN-γ(+) T cell response, which correlated positively with immunological protection.

  1. MAP kinase p38α regulates type III interferon (IFN-λ1) gene expression in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells in response to RNA stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Österlund, Pamela; Fagerlund, Riku; Rios, Diana N; Hoffmann, Alexander; Poranen, Minna M; Bamford, Dennis H; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2015-02-01

    Recognition of viral nucleic acids leads to type I and type III IFN gene expression and activation of host antiviral responses. At present, type III IFN genes are the least well-characterized IFN types. Here, we demonstrate that the p38 MAPK signaling pathway is involved in regulating IFN-λ1 gene expression in response to various types of RNA molecules in human moDCs. Inhibition of p38 MAPK strongly reduced IFN gene expression, and overexpression of p38α MAPK enhanced IFN-λ1 gene expression in RNA-stimulated moDCs. The regulation of IFN gene expression by p38 MAPK signaling was independent of protein synthesis and thus, a direct result of RNA stimulation. Moreover, the RIG-I/MDA5-MAVS-IRF3 pathway was required for p38α MAPK to up-regulate IFN-λ1 promoter activation, whereas the MyD88-IRF7 pathway was not needed, and the regulation was not involved directly in IRF7-dependent IFN-α1 gene expression. The stimulatory effect of p38α MAPK on IFN-λ1 mRNA expression in human moDCs did not take place directly via the activating TBK1/IKKε complex, but rather, it occurred through some other parallel pathways. Furthermore, mutations in ISRE and NF-κB binding sites in the promoter region of the IFN-λ1 gene led to a significant reduction in p38α MAPK-mediated IFN responses after RNA stimulation. Altogether, our data suggest that the p38α MAPK pathway is linked with RLR signaling pathways and regulates the expression of early IFN genes after RNA stimulation cooperatively with IRF3 and NF-κB to induce antiviral responses further.

  2. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling Identifies Type 1 Interferon Response Pathways in Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Zhang, Mingzi M.; Wong, Hazel E. E.; Sahiratmadja, Edhyana; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout; Marzuki, Sangkot; Seielstad, Mark; van de Vosse, Esther; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), remains the leading cause of mortality from a single infectious agent. Each year around 9 million individuals newly develop active TB disease, and over 2 billion individuals are latently infected with M.tb worldwide, thus being at risk of developing TB reactivation disease later in life. The underlying mechanisms and pathways of protection against TB in humans, as well as the dynamics of the host response to M.tb infection, are incompletely understood. We carried out whole-genome expression profiling on a cohort of TB patients longitudinally sampled along 3 time-points: during active infection, during treatment, and after completion of curative treatment. We identified molecular signatures involving the upregulation of type-1 interferon (α/β) mediated signaling and chronic inflammation during active TB disease in an Indonesian population, in line with results from two recent studies in ethnically and epidemiologically different populations in Europe and South Africa. Expression profiles were captured in neutrophil-depleted blood samples, indicating a major contribution of lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Expression of type-1 interferon (α/β) genes mediated was also upregulated in the lungs of M.tb infected mice and in infected human macrophages. In patients, the regulated gene expression-signature normalized during treatment, including the type-1 interferon mediated signaling and a concurrent opposite regulation of interferon-gamma. Further analysis revealed IL15RA, UBE2L6 and GBP4 as molecules involved in the type-I interferon response in all three experimental models. Our data is highly suggestive that the innate immune type-I interferon signaling cascade could be used as a quantitative tool for monitoring active TB disease, and provide evidence that components of the patient’s blood gene expression signature bear similarities to the pulmonary and macrophage response to mycobacterial infection

  3. Evasion of interferon responses by Ebola and Marburg viruses.

    PubMed

    Basler, Christopher F; Amarasinghe, Gaya K

    2009-09-01

    The filoviruses, Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV), cause frequently lethal viral hemorrhagic fever. These infections induce potent cytokine production, yet these host responses fail to prevent systemic virus replication. Consistent with this, filoviruses have been found to encode proteins VP35 and VP24 that block host interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta production and inhibit signaling downstream of the IFN-alpha/beta and the IFN-gamma receptors, respectively. VP35, which is a component of the viral nucleocapsid complex and plays an essential role in viral RNA synthesis, acts as a pseudosubstrate for the cellular kinases IKK-epsilon and TBK-1, which phosphorylate and activate interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) and interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7). VP35 also promotes SUMOylation of IRF-7, repressing IFN gene transcription. In addition, VP35 is a dsRNA-binding protein, and mutations that disrupt dsRNA binding impair VP35 IFN-antagonist activity while leaving its RNA replication functions intact. The phenotypes of recombinant EBOV bearing mutant VP35s unable to inhibit IFN-alpha/beta demonstrate that VP35 IFN-antagonist activity is critical for full virulence of these lethal pathogens. The structure of the VP35 dsRNA-binding domain, which has recently become available, is expected to provide insight into how VP35 IFN-antagonist and dsRNA-binding functions are related. The EBOV VP24 protein inhibits IFN signaling through an interaction with select host cell karyopherin-alpha proteins, preventing the nuclear import of otherwise activated STAT1. It remains to be determined to what extent VP24 may also modulate the nuclear import of other host cell factors and to what extent this may influence the outcome of infection. Notably, the Marburg virus VP24 protein does not detectably block STAT1 nuclear import, and, unlike EBOV, MARV infection inhibits STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation. Thus, despite their similarities, there are fundamental differences by which

  4. Inhibiting DNA methylation causes an interferon response in cancer via dsRNA including endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Strissel, Pamela L.; Desrichard, Alexis; Li, Huili; Henke, Christine; Akman, Benjamin; Hein, Alexander; Rote, Neal S.; Cope, Leslie M.; Snyder, Alexandra; Makarov, Vladimir; Buhu, Sadna; Slamon, Dennis J.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Zahnow, Cynthia A.; Mergoub, Taha; Chan, Timothy A.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Summary We show that DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTis) upregulate immune signaling in cancer through the viral defense pathway. In ovarian cancer (OC), DNMTis trigger cytosolic sensing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) causing a Type I Interferon response and apoptosis. Knocking down dsRNA sensors TLR3 and MAVS reduces this response twofold, and blocking interferon beta or its receptor abrogates it. Upregulation of hypermethylated endogenous retrovirus (ERV) genes accompanies the response and ERV overexpression activates the response. Basal levels of ERV and viral defense gene expression significantly correlate in primary OC and the latter signature separates primary samples for multiple tumor types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into low versus high expression groups. In melanoma patients treated with an immune checkpoint therapy, high viral defense signature expression in tumors significantly associates with durable clinical response and DNMTi treatment sensitizes to anti-CTLA4 therapy in a pre-clinical melanoma model. PMID:26317466

  5. Phleboviruses and the Type I Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Wuerth, Jennifer Deborah; Weber, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    The genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae contains a number of emerging virus species which pose a threat to both human and animal health. Most prominent members include Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV), sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV), Toscana virus (TOSV), Punta Toro virus (PTV), and the two new members severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) and Heartland virus (HRTV). The nonstructural protein NSs is well established as the main phleboviral virulence factor in the mammalian host. NSs acts as antagonist of the antiviral type I interferon (IFN) system. Recent progress in the elucidation of the molecular functions of a growing list of NSs proteins highlights the astonishing variety of strategies employed by phleboviruses to evade the IFN system. PMID:27338447

  6. The Delta 32 mutation of the chemokine-receptor 5 gene neither is correlated with chronic hepatitis C nor does it predict response to therapy with interferon-alpha and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Glas, J; Török, H P; Simperl, C; König, A; Martin, K; Schmidt, F; Schaefer, M; Schiemann, U; Folwaczny, C

    2003-07-01

    Unlike in HIV, homozygosity for a 32-bp deletion (Delta 32) of the chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) gene was recently described in increased frequency in patients with chronic hepatitis C (HCV). Thus, it was speculated that this mutation might be relevant for disease susceptibility and influence the response to antiviral therapy. The present study sought to confirm the association between HCV and the Delta 32 mutation of the CCR5 gene and to correlate it with the response to therapy with interferon-alpha-2a and ribavirin. Sixty-two patients with HCV and 119 healthy unrelated controls were genotyped for the Delta 32 mutation. For the correlation between the Delta 32 mutation and response to therapy, only patients (n = 59) who completed 6 months of combination therapy as part of a prospective study were evaluated. The Delta 32 mutation was not observed in increased frequency in HCV. Furthermore, a significant difference of the HCV load or aminotransferase concentrations was not observed in carriers versus noncarriers of the Delta 32 mutation. After stratification for potentially confounding factors such as gender or HCV genotype, a significant difference was also not detected with respect to treatment outcome. These observations argue strongly against a role of CCR5 for susceptibility to HCV infection or response to combination therapy.

  7. Biological response modifiers: interferons, interleukins, recombinant products, liposomal products.

    PubMed

    Kruth, S A

    1998-03-01

    The concept of enhancing the normal immune response against infections and neoplasms has been considered for decades. The administration of various natural and synthetic products to simulate systemic infections has largely given over to the idea that specific cytokines can be used effectively when administered systemically. Interferons, interleukins, and hematopoietic growth factors may offer substantial clinical benefit in chronic viral infections, and cancers such as osteosarcoma, melanoma, and lymphosarcoma. Erythropoietin has been shown to have great utility in the management of chronic renal failure. At this point in time, only recombinant products derived from humans are commercially available, and they are expensive and not licensed for use in companion animals. Nevertheless, these products may have significant clinical impact on several highly fatal disorders of dogs and cats. When administered systemically, cytokines perturb complex regulatory pathways, and serious side effects may occur. Innovative delivery methods, such as liposomes, gene therapy, and even oral administration may increase the therapeutic index of these molecules. Biological response modification, cytokine biology, and associated delivery systems are rapidly changing fields, and the small animal veterinarian will need to watch for significant advances in these areas over the next several years.

  8. Interferon-λ polymorphisms and response to pegylated interferon in Iranian hepatitis C patients

    PubMed Central

    Haj-sheykholeslami, Arghavan; Keshvari, Maryam; Sharafi, Heidar; Pouryasin, Ali; Hemmati, Khalil; Mohammadzadehparjikolaei, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of pegylated interferon in Iranian chronic hepatitis C patients in relation to interferon-λ (IFNL) polymorphisms. METHODS: This study enrolled patients with chronic hepatitis C referred to the Tehran Blood Transfusion Hepatitis Clinic in 2011. Patients were included in the study if they had no concomitant hepatic illness, were negative for human immunodeficiency virus antibodies, and had no prior history of treatment with any type of pegylated interferon. Patients were treated with 180 μg pegylated interferon alpha-2a (Pegaferon®) weekly and 800-1200 mg ribavirin daily for 24 or 48 wk depending on weight and hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype. Blood samples were collected from patients to obtain DNA for determination of IFNL rs12979860 and rs8099917 polymorphisms. The virologic response in patients was then evaluated and compared between the different IFNL genotypes. RESULTS: A total of 152 patients with a mean age of 41.9 ± 10.0 years were included in the study, of which 141/152 were men (92.8%). The most frequent HCV genotype was type-1, infecting 93/152 (61.2%) patients. Sustained virologic response (SVR) was achieved in 81.9% of patients with HCV genotype-1 and 91.1% of patients with HCV genotype-3. Treatment success was achieved in 91.2% (52/57) of patients with the IFNL rs12979860 CC genotype and 82.1% (78/95) in those with other genotypes. Similar treatment response rates were also observed in patients with rs8099917 TT (39/45; 86.7%) and non-TT (61/68; 89.7%) genotypes. Univariate analyses identified the following factors which influenced treatment response for inclusion in a multivariate analysis: age, HCV RNA level, stage of liver fibrosis, rs12979860 CC genotype, and aspartate transaminase level. A logistic regression analysis revealed that only the rs12979860 CC genotype was significantly associated with achievement of SVR (OR = 6.2; 95%CI: 1.2-31.9; P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: The rs12979860 CC genotype was associated with

  9. Molecular study of the interferon genes in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Larripa, I; Giere, I; Slavutsky, I; Diaz, M

    1995-08-01

    The interferons alpha, beta, and w (IFNA, IFNB, IFNW), are a family of genes that have been mapped on the short arm of chromosome 9 (9p21-22). Deletions of genetic material on 9p are frequently observed in hematological diseases, particularly in lymphoid neoplasias. In this paper we have performed the molecular studies of IFNA and IFNB genes in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in order to determine if the deletions of these genes are prevalent in this pathology. Forty CML patients, Philadelphia positive or with BCR/ABL rearrangement, were studied at diagnosis. The analysis of IFNA and IFNB genes was performed by Southern and dot blot techniques. Homozygous or hemizygous deletions of IFNA and IFNB genes could not be detected, indicating that deletions of these genes would not be present or would be a very infrequent event in the chronic phase of the CML patients.

  10. Systems biology unravels interferon responses to respiratory virus infections.

    PubMed

    Kroeker, Andrea L; Coombs, Kevin M

    2014-02-26

    Interferon production is an important defence against viral replication and its activation is an attractive therapeutic target. However, it has long been known that viruses perpetually evolve a multitude of strategies to evade these host immune responses. In recent years there has been an explosion of information on virus-induced alterations of the host immune response that have resulted from data-rich omics technologies. Unravelling how these systems interact and determining the overall outcome of the host response to viral infection will play an important role in future treatment and vaccine development. In this review we focus primarily on the interferon pathway and its regulation as well as mechanisms by which respiratory RNA viruses interfere with its signalling capacity.

  11. Inhibition by interferon of biochemical transformation induced by cloned herpesvirus thymidine kinase genes.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, H; Qavi, H; Kit, S

    1982-10-01

    To learn whether interferon could prevent the biochemical transformations induced by cloned herpesvirus thymidine kinase (TK) genes, LM(TK-) mouse fibroblast cultures were pretreated for 24 h with 2.4-40 international units (I.U.)/ml mouse alpha + beta interferon, and subsequently transformed to the TK+ phenotype with recombinant plasmids containing the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) TK gene (pAGO and pMH110) and the marmoset herpesvirus (MarHV) TK gene (pMAR035). Mouse alpha + beta interferon inhibited transformation and the inhibition was interferon dose-dependent. Transformation was also inhibited when LM(TK-) cells were pretreated for 2-5 h with 40 I.U./ml interferon. Maximal inhibitions of TK+ colony formation were observed following a 9-20 h pretreatment period with interferon. In contrast, 40 I.U./ml interferon treatment for 20 h did not reduce the rate or extent of LM(TK-) cell growth. Experiments in which cultures were first treated with plasmid pAGO and only afterwards treated with interferon also showed that, as the interferon concentration used, interferon did not inhibit the outgrowth of transformated colonies. Enzyme assays showed that pretreatment with interferon inhibited the induction of TK activity in cells that had been transfected with pAGO DNA.

  12. Two Modes of the Axonal Interferon Response Limit Alphaherpesvirus Neuroinvasion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ren; Koyuncu, Orkide O.; Greco, Todd M.; Diner, Benjamin A.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection by alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus (PRV), typically begins at epithelial surfaces and continues into the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Inflammatory responses are induced at the infected peripheral site prior to invasion of the PNS. When the peripheral tissue is first infected, only the innervating axons are exposed to this inflammatory milieu, which includes the interferons (IFNs). The fundamental question is how do PNS cell bodies respond to these distant, potentially damaging events experienced by axons. Using compartmented cultures that physically separate neuron axons from cell bodies, we found that pretreating isolated axons with beta interferon (IFN-β) or gamma interferon (IFN-γ) significantly diminished the number of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and PRV particles moving in axons toward the cell bodies in a receptor-dependent manner. Exposing axons to IFN-β induced STAT1 phosphorylation (p-STAT1) only in axons, while exposure of axons to IFN-γ induced p-STAT1 accumulation in distant cell body nuclei. Blocking transcription in cell bodies eliminated antiviral effects induced by IFN-γ, but not those induced by IFN-β. Proteomic analysis of IFN-β- or IFN-γ-treated axons identified several differentially regulated proteins. Therefore, unlike treatment with IFN-γ, IFN-β induces a noncanonical, local antiviral response in axons. The activation of a local IFN response in axons represents a new paradigm for cytokine control of neuroinvasion. PMID:26838720

  13. Rhinovirus Load Is High despite Preserved InterferonResponse in Cystic Fibrosis Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cammisano, Maria; Chen, He; Singh, Sareen; Kooi, Cora; Leigh, Richard; Beaudoin, Trevor; Rousseau, Simon; Lands, Larry C.

    2015-01-01

    Lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) is often exacerbated following acute upper respiratory tract infections caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Pathophysiology of these exacerbations is presently unclear and may involve deficient innate antiviral or exaggerated inflammatory responses in CF airway epithelial cells. Furthermore, responses of CF cells to HRV may be adversely affected by pre-exposure to virulence factors of Pseudomonas (P.) aeruginosa, the microorganism that frequently colonizes CF airways. Here we examined production of antiviral cytokine interferon-β and inflammatory chemokine interleukin-8, expression of the interferon-responsive antiviral gene 2’-5’-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), and intracellular virus RNA load in primary CF (delF508 CFTR) and healthy airway epithelial cells following inoculation with HRV16. Parallel cells were exposed to virulence factors of P. aeruginosa prior to and during HRV16 inoculation. CF cells exhibited production of interferon-β and interleukin-8, and expression of OAS1 at levels comparable to those in healthy cells, yet significantly higher HRV16 RNA load during early hours post-inoculation with HRV16. In line with this, HRV16 RNA load was higher in the CFBE41o- dF cell line overexpessing delF508 CFTR, compared with the isogenic control CFBE41o- WT (wild-type CFTR). Pre-exposure to virulence factors of P. aeruginosa did not affect OAS1 expression or HRV16 RNA load, but potentiated interleukin-8 production. In conclusion, CF cells demonstrate elevated HRV RNA load despite preserved interferon-β and OAS1 responses. High HRV load in CF airway epithelial cells appears to be due to deficiencies manifesting early during HRV infection, and may not be related to interferon-β. PMID:26599098

  14. Interferon-stimulated gene 15 and the protein ISGylation system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongxian; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2011-01-01

    Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is one of the most upregulated genes upon Type I interferon treatment or pathogen infection. Its 17  kDa protein product, ISG15, was the first ubiquitin-like modifier identified, and is similar to a ubiquitin linear dimer. As ISG15 modifies proteins in a similar manner to ubiquitylation, protein conjugation by ISG15 is termed ISGylation. Some of the primary enzymes that promote ISGylation are also involved in ubiquitin conjugation. The process to remove ISG15 from its conjugated proteins, termed de-ISGylation, is performed by a cellular ISG15-specific protease, ubiquitin-specific proteases with molecular mass 43 kDa (UBP43)/ubiquitin-specific proteases 18. Relative to ubiquitin, the biological function of ISG15 is still poorly understood, but ISG15 appears to play important roles in various biological and cellular functions. Therefore, there is growing interest in ISG15, as the study of free ISG15 and functional consequences of ISGylation/de-ISGylation may identify useful therapeutic targets. This review highlights recent discoveries and remaining questions important to understanding the biological functions of ISG15.

  15. Improving Adaptive and Memory Immune Responses of an HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidate MVA-B by Deletion of Vaccinia Virus Genes (C6L and K7R) Blocking Interferon Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Arnáez, Pilar; Gómez, Carmen E.; Sorzano, Carlos Óscar S.; Esteban, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Poxvirus vector Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B (termed MVA-B) is a promising HIV/AIDS vaccine candidate, as confirmed from results obtained in a prophylactic phase I clinical trial in humans. To improve the immunogenicity elicited by MVA-B, we have generated and characterized the innate immune sensing and the in vivo immunogenicity profile of a vector with a double deletion in two vaccinia virus (VACV) genes (C6L and K7R) coding for inhibitors of interferon (IFN) signaling pathways. The innate immune signals elicited by MVA-B deletion mutants (MVA-B ΔC6L and MVA-B ΔC6L/K7R) in human macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) showed an up-regulation of the expression of IFN-β, IFN-α/β-inducible genes, TNF-α, and other cytokines and chemokines. A DNA prime/MVA boost immunization protocol in mice revealed that these MVA-B deletion mutants were able to improve the magnitude and quality of HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell adaptive and memory immune responses, which were mostly mediated by CD8+ T cells of an effector phenotype, with MVA-B ΔC6L/K7R being the most immunogenic virus recombinant. CD4+ T cell responses were mainly directed against Env, while GPN-specific CD8+ T cell responses were induced preferentially by the MVA-B deletion mutants. Furthermore, antibody levels to Env in the memory phase were slightly enhanced by the MVA-B deletion mutants compared to the parental MVA-B. These findings revealed that double deletion of VACV genes that act blocking intracellularly the IFN signaling pathway confers an immunological benefit, inducing innate immune responses and increases in the magnitude, quality and durability of the HIV-1-specific T cell immune responses. Our observations highlighted the immunomodulatory role of the VACV genes C6L and K7R, and that targeting common pathways, like IRF3/IFN-β signaling, could be a general strategy to improve the immunogenicity of poxvirus

  16. SARS coronavirus pathogenesis: host innate immune responses and viral antagonism of interferon.

    PubMed

    Totura, Allison L; Baric, Ralph S

    2012-06-01

    SARS-CoV is a pathogenic coronavirus that emerged from a zoonotic reservoir, leading to global dissemination of the virus. The association SARS-CoV with aberrant cytokine, chemokine, and Interferon Stimulated Gene (ISG) responses in patients provided evidence that SARS-CoV pathogenesis is at least partially controlled by innate immune signaling. Utilizing models for SARS-CoV infection, key components of innate immune signaling pathways have been identified as protective factors against SARS-CoV disease, including STAT1 and MyD88. Gene transcription signatures unique to SARS-CoV disease states have been identified, but host factors that regulate exacerbated disease phenotypes still remain largely undetermined. SARS-CoV encodes several proteins that modulate innate immune signaling through the antagonism of the induction of Interferon and by avoidance of ISG effector functions.

  17. Characterization and expression of gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) gene in amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri with implications for GILT in innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Naiguo; Zhang, Shicui; Liu, Zhenhui; Gaowa, Saren; Wang, Yongjun

    2007-04-01

    An amphioxus cDNA, AmphiGILT, encoding GILT protein was isolated from the gut cDNA library of Branchiostoma belcheri. It codes for a deduced protein of 254 amino acids, which has all the main features typical of GILT proteins including the signature sequence CQHGX(2)CX(2)NX(4)C, CXXC motif and 11 conserved cysteines. Phylogenetic analysis showed that AmphiGILT and sea urchin GILT clubbed together and positioned at the base of vertebrate GILT clade, suggesting that both AmphiGILT and sea urchin GILT might share some characteristics of the archetype of vertebrate GILT proteins. The genomic DNA sequence of B. floridae contains seven exons and six introns, which is similar to vertebrate GILT exon-intron organization. AmphiGILT was expressed in a tissue-specific manner with the most abundant mRNA in the digestive system including hepatic caecum and hind-gut. It was also found that mammalian IFN-gamma only exerted a slight effect on the expression of GILT gene in amphioxus, forming a contrast to the marked induction of human and mouse GILT expression by IFN-gamma. Taken the absence of the adaptive immune system including MHC class II molecules and lymphocytes into consideration, these results suggest that AmphiGILT is highly likely to play a role in the innate immune responses in amphioxus.

  18. Polymorphism of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 gene promoter region in chronic hepatitis C virus patients and their effect on pegylated interferon-α therapy response.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Gaurav; Chakravarti, Anita; Kar, Premashish; Chawla, Yogesh Kumar

    2011-10-01

    The development and resolution of an inflammatory process is regulated by a complex interplay among cytokines that have pro- and anti-inflammatory effects. Regulatory mechanisms that control the production of cytokines include genetic polymorphism in particular promoter/leader region. Polymorphisms may directly or indirectly affect the binding of transcriptional factors, consequently increasing or decreasing the production of mRNA, thus regulating cytokine production. A total of 70 hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-positive patients and 70 healthy control subjects were included in the present study, who were attending the medical outpatient department (OPD) and wards of a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi during 2006-2008. This study was designed to determine the polymorphism of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 genes in patients with chronic HCV infection patients and their effect on pegylated interferon-α therapy response. Polymorphism in the tumor necrosis factor-α G/G, G/A, and A/A genotype was significant between HCV patients and healthy controls. Interleukin-10 variants (G/G, G/A) were nonsignificant among HCV patients compared with healthy controls. As this is a preliminary study on small sample size, we believe that our findings may stimulate further studies on larger number of patients from this geographic region.

  19. Interferon gamma rapidly induces in human monocytes a DNA-binding factor that recognizes the gamma response region within the promoter of the gene for the high-affinity Fc gamma receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, K C; Finbloom, D S

    1992-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) transcriptionally activates several early-response genes in monocytes that are important for the ultimate phenotype of the activated macrophage. One of these genes is the high-affinity Fc receptor for IgG (Fc gamma RI). Recently, Pearse et al. [Pearse, R.N., Feinman, R. & Ravetch, J. V. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 11305-11309] defined within the promoter region of the Fc gamma RI gene an element, the gamma response region, which was necessary for IFN-gamma-induced enhancement of Fc gamma RI. In this report we describe the induction by IFN-gamma of a DNA-binding factor, FcRF gamma (Fc gamma RI DNA-binding factor, IFN-gamma induced), that specifically recognizes the gamma response region element. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated the presence of FcRF gamma in human monocytes within 1 min after exposure to IFN-gamma. On EMSA, FcRF gamma consisted of two complexes termed FcRF gamma 1 and FcRF gamma 2. The nuclear concentration of FcRF gamma rapidly increased, peaked at 15 min, and then fell after 1-2 hr. Dose-response studies revealed (i) as little as 0.05 ng of IFN-gamma per ml induced FcRF gamma, (ii) maximum activation occurred at 1 ng/ml, and (iii) steady-state levels of Fc gamma RI mRNA closely paralleled that of FcRF gamma. Since FcRF gamma was activated in cells normally not expressing Fc gamma RI RNA, other regulatory mechanisms must control Fc gamma RI-restricted tissue expression. Activation of FcRF gamma by IFN-gamma was inhibited by pretreatment with 500 nM staurosporin and 25 microM phenyl arsine oxide. These data suggest that a kinase and possibly a phosphatase activity are required for IFN-gamma-induced signaling of FcRF gamma in monocytes. Images PMID:1334553

  20. Interferon Response and Viral Evasion by Members of the Family Rhabdoviridae

    PubMed Central

    Faul, Elizabeth J.; Lyles, Douglas S.; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2009-01-01

    Like many animal viruses, those of the Rhabdoviridae family, are able to antagonize the type I interferon response and cause disease in mammalian hosts. Though these negative-stranded RNA viruses are very simple and code for as few as five proteins, they have been seen to completely abrogate the type I interferon response early in infection. In this review, we will discuss the viral organization and type I interferon evasion of rhabdoviruses, focusing on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and rabies virus (RABV). Despite their structural similarities, VSV and RABV have completely different mechanisms by which they avert the host immune response. VSV relies on the matrix protein to interfere with host gene transcription and nuclear export of anti-viral mRNAs. Alternatively, RABV uses its phosphoprotein to interfere with IRF-3 phosphorylation and STAT1 signaling. Understanding the virus-cell interactions and viral proteins necessary to evade the immune response is important in developing effective vaccines and therapeutics for this viral family. PMID:21994572

  1. Two distinct interferongenes in Tetraodon nigroviridis: Functional analysis during Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wan; Lu, Dan-Qi; Li, Gao-Fei; Zhang, Xu; Yao, Mi; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Hao-Ran

    2016-02-01

    Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is a Th1 cytokine that plays a very important role in almost all phases of immune and inflammatory responses. In this study, we explored the functions of IFNγ1 and IFNγ2 of Tetraodon nigroviridis. Treating T. nigroviridis spleen and head kidney cells in vitro with recombinant T. nigroviridis IFNγ1 protein (rTn IFNγ1) or recombinant T. nigroviridis IFNγ2 protein (rTn IFNγ2) enhanced their nitric oxide responses. Both rTn IFNγ1 and rTn IFNγ2 also induced the expression of interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), a common anti-viral gene, although the expression of the interferon-inducible Mx gene was markedly inhibited by rTn IFNγ1 and was induced by rTn IFNγ2. The in vivo effects of rTn IFNγ1 and rTn IFNγ2 on Vibrio parahaemolyticus (V. parahaemolyticus) infection were assessed by intraperitoneally injecting rTn IFNγ1 or rTn IFNγ2 (100 ng) and V. parahaemolyticus (8 × 10(10)CFU/mL) into T. nigroviridis. A comparison of the group treated only with V. parahaemolyticus and those also treated with rTn IFNγ1 or rTn IFNγ2 showed that neither of these IFNγs protected T. nigroviridis from V. parahaemolyticus infection. However, rTn IFNγ1 more rapidly and robustly promoted inflammatory responses compared with rTn IFNγ2, whereas rTn IFNγ2 was involved in inducing the host to develop a more effective response earlier during the later stage of a V. parahaemolyticus infection. Moreover, microRNA-29b (miR-29b) expression is inversely correlated with IFNγ2 expression in T. nigroviridis.

  2. Biological markers of interferon-beta therapy: comparison among interferon-stimulated genes MxA, TRAIL and XAF-1.

    PubMed

    Gilli, F; Marnetto, F; Caldano, M; Sala, A; Malucchi, S; Capobianco, M; Bertolotto, A

    2006-02-01

    Biological activity of interferon-beta (IFNbeta) can be assessed by measuring IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). Among them, myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA) appears to have the highest specificity, but it has no role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). To investigate the reliability of MxA as a biomarker, we compared its expression to that of two other ISGs: TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis factor-1 (XAF-1). Both were shown to be involved in immunoregulatory mechanisms and might play a role in MS. Quantitative-PCR measurements were performed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 73 MS patients after short-term and long-term treatment with IFNbeta. A time-dependent response for multiple ISGs was observed in all patients after short-term treatment. In contrast, long-term treatment induced concurrent inhibition of ISGs in 12.3% (9/73) of patients, in whom neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) were detectable. Besides, 22% (16/73) of chronically treated patients showed a non-NAbs-related abrogation of TRAIL expression. In summary, 1) MxA expression was significantly higher than both TRAIL and XAF-1, and 2) MxA was the most sensitive gene to detect decreased bioavailability due to NAbs. These findings identify MxA as an appropriate biomarker for IFNbeta, although there is no evidence for a functional role of it in MS.

  3. IRAV (FLJ11286), an Interferon-Stimulated Gene with Antiviral Activity against Dengue Virus, Interacts with MOV10

    PubMed Central

    Balinsky, Corey A.; Schmeisser, Hana; Wells, Alexandra I.; Ganesan, Sundar; Jin, Tengchuan; Singh, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the genus Flavivirus and can cause severe febrile illness. Here, we show that FLJ11286, which we refer to as IRAV, is induced by DENV in an interferon-dependent manner, displays antiviral activity against DENV, and localizes to the DENV replication complex. IRAV is an RNA binding protein and localizes to cytoplasmic processing bodies (P bodies) in uninfected cells, where it interacts with the MOV10 RISC complex RNA helicase, suggesting a role for IRAV in the processing of viral RNA. After DENV infection, IRAV, along with MOV10 and Xrn1, localizes to the DENV replication complex and associates with DENV proteins. Depletion of IRAV or MOV10 results in an increase in viral RNA. These data serve to characterize an interferon-stimulated gene with antiviral activity against DENV, as well as to propose a mechanism of activity involving the processing of viral RNA. IMPORTANCE Dengue virus, a member of the family Flaviviridae, can result in a life-threatening illness and has a significant impact on global health. Dengue virus has been shown to be particularly sensitive to the effects of type I interferon; however, little is known about the mechanisms by which interferon-stimulated genes function to inhibit viral replication. A better understanding of the interferon-mediated antiviral response to dengue virus may aid in the development of novel therapeutics. Here, we examine the influence of the interferon-stimulated gene IRAV (FLJ11286) on dengue virus replication. We show that IRAV associates with P bodies in uninfected cells and with the dengue virus replication complex after infection. IRAV also interacts with MOV10, depletion of which is associated with increased viral replication. Our results provide insight into a newly identified antiviral gene, as well as broadening our understanding of the innate immune response to dengue virus infection. PMID:27974568

  4. Induction of Interferon-Stimulated Genes by IRF3 Promotes Replication of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Tanmay; Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Ozhegov, Evgeny; Dhar, Jayeeta; Goswami, Ramansu; Sen, Ganes C.; Barik, Sailen

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity is the first line of defense against microbial insult. The transcription factor, IRF3, is needed by mammalian cells to mount innate immune responses against many microbes, especially viruses. IRF3 remains inactive in the cytoplasm of uninfected cells; upon virus infection, it gets phosphorylated and then translocates to the nucleus, where it binds to the promoters of antiviral genes and induces their expression. Such genes include type I interferons (IFNs) as well as Interferon Stimulated Genes (ISGs). IRF3-/- cells support enhanced replication of many viruses and therefore, the corresponding mice are highly susceptible to viral pathogenesis. Here, we provide evidence for an unexpected pro-microbial role of IRF3: the replication of the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, was significantly impaired in IRF3-/- cells. In exploring whether the transcriptional activity of IRF3 was important for its pro-parasitic function, we found that ISGs induced by parasite-activated IRF3 were indeed essential, whereas type I interferons were not important. To delineate the signaling pathway that activates IRF3 in response to parasite infection, we used genetically modified human and mouse cells. The pro-parasitic signaling pathway, which we termed PISA (Parasite-IRF3 Signaling Activation), activated IRF3 without any involvement of the Toll-like receptor or RIG-I-like receptor pathways, thereby ruling out a role of parasite-derived RNA species in activating PISA. Instead, PISA needed the presence of cGAS, STING, TBK1 and IRF3, indicating the necessity of DNA-triggered signaling. To evaluate the physiological significance of our in vitro findings, IRF3-/- mice were challenged with parasite infection and their morbidity and mortality were measured. Unlike WT mice, the IRF3-/- mice did not support replication of the parasite and were resistant to pathogenesis caused by it. Our results revealed a new paradigm in which the antiviral host factor, IRF3, plays a cell

  5. Induction of interferon-stimulated genes by IRF3 promotes replication of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Tanmay; Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Ozhegov, Evgeny; Dhar, Jayeeta; Goswami, Ramansu; Sen, Ganes C; Barik, Sailen

    2015-03-01

    Innate immunity is the first line of defense against microbial insult. The transcription factor, IRF3, is needed by mammalian cells to mount innate immune responses against many microbes, especially viruses. IRF3 remains inactive in the cytoplasm of uninfected cells; upon virus infection, it gets phosphorylated and then translocates to the nucleus, where it binds to the promoters of antiviral genes and induces their expression. Such genes include type I interferons (IFNs) as well as Interferon Stimulated Genes (ISGs). IRF3-/- cells support enhanced replication of many viruses and therefore, the corresponding mice are highly susceptible to viral pathogenesis. Here, we provide evidence for an unexpected pro-microbial role of IRF3: the replication of the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, was significantly impaired in IRF3-/- cells. In exploring whether the transcriptional activity of IRF3 was important for its pro-parasitic function, we found that ISGs induced by parasite-activated IRF3 were indeed essential, whereas type I interferons were not important. To delineate the signaling pathway that activates IRF3 in response to parasite infection, we used genetically modified human and mouse cells. The pro-parasitic signaling pathway, which we termed PISA (Parasite-IRF3 Signaling Activation), activated IRF3 without any involvement of the Toll-like receptor or RIG-I-like receptor pathways, thereby ruling out a role of parasite-derived RNA species in activating PISA. Instead, PISA needed the presence of cGAS, STING, TBK1 and IRF3, indicating the necessity of DNA-triggered signaling. To evaluate the physiological significance of our in vitro findings, IRF3-/- mice were challenged with parasite infection and their morbidity and mortality were measured. Unlike WT mice, the IRF3-/- mice did not support replication of the parasite and were resistant to pathogenesis caused by it. Our results revealed a new paradigm in which the antiviral host factor, IRF3, plays a cell

  6. Optineurin regulates the interferon response in a cell cycle-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Génin, Pierre; Cuvelier, Frédérique; Lambin, Sandrine; Côrte-Real Filipe, Josina; Autrusseau, Elodie; Laurent, Christine; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Weil, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Viral invasion into a host is initially recognized by the innate immune system, mainly through activation of the intracellular cytosolic signaling pathway and coordinated activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factors that promote type I interferon gene induction. The TANK-binding Kinase 1 (TBK1) phosphorylates and activates IRF3. Here, we show that Optineurin (Optn) dampens the antiviral innate immune response by targeting the deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD to TBK1 in order to inhibit its enzymatic activity. Importantly, we found that this regulatory mechanism is abolished at the G2/M phase as a consequence of the nuclear translocation of CYLD and Optn. As a result, we observed, at this cell division stage, an increased activity and phosphorylation of TBK1 that lead to its relocalization to mitochondria and to enhanced interferon production, suggesting that this process, which relies on Optn function, might be of major importance to mount a preventive antiviral response during mitosis.

  7. Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15 Conjugation Stimulates Hepatitis B Virus Production Independent of Type I Interferon Signaling Pathway In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanzhao; Jiao, Baihai; Ye, Haiyan; Yao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important account of infectious hepatitis and interferon (IFN) remains one of the best treatment options. Activation of type I IFN signaling pathway leads to expressions of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) which play important roles in antiviral and immunomodulatory responses to HBV or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Our previous studies indicated that ISG15 and its conjugation (ISGylation) were exploited by HCV to benefit its replication and persistent infection. This study was designed to assess the role of ISG15 and ISGylation in HBV infection in vitro. The levels of ISG15 and ISGylation were upregulated by ISG15 plasmid transfection into HepG2.2.15 cells. Decreased ISGylation was achieved by siRNA targeting UBE1L, the only E1 activating enzyme for ISGylation. Overexpression of ISG15 and subsequent ISGylation significantly increased the levels of HBV DNA in the culture supernatants although the intracellular viral replication remained unaffected. Silencing UBE1L, with decreased ISGylation achieved, abrogated this ISGylation-mediated promoting effect. Our data indicated that overexpression of ISG15 stimulated HBV production in an ISGylation-dependent manner. Identification of ISG15-conjugated proteins (either HBV viral or host proteins) may reveal promising candidates for further antiviral drug development. PMID:27867263

  8. Single Nucleotide rs760370 Polymorphism at the Main Ribavirin Transporter Gene Detection by PCR-RFLP Assay Compared with the TaqMan Assay and Its Relation to Sustained Virological Response in Chronic HCV Patients Treated with Pegylated Interferon-Ribavirin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Rabab; Zachariah, Khaled; Khairy, Marwa; Khorshied, Mervat; Ezzat, Wafaa; Sheta, Marwa M; Heiba, Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    Ribavirin clearly plays a role in chronic hepatitis C treatment response. The equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 codified by SLC29A1 gene has been associated with ribavirin uptake into hepatocytes and erythrocytes. rs760370A>G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the SLC29A1 gene may have a role in ribavirin-based regimen treatment response. Accuracy of the polymerase-chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay compared with the TaqMan assay for the detection of the SNP rs760370 at the main ribavirin transporter gene and its relation to sustained virological response in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients treated with pegylated interferon-ribavirin therapy. The study included 100 chronic HCV patients who were treated with pegylated interferon-ribavirin therapy. The patients were categorized according to the treatment response into responders (50 patients) and null responders (50 patients). rs760370 SNP was measured using TaqMan 5-nuclease assay and by the newly developed PCR-based RFLP assay. The overall accuracy of the newly developed PCR-RFLP assay compared with the TaqMan assay for rs760370 polymorphism detection was 100%. Allelic frequencies at rs760370 were as follows: A/A genotype (28%), A/G genotype (58%), and G/G genotype (14%). Treatment response was not significantly related with rs760370 polymorphism (P = 0.5). Ribavirin-induced anemia was good predictor of sustained virological response (P = 0.001), but was not related to rs760370 polymorphism (P = 0.92). PCR-RFLP assay is an accurate, cost-effective method in the detection of rs760370 compared with TaqMan assay. rs760370 SNP cannot serve as predictor of response in chronic HCV patients treated with interferon ribavirin therapy.

  9. Gene-Expression Profiling Suggests Impaired Signaling via the Interferon Pathway in Cstb-/- Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Körber, Inken; Katayama, Shintaro; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Krjutškov, Kaarel; Hakala, Paula; Kere, Juha; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Joensuu, Tarja

    2016-01-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsy of Unverricht-Lundborg type (EPM1, OMIM254800) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by stimulus-sensitive and action-activated myoclonus, tonic-clonic epileptic seizures, and ataxia. Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin B (CSTB) underlie EPM1. The deficiency of CSTB in mice (Cstb-/- mice) generates a phenotype resembling the symptoms of EPM1 patients and is accompanied by microglial activation at two weeks of age and an upregulation of immune system-associated genes in the cerebellum at one month of age. To shed light on molecular pathways and processes linked to CSTB deficiency in microglia we characterized the transcriptome of cultured Cstb-/- mouse microglia using microarray hybridization and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). The gene expression profiles obtained with these two techniques were in good accordance and not polarized to either pro- or anti-inflammatory status. In Cstb-/- microglia, altogether 184 genes were differentially expressed. Of these, 33 genes were identified by both methods. Several interferon-regulated genes were weaker expressed in Cstb-/- microglia compared to control. This was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR of the transcripts Irf7 and Stat1. Subsequently, we explored the biological context of CSTB deficiency in microglia more deeply by functional enrichment and canonical pathway analysis. This uncovered a potential role for CSTB in chemotaxis, antigen-presentation, and in immune- and defense response-associated processes by altering JAK-STAT pathway signaling. These data support and expand the previously suggested involvement of inflammatory processes to the disease pathogenesis of EPM1 and connect CSTB deficiency in microglia to altered expression of interferon-regulated genes. PMID:27355630

  10. Type I Interferon Response Is Delayed in Human Astrovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Guix, Susana; Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Miró, Lluïsa; Moretó, Miquel; Bosch, Albert; Pintó, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) activation and its subsequent effects are important in the response to viral infections. Here we show that human astroviruses (HAstVs), which are important agents of acute gastroenteritis in children, induce a mild and delayed IFN response upon infecting CaCo-2 cells. Although IFN-β mRNA is detected within infected cells and supernatant from infected cells show antiviral activity against the replication of other well-known IFN-sensitive viruses, these responses occur at late stages of infection once genome replication has taken place. On the other hand, HAstV replication can be partially reduced by the addition of exogenous IFN, and inhibition of IFN activation by BX795 enhances viral replication, indicating that HAstVs are IFN-sensitive viruses. Finally, different levels of IFN response were observed in cells infected with different HAstV mutants with changes in the hypervariable region of nsP1a/4, suggesting that nsP1a/4 genotype may potentially have clinical implications due to its correlation with the viral replication phenotype and the antiviral responses induced within infected cells. PMID:25837699

  11. Type I interferon response is delayed in human astrovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Guix, Susana; Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Miró, Lluïsa; Moretó, Miquel; Bosch, Albert; Pintó, Rosa M

    2015-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) activation and its subsequent effects are important in the response to viral infections. Here we show that human astroviruses (HAstVs), which are important agents of acute gastroenteritis in children, induce a mild and delayed IFN response upon infecting CaCo-2 cells. Although IFN-β mRNA is detected within infected cells and supernatant from infected cells show antiviral activity against the replication of other well-known IFN-sensitive viruses, these responses occur at late stages of infection once genome replication has taken place. On the other hand, HAstV replication can be partially reduced by the addition of exogenous IFN, and inhibition of IFN activation by BX795 enhances viral replication, indicating that HAstVs are IFN-sensitive viruses. Finally, different levels of IFN response were observed in cells infected with different HAstV mutants with changes in the hypervariable region of nsP1a/4, suggesting that nsP1a/4 genotype may potentially have clinical implications due to its correlation with the viral replication phenotype and the antiviral responses induced within infected cells.

  12. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R. . E-mail: nerurkar@pbrc.hawaii.edu

    2006-02-20

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML.

  13. Kinetic Differences in the Induction of Interferon Stimulated Genes by Interferon-α and IL28B are altered by Infection with Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Jilg, Nikolaus; Lin, Wenyu; Hong, Jian; Schaefer, Esperance A.; Wolski, David; Meixong, James; Goto, Kaku; Brisac, Cynthia; Chusri, Pattranuch; Fusco, Dahlene N.; Chevaliez, Stephane; Luther, Jay; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Urban, Thomas J.; Peng, Lee F.; Lauer, Georg M.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    Several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a genetic polymorphism associated with the gene locus for interleukin 28B (IL28B), a type III interferon (IFN), as a major predictor of clinical outcome in hepatitis C. Antiviral effects of the type III IFN family have previously been shown against several viruses, including hepatitis C virus (HCV), and resemble the function of type I IFN including utilization of the intracellular JAK-STAT pathway. Effects unique to IL28B that would distinguish it from IFN-α are not well defined. By analyzing the transcriptomes of primary human hepatocytes (PHH) treated with IFN-α or IL28B, we sought to identify functional differences between IFN-α and IL28B to better understand the roles of these cytokines in the innate immune response. Although our data did not reveal distinct gene signatures, we detected striking kinetic differences between IFN-α and IL28B stimulation for interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). While gene induction was rapid and peaked at 8 h of stimulation with IFN-α in PHH, IL28B produced a slower, but more sustained increase in gene expression. We confirmed these findings in the human hepatoma cell line Huh7.5.1. Interestingly, in HCV infected cells, the rapid response after stimulation with IFN-α was blunted, and the induction pattern resembled that caused by IL28B. In conclusion, we describe the kinetics of gene induction as being fundamentally different for stimulations with either IFN-α or IL28B in hepatocytes suggesting distinct roles of these cytokines within the immune response. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the observed differences are substantially altered by infection with the hepatitis C virus. PMID:23913866

  14. Interferon-Induced Genes of the Expanded IFIT Family Show Conserved Antiviral Activities in Non-Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    Pereiro, Patricia; Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Costa, Maria M.; Dios, Sonia; Romero, Alejandro; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) are involved in the protective response to viral infection, although the precise mechanism of IFITs for reducing viral proliferation is currently unknown. The interaction with the translation initiation factor eIF-3 or viral proteins and the sequestering of viral RNA have been proposed as potential antiviral functions for these proteins. In humans, four members of this family have been characterized. Nevertheless, information about these proteins in fish is almost non-existent. Exploiting the conservation of synteny between human and zebrafish genomes, we have identified ten members of the IFIT family located on four different chromosomes. The induction of these genes was examined both in vitro and in vivo after interferon (IFN) administration and rhabdovirus challenge. Whereas an induction of IFIT genes was observed after interferon treatments (IFNΦ1, IFNΦ2 and IFNΦ3), the viral infection did not affect these IFN-induced genes in vitro, and even reduced the IFN-induced expression of these genes. The response was largely different in vivo, with a broad up-regulation of IFIT genes after viral challenge. In addition, three selected IFITs were cloned in an expression vector and microinjected into zebrafish larvae to examine the protective effect of IFITs upon viral infection. Reduction in the mortality rate was observed confirming a conserved antiviral function in non-mammalian species. PMID:24950240

  15. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  16. Mutations of the human interferon alpha-2b (hIFN-α2b) gene in occupationally protracted low dose radiation exposed personnel.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Saman; Mahmood, Nasir; Chaudhry, Muhammad Nawaz; Sheikh, Shaharyar; Ahmad, Nauman

    2015-05-01

    Ionizing radiations impact human tissues by affecting the DNA bases which constitute genes. Human interferon alpha 2b gene synthesizes a protein which is an important anticancerous, immunomodulatory, anti-proliferative and antiviral protein. This study was aimed to identify interferon alpha-2b mutations as a consequence of the use of occupational chronic low dose radiation by hospital radiation exposed workers. A molecular analysis was done in which DNAs were extracted from blood samples from radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine workers. The gene was amplified through polymerase chain reaction and further genetic data from sequencing results analyzed by bioinformatics tools in order to determine as to how mutations in interferon alpha 2b sequences will lead to changes in human interferon alpha-2b protein. A total of 41% gene mutations was detected among all radiation exposed workers in which higher percentage (5.4%) of base insertion mutations and 14% frameshift mutations were found in radiology workers. The chronic use of low dose of radiations by occupational workers has a significant correlation with mutational effects on interferon alpha 2b gene, further evident by depressed interferon alpha levels in serum. This can lead to depressed immunity in radiation exposed workers. Hematological profiling of this group also showed hyperimmune response in the form of lymphocytosis.

  17. The Interferon-Stimulated Gene Ifitm3 Restricts West Nile Virus Infection and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Matthew J.; Poddar, Subhajit; Farzan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The interferon-induced transmembrane protein (IFITM) family of proteins inhibit infection of several different enveloped viruses in cell culture by virtue of their ability to restrict entry and fusion from late endosomes. As few studies have evaluated the importance of Ifitm3 in vivo in restricting viral pathogenesis, we investigated its significance as an antiviral gene against West Nile virus (WNV), an encephalitic flavivirus, in cells and mice. Ifitm3−/− mice were more vulnerable to lethal WNV infection, and this was associated with greater virus accumulation in peripheral organs and central nervous system tissues. As no difference in viral burden in the brain or spinal cord was observed after direct intracranial inoculation, Ifitm3 likely functions as an antiviral protein in nonneuronal cells. Consistent with this, Ifitm3−/− fibroblasts but not dendritic cells resulted in higher yields of WNV in multistep growth analyses. Moreover, transcomplementation experiments showed that Ifitm3 inhibited WNV infection independently of Ifitm1, Ifitm2, Ifitm5, and Ifitm6. Beyond a direct effect on viral infection in cells, analysis of the immune response in WNV-infected Ifitm3−/− mice showed decreases in the total number of B cells, CD4+ T cells, and antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Finally, bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that Ifitm3 functioned in both radioresistant and radiosensitive cells, as higher levels of WNV were observed in the brain only when Ifitm3 was absent from both compartments. Our analyses suggest that Ifitm3 restricts WNV pathogenesis likely through multiple mechanisms, including the direct control of infection in subsets of cells. IMPORTANCE As part of the mammalian host response to viral infections, hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) are induced. The inhibitory activity of individual ISGs varies depending on the specific cell type and viral pathogen. Among ISGs, the genes encoding interferon

  18. Evasion of the interferon-mediated antiviral response by filoviruses.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Washington B

    2010-01-01

    The members of the filoviruses are recognized as some of the most lethal viruses affecting human and non-human primates. The only two genera of the Filoviridae family, Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus (EBOV), comprise the main etiologic agents of severe hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in central Africa, with case fatality rates ranging from 25 to 90%. Fatal outcomes have been associated with a late and dysregulated immune response to infection, very likely due to the virus targeting key host immune cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) that are necessary to mediate effective innate and adaptive immune responses. Despite major progress in the development of vaccine candidates for filovirus infections, a licensed vaccine or therapy for human use is still not available. During the last ten years, important progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of filovirus pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence implicate the impairment of the host interferon (IFN) antiviral innate immune response by MARV or EBOV as an important determinant of virulence. In vitro and in vivo experimental infections with recombinant Zaire Ebola virus (ZEBOV), the best characterized filovirus, demonstrated that the viral protein VP35 plays a key role in inhibiting the production of IFN-α/β. Further, the action of VP35 is synergized by the inhibition of cellular responses to IFN-α/β by the minor matrix viral protein VP24. The dual action of these viral proteins may contribute to an efficient initial virus replication and dissemination in the host. Noticeably, the analogous function of these viral proteins in MARV has not been reported. Because the IFN response is a major component of the innate immune response to virus infection, this chapter reviews recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of IFN-mediated antiviral evasion by filovirus infection.

  19. Molecular Pathways: Targeting the Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING) in the Immunotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Corrales, Leticia; Gajewski, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Novel immunotherapy approaches are transforming the treatment of cancer, yet many patients remain refractory to these agents. One hypothesis is that immunotherapy fails because of a tumor microenvironment that fails to support recruitment of immune cells including CD8+ T cells. Therefore, new approaches designed to initiate a de novo anti-tumor immune response from within the tumor microenvironment are being pursued. Recent evidence has indicated that spontaneous activation of the Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING) pathway within tumor-resident dendritic cells leads to type I interferon (IFN) production and adaptive immune responses against tumors. This pathway is activated in the presence of cytosolic DNA, that is detected by the sensor cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), and generates cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP), which binds and activates STING. As a therapeutic approach, intratumoral injection of STING agonists has demonstrated profound therapeutic effects in multiple mouse tumor models, including melanoma, colon, breast, prostate, and fibrosarcoma. Better characterization of the STING pathway in human tumor recognition, and the development of new pharmacologic approaches to engage this pathway within the tumor microenvironment in patients, are important areas for clinical translation. PMID:26373573

  20. Priming of human monocytes for enhanced lipopolysaccharide responses: expression of alpha interferon, interferon regulatory factors, and tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, M P; Zoon, K C

    1993-01-01

    Culture of human monocytes with either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) results in a primed state, during which these cells express heightened responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The production of IFN-alpha in response to LPS by human monocytes has an absolute requirement for priming. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) expression is also greatly enhanced in primed monocytes after LPS stimulation, but unlike IFN-alpha, TNF is readily expressed in unprimed monocytes as well. In an effort to determine the molecular events associated with IFN-alpha induction in this system, freshly isolated human monocytes were primed by culture with either IFN-gamma or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with LPS; expression of IFN-alpha subtype 2 (IFN-alpha 2), IFN regulatory factors (IRFs), and TNF was assessed by Northern (RNA blot) analysis. IRF-1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in monocytes and is regulated by both LPS and priming cytokines, but its expression alone does not correlate with the induction of IFN-alpha 2 expression. IRF-2 mRNA is expressed in a more gradual manner following LPS stimulation, implying a possible feedback mechanism for inhibiting IFN-alpha expression. However, nuclear run-on analysis indicates that IFN-alpha 2 is not transcriptionally modulated in this system, in striking contrast to TNF, which is clearly regulated at the transcriptional level. In addition, IFN-alpha 2 mRNA accumulation is superinduced when primed monocytes are treated with LPS plus cycloheximide, while TNF mRNA is relatively unaffected. The results demonstrate that priming can affect subsequent LPS-induced gene expression at different levels in human monocytes. Images PMID:8335353

  1. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-10-07

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130-170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  2. shRNA-induced interferon-stimulated gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Morral, Núria; Witting, Scott R

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a cellular mechanism to inhibit the expression of gene products in a highly specific manner. In recent years, RNAi has become the cornerstone of gene function studies, shortening the otherwise long process of target identification and validation. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) and short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) therapies are being developed for the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Despite its huge potential for gene silencing, a hurdle to safe and effective RNAi is the activation of innate immune responses. Induction of innate immunity is dose- and sequence-dependent, and is also influenced by target tissue and delivery vehicle. Research on the molecular mechanisms mediating this response is helping to improve the design of the RNAi molecules. Nevertheless, appropriate testing for the presence of this undesired effect is needed prior to making conclusions on the outcome of the silencing treatment.

  3. Identification and isolation of stimulator of interferon genes (STING): an innate immune sensory and adaptor gene from camelids.

    PubMed

    Premraj, A; Aleyas, A G; Nautiyal, B; Rasool, T J

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism by which type I interferon-mediated antiviral response is mounted by hosts against invading pathogen is an intriguing one. Of late, an endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein encoded by a gene called stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is implicated in the innate signalling pathways and has been identified and cloned in few mammalian species including human, mouse and pig. In this article, we report the identification of STING from three different species of a highly conserved family of mammals - the camelids. cDNAs encoding the STING of Old World camels - dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) and bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) and a New World camel - llama (Llama glama) were amplified using conserved primers and RACE. The complete STING cDNA of dromedary camel is 2171 bp long with a 706-bp 5' untranslated regions (UTR), an 1137-bp open reading frame (ORF) and a 328-bp 3' UTR. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the ORF of STING from these three camelids indicate high level of similarity among camelids and conservation of critical amino acid residues across different species. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed high levels of STING mRNA expression in blood, spleen, lymph node and lung. The identification of camelid STING will help in better understanding of the role of this molecule in the innate immunity of the camelids and other mammals.

  4. Multiplex pcr assay for detection of human interferon alpha2b gene in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Gerasymenko, I M; Sakhno, L O; Mazur, M G; Sheludko, Y V

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade interferons are regarded as potent candidates for generation of plant-based edible vaccines because of broad spectrum of antiviral activities and adjuvant properties. Establishment and certification of numerous interferon producing plant systems requests development of fast and efficient multiplex PCR protocol for the transgene detection in GM plants. Here we represent a protocol for simultaneous amplification in one assay of fragments of hIFN alpha 2b gene and two control genes, namely virD1 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and conservative region of plant actin gene.

  5. Assessment of mTOR-Dependent Translational Regulation of Interferon Stimulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Mark; Sikström, Kristina; Robert, Philippe A.; Uzé, Gilles; Larsson, Ola; Pellegrini, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Type-I interferon (IFN)-induced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway has been implicated in translational control of mRNAs encoding interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). However, mTOR-sensitive translatomes commonly include mRNAs with a 5’ terminal oligopyrimidine tract (TOP), such as those encoding ribosomal proteins, but not ISGs. Because these translatomes were obtained under conditions when ISG expression is not induced, we examined the mTOR-sensitive translatome in human WISH cells stimulated with IFN β. The mTOR inhibitor Torin1 resulted in a repression of global protein synthesis, including that of ISG products, and translation of all but 3 ISG mRNAs (TLR3, NT5C3A, and RNF19B) was not selectively more sensitive to mTOR inhibition. Detailed studies of NT5C3A revealed an IFN-induced change in transcription start site resulting in a switch from a non-TOP to a TOP-like transcript variant and mTOR sensitive translation. Thus, we show that, in the cell model used, translation of the vast majority of ISG mRNAs is not selectively sensitive to mTOR activity and describe an uncharacterized mechanism wherein the 5’-UTR of an mRNA is altered in response to a cytokine, resulting in a shift from mTOR-insensitive to mTOR-sensitive translation. PMID:26207988

  6. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IF stimulated ...

  7. Cleavage of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 by Enterovirus 71 3C Suppresses Cellular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiaobo; Xiao, Xia; Xue, Qinghua; Jin, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a positive-stranded RNA virus which is capable of inhibiting innate immunity. Among virus-encoded proteins, the 3C protein compromises the type I interferon (IFN-I) response mediated by retinoid acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) or Toll-like receptor 3 that activates interferon regulatory 3 (IRF3) and IRF7. In the present study, we report that enterovirus 71 downregulates IRF7 through the 3C protein, which inhibits the function of IRF7. When expressed in mammalian cells, the 3C protein mediates cleavage of IRF7 rather than that of IRF3. This process is insensitive to inhibitors of caspase, proteasome, lysosome, and autophagy. H40D substitution in the 3C active site abolishes its activity, whereas R84Q or V154S substitution in the RNA binding motif has no effect. Furthermore, 3C-mediated cleavage occurs at the Q189-S190 junction within the constitutive activation domain of IRF7, resulting in two cleaved IRF7 fragments that are incapable of activating IFN expression. Ectopic expression of wild-type IRF7 limits EV71 replication. On the other hand, expression of the amino-terminal domain of IRF7 enhances EV71 infection, which correlates with its ability to interact with and inhibit IRF3. These results suggest that control of IRF7 by the 3C protein may represent a viral mechanism to escape cellular responses. PMID:23175366

  8. Dietary Selenium Levels Affect Selenoprotein Expression and Support the Interferon-γ and IL-6 Immune Response Pathways in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Petra A.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Anderson, Christine B.; Seifried, Harold E.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Howard, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium is an essential element that is required to support a number of cellular functions and biochemical pathways. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of reduced dietary selenium levels on gene expression to assess changes in expression of non-selenoprotein genes that may contribute to the physiological consequences of selenium deficiency. Mice were fed diets that were either deficient in selenium or supplemented with selenium in the form of sodium selenite for six weeks. Differences in liver mRNA expression and translation were measured using a combination of ribosome profiling, RNA-Seq, microarrays, and qPCR. Expression levels and translation of mRNAs encoding stress-related selenoproteins were shown to be up-regulated by increased selenium status, as were genes involved in inflammation and response to interferon-γ. Changes in serum cytokine levels were measured which confirmed that interferon-γ, as well as IL-6, were increased in selenium adequate mice. Finally, microarray and qPCR analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that the selenium effects on immune function are not limited to liver. These data are consistent with previous reports indicating that adequate selenium levels can support beneficial immune responses, and further identify the IL-6 and interferon-γ pathways as being responsive to dietary selenium intake. PMID:26258789

  9. Dietary Selenium Levels Affect Selenoprotein Expression and Support the Interferon-γ and IL-6 Immune Response Pathways in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Petra A; Carlson, Bradley A; Anderson, Christine B; Seifried, Harold E; Hatfield, Dolph L; Howard, Michael T

    2015-08-06

    Selenium is an essential element that is required to support a number of cellular functions and biochemical pathways. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of reduced dietary selenium levels on gene expression to assess changes in expression of non-selenoprotein genes that may contribute to the physiological consequences of selenium deficiency. Mice were fed diets that were either deficient in selenium or supplemented with selenium in the form of sodium selenite for six weeks. Differences in liver mRNA expression and translation were measured using a combination of ribosome profiling, RNA-Seq, microarrays, and qPCR. Expression levels and translation of mRNAs encoding stress-related selenoproteins were shown to be up-regulated by increased selenium status, as were genes involved in inflammation and response to interferon-γ. Changes in serum cytokine levels were measured which confirmed that interferon-γ, as well as IL-6, were increased in selenium adequate mice. Finally, microarray and qPCR analysis of lung tissue demonstrated that the selenium effects on immune function are not limited to liver. These data are consistent with previous reports indicating that adequate selenium levels can support beneficial immune responses, and further identify the IL-6 and interferon-γ pathways as being responsive to dietary selenium intake.

  10. Aging. Aging-induced type I interferon response at the choroid plexus negatively affects brain function.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; David, Eyal; Castellano, Joseph M; Miller, Omer; Kertser, Alexander; Berkutzki, Tamara; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Bezalel, Dana; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Amit, Ido; Schwartz, Michal

    2014-10-03

    Aging-associated cognitive decline is affected by factors produced inside and outside the brain. By using multiorgan genome-wide analysis of aged mice, we found that the choroid plexus, an interface between the brain and the circulation, shows a type I interferon (IFN-I)-dependent gene expression profile that was also found in aged human brains. In aged mice, this response was induced by brain-derived signals, present in the cerebrospinal fluid. Blocking IFN-I signaling within the aged brain partially restored cognitive function and hippocampal neurogenesis and reestablished IFN-II-dependent choroid plexus activity, which is lost in aging. Our data identify a chronic aging-induced IFN-I signature, often associated with antiviral response, at the brain's choroid plexus and demonstrate its negative influence on brain function, thereby suggesting a target for ameliorating cognitive decline in aging.

  11. KAP1 regulates type I interferon/STAT1-mediated IRF-1 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kamitani, Shinya; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Togi, Sumihito; Muromoto, Ryuta; Sekine, Yuichi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Ishiyama, Hironobu; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2008-05-30

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) mediate cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival in immune responses, hematopoiesis, neurogenesis, and other biological processes. Recently, we showed that KAP1 is a novel STAT-binding partner that regulates STAT3-mediated transactivation. KAP1 is a universal co-repressor protein for the KRAB zinc finger protein superfamily of transcriptional repressors. In this study, we found KAP1-dependent repression of interferon (IFN)/STAT1-mediated signaling. We also demonstrated that endogenous KAP1 associates with endogenous STAT1 in vivo. Importantly, a small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction in KAP1 expression enhanced IFN-induced STAT1-dependent IRF-1 gene expression. These results indicate that KAP1 may act as an endogenous regulator of the IFN/STAT1 signaling pathway.

  12. Inhibitors of the Interferon Response Enhance Virus Replication In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Claire E.; Randall, Richard E.; Adamson, Catherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Virus replication efficiency is influenced by two conflicting factors, kinetics of the cellular interferon (IFN) response and induction of an antiviral state versus speed of virus replication and virus-induced inhibition of the IFN response. Disablement of a virus's capacity to circumvent the IFN response enables both basic research and various practical applications. However, such IFN-sensitive viruses can be difficult to grow to high-titer in cells that produce and respond to IFN. The current default option for growing IFN-sensitive viruses is restricted to a limited selection of cell-lines (e.g. Vero cells) that have lost their ability to produce IFN. This study demonstrates that supplementing tissue-culture medium with an IFN inhibitor provides a simple, effective and flexible approach to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice. We report that IFN inhibitors targeting components of the IFN response (TBK1, IKK2, JAK1) significantly increased virus replication. More specifically, the JAK1/2 inhibitor Ruxolitinib enhances the growth of viruses that are sensitive to IFN due to (i) loss of function of the viral IFN antagonist (due to mutation or species-specific constraints) or (ii) mutations/host cell constraints that slow virus spread such that it can be controlled by the IFN response. This was demonstrated for a variety of viruses, including, viruses with disabled IFN antagonists that represent live-attenuated vaccine candidates (Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), Influenza Virus), traditionally attenuated vaccine strains (Measles, Mumps) and a slow-growing wild-type virus (RSV). In conclusion, supplementing tissue culture-medium with an IFN inhibitor to increase the growth of IFN-sensitive viruses in a cell-line of choice represents an approach, which is broadly applicable to research investigating the importance of the IFN response in controlling virus infections and has utility in a number of practical applications including

  13. Induction of interferon-stimulated genes by Simian virus 40 T antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Rathi, Abhilasha V.; Cantalupo, Paul G.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.; Pipas, James M.

    2010-10-25

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (TAg) is a multifunctional oncoprotein essential for productive viral infection and for cellular transformation. We have used microarray analysis to examine the global changes in cellular gene expression induced by wild-type T antigen (TAg{sup wt}) and TAg-mutants in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). The expression profile of approximately 800 cellular genes was altered by TAg{sup wt} and a truncated TAg (TAg{sup N136}), including many genes that influence cell cycle, DNA-replication, transcription, chromatin structure and DNA repair. Unexpectedly, we found a significant number of immune response genes upregulated by TAg{sup wt} including many interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) such as ISG56, OAS, Rsad2, Ifi27 and Mx1. Additionally, we also observed activation of STAT1 by TAg{sup wt}. Our genetic studies using several TAg-mutants reveal an unexplored function of TAg and indicate that the LXCXE motif and p53 binding are required for the upregulation of ISGs.

  14. The impact of interferon-alpha2 on HLA genes in patients with polycythemia vera and related neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Skov, Vibe; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Thomassen, Mads; Kjær, Lasse; Stauffer Larsen, Thomas; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Kruse, Torben A; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl

    2017-08-01

    Gene expression profiling in Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) have unraveled significant deregulation of several immune and inflammation genes of potential importance for clonal evolution. Other mechanisms might be downregulation of major histocompatibility class I and II genes used by tumor cells to escape antitumor T-cell-mediated immune responses. Several genes encoding human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules have been shown to be significantly downregulated. Upregulation of HLA genes is considered one of the mechanisms of action of interferon (IFN)-alpha2, but regulation of these genes during IFN-alpha2 treatment in MPNs has never been studied. Our findings show a significant upregulation of several HLA genes of importance for tumor immune surveillance by IFN-alpha2 treatment in MPNs. This mechanism might enhance the cytotoxic potential of immune cells against MPNs and explain the induction of minimal residual disease by IFN-alpha2 treatment in these patients.

  15. Neurotropic arboviruses induce interferon regulatory factor 3-mediated neuronal responses that are cytoprotective, interferon independent, and inhibited by Western equine encephalitis virus capsid.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Daniel C; Lazear, Helen M; Farmer, Jocelyn R; Diamond, Michael S; Miller, David J

    2013-02-01

    Cell-intrinsic innate immune responses mediated by the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) are often vital for early pathogen control, and effective responses in neurons may be crucial to prevent the irreversible loss of these critical central nervous system cells after infection with neurotropic pathogens. To investigate this hypothesis, we used targeted molecular and genetic approaches with cultured neurons to study cell-intrinsic host defense pathways primarily using the neurotropic alphavirus western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV). We found that WEEV activated IRF-3-mediated neuronal innate immune pathways in a replication-dependent manner, and abrogation of IRF-3 function enhanced virus-mediated injury by WEEV and the unrelated flavivirus St. Louis encephalitis virus. Furthermore, IRF-3-dependent neuronal protection from virus-mediated cytopathology occurred independently of autocrine or paracrine type I interferon activity. Despite being partially controlled by IRF-3-dependent signals, WEEV also disrupted antiviral responses by inhibiting pattern recognition receptor pathways. This antagonist activity was mapped to the WEEV capsid gene, which disrupted signal transduction downstream of IRF-3 activation and was independent of capsid-mediated inhibition of host macromolecular synthesis. Overall, these results indicate that innate immune pathways have important cytoprotective activity in neurons and contribute to limiting injury associated with infection by neurotropic arboviruses.

  16. Type-I Interferon Responses: From Friend to Foe in the Battle against Chronic Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Murira, Armstrong; Lamarre, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-I) have long been heralded as key contributors to effective antiviral responses. More widely understood in the context of acute viral infection, the role of this pleiotropic cytokine has been characterized as triggering antiviral states in cells and potentiating adaptive immune responses. Upon induction in the innate immune response, IFN-I triggers the expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), which upregulate the effector function of immune cells (e.g., dendritic cells, B cells, and T cells) toward successful resolution of infections. However, emerging lines of evidence reveal that viral persistence in the course of chronic infections could be driven by deleterious immunomodulatory effects upon sustained IFN-I expression. In this setting, elevation of IFN-I and ISGs is directly correlated to viral persistence and elevated viral loads. It is important to note that the correlation among IFN-I expression, ISGs, and viral persistence may be a cause or effect of chronic infection and this is an important distinction to make toward establishing the dichotomous nature of IFN-I responses. The aim of this mini review is to (i) summarize the interaction between IFN-I and downstream effector responses and therefore (ii) delineate the function of this cytokine on positive and negative immunoregulation in chronic infection. This is a significant consideration given the current therapeutic administration of IFN-I in chronic viral infections whose therapeutic significance is projected to continue despite emergence of increasingly efficacious antiviral regimens. Furthermore, elucidation of the interplay between virus and the antiviral response in the context of IFN-I will elucidate avenues toward more effective therapeutic and prophylactic measures against chronic viral infections. PMID:28066419

  17. Clonal variation in interferon response determines the outcome of oncolytic virotherapy in mouse CT26 colon carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, J J; Kaikkonen, M U; Niittykoski, M; Martikainen, M W; Lemay, C G; Cox, J; De Silva, N S; Kus, A; Falls, T J; Diallo, J-S; Le Boeuf, F; Bell, J C; Ylä-Herttuala, S; Hinkkanen, A E; Vähä-Koskela, M J

    2015-01-01

    In our earlier studies, Semliki Forest virus vector VA7 completely eliminated type I interferon (IFN-I)-unresponsive human U87-luc glioma xenografts, whereas interferon-responsive mouse gliomas proved refractory. Here, we describe in two clones of CT26 murine colon carcinoma, opposed patterns of IFN-I responsiveness and sensitivity to VA7. Both CT26WT and CT26LacZ clones secreted biologically active interferon in vitro upon virus infection but only CT26WT cells were protected. Focal infection of CT26WT cultures was self-limiting but could be rescued using IFN-I pathway inhibitor Ruxolitinib or antibody against IFNβ. Whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) and protein expression analysis revealed that CT26WT cells constitutively expressed 56 different genes associated with pattern recognition and IFN-I signaling pathways, spanning two reported anti-RNA virus gene signatures and 22 genes with reported anti-alphaviral activity. Whereas CT26WT tumors were strictly virus-resistant in vivo, infection of CT26LacZ tumors resulted in complete tumor eradication in both immunocompetent and severe combined immune deficient mice. In double-flank transplantation experiments, CT26WT tumors grew despite successful eradication of CT26LacZ tumors from the contralateral flank. Tumor growth progressed uninhibited also when CT26LacZ inoculums contained only a small fraction of CT26WT cells, demonstrating dominance of IFN responsiveness when heterogeneous tumors are targeted with interferon-sensitive oncolytic viruses.

  18. Interferon γ (IFNγ) Signaling via Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 (mTORC2) and Regulatory Effects in the Generation of Type II Interferon Biological Responses*

    PubMed Central

    Kroczynska, Barbara; Rafidi, Robert L.; Majchrzak-Kita, Beata; Kosciuczuk, Ewa M.; Blyth, Gavin T.; Jemielity, Jacek; Warminska, Zofia; Saleiro, Diana; Mehrotra, Swarna; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Fish, Eleanor N.; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2016-01-01

    We provide evidence for a unique pathway engaged by the type II IFN receptor, involving mTORC2/AKT-mediated downstream regulation of mTORC1 and effectors. These events are required for formation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F complex (eIF4F) and initiation of mRNA translation of type II interferon-stimulated genes. Our studies establish that Rictor is essential for the generation of type II IFN-dependent antiviral and antiproliferative responses and that it controls the generation of type II IFN-suppressive effects on normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Together, our findings establish a central role for mTORC2 in IFNγ signaling and type II IFN responses. PMID:26645692

  19. Interferon γ (IFNγ) Signaling via Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 (mTORC2) and Regulatory Effects in the Generation of Type II Interferon Biological Responses.

    PubMed

    Kroczynska, Barbara; Rafidi, Robert L; Majchrzak-Kita, Beata; Kosciuczuk, Ewa M; Blyth, Gavin T; Jemielity, Jacek; Warminska, Zofia; Saleiro, Diana; Mehrotra, Swarna; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Fish, Eleanor N; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2016-01-29

    We provide evidence for a unique pathway engaged by the type II IFN receptor, involving mTORC2/AKT-mediated downstream regulation of mTORC1 and effectors. These events are required for formation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F complex (eIF4F) and initiation of mRNA translation of type II interferon-stimulated genes. Our studies establish that Rictor is essential for the generation of type II IFN-dependent antiviral and antiproliferative responses and that it controls the generation of type II IFN-suppressive effects on normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Together, our findings establish a central role for mTORC2 in IFNγ signaling and type II IFN responses.

  20. Synergistic Induction of Interferon α through TLR-3 and TLR-9 Agonists Identifies CD21 as Interferon α Receptor for the B Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dhohyung; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Maternal antibodies inhibit seroconversion and the generation of measles virus (MeV)-specific antibodies (both neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies) after vaccination whereas T cell responses are usually unaffected. The lack of seroconversion leaves individuals susceptible to vaccine-preventable infections. Inhibition of antibody secretion is due to the inhibition of B cells through a cross-link of the B cell receptor with the inhibitory FcγIIB receptor (CD32) by maternal antibody/vaccine complexes. Here, we demonstrate that a combination of TLR-3 and TLR-9 agonists induces synergistically higher levels of type I interferon in vitro and in vivo than either agonist alone. The synergistic action of TLR-3 and TLR-9 agonists is based on a feedback loop through the interferon receptor. Finally, we have identified CD21 as a potential receptor for interferon α on B cells which contributes to interferon α-mediated activation of B cells in the presence of maternal antibodies. The combination leads to complete restoration of B cell and antibody responses after immunization in the presence of inhibitory MeV-specific IgG. The strong stimulatory action of type I interferon is due to the fact that type I interferon uses not only the interferon receptor but also CD21 as a functional receptor for B cell activation. PMID:23516365

  1. Macrophage nitric oxide synthase gene: two upstream regions mediate induction by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, C J; Alley, E W; Raval, P; Snowman, A M; Snyder, S H; Russell, S W; Murphy, W J

    1993-10-15

    The promoter region of the mouse gene for macrophage-inducible nitric oxide synthase (mac-NOS; EC 1.14.13.39) has been characterized. A putative TATA box is 30 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Computer analysis reveals numerous potential binding sites for transcription factors, many of them associated with stimuli that induce mac-NOS expression. To localize functionally important portions of the regulatory region, we constructed deletion mutants of the mac-NOS 5' flanking region and placed them upstream of a luciferase reporter gene. The macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, when transfected with a minimal promoter construct, expresses little luciferase activity when stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), or both. Maximal expression depends on two discrete regulatory regions upstream of the putative TATA box. Region I (position -48 to -209) increases luciferase activity approximately 75-fold over the minimal promoter construct. Region I contains LPS-related responsive elements, including a binding site for nuclear factor interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) and the kappa B binding site for NF-kappa B, suggesting that this region regulates LPS-induced expression of the mac-NOS gene. Region II (position -913 to -1029) alone does not increase luciferase expression, but together with region I it causes an additional 10-fold increase in expression. Together the two regions increase expression 750-fold over activity obtained from a minimal promoter construct. Region II contains motifs for binding IFN-related transcription factors and thus probably is responsible for IFN-mediated regulation of LPS-induced mac-NOS. Delineation of these two cooperative regions explains at the level of transcription how IFN-gamma and LPS act in concert to induce maximally the mac-NOS gene and, furthermore, how IFN-gamma augments the inflammatory response to LPS.

  2. Association study of polymorphisms in interferon-γ receptor genes with the risk of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joong-Gon; Park, Byung Lae; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Namgoong, Suhg; Kim, Ji On; Chang, Hun Soo; Park, Jong Sook; Jang, An Soo; Park, Sung Woo; Kim, Do Jin; Kim, Ki Up; Kim, Yang Gee; Uh, Soo-Taek; Seo, Ki Hyun; Kim, Young Hoon; Koh, Insong; Park, Choon Sik; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by mycobacterium, which most commonly affects the lungs. The adaptive immune response in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is predominantly mediated by the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) signaling pathway, which is regulated by IFN-γ receptors (IFNGR). IFN-γ activates the transcription of a number of genes that are important in immune responses, thus the appropriate function of IFNGR appears to be important in host defense against mycobacteria. In the present study, 22 genetic variants in IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were genotyped in 673 patients and 592 normal controls to investigate the association between IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 polymorphisms and the risk of TB. Statistical analyses revealed that four genetic variants in IFNGR1, rs9376269, rs9376268, rs9376267 and rs56251346 were marginally associated with the risk of TB (P = 0.02-0.04), while other single nucleotide polymorphisms in IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 did not exhibit any associations. However, the significance of the four genetic variants rs9376269, rs9376268, rs9376267 and rs56251346 was eliminated following a multiple testing correction of the data (P>0.05). The present results revealed that certain genetic variants in IFNGR genes may be associated with TB development, which may be useful preliminary data for future investigation.

  3. Modulation of the host interferon response and ISGylation pathway by B. pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Christine; Relman, David A

    2011-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) is a surface-associated and secreted protein that serves as a crucial adherence factor, and displays immunomodulatory activity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In order to appreciate more fully the role of secreted FHA in pathogenesis, we analyzed FHA-induced changes in genome-wide transcript abundance in human PBMCs. Among the 683 known unique genes with greater than 3-fold change in transcript abundance following FHA treatment, 125 (18.3%) were identified as interferon (IFN)-regulated. Among the latter group were genes encoding several members of the IFN type I response, as well as 3 key components of the ISGylation pathway. Using real-time RT-PCR, we confirmed FHA-associated increases in transcript abundance for the genes encoding ubiquitin-like protein, ISG15, and its specific protease USP18. Western-blot analysis demonstrated the presence of both, free ISG15 and several ISGylated conjugates in FHA-stimulated PBMC lysates, but not in unstimulated cells. Intracellular FACS analysis provided evidence that monocytes and a natural killer-enriched cell population were the primary producers of ISG15 in PBMCs after FHA stimulation. Our data reveal previously-unrecognized effects of B. pertussis FHA on host IFN and ISGylation responses, and suggest previously-unsuspected mechanisms by which FHA may alter the outcome of the host-pathogen interaction.

  4. Baseline Gene Expression Signatures in Monocytes from Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated with Interferon-beta

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Marta F.; Nurtdinov, Ramil N.; Río, Jordi; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background A relatively large proportion of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients do not respond to interferon-beta (IFNb) treatment. In previous studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we identified a subgroup of IFNb non-responders that was characterized by a baseline over-expression of type I IFN inducible genes. Additional mechanistic experiments carried out in IFNb non-responders suggested a selective alteration of the type I IFN signaling pathway in the population of blood monocytes. Here, we aimed (i) to investigate whether the type I IFN signaling pathway is up-regulated in isolated monocytes from IFNb non-responders at baseline; and (ii) to search for additional biological pathways in this cell population that may be implicated in the response to IFNb treatment. Methods Twenty RRMS patients classified according to their clinical response to IFNb treatment and 10 healthy controls were included in the study. Monocytes were purified from PBMC obtained before treatment by cell sorting and the gene expression profiling was determined with oligonucleotide microarrays. Results and discussion Purified monocytes from IFNb non-responders were characterized by an over-expression of type I IFN responsive genes, which confirms the type I IFN signature in monocytes suggested from previous studies. Other relevant signaling pathways that were up-regulated in IFNb non-responders were related with the mitochondrial function and processes such as protein synthesis and antigen presentation, and together with the type I IFN signaling pathway, may also be playing roles in the response to IFNb. PMID:23637780

  5. Cross-Species Antiviral Activity of Goose Interferons against Duck Plague Virus Is Related to Its Positive Self-Feedback Regulation and Subsequent Interferon Stimulated Genes Induction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Zhou, Qin; Wei, Yunan; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Interferons are a group of antiviral cytokines acting as the first line of defense in the antiviral immunity. Here, we describe the antiviral activity of goose type I interferon (IFNα) and type II interferon (IFNγ) against duck plague virus (DPV). Recombinant goose IFNα and IFNγ proteins of approximately 20 kDa and 18 kDa, respectively, were expressed. Following DPV-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) infection of duck embryo fibroblast cells (DEFs) with IFNα and IFNγ pre-treatment, the number of viral gene copies decreased more than 100-fold, with viral titers dropping approximately 100-fold. Compared to the control, DPV-EGFP cell positivity was decreased by goose IFNα and IFNγ at 36 hpi (3.89%; 0.79%) and 48 hpi (17.05%; 5.58%). In accordance with interferon-stimulated genes being the “workhorse” of IFN activity, the expression of duck myxovirus resistance (Mx) and oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) was significantly upregulated (p < 0.001) by IFN treatment for 24 h. Interestingly, duck cells and goose cells showed a similar trend of increased ISG expression after goose IFNα and IFNγ pretreatment. Another interesting observation is that the positive feedback regulation of type I IFN and type II IFN by goose IFNα and IFNγ was confirmed in waterfowl for the first time. These results suggest that the antiviral activities of goose IFNα and IFNγ can likely be attributed to the potency with which downstream genes are induced by interferon. These findings will contribute to our understanding of the functional significance of the interferon antiviral system in aquatic birds and to the development of interferon-based prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against viral disease. PMID:27438848

  6. Role of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 in Type I Interferon Responses in Rotavirus-Infected Dendritic Cells and Fibroblasts▿

    PubMed Central

    Douagi, Iyadh; McInerney, Gerald M.; Hidmark, Åsa S.; Miriallis, Vassoula; Johansen, Kari; Svensson, Lennart; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2007-01-01

    The main pathway for the induction of type I interferons (IFN) by viruses is through the recognition of viral RNA by cytosolic receptors and the subsequent activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), which drives IFN-α/β transcription. In addition to their role in inducing an antiviral state, type I IFN also play a role in modulating adaptive immune responses, in part via their effects on dendritic cells (DCs). Many viruses have evolved mechanisms to interfere with type I IFN induction, and one recently reported strategy for achieving this is by targeting IRF-3 for degradation, as shown for rotavirus nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1). It was therefore of interest to investigate whether rotavirus-exposed DCs would produce type I IFN and/or mature in response to the virus. Our results demonstrate that IRF-3 was rapidly degraded in rotavirus-infected mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and type I IFN was not detected in these cultures. In contrast, rotavirus induced type I IFN production in myeloid DCs (mDCs), resulting in their activation. Type I IFN induction in response to rotavirus was reduced in mDCs from IRF-3−/− mice, indicating that IRF-3 was important for mediating the response. Exposure of mDCs to UV-treated rotavirus induced significantly higher type I IFN levels, suggesting that rotavirus-encoded functions also antagonized the response in DCs. However, in contrast to MEFs, this action was not sufficient to completely abrogate type I IFN induction, consistent with a role for DCs as sentinels for virus infection. PMID:17215281

  7. Enterovirus 71 Protease 2Apro Targets MAVS to Inhibit Anti-Viral Type I Interferon Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei; Xi, Xueyan; Lei, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Cui, Sheng; Wang, Jianwei; Jin, Qi; Zhao, Zhendong

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the major causative pathogen of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Its pathogenicity is not fully understood, but innate immune evasion is likely a key factor. Strategies to circumvent the initiation and effector phases of anti-viral innate immunity are well known; less well known is whether EV71 evades the signal transduction phase regulated by a sophisticated interplay of cellular and viral proteins. Here, we show that EV71 inhibits anti-viral type I interferon (IFN) responses by targeting the mitochondrial anti-viral signaling (MAVS) protein—a unique adaptor molecule activated upon retinoic acid induced gene-I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation associated gene (MDA-5) viral recognition receptor signaling—upstream of type I interferon production. MAVS was cleaved and released from mitochondria during EV71 infection. An in vitro cleavage assay demonstrated that the viral 2A protease (2Apro), but not the mutant 2Apro (2Apro-110) containing an inactivated catalytic site, cleaved MAVS. The Protease-Glo assay revealed that MAVS was cleaved at 3 residues between the proline-rich and transmembrane domains, and the resulting fragmentation effectively inactivated downstream signaling. In addition to MAVS cleavage, we found that EV71 infection also induced morphologic and functional changes to the mitochondria. The EV71 structural protein VP1 was detected on purified mitochondria, suggesting not only a novel role for mitochondria in the EV71 replication cycle but also an explanation of how EV71-derived 2Apro could approach MAVS. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel strategy employed by EV71 to escape host anti-viral innate immunity that complements the known EV71-mediated immune-evasion mechanisms. PMID:23555247

  8. In Vivo-Simulated Sonotransfection and the Effect of Gamma Interferon Gene on Neurofibroma Proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Feril, Loreto B.; Yoshida, Yuichi; Nakayama, Juichiro; Tachibana, Katsuro

    2007-05-01

    We have previously shown that ultrasound-mediated gene transfection (or sonotransfection) can be optimized on the basis of concepts drawn from previous in vitro experiments demonstrating ultrasound-induced apoptosis. At optimized conditions, we have shown using five cancer cell lines (HeLa, U937, Meth A, T24 and PC3) that sonotransfection is superior to other conventional non-viral methods such as electroporation and liposome-mediated transfection. In the present study, we further investigate the gene transfection of pEGFP-N1 into neurofibroma cell line isolated from human dermal neurofibroma, using an improved experimental set up that simulates in vivo conditions. The ultrasound device used was SonoPore KTAC-4000, which is capable of various settings. Using transducers of centre frequency 1.011 MHz, the optimal conditions include ISATA of 0.15, 0.44 and 0.64 W/cm2, burst frequency of 0.5 Hz, 25% duty factor, and 10-40 sec exposure duration. Cells were assayed at 24, 48 and 72 hr after the sonication. The transfection efficiency was found to be around 10%. Then we further investigated whether sonotransfection of gamma interferon on neurofibroma cell lines in vivo can suppress cell proliferation. Gamma interferon is well known as a pluripotential cytokine. It exerts an anti-tumor activity in some malignant diseases such as malignant lymphoma. Gamma interferon gene transfection by use of lipofectamin has been found to markedly inhibit the proliferation of neurofibroma cell lines in vitro. Our new experimental system was applied in evaluating the effect of sonotransfected gamma interferon gene on neurofibroma proliferation in vitro. It is suggested that ultrasound-mediated gamma interferon gene transfection could potentially become a non-surgical method in treating skin diseases, such as neurofibromas, particularly in patients with von Recklinghausen's disease.

  9. Mechanism of inhibition of retrovirus release from cells by interferon-induced gene ISG15.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Zhizhou; Seo, Eun Joo; Leis, Jonathan

    2011-07-01

    Budding of retroviruses from cell membranes requires ubiquitination of Gag and recruitment of cellular proteins involved in endosome sorting, including endosome sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III) protein complex and vacuolar protein sorting 4 (VPS4) and its ATPase. In response to infection, a cellular mechanism has evolved that blocks virus replication early and late in the budding process through expression of interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), a dimer homologue of ubiquitin. Interferon treatment of DF-1 cells blocks avian sarcoma/leukosis virus release, demonstrating that this mechanism is functional under physiological conditions. The late block to release is caused in part by a loss in interaction between VPS4 and its coactivator protein LIP5, which is required to promote the formation of the ESCRT III-VPS4 double-hexamer complex to activate its ATPase. ISG15 is conjugated to two different LIP5-ESCRT-III-binding charged multivesicular body proteins, CHMP2A and CHMP5. Upon ISGylation of each, interaction with LIP5 is no longer detected. Two other ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP4B and CHMP6, are also conjugated to ISG15. ISGylation of CHMP2A, CHMP4B, and CHMP6 weakens their binding directly to VPS4, thereby facilitating the release of this protein from the membrane into the cytosol. The remaining budding complex fails to release particles from the cell membrane. Introducing a mutant of ISG15 into cells that cannot be conjugated to proteins prevents the ISG15-dependent mechanism from blocking virus release. CHMP5 is the primary switch to initiate the antiviral mechanism, because removal of CHMP5 from cells prevents ISGylation of CHMP2A and CHMP6.

  10. Murine coronavirus delays expression of a subset of interferon-stimulated genes.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kristine M; Elliott, Ruth; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Weiss, Susan R

    2010-06-01

    The importance of the type I interferon (IFN-I) system in limiting coronavirus replication and dissemination has been unequivocally demonstrated by rapid lethality following infection of mice lacking the alpha/beta IFN (IFN-alpha/beta) receptor with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), a murine coronavirus. Interestingly, MHV has a cell-type-dependent ability to resist the antiviral effects of IFN-alpha/beta. In primary bone-marrow-derived macrophages and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, MHV replication was significantly reduced by the IFN-alpha/beta-induced antiviral state, whereas IFN treatment of cell lines (L2 and 293T) has only minor effects on replication (K. M. Rose and S. R. Weiss, Viruses 1:689-712, 2009). Replication of other RNA viruses, including Theiler's murine encephalitis virus (TMEV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), Sindbis virus, Newcastle disease virus (NDV), and Sendai virus (SeV), was significantly inhibited in L2 cells treated with IFN-alpha/beta, and MHV had the ability to rescue only SeV replication. We present evidence that MHV infection can delay interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) induction mediated by both SeV and IFN-beta but only when MHV infection precedes SeV or IFN-beta exposure. Curiously, we observed no block in the well-defined IFN-beta signaling pathway that leads to STAT1-STAT2 phosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus in cultures infected with MHV. This observation suggests that MHV must inhibit an alternative IFN-induced pathway that is essential for early induction of ISGs. The ability of MHV to delay SeV-mediated ISG production may partially involve limiting the ability of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) to function as a transcription factor. Transcription from an IRF-3-responsive promoter was partially inhibited by MHV; however, IRF-3 was transported to the nucleus and bound DNA in MHV-infected cells superinfected with SeV.

  11. Different STAT transcription complexes drive early and delayed responses to type I Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Plumlee, Courtney R.; Perry, Stuart; Gu, Ai Di; Lee, Carolyn; Shresta, Sujan; Decker, Thomas; Schindler, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Interferons, which transduce pivotal signals through signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)1 and Stat2, effectively suppress the replication of Legionella pneumophila in primary murine macrophages. Whereas the ability of IFN-γ to impede L. pneumophila growth is fully dependent on Stat1, IFN-α/β unexpectedly suppresses L. pneumophila growth in both Stat1 and Stat2 deficient macrophages. New studies demonstrating that the robust response to IFN-α/β is lost in Stat1-Stat2 double knockout macrophages, suggest that Stat1 and Stat2 are functionally redundant in their ability to direct an innate response towards L. pneumophila. Since the ability of IFN-α/β to signal through Stat1-dependent complexes (i.e., Stat1-Stat1 and Stat1-Stat2 dimers) has been well characterized, the current studies focus on how Stat2 is able to direct a potent response to IFN-α/β in the absence of Stat1. These studies reveal that IFN-α/β is able to drive the formation of a Stat2 and IRF9 complex that drives the expression of a subset of IFN stimulated genes (ISGs), but with substantially delayed kinetics. These observations raise the possibility that this pathway evolved in response to microbes that have devised strategies to subvert Stat1 dependent responses. PMID:26019270

  12. Enhanced Gamma Interferon Responses of Mouse Spleen Cells following Immunotherapy for Tuberculosis Relapse ▿

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Olga; Vilaplana, Cristina; Guirado, Evelyn; Díaz, Jorge; Cáceres, Neus; Singh, Mahavir; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2008-01-01

    Gamma interferon responses of spleen cells in mice were examined during postchemotherapy relapse of intraperitoneally induced latent tuberculous infection. The mycobacterial extract RUTI, which prevented the relapse, significantly enhanced the immune responses to secreted and structural recombinant mycobacterial antigens, suggesting that RUTI-mediated protection was mediated by activated T cells. PMID:18827194

  13. Characterization of the interferonresponse of pigs to the weaning stress.

    PubMed

    Razzuoli, Elisabetta; Villa, Riccardo; Sossi, Enrico; Amadori, Massimo

    2011-02-01

    The interferon (IFN)-α response of pigs to the stressing event of early weaning was investigated in a field trial. All the animals under study remained healthy and tested negative for common viral infections. However, a low-titered IFN-α response was detected in many sera by a bioassay on Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells on day +6 after weaning. Porcine IFN-α was unambiguously identified by a neutralization assay on a pool of IFN-α-positive sera. By gel filtration chromatography, the antiviral activity of sera on MDBK cells could be traced back to 3 components of apparent molecular mass 27/18/<14 kDa. Additional components of apparent molecular mass 58 and 41 kDa were revealed by ELISA in Nonidet P-40 lysates of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Also, many pigs tested positive in flow cytometry assays on PBMC for intracellular IFN-α. The expression of porcine IFN-α genes was investigated by reverse transcriptase (RT) real-time polymerase chain reaction at days -1, +6, and +12 with regard to weaning in PBMC of 9 piglets. On days -1 and +12, IFN A5, A6, A12, as well as (in fewer pigs) A1, A7, A11, and A2 genes were shown to be expressed. On the contrary, none of the above genes was expressed on day +6, when plenty of pig sera were IFN-α-positive. Our results indicate that weaning causes the release of IFN-α and the transient shut-off of the corresponding gene transcriptions in PBMC. Interestingly, only IFN A9 gene transcription was shown in vitro to be virus induction-dependent.

  14. Canonical and Non-Canonical Aspects of JAK–STAT Signaling: Lessons from Interferons for Cytokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Majoros, Andrea; Platanitis, Ekaterini; Kernbauer-Hölzl, Elisabeth; Rosebrock, Felix; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signal transduction mediates cytokine responses. Canonical signaling is based on STAT tyrosine phosphorylation by activated JAKs. Downstream of interferon (IFN) receptors, activated JAKs cause the formation of the transcription factors IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3), a heterotrimer of STAT1, STAT2 and interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) subunits, and gamma interferon-activated factor (GAF), a STAT1 homodimer. In recent years, several deviations from this paradigm were reported. These include kinase-independent JAK functions as well as extra- and intranuclear activities of U-STATs without phosphotyrosines. Additionally, transcriptional control by STAT complexes resembling neither GAF nor ISGF3 contributes to transcriptome changes in IFN-treated cells. Our review summarizes the contribution of non-canonical JAK–STAT signaling to the innate antimicrobial immunity imparted by IFN. Moreover, we touch upon functions of IFN pathway proteins beyond the IFN response. These include metabolic functions of IRF9 as well as the regulation of natural killer cell activity by kinase-dead TYK2 and different phosphorylation isoforms of STAT1. PMID:28184222

  15. Molecular Pathways: Targeting the Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING) in the Immunotherapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Corrales, Leticia; Gajewski, Thomas F

    2015-11-01

    Novel immunotherapy approaches are transforming the treatment of cancer, yet many patients remain refractory to these agents. One hypothesis is that immunotherapy fails because of a tumor microenvironment that fails to support recruitment of immune cells, including CD8(+) T cells. Therefore, new approaches designed to initiate a de novo antitumor immune response from within the tumor microenvironment are being pursued. Recent evidence has indicated that spontaneous activation of the Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING) pathway within tumor-resident dendritic cells leads to type I IFN production and adaptive immune responses against tumors. This pathway is activated in the presence of cytosolic DNA that is detected by the sensor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) and generates cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP), which binds and activates STING. As a therapeutic approach, intratumoral injection of STING agonists has demonstrated profound therapeutic effects in multiple mouse tumor models, including melanoma, colon, breast, prostate, and fibrosarcoma. Better characterization of the STING pathway in human tumor recognition, and the development of new pharmacologic approaches to engage this pathway within the tumor microenvironment in patients, are important areas for clinical translation.

  16. Expression of interferon and interferon--induced genes in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar cell lines SHK-1 and TO following infection with Salmon AlphaVirus SAV.

    PubMed

    Gahlawat, Suresh K; Ellis, Anthony E; Collet, Bertrand

    2009-04-01

    Salmon AlphaVirus (SAV) is the aetiological agent of Salmon Pancreas Disease (SPD), a serious disease in farmed Atlantic salmon. Currently there is no available information on the ability of this virus to stimulate or suppress aspects of innate immunity in host cells. Two different Atlantic salmon cell lines (SHK-1 and TO), both derived from head kidney leucocytes, were infected with SAV and the kinetics and magnitude of gene expression were studied by real-time quantitative PCR. SAV nsP1 gene transcripts for strain P42P increased rapidly in TO cells with subsequent development of a cytopathic effect (CPE) while this virus strain hardly replicated at all SHK-1 cells causing no CPE. SAV P42P induced strong expression of type I IFN (IFN) and the antiviral IFN-induced gene MX transcripts in SHK-1 cells. Although the IFN response in infected TO cells was higher than in SHK-1 cells, the level of MX transcripts was lower. This may be because the virus was able to interfere with IFN-signaling and suppress MX transcription or that the TO cells are less able to transcribe the MX gene. Either way, it may account for why the SHK-1 cells suppress SAV replication while the TO cells are highly susceptible and succumb to the virus. The present results provide the first evidence for differential induction of expression of the interferon-induced antiviral gene, MX, correlating with resistant (SHK-1) and susceptible (TO) Atlantic salmon cell lines in response to infection by SAV.

  17. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process.

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors trigger a type I interferon response in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Saveria

    2016-01-01

    The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is centrally involved in the regulation of key processes of the epithelia, including cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, and also tumorigenesis. Humanized antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors targeting EGFR were developed to disrupt these functions in cancer cells and are currently used in the treatment of diverse metastatic epithelial cancers. By contrast, these drugs possess significant skin-specific toxic effects, comprising the establishment of a persistent inflammatory milieu. So far, the molecular mechanisms underlying these epiphenomena have been investigated rather poorly. Here we showed that keratinocytes respond to anti-EGFR drugs with the development of a type I interferon molecular signature. Upregulation of the transcription factor IRF1 is early implicated in the enhanced expression of interferon-kappa, leading to persistent activation of STAT1 and further amplification of downstream interferon-induced genes, including anti-viral effectors and chemokines. When anti-EGFR drugs are associated to TNF-α, whose expression is enhanced by the drugs themselves, all these molecular events undergo a dramatic enhancement by synergy mechanisms. Finally, high levels of interferon-kappa can be observed in epidermal keratinocytes and also in leukocytes infiltrating the upper dermis of cetuximab-driven skin lesions. Our data suggest that dysregulated activation of type I interferon innate immunity is implicated in the molecular processes triggered by anti-EGFR drugs and leading to persistent skin inflammation. PMID:27322144

  19. The Envelope Gene of Transmitted HIV-1 Resists a Late Interferon Gamma-Induced Block

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Suzannah J.; Foster, Toshana L.; Busnadiego, Idoia; Aziz, Muhamad Afiq; Hughes, Joseph; Neil, Stuart J. D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I interferon (IFN) signaling engenders an antiviral state that likely plays an important role in constraining HIV-1 transmission and contributes to defining subsequent AIDS pathogenesis. Type II IFN (IFN-γ) also induces an antiviral state but is often primarily considered to be an immunomodulatory cytokine. We report that IFN-γ stimulation can induce an antiviral state that can be both distinct from that of type I interferon and can potently inhibit HIV-1 in primary CD4+ T cells and a number of human cell lines. Strikingly, we find that transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 viruses can resist a late block that is induced by type II IFN, and the use of chimeric IFN-γ-sensitive/resistant viruses indicates that interferon resistance maps to the env gene. Simultaneously, in vitro evolution also revealed that just a single amino acid substitution in the envelope can confer substantial resistance to IFN-mediated inhibition. Thus, the env gene of transmitted HIV-1 confers resistance to a late block that is phenotypically distinct from blocks previously described to be resisted by env and is therefore mediated by unknown IFN-γ-stimulated factor(s) in human CD4+ T cells and cell lines. This important unidentified block could play a key role in constraining HIV-1 transmission. IMPORTANCE The human immune system can hinder invading pathogens through interferon (IFN) signaling. One consequence of this signaling is that cells enter an antiviral state, increasing the levels of hundreds of defenses that can inhibit the replication and spread of viruses. The majority of HIV-1 infections result from a single virus particle (the transmitted/founder) that makes it past these defenses and colonizes the host. Thus, the founder virus is hypothesized to be a relatively interferon-resistant entity. Here, we show that certain HIV-1 envelope genes have the unanticipated ability to resist specific human defenses mediated by different types of interferons. Strikingly, the envelope

  20. Genetic Variation of Goat Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Gene and Its Implication in Goat Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Liping; Zhang, Yesheng; Wang, Yangzi; Sanni, Timothy M.; Imumorin, Ikhide G.; Peters, Sunday O.; Zhang, Jiajin; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The immune systems are fundamentally vital for evolution and survival of species; as such, selection patterns in innate immune loci are of special interest in molecular evolutionary research. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) gene family control many different aspects of the innate and adaptive immune responses in vertebrates. Among these, IRF3 is known to take active part in very many biological processes. We assembled and evaluated 1356 base pairs of the IRF3 gene coding region in domesticated goats from Africa (Nigeria, Ethiopia and South Africa) and Asia (Iran and China) and the wild goat (Capra aegagrus). Five segregating sites with θ value of 0.0009 for this gene demonstrated a low diversity across the goats’ populations. Fu and Li tests were significantly positive but Tajima’s D test was significantly negative, suggesting its deviation from neutrality. Neighbor joining tree of IRF3 gene in domesticated goats, wild goat and sheep showed that all domesticated goats have a closer relationship than with the wild goat and sheep. Maximum likelihood tree of the gene showed that different domesticated goats share a common ancestor and suggest single origin. Four unique haplotypes were observed across all the sequences, of which, one was particularly common to African goats (MOCH-K14-0425, Poitou and WAD). In assessing the evolution mode of the gene, we found that the codon model dN/dS ratio for all goats was greater than one. Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) gave a ω0 (dN/dS) value of 0.067 with LnL value of -6900.3 for the first Model (M1) while ω2 = 1.667 in model M2 with LnL value of -6900.3 with positive selection inferred in 3 codon sites. Mechanistic empirical combination (MEC) model for evaluating adaptive selection pressure on particular codons also confirmed adaptive selection pressure in three codons (207, 358 and 408) in IRF3 gene. Positive diversifying selection inferred with recent evolutionary changes in domesticated goat

  1. Gamma Interferon-Dependent Transcriptional Memory via Relocalization of a Gene Locus to PML Nuclear Bodies▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gialitakis, Manolis; Arampatzi, Panagiota; Makatounakis, Takis; Papamatheakis, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Memory of past cellular responses is an essential adaptation to repeating environmental stimuli. We addressed the question of whether gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-inducible transcription generates memory that sensitizes cells to a second stimulus. We have found that the major histocompatibility complex class II gene DRA is relocated to promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies upon induction with IFN-γ, and this topology is maintained long after transcription shut off. Concurrent interaction of PML protein with mixed-lineage leukemia generates a prolonged permissive chromatin state on the DRA gene characterized by high promoter histone H3 K4 dimethylation that facilitates rapid expression upon restimulation. We propose that the primary signal-induced transcription generates spatial and epigenetic memory that is maintained through several cell generations and endows the cell with increased responsiveness to future activation signals. PMID:20123968

  2. The autoimmunity-associated gene PTPN22 potentiates toll-like receptor-driven, type 1 interferon-dependent immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaya; Shaked, Iftach; Stanford, Stephanie M; Zhou, Wenbo; Curtsinger, Julie M; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Shaheen, Zachary R; Cheng, Genhong; Sawatzke, Kristy; Campbell, Amanda M; Auger, Jennifer L; Bilgic, Hatice; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Schmeling, David O; Balfour, Henry H; Hasegawa, Kiminori; Chan, Andrew C; Corbett, John A; Binstadt, Bryce A; Mescher, Matthew F; Ley, Klaus; Bottini, Nunzio; Peterson, Erik J

    2013-07-25

    Immune cells sense microbial products through Toll-like receptors (TLR), which trigger host defense responses including type 1 interferons (IFNs) secretion. A coding polymorphism in the protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22) gene is a susceptibility allele for human autoimmune and infectious disease. We report that Ptpn22 selectively regulated type 1 IFN production after TLR engagement in myeloid cells. Ptpn22 promoted host antiviral responses and was critical for TLR agonist-induced, type 1 IFN-dependent suppression of inflammation in colitis and arthritis. PTPN22 directly associated with TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) and promotes TRAF3 lysine 63-linked ubiquitination. The disease-associated PTPN22W variant failed to promote TRAF3 ubiquitination, type 1 IFN upregulation, and type 1 IFN-dependent suppression of arthritis. The findings establish a candidate innate immune mechanism of action for a human autoimmunity "risk" gene in the regulation of host defense and inflammation.

  3. Association between Interferon Response and Protective Efficacy of NS1-Truncated Mutants as Influenza Vaccine Candidates in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyesun; Ngunjiri, John M.; Lee, Chang-Won

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus mutants that encode C-terminally truncated NS1 proteins (NS1-truncated mutants) are attractive candidates for avian live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) development because they are both attenuated and immunogenic in chickens. We previously showed that a high protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV in chickens corresponds with induction of high levels of type I interferon (IFN) responses in chicken embryonic fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the relationship between induction of IFN and IFN-stimulated gene responses in vivo and the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV. Our data demonstrates that accelerated antibody induction and protective efficacy of NS1-truncated LAIV correlates well with upregulation of IFN-stimulated genes. Further, through oral administration of recombinant chicken IFN alpha in drinking water, we provide direct evidence that type I IFN can promote rapid induction of adaptive immune responses and protective efficacy of influenza vaccine in chickens. PMID:27257989

  4. Novel Mutation of Interferon-γ Receptor 1 Gene Presenting as Early Life Mycobacterial Bronchial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Maria J.; Kalra, Neelu; Horwitz, Alexandra; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) are a spectrum of inherited disorders characterized by localized or disseminated infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) deficiency was the first identified genetic disorder recognized as MSMD. Mutations in the genes encoding IFNGR1 can be recessive or dominant and cause complete or partial receptor deficiency. We present the case of a 2½-year-old boy with a history of recurrent wheezing, diagnosed with endobronchial mycobacterial infection. Immunological workup revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the IFNGR1 gene, a novel mutation predicted in silico to cause complete IFNGR1 deficiency. This case demonstrates that (a) Interferon-γ receptor deficiency can present resembling common disorders of the lung; (b) mycobacterial infections should be suspected when parenchymal lung disease, hilar lymphadenopathy, and endobronchial disease are present; and (c) high index of suspicion for immunodeficiency should be maintained in patients with disseminated nontubercular mycobacterial infection. PMID:27868075

  5. Novel Mutation of Interferon-γ Receptor 1 Gene Presenting as Early Life Mycobacterial Bronchial Disease.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Maria J; Kalra, Neelu; Horwitz, Alexandra; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) are a spectrum of inherited disorders characterized by localized or disseminated infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) deficiency was the first identified genetic disorder recognized as MSMD. Mutations in the genes encoding IFNGR1 can be recessive or dominant and cause complete or partial receptor deficiency. We present the case of a 2½-year-old boy with a history of recurrent wheezing, diagnosed with endobronchial mycobacterial infection. Immunological workup revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the IFNGR1 gene, a novel mutation predicted in silico to cause complete IFNGR1 deficiency. This case demonstrates that (a) Interferon-γ receptor deficiency can present resembling common disorders of the lung; (b) mycobacterial infections should be suspected when parenchymal lung disease, hilar lymphadenopathy, and endobronchial disease are present; and (c) high index of suspicion for immunodeficiency should be maintained in patients with disseminated nontubercular mycobacterial infection.

  6. Hepatitis A and hepatitis C viruses: divergent infection outcomes marked by similarities in induction and evasion of interferon responses.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lin; Lemon, Stanley M

    2010-11-01

    Hepatitis A and hepatitis C viruses (HAV and HCV) are both positive-strand ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses with hepatotropic lifestyles. Despite several important differences, they share many biological and molecular features and similar genome replication schemes. Despite this, HAV infections are usually effectively controlled by the host with elimination of the virus, whereas HCV most often is able to establish lifelong persistent infection. The mechanisms underlying this difference are unknown. The cellular helicases RIG-I and MDA5, and Toll-like receptor 3, are pattern recognition receptors that sense virus-derived RNAs within hepatocytes in the liver. Activation of these receptors leads to their interaction with specific adaptor proteins, mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), respectively, which engage downstream kinases to activate two crucial transcription factors, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). This results in the induction of interferons (IFNs) and IFN-stimulated genes that ultimately establish an antiviral state. These signaling pathways are central to host antiviral defense and thus frequent targets for viral interference. Both HAV and HCV express proteases that target signal transduction through these pathways and that block the induction of IFNs upon sensing of viral RNA by these receptors. An understanding of the differences and similarities in the early innate immune responses to these infections is likely to provide important insights into the mechanism underlying the long-term persistence of HCV.

  7. Pathogenesis of Rift Valley Fever in Rhesus Monkeys: Role of Interferon Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    portal cellular infiltrate involving vascular walls, connective tissue, and adjacent hepatic plates was observed in several portal triads... Lymphoplasmacytes dominated the infiltra- tion, however, macrophages and granulocytes were distributed among the lym- phoid cells. Moderate, multifocal, epicardial...primarily of lymphoplasmacytic cells. Interferon response in RVF virus-inficted monkeys 207 Table 5. Viral titers" of organs from fatally infected

  8. Interferons and viruses: an interplay between induction, signalling, antiviral responses and virus countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Randall, Richard E; Goodbourn, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) system is an extremely powerful antiviral response that is capable of controlling most, if not all, virus infections in the absence of adaptive immunity. However, viruses can still replicate and cause disease in vivo, because they have some strategy for at least partially circumventing the IFN response. We reviewed this topic in 2000 [Goodbourn, S., Didcock, L. & Randall, R. E. (2000). J Gen Virol 81, 2341-2364] but, since then, a great deal has been discovered about the molecular mechanisms of the IFN response and how different viruses circumvent it. This information is of fundamental interest, but may also have practical application in the design and manufacture of attenuated virus vaccines and the development of novel antiviral drugs. In the first part of this review, we describe how viruses activate the IFN system, how IFNs induce transcription of their target genes and the mechanism of action of IFN-induced proteins with antiviral action. In the second part, we describe how viruses circumvent the IFN response. Here, we reflect upon possible consequences for both the virus and host of the different strategies that viruses have evolved and discuss whether certain viruses have exploited the IFN response to modulate their life cycle (e.g. to establish and maintain persistent/latent infections), whether perturbation of the IFN response by persistent infections can lead to chronic disease, and the importance of the IFN system as a species barrier to virus infections. Lastly, we briefly describe applied aspects that arise from an increase in our knowledge in this area, including vaccine design and manufacture, the development of novel antiviral drugs and the use of IFN-sensitive oncolytic viruses in the treatment of cancer.

  9. Virus-activated interferon regulatory factor 7 upregulates expression of the interferon-regulated BST2 gene independently of interferon signaling.

    PubMed

    Bego, Mariana G; Mercier, Johanne; Cohen, Eric A

    2012-04-01

    BST-2/tetherin is an interferon (IFN)-inducible host restriction factor that inhibits the release of many enveloped viruses and functions as a negative-feedback regulator of IFN production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Currently, mechanisms underlying BST2 transcriptional regulation by type I IFN remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the BST2 promoter is a secondary target of the IFN cascade and show that a single IRF binding site is sufficient to render this promoter responsive to IFN-α. Interestingly, expression of IRF-1 or virus-activated forms of IRF-3 and IRF-7 stimulated the BST2 promoter even under conditions where type I IFN signaling was inhibited. Indeed, vesicular stomatitis virus could directly upregulate BST-2 during infection of mouse embryonic fibroblasts through a process that required IRF-7 but was independent from the type I IFN cascade; however, in order to achieve optimal BST-2 induction, the type I IFN cascade needed to be engaged through activation of IRF-3. Furthermore, using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we show that BST-2 upregulation is part of an early intrinsic immune response since TLR8 and TLR3 agonists, known to trigger pathways that mediate activation of IRF proteins, could upregulate BST-2 prior to engagement of the type I IFN pathway. Collectively, our findings reveal that BST2 is activated by the same signals that trigger type I IFN production, outlining a regulatory mechanism ensuring that production of type I IFN and expression of a host restriction factor involved in the IFN negative-feedback loop are closely coordinated.

  10. The interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Toy, J L

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the interferons is presented. A description of something of what is known about them is given, including: their genes; their protein structures and characteristics; their mechanisms of actions; and their varied biological effects emphasising particularly their immunomodulatory actions. Finally, a brief summary is made of the current status of human clinical studies that have been conducted with interferons in the oncological and viral fields, mentioning also recent findings in patients who have the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:6193915

  11. Antiviral responses in mouse embryonic stem cells: differential development of cellular mechanisms in type I interferon production and response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoxing; Wang, Jundi; Acharya, Dhiraj; Paul, Amber M; Bai, Fengwei; Huang, Faqing; Guo, Yan-Lin

    2014-09-05

    We have recently reported that mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) are deficient in expressing type I interferons (IFNs) in response to viral infection and synthetic viral RNA analogs (Wang, R., Wang, J., Paul, A. M., Acharya, D., Bai, F., Huang, F., and Guo, Y. L. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 15926-15936). Here, we report that mESCs are able to respond to type I IFNs, express IFN-stimulated genes, and mediate the antiviral effect of type I IFNs against La Crosse virus and chikungunya virus. The major signaling components in the IFN pathway are expressed in mESCs. Therefore, the basic molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects of type I IFNs are functional in mESCs; however, these mechanisms may not yet be fully developed as mESCs express lower levels of IFN-stimulated genes and display weaker antiviral activity in response to type I IFNs when compared with fibroblasts. Further analysis demonstrated that type I IFNs do not affect the stem cell state of mESCs. We conclude that mESCs are deficient in type I IFN expression, but they can respond to and mediate the cellular effects of type I IFNs. These findings represent unique and uncharacterized properties of mESCs and are important for understanding innate immunity development and ESC physiology.

  12. The Alpha/Beta Interferon Response Controls Tissue Tropism and Pathogenicity of Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    Ida-Hosonuma, Miki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Nagata, Noriyo; Sato, Yuko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Yoneyama, Mitsutoshi; Fujita, Takashi; Taya, Choji; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Koike, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Poliovirus selectively replicates in neurons in the spinal cord and brainstem, although poliovirus receptor (PVR) expression is observed in both the target and nontarget tissues in humans and transgenic mice expressing human PVR (PVR-transgenic mice). We assessed the role of alpha/beta interferon (IFN) in determining tissue tropism by comparing the pathogenesis of the virulent Mahoney strain in PVR-transgenic mice and PVR-transgenic mice deficient in the alpha/beta IFN receptor gene (PVR-transgenic/Ifnar knockout mice). PVR-transgenic/Ifnar knockout mice showed increased susceptibility to poliovirus. After intravenous inoculation, severe lesions positive for the poliovirus antigen were detected in the liver, spleen, and pancreas in addition to the central nervous system. These results suggest that the alpha/beta IFN system plays an important role in determining tissue tropism by protecting nontarget tissues that are potentially susceptible to infection. We subsequently examined the expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in the PVR-transgenic mice. In the nontarget tissues, ISGs were expressed even in the noninfected state, and the expression level increased soon after poliovirus infection. On the contrary, in the target tissues, ISG expression was low in the noninfected state and sufficient response after poliovirus infection was not observed. The results suggest that the unequal IFN response is one of the important determinants for the differential susceptibility of tissues to poliovirus. We consider that poliovirus replication was observed in the nontarget tissues of PVR-transgenic/Ifnar knockout mice because the IFN response was null in all tissues. PMID:15767446

  13. Type I Interferons Induce T Regulatory 1 Responses and Restrict Humoral Immunity during Experimental Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Ryan A.; Guthmiller, Jenna J.; Graham, Amy C.; Burke, Bradly E.; Carr, Daniel J.J.

    2016-01-01

    CD4 T cell-dependent antibody responses are essential for limiting Plasmodium parasite replication and the severity of malaria; however, the factors that regulate humoral immunity during highly inflammatory, Th1-biased systemic infections are poorly understood. Using genetic and biochemical approaches, we show that Plasmodium infection-induced type I interferons limit T follicular helper accumulation and constrain anti-malarial humoral immunity. Mechanistically we show that CD4 T cell-intrinsic type I interferon signaling induces T-bet and Blimp-1 expression, thereby promoting T regulatory 1 responses. We further show that the secreted effector cytokines of T regulatory 1 cells, IL-10 and IFN-γ, collaborate to restrict T follicular helper accumulation, limit parasite-specific antibody responses, and diminish parasite control. This circuit of interferon-mediated Blimp-1 induction is also operational during chronic virus infection and can occur independently of IL-2 signaling. Thus, type I interferon-mediated induction of Blimp-1 and subsequent expansion of T regulatory 1 cells represent generalizable features of systemic, inflammatory Th1-biased viral and parasitic infections that are associated with suppression of humoral immunity. PMID:27732671

  14. Activation of the type I interferon pathway is enhanced in response to human neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Jocelyn R; Altschaefl, Kate M; O'Shea, K Sue; Miller, David J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of innate immunity in preventing or controlling pathogen-induced damage in most, if not all, cell types, very little is known about the activity of this essential defense system in central nervous system neurons, especially in humans. In this report we use both an established neuronal cell line model and an embryonic stem cell-based system to examine human neuronal innate immunity and responses to neurotropic alphavirus infection in cultured cells. We demonstrate that neuronal differentiation is associated with increased expression of crucial type I interferon signaling pathway components, including interferon regulatory factor-9 and an interferon receptor heterodimer subunit, which results in enhanced interferon stimulation and subsequent heightened antiviral activity and cytoprotective responses against neurotropic alphaviruses such as western equine encephalitis virus. These results identify important differentiation-dependent changes in innate immune system function that control cell-autonomous neuronal responses. Furthermore, this work demonstrates the utility of human embryonic stem cell-derived cultures as a platform to study the interactions between innate immunity, virus infection, and pathogenesis in central nervous system neurons.

  15. Regulation of cannabinoid receptor gene expression and endocannabinoid levels in lymphocyte subsets by interferon-β: a longitudinal study in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Sánchez López, A J; Román-Vega, L; Ramil Tojeiro, E; Giuffrida, A; García-Merino, A

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests the involvement of the cannabinoid system in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied cannabinoid receptor (CB)1 and CB2 receptor gene expression in B, natural killer (NK) and T cells from MS patients before and after 1 year of interferon beta therapy, and compared these levels to those of healthy controls. We also measured the production of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and the gene expression of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in these cells. Prior to interferon therapy, MS patients showed significantly elevated CB2 expression in B cells, but not in T or NK cells. These levels decreased gradually within 6 months to 1 year of interferon treatment. CB1 expression was elevated in all cell subsets, but only reached statistical significance in T cells; all levels decreased progressively over time. Before treatment, AEA but not 2-AG levels were significantly elevated in the three cell populations; after 1 year of treatment, all values decreased to control levels. The expression of FAAH was unchanged. The different expression of cannabinoid receptor genes and the increased level of AEA in lymphocytes point to a possible role of the cannabinoid system in MS immune response and its modulation by interferon.

  16. Regulation of cannabinoid receptor gene expression and endocannabinoid levels in lymphocyte subsets by interferon-β: a longitudinal study in multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez López, A J; Román-Vega, L; Ramil Tojeiro, E; Giuffrida, A; García-Merino, A

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests the involvement of the cannabinoid system in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied cannabinoid receptor (CB)1 and CB2 receptor gene expression in B, natural killer (NK) and T cells from MS patients before and after 1 year of interferon beta therapy, and compared these levels to those of healthy controls. We also measured the production of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and the gene expression of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in these cells. Prior to interferon therapy, MS patients showed significantly elevated CB2 expression in B cells, but not in T or NK cells. These levels decreased gradually within 6 months to 1 year of interferon treatment. CB1 expression was elevated in all cell subsets, but only reached statistical significance in T cells; all levels decreased progressively over time. Before treatment, AEA but not 2-AG levels were significantly elevated in the three cell populations; after 1 year of treatment, all values decreased to control levels. The expression of FAAH was unchanged. The different expression of cannabinoid receptor genes and the increased level of AEA in lymphocytes point to a possible role of the cannabinoid system in MS immune response and its modulation by interferon. PMID:25169051

  17. Hyperexpression of interferon-gamma-induced MHC class II genes associated with reorganization of the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Ulevitch, R. J.; Kline, L.; Schreiber, R. D.; Pingel, J.; Amaldi, I.; Reith, W.; Mach, B.

    1991-01-01

    Class I and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products are key recognition units in the induction and regulation of the immune response. Expression of class I and class II may be constitutive or inducible by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). A key step in the induction of MHC genes is recognition of IFN-gamma by its membrane receptor. The work described here examines the regulation of the occupied IFN-gamma receptor by the cytoskeleton. To do this the authors have used the fungal metabolites dihydrocytochalasin B (DHCB) and cytochalasin D (CD), substances that bind to actin filaments and thereby disrupt the cytoskeleton. The authors have studied the effect of DHCB and CD on IFN-gamma-induced MHC gene expression in 143 B cells, a human osteosarcoma-derived cell line. Herein the authors demonstrate that alterations in the cytoskeleton induced by DHCB and CD can lead to increases in IFN-gamma-induced MHC gene expression. Dihydrocytochalasin B added up to 3 hours after IFN-gamma results in a threefold to sixfold increase in levels of class II mRNA while producing minimal enhancement of class I gene expression. In contrast, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA expression was unaltered by IFN-gamma or by the cytochalasins. The increased amount of class II mRNA can be accounted for by a concomitant increase in transcription rate of this gene. Studies using 125I-IFN-gamma demonstrate that the occupied IFN-gamma receptor associates with a Triton X-100 insoluble fraction of 143 B cells and that DHCB and CD markedly inhibit this association. The results described here provide evidence that is consistent with the hypothesis that the activity of the occupied IFN-gamma receptor may be modulated by interactions with the cytoskeleton of the cell. This receptor may be one of a group of plasma membrane receptors that are sensitive to the action of cytochalasins after ligand binding. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1907805

  18. The interferon lambda 4 rs368234815 predicts treatment response to pegylated-interferon alpha and ribavirin in hemophilic patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Keshvari, Maryam; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Behnava, Bita; Pouryasin, Ali; Sharafi, Heidar

    2016-01-01

    Background: A dinucleotide variant rs368234815 in interferon lambda 4 (IFNL4) gene was recently found to be associated with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment response. This study aimed to assess the impact of IFNL4 rs368234815 polymorphism on treatment response to pegylated-IFN alpha (Peg-IFN-α) and ribavirin (RBV) in hemophilic patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 92 hemophilic patients with CHC who were treated with Peg-IFN-α/RBV were investigated. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in IFNL genomic region including rs368234815, rs12979860, and rs8099917 were analyzed by DNA sequencing. Results: Of the 92 patients, 63 (68.5%) achieved sustained virological response (SVR). Of the 43 patients with rs368234815 TT/TT genotype, 36 (83.7%) achieved SVR, while in 49 patients with non-TT/TT genotypes, 27 (55.1%) achieved SVR. Other pretreatment parameters predicted SVR were patients’ body mass index, HCV genotype, rs12979860, and rs8099917 SNPs. In multivariate analysis, all above-mentioned parameters except rs8099917 remained as predictors of SVR. IFNL4 rs368234815 was a strong predictor of SVR; however, the prediction power of this SNP was the same as that of rs12979860 SNP in the patients of the current study. Conclusion: IFNL4 rs368234815 SNP can be considered for decision-making in the treatment of HCV-infected patients. PMID:27904617

  19. Innate immunity in pluripotent human cells: attenuated response to interferon-β.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiao-Xiao; Carmichael, Gordon G

    2013-05-31

    Type I interferon (IFN-α/β) binds to cell surface receptors IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 and triggers a signaling cascade that leads to the transcription of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes. This response is a crucial component in innate immunity in that it establishes an "antiviral state" in cells and protects them against further damage. Previous work demonstrated that, compared with their differentiated counterparts, pluripotent human cells have a much weaker response to cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and are only able to produce a minimal amount of IFN-β. We show here that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) also exhibit an attenuated response to IFN-β. Even though all known type I IFN signaling components are expressed in these cells, STAT1 phosphorylation is greatly diminished upon IFN-β treatment. This attenuated response correlates with a high expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1). Upon differentiation of hESCs into trophoblasts, cells acquire the ability to respond to IFN-β, and this is accompanied by a significant induction of STAT1 phosphorylation as well as a decrease in SOCS1 expression. Furthermore, SOCS1 knockdown in hiPSCs enhances their ability to respond to IFN-β. Taken together, our results suggest that an attenuated cellular response to type I IFNs may be a general feature of pluripotent human cells and that this is associated with high expression of SOCS1.

  20. Hepatic IFIT3 predicts interferon-α therapeutic response in patients of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingyun; Zhou, Ye; Hou, Jin; Bai, Chunmei; Li, Zhenyang; Fan, Jia; Ng, Irene O L; Zhou, Weiping; Sun, Huichuan; Dong, Qiongzhu; Lee, Joyce M F; Lo, Chung-Mau; Man, Kwan; Yang, Yun; Li, Nan; Ding, Guoshan; Yu, Yizhi; Cao, Xuetao

    2017-03-13

    Adjuvant interferon-α (IFN-α) therapy is used to control certain types of cancer in clinics. For hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), IFN-α therapy is effective in only a subgroup of HCC patients, therefore identifying biomarkers to predict the response to IFN-α therapy is of high significance and clinical utility. As the induced IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) expression following IFN-α treatment plays pivotal roles in IFN-α effects, we screened ISGs expression in HCC tissues and found several ISGs were significantly decreased in HCC. Interestingly, expressions of IFN-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT) family members, including IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT3, and IFIT5, were all decreased in HCC tissues. We further analyzed the expressions of IFIT family members in HCC and their roles in patients' responses to IFN-α therapy in two independent randomized controlled IFN-α therapy clinical trials of HCC patients. We found that higher expression of IFIT3, but not other IFITs, in HCC tissues predicts better response to IFN-α therapy, suggesting that IFIT3 may be a useful predictor of the response to IFN-α therapy in HCC patients. Mechanistically, IFIT3 enhanced the antitumor effects of IFN-α by promoting IFN-α effector responses both in vitro and in vivo. IFIT3 could bind signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and STAT2 to enhance STAT1/STAT2 hetero-dimerization and nuclear translocation upon IFN-α treatment, thus promoting IFN-α effector signaling.

  1. Negative feedback contributes to the stochastic expression of the interferongene in virus-triggered type I interferon signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tian, Tianhai; Zou, Xiufen

    2015-07-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) signaling pathways play an essential role in the defense against early viral infections; however, the diverse and intricate molecular mechanisms of virus-triggered type I IFN responses are still poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed and compared two classes of models i.e., deterministic ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and stochastic models to elucidate the dynamics and stochasticity of type I IFN signaling pathways. Bifurcation analysis based on an ODE model reveals that the system exhibits a bistable switch and a one-way switch at high or low levels when the strengths of the negative and positive feedbacks are tuned. Furthermore, we compared the stochastic simulation results under the Master and Langevin equations. Both of the stochastic equations generate the bistable switch phenomenon, and the distance between two stable states are smaller than normal under the simulation of the Langevin equation. The quantitative computations also show that a moderate ratio between positive and negative feedback strengths is required to ensure a reliable switch between the different IFN concentrations that regulate the immune response. Moreover, we propose a multi-state stochastic model based on the above deterministic model to describe the multi-cellular system coupled with the diffusion of IFNs. The perturbation and inhibition analysis showed that the positive feedback, as well as noises, has little effect on the stochastic expression of IFNs, but the negative feedback of ISG56 on the activation of IRF7 has a great influence on IFN stochastic expression. Together, these results reveal that positive feedback stabilizes IFN gene expression, and negative feedback may be the main contribution to the stochastic expression of the IFN gene in the virus-triggered type I IFN response. These findings will provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of virus-triggered type I IFN signaling pathways.

  2. Monitoring interferon β treatment response with magnetic resonance spectroscopy in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yetkin, Mehmet Fatih; Mirza, Meral; Dönmez, Halil

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the white matter of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with healthy controls and to monitor the response to the treatment with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS).Fifteen healthy controls and 36 recently diagnosed MS patients never treated with interferon β were included in this study. In the patient group, MRS was performed before treatment, at 6th and 12th month after the initiation of treatment and once in control group. Patient group was divided into 3 interferon groups randomly. Physical examination findings were recorded as Expanded Disability Status Scale scores before treatment, at 6th and 12th month of interferon treatment.At the end of 1 year follow up, 26 of 36 patients completed the study. In patients' white matter lesions, N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratios were lower than control group's white matters. NAA/Cr ratios were higher in control group's white matter than patient's normal appearing white matter but this difference was not statistically significant. There was no difference in choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) ratios between 2 groups. In follow-up period, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios obtained from patients' white matter lesions and normal appearing white matter did not change statistically.This study showed that in MS patients' white matters, especially in white matter lesions, neuron viability is reduced compared with healthy controls' normal white matter; and in the patients treated with interferon β NAA/Cr ratios remained stable. These stable levels of metabolite ratios in the patients who received interferon β therapy can be explained with either the shortness of the follow-up period post-treatment or may reflect a positive effect of the beta interferon therapy on the progress of MS.

  3. Monitoring interferon β treatment response with magnetic resonance spectroscopy in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yetkin, Mehmet Fatih; Mirza, Meral; Dönmez, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to compare the white matter of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with healthy controls and to monitor the response to the treatment with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Fifteen healthy controls and 36 recently diagnosed MS patients never treated with interferon β were included in this study. In the patient group, MRS was performed before treatment, at 6th and 12th month after the initiation of treatment and once in control group. Patient group was divided into 3 interferon groups randomly. Physical examination findings were recorded as Expanded Disability Status Scale scores before treatment, at 6th and 12th month of interferon treatment. At the end of 1 year follow up, 26 of 36 patients completed the study. In patients’ white matter lesions, N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratios were lower than control group's white matters. NAA/Cr ratios were higher in control group's white matter than patient's normal appearing white matter but this difference was not statistically significant. There was no difference in choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) ratios between 2 groups. In follow-up period, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios obtained from patients’ white matter lesions and normal appearing white matter did not change statistically. This study showed that in MS patients’ white matters, especially in white matter lesions, neuron viability is reduced compared with healthy controls’ normal white matter; and in the patients treated with interferon β NAA/Cr ratios remained stable. These stable levels of metabolite ratios in the patients who received interferon β therapy can be explained with either the shortness of the follow-up period post-treatment or may reflect a positive effect of the beta interferon therapy on the progress of MS. PMID:27603381

  4. Interferongene transfer induces a strong cytotoxic bystander effect on melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Úrsula A; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Villaverde, Marcela S; Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2015-05-01

    A local gene therapy scheme for the delivery of type I interferons could be an alternative for the treatment of melanoma. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of interferon-β (IFNβ) gene lipofection on tumor cell lines derived from three human cutaneous and four canine mucosal melanomas. The cytotoxicity of human IFNβ gene lipofection resulted higher or equivalent to that of the corresponding addition of the recombinant protein (rhIFNβ) to human cells. IFNβ gene lipofection was not cytotoxic for only one canine melanoma cell line. When cultured as monolayers, three human and three canine IFNβ-lipofected melanoma cell lines displayed a remarkable bystander effect. As spheroids, the same six cell lines were sensitive to IFNβ gene transfer, two displaying a significant multicell resistance phenotype. The effects of conditioned IFNβ-lipofected canine melanoma cell culture media suggested the release of at least one soluble thermolabile cytotoxic factor that could not be detected in human melanoma cells. By using a secretion signal-free truncated human IFNβ, we showed that its intracellular expression was enough to induce cytotoxicity in two human melanoma cell lines. The lower cytoplasmatic levels of reactive oxygen species detected after intracellular IFNβ expression could be related to the resistance displayed by one human melanoma cell line. As IFNβ gene transfer was effective against most of the assayed melanomas in a way not limited by relatively low lipofection efficiencies, the clinical potential of this approach is strongly supported.

  5. Identification of Interferon-Stimulated Gene Proteins That Inhibit Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, M A G; Ribaudo, Michael; Guo, Ju-Tao; Barik, Sailen

    2016-12-15

    A major arm of cellular innate immunity is type I interferon (IFN), represented by IFN-α and IFN-β. Type I IFN transcriptionally induces a large number of cellular genes, collectively known as IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) proteins, which act as antivirals. The IFIT (interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats) family proteins constitute a major subclass of ISG proteins and are characterized by multiple tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). In this study, we have interrogated IFIT proteins for the ability to inhibit the growth of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family and a major cause of respiratory disease in children. We found that IFIT1 significantly inhibited PIV3, whereas IFIT2, IFIT3, and IFIT5 were less effective or not at all. In further screening a set of ISG proteins we discovered that several other such proteins also inhibited PIV3, including IFITM1, IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase), PKR (protein kinase, RNA activated), and viperin (virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum associated, interferon inducible)/Cig5. The antiviral effect of IDO, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step of tryptophan degradation, could be counteracted by tryptophan. These results advance our knowledge of diverse ISG proteins functioning as antivirals and may provide novel approaches against PIV3.

  6. Systemic cytokine and interferon responsiveness Patterns in HIV and HCV mono and co-infections.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Joshi-Barve, Swati; Ghare, Smita; Barve, Shirish; Young, Mary; Plankey, Michael; Bordon, Jose

    2014-11-01

    The role of host response-related factors in the fast progression of liver disease in individuals co-infected with HIV and HCV viruses remains poorly understood. This study compared patterns of cytokines, caspase-1 activation, endotoxin exposure in plasma as well as interferon signaling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV/HCV co-infected (HIV(+)/HCV(+)), HCV mono-infected (HIV(-)/HCV(+)), HIV mono-infected (HIV(+)/HCV(-)) female patients and HIV- and HCV-uninfected women (HIV(-)/HCV(-)) who had enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). HIV(+)/HCV(+) women had higher plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as caspase-1 compared with other groups. Both HIV(+)/HCV(+) and HIV(+)/HCV(-) women had significantly higher sCD14 levels compared with other groups. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HCV mono-infected patients had reduced levels of phosphorylation of STAT1 compared with other groups as well as lower basal levels of expression of the IFN-stimulated genes, OAS1, ISG15, and USP18 (UBP43). Basal expression of USP18, a functional antagonist of ISG15, as well as USP18/ISG15 ratios were increased in the HIV(+)/HCV(+) group compared with HIV(-)/HCV(+) and HIV(+)/HCV(-) groups. A more pronounced systemic inflammatory profile as well as increased expression ratios of USP18 to ISG15 may contribute to the more rapid progression of liver disease in HIV(+)/HCV(+) individuals.

  7. Interferon regulatory factor 5 gene polymorphism in Egyptian children with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hammad, A; Mossad, Y M; Nasef, N; Eid, R

    2017-01-01

    Background Increased expression of interferon-inducible genes is implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is one of the transcription factors regulating interferon and was proved to be implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE in different populations. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between polymorphisms of the IRF5 gene and SLE susceptibility in a cohort of Egyptian children and to investigate their association with clinico-pathological features, especially lupus nephritis. Subjects and methods Typing of interferon regulatory factor 5 rs10954213, rs2004640 and rs2280714 polymorphisms were done using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism for 100 children with SLE and 100 matched healthy controls. Results Children with SLE had more frequent T allele and TT genotype of rs2004640 ( Pc = 0.003 and 0.024, respectively) compared to controls. Patients with nephritis had more frequent T allele of rs2004640 compared to controls ( Pc = 0.003). However the allele and genotype frequencies of the three studied polymorphisms did not show any difference in patients with nephritis in comparison to those without nephritis. Haplotype GTA of rs10954213, rs2004640 and rs2280714, respectively, was more frequent in lupus patients in comparison to controls ( p = 0.01) while the haplotype GGG was more frequent in controls than lupus patients ( p = 0.011). Conclusion The rs2004640 T allele and TT genotype and GTA haplotype of rs rs10954213, rs2004640, and rs2280714, respectively, can be considered as risk factors for the development of SLE. The presence of the rs2004640 T allele increases the risk of nephritis development in Egyptian children with SLE.

  8. Zebra Fish Lacking Adaptive Immunity Acquire an Antiviral Alert State Characterized by Upregulated Gene Expression of Apoptosis, Multigene Families, and Interferon-Related Genes.

    PubMed

    García-Valtanen, Pablo; Martínez-López, Alicia; López-Muñoz, Azucena; Bello-Perez, Melissa; Medina-Gali, Regla M; Ortega-Villaizán, María Del Mar; Varela, Monica; Figueras, Antonio; Mulero, Víctoriano; Novoa, Beatriz; Estepa, Amparo; Coll, Julio

    2017-01-01

    To investigate fish innate immunity, we have conducted organ and cell immune-related transcriptomic as well as immunohistologic analysis in mutant zebra fish (Danio rerio) lacking adaptive immunity (rag1(-/-)) at different developmental stages (egg, larvae, and adult), before and after infection with spring viremia carp virus (SVCV). The results revealed that, compared to immunocompetent zebra fish (rag1(+/+) ), rag1(-/-) acquired increased resistance to SVCV with age, correlating with elevated transcript levels of immune genes in skin/fins and lymphoid organs (head kidney and spleen). Gene sets corresponding to apoptotic functions, immune-related multigene families, and interferon-related genes were constitutively upregulated in uninfected adult rag1(-/-) zebra fish. Overexpression of activated CASPASE-3 in different tissues before and after infection with SVCV further confirmed increased apoptotic function in rag1(-/-) zebra fish. Concurrently, staining of different tissue samples with a pan-leukocyte antibody marker showed abundant leukocyte infiltrations in SVCV-infected rag1(-/-) fish, coinciding with increased transcript expression of genes related to NK-cells and macrophages, suggesting that these genes played a key role in the enhanced immune response of rag1(-/-) zebra fish to SVCV lethal infection. Overall, we present evidence that indicates that rag1(-/-) zebra fish acquire an antiviral alert state while they reach adulthood in the absence of adaptive immunity. This antiviral state was characterized by (i) a more rapid response to viral infection, which resulted in increased survival, (ii) the involvement of NK-cell- and macrophage-mediated transcript responses rather than B- and/or T-cell dependent cells, and (iii) enhanced apoptosis, described here for the first time, as well as the similar modulation of multigene family/interferon-related genes previously associated to fish that survived lethal viral infections. From this and other studies, it might

  9. RNA-Seq Based Transcriptome Analysis of the Type I Interferon Host Response upon Vaccinia Virus Infection of Mouse Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Graciela; Alonso-Lobo, Juan Manuel; Rastrojo, Alberto; Fischer, Cornelius; Sauer, Sascha; Aguado, Begoña

    2017-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes the soluble type I interferon (IFN) binding protein B18 that is secreted from infected cells and also attaches to the cell surface, as an immunomodulatory strategy to inhibit the host IFN response. By using next generation sequencing technologies, we performed a detailed RNA-seq study to dissect at the transcriptional level the modulation of the IFN based host response by VACV and B18. Transcriptome profiling of L929 cells after incubation with purified recombinant B18 protein showed that attachment of B18 to the cell surface does not trigger cell signalling leading to transcriptional activation. Consistent with its ability to bind type I IFN, B18 completely inhibited the IFN-mediated modulation of host gene expression. Addition of UV-inactivated virus particles to cell cultures altered the expression of a set of 53 cellular genes, including genes involved in innate immunity. Differential gene expression analyses of cells infected with replication competent VACV identified the activation of a broad range of host genes involved in multiple cellular pathways. Interestingly, we did not detect an IFN-mediated response among the transcriptional changes induced by VACV, even after the addition of IFN to cells infected with a mutant VACV lacking B18. This is consistent with additional viral mechanisms acting at different levels to block IFN responses during VACV infection. PMID:28280747

  10. Infectious salmon anemia virus is a powerful inducer of key genes of the type I interferon system of Atlantic salmon, but is not inhibited by interferon.

    PubMed

    Kileng, Øyvind; Brundtland, Marthe Iren; Robertsen, Børre

    2007-08-01

    Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is an aquatic orthomyxovirus causing disease and high mortality in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). The virus is thus apparently able to initiate replication without being hampered by the host's immune system. In this work we have studied the role of the type I interferon (IFN) system of Atlantic salmon in protection against ISAV. Real-time RT-PCR was used to study the expression of type I IFN and the IFN stimulated genes Mx and ISG15 in TO cells and live fish in response to infection with ISAV. The in vitro studies showed that ISAV was a powerful inducer of Mx and ISG15 genes in TO cells and that induction started relatively early during infection. In contrast, IFN transcripts were induced later than both Mx and ISG15 transcripts in the ISAV infected cells indicating that Mx and ISG15 are induced through IFN-independent pathways in the early stages of ISAV infection. A cohabitee infection trial with ISAV in Atlantic salmon resulted in high mortality, even though elevated levels of IFN, Mx and ISG15 transcripts in the head kidney and liver were observed. Immunoblotting confirmed the presence of Mx and ISG15 proteins in the liver of infected salmon. In order to evaluate whether the type I IFN system is able to inhibit replication of ISAV, TO cells were stimulated with recombinant salmon IFN-alpha1 (rSasaIFN-alpha1) and subsequently infected with virus. The rSasaIFN-alpha1 showed no protection of TO cells against ISAV, but full protection against IPNV. These data demonstrate that key proteins of the type I IFN system are induced during an ISAV infection, but that they are unable to inhibit the replication of ISAV in vitro and in vivo. ISAV must thus encode genes that enable the virus to counteract IFN induced antiviral proteins of the host.

  11. Interferon regulatory factor-two restricts expression of interferon-stimulated genes to the endometrial stroma and glandular epithelium of the ovine uterus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y; Johnson, G A; Burghardt, R C; Berghman, L R; Joyce, M M; Taylor, K M; Stewart, M D; Bazer, F W; Spencer, T E

    2001-10-01

    Interferon tau (IFNtau) is the signal for maternal recognition of pregnancy in ruminants. The positive effects of IFNtau on IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression are mediated by ISG factor 3 (ISGF3), which is composed of signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 1, Stat 2, and IFN regulatory factor-9 (IRF-9), and by gamma-activated factor (GAF), which is a Stat 1 homodimer. Induction of ISGs, such as ISG17 and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, by IFNtau during pregnancy is limited to the endometrial stroma (S) and glandular epithelium (GE) of the ovine uterus. The IRF-2, a potent transcriptional repressor of ISG expression, is expressed in the luminal epithelium (LE). This study determined effects of the estrous cycle, pregnancy, and IFNtau on expression of Stat 1, Stat 2, IRF-9, IRF-1, and IRF-2 genes in the ovine endometrium. In cyclic ewes, Stat 1, Stat 2, IRF-1, and IRF-9 mRNA and protein were detected at low levels in the S and GE. During pregnancy, expression of these genes increased only in the S and GE. Expression of IRF-2 was detected only in the LE and superficial GE (sGE) of both cyclic and pregnant ewes. In cyclic ewes, intrauterine administration of IFNtau stimulated Stat 1, Stat 2, IRF-9, and IRF-1 expression in the endometrium. Ovine IRF-2 repressed transcriptional activity driven by IFN-stimulated response elements that bind ISGF3, but not by gamma-activation sequences that bind GAF. These results suggest that IRF-2 in the LE and sGE restricts IFNtau induction of ISGs to the S and GE. In the S and GE, IFNtau hyperactivation of ISG expression likely involves formation and actions of the transcription factors ISGF3 and, perhaps, IRF-1.

  12. Sustained inflammation and differential expression of interferons type I and III in PVM-infected interferon-gamma (IFNγ) gene-deleted mice.

    PubMed

    Glineur, Stephanie F; Bowen, Aaron B; Percopo, Caroline M; Garcia-Crespo, Katia E; Dyer, Kimberly D; Ochkur, Sergei I; Lee, Nancy A; Lee, James J; Domachowske, Joseph B; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2014-11-01

    Interferon gamma (IFNγ) has complex immunomodulatory and antiviral properties. While IFNγ is detected in the airways in response to infection with the pneumovirus pathogen, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM; Family Paramyxoviridae), its role in promoting disease has not been fully explored. Here, we evaluate PVM infection in IFNγ(-/-) mice. Although the IFNγ gene-deletion has no impact on weight loss, survival or virus kinetics, expression of IFNβ, IFNλ2/3 and IFN-stimulated 2-5' oligoadenylate synthetases was significantly diminished compared to wild-type counterparts. Furthermore, PVM infection in IFNγ(-/-) mice promoted prominent inflammation, including eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration into the airways and lung parenchyma, observed several days after peak virus titer. Potential mechanisms include over-production of chemoattractant and eosinophil-active cytokines (CXCL1, CCL11, CCL3 and IL5) in PVM-infected IFNγ(-/-) mice; likewise, IFNγ actively antagonized IL5-dependent eosinophil survival ex vivo. Our results may have clinical implications for pneumovirus infection in individuals with IFNγ signaling defects.

  13. Anti-colorectal cancer effect of interleukin-2 and interferon-β fusion gene driven by carcinoembryonic antigen promoter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Mengchun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the antitumor effects of combined interleukin-2/interferon-β-based gene therapy in colorectal cancer. Transfection of the fusion gene expression plasmid induced significant apoptosis of Lovo cells. Additionally, the fusion gene exhibited strong inhibitory activity against tumor growth and apoptosis when being injected into the nude mice implanted with human colon cancer cells. Furthermore, the tail-vein injection showed a more notable effect than direct injection into tumor. These results suggest that the combined interleukin-2/interferon-β-based gene therapy with the carcinoembryonic antigen promoter might be an effective antitumor strategy. PMID:27313471

  14. Inhibition of the Type I Interferon Antiviral Response During Arenavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Borrow, Persephone; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Arenaviruses merit interest both as tractable experimental model systems to study acute and persistent viral infections, and as clinically-important human pathogens. Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans. In addition, evidence indicates that the globally-distributed prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) is a human pathogen of clinical significance in congenital infections, and also poses a great danger to immunosuppressed individuals. Arenavirus persistence and pathogenesis are facilitated by their ability to overcome the host innate immune response. Mammalian hosts have developed both membrane toll-like receptors (TLR) and cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), resulting in activation of the transcription factors IRF3 or IRF7, or both, which together with NF-κB and ATF-2/c-JUN induce production of type I interferon (IFN-I). IFN-I plays a key role in host anti-microbial defense by mediating direct antiviral effects via up-regulation of IFN-I stimulated genes (ISGs), activating dendritic cells (DCs) and natural killer (NK) cells, and promoting the induction of adaptive responses. Accordingly, viruses have developed a plethora of strategies to disrupt the IFN-I mediated antiviral defenses of the host, and the viral gene products responsible for these disruptions are often major virulence determinants. IRF3- and IRF7-dependent induction of host innate immune responses is frequently targeted by viruses. Thus, the arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) was shown to inhibit the IFN-I response by interfering with the activation of IRF3. This NP anti-IFN activity, together with alterations in the number and function of DCs observed in mice chronically infected with LCMV, likely play an important role in LCMV persistence in its murine host. In this review we will discuss current knowledge about the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which

  15. Repression of retrovirus-mediated transgene expression by interferons: implications for gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Ghazizadeh, S; Carroll, J M; Taichman, L B

    1997-01-01

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer is commonly used in gene therapy protocols and has the potential to provide long-term expression of the transgene. Although expression of a retrovirus-delivered transgene is satisfactory in cultured cells, it has been difficult to achieve consistent and high-level expression in vivo. In this investigation, we explored the possibility of modulating transgene expression by host-derived cytokines. Normal human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts were transduced with recombinant retroviruses expressing a reporter gene (lacZ). Treatment of transduced cells with a proinflammatory cytokine, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), significantly reduced lacZ expression to less than 25% of that of nontreated cells. The inhibition was concentration dependent (peak at 5 ng/ml) and time dependent (maximal at 16 h for transcript and 24 h for protein); expression remained repressed in the continued presence of IFN-gamma but returned to normal levels 24 h after IFN-gamma withdrawal. The decrease in beta-galactosidase activity appeared to result from decrease in steady-state lacZ mRNA levels. Inhibitors of transcription and translation blocked IFN-gamma-induced repression, suggesting involvement of newly synthesized protein intermediates. Similar results were obtained by treatment of transduced cells with IFN-alpha but not with other proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-2 (IL-1), IL-4, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Although the level of lacZ mRNA was reduced by >70% following IFN treatment, the rate of lacZ transcription was not significantly different from that for nontreated cells. These results suggest that IFN-mediated regulation of transgene expression is at a posttranscriptional level. Interestingly, IFN-gamma also suppressed transgene expression driven by a cellular promoter (involucrin) inserted in an internal position in the retroviral vector. The presence of the overlapping 3' untranslated

  16. LSD1 collaborates with EZH2 to regulate expression of interferon-stimulated genes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yue; Huo, Bo; Fu, Xueqi; Hao, Tian; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Yidi; Hu, Xin

    2017-04-01

    Histone methylation is a complicate and dynamic epigenetic modification that regulates gene transcription, chromosomal structure and cell differentiation. Here, we discovered the interaction between the H3K4 demethylase, lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, an important component of CoREST repressor complex) and the H3K27 methyltransferase, enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2, an essential component of PRC2). Immuno-precipitation and GST-pull down assay were performed to observe the interaction between the proteins. The MCF-7 cells were cultured and transfected with the siRNA. The mRNA and proteins were examined by using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot assay, respectively. HPLC and LC-MS/MS analysis were performed to purify the proteins. RT-PCR-based quantitative ChIP analysis were performed. LSD1 interacts with histone modification protein EZH2 in MCF-7 cells. LSD1 and EZH2 target a few common genes. LSD1 knockdown and EZH2 knockdown affect protein expression. LSD1 knockdown and EZH2 knockdown affect the proteins involving in IFN signaling pathway. LSD1 and EZH2 modify histone methylation at IRF9 gene locus. We systematically analyzed the proteins that are affected by either LSD1 or EZH2 knockdown with proteomic approaches and identified that the interferon pathway and some other pathways are commonly affected. The interaction between LSD1 and EZH2 stabilizes the binding of LSD1 to the promoter region of IRF9, which is a key transcription factor of the interferon pathway. In conclusion, our study revealed that the coordination between histone demethylases and methyl-transferases might serve as a double lock system to suppress the expression of interferon stimulated genes.

  17. Cloning and expression analysis of interferon-gamma-inducible-lysosomal thiol reductase gene in large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenbiao; Chen, Xinhua

    2006-05-01

    In mammals, interferon-gamma-inducible-lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) has been demonstrated to play a key role in the processing and presentation of MHC class II-restricted antigen (Ag) by catalyzing disulfide bond reduction, thus unfolding native protein Ag and facilitating subsequent cleavage by proteases. Here, we reported the cloning of a GILT gene homologue from the spleen of large yellow croaker, a marine fish (LycGILT). The full-length cDNA of LycGILT gene is 1033 nucleotides (nt) encoding a protein of 256 amino acids (aa), with a putative molecular weight of 28.9 kDa. The deduced protein is highly homologous to that of mammalian and zebrafish GILTs and shares 54.1% sequence identity to that of zebrafish and 43.2-39.2% sequence identity to that of various mammals. The deduced LycGILT possesses the typical structural feature of mammalian GILT, including an active-site CXXC motif, a GILT signature sequence CQHGX2ECX2NX4C, and other six cysteines responsible for the formation of disulfide bonds in the C-terminus. Genomic analysis revealed that LycGILT gene, spanning a 3159nt fragment, contained seven exons interrupted by six introns and exhibited a similar exon-intron organization to human and mouse GILT genes except for a slightly more compact intron arrangement. The LycGILT expression is obviously up-regulated in spleen and kidney after immunization with inactivated trivalent bacterial vaccine consisting of Vibrio alginolyticus, V. paraphaemolyticus, and Aeromonas hydrophila although it also is constitutively expressed in liver, gills, brain, and heart, suggesting that LycGILT may be involved in the immune response to bacterial challenge in large yellow croaker. A search of NCBI sequence data with LycGILT cDNA identified a pufferfish (fugu rubrides) GILT homologue cDNA and its genomic DNA sequence, where two putative interferon-gamma activation sites (GAS) were found within the promoter region. This provided evidence that a fish GILT homologue like

  18. Quantification of neutralizing antibodies to human type I interferons using division-arrested frozen cells carrying an interferon-regulated reporter-gene.

    PubMed

    Lallemand, C; Meritet, J-F; Erickson, R; Grossberg, S E; Roullet, E; Lyon-Caen, O; Lebon, P; Tovey, M G

    2008-06-01

    Development of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) to interferons (IFNs) can reduce the clinical response to IFN therapy. As current cell-based assays for quantifying NAbs have limitations, a highly sensitive and reproducible assay was developed, using division-arrested frozen human U937 cells transfected with the luciferase reportergene controlled by an IFN-responsive chimeric promoter, which allows IFN activity to be determined with precision within hours. Assay-ready PIL5 cells can be stored frozen for >3 years without loss of IFN sensitivity or the need for cell propagation. The assay is highly IFN sensitive (detecting <1.0 IU/mL), reproducible (SE +/- 15%) over concentrations from <1.0 to 100 IU/mL and able to measure different IFN subtypes and their pegylated variants. The use of this assay has shown that NAbs from patients treated with IFN-alpha2 exhibited markedly lower titers against 10 LU/mL of low specific activity IFNs, namely, IFN-alpha1, PEG-Intron(TM) (Schering-Plough, Levallois-Perret,France), or Pegasys(TM) (Hoffmann-La Roche, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, than against 10 LU/mL IFN-alpha2. Similarly, NAbs from patients treated with IFN-beta1a exhibit lower titers against 10 LU/mL of low specific activity IFN-beta1b than against IFN-beta1a. The combination of the use of division-arrested, IFN-responsive human cells transfected with the luciferase reporter-gene makes the rapid PIL5 assay for NAbs highly advantageous.

  19. P02.07INTERFERON-β MODULATES THE INNATE IMMUNE RESPONSE AGAINST GLIOBLASTOMA INITIATING CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Wolpert, F.; Happold, C.; Roth, P.; Reifenberger, G.; Weller, M.; Eisele, G.

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis of glioblastoma remains dismal. Immunotherapy is a promising approach with the need of well-defined targets and potent adjuvants. Glioma-initiating cells (GIC) with stem cell properties are such an attractive target for immunotherapy. However, the immunogenicity of GIC seems limited. Interferon (IFN)-β exerts immune-activating effects like enhanced antigen processing, up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and enhanced natural killer (NK) cell activity and thus might enhance an immune response against GIC. Moreover, IFN-β exerts direct anti-GIC cell activities. Thus, IFN-β warrants being further evaluated as an adjuvant for anti-glioblastoma immunotherapies. Here we define the net effect of IFN-β treatment on the innate immunogenicity of GIC. Employing Affymetrix-based transcriptomic profiling, we identified alterations in the expression of several immune regulatory genes in a panel of well-defined GIC lines upon treatment with IFN-β. The up-regulation of immunosuppressive human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E was contrasted by enhanced surface levels of immune activating nectin-2 while the level of NKG2D ligands remained largely unaltered. In NK cell lysis assays, the immunogenicity of 2 of 3 GIC lines was increased upon IFN-β treatment and further enhanced upon gene silencing of HLA-E using RNA interference. Our data indicate that treatment with IFN-β alters the innate immunogenicity of GIC by increased expression of nectin-2, reverted in part by the concurrent upregulation of HLA-E.

  20. PARP12, an interferon-stimulated gene involved in the control of protein translation and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Welsby, Iain; Hutin, David; Gueydan, Cyril; Kruys, Veronique; Rongvaux, Anthony; Leo, Oberdan

    2014-09-19

    Transcriptome analyses have recently identified PARP12, a member of a large family of ADP-ribosyl transferases, as an interferon-induced gene (ISG), whose function remains incompletely characterized. We demonstrate herein that PARP12 is a genuine ISG, whose expressed protein displays at least two distinct subcellular locations and related functions. Upon ectopic expression or exposure to oxidative stress, PARP12 is recruited to stress-granules (SGs), known sites of mRNA translational arrest. Accordingly, PARP12 was found to block mRNA translation, possibly upon association to the translational machinery. Both the N-terminal domain (containing an RNA-binding domain characterized by the presence of five CCCH-type Zn-fingers) and integrity of the catalytic domain are required for this suppressive function. In contrast, stimulation with LPS leads to the localization of PARP12 to p62/SQSTM1 (an adaptor protein involved in innate signaling and autophagy) containing structures, unrelated to SGs. Deletion of the N-terminal domain promotes the association of the protein to p62/SQSTM1, suggesting that the RNA-binding domain is responsible for the subcellular localization of PARP12. Association to p62/SQSTM1 was found to correlate with increased NF-κB signaling, suggesting a role for PARP12 in inflammation. Collectively, these observations suggest that PARP12 can alternate between two distinct subcellular compartments associated to two distinct cellular functions. The present work therefore identifies PARP12 as an ISG with a potential role in cellular defenses against viral infections.

  1. Cloning and expression analyses of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and 7 genes in European eel, Anguilla anguilla with the identification of genes involved in IFN production.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bei; Huang, Wen Shu; Nie, P

    2014-04-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and IRF7 have been identified as regulators of type I interferon (IFN) gene expression in mammals. In the present study, the two genes were cloned and characterized in the European eel, Anguilla anguilla. The full-length cDNA sequence of IRF3 and IRF7 in the European eel, named as AaIRF3 and AaIRF7 consists of 2879 and 2419 bp respectively. Multiple alignments showed that the two IRFs have a highly conserved DNA binding domain (DBD) in the N terminus, with the characteristic motif containing five tryptophan residues, which is a feature present in their mammalian homologues. But, IRF7 has only four of the five residues in other species of fish. The expression of AaIRF3 and AaIRF7 both displayed an obvious dose-dependent manner following polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) challenge. In vivo expression analysis showed that the mRNA level of AaIRF3 and AaIRF7 was significantly up-regulated in response to PolyI:C stimulation in all examined tissues/organs except in muscle, with a lower level of increase observed in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge and Edwardsiella tarda infection, indicating that AaIRF3 and AaIRF7 may be more likely involved in antiviral immune response. In addition, some pattern recognition receptors genes related with the production of type I IFNs and those genes in response to type I IFNs were identified in the European eel genome database, indicating a relatively conserved system in the production of type I IFN and its signalling in the European eel.

  2. Unique Type I Interferon Responses Determine the Functional Fate of Migratory Lung Dendritic Cells during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moltedo, Bruno; Li, Wenjing; Yount, Jacob S.; Moran, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Migratory lung dendritic cells (DCs) transport viral antigen from the lungs to the draining mediastinal lymph nodes (MLNs) during influenza virus infection to initiate the adaptive immune response. Two major migratory DC subsets, CD103+ DCs and CD11bhigh DCs participate in this function and it is not clear if these antigen presenting cell (APC) populations become directly infected and if so whether their activity is influenced by the infection. In these experiments we show that both subpopulations can become infected and migrate to the draining MLN but a difference in their response to type I interferon (I-IFN) signaling dictates the capacity of the virus to replicate. CD103+ DCs allow the virus to replicate to significantly higher levels than do the CD11bhigh DCs, and they release infectious virus in the MLNs and when cultured ex-vivo. Virus replication in CD11bhigh DCs is inhibited by I-IFNs, since ablation of the I-IFN receptor (IFNAR) signaling permits virus to replicate vigorously and productively in this subset. Interestingly, CD103+ DCs are less sensitive to I-IFNs upregulating interferon-induced genes to a lesser extent than CD11bhigh DCs. The attenuated IFNAR signaling by CD103+ DCs correlates with their described superior antigen presentation capacity for naïve CD8+ T cells when compared to CD11bhigh DCs. Indeed ablation of IFNAR signaling equalizes the competency of the antigen presenting function for the two subpopulations. Thus, antigen presentation by lung DCs is proportional to virus replication and this is tightly constrained by I-IFN. The “interferon-resistant” CD103+ DCs may have evolved to ensure the presentation of viral antigens to T cells in I-IFN rich environments. Conversely, this trait may be exploitable by viral pathogens as a mechanism for systemic dissemination. PMID:22072965

  3. The Correlation Between Interferon Lambda 3 Gene Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Zahra; Moudi, Bita; Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb, Hamidreza; Hashemi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytokines are proteins that mediate innate and adaptive immunity responses. It is hypothesized that interferon lambda 3 (IFNL3) levels can influence the outcome of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Polymorphisms in IFN genes have been associated with response to infection. Objectives This study was carried-out to investigate the association of IFNL3 gene polymorphisms (rs12979860 and rs8099917) with HBV susceptibility, in chronic HBV-infected patients. Patients and Methods In this case-control study, we determined IFNL3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs12979860 and rs8099917) in 221 individuals, with chronic HBV infection, and 200 healthy individuals, who were voluntary blood donors, with negative test for HBV. Alleles and genotypes analyses were performed by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. Results The frequencies of the rs12979860 and rs8099917 genotypes were not significantly different between the HBV-infected and the control groups (CC:CT:TT of 30.3%:48.0%:21.7% vs. 33.0%:49.0%:18.0%, P > 0.05, and GG:GT:TT of 5.8%:39.4%:54.8% vs. 5.0%:41.0%:54.0%, P > 0.05, respectively). Also, the frequencies of the alleles were not significantly different between both groups (C:T of 54.3%:45.7% vs. 57.5%:42.5%, P > 0.05, and G:T of 25.6%:74.4% vs. 25.5%:74.5%, P > 0.05, respectively) and the chronic HBV infection. There were no significant differences between patients, with at least one rs12979860C and or rs8099917T alleles compared to the healthy controls (rs12979860: CT + CC:TT, OR = 1.26, 95%CI = 0.78 - 2.04, P = 0.341 and rs8099917: GT + TT:GG, OR = 1.03, 95%CI = 0.70 - 1.51, P = 0.877, respectively). Conclusions Our study showed no correlation between rs12979860 and rs8099917 SNPs and chronic HBV infection. Further studies, with larger sample sizes and different ethnicities, are necessary to validate our

  4. [THE PERSPECTIVES OF STUDYING OF POLYMORPHISM OF GENES OF GAMMA-INTERFERON UNDER CHRONIC BRUCELLOSIS].

    PubMed

    Nurpeisova, A Kh; Kolomeietz, A N

    2016-02-01

    The brucellosis is an actual zoonotic disease in many countries, Russia included. The complexity of individual prognosis of disease and choice of tactics of maintenance of patients is explained by heterogeneity of clinical manifestations of brucellosis and different rate of progression of organs pathology. Despite of low mortality, this pathology quite often results in disability of patient. The frequent transition of acute process into chronic one (40-60%), probability of development of primary chronic brucellosis determines interest of researchers to issues of immunopathogenesis of this disease. The article presents review of achievements in studies of polymorphism of genes of gamma-interferon in the given area.

  5. Regulation of interferon-dependent mRNA translation of target genes.

    PubMed

    Kroczynska, Barbara; Mehrotra, Swarna; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Kaur, Surinder; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2014-04-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are released by cells on exposure to various stimuli, including viruses, double-stranded RNA, and other cytokines and various polypeptides. These IFNs play important physiological and pathophysiological roles in humans. Many clinical studies have established activity for these cytokines in the treatment of several malignancies, viral syndromes, and autoimmune disorders. In this review, the regulatory effects of type I and II IFN receptors on the translation-initiation process mediated by mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and the known mechanisms of control of mRNA translation of IFN-stimulated genes are summarized and discussed.

  6. Underexpression of Specific Interferon Genes Is Associated with Poor Prognosis of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Because the prognosis of melanoma is challenging and inaccurate when using current clinical approaches, clinicians are seeking more accurate molecular markers to improve risk models. Accordingly, we performed a survival analysis on 404 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort of skin cutaneous melanoma. Using our recently developed gene network model, we identified biological signatures that confidently predict the prognosis of melanoma (p-value < 10−5). Our model predicted 38 cases as low–risk and 54 cases as high–risk. The probability of surviving at least 5 years was 64% for low–risk and 14% for high–risk cases. In particular, we found that the overexpression of specific genes in the mitotic cell cycle pathway and the underexpression of specific genes in the interferon pathway are both associated with poor prognosis. We show that our predictive model assesses the risk more accurately than the traditional Clark staging method. Therefore, our model can help clinicians design treatment strategies more effectively. Furthermore, our findings shed light on the biology of melanoma and its prognosis. This is the first in vivo study that demonstrates the association between the interferon pathway and the prognosis of melanoma. PMID:28114321

  7. Transcriptional basis for hyporesponsiveness of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase gene to lipopolysaccharide/interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Laubach, V E; Alley, E W; Edwards, K A; Sherman, P A; Russell, S W; Murphy, W J

    1996-04-01

    The work reported here resolves, at the level of gene regulation, the controversy as to whether or not human monocytes/macrophages can produce nitric oxide (NO) when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), with or without co-stimulation by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Studies included structural comparison of the promoters for human and mouse inducible NO synthase (iNOS) genes, transfection and assay of human and mouse iNOS promoter regions in response to LPS +/- IFN-gamma, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays of kappa B response elements. Two explanations for hyporesponsiveness of the human iNOS promoter to LPS +/- IFN-gamma were found: (1) multiple inactivating nucleotide substitutions in the human counterpart of the enhancer element that has been shown to regulate LPS/IFN-gamma induced expression of the mouse iNOS gene; and (2) and absence of one or more nuclear factors in human macrophages (e.g., an LPS-inducible nuclear factor-kappa B/Rel complex), that is (are) required for maximal expression of the gene. The importance of resolution of this controversy is that future research in this area should be directed toward the understanding of alternative mechanisms that can result in the successful production of NO.

  8. Regression of melanoma metastases after immunotherapy is associated with activation of antigen presentation and interferon-mediated rejection genes

    PubMed Central

    Carretero, Rafael; Wang, Ena; Rodriguez, Ana I.; Reinboth, Jennifer; Ascierto, Maria L.; Engle, Alyson M.; Liu, Hui; Camacho, Francisco M.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Garrido, Federico; Cabrera, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a comparative gene expression analysis of 15 metastases (10 regressing and 5 progressing) obtained from 2 melanoma patients with mixed response following different forms of immunotherapy. Whole genome transcriptional analysis clearly indicate that regression of melanoma metastases is due to an acute immune rejection mediated by the upregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation and interferon mediated response (STAT-1/IRF-1) in all the regressing metastases from both patients. In contrast, progressing metastases showed low transcription levels of genes involved in these pathways. Histological analysis showed T cells and HLA-DR positive infiltrating cells in the regressing but not in the progressing metastases. Quantitative expression analysis of HLA-A, B and C genes on microdisected tumoral regions indicate higher HLA expression in regressing than in progressing metastases. The molecular signature obtained in melanoma rejection appeared to be similar to that observed in other forms of immune-mediated tissue-specific rejection such as allograft, pathogen clearance, graft versus host or autoimmune disease, supporting the immunological constant of rejection. We favor the idea that the major factor determining the success or failure of immunotherapy is the nature of HLA Class I alterations in tumor cells and not the type of immunotherapy used. If the molecular alteration is reversible by the immunotherapy, the HLA expression will be upregulated and the lesion will be recognized and rejected. In contrast, if the defect is structural the MHC Class I expression will remain unchanged and the lesion will progress. PMID:21964766

  9. Identification and implantation stage-specific expression of an interferon-alpha-regulated gene in human and rat endometrium.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Zhang, M; Kumar, S; Zhu, L J; Chen, D; Bagchi, M K; Bagchi, I C

    2001-06-01

    Implantation of the developing blastocyst is regulated by multiple effectors, such as steroid hormones, growth factors, and cytokines. To understand how these diverse signaling pathways interact to modulate uterine gene expression, we employed a gene expression screen technique to identify the molecules that are induced in the periimplantation rat uterus. Here we report the isolation of a complementary DNA representing a novel gene, interferon-regulated gene 1 (IRG1). This gene exhibits significant homology to interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta-inducible human genes p27 and 6-16, indicating that these genes may belong to the same family. Consistent with this finding, expression of IRG1 messenger RNA (mRNA) in rat uterus increased about 20-fold in response to IFNalpha. Uterine expression of IRG1 was also stimulated by estrogen and was partially inhibited by an antiestrogen, ICI 182,780. In pregnant rats, IRG1 expression was high on day 1, but declined on days 2 and 3. The level of IRG1 mRNA again rose transiently on day 4 immediately preceding implantation. In situ hybridization analysis localized the IRG1 mRNA expression in the endometrial epithelium and the surrounding stroma. Interestingly, the expression of p27, which shows high homology to IRG1, was strongly enhanced in human endometrium during the midsecretory phase of the menstrual cycle, overlapping the putative window of implantation. Both IRG1 and p27 mRNAs are therefore induced in the endometrium in an implantation stage-specific manner. We also observed a synergistic interaction between IFNalpha and estrogen receptor signaling pathways that led to maximal induction of p27 mRNA in Ishikawa cells. Although the functional roles of IRG1 and p27 remain unclear, we describe for the first time, identification of a gene family regulated by IFNalpha in both rodent and human uteri. More importantly, our studies reveal that a complex interplay between the steroid hormone and IFN pathways regulates the expression of these

  10. Noncanonical autophagy is required for type I interferon secretion in response to DNA-immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Henault, Jill; Martinez, Jennifer; Riggs, Jeffrey M; Tian, Jane; Mehta, Payal; Clarke, Lorraine; Sasai, Miwa; Latz, Eicke; Brinkmann, Melanie M; Iwasaki, Akiko; Coyle, Anthony J; Kolbeck, Roland; Green, Douglas R; Sanjuan, Miguel A

    2012-12-14

    Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) is largely responsible for discriminating self from pathogenic DNA. However, association of host DNA with autoantibodies activates TLR9, inducing the pathogenic secretion of type I interferons (IFNs) from plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Here, we found that in response to DNA-containing immune complexes (DNA-IC), but not to soluble ligands, IFN-α production depended upon the convergence of the phagocytic and autophagic pathways, a process called microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3)-associated phagocytosis (LAP). LAP was required for TLR9 trafficking into a specialized interferon signaling compartment by a mechanism that involved autophagy-related proteins, but not the conventional autophagic preinitiation complex, or adaptor protein-3 (AP-3). Our findings unveil a new role for nonconventional autophagy in inflammation and provide one mechanism by which anti-DNA autoantibodies, such as those found in several autoimmune disorders, bypass the controls that normally restrict the apportionment of pathogenic DNA and TLR9 to the interferon signaling compartment.

  11. [Good virological response to pegylated interferon alfa monotherapy of chronic hepatitis C infection in hemodialysis patient].

    PubMed

    Caro, P; Núñez, A; Delgado, R; Dapena, F; Amann, R

    2007-01-01

    Liver disease caused by hepatitis C virus infection is associated to significant morbidity and mortality among patient with end stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis (HD). Therapy in these patients consists of Interferon, preferably pegylated Interferon (pIFN), thus Ribavirin (RBV) is not recommended for patients with impaired renal function, outside its use in controlled trials. We report a case of 35 years young woman on HD treatment, renal transplantation candidate with chronic hepatitis C virus infection, HCV RNA positive (by PCR), genotype 3a, moderate viral load, light increase of aminotransferases. Pegylated Interferon alfa-2a (135 mcg/weekly/SC) was initiated. She achieved HVC RNA negative within 12 weeks, following with pINF as monotherapy to complete 24 weeks (6 months). Sustained virologic response persisted to 24 and 48 weeks. Most important side effects were light detriment of anemia, moderate neutropenia and thombocytopenia, transitory elevation of transaminases and "flu-like" syndrome. Adverse events were well tolerated with total compliance with pIFN dose, no requiring reduce or stop the treatment. These findings confirm that hemodialysis patients with chronic hepatitis C respond well to pegylated IFN monotherapy and a long-term sustained virologic response is achieved, appears to be better tolerated with less side effects, so combination therapy with pINF plus ribavirin is not necessary in all cases.

  12. Interaction of SARS and MERS Coronaviruses with the Antiviral Interferon Response.

    PubMed

    Kindler, E; Thiel, V; Weber, F

    2016-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) are the most severe coronavirus (CoV)-associated diseases in humans. The causative agents, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, are of zoonotic origin but may be transmitted to humans, causing severe and often fatal respiratory disease in their new host. The two coronaviruses are thought to encode an unusually large number of factors that allow them to thrive and replicate in the presence of efficient host defense mechanisms, especially the antiviral interferon system. Here, we review the recent progress in our understanding of the strategies that highly pathogenic coronaviruses employ to escape, dampen, or block the antiviral interferon response in human cells.

  13. Homozygous deletion of the. alpha. - and. beta. sub 1 -interferon genes in human leukemia and derived cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, M.O.; Ziemin, S.; Le Beau, M.M.; Pitha, P.; Smith, S.D.; Chilcote, R.R.; Rowley, J.D. )

    1988-07-01

    The loss of bands p21-22 from one chromosome 9 homologue as a consequence of a deletion of the short arm (del(9p)), unbalanced translocation, or monosomy 9 is frequently observed in the malignant cells of patients with lymphoid neoplasias, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The {alpha}- and {beta}{sub 1}-interferon genes have been assigned to this chromosome region (9p21-22). The authors now present evidence of the homozygous deletion of the interferon genes in neoplastic hematopoietic cell lines and primary leukemia cells in the presence or absence of chromosomal deletions that are detectable at the level of the light microscope. In these cell lines, the deletion of the interferon genes is accompanied by a deficiency of 5{prime}-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase, an enzyme of purine metabolism. These homozygous deletions may be associated with the loss of a tumor-suppressor gene that is involved in the development of these neoplasias. The relevant genes may be either the interferon genes themselves or a gene that has a tumor-suppressor function and is closely linked to them.

  14. Type I interferon related genes are common genes on the early stage after vaccination by meta-analysis of microarray data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junnan; Shao, Jie; Wu, Xing; Mao, Qunying; Wang, Yiping; Gao, Fan; Kong, Wei; Liang, Zhenglun

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find common immune mechanism across different kinds of vaccines. A meta-analysis of microarray datasets was performed using publicly available microarray Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and Array Express data sets of vaccination records. Seven studies (out of 35) were selected for this meta-analysis. A total of 447 chips (145 pre-vaccination and 302 post-vaccination) were included. Significance analysis of microarrays (SAM) program was used for screening differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Functional pathway enrichment for the DEGs was conducted in DAVID Gene Ontology (GO) database. Twenty DEGs were identified, of which 10 up-regulated genes involved immune response. Six of which were type I interferon (IFN) related genes, including LY6E, MX1, OAS3, IFI44L, IFI6 and IFITM3. Ten down-regulated genes mainly mediated negative regulation of cell proliferation and cell motion. Results of a subgroup analysis showed that although the kinds of genes varied widely between days 3 and 7 post vaccination, the pathways between them are basically the same, such as immune response and response to viruses, etc. For an independent verification of these 6 type I IFN related genes, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected at baseline and day 3 after the vaccination from 8 Enterovirus 71(EV71) vaccinees and were assayed by RT-PCR. Results showed that the 6 DEGs were also upregulated in EV71 vaccinees. In summary, meta-analysis methods were used to explore the immune mechanism of vaccines and results indicated that the type I IFN related genes and corresponding pathways were common in early immune responses for different kinds of vaccines.

  15. Response of Three Different Viruses to Interferon Priming and Dithiothreitol Treatment of Avian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lostalé-Seijo, Irene; Martínez-Costas, José

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have previously shown that the replication of avian reovirus (ARV) in chicken cells is much more resistant to interferon (IFN) than the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) or vaccinia virus (VV). In this study, we have investigated the role that the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) plays in the sensitivity of these three viruses toward the antiviral action of chicken interferon. Our data suggest that while interferon priming of avian cells blocks vaccinia virus replication by promoting PKR activation, the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus appears to be blocked at a pretranslational step. Our data further suggest that the replication of avian reovirus in chicken cells is quite resistant to interferon priming because this virus uses strategies to downregulate PKR activation and also because translation of avian reovirus mRNAs is more resistant to phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of initiation factor eIF2 than translation of their cellular counterparts. Our results further reveal that the avian reovirus protein sigmaA is able to prevent PKR activation and that this function is dependent on its double-stranded RNA-binding activity. Finally, this study demonstrates that vaccinia virus and avian reovirus, but not vesicular stomatitis virus, express/induce factors that counteract the ability of dithiothreitol to promote eIF2 phosphorylation. Our data demonstrate that each of the three different viruses used in this study elicits distinct responses to interferon and to dithiothreitol-induced eIF2 phosphorylation when infecting avian cells. IMPORTANCE Type I interferons constitute the first barrier of defense against viral infections, and one of the best characterized antiviral strategies is mediated by the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR). The results of this study revealed that IFN priming of avian cells has little effect on avian reovirus (ARV) replication but drastically diminishes the

  16. Interferon-related and other immune genes are downregulated in peripheral blood leukocytes in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Dosiou, Chrysoula; Lathi, Ruth B; Tulac, Suzana; Huang, S-T Joseph; Giudice, Linda C

    2004-05-01

    Interaction between the endocrine and the immune systems has been suggested by observations of sexual dimorphism of the immune response, differential susceptibility to autoimmunity between the sexes, changes in autoimmune disease activity during the menstrual cycle and in pregnancy and in vitro studies of hormonal influence on cytokine production.We hypothesized that if there is hormonal regulation of the immune response, this would be manifest in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) at different phases of the menstrual cycle. In this study, we describe gene profiling of PBLs from the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. We observe important differences in immune gene expression, with significant down-regulation of the Th1 immune response in the luteal phase. A significant number of interferon (IFN)-related genes are amongst the downregulated genes. These results support significant hormonal regulation of the immune system and may have therapeutic implications in diseases of autoimmunity in women.

  17. The brain parenchyma has a type I interferon response that can limit virus spread

    PubMed Central

    Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Göz Aytürk, Didem; Soh, Timothy K.; Chrenek, Ryan; O’Loughlin, Elaine; Madore, Charlotte; Butovsky, Oleg; Cepko, Constance L.

    2017-01-01

    The brain has a tightly regulated environment that protects neurons and limits inflammation, designated “immune privilege.” However, there is not an absolute lack of an immune response. We tested the ability of the brain to initiate an innate immune response to a virus, which was directly injected into the brain parenchyma, and to determine whether this response could limit viral spread. We injected vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a transsynaptic tracer, or naturally occurring VSV-derived defective interfering particles (DIPs), into the caudate–putamen (CP) and scored for an innate immune response and inhibition of virus spread. We found that the brain parenchyma has a functional type I interferon (IFN) response that can limit VSV spread at both the inoculation site and among synaptically connected neurons. Furthermore, we characterized the response of microglia to VSV infection and found that infected microglia produced type I IFN and uninfected microglia induced an innate immune response following virus injection. PMID:27980033

  18. Cytoplasmic localized infected cell protein 0 (bICP0) encoded by bovine herpesvirus 1 inhibits beta interferon promoter activity and reduces IRF3 (interferon response factor 3) protein levels

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Leticia Frizzo; Gaudreault, Natasha; Jones, Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), an alpha-herpesvirinae subfamily member, establishes a life-long latent infection in sensory neurons. Periodically, BHV-1 reactivates from latency, infectious virus is spread, and consequently virus transmission occurs. BHV-1 acute infection causes upper respiratory track infections and conjunctivitis in infected cattle. As a result of transient immunesuppression, BHV-1 infections can also lead to life-threatening secondary bacterial pneumonia that is referred to as bovine respiratory disease. The infected cell protein 0 (bICP0) encoded by BHV-1 reduces human beta-interferon (IFN-β) promoter activity, in part, by inducing degradation of interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) and interacting with IRF7. In contrast to humans, cattle contain three IFN-β genes. All three bovine IFN-β proteins have anti-viral activity: but each IFN-β gene has a distinct transcriptional promoter. We have recently cloned and characterized the three bovine IFN-β promoters. Relative to the human IFN-β promoter, each of the three IFN-β promoters contain differences in the four positive regulatory domains that are required for virus-induced activity. In this study, we demonstrate that bICP0 effectively inhibits bovine IFN-β promoter activity following transfection of low passage bovine cells with interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) or IRF7. A bICP0 mutant that localizes to the cytoplasm inhibits bovine IFN-β promoter activity as efficiently as wt bICP0. The cytoplasmic localized bICP0 protein also induced IRF3 degradation with similar efficiency as wt bICP0. In summary, these studies suggested that cytoplasmic localized bICP0 plays a role in inhibiting the IFN-β response during productive infection. PMID:21689696

  19. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling reveals that HIV-1 Vpr differentially regulates interferon-stimulated genes in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Zahoor, Muhammad Atif; Xue, Guangai; Sato, Hirotaka; Aida, Yoko

    2015-10-02

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that directly link the innate and adaptive immune responses. HIV-1 infection of DCs leads to a diverse array of changes in gene expression and play a major role in dissemination of the virus into T-cells. Although HIV-1 Vpr is a pleiotropic protein involved in HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis, its exact role in APCs such as DCs remains elusive. In this study, utilizing a microarray-based systemic biology approach, we found that HIV-1 Vpr differentially regulates (fold change >2.0) more than 200 genes, primarily those involved in the immune response and innate immune response including type I interferon signaling pathway. The differential expression profiles of select genes involved in innate immune responses (interferon-stimulated genes [ISGs]), including MX1, MX2, ISG15, ISG20, IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT3, IFI27, IFI44L, and TNFSF10, were validated by real-time quantitative PCR; the results were consistent with the microarray data. Taken together, our findings are the first to demonstrate that HIV-1 Vpr induces ISGs and activates the type I IFN signaling pathway in human DCs, and provide insights into the role of Vpr in HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  20. High-density nucleosome occupancy map of human chromosome 9p21-22 reveals chromatin organization of the type I interferon gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Freaney, Jonathan E; Zhang, Quanwei; Yigit, Erbay; Kim, Rebecca; Widom, Jonathan; Wang, Ji-Ping; Horvath, Curt M

    2014-09-01

    Genome-wide investigations have dramatically increased our understanding of nucleosome positioning and the role of chromatin in gene regulation, yet some genomic regions have been poorly represented in human nucleosome maps. One such region is represented by human chromosome 9p21-22, which contains the type I interferon gene cluster that includes 16 interferon alpha genes and the single interferon beta, interferon epsilon, and interferon omega genes. A high-density nucleosome mapping strategy was used to generate locus-wide maps of the nucleosome organization of this biomedically important locus at a steady state and during a time course of infection with Sendai virus, an inducer of interferon gene expression. Detailed statistical and computational analysis illustrates that nucleosomes in this locus exhibit preferences for particular dinucleotide and oligomer DNA sequence motifs in vivo, which are similar to those reported for lower eukaryotic nucleosome-DNA interactions. These data were used to visualize the region's chromatin architecture and reveal features that are common to the organization of all the type I interferon genes, indicating a common nucleosome-mediated gene regulatory paradigm. Additionally, this study clarifies aspects of the dynamic changes that occur with the nucleosome occupying the transcriptional start site of the interferon beta gene after virus infection.

  1. Differential expression profiling of spleen microRNAs in response to two distinct type II interferons in Tetraodon nigroviridis.

    PubMed

    Yi, Shibai; Lu, Danqi; Peng, Wan; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Haoran

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous, small non-coding RNAs approximately 18-26 nucleotides in length that regulate target gene expression at the post-transcription level. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is a Th1 cytokine that is involved in both the innate and adaptive immune responses. We previously identified two IFN-γ genes in green-spotted puffer fish (Tetraodon nigroviridis). To determine whether miRNAs participate in IFN-γ-related immune responses, T. nigroviridis spleen cells were treated with recombinant IFN-γ isoforms, and a Solexa high-throughput sequencing method was used to identify miRNAs. In total, 1,556, 1,538 and 1,573 miRNAs were found in the three samples, and differentially expressed miRNAs were determined. In total, 398 miRNAs were differentially expressed after rIFN-γ1 treatment, and 438 miRNAs were differentially expressed after rIFN-γ2 treatment; additionally, 403 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the treatment groups. Ten differentially expressed miRNAs were chosen for validation using qRT-PCR. Target genes for the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted, and GO and KEGG analyses were performed. This study provides basic knowledge regarding fish IFN-γ-induced miRNAs and offers clues for further studies into the mechanisms underlying fish IFN-γ-mediated immune responses.

  2. Differential Expression Profiling of Spleen MicroRNAs in Response to Two Distinct Type II Interferons in Tetraodon nigroviridis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wan; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Haoran

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous, small non-coding RNAs approximately 18–26 nucleotides in length that regulate target gene expression at the post-transcription level. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is a Th1 cytokine that is involved in both the innate and adaptive immune responses. We previously identified two IFN-γ genes in green-spotted puffer fish (Tetraodon nigroviridis). To determine whether miRNAs participate in IFN-γ-related immune responses, T. nigroviridis spleen cells were treated with recombinant IFN-γ isoforms, and a Solexa high-throughput sequencing method was used to identify miRNAs. In total, 1,556, 1,538 and 1,573 miRNAs were found in the three samples, and differentially expressed miRNAs were determined. In total, 398 miRNAs were differentially expressed after rIFN-γ1 treatment, and 438 miRNAs were differentially expressed after rIFN-γ2 treatment; additionally, 403 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the treatment groups. Ten differentially expressed miRNAs were chosen for validation using qRT-PCR. Target genes for the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted, and GO and KEGG analyses were performed. This study provides basic knowledge regarding fish IFN-γ-induced miRNAs and offers clues for further studies into the mechanisms underlying fish IFN-γ-mediated immune responses. PMID:24800866

  3. The Interferon Type I/III Response to Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Airway Epithelial Cells Can Be Attenuated or Amplified by Antiviral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, R.; Mawhorter, M. E.; Noton, S. L.; Powers, J. G.; Fearns, R.; Cihlar, T.; Perron, M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that causes acute, and occasionally fatal, lower respiratory illness in young infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients. Therapeutic interventions able to cut short viral replication and quickly return the airways to normal function are needed. An understanding of antiviral activities and their effects on host defense mechanisms is important for the design of safe and effective therapy. We targeted functionally and temporally distinct steps within the viral life cycle using small-molecule RSV inhibitors and studied their antiviral activities and their effects on innate interferon responses of airway epithelial cells in vitro. Antivirals acting upstream of RSV polymerase activity (i.e., compounds targeting the fusion protein or the nucleoprotein) reduced viral load immediately postinfection and partially attenuated interferon responses. In contrast, antivirals directed to the RSV polymerase demonstrated activity throughout the viral replication cycle and specifically modulated the RIG-I/mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)/TBK1/IRF3/interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) axis, causing either an upregulation or a downregulation of interferon responses, depending on the mechanism of polymerase inhibition. Notably, polymerase inhibition leading to the accumulation of abortive RNA products correlated with the amplification of interferon-stimulated genes to up to 10 times above normal infection levels. Understanding how antiviral activities and their modulation of innate immunity may affect recovery from RSV infection will help guide the development of safe and effective therapies. IMPORTANCE RSV circulates seasonally, causing acute lower respiratory disease. Therapeutic interventions with efficacy throughout the viral replication cycle, rapid viral clearance, and prevention of potentially harmful inflammatory responses are desirable. Compounds targeting the RSV polymerase

  4. Amphibian (Xenopus laevis) tadpoles and adult frogs mount distinct interferon responses to the Frog Virus 3 ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Wendel, Emily S; Yaparla, Amulya; Koubourli, Daphne V; Grayfer, Leon

    2017-03-01

    Infections of amphibians by Frog Virus 3 (FV3) and other ranavirus genus members are significantly contributing to the amphibian declines, yet much remains unknown regarding amphibian antiviral immunity. Notably, amphibians represent an important step in the evolution of antiviral interferon (IFN) cytokines as they are amongst the first vertebrates to possess both type I and type III IFNs. Accordingly, we examined the roles of type I and III IFNs in the skin of FV3-challenged amphibian Xenopus laevis) tadpoles and adult frogs. Interestingly, FV3-infected tadpoles mounted type III IFN responses, whereas adult frogs relied on type I IFN immunity. Subcutaneous administration of type I or type III IFNs offered short-term protection of tadpoles against FV3 and these type I and type III IFNs induced the expression of distinct antiviral genes in the tadpole skin. Moreover, subcutaneous injection of tadpoles with type III IFN significantly extended their survival and reduced FV3 dissemination.

  5. Recombinant interferon-α in myelofibrosis reduces bone marrow fibrosis, improves its morphology and is associated with clinical response.

    PubMed

    Pizzi, Marco; Silver, Richard T; Barel, Ariella; Orazi, Attilio

    2015-10-01

    Recombinant interferon-α represents a well-established therapeutic option for the treatment of polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia. Recent studies also suggest a role for recombinant interferon-α in the treatment of 'early stage' primary myelofibrosis, but few studies have reported the bone marrow changes after clinically successful interferon therapy. The aim of the present study is to detail the histological responses to recombinant interferon-α in primary myelofibrosis and post-polycythemia vera/post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis and to correlate these with clinical findings. We retrospectively studied 12 patients with primary myelofibrosis or post-polycythemia vera/post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis, who had been treated with recombinant interferon-α. Six patients had received other prior cytoreductive therapies. Bone marrow biopsy was assessed for the following histological parameters: (i) cellularity; (ii) myeloid-to-erythroid ratio; (iii) megakaryocyte tight clusters; (iv) megakaryocyte and naked nuclei density; (v) megakaryocytic atypia; (vi) fibrosis; and (vii) the percentage of blasts. Clinical and laboratory data were included: (i) constitutional symptoms; (ii) splenomegaly, if present; and (iii) complete cell blood count. The clinical response to therapy was evaluated using the International Working Group for Myelofibrosis Research and Treatment/European LeukemiaNet response criteria. The Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System (DIPSS) score was calculated before and after recombinant interferon-α administration. Successful interferon therapy for myelofibrosis was associated with a significant reduction of marrow fibrosis, cellularity, megakaryocyte density and naked nuclei density. The presence of JAK2(V617F) mutation correlated with improved DIPSS score. JAK2(V617F)-negative cases showed worsening of such score or evolution to acute myeloid leukemia. Cytogenetic analysis documented a normal karyotype in all

  6. Interferon gamma response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis specific lipopentapeptide antigen L5P in cattle.

    PubMed

    Holbert, Sébastien; Branger, Maxime; Souriau, Armel; Lamoureux, Bérénice; Ganneau, Christelle; Richard, Gaëlle; Cochard, Thierry; Tholoniat, Christophe; Bay, Sylvie; Winter, Nathalie; Moyen, Jean Louis; Biet, Franck

    2015-10-01

    After Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response indicative of early Th1 activation may be detected using interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). Currently, the purified protein derivatives (PPDs), i.e., the total extract of mycobacteria antigens are used to recall CMI responses against Map. This study aimed to assess the ability of the chemically synthesized Map specific cell wall lipopentapeptide L5P to induce CMI response in cows infected by Map compared to PPD. L5P and PPD elicited an IFN-γ response in 12 and 35 animals from two Map infected herds respectively, but IFN-γ was not detected in the 13 cows recruited from a non-infected herd. Levels of IFN-γ detected were higher with PPD than with L5P. There was no correlation between the IFN-γ response and the humoral response to Map or faecal culture.

  7. Extremes of Interferon-Stimulated Gene Expression Associate with Worse Outcomes in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nick, Jerry A.; Caceres, Silvia M.; Kret, Jennifer E.; Poch, Katie R.; Strand, Matthew; Faino, Anna V.; Nichols, David P.; Saavedra, Milene T.; Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L.; Geraci, Mark W.; Burnham, Ellen L.; Fessler, Michael B.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Abraham, Edward; Moss, Marc; Malcolm, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) severity may be influenced by heterogeneity of neutrophil activation. Interferon-stimulated genes (ISG) are a broad gene family induced by Type I interferons, often as a response to viral infections, which evokes extensive immunomodulation. We tested the hypothesis that over- or under-expression of immunomodulatory ISG by neutrophils is associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with ARDS. Genome-wide transcriptional profiles of circulating neutrophils isolated from patients with sepsis-induced ARDS (n = 31) and healthy controls (n = 19) were used to characterize ISG expression. Hierarchical clustering of expression identified 3 distinct subject groups with Low, Mid and High ISG expression. ISG accounting for the greatest variability in expression were identified (MX1, IFIT1, and ISG15) and used to analyze a prospective cohort at the Colorado ARDS Network site. One hundred twenty ARDS patients from four urban hospitals were enrolled within 72 hours of initiation of mechanical ventilation. Circulating neutrophils were isolated from patients and expression of ISG determined by PCR. Samples were stratified by standard deviation from the mean into High (n = 21), Mid, (n = 82) or Low (n = 17) ISG expression. Clinical outcomes were compared between patients with High or Low ISG expression to those with Mid-range expression. At enrollment, there were no differences in age, gender, co-existing medical conditions, or type of physiologic injury between cohorts. After adjusting for age, race, gender and BMI, patients with either High or Low ISG expression had significantly worse clinical outcomes than those in the Mid for number of 28-day ventilator- and ICU-free days (P = 0.0006 and 0.0004), as well as 90-day mortality and 90-day home with unassisted breathing (P = 0.02 and 0.004). These findings suggest extremes of ISG expression by circulating neutrophils from ARDS patients recovered early in the syndrome are associated

  8. Interferon Response Factors 3 and 7 Protect against Chikungunya Virus Hemorrhagic Fever and Shock

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Penny A.; Wilson, Jane; Gardner, Joy; Larcher, Thibaut; Babarit, Candice; Le, Thuy T.; Anraku, Itaru; Kumagai, Yutaro; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Akira, Shizuo; Khromykh, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infections can produce severe disease and mortality. Here we show that CHIKV infection of adult mice deficient in interferon response factors 3 and 7 (IRF3/7−/−) is lethal. Mortality was associated with undetectable levels of alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) in serum, ∼50- and ∼10-fold increases in levels of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), respectively, increased virus replication, edema, vasculitis, hemorrhage, fever followed by hypothermia, oliguria, thrombocytopenia, and raised hematocrits. These features are consistent with hemorrhagic shock and were also evident in infected IFN-α/β receptor-deficient mice. In situ hybridization suggested CHIKV infection of endothelium, fibroblasts, skeletal muscle, mononuclear cells, chondrocytes, and keratinocytes in IRF3/7−/− mice; all but the latter two stained positive in wild-type mice. Vaccination protected IRF3/7−/− mice, suggesting that defective antibody responses were not responsible for mortality. IPS-1- and TRIF-dependent pathways were primarily responsible for IFN-α/β induction, with IRF7 being upregulated >100-fold in infected wild-type mice. These studies suggest that inadequate IFN-α/β responses following virus infection can be sufficient to induce hemorrhagic fever and shock, a finding with implications for understanding severe CHIKV disease and dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. PMID:22761364

  9. The interferon-inducible HIN-200 gene family in apoptosis and inflammation: implication for autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mondini, Michele; Costa, Silvia; Sponza, Simone; Gugliesi, Francesca; Gariglio, Marisa; Landolfo, Santo

    2010-04-01

    The Ifi-200/HIN-200 gene family encodes highly homologous human (IFI16, myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen, absent in melanoma 2, and IFIX) and murine proteins (Ifi202a, Ifi202b, Ifi203, Ifi204, Ifi205, and Ifi206), which are induced by type I and II interferons (IFN). These proteins have been described as regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation and, more recently, several reports have suggested their involvement in both apoptotic and inflammatory processes. The relevance of HIN-200 proteins in human disease is beginning to be clarified, and emerging experimental data indicate their role in autoimmunity. Autoimmune disorders are sustained by perpetual activation of inflammatory process and a link between autoimmunity and apoptosis has been clearly established. Moreover, the interferon system is now considered as a key player in autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythemathosus, systemic sclerosis, and Sjögren's syndrome, and it is therefore conceivable to hypothesize that HIN-200 may be among the pivotal mediators of IFN activity in autoimmune disease. In particular, the participation of HIN-200 proteins in apoptosis and inflammation could support their potential role in autoimmunity.

  10. The Interferon-Stimulated Gene IFITM3 Restricts Infection and Pathogenesis of Arthritogenic and Encephalitic Alphaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Subhajit; Hyde, Jennifer L.; Gorman, Matthew J.; Farzan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Host cells respond to viral infections by producing type I interferon (IFN), which induces the expression of hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Although ISGs mediate a protective state against many pathogens, the antiviral functions of the majority of these genes have not been identified. IFITM3 is a small transmembrane ISG that restricts a broad range of viruses, including orthomyxoviruses, flaviviruses, filoviruses, and coronaviruses. Here, we show that alphavirus infection is increased in Ifitm3−/− and Ifitm locus deletion (Ifitm-del) fibroblasts and, reciprocally, reduced in fibroblasts transcomplemented with Ifitm3. Mechanistic studies showed that Ifitm3 did not affect viral binding or entry but inhibited pH-dependent fusion. In a murine model of chikungunya virus arthritis, Ifitm3−/− mice sustained greater joint swelling in the ipsilateral ankle at days 3 and 7 postinfection, and this correlated with higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and viral burden. Flow cytometric analysis suggested that Ifitm3−/− macrophages from the spleen were infected at greater levels than observed in wild-type (WT) mice, results that were supported by experiments with Ifitm3−/− bone marrow-derived macrophages. Ifitm3−/− mice also were more susceptible than WT mice to lethal alphavirus infection with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, and this was associated with greater viral burden in multiple organs. Collectively, our data define an antiviral role for Ifitm3 in restricting infection of multiple alphaviruses. IMPORTANCE The interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3) inhibits infection of multiple families of viruses in cell culture. Compared to other viruses, much less is known about the antiviral effect of IFITM3 on alphaviruses. In this study, we characterized the antiviral activity of mouse Ifitm3 against arthritogenic and encephalitic alphaviruses using cells and animals with a targeted gene deletion of Ifitm3 as

  11. Ultrasound-mediated interferon {beta} gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-{beta} genes both in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon {beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-{beta} in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-{beta} genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-{beta} gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-{beta} gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  12. Orf virus encodes a homolog of the vaccinia virus interferon-resistance gene E3L.

    PubMed

    McInnes, C J; Wood, A R; Mercer, A A

    1998-01-01

    A homolog of the vaccinia virus (VAC) interferon resistance gene E3L has been discovered in orf virus strain NZ-2, a parapoxvirus that infects sheep, goats and humans. The gene is located 20 kb from the left terminus of the orf virus genome and is transcribed towards this terminus. RNase protection studies have been used to define the limits of the gene and Northern analysis revealed that it is expressed early in infection. The predicted amino acid sequence of the orf virus protein shares 31% identity (57% similarity) with the VAC E3L protein. Four of the six residues identified as being essential to dsRNA binding in the vaccinia virus protein are conserved in the orf virus protein whilst the other two amino acid changes are conservative substitutions. The orf virus gene has been sequenced in two other orf virus strains which vary markedly in their ability to produce experimental lesions in vivo. Their predicted protein sequences vary by less than 3% from the NZ-2 protein. The recombinant orf virus protein, expressed as a fusion protein in E. coli, bound double-stranded (ds)RNA but not dsDNA, single-stranded (ss)DNA or ssRNA . This is the first demonstration of a VAC E3L-like gene encoded by a parapoxvirus.

  13. Role of the Alpha/Beta Interferon Response in the Acquisition of Susceptibility to Poliovirus by Kidney Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Ida-Hosonuma, Miki; Yoneyama, Mitsutoshi; Fujita, Takashi; Horie, Hitoshi; Miyazawa, Miwako; Abe, Shinobu; Simizu, Bunsiti; Koike, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Replication of poliovirus (PV) is restricted to a few sites, including the brain and spinal cord. However, this neurotropism is not conserved in cultured cells. Monkey kidney cells become susceptible to PV infection after cultivation in vitro, and cell lines of monolayer cultures from almost any tissue of primates are susceptible to PV infection. These observations suggest that cellular changes during cultivation are required for acquisition of susceptibility. The molecular basis for the cellular changes during this process is not known. We investigated the relationship between PV susceptibility and interferon (IFN) response in primary cultured kidney and liver cells derived from transgenic mice expressing human PV receptor and in several primate cell lines. Both kidneys and liver in vivo showed rapid IFN response within 6 h postinfection. However, monkey and mouse kidney cells in culture and primate cell lines, which were susceptible to PV, did not show such rapid response or showed no response at all. On the other hand, primary cultured liver cells, which were partially resistant to infection, showed rapid IFN induction. The loss of IFN inducibility in kidney cells was associated with a decrease in expression of IFN-stimulated genes involved in IFN response. Mouse kidney cells pretreated with a small dose of IFN, in turn, restored IFN inducibility and resistance to PV. These results strongly suggest that the cells in culture acquire PV susceptibility during the process of cultivation by losing rapid IFN response that has been normally maintained in extraneural tissues in vivo. PMID:16611890

  14. Characterization of the interferon genes in homozygous rainbow trout reveals two novel genes, alternate splicing and differential regulation of duplicated genes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, M.K.; Laing, K.J.; Woodson, J.C.; Thorgaard, G.H.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    The genes encoding the type I and type II interferons (IFNs) have previously been identified in rainbow trout and their proteins partially characterized. These previous studies reported a single type II IFN (rtIFN-??) and three rainbow trout type I IFN genes that are classified into either group I (rtIFN1, rtIFN2) or group II (rtIFN3). In this present study, we report the identification of a novel IFN-?? gene (rtIFN-??2) and a novel type I group II IFN (rtIFN4) in homozygous rainbow trout and predict that additional IFN genes or pseudogenes exist in the rainbow trout genome. Additionally, we provide evidence that short and long forms of rtIFN1 are actively and differentially transcribed in homozygous trout, and likely arose due to alternate splicing of the first exon. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) assays were developed to systematically profile all of the rainbow trout IFN transcripts, with high specificity at an individual gene level, in na??ve fish and after stimulation with virus or viral-related molecules. Cloned PCR products were used to ensure the specificity of the qRT-PCR assays and as absolute standards to assess transcript abundance of each gene. All IFN genes were modulated in response to Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), a DNA vaccine based on the IHNV glycoprotein, and poly I:C. The most inducible of the type I IFN genes, by all stimuli tested, were rtIFN3 and the short transcript form of rtIFN1. Gene expression of rtIFN-??1 and rtIFN-??2 was highly up-regulated by IHNV infection and DNA vaccination but rtIFN-??2 was induced to a greater magnitude. The specificity of the qRT-PCR assays reported here will be useful for future studies aimed at identifying which cells produce IFNs at early time points after infection. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paijo, Jennifer; Döring, Marius; Spanier, Julia; Grabski, Elena; Nooruzzaman, Mohammed; Schmidt, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Messerle, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Kaever, Volkhard; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages. PMID:27058035

  16. Pharmacogenomics of interferon beta and glatiramer acetate response: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mahurkar, Sunil; Suppiah, Vijayaprakash; O'Doherty, Catherine

    2014-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common inflammatory and degenerative autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system with considerable heterogeneity in all aspects, including response to therapy. A number of disease modifying drugs, including traditional first line agents such as, interferon-beta (IFN-β) and glatiramer acetate (GA) are available for disease management. However, a considerable number of patients fail to achieve adequate response at therapeutic doses of IFN-β or GA. This variability in response to treatment has prompted the search for prognostic markers in order to personalize and optimize therapy so as to treat MS more efficiently. This review will summarize the existing literature examining the pharmacogenomics of IFN-β and GA response in MS patients.

  17. Remodelling of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in response to interferons.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Ulrike; Krüger, Elke

    2008-10-01

    Peptide generation by the UPS (ubiquitin-proteasome system) is rate-limiting in MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation in response to virus-induced IFNs (interferons). In this process, the role of IFN-induced rapid remodelling of the UPS is less defined. IFN-mediated de novo formation of different proteasome compositions as i20S (immunoproteasomes) or m20S (mixed-type proteasomes) essentially supports the rapid adjustment of the mammalian immune system to pathogens. This adjustment is of particular importance for the immune response to rapidly replicating viruses. In agreement, i20S formation has been shown to be an accelerated and transient response. Moreover, i20S and/or PA28 (proteasome activator 28) are essentially required for the generation of certain viral epitopes. In the present paper, we discuss how IFNs consecutively regulate the UPS at different levels, thereby improving the immune responsiveness of target cells.

  18. "Bad genes" & criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    González-Tapia, María Isabel; Obsuth, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The genetics of the accused is trying to break into the courts. To date several candidate genes have been put forward and their links to antisocial behavior have been examined and documented with some consistency. In this paper, we focus on the so called "warrior gene", or the low-activity allele of the MAOA gene, which has been most consistently related to human behavior and specifically to violence and antisocial behavior. In preparing this paper we had two objectives. First, to summarize and analyze the current scientific evidence, in order to gain an in depth understanding of the state of the issue and determine whether a dominant line of generally accepted scientific knowledge in this field can be asserted. Second, to derive conclusions and put forward recommendations related to the use of genetic information, specifically the presence of the low-activity genotype of the MAOA gene, in modulation of criminal responsibility in European and US courts.

  19. Interferon-mediated innate immune responses against malaria parasite liver stages.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica L; Sack, Brandon K; Baldwin, Michael; Vaughan, Ashley M; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2014-04-24

    Mosquito-transmitted malaria parasites infect hepatocytes and asymptomatically replicate as liver stages. Using RNA sequencing, we show that a rodent malaria liver-stage infection stimulates a robust innate immune response including type I interferon (IFN) and IFNγ pathways. Liver-stage infection is suppressed by these infection-engendered innate responses. This suppression was abrogated in mice deficient in IFNγ, the type I IFN α/β receptor (IFNAR), and interferon regulatory factor 3. Natural killer and CD49b(+)CD3(+) natural killer T (NKT) cells increased in the liver after a primary infection, and CD1d-restricted NKT cells, which secrete IFNγ, were critical in reducing liver-stage burden of a secondary infection. Lack of IFNAR signaling abrogated the increase in NKT cell numbers in the liver, showing a link between type I IFN signaling, cell recruitment, and subsequent parasite elimination. Our findings demonstrate innate immune sensing of malaria parasite liver-stage infection and that the ensuing innate responses can eliminate the parasite.

  20. Zebra Fish Lacking Adaptive Immunity Acquire an Antiviral Alert State Characterized by Upregulated Gene Expression of Apoptosis, Multigene Families, and Interferon-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    García-Valtanen, Pablo; Martínez-López, Alicia; López-Muñoz, Azucena; Bello-Perez, Melissa; Medina-Gali, Regla M.; Ortega-Villaizán, María del Mar; Varela, Monica; Figueras, Antonio; Mulero, Víctoriano; Novoa, Beatriz; Estepa, Amparo; Coll, Julio

    2017-01-01

    To investigate fish innate immunity, we have conducted organ and cell immune-related transcriptomic as well as immunohistologic analysis in mutant zebra fish (Danio rerio) lacking adaptive immunity (rag1−/−) at different developmental stages (egg, larvae, and adult), before and after infection with spring viremia carp virus (SVCV). The results revealed that, compared to immunocompetent zebra fish (rag1+/+), rag1−/− acquired increased resistance to SVCV with age, correlating with elevated transcript levels of immune genes in skin/fins and lymphoid organs (head kidney and spleen). Gene sets corresponding to apoptotic functions, immune-related multigene families, and interferon-related genes were constitutively upregulated in uninfected adult rag1−/− zebra fish. Overexpression of activated CASPASE-3 in different tissues before and after infection with SVCV further confirmed increased apoptotic function in rag1−/− zebra fish. Concurrently, staining of different tissue samples with a pan-leukocyte antibody marker showed abundant leukocyte infiltrations in SVCV-infected rag1−/− fish, coinciding with increased transcript expression of genes related to NK-cells and macrophages, suggesting that these genes played a key role in the enhanced immune response of rag1−/− zebra fish to SVCV lethal infection. Overall, we present evidence that indicates that rag1−/− zebra fish acquire an antiviral alert state while they reach adulthood in the absence of adaptive immunity. This antiviral state was characterized by (i) a more rapid response to viral infection, which resulted in increased survival, (ii) the involvement of NK-cell- and macrophage-mediated transcript responses rather than B- and/or T-cell dependent cells, and (iii) enhanced apoptosis, described here for the first time, as well as the similar modulation of multigene family/interferon-related genes previously associated to fish that survived lethal viral infections. From this and other studies

  1. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms within Interferon Signaling Pathway Genes Are Associated with Colorectal Cancer Susceptibility and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shun; Pardini, Barbara; Cheng, Bowang; Naccarati, Alessio; Huhn, Stefanie; Vymetalkova, Veronika; Vodickova, Ludmila; Buchler, Thomas; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel; Försti, Asta

    2014-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) signaling has been suggested to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Our study aimed to examine potentially functional genetic variants in interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), IRF5, IRF7, type I and type II IFN and their receptor genes with respect to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and clinical outcome. Altogether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were covered by the 34 SNPs genotyped in a hospital-based case-control study of 1327 CRC cases and 758 healthy controls from the Czech Republic. We also analyzed these SNPs in relation to overall survival and event-free survival in a subgroup of 483 patients. Seven SNPs in IFNA1, IFNA13, IFNA21, IFNK, IFNAR1 and IFNGR1 were associated with CRC risk. After multiple testing correction, the associations with the SNPs rs2856968 (IFNAR1) and rs2234711 (IFNGR1) remained formally significant (P = 0.0015 and P<0.0001, respectively). Multivariable survival analyses showed that the SNP rs6475526 (IFNA7/IFNA14) was associated with overall survival of the patients (P = 0.041 and event-free survival among patients without distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, P = 0.034). The hazard ratios (HRs) for rs6475526 remained statistically significant even after adjustment for age, gender, grade and stage (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036, respectively), suggesting that rs6475526 is an independent prognostic marker for CRC. Our data suggest that genetic variation in the IFN signaling pathway genes may play a role in the etiology and survival of CRC and further studies are warranted. PMID:25350395

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms within interferon signaling pathway genes are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility and survival.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shun; Pardini, Barbara; Cheng, Bowang; Naccarati, Alessio; Huhn, Stefanie; Vymetalkova, Veronika; Vodickova, Ludmila; Buchler, Thomas; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel; Försti, Asta

    2014-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) signaling has been suggested to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Our study aimed to examine potentially functional genetic variants in interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), IRF5, IRF7, type I and type II IFN and their receptor genes with respect to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and clinical outcome. Altogether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were covered by the 34 SNPs genotyped in a hospital-based case-control study of 1327 CRC cases and 758 healthy controls from the Czech Republic. We also analyzed these SNPs in relation to overall survival and event-free survival in a subgroup of 483 patients. Seven SNPs in IFNA1, IFNA13, IFNA21, IFNK, IFNAR1 and IFNGR1 were associated with CRC risk. After multiple testing correction, the associations with the SNPs rs2856968 (IFNAR1) and rs2234711 (IFNGR1) remained formally significant (P = 0.0015 and P<0.0001, respectively). Multivariable survival analyses showed that the SNP rs6475526 (IFNA7/IFNA14) was associated with overall survival of the patients (P = 0.041 and event-free survival among patients without distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, P = 0.034). The hazard ratios (HRs) for rs6475526 remained statistically significant even after adjustment for age, gender, grade and stage (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036, respectively), suggesting that rs6475526 is an independent prognostic marker for CRC. Our data suggest that genetic variation in the IFN signaling pathway genes may play a role in the etiology and survival of CRC and further studies are warranted.

  3. Identification and characterization of a novel repressor of beta-interferon gene expression.

    PubMed

    Keller, A D; Maniatis, T

    1991-05-01

    We have identified and characterized a novel repressor of human beta-interferon (beta-IFN) gene expression. This protein, designated PRDI-BF1, binds specifically to the PRDI element of the beta-IFN gene promoter and is distinct from previously reported proteins that bind to this sequence. PRDI-BF1 is an 88-kD protein containing five zinc-finger motifs. Cotransfection experiments in cultured mammalian cells revealed that PRDI-BF1 is a potent repressor of PRDI-dependent transcription. PRDI-BF1 blocks virus induction of the intact beta-IFN gene promoter and of synthetic promoters containing multiple PRDI sites. PRDI-BF1 can also block the SV40 enhancer when PRDI sites are located between the enhancer and the promoter. This repression is highly dependent on the location of the PRDI sites, however, indicating that PRDI-BF1 cannot act at a distance. On the basis of the properties of PRDI-BF1 and the observation that PRDI-BF1 mRNA accumulation is virus inducible, we propose that PRDI-BF1 may act as a postinduction repressor of the beta-IFN gene by displacing positive regulatory proteins from the PRDI site of the promoter.

  4. Molecular characterisation and expression analysis of interferon gamma in response to natural Chlamydia infection in the koala, Phascolarctos cinereus.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Marina; Pavasovic, Ana; Prentis, Peter J; Beagley, Kenneth W; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2013-09-25

    Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is a key Th1 cytokine, with a principal role in the immune response against intracellular organisms such as Chlamydia. Along with being responsible for significant morbidity in human populations, Chlamydia is also responsible for wide spread infection and disease in many animal hosts, with reports that many Australian koala subpopulations are endemically infected. An understanding of the role played by IFNγ in koala chlamydial diseases is important for the establishment of better prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against chlamydial infection in this host. A limited number of IFNγ sequences have been published from marsupials and no immune reagents to measure expression have been developed. Through preliminary analysis of the koala transcriptome, we have identified the full coding sequence of the koala IFNγ gene. Transcripts were identified in spleen and lymph node tissue samples. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that koala IFNγ is closely related to other marsupial IFNγ sequences and more distantly related to eutherian mammals. To begin to characterise the role of this important cytokine in the koala's response to chlamydial infection, we developed a quantitative real time PCR assay and applied it to a small cohort of koalas with and without active chlamydial disease, revealing significant differences in expression patterns between the groups. Description of the IFNγ sequence from the koala will not only assist in understanding this species' response to its most important pathogen but will also provide further insight into the evolution of the marsupial immune system.

  5. The interferon-induced gene ISG15 blocks retrovirus release from cells late in the budding process.

    PubMed

    Pincetic, Andrew; Kuang, Zhizhou; Seo, Eun Joo; Leis, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    The release of retroviruses from cells requires ubiquitination of Gag and recruitment of cellular proteins involved in endosome sorting, including the ESCRT-III proteins and the Vps4 ATPase. In response to infection, cells have evolved an interferon-induced mechanism to block virus replication through expression of the interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), a dimer homologue of ubiquitin, which interferes with ubiquitin pathways in cells. Previously, it has been reported that ISG15 expression inhibited the E3 ubiquitin ligase, Nedd4, and prevented association of the ESCRT-I protein Tsg101 with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag. The budding of avian sarcoma leukosis virus and HIV-1 Gag virus-like particles containing L-domain mutations can be rescued by fusion to ESCRT proteins, which cause entry into the budding pathway beyond these early steps. The release of these fusions from cells was susceptible to inhibition by ISG15, indicating that there was a block late in the budding process. We now demonstrate that the Vps4 protein does not associate with the avian sarcoma leukosis virus or the HIV-1 budding complexes when ISG15 is expressed. This is caused by a loss in interaction between Vps4 with its coactivator protein LIP5 needed to promote the formation of the ESCRT-III-Vps4 double-hexamer complex required for membrane scission and virus release. The inability of LIP5 to interact with Vps4 is the probable result of ISG15 conjugation to the ESCRT-III protein, CHMP5, which regulates the availability of LIP5. Thus, there appear to be multiple levels of ISG15-induced inhibition acting at different stages of the virus release process.

  6. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control.

    PubMed

    Toth, Karoly; Lee, Sang R; Ying, Baoling; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Tollefson, Ann E; Sagartz, John E; Kong, Il-Keun; Wang, Zhongde; Wold, William S M

    2015-08-01

    Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as animal models.

  7. Expression of human interferon-α8 synthetic gene under P(BAD) promoter.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Y; El-Baky, N A; Redwan, N A; Redwan, E M

    2012-10-01

    Recombinant human interferon-α8 (rhIFN-α8) was obtained by synthesizing a codon-optimized gene in a two-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and expressing it in Escherichia coli. The gene encoding human IFN-α8 shows a high content of rare codons. These were replaced based on E. coli codon usage and balancing TA-GC ratio contents of the entire gene. The two-step PCR was performed using long (45-60 nucleotides) overlapped primers and two Taq polymerases (pfu clone and GC-rich system) and resulted in a DNA band of 504 base pairs (bp) corresponding to the calculated size of the IFN-α8 coding sequence; the pfu clone failed to amplify the gene in the correct size without unspecific bands. The full gene was cloned into the pBAD-TOPO expression vector. After cloning, the gene was reoriented by NcoI restriction digestion and religation. The ligated pBAD-TOPO-IFN-α8 (pBAD-IFNα8) plasmid carried the IFN-α8 gene under transcriptional control of the L-arabinose-inducible P(BAD) promoter. IFN-α8 expression was optimized with respect to L-arabinose concentration, temperature, and time of induction in shake flask cultures to maximize the yield of soluble IFN-α8. The produced IFN-α8 was characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoassays. After purification on DEAE-Sepharose, the yield was 100 mg/liter. The antiviral and anticancer activities of the IFN-α8 were evaluated in comparison with IFN-α2a, and the results are discussed.

  8. Evolutionary Dynamics of the Interferon-Induced Transmembrane Gene Family in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhao; Liu, Jun; Li, Meng; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Chiyu

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) genes have been demonstrated to have extensive and diverse functions, playing important roles in the evolution of vertebrates. Despite observance of their functionality, the evolutionary dynamics of this gene family are complex and currently unknown. Here, we performed detailed evolutionary analyses to unravel the evolutionary history of the vertebrate IFITM family. A total of 174 IFITM orthologous genes and 112 pseudogenes were identified from 27 vertebrate genome sequences. The vertebrate IFITM family can be divided into immunity-related IFITM (IR-IFITM), IFITM5 and IFITM10 sub-families in phylogeny, implying origins from three different progenitors. In general, vertebrate IFITM genes are located in two loci, one containing the IFITM10 gene, and the other locus containing IFITM5 and various numbers of IR-IFITM genes. Conservation of evolutionary synteny was observed in these IFITM genes. Significant functional divergence was detected among the three IFITM sub-families. No gene duplication or positive selection was found in IFITM5 sub-family, implying the functional conservation of IFITM5 in vertebrate evolution, which is involved in bone formation. No IFITM5 locus was identified in the marmoset genome, suggesting a potential association with the tiny size of this monkey. The IFITM10 sub-family was divided into two groups: aquatic and terrestrial types. Functional divergence was detected between the two groups, and five IFITM10-like genes from frog were dispersed into the two groups. Both gene duplication and positive selection were observed in aquatic vertebrate IFITM10-like genes, indicating that IFITM10 might be associated with the adaptation to aquatic environments. A large number of lineage- and species-specific gene duplications were observed in IR-IFITM sub-family and positive selection was detected in IR-IFITM of primates and rodents. Because primates have experienced a long history of viral infection

  9. Interferon Gamma Gene Polymorphism (+874 T > A) and Chronic Hepatitis B in the Population of Gorgan, North-Eastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Nadia; Shahbazi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background Based on differences in individual immune responses to the hepatitis B virus (HBV), between 5% and 10% of patients become persistently infected with the virus, which leads to the determination of chronic HBV. Cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFN-γ) are secretory proteins that play important roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Functional studies have demonstrated that the IFN + 874A/T gene polymorphism can increase or decrease the overall expression of IFN-gamma (γ) and ultimately determine the outcome of the infection. Objectives This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the IFN-γ + 874 gene polymorphism and susceptibility to chronic HBV infection. Methods Polymorphism detection analysis was performed on 598 subjects from North-Eastern Iran. The IFN-γ gene polymorphism (+ 874A/T) was genotyped through a specific sequence primer polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR). Results The frequencies of the AA, AT, and TT genotypes were 31%, 51%, and 18% in the chronic HBV patient group, and 40%, 45%, and 15% in the healthy control group, respectively. However, a lack of association of the + 874 polymorphism in the IFN-γ gene of those with chronic HBV infection was found. Evaluation of HBV association with this polymorphism was significant under the dominant genetic model (P = 0.04). Conclusions Ultimately, no association could be characterized between the polymorphism in IFN-γ + 874A/T and susceptibility to chronic HBV infection in this segment of the Iranian population (P > 0.05). PMID:27800132

  10. Cellular immune responses in multiple sclerosis patients treated with interferon-beta

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, M. F.; Rio, J.; Castro, Z.; Sánchez, A.; Montalban, X.; Comabella, M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary We investigated cellular immune responses at baseline in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with interferon (IFN)-β and classified into responders and non-responders according to clinical response criteria. Levels for IFN-γ, interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-4 were determined in activated PBMC of 10 responders, 10 non-responders and 10 healthy controls by cytometric bead arrays. Cytokine levels in cell culture supernatants were similar between responders and non-responders, and comparable to those obtained in healthy controls. These findings do not support differential cellular immune responses in PBMC at baseline between IFN-β responders and non-responders. PMID:23379429

  11. Schisandrin A inhibits dengue viral replication via upregulating antiviral interferon responses through STAT signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jung-Sheng; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Hsu, Yao-Chin; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infects 400 million people worldwide annually. Infection of more than one serotype of DENV highly corresponds to dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, which are the leading causes of high mortality. Due to lack of effective vaccines and unavailable therapies against DENV, discovery of anti-DENV agents is urgently needed. We first characterize that Schisandrin A can inhibit the replication of four serotypes of DENV in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with an effective half-maximal effective concentration 50% (EC50) value of 28.1 ± 0.42 μM against DENV serotype type 2 without significant cytotoxicity. Furthermore, schisandrin A can effectively protect mice from DENV infection by reducing disease symptoms and mortality of DENV-infected mice. We demonstrate that STAT1/2-mediated antiviral interferon responses contribute to the action of schisandrin A against DENV replication. Schisandrin A represents a potential antiviral agent to block DENV replication in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, stimulation of STAT1/2-mediated antiviral interferon responses is a promising strategy to develop antiviral drug. PMID:28338050

  12. Nonstructural 5A Protein of Hepatitis C Virus Interferes with Toll-Like Receptor Signaling and Suppresses the Interferon Response in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Okushin, Kazuya; Enooku, Kenichiro; Fujinaga, Hidetaka; Moriya, Kyoji; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Aizaki, Hideki; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A is involved in resistance to the host immune response, as well as the viral lifecycle such as replication and maturation. Here, we established transgenic mice expressing NS5A protein in the liver and examined innate immune responses against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vivo. Intrahepatic gene expression levels of cytokines such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ were significantly suppressed after LPS injection in the transgenic mouse liver. Induction of the C-C motif chemokine ligand 2, 4, and 5 was also suppressed. Phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which is activated by cytokines, was also reduced, and expression levels of interferon-stimulated genes, 2’-5’ oligoadenylate synthase, interferon-inducible double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, and myxovirus resistance 1 were similarly suppressed. Since LPS binds to toll-like receptor 4 and stimulates the downstream pathway leading to induction of these genes, we examined the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and IκB-α. The phosphorylation levels of these molecules were reduced in transgenic mouse liver, indicating that the pathway upstream of the molecules was disrupted by NS5A. Further analyses revealed that the interaction between interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor-6 was dispersed in transgenic mice, suggesting that NS5A may interfere with this interaction via myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, which was shown to interact with NS5A. Since the gut microbiota, a source of LPS, is known to be associated with pathological conditions in liver diseases, our results suggest the involvement of NS5A in the pathogenesis of HCV infected-liver via the suppression of innate immunity. PMID:28107512

  13. Interferon (IFN) and Cellular Immune Response Evoked in RNA-Pattern Sensing During Infection with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV).

    PubMed

    Nakai, Masato; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Funami, Kenji; Okamoto, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-10-23

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects hepatocytes but not dendritic cells (DCs), but DCs effectively mature in response to HCV-infected hepatocytes. Using gene-disrupted mice and hydrodynamic injection strategy, we found the MAVS pathway to be crucial for induction of type III interferons (IFNs) in response to HCV in mouse. Human hepatocytes barely express TLR3 under non-infectious states, but frequently express it in HCV infection. Type I and III IFNs are induced upon stimulation with polyI:C, an analog of double-stranded (ds)RNA. Activation of TLR3 and the TICAM-1 pathway, followed by DC-mediated activation of cellular immunity, is augmented during exposure to viral RNA. Although type III IFNs are released from replication-competent human hepatocytes, DC-mediated CTL proliferation and NK cell activation hardly occur in response to the released type III IFNs. Yet, type I IFNs and HCV-infected hepatocytes can induce maturation of DCs in either human or mouse origin. In addition, mouse CD8+ DCs mature in response to HCV-infected hepatocytes unless the TLR3/TICAM-1 pathway is blocked. We found the exosomes containing HCV RNA in the supernatant of the HCV-infected hepatocytes act as a source of TLR3-mediated DC maturation. Here we summarize our view on the mechanism by which DCs mature to induce NK and CTL in a status of HCV infection.

  14. Reverse transcription real-time PCR for detection of porcine interferon α and β genes.

    PubMed

    Razzuoli, E; Villa, R; Sossi, E; Amadori, M

    2011-10-01

    A few studies provided convincing evidence of constitutive expression of type I interferons (IFNs) in humans and mice, and of the steady-state role of these cytokines under health conditions. These results were later confirmed in pigs, too. In line with this tenet, low levels of IFN-α/β can be detected in swine tissues in the absence of any specific inducer. These studies are compounded by the utmost complexity of type I IFNs (including among others 17 IFN-α genes in pigs), which demands proper research tools. This prompted us to analyse the available protocols and to develop a relevant, robust, reverse transcription (RT) real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection system for the amplification of porcine IFN-α/β genes. The adopted test procedure is user-friendly and provides the complete panel of gene expression of one subject in a microtitre plate. Also, a proper use of PCR fluorochromes (SYBR(®) versus EvaGreen(®) supermix) enables users to adopt proper test protocols in case of low-expression porcine IFN-α genes. This is accounted for by the much higher sensitivity of the test protocol with EvaGreen(®) supermix. Interestingly, IFN-β showed the highest frequency of constitutive expression, in agreement with its definition of 'immediate early' gene in both humans and mice. Results indicate that the outlined procedure can detect both constitutively expressed and virus-induced IFN-α/β genes, as well as the impact of environmental, non-infectious stressors on the previous profile of constitutive expression.

  15. Highly Pathogenic New World and Old World Human Arenaviruses Induce Distinct Interferon Responses in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng; Kolokoltsova, Olga A.; Yun, Nadezhda E.; Seregin, Alexey V.; Ronca, Shannon; Koma, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arenavirus family includes several important pathogens that cause severe and sometimes fatal diseases in humans. The highly pathogenic Old World (OW) arenavirus Lassa fever virus (LASV) is the causative agent of Lassa fever (LF) disease in humans. LASV infections in severe cases are generally immunosuppressive without stimulating interferon (IFN) induction, a proinflammatory response, or T cell activation. However, the host innate immune responses to highly pathogenic New World (NW) arenaviruses are not well understood. We have previously shown that the highly pathogenic NW arenavirus, Junin virus (JUNV), induced an IFN response in human A549 cells. Here, we report that Machupo virus (MACV), another highly pathogenic NW arenavirus, also induces an IFN response. Importantly, both pathogenic NW arenaviruses, in contrast to the OW highly pathogenic arenavirus LASV, readily elicited an IFN response in human primary dendritic cells and A549 cells. Coinfection experiments revealed that LASV could potently inhibit MACV-activated IFN responses even at 6 h after MACV infection, while the replication levels of MACV and LASV were not affected by virus coinfection. Our results clearly demonstrated that although all viruses studied herein are highly pathogenic to humans, the host IFN responses toward infections with the NW arenaviruses JUNV and MACV are quite different from responses to infections with the OW arenavirus LASV, a discovery that needs to be further investigated in relevant animal models. This finding might help us better understand various interplays between the host immune system and highly pathogenic arenaviruses as well as distinct mechanisms underlying viral pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Infections of humans with the highly pathogenic OW LASV are accompanied by potent suppression of interferon or proinflammatory cytokine production. In contrast, infections with the highly pathogenic NW arenavirus JUNV are associated with high levels of IFNs and

  16. Neuromyelitis optica-like pathology is dependent on type I interferon response.

    PubMed

    Khorooshi, Reza; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Asgari, Nasrin; Owens, Trevor

    2013-09-01

    Neuromyelitis optica is an antibody-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. Reports have suggested that interferon beta which is beneficial for multiple sclerosis, exacerbates neuromyelitis optica. Our aim was to determine whether type I interferon plays a role in the formation of neuromyelitis optica lesions. Immunoglobulin G from a neuromyelitis optica patient was injected intracerebrally with human complement to type I interferon receptor deficient and wildtype mice. Loss of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein was reduced in type I interferon receptor deficient mice brain. Our findings suggest that type I interferon signaling contributes to neuromyelitis optica pathogenesis.

  17. Murine Coronavirus Cell Type Dependent Interaction with the Type I Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Kristine M.; Weiss, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    Coronaviruses infect many species of animal including humans, causing acute and chronic diseases of many organ systems. Murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) infection of the mouse, provides animal models for the study of central nervous system disease, including encephalitis and demyelinating diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis and for hepatitis. While there are many studies of the adaptive immune response to MHV, there has until recently been scant information on the type I interferon (IFN) response to MHV. The relationship between MHV and the IFN-α/β response is paradoxical. While the type I IFN response is a crucial aspect of host defense against MHV in its natural host, there is little if any induction of IFN following infection of mouse fibroblast cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, MHV is relatively resistant to the antiviral effects of IFN-α/β in mouse fibroblast cell lines and in human 293T cells. MHV can, under some circumstances, compromise the antiviral effects of IFN signaling. The nucleocapsid protein as well as the nsp1 and nsp3 proteins of MHV has been reported to have IFN antagonist activity. However, in primary cell types such as plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) and macrophages, IFN is induced by MHV infection and an antiviral state is established. Other primary cell types such as neurons, astrocytes and hepatocytes fail to produce IFN following infection and, in vivo, likely depend on IFN produced by pDCs and macrophages for protection from MHV. Thus MHV induction of IFN-α/β and the ability to induce an antiviral state in response to interferon is extremely cell type dependent. IFN induced protection from MHV pathogenesis likely requires the orchestrated activities of several cell types, however, the cell types involved in limiting MHV replication may be different in the liver and in the immune privileged CNS. PMID:20221421

  18. Gene Regulatory Network Inference of Immunoresponsive Gene 1 (IRG1) Identifies Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) as Its Transcriptional Regulator in Mammalian Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tallam, Aravind; Perumal, Thaneer M; Antony, Paul M; Jäger, Christian; Fritz, Joëlle V; Vallar, Laurent; Balling, Rudi; Del Sol, Antonio; Michelucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein/cis-aconitic acid decarboxylase (IRG1/CAD), an enzyme catalysing the production of itaconic acid from cis-aconitic acid, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate. Itaconic acid possesses specific antimicrobial properties inhibiting isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, an anaplerotic pathway that bypasses the TCA cycle and enables bacteria to survive on limited carbon conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying itaconic acid production through IRG1 induction in macrophages, we examined the transcriptional regulation of IRG1. To this end, we studied IRG1 expression in human immune cells under different inflammatory stimuli, such as TNFα and IFNγ, in addition to lipopolysaccharides. Under these conditions, as previously shown in mouse macrophages, IRG1/CAD accumulates in mitochondria. Furthermore, using literature information and transcription factor prediction models, we re-constructed raw gene regulatory networks (GRNs) for IRG1 in mouse and human macrophages. We further implemented a contextualization algorithm that relies on genome-wide gene expression data to infer putative cell type-specific gene regulatory interactions in mouse and human macrophages, which allowed us to predict potential transcriptional regulators of IRG1. Among the computationally identified regulators, siRNA-mediated gene silencing of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) in macrophages significantly decreased the expression of IRG1/CAD at the gene and protein level, which correlated with a reduced production of itaconic acid. Using a synergistic approach of both computational and experimental methods, we here shed more light on the transcriptional machinery of IRG1 expression and could pave the way to therapeutic approaches targeting itaconic acid levels.

  19. Gene Regulatory Network Inference of Immunoresponsive Gene 1 (IRG1) Identifies Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) as Its Transcriptional Regulator in Mammalian Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tallam, Aravind; Perumal, Thaneer M.; Antony, Paul M.; Jäger, Christian; Fritz, Joëlle V.; Vallar, Laurent; Balling, Rudi; del Sol, Antonio; Michelucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein/cis-aconitic acid decarboxylase (IRG1/CAD), an enzyme catalysing the production of itaconic acid from cis-aconitic acid, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate. Itaconic acid possesses specific antimicrobial properties inhibiting isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, an anaplerotic pathway that bypasses the TCA cycle and enables bacteria to survive on limited carbon conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying itaconic acid production through IRG1 induction in macrophages, we examined the transcriptional regulation of IRG1. To this end, we studied IRG1 expression in human immune cells under different inflammatory stimuli, such as TNFα and IFNγ, in addition to lipopolysaccharides. Under these conditions, as previously shown in mouse macrophages, IRG1/CAD accumulates in mitochondria. Furthermore, using literature information and transcription factor prediction models, we re-constructed raw gene regulatory networks (GRNs) for IRG1 in mouse and human macrophages. We further implemented a contextualization algorithm that relies on genome-wide gene expression data to infer putative cell type-specific gene regulatory interactions in mouse and human macrophages, which allowed us to predict potential transcriptional regulators of IRG1. Among the computationally identified regulators, siRNA-mediated gene silencing of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) in macrophages significantly decreased the expression of IRG1/CAD at the gene and protein level, which correlated with a reduced production of itaconic acid. Using a synergistic approach of both computational and experimental methods, we here shed more light on the transcriptional machinery of IRG1 expression and could pave the way to therapeutic approaches targeting itaconic acid levels

  20. Interferon-lambda4 genetic polymorphism is associated with the therapy response for hepatitis C virus recurrence after a living donor liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Konishi, H; Motomura, T; Matsumoto, Y; Harimoto, N; Ikegami, T; Yoshizumi, T; Soejima, Y; Shirabe, K; Fukuhara, T; Maehara, Y

    2014-06-01

    The standard therapy against hepatitis C virus (HCV) recurrence postliver transplantation includes interferon (IFN)α and ribavirin. IFNL4 ss469415590 polymorphism has been reported as a novel predictor of the response to IFN therapy for chronic HCV infection. We examined the impact of IFNL4 polymorphism on the responsiveness to IFN therapy after liver transplantation. Tissue specimens were collected from 80 HCV-infected recipients and 78 liver donors, and their IFNL4 ss469415590 genotype, hepatic IFNL4 and interferon-stimulated genes' mRNA expression levels were examined. The association of the polymorphism and expression levels in terms of the IFN therapy response to HCV recurrence was analysed. Most individuals who had rs8099917 risk alleles also had ss469415590 risk alleles (R(2) = 0.9). Sustained virological response (SVR) rates were higher in both liver graft recipients and transplants with ss469415590 TT/TT alleles than in those with the risk ΔG allele (P = 0.003 and P = 0.005, respectively). In recipients with ss469415590 TT/TT, IFNL4 TT mRNA levels showed no significant differences between livers of patients who responded to therapy and those who did not (P = 0.4). In recipients with the risk ΔG allele, IFNL4 ΔG mRNA expression levels were significantly lower in SVR patients than in non-SVR patients (P = 0.02). Hepatic interferon stimulable genes and IFNL4 mRNA expression were correlated. Our findings suggest that analysing the ss469415590 genotype and IFNL4 ΔG expression provides a novel prediction strategy for the possible response to IFN therapy after liver transplantation.

  1. Hepatitis B virus genome replication triggers toll-like receptor 3-dependent interferon responses in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen

    PubMed Central

    Real, Catherine Isabell; Lu, Mengji; Liu, Jia; Huang, Xuan; Trippler, Martin; Hossbach, Markus; Deckert, Jochen; Jahn-Hofmann, Kerstin; Ickenstein, Ludger Markus; John, Matthias Johannes; Gibbert, Kathrin; Dittmer, Ulf; Vornlocher, Hans-Peter; Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Gerken, Guido; Schlaak, Joerg Friedrich; Broering, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been described as stealth virus subverting immune responses initially upon infection. Impaired toll-like receptor signaling by the HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) attenuates immune responses to facilitate chronic infection. This implies that HBV replication may trigger host innate immune responses in the absence of HBsAg. Here we tested this hypothesis, using highly replicative transgenic mouse models. An HBV replication-dependent expression of antiviral genes was exclusively induced in HBsAg-deficient mice. These interferon responses attributed to toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)-activated Kupffer and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and further controlled the HBV genome replication. However, activation of TLR3 with exogenous ligands indicated additional HBs-independent immune evasion events. Our data demonstrate that in the absence of HBsAg, hepatic HBV replication leads to Tlr3-dependent interferon responses in non-parenchymal liver cells. We hypothesize that HBsAg is a major HBV-mediated evasion mechanism controlling endogenous antiviral responses in the liver. Eradication of HBsAg as a therapeutic goal might facilitate the induction of endogenous antiviral immune responses in patients chronically infected with HBV. PMID:27121087

  2. The choroid plexus transcriptome reveals changes in type I and II interferon responses in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Sandro Dá; Ferreira, Ana C; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Geschwind, Daniel H; Sousa, João C; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Sousa, Nuno; Palha, Joana A; Marques, Fernanda

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a marked decline in cognition and memory function. Increasing evidence highlights the essential role of neuroinflammatory and immune-related molecules, including those produced at the brain barriers, on brain immune surveillance, cellular dysfunction and amyloid beta (Aβ) pathology in AD. Therefore, understanding the response at the brain barriers may unravel novel pathways of relevance for the pathophysiology of AD. Herein, we focused on the study of the choroid plexus (CP), which constitutes the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, in aging and in AD. Specifically, we used the PDGFB-APPSwInd (J20) transgenic mouse model of AD, which presents early memory decline and progressive Aβ accumulation, and littermate age-matched wild-type (WT) mice, to characterize the CP transcriptome at 3, 5-6 and 11-12months of age. The most striking observation was that the CP of J20 mice displayed an overall overexpression of type I interferon (IFN) response genes at all ages. Moreover, J20 mice presented a high expression of type II IFN genes in the CP at 3months, which became lower than WT at 5-6 and 11-12months. Importantly, along with a marked memory impairment and increased glial activation, J20 mice also presented a similar overexpression of type I IFN genes in the dorsal hippocampus at 3months. Altogether, these findings provide new insights on a possible interplay between type I and II IFN responses in AD and point to IFNs as targets for modulation in cognitive decline.

  3. A striking similarity in the organization of the E-selectin and beta interferon gene promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, M Z; Thanos, D; Read, M A; Maniatis, T; Collins, T

    1994-01-01

    Transcription of the endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (E-selectin or ELAM-1) gene is induced by the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). In this report, we identify four positive regulatory domains (PDI to PDIV) in the E-selectin promoter that are required for maximal levels of TNF-alpha induction in endothelial cells. In vitro DNA binding studies reveal that two of the domains contain novel adjacent binding sites for the transcription factor NF-kappa B (PDIII and PDIV), a third corresponds to a recently described CRE/ATF site (PDII), and a fourth is a consensus NF-kappa B site (PDI). Mutations that decrease the binding of NF-kappa B to any one of the NF-kappa B binding sites in vitro abolished cytokine-induced E-selectin gene expression in vivo. Previous studies demonstrated a similar correlation between ATF binding to PDII and E-selectin gene expression. Here we show that the high-mobility-group protein I(Y) [HMG I(Y)] also binds specifically to the E-selectin promoter and thereby enhances the binding of both ATF-2 and NF-kappa B to the E-selectin promoter in vitro. Moreover, mutations that interfere with HMG I(Y) binding decrease the level of cytokine-induced E-selectin expression. The organization of the TNF-alpha-inducible element of the E-selectin promoter is remarkably similar to that of the virus-inducible promoter of the human beta interferon gene in that both promoters require NF-kappa B, ATF-2, and HMG I(Y). We propose that HMG I(Y) functions as a key architectural component in the assembly of inducible transcription activation complexes on both promoters. Images PMID:7523851

  4. Interferon stimulated genes as peripheral diagnostic markers of early pregnancy in sheep: a critical assessment.

    PubMed

    Mauffré, V; Grimard, B; Eozenou, C; Inghels, S; Silva, L; Giraud-Delville, C; Capo, D; Sandra, O; Constant, F

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the diagnostic reliability of pregnancy detection using changes in interferon stimulated gene (ISG) messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in circulating immune cells in ewes. Two different groups of ewes (an experimental group, experiment 1 and a farm group, experiment 2) were oestrus-synchronized and blood sampled on day 14 (D0=day of insemination in control animals, experiment 1) and day 15 (experiment 2). Real-time PCR were performed to evaluate the abundance of different ISG mRNAs. In the experimental group, peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 29 ewes born and bred in experimental facilities were isolated using a Percoll gradient method. Gene expression for Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10), Myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 1 (MX1) and Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) mRNA were, respectively, 8.3-fold, 6.1-fold and 2.7-fold higher (P0.10) in CXCL10, STAT1, MX1, Myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 2 (MX2) and ISG15 ubiquitin-like modifier (ISG15) mRNA expression were found between pregnant and non-pregnant ewes. The ROC curves and the hierarchical classification generated from the real-time PCR data failed to discriminate between pregnant and non-pregnant animals. In this group of animals, our results show a strong variability in ISG expression patterns: 17% of animals identified as non-pregnant by the five tests were in fact pregnant, only 52% of pregnant animals had at least two positive results (two genes above threshold), whereas up to five positive results (five genes above threshold) were needed to avoid misclassification. In conclusion, this study illustrates the high variability in ISG expression levels in immune circulating cells during early pregnancy and, therefore, highlights the limits of using ISG expression levels in blood samples, collected on PAXgene® tubes on farms, for early pregnancy detection in sheep.

  5. Genomic Analysis and mRNA Expression of Equine Type I Interferon Genes

    PubMed Central

    Detournay, Olivier; Morrison, David A.; Wagner, Bettina; Zarnegar, Behdad

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying all of the type I interferon (IFN) genes of the horse and at monitoring their expression in equine cells on in vitro induction. We identified 32 putative type I IFN loci on horse chromosome 23 and an unplaced genomic scaffold. A phylogentic analysis characterized these into 8 different type I IFN classes, that is, putative functional genes for 6 IFN-α, 4 IFN-β, 8 IFN-ω (plus 4 pseudogenes), 3 IFN-δ (plus 1 pseudogene), 1 IFN-κ and 1 IFN-ɛ, plus 1 IFN-ν pseudogene, and 3 loci belonging to what has previously been called IFN-αω. Our analyses indicate that the IFN-αω genes are quite distinct from both IFN-α and IFN-ω, and we refer to this type I IFN as IFN-μ. Results from cell cultures showed that leukocytes readily expressed IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-δ, IFN-μ, and IFN-ω mRNA on induction with, for example, live virus; while fibroblasts only expressed IFN-β mRNA on stimulation. IFN-κ or IFN-ɛ expression was not consistently induced in these cell cultures. Thus, the equine type I IFN family comprised 8 classes, 7 of which had putative functional genes, and mRNA expression of 5 was induced in vitro. Moreover, a relatively low number of IFN-α subtypes was found in the horse compared with other eutherian mammals. PMID:23772953

  6. Replication of Human Norovirus RNA in Mammalian Cells Reveals Lack of Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Lin; Murakami, Kosuke; Broughman, James R.; Lay, Margarita K.; Guix, Susana; Tenge, Victoria R.; Atmar, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human noroviruses (HuNoVs), named after the prototype strain Norwalk virus (NV), are a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. Studies on the related murine norovirus (MNV) have demonstrated the importance of an interferon (IFN) response in host control of virus replication, but this remains unclear for HuNoVs. Despite the lack of an efficient cell culture infection system, transfection of stool-isolated NV RNA into mammalian cells leads to viral RNA replication and virus production. Using this system, we show here that NV RNA replication is sensitive to type I (α/β) and III (interleukin-29 [IL-29]) IFN treatment. However, in cells capable of a strong IFN response to Sendai virus (SeV) and poly(I·C), NV RNA replicates efficiently and generates double-stranded RNA without inducing a detectable IFN response. Replication of HuNoV genogroup GII.3 strain U201 RNA, generated from a reverse genetics system, also does not induce an IFN response. Consistent with a lack of IFN induction, NV RNA replication is enhanced neither by neutralization of type I/III IFNs through neutralizing antibodies or the soluble IFN decoy receptor B18R nor by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) or interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in the IFN induction pathways. In contrast to other positive-strand RNA viruses that block IFN induction by targeting MAVS for degradation, MAVS is not degraded in NV RNA-replicating cells, and an SeV-induced IFN response is not blocked. Together, these results indicate that HuNoV RNA replication in mammalian cells does not induce an IFN response, suggesting that the epithelial IFN response may play a limited role in host restriction of HuNoV replication. IMPORTANCE Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to lack of an efficient cell culture system and robust small-animal model, little is known about the innate host defense to these

  7. Interferon-gamma responses in sheep exposed to virulent and attenuated Brucella melitensis strains.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sancho, Marta; Durán-Ferrer, Manuel; García-Seco, Teresa; Macías, Paula; García, Nerea; Martínez, Irene; Ruiz, Elena; Legaz, Emilio; Diez-Guerrier, Alberto; González, Sergio; Domínguez, Lucas; Álvarez, Julio

    2014-07-15

    Antibody detection is the basis of large-scale sheep brucellosis diagnosis because of its sensitivity and specificity. In contrast, information on the cellular mediated immune (CMI) response triggered after Brucella melitensis infection, a cornerstone in the protection against this pathogen, is more limited, particularly regarding the effect of the virulence of the infecting strain in the induced CMI reaction. Here, the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) profiles evoked after exposure by different routes to virulent (H38) and attenuated (Rev.1) B. melitensis strains in 14 pregnant sheep and 87 ewe lambs, respectively, were characterized accounting for different host-related factors, and compared with their serological response and with the basal IFN-γ responses observed in 155 animals non exposed to Brucella. No significant differences in the IFN-γ response of Rev.1 vaccinated animals depending on the inoculation route was observed, in contrast with their serological results. Response in H38-challenged followed a similar trend although peaked later, and an effect of the abortion on the IFN-γ response was detected. This information could help to understand the interaction bacteria-host that leads to its intracellular survival and could be useful for the design of new diagnostic approaches.

  8. NS1 Protein Mutation I64T Affects Interferon Responses and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    DeDiego, Marta L; Nogales, Aitor; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J

    2016-11-01

    Influenza NS1 protein is the main viral protein counteracting host innate immune responses, allowing the virus to efficiently replicate in interferon (IFN)-competent systems. In this study, we analyzed NS1 protein variability within influenza A (IAV) H3N2 viruses infecting humans during the 2012-2013 season. We also evaluated the impact of the mutations on the ability of NS1 proteins to inhibit host innate immune responses and general gene expression. Surprisingly, a previously unidentified mutation in the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (I64T) decreased NS1-mediated general inhibition of host protein synthesis by decreasing its interaction with cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to increased innate immune responses after viral infection. Notably, a recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-T64 protein was highly attenuated in mice, most likely because of its ability to induce higher antiviral IFN responses at early times after infection and because this virus is highly sensitive to the IFN-induced antiviral state. Interestingly, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected at the acute visit (2 to 3 days after infection), we show that the subject infected with the NS1-T64 attenuated virus has diminished responses to interferon and to interferon induction, suggesting why this subject could be infected with this highly IFN-sensitive virus. These data demonstrate the importance of influenza virus surveillance in identifying new mutations in the NS1 protein, affecting its ability to inhibit innate immune responses and, as a consequence, the pathogenicity of the virus.

  9. Role of the interferon-inducible IFI16 gene in the induction of ICAM-1 by TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Sponza, Simone; De Andrea, Marco; Mondini, Michele; Gugliesi, Francesca; Gariglio, Marisa; Landolfo, Santo

    2009-01-01

    The Interferon-inducible gene IFI16, a member of the HIN200 family, is activated by oxidative stress and cell density, in addition to Interferons, and it is implicated in the regulation of endothelial cell proliferation and vessel formation in vitro. We have previously shown that IFI16 is required for proinflammatory gene stimulation by IFN-gamma through the NF-kappaB complex. To examine whether IFI16 induction might be extended to other proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, we used the strategy of the RNA interference to knock down IFI16 expression, and analyze the capability of TNF-alpha to stimulate intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 or CD54) expression in the absence of functional IFI16. Our studies demonstrate that IFI16 mediates ICAM-1 stimulation by TNF-alpha through the NF-kappaB pathway, thus reinforcing the role of the IFI16 molecule in the inflammation process.

  10. Zika virus evades interferon-mediated antiviral response through the co-operation of multiple nonstructural proteins in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yaoxing; Liu, Qingxiang; Zhou, Jie; Xie, Weihong; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Zefang; Yang, Haitao; Cui, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) serves as the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Inhibition of IFN-triggered signaling cascade by Zika virus (ZIKV) plays a critical role for ZIKV to evade antiviral responses from host cells. Here we demonstrate that ZIKV nonstructural proteins NS1, NS4B and NS2B3 inhibit the induction of IFN and downstream IFN-stimulated genes through diverse strategies. NS1 and NS4B of ZIKV inhibit IFNβ signaling at TANK-binding kinase 1 level, whereas NS2B-NS3 of ZIKV impairs JAK–STAT signaling pathway by degrading Jak1 and reduces virus-induced apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, co-operation of NS1, NS4B and NS2B3 further enhances viral infection by blocking IFN-induced autophagic degradation of NS2B3. Hence, our study reveals a novel antagonistic system employing multiple ZIKV nonstructural proteins in restricting the innate antiviral responses. PMID:28373913

  11. Zika virus evades interferon-mediated antiviral response through the co-operation of multiple nonstructural proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaoxing; Liu, Qingxiang; Zhou, Jie; Xie, Weihong; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Zefang; Yang, Haitao; Cui, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) serves as the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Inhibition of IFN-triggered signaling cascade by Zika virus (ZIKV) plays a critical role for ZIKV to evade antiviral responses from host cells. Here we demonstrate that ZIKV nonstructural proteins NS1, NS4B and NS2B3 inhibit the induction of IFN and downstream IFN-stimulated genes through diverse strategies. NS1 and NS4B of ZIKV inhibit IFNβ signaling at TANK-binding kinase 1 level, whereas NS2B-NS3 of ZIKV impairs JAK-STAT signaling pathway by degrading Jak1 and reduces virus-induced apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, co-operation of NS1, NS4B and NS2B3 further enhances viral infection by blocking IFN-induced autophagic degradation of NS2B3. Hence, our study reveals a novel antagonistic system employing multiple ZIKV nonstructural proteins in restricting the innate antiviral responses.

  12. Cardiac glycosides are potent inhibitors of interferongene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Junqiang; Chen, Shuibing; Maniatis, Tom

    2011-01-01

    We report that bufalin and other cardiac glycoside inhibitors of the sodium-potassium ATPase (sodium pump) potently inhibit the induction of the interferon-β (IFNβ) gene by virus, dsRNA or dsDNA. Cardiac glycosides increase the intracellular sodium concentration, which appears to inhibit the ATPase activity of the RNA sensor RIG-I, an essential and early component in the IFNβ activation pathway. This, in turn, prevents the activation of the critical transcription factors IRF3 and NFκB. Bufalin inhibition can be overcome by expressing a drug-resistant variant of the sodium pump, and knocking down the pump by shRNA inhibits IFNβ expression. Thus, bufalin acts exclusively through the sodium pump. We also show that bufalin inhibits tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling, at least in part by interfering with the nuclear translocation of NFκB. These findings suggest that bufalin could be used to treat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases where IFN or TNF are hyperactivated. PMID:21076398

  13. Roles of Endogenous Gamma Interferon and Macrophage Microbicidal Mechanisms in Host Response to Chemotherapy in Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Henry W.; Delph-Etienne, Sharmaine

    2000-01-01

    In experimental visceral leishmaniasis, in which the tissue macrophage is the target, in vivo responsiveness to conventional chemotherapy (pentavalent antimony [Sb]) requires a T-cell-dependent mechanism. To determine if this mechanism involves gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-induced activation and/or specific IFN-γ-regulated macrophage leishmanicidal mechanisms (generation of reactive nitrogen or oxygen intermediates, we treated gene-deficient mice infected with Leishmania donovani. In IFN-γ gene knockout (GKO) mice, Sb inhibited but did not kill intracellular L. donovani (2% killing versus 76% in controls). Sb was active (>94% killing), however, in both inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) knockout (KO) and respiratory burst (phagocyte oxidase)-deficient chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) mice. Sb's efficacy was also maintained in doubly deficient animals (X-CGD mice treated with an iNOS inhibitor). In contrast to Sb, amphotericin B (AmB) induced high-level killing in GKO mice; AmB was also fully active in iNOS KO and X-CGD animals. Although resolution of L. donovani infection requires iNOS, residual visceral infection remained largely suppressed in iNOS KO mice treated with Sb or AmB. These results indicate that endogenous IFN-γ regulates the leishmanicidal response to Sb and achieves this effect via a pathway unrelated to the macrophage's primary microbicidal mechanisms. The role of IFN-γ is selective, since it is not a cofactor in the response to AmB. Treatment with either Sb or AmB permits an iNOS-independent mechanism to emerge and control residual intracellular L. donovani infection. PMID:10603400

  14. Induction of interferon and cell death in response to cytosolic DNA in chicken macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vitak, Nazarii; Hume, David A; Chappell, Keith J; Sester, David P; Stacey, Katryn J

    2016-06-01

    Responses to cytosolic DNA can protect against both infectious organisms and the mutagenic effect of DNA integration. Recognition of invading DNA is likely to be fundamental to eukaryotic cellular life, but has been described only in mammals. Introduction of DNA into chicken macrophages induced type I interferon mRNA via a pathway conserved with mammals, requiring the receptor cGAS and the signalling protein STING. A second pathway of cytosolic DNA recognition in mammalian macrophages, initiated by absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2), results in rapid inflammasome-mediated pyroptotic cell death. AIM2 is restricted to mammals. Nevertheless, chicken macrophages underwent lytic cell death within 15 min of DNA transfection. The mouse AIM2-mediated response requires double stranded DNA, but chicken cell death was maintained with denatured DNA. This appears to be a novel form of rapid necrotic cell death, which we propose is an ancient response rendered redundant in mammalian macrophages by the appearance of the AIM2 inflammasome. The retention of these cytosolic DNA responses through evolution, with both conserved and non-conserved mechanisms, suggests a fundamental importance in cellular defence.

  15. Type I Interferon Impairs Specific Antibody Responses Early during Establishment of LCMV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Daugan, Matthieu; Murira, Armstrong; Mindt, Barbara C.; Germain, Amélie; Tarrab, Esther; Lapierre, Pascal; Fritz, Jörg H.; Lamarre, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Elicitation of type I interferon (IFN-I) has been shown to both enhance and impair cell-mediated immune responses in acute and persistent viral infections, respectively. Here, we show that, in addition to its effect on T cells, IFN-I drives impairment of specific antibody responses through interaction with B cells in the acute phase of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection. This impairment was limited to the T cell-dependent B cell response and was associated with disruption of B cell follicles, development of hypergammaglobulinemia (HGG), and expansion of the T follicular helper cell population. Antigen-specific antibody responses were restored by ablation of IFN-I signaling through antibody-mediated IFN-I receptor blockade and B cell-specific IFN-I receptor knockout. Importantly, IFN-I receptor deficiency in B cells also accelerated the development of LCMV neutralizing antibodies and alleviated HGG. These results provide a potential therapeutic target toward efficient treatment measures that limit immunopathology in persistent viral infections. PMID:27994594

  16. Cytokine profiles show heterogeneity of interferonresponse in multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hegen, Harald; Adrianto, Indra; Lessard, Christopher J.; Millonig, Alban; Bertolotto, Antonio; Comabella, Manuel; Giovannoni, Gavin; Guger, Michael; Hoelzl, Martina; Khalil, Michael; Fazekas, Franz; Killestein, Joep; Lindberg, Raija L.P.; Malucchi, Simona; Mehling, Matthias; Montalban, Xavier; Rudzki, Dagmar; Schautzer, Franz; Sellebjerg, Finn; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Deisenhammer, Florian; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate serum cytokine profiles for their utility to determine the heterogeneous responses to interferon (IFN)–β treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or clinically isolated syndrome receiving de novo IFN-β treatment were included in this prospective, observational study. Number of relapses and changes in disability were assessed 2 years prior to and 2 years after initiation of treatment. Sera were collected at baseline and after 3 months on therapy. Cytokine levels in sera were assessed by Luminex multiplex assays. Baseline cytokine profiles were grouped by hierarchical clustering analysis. Demographic features, changes in cytokines, and clinical outcome were then assessed in the clustered patient groups. Results: A total of 157 patients were included in the study and clustered into 6 distinct subsets by baseline cytokine profiles. These subsets differed significantly in their clinical and biological response to IFN-β therapy. Two subsets were associated with patients who responded poorly to therapy. Two other subsets, associated with a good response to therapy, showed a significant reduction in relapse rates and no worsening of disability. Each subset also had differential changes in cytokine levels after 3 months of IFN-β treatment. Conclusions: There is heterogeneity in the immunologic pathways of the RRMS population, which correlates with IFN-β response. PMID:26894205

  17. Maternal recognition of pregnancy and implantation are not associated with an interferon response of the endometrium to the presence of the conceptus in dromedary camel.

    PubMed

    Salah Abdoon, Ahmed Sabry; Giraud-Delville, Corrine; Kandil, Omaima Mohamed; Kerboeuf-Giraud, Annelye; Eozénou, Caroline; Carvalho, Anais Vitorino; Julian, Skidmore; Sandra, Olivier

    2017-03-01

    Maternal recognition of pregnancy (MRP) and implantation involve appropriate interactions between the elongating conceptus and the receptive endometrium that will condition development of the feto-placental unit to term. Molecular mechanisms that take place at the conceptus-endometrium interface during early pregnancy have been extensively investigated in domestic ungulates but they are still poorly understood in camelids including the dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius), a domestic species with important economic and social roles in arid and semi-arid areas. In order to better understand how MRP and implantation take place in the left horn of this species, we investigated expression levels of genes encoding steroid hormones (PGR, ESR1), transcription factors (STAT1, FOXL2), interferon stimulated genes (MX1, MX2, OAS1, RSAD2) including SOCS genes (SOCS1, SOCS2, SOCS3 and CISH), previously identified as conceptus regulated genes in the endometrium of other domestic animals. Using endometrial tissue collected from left and right uterine horns of dromedary camel females that were non pregnant or early pregnant, gene expression of these genes was detected and our results provided first insights on their regulation, showing that (i) conceptus implantation is not associated with an IFN response in the pregnant uterine horn (ii) when regulation of classical interferon-stimulated genes (ISG) occurs, it takes place during the formation of the feto-placental unit, and (iii) gene expression can differ between the left and right uterine horns during implantation and early placentation phase. Additional experiments will be required in dromedary camels to understand the unusual regulation of ISG during implantation as well as to determine the molecular processes that drive the systematic implantation of the elongating conceptus in the left uterine horn.

  18. Cloning, Transformation and Expression of Human Interferon α2b Gene in Tobacco Plant (Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi)

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarzadeh, Shahrzad; Daneshvar, Mohammad Hosein; Rajabi-Memari, Hamid; Galehdari, Hamid; Alamisaied, Khalil

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecular farming is the production of important recombinant proteins in transgenic organisms on an agricultural scale. Interferons are proteins with antiviral and antitumor activities and can be used for viral infections and cancers treatments. Objectives This study reports the transformation of INF α2b gene in tobacco plant for the first time in Iran. Materials and Methods Interferon α2b gene was amplified by PCR using specific primers containing appropriate restriction enzymes, plant highly expression sequence and Histidine tag sequence. Target sequence was cloned in plant expression vector pCAMBIA1304 and the construct named pCAMINFα. pCAMINFα was transferred to E. coli strain DH5α and plated on LB agar medium containing kanamycin 50 mgl-1. The colonies were confirmed by colony PCR and sequencing. The construct was transferred into Agrobacterium tumefaciens by freeze-thaw method and transformed colonies were confirmed by colony PCR. Tobacco plants (cultivar xanthi) were inoculated with A. tumefaciens strain LBA4404 by leaf disc method. Inoculated explants were cultured on MSII (MS + BAP 1mgl-1 + NAA 0.1 mgl-1) at 28°C and darkness for 48 hours. Then explants were transferred to selection medium containing cephotaxime (250 mgl-1) and hygromycin (15 mgl-1) in a 16/8 (day/night) h photoperiod in growth room with an irradiance of 5000 lux. Transgenic plants were regenerated and transferred to perlite. Genomic DNA was extracted from regenerated plants by Dellaporta method at 5-leaf step and transgenic lines were confirmed by PCR with specific primers. Expression of Interferon α2b gene was confirmed by dot blotting. Conclusions Since no report of interferon alpha production in plants in Iran has been expressed yet, this research could create a field of producing this drug in tobacco, in Iran. PMID:24624166

  19. C7L Family of Poxvirus Host Range Genes Inhibits Antiviral Activities Induced by Type I Interferons and Interferon Regulatory Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Schoggins, John; Rose, Lloyd; Cao, Jingxin; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) K1L and C7L function equivalently in many mammalian cells to support VACV replication and antagonize antiviral activities induced by type I interferons (IFNs). While K1L is limited to orthopoxviruses, genes that are homologous to C7L are found in diverse mammalian poxviruses. In this study, we showed that the C7L homologues from sheeppox virus and swinepox virus could rescue the replication defect of a VACV mutant deleted of both K1L and C7L (vK1L−C7L−). Interestingly, the sheeppox virus C7L homologue could rescue the replication of vK1L−C7L− in human HeLa cells but not in murine 3T3 and LA-4 cells, in contrast to all other C7L homologues. Replacing amino acids 134 and 135 of the sheeppox virus C7L homologue, however, made it functional in the two murine cell lines, suggesting that these two residues are critical for antagonizing a putative host restriction factor which has some subtle sequence variation in human and murine cells. Furthermore, the C7L family of host range genes from diverse mammalian poxviruses were all capable of antagonizing type I IFN-induced antiviral activities against VACV. Screening of a library of more than 350 IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) identified interferon-regulated factor 1 (IRF1) as an inhibitor of vK1L−C7L− but not wild-type VACV. Expression of either K1L or C7L, however, rendered vK1L−C7L− resistant to IRF1-induced antiviral activities. Altogether, our data show that K1L and C7L antagonize IRF1-induced antiviral activities and that the host modulation function of C7L is evolutionally conserved in all poxviruses that can readily replicate in tissue-cultured mammalian cells. PMID:22345458

  20. Gene therapy of multiple sclerosis using interferon β-secreting human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Chung Heon; Park, Kwang Ywel; Hou, Yun; Jeong, Chang Hyun; Kim, Seong Muk; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Interferon-beta (IFN- β ), a well-established standard treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS), has proved to exhibit clinical efficacy. In this study, we first evaluated the therapeutic effects for MS using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) as delivery vehicles with lesion-targeting capability and IFN- β as therapeutic gene. We also engineered hBM-MSCs to secret IFN- β (MSCs-IFN β ) via adenoviral transduction and confirmed the secretory capacity of MSCs-IFN β by an ELISA assay. MSCs-IFN β -treated mice showed inhibition of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) onset, and the maximum and average score for all animals in each group was significantly lower in the MSCs-IFN β -treated EAE mice when compared with the MSCs-GFP-treated EAE mice. Inflammatory infiltration and demyelination in the lumbar spinal cord also significantly decreased in the MSCs-IFN β -treated EAE mice compared to PBS- or MSCs-GFP-treated EAE mice. Moreover, MSCs-IFN β treatment enhanced the immunomodulatory effects, which suppressed proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF-α) and conversely increased anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Importantly, injected MSCs-IFN β migrated into inflamed CNS and significantly reduced further injury of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in EAE mice. Thus, our results provide the rationale for designing novel experimental protocols to enhance the therapeutic effects for MS using hBM-MSCs as an effective gene vehicle to deliver the therapeutic cytokines.

  1. Gene Therapy of Multiple Sclerosis Using Interferon β-Secreting Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Chung Heon; Park, Kwang Ywel; Hou, Yun; Jeong, Chang Hyun; Kim, Seong Muk; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Interferon-beta (IFN-β), a well-established standard treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS), has proved to exhibit clinical efficacy. In this study, we first evaluated the therapeutic effects for MS using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) as delivery vehicles with lesion-targeting capability and IFN-β as therapeutic gene. We also engineered hBM-MSCs to secret IFN-β (MSCs-IFNβ) via adenoviral transduction and confirmed the secretory capacity of MSCs-IFNβ by an ELISA assay. MSCs-IFNβ-treated mice showed inhibition of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) onset, and the maximum and average score for all animals in each group was significantly lower in the MSCs-IFNβ-treated EAE mice when compared with the MSCs-GFP-treated EAE mice. Inflammatory infiltration and demyelination in the lumbar spinal cord also significantly decreased in the MSCs-IFNβ-treated EAE mice compared to PBS- or MSCs-GFP-treated EAE mice. Moreover, MSCs-IFNβ treatment enhanced the immunomodulatory effects, which suppressed proinflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF-α) and conversely increased anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Importantly, injected MSCs-IFNβ migrated into inflamed CNS and significantly reduced further injury of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in EAE mice. Thus, our results provide the rationale for designing novel experimental protocols to enhance the therapeutic effects for MS using hBM-MSCs as an effective gene vehicle to deliver the therapeutic cytokines. PMID:23710456

  2. Differential regulation of interferon responses by Ebola and Marburg virus VP35 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Megan R.; Liu, Gai; Mire, Chad E.; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Luthra, Priya; Yen, Benjamin; Shabman, Reed S.; Leung, Daisy W.; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Basler, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Suppression of innate immune responses during filoviral infection contributes to disease severity. Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg (MARV) viruses each encode a VP35 protein that suppresses RIG-I-like receptor signaling and interferon-α/β (IFN-α/β) production by several mechanisms, including direct binding to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Here, we demonstrate that in cell culture MARV infection results in a greater upregulation of IFN responses as compared to EBOV infection. This correlates with differences in the efficiencies by which EBOV and MARV VP35s antagonize RIG-I signaling. Furthermore, structural and biochemical studies suggest that differential recognition of RNA elements by the respective VP35 C-terminal IFN inhibitory domain (IID) rather than affinity for RNA by the respective VP35s is critical for this observation. Our results reveal functional differences in EBOV versus MARV VP35 RNA binding result in unexpected differences in the host response to deadly viral pathogens. PMID:26876165

  3. Upregulation of interferon-induced genes in infants with virus-associated acute bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Scagnolari, Carolina; Midulla, Fabio; Trombetti, Simona; Pierangeli, Alessandra; Tromba, Valeria; Grossi, Rosanna; Di Marco, Paola; Dianzani, Caterina; Girardi, Enrico; Antonelli, Guido

    2007-11-01

    To determine whether there is an airway IFN response in infants with acute bronchiolitis and to establish whether the rate of such a response is related to the severity of illness, the expression of some IFN-induced genes was measured in nasopharyngeal washes from 39 infants with acute bronchiolitis. The results indicate that in infants with a virus-associated acute bronchiolitis there is a strong activation of IFN system and that the severity of illness is inversely related to the level of expression of IFN-induced genes. This suggests that the IFN response plays an important role in determining virus-associated respiratory disease in early life.

  4. ATL response to arsenic/interferon therapy is triggered by SUMO/PML/RNF4-dependent Tax degradation.

    PubMed

    Dassouki, Zeina; Sahin, Umut; El Hajj, Hiba; Jollivet, Florence; Kfoury, Youmna; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie; Hermine, Olivier; de Thé, Hugues; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2015-01-15

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1) Tax transactivator initiates transformation in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), a highly aggressive chemotherapy-resistant malignancy. The arsenic/interferon combination, which triggers degradation of the Tax oncoprotein, selectively induces apoptosis of ATL cell lines and has significant clinical activity in Tax-driven murine ATL or human patients. However, the role of Tax loss in ATL response is disputed, and the molecular mechanisms driving degradation remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that ATL-derived or HTLV-1-transformed cells are dependent on continuous Tax expression, suggesting that Tax degradation underlies clinical responses to the arsenic/interferon combination. The latter enforces promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear body (NB) formation and partner protein recruitment. In arsenic/interferon-treated HTLV-1 transformed or ATL cells, Tax is recruited onto NBs and undergoes PML-dependent hyper-sumoylation by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)2/3 but not SUMO1, ubiquitination by RNF4, and proteasome-dependent degradation. Thus, the arsenic/interferon combination clears ATL through degradation of its Tax driver, and this regimen could have broader therapeutic value by promoting degradation of other pathogenic sumoylated proteins.

  5. Interferon-stimulated gene 20-kDa protein (ISG20) in infection and disease: Review and outlook

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Wang, Lin; Pan, Jihong

    2017-01-01

    Summary Interferon-stimulated exonuclease gene 20 (ISG20) is an RNA exonuclease in the yeast RNA exonuclease 4 homolog (REX4) subfamily and the DEDDh exonuclease family, and this gene codes for a 20-kDa protein. Those exonucleases are involved in cleaving single-stranded RNA and DNA. ISG20 is also referred to as HEM45 (HeLa estrogen-modulated, band 45). Expression of ISG20 can be induced or regulated by both type I and II interferons (IFNs) in various cell lines. ISG20 plays a role in mediating interferon's antiviral activities. In addition, ISG20 may be a potential susceptibility biomarker or pharmacological target in some inflammatory conditions. Exonucleases are useful components of many physiological processes. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the functions of ISG20, much work remains to be done with regard to uncovering the mechanism of action of ISG20 in specific diseases and adapting ISG20 for use as a biomarker of disease. This review describes current information on ISG20 and its potential use in marking disease. This review describes several research achievements thus far and it seeks to provide some new ideas for future related research. PMID:28357179

  6. Impact of hepatitis C virus core mutations on the response to interferon-based treatment in chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Camelia; Oprişan, Gabriela; Teleman, Monica Delia; Dinu, Sorin; Oprea, Cristiana; Voiculescu, Mihai; Ruta, Simona

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) core substitutions play a role in the response to interferon-based treatment in Caucasian patients. METHODS One hundred eight HCV chronically infected patients initiating treatment with pegylated IFN plus ribavirin for 48 wk were tested for baseline substitutions at codons 70 and 91 of the viral core protein (BigDye Terminator vers.3.1, Applied Biosystems,) and for genetic polymorphisms in host IL28B gene rs12979860 (Custom TaqMan 5' allelic discrimination assay; Applied Biosystems). RESULTS Of the patients, all were infected with HCV genotype 1b, 44.4% had low baseline HCV viral load, and 37.9% had mild/moderate fibrosis. Only 38.9% achieved therapeutic success, defined as sustained virological response (SVR). Eighty-eight percent of the patients presented at least one substitution at core position 70 (R70Q/H) or/and position 91 (L91M). The favorable IL28B CC polymorphism was detected in only 17.6% of the patients. In the univariate analysis, young age (P < 0.001), urban residence (P = 0.004), IL28B CC genotype (P < 0.001), absence of core mutations (P = 0.005), achievement of rapid virologic response (P < 0.001) and early virological response (P < 0.001) were significantly correlated with SVR. A multivariate analysis revealed three independent predictors of therapeutic success: young age (P < 0.001), absence of core substitutions (P = 0.04) and IL28B CC genotype (P < 0.001); the model correctly classified 75.9% of SVR cases with a positive predictive value of 80.7%. CONCLUSION HCV core mutations can help distinguish between patients who can still benefit from the affordable IFN-based therapy from those who must be treated with DAAs to prevent the evolution towards end-stage liver disease. PMID:27729747

  7. Optimization of Fermentation Conditions for Recombinant Human Interferon Beta Production by Escherichia coli Using the Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Morowvat, Mohammad Hossein; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Rajabi Memari, Hamid; Vahidi, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: The periplasmic overexpression of recombinant human interferon beta (rhIFN-β)-1b using a synthetic gene in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) was optimized in shake flasks using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) based on the Box-Behnken Design (BBD). Objectives: This study aimed to predict and develop the optimal fermentation conditions for periplasmic expression of rhIFN-β-1b in shake flasks whilst keeping the acetate excretion as the lowest amount and exploit the best results condition for rhIFN-β in a bench top bioreactor. Materials and Methods: The process variables studied were the concentration of glucose as carbon source, cell density prior the induction (OD 600 nm) and induction temperature. Ultimately, a three-factor three-level BBD was employed during the optimization process. The rhIFN-β production and the acetate excretion served as the evaluated responses. Results: The proposed optimum fermentation condition consisted of 7.81 g L-1 glucose, OD 600 nm prior induction 1.66 and induction temperature of 30.27°C. The model prediction of 0.267 g L-1 of rhIFN-β and 0.961 g L-1 of acetate at the optimum conditions was verified experimentally as 0.255 g L-1 and 0.981 g L-1 of acetate. This agreement between the predicted and observed values confirmed the precision of the applied method to predict the optimum conditions. Conclusions: It can be concluded that the RSM is an effective method for the optimization of recombinant protein expression using synthetic genes in E. coli. PMID:26034535

  8. Cellular response to influenza virus infection: a potential role for autophagy in CXCL10 and interferon-alpha induction.

    PubMed

    Law, Anna Hing-Yee; Lee, Davy Chun-Wai; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Peiris, Malik; Lau, Allan Sik-Yin

    2010-07-01

    Historically, influenza pandemics have arisen from avian influenza viruses. Avian influenza viruses H5N1 and H9N2 are potential pandemic candidates. Infection of humans with the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus is associated with a mortality in excess of 60%, which has been attributed to dysregulation of the cytokine system. Human macrophages and epithelial cells infected with some genotypes of H5N1 and H9N2 viruses express markedly elevated cytokine and chemokine levels when compared with seasonal influenza A subtype H1N1 virus. The mechanisms underlying this cytokine and chemokine hyperinduction are not fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrate that autophagy, a tightly regulated homeostatic process for self-digestion of unwanted cellular subcomponents, plays a role in cytokine induction. Autophagy is induced to a greater extent by H9N2/G1, in association with cytokine hyperinduction, compared with H1N1 and the novel pandemic swine-origin influenza A/H1N1 viruses. Using 3-methyladenine to inhibit autophagy and small interfering RNA to silence the autophagy gene, Atg5, we further show that autophagic responses play a role in influenza virus-induced CXCL10 and interferon-alpha expression in primary human blood macrophages. Our results provide new insights into the pathogenic mechanisms of avian influenza viruses.

  9. Organization of the murine and human interleukin-7 receptor genes: Two mRNAs: Two mRNAs generated by differential splicing and presence of a type I-interferon-inducible promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Pleiman, C.M.; Gimpel, S.D.; Ziegler, S.F.; Park, L.S. ); Harada, Hisashi; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu )

    1991-06-01

    To better understand the regulation of interleukin-7 receptor (IL-7R) expression, the authors have pursued a detailed analysis of the structure of the murine and human IL-7R genes. The genes consist of eight exons, the sizes of which are conserved in mouse and human cells, spread out over 24 kbp (murine) and 19 kbp (human). A differential splicing event results in an mRNA encoding a secreted form of the human IL-7R gene. Primer extension and S1 nuclease analysis show a single transcriptional start site for the murine IL-7R gene. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the murine IL-7R gene contains TATA- and CAAT-like sequences. The promoter region also contains a functional interferon regulatory element, to which the interferon-induced nuclear factors IRF-1 and IRF-2 are capable of binding and which is able to confer interferon-inducible expression on a heterologous gene. There are also potential binding sites for the transcription factors Ap-1 and Ap-2 as well as multiple glucocorticoid response elements. Comparison of the murine and human IL-7R exon/intron boundaries with those of other hematopoietin receptor superfamily members whose exon/intron boundaries are also known reveals a conserved evolutionary structure.

  10. SnapShot: Interferon Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kwan T; Gale, Michael

    2015-12-17

    Interferons (IFNs) are crucial cytokines of antimicrobial, antitumor, and immunomodulatory activity. The three types of IFN (I, II, and III) are classified by their receptor specificity and sequence homology. IFNs are produced and secreted by cells in response to specific stimuli. Here, we review the subsequent IFN signaling events occurring through unique receptors leading to regulation of gene expression for modulation of innate and adaptive immunity. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF.

  11. Hepatitis C virus kinetics by administration of pegylated interferon-α in human and chimeric mice carrying human hepatocytes with variants of the IL28B gene

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tsunamasa; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Matsuura, Kentaro; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Murakami, Shuko; Iijima, Sayuki; Iio, Etsuko; Sugiyama, Masaya; Shimada, Takashi; Kakuni, Masakazu; Kohara, Michinori; Mizokami, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent studies have demonstrated that genetic polymorphisms near the IL28B gene are associated with the clinical outcome of pegylated interferon α (peg-IFN-α) plus ribavirin therapy for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, it is unclear whether genetic variations near the IL28B gene influence hepatic interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) induction or cellular immune responses, lead to the viral reduction during IFN treatment. Design Changes in HCV-RNA levels before therapy, at day 1 and weeks 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 after administering peg-IFN-α plus ribavirin were measured in 54 patients infected with HCV genotype 1. Furthermore, we prepared four lines of chimeric mice having four different lots of human hepatocytes containing various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) around the IL28B gene. HCV infecting chimeric mice were subcutaneously administered with peg-IFN-α for 2 weeks. Results There were significant differences in the reduction of HCV-RNA levels after peg-IFN-α plus ribavirin therapy based on the IL28B SNP rs8099917 between TT (favourable) and TG/GG (unfavourable) genotypes in patients; the first-phase viral decline slope per day and second-phase slope per week in TT genotype were significantly higher than in TG/GG genotype. On peg-IFN-α administration to chimeric mice, however, no significant difference in the median reduction of HCV-RNA levels and the induction of antiviral ISG was observed between favourable and unfavourable human hepatocyte genotypes. Conclusions As chimeric mice have the characteristic of immunodeficiency, the response to peg-IFN-α associated with the variation in IL28B alleles in chronic HCV patients would be composed of the intact immune system. PMID:23135762

  12. A Novel BRISC-SHMT Complex Deubiquitinates IFNAR1 and Regulates Interferon Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Gupta, Vibhor; Patterson-Fortin, Jeffrey; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; Katlinski, Kanstantsin; Wu, Junmin; Varghese, Bentley; Carbone, Christopher J.; Aressy, Bernadette; Fuchs, Serge Y.; Greenberg, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine63-linked ubiquitin (K63-Ub) chains represent a particular ubiquitin topology that mediates proteasome-independent signaling events. The deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) BRCC36 segregates into distinct nuclear and cytoplasmic complexes that are specific for K63-Ub hydrolysis. RAP80 targets the five-member nuclear BRCC36 complex to K63-Ub chains at DNA double-strand breaks. The alternative four-member BRCC36 containing complex (BRISC) lacks a known targeting moiety. Here we identify Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) as a heretofore-unappreciated component that fulfills this function. SHMT directs BRISC activity at K63-Ub chains conjugated to the type 1 interferon (IFN) receptor chain 1 (IFNAR1). BRISC-SHMT2 complexes localize to and deubiquitinate actively engaged IFNAR1, thus limiting its K63-Ub mediated internalization and lysosomal degradation. BRISC deficient cells and mice exhibit attenuated responses to IFN and are protected from IFN-associated immunopathology. These studies reveal a novel mechanism of DUB regulation, and suggest a therapeutic use of BRISC inhibitors for treating pathophysiologic processes driven by elevated IFN responses. PMID:24075985

  13. CC-122, a pleiotropic pathway modifier, mimics an interferon response and has antitumor activity in DLBCL.

    PubMed

    Hagner, Patrick R; Man, Hon-Wah; Fontanillo, Celia; Wang, Maria; Couto, Suzana; Breider, Mike; Bjorklund, Chad; Havens, Courtney G; Lu, Gang; Rychak, Emily; Raymon, Heather; Narla, Rama Krishna; Barnes, Leo; Khambatta, Gody; Chiu, Hsiling; Kosek, Jolanta; Kang, Jian; Amantangelo, Michael D; Waldman, Michelle; Lopez-Girona, Antonia; Cai, Ti; Pourdehnad, Michael; Trotter, Matthew; Daniel, Thomas O; Schafer, Peter H; Klippel, Anke; Thakurta, Anjan; Chopra, Rajesh; Gandhi, Anita K

    2015-08-06

    Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor of the Cullin 4 RING E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, is the target of the immunomodulatory drugs lenalidomide and pomalidomide. Recently, it was demonstrated that binding of these drugs to CRBN promotes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of 2 common substrates, transcription factors Aiolos and Ikaros. Here we report that CC-122, a new chemical entity termed pleiotropic pathway modifier, binds CRBN and promotes degradation of Aiolos and Ikaros in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and T cells in vitro, in vivo, and in patients, resulting in both cell autonomous as well as immunostimulatory effects. In DLBCL cell lines, CC-122-induced degradation or short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of Aiolos and Ikaros correlates with increased transcription of interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes independent of IFN-α, -β, and -γ production and/or secretion and results in apoptosis in both activated B-cell (ABC) and germinal center B-cell DLBCL cell lines. Our results provide mechanistic insight into the cell-of-origin independent antilymphoma activity of CC-122, in contrast to the ABC subtype selective activity of lenalidomide.

  14. CC-122, a pleiotropic pathway modifier, mimics an interferon response and has antitumor activity in DLBCL

    PubMed Central

    Hagner, Patrick R.; Man, Hon-Wah; Fontanillo, Celia; Wang, Maria; Couto, Suzana; Breider, Mike; Bjorklund, Chad; Havens, Courtney G.; Lu, Gang; Rychak, Emily; Raymon, Heather; Narla, Rama Krishna; Barnes, Leo; Khambatta, Gody; Chiu, Hsiling; Kosek, Jolanta; Kang, Jian; Amantangelo, Michael D.; Waldman, Michelle; Lopez-Girona, Antonia; Cai, Ti; Pourdehnad, Michael; Trotter, Matthew; Daniel, Thomas O.; Schafer, Peter H.; Klippel, Anke; Thakurta, Anjan; Gandhi, Anita K.

    2015-01-01

    Cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor of the Cullin 4 RING E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, is the target of the immunomodulatory drugs lenalidomide and pomalidomide. Recently, it was demonstrated that binding of these drugs to CRBN promotes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of 2 common substrates, transcription factors Aiolos and Ikaros. Here we report that CC-122, a new chemical entity termed pleiotropic pathway modifier, binds CRBN and promotes degradation of Aiolos and Ikaros in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and T cells in vitro, in vivo, and in patients, resulting in both cell autonomous as well as immunostimulatory effects. In DLBCL cell lines, CC-122-induced degradation or short hairpin RNA–mediated knockdown of Aiolos and Ikaros correlates with increased transcription of interferon (IFN)–stimulated genes independent of IFN-α, -β, and -γ production and/or secretion and results in apoptosis in both activated B-cell (ABC) and germinal center B-cell DLBCL cell lines. Our results provide mechanistic insight into the cell-of-origin independent antilymphoma activity of CC-122, in contrast to the ABC subtype selective activity of lenalidomide. PMID:26002965

  15. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 Has a Protective Role in the Host Response to Endotoxic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Paige; Moreland, Jessica G.; Dunnwald, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF) 6, a member of the IRF family, is essential for epidermal and orofacial embryonic development. Irf6 is strongly expressed in keratinocytes, in which it regulates epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and migration. A recent role for Irf6 in Toll-like receptor 2-dependent chemokine gene expression was also reported in an epithelial cell line. However, a function for Irf6 in innate immune cells was not previously reported. In the present study, we investigated the expression and function of Irf6 in bone marrow-derived neutrophils and macrophages. We show here, using a conditional knockout of Irf6 in lysosymeM expressing cells, that Irf6 is required for resistance to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. In addition, Irf6-deficient bone marrow-derived neutrophils exhibited increased chemotactic index and velocity compared with wild-type cells in vitro. TLR4-specific KC and IL6 secretions were upregulated in Irf6-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These cells also exhibited an increased level of phosphorylated IkBa. Collectively, our findings suggest a role for Irf6 in the resistance to endotoxic shock due to NFk-B-mediated alteration of cytokine production. PMID:27035130

  16. A Simple Screening Approach To Prioritize Genes for Functional Analysis Identifies a Role for Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 in the Control of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Jacqueline U.; Kaforou, Myrsini; Clare, Simon; Hale, Christine; Ivanova, Maria; Huntley, Derek; Dorner, Marcus; Wright, Victoria J.; Levin, Michael; Martinon-Torres, Federico; Herberg, Jethro A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Greater understanding of the functions of host gene products in response to infection is required. While many of these genes enable pathogen clearance, some enhance pathogen growth or contribute to disease symptoms. Many studies have profiled transcriptomic and proteomic responses to infection, generating large data sets, but selecting targets for further study is challenging. Here we propose a novel data-mining approach combining multiple heterogeneous data sets to prioritize genes for further study by using respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection as a model pathogen with a significant health care impact. The assumption was that the more frequently a gene is detected across multiple studies, the more important its role is. A literature search was performed to find data sets of genes and proteins that change after RSV infection. The data sets were standardized, collated into a single database, and then panned to determine which genes occurred in multiple data sets, generating a candidate gene list. This candidate gene list was validated by using both a clinical cohort and in vitro screening. We identified several genes that were frequently expressed following RSV infection with no assigned function in RSV control, including IFI27, IFIT3, IFI44L, GBP1, OAS3, IFI44, and IRF7. Drilling down into the function of these genes, we demonstrate a role in disease for the gene for interferon regulatory factor 7, which was highly ranked on the list, but not for IRF1, which was not. Thus, we have developed and validated an approach for collating published data sets into a manageable list of candidates, identifying novel targets for future analysis. IMPORTANCE Making the most of “big data” is one of the core challenges of current biology. There is a large array of heterogeneous data sets of host gene responses to infection, but these data sets do not inform us about gene function and require specialized skill sets and training for their utilization. Here we

  17. Lower Viral Response to Pegylated Interferon Alpha 2a Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis B in Roma People in Eastern Slovakia

    PubMed Central

    Drazilova, Sylvia; Janicko, Martin; Kristian, Pavol; Schreter, Ivan; Kucinsky, Branislav; Kozlej, Marek; Hockickova, Ivana; Jarcuska, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the compliance and virological response to pegylated interferon alpha 2a treatment of chronic hepatitis B in Roma population compared to majority Caucasian population in Slovakia. Methods. Retrospective evaluation of a cohort of all Roma patients treated with pegylated interferon alpha 2a from 2007 to 2013 in 3 centers for treatment of chronic viral hepatitis B. The Study included 43 Roma patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and randomly selected control group. Treatment duration was 48 weeks. Viral response was evaluated after 24 weeks, at the end of treatment, and 24 weeks after the end of treatment. Results. Complete treatment course was finished by 79.1% of Roma patients compared to all patients from the control group (p = 0.0009). There was a tendency toward lower viral response rate in Roma at all time points; however significant difference was only at end of treatment viral response (51.2% Roma versus 81.4% majority, p = 0.003). We also did not find significant difference at the rate of HBsAg loss. Conclusion. Roma patients with chronic hepatitis B have significantly worse compliance to treatment with pegylated interferon and they have significantly lower rate of end of treatment viral response. PMID:26858755

  18. Activation of Type I and III Interferon Response by Mitochondrial and Peroxisomal MAVS and Inhibition by Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Silke; Reuter, Antje; Eberle, Florian; Einhorn, Evelyne; Binder, Marco; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Sensing viruses by pattern recognition receptors (PRR) triggers the innate immune system of the host cell and activates immune signaling cascades such as the RIG-I/IRF3 pathway. Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, also known as IPS-1, Cardif, and VISA) is the crucial adaptor protein of this pathway localized on mitochondria, peroxisomes and mitochondria-associated membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. Activation of MAVS leads to the production of type I and type III interferons (IFN) as well as IFN stimulated genes (ISGs). To refine the role of MAVS subcellular localization for the induction of type I and III IFN responses in hepatocytes and its counteraction by the hepatitis C virus (HCV), we generated various functional and genetic knock-out cell systems that were reconstituted to express mitochondrial (mito) or peroxisomal (pex) MAVS, exclusively. Upon infection with diverse RNA viruses we found that cells exclusively expressing pexMAVS mounted sustained expression of type I and III IFNs to levels comparable to cells exclusively expressing mitoMAVS. To determine whether viral counteraction of MAVS is affected by its subcellular localization we employed infection of cells with HCV, a major causative agent of chronic liver disease with a high propensity to establish persistence. This virus efficiently cleaves MAVS via a viral protease residing in its nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) and this strategy is thought to contribute to the high persistence of this virus. We found that both mito- and pexMAVS were efficiently cleaved by NS3 and this cleavage was required to suppress activation of the IFN response. Taken together, our findings indicate comparable activation of the IFN response by pex- and mitoMAVS in hepatocytes and efficient counteraction of both MAVS species by the HCV NS3 protease. PMID:26588843

  19. Atlantic salmon possesses two clusters of type I interferon receptor genes on different chromosomes, which allows for a larger repertoire of interferon receptors than in zebrafish and mammals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baojian; Greiner-Tollersrud, Linn; Koop, Ben F; Robertsen, Børre

    2014-12-01

    Mammalian type I interferons (IFNs) signal through a receptor composed of the IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 chains. In zebrafish two-cysteine IFNs utilize a receptor composed of CRFB1 and CRFB5, while four-cysteine IFNs signal through a receptor formed by CRFB2 and CRFB5. In the present work two CRFB clusters were identified in different chromosomes of Atlantic salmon. Genes of three CRFB5s, one CRFB1, one CRFB2 and the novel CRFB5x were identified, cloned and studied functionally. All CRFBs were expressed in 10 different organs, but the relative expression of CRFBs varied. Mx-reporter assay was used to study which CRFBs might be involved in receptors for salmon IFNa, IFNb and IFNc. The results of Mx-reporter assays suggest that IFNa signals through a receptor composed of CRFB1a as the long chain and either CRFB5a, CRFB5b or CRFB5c as the short chain; IFNc signals through a receptor with CRFB5a or CRFB5c as the short chain while IFNb may signal through a receptor with CRFB5x as a short chain. Taken together, the present work demonstrates that Atlantic salmon has a more diverse repertoire of type I IFN receptors compared to zebrafish or mammals.

  20. Viperin interaction with mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) limits viperin-mediated inhibition of the interferon response in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Viperin is an antiviral protein that is upregulated by interferons and by ligands for a variety of innate immune receptors. It possesses diverse capabilities and functions in an array of viral infections. Studies have shown that it appears to be particularly important in defence against RNA viruses, such as West Nile, Dengue, and Chikungunya viruses, although the specific mechanisms involved are not well understood at the molecular level. Here we identify the mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein MAVS as a novel viperin interaction partner, most likely in mitochondria associated membranes, and characterize a more central, overarching role of viperin as a negative regulator of the interferon response, an ability that can be regulated by the viperin-MAVS interaction. This suggests a novel mechanism of viperin action in immune defence against RNA viruses by which it may prevent pathology from excessive immune responses. PMID:28207838

  1. Hepatitis B virus spliced variants are associated with an impaired response to interferon therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jieliang; Wu, Min; Wang, Fan; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Jiming; Liu, Yinghui; Liu, Yi; Feng, Yanling; Zheng, Ye; Hu, Yunwen; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    During hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication, spliced HBV genomes and splice-generated proteins have been widely described, however, their biological and clinical significance remains to be defined. Here, an elevation of the proportion of HBV spliced variants in the sera of patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is shown to correlate with an impaired respond to interferon-α (IFN-α) therapy. Transfection of the constructs encoding the three most dominant species of spliced variants into cells or ectopic expression of the two major spliced protein including HBSP and N-terminal-truncated viral polymerase protein result in strong suppression of IFN-α signaling transduction, while mutation of the major splicing-related sites of HBV attenuates the viral anti-IFN activities in both cell and mouse models. These results have associated the productions of HBV spliced variants with the failure response to IFN therapy and illuminate a novel mechanism where spliced viral products are employed to resist IFN-mediated host defense. PMID:26585041

  2. Use of interferon-gamma ELISPOT in monitoring immune responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Matijevic, Mark; Urban, Robert G

    2005-01-01

    The interferon (IFN)-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay has become a useful tool for immunologists seeking to quantify immune responses on a per-cell basis. The assay is sensitive and allows for the enumeration of low-frequency T-cells. Many have applied this assay to clinical trials as a way to measure biological activity in a patient cohort. It is critical that each laboratory attempting to use the assay in their facility perform rigorous development and qualification work to establish an assay that suits their particular needs. This chapter serves as a demonstration of two practical and slightly different approaches to using the ELISPOT assay to monitor immune activity in the human periphery: (1) assays using whole samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with and without the use of additional antigen presenting cells and (2) assays using enriched T-cell populations. Detailed protocols and procedures will be covered, as well as a demonstration of results obtained from three separate applications.

  3. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Induce DNA Damage-Dependent Interferon Responses Circumventing Ebola Virus Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Priya; Aguirre, Sebastian; Yen, Benjamin C.; Pietzsch, Colette A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Maria T.; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Morlock, Lorraine K.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Leung, Daisy W.; Williams, Noelle S.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ebola virus (EBOV) protein VP35 inhibits production of interferon alpha/beta (IFN) by blocking RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways, thereby promoting virus replication and pathogenesis. A high-throughput screening assay, developed to identify compounds that either inhibit or bypass VP35 IFN-antagonist function, identified five DNA intercalators as reproducible hits from a library of bioactive compounds. Four, including doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are anthracycline antibiotics that inhibit topoisomerase II and are used clinically as chemotherapeutic drugs. These compounds were demonstrated to induce IFN responses in an ATM kinase-dependent manner and to also trigger the DNA-sensing cGAS-STING pathway of IFN induction. These compounds also suppress EBOV replication in vitro and induce IFN in the presence of IFN-antagonist proteins from multiple negative-sense RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into signaling pathways activated by important chemotherapy drugs and identify a novel therapeutic approach for IFN induction that may be exploited to inhibit RNA virus replication. PMID:28377530

  4. Type I Interferons Regulate Immune Responses in Humans with Blood-Stage Plasmodium falciparum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H.; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Best, Shannon E.; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S.; Edwards, Chelsea L.; Boyle, Glen M.; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Loughland, Jessica R.; Burel, Julie; Doolan, Denise L.; Haque, Ashraful; McCarthy, James S.; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The development of immunoregulatory networks is important to prevent disease. However, these same networks allow pathogens to persist and reduce vaccine efficacy. Here, we identify type I interferons (IFNs) as important regulators in developing anti-parasitic immunity in healthy volunteers infected for the first time with Plasmodium falciparum. Type I IFNs suppressed innate immune cell function and parasitic-specific CD4+ T cell IFNγ production, and they promoted the development of parasitic-specific IL-10-producing Th1 (Tr1) cells. Type I IFN-dependent, parasite-specific IL-10 production was also observed in P. falciparum malaria patients in the field following chemoprophylaxis. Parasite-induced IL-10 suppressed inflammatory cytokine production, and IL-10 levels after drug treatment were positively associated with parasite burdens before anti-parasitic drug administration. These findings have important implications for understanding the development of host immune responses following blood-stage P. falciparum infection, and they identify type I IFNs and related signaling pathways as potential targets for therapies or vaccine efficacy improvement. PMID:27705789

  5. The first characterization of two type I interferons in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) reveals their differential role, expression pattern and gene induction.

    PubMed

    Pereiro, P; Costa, M M; Díaz-Rosales, P; Dios, S; Figueras, A; Novoa, B

    2014-08-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are considered the main cytokines directing the antiviral immune response in vertebrates. These molecules are able to induce the transcription of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) which, using different blocking mechanisms, reduce the viral proliferation in the host. In addition, a contradictory role of these IFNs in the protection against bacterial challenges using murine models has been observed, increasing the survival or having a detrimental effect depending on the bacteria species. In teleosts, a variable number of type I IFNs has been described with different expression patterns, protective capabilities or gene induction profiles even for the different IFNs belonging to the same species. In this work, two type I IFNs (ifn1 and ifn2) have been characterized for the first time in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus), showing different properties. Whereas Ifn1 reflected a clear antiviral activity (over-expression of ISGs and protection against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus), Ifn2 was not able to induce this response, although both transcripts were up-regulated after viral challenge. On the other hand, turbot IFNs did not show any protective effect against the bacteria Aeromonas salmonicida, although they were induced after bacterial challenge. Both IFNs induced the expression of several immune genes, but the effect of Ifn2 was mainly limited to the site of administration (intramuscular injection). Interestingly, Ifn2 but not Ifn1 induced an increase in the expression level of interleukin-1 beta (il1b). Therefore, the role of Ifn2 could be more related with the immune regulation, being involved mainly in the inflammation process.

  6. NS1 Protein Mutation I64T Affects Interferon Responses and Virulence of Circulating H3N2 Human Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    DeDiego, Marta L.; Nogales, Aitor; Lambert-Emo, Kris; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza NS1 protein is the main viral protein counteracting host innate immune responses, allowing the virus to efficiently replicate in interferon (IFN)-competent systems. In this study, we analyzed NS1 protein variability within influenza A (IAV) H3N2 viruses infecting humans during the 2012-2013 season. We also evaluated the impact of the mutations on the ability of NS1 proteins to inhibit host innate immune responses and general gene expression. Surprisingly, a previously unidentified mutation in the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (I64T) decreased NS1-mediated general inhibition of host protein synthesis by decreasing its interaction with cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to increased innate immune responses after viral infection. Notably, a recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-T64 protein was highly attenuated in mice, most likely because of its ability to induce higher antiviral IFN responses at early times after infection and because this virus is highly sensitive to the IFN-induced antiviral state. Interestingly, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected at the acute visit (2 to 3 days after infection), we show that the subject infected with the NS1-T64 attenuated virus has diminished responses to interferon and to interferon induction, suggesting why this subject could be infected with this highly IFN-sensitive virus. These data demonstrate the importance of influenza virus surveillance in identifying new mutations in the NS1 protein, affecting its ability to inhibit innate immune responses and, as a consequence, the pathogenicity of the virus. IMPORTANCE Influenza A and B viruses are one of the most common causes of respiratory infections in humans, causing 1 billion infections and between 300,000 and 500,000 deaths annually. Influenza virus surveillance to identify new mutations in the NS1 protein affecting innate immune responses and, as a consequence

  7. Cellular Mechanism for Impaired Hepatitis C Virus Clearance by Interferon Associated with IFNL3 Gene Polymorphisms Relates to Intrahepatic Interferon-λ Expression.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Pauline; Chandra, Partha K; Panigrahi, Rajesh; Aboulnasr, Fatma; Chava, Srinivas; Kurt, Ramazan; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Wilkens, Ludwig; Osterlund, Pamela; Hartmann, Rune; Balart, Luis A; Wu, Tong; Dash, Srikanta

    2016-04-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism located within the IFNL3 (also known as IL28B) promoter is one of the host factors associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) clearance by interferon (IFN)-α therapy; however the mechanism remains unknown. We investigated how IL28B gene polymorphism influences HCV clearance with infected primary human hepatocytes, liver biopsies, and hepatoma cell lines. Our study confirms that the rs12979860-T/T genotype has a strong correlation with ss469415590-ΔG/ΔG single nucleotide polymorphism that produces IFN-λ4 protein. We found that IFN-α and IFN-λ1 antiviral activity against HCV was impaired in IL28B T/T infected hepatocytes compared with C/C genotype. Western blot analysis showed that IL28B TT genotype hepatocytes expressed higher levels of IFN-λ proteins (IL28B, IL-29), preactivated IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression, and impaired Stat phosphorylation when stimulated with either IFN-α or IFN-λ1. Furthermore, we showed that silencing IFN-λ1 in T/T cell line reduced basal ISG expression and improved antiviral activity. Likewise, overexpression of IFN-λ (1 to 4) in C/C cells induced basal ISG expression and prevented IFN-α antiviral activity. We showed that IFN-λ4, produced at low level only in T/T cells induced expression of IL28B and IL-29 and prevented IFN-α antiviral activity in HCV cell culture. Our results suggest that IFN-λ4 protein expression associated with the IL28B-T/T variant preactivates the Janus kinase-Stat signaling, leading to impaired HCV clearance by both IFN-α and IFN-λ.

  8. Thymoquinone regulates gene expression levels in the estrogen metabolic and interferon pathways in MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Motaghed, Marjaneh; Al-Hassan, Faisal Muti; Hamid, Shahrul Sahul

    2014-01-01

    New drugs are continuously being developed for the treatment of patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Thymoquinone is one of the drugs that exhibits anticancer characteristics based on in vivo and in vitro models. This study further investigates the effects of thymoquinone on human gene expression using cDNA microarray technology. The quantification of RNA samples was carried out using an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyser to determine the RNA integrity number (RIN). The Agilent Low Input Quick Amplification Labelling kit was used to generate cRNA in two-color microarray analysis. Samples with RIN >9.0 were used in this study. The universal human reference RNA was used as the common reference. The samples were labelled with cyanine-3 (cye-3) CTP dye and the universal human reference was labelled with cyanine-5 (cye-5) CTP dye. cRNA was purified with the RNeasy Plus Mini kit and quantified using a NanoDrop 2000c spectrophotometer. The arrays were scanned data analysed using Feature Extraction and GeneSpring software. Two-step qRT-PCR was selected to determine the relative gene expression using the High Capacity RNA-to-cDNA kit. The results from Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, indicated that 8 GO terms were related to biological processes (84%) and molecular functions (16%). A total of 577 entities showed >2-fold change in expression. Of these entities, 45.2% showed an upregulation and 54.7% showed a downregulation in expression. The interpretation of single experiment analysis (SEA) revealed that the cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (CYP1A1) and UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, polypeptide A8 (UGT1A8) genes in the estrogen metabolic pathway were downregulated significantly by 43- and 11‑fold, respectively. The solute carrier family 7 (anionic amino acid transporter light chain, xc-system), member 11 (SLC7A11) gene in the interferon pathway, reported to be involved in the development of chemoresistance, was downregulated by 15

  9. Interleukin-28B Polymorphisms and Response of Chronic Hepatitis C Patients from Indonesia to Pegylated Interferon/Ribavirin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Juniastuti; Wibowo, Bogi P.; Wibawa, I D. N.; Utsumi, Takako; Mustika, Syifa; Amin, Mochamad; Wahyuni, Rury M.; Kurniawan, Hendra; Hendrayana, Agus; Setiawan, Poernomo B.; Yamani, Laura N.; Soetjipto; Yano, Yoshihiko; Hotta, Hak; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrated that Indonesian patients with chronic hepatitis C (mostly ethnic Java people) mostly were infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1; however, they carried mainly the major genotypes of interleukin 28B (IL-28B) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs12979860 CC, rs11881222 TT, rs8103142 AA, and rs8099917 TT), and they mostly achieved sustained virological responses to pegylated interferon/ribavirin treatment. PMID:24696021

  10. Evaluation of Hepatitis B Surface Antibody and Specific Gamma Interferon Response in Health Care Workers After Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Sarmast Shooshtari, Mohammad Hosein; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Rasti, Mojtaba; Neisi, Niloofar; Rastegarvand, Nasrin; Pouremamali, Amir; Sadeghi Haj, Mehrdad; Ghaedi, Fardin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health care workers are at high risk of acquiring hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection through occupational exposure to blood or body fluids. Thus, the assessment of anti-HBs status after immunization is very important. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the measurement of HBsAb titer and specific gamma interferon response among the vaccinated health care workers in Golestan Hospital, Ahvaz, Iran. Patients and Methods: The blood samples of 39 health care workers, including 13 general surgeons, 10 anesthesiologists, 5 neurosurgeons, 3 general physicians, 1 orthopedist, 2 urologist and 5 nurses were collected during June 2013. All the participants had received HBV vaccine. They had received last vaccine dose from 2 months to 14 years ago. Their sera were tested for anti-hepatitis B antibody and HBc-IgG by the ELISA. Also, the evaluation of specific interferon γ response against HBsAg was carried out using ELISA test. The age of health care workers were between 24 and 58 years with the mean age of 34.3 ± 7.4 y. Results: Out of 39 sera, 22 (56.41%) had HBsAb titer above 100 IU/mL, 17 (43.6%) had titer below 100 IU/mL, 27 (69.2%) had positive specific HBsAg interferon γ, 8 (20.5%) cases had positive antibody response above 100IU, but negative for specific interferon γ and 3 (7.6%) cases were positive for HBc-IgG. Conclusions: Overall, 87.2% of the health care workers had immunity against HBV infection, which showed remarkable immunity response following HBV vaccination. Booster dose of HBV vaccine is recommended for those whose immunity are below 100 IU/mL. PMID:25789124

  11. Evaluation of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced protein 10 (IP-10) responses for detection of cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis: comparisons to IFN-gamma responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced protein 10 (IP-10) has recently shown promise as a diagnostic biomarker of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of humans. The aim of the current study was to compare IP-10 and IFN-gamma responses upon Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle using archived sample...

  12. Effects of Filovirus Interferon Antagonists on Responses of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells to RNA Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Benjamin C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendritic cells (DCs) are major targets of filovirus infection in vivo. Previous studies have shown that the filoviruses Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) suppress DC maturation in vitro. Both viruses also encode innate immune evasion functions. The EBOV VP35 (eVP35) and the MARV VP35 (mVP35) proteins each can block RIG-I-like receptor signaling and alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) production. The EBOV VP24 (eVP24) and MARV VP40 (mVP40) proteins each inhibit the production of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) by blocking Jak-STAT signaling; however, this occurs by different mechanisms, with eVP24 blocking nuclear import of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT1 and mVP40 blocking Jak1 function. MARV VP24 (mVP24) has been demonstrated to modulate host cell antioxidant responses. Previous studies demonstrated that eVP35 is sufficient to strongly impair primary human monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) responses upon stimulation induced through the RIG-I-like receptor pathways. We demonstrate that mVP35, like eVP35, suppresses not only IFN-α/β production but also proinflammatory responses after stimulation of MDDCs with RIG-I activators. In contrast, eVP24 and mVP40, despite suppressing ISG production upon RIG-I activation, failed to block upregulation of maturation markers or T cell activation. mVP24, although able to stimulate expression of antioxidant response genes, had no measurable impact of DC function. These data are consistent with a model where filoviral VP35 proteins are the major suppressors of DC maturation during filovirus infection, whereas the filoviral VP24 proteins and mVP40 are insufficient to prevent DC maturation. IMPORTANCE The ability to suppress the function of dendritic cells (DCs) likely contributes to the pathogenesis of disease caused by the filoviruses Ebola virus and Marburg virus. To clarify the basis for this DC suppression, we assessed the effect of filovirus proteins known to antagonize innate immune signaling pathways, including Ebola

  13. Importance of interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins and retinoic acid inducible gene I for influenza virus replication: A review.

    PubMed

    Suo, Siqingaowa; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between Influenza viruses and host cells is key to elucidating the pathogenesis of these viruses. Several host factors have been identified that exert antiviral functions; however, influenza viruses continue to replicate utilizing host cell machinery. Herein, we review the mechanisms of action of two host-derived proteins on conferring cellular resistance to the influenza virus; (1) the interferon inducible trans-membrane proteins, 1, 2 and 3, a recently identified family of early restriction factors; and (2) retinoic acid inducible gene I, a key mediator of antiviral immunity. These data may contribute to the design of novel and efficient anti-influenza treatments.

  14. Intracranial Injection of Dengue Virus Induces Interferon Stimulated Genes and CD8+ T Cell Infiltration by Sphingosine Kinase 1 Independent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Jennifer N.; Davies, Lorena T.; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Pitson, Stuart M.; Carr, Jillian M.

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported that the absence of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) affects both dengue virus (DENV) infection and innate immune responses in vitro. Here we aimed to define SK1-dependancy of DENV-induced disease and the associated innate responses in vivo. The lack of a reliable mouse model with a fully competent interferon response for DENV infection is a challenge, and here we use an experimental model of DENV infection in the brain of immunocompetent mice. Intracranial injection of DENV-2 into C57BL/6 mice induced body weight loss and neurological symptoms which was associated with a high level of DENV RNA in the brain. Body weight loss and DENV RNA level tended to be greater in SK1-/- compared with wildtype (WT) mice. Brain infection with DENV-2 is associated with the induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression including viperin, Ifi27l2a, IRF7, and CXCL10 without any significant differences between WT and SK1-/- mice. The SK2 and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) levels in the brain were unchanged by DENV infection or the lack of SK1. Histological analysis demonstrated the presence of a cellular infiltrate in DENV-infected brain with a significant increase in mRNA for CD8 but not CD4 suggesting this infiltrate is likely CD8+ but not CD4+ T-lymphocytes. This increase in T-cell infiltration was not affected by the lack of SK1. Overall, DENV-infection in the brain induces IFN and T-cell responses but does not influence the SK/S1P axis. In contrast to our observations in vitro, SK1 has no major influence on these responses following DENV-infection in the mouse brain. PMID:28095439

  15. Intracranial Injection of Dengue Virus Induces Interferon Stimulated Genes and CD8+ T Cell Infiltration by Sphingosine Kinase 1 Independent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Al-Shujairi, Wisam H; Clarke, Jennifer N; Davies, Lorena T; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Pitson, Stuart M; Carr, Jillian M

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported that the absence of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) affects both dengue virus (DENV) infection and innate immune responses in vitro. Here we aimed to define SK1-dependancy of DENV-induced disease and the associated innate responses in vivo. The lack of a reliable mouse model with a fully competent interferon response for DENV infection is a challenge, and here we use an experimental model of DENV infection in the brain of immunocompetent mice. Intracranial injection of DENV-2 into C57BL/6 mice induced body weight loss and neurological symptoms which was associated with a high level of DENV RNA in the brain. Body weight loss and DENV RNA level tended to be greater in SK1-/- compared with wildtype (WT) mice. Brain infection with DENV-2 is associated with the induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression including viperin, Ifi27l2a, IRF7, and CXCL10 without any significant differences between WT and SK1-/- mice. The SK2 and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) levels in the brain were unchanged by DENV infection or the lack of SK1. Histological analysis demonstrated the presence of a cellular infiltrate in DENV-infected brain with a significant increase in mRNA for CD8 but not CD4 suggesting this infiltrate is likely CD8+ but not CD4+ T-lymphocytes. This increase in T-cell infiltration was not affected by the lack of SK1. Overall, DENV-infection in the brain induces IFN and T-cell responses but does not influence the SK/S1P axis. In contrast to our observations in vitro, SK1 has no major influence on these responses following DENV-infection in the mouse brain.

  16. Interferon Type I Receptor-Deficient Mice have Altered Disease Symptoms in Response to Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Traynor, Tim R.; Majde, Jeannine A.; Bohnet, Stewart G.; Krueger, James M.

    2007-01-01

    The role of type I interferons (IFNs) in mediation of acute viral symptoms (fever, somnolence, anorexia, etc.) is unknown. To determine the role of type I IFN in selected symptom development, body temperature and sleep responses to a marginally lethal dose of X-31 influenza virus were examined in mice with a targeted mutation of the IFN receptor type I (IFN-RI knockouts) and compared to wild-type 129 SvEv control mice. Mice were monitored for 48 hr to determine baseline temperature and sleep profiles prior to infection, and then for 9 days following infection. Hypothermic responses to virus were perceptible beginning at 64 hr post-infection (PI) and were more marked in KO mice until 108 hr, when hypothermia became more exaggerated in wild-type controls. Temperatures of wild-type mice continued to decline through day 9 while temperatures in IFN-RI KO mice stabilized. Time spent in non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) increased in KO mice when hypothermia was marked and then returned to baseline levels, while NREMS continued to increase in wild-type mice through day 9. Other sleep parameters [time spent in rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), relative NREMS EEG slow wave activity, NREMS EEG power density] were all reduced in wild-type mice compared to KOs from days 3 to 8 while REMS low frequency EEG power density increased in wild-type relative to KOs. In conclusion, our results indicate that the presence of functional type I IFN slightly ameliorates disease symptoms early in the X-31 infection while exacerbating disease symptoms later in the infection. PMID:17098395

  17. The Ebola Interferon Inhibiting Domains Attenuate and Dysregulate Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michelle; Koup, Richard A.; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) infections are characterized by deficient T-lymphocyte responses, T-lymphocyte apoptosis and lymphopenia. We previously showed that disabling of interferon-inhibiting domains (IIDs) in the VP24 and VP35 proteins effectively unblocks maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) and increases the secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Here, we investigated the role of IIDs in adaptive and innate cell-mediated responses using recombinant viruses carrying point mutations, which disabled IIDs in VP24 (EBOV/VP24m), VP35 (EBOV/VP35m) or both (EBOV/VP35m/VP24m). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seropositive donors were inoculated with the panel of viruses and stimulated with CMV pp65 peptides. Disabling of the VP35 IID resulted in increased proliferation and higher percentages of CD4+ T cells secreting IFNγ and/or TNFα. To address the role of aberrant DC maturation in the IID-mediated suppression of T cell responses, CMV-stimulated DCs were infected with the panel of viruses and co-cultured with autologous T-lymphocytes. Infection with EBOV/VP35m infection resulted in a significant increase, as compared to wt EBOV, in proliferating CD4+ cells secreting IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2. Experiments with expanded CMV-specific T cells demonstrated their increased activation following co-cultivation with CMV-pulsed DCs pre-infected with EBOV/VP24m, EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m, as compared to wt EBOV. Both IIDs were found to block phosphorylation of TCR complex-associated adaptors and downstream signaling molecules. Next, we examined the effects of IIDs on the function of B cells in infected PBMC. Infection with EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m resulted in significant increases in the percentages of phenotypically distinct B-cell subsets and plasma cells, as compared to wt EBOV, suggesting inhibition of B cell function and differentiation by VP35 IID. Finally, infection with EBOV/VP35m increased activation of NK cells, as compared to wt

  18. MULTIPLEX PCR ASSAY FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN SOMATOTROPIN AND INTERFERON ALPHA2b GENES IN PLANT MATERIAL.

    PubMed

    Gerasymenko, I M; Mazur, M G; Sheludko, Y V; Kuchuk, N V

    2015-01-01

    Using transgenic plants as factories for production of physiologically active human proteins arouses special concern because occasional escape of such transgenes into environment may cause health problems. Creation of plant varieties producing pharmaceutically valuable proteins should be accompanied by development of detection methods suitable for controlling the transgene behavior. Here we describe a multiplex PCR protocol for revealing of two human genes (encoding growth hormone and interferon alpha2b) that have been successfully introduced into plant genomes. The primer pair designed for detection of human growth hormone coding sequence amplifies fragments of different size from the full-length gene in the human genome and the intronless coding sequence usually used for plant transformation. Application of this primer pair may be recommended for ruling out false positive results due to sample contamination with human DNA. Such a control may be useful also in PCR analysis during establishing of transgenic plants carrying genes of human origin.

  19. CD8+ T Cell Exhaustion, Suppressed Gamma Interferon Production, and Delayed Memory Response Induced by Chronic Brucella melitensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Durward-Diioia, Marina; Harms, Jerome; Khan, Mike; Hall, Cherisse; Smith, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is a well-adapted zoonotic pathogen considered a scourge of mankind since recorded history. In some cases, initial infection leads to chronic and reactivating brucellosis, incurring significant morbidity and economic loss. The mechanism by which B. melitensis subverts adaptive immunological memory is poorly understood. Previous work has shown that Brucella-specific CD8+ T cells express gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and can transition to long-lived memory cells but are not polyfunctional. In this study, chronic infection of mice with B. melitensis led to CD8+ T cell exhaustion, manifested by programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) expression and a lack of IFN-γ production. The B. melitensis-specific CD8+ T cells that produced IFN-γ expressed less IFN-γ per cell than did CD8+ cells from uninfected mice. Both memory precursor (CD8+ LFA1HI CD127HI KLRG1LO) and long-lived memory (CD8+ CD27HI CD127HI KLRG1LO) cells were identified during chronic infection. Interestingly, after adoptive transfer, mice receiving cells from chronically infected animals were able to contain infection more rapidly than recipients of cells from acutely infected or uninfected donors, although the proportions of exhausted CD8+ T cells increased after adoptive transfer in both challenged and unchallenged recipients. CD8+ T cells of challenged recipients initially retained the stunted IFN-γ production found prior to transfer, and cells from acutely infected mice were never seen to transition to either memory subset at all time points tested, up to 30 days post-primary infection, suggesting a delay in the generation of memory. Here we have identified defects in Brucella-responsive CD8+ T cells that allow chronic persistence of infection. PMID:26416901

  20. CD8+ T cell exhaustion, suppressed gamma interferon production, and delayed memory response induced by chronic Brucella melitensis infection.

    PubMed

    Durward-Diioia, Marina; Harms, Jerome; Khan, Mike; Hall, Cherisse; Smith, Judith A; Splitter, Gary A

    2015-12-01

    Brucella melitensis is a well-adapted zoonotic pathogen considered a scourge of mankind since recorded history. In some cases, initial infection leads to chronic and reactivating brucellosis, incurring significant morbidity and economic loss. The mechanism by which B. melitensis subverts adaptive immunological memory is poorly understood. Previous work has shown that Brucella-specific CD8(+) T cells express gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and can transition to long-lived memory cells but are not polyfunctional. In this study, chronic infection of mice with B. melitensis led to CD8(+) T cell exhaustion, manifested by programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) expression and a lack of IFN-γ production. The B. melitensis-specific CD8(+) T cells that produced IFN-γ expressed less IFN-γ per cell than did CD8(+) cells from uninfected mice. Both memory precursor (CD8(+) LFA1(HI) CD127(HI) KLRG1(LO)) and long-lived memory (CD8(+) CD27(HI) CD127(HI) KLRG1(LO)) cells were identified during chronic infection. Interestingly, after adoptive transfer, mice receiving cells from chronically infected animals were able to contain infection more rapidly than recipients of cells from acutely infected or uninfected donors, although the proportions of exhausted CD8(+) T cells increased after adoptive transfer in both challenged and unchallenged recipients. CD8(+) T cells of challenged recipients initially retained the stunted IFN-γ production found prior to transfer, and cells from acutely infected mice were never seen to transition to either memory subset at all time points tested, up to 30 days post-primary infection, suggesting a delay in the generation of memory. Here we have identified defects in Brucella-responsive CD8(+) T cells that allow chronic persistence of infection.

  1. Temporal Dynamics of Interferon Gamma Responses in Children Evaluated for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Belloy, Marie; Porcher, Raphael; Simonney, Nancy; Aboutaam, Rola; Lebourgeois, Muriel; Gaudelus, Joel; De LosAngeles, Laure; Chadelat, Katarina; Scheinmann, Pierre; Beydon, Nicole; Fauroux, Brigitte; Bingen, Martine; Terki, Mustapha; Barraud, Dominique; Cruaud, Philippe; Offredo, Catherine; Ferroni, Agnes; Berche, Patrick; Moissenet, Didier; Vuthien, Hoang; Doit, Catherine; Bingen, Edouard; Lagrange, Philippe Henri

    2009-01-01

    Background Development of T-cells based-Interferon gamma (IFNγ) assays has offered new possibilities for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active disease in adults. Few studies have been performed in children, none in France. With reference to the published data on childhood TB epidemiology in the Paris and Ile de France Region, we considered it important to evaluate the performance of IGRA (QuantiFERON TB Gold In Tube®, QF-TB-IT) in the diagnosis and the follow-up through treatment of LTBI and active TB in a cohort of French children. Methodology/Principal Findings 131 children were recruited during a prospective and multicentre study (October 2005 and May 2007; Ethical Committee St Louis Hospital, Paris, study number 2005/32). Children were sampled at day 0, 10, 30, 60 (except Healthy Contacts, HC) and 90 for LTBI and HC, and a further day 120, and day 180 for active TB children. Median age was 7.4 years, with 91% of the children BCG vaccinated. LTBI and active TB children undergoing therapy produced significant higher IFNγ values after 10 days of treatment (p = 0.035). In addition, IFNγ values were significantly lower at the end of treatment compared to IFNγ values at day 0, although the number of positive patients was not significantly different between day 0 and end of treatment. Conclusions/ Significance By following quantitative IFNγ values in each enrolled child with LTBI or active TB and receiving treatment, we were able to detect an increase in the IFNγ response at day 10 of treatment which might allow the confirmation of a diagnosis. In addition, a decline in IFNγ values during treatment makes it possible for clinicians to monitor the effect of preventive or curative therapy. PMID:19125189

  2. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maddur, Mohan S.; O’Neal, Justin T.; Fedorova, Nadia B.; Puri, Vinita; Pulendran, Bali; Suthar, Mehul S.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs) are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target. PMID:28152048

  3. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Bowen, James R; Quicke, Kendra M; Maddur, Mohan S; O'Neal, Justin T; McDonald, Circe E; Fedorova, Nadia B; Puri, Vinita; Shabman, Reed S; Pulendran, Bali; Suthar, Mehul S

    2017-02-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs) are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target.

  4. Atopic manifestations in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome: response to recombinant interferon gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, J M; Eales, L J; Galazka, A R; Pinching, A J

    1987-01-01

    Six patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) had exacerbations or recurrences of previously quiescent atopic disease when they developed immunodeficiency. Four developed a different atopic illness from that suffered previously. Atopic symptoms developed within three months after the patients developed AIDS or during prodromal illness. Two of the patients were treated with recombinant interferon gamma: both showed a striking improvement in symptoms and cellular immunity. These results indicate that cellular immunity, through interferon gamma, may have a role in regulating atopic disease. PMID:3109572

  5. Spatiotemporal control of interferon-induced JAK/STAT signalling and gene transcription by the retromer complex

    PubMed Central

    Chmiest, Daniela; Sharma, Nanaocha; Zanin, Natacha; Viaris de Lesegno, Christine; Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Sibut, Vonick; Dingli, Florent; Hupé, Philippe; Wilmes, Stephan; Piehler, Jacob; Loew, Damarys; Johannes, Ludger; Schreiber, Gideon; Lamaze, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Type-I interferons (IFNs) play a key role in the immune defences against viral and bacterial infections, and in cancer immunosurveillance. We have established that clathrin-dependent endocytosis of the type-I interferon (IFN-α/β) receptor (IFNAR) is required for JAK/STAT signalling. Here we show that the internalized IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 subunits of the IFNAR complex are differentially sorted by the retromer at the early endosome. Binding of the retromer VPS35 subunit to IFNAR2 results in IFNAR2 recycling to the plasma membrane, whereas IFNAR1 is sorted to the lysosome for degradation. Depletion of VPS35 leads to abnormally prolonged residency and association of the IFNAR subunits at the early endosome, resulting in increased activation of STAT1- and IFN-dependent gene transcription. These experimental data establish the retromer complex as a key spatiotemporal regulator of IFNAR endosomal sorting and a new factor in type-I IFN-induced JAK/STAT signalling and gene transcription. PMID:27917878

  6. The interferon-alpha gene family of Marmota himalayana, a Chinese marmot species with susceptibility to woodchuck hepatitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yinping; Wang, Baoju; Huang, Hongping; Tian, Yongjun; Bao, Junjie; Dong, Jihua; Roggendorf, Michael; Lu, Mengji; Yang, Dongliang

    2008-01-01

    The interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) gene family is an important part of the immune system. Recombinant interferon-alpha is widely used to treat viral hepatitis and malignant diseases. Marmota himalayana has been found to be susceptible to woodchuck hepatitis virus, a virus genetically related to hepatitis B virus (HBV), and is suitable as an animal model for studies on HBV infection. Here, the IFN-alpha gene family of M. himalayana (cwIFN-alpha) was characterized. Sequence data indicate that the cwIFN-alpha family consists of at least 8 functional sequences and 6 pseudogenes with high homology within the family and to IFN-alpha of Marmota monax, a related species and well-established animal model. The recombinant cwIFN-alpha subtypes were expressed and tested to be active in viral protection assay and to induce expression of MxA in a species-specific manner. This work provides essential information for future work on testing new therapeutic approaches of HBV infection based on IFN-alpha in M. himalayana.

  7. Genetic analysis of interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT): evidence for a key role for MHC and apoptosis related genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Hasham, Alia; Zhang, Weijia; Lotay, Vaneet; Haggerty, Shannon; Stefan, Mihaela; Concepcion, Erlinda; Dieterich, Douglas T; Tomer, Yaron

    2013-08-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) have become increasingly recognized as a complication of interferon-alpha (IFNα) therapy in patients with chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Interferon-induced thyroiditis (IIT) can manifest as clinical thyroiditis in approximately 15% of HCV patients receiving IFNα and subclinical thyroiditis in up to 40% of patients, possibly resulting in either dose reduction or discontinuation of IFNα treatment. However, the exact mechanisms that lead to the development of IIT are unknown and may include IFNα-mediated immune-recruitment as well as direct toxic effects on thyroid follicular cells. We hypothesized that IIT develops in genetically predisposed individuals whose threshold for developing thyroiditis is lowered by IFNα. Therefore, our aim was to identify the susceptibility genes for IIT. We used a genomic convergence approach combining genetic association data with transcriptome analysis of genes upregulated by IFNα. Integrating results of genetic association, transcriptome data, pathway, and haplotype analyses enabled the identification of 3 putative loci, SP100/110/140 (2q37.1), HLA (6p21.3), and TAP1 (6p21.3) that may be involved in the pathogenesis of IIT. Immune-regulation and apoptosis emerged as the predominant mechanisms underlying the etiology of IIT.

  8. Roles of interferon-gamma and its target genes in schizophrenia: Proteomics-based reverse genetics from mouse to human.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Jae; Eom, Chi-Yong; Kwon, Joseph; Joo, Jaesoon; Lee, Sujeong; Nah, Seong-Su; Kim, Il-Chul; Jang, Ik-Soon; Chung, Young-Ho; Kim, Seung Il; Chung, Joo-Ho; Choi, Jong-Soon

    2012-06-01

    A decreased production of interferon gamma (IFNG) has been observed in acute schizophrenia. In order to explore the possible relationship between IFNG and schizophrenia, we attempted to analyze the differentially expressed proteins in the brains of interferon-gamma knockout (Ifng-KO) mice. Five upregulated and five downregulated proteins were identified with 2D gels and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analyses in Ifng-KO mouse brain. Of the identified proteins, we focused on creatine kinase brain (CKB) and triose phosphate isomerase 1 (TPI1). Consistent with the proteomic data, reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry analyses confirmed that the levels of gene expressions of Ckb and Tpi1 were downregulated and upregulated, respectively. When we analyzed the genetic polymorphisms of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of their human orthologous genes in a Korean population, the promoter SNPs of CKB and TPI1 were weakly associated with schizophrenia. In addition, IFNG polymorphisms were associated with schizophrenia. These results suggest that IFNG and proteins affected by IFNG may play a role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  9. Lateral flow immunoassay with upconverting nanoparticle-based detection for indirect measurement of interferon response by the level of MxA.

    PubMed

    Juntunen, Etvi; Salminen, Teppo; Talha, Sheikh M; Martiskainen, Iida; Soukka, Tero; Pettersson, Kim; Waris, Matti

    2017-04-01

    Myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA) is a biomarker of interferon-induced gene expression state involved in many viral infections and some autoimmune disorders. It has a variety of potential utilities in clinical diagnostics, including distinguishing between bacterial and viral infections. Currently, MxA-assays are used for monitoring of IFN-β therapy in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. As a proof-of-concept for rapid quantitative measurement of interferon response, a lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) with upconverting nanoparticle (UCNP) reporters was developed and evaluated with clinical whole blood samples to assess the potential for a rapid and user-friendly quantitative assay for MxA, since the currently available rapid test for MxA (FebriDX) produces only qualitative result. The high detection sensitivity enabled by the UCNP reporter technology allowed the sample pre-treatment with dilution of whole blood into lysis buffer at a detectable analyte concentration. The assay can be done within 2 hr and the results correlate with the reference MxA-ELISA, which requires an overnight incubation. With 36 samples, R(2) for linear regression was 0.86. The assay detected 96% of the IFN-β responders with 89% specificity using a cut-off level of 100 μg/L for an elevated MxA-concentration. J. Med. Virol. 89:598-605, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, orange-spotted grouper novel immune gene EcVig, is induced by immune stimulants and type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ying-Chun; Wang, Ting-Yu; Chou, Hsin-Yiu; Lin, Han-You; Chen, Tzong-Yueh; Aoki, Takashi; Wang, Han-Ching

    2016-11-01

    A novel grouper immune gene, EcVig was identified in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). We recently determined that EcVig expression can be induced by infection with nervous necrosis virus (NNV, an RNA virus), whereas NNV replication may be suppressed when EcVig was overexpressed. Although EcVig appeared to be involved in grouper antiviral activity, its immune effects have not been well characterized. In the present study, two PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns; lipopolysaccharides [LPS] and synthetic double-stranded RNA polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I:C)]), as well as fish DNA virus (red sea bream iridovirus, RSIV; grouper iridovirus, GIV), were used to study EcVig responses in orange-spotted grouper. In addition, groupers were given recombinant type I interferon to determine whether EcVig expression was induced. Poly(I:C) rapidly induced substantial expression of EcVig, whereas LPS stimulation did not appear to have any effect in grouper intestine. Expression levels of total EcVig and other IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) were all significantly increased after RSIV and GIV infection. Furthermore, stimulation of recombinant type I IFN also increased EcVig expression. We conclude that EcVig may be a novel IFN-stimulated gene that demonstrates an antiviral immune response.

  11. Interferon signaling remains functional during henipavirus infection of human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Virtue, Elena R; Marsh, Glenn A; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2011-04-01

    Henipaviruses encode several proteins from the P gene, of which V and W have been demonstrated by gene-based transfection studies to antagonize the innate immune response, blocking both type I interferon production and signaling. This study examines the effects of henipavirus infection on the innate immune response in human cell lines. We report that henipavirus infection does not result in interferon production, with the virus antagonizing this response. In contrast to published transfection studies, our study found that the interferon signaling pathways are only partially blocked by henipavirus infection of human cell lines.

  12. Study of PKRBD in HCV genotype 3a infected patients in response to interferon therapy in Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma and infects about 3% world population. Response to interferon therapy depends upon the genotype of the virus and factors associated with the host. Despite a good response to interferon therapy, a considerable number of genotype 3a infected patients remains unalleviated. Results In total forty-nine patients including twenty-five non-responders (non-SVR) and twenty-four responders (SVR) were recruited. Patients were tested for viral status at different intervals and the isolated RNA was sequenced for the NS5A region in both groups. The comparison of PKRBD of HCV between the SVR and non-SVR patients did not confirm any significant difference in the number of mutations. However, when the sequence downstream to the PKRBD of NS5A was compared, two important statistically significant mutations were observed; at positions 2309 (Ala to Ser) and 2326 (Gly to Ala). These mutations were then analysed for tertiary protein structure and important structural changes were observed. Statistically significant difference was also observed when age groups of patients were compared; younger patients showed better response than the older ones. Conclusions The region between PKRBD and IRRDR may be important for prediction of response to IFN therapy for genotype 3a. ISDR and PKRBD have not shown any involvement in treatment response. Further functional analyses of these findings can help in understanding the involvement of the NS5A region in interferon treatment of HCV-3a infected patients. PMID:24321105

  13. Chemokine gene expression in the murine renal cell carcinoma, RENCA, following treatment in vivo with interferon-alpha and interleukin-2.

    PubMed Central

    Sonouchi, K.; Hamilton, T. A.; Tannenbaum, C. S.; Tubbs, R. R.; Bukowski, R.; Finke, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    The expression of three chemoattractant cytokine (chemokine) messenger (m)RNAs in the murine renal cell carcinoma (RENCA) from mice treated with a combination of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) and interleukin-2 was examined and related to tumor infiltration by inflammatory leukocytes. Using a semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay, mRNAs encoding the KC, JE, and IP-10 genes were all elevated in tumor tissue from mice treated systemically with IFN-alpha/interleukin-2 for 4 days. Similarly, the mRNA for tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was also increased in tumors from treated as compared to control animals. The same tumors showed a significant increase in Mac-1+ leukocytes, which correlated well with the increase in chemokine and TNF-alpha gene expression. The renal cell carcinoma tumor itself may be responsible for the expression of chemokine genes in the tumor bed following cytokine therapy. Cultures of freshly explanted RENCA cells expressed significant levels of chemokine mRNAs when stimulated in vitro with IFN alpha, IFN gamma, and/or interleukin-2, demonstrating that this tumor cell has potential for expression of these genes in vivo. In contrast, TNF-alpha expression was not detected in cultured tumor cells. Thus TNF-alpha may be expressed by infiltrating monocytes following exposure to recombinant cytokine therapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8160774

  14. Suppression of interferon β gene transcription by inhibitors of bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family members.

    PubMed

    Malik, Nazma; Vollmer, Stefan; Nanda, Sambit Kumar; Lopez-Pelaez, Marta; Prescott, Alan; Gray, Nathanael; Cohen, Philip

    2015-06-15

    PLK (Polo-like kinase) inhibitors, such as BI-2536, have been reported to suppress IFNB (encoding IFNβ, interferon β) gene transcription induced by ligands that activate TLR3 (Toll-like receptor 3) and TLR4. In the present study, we found that BI-2536 is likely to exert this effect by preventing the interaction of the transcription factors IRF3 (interferon-regulatory factor 3) and c-Jun with the IFNB promoter, but without affecting the TBK1 {TANK [TRAF (tumour-necrosis-factor-receptor-associated factor)-associated nuclear factor κB activator]-binding kinase 1}-catalysed phosphorylation of IRF3 at Ser³⁹⁶, the dimerization and nuclear translocation of IRF3 or the phosphorylation of c-Jun and ATF2 (activating transcription factor 2). Although BI-2536 inhibits few other kinases tested, it interacts with BET (bromodomain and extra-terminal) family members and displaces them from acetylated lysine residues on histones. We found that BET inhibitors that do not inhibit PLKs phenocopied the effect of BI-2536 on IFNB gene transcription. Similarly, BET inhibitors blocked the interaction of IRF5 with the IFNB promoter and the secretion of IFNβ induced by TLR7 or TLR9 ligands in the human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line GEN2.2, but without affecting the nuclear translocation of IRF5. We found that the BET family member BRD4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4) was associated with the IFNB promoter and that this interaction was enhanced by TLR3- or TLR4-ligation and prevented by BI-2536 and other BET inhibitors. Our results establish that BET family members are essential for TLR-stimulated IFNB gene transcription by permitting transcription factors to interact with the IFNB promoter. They also show that the interaction of the IFNB promoter with BRD4 is regulated by TLR ligation and that BI-2536 is likely to suppress IFNB gene transcription by targeting BET family members.

  15. IFI35, mir-99a and HCV Genotype to Predict Sustained Virological Response to Pegylated-Interferon Plus Ribavirin in Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Estrabaud, Emilie; Appourchaux, Kevin; Bièche, Ivan; Carrat, Fabrice; Lapalus, Martine; Lada, Olivier; Martinot-Peignoux, Michelle; Boyer, Nathalie; Marcellin, Patrick; Vidaud, Michel; Asselah, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    Although, the treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) greatly improved with the use of direct antiviral agents, pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin remains an option for many patients, worldwide. The intra-hepatic level of expression of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) and the rs12979860 CC genotype located within IFNL3 have been associated with sustained virological response (SVR), in patients with CHC. The aim of the study was to identify micro-RNAs associated with SVR and to build an accurate signature to predict SVR. Pre-treatment liver biopsies from 111 patients, treated with PEG-IFN plus ribavirin, were studied. Fifty-seven patients had SVR, 36 non-response (NR) and 18 relapse (RR). The expression of 851 human miRNAs and 30 selected mRNAs, including ISGs, was assessed by RT-qPCR. In the first group of patients (screen), 20 miRNAs out of the 851 studied were deregulated between NRs and SVRs. From the 4 miRNAs validated (mir-23a, mir-181a*, mir-217 and mir-99a), in the second group of patients (validation), 3 (mir-23a, mir-181a* and mir-99a) were down-regulated in NRs as compared to SVRs. The ISGs, studied, were accumulated in SVRs and IFNL3 rs12979860 CT/TT carriers compared respectively to NRs and CC carriers. Combining, clinical data together with the expression of selected genes and micro-RNAs, we identified a signature (IFI35, mir-99a and HCV genotype) to predict SVR (AUC:0.876) with a positive predictive value of 86.54% with high sensibility (80%) and specificity (80.4%). This signature may help to characterize patients with low chance to respond to PEG-IFN/ribavirin and to elucidate mechanisms of NR. PMID:25844942

  16. Biochemical and Structural Insights into the Preference of Nairoviral DeISGylases for Interferon-Stimulated Gene Product 15 Originating from Certain Species

    PubMed Central

    Deaton, M. K.; Dzimianski, J. V.; Daczkowski, C. M.; Whitney, G. K.; Parham, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The regulation of the interferon type I (IFN-I) response has been shown to rely on posttranslational modification by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like interferon-stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15) to stabilize, or activate, a variety of IFN-I signaling and downstream effector proteins. Unlike Ub, which is almost perfectly conserved among eukaryotes, ISG15 is highly divergent, even among mammals. Since zoonotic viruses rely on viral proteins to recognize, or cleave, ISG15 conjugates in order to evade, or suppress, innate immunity, the impact of ISG15 biodiversity on deISGylating proteases of the ovarian tumor family (vOTU) from nairoviruses was evaluated. The enzymatic activities of vOTUs originating from the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Erve virus, and Nairobi sheep disease virus were tested against ISG15s from humans, mice, shrews, sheep, bats, and camels, which are mammalian species known to be infected by nairoviruses. This along with investigation of binding by isothermal titration calorimetry illustrated significant differences in the abilities of nairovirus deISGylases to accommodate certain species of ISG15. To investigate the molecular underpinnings of species preferences of these vOTUs, a structure was determined to 2.5 Å for a complex of Erve virus vOTU protease and a mouse ISG15 domain. This structure revealed the molecular basis of Erve virus vOTU's preference for ISG15 over Ub and the first structural insight into a nonhuman ISG15. This structure also revealed key interactions, or lack thereof, surrounding three amino acids that may drive a viral deISgylase to prefer an ISG15 from one species over that of another. IMPORTANCE Viral ovarian tumor domain proteases (vOTUs) are one of the two principal classes of viral proteases observed to reverse posttranslational modification of host proteins by ubiquitin and interferon-stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15), subsequently facilitating downregulation of IFN-I signaling pathways. Unlike the case

  17. Biochemical and Structural Insights into the Preference of Nairoviral DeISGylases for Interferon-Stimulated Gene Product 15 Originating from Certain Species

    SciTech Connect

    Deaton, M. K.; Dzimianski, J. V.; Daczkowski, C. M.; Whitney, G. K.; Mank, N. J.; Parham, M. M.; Bergeron, E.; Pegan, S. D.; Perlman, S.

    2016-07-13

    ABSTRACT

    The regulation of the interferon type I (IFN-I) response has been shown to rely on posttranslational modification by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like interferon-stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15) to stabilize, or activate, a variety of IFN-I signaling and downstream effector proteins. Unlike Ub, which is almost perfectly conserved among eukaryotes, ISG15 is highly divergent, even among mammals. Since zoonotic viruses rely on viral proteins to recognize, or cleave, ISG15 conjugates in order to evade, or suppress, innate immunity, the impact of ISG15 biodiversity on deISGylating proteases of the ovarian tumor family (vOTU) from nairoviruses was evaluated. The enzymatic activities of vOTUs originating from the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Erve virus, and Nairobi sheep disease virus were tested against ISG15s from humans, mice, shrews, sheep, bats, and camels, which are mammalian species known to be infected by nairoviruses. This along with investigation of binding by isothermal titration calorimetry illustrated significant differences in the abilities of nairovirus deISGylases to accommodate certain species of ISG15. To investigate the molecular underpinnings of species preferences of these vOTUs, a structure was determined to 2.5 Å for a complex of Erve virus vOTU protease and a mouse ISG15 domain. This structure revealed the molecular basis of Erve virus vOTU's preference for ISG15 over Ub and the first structural insight into a nonhuman ISG15. This structure also revealed key interactions, or lack thereof, surrounding three amino acids that may drive a viral deISgylase to prefer an ISG15 from one species over that of another.

    IMPORTANCEViral ovarian tumor domain proteases (vOTUs) are one of the two principal classes of viral proteases observed to reverse posttranslational modification of host proteins by ubiquitin and interferon-stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15), subsequently facilitating downregulation of IFN

  18. Multiple interferon stimulated genes synergize with the zinc finger antiviral protein to mediate anti-alphavirus activity.

    PubMed

    Karki, Sophiya; Li, Melody M H; Schoggins, John W; Tian, Suyan; Rice, Charles M; MacDonald, Margaret R

    2012-01-01

    The zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP) is a host factor that mediates inhibition of viruses in the Filoviridae, Retroviridae and Togaviridae families. We previously demonstrated that ZAP blocks replication of Sindbis virus (SINV), the prototype Alphavirus in the Togaviridae family at an early step prior to translation of the incoming genome and that synergy between ZAP and one or more interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) resulted in maximal inhibitory activity. The present study aimed to identify those ISGs that synergize with ZAP to mediate Alphavirus inhibition. Using a library of lentiviruses individually expressing more than 350 ISGs, we screened for inhibitory activity in interferon defective cells with or without ZAP overexpression. Confirmatory tests of the 23 ISGs demonstrating the largest infection reduction in combination with ZAP revealed that 16 were synergistic. Confirmatory tests of all potentially synergistic ISGs revealed 15 additional ISGs with a statistically significant synergistic effect in combination with ZAP. These 31 ISGs are candidates for further mechanistic studies. The number and diversity of the identified ZAP-synergistic ISGs lead us to speculate that ZAP may play an important role in priming the cell for optimal ISG function.

  19. Evolutionary characterization of pig interferon-inducible transmembrane gene family and member expression dynamics in tracheobronchial lymph nodes of pigs infected with swine respiratory disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laura C; Jiang, Zhihua; Sang, Yongming; Harhay, Gregory P; Lager, Kelly M

    2014-06-15

    Studies have found that a cluster of duplicated gene loci encoding the interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) family have antiviral activity against several viruses, including influenza A virus. The gene family has 5 and 7 members in humans and mice, respectively. Here, we confirm the current annotation of pig IFITM1, IFITM2, IFITM3, IFITM5, IFITM1L1 and IFITM1L4, manually annotated IFITM1L2, IFITM1L3, IFITM5L, IFITM3L1 and IFITM3L2, and provide expressed sequence tag (EST) and/or mRNA evidence, not contained with the NCBI Reference Sequence database (RefSeq), for the existence of IFITM6, IFITM7 and a new IFITM1-like (IFITM1LN) gene in pigs. Phylogenic analyses showed seven porcine IFITM genes with highly conserved human/mouse orthologs known to have anti-viral activity. Digital Gene Expression Tag Profiling (DGETP) of swine tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN) of pigs infected with swine influenza virus (SIV), porcine pseudorabies virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus or porcine circovirus type 2 over 14 days post-inoculation (dpi) showed that gene expression abundance differs dramatically among pig IFITM family members, ranging from 0 to over 3000 tags per million. In particular, SIV up-regulated IFITM1 by 5.9 fold at 3 dpi. Bayesian framework further identified pig IFITM1 and IFITM3 as differentially expressed genes in the overall transcriptome analysis. In addition to being a component of protein complexes involved in homotypic adhesion, the IFITM1 is also associated with pathways related to regulation of cell proliferation and IFITM3 is involved in immune responses.

  20. Pepscan mapping of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus glycoprotein G major lineal determinants implicated in triggering host cell antiviral responses mediated by type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Chico, V; Martinez-Lopez, A; Ortega-Villaizan, M; Falco, A; Perez, L; Coll, J M; Estepa, A

    2010-07-01

    Surface glycoproteins of enveloped virus are potent elicitors of type I interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral responses in a way that may be independent of the well-studied genome-mediated route. However, the viral glycoprotein determinants responsible for initiating the IFN response remain unidentified. In this study, we have used a collection of 60 synthetic 20-mer overlapping peptides (pepscan) spanning the full length of glycoprotein G (gpG) of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) to investigate what regions of this protein are implicated in triggering the type I IFN-associated immune responses. Briefly, two regions with ability to increase severalfold the basal expression level of the IFN-stimulated mx gene and to restrict the spread of virus among responder cells were mapped to amino acid residues 280 to 310 and 340 to 370 of the gpG protein of VHSV. In addition, the results obtained suggest that an interaction between VHSV gpG and integrins might trigger the host IFN-mediated antiviral response after VHSV infection. Since it is known that type I IFN plays an important role in determining/modulating the protective-antigen-specific immune responses, the identification of viral glycoprotein determinants directly implicated in the type I IFN induction might be of special interest for designing new adjuvants and/or more-efficient and cost-effective viral vaccines as well as for improving our knowledge on how to stimulate the innate immune system.

  1. Analyzing the metabolic stress response of recombinant Escherichia coli cultures expressing human interferon-beta in high cell density fed batch cultures using time course transcriptomic data.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anuradha B; Sharma, Ashish K; Mukherjee, Krishna J

    2012-02-01

    Fed batch cultures expressing recombinant interferon beta under the T7 promoter were run with different exponential feeding rates of a complex substrate and induced at varying cell densities. Post-induction profiles of the specific product formation rates showed a strong dependence on the specific growth rate with the maximum product yield obtained at 0.2 h(-1). A study of the relative transcriptomic profiles as a function of pre-induction μ was therefore done to provide insight into the role of cellular physiology in enhancing recombinant protein expression. Hierarchical clustering analysis of the significantly regulated genes allowed us to identify biologically important groups of genes which fall under specific master regulators. The groups were: rpoH, ArcB, CreB, Lrp, RelA, Fis and Hfq. The response of these regulators, which exert a feedback control on the growth and product formation rates correlated well with the expression levels obtained. Thus at the optimum pre-induction μ, the alternative sigma factors and ribosomal machinery genes did not get depressed till the 6th hour post-induction unlike at other specific growth rates, demonstrating a critical role for the genes in sustaining recombinant protein expression.

  2. An interferon regulatory factor binding site in the U5 region of the bovine leukemia virus long terminal repeat stimulates Tax-independent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kiermer, V; Van Lint, C; Briclet, D; Vanhulle, C; Kettmann, R; Verdin, E; Burny, A; Droogmans, L

    1998-07-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) replication is controlled by both cis- and trans-acting elements. The virus-encoded transactivator, Tax, is necessary for efficient transcription from the BLV promoter, although it is not present during the early stages of infection. Therefore, sequences that control Tax-independent transcription must play an important role in the initiation of viral gene expression. This study demonstrates that the R-U5 sequence of BLV stimulates Tax-independent reporter gene expression directed by the BLV promoter. R-U5 was also stimulatory when inserted immediately downstream from the transcription initiation site of a heterologous promoter. Progressive deletion analysis of this region revealed that a 46-bp element corresponding to the 5' half of U5 is principally responsible for the stimulation. This element exhibited enhancer activity when inserted upstream or downstream from the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter. This enhancer contains a binding site for the interferon regulatory factors IRF-1 and IRF-2. A 3-bp mutation that destroys the IRF recognition site caused a twofold decrease in Tax-independent BLV long terminal repeat-driven gene expression. These observations suggest that the IRF binding site in the U5 region of BLV plays a role in the initiation of virus replication.

  3. TRIM79α, an interferon-stimulated gene product, restricts tick-borne encephalitis virus replication by degrading the viral RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, R. Travis; Lubick, Kirk J.; Robertson, Shelly J.; Broughton, James P.; Bloom, Marshall E.; Bresnahan, Wade A.; Best, Sonja M.

    2011-01-01

    In response to virus infection, type I interferons (IFNs) induce several genes, most of whose functions are largely unknown. Here we show that the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein, TRIM79α, is an IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) product that specifically targets tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), a Flavivirus that causes encephalitides in humans. TRIM79α restricts TBEV replication by mediating lysosome-dependent degradation of the flavivirus NS5 protein, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase essential for virus replication. NS5 degradation was specific to tick-borne flaviviruses as TRIM79α did not recognize NS5 from West Nile virus (WNV) or inhibit WNV replication. In the absence of TRIM79α, IFN-β was less effective in inhibiting tick-borne flavivirus infection of mouse macrophages, highlighting the importance of a single virus-specific ISG in establishing an antiviral state. The specificity of TRIM79α for TBEV reveals a remarkable ability of the innate IFN response to discriminate between closely related flaviviruses. PMID:21925107

  4. TRIM79α, an interferon-stimulated gene product, restricts tick-borne encephalitis virus replication by degrading the viral RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R Travis; Lubick, Kirk J; Robertson, Shelly J; Broughton, James P; Bloom, Marshall E; Bresnahan, Wade A; Best, Sonja M

    2011-09-15

    In response to virus infection, type I interferons (IFNs) induce several genes, most of whose functions are largely unknown. Here, we show that the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein, TRIM79α, is an IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) product that specifically targets tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), a Flavivirus that causes encephalitides in humans. TRIM79α restricts TBEV replication by mediating lysosome-dependent degradation of the flavivirus NS5 protein, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase essential for virus replication. NS5 degradation was specific to tick-borne flaviviruses, as TRIM79α did not recognize NS5 from West Nile virus (WNV) or inhibit WNV replication. In the absence of TRIM79α, IFN-β was less effective in inhibiting tick-borne flavivirus infection of mouse macrophages, highlighting the importance of a single virus-specific ISG in establishing an antiviral state. The specificity of TRIM79α for TBEV reveals a remarkable ability of the innate IFN response to discriminate between closely related flaviviruses.

  5. Modulation by gamma interferon of antiviral cell-mediated immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Utermöhlen, O; Dangel, A; Tárnok, A; Lehmann-Grube, F

    1996-01-01

    Mice were infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and injected once 24 h later with a monoclonal antibody directed against gamma interferon. In comparison with controls, the increase of numbers of CD8+ T cells and the generation of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in spleens and virus clearance from organs were diminished, as was the ability of spleen cells to transmit adoptive immunity to infected recipients. The same treatment slightly but consistently lessened rather than augmented the virus titers early in infection, which was also observed in thymusless nu/nu mice. Injection into infected mice of the lymphokine itself in quantities probably higher than are produced endogenously resulted in lower virus titers in spleens but higher titers in livers. The adoptive immunity in infected mice achieved by infusion of immune spleen cells was not altered by treating the recipients with gamma interferon monoclonal antibody. Such treatment did not measurably affect the production of antiviral serum antibodies. We conclude that in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-infected mice, gamma interferon is needed for the generation of antivirally active CD8+ T lymphocytes, and furthermore that in this experimental model, direct antiviral effects of the lymphokine elude detection. PMID:8627670

  6. [Response to treatment with interferon beta in patients with multiple sclerosis. Validation of the Rio Score].

    PubMed

    Rio, J; Rovira, A; Blanco, Y; Sainz, A; Perkal, H; Robles, R; Ramio-Torrenta, Ll; Diaz, R M; Arroyo, R; Urbaneja, P; Fernandez, O; Garcia-Merino, J A; Reyes, M P; Oreja-Guevara, C; Prieto, J M; Izquierdo, G; Olascoaga, J; Alvarez-Cermeno, J C; Simon, E; Pujal, B; Comabella, M; Montalban, X

    2016-08-16

    Introduccion. Se han propuesto diferentes criterios de respuesta al tratamiento con interferon beta, y el Rio Score es uno de los mas utilizados. El objetivo de este estudio fue validar la utilidad del Rio Score en una cohorte independiente. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio multicentrico, prospectivo y longitudinal de pacientes con esclerosis multiple remitente recurrente tratados con interferon beta. Los pacientes fueron clasificados basandose en la presencia de brotes, lesiones activas (nuevas en T2 o lesiones que captaban gadolinio) en la resonancia magnetica, incremento confirmado de la discapacidad o combinaciones de estas variables (brotes, incremento en la Expanded Disability Status Scale y lesiones activas) tras un año de tratamiento. Se utilizo un analisis de regresion con el fin de identificar las variables de prediccion de respuesta despues de un seguimiento de tres años. Resultados. Se incluyo a 249 pacientes con esclerosis multiple remitente recurrente. El modelo logistico confirmo que la presencia de dos (odds ratio = 6,6; IC 95% = 2,7-16,1; p < 0,0001) o tres (odds ratio = 8,5; IC 95% = 1,6-46; p < 0,01) variables positivas durante el primer año de tratamiento conferia un riesgo significativo de actividad (brotes o progresion) en los siguientes dos años. Conclusiones. Se confirma, en una cohorte independiente, la utilidad del Rio Score para identificar a pacientes con un mayor riesgo de desarrollar actividad clinica o progresion de la discapacidad durante el tratamiento con interferon beta.

  7. The conserved Cockayne syndrome B-piggyBac fusion protein (CSB-PGBD3) affects DNA repair and induces both interferon-like and innate antiviral responses in CSB-null cells

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Arnold D.; Gray, Lucas T.; Pavelitz, Thomas; Newman, John C.; Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Weiner, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a segmental progeria most often caused by mutations in the CSB gene encoding a SWI/SNF-like ATPase required for transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR). Over 43 Mya before marmosets diverged from humans, a piggyBac3 (PGBD3) transposable element integrated into intron 5 of the CSB gene. As a result, primate CSB genes now generate both CSB protein and a conserved CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein in which the first 5 exons of CSB are alternatively spliced to the PGBD3 transposase. Using a host cell reactivation assay, we show that the fusion protein inhibits TCR of oxidative damage but facilitates TCR of UV damage. We also show by microarray analysis that expression of the fusion protein alone in CSB-null UV-sensitive syndrome (UVSS) cells induces an interferon-like response that resembles both the innate antiviral response and the prolonged interferon response normally maintained by unphosphorylated STAT1 (U-STAT1); moreover, as might be expected based on conservation of the fusion protein, this potentially cytotoxic interferon-like response is largely reversed by coexpression of functional CSB protein. Interestingly, expression of CSB and the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein together, but neither alone, upregulates the insulin growth factor binding protein IGFBP5 and downregulates IGFBP7, suggesting that the fusion protein may also confer a metabolic advantage, perhaps in the presence of DNA damage. Finally, we show that the fusion protein binds in vitro to members of a dispersed family of 900 internally deleted piggyBac elements known as MER85s, providing a potential mechanism by which the fusion protein could exert widespread effects on gene expression. Our data suggest that the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein is important in both health and disease, and could play a role in Cockayne syndrome. PMID:22483866

  8. The multifaceted balance of TNF-α and type I/II interferon responses in SLE and RA: how monocytes manage the impact of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Smiljanovic, Biljana; Grün, Joachim R; Biesen, Robert; Schulte-Wrede, Ursula; Baumgrass, Ria; Stuhlmüller, Bruno; Maslinski, Wlodzimierz; Hiepe, Falk; Burmester, Gerd-R; Radbruch, Andreas; Häupl, Thomas; Grützkau, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Many cytokines are involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and are recognized as relevant therapeutic targets to attenuate inflammation, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and interferon (IFN)-α/γ in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To relate the transcriptional imprinting of cytokines in a cell type- and disease-specific manner, we generated gene expression profiles from peripheral monocytes of SLE and RA patients and compared them to in vitro-generated signatures induced by TNF-α, IFN-α2a, and IFN-γ. Monocytes from SLE and RA patients revealed disease-specific gene expression profiles. In vitro-generated signatures induced by IFN-α2a and IFN-γ showed similar profiles that only partially overlapped with those induced by TNF-α. Comparisons between disease-specific and in vitro-generated signatures identified cytokine-regulated genes in SLE and RA with qualitative and quantitative differences. The IFN responses in SLE and RA were found to be regulated in a STAT1-dependent and STAT1-independent manner, respectively. Similarly, genes recognized as TNF-α regulated were clearly distinguishable between RA and SLE patients. While the activity of SLE monocytes was mainly driven by IFN, the activity from RA monocytes showed a dominance of TNF-α that was characterized by STAT1 down-regulation. The responses to specific cytokines were revealed to be disease-dependent and reflected the interplay of cytokines within various inflammatory milieus. This study has demonstrated that monocytes from RA and SLE patients exhibit disease-specific gene expression profiles, which can be molecularly dissected when compared with in vitro-generated cytokine signatures. The results suggest that an assessment of cytokine-response status in monocytes may be helpful for improvement of diagnosis and selection of the best cytokine target for therapeutic intervention.

  9. Ladder-like amplification of the type I interferon gene cluster in the human osteosarcoma cell line MG63.

    PubMed

    Marella, Narasimharao V; Zeitz, Michael J; Malyavantham, Kishore S; Pliss, Artem; Matsui, Sei-ichi; Goetze, Sandra; Bode, Juergen; Raska, Ivan; Berezney, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    The organization of the type I interferon (IFN) gene cluster (9p21.3) was studied in a human osteosarcoma cell line (MG63). Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) showed an amplification of approximately 6-fold which ended at both ends of the gene cluster with a deletion that extended throughout the 9p21.3 band. Spectral karyotyping (SKY) combined with fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) identified an arrangement of the gene cluster in a ladder-like array of 5-7 'bands' spanning a single chromosome termed the 'IFN chromosome'. Chromosome painting revealed that the IFN chromosome is derived from components of chromosomes 4, 8 and 9. Labelling with centromeric probes demonstrated a ladder-like amplification of centromeric 4 and 9 sequences that co-localized with each other and a similar banding pattern of chromosome 4, as well as alternating with the IFN gene clusters. In contrast, centromere 8 was not detected on the IFN chromosome. One of the amplified centromeric 9 bands was identified as the functional centromere based on its location at the chromosome constriction and immunolocalization of the CENP-C protein. A model is presented for the generation of the IFN chromosome that involves breakage-fusion-bridge events.

  10. Polymorphisms of interferon-inducible genes OAS-1 and MxA associated with SARS in the Vietnamese population.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Emi; Hijikata, Minako; Itoyama, Satoru; Quy, Tran; Phi, Nguyen Chi; Long, Hoang Thuy; Ha, Le Dang; Ban, Vo Van; Matsushita, Ikumi; Yanai, Hideki; Kirikae, Fumiko; Kirikae, Teruo; Kuratsuji, Tadatoshi; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Keicho, Naoto

    2005-04-22

    We hypothesized that host antiviral genes induced by type I interferons might affect the natural course of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS-1), myxovirus resistance-A (MxA), and double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase in 44 Vietnamese SARS patients with 103 controls. The G-allele of non-synonymous A/G SNP in exon 3 of OAS-1 gene showed association with SARS (p=0.0090). The G-allele in exon 3 of OAS-1 and the one in exon 6 were in strong linkage disequilibrium and both of them were associated with SARS infection. The GG genotype and G-allele of G/T SNP at position -88 in the MxA gene promoter were found more frequently in hypoxemic group than in non-hypoxemic group of SARS (p=0.0195). Our findings suggest that polymorphisms of two IFN-inducible genes OAS-1 and MxA might affect susceptibility to the disease and progression of SARS at each level.

  11. Interferon-β Modulates the Innate Immune Response against Glioblastoma Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wolpert, Fabian; Happold, Caroline; Reifenberger, Guido; Florea, Ana-Maria; Deenen, René; Roth, Patrick; Neidert, Marian Christoph; Lamszus, Katrin; Westphal, Manfred; Weller, Michael; Eisele, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy targeting glioblastoma initiating cells (GIC) is considered a promising strategy. However, GIC are prone to evade immune response and there is a need for potent adjuvants. IFN-β might enhance the immune response and here we define its net effect on the innate immunogenicity of GIC. The transcriptomes of GIC treated with IFN-β and controls were assessed by microarray-based expression profiling for altered expression of immune regulatory genes. Several genes involved in adaptive and innate immune responses were regulated by IFN-β. We validated these results using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and flow cytometry for corresponding protein levels. The up-regulation of the NK cell inhibitory molecules HLA-E and MHC class I was balanced by immune stimulating effects including the up-regulation of nectin-2. In 3 out of 5 GIC lines tested we found a net immune stimulating effect of IFN-β in cytotoxicity assays using NKL cells as effectors. IFN-β therefore warrants further investigation as an adjuvant for immunotherapy targeting GIC. PMID:26441059

  12. Interferon-β Modulates the Innate Immune Response against Glioblastoma Initiating Cells.

    PubMed

    Wolpert, Fabian; Happold, Caroline; Reifenberger, Guido; Florea, Ana-Maria; Deenen, René; Roth, Patrick; Neidert, Marian Christoph; Lamszus, Katrin; Westphal, Manfred; Weller, Michael; Eisele, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy targeting glioblastoma initiating cells (GIC) is considered a promising strategy. However, GIC are prone to evade immune response and there is a need for potent adjuvants. IFN-β might enhance the immune response and here we define its net effect on the innate immunogenicity of GIC. The transcriptomes of GIC treated with IFN-β and controls were assessed by microarray-based expression profiling for altered expression of immune regulatory genes. Several genes involved in adaptive and innate immune responses were regulated by IFN-β. We validated these results using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and flow cytometry for corresponding protein levels. The up-regulation of the NK cell inhibitory molecules HLA-E and MHC class I was balanced by immune stimulating effects including the up-regulation of nectin-2. In 3 out of 5 GIC lines tested we found a net immune stimulating effect of IFN-β in cytotoxicity assays using NKL cells as effectors. IFN-β therefore warrants further investigation as an adjuvant for immunotherapy targeting GIC.

  13. Engagement of soluble resistance-related calcium binding protein (sorcin) with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) VP1 inhibits type I interferon response in cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaying; Wang, Jianchang; Liu, Jue; Li, Zhonghua; Wang, Yongqiang; Xue, Yanfei; Li, Xiaoqi; Cao, Hong; Zheng, Shijun J

    2013-09-27

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an acute, highly contagious animal disease caused by FMD virus (FMDV). Although FMDV-induced immunosuppression in host has been well established, the exact molecular mechanism for such induction is not very clear. We report here the identification of FMDV VP1 as an interferon-suppressor by interacting with soluble resistance-related calcium binding protein (sorcin). We found that VP1 suppressed tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or Sendai virus (SeV)-induced type I interferon response in HEK293T cells, and that this suppression could be completely abolished by knockdown of sorcin by shRNA. Furthermore, overexpression of sorcin inhibited type I interferon response. Conversely, TNF- or SeV-induced type I interferon response increased when sorcin knocked down, leading to inhibition of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication. Thus, VP1-induced suppression of type I interferon is mediated by interacting with sorcin, a protein that appears to regulate cell response to viral infections.

  14. Greater preexisting interferon γ responses to mycobacterial antigens and lower bacillary load during HIV-associated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lahey, Timothy; Czechura, Tom; Crabtree, Scott; Arbeit, Robert D; Matee, Mecky; Horsburgh, C Robert; MacKenzie, Todd; Bakari, Muhammad; Pallangyo, Kisali; von Reyn, C Fordham

    2013-11-15

    The role of preexisting interferon (IFN) γ responses in controlling bacillary burden in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated tuberculosis is not known. Among BCG-immunized HIV-infected adults who developed tuberculosis in a phase III trial of an investigational tuberculosis vaccine, greater baseline IFN-γ responses to early secretory antigenic target 6 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole-cell lysate were associated with reduced bacillary burden on sputum smear grade, days to culture positivity on agar, and sputum culture grade during subsequent tuberculosis. This association was most consistent among recipients of the investigational vaccine. When HIV-associated tuberculosis develops, greater preexisting IFN-γ responses to mycobacterial antigens are associated with reduced tuberculosis bacillary burden. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier. NCT0052195.

  15. Decrease of HCVRNA after three days of daily interferon treatment is predictive of the virological response at one month.

    PubMed

    Magalini, A; Puoti, M; Putzolu, V; Quiros-Roldan, E; Forleo, M A; Rossi, S; Zaltron, S; Spinetti, A; Zanini, B; Zonaro, A; Solfrini, R; Carosi, G

    2000-01-01

    Early monitoring of HCVRNA during interferon treatment may allow clinicians to obtain important information that could help them to adopt therapeutic decisions in individual cases. The hepatitis C virus infection is highly dynamic and a daily high dose of IFN may induce a decline of viremia of 95+/-10% of baseline value after 24 to 48 hours of treatment. The importance of this early antiviral efficacy has not been understood. We have measured HCVRNA levels in 47 patients with chronic hepatitis C infection during interferon treatment to study HCVRNA kinetics and evaluate the predictive value of the early decay of viremia on the virological response after one month of treatment. Sixty percent of treated patients showed early virological response (EVR) and it was significantly associated with low HCVRNA levels and a genotype other than 1b. Finally, the absence of an 85% decline in HCVRNA levels after 3 days of treatment observed in 11 out of 45 patients (24%) was an absolute and very early predictor of the absence of EVR in the study population.

  16. Type I interferon signaling genes in recurrent major depression: increased expression detected by whole-blood RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, S; Battle, A; Zhu, X; Potash, J B; Weissman, M M; Shi, J; Beckman, K; Haudenschild, C; McCormick, C; Mei, R; Gameroff, M J; Gindes, H; Adams, P; Goes, F S; Mondimore, F M; MacKinnon, D F; Notes, L; Schweizer, B; Furman, D; Montgomery, S B; Urban, A E; Koller, D; Levinson, D F

    2014-12-01

    A study of genome-wide gene expression in major depressive disorder (MDD) was undertaken in a large population-based sample to determine whether altered expression levels of genes and pathways could provide insights into biological mechanisms that are relevant to this disorder. Gene expression studies have the potential to detect changes that may be because of differences in common or rare genomic sequence variation, environmental factors or their interaction. We recruited a European ancestry sample of 463 individuals with recurrent MDD and 459 controls, obtained self-report and semi-structured interview data about psychiatric and medical history and other environmental variables, sequenced RNA from whole blood and genotyped a genome-wide panel of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We used analytical methods to identify MDD-related genes and pathways using all of these sources of information. In analyses of association between MDD and expression levels of 13 857 single autosomal genes, accounting for multiple technical, physiological and environmental covariates, a significant excess of low P-values was observed, but there was no significant single-gene association after genome-wide correction. Pathway-based analyses of expression data detected significant association of MDD with increased expression of genes in the interferon α/β signaling pathway. This finding could not be explained by potentially confounding diseases and medications (including antidepressants) or by computationally estimated proportions of white blood cell types. Although cause-effect relationships cannot be determined from these data, the results support the hypothesis that altered immune signaling has a role in the pathogenesis, manifestation, and/or the persistence and progression of MDD.

  17. Suppression of Tregs by anti-glucocorticoid induced TNF receptor antibody enhances the antitumor immunity of interferongene therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Aida, Kouichirou; Miyakawa, Reina; Suzuki, Koji; Narumi, Kenta; Udagawa, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Yuki; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-02-01

    We have reported that interferon (IFN)-α can attack cancer cells by multiple antitumor mechanisms including the induction of direct cancer cell death and the enhancement of an immune response in several pancreatic cancer models. However, an immunotolerant microenvironment in the tumors is often responsible for the failure of the cancer immunotherapy. Here we examined whether the suppression of regulatory T cells (Tregs) within tumors can enhance an antitumor immunity induced by an intratumoral IFN-α gene transfer. First we showed that an intraperitoneal administration of an agonistic anti-glucocorticoid induced TNF receptor (GITR) monoclonal antibody (mAb), which is reported to suppress the function of Tregs, significantly inhibited subcutaneous tumor growth in a murine pancreatic cancer model. The anti-GITR mAb was then combined with the intratumoral injection of the IFN-α-adenovirus vector. The treatment with the antibody synergistically augmented the antitumor effect of IFN-α gene therapy not only in the vector-injected tumors but also in the vector-uninjected tumors. Immunostaining showed that the anti-GITR mAb decreased Foxp3(+) cells infiltrating in the tumors, while the intratumoral IFN-α gene transfer increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the tumors. Therefore, the combination therapy strongly inclined the immune balance of the tumor microenvironment in an antitumor direction, leading to a marked systemic antitumor effect. The CCR5 expression on Tregs was downregulated in the antibody-treated mice, which may explain the decrease of tumor-infiltrating Tregs. The combination of Treg-suppression by GITR mAb and the tumor immunity induction by IFN-α gene therapy could be a promising therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes induces an interferon-enhanced activation of the integrated stress response that is detrimental for resolution of infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Carolina; Clark, Amy; Urano, Fumihiko; Unanue, Emil R; Carrero, Javier A

    2017-03-07

    Type I interferons (IFNs) induce a detrimental response during Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) infection. We were interested in identifying mechanisms linking IFN signaling to negative host responses against L. monocytogenes infection. Herein we found that infection of myeloid cells with L. monocytogenes led to a coordinated induction of type I IFNs and activation of the integrated stress response (ISR). Infected cells did not induce Xbp1 splicing or BiP upregulation, indicating that the unfolded protein response was not triggered. CHOP (Ddit3) gene expression was upregulated during the ISR activation induced by L. monocytogenes. Myeloid cells deficient in either type I IFN signaling or PKR activation had less upregulation of CHOP following infection. CHOP deficient mice showed lower expression of innate immune cytokines and were more resistant than wild-type counterparts following L. monocytogenes infection. These findings indicate that L. monocytogenes infection induces type I IFNs, which activate the ISR through PKR, which contributes to a detrimental outcome in the infected host. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Predictive value of early brain atrophy on response in patients treated with interferon β

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Miralles, Francisco Carlos; Vidal-Jordana, Angela; Río, Jordi; Auger, Cristina; Pareto, Deborah; Tintoré, Mar; Rovira, Alex; Montalban, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between brain volume loss during the first year of interferon treatment and clinical outcome at 4 years. Methods: Patients with multiple sclerosis initiating interferon β were clinically evaluated every 6 months for the presence of relapses and assessment of global disability using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). MRI scans were performed at baseline and after 12 months, and the percentage of brain volume change (PBVC), brain parenchymal volume change (BPVc%), gray matter volume change (GMVc%), and white matter volume change (WMVc%) were estimated. Patients were divided based on the cutoff values for predicting confirmed EDSS worsening obtained by receiver operating characteristic analysis for all atrophy measurements. Survival curves and Cox proportional hazards regression to predict disability worsening at last observation were applied, adjusting for demographic, clinical, and radiologic variables. Results: Larger PBVC and WMVc% decreases were observed in patients with disability worsening at 4 years of follow-up, whereas no differences were found in BPVc% or GMVc%. Cutoff points were obtained for PBVC (−0.86%; sensitivity 65.5%, specificity 71.4%) and WMVc% (−2.49%; sensitivity 85.3%, specificity 43.8%). Patients with decreases of PBVC and WMVc% below cutoff values were more prone to develop disability worsening (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] 3.875, p = 0.005; HR 4.246, p = 0.004, respectively). PBVC (HR 4.751, p = 0.008) and the interaction of new T2 lesions with WMVc% (HR 1.086, p = 0.005) were found to be independent predictors of disability worsening in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions: At the patient level, whole-brain and white matter volume changes in the first year of interferon β therapy are predictive of subsequent clinical evolution under treatment. PMID:26185778

  20. Diversity of interferon inducible Mx gene in horses and association of variations with susceptibility vis-à-vis resistance against equine influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Manuja, Balvinder K; Manuja, Anju; Dahiya, Rajni; Singh, Sandeep; Sharma, R C; Gahlot, S K

    2014-10-01

    Equine influenza (EI) is primarily an infection of the upper respiratory tract and is one of the major infectious respiratory diseases of economic importance in equines. Re-emergence of the disease, species jumping by H3N8 virus in canines and possible threat of human pandemic due to the unpredictable nature of the virus have necessitated research on devising strategies for preventing the disease. The myxovirus resistance protein (Mx) has been reported to confer resistance to Orthomyxo virus infection by modifying cellular functions needed along the viral replication pathway. Polymorphisms and differential antiviral activities of Mx gene have been reported in pigs and chicken. Here we report the diversity of Mx gene, its expression in response to stimulation with interferon (IFN) α/β and their association with EI resistance and susceptibility in Marwari horses. Blood samples were collected from horses declared positive for equine influenza and in contact animals with a history of no clinical signs. Mx gene was amplified by reverse transcription from total RNA isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with IFN α/β using gene specific primers. The amplified gene products from representative samples were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide sequences and deduced amino acid sequences were analyzed. Out of a total 24 amino acids substitutions sorting intolerant from tolerant (SIFT) analysis predicted 13 substitutions with functional consequences. Five substitutions (V67A, W123L, E346Y, N347Y, S689N) were observed only in resistant animals. Evolutionary distances based on nucleotide sequences with in equines ranged between 0.3-2.0% and 20-24% with other species. On phylogenetic analysis all equine sequences clustered together while other species formed separate clades.

  1. Transcriptome Profiling of the Virus-Induced Innate Immune Response in Pteropus vampyrus and Its Attenuation by Nipah Virus Interferon Antagonist Functions

    PubMed Central

    Glennon, Nicole B.; Jabado, Omar; Lo, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bats are important reservoirs for several viruses, many of which cause lethal infections in humans but have reduced pathogenicity in bats. As the innate immune response is critical for controlling viruses, the nature of this response in bats and how it may differ from that in other mammals are of great interest. Using next-generation transcriptome sequencing (mRNA-seq), we profiled the transcriptional response of Pteropus vampyrus bat kidney (PVK) cells to Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian paramyxovirus known to elicit a strong innate immune response in mammalian cells. The Pteropus genus is a known reservoir of Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV). Analysis of the 200 to 300 regulated genes showed that genes for interferon (IFN) and antiviral pathways are highly upregulated in NDV-infected PVK cells, including genes for beta IFN, RIG-I, MDA5, ISG15, and IRF1. NDV-infected cells also upregulated several genes not previously characterized to be antiviral, such as RND1, SERTAD1, CHAC1, and MORC3. In fact, we show that MORC3 is induced by both IFN and NDV infection in PVK cells but is not induced by either stimulus in human A549 cells. In contrast to NDV infection, HeV and NiV infection of PVK cells failed to induce these innate immune response genes. Likewise, an attenuated response was observed in PVK cells infected with recombinant NDVs expressing the NiV IFN antagonist proteins V and W. This study provides the first global profile of a robust virus-induced innate immune response in bats and indicates that henipavirus IFN antagonist mechanisms are likely active in bat cells. IMPORTANCE Bats are the reservoir host for many highly pathogenic human viruses, including henipaviruses, lyssaviruses, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and filoviruses, and many other viruses have also been isolated from bats. Viral infections are reportedly asymptomatic or heavily attenuated in bat populations. Despite their ecological importance to viral

  2. A Luciferase Reporter Gene Assay to Measure Ebola Virus Viral Protein 35-Associated Inhibition of Double-Stranded RNA-Stimulated, Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene 1-Mediated Induction of Interferon β.

    PubMed

    Cannas, Valeria; Daino, Gian Luca; Corona, Angela; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-10-01

    During Ebola virus (EBOV) infection, the type I interferon α/β (IFN-α/β) innate immune response is suppressed by EBOV viral protein 35 (VP35), a validated drug target. Identification of EBOV VP35 inhibitors requires a cellular system able to assess the VP35-based inhibitory functions of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) IFN-β induction. We established a miniaturized luciferase gene reporter assay in A549 cells that measures IFN-β induction by viral dsRNA and is dose-dependently inhibited by VP35 expression. When compared to influenza A virus NS1 protein, EBOV VP35 showed improved inhibition of viral dsRNA-based IFN-β induction. This assay can be used to screen for EBOV VP35 inhibitors.

  3. Lack of innate interferon responses during SARS coronavirus infection in a vaccination and reinfection ferret model.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Mark J; Kelvin, Alyson A; Leon, Alberto J; Cameron, Cheryl M; Ran, Longsi; Xu, Luoling; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Danesh, Ali; Fang, Yuan; Li, Qianjun; Anderson, Austin; Couch, Ronald C; Paquette, Stephane G; Fomukong, Ndingsa G; Kistner, Otfried; Lauchart, Manfred; Rowe, Thomas; Harrod, Kevin S; Jonsson, Colleen B; Kelvin, David J

    2012-01-01

    In terms of its highly pathogenic nature, there remains a significant need to further define the immune pathology of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection, as well as identify correlates of immunity to help develop vaccines for severe coronaviral infections. Here we use a SARS-CoV infection-reinfection ferret model and a functional genomics approach to gain insight into SARS immunopathogenesis and to identify correlates of immune protection during SARS-CoV-challenge in ferrets previously infected with SARS-CoV or immunized with a SARS virus vaccine. We identified gene expression signatures in the lungs of ferrets associated with primary immune responses to SARS-CoV infection and in ferrets that received an identical second inoculum. Acute SARS-CoV infection prompted coordinated innate immune responses that were dominated by antiviral IFN response gene (IRG) expression. Reinfected ferrets, however, lacked the integrated expression of IRGs that was prevalent during acute infection. The expression of specific IRGs was also absent upon challenge in ferrets immunized with an inactivated, Al(OH)(3)-adjuvanted whole virus SARS vaccine candidate that protected them against SARS-CoV infection in the lungs. Lack of IFN-mediated immune enhancement in infected ferrets that were previously inoculated with, or vaccinated against, SARS-CoV revealed 9 IRG correlates of protective immunity. This data provides insight into the molecular pathogenesis of SARS-CoV and SARS-like-CoV infections and is an important resource for the development of CoV antiviral therapeutics and vaccines.

  4. Real-Time Whole-Body Visualization of Chikungunya Virus Infection and Host Interferon Response in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Palha, Nuno; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Briolat, Valérie; Lutfalla, Georges; Sourisseau, Marion; Ellett, Felix; Wang, Chieh-Huei; Lieschke, Graham J.; Herbomel, Philippe; Schwartz, Olivier; Levraud, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV), a re-emerging arbovirus that may cause severe disease, constitutes an important public health problem. Herein we describe a novel CHIKV infection model in zebrafish, where viral spread was live-imaged in the whole body up to cellular resolution. Infected cells emerged in various organs in one principal wave with a median appearance time of ∼14 hours post infection. Timing of infected cell death was organ dependent, leading to a shift of CHIKV localization towards the brain. As in mammals, CHIKV infection triggered a strong type-I interferon (IFN) response, critical for survival. IFN was mainly expressed by neutrophils and hepatocytes. Cell type specific ablation experiments further demonstrated that neutrophils play a crucial, unexpected role in CHIKV containment. Altogether, our results show that the zebrafish represents a novel valuable model to dynamically visualize replication, pathogenesis and host responses to a human virus. PMID:24039582

  5. Clash of the Cytokine Titans: counter-regulation of interleukin-1 and type I interferon-mediated inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Yan, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades the notion of ‘inflammation' has been extended beyond the original hallmarks of rubor (redness), calor (heat), tumor (swelling) and dolor (pain) described by Celsus. We have gained a more detailed understanding of the cellular players and molecular mediators of inflammation which is now being applied and extended to areas of biomedical research such as cancer, obesity, heart disease, metabolism, auto-inflammatory disorders, autoimmunity and infectious diseases. Innate cytokines are often central components of inflammatory responses. Here, we discuss how the type I interferon and interleukin-1 cytokine pathways represent distinct and specialized categories of inflammatory responses and how these key mediators of inflammation counter-regulate each other. PMID:27264686

  6. Mx Is Not Responsible for the Antiviral Activity of Interferon-α against Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Wang, Shi-Qi; Wei, Jian-Chao; Zhang, Xiao-Min; Gao, Zhi-Can; Liu, Ke; Ma, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Pu-Yan; Zhou, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Mx proteins are interferon (IFN)-induced dynamin-like GTPases that are present in all vertebrates and inhibit the replication of myriad viruses. However, the role Mx proteins play in IFN-mediated suppression of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection is unknown. In this study, we set out to investigate the effects of Mx1 and Mx2 expression on the interferon-α (IFNα) restriction of JEV replication. To evaluate whether the inhibitory activity of IFNα on JEV is dependent on Mx1 or Mx2, we knocked down Mx1 or Mx2 with siRNA in IFNα-treated PK-15 cells and BHK-21 cells, then challenged them with JEV; the production of progeny virus was assessed by plaque assay, RT-qPCR, and Western blotting. Our results demonstrated that depletion of Mx1 or Mx2 did not affect JEV restriction imposed by IFNα, although these two proteins were knocked down 66% and 79%, respectively. Accordingly, expression of exogenous Mx1 or Mx2 did not change the inhibitory activity of IFNα to JEV. In addition, even though virus-induced membranes were damaged by Brefeldin A (BFA), overexpressing porcine Mx1 or Mx2 did not inhibit JEV proliferation. We found that BFA inhibited JEV replication, not maturation, suggesting that BFA could be developed into a novel antiviral reagent. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that IFNα inhibits JEV infection by Mx-independent pathways. PMID:28075421

  7. Role for herpes simplex virus 1 ICP27 in the inhibition of type I interferon signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Karen E.; Song, Byeongwoon; Knipe, David M.

    2008-05-10

    Host cells respond to viral infection by many mechanisms, including the production of type I interferons which act in a paracrine and autocrine manner to induce the expression of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Viruses have evolved means to inhibit interferon signaling to avoid induction of the innate immune response. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) has several mechanisms to inhibit type I interferon production, the activities of ISGs, and the interferon signaling pathway itself. We report that the inhibition of the Jak/STAT pathway by HSV-1 requires viral gene expression and that viral immediate-early protein ICP27 plays a role in downregulating STAT-1 phosphorylation and in preventing the accumulation of STAT-1 in the nucleus. We also show that expression of ICP27 by transfection causes an inhibition of IFN-induced STAT-1 nuclear accumulation. Therefore, ICP27 is necessary and sufficient for at least some of the effects of HSV infection on STAT-1.

  8. Concomitant Interferon Alpha Stimulation and TLR3 Activation Induces Neuronal Expression of Depression-Related Genes That Are Elevated in the Brain of Suicidal Persons

    PubMed Central

    Trippler, Martin; Lutterbeck, Melanie; Liu, Zijian J.; Truebner, Kurt; Bajanowski, Thomas; Gerken, Guido; Hermann, Dirk M.; Schlaak, Joerg F.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously identified 15 genes that are associated with the development of severe depressive side effects during the standard therapy with interferon alpha and ribavirin in the peripheral blood of hepatitis C virus infected patients. An enhanced expression of these genes was also found in the blood of psychiatric patients suffering severe depressive episode. Herein, we demonstrate that the same depression-related interferon-inducible genes (DRIIs) are also upregulated in post-mortem brains of suicidal individuals. Using cultured mouse hippocampal and prefrontal neurons we show that costimulation with murine IFN (mIFN) and the TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) promotes the expression of the described DRIIs, at the same time inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine expression through Stat1 and Stat3 activation, promoting neuronal apoptosis. Consequently, the upregulation of selective DRIIs, production of inflammatory cytokines and inhibition of neuronal plasticity may be involved in the pathogenesis of IFN-associated depression. PMID:24391741

  9. Type I interferons induce apoptosis by balancing cFLIP and caspase-8 independent of death ligands.

    PubMed

    Apelbaum, Amir; Yarden, Ganit; Warszawski, Shira; Harari, Daniel; Schreiber, Gideon

    2013-02-01

    Interferons induce a pleiotropy of responses through binding the same cell surface receptor. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism driving interferon-induced apoptosis. Using a nonbiased small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen, we show that silencing genes whose products are directly engaged in the initiation of interferon signaling completely abrogate the interferon antiproliferative response. Apoptosis-related genes such as the caspase-8, cFLIP, and DR5 genes specifically interfere with interferon-induced apoptosis, which we found to be independent of the activity of death ligands. The one gene for which silencing resulted in the strongest proapoptotic effect upon interferon signaling is the cFLIP gene, where silencing shortened the time of initiation of apoptosis from days to hours and increased dramatically the population of apoptotic cells. Thus, cFLIP serves as a regulator for interferon-induced apoptosis. A shift over time in the balance between cFLIP and caspase-8 results in downstream caspase activation and apoptosis. While gamma interferon (IFN-γ) also causes caspase-8 upregulation, we suggest that it follows a different path to apoptosis.

  10. West Nile Virus Population Structure, Injury, and Interferon-Stimulated Gene Expression in the Brain From a Fatal Case of Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Grubaugh, Nathan D.; Massey, Aaron; Shives, Katherine D.; Stenglein, Mark D.; Ebel, Gregory D.; Beckham, J. David

    2016-01-01

    Background. West Nile virus (WNV) infection in humans can result in severe, acute encephalitis typically involving subcortical gray matter brain regions. West Nile virus replication within specific human brain regions from a human case of acute encephalitis has not been studied. Methods. We describe a fatal case of WNV encephalitis in which we obtained tissue from specific brain regions at autopsy to evaluate viral-host interactions using next-generation sequencing and immunohistochemistry analysis. Results. We found that WNV populations in the injured subcortical brain regions exhibited increased amino acid variation and increased expression of specific interferon genes compared with cortical tissues despite similar viral burden. Conclusions. These observational, patient-based data suggest that neuronal injury and the strength of viral selection pressure may be associated with the level of the innate immune responses. Further studies in human and animal models evaluating the role of innate immune responses on injury patterns and viral selection pressure are needed. PMID:26730392

  11. Identification of Type II Interferon Receptors in Geese: Gene Structure, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Expression Patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Qi, Yulin; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) and IFNGR2 are two cell membrane molecules belonging to class II cytokines, which play important roles in the IFN-mediated antiviral signaling pathway. Here, goose IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were cloned and identified for the first time. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that relatively high levels of goose IFNγ mRNA transcripts were detected in immune tissues, including the harderian gland, cecal tonsil, cecum, and thymus. Relatively high expression levels of both IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were detected in the cecal tonsil, which implicated an important role of IFNγ in the secondary immune system of geese. No specific correlation between IFNγ, IFNGR1, and IFNGR2 expression levels was observed in the same tissues of healthy geese. IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed different expression profiles, although they appeared to maintain a relatively balanced state. Furthermore, the agonist R848 led to the upregulation of goose IFNγ but did not affect the expression of goose IFNGR1 or IFNGR2. In summary, trends in expression of goose IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed tissue specificity, as well as an age-related dependency. These findings may help us to better understand the age-related susceptibility to pathogens in birds.

  12. Antitumor efficacy of combination of interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 gene with gemcitabine, a study in murine model

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Kai; Wang, Lian; Tian, Ling; Yu, Jingrui; Zhang, Zhixuan; Wei, Yuquan

    2008-01-01

    Background Interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) is a potent inhibitor of tumor angiogenesis. It has been reported that the antiangiogenic therapy combined with chemotherapy has synergistic effects. Methods To elucidate the mechanisms of IP-10 gene combined with a chemotherapy agent, we intramuscularly injected pBLAST-IP-10 expression plasmid combined with gemcitabine into tumor-bearing mice. Results The proliferation of endothelial cells was effectively inhibited by IP-10 combined with gemcitabine in vitro. Treatment with pBLAST-IP-10 twice a week for 4 weeks combined with gemcitabine 10 mg/kg (once a week) resulted in sustained high level of IP-10 protein in serum, inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Compared with administration of IP-10 plasmid or gemcitabine alone, the angiogenesis in tumors were apparently inhibited, and the numbers of apoptotic cells and lymphocytes in tumor increased in the combination therapy group. Conclusion Our data indicate that the gene therapy of antiangiogenesis by intramuscular delivery of plasmid DNA encoding IP-10 combined with gemcitabine has synergistic effects on tomor by inhibiting the proliferation of endothelail cells, inducing the apoptosis of tumor cells, and recruiting lymphocytes to tumor in murine models. The present findings provided evidence of antitumor effects of genetherapy combined with chemotherapy. PMID:18983688

  13. Interferon-inducible gene expression signature in peripheral blood cells of patients with severe lupus.

    PubMed

    Baechler, Emily C; Batliwalla, Franak M; Karypis, George; Gaffney, Patrick M; Ortmann, Ward A; Espe, Karl J; Shark, Katherine B; Grande, William J; Hughes, Karis M; Kapur, Vivek; Gregersen, Peter K; Behrens, Timothy W

    2003-03-04

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex, inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects multiple organ systems. We used global gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to identify distinct patterns of gene expression that distinguish most SLE patients from healthy controls. Strikingly, about half of the patients studied showed dysregulated expression of genes in the IFN pathway. Furthermore, this IFN gene expression "signature" served as a marker for more severe disease involving the kidneys, hematopoetic cells, and/or the central nervous system. These results provide insights into the genetic pathways underlying SLE, and identify a subgroup of patients who may benefit from therapies targeting the IFN pathway.

  14. Altered expression of cell proliferation-related and interferon-stimulated genes in colon cancer cells resistant to SN38.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Céline; Candeil, Laurent; Vezzio, Nadia; Copois, Virginie; Denis, Vincent; Breil, Corinne; Molina, Franck; Fraslon, Caroline; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Pau, Bernard; Martineau, Pierre; Del Rio, Maguy

    2008-06-01

    Irinotecan is a topoisomerase I inhibitor widely used as an anticancer agent in the treatment of metastatic colon cancer. However, its efficacy is often limited by the development of resistance. We have isolated a colon carcinoma cell line, HCT116-SN6, which displays a 6-fold higher resistance to SN38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. In this paper, we studied the molecular mechanisms that cause resistance to SN38 in the HCT116-SN6 cell line. First, we analyzed proliferation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, topoisomerase I expression and activity in SN38-resistant (HCT116-SN6) and sensitive (HCT116-s cells). We showed that the SN38-induced apoptosis and the SN38-activated cell cycle checkpoints leading to G(2)/M cell cycle arrest were similar in both cell lines. Topoisomerase I expression and catalytic activity were also unchanged. Then, we compared mRNA expression profiles in the two cell lines using the Affymetrix Human Genome GeneChip arrays U133A and B. Microarray analysis showed that among the genes, which were differentially expressed in HCT116-s and HCT116-SN6 cells, 27% were related to cell proliferation suggesting that proliferation might be the main target in the development of resistance to SN38. This result correlates with the phenotypic observation of a reduced growth rate in HCT116-SN6 resistant cells. Furthermore, 29% of the overexpressed genes were Interferon Stimulated Genes and we demonstrate that their overexpression is, at least partially, due to endogenous activation of the p38 MAP kinase pathway in SN38 resistant cells. In conclusion, a slower cell proliferation rate may be a major cause of acquired resistance to SN38 via a reduction of cell cycle progression through the S phase which is mandatory for the cytotoxic action of SN38. This lower growth rate could be due to the endogenous activation of p38.

  15. Variation in interferon-gamma responses to Coxiella burnetii antigens with lymphocytes from vaccinated or naturally infected subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Izzo, A A; Marmion, B P

    1993-01-01

    Previous work in our laboratory has shown that lymphocytes from persons vaccinated with a formalin-inactivated Phase I Q fever vaccine (Q-Vax CSL Ltd) show a mitogenic response to Coxiella burnetii antigens. The mitogenic response is the sum of that from various subsets of CD4+, T helper cells, CD8+ T cells and probably B cells. It does not distinguish between T helper cell responses leading to formation of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)--a cytokine responsible for clearing intracellular infection with C. burnetii organisms--and responses of other T cell subsets which may produce disease-enhancing cytokines. The present study analyses (i) the capacity of Q-Vax to induce T cell sensitization which leads to IFN-gamma responses on antigen stimulation, and (ii) the immunomodulatory, (down-regulatory) effects of the Phase I lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the organism, which interacts with monocyte/macrophages to limit IL-2 production and production of IFN-gamma by sensitized T lymphocytes. PMID:8252811

  16. Interferon γ and interleukin 10 responses in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed New Zealand White rabbits naturally infected with Encephalitozoon cuniculi.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Tovar, Luis E; Castillo-Velázquez, Uziel; Arce-Mendoza, Alma Y; Nevárez-Garza, Alicia M; Zarate-Ramos, Juan J; Hernández-Vidal, Gustavo; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Heidi G; Trejo-Chávez, Armando

    2016-09-01

    Levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-10 were measured in the serum of immunocompetent and immunosuppressed New Zealand White rabbits naturally infected with Encephalitozoon cuniculi. IFN-γ levels were elevated in infected rabbits, and a synergic effect was observed in animals treated with the immunosuppressive agent dexamethasone (Dex). The role of IL-10 in infected rabbits remains unclear, as IL-10 levels were similar to those of negative controls. Dex appeared to exhibit a proinflammatory effect, as IFN-γ levels were elevated in infected immunosuppressed rabbits. Similarly, Dex exhibited a synergic effect in infected immunosuppressed rabbits, as evidenced by the elevation in IFN-γ production. These data indicate that the immune response to this glucocorticoid should be considered in the design of future animal model studies of immunosuppression.

  17. Investigation of Toll-Like Receptor-2 (2258G/A) and Interferon Gamma (+874T/A) Gene Polymorphisms among Infertile Women with Female Genital Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhanothu, Venkanna; Lakshmi, Vemu; Theophilus, Jane P.; Rozati, Roya; Badhini, Prabhakar; Vijayalaxmi, Boda

    2015-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) coordinate with a diverse array of cellular programs through the transcriptional regulation of immunologically relevant genes and play an important role in immune system, reproductive physiology and basic pathology. Alterations in the functions of TLR2 2258G (guanine)/ A, IFN-γ (+874T/A) and signalling molecules that result from polymorphisms are often associated with susceptibility or resistance, which may, in turn, establish the innate host response to various infectious diseases. Presently, we proposed to investigate the risk of common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of TLR2 and IFN-γ genes, for their effect on infertility in women with female genital tuberculosis (FGTB) and healthy women as controls. Methodology/Principal Findings Genotyping of TLR2 and IFN-γ gene polymorphisms was performed by amplification refractory mutation system multi-gene/multi-primer polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism in 175 FGTB patients and 100 healthy control women (HCW). The TLR2 polymorphism [adenine (A) allele] was observed in 57.7 and 58.0% of FGTB patients and HCW, respectively. The IFN-γ (+874T/A) polymorphism (A allele) was significant in 74.3 and 71.0% of FGTB patients and HCW, respectively, while the odds ratios for the AA and TA genotypes for predisposition of FGTB were found to be 0.304 and 1.650 in HCW, respectively. The SNP of TLR2 was not associated with FGTB but the SNP of IFN-γ was found to be associated with mycobacteria infections and to induce infertility. Conclusions/Significance At present, we hypothesize that infertile women with FGTB and HCW without tuberculosis (TB) have identical frequency of TLR variants, which may be adequate in the production of IFN-γ in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections. Thus, the study appears to be the first of its kind reporting a mutation in the IFN-γ gene [+874 T (thymine) to A] responsible for

  18. Qualitative and quantitative results of interferon-γ release assays for monitoring the response to anti-tuberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Park, I-Nae; Shim, Tae Sun

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The usefulness of interferon-γ release assays (IGRAs) in monitoring to responses to anti-tuberculosis (TB) treatment is controversial. We compared the results of two IGRAs before and after anti-TB treatment in same patients with active TB. Methods From a retrospective review, we selected patients with active TB who underwent repeated QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFN-Gold, Cellestis Limited) and T-SPOT.TB (Oxford Immunotec) assays before and after anti-TB treatment with first-line drugs. Both tests were performed prior to the start of anti-TB treatment or within 1 week after the start of anti-TB treatment and after completion of treatment. Results A total of 33 active TB patients were included in the study. On the QFN-Gold test, at baseline, 23 cases (70%) were early secreted antigenic target 6-kDa protein 6 (ESAT-6) or culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10) positive. On the T-SPOT. TB test, at baseline, 31 cases (94%) were ESAT-6 or CFP-10 positive. Most of patients remained both test-positive after anti-TB treatment. Although changes in interferon-γ release responses over time were highly variable in both tests, there was a mean decline of 27 and 24 spot-forming counts for ESAT-6 and CFP-10, respectively on the T-SPOT.TB test (p < 0.05 for all). Conclusions Although limited by the small number of patients and a short-term follow-up, there was significant decline in the quantitative result of the T-SPOT. TB test with treatment. However, both commercial IGRAs may not provide evidence regarding the cure of disease in Korea, a country where the prevalence of TB is within the intermediate range. PMID:27951621

  19. Biased expression, under the control of single promoter, of human interferon α-2b and Escherichia coli methionine amino peptidase genes in E. coli, irrespective of their distance from the promoter.

    PubMed

    Arif, Amina; Rashid, Naeem; Aslam, Farheen; Mahmood, Nasir; Akhtar, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    Human interferon α-2b and Escherichia coli methionine amino peptidase genes were cloned independently as well as bicistronically in expression plasmid pET-21a (+). Production of human interferon α-2b was comparable to that of E. coli methionine amino peptidase when these genes were expressed independently in E. coli BL21-CodonPlus (DE3)-RIL. However, human interferon α-2b was produced in a much less amount whereas there was no difference in the production of methionine amino peptidase when the encoding genes were expressed bicistronically. It is important to note that human interferon α-2b was the first gene in order, after the promoter and E. coli methionine amino peptidase was the next with a linker sequence of 27 nucleotides between them.

  20. Alternate virtual populations elucidate the type I interferon signature predictive of the response to rituximab in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mechanistic biosimulation can be used in drug development to form testable hypotheses, develop predictions of efficacy before clinical trial results are available, and elucidate clinical response to therapy. However, there is a lack of tools to simultaneously (1) calibrate the prevalence of mechanistically distinct, large sets of virtual patients so their simulated responses statistically match phenotypic variability reported in published clinical trial outcomes, and (2) explore alternate hypotheses of those prevalence weightings to reflect underlying uncertainty in population biology. Here, we report the development of an algorithm, MAPEL (Mechanistic Axes Population Ensemble Linkage), which utilizes a mechanistically-based weighting method to match clinical trial statistics. MAPEL is the first algorithm for developing weighted virtual populations based on biosimulation results that enables the rapid development of an ensemble of alternate virtual population hypotheses, each validated by a composite goodness-of-fit criterion. Results Virtual patient cohort mechanistic biosimulation results were successfully calibrated with an acceptable composite goodness-of-fit to clinical populations across multiple therapeutic interventions. The resulting virtual populations were employed to investigate the mechanistic underpinnings of variations in the response to rituximab. A comparison between virtual populations with a strong or weak American College of Rheumatology (ACR) score in response to rituximab suggested that interferon β (IFNβ) was an important mechanistic contributor to the disease state, a signature that has previously been identified though the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Sensitivity analysis elucidated key anti-inflammatory properties of IFNβ that modulated the pathophysiologic state, consistent with the observed prognostic correlation of baseline type I interferon measurements with clinical response. Specifically, the effects of IFN

  1. A prosurvival DNA damage-induced cytoplasmic interferon response is mediated by end resection factors and is limited by Trex1

    PubMed Central

    Erdal, Erkin; Haider, Syed; Rehwinkel, Jan; Harris, Adrian L.

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are effective treatment methods for many types of cancer, but resistance is common. Recent findings indicate that antiviral type I interferon (IFN) signaling is induced by these treatments. However, the underlying mechanisms still need to be elucidated. Expression of a set of IFN-stimulated genes comprises an IFN-related DNA damage resistance signature (IRDS), which correlates strongly with resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy across different tumors. Classically, during viral infection, the presence of foreign DNA in the cytoplasm of host cells can initiate type I IFN signaling. Here, we demonstrate that DNA-damaging modalities used during cancer therapy lead to the release of ssDNA fragments from the cell nucleus into the cytosol, engaging this innate immune response. We found that the factors that control DNA end resection during double-strand break repair, including the Bloom syndrome (BLM) helicase and exonuclease 1 (EXO1), play a major role in generating these DNA fragments and that the cytoplasmic 3′–5′ exonuclease Trex1 is required for their degradation. Analysis of mRNA expression profiles in breast tumors demonstrates that those with lower Trex1 and higher BLM and EXO1 expression levels are associated with poor prognosis. Targeting BLM and EXO1 could therefore represent a novel approach for circumventing the IRDS produced in response to cancer therapeutics. PMID:28279982

  2. NLRX1 Sequesters STING to Negatively Regulate the Interferon Response, Thereby Facilitating the Replication of HIV-1 and DNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haitao; König, Renate; Deng, Meng; Riess, Maximilian; Mo, Jinyao; Zhang, Lu; Petrucelli, Alex; Yoh, Sunnie M; Barefoot, Brice; Samo, Melissa; Sempowski, Gregory D; Zhang, Aiping; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M; Feng, Hui; Lemon, Stanley M; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yanping; Wen, Haitao; Zhang, Zhigang; Damania, Blossom; Tsao, Li-Chung; Wang, Qi; Su, Lishan; Duncan, Joseph A; Chanda, Sumit K; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2016-04-13

    Understanding the negative regulators of antiviral immune responses will be critical for advancing immune-modulated antiviral strategies. NLRX1, an NLR protein that negatively regulates innate immunity, was previously identified in an unbiased siRNA screen as required for HIV infection. We find that NLRX1 depletion results in impaired nuclear import of HIV-1 DNA in human monocytic cells. Additionally, NLRX1 was observed to reduce type-I interferon (IFN-I) and cytokines in response to HIV-1 reverse-transcribed DNA. NLRX1 sequesters the DNA-sensing adaptor STING from interaction with TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), which is a requisite for IFN-1 induction in response to DNA. NLRX1-deficient cells generate an amplified STING-dependent host response to cytosolic DNA, c-di-GMP, cGAMP, HIV-1, and DNA viruses. Accordingly, Nlrx1(-/-) mice infected with DNA viruses exhibit enhanced innate immunity and reduced viral load. Thus, NLRX1 is a negative regulator of the host innate immune response to HIV-1 and DNA viruses.

  3. Convergent Transcription of Interferon-stimulated Genes by TNF-α and IFN-α Augments Antiviral Activity against HCV and HEV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenshi; Xu, Lei; Brandsma, Johannes H; Wang, Yijin; Hakim, Mohamad S; Zhou, Xinying; Yin, Yuebang; Fuhler, Gwenny M; van der Laan, Luc J W; van der Woude, C Janneke; Sprengers, Dave; Metselaar, Herold J; Smits, Ron; Poot, Raymond A; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2016-05-06

    IFN-α has been used for decades to treat chronic hepatitis B and C, and as an off-label treatment for some cases of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection. TNF-α is another important cytokine involved in inflammatory disease, which can interact with interferon signaling. Because interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) are the ultimate antiviral effectors of the interferon signaling, this study aimed to understand the regulation of ISG transcription and the antiviral activity by IFN-α and TNF-α. In this study, treatment of TNF-α inhibited replication of HCV by 71 ± 2.4% and HEV by 41 ± 4.9%. Interestingly, TNF-α induced the expression of a panel of antiviral ISGs (2-11 fold). Blocking the TNF-α signaling by Humira abrogated ISG induction and its antiviral activity. Chip-seq data analysis and mutagenesis assay further revealed that the NF-κB protein complex, a key downstream element of TNF-α signaling, directly binds to the ISRE motif in the ISG promoters and thereby drives their transcription. This process is independent of interferons and JAK-STAT cascade. Importantly, when combined with IFN-α, TNF-α works cooperatively on ISG induction, explaining their additive antiviral effects. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism of convergent transcription of ISGs by TNF-α and IFN-α, which augments their antiviral activity against HCV and HEV.

  4. Ticks Take Cues from Mammalian Interferon.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Aravinda M

    2016-07-13

    Interferons are considered a first line of immune defense restricted to vertebrates. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Smith et al. (2016) demonstrate that mammalian interferon γ activates an antimicrobial response within ticks feeding on blood. The study suggests that arthropods have a parallel interferon-like defense system.

  5. Role of proinflammatory cytokines (interferon gamma) and anti-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin-10) gene polymorphisms in chronic hepatitis B infection: an Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Manjita; Ranjan, Arttrika; Choudhary, Jitendra K; Tripathi, Manish K; Verma, Smita; Dixit, Vinod K; Nath, Gopal; Jain, Ashok K

    2014-07-01

    Immune-mediated mechanisms have been found to play an important role in the progression of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The outcomes of infection do not appear to be determined by viral strains. Instead, allelic variants in human genome are likely to affect the disease progression. Allelic variation of proinflammatory cytokines such as interferon gamma (IFN-γ) participates in the elimination of HBV, and interleukin-10 (IL-10) helps in inhibition of Th1 effector mechanisms for host defense. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of host genetic factors in chronic HBV infection and gene promoter polymorphism or single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis of IFN-γ+874 and IL-10 (-1082, -592, and -819) on disease progression and persistence. A total of 232 patients along with 76 healthy controls were included. Allele-specific primers for IFN-γ and restriction fragment length polymorphism for IL-10 were used. The study indicated that low IFN-γ expression probably impairs host immune response to HBV, rendering these subjects more prone to HBV infection. No significant differences were detected between the 2 groups in the distributions of IL-10 genotype at the -1082, -819, and -592 positions. Odds ratio indicated that heterozygosity of genotypes -819 CT and -592 AC was more strongly associated with liver chronicity. Significantly, AA homozygous genotype was dominant in chronic hepatitis B cases in IFN-γ+874 and IL-10 (-1082 and -592) and is associated with increased risk of persistent infection.

  6. RNA interference screening of interferon-stimulated genes with antiviral activities against classical swine fever virus using a reporter virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Lian-Feng; Shen, Liang; Zhang, Lingkai; Yu, Jiahui; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Li, Su; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-04-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of pigs, which leads to significant economic losses in many countries. Viral infection can induce the production of interferons (IFNs), giving rise to the transcription of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) to exert antiviral effects. Although numerous ISGs have been identified to possess antiviral activities against different viruses, rare anti-CSFV ISGs have been reported to date. In this study, to screen anti-CSFV ISGs, twenty-one ISGs reported previously were individually knocked down using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) followed by infection with a reporter CSFV expressing Renilla luciferase (Rluc). As a result, four novel anti-CSFV ISGs were identified, including natural-resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1), cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase III A (NT5C3A), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10), and 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), which were further verified to exhibit antiviral activities against wild-type CSFV. We conclude that the reporter virus is a useful tool for efficient screening anti-CSFV ISGs.

  7. Sensitivity of human pleural mesothelioma to oncolytic measles virus depends on defects of the type I interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Achard, Carole; Boisgerault, Nicolas; Delaunay, Tiphaine; Roulois, David; Nedellec, Steven; Royer, Pierre-Joseph; Pain, Mallory; Combredet, Chantal; Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Cellerin, Laurent; Magnan, Antoine; Tangy, Frédéric; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Attenuated measles virus (MV) is currently being evaluated as an oncolytic virus in clinical trials and could represent a new therapeutic approach for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Herein, we screened the sensitivity to MV infection and replication of twenty-two human MPM cell lines and some healthy primary cells. We show that MV replicates in fifteen of the twenty-two MPM cell lines. Despite overexpression of CD46 by a majority of MPM cell lines compared to healthy cells, we found that the sensitivity to MV replication did not correlate with this overexpression. We then evaluated the antiviral type I interferon (IFN) responses of MPM cell lines and healthy cells. We found that healthy cells and the seven insensitive MPM cell lines developed a type I IFN response in presence of the virus, thereby inhibiting replication. In contrast, eleven of the fifteen sensitive MPM cell lines were unable to develop a complete type I IFN response in presence of MV. Finally, we show that addition of type I IFN onto MV sensitive tumor cell lines inhibits replication. These results demonstrate that defects in type I IFN response are frequent in MPM and that MV takes advantage of these defects to exert oncolytic activity. PMID:26539644

  8. Can zinc enhance response interferon therapy for patients with HCV-related liver disease?

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru

    2012-01-01

    Patients with liver disease may be at risk of zinc depletion. Zinc supplementation has been shown to contribute to inhibition of liver fibrosis and improvement in hepatic encephalopathy. However, little is known about the anti-inflammatory effect of zinc on hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related chronic liver disease. The standard of care for chronic HCV has improved markedly since the approval of interferon (IFN) therapy more than a decade ago. Over the past 20 years, IFN therapy has improved to more effectively eliminate the virus, progressing from single IFN therapy to combination therapy with ribavirin (RBV) and finally to pegylated IFN (PEG-IFN) therapy. However, even combined therapy with PEG-IFN and RBV for 48 wk is unable to eliminate the virus in some 40% of hepatitis C cases, particularly those with genotype 1b and high viral load. Treatment options for patients who have relapsed or are refractory to treatment with PEG-IFN and RBV therefore need to be critically assessed. This paper overviews the relationship between chronic liver disease and zinc metabolism. PMID:22783042

  9. Impact of HIV infection on sustained virological response to treatment against hepatitis C virus with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Monje-Agudo, P; Castro-Iglesias, A; Rivero-Juárez, A; Martínez-Marcos, F; Ortega-González, E; Real, L M; Pernas, B; Merchante, N; Cid, P; Macías, J; Merino, M D; Rivero, A; Mena, A; Neukam, K; Pineda, J A

    2015-10-01

    It is commonly accepted that human immunodeficiency (HIV) coinfection negatively impacts on the rates of sustained virological response (SVR) to therapy with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (PR). However, this hypothesis is derived from comparing different studies. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of HIV coinfection on SVR to PR in one single population. In a multicentric, prospective study conducted between 2000 and 2013, all previously naïve hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients who started PR in five Spanish hospitals were analyzed. SVR was evaluated 24 weeks after the scheduled end of therapy. Of the 1046 patients included in this study, 413 (39%) were coinfected with HIV. Three hundred and forty-one (54%) HCV-monoinfected versus 174 (42%) HIV/HCV-coinfected patients achieved SVR (p < 0.001). The corresponding figures for undetectable HCV RNA at treatment week 4 were 86/181 (47%) versus 59/197 (30%), p < 0.001. SVR was observed in 149 (69%) HCV genotype 2/3-monoinfected subjects versus 91 (68%) HIV/HCV genotype 2/3-coinfected subjects (p = 0.785). In the HCV genotype 1/4-infected population, 188 (46%) monoinfected patients versus 82 (30%) with HIV coinfection (p < 0.001) achieved SVR. In this subgroup, absence of HIV coinfection was independently associated with higher SVR [adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 2.127 (1.135-3.988); p = 0.019] in a multivariate analysis adjusted for age, sex, baseline HCV RNA load, IL28B genotype, fibrosis stage, and type of pegylated interferon. HIV coinfection impacts on the rates of SVR to PR only in HCV genotype 1/4-infected patients, while it has no effect on SVR in the HCV genotype 2/3-infected subpopulation.

  10. Induction of the Ly-6A/E gene by interferon alpha/beta and gamma requires a DNA element to which a tyrosine-phosphorylated 91-kDa protein binds.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, K D; Shuai, K; Lindwall, G; Maher, S E; Darnell, J E; Bothwell, A L

    1993-01-01

    The murine Ly-6A/E gene is transcriptionally induced in cells exposed to interferon alpha/beta or gamma (IFN-alpha/beta or IFN-gamma). Analysis of the 5' flanking sequence using reporter plasmids that contain upstream elements of the Ly-6E gene has previously identified an approximately 850-base-pair IFN-responsive region that lacked an IFN-alpha-stimulated response element (ISRE), the element present and required for an IFN-alpha response of a number of genes. Analysis by deletion and stable transfection of the IFN-responsive region of the Ly-6E promoter has defined an 80-base-pair region containing an IFN-gamma activation site (GAS) but no ISRE that allows IFN-gamma and IFN-alpha inducibility of the Ly-6E gene. As tested by specific antiserum, a 91-kDa protein known to be activated in IFN-alpha- or IFN-gamma-treated cells binds to the GAS element from the Ly-6E promoter. The 91-kDa protein exists as an inactive cytoplasmic precursor and depends on tyrosine phosphorylation for its activation. Thus the same 91-kDa protein appears to act in the signal transduction pathways of both types of IFN for the Ly-6-A/E gene. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7688129

  11. Growth inhibition of human pancreatic cancer cells by human interferon-beta gene combined with gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Endou, Masato; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nagata, Takuya; Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Nakahara, Norimoto; Tsuno, Takaya; Osawa, Hirokatsu; Kuno, Tomohiko; Fujita, Mitsugu; Hatano, Manabu; Yoshida, Jun

    2005-02-01

    We examined the anti-tumor effect of cationic multilamellar liposome containing human IFN-beta (huIFN-beta) gene against cultured human pancreatic cancer cells. We also evaluated the combined effect of huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and gemcitabine. Furthermore, we examined the anti-tumor mechanisms of the therapy, with emphasis on the Ras-related signal pathway. Three human pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPc-1, MIAPaCa-2, and PANC-1) were used in this study. The growth inhibition together with the therapy were evaluated by WST-1 assay; the production of huIFN-beta protein was measured by ELISA; the cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed using a FACScan flow cytometer; the protein levels of Son of sevenless (SOS-1) and Ras-GAP were measured by Western blotting; and the activation of Ras-GTP was evaluated by the immunoprecipitation method. As a result, we found that huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes demonstrated a strong anti-tumor effect against human pancreatic cancer cells. The treatment that combined huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and gemcitabine was more effective than each treatment alone. Although gemcitabine remarkably reduced the level of SOS-1, the above combined therapy reduced the level of SOS-1 even more significantly. Both huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and the com-bination of huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and gemcitabine increased the level of Ras-GAP, and decreased the activity of Ras-GTP. These results suggest that this combination therapy can induce strong anti-tumor activity against human pancreatic cancer cells through the regulation of the Ras-related signal pathway.

  12. Effects of interferon on antibody formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the effects of interferon on primary and secondary antibody responses and of the relationship of interferon to other cytokines, or cell products, are presented. Dosage- and timing-dependent immunoenhancing and immunosuppressive activities of interferon are documented for mouse spleen cell cultures and for mice infected with murine hepatitis virus (MHV-3). A possibility that altered interferon production might lead to immunopathological disorders, such as lupus erythematosus, AIDS, arthritis, etc., is discussed. Latest technological developments are presented that indicate that interferon does apparently play a major role in the regulation of antibody responses.

  13. Type I interferon genes from the egg-laying mammal, Tachyglossus aculeatus (short-beaked echidna).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Gavan A; McNicol, Kelly A; Deane, Elizabeth M

    2004-04-01

    The type I IFN are an important group of multifunctional cytokines that have, for whatever reason, evolved to a high level of complexity in eutherian mammals such as humans and mice. However, until recently, little was known about the type I IFN systems of the other two groups of extant mammals, the marsupials and the egg-laying monotremes. Preliminary partial type I IFN sequences from the short-beaked echidna were previously found to cluster only with the IFN-beta subtype in phylogenetic analyses, but a lack of sequence information made interpretation of these results tenuous. Here, we report cloning of the full-length genes of representatives from the two previously defined groups of echidna type I IFN by genomic walking PCR. Along with analysis of conserved cysteine placement and promoter elements, phylogenetic analysis incorporating these sequences strongly suggest that the two groups of echidna type I IFN genes are in fact homologous to IFN-alpha and IFN-beta, confirming that the duplication leading to these two major classes of type I IFN occurred prior to the divergence of eutherians and monotremes some 180 million years ago. Thus, even though there are major differences in gene copy number and heterogeneity, separate IFN-alpha and IFN-beta gene families are a feature of the cytokine networks of all three groups of living mammals.

  14. Cytokine-Enhanced Vaccine and Interferon-β plus Suicide Gene Therapy as Surgery Adjuvant Treatments for Spontaneous Canine Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Fondello, Chiara; Gil-Cardeza, María L.; Rossi, Úrsula A.; Villaverde, Marcela S.; Riveros, María D.; Glikin, Gerardo C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present here a nonviral immunogene therapy trial for canine malignant melanoma, an aggressive disease displaying significant clinical and histopathological overlapping with human melanoma. As a surgery adjuvant approach, it comprised the co-injection of lipoplexes bearing herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase and canine interferongenes at the time of surgery, combined with the periodic administration of a subcutaneous genetic vaccine composed of tumor extracts and lipoplexes carrying the genes of human interleukin-2 and human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Following complete surgery (CS), the combined treatment (CT) significantly raised the portion of local disease-free canine patients from 11% to 83% and distant metastases-free (M0) from 44% to 89%, as compared with surgery-only-treated controls (ST). Even after partial surgery (PS), CT better controlled the systemic disease (M0: 82%) than ST (M0: 48%). Moreover, compared with ST, CT caused a significant 7-fold (CS) and 4-fold (PS) rise of overall survival, and >17-fold (CS) and >13-fold (PS) rise of metastasis-free survival. The dramatic increase of PS metastasis-free survival (>1321 days) and CS recurrence- and metastasis-free survival (both >2251 days) demonstrated that CT was shifting a rapidly lethal disease into a chronic one. In conclusion, this surgery adjuvant CT was able of significantly delaying or preventing postsurgical recurrence and distant metastasis, increasing disease-free and overall survival, and maintaining the quality of life. The high number of canine patients involved in CT (301) and the extensive follow-up (>6 years) with minimal or absent toxicity warrant the long-term safety and efficacy of this treatment. This successful clinical outcome justifies attempting a similar scheme for human melanoma. PMID:25762364

  15. Cytokine-Enhanced Vaccine and Interferon-β plus Suicide Gene Therapy as Surgery Adjuvant Treatments for Spontaneous Canine Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, Liliana M E; Fondello, Chiara; Gil-Cardeza, María L; Rossi, Úrsula A; Villaverde, Marcela S; Riveros, María D; Glikin, Gerardo C

    2015-06-01

    We present here a nonviral immunogene therapy trial for canine malignant melanoma, an aggressive disease displaying significant clinical and histopathological overlapping with human melanoma. As a surgery adjuvant approach, it comprised the co-injection of lipoplexes bearing herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase and canine interferongenes at the time of surgery, combined with the periodic administration of a subcutaneous genetic vaccine composed of tumor extracts and lipoplexes carrying the genes of human interleukin-2 and human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Following complete surgery (CS), the combined treatment (CT) significantly raised the portion of local disease-free canine patients from 11% to 83% and distant metastases-free (M0) from 44% to 89%, as compared with surgery-only-treated controls (ST). Even after partial surgery (PS), CT better controlled the systemic disease (M0: 82%) than ST (M0: 48%). Moreover, compared with ST, CT caused a significant 7-fold (CS) and 4-fold (PS) rise of overall survival, and >17-fold (CS) and >13-fold (PS) rise of metastasis-free survival. The dramatic increase of PS metastasis-free survival (>1321 days) and CS recurrence- and metastasis-free survival (both >2251 days) demonstrated that CT was shifting a rapidly lethal disease into a chronic one. In conclusion, this surgery adjuvant CT was able of significantly delaying or preventing postsurgical recurrence and distant metastasis, increasing disease-free and overall survival, and maintaining the quality of life. The high number of canine patients involved in CT (301) and the extensive follow-up (>6 years) with minimal or absent toxicity warrant the long-term safety and efficacy of this treatment. This successful clinical outcome justifies attempting a similar scheme for human melanoma.

  16. Priming affects the activity of a specific region of the promoter of the human beta interferon gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dron, M; Lacasa, M; Tovey, M G

    1990-01-01

    Treatment of Daudi or HeLa cells with human interferon (IFN) alpha 8 before induction with either poly(I)-poly(C) or Sendai virus resulted in an 8- to 100-fold increase in IFN production. The extent of priming in Daudi cells paralleled the increase in the intracellular content of IFN-beta mRNA. IFN-alpha mRNA remained undetectable in poly(I)-poly(C)-treated Daudi cells either before or after priming. An IFN-resistant clone of Daudi cells was found to produce 4- to 20-fold more IFN after priming, indicating that priming was unrelated to the phenotype of IFN sensitivity. IFN treatment of either Daudi or HeLa cells transfected with the human IFN-beta promoter (-282 to -37) linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene resulted in an increase in CAT activity after induction with poly(I)-poly(C) or Sendai virus. A synthetic double-stranded oligonucleotide corresponding to an authentic 30-base-pair (bp) region of the human IFN-beta promoter between positions -91 and -62 was found to confer virus inducibility upon the reporter CAT gene in HeLa cells. IFN treatment of HeLa cells transfected with this 30-bp region of the IFN-beta promoter in either the correct or reversed orientation also increased CAT activity upon subsequent induction. IFN treatment alone had no detectable effect on the activity of either the 30-bp region or the complete human IFN promoter. Images PMID:2153928

  17. Type I Interferons as Stimulators of DC-Mediated Cross-Priming: Impact on Anti-Tumor Response.

    PubMed

    Schiavoni, Giovanna; Mattei, Fabrizio; Gabriele, Lucia

    2013-12-25

    Induction of potent tumor-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses is a fundamental objective in anticancer therapeutic strategies. This event requires that antigen-presenting cells present tumor-associated antigens (Ag) on their MHC class-I molecule, in a process termed cross-presentation. Dendritic cells (DC) are particularly keen on this task and can induce the cross-priming of CD8(+) T cells, when exposed to danger or inflammatory signals that stimulate their activation. Type I interferons (IFN-I), a family of long-known immunostimulatory cytokines, have been proven to produce optimal activation signal for DC-induced cross-priming. Recent in vitro and in vivo evidences have suggested that IFN-I-stimulated cross-priming by DC against tumor-associated Ag is a key mechanism for cancer immunosurveillance and may be usefully exploited to boost anti-tumor CD8(+) T-cell responses. Here, we will review the cross-presentation properties of different DC subsets, with special focus on cell-associated and tumor Ag, and discuss how IFN-I can modify this function, with the aim of identifying more specific and effective strategies for improving anticancer responses.

  18. Dysregulated Type I Interferon and Inflammatory Monocyte-Macrophage Responses Cause Lethal Pneumonia in SARS-CoV-Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fehr, Anthony R; Vijay, Rahul; Mack, Matthias; Zhao, Jincun; Meyerholz, David K; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-02-10

    Highly pathogenic human respiratory coronaviruses cause acute lethal disease characterized by exuberant inflammatory responses and lung damage. However, the factors leading to lung pathology are not well understood. Using mice infected with SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome)-CoV, we show that robust virus replication accompanied by delayed type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling orchestrates inflammatory responses and lung immunopathology with diminished survival. IFN-I remains detectable until after virus titers peak, but early IFN-I administration ameliorates immunopathology. This delayed IFN-I signaling promotes the accumulation of pathogenic inflammatory monocyte-macrophages (IMMs), resulting in elevated lung cytokine/chemokine levels, vascular leakage, and impaired virus-specific T cell responses. Genetic ablation of the IFN-αβ receptor (IFNAR) or IMM depletion protects mice from lethal infection, without affecting viral load. These results demonstrate that IFN-I and IMM promote lethal SARS-CoV infection and identify IFN-I and IMMs as potential therapeutic targets in patients infected with pathogenic coronavirus and perhaps other respiratory viruses.

  19. Novel Approaches to Detect Serum Biomarkers for Clinical Response to Interferon-β Treatment in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Kaushal S.; McKay, Fiona C.; Diefenbach, Eve; Crossett, Ben; Schibeci, Stephen D.; Heard, Robert N.; Stewart, Graeme J.; Booth, David R.; Arthur, Jonathan W.

    2010-01-01

    Interferon beta (IFNβ) is the most common immunomodulatory treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). However, some patients fail to respond to treatment. In this study, we identified putative clinical response markers in the serum and plasma of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with IFNβ. In a discovery-driven approach, we use 2D-difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to identify putative clinical response markers and apply power calculations to identify the sample size required to further validate those markers. In the process we have optimized a DIGE protocol for plasma to obtain cost effective and high resolution gels for effective spot comparison. APOA1, A2M, and FIBB were identified as putative clinical response markers. Power calculations showed that the current DIGE experiment requires a minimum of 10 samples from each group to be confident of 1.5 fold difference at the p<0.05 significance level. In a complementary targeted approach, Cytometric Beadarray (CBA) analysis showed no significant difference in the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-8, MIG, Eotaxin, IP-10, MCP-1, and MIP-1α, between clinical responders and non-responders, despite the association of these proteins with IFNβ treatment in MS. PMID:20463963

  20. Novel approaches to detect serum biomarkers for clinical response to interferon-beta treatment in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Kaushal S; McKay, Fiona C; Diefenbach, Eve; Crossett, Ben; Schibeci, Stephen D; Heard, Robert N; Stewart, Graeme J; Booth, David R; Arthur, Jonathan W

    2010-05-05

    Interferon beta (IFNbeta) is the most common immunomodulatory treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). However, some patients fail to respond to treatment. In this study, we identified putative clinical response markers in the serum and plasma of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with IFNbeta. In a discovery-driven approach, we use 2D-difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to identify putative clinical response markers and apply power calculations to identify the sample size required to further validate those markers. In the process we have optimized a DIGE protocol for plasma to obtain cost effective and high resolution gels for effective spot comparison. APOA1, A2M, and FIBB were identified as putative clinical response markers. Power calculations showed that the current DIGE experiment requires a minimum of 10 samples from each group to be confident of 1.5 fold difference at the p<0.05 significance level. In a complementary targeted approach, Cytometric Beadarray (CBA) analysis showed no significant difference in the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-8, MIG, Eotaxin, IP-10, MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha, between clinical responders and non-responders, despite the association of these proteins with IFNbeta treatment in MS.

  1. Genetic Screen of a Library of Chimeric Poxviruses Identifies an Ankyrin Repeat Protein Involved in Resistance to the Avian Type I Interferon Response

    PubMed Central

    Buttigieg, Karen; Laidlaw, Stephen M.; Ross, Craig; Davies, Marc; Goodbourn, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Viruses must be able to resist host innate responses, especially the type I interferon (IFN) response. They do so by preventing the induction or activity of IFN and/or by resisting the antiviral effectors that it induces. Poxviruses are no exception, with many mechanisms identified whereby mammalian poxviruses, notably, vaccinia virus (VACV), but also cowpox and myxoma viruses, are able to evade host IFN responses. Similar mechanisms have not been described for avian poxviruses (avipoxviruses). Restricted for permissive replication to avian hosts, they have received less attention; moreover, the avian host responses are less well characterized. We show that the prototypic avipoxvirus, fowlpox virus (FWPV), is highly resistant to the antiviral effects of avian IFN. A gain-of-function genetic screen identified fpv014 to contribute to increased resistance to exogenous recombinant chicken alpha IFN (ChIFN1). fpv014 is a member of the large family of poxvirus (especially avipoxvirus) genes that encode proteins containing N-terminal ankyrin repeats (ANKs) and C-terminal F-box-like motifs. By binding the Skp1/cullin-1 complex, the F box in such proteins appears to target ligands bound by the ANKs for ubiquitination. Mass spectrometry and immunoblotting demonstrated that tandem affinity-purified, tagged fpv014 was complexed with chicken cullin-1 and Skp1. Prior infection with an fpv014-knockout mutant of FWPV still blocked transfected poly(I·C)-mediated induction of the beta IFN (ChIFN2) promoter as effectively as parental FWPV, but the mutant was more sensitive to exogenous ChIFN1. Therefore, unlike the related protein fpv012, fpv014 does not contribute to the FWPV block to induction of ChIFN2 but does confer resistance to an established antiviral state. PMID:23427151

  2. Sodium butyrate enhances STAT 1 expression in PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells and augments their responsiveness to interferon-alpha.

    PubMed

    Hung, W C; Chuang, L Y

    1999-05-01

    Although interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) has shown great promise in the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis, the anti-tumour effect of this agent in the therapy of liver cancer is unclear. Recent studies have demonstrated that differentiation-inducing agents could modulate the responsiveness of cancer cells to IFN-alpha by regulating the expression of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins, a group of transcription factors which play important roles in the IFN signalling pathway. We have reported that sodium butyrate is a potent differentiation inducer for human hepatoma cells. In this study, we investigated whether this drug could regulate the expression of STAT proteins and enhance the anti-tumour effect of IFN-alpha in hepatoma cells. We found that sodium butyrate specifically activated STAT1 gene expression and enhanced IFN-alpha-induced phosphorylation and activation of STAT1 proteins. Co-treatment with these two drugs led to G1 growth arrest, accompanied by down-regulation of cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21WAF-1, and accumulation of hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma protein in hepatoma cells. Additionally, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, a biological hallmark of apoptosis, was detected in hepatoma cells after continuous incubation with a combination of these two drugs for 72 h. Our results show that sodium butyrate potently enhances the anti-tumour effect of IFN-alpha in vitro and suggest that a rational combination of these two drugs may be useful for the treatment of liver cancer.

  3. OBTAINING OF THE TRANSGENIC HELIANTHUS TUBEROSUS L. PLANTS, CALLUS AND "HAIRY" ROOT CULTURES ABLE TO EXPRESS THE RECOMBINANT HUMAN INTERFERON ALPHA-2b GENE.

    PubMed

    Maistrenko, O M; Luchakivska, Yu S; Zholobak, N M; Spivak, M Ya; Kuchuk, M V

    2015-01-01

    This work is the first to our knowledge to describe the successful attempt of Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation of topinambour in order to obtain the transgenic H. tuberosus plants, callus and "hairy" root cultures. The plasmid vectors contained the sequence of interferon gene fused with Nicotiana plumbagenifolia L. calreticulin apoplast targeting signal driven by 35S CaMV promoter or root-specific Mll promoter. Nearly 75% isolated Ri-root lines and callus cultures were proved (by PCR analysis) to contain HuINFa-2b transgene. We also managed to obtain H. tuberosus transgenic plants through somatic embryogenesis on the transgenic "hairy" root culture. The obtained transgenic H. tuberosus cultures exhibited high-level antiviral activity that ranged from 2000 to 54500 IU/g FW that makes this crop considered a promising source of recombinant interferon alpha 2b protein.

  4. Differential regulation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-7 and IRF-9 gene expression in the central nervous system during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Ousman, Shalina S; Wang, Jianping; Campbell, Iain L

    2005-06-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors involved in the regulation of the interferons (IFNs) and other genes that may have an essential role in antiviral defense in the central nervous system, although this is currently not well defined. Therefore, we examined the regulation of IRF gene expression in the brain during viral infection. Several IRF genes (IRF-2, -3, -5, -7, and -9) were expressed at low levels in the brain of uninfected mice. Following intracranial infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), expression of the IRF-7 and IRF-9 genes increased significantly by day 2. IRF-7 and IRF-9 gene expression in the brain was widespread at sites of LCMV infection, with the highest levels in infiltrating mononuclear cells, microglia/macrophages, and neurons. IRF-7 and IRF-9 gene expression was increased in LCMV-infected brain from IFN-gamma knockout (KO) but not IFN-alpha/betaR KO animals. In the brain, spleen, and liver or cultured glial and spleen cells, IRF-7 but not IRF-9 gene expression increased with delayed kinetics in the absence of STAT1 but not STAT2 following LCMV infection or IFN-alpha treatment, respectively. The stimulation of IRF-7 gene expression by IFN-alpha in glial cell culture was prevented by cycloheximide. Thus, (i) many of the IRF genes were expressed constitutively in the mouse brain; (ii) the IRF-7 and IRF-9 genes were upregulated during viral infection, a process dependent on IFN-alpha/beta but not IFN-gamma; and (iii) IRF-7 but not IRF-9 gene expression can be stimulated in a STAT1-independent but STAT2-dependent fashion via unidentified indirect pathways coupled to the activation of the IFN-alpha/beta receptor.

  5. Assessment of safety and interferon gamma responses of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine in goat kids and milking goats.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; Vidal, Enric; López-Soria, Sergio; Marco, Alberto; Cervera, Zoraida; Martín, Maite; Mercader, Irene; Singh, Mahavir; Raeber, Alex; Domingo, Mariano

    2016-02-10

    Vaccination of domestic animals has emerged as an alternative long-term strategy for the control of tuberculosis (TB). A trial under field conditions was conducted in a TB-free goat herd to assess the safety of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Eleven kids and 10 milking goats were vaccinated with BCG. Bacterial shedding and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses were monitored throughout the study. Comprehensive pathological examination and mycobacterial culture of target tissues were performed. BCG vaccine strain was only isolated from the draining lymph node of the injection site of a kid euthanized at week 8 post-vaccination. The remaining animals were euthanized at week 24. Six out of 20 showed small granulomas at the injection site. BCG shedding was not detected in either faeces or in milk throughout the study. All vaccinated kids showed BCG-induced IFN-γ responses at week 8 post-vaccination. BCG vaccination of goats showed no lack of biological safety for the animals, environment and public health, and local adverse reactions were negligible.

  6. Impaired responsiveness to gamma interferon of macrophages infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13: susceptibility to histoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Villarete, L; de Fries, R; Kolhekar, S; Howard, D; Ahmed, R; Wu-Hsieh, B

    1995-01-01

    Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13 (LCMV clone 13), a variant isolated from the spleens of neonatally infected mice, causes persistent infections in mice infected as adults. Such persistently infected mice succumb to a normally sublethal dose of Histoplasma capsulatum, and their macrophages contain overwhelming numbers of yeast cells of the fungus. Both LCMV clone 13 and H. capsulatum yeast cells target and replicate in macrophages of the host. We sought to study the effects of LCMV clone 13 on the ability of macrophages to control growth of H. capsulatum in vitro. We show that the growth of H. capsulatum within macrophages was not directly affected by the presence of LCMV clone 13. However, macrophages containing LCMV clone 13 did not respond fully to gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) stimulation. Such unresponsiveness resulted in proliferation of the fungus within macrophages cultured in the presence of IFN-gamma. The addition of anti-IFN-alpha/beta antibodies to LCMV clone 13-infected macrophage cultures restored macrophage responsiveness to IFN-gamma. These results indicate that production of IFN-alpha/beta by LCMV clone 13-infected macrophages antagonizes their responsiveness to IFN-gamma. Such antagonism may be one of the mechanisms by means of which certain viruses cause immune suppression and susceptibility to opportunistic infections. PMID:7890411

  7. The biased nucleotide composition of HIV-1 triggers type I interferon response and correlates with subtype D increased pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Vabret, Nicolas; Bailly-Bechet, Marc; Najburg, Valérie; Müller-Trutwin, Michaela; Verrier, Bernard; Tangy, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The genome of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has an average nucleotide composition strongly biased as compared to the human genome. The consequence of such nucleotide composition on HIV pathogenicity has not been investigated yet. To address this question, we analyzed the role of nucleotide bias of HIV-derived nucleic acids in stimulating type-I interferon response in vitro. We found that the biased nucleotide composition of HIV is detected in human cells as compared to humanized sequences, and triggers a strong innate immune response, suggesting the existence of cellular immune mechanisms able to discriminate RNA sequences according to their nucleotide composition or to detect specific secondary structures or linear motifs within biased RNA sequences. We then extended our analysis to the entire genome scale by testing more than 1300 HIV-1 complete genomes to look for an association between nucleotide composition of HIV-1 group M subtypes and their pathogenicity. We found that subtype D, which has an increased pathogenicity compared to the other subtypes, has the most divergent nucleotide composition relative to the human genome. These data support the hypothesis that the biased nucleotide composition of HIV-1 may be related to its pathogenicity.

  8. Influence of type-I Interferon receptor expression level on the response to type-I Interferons in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Booy, Stephanie; van Eijck, Casper H J; Dogan, Fadime; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Hofland, Leo J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Type-I interferons (e.g. IFN-α/-β) have several anti-tumour activities. Over the past few years, clinical studies evaluating the effect of adjuvant IFN-α therapy in pancreatic cancer yielded equivocal results. Although IFN-α and-β act via the type-I IFN receptor, the role of the number of receptors present on tumour cells is still unknown. Therefore, this study associated, for the first time, in a large panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines the effects of IFN-α/-β with the expression of type-I IFN receptors. The anti-tumour effects of IFN-α or IFN-β on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in 11 human pancreatic cell lines. Type-I IFN receptor expression was determined on both the mRNA and protein level. After 7 days of incubation, IFN-α significantly reduced cell growth in eight cell lines by 5–67%. IFN-β inhibited cell growth statistically significant in all cell lines by 43–100%. After 3 days of treatment, IFN-β induced significantly more apoptosis than IFN-α. The cell lines variably expressed the type-I IFN receptor. The maximal inhibitory effect of IFN-α was positively correlated with the IFNAR-1 mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.63), IFNAR-2c mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.69) and protein expression (P < 0.05, r = 0.65). Human pancreatic cancer cell lines variably respond to IFN-α and-β. The expression level of the type-I IFN receptor is of predictive value for the direct anti-tumour effects of IFN-α treatment. More importantly, IFN-β induces anti-tumour effects already at much lower concentrations, is less dependent on interferon receptor expression and seems, therefore, more promising than IFN-α. PMID:24460759

  9. Influence of type-I Interferon receptor expression level on the response to type-I Interferons in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Booy, Stephanie; van Eijck, Casper H J; Dogan, Fadime; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Hofland, Leo J

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Type-I interferons (e.g. IFN-α/-β) have several anti-tumour activities. Over the past few years, clinical studies evaluating the effect of adjuvant IFN-α therapy in pancreatic cancer yielded equivocal results. Although IFN-α and -β act via the type-I IFN receptor, the role of the number of receptors present on tumour cells is still unknown. Therefore, this study associated, for the first time, in a large panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines the effects of IFN-α/-β with the expression of type-I IFN receptors. The anti-tumour effects of IFN-α or IFN-β on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in 11 human pancreatic cell lines. Type-I IFN receptor expression was determined on both the mRNA and protein level. After 7 days of incubation, IFN-α significantly reduced cell growth in eight cell lines by 5-67%. IFN-β inhibited cell growth statistically significant in all cell lines by 43-100%. After 3 days of treatment, IFN-β induced significantly more apoptosis than IFN-α. The cell lines variably expressed the type-I IFN receptor. The maximal inhibitory effect of IFN-α was positively correlated with the IFNAR-1 mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.63), IFNAR-2c mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.69) and protein expression (P < 0.05, r = 0.65). Human pancreatic cancer cell lines variably respond to IFN-α and -β. The expression level of the type-I IFN receptor is of predictive value for the direct anti-tumour effects of IFN-α treatment. More importantly, IFN-β induces anti-tumour effects already at much lower concentrations, is less dependent on interferon receptor expression and seems, therefore, more promising than IFN-α.

  10. Identification and genotyping of feline infectious peritonitis-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in the feline interferongene.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Li-En; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2014-05-21

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is an immune-mediated, highly lethal disease caused by feline coronavirus (FCoV) infection. Currently, no protective vaccine or effective treatment for the disease is available. Studies have found that some cats survive the challenge of virulent FCoV isolates. Since cellular immunity is thought to be critical in preventing FIP and because diseased cats often show a significant decrease in interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production, we investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the feline IFN-γ gene (fIFNG) are associated with the outcome of infection. A total of 82 asymptomatic and 63 FIP cats were analyzed, and 16 SNP were identified in intron 1 of fIFNG. Among these SNP, the fFING + 428 T allele was shown to be a FIP-resistant allele (p = 0.03), and the heterozygous genotypes 01C/T and +408C/T were found to be FIP-susceptible factors (p = 0.004). Furthermore, an fIFNG + 428 resistant allele also showed a clear correlation with the plasma level of IFN-γ in FIP cats. For the identification of these three FIP-related SNP, genotyping methods were established using amplification refractory mutation system PCR (ARMS-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP), and the different genotypes could easily be identified without sequencing. The identification of additional FIP-related SNP will allow the selection of resistant cats and decrease the morbidity of the cat population to FIP.

  11. Urokinase-Targeted Fusion by Oncolytic Sendai Virus Eradicates Orthotopic Glioblastomas by Pronounced Synergy With InterferonGene

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kinoh, Hiroaki; Iwadate, Yasuo; Onimaru, Mitsuho; Ueda, Yasuji; Harada, Yui; Saito, Satoru; Furuya, Aki; Saegusa, Takashi; Morodomi, Yosuke; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Saito, Shigeyoshi; Aoki, Ichio; Saeki, Naokatsu; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GM), the most frequent primary malignant brain tumor, is highly invasive due to the expression of proteases, including urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Here, we show the potential of our new and powerful recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV) showing uPA-specific cell-to-cell fusion activity [rSeV/dMFct14 (uPA2), named “BioKnife”] for GM treatment, an effect that was synergistically enhanced by arming BioKnife with the interferon-β (IFN-β) gene. BioKnife killed human GM cell lines efficiently in a uPA-dependent fashion, and this killing was prevented by PA inhibitor-1. Rat gliosarcoma 9L cells expressing both uPA and its functional receptor uPAR (9L-L/R) exhibited high uPA activity on the cellular surface and were highly susceptible to BioKnife. Although parent 9L cells (9L-P) were resistant to BioKnife and to BioKnife expressing IFN-β (BioKnife-IFNβ), cell–cell fusion of 9L-L/R strongly facilitated the expression of IFN-β, and in turn, IFN-β significantly accelerated the fusion activity of BioKnife. A similar synergy was seen in a rat orthotopic brain GM model with 9L-L/R in vivo; therefore, these results suggest that BioKnife-IFNβ may have significant potential to improve the survival of GM patients in a clinical setting. PMID:20606645

  12. The roles of interferon-inducible p200 family members IFI16 and p204 in innate immune responses, cell differentiation and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Gonzalezgugel, Elena; Cheng, Lei; Richbourgh, Brendon; Nie, Lin; Liu, Chuanju

    2014-01-01

    p204 is a member of the interferon-inducible p200 family proteins in mice. The p200 family has been reported to be multifunctional regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and senescence. Interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) is regarded as the human ortholog of p204 in several studies. This is possibly due to the similarity of their structures. However the consistency of their functions is still elusive. Currently, an emerging focus has been placed upon the role of the p200 proteins as sensors for microbial DNA in innate immune responses and provides new insights into infections as well as autoimmune diseases. This review specially focuses on IFI16 and p204, the member of p200 family in human and murine respectively, and their pathophysiological roles in innate immune responses, cell differentiation and proliferation. PMID:25815367

  13. Regulation of type I-interferon responses in the human epidermal melanocyte cell line SKMEL infected by the Ross River alphavirus.

    PubMed

    Assi, Mohamad; Thon-Hon, Vincent Gérard; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie-Christine; Martinez, Audrey; Gasque, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Melanocytes are melanin-producing cells and with emerging innate immune functions including the expression of antiviral interferon-type I cytokines. We herein ascertained the susceptibility of the human melanocytes to Ross River alphavirus (RRV) infection and analyzed the subsequent immune responses. We demonstrated for the first time that (1) SKMEL-28 melanocyte cell line was susceptible to RRV infection and displaying major cytopathic activities and (2) RRV interfered with the interferon-type I response by altering nuclear translocation of pSTAT1 and pSTAT2 in infected SKMEL-28. These results suggest that the human melanoma cell line SKMEL-28 is a valuable model to analyze the mechanisms involved in severe skin manifestations and melanocyte's immunity at the portal of entry of major infection by arboviruses.

  14. Tumor Interferon Signaling Regulates a Multigenic Resistance Program to Immune Checkpoint Blockade.

    PubMed

    Benci, Joseph L; Xu, Bihui; Qiu, Yu; Wu, Tony J; Dada, Hannah; Twyman-Saint Victor, Christina; Cucolo, Lisa; Lee, David S M; Pauken, Kristen E; Huang, Alexander C; Gangadhar, Tara C; Amaravadi, Ravi K; Schuchter, Lynn M; Feldman, Michael D; Ishwaran, Hemant; Vonderheide, Robert H; Maity, Amit; Wherry, E John; Minn, Andy J

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic blocking of the PD1 pathway results in significant tumor responses, but resistance is common. We demonstrate that prolonged interferon signaling orchestrates PDL1-dependent and PDL1-independent resistance to immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) and to combinations such as radiation plus anti-CTLA4. Persistent type II interferon signaling allows tumors to acquire STAT1-related epigenomic changes and augments expression of interferon-stimulated genes and ligands for multiple T cell inhibitory receptors. Both type I and II interferons maintain this resistance program. Crippling the program genetically or pharmacologically interferes with multiple inhibitory pathways and expands distinct T cell populations with improved function despite expressing markers of severe exhaustion. Consequently, tumors resistant to multi-agent ICB are rendered responsive to ICB monotherapy. Finally, we observe that biomarkers for interferon-driven resistance associate with clinical progression after anti-PD1 therapy. Thus, the duration of tumor interferon signaling augments adaptive resistance and inhibition of the interferon response bypasses requirements for combinatorial ICB therapies.

  15. MicroRNAs as Predictor Markers for Response to Interferon Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C Genotype-4 in Egyptian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Motawi, Tarek M. K.; Rizk, Sherine M.; Shaker, Olfat G.; Mokhtar, Olfat Z. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus genotype 4 (HCV-4) infection is common in the Middle East and Africa, with an extraordinarily high prevalence in Egypt. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in various diseases, including HCV infection. The aim of the present study was to assess serum miR-122, miR-221 and miR-21 expression profiles in HCV-4 patients prior to treatment with HCV-4 combination therapy (pegylated alpha interferon and ribavirin) and to determine whether the miRNAs were associated with the drug response. Methods RNA was extracted from pretreatment serum samples, and miR-122, miR-221 and miR-21 levels were measured by quantitative PCR. The results were compared among patients with sustained virological responses (SVR) and non-responders (NR). Results The expression levels of miR-21 and miR-122 were significantly different between the SVR and NR groups. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values of miR-21 were 82.2%, 77.3% and 88.1%, respectively, with a cut-off value of 1.7. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values of miR-122 were 68.9%, 59.1% and 77.5%, respectively, with a cut-off value of 3.5. Conclusion and Significance miR-21 and miR-122 might be useful predictors for SVR in HCV-4 patients prior to the administration of combination therapy. A higher predictive response power was obtained for miR-21 than for miR-122. These results should reduce ineffective treatments. PMID:25811198

  16. Effect of route of inoculation on replication of avian influenza virus (H9N2) and interferon gene expression in guinea fowl (Numida meleagridis).

    PubMed

    Umar, S; Munir, M T; Kaboudi, K; Rehman, A; Asif, S; Usman, M; Ali, A; Shahzad, M; Subhan, S; Shah, M A A

    2016-08-01

    The study was designed to investigate the replication of a re-assortant H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) and induction of the interferon (IFNγ) response after aerosol or intranasal inoculation with the virus in guinea fowl. To determine virus shedding pattern, oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs and tissue specimens of trachea, lungs, spleen and caecal tonsils were collected post-inoculation (pi). Infected guinea fowl showed mild clinical signs, while negative control guinea fowl remained healthy and active throughout the experiment irrespective of the inoculation route. However, the clinical signs were more prominent in guinea fowl infected through the aerosol route. Virus was detected in all oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs up to 7 d pi in guinea fowl from both inoculation groups. However, virus was detected more frequently and in higher titres in oropharyngeal swabs and specimens of trachea and lungs from the group exposed to aerosols than in the group given intranasal drops. In accordance with viral replication findings, expression of IFNγ was up-regulated on 1, 2 and 4 d pi to a significantly higher level in lung tissue specimens from the group exposed to virus aerosol than from controls treated with PBS intranasally. On the other hand, IFNγ was up-regulated above that of controls in lung tissue specimens from the group treated with intranasal drops of virus only on 4 d pi. These findings indicate that virus administered in aerosols was more efficient in infecting the lower respiratory tract and in inducing activity of the IFNγ gene than virus administered as intranasal drops. The results of this study suggest that virus aerosols cause more intense respiratory infection and increase the shedding of the H9N2 AIV in guinea fowl, highlighting the potential role of guinea fowl as a mixing bowl for transmission and maintenance of H9N2 AIV between poultry premises.

  17. Interferon γ-induced protein 10 kinetics in treatment-naive versus treatment-experienced patients receiving interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C virus infection: implications for the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jennifer C; Habersetzer, François; Rodriguez-Torres, Maribel; Afdhal, Nezam; Lawitz, Eric J; Paulson, Matthew S; Zhu, Yanni; Subramanian, Gangadharan Mani; McHutchison, John G; Sulkowski, Mark; Wyles, David L; Schooley, Robert T

    2014-12-15

    We measured interferon γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10) levels in 428 patients at baseline, week 1, and week 2 of all-oral treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. An increased baseline IP-10 level was associated with a T allele in the IL28B gene, an increased alanine aminotransferase level in treatment-naive but not experienced patients, and an increased body mass index. At week 1, the mean decline in plasma IP-10 levels was the same in treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients (-49%), whereas during week 2 the mean decline in IP-10 levels in treatment-naive patients (-14%) was significantly larger than in treatment-experienced patients (-2%; P = .0176). IP-10 thus may be a surrogate marker of the rate of intracellular viral replication complex decay.

  18. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is involved in the induction of phosphatidylserine receptor (PSR) in response to dsRNA virus infection and contributes to apoptotic cell clearance in CHSE-214 cell.

    PubMed

    Kung, Hsin-Chia; Evensen, Øystein; Hong, Jiann-Ruey; Kuo, Chia-Yu; Tso, Chun-Hsi; Ngou, Fang-Huar; Lu, Ming-Wei; Wu, Jen-Leih

    2014-10-23

    The phosphatidylserine receptor (PSR) recognizes a surface marker on apoptotic cells and initiates engulfment. This receptor is important for effective apoptotic cell clearance and maintains normal tissue homeostasis and regulation of the immune response. However, the regulation of PSR expression remains poorly understood. In this study, we determined that interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) was dramatically upregulated upon viral infection in the fish cell. We observed apoptosis in virus-infected cells and found that both PSR and IRF-1 increased simultaneously. Based on a bioinformatics promoter assay, IRF-1 binding sites were identified in the PSR promoter. Compared to normal viral infection, we found that PSR expression was delayed, viral replication was increased and virus-induced apoptosis was inhibited following IRF-1 suppression with morpholino oligonucleotides. A luciferase assay to analyze promoter activity revealed a decreasing trend after the deletion of the IRF-1 binding site on PSR promoter. The results of this study indicated that infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) infection induced both the apoptotic and interferon (IFN) pathways, and IRF-1 was involved in regulating PSR expression to induce anti-viral effects. Therefore, this work suggests that PSR expression in salmonid cells during IPNV infection is activated when IRF-1 binds the PSR promoter. This is the first report to show the potential role of IRF-1 in triggering the induction of apoptotic cell clearance-related genes during viral infection and demonstrates the extensive crosstalk between the apoptotic and innate immune response pathways.

  19. Histone H2B-IFI16 Recognition of Nuclear Herpesviral Genome Induces Cytoplasmic InterferonResponses

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Jawed; Ansari, Mairaj Ahmed; Kumar, Binod; Dutta, Dipanjan; Roy, Arunava; Chikoti, Leela; Pisano, Gina; Dutta, Sujoy; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Chandran, Bala

    2016-01-01

    IFI16 (gamma-interferon-inducible protein 16), a predominantly nuclear protein involved in transcriptional regulation, also functions as an innate immune response DNA sensor and induces the IL-1β and antiviral type-1 interferon-β (IFN-β) cytokines. We have shown that IFI16, in association with BRCA1, functions as a sequence independent nuclear sensor of episomal dsDNA genomes of KSHV, EBV and HSV-1. Recognition of these herpesvirus genomes resulted in IFI16 acetylation, BRCA1-IFI16-ASC-procaspase-1 inflammasome formation, cytoplasmic translocation, and IL-1β generation. Acetylated IFI16 also interacted with cytoplasmic STING and induced IFN-β. However, the identity of IFI16 associated nuclear proteins involved in STING activation and the mechanism is not known. Mass spectrometry of proteins precipitated by anti-IFI16 antibodies from uninfected endothelial cell nuclear lysate revealed that histone H2B interacts with IFI16. Single and double proximity ligation microscopy, immunoprecipitation, EdU-genome labeled virus infection, and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that H2B is associated with IFI16 and BRCA1 in the nucleus in physiological conditions. De novo KSHV and HSV-1 infection as well as latent KSHV and EBV infection induces the cytoplasmic distribution of H2B-IFI16, H2B-BRCA1 and IFI16-ASC complexes. Vaccinia virus (dsDNA) cytoplasmic replication didn’t induce the redistribution of nuclear H2B-IFI16 or H2B into the cytoplasm. H2B is critical in KSHV and HSV-1 genome recognition by IFI16 during de novo infection. Viral genome sensing by IFI16-H2B-BRCA1 leads to BRCA1 dependent recruitment of p300, and acetylation of H2B and IFI16. BRCA1 knockdown or inhibition of p300 abrogated the acetylation of H2B-IFI16 or H2B. Ran-GTP protein mediated the translocation of acetylated H2B and IFI16 to the cytoplasm along with BRCA1 that is independent of IFI16-ASC inflammasome. ASC knockdown didn’t affect the acetylation of H2B, its cytoplasmic

  20. Limited trafficking of a neurotropic virus through inefficient retrograde axonal transport and the type I interferon response.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Karen Z; Pfeiffer, Julie K

    2010-03-05

    Poliovirus is an enteric virus that rarely invades the human central nervous system (CNS). To identify barriers limiting poliovirus spread from the periphery to CNS, we monitored trafficking of 10 marked viruses. After oral inoculation of susceptible mice, poliovirus was present in peripheral neurons, including vagus and sciatic nerves. To model viral trafficking in peripheral neurons, we intramuscularly injected mice with poliovirus, which follows a muscle-sciatic nerve-spinal cord-brain route. Only 20% of the poliovirus population successfully moved from muscle to brain, and three barriers limiting viral trafficking were identified. First, using light-sensitive viruses, we found limited viral replication in peripheral neurons. Second, retrograde axonal transport of poliovirus in peripheral neurons was inefficient; however, the efficiency was increased upon muscle damage, which also increased the transport efficiency of a non-viral neural tracer, wheat germ agglutinin. Third, using susceptible interferon (IFN) alpha/beta receptor knockout mice, we demonstrated that the IFN response limited viral movement from the periphery to the brain. Surprisingly, the retrograde axonal transport barrier was equivalent in strength to the IFN barrier. Illustrating the importance of barriers created by the IFN response and inefficient axonal transport, IFN alpha/beta receptor knockout mice with muscle damage permitted 80% of the viral population to access the brain, and succumbed to disease three times faster than mice with intact barriers. These results suggest that multiple separate barriers limit poliovirus trafficking from peripheral neurons to the CNS, possibly explaining the rare incidence of paralytic poliomyelitis. This study identifies inefficient axonal transport as a substantial barrier to poliovirus trafficking in peripheral neurons, which may limit CNS access for other viruses.

  1. Type I interferon suppresses virus-specific B cell responses by modulating CD8+ T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Moseman, E. Ashley; Wu, Tuoqi; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have established a role for T cells in resolving persistent viral infections, yet emerging evidence indicates that both T and B cells are required to control some viruses. During persistent infection, a marked lag or failure to generate neutralizing antibodies is commonly observed and likely contributes to an inability to control certain pathogens. Using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) as a model, we have examined how a persistent viral infection can suppress neutralizing humoral immunity. By tracking the fate of virus-specific B cells in vivo, we report that LCMV-specific B cells were rapidly deleted within a few days of persistent infection, and this deletion was completely reversed by blockade of type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling. Early interference with IFN-I signaling promoted survival and differentiation of LCMV-specific B cells, which accelerated the generation of neutralizing antibodies. This marked improvement in antiviral humoral immunity did not rely on the cessation of IFN-I signaling in B cells but on alterations in the virus-specific CD8+ T cell response. Using two-photon microscopy and in vivo calcium imaging, we observed that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) productively engaged and killed LCMV-specific B cells in a perforin-dependent manner within the first few days of infection. Blockade of IFN-I signaling protected LCMV-specific B cells by promoting CTL dysfunction. Therapeutic manipulation of this pathway may facilitate efforts to promote humoral immunity during persistent viral infection in humans. Our findings illustrate how events that occur early after infection can disturb the resultant adaptive response and contribute to viral persistence. PMID:27812556

  2. The Interferon-Stimulated Gene Ifi27l2a Restricts West Nile Virus Infection and Pathogenesis in a Cell-Type- and Region-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Tiffany M.; Richner, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mammalian host responds to viral infections by inducing expression of hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). While the functional significance of many ISGs has yet to be determined, their cell type and temporal nature of expression suggest unique activities against specific pathogens. Using a combination of ectopic expression and gene silencing approaches in cell culture, we previously identified Ifi27l2a as a candidate antiviral ISG within neuronal subsets of the central nervous system (CNS) that restricts infection by West Nile virus (WNV), an encephalitic flavivirus of global concern. To investigate the physiological relevance of Ifi27l2a in the context of viral infection, we generated Ifi27l2a−/− mice. Although adult mice lacking Ifi27l2a were more vulnerable to lethal WNV infection, the viral burden was greater only within the CNS, particularly in the brain stem, cerebellum, and spinal cord. Within neurons of the cerebellum and brain stem, in the context of WNV infection, a deficiency of Ifi27l2a was associated with less cell death, which likely contributed to sustained viral replication and higher titers in these regions. Infection studies in a primary cell culture revealed that Ifi27l2a−/− cerebellar granule cell neurons and macrophages but not cerebral cortical neurons, embryonic fibroblasts, or dendritic cells sustained higher levels of WNV infection than wild-type cells and that this difference was greater under conditions of beta interferon (IFN-β) pretreatment. Collectively, these findings suggest that Ifi27l2a has an antiviral phenotype in subsets of cells and that at least some ISGs have specific inhibitory functions in restricted tissues. IMPORTANCE The interferon-stimulated Ifi27l2a gene is expressed differentially within the central nervous system upon interferon stimulation or viral infection. Prior studies in cell culture suggested an antiviral role for Ifi27l2a during infection by West Nile virus (WNV). To

  3. Polymorphisms in interferon-induced genes and the outcome of hepatitis C virus infection: roles of MxA, OAS-1 and PKR.

    PubMed

    Knapp, S; Yee, L J; Frodsham, A J; Hennig, B J W; Hellier, S; Zhang, L; Wright, M; Chiaramonte, M; Graves, M; Thomas, H C; Hill, A V S; Thursz, M R

    2003-09-01

    Interferon stimulates the expression of a number of genes encoding enzymes with antiviral activities, including myxovirus resistance-1 (MxA), 2-5-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS-1) and double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). We examined whether polymorphisms in these genes influenced the outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We observed a lower frequency of the GG genotype at position -88 in the MxA gene promoter in self-limiting HCV infection (OR=0.56; 95% CI: 0.35-0.8; P=0.010) and in nonresponders to therapy (OR=0.49; 95% CI: 0.25-0.95; P=0.020). This genotype predominantly influenced the outcome of treatment in patients with viral genotype 1 (OR=0.22 95% CI: 0.07-0.67; P=0.002). A polymorphism in the 3'-untranslated region of the OAS-1 gene was associated with outcome of infection (GG genotype less frequent in self-limiting infection: OR=0.43; 95% CI: 0.21-0.86; P=0.010). A polymorphism at position -168 in the promoter region of the PKR gene was associated with self-limiting infection (CT genotype: OR=2.75; 95% CI: 1.45-5.24; P=0.002). Further associations were found with a CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5'UTR region of the PKR gene. Polymorphisms in the interferon-induced genes, MxA, OAS-1 and PKR appear thus associated with HCV outcome.

  4. Sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selectively inhibits interferon-{gamma}-induced expression of the chemokine CXCL9 gene in mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaeda, Yoshiichi; Hiroi, Miki; Shimojima, Takahiro; Iguchi, Mayumi; Kanegae, Haruhide; Ohmori, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp

    2006-11-17

    Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to exert an anti-tumor effect on several types of cancer. To determine the effect of sulindac on intracellular signaling pathways in host immune cells such as macrophages, we investigated the effect of the drug on interferon gamma (IFN{gamma})-induced expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and other genes in mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Sulindac, but not aspirin or sodium salicylate, inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced expression of the CXC ligand 9 (CXCL9) mRNA, a chemokine for activated T cells, whereas the interferon-induced expression of CXCL10 or IFN regulatory factor-1 was not affected by sulindac. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that sulindac inhibited IFN{gamma}-induced promoter activity of the CXCL9 gene. Surprisingly, sulindac had no inhibitory effect on IFN{gamma}-induced STAT1 activation; however, constitutive nuclear factor {kappa}B activity was suppressed by the drug. These results indicate that sulindac selectively inhibited IFN{gamma}-inducible gene expression without inhibiting STAT1 activation.

  5. Opposite Orientations of a Transcription Factor Heterodimer Bind DNA Cooperatively with Interaction Partners but Have Different Effects on InterferonGene Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Veronica; Kerppola, Tom Klaus

    2012-01-01

    ATF2-Jun, IRF3, and HMGI recognize a composite regulatory element within the interferon-β enhancer (IFNb). Cooperative ATF2-Jun-IRF3 complex formation at IFNb has been proposed to require a fixed orientation of ATF2-Jun binding. Our results show that ATF2-Jun heterodimers bound IFNb in both orientations alone and in association with IRF3 and HMGI. Two sets of symmetrically located amino acid residues in ATF2 and Jun facilitated the interactions between heterodimers bound in opposite orientations and IRF3 at IFNb. IRF3 and HMGI bound IFNb in association with both orientations of ATF2-Jun heterodimers with the same cooperativity. ATF2-Jun heterodimers that bound IFNb in opposite orientations in vitro had different effects on interferongene transcription when they were co-expressed with IRF3 in cultured cells. These heterodimers had different transcriptional activities at different endogenous genes. Different regions of ATF2 and Jun mediated their orientation-dependent transcriptional activities at different genes. These studies revealed that cooperative DNA binding does not require a unique nucleoprotein complex configuration, and that transcription factor complexes that bind the same enhancer in different configurations can have different transcriptional activities. PMID:22843696

  6. Mutations of the human interferon alpha-2b (hIFNα-2b) gene in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Saman; Chaudhry, Muhammad Nawaz; Mahmood, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to find out the impact of ionizing radiations on the hIFNα-2b gene of radiotherapy treated cancer patients. The gene hIFNα-2b synthesizes a protein which is an important anticancerous and antiviral protein. The cancer patients (breast, lung, thyroid, oral and prostate) who were undergoing a radiotherapy treatment were selected. A molecular analysis was performed for DNA isolation and gene amplification through PCR, to identify gene mutations. Further, by bioinformatics tools we concluded that how mutations identified in gene sequences have led to the alterations in the hINFα-2b protein in radiotherapy receiving cancer patients. The 32% mutations in the hINFα-2b gene were identified and all were frameshift mutations. Radiotherapy can impact the immune system and cancer patients may modulate their immunity. Understaning the mechanisms of radiotherapy-elicited immune response may be helpful in the development of those therapeutic interventions that can enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:26396921

  7. Epigenetic regulation of gene responsiveness in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    To, Taiko K.; Kim, Jong Myong

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of chromatin structure is inevitable for proper transcriptional response in eukaryotes. Recent reports in Arabidopsis have suggested that gene responsiveness is modulated by particular chromatin status. One such feature is H2A.Z, a histone variant conserved among eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, H2A.Z is enriched within gene bodies of transcriptionally variable genes, which is in contrast to genic DNA methylation found within constitutive genes. In the absence of H2A.Z, the genes normally harboring H2A.Z within gene bodies are transcriptionally misregulated, while DNA methylation is unaffected. Therefore, H2A.Z may promote variability of gene expression without affecting genic DNA methylation. Another epigenetic information that could be important for gene responsiveness is trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3). The level of H3K4me3 increases when stress responsive genes are transcriptionally activated, and it decreases after recovery from the stress. Even after the recovery, however, H3K4me3 is kept at some atypical levels, suggesting possible role of H3K4me3 for a stress memory. In this review, we summarize and discuss the growing evidences connecting chromatin features and gene responsiveness. PMID:24432027

  8. Anti-viral immune responses in a primitive lung: characterization and expression analysis of interferon-inducible immunoproteasome subunits LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1 in a sarcopterygian fish, the Nigerian spotted lungfish (Protopterus dolloi).

    PubMed

    Tacchi, Luca; Misra, Milind; Salinas, Irene

    2013-12-01

    Lungfishes (Dipnoi) represent the closest ancestor of tetrapods. Dipnoi have dual breathing modes extracting oxygen from water and air. The primitive lungs of lungfishes are exposed to external antigens including viruses. To date, the immune response of lungfishes against viruses has not been investigated. During viral immune responses, cell exposure to type I interferon induces the replacement of the constitutive proteasome with LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1 beta subunits forming the immunoproteasome and enhancing antigen presentation to MHC class I molecules. In order to study the immune defense system of the lungfish lung, we have characterized for the first time the three immunoproteasome subunits in the sarcopterygian fish, the Nigerian spotted lungfish (Protopterus dolloi). LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1 were identified in P. dolloi and their sequences encoded predicted proteins of 216, 275 and 278 amino acids, respectively. The mRNA of these three genes was expressed in multiple tissues, including the lung, with the highest abundance observed in kidney and post-pyloric spleen. In vitro stimulation of lungfish lung and kidney primary cell cultures with PolyI:C for 4 and 12 h resulted in increased LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1 expression in both tissues. These results suggest a central role of these genes in the activation of an antiviral immune response in lungfish. Importantly, they indicate that the primitive lung of the common ancestor of all tetrapods is capable of inducing the expression of these genes in response to viral stimulation.

  9. Anti-viral immune responses in a primitive lung: characterization and expression analysis of interferon-inducible immunoproteasome subunits LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1 in a sarcopterygian fish, the Nigerian spotted lungfish (Protopterus dolloi)

    PubMed Central

    Tacchi, Luca; Misra, Milind; Salinas, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Lungfishes (Dipnoi) represent the closest ancestor of tetrapods. Dipnoi have dual breathing modes extracting oxygen from water and air. The primitive lungs of lungfishes are exposed to external antigens including viruses. To date, the immune response of lungfishes against viruses has not been investigated. During viral immune responses, cell exposure to type I interferon induces the replacement of the constitutive proteasome with LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1 beta subunits forming the immunoproteasome and enhancing antigen presentation to MHC class I molecules. In order to study the immune defense system of the lungfish lung, we have characterized for the first time the three immunoproteasome subunits in the sarcopterygian fish, the Nigerian spotted lungfish (Protopterus dolloi). LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1 were identified in P. dolloi and their sequences encoded predicted proteins of 216, 275 and 278 amino acids, respectively. The mRNA of these three genes was expressed in multiple tissues, including the lung, with the highest abundance observed in kidney and post-pyloric spleen. In vitro stimulation of lungfish lung and kidney primary cell cultures with PolyI:C for 4 and 12 h resulted in increased LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1 expression in both tissues. These results suggest a central role of these genes in the activation of an antiviral immune response in lungfish. Importantly, they indicate that the primitive lung of the common ancestor of all tetrapods is capable of inducing the expression of these genes in response to viral stimulation. PMID:23932981

  10. Interferons and Interferon Regulatory Factors in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Claser, Carla; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei; Rénia, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most serious infectious diseases in humans and responsible for approximately 500 million clinical cases and 500 thousand deaths annually. Acquired adaptive immune responses control parasite replication and infection-induced pathologies. Most infections are clinically silent which reflects on the ability of adaptive immune mechanisms to prevent the disease. However, a minority of these can become severe and life-threatening, manifesting a range of overlapping syndromes of complex origins which could be induced by uncontrolled immune responses. Major players of the innate and adaptive responses are interferons. Here, we review their roles and the signaling pathways involved in their production and protection against infection and induced immunopathologies. PMID:25157202

  11. H-2 alleles contribute to antigen 85-specific interferon-gamma responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Beamer, Gillian L; Cyktor, Joshua; Carruthers, Bridget; Turner, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    The in vitro immune responses to mycobacterial antigens have been linked to the H-2 loci in mice. We evaluated in vitro and in vivo immune responses during early Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) pulmonary infection of C57BL/6 (H-2(b)), C57BL/6 (H-2(k)), CBA/J (H-2(k)), and C3H/HeJ (H-2(k)) mice to determine H-2(k)-dependent and -independent effects. H-2(k)-dependent effects included delayed and diminished Ag85-specific Th1 cell priming, a reduced frequency of Ag85-specific IFN-γ producing cells, reduced IFN-γ protein in vivo, and increased M.tb lung burden as demonstrated by C57BL/6 H-2(k) mice vs. C57BL/6 mice. H-2(k)-independent factors controlled the amount of Ag85-specific IFN-γ produced by each cell, T cell numbers, granuloma size, and lymphocytic infiltrates in the lungs. Overall, these results suggest that an H-2(k)-dependent suboptimal generation of Ag85-specific cells impairs control of early M.tb growth in the lungs. H-2(k)-independent factors influence the potency of IFN-γ producing cells and immune cell trafficking during pulmonary M.tb infection.

  12. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis of Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Identified Hypomethylation in Genes Related to the Type I Interferon Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Kit San; Chung, Brian Hon-Yin; Choufani, Sanaa; Mok, Mo Yin; Wong, Wai Lap; Mak, Christopher Chun Yu; Yang, Wanling; Lee, Pamela Pui Wah; Wong, Wilfred Hing Sang; Chen, Yi-an; Grafodatskaya, Daria; Wong, Raymond Woon Sing; Lau, Chak Sing; Chan, Daniel Tak Mao; Weksberg, Rosanna; Lau, Yu-Lung

    2017-01-01

    Background Epigenetic variants have been shown in recent studies to be important contributors to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here, we report a 2-step study of discovery followed by replication to identify DNA methylation alterations associated with SLE in a Chinese population. Using a genome-wide DNA methylation microarray, the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, we compared the methylation levels of CpG sites in DNA extracted from white blood cells from 12 female Chinese SLE patients and 10 healthy female controls. Results We identified 36 CpG sites with differential loss of DNA methylation and 8 CpG sites with differential gain of DNA methylation, representing 25 genes and 7 genes, respectively. Surprisingly, 42% of the hypomethylated CpG sites were located in CpG shores, which indicated the functional importance of the loss of DNA methylation. Microarray results were replicated in another cohort of 100 SLE patients and 100 healthy controls by performing bisulfite pyrosequencing of four hypomethylated genes, MX1, IFI44L, NLRC5 and PLSCR1. In addition, loss of DNA methylation in these genes was associated with an increase in mRNA expression. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the hypomethylated genes identified in the microarray study were overrepresented in the type I interferon pathway, which has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE. Conclusion Our epigenetic findings further support the importance of the type I interferon pathway in SLE pathogenesis. Moreover, we showed that the DNA methylation signatures of SLE can be defined in unfractionated white blood cells. PMID:28085900

  13. CD8+ T Cell Response to Gammaherpesvirus Infection Mediates Inflammation and Fibrosis in Interferon Gamma Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    O’Flaherty, Brigid M.; Matar, Caline G.; Wakeman, Brian S.; Garcia, AnaPatricia; Wilke, Carol A.; Courtney, Cynthia L.; Moore, Bethany B.; Speck, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), one of the most severe interstitial lung diseases, is a progressive fibrotic disorder of unknown etiology. However, there is growing appreciation for the role of viral infection in disease induction and/or progression. A small animal model of multi-organ fibrosis, which involves murine gammaherpesvirus (MHV68) infection of interferon gamma receptor deficient (IFNγR-/-) mice, has been utilized to model the association of gammaherpesvirus infections and lung fibrosis. Notably, several MHV68 mutants which fail to induce fibrosis have been identified. Our current study aimed to better define the role of the unique MHV68 gene, M1, in development of pulmonary fibrosis. We have previously shown that the M1 gene encodes a secreted protein which possesses superantigen-like function to drive the expansion and activation of Vβ4+ CD8+ T cells. Here we show that M1-dependent fibrosis is correlated with heightened levels of inflammation in the lung. We observe an M1-dependent cellular infiltrate of innate immune cells with most striking differences at 28 days-post infection. Furthermore, in the absence of M1 protein expression we observed reduced CD8+ T cells and MHV68 epitope specific CD8+ T cells to the lungs—despite equivalent levels of viral replication between M1 null and wild type MHV68. Notably, backcrossing the IFNγR-/- onto the Balb/c background, which has previously been shown to exhibit weak MHV68-driven Vβ4+ CD8+ T cell expansion, eliminated MHV68-induced fibrosis—further implicating the activated Vβ4+ CD8+ T cell population in the induction of fibrosis. We further addressed the role that CD8+ T cells play in the induction of fibrosis by depleting CD8+ T cells, which protected the mice from fibrotic disease. Taken together these findings are consistent with the hypothesized role of Vβ4+ CD8+ T cells as mediators of fibrotic disease in IFNγR-/- mice. PMID:26317335

  14. Mouse embryonic stem cells are deficient in type I interferon expression in response to viral infections and double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoxing; Wang, Jundi; Paul, Amber M; Acharya, Dhiraj; Bai, Fengwei; Huang, Faqing; Guo, Yan-Lin

    2013-05-31

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are considered to be a promising cell source for regenerative medicine because of their unlimited capacity for self-renewal and differentiation. However, little is known about the innate immunity in ESCs and ESC-derived cells. We investigated the responses of mouse (m)ESCs to three types of live viruses as follows: La Crosse virus, West Nile virus, and Sendai virus. Our results demonstrated mESCs were susceptible to viral infection, but they were unable to express type I interferons (IFNα and IFNβ, IFNα/β), which differ from fibroblasts (10T1/2 cells) that robustly express IFNα/β upon viral infections. The failure of mESCs to express IFNα/β was further demonstrated by treatment with polyIC, a synthetic viral dsRNA analog that strongly induced IFNα/β in 10T1/2 cells. Although polyIC transiently inhibited the transcription of pluripotency markers, the stem cell morphology was not significantly affected. However, polyIC can induce dsRNA-activated protein kinase in mESCs, and this activation resulted in a strong inhibition of cell proliferation. We conclude that the cytosolic receptor dsRNA-activated protein kinase is functional, but the mechanisms that mediate type I IFN expression are deficient in mESCs. This conclusion is further supported by the findings that the major viral RNA receptors are either expressed at very low levels (TLR3 and MDA5) or may not be active (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) in mESCs.

  15. Serological Tests Do Not Predict Residual Fibrosis in Hepatitis C Cirrhotics with a Sustained Virological Response to Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Aghemo, Alessio; Fraquelli, Mirella; Lampertico, Pietro; Rumi, Maria Grazia; Facchetti, Floriana; Grassi, Eleonora; Casazza, Giovanni; Rosenberg, William; Bedossa, Pierre; Colombo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Liver biopsy (LB) has lost popularity to stage liver fibrosis in the era of highly effective anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy, yet diagnosis of persistent cirrhosis may have important implications following HCV eradication. As performance of serological non-invasive tests (NITs) to predict residual fibrosis in non-viremic HCV patients is unknown, we investigated accuracy of NITs to predict residual fibrosis in cirrhotics after a sustained virological response (SVR) to interferon (IFN). Methods Thirty-eight patients with a pre-treatment histological diagnosis of cirrhosis and a 48–104 months post-SVR LB were tested with APRI, CDS, FIB-4, FibroQ, Forns Score, GUCI Index, King Score, Lok Index, PLF, ELF. In 23 (61%) patients, cirrhosis had histologically regressed. Results All NITs values declined after SVR without any significant difference between regressors and non-regressors (AUROC 0.52–0.75). Using viremic cut-offs, PPV ranged from 34% to 100%, with lower NPV (63% - 68%). NITs performance did not improve using derived cut-offs (PPV: 40% - 80%; NPV: 66% - 100%). PLF, which combines several NITs with transient elastography, had the best diagnostic performance (AUROC 0.75, Sn 61%, Sp 90%, PPV 80%, NPV 78%). After treatment, none of the NITs resulted significantly associated with any of the histological features (activity grade, fibrosis stage, area of fibrosis). Conclusions The diagnostic estimates obtained using both viremic and derived cut-off values of NITs were suboptimal, indicating that none of these tests helps predicting residual fibrosis and that LB remains the gold standard for this purpose. PMID:27304619

  16. Favorable Outcomes of Chinese HCV-Related Cirrhotic Patients with Sustained Virological Response after Pegylated Interferon Plus Ribavirin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You-ming; Zhang, Ting; Cai, Qing-xian; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Zhao, Zhi-xing

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have conducted follow-up investigations of the clinical course in HCV-related cirrhotic patients who achieved a sustained virological response (SVR) with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin treatment (PegIFN + RBV). We investigated the clinical course and laboratory data in a prospective cohort study enrolling HCV-related cirrhotic patients who received PegIFN + RBV between August 2008 and July 2013 in China. Complete blood counts, liver function tests, and HCV-RNA were serially examined. Liver-related complications were recorded. To detect hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), alpha-fetoprotein assays, and ultrasound scans were repeated at 6-month intervals. Twenty-five patients were enrolled, including 8 patients with decompensation events before treatment. Eighteen patients achieved SVR with a mean follow-up period of 25.78 months. During the follow-up period, only one patient exhibited HCV-RNA positivity and no decompensation events were detected, but 4 patients developed HCC after SVR. APRI decreased more in patients with SVR than in patients with non-SVR (median, −1.33 versus 0.86, P < 0.001). The albumin levels and platelet counts significantly increased during the follow-up period after SVR (44.27 ± 4.09 versus 42.63 ± 4.37, P = 0.037 and 173.89 ± 87.36 versus 160.11 ± 77.97, P = 0.047). These data indicated that HCV-related cirrhotic patients with SVR after PegIFN + RBV may have a favorable clinical course and improvements in laboratory data. Moreover, HCC should be monitored. PMID:28232944

  17. Molecular stress response in the CNS of mice after systemic exposureto interferon-alpha, ionizing radiation and ketamine

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Xiu R.; Marchetti, Francesco; Lu, Xiaochen; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-03-03

    We previously showed that the expression of troponin T1 (Tnnt 1) was induced in the central nervous system (CNS) of adultmice 30 min after treatment with ketamine, a glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that Tnnt 1 expression may be an early molecular biomarker of stress response in the CNS of mice. To further evaluate this hypothesis, we investigated the regional expression of Tnnt 1 in the mouse brain using RNA in situ hybridization 4 h after systemic exposure to interferon-a (IFN-a) and gamma ionizing radiation, both of which have be associated with wide ranges of neuropsychiatric complications. Adult B6C3F1 male mice were treated with either human IFN-a (a single i.p. injection at 1 x 105 IU/kg) or whole body gamma-radiation (10 cGy or 2 Gy). Patterns of Tnnt 1 transcript expression were compared in various CNS regions after IFN-a, radiation and ketamine treatments (previous study). Tnnt 1 expression was consistently induced in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex and hippocampus after all treatment regimens including 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Regional expression of Tnnt 1 was induced in Purkinje cells of cerebellum after ionizing radiation and ketamine treatment; but not after IFN-a treatment. None of the three treatments induced Tnnt 1 expression in glial cells. The patterns of Tnnt 1 expression in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex andhippocampus, which are both known to play important roles in cognitive function, memory and emotion, suggest that the expression of Tnnt 1 may be an early molecular biomarker of induced CNS stress.

  18. Sustained response to combination therapy in a patient with chronic hepatitis C and thrombocytopenia secondary to alpha-interferon.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Sáenz, M; Rojas, M; Piñar, A; Salas, E; Rebollo, J; Carmona, I; Herrerías-Esteban, J M; Herrerías-Gutiérrez, J M

    2000-05-01

    Recent data suggest that hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection may induce a significant autoimmune reaction to platelets, but the mechanism is unknown. Many patients with chronic hepatitis C, in fact, have high levels of platelet-associated immunoglobulin G (PAIgG) and HCV-RNA is present in the platelets of 100% of those patients with thrombocytopenia and high PAIgG levels. Hepatitis C virus infection has been associated with the development of thrombocytopenic purpura, sometimes triggered during interferon (IFN) therapy. In such cases, the treatment of the underlying disease is a difficult problem to solve. We report the case of a patient with chronic hepatitis C, who developed life-threatening thrombocytopenic purpura after a prolonged course of IFN-alpha2b over a 4-year period. Treatment with anti-immunoglobulin gammaglobulin (Polyglobin; Química Farmaceutica Bayer, Barcelona, Spain) had a transient effect on the platelet count, but prolonged therapy with prednisone was necessary for definitive relief of the haematological complication. Two years later, the patient was treated with combined therapy, including ribavirin (1200 mg/day) and IFN-alpha2b (5 mU, t.i.w.) for 12 months. This therapy induced a sustained response, both biochemical and virological, without haematological complications. This observation suggests that ribavirin may be of benefit in the treatment of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic hepatitis C, preventing the harmful effect of IFN-alpha but also allowing both drugs to be combined so as to increase the probability of sustained remission of the liver disease.

  19. Interferon-dependent induction of mRNA for the major histocompatibility antigens in human fibroblasts and lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fellous, M; Nir, U; Wallach, D; Merlin, G; Rubinstein, M; Revel, M

    1982-01-01

    In human cells treated with interferons, there is an increase in the amount of HLA-A,B,C and beta 2-microglobulin exposed on the cell surface. We have used a cloned HLA-A,B,C cDNA probe to demonstrate by molecular hybridization that this effect of interferon is preceded by a large increase in the amount of HLA mRNA in the cell. This effect was found in five different human cell lines, with purified leukocyte and fibroblast interferons. The increase in HLA mRNA is comparable in its kinetics and dose-response to the induction of (2'-5') oligo(A) synthetase mRNA by interferons. Therefore, interferons seem to activate at least two cellular genes which have different biochemical functions. Images PMID:6179076

  20. Stimuli-responsive polymers in gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Piskin, Erhan

    2005-07-01

    Recent interest in clinical therapy has been directed to deliver nucleic acids (DNA, RNA or short-chain oligonucleotides) that alter gene expression within a specific cell population, thereby manipulating cellular processes and responses, which in turn stimulate immune responses or tissue regeneration, or blocks expression at the level of transcription or translation for treatment of several diseases. Both ex vivo and in vivo gene delivery can be achieved mostly by using a delivery system (vector). Viral vectors exhibit high gene expression, but also have very significant side effects. Mainly cationic polymeric systems are used as nonviral vectors, although usually with low levels of transfection. Through the use of stimuli-responsive polymers as novel vectors for gene delivery, two benefits can be obtained: high gene expression efficiency and more selective gene expression.

  1. Obligatory role of gamma interferon in T cell-replacing factor- dependent, antigen-specific murine B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The role of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in T cell-replacing factor (TRF) activity for antigen-specific plaque-forming cell (PFC) responses in vitro was studied using antibodies to murine IFN-gamma (Mu IFN- gamma). TRF activity was present in supernatants (Sn) of Con A- or mixed leukocyte reaction-stimulated murine spleen cells as well as in an IL-2-rich fraction of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocyte Sn and in the Sn of the Gibbon T lymphoma MLA-144. The human TRF was highly active with cells from nu/nu mice and normal mice but not with cells from animals with the xid immunologic defect, similar to the activity of murine TRF. Antibodies to IFN-gamma consisted of hyper-immune rabbit antisera, IFN-gamma affinity-purified rabbit immunoglobulin and an interspecies hybridoma specific for Mu IFN- gamma. The results show that the activities of all preparations of TRF are markedly diminished or abrogated by antibody to Mu IFN-gamma but not by antibodies to human IFN-gamma (Hu IFN-gamma), nor by normal rabbit sera or purified rabbit Ig. The degree of inhibition was dose dependent and was quantitatively reversed by the addition to the cultures of recombinant-derived Mu IFN-gamma (Mu rIFN-gamma) but not Hu rIFN-gamma. This reversal was fully antigen specific and thus not attributable to polyclonal B cell activation by IFN-gamma, which is inactive alone in the TRF assay. Kinetic analysis shows that IFN-gamma must act by 24-48 h to produce PFC responses at 4 d. Together, the data demonstrate that IFN-gamma is a necessary mediator for TRF effects and that IFN-gamma is induced by TRF from T-depleted murine spleen cells in sufficient quantity to support large antibody responses. The source of this IFN-gamma may be the potent natural killer cells that are induced in cultures stimulated with TRF. PMID:2580939

  2. Analysis of STAT1 expression and biological activity reveals interferon-tau-dependent STAT1-regulated SOCS genes in the bovine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Vitorino Carvalho, A; Eozenou, C; Healey, G D; Forde, N; Reinaud, P; Chebrout, M; Gall, L; Rodde, N; Padilla, A Lesage; Delville, C Giraud; Leveugle, M; Richard, C; Sheldon, I M; Lonergan, P; Jolivet, G; Sandra, O

    2016-03-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins are critical for the regulation of numerous biological processes. In cattle, microarray analyses identified STAT1 as a differentially expressed gene in the endometrium during the peri-implantation period. To gain new insights about STAT1 during the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy, we investigated STAT1 transcript and protein expression, as well as its biological activity in bovine tissue and cells of endometrial origin. Pregnancy increased STAT1 expression on Day 16, and protein and phosphorylation levels on Day 20. In cyclic and pregnant females, STAT1 was located in endometrial cells but not in the luminal epithelium at Day 20 of pregnancy. The expression of STAT1 during the oestrous cycle was not affected by progesterone supplementation. In vivo and in vitro, interferon-tau (IFNT) stimulated STAT1 mRNA expression, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation in IFNT-stimulated endometrial cells, we demonstrated an increase of STAT1 binding on interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1), cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CISH), suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 and 3 (SOCS1, SOCS3) gene promoters consistent with the induction of their transcripts. Our data provide novel molecular insights into the biological functions of STAT1 in the various cells composing the endometrium during maternal pregnancy recognition and implantation.

  3. Type 1 IFN-independent activation of a subset of interferon stimulated genes in West Nile virus Eg101-infected mouse cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pulit-Penaloza, Joanna A.; Scherbik, Svetlana V.; Brinton, Margo A.

    2012-04-10

    Although infection of mouse embryofibroblasts (MEFs) with WNV Eg101 induced interferon (IFN) beta production and STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation, these transcription factors (TFs) were not detected in the nucleus or on the promoters of four IRF-3-independent interferon stimulated genes (ISGs): Oas1a and Irf7 (previously characterized as IFN/ISGF3-dependent), Oas1b and Irf1. These ISGs were upregulated in WNV Eg101-infected STAT1-/-, STAT2-/-, and IFN alpha/beta receptor -/- MEFs. Although either IRF-3 or IRF-7 could amplify/sustain Oas1a and Oas1b upregulation at later times after infection, these factors were not required for the initial gene activation. The lack of upregulation of these ISGs in WNV Eg101-infected IRF-3/9-/- MEFs suggested the involvement of IRF-9. Activation of Irf1 in infected MEFs did not depend on any of these IRFs. The data indicate that additional alternative activation mechanisms exist for subsets of ISGs when a virus infection has blocked ISG activation by the canonical IFN-mediated pathway.

  4. A variant upstream of IFNL3 (IL28B) creating a novel interferon gene IFNL4 is associated with impaired clearance of hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Muchmore, Brian; Tang, Wei; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Park, Heiyoung; Dickensheets, Harold; Hergott, Dianna; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Mumy, Adam; Kohaar, Indu; Chen, Sabrina; Brand, Nathan; Tarway, McAnthony; Liu, Luyang; Sheikh, Faruk; Astemborski, Jacquie; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Edlin, Brian R.; Howell, Charles D.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Thomas, David L.; Rehermann, Barbara; Donnelly, Raymond P.; O’Brien, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a common cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer. We performed RNA-sequencing in primary human hepatocytes activated with synthetic dsRNA to mimic HCV infection. Upstream of IFNL3 (IL28B) on chromosome 19q13.13, we discovered a novel, transiently induced region that harbors dinucleotide variant ss469415590 (TT/ΔG), which is in high linkage disequilibrium with rs12979860, a genetic marker strongly associated with HCV clearance. ss469415590-ΔG is a frame-shift variant that creates a novel primate-specific gene, designated interferon lambda 4 (IFNL4), which encodes a protein of moderate similarity with IFNL3. Compared to rs12979860, ss469415590 is more strongly associated with HCV clearance in individuals of African ancestry, whereas it provides comparable information in Europeans and Asians. Transient over-expression of IFNL4 in a hepatoma cell line induced STAT1/STAT2 phosphorylation and expression of interferon-stimulated genes. Our findings provide new insights into the genetic regulation of HCV clearance and its clinical management. PMID:23291588

  5. Tandem repeat polymers of a critical region of the human interferon-beta promoter exhibit a marked constitutive activity and enhanced responsiveness to transcriptional regulators in transfected HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Dron, M; Rebouillat, D; Tovey, M G

    1992-10-01

    Multiple copy tandem repeats polymers of an authentic 30-bp region of the human interferon-beta (IFN-beta) promoter between positions-91 to -62 relative to the cap site or the hexanucleotide GAAAGT derived from this region, both acted as strong constitutive regulatory elements in transfected HeLa cells. Such polymers were unresponsive to treatment with IFN-alpha despite their considerable homology with the IFN-responsive elements of other genes but were highly responsive to treatment of HeLa cells with IFN-gamma. Virus induction of HeLa cells transfected with polymers of the 30-bp region linked to a CAT gene increased the activity of the reporter gene 500- to 2,000-fold over baseline levels. Treatment with IFN-alpha prior to virus induction did not increase further CAT activity. Cotransfection of HeLa cells with the CAT gene under the control of a 12-element tandem repeat polymer of the human IFN-beta promoter and an expression vector for the IRF-1 transcriptional activator markedly increased CAT activity while cotransfection of HeLa cells with the IFN-beta construct together with an expression vector for the transcriptional regulator IRF-2 markedly decreased CAT activity relative to cells transfected with the IFN-beta polymer alone.

  6. Evolution of Interferons and Interferon Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Secombes, Chris J.; Zou, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The earliest jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomes) would likely have had interferon (IFN) genes, since they are present in extant cartilaginous fish (sharks and rays) and bony fish (lobe-finned and ray-finned fish, the latter consisting of the chondrostei, holostei, and teleostei), as well as in tetrapods. They are thought to have evolved from a class II helical cytokine ancestor, along with the interleukin (IL)-10 cytokine family. The two rounds of whole genome duplication (WGD) that occurred between invertebrates and vertebrates (1) may have given rise to additional loci, initially containing an IL-10 ancestor and IFN ancestor, which have duplicated further to give rise to the two loci containing the IL-10 family genes, and potentially the IFN type I and IFN type III loci (2). The timing of the divergence of the IFN type II gene from the IL-10 family genes is not clear but was also an early event in vertebrate evolution. Further WGD events at the base of the teleost fish, and in particular teleost lineages (cyprinids, salmonids), have duplicated the loci further, giving rise to additional IFN genes, with tandem gene duplication within a locus a common occurrence. Finally, retrotransposition events have occurred in different vertebrate lineages giving rise to further IFN loci, with large expansions of genes at these loci in some cases. This review will initially explore the likely IFN system present in the earliest Gnathostomes by comparison of the known cartilaginous fish genes with those present in mammals and will then explore the changes that have occurred in gene number/diversification, gene organization, and the encoded proteins during vertebrate evolution. PMID:28303139

  7. miR-9 modulates the expression of interferon-regulated genes and MHC class I molecules in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Zhao, Zun-Lan; Zhao, Wen-Tao; Fan, Quan-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Chun; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Shi, Jun-Wen; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Rao-Ying; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Yong-Liang; Xu, Kang; Yao, Kai-Tai; Xiao, Dong

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► miR-9 can negatively or positively modulate interferon-induced gene expression. ► miR-9 can up-regulate major histocompatibility complex class I molecule expression. ► miR-9 can down-regulate the expression of interleukin-related genes. -- Abstract: The functions of miR-9 in some cancers are recently implicated in regulating proliferation, epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), invasion and metastasis, apoptosis, and tumor angiogenesis, etc. miR-9 is commonly down-regulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), but the exact roles of miR-9 dysregulation in the pathogenesis of NPC remains unclear. Therefore, we firstly used miR-9-expressing CNE2 cells to determine the effects of miR-9 overexpression on global gene expression profile by microarray analysis. Microarray-based gene expression data unexpectedly demonstrated a significant number of up- or down-regulated immune- and inflammation-related genes, including many well-known interferon (IFN)-induced genes (e.g., IFI44L, PSMB8, IRF5, PSMB10, IFI27, PSB9{sub H}UMAN, IFIT2, TRAIL, IFIT1, PSB8{sub H}UMAN, IRF1, B2M and GBP1), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules (e.g., HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-F and HLA-H) and interleukin (IL)-related genes (e.g., IL20RB, GALT, IL7, IL1B, IL11, IL1F8, IL1A, IL6 and IL7R), which was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Moreover, the overexpression of miR-9 with the miRNA mimics significantly up- or down-regulated the expression of above-mentioned IFN-inducible genes, MHC class I molecules and IL-related genes; on the contrary, miR-9 inhibition by anti-miR-9 inhibitor in CNE2 and 5–8F cells correspondingly decreased or increased the aforementioned immune- and inflammation-related genes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that miR-9 can modulate the expression of IFN-induced genes and MHC class I molecules in human cancer cells, suggesting a novel role of miR-9 in linking inflammation and cancer, which remains to be fully characterized.

  8. Antiviral Actions of Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Charles E.

    2001-01-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of the antiviral actions of interferons (IFNs), as well as strategies evolved by viruses to antagonize the actions of IFNs. Furthermore, advances made while elucidating the IFN system have contributed significantly to our understanding in multiple areas of virology and molecular cell biology, ranging from pathways of signal transduction to the biochemical mechanisms of transcriptional and translational control to the molecular basis of viral pathogenesis. IFNs are approved therapeutics and have moved from the basic research laboratory to the clinic. Among the IFN-induced proteins important in the antiviral actions of IFNs are the RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), the 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) and RNase L, and the Mx protein GTPases. Double-stranded RNA plays a central role in modulating protein phosphorylation and RNA degradation catalyzed by the IFN-inducible PKR kinase and the 2′-5′-oligoadenylate-dependent RNase L, respectively, and also in RNA editing by the IFN-inducible RNA-specific adenosine deaminase (ADAR1). IFN also induces a form of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS2) and the major histocompatibility complex class I and II proteins, all of which play important roles in immune response to infections. Several additional genes whose expression profiles are altered in response to IFN treatment and virus infection have been identified by microarray analyses. The availability of cDNA and genomic clones for many of the components of the IFN system, including IFN-α, IFN-β, and IFN-γ, their receptors, Jak and Stat and IRF signal transduction components, and proteins such as PKR, 2′,5′-OAS, Mx, and ADAR, whose expression is regulated by IFNs, has permitted the generation of mutant proteins, cells that overexpress different forms of the proteins, and animals in which their expression has been disrupted by targeted gene disruption. The use of these IFN system

  9. Identification and validation of reference genes for expression studies in human keratinocyte cell lines treated with and without interferon-γ - a method for qRT-PCR reference gene determination.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Angelika B; Keskin, Derin B; Reinherz, Ellis L

    2012-08-01

    Based on the exquisite sensitivity, reproducibility and wide dynamic range of quantitative reverse-transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), it is currently the gold standard for gene expression studies. Target gene expression is calculated relative to a stably expressed reference gene. An ideal reference should be uniformly expressed during all experimental conditions within the given experimental system. However, no commonly applicable 'best' reference gene has been identified. Thus, endogenous controls must be determined for every experimental system. As no appropriate reference genes have been reported for immunological studies in keratinocytes, we aimed at identifying and validating a set of endogenous controls for these settings. An extensive validation of sixteen possible endogenous controls in a panel of 8 normal and transformed keratinocyte cell lines in experimental conditions with and without interferon-γ was performed. RNA and cDNA quality was stringently controlled. Candidate reference genes were assessed by TaqMan(®) qRT-PCR. Two different statistical algorithms were used to determine the most stably and reproducibly expressed housekeeping genes. mRNA abundance was compared and reference genes with widely different ranges of expression than possible target genes were excluded. Subsequent geNorm and NormFinder analyses identified GAPDH, PGK1, IPO8 and PPIA as the most stably expressed genes in the keratinocyte panel under the given experimental conditions. We conclude that the geometric means of expression values of these four genes represents a robust normalization factor for qRT-PCR analyses in interferon-γ-dependent gene expression studies in keratinocytes. The methodology and results herein may help other researchers by facilitating their choice of reference genes.

  10. Involvement of the transcription factor PU.1/Spi-1 in myeloid cell-restricted expression of an interferon-inducible gene encoding the human high-affinity Fc gamma receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Perez, C; Coeffier, E; Moreau-Gachelin, F; Wietzerbin, J; Benech, P D

    1994-01-01

    Induction by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) of the gene encoding the human high-affinity Fc gamma receptor (Fc gamma R1) in myeloid cells requires an IFN-gamma response region (GRR) and a myeloid cell-activating transcription element (MATE). GRR and MATE interact with factors to form, respectively, an IFN-gamma-activating complex (GIRE-BP), depending on the phosphorylation of the 91-kDa protein (subunit of ISGF3), and a cell-type-specific complex (MATE-BP). Although GIRE-BP is detected in cells of different origins after IFN-gamma treatment, the presence of MATE-BP was found to be restricted to B- and myeloid cell lines. Sequence analysis of a cDNA encoding a polypeptide recognizing specifically the MATE motif led to the identification of this product as the proto-oncogene PU.1/Spi-1, a transcriptional activator expressed in myeloid and B cells. Expression of this factor in nonhematopoietic cells allowed IFN-gamma-induced expression of a reporter gene under control of the GRR and MATE sequences. The presence of these motifs in other gene promoters indicates that the binding of PU.1/Spi-1 and IFN regulatory proteins to their respective motifs could be part of a general mechanism leading to cell-type-restricted and IFN-induced gene expression. Images PMID:8035786

  11. Post-marketing survey on clinical response to interferon beta in relapsing multiple sclerosis: the Roman experience.

    PubMed

    Pozzilli, C; Prosperini, L; Sbardella, E; De Giglio, L; Onesti, E; Tomassini, V

    2005-12-01

    Safety, tolerability and efficacy profiles of interferon beta (IFNbeta) therapy in relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) has been widely verified both in trial settings and in daily clinical practice. However, for a variable percentage of treated patients, it remains only partially effective. In this study, we reported the post-marketing experience of the efficacy of IFNbeta therapy for a large cohort of MS patients regularly attending the MS Outpatient Clinic of "La Sapienza University" in Rome. In this cohort we also sought clinical and paraclinical variables responsible for the clinical course of MS during IFNbeta therapy. Patients that received treatment with one of the IFNbeta formulations for at least 1 year were included. Clinical outcomes (i. e., relapses and disability score) were monitored throughout the entire study period. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed twice for each subject: at baseline and after 1 year of therapy. The occurrence of more than one relapse during the study period or a sustained disability progression in the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score were considered as criteria for the definition of suboptimal clinical response to IFNbeta therapy. During IFNbeta therapy (number of patients 242, mean length of treatment 4.3+/-2.3 years) a reduction in the annualised relapse rate of 59% (p<0.001) was observed. Eighty-six patients (35%) fulfilled the criterion for defining "suboptimal responder" on the basis of relapses, and 69 (28.5%) did the same on the basis of EDSS sustained progression. Twenty-seven (11.1%) patients showed both an EDSS progression and two or more relapses. The presence of T1-enhancing lesions and new T2 hyperintense lesions on the scan performed after the first year of therapy were the best MRI features associated with both the occurrence of relapses during the treatment period (OR for enhancing lesions and relapses 3.6; OR for new T2 lesion and relapses 2.8). The present post-marketing experience

  12. Fine-Tuning of the RIG-I-Like Receptor/Interferon Regulatory Factor 3-Dependent Antiviral Innate Immune Response by the Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3/β-Catenin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Khan, Kashif Aziz; Dô, Florence; Marineau, Alexandre; Doyon, Priscilla; Clément, Jean-François; Woodgett, James R; Doble, Bradley W; Servant, Marc J

    2015-09-01

    Induction of an antiviral innate immune response relies on pattern recognition receptors, including retinoic acid-inducible gene 1-like receptors (RLR), to detect invading pathogens, resulting in the activation of multiple latent transcription factors, including interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Upon sensing of viral RNA and DNA, IRF3 is phosphorylated and recruits coactivators to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and selected sets of IRF3-regulated IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) such as those for ISG54 (Ifit2), ISG56 (Ifit1), and viperin (Rsad2). Here, we used wild-type, glycogen synthase kinase 3α knockout (GSK-3α(-/-)), GSK-3β(-/-), and GSK-3α/β double-knockout (DKO) embryonic stem (ES) cells, as well as GSK-3β(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast cells in which GSK-3α was knocked down to demonstrate that both isoforms of GSK-3, GSK-3α and GSK-3β, are required for this antiviral immune response. Moreover, the use of two selective small-molecule GSK-3 inhibitors (CHIR99021 and BIO-acetoxime) or ES cells reconstituted with the catalytically inactive versions of GSK-3 isoforms showed that GSK-3 activity is required for optimal induction of antiviral innate immunity. Mechanistically, GSK-3 isoform activation following Sendai virus infection results in phosphorylation of β-catenin at S33/S37/T41, promoting IRF3 DNA binding and activation of IRF3-regulated ISGs. This study identifies the role of a GSK-3/β-catenin axis in antiviral innate immunity.

  13. Application of Long-term cultured Interferon-γ Enzyme-linked Immunospot Assay for Assessing Effector and Memory T Cell Responses in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Maggioli, Mayara F.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Whelan, Adam O.; Fosse, James M.; Nonnecke, Brian J.; Waters, W. Ray

    2015-01-01

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of naïve cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled up to 95 % of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a lifetime. In humans, two functionally distinct subsets of memory T cells have been described based on the expression of lymph node homing receptors. Central memory T cells express C-C chemokine receptor 7 and CD45RO and are mainly located in T-cell areas of secondary lymphoid organs. Effector memory T cells express CD45RO, lack CCR7 and display receptors associated with lymphocyte homing to peripheral or inflamed tissues. Effector T cells do not express either CCR7 or CD45RO but upon encounter with antigen produce effector cytokines, such as interferon-γ. Interferon-γ release assays are used for the diagnosis of bovine and human tuberculosis and detect primarily effector and effector memory T cell responses. Central memory T cell responses by CD4+ T cells to vaccination, on the other hand, may be used to predict vaccine efficacy, as demonstrated with simian immunodeficiency virus infection of non-human primates, tuberculosis in mice, and malaria in humans. Several studies with mice and humans as well as unpublished data on cattle, have demonstrated that interferon-γ ELISPOT assays measure central memory T cell responses. With this assay, peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured in decreasing concentration of antigen for 10 to 14 days (long-term culture), allowing effector responses to peak and wane; facilitating central memory T cells to differentiate and expand within the culture. PMID:26275095

  14. Divergent Gene Expression Responses to Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Cole, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    The “widowhood effect” (i.e., morbidity/mortality in recently bereaved spouses) may be related to changes in immune function, but little is known about the impact of bereavement on gene transcription in immune cells. This study examined how Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief responses to bereavement differentially affect leukocyte gene expression. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and bioinformatic analyses were completed on 63 older adults. Thirty-six of them had lost their spouse/partner on average 2 years ago, and 27 were nonbereaved, married controls. Twelve of the bereaved participants met criteria for Complicated Grief. Compared to nonbereaved controls, bereavement (both Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief) was associated with upregulated expression of genes involved in general immunologic activation and a selective downregulation of genes involved in B lymphocyte responses. However, Complicated Grief and Non-complicated Grief differed markedly in their expression of Type I interferon-related transcripts, with Non-complicated Grief subjects showing substantial upregulation relative to nonbereaved controls and Complicated Grief subjects showing substantial downregulation. Bereavement significantly modulates immune function gene expression. The magnitude of bereavement-related distress (i.e., Complicated Grief vs. Non-complicated Grief) is linked to differential patterns of transcription factor activation and gene expression involved in innate antiviral responses. These findings provide a molecular framework for understanding the health effects of bereavement, as well as new insights into the particular gene modules that are most sensitive to the individual's psychological response to loss. PMID:24380850

  15. Quantitative analysis of interferon alpha receptor subunit 1 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 gene transcription in blood cells of patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Interferon (IFN)-α receptor 1 (ifnar1) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (socs1) transcription levels were quantified in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 59 patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and 17 non-infected individuals. Samples were obtained from patients infected with HCV that were either untreated or treated with IFN-α2 plus ribavirin for 1 year and divided into responders and non-responders based on viral load reduction 6 months after treatment. Ifnar1 and socs1 transcription was quantified by real-time RT-PCR, and the fold difference (2-ΔΔCT) with respect to hprt housekeeping gene was calculated. Results Ifnar1 transcription increased significantly in HCV-infected patients either untreated (3.26 ± 0.31), responders (3.1 ± 0.23) and non-responders (2.18 ± 0.23) with respect to non-infected individuals (1 ± 0.34; P = 0.005). Ifnar1 transcription increased significantly (P = 0.003) in patients infected with HCV genotypes 1a (4.74 ± 0.25) and 1b (2.81 ± 0.25) but not in 1a1b (1.58 ± 0.21). No association was found of Ifnar1 transcription with disease progress, initial viral load or other clinical factors. With respect to socs1 transcription, values were similar for non-infected individuals (1 ± 0.28) and untreated patients (0.99 ± 0.41) but increased in responders (2.81 ± 0.17) and non-responder patients (1.67 ± 0.41). Difference between responder and non-responder patients was not statistically significant. Socs1 transcription increased in patients infected with HCV genotypes 1a and 1b (2.87 ± 0.45 and 2.22 ± 0.17, respectively) but not in 1a1b (1.28 ± 0.40). Socs1 transcript was absent in three patients infected with HCV genotype 1b. A weak correlation between ifnar1 and socs1 transcription was found, when Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated. Conclusion Our results suggest that HCV infection may up-regulate ifnar1 transcription. HCV genotypes differ in their capacity to affect ifnar1 and

  16. Immune response genes receptors expression and polymorphisms in relation to multiple sclerosis susceptibility and response to INF-β therapy.

    PubMed

    Karam, Rehab A; Rezk, Noha A; Amer, Mona M; Fathy, Hala A

    2016-09-01

    Interferon (IFN)-β is one of the disease modifying drugs used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. A predictive marker that indicates good or poor response to the treatment is highly desirable. We aimed to investigate the relation between the immune response genes receptors (IFNAR1, IFNAR2, and CCR5) expression and their polymorhic variants and multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility as well as the response to IFN-β therapy. The immune response genes receptors expression and genotyping were analyzed in 80 patients with MS, treated with IFN-β and in 110 healthy controls. There was a significant decrease of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 mRNA expression and a significant increase of CCR5 mRNA expression in MS patients compared with the control group. Also, the level of IFNAR1, IFNAR2, and CCR5 mRNA expression was found to be significantly lower in the responders than nonresponders. Carriers of IFNAR1 18417 C/C genotype and C allele had an increased risk of developing MS. There was a significant relation between CCR5 Δ32 allele and IFN-β treatment response in MS patients. Our results highlighted the significance of IFNAR and CCR5 genes in multiple sclerosis risk and the response to IFN-β therapy. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(9):727-734, 2016.

  17. Interferon lambda genotype and low serum LDL cholesterol levels in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Josephine H.; Lao, Xiang Qian; Tillmann, Hans L.; Rowell, Jennifer; Patel, Keyur; Thompson, Alexander; Suchindran, Sunil; Muir, Andrew J.; Guyton, John R.; Gardner, Stephen D.; McHutchison, John G.; McCarthy, Jeanette J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, genetic polymorphisms occurring in the interferon lambda gene region were associated with response to interferon-based treatment of hepatitis C infection. Both infection with the hepatitis C virus and interferon therapy are associated with decreased serum cholesterol and high cholesterol has been associated with increased likelihood to respond to interferon. We sought to determine if the interferon lambda gene variant was also associated with serum lipid levels in chronic hepatitis C patients. We compared genotypes of the rs12979860 polymorphism, located proximal to the IL28 gene, with serum lipid and apolipoprotein levels in 746 subjects with chronic HCV infection, not currently undergoing treatment, using multivariable analysis of variance. Results Levels of total cholesterol (p=6.0×10-4), apolipoprotein B (p=1.3×10-6) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (p=8.9×10-10) were significantly higher in subjects carrying the rs12979860 CC ‘responder’ genotype compared to those with the CT or TT genotype. Levels of triglycerides (p=0.03), apolipoprotein A-I (p=0.06) and apolipoprotein E (p=0.01) were slightly lower in the rs12979860 CC genotype group, while levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (p=0.78) and apolipoprotein C-III (p=0.74) did not vary by rs12979860 genotype. Conclusions Our results suggest that low levels of LDL cholesterol in chronic hepatitis C patients may be a marker of host endogenous interferon response to hepatitis C and that subjects with the rs12979860 CC ‘responder’ genotype may have a lower endogenous interferon response to the virus. PMID:20235331

  18. Organization of the amplified type I interferon gene cluster and associated chromosome regions in the interphase nucleus of human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, Michael J; Marella, Narasimharao V; Malyavantham, Kishore S; Goetze, Sandra; Bode, Juergen; Raska, Ivan; Berezney, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    The organization of the amplified type I interferon (IFN) gene cluster and surrounding chromosomal regions was studied in the interphase cell nucleus of the human osteosarcoma cell line MG63. Rather than being arranged in a linear ladder-like array as in mitotic chromosomes, a cluster of approximately 15 foci was detected that was preferentially associated along the periphery of both the cell nucleus and a chromosome territory containing components of chromosomes 4, 8, and 9. Interspersed within the IFN gene foci were corresponding foci derived from amplified centromere 4 and 9 sequences. Other copies of chromosomes 4 and 8 were frequently detected in pairs or higher-order arrays lacking discrete borders between the chromosomes. In contrast, while chromosomes 4 and 8 in normal WI38 human fibroblast and osteoblast cells were occasionally found to associate closely, discrete boundaries were always detected between the two. DNA replication timing of the IFN gene cluster in early- to mid-S phase of WI38 cells was conserved in the amplified IFN gene cluster of MG63. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated a approximately 3-fold increase in IFN beta transcripts in MG63 compared with WI38 and RNA/DNA FISH experiments revealed 1-5 foci of IFN beta transcripts per cell with only approximately 5% of the cells showing foci within the highly amplified IFN gene cluster.

  19. Role of interferon α in promoting T helper cell type 1 responses in the small intestine in coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Monteleone, G; Pender, S; Alstead, E; Hauer, A; Lionetti, P; MacDonald, T

    2001-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is caused by a CD4 T helper cell type 1 (Th1) response in the small intestinal mucosa to dietary gluten. As the major Th1 inducing cytokine, interleukin 12, is undetectable in CD gut mucosa, the mechanism by which Th1 effector cells are generated remains unknown. Interferon (IFN) α, a cytokine capable of promoting IFN-γ synthesis, has been implicated in the development of Th1 mediated immune diseases. Here we report a case of CD-like enteropathy in a patient receiving IFN-α for chronic myeloid leukaemia. Morphological assessment of duodenal biopsies taken from the patient showed total villous atrophy, crypt cell hyperplasia, and a high number of CD3+ intraepithelial lymphocytes. Both antigliadin antibodies and antiendomysial antibodies were positive. RNA analysis revealed pronounced expression of IFN-γ. Withdrawal of gluten from the diet resulted in a patchy improvement in intestinal morphology, normalisation of laboratory parameters, and resolution of clinical symptoms. By western blot analysis, IFN-α protein was seen in the duodenal mucosa from untreated CD patients but not in controls. This was associated with marked expression of IFN-γ protein in CD mucosa. Collectively, these results suggest a role for IFN-α in promoting Th1 responses to gluten.


Keywords: coeliac disease; interferon; small intestine; T helper cell response PMID:11171837

  20. Interferon-γ enhances both the anti-bacterial and the pro-inflammatory response of human mast cells to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Swindle, Emily J; Brown, Jared M; Rådinger, Madeleine; DeLeo, Frank R; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2015-01-01

    Human mast cells (huMCs) are involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses where they release mediators including amines, reactive oxygen species (ROS), eicosanoids and cytokines. We have reported that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) enhances FcγR-dependent ROS production. The aim of this study was to extend these observations by investigating the effect of IFN-γ on the biological responses of huMCs to Staphylococcus aureus. We found that exposure of huMCs to S. aureus generated intracellular and extracellular ROS, which were enhanced in the presence of IFN-γ. IFN-γ also promoted bacteria killing, β-hexosaminidase release and eicosanoid production. Interferon-γ similarly increased expression of mRNAs encoding CCL1 to CCL4, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumour necrosis factor-α and CXCL8 in S. aureus-stimulated huMCs. The ability of IFN-γ to increase CXCL8 and GM-CSF protein levels was confirmed by ELISA. Fibronectin or a β1 integrin blocking antibody completely abrogated IFN-γ-dependent S. aureus binding and reduced S. aureus-dependent CXCL8 secretion. These data demonstrate that IFN-γ primes huMCs for enhanced anti-bacterial and pro-inflammatory responses to S. aureus, partially mediated by β1 integrin. PMID:26288256