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Sample records for intergenic spacers repetitive

  1. Cytomolecular Analysis of Ribosomal DNA Evolution in a Natural Allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum and Its Putative Ancestors—Dissecting Complex Repetitive Structure of Intergenic Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Borowska-Zuchowska, Natalia; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon associated with nuclear 35S rRNA genes and consists in selective suppression of gene loci inherited from one of the progenitors in the allopolyploid. Our understanding of the exact mechanisms that determine this process is still fragmentary, especially in case of the grass species. This study aimed to shed some light on the molecular basis of this genome-specific inactivation of 35S rDNA loci in an allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum (2n = 30), which arose from the interspecific hybridization between two diploid ancestors that were very similar to modern B. distachyon (2n = 10) and B. stacei (2n = 20). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization with 25S rDNA and chromosome-specific BAC clones as probes we revealed that the nucleolar dominance is present not only in meristematic root-tip cells but also in differentiated cell fraction of B. hybridum. Additionally, the intergenic spacers (IGSs) from both of the putative ancestors and the allotetraploid were sequenced and analyzed. The presumptive transcription initiation sites, spacer promoters and repeated elements were identified within the IGSs. Two different length variants, 2.3 and 3.5 kb, of IGSs were identified in B. distachyon and B. stacei, respectively, however only the IGS that had originated from B. distachyon-like ancestor was present in the allotetraploid. The amplification pattern of B. hybridum IGSs suggests that some genetic changes occurred in inactive B. stacei-like rDNA loci during the evolution of the allotetraploid. We hypothesize that their preferential silencing is an effect of structural changes in the sequence rather than just the result of the sole inactivation at the epigenetic level. PMID:27790225

  2. Structural and phylogenetic analysis of the rDNA intergenic spacer region of Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Ioannis A; Dimopoulou, Chrysoula D; Typas, Milton A

    2013-10-01

    The nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer (IGS) region was structurally analyzed and exploited for molecular discrimination and phylogenetic analysis of vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) of Verticillium dahliae. A structural study of 201 available IGS sequences of the fungus was performed, and four classes of ubiquitous repetitive elements, organized in higher-order repetitive structures or composite blocks, were detected in a variable IGS subregion. This subregion was amplified from an international collection of 59 V. dahliae isolates covering all VCGs, together with nine representative V. albo-atrum and V. longisporum isolates, and sequenced. Structural and phylogenetic analyses of the sequences of this polymorphic IGS subregion were consistently informative and allowed the identification of two main lineages in V. dahliae, that is, clade I including VCGs 1A, 1B, 2A, 4B, and 3 and clade II containing VCGs 2B, 4A, and 6. Analysis of IGS sequences proved a highly suitable molecular tool for (a) rapid interspecific differentiation, (b) intraspecific discrimination among VCGs of V. dahliae, facilitating high-throughput VCG confirmation and prediction/profiling, and (c) phylogenetic analysis within and among V. dahliae VCGs.

  3. Cladistic biogeography of Juglans (Juglandaceae) based on chloroplast DNA intergenic spacer sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phylogenetic utility of sequence variation from five chloroplast DNA intergenic spacer (IGS) regions: trnT-trnF, psbA-trnH, atpB-rbcL, trnV-16S rRNA, and trnS-trnfM was examined in the genus Juglans. A total of seventeen taxa representing the four sections within Juglans and an outgroup taxon, ...

  4. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Endemic Woody Legumes of the Canary Islands by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Genes Encoding 16S rRNA (16S rDNA) and 16S-23S rDNA Intergenic Spacers, Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic PCR Genomic Fingerprinting, and Partial 16S rDNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinuesa, Pablo; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; de Bruijn, Frans J.; Werner, Dietrich

    1998-01-01

    We present a phylogenetic analysis of nine strains of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from nodules of tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) and other endemic woody legumes of the Canary Islands, Spain. These and several reference strains were characterized genotypically at different levels of taxonomic resolution by computer-assisted analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs), 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) RFLPs, and repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints with BOX, ERIC, and REP primers. Cluster analysis of 16S rDNA restriction patterns with four tetrameric endonucleases grouped the Canarian isolates with the two reference strains, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110spc4 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain (Centrosema) CIAT 3101, resolving three genotypes within these bradyrhizobia. In the analysis of IGS RFLPs with three enzymes, six groups were found, whereas rep-PCR fingerprinting revealed an even greater genotypic diversity, with only two of the Canarian strains having similar fingerprints. Furthermore, we show that IGS RFLPs and even very dissimilar rep-PCR fingerprints can be clustered into phylogenetically sound groupings by combining them with 16S rDNA RFLPs in computer-assisted cluster analysis of electrophoretic patterns. The DNA sequence analysis of a highly variable 264-bp segment of the 16S rRNA genes of these strains was found to be consistent with the fingerprint-based classification. Three different DNA sequences were obtained, one of which was not previously described, and all belonged to the B. japonicum/Rhodopseudomonas rDNA cluster. Nodulation assays revealed that none of the Canarian isolates nodulated Glycine max or Leucaena leucocephala, but all nodulated Acacia pendula, C. proliferus, Macroptilium atropurpureum, and Vigna unguiculata. PMID:9603820

  5. [Comparative characteristics of intergenic spacers of ribosomal RNA gene cluster in mosquitoes of the genus Culex (Diptera: Culicidae)].

    PubMed

    Shaĭkevich, E V; Zagoskin, M V; Mukha, D V

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of intergenic spacer of ribosomal RNA gene cluster (rIGS) were identified in mosquitoes Culex modestus, Culex torrentium and Culex pipiens pallens. The level of interpopulation variability of the rIGS in the subspecies C. pipiens pipiens (form pipiens--mosquitoes that inhabit the open waters, and form molestus--mosquitoes that inhabit basements) living in Russia was estimated. No extensive repetitive sequences characteristic of the rIGS of all previously described species of mosquitoes were found within the rIGS of Culex mosquitoes. At the same time, evolutionarily conserved motifs and relatively short degenerate sequences of different classes of transposable elements, as well as multiple blocks of variable microsatellite repeats were identified. Our data demonstrated that the rIGS of Culex mosquitoes can be considered as a promising molecular marker for the analysis of population and phylogenetic relationships within this group of insects.

  6. Molecular Identification of Closely Related Candida Species Using Two Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Fingerprinting Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cornet, Muriel; Sendid, Boualem; Fradin, Chantal; Gaillardin, Claude; Poulain, Daniel; Nguyen, Huu-Vang

    2011-01-01

    Recent changes in the epidemiology of candidiasis highlighted an increase in non- Candida albicans species emphasizing the need for reliable identification methods. Molecular diagnostics in fungal infections may improve species characterization, particularly in cases of the closely related species in the Candida complexes. We developed two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism assays, targeting either a part of the intergenic spacer 2 or the entire intergenic spacer (IGS) of ribosomal DNA using a panel of 270 isolates. A part of the intergenic spacer was used for discrimination between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and between species of the C. glabrata complex (C. glabrata/C. bracarensis/C. nivariensis). The whole IGS was applied to C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis, and to separate C. famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) from C. guilliermondii (Pichia guilliermondii) and from the other species within this complex (ie, C. carpophila, C. fermentati and C. xestobii). Sharing similar biochemical patterns, Pichia norvegensis and C. inconspicua exhibited specific IGS profiles. Our study confirmed that isolates of C. guilliermondii were frequently mis-identified as C. famata. As much as 67% of the clinical isolates phenotypically determined as C. famata were recognized mostly as true P. guilliermondii. Conversely, 44% of the isolates initially identified as C. guilliermondii were corrected by the IGS fingerprints as C. parapsilosis, C. fermentati, or C. zeylanoides. These two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism methods may be used as reference tools [either alternatively or adjunctively to the existing ribosomal DNA (26S or ITS) sequence comparisons] for unambiguous determination of the Candida species for which phenotypic characterization remains problematic. PMID:21227390

  7. Identification and Tracing of Bifidobacterium Species by Use of Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Marco; Meylan, Valerie; Zink, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    Eighty-nine Bifidobacterium strains from 26 species were identified and classified to the species level with an enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR approach. We demonstrated that ERIC-PCR is useful for a phylogenetic and taxonomical analysis but as well as for a species composition analysis of mixed bifidobacterial cultures isolated from dairy products and other environments. PMID:12839818

  8. Structure of Intergenic Spacer IGS1 of Ribosomal Operon from Schistidium Mosses.

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatova, E A; Ignatov, M S; Goryunov, D V; Troitsky, A V

    2015-11-01

    The structure of the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) of the ribosomal operon from 12 species of Schistidium mosses was studied. In the IGS1 sequences of these species, three conserved regions and two areas of GC- and A-enriched repeats were identified. All of the studied mosses have a conserved pyrimidine-enriched motif at the 5'-end of IGS1. Species-specific nucleotide substitutions and insertions were found in the conserved areas. The repeated units contain single nucleotide substitutions that make unique the majority of repeated units. The positions of such repeats in IGS1 are species-specific, but their number can vary within the species and among operons of the same specimen. The comparison of IGS1 sequences from the Schistidium species and from representatives of ten other moss genera revealed the presence of common conserved motifs with similar localization. Presumably, these motifs are elements of termination of the pre-rRNA transcription and processing of rRNA. PMID:26615440

  9. Structure of Intergenic Spacer IGS1 of Ribosomal Operon from Schistidium Mosses.

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatova, E A; Ignatov, M S; Goryunov, D V; Troitsky, A V

    2015-11-01

    The structure of the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) of the ribosomal operon from 12 species of Schistidium mosses was studied. In the IGS1 sequences of these species, three conserved regions and two areas of GC- and A-enriched repeats were identified. All of the studied mosses have a conserved pyrimidine-enriched motif at the 5'-end of IGS1. Species-specific nucleotide substitutions and insertions were found in the conserved areas. The repeated units contain single nucleotide substitutions that make unique the majority of repeated units. The positions of such repeats in IGS1 are species-specific, but their number can vary within the species and among operons of the same specimen. The comparison of IGS1 sequences from the Schistidium species and from representatives of ten other moss genera revealed the presence of common conserved motifs with similar localization. Presumably, these motifs are elements of termination of the pre-rRNA transcription and processing of rRNA.

  10. Diversity and Inheritance of Intergenic Spacer Sequences of 45S Ribosomal DNA among Accessions of Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kiwoung; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yi, Go-Eun; Lee, Jonghoon; Chung, Mi-Young; Yang, Tae-Jin; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of plants is present in high copy number and shows variation between and within species in the length of the intergenic spacer (IGS). The 45S rDNA of flowering plants includes the 5.8S, 18S and 25S rDNA genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2), and the intergenic spacer 45S-IGS (25S-18S). This study identified six different types of 45S-IGS, A to F, which at 363 bp, 1121 bp, 1717 bp, 1969 bp, 2036 bp and 2111 bp in length, respectively, were much shorter than the reported reference IGS sequences in B. oleracea var. alboglabra. The shortest two IGS types, A and B, lacked the transcription initiation site, non-transcribed spacer, and external transcribed spacer. Functional behavior of those two IGS types in relation to rRNA synthesis is a subject of further investigation. The other four IGSs had subtle variations in the transcription termination site, guanine-cytosine (GC) content, and number of tandem repeats, but the external transcribed spacers of these four IGSs were quite similar in length. The 45S IGSs were found to follow Mendelian inheritance in a population of 15 F1s and their 30 inbred parental lines, which suggests that these sequences could be useful for development of new breeding tools. In addition, this study represents the first report of intra-specific (within subspecies) variation of the 45S IGS in B. oleracea. PMID:26633391

  11. Identification and detection of Trypanosoma cruzi by using a DNA amplification fingerprint obtained from the ribosomal intergenic spacer.

    PubMed Central

    González, N; Galindo, I; Guevara, P; Novak, E; Scorza, J V; Añez, N; Da Silveira, J F; Ramírez, J L

    1994-01-01

    We designed a PCR assay targeted on repeated elements of the ribosomal intergenic spacer which produces highly polymorphic DNA band patterns for different strains of Trypanosoma cruzi. By labeling the PCR products with digoxigenin and by chemiluminescence detection, we improved the assay sensitivity by three orders of magnitude to get T. cruzi strain fingerprints in feces of the trypanosome-infected triatomine bug vector. We also developed a capture assay for the digoxigenin-labeled PCR products that allowed us to detect T. cruzi in triatomine bug vector feces and in human serum samples with a solid support. Images PMID:8126172

  12. Structure and comparative analysis of the rDNA intergenic spacer of Brassica rapa. Implications for the function and evolution of the Cruciferae spacer.

    PubMed

    Da Rocha, P S; Bertrand, H

    1995-04-15

    The sequence of the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the Brassica rapa rDNA was determined and compared with those of other Cruciferae species. In the 3012-bp IGS, two segments of mostly unique sequence flank a 1.5-kb region consisting of two tandem arrays of repeats. A putative transcription initiation site (TIS) was identified by sequence comparison, 395 bp downstream from the repeat region. The intercalating segment displays unusual sequence patterns, and modelling of its topology predicts intrinsically bent DNA, with two elements of bending centered at positions -118 and -288 relative to the TIS. Comparative analysis of spacers from Cruciferae, revealed a common organization and high sequence similarity in their 5' and, particularly, 3' regions, whereas the repeat region upstream of TIS diverges rapidly. The conservation of structural elements, including the bent DNA upstream from the TIS, is discussed in light of their possible involvement in the IGS functions and structure of spacers in common ancestors. Examination of the Cruciferae spacers shows that, in addition to unequal crossover and gene conversion, insertional mutagenesis and replication slippage are molecular mechanisms significantly contributing to their evolution.

  13. Characterization of the Lancefield group C streptococcus 16S-23S RNA gene intergenic spacer and its potential for identification and sub-specific typing.

    PubMed Central

    Chanter, N.; Collin, N.; Holmes, N.; Binns, M.; Mumford, J.

    1997-01-01

    The 16S-23S RNA gene intergenic spacers of isolates of Streptococcus equi (n = 5), S. zooepidemicus (n = 5), S. equisimilis (n = 3) and S. dysgalactiae (n = 2) were sequenced and compared. There were distinct regions within the spacer, arranged in the order 1-9 for all S. equi and one S. zooepidemicus isolate and 1,2 and 4-9 for the remaining isolates. Region 4 was identical to the tRNA(ala) gene found in the 16S-23S intergenic spacers of other streptococci. Regions 1, 5, 6 and 7 had distinct variations, each conserved in different isolates. However, amongst the intergenic spacers there were different combinations of variant regions, suggesting a role for DNA recombination in their evolution. The intergenic spacer of all isolates of S. equi and one S. zooepidemicus isolate were almost identical. Primers derived from the variant sequences of regions 1 and 5 to 6 were used to group all S. zooepidemicus (n = 17) and S. equi (n = 5) into 1 of 8 types by polymerase chain reaction; three S. zooepidemicus isolates typed the same as S. equi. S. equi and S. zooepidemicus were clearly distinguishable from S. equisimilis and S. dysgalactiae which had shorter regions 5 and 6 and no region 7. Most homology for the group C sequences was found in previously published sequences for the 16S-23S intergenic spacers of S. anginosis, S. constellatus, S. intermedius, S. salivarius and S. agalactiae. A 75-90 nucleotide length shared with S. anginosus and S. intermedius in opposite orientations in the two main variants of region 6 supported the role for DNA recombination in the evolution of the spacer. The 16S-23S intergenic spacers indicate that S. zooepidemicus was the archetypal species for S. equi and that both are genetically more distant from S. equisimilis and S. dysgalactiae. The intergenic spacer can be used to identify specifically the group C streptococci and as an epidemiological marker for S. zooepidemicus. PMID:9129589

  14. The Mitochondrial Genome of the Leaf-Cutter Ant Atta laevigata: A Mitogenome with a Large Number of Intergenic Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Rodovalho, Cynara de Melo; Lyra, Mariana Lúcio; Ferro, Milene; Bacci, Maurício

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata, assembled using transcriptomic libraries from Sanger and Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS), and PCR products. This mitogenome was found to be very large (18,729 bp), given the presence of 30 non-coding intergenic spacers (IGS) spanning 3,808 bp. A portion of the putative control region remained unsequenced. The gene content and organization correspond to that inferred for the ancestral pancrustacea, except for two tRNA gene rearrangements that have been described previously in other ants. The IGS were highly variable in length and dispersed through the mitogenome. This pattern was also found for the other hymenopterans in particular for the monophyletic Apocrita. These spacers with unknown function may be valuable for characterizing genome evolution and distinguishing closely related species and individuals. NGS provided better coverage than Sanger sequencing, especially for tRNA and ribosomal subunit genes, thus facilitating efforts to fill in sequence gaps. The results obtained showed that data from transcriptomic libraries contain valuable information for assembling mitogenomes. The present data also provide a source of molecular markers that will be very important for improving our understanding of genomic evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships among hymenopterans. PMID:24828084

  15. Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequence Repeats in Yersiniae: Genomic Organization and Functional Properties

    PubMed Central

    De Gregorio, Eliana; Silvestro, Giustina; Petrillo, Mauro; Carlomagno, Maria Stella; Di Nocera, Pier Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Genome-wide analyses carried out in silico revealed that the DNA repeats called enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences (ERICs), which are present in several Enterobacteriaceae, are overrepresented in yersiniae. From the alignment of DNA regions from the wholly sequenced Yersinia enterocolitica 8081 and Yersinia pestis CO92 strains, we could establish that ERICs are miniature mobile elements whose insertion leads to duplication of the dinucleotide TA. ERICs feature long terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) and can fold as RNA into hairpin structures. The proximity to coding regions suggests that most Y. enterocolitica ERICs are cotranscribed with flanking genes. Elements which either overlap or are located next to stop codons are preferentially inserted in the same (or B) orientation. In contrast, ERICs located far apart from open reading frames are inserted in the opposite (or A) orientation. The expression of genes cotranscribed with A- and B-oriented ERICs has been monitored in vivo. In mRNAs spanning B-oriented ERICs, upstream gene transcripts accumulated at lower levels than downstream gene transcripts. This difference was abolished by treating cells with chloramphenicol. We hypothesize that folding of B-oriented elements is impeded by translating ribosomes. Consequently, upstream RNA degradation is triggered by the unmasking of a site for the RNase E located in the right-hand TIR of ERIC. A-oriented ERICs may act in contrast as upstream RNA stabilizers or may have other functions. The hypothesis that ERICs act as regulatory RNA elements is supported by analyses carried out in Yersinia strains which either lack ERIC sequences or carry alternatively oriented ERICs at specific loci. PMID:16291667

  16. Correlation of maple sap composition with bacterial and fungal communities determined by multiplex automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (MARISA).

    PubMed

    Filteau, Marie; Lagacé, Luc; LaPointe, Gisèle; Roy, Denis

    2011-08-01

    During collection, maple sap is contaminated by bacteria and fungi that subsequently colonize the tubing system. The bacterial microbiota has been more characterized than the fungal microbiota, but the impact of both components on maple sap quality remains unclear. This study focused on identifying bacterial and fungal members of maple sap and correlating microbiota composition with maple sap properties. A multiplex automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (MARISA) method was developed to presumptively identify bacterial and fungal members of maple sap samples collected from 19 production sites during the tapping period. Results indicate that the fungal community of maple sap is mainly composed of yeast related to Mrakia sp., Mrakiella sp., Guehomyces pullulans, Cryptococcus victoriae and Williopsis saturnus. Mrakia, Mrakiella and Guehomyces peaks were identified in samples of all production sites and can be considered dominant and stable members of the fungal microbiota of maple sap. A multivariate analysis based on MARISA profiles and maple sap chemical composition data showed correlations between Candida sake, Janthinobacterium lividum, Williopsis sp., Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Mrakia sp., Rhodococcus sp., Pseudomonas tolaasii, G. pullulans and maple sap composition at different flow periods. This study provides new insights on the relationship between microbial community and maple sap quality.

  17. Comparison of the bacterial community structure within the equine hindgut and faeces using Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA).

    PubMed

    Sadet-Bourgeteau, S; Philippeau, C; Dequiedt, S; Julliand, V

    2014-12-01

    The horse's hindgut bacterial ecosystem has often been studied using faecal samples. However few studies compared both bacterial ecosystems and the validity of using faecal samples may be questionable. Hence, the present study aimed to compare the structure of the equine bacterial community in the hindgut (caecum, right ventral colon) and faeces using a fingerprint technique known as Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA). Two DNA extraction methods were also assessed. Intestinal contents and faeces were sampled 3 h after the morning meal on four adult fistulated horses fed meadow hay and pelleted concentrate. Irrespective of the intestinal segment, Principal Component Analysis of ARISA profiles showed a strong individual effect (P<0.0001). However, across the study, faecal bacterial community structure significantly (P<0.001) differed from those of the caecum and colon, while there was no difference between the two hindgut communities. The use of a QIAamp(®) DNA Stool Mini kit increased the quality of DNA extracted irrespective of sample type. The differences observed between faecal and hindgut bacterial communities challenge the use of faeces as a representative for hindgut activity. Further investigations are necessary to compare bacterial activity between the hindgut and faeces in order to understand the validity of using faecal samples. PMID:25075719

  18. A comparison of fungal communities from four salt marsh plants using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA).

    PubMed

    Torzilli, Albert P; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Chalkley, David; Gillevet, Patrick M

    2006-01-01

    Fungal decomposers are important contributors to the detritus-based food webs of salt marsh ecosystems. Knowing the composition of salt marsh fungal communities is essential in understanding how detritus processing is affected by changes in community dynamics. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was used to examine the composition of fungal communities associated with four temperate salt marsh plants, Spartina alterniflora (short and tall forms), Juncus roemerianus, Distichlis spicata and Sarcocornia perennis. Plant tissues were homogenized and subjected to a particle-filtration protocol that yielded 106 microm particulate fractions, which were used as a source of fungal isolates and fungal DNA. Genera identified from sporulating cultures demonstrated that the 106 microm particles from each host plant were reliable sources of fungal DNA for ARISA. Analysis of ARISA data by principal component analysis (PCA), principal coordinate analysis (PCO) and species diversity comparisons indicated that the fungal communities from the two grasses, S. alterniflora and D. spicata were more similar to each other than they were to the distinct communities associated with J. roemerianus and S. perennis. Principal component analysis also showed no consistent, seasonal pattern in the composition of these fungal communities. Comparisons of ARISA fingerprints from the different fungal communities and those from pure cultures of selected Spartina ascomycetes supported the host/substrate specificity observed for the fungal communities.

  19. Evaluation of Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis for Bacterial Fingerprinting of Rumen Microbiome Compared to Pyrosequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Jami, Elie; Shterzer, Naama; Mizrahi, Itzhak

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian gut houses a complex microbial community which is believed to play a significant role in host physiology. In recent years, several microbial community analysis methods have been implemented to study the whole gut microbial environment, in contrast to classical microbiological methods focusing on bacteria which can be cultivated. One of these is automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), an inexpensive and popular way of analyzing bacterial diversity and community fingerprinting in ecological samples. ARISA uses the natural variability in length of the DNA fragment found between the 16S and 23S genes in different bacterial lineages to infer diversity. This method is now being supplanted by affordable next-generation sequencing technologies that can also simultaneously annotate operational taxonomic units for taxonomic identification. We compared ARISA and pyrosequencing of samples from the rumen microbiome of cows, previously sampled at different stages of development and varying in microbial complexity using several ecological parameters. We revealed close agreement between ARISA and pyrosequencing outputs, especially in their ability to discriminate samples from different ecological niches. In contrast, the ARISA method seemed to underestimate sample richness. The good performance of the relatively inexpensive ARISA makes it relevant for straightforward use in bacterial fingerprinting analysis as well as for quick cross-validation of pyrosequencing data. PMID:25437610

  20. Evaluation of automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis for bacterial fingerprinting of rumen microbiome compared to pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Jami, Elie; Shterzer, Naama; Mizrahi, Itzhak

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian gut houses a complex microbial community which is believed to play a significant role in host physiology. In recent years, several microbial community analysis methods have been implemented to study the whole gut microbial environment, in contrast to classical microbiological methods focusing on bacteria which can be cultivated. One of these is automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), an inexpensive and popular way of analyzing bacterial diversity and community fingerprinting in ecological samples. ARISA uses the natural variability in length of the DNA fragment found between the 16S and 23S genes in different bacterial lineages to infer diversity. This method is now being supplanted by affordable next-generation sequencing technologies that can also simultaneously annotate operational taxonomic units for taxonomic identification. We compared ARISA and pyrosequencing of samples from the rumen microbiome of cows, previously sampled at different stages of development and varying in microbial complexity using several ecological parameters. We revealed close agreement between ARISA and pyrosequencing outputs, especially in their ability to discriminate samples from different ecological niches. In contrast, the ARISA method seemed to underestimate sample richness. The good performance of the relatively inexpensive ARISA makes it relevant for straightforward use in bacterial fingerprinting analysis as well as for quick cross-validation of pyrosequencing data. PMID:25437610

  1. Characterization of mitochondrial control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNAs of Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Norma Machado; de Souza Dias, Aline; da Silva Valente, Vera Lúcia; Valiati, Victor Hugo

    2009-12-01

    The control region in insects is the major noncoding region in animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and is responsible for a large part of the variation in the DNA sequence and size of the genome of this organelle. In this study, the mtDNA control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNA genes of a Zaprionus indianus strain were cloned, sequenced and compared with other Drosophila species. The overall A+T content in the Z. indianus control region is 94.3%, and a comparison with other Drosophila species demonstrated that the most conserved region appears to be the 420 base pairs nearest to the tRNA(ile), similar to the findings of other authors. We also describe conserved sequence blocks, including a poly-T involved in the replication process of Drosophila mtDNA; a putative secondary structure also involved in the replication process and repeated sequences. tRNA(ile) sequence demonstrated the greatest variability when the tRNA sequences of species were compared.

  2. Influence of commonly used primer systems on automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis of bacterial communities in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Purahong, Witoon; Stempfhuber, Barbara; Lentendu, Guillaume; Francioli, Davide; Reitz, Thomas; Buscot, François; Schloter, Michael; Krüger, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high diversity of bacteria in many ecosystems, their slow generation times, specific but mostly unknown nutrient requirements and syntrophic interactions, isolation based approaches in microbial ecology mostly fail to describe microbial community structure. Thus, cultivation independent techniques, which rely on directly extracted nucleic acids from the environment, are a well-used alternative. For example, bacterial automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (B-ARISA) is one of the widely used methods for fingerprinting bacterial communities after PCR-based amplification of selected regions of the operon coding for rRNA genes using community DNA. However, B-ARISA alone does not provide any taxonomic information and the results may be severely biased in relation to the primer set selection. Furthermore, amplified DNA stemming from mitochondrial or chloroplast templates might strongly bias the obtained fingerprints. In this study, we determined the applicability of three different B-ARISA primer sets to the study of bacterial communities. The results from in silico analysis harnessing publicly available sequence databases showed that all three primer sets tested are specific to bacteria but only two primers sets assure high bacterial taxa coverage (1406f/23Sr and ITSF/ITSReub). Considering the study of bacteria in a plant interface, the primer set ITSF/ITSReub was found to amplify (in silico) sequences of some important crop species such as Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays. Bacterial genera and plant species potentially amplified by different primer sets are given. These data were confirmed when DNA extracted from soil and plant samples were analyzed. The presented information could be useful when interpreting existing B-ARISA results and planning B-ARISA experiments, especially when plant DNA can be expected. PMID:25749323

  3. PCR-based method for targeting 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions among Vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genus Vibrio is a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria comprised of 74 species. Furthermore, the genus has and is expected to continue expanding with the addition of several new species annually. Consequently, it is of paramount importance to have a method which is able to reliably and efficiently differentiate the numerous Vibrio species. Results In this study, a novel and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based intergenic spacer (IGS)-typing system for vibrios was developed that is based on the well-known IGS regions located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes on the bacterial chromosome. The system was optimized to resolve heteroduplex formation as well as to take advantage of capillary gel electrophoresis technology such that reproducible analyses could be achieved in a rapid manner. System validation was achieved through testing of 69 archetypal Vibrio strains, representing 48 Vibrio species, from which an 'IGS-type' profile database was generated. These data, presented here in several cluster analyses, demonstrated successful differentiation of the 69 type strains showing that this PCR-based fingerprinting method easily discriminates bacterial strains at the species level among Vibrio. Furthermore, testing 36 strains each of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, important food borne pathogens, isolated from a variety of geographical locations with the IGS-typing method demonstrated distinct IGS-typing patterns indicative of subspecies divergence in both populations making this technique equally useful for intraspecies differentiation, as well. Conclusion This rapid, reliable and efficient IGS-typing system, especially in combination with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, has the capacity to not only discern and identify vibrios at the species level but, in some cases, at the sub-species level, as well. This procedure is particularly well-suited for preliminary species identification and, lends itself nicely to epidemiological investigations

  4. Analysis of 16S-23S rRNA Intergenic Spacer Regions of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Jongsik; Huq, Anwarul; Colwell, Rita R.

    1999-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae identification based on molecular sequence data has been hampered by a lack of sequence variation from the closely related Vibrio mimicus. The two species share many genes coding for proteins, such as ctxAB, and show almost identical 16S DNA coding for rRNA (rDNA) sequences. Primers targeting conserved sequences flanking the 3′ end of the 16S and the 5′ end of the 23S rDNAs were used to amplify the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions of V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Two major (ca. 580 and 500 bp) and one minor (ca. 750 bp) amplicons were consistently generated for both species, and their sequences were determined. The largest fragment contains three tRNA genes (tDNAs) coding for tRNAGlu, tRNALys, and tRNAVal, which has not previously been found in bacteria examined to date. The 580-bp amplicon contained tDNAIle and tDNAAla, whereas the 500-bp fragment had single tDNA coding either tRNAGlu or tRNAAla. Little variation, i.e., 0 to 0.4%, was found among V. cholerae O1 classical, O1 El Tor, and O139 epidemic strains. Slightly more variation was found against the non-O1/non-O139 serotypes (ca. 1% difference) and V. mimicus (2 to 3% difference). A pair of oligonucleotide primers were designed, based on the region differentiating all of V. cholerae strains from V. mimicus. The PCR system developed was subsequently evaluated by using representatives of V. cholerae from environmental and clinical sources, and of other taxa, including V. mimicus. This study provides the first molecular tool for identifying the species V. cholerae. PMID:10224020

  5. 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Variability Helps Resolve Closely Related Sphingomonads.

    PubMed

    Tokajian, Sima; Issa, Nahla; Salloum, Tamara; Ibrahim, Joe; Farah, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonads comprise a physiologically versatile group many of which appear to be adapted to oligotrophic environments, but several also had features in their genomes indicative of host associations. In this study, the extent variability of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences of 14 ATCC reference sphingomonad strains and 23 isolates recovered from drinking water was investigated through PCR amplification and sequencing. Sequencing analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region revealed that the ITS sizes for all studied isolates varied between 415 and 849 bp, while their G+C content was 42.2-57.9 mol%. Five distinct ITS types were identified: ITS(none) (without tRNA genes), ITS(Ala(TGC)), ITS(Ala(TGC)+Ile(GAT)), ITS(Ile(GAT)+Ala(TGC)), and ITS (Ile(GAT)+Pseudo). All of the identified tRNA(Ala(TGC)) molecules consisted of 73 bases, and all of the tRNA(Ile(GAT)) molecules consisted of 74 bases. We also detected striking variability in the size of the ITS region among the various examined isolates. Highest variability was detected within the ITS-2. The importance of this study is that this is the first comparison of the 16S-23S rDNA ITS sequence similarities and tRNA genes from sphingomonads. Collectively the data obtained in this study revealed the heterogeneity and extent of variability within the ITS region compared to the 16S rRNA gene within closely related isolates. Sequence and length polymorphisms within the ITS region along with the ITS types (tRNA-containing or lacking and the type of tRNA) and ITS-2 size and sequence similarities allowed us to overcome the limitation we previously encountered in resolving closely related isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence.

  6. 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Variability Helps Resolve Closely Related Sphingomonads.

    PubMed

    Tokajian, Sima; Issa, Nahla; Salloum, Tamara; Ibrahim, Joe; Farah, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonads comprise a physiologically versatile group many of which appear to be adapted to oligotrophic environments, but several also had features in their genomes indicative of host associations. In this study, the extent variability of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences of 14 ATCC reference sphingomonad strains and 23 isolates recovered from drinking water was investigated through PCR amplification and sequencing. Sequencing analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region revealed that the ITS sizes for all studied isolates varied between 415 and 849 bp, while their G+C content was 42.2-57.9 mol%. Five distinct ITS types were identified: ITS(none) (without tRNA genes), ITS(Ala(TGC)), ITS(Ala(TGC)+Ile(GAT)), ITS(Ile(GAT)+Ala(TGC)), and ITS (Ile(GAT)+Pseudo). All of the identified tRNA(Ala(TGC)) molecules consisted of 73 bases, and all of the tRNA(Ile(GAT)) molecules consisted of 74 bases. We also detected striking variability in the size of the ITS region among the various examined isolates. Highest variability was detected within the ITS-2. The importance of this study is that this is the first comparison of the 16S-23S rDNA ITS sequence similarities and tRNA genes from sphingomonads. Collectively the data obtained in this study revealed the heterogeneity and extent of variability within the ITS region compared to the 16S rRNA gene within closely related isolates. Sequence and length polymorphisms within the ITS region along with the ITS types (tRNA-containing or lacking and the type of tRNA) and ITS-2 size and sequence similarities allowed us to overcome the limitation we previously encountered in resolving closely related isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence. PMID:26904019

  7. 16S–23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Variability Helps Resolve Closely Related Sphingomonads

    PubMed Central

    Tokajian, Sima; Issa, Nahla; Salloum, Tamara; Ibrahim, Joe; Farah, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonads comprise a physiologically versatile group many of which appear to be adapted to oligotrophic environments, but several also had features in their genomes indicative of host associations. In this study, the extent variability of the 16S–23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences of 14 ATCC reference sphingomonad strains and 23 isolates recovered from drinking water was investigated through PCR amplification and sequencing. Sequencing analysis of the 16S–23S rRNA gene ITS region revealed that the ITS sizes for all studied isolates varied between 415 and 849 bp, while their G+C content was 42.2–57.9 mol%. Five distinct ITS types were identified: ITSnone (without tRNA genes), ITSAla(TGC), ITSAla(TGC)+Ile(GAT), ITSIle(GAT)+Ala(TGC), and ITS Ile(GAT)+Pseudo. All of the identified tRNAAla(TGC) molecules consisted of 73 bases, and all of the tRNAIle(GAT) molecules consisted of 74 bases. We also detected striking variability in the size of the ITS region among the various examined isolates. Highest variability was detected within the ITS-2. The importance of this study is that this is the first comparison of the 16S–23S rDNA ITS sequence similarities and tRNA genes from sphingomonads. Collectively the data obtained in this study revealed the heterogeneity and extent of variability within the ITS region compared to the 16S rRNA gene within closely related isolates. Sequence and length polymorphisms within the ITS region along with the ITS types (tRNA-containing or lacking and the type of tRNA) and ITS-2 size and sequence similarities allowed us to overcome the limitation we previously encountered in resolving closely related isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence. PMID:26904019

  8. Paenibacillus larvae 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions: DNA fingerprinting and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2012-07-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae. PCR amplification of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the amplified DNA, was performed using genomic DNA collected from 134 P. larvae strains isolated in Connecticut, six Northern Regional Research Laboratory stock strains, four strains isolated in Argentina, and one strain isolated in Chile. Following electrophoresis of amplified DNA, all isolates exhibited a common migratory profile (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint pattern) of six DNA bands. This profile represented a unique ITS-PCR DNA fingerprint that was useful as a fast, simple, and accurate procedure for identification of P. larvae. Digestion of ITS-PCR amplified DNA, using mung bean nuclease prior to electrophoresis, characterized only three of the six electrophoresis bands as homoduplex DNA and indicating three true ITS regions. These three ITS regions, DNA migratory band sizes of 915, 1010, and 1474 bp, signify a minimum of three types of rrn operons within P. larvae. DNA sequence analysis of ITS region DNA, using P. larvae NRRL B-3553, identified the 3' terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene, 5' terminal nucleotides of the 23S rRNA gene, and the complete DNA sequences of the 5S rRNA, tRNA(ala), and tRNA(ile) genes. Gene organization within the three rrn operon types was 16S-23S, 16S-tRNA(ala)-23S, and l6S-5S-tRNA(ile)-tRNA(ala)-23S and these operons were named rrnA, rrnF, and rrnG, respectively. The 23S rRNA gene was shown by I-CeuI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to be present as seven copies. This was suggestive of seven rrn operon copies within the P. larvae genome. Investigation of the 16S-23S rDNA regions of this bacterium has aided the development of a diagnostic procedure and has helped genomic mapping investigations via characterization of the ITS regions.

  9. Inter- and intraspecific genomic variability of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer regions (ISR) in representatives of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yong-Qing; Yang, Yuan; Bao, Jing-Ting; He, Kai-Yu; Li, Hong-Yu

    2007-05-01

    The complete sequences of 32 intergenic spacer regions (ISR) from Acidithiobacillus strains, including 29 field strains isolated from coal, copper, molybdenum mine wastes or sediment of different geoclimatic regions in China, reference strain ATCC19859 and the type strains of the two species were determined. These data, together with other sequences available in the GenBank database, were used to carry out the first detailed assessment of the inter- and intraspecific genomic variability of the ISR sequences and to infer phylogenetic relationships within the genus. The total length of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions of the Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains ranged from 451 to 490 bp, and from 434 to 456 bp, respectively. The degree of intrageneric ISR sequence similarity was higher than the degree of intergeneric similarity, and the overall similarity values of the ISRs varied from 60.49% to 84.71% between representatives of different species of the genus Acidithiobacillus. Sequences from the spacer of the A. thiooxidans and A. ferrooxidans strains ranged from 86.71% to 99.56% and 92.36% to 100% similarity, respectively. All Acidithiobacillus strains were separated into three phylogenetic major clusters and seven phylogenetic groups. ISR may be a potential target for the development of in situ hybridization probe aimed at accurately detecting acidithiobacilli in the various acidic environments.

  10. Bacterial diversity in water samples from uranium wastes as demonstrated by 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrievals.

    PubMed

    Radeva, Galina; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial diversity was assessed in water samples collected from several uranium mining wastes in Ger many and in the United States by using 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrievals. The results obtained using the 16S rDNA retrieval showed that the samples collected from the uranium mill tailings of Schlema/Alberoda, Germany, were predominated by Nitrospina-like bacteria, whereas those from the mill tailings of Shiprock, New Mexico, USA, were predominated by gamma-Pseudomonas and Frauteria spp. Additional smaller populations of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group and alpha- and delta-Proteobacteria were identified in the Shiprock samples as well. Proteobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides were also found in the third uranium mill tailings studied, Gittersee/Coschütz, Germany, but the groups of the predominant clones were rather small. Most of the clones of the Gittersee/Coschütz samples represented individual sequences, which indicates a high level of bacterial diversity. The samples from the fourth uranium waste studied, Steinsee Deponie B1, Germany, were predominantly occupied by Acinetobacter spp. The ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrieval provided results complementary to those obtained by the 16S rDNA analyses. For instance, in the Shiprock samples, an additional predominant bacterial group was identified and affiliated with Nitrosomonas sp., whereas in the Gittersee/Coschütz samples, anammox populations were identified that were not retrieved by the applied 16S rDNA approach.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Avena based on chloroplast intergenic spacer psbA-trnH and single-copy nuclear gene Acc1.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-Hai; Baum, Bernard R; Zhou, Ping-Ping; Zhao, Jun; Wei, Yu-Ming; Ren, Chang-Zhong; Xiong, Fang-Qiu; Liu, Gang; Zhong, Lin; Zhao, Gang; Peng, Yuan-Ying

    2014-05-01

    Two uncorrelated nucleotide sequences, chloroplast intergenic spacer psbA-trnH and acetyl CoA carboxylase gene (Acc1), were used to perform phylogenetic analyses in 75 accessions of the genus Avena, representing 13 diploids, seven tetraploid, and four hexaploids by maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference. Phylogenic analyses based on the chloroplast intergenic spacer psbA-trnH confirmed that the A genome diploid might be the maternal donor of species of the genus Avena. Two haplotypes of the Acc1 gene region were obtained from the AB genome tetraploids, indicating an allopolyploid origin for the tetraploid species. Among the AB genome species, both gene trees revealed differences between Avena agadiriana and the other species, suggesting that an AS genome diploid might be the A genome donor and the other genome diploid donor might be the Ac genome diploid Avena canariensis or the Ad genome diploid Avena damascena. Three haplotypes of the Acc1 gene have been detected among the ACD genome hexaploid species. The haplotype that seems to represent the D genome clustered with the tetraploid species Avena murphyi and Avena maroccana, which supported the CD genomic designation instead of AC for A. murphyi and A. maroccana.

  12. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus 1R PCR assay for detection of Raoultella sp. isolates among strains identified as Klebsiella oxytoca in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Granier, Sophie A; Leflon-Guibout, Véronique; Goldstein, Fred W; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène

    2003-04-01

    The enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus 1R PCR method, which provided recognizable profiles for reference strains of the three species of Raoultella and the two genetic groups of Klebsiella oxytoca, was applied to 19 clinical isolates identified as K. oxytoca. By this method, as confirmed by species-specific gene sequencing, two Raoultella ornithinolytica and two unclassifiable K. oxytoca isolates were identified.

  13. Patterns of variation in the intergenic spacers of ribosomal DNA in Drosophila melanogaster support a model for genetic exchanges during X-Y pairing.

    PubMed

    Polanco, C; González, A I; Dover, G A

    2000-07-01

    Detailed analysis of variation in intergenic spacer (IGS) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA drawn from natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster has revealed contrasting patterns of homogenization although both spacers are located in the same rDNA unit. On the basis of the role of IGS regions in X-Y chromosome pairing, we proposed a mechanism of single-strand exchanges at the IGS regions, which can explain the different evolutionary trajectories followed by the IGS and the ITS regions. Here, we provide data from the chromosomal distribution of selected IGS length variants, as well as the detailed internal structure of a large number of IGS regions obtained from specific X and Y chromosomes. The variability found in the different internal subrepeat regions of IGS regions isolated from X and Y chromosomes supports the proposed mechanism of genetic exchanges and suggests that only the "240" subrepeats are involved. The presence of a putative site for topoisomerase I at the 5' end of the 18S rRNA gene would allow for the exchange between X and Y chromosomes of some 240 subrepeats, the promoter, and the ETS region, leaving the rest of the rDNA unit to evolve along separate chromosomal lineages. The phenomenon of localized units (modules) of homogenization has implications for multigene family evolution in general.

  14. Genomic Variability of Haemophilus influenzae Isolated from Mexican Children Determined by Using Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequences and PCR

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-De-Leon, Patricia; Santos, Jose I.; Caballero, Javier; Gomez, Demostenes; Espinosa, Luz E.; Moreno, Isabel; Piñero, Daniel; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2000-01-01

    Genomic fingerprints from 92 capsulated and noncapsulated strains of Haemophilus influenzae from Mexican children with different diseases and healthy carriers were generated by PCR using the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequences. A cluster analysis by the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages based on the overall similarity as estimated from the characteristics of the genomic fingerprints, was conducted to group the strains. A total of 69 fingerprint patterns were detected in the H. influenzae strains. Isolates from patients with different diseases were represented by a variety of patterns, which clustered into two major groups. Of the 37 strains isolated from cases of meningitis, 24 shared patterns and were clustered into five groups within a similarity level of 1.0. One fragment of 1.25 kb was common to all meningitis strains. H. influenzae strains from healthy carriers presented fingerprint patterns different from those found in strains from sick children. Isolates from healthy individuals were more variable and were distributed differently from those from patients. The results show that ERIC-PCR provides a powerful tool for the determination of the distinctive pathogenicity potentials of H. influenzae strains and encourage its use for molecular epidemiology investigations. PMID:10878033

  15. Molecular typing among beef isolates of Escherichia coli using consensus repetitive intergenic enterobacteria-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoolkifli, Nurliyana Wan; Mutalib, Sahilah Abd

    2013-11-01

    Genomic DNA of Escherichia coli were characterized by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-Polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and the presence of Shiga toxin gene-I (Stx1) and Shiga toxin gene-2 (Stx2). These isolates were originated from imported raw beef which are come from two countries namely Australia and India. The isolation of E. coli was conducted by using Eosin Methylene Blue Agar (EMBA). A total of 94 strains had been isolated from 30 samples of imported raw beefand 42 strains had been detected positively E. coli by doing biochemical tests. All strains had been tested and the results of biochemical tests showed that 3 strains were from Australia samples while the other 39 strains were from India samples. The biochemical tests used are Indole test, Methyl Red test, Voges-Proskauer test and Citrate test. All the 42 strains were examined for Shiga toxin (stx1 and stx2) gene detection by two pair primers which are stx2F (5'-TTCTTCGGTATCCTATTCCC-3'), stx2R (5'-ATGCATCTCTGGTCATTGTA-3'), stx1F (5'-CAGTTAATGTGGTGGCGAAG-3'), and stx1R (5'-CTGTCACAGTAACAACCGT-3'). The results showed that none of the strains are positive for Shiga toxin gene. Application of ERIC-PCR method towards E. coli had successfully shown the high diversity polymorphism in 21 different genome types of DNA with primers ERIC1R (5'- CACTTAGGGGTCCTCGAATGTA- 3') and ERIC2R (5'- AAGTAAGTGACTGGGGTGACGC- 3').

  16. Identification of Carnobacterium species by restriction fragment length polymorphism of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region and species-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Rachman, Cinta; Kabadjova, Petia; Valcheva, Rosica; Prévost, Hervé; Dousset, Xavier

    2004-08-01

    The genus Carnobacterium is currently divided into the following eight species: Carnobacterium piscicola, C. divergens, C. gallinarum, C. mobile, C. funditum, C. alterfunditum, C. inhibens, and C. viridans. An identification tool for the rapid differentiation of these eight Carnobacterium species was developed, based on the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacer region (ISR). PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of this 16S-23S rDNA ISR was performed in order to obtain restriction profiles for all of the species. Three PCR amplicons, which were designated small ISR (S-ISR), medium ISR (M-ISR), and large ISR (L-ISR), were obtained for all Carnobacterium species. The L-ISR sequence revealed the presence of two tRNA genes, tRNA(Ala) and tRNA(Ile), which were separated by a spacer region that varied from 24 to 38 bp long. This region was variable among the species, allowing the design of species-specific primers. These primers were tested and proved to be species specific. The identification method based on the 16S-23S rDNA ISR, using PCR-RFLP and specific primers, is very suitable for the rapid low-cost identification and discrimination of all of the Carnobacterium species from other phylogenetically related lactic acid bacteria.

  17. Identification of Mushroom Species by Automated rRNA Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and Its Application to a Suspected Case of Food Poisoning with Tricholoma ustale.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Ryota; Yamada, Sayumi; Tu, Zhihao; Sugawara, Akiko; Hoshiba, Toshihiro; Eisaka, Sadao; Yamaguchi, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), a method of microbiome analysis, was evaluated for species identification of mushrooms based on the specific fragment sizes. We used 51 wild mushroom-fruiting bodies collected in the centre of Hokkaido and two cultivated mushrooms. Samples were hot-air-dried and DNA were extracted by a beads beating procedure. Sequencing analysis of portions of the rRNA gene (rDNA) provided 33 identifications of mushrooms by genus or species. The results of ARISA identification based on the combination of the fragment sizes corresponding to two inter spacer regions (ITS2 and ITS1) of rDNA within±0.1% accuracy showed that 27 out of the 33 species had specific fragment sizes differentiated from other species. The remaining 6 species formed 3 pairs that showed overlapping fragment sizes. In addition, within-species polymorphisms were observed as 1 bp differences among 32 samples of 13 species. ARISA was applied to investigate a case of suspected food poisoning in which the mushroom was thought to be a toxic Kakishimeji. The morphological identification of the mushroom was ambiguous since the remaining sample lacked a part of the fruiting body. Further, yeast colonies had grown on the surface of the fruiting body during storage. The ARISA fragment size of the mushroom showed 7 bp difference from that of the candidate toxic mushroom. Although ARISA could be a useful tools for estimation of mushroom species, especially in case where the fruiting bodies have deteriorated or been processed, further studies are necessary for reliable identification. For example, it may be necessary to adopt more informative genes which could provide clearer species-specific polymorphisms than the ITS regions. PMID:27211917

  18. Utility of indels for species-level identification of a biologically complex plant group: a study with intergenic spacer in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Mahadani, Pradosh; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2014-11-01

    The Consortium of Barcode of Life plant working group proposed to use the defined portion of plastid genes rbcL and matK either singly or in combination as the standard DNA barcode for plants. But DNA barcode based identification of biologically complex plant groups are always a challenging task due to the occurrence of natural hybridization. Here, we examined the use of indels polymorphism in trnH-psbA and trnL-trnF sequences for rapid species identification of citrus. DNA from young leaves of selected citrus species were isolated and matK gene (~800 bp) and trnH-psbA spacer (~450 bp) of Chloroplast DNA was amplified for species level identification. The sequences within the group taxa of Citrus were aligned using the ClustalX program. With few obvious misalignments were corrected manually using the similarity criterion. We identified a 54 bp inverted repeat or palindrome sequence (27-80 regions) and 6 multi residues indel coding regions. Large inverted repeats in cpDNA provided authentication at the higher taxonomic levels. These diagnostics indel marker from trnH-psbA were successful in identifying different species (5 out of 7) within the studied Citrus except Citrus limon and Citrus medica. These two closely related species are distinguished through the 6 bp deletion in trnL-trnF. This study demonstrated that the indel polymorphism based approach easily characterizes the Citrus species and the same may be applied in other complex groups. Likewise other indels occurring intergenic spacer of chloroplast regions may be tested for rapid identification of other secondary citrus species.

  19. Nature of polymorphisms in 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer fingerprinting of Bacillus and related genera.

    PubMed

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Rizzi, Aurora; Mora, Diego; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Borin, Sara

    2003-09-01

    The intergenic transcribed spacers (ITS) between the 16S and 23S rRNA genetic loci are frequently used in PCR fingerprinting to discriminate bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. We investigated the molecular nature of polymorphisms in ITS-PCR fingerprinting of low-G+C-content spore-forming bacteria belonging to the genera Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, and Paenibacillus: We found that besides the polymorphisms in the homoduplex fragments amplified by PCR, heteroduplex products formed during PCR between amplicons from different ribosomal operons, with or without tRNA genes in the ITS, contribute to the interstrain variability in ITS-PCR fingerprinting patterns obtained in polyacrylamide-based gel matrices. The heteroduplex nature of the discriminating bands was demonstrated by fragment separation in denaturing polyacrylamide gels, by capillary electrophoresis, and by cloning, sequencing, and recombination of purified short and tRNA gene-containing long ITS. We also found that heteroduplex product formation is enhanced by increasing the number of PCR cycles. Homoduplex-heteroduplex polymorphisms (HHP) in a conserved region, such as the 16S and 23S rRNA gene ITS, allowed discrimination of closely related strains and species undistinguishable by other methods, indicating that ITS-HHP analysis is an easy and reproducible additional tool for strain typing.

  20. Genotypic Characterization of Bradyrhizobium Strains Nodulating Small Senegalese Legumes by 16S-23S rRNA Intergenic Gene Spacers and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Fingerprint Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Doignon-Bourcier, Florence; Willems, Anne; Coopman, Renata; Laguerre, Gisele; Gillis, Monique; de Lajudie, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    We examined the genotypic diversity of 64 Bradyrhizobium strains isolated from nodules from 27 native leguminous plant species in Senegal (West Africa) belonging to the genera Abrus, Alysicarpus, Bryaspis, Chamaecrista, Cassia, Crotalaria, Desmodium, Eriosema, Indigofera, Moghania, Rhynchosia, Sesbania, Tephrosia, and Zornia, which play an ecological role and have agronomic potential in arid regions. The strains were characterized by intergenic spacer (between 16S and 23S rRNA genes) PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (IGS PCR-RFLP) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting analyses. Fifty-three reference strains of the different Bradyrhizobium species and described groups were included for comparison. The strains were diverse and formed 27 groups by AFLP and 16 groups by IGS PCR-RFLP. The sizes of the IGS PCR products from the Bradyrhizobium strains that were studied varied from 780 to 1,038 bp and were correlated with the IGS PCR-RFLP results. The grouping of strains was consistent by the three methods AFLP, IGS PCR-RFLP, and previously reported 16S amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. For investigating the whole genome, AFLP was the most discriminative technique, thus being of particular interest for future taxonomic studies in Bradyrhizobium, for which DNA is difficult to obtain in quantity and quality to perform extensive DNA:DNA hybridizations. PMID:10966419

  1. Genotypic characterization of Bradyrhizobium strains nodulating small Senegalese legumes by 16S-23S rRNA intergenic gene spacers and amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprint analyses.

    PubMed

    Doignon-Bourcier, F; Willems, A; Coopman, R; Laguerre, G; Gillis, M; de Lajudie, P

    2000-09-01

    We examined the genotypic diversity of 64 Bradyrhizobium strains isolated from nodules from 27 native leguminous plant species in Senegal (West Africa) belonging to the genera Abrus, Alysicarpus, Bryaspis, Chamaecrista, Cassia, Crotalaria, Desmodium, Eriosema, Indigofera, Moghania, Rhynchosia, Sesbania, Tephrosia, and Zornia, which play an ecological role and have agronomic potential in arid regions. The strains were characterized by intergenic spacer (between 16S and 23S rRNA genes) PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (IGS PCR-RFLP) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting analyses. Fifty-three reference strains of the different Bradyrhizobium species and described groups were included for comparison. The strains were diverse and formed 27 groups by AFLP and 16 groups by IGS PCR-RFLP. The sizes of the IGS PCR products from the Bradyrhizobium strains that were studied varied from 780 to 1,038 bp and were correlated with the IGS PCR-RFLP results. The grouping of strains was consistent by the three methods AFLP, IGS PCR-RFLP, and previously reported 16S amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. For investigating the whole genome, AFLP was the most discriminative technique, thus being of particular interest for future taxonomic studies in Bradyrhizobium, for which DNA is difficult to obtain in quantity and quality to perform extensive DNA:DNA hybridizations.

  2. Bat white-nose syndrome: a real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructanstructans.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muller, Laura K.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Lindner, Daniel L.; O'Connor, Michael; Gargas, Andrea; Blehert, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Geomyces destructans is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that has killed millions of North American hibernating bats. We describe a real-time TaqMan PCR test that detects DNA from G. destructans by targeting a portion of the multicopy intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene complex. The test is highly sensitive, consistently detecting as little as 3.3 fg of genomic DNA from G. destructans. The real-time PCR test specifically amplified genomic DNA from G. destructans but did not amplify target sequence from 54 closely related fungal isolates (including 43 Geomyces spp. isolates) associated with bats. The test was further qualified by analyzing DNA extracted from 91 bat wing skin samples, and PCR results matched histopathology findings. These data indicate the real-time TaqMan PCR method described herein is a sensitive, specific, and rapid test to detect DNA from G. destructans and provides a valuable tool for WNS diagnostics and research.

  3. The Mycoplasma gallisepticum 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region sequence as a novel tool for epizootiological studies.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Ziv; Callison, S; Ferguson-Noel, N; Laibinis, V; Wooten, R; Kleven, S H

    2007-06-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) contains two sets of rRNA genes (5S, 16S and 23S) in its genome, but only one of the two is organized in an operon cluster and contains a unique 660-nucleotide intergenic spacer region (IGSR) between the 16S and the 23S rRNA genes. We designed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the specific amplification of the complete MG IGSR segment. The MG IGSR PCR was tested on 18 avian mollicute species and was confirmed as MG specific. The reaction sensitivity was demonstrated by comparing it to the well-established MG mgc2 PCR. The MG IGSR sequence was found to be highly variable (discrimination [D] index of 0.950) among a variety of MG laboratory strains, vaccine strains, and field isolates. The sequencing of the MG IGSR appears to be a valuable single-locus sequence typing (SLST) tool for MG isolate differentiation in diagnostic cases and epizootiological studies. PMID:17626483

  4. Sequence Diversity of the Intergenic Spacer Region of the rRNA Gene of Malassezia globosa Colonizing the Skin of Patients with Atopic Dermatitis and Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Takashi; Kodama, Minako; Saito, Masuyoshi; Ito, Tomonobu; Kato, Yukihiko; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Nishikawa, Akemi

    2003-01-01

    The lipophilic yeast Malassezia globosa is one of the major constituents of the mycoflora of the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). We compared the genotypes of M. globosa colonizing the skin surface of 32 AD patients and 20 healthy individuals for polymorphism of the intergenic spacer (IGS) 1 region of the rRNA gene. Sequence analysis demonstrated that M. globosa was divided into four major groups, which corresponded to the sources of the samples, on the phylogenetic tree. Of the four groups, two were from AD patients and one was from healthy subjects. The remaining group included samples from both AD patients and healthy subjects. In addition, the IGS 1 region of M. globosa contained short sequence repeats: (CT)n, and (GT)n. The number of sequence repeats also differed between the IGS 1 of M. globosa from AD patients and that from healthy subjects. These findings suggest that a specific genotype of M. globosa may play a significant role in AD, although M. globosa commonly colonizes both AD patients and healthy subjects. PMID:12843037

  5. Development of a 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer-based quantitative PCR assay for improved detection and enumeration of Lactococcus garvieae.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Hien Dang; Park, Hee Kuk; Kim, Wonyong; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2013-02-01

    Lactococcus garvieae is an important foodborne pathogen causing lactococcosis associated with hemorrhagic septicemia in fish worldwide. A real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) protocol targeting the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (ITS) region was developed for the detection and enum-eration of L. garvieae. The specificity was evaluated using genomic DNAs extracted from 66 cocci strains. Fourteen L. garvieae strains tested were positive, whereas 52 other strains including Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis ssp. hordniae and Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris did not show a specific signal. The minimal limit of detection was 2.63 fg of purified genomic DNA, equivalent to 1 genome of L. garvieae. The optimized protocol was applied for the survey of L. garvieae in naturally contaminated fish samples. Our results suggest that the qPCR protocol using ITS is a sensitive and efficient tool for the rapid detection and enumeration of L. garvieae in fish and fish-containing foods.

  6. Identification of virulence factors in 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer genotyped Staphylococcus aureus isolated from water buffaloes and small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Zottola, T; Locatelli, C; Pollera, C; Castiglioni, B; Scaccabarozzi, L; Moroni, P

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human and animal pathogen, and is regarded as an important cause of intramammary infection (IMI) in ruminants. Staphylococcus aureus genetic variability and virulence factors have been well studied in veterinary medicine, especially in cows as support for control and management of IMI. The aim of the present study was to genotype 71 Staph. aureus isolates from the bulk tank and foremilk of water buffaloes (n=40) and from udder tissue (n=7) and foremilk (n=24) from small ruminants. The method used was previously applied to bovine Staph. aureus and is based on the amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. The technique applied was able to identify different Staph. aureus genotypes isolated from dairy species other than the bovine species, and cluster the genotypes according to species and herds. Virulence gene distribution was consistent with genotype differentiation. The isolates were also characterized through determination of the presence of 19 virulence-associated genes by specific PCR. Enterotoxins A, C, D, G, I, J, and L were associated with Staph. aureus isolates from buffaloes, whereas enterotoxins C and L were linked to small ruminants. Genes coding for methicillin resistance, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, exfoliative toxins A and B, and enterotoxins B, E, and H were undetected. These findings indicate that RNA template-specific PCR is a valid technique for typing Staph. aureus from buffaloes and small ruminants and is a useful tool for understanding udder infection epidemiology.

  7. Bat white-nose syndrome: a real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructans.

    PubMed

    Muller, Laura K; Lorch, Jeffrey M; Lindner, Daniel L; O'Connor, Michael; Gargas, Andrea; Blehert, David S

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Geomyces destructans is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that has killed millions of North American hibernating bats. We describe a real-time TaqMan PCR test that detects DNA from G. destructans by targeting a portion of the multicopy intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene complex. The test is highly sensitive, consistently detecting as little as 3.3 fg genomic DNA from G. destructans. The real-time PCR test specifically amplified genomic DNA from G. destructans but did not amplify target sequence from 54 closely related fungal isolates (including 43 Geomyces spp. isolates) associated with bats. The test was qualified further by analyzing DNA extracted from 91 bat wing skin samples, and PCR results matched histopathology findings. These data indicate the real-time TaqMan PCR method described herein is a sensitive, specific and rapid test to detect DNA from G. destructans and provides a valuable tool for WNS diagnostics and research. PMID:22962349

  8. Nature of polymorphisms in 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer fingerprinting of Bacillus and related genera.

    PubMed

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Rizzi, Aurora; Mora, Diego; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Borin, Sara

    2003-09-01

    The intergenic transcribed spacers (ITS) between the 16S and 23S rRNA genetic loci are frequently used in PCR fingerprinting to discriminate bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. We investigated the molecular nature of polymorphisms in ITS-PCR fingerprinting of low-G+C-content spore-forming bacteria belonging to the genera Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Geobacillus, and Paenibacillus: We found that besides the polymorphisms in the homoduplex fragments amplified by PCR, heteroduplex products formed during PCR between amplicons from different ribosomal operons, with or without tRNA genes in the ITS, contribute to the interstrain variability in ITS-PCR fingerprinting patterns obtained in polyacrylamide-based gel matrices. The heteroduplex nature of the discriminating bands was demonstrated by fragment separation in denaturing polyacrylamide gels, by capillary electrophoresis, and by cloning, sequencing, and recombination of purified short and tRNA gene-containing long ITS. We also found that heteroduplex product formation is enhanced by increasing the number of PCR cycles. Homoduplex-heteroduplex polymorphisms (HHP) in a conserved region, such as the 16S and 23S rRNA gene ITS, allowed discrimination of closely related strains and species undistinguishable by other methods, indicating that ITS-HHP analysis is an easy and reproducible additional tool for strain typing. PMID:12957895

  9. DNA fingerprinting of Paenibacillus popilliae and Paenibacillus lentimorbus using PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2009-01-01

    Failure to identify correctly the milky disease bacteria, Paenibacillus popilliae and Paenibacillus lentimorbus, has resulted in published research errors and commercial production problems. A DNA fingerprinting procedure, using PCR amplification of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, has been shown to easily and accurately identify isolates of milky disease bacteria. Using 34 P. popilliae and 15 P. lentimorbus strains, PCR amplification of different ITS regions produced three DNA fingerprints. For P. lentimorbus phylogenic group 2 strains and for all P. popilliae strains tested, electrophoresis of amplified DNA produced a migratory pattern (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint) exhibiting three DNA bands. P. lentimorbus group 1 strains also produced this ITS-PCR fingerprint. However, the fingerprint was phase-shifted toward larger DNA sizes. Alignment of the respective P. popilliae and P. lentimorbus group 1 ITS DNA sequences showed extensive homology, except for a 108bp insert in all P. lentimorbus ITS regions. This insert occurred at the same location relative to the 23S rDNA and accounted for the phase-shift difference in P. lentimorbus group 1 DNA fingerprints. At present, there is no explanation for this 108bp insert. The third ITS-PCR fingerprint, produced by P. lentimorbus group 3 strains, exhibited approximately eight DNA bands. Comparison of the three fingerprints of milky disease bacteria to the ITS-PCR fingerprints of other Paenibacillus species demonstrated uniqueness. ITS-PCR fingerprinting successfully identified eight unknown isolates as milky disease bacteria. Therefore, this procedure can serve as a standard protocol to identify P. popilliae and P. lentimorbus.

  10. Utility of the trnH–psbA Intergenic Spacer Region and Its Combinations as Plant DNA Barcodes: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Liang, Dong; Li, Huan; Cherny, Stacey S.; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    Background The trnH–psbA intergenic spacer region has been used in many DNA barcoding studies. However, a comprehensive evaluation with rigorous sequence preprocessing and statistical testing on the utility of trnH–psbA and its combinations as DNA barcodes is lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings Sequences were searched from GenBank for a meta-analysis on the usefulness of trnH–psbA and its combinations as DNA barcodes. After preprocessing, we constructed full and matching data sets that contained 17 983 trnH–psbA sequences and 2190 sets of trnH–psbA, matK, rbcL, and ITS2 sequences from the same sample, repectively. These datasets were used to analyze the ability of trnH–psbA and its combinations to discriminate species by the BLAST and BLAST+P methods. The Fisher's exact test was used to evaluate the significance of performance differences. For the full data set, the identification success rates of trnH–psbA exceeded 70% in 18 families and 12 genera, respectively. For the matching data set, the identification rates of trnH–psbA were significantly higher than those of the other loci in two families and four genera. Similarly, the identification rates of trnH–psbA+ITS2 were significantly higher than those of matK+rbcL in 18 families and 21 genera. Conclusion/Significane This study provides valuable information on the higher utility of trnH–psbA and its combinations. We found that trnH–psbA+ITS2 combination performs better or equally well compared with other combinations in most taxonomic groups investigated. This information will guide the optimal usage of trnH–psbA and its combinations for species identification. PMID:23155412

  11. Analysis of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacers (IGSs) of marine vibrios for species-specific signature DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Lee, Simon K Y; Wang, H Z; Law, Sheran H W; Wu, Rudolf S S; Kong, Richard Y C

    2002-05-01

    Vibrios are widespread in the marine environment and a few pathogenic species are known to be commonly associated with outbreaks of diarrheal diseases in humans due to the consumption of raw or improperly cooked seafood. However, there are also many Vibrio species which are potentially pathogenic to vertebrate and invertebrate aquatic animals, and of which little is known. In an attempt to develop rapid PCR detection methods for these latter class of vibrios, we have examined the 16S-23S intergenic spacers (IGSs) of 10 lesser-known Vibrio species and successfully developed species-specific primers for eight of them--Vibrio costicola, V. diazotrophicus, V. fluvialis, V. nigripulchritudo, V. proteolyticus, V. salmonicida, V. splendidus and V. tubiashii. The IGS amplicons were amplified using primers complementary to conserved regions of the 16S and 23S rRNA genes, and cloned into plasmid vectors and sequenced. Analysis of the IGS sequences showed that 37 ribosomal RNA (rrn) operons representing seven different IGS types have been cloned from the 10 vibrios. The three IGS types--IGS(0), IGS(IA) and IGS(Glu)--were the most prevalent forms detected. Multiple alignment of representative sequences of these three IGS types from different Vibrio species revealed several domains of high sequence variability, which were used to design species-specific primers for PCR. The specificity of the primers were evaluated using total DNA prepared from different Vibrio species and bacterial genera. The results showed that the PCR method can be used to reliably detect eight of the 10 Vibrio species in marine waters in this study.

  12. The nuclear ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer as a target sequence to study intraspecific diversity of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Hebeloma cylindrosporum directly on pinus root systems.

    PubMed

    Guidot, A; Lumini, E; Debaud, J C; Marmeisse, R

    1999-03-01

    Polymorphism of the nuclear ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer (IGS) of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Hebeloma cylindrosporum was studied to evaluate whether this sequence could be used in field studies to estimate the diversity of strains forming mycorrhizas on individual Pinus pinaster root systems. This sequence was amplified by PCR from 125 haploid homokaryotic strains collected in 14 P. pinaster stands along the Atlantic coast of France by using conserved oligonucleotide primers. Restriction enzyme digestion of the amplified 3.4-kbp-long IGS allowed us to characterize 24 alleles whose frequencies differed. Nine of these alleles were found only once, whereas about 60% of the strains contained four of the alleles. Local populations could be almost as diverse as the entire population along a 150-km stretch of coastline that was examined; for example, 13 alleles were found in a single forest stand. The IGS from one strain was partially sequenced, and the sequence data were used to design oligonucleotides which allowed separate PCR amplification of three different segments of the IGS. Most polymorphisms observed among the full-length IGS regions resulted from polymorphisms in an internal ca. 1,500-bp-long sequence characterized by length variations that may have resulted from variable numbers of a T2AG3 motif. This internal polymorphic sequence could not be amplified from the genomes of nine other Hebeloma species. Analysis of this internal sequence amplified from the haploid progenies of 10 fruiting bodies collected in a 70-m2 area resulted in identification of six allelic forms and seven distinct diplotypes out of the 21 possible different combinations. Moreover, optimization of the PCR conditions resulted in amplification of this sequence from more than 80% of the DNA samples extracted from individual H. cylindrosporum infected P. pinaster mycorrhizal root tips, thus demonstrating the usefulness of this sequence for studying the below-ground diversity of

  13. Comparison of soil fungal community structure in different peanut rotation sequences using ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis in relation to aflatoxin-producing fungi.

    PubMed

    Sudini, H; Arias, C R; Liles, M R; Bowen, K L; Huettel, R N

    2011-01-01

    The present study focuses on determining soil fungal community structure in different peanut-cropping sequences by using a high-resolution DNA fingerprinting technique: ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). This study was initiated to determine fungal community profiles in four peanut-cropping sequences (continuous peanut, 4 years of continuous bahiagrass followed by peanut, peanut-corn-cotton, and peanut-cotton rotations), with a special focus to evaluate whether the profiles under investigation may have also indicated microbial differences that could affect Aspergillus flavus populations. Results indicated 75% similarities among fungal communities from the same cropping sequences as well as with similar times of sampling. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based detection of A. flavus directly from these soils was carried out using A. flavus-specific primers (FLA1 and FLA2) and also through quantitative estimation on A. flavus and A. parasiticus agar medium. Population levels of A. flavus in soil samples ranged from zero to 1.2 × 10(3) CFU g(-1) of soil (based on culturable methods); however, the fungus was not detected with A. flavus-specific primers. The minimum threshold limit at which these aflatoxin-producing fungi could be detected from the total soil genomic DNA was determined through artificial inoculation of samples with 10-fold increases in concentrations. The results indicated that a minimum population density of 2.6 × 10(6) CFU g(-1) of soil is required for PCR detection in our conditions. These results are useful in further determining the relative population levels of these fungi in peanut soils with other soil fungi. This is a new approach to understanding soil fungal communities and how they might change over time and under different rotation systems.

  14. Phylogeny of bradyrhizobia from Chinese cowpea miscellany inferred from 16S rRNA, atpD, glnII, and 16S-23S intergenic spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sufang; Xie, Fuli; Yang, Jiangke; Li, Youguo

    2011-04-01

    The cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.), peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), and mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) belong to a group of plants known as the "cowpea miscellany" plants, which are widely cultivated throughout the tropic and subtropical zones of Africa and Asia. However, the phylogeny of the rhizobial strains that nodulate these plants is poorly understood. Previous studies have isolated a diversity of rhizobial strains from cowpea miscellany hosts and have suggested that, phylogenetically, they are from different species. In this work, the phylogeny of 42 slow-growing rhizobial strains, isolated from root nodules of cowpea, peanut, and mung bean from different geographical regions of China, was investigated using sequences from the 16S rRNA, atpD and glnII genes, and the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer. The indigenous rhizobial strains from the cowpea miscellany could all be placed in the genus Bradyrhizobium , and Bradyrhizobium liaoningense and Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense were the main species. Phylogenies derived from housekeeping genes were consistent with phylogenies generated from the ribosomal gene. Mung bean rhizobia clustered only into B. liaoningense and B. yuanmingense and were phylogenetically less diverse than cowpea and peanut rhizobia. Geographical origin was significantly reflected in the phylogeny of mung bean rhizobia. Most cowpea rhizobia were more closely related to the 3 major groups B. liaoningense, B. yuanmingense, and Bradyrhizobium elkanii than to the minor groups Bradyrhizobium japonicum or Bradyrhizobium canariense . However, most peanut rhizobia were more closely related to the 2 major groups B. liaoningense and B. yuanmingense than to the minor group B. elkanii.

  15. Rapid Identification and Differentiation of the Soft Rot Erwinias by 16S-23S Intergenic Transcribed Spacer-PCR and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Toth, I. K.; Avrova, A. O.; Hyman, L. J.

    2001-01-01

    Current identification methods for the soft rot erwinias are both imprecise and time-consuming. We have used the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) to aid in their identification. Analysis by ITS-PCR and ITS-restriction fragment length polymorphism was found to be a simple, precise, and rapid method compared to current molecular and phenotypic techniques. The ITS was amplified from Erwinia and other genera using universal PCR primers. After PCR, the banding patterns generated allowed the soft rot erwinias to be differentiated from all other Erwinia and non-Erwinia species and placed into one of three groups (I to III). Group I comprised all Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica and subsp. betavasculorum isolates. Group II comprised all E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, subsp. odorifera, and subsp. wasabiae and E. cacticida isolates, and group III comprised all E. chrysanthemi isolates. To increase the level of discrimination further, the ITS-PCR products were digested with one of two restriction enzymes. Digestion with CfoI identified E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica and subsp. betavasculorum (group I) and E. chrysanthemi (group III) isolates, while digestion with RsaI identified E. carotovora subsp. wasabiae, subsp. carotovora, and subsp. odorifera/carotovora and E. cacticida isolates (group II). In the latter case, it was necessary to distinguish E. carotovora subsp. odorifera and subsp. carotovora using the α-methyl glucoside test. Sixty suspected soft rot erwinia isolates from Australia were identified as E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, E. chrysanthemi, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, and non-soft rot species. Ten “atypical” E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica isolates were identified as E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, subsp. carotovora, and subsp. betavasculorum and non-soft rot species, and two “atypical” E. carotovora subsp. carotovora isolates were identified as E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and subsp. atroseptica. PMID:11526007

  16. Identification of Lactobacillus Isolates from the Gastrointestinal Tract, Silage, and Yoghurt by 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Sequence Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Tannock, G. W.; Tilsala-Timisjarvi, A.; Rodtong, S.; Ng, J.; Munro, K.; Alatossava, T.

    1999-01-01

    Lactobacillus isolates were identified by PCR amplification and sequencing of the region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (spacer region). The sequences obtained from the isolates were compared to those of reference strains held in GenBank. A similarity of 97.5% or greater was considered to provide identification. To check the reliability of the method, the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced in the case of isolates whose spacer region sequences were less than 99% similar to that of a reference strain. Confirmation of identity was obtained in all instances. Spacer region sequencing provided rapid and accurate identification of Lactobacillus isolates obtained from gastrointestinal, yoghurt, and silage samples. It had an advantage over 16S V2-V3 sequence comparisons because it distinguished between isolates of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. PMID:10473450

  17. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O 139 outbreak based on the inter-genomic heterogeneity of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Atreyi; Majumdar, Anasuya; Ghosh, Ranajit K

    2005-12-01

    We have cloned, sequenced and analysed all the five classes of the intergenic (16S-23S rRNA) spacer region (ISR) associated with the eight rrn operons (rrna-rrnh) of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O 139 outbreak. ISR classes 'a' and 'g' were found to be invariant, ISR-B (ISRb and ISRe) exhibited very little variation, whereas ISR-C (ISRc, ISRd, and ISRf) and ISRh showed the maximum variation. Phylogenetic analysis conducted with all three ISR classes (ISR-B, ISR-C and ISRh) showed that the pre-O 139 serogroup and post-O 139 serogroup O1 El Tor strains arose out of two independent clones, which was congruent with the observation made by earlier workers suggesting that analyses of ISR-C and ISR-h, instead of all five ISR classes, could be successfully used to study phylogeny in this organism.

  18. Genetic relationships among strains of Xanthomonas fragariae based on random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR, repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR data and generation of multiplexed PCR primers useful for the identification of this phytopathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Pooler, M R; Ritchie, D F; Hartung, J S

    1996-01-01

    Genetic relationships among 25 isolates of Xanthomonas fragariae from diverse geographic regions were determined by three PCR methods that rely on different amplification priming strategies: random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR, repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) PCR, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) PCR. The results of these assays are mutually consistent and indicate that pathogenic strains are very closely related to each other. RAPD, ERIC, and REP PCR assays identified nine, four, and two genotypes, respectively, within X. fragariae isolates. A single nonpathogenic isolate of X. fragariae was not distinguishable by these methods. The results of the PCR assays were also fully confirmed by physiological tests. There was no correlation between DNA amplification product patterns and geographic sites of isolation, suggesting that this bacterium has spread largely through exchange of infected plant germ plasm. Sequences identified through the RAPD assays were used to develop three primer pairs for standard PCR assays to identify X. fragariae. In addition, we developed a stringent multiplexed PCR assay to identify X. fragariae by simultaneously using the three independently derived sets of primers specific for pathogenic strains of the bacteria. PMID:8795198

  19. Trypanosoma vivax: characterization of the spliced-leader gene of a Brazilian stock and species-specific detection by PCR amplification of an intergenic spacer sequence.

    PubMed

    Ventura, R M; Paiva, F; Silva, R A; Takeda, G F; Buck, G A; Teixeira, M M

    2001-09-01

    The sequence of the spliced-leader gene repeat of a Brazilian Trypanosoma vivax stock from cattle showed high similarity to sequences of West African T. vivax in both intron and intergenic sequences. This is the first evidence based on DNA sequences of close-relatedness between Brazilian and West African T. vivax stocks. A T. vivax-specific diagnostic PCR assay based on spliced-leader gene intergenic sequences was able to amplify DNA from T. vivax stocks from South America (Brazil, Bolivia, and Colombia) and West Africa. Species-specificity of this method was confirmed by results obtained by testing 15 other trypanosomes, including other species and subspecies that can also infect cattle. The PCR assay developed presented high sensitivity, detecting the DNA content of only one parasite and also revealing T. vivax infection in asymptomatic animals without detectable parasitemia by microhematocrit or in Giemsa-stained blood smears. Use of crude preparations from field-blood samples collected on both filter paper and glass slides as DNA template suggested that this method could be useful for the diagnosis of T. vivax in large epidemiological studies.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in different geographic regions and transmission cycles based on a microsatellite motif of the intergenic spacer of spliced leader genes✯

    PubMed Central

    Cura, Carolina I.; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M.; Duffy, Tomás; Burgos, Juan M.; Rodriguero, Marcela; Cardinal, Marta V.; Kjos, Sonia; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Blanchet, Denis; De Pablos, Luis M.; Tomasini, Nicolás; Silva, Alex Da; Russomando, Graciela; Cuba Cuba, Cesar A.; Aznar, Christine; Abate, Teresa; Levin, Mariano J.; Osuna, Antonio; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Diosque, Patricio; Solari, Aldo; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2011-01-01

    The intergenic region of spliced-leader (SL-IR) genes from 105 Trypanosoma cruzi I (Tc I) infected biological samples, culture isolates and stocks from 11 endemic countries, from Argentina to the USA were characterised, allowing identification of 76 genotypes with 54 polymorphic sites from 123 aligned sequences. On the basis of the microsatellite motif proposed by Herrera et al. (2007) to define four haplotypes in Colombia, we could classify these genotypes into four distinct Tc I SL-IR groups, three corresponding to the former haplotypes Ia (11 genotypes), Ib (11 genotypes) and Id (35 genotypes); and one novel group, Ie (19 genotypes). Genotypes harboring the Tc Ic motif were not detected in our study. Tc Ia was associated with domestic cycles in southern and northern South America and sylvatic cycles in Central and North America. Tc Ib was found in all transmission cycles from Colombia. Tc Id was identified in all transmission cycles from Argentina and Colombia, including Chagas cardiomyopathy patients, sylvatic Brazilian samples and human cases from French Guiana, Panama and Venezuela. Tc Ie gathered five samples from domestic Triatoma infestans from northern Argentina, nine samples from wild Mepraia spinolai and Mepraia gajardoi and two chagasic patients from Chile and one from a Bolivian patient with chagasic reactivation. Mixed infections by Tc Ia + Tc Id, Tc Ia + Tc Ie and Tc Id + Tc Ie were detected in vector faeces and isolates from human and vector samples. In addition, Tc Ia and Tc Id were identified in different tissues from a heart transplanted Chagas cardiomyopathy patient with reactivation, denoting histotropism. Trypanosoma cruzi I SL-IR genotypes from parasites infecting Triatoma gerstaeckeri and Didelphis virginiana from USA, T. infestans from Paraguay, Rhodnius nasutus and Rhodnius neglectus from Brazil and M. spinolai and M. gajardoi from Chile are to our knowledge described for the first time. PMID:20670628

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in different geographical regions and transmission cycles based on a microsatellite motif of the intergenic spacer of spliced-leader genes.

    PubMed

    Cura, Carolina I; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M; Duffy, Tomás; Burgos, Juan M; Rodriguero, Marcela; Cardinal, Marta V; Kjos, Sonia; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Blanchet, Denis; De Pablos, Luis M; Tomasini, Nicolás; da Silva, Alexandre; Russomando, Graciela; Cuba, Cesar A Cuba; Aznar, Christine; Abate, Teresa; Levin, Mariano J; Osuna, Antonio; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Diosque, Patricio; Solari, Aldo; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Schijman, Alejandro G

    2010-12-01

    The intergenic region of spliced-leader (SL-IR) genes from 105 Trypanosoma cruzi I (Tc I) infected biological samples, culture isolates and stocks from 11 endemic countries, from Argentina to the USA were characterised, allowing identification of 76 genotypes with 54 polymorphic sites from 123 aligned sequences. On the basis of the microsatellite motif proposed by Herrera et al. (2007) to define four haplotypes in Colombia, we could classify these genotypes into four distinct Tc I SL-IR groups, three corresponding to the former haplotypes Ia (11 genotypes), Ib (11 genotypes) and Id (35 genotypes); and one novel group, Ie (19 genotypes). Genotypes harbouring the Tc Ic motif were not detected in our study. Tc Ia was associated with domestic cycles in southern and northern South America and sylvatic cycles in Central and North America. Tc Ib was found in all transmission cycles from Colombia. Tc Id was identified in all transmission cycles from Argentina and Colombia, including Chagas cardiomyopathy patients, sylvatic Brazilian samples and human cases from French Guiana, Panama and Venezuela. Tc Ie gathered five samples from domestic Triatoma infestans from northern Argentina, nine samples from wild Mepraia spinolai and Mepraia gajardoi and two chagasic patients from Chile and one from a Bolivian patient with chagasic reactivation. Mixed infections by Tc Ia+Tc Id, Tc Ia+Tc Ie and Tc Id+Tc Ie were detected in vector faeces and isolates from human and vector samples. In addition, Tc Ia and Tc Id were identified in different tissues from a heart transplanted Chagas cardiomyopathy patient with reactivation, denoting histotropism. Trypanosoma cruzi I SL-IR genotypes from parasites infecting Triatoma gerstaeckeri and Didelphis virginiana from USA, T. infestans from Paraguay, Rhodnius nasutus and Rhodnius neglectus from Brazil and M. spinolai and M. gajardoi from Chile are to our knowledge described for the first time.

  2. Molecular organization of 5S rDNAs in Rajidae (Chondrichthyes): Structural features and evolution of piscine 5S rRNA genes and nontranscribed intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Pasolini, Paola; Costagliola, Domenico; Rocco, Lucia; Tinti, Fausto

    2006-05-01

    The genomic and gene organisation of 5S rDNA clusters have been extensively characterized in bony fish and eukaryotes, providing general issues for understanding the molecular evolution of this multigene DNA family. By contrast, the 5S rDNA features have been rarely investigated in cartilaginous fish (only three species). Here, we provide evidence for a dual 5S rDNA gene system in the Rajidae by sequence analysis of the coding region (5S) and adjacent nontranscribed spacer (NTS) in five Mediterranean species of rays (Rajidae), and in a large number of piscine taxa including lampreys and bony fish. As documented in several bony fish, two functional 5S rDNA types were found here also in the rajid genome: a short one (I) and a long one (II), distinguished by distinct 5S and NTS sequences. That the ancestral piscine genome had these two 5S rDNA loci might be argued from the occurrence of homologous dual gene systems that exist in several fish taxa and from 5S phylogenetic relationships. An extensive analysis of NTS-II sequences of Rajidae and Dasyatidae revealed the occurrence of large simple sequence repeat (SSR) regions that are formed by microsatellite arrays. The localization and organization of SSR within the NTS-II are conserved in Rajiformes since the Upper Cretaceous. The direct correlation between the SSRs extension and the NTS length indicated that they might play a role in the maintenance of the larger 5S rDNA clusters in rays. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that NTS-II is a valuable systematic tool limited to distantly related taxa of Rajiformes. PMID:16612546

  3. Development and Validation of an Improved PCR Method Using the 23S-5S Intergenic Spacer for Detection of Rickettsiae in Dermacentor variabilis Ticks and Tissue Samples from Humans and Laboratory Animals.

    PubMed

    Kakumanu, Madhavi L; Ponnusamy, Loganathan; Sutton, Haley T; Meshnick, Steven R; Nicholson, William L; Apperson, Charles S

    2016-04-01

    A novel nested PCR assay was developed to detectRickettsiaspp. in ticks and tissue samples from humans and laboratory animals. Primers were designed for the nested run to amplify a variable region of the 23S-5S intergenic spacer (IGS) ofRickettsiaspp. The newly designed primers were evaluated using genomic DNA from 11Rickettsiaspecies belonging to the spotted fever, typhus, and ancestral groups and, in parallel, compared to otherRickettsia-specific PCR targets (ompA,gltA, and the 17-kDa protein gene). The new 23S-5S IGS nested PCR assay amplified all 11Rickettsiaspp., but the assays employing other PCR targets did not. The novel nested assay was sensitive enough to detect one copy of a cloned 23S-5S IGS fragment from "CandidatusRickettsia amblyommii." Subsequently, the detection efficiency of the 23S-5S IGS nested assay was compared to those of the other three assays using genomic DNA extracted from 40 adultDermacentor variabilisticks. The nested 23S-5S IGS assay detectedRickettsiaDNA in 45% of the ticks, while the amplification rates of the other three assays ranged between 5 and 20%. The novel PCR assay was validated using clinical samples from humans and laboratory animals that were known to be infected with pathogenic species ofRickettsia The nested 23S-5S IGS PCR assay was coupled with reverse line blot hybridization with species-specific probes for high-throughput detection and simultaneous identification of the species ofRickettsiain the ticks. "CandidatusRickettsia amblyommii,"R. montanensis,R. felis, andR. belliiwere frequently identified species, along with some potentially novelRickettsiastrains that were closely related toR. belliiandR. conorii.

  4. Development and Validation of an Improved PCR Method Using the 23S-5S Intergenic Spacer for Detection of Rickettsiae in Dermacentor variabilis Ticks and Tissue Samples from Humans and Laboratory Animals.

    PubMed

    Kakumanu, Madhavi L; Ponnusamy, Loganathan; Sutton, Haley T; Meshnick, Steven R; Nicholson, William L; Apperson, Charles S

    2016-04-01

    A novel nested PCR assay was developed to detectRickettsiaspp. in ticks and tissue samples from humans and laboratory animals. Primers were designed for the nested run to amplify a variable region of the 23S-5S intergenic spacer (IGS) ofRickettsiaspp. The newly designed primers were evaluated using genomic DNA from 11Rickettsiaspecies belonging to the spotted fever, typhus, and ancestral groups and, in parallel, compared to otherRickettsia-specific PCR targets (ompA,gltA, and the 17-kDa protein gene). The new 23S-5S IGS nested PCR assay amplified all 11Rickettsiaspp., but the assays employing other PCR targets did not. The novel nested assay was sensitive enough to detect one copy of a cloned 23S-5S IGS fragment from "CandidatusRickettsia amblyommii." Subsequently, the detection efficiency of the 23S-5S IGS nested assay was compared to those of the other three assays using genomic DNA extracted from 40 adultDermacentor variabilisticks. The nested 23S-5S IGS assay detectedRickettsiaDNA in 45% of the ticks, while the amplification rates of the other three assays ranged between 5 and 20%. The novel PCR assay was validated using clinical samples from humans and laboratory animals that were known to be infected with pathogenic species ofRickettsia The nested 23S-5S IGS PCR assay was coupled with reverse line blot hybridization with species-specific probes for high-throughput detection and simultaneous identification of the species ofRickettsiain the ticks. "CandidatusRickettsia amblyommii,"R. montanensis,R. felis, andR. belliiwere frequently identified species, along with some potentially novelRickettsiastrains that were closely related toR. belliiandR. conorii. PMID:26818674

  5. Differentiation of Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida famata by rRNA gene intergenic spacer fingerprinting and reassessment of phylogenetic relationships among D. hansenii, C. famata, D. fabryi, C. flareri (=D. subglobosus) and D. prosopidis: description of D. vietnamensis sp. nov. closely related to D. nepalensis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huu-Vang; Gaillardin, Claude; Neuvéglise, Cécile

    2009-06-01

    The intergenic spacer rDNA amplification and AluI fingerprinting (IGSAF) method detected four distinct groups among 170 Debaryomyces hansenii strains: D. hansenii var. hansenii; Candida famata var. famata; D. hansenii var. fabryi and C. famata var. flareri. IGS sequence comparison of representative strains showed that D. hansenii var. hansenii and C. famata var. famata belonged to one species, whereas D. hansenii var. fabryi and C. famata var. flareri belonged to two different ones. This confirmed the following three species recently reinstated: D. hansenii (=C. famata), Debaryomyces fabryi and Debaryomyces subglobosus (=Candida flareri). Accordingly, growth at 37 degrees C may no longer be used to differentiate D. hansenii from D. fabryi. Riboflavin production is more specific for D. fabryi and D. subglobosus strains. IGSAF identified all the other 17 species of the genus Debaryomyces, six of them sharing with D. hansenii an rRNA gene unit harbouring two 5S rRNA genes. The phylogenetic tree established with IGS sequences was congruent with the one based on ACT1, GPD1 and COX2 sequences depicting a distinct D. hansenii clade close to the D. subglobosus, Debaryomyces prosopidis and D. fabryi clade. Description of Debaryomyces vietnamensis sp. nov. (type strain CBS 10535(T), MUCL 51648(T)), closely related to Debaryomyces nepalensis is given. PMID:19385997

  6. IntergenicDB: a database for intergenic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Notari, Daniel Luis; Molin, Aurione; Davanzo, Vanessa; Picolotto, Douglas; Ribeiro, Helena Graziottin; Silva, Scheila de Avila e

    2014-01-01

    A whole genome contains not only coding regions, but also non-coding regions. These are located between the end of a given coding region and the beginning of the following coding region. For this reason, the information about gene regulation process underlies in intergenic regions. There is no easy way to obtain intergenic regions from current available databases. IntergenicDB was developed to integrate data of intergenic regions and their gene related information from NCBI databases. The main goal of INTERGENICDB is to offer friendly database for intergenic sequences of bacterial genomes. Availability http://intergenicdb.bioinfoucs.com/ PMID:25097383

  7. Functionality of Intergenic Transcription: An Evolutionary Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, Johann; Giger, Thomas; Joerchel, Sabrina; Petzold, Ekkehard; Green, Richard E; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2006-01-01

    Although a large proportion of human transcription occurs outside the boundaries of known genes, the functional significance of this transcription remains unknown. We have compared the expression patterns of known genes as well as intergenic transcripts within the ENCODE regions between humans and chimpanzees in brain, heart, testis, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. We find that intergenic transcripts show patterns of tissue-specific conservation of their expression, which are comparable to exonic transcripts of known genes. This suggests that intergenic transcripts are subject to functional constraints that restrict their rate of evolutionary change as well as putative positive selection to an extent comparable to that of classical protein-coding genes. In brain and testis, we find that part of this intergenic transcription is caused by widespread use of alternative promoters. Further, we find that about half of the expression differences between humans and chimpanzees are due to intergenic transcripts. PMID:17040132

  8. Direct identification of slowly growing Mycobacterium species by analysis of the intergenic 16S-23S rDNA spacer region (ISR) using a GelCompar II database containing sequence based optimization for restriction fragment site polymorphisms (RFLPs) for 12 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, Volker; Harford, Cate; Bywater, Judy; Mayall, Barrie C

    2006-02-01

    To obtain Mycobacterium species identification directly from clinical specimens and cultures, the 16S-23S rDNA spacer (ISR) was amplified using previously published primers that detect all Mycobacterium species. The restriction enzyme that could potentially produce the most restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) was determined from all available ISR DNA sequences in GenBank to produce a novel data set of RFLPs for 31 slowly growing Mycobacterium species. Subsequently a GelCompar II database was constructed from RFLPs for 10 enzymes that have been used in the literature to differentiate slowly growing Mycobacterium species. The combination of Sau96I and HaeIII were the best choice of enzymes for differentiating clinically relevant slowly growing Mycobacterium species. A total of 392 specimens were studied by PCR with 195 negative and 197 positive specimens. The ISR-PCR product was digested with HaeIII (previously reported) and Sau96I (new to this study) to obtain a Mycobacterium species identification based on the ISR-RFLPs. The species identification obtained by ISR-RFLP was confirmed by DNA sequencing (isolate numbers are shown in parentheses) for M. avium (3), M. intracellulare (4), M. avium complex (1), M. gordonae (2) and M. tuberculosis (1). The total number of specimens (99) identified were from culture (67), Bactectrade mark 12B culture bottles (11), EDTA blood (3), directly from smear positive specimens (13), tissue (4) and urine (1). Direct species identification was obtained from all 13/13 smear positive specimens. The total number of specimens (99) were identified as M. tuberculosis (41), M. avium (7), M. avium complex (11), M. intracellulare MIN-A (20), M. flavescens (2), M. fortuitum (10), M. gordonae (4), M. shimoidei (1), M. ulcerans (1) and M. chelonae (2). This method reduces the time taken for Mycobacterium species identification from 8-10 weeks for culture and biochemical identification; to 4-6 weeks for culture and ISR-RFLP; to 2 days

  9. 100 Repetitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    One hundred repetitions--100 "useful" repetitions. This notion has guided the author's work in alternative education programs for almost 20 years, dealing with the most challenging students, from addicts to conduct-disordered adolescents to traumatized 5th graders. There are no magic tricks. The role of educators is to align with the healthy…

  10. Improving Resident Knowledge of Spacers.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Brian; Al Katranji, Khalid; Woodall, Meredith; Shepherd, Meagan; Flesher, Susan L

    2016-10-01

    Studies show the delivery of inhaled medications is maximized when a metered-dose inhaler (MDI) with a spacer is utilized. Our residents expressed concern with their knowledge of MDIs and spacers. This study was designed to address those concerns. Residents were given a 12-question pre-intervention, self-assessment questionnaire that explored their overall knowledge and comfort in utilizing MDI with spacers. Participants then received educational intervention via multimedia videos and a demonstration of proper use of MDI with spacer. Participants were given the same questionnaire immediately following the education and again 3 months later. Improvement was significant (P < .05) for each element studied as derived from the 12 questions. Improvement remained significant when these variables were assessed in the 3-month follow-up. In this study, we successfully improved the ability of our residents to deliver quality care by improving their knowledge and confidence in utilizing MDIs with spacers. PMID:27630006

  11. Identification of rickettsial isolates at the species level using multi-spacer typing

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier

    2007-01-01

    Background In order to estimate whether multi-spacer typing (MST), based on the sequencing of variable intergenic spacers, could serve for the identification of Rickettsia at the species level, we applied it to 108 rickettsial isolates or arthropod amplicons that include representatives of 23 valid Rickettsia species. Results MST combining the dksA-xerC, mppA-purC, and rpmE-tRNAfMet spacer sequences identified 61 genotypes, allowing the differentiation of each species by at least one distinct genotype. In addition, MST was discriminatory at the strain level in six species for which several isolates or arthropod amplicons were available. Conclusion MST proved to be a reproducible and high-resolution genotyping method allowing clear identification of rickettsial isolates at the species level and further additional differentiation of strains within some species. PMID:17662158

  12. Intergenic Transposable Elements Are Not Randomly Distributed in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Plague, Gordon R.

    2010-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) are mobile genetic elements in bacterial genomes. In general, intergenic IS elements are probably less deleterious for their hosts than intragenic ISs, simply because they have a lower likelihood of disrupting native genes. However, since promoters, Shine–Dalgarno sequences, and transcription factor binding sites are intergenic and upstream of genes, I hypothesized that not all neighboring gene orientations (NGOs) are selectively equivalent for IS insertion. To test this, I analyzed the NGOs of all intergenic ISs in 326 fully sequenced bacterial chromosomes. Of the 116 genomes with enough IS elements for statistical analysis, 68 have significantly more ISs between convergently oriented genes than expected, and 46 have significantly fewer ISs between divergently oriented genes. This suggests that natural selection molds intergenic IS distributions because they are least intrusive between convergent gene pairs and most intrusive between divergent gene pairs. PMID:20697140

  13. Repetition reduction: Lexical repetition in the absence of referent repetition

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tuan Q.; Watson, Duane G.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated words are produced with reduced acoustic prominence compared to words that are new to a discourse. Although these effects are often attributed to priming in the production system, the locus of the effect within the production system remains unresolved because in natural speech, repetition often involves repetition of referents and lexical items simultaneously. Therefore, repetition reduction could be due to repeated mention of a referent, or repetition of a word or referring expression. In our study, we test whether repetition reduction is due to repetition of lexical items or repeated mention of referents using an event description task. The results show that repeated lexical items lead to reduced duration and intensity even in the absence of referent repetition whereas repeated referents lead to reduced intensity alone. The general pattern suggests that repetition reduction is due most strongly to repetition of the lexical item, rather than repeated mention of the referent. PMID:24548320

  14. Complete Sequence Construction of the Highly Repetitive Ribosomal RNA Gene Repeats in Eukaryotes Using Whole Genome Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Saumya; Ganley, Austen R D

    2016-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) encode the major rRNA species of the ribosome, and thus are essential across life. These genes are highly repetitive in most eukaryotes, forming blocks of tandem repeats that form the core of nucleoli. The primary role of the rDNA in encoding rRNA has been long understood, but more recently the rDNA has been implicated in a number of other important biological phenomena, including genome stability, cell cycle, and epigenetic silencing. Noncoding elements, primarily located in the intergenic spacer region, appear to mediate many of these phenomena. Although sequence information is available for the genomes of many organisms, in almost all cases rDNA repeat sequences are lacking, primarily due to problems in assembling these intriguing regions during whole genome assemblies. Here, we present a method to obtain complete rDNA repeat unit sequences from whole genome assemblies. Limitations of next generation sequencing (NGS) data make them unsuitable for assembling complete rDNA unit sequences; therefore, the method we present relies on the use of Sanger whole genome sequence data. Our method makes use of the Arachne assembler, which can assemble highly repetitive regions such as the rDNA in a memory-efficient way. We provide a detailed step-by-step protocol for generating rDNA sequences from whole genome Sanger sequence data using Arachne, for refining complete rDNA unit sequences, and for validating the sequences obtained. In principle, our method will work for any species where the rDNA is organized into tandem repeats. This will help researchers working on species without a complete rDNA sequence, those working on evolutionary aspects of the rDNA, and those interested in conducting phylogenetic footprinting studies with the rDNA. PMID:27576718

  15. Repetition Reduction: Lexical Repetition in the Absence of Referent Repetition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Tuan Q.; Watson, Duane G.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to words that are new to a discourse, repeated words are produced with reduced acoustic prominence. Although these effects are often attributed to priming in the production system, the locus of the effect within the production system remains unresolved because, in natural speech, repetition often involves repetition of referents and…

  16. Electrostatic precipitator construction having spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Jonelis, J.A.

    1984-10-23

    The present invention relates to an improved construction for an electrostatic precipitator. The electrostatic precipitator collects solid particles carried by a flue gas from a source of combustion. The precipitator includes a plurality of spaced plates for collecting solid particles from the flue gas by electrostatic attraction of the solid particles to the plates. A plurality of elongated electrodes is positioned among the plates. Each of the electrodes is mounted between a pair of adjacent plates. Each of the electrodes is parallel to the other electrodes and is parallel to the plates. A plurality of identical spacers is positioned between adjacent plates to hold the plates in a flat attitude and to maintain adjacent surfaces of adjacent plates equidistantly spaced from one another. Each of the spacers is an elongated single unitary member and has one end fixed to a surface of one of a pair of adjacent surfaces of the plates and the other end abutting the other of the adjacent surfaces.

  17. Spacer grid assembly and locking mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Jr., Harold J.; Veca, Anthony R.; Donck, Harry A.

    1982-01-01

    A spacer grid assembly is disclosed for retaining a plurality of fuel rods in substantially parallel spaced relation, the spacer grids being formed with rhombic openings defining contact means for engaging from one to four fuel rods arranged in each opening, the spacer grids being of symmetric configuration with their rhombic openings being asymmetrically offset to permit inversion and relative rotation of the similar spacer grids for improved support of the fuel rods. An improved locking mechanism includes tie bars having chordal surfaces to facilitate their installation in slotted circular openings of the spacer grids, the tie rods being rotatable into locking engagement with the slotted openings.

  18. Generator stator core vent duct spacer posts

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, John Wesley; Tong, Wei

    2003-06-24

    Generator stator cores are constructed by stacking many layers of magnetic laminations. Ventilation ducts may be inserted between these layers by inserting spacers into the core stack. The ventilation ducts allow for the passage of cooling gas through the core during operation. The spacers or spacer posts are positioned between groups of the magnetic laminations to define the ventilation ducts. The spacer posts are secured with longitudinal axes thereof substantially parallel to the core axis. With this structure, core tightness can be assured while maximizing ventilation duct cross section for gas flow and minimizing magnetic loss in the spacers.

  19. Grammatical Change through Repetition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arevart, Supot

    1989-01-01

    The effect of repetition on grammatical change in an unrehearsed talk is examined based on a case study of a single learner. It was found that repetition allows for accuracy monitoring in that errors committed in repeated contexts undergo correction. Implications for teaching are discussed. (23 references) (LB)

  20. Replicating repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    Tognetti, Silvia; Speck, Christian

    2016-05-27

    The function and regulation of repetitive DNA, the 'dark matter' of the genome, is still only rudimentarily understood. Now a study investigating DNA replication of repetitive centromeric chromosome segments has started to expose a fascinating replication program that involves suppression of ATR signalling, in particular during replication stress. PMID:27230530

  1. The Negative Repetition Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  2. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that happen when too much stress is placed on a part of the body, resulting in inflammation (pain and swelling), muscle strain, or tissue damage. This stress generally occurs from ...

  3. Repetitive stereotyped behaviors.

    PubMed

    Berkson, G

    1983-11-01

    This paper points to factors that determine whether repetitive stereotyped behavior occur in the behavior repertoire. The analysis pits an "intrinsic oscillator" mechanism against a "self-stimulation" theory and chooses to emphasize the latter. The paper accounts for the repetitive and rhythmic nature of stereotypy by suggesting that repetition in a rhythmic way is the most efficient way of self-stimulation. It proposes that rhythm may be a reinforcement in at least some cases. It raises the question of whether control of stimulation by the person is a necessary condition for maintaining stereotypy. The paper recognizes the possibility that stereotyped behaviors may have their origin in the common repetitive behaviors of infancy but emphasizes that pathological stereotypy may involve more than immature repetition. It suggests that there is reason to believe that early intervention to prevent pathological stereotyped behavior might be effective but that we do not know much about how stereotypies get started.

  4. Roles of repetitive sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  5. Comparative analysis of the S-intergenic region in class-II S haplotypes of self-incompatible Brassica rapa (syn. campestris).

    PubMed

    Kakizaki, Tomohiro; Takada, Yoshinobu; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Suzuki, Go; Satta, Yoko; Shiba, Hiroshi; Isogai, Akira; Takayama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masao

    2006-02-01

    In the Brassica self-incompatibility (SI) system, a pollen determinant, SP11, is involved in dominance/recessive relationships in pollen SI phenotypes. In order to gain some insights into the genomic structure around the SP11 and the mechanisms that give dominance/recessive relationships, we characterized the genomic region containing SP11 and SRK genes in three pollen recessive class-II S haplotypes. The direction of transcription of S genes was completely conserved among class-II S haplotypes. However, the region between SP11 and SRK (S-intergenic region) was highly polymorphic without short repetitive sequences. In addition, we found a sequence similarity between the short repetitive sequence and 5'-upstream region of SP11. This sequence similarity was found to be potentially related to the expression of dominance relationships through the change of chromatin structure.

  6. Repetition priming in music.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Sean; Palmer, Caroline

    2008-06-01

    The authors explore priming effects of pitch repetition in music in 3 experiments. Musically untrained participants heard a short melody and sang the last pitch of the melody as quickly as possible. Each experiment manipulated (a) whether or not the tone to be sung (target) was heard earlier in the melody (primed) and (b) the prime-target distance (measured in events). Experiment 1 used variable-length melodies, whereas Experiments 2 and 3 used fixed-length melodies. Experiment 3 changed the timbre of the target tone. In all experiments, fast-responding participants produced repeated tones faster than nonrepeated tones, and this repetition benefit decreased as prime-target distances increased. All participants produced expected tonic endings faster than less expected nontonic endings. Repetition and tonal priming effects are compared with harmonic priming effects in music and with repetition priming effects in language. PMID:18505332

  7. Repetition priming in music.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Sean; Palmer, Caroline

    2008-06-01

    The authors explore priming effects of pitch repetition in music in 3 experiments. Musically untrained participants heard a short melody and sang the last pitch of the melody as quickly as possible. Each experiment manipulated (a) whether or not the tone to be sung (target) was heard earlier in the melody (primed) and (b) the prime-target distance (measured in events). Experiment 1 used variable-length melodies, whereas Experiments 2 and 3 used fixed-length melodies. Experiment 3 changed the timbre of the target tone. In all experiments, fast-responding participants produced repeated tones faster than nonrepeated tones, and this repetition benefit decreased as prime-target distances increased. All participants produced expected tonic endings faster than less expected nontonic endings. Repetition and tonal priming effects are compared with harmonic priming effects in music and with repetition priming effects in language.

  8. Characterizing temporal repetition

    SciTech Connect

    Cukierman, D.; Delgrande, J.

    1996-12-31

    We are investigating the representation and reasoning about schedulable, repeated activities, specified using calendars. Examples of such activities include meeting every Tuesday and Thursday during a semester and attending a seminar every first day of a month. This research provides for a valuable framework for scheduling systems, financial systems and, in general, date-based systems. Very recently work has been done related to reasoning about repetition in the Artificial Intelligence community and others. A partial reference list is provided here. However, to our knowledge no extensive taxonomy of repetition has been proposed in the literature. We believe that reasoning about repeated activities calls for a study and precise definition of the topological characteristics in a repetitive series. In this abstract we summarize a proposal to classify types of repetition according to parameters. The combination of all possible values of these parameters provides a complete taxonomy of repetitive classes with respect to the proposed parameters. Several notions of repetition are considered, some are extremely general, some are very specific.

  9. Indirect decentralized repetitive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo Cheol; Longman, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    Learning control refers to controllers that learn to improve their performance at executing a given task, based on experience performing this specific task. In a previous work, the authors presented a theory of indirect decentralized learning control based on use of indirect adaptive control concepts employing simultaneous identification and control. This paper extends these results to apply to the indirect repetitive control problem in which a periodic (i.e., repetitive) command is given to a control system. Decentralized indirect repetitive control algorithms are presented that have guaranteed convergence to zero tracking error under very general conditions. The original motivation of the repetitive control and learning control fields was learning in robots doing repetitive tasks such as on an assembly line. This paper starts with decentralized discrete time systems, and progresses to the robot application, modeling the robot as a time varying linear system in the neighborhood of the desired trajectory. Decentralized repetitive control is natural for this application because the feedback control for link rotations is normally implemented in a decentralized manner, treating each link as if it is independent of the other links.

  10. Genetic variability and geographical diversity of the main Chagas' disease vector Panstrongylus megistus (Hemiptera: Triatominae) in Brazil based on ribosomal DNA intergenic sequences.

    PubMed

    Cavassin, Francelisse Bridi; Kuehn, Christian Collins; Kopp, Rogério Luiz; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanette; Da Rosa, João Aristeu; Luz, Ennio; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Bargues, María Dolores

    2014-05-01

    Studies were made on the ribosomal DNA intergenic region, comprising complete internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 sequences, of populations of the triatomine Panstrongylus megistus, the most important vector of Chagas' disease in Brazil since Triatoma infestans eradication. Specimens were from 26 localities of Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, Paraná, São Paulo, Minas Gerais, Bahia, and Sergipe states. In total, 21 ITS-1 and 12 ITS-2 haplotypes were found. Nucleotide differences were higher in ITS-1 (3.00%) than in ITS-2 (1.33%). The intergenic region was 1,513-1,522-bp-long (mean 1,516.9 bp), providing 26 combined haplotypes. The combination of microsatellites found in both ITSs may be of applied usefulness, to assess interpopulation specimen exchange and potential recolonizations after vector elimination by control implementation. Network results suggest that São Paulo may be considered one of the spreading centers of this species. Molecular clock datation suggests that P. megistus populations are diversifying at least since 4.54 million years ago, with diversification still ongoing today by geographical isolation of populations. Evidence is provided about the relationship of genetic diversity with geographical spread that characterizes a major vector and explains its ability to colonize distant areas and different ecotopes, including human habitats, and consequently its importance in Chagas' disease epidemiology.

  11. The negative repetition effect.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Neil W; Peterson, Daniel J

    2013-09-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising negative repetition effect, in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and across pairs, the target words were drawn from a small set of categories. In the repetition condition, the pairs were initially presented in a random order and then presented a 2nd time blocked by the category of the target words. In the single presentation condition, the pairs were presented only in the blocked order. Participants in the former condition recalled fewer target words on a free recall test despite having seen the word pairs twice (the negative repetition effect). This phenomenon is explored in a series of 5 experiments assessing 3 theoretical accounts of the effect. The experiments demonstrate that the negative repetition effect generalizes over multiple encoding conditions (reading and generative encoding), over different memory tests (free and cued recall), and over delay (5 min and 2 days). The results argue against a retrieval account and a levels-of-processing account but are consistent with the item-specific-relational account, the account upon which the effect was initially predicated. PMID:23421508

  12. The ribosomal gene spacer region in archaebacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achenbach-Richter, L.; Woese, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Sequences for the spacer regions that separate the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA genes have been determined for four more (strategically placed) archaebacteria. These confirm the general rule that methanogens and extreme halophiles have spacers that contain a single tRNAala gene, while tRNA genes are not found in the spacer region of the true extreme thermophiles. The present study also shows that the spacer regions from the sulfate reducing Archaeglobus and the extreme thermophile Thermococcus (both of which cluster phylogenetically with the methanogens and extreme halophiles) contain each a tRNAala gene. Thus, not only all methanogens and extreme halophiles show this characteristic, but all organisms on the "methanogen branch" of the archaebacterial tree appear to do so. The finding of a tRNA gene in the spacer region of the extreme thermophile Thermococcus celer is the first known phenotypic property that links this organism with its phylogenetic counterparts, the methanogens, rather than with its phenotypic counterparts, the sulfur-dependent extreme thermophiles.

  13. Gemini surfactants with a disaccharide spacer.

    PubMed

    Menger, F M; Mbadugha, B N

    2001-02-01

    A gemini surfactant is an amphiphile possessing (in sequence) the following: hydrocarbon tail/polar group/spacer/polar group/hydrocarbon tail. Widespread interest in geminis has emerged recently from both industrial and academic laboratories. In the present contribution, two related families of geminis have been synthesized, both with trehalose, a disaccharide, as a polar spacer. One family, Series-A, is nonionic and has amide groups separating the long chains from the trehalose spacer. The other family, Series-B, has quaternary ammonium ions connecting the long chains to the trehalose spacer. It was found that Series-A geminis are water insoluble despite the two amides and multiple hydroxyls. When hydrated or extruded, these geminis form microscopically visible vesicular and tubular structures above their transition temperatures (which were determined calorimetrically). Insoluble monomolecular films, constructed from these geminis, have interfacial areas that are dominated by the sugar spacer although intermolecular chain/chain interactions seem to stabilize the films. Thus, the behavior of Series-A geminis in many ways parallels that of phospholipids and simple double-chain surfactants. It is as if the trehalose is less of a spacer than a large but conventional headgroup. In contrast, cationic Series-B geminis are water soluble and form micelles with critical micelle concentrations an order of magnitude lower than that of corresponding conventional surfactants. Molecular modeling using the Amber force field explains the difference in properties between the two families of geminis. Series-A are tubular in shape and thus prefer bilayer packing as do other amphiphiles in which the headgroups are similar in width to the sum of the tail diameters. Series-B geminis are conical-shaped and pack more readily into spherical micelles. This work entails synthesis, tensiometry, conductance, microscopy, surface balance studies, calorimetry, light scattering, and molecular

  14. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, S T

    2001-05-01

    Repetitive strain injury is a group of musculoskeletal disorders affecting muscles, tendons, nerves and blood vessels. These disorders could be attributed to occupational causes; however non-occupational causes should be excluded. The management of these cases required a multidisciplinary team approach.

  15. Repetition Priming in Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Sean; Palmer, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    The authors explore priming effects of pitch repetition in music in 3 experiments. Musically untrained participants heard a short melody and sang the last pitch of the melody as quickly as possible. Each experiment manipulated (a) whether or not the tone to be sung (target) was heard earlier in the melody (primed) and (b) the prime-target distance…

  16. Separator-spacer for electrochemical systems

    DOEpatents

    Grimes, Patrick G.; Einstein, Harry; Newby, Kenneth R.; Bellows, Richard J.

    1983-08-02

    An electrochemical cell construction features a novel co-extruded plastic electrode in an interleaved construction with a novel integral separator-spacer. Also featured is a leak and impact resistant construction for preventing the spill of corrosive materials in the event of rupture.

  17. Heterogeneous diversity of spacers within CRISPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael; He, Jiankui

    2011-03-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in bacterial and archaeal DNA have recently been shown to be a new type of anti-viral immune system in these organisms. We here study the diversity of spacers in CRISPR under selective pressure. We propose a population dynamics model that explains the biological observation that the leader-proximal end of CRISPR is more diversified and the leader-distal end of CRISPR is more conserved. This result is shown to be in agreement with recent experiments. Our results show that the CRISPR spacer structure is influenced by and provides a record of the viral challenges that bacteria face. 1) J. He and M. W. Deem, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 (2010) 128102

  18. Tube support grid and spacer therefor

    DOEpatents

    Ringsmuth, Richard J.; Kaufman, Jay S.

    1986-01-01

    A tube support grid and spacers therefor provide radially inward preloading of heat exchange tubes to minimize stress upon base welds due to differential thermal expansion. The grid comprises a concentric series of rings and spacers with opposing concave sides for conforming to the tubes and V-shaped ends to provide resilient flexibility. The flexibility aids in assembly and in transmitting seismic vibrations from the tubes to a shroud. The tube support grid may be assembled in place to achieve the desired inwardly radial preloading of the heat exchange tubes. Tab and slot assembly further minimizes stresses in the system. The radii of the grid rings may be preselected to effect the desired radially inward preloading.

  19. Honeycomb spacer crush stength test results

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1993-09-15

    This report discusses aluminum honeycomb spacers, which are used as an energy absorbent material in shipping packages for off site shipment of radioactive materials and which were ordered in two crush strengths, 1,000 psi and 2,000 psi for use in drop tests requested by the Packaging and Transportation group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the vendor and the SRTC Materials Laboratory performed crush strength measurements on test samples made from the material used to fabricate the actual spacers. The measurements of crush strength made in the SRTC Materials Laboratory are within 100 psi of the measurements made by the manufacturer for all samples tested and all test measurements are within 10% of the specified crush strength, which is acceptable to the P&T group for the planned tests.

  20. Improved nuclear fuel assembly grid spacer

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, John; Kaplan, Samuel

    1977-01-01

    An improved fuel assembly grid spacer and method of retaining the basic fuel rod support elements in position within the fuel assembly containment channel. The improvement involves attachment of the grids to the hexagonal channel and of forming the basic fuel rod support element into a grid structure, which provides a design which is insensitive to potential channel distortion (ballooning) at high fluence levels. In addition the improved method eliminates problems associated with component fabrication and assembly.

  1. Allele-specific germ cell epimutation in the spacer promoter of the 45S ribosomal RNA gene after Cr(III) exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Shiao, Y.-H. . E-mail: shiao@mail.ncifrcf.gov; Crawford, Erik B.; Anderson, Lucy M.; Patel, Pritesh; Ko, Kinarm

    2005-06-15

    Paternal exposure of mice to Cr(III) causes increased tumor risk in offspring; an epigenetic mechanism has been hypothesized. Representational difference analysis of gene methylation in sperm revealed hypomethylation in the 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene after Cr(III) exposure, compared with controls. The most striking effects were seen in the rRNA spacer promoter, a region in the intergenic region of rRNA gene clusters that can influence transcription. Methylation of the rRNA spacer promoter has not been studied heretofore. Sperm DNAs from Cr(III)-treated and control mice were modified by the bisulfite method followed by PCR amplification of the spacer promoter, including 27 CpG sites. Cloning and dideoxy sequencing identified sequence variants (T or G at base -2214) in the spacer promoter. The T allele had less DNA methylation than the G allele in control mice (17 of 17 clones vs. 42 of 72 clones, P = 0.0004). In spite of diversity of sperm DNA methylation patterns, the DNA clones from Cr(III)-exposed mice had fewer methylated CpG sites, by an average of 19% (P < 0.0001). This difference was limited to the G allele. The pyrosequencing technique was applied to quantify the percentage of methylation directly from amplified PCR products. Strikingly, for nine CpG sites including the spacer promoter core region, hypomethylation was highly significant in the Cr(III)-treated group (paired T test, P < 0.0001). Thus, one allele of the 45S rRNA spacer promoter is hypomethylated in sperm germ cells after Cr(III) exposure. This epimutation may lead to increase of tumor risk in the offspring.

  2. Method of forming tiny silicon nitride spacer for flash EPROM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. H.; Wu, K. C.; Hwang, Yuan-Ko; Chen, Shih-Shiung

    2001-04-01

    The silicon nitride spacer technology is widely used in split gate non-volatile memory device sand flash EPROM. A tiny spacer structure is formed on tunnel oxide layer adjacent to the sidewall of floating gate electrode to prevent write disturbance that caused by reverse tunneling. But the processing is very critical for such flash EPROM devices since the dimension the SN spacer are so small. It was influenced not only by SN spacer dry etching but also later photo-resistance strip process of implantation for threshold voltage adjustment. A new method of forming tiny SN spacer by using anisotropic dry etching and isotropic wet etching was presented in this paper.

  3. Designing string-of-beads vaccines with optimal spacers.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Benjamin; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2016-01-26

    String-of-beads polypeptides allow convenient delivery of epitope-based vaccines. The success of a polypeptide relies on efficient processing: constituent epitopes need to be recovered while avoiding neo-epitopes from epitope junctions. Spacers between epitopes are employed to ensure this, but spacer selection is non-trivial.We present a framework to determine optimally the length and sequence of a spacer through multi-objective optimization for human leukocyte antigen class I restricted polypeptides. The method yields string-of-bead vaccines with flexible spacer lengths that increase the predicted epitope recovery rate fivefold while reducing the immunogenicity from neo-epitopes by 44% compared to designs without spacers.

  4. Molecular profiling of microbial communities from contaminated sources: Use of subtractive cloning methods and rDNA spacer sequences. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, F.T.

    1998-06-01

    'The major objective of the research is to provide appropriate sequences and to assemble a high-density DNA array of oligonucleotides that can be used for rapid profiling of microbial populations from polluted areas. The sequences to be assigned to the DNA array are chosen from from cloned genomic DNA sequences (the ribosomal operon, described below) from groundwater at DOE sites containing organic solvents. The sites, Hanford Nuclear Plant and Lawrence Livermore Site 300, have well characterized pollutant histories, which have been provided by the collaborators. At this mid-point of the project, over 60 unique sequence classes of intergenic spacer region have been idedntified from the first sample site. The use of these sequences as hybridization probes, and their frequency of occurrence, allow a clear distinction between bacterial communities before and after remediation by acetate/nitrate pumping. The authors have developed the hybridization conditions for identifying PCR products in a 96 well format, a versatile alignment and visualization program (acronym: MALIGN) developed by Dr. Dennis Maeder, has been used to align the ISRs, which are variable in length and sometimes in position of the tRNAs. Finally, in collaboration with Dr. W. Chen and Dr. J. Zhou at ORNL, they have significant evidence that mass spectrometer analysis can be used to determine the lengths of PCR amplified intergenic spacer DNA.'

  5. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    van Tulder, Maurits; Malmivaara, Antti; Koes, Bart

    2007-05-26

    Repetitive strain injury remains a controversial topic. The term repetitive strain injury includes specific disorders such as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, Guyon canal syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, and tendonitis of the wrist or hand. The diagnosis is usually made on the basis of history and clinical examination. Large high-quality studies using newer imaging techniques, such as MRI and ultrasonography are few. Consequently, the role of such imaging in diagnosis of upper limb disorders remains unclear. In many cases, no specific diagnosis can be established and complaints are labelled as non-specific. Little is known about the effectiveness of treatment options for upper limb disorders. Strong evidence for any intervention is scarce and the effect, if any, is mainly short-term pain relief. Exercise is beneficial for non-specific upper limb disorders. Immobilising hand braces and open carpal tunnel surgery release are beneficial for carpal tunnel syndrome, and topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroid injections are helpful for lateral epicondylitis. Exercise is probably beneficial for neck pain, as are corticosteroid injections and exercise for shoulder pain. Although upper limb disorders occur frequently in the working population, most trials have not exclusively included a working population or assessed effects on work-related outcomes. Further high-quality trials should aim to include sufficient sample sizes, working populations, and work-related outcomes.

  6. Intergenic exchange, geographic isolation, and the evolution of bioluminescent color for Pyrophorus click beetles.

    PubMed

    Feder, Jeffrey L; Velez, Sebastian

    2009-05-01

    Gene duplication is an evolutionary process in which the emergent property of the whole can become greater and different than the sum of its parts. One potential outcome for gene duplication is for loci to evolve different, yet related functions. In this case, intergenic exchange can shuffle blocks of differentiated nucleotides between paralogues to create new alleles and phenotypes rather than simply homogenize loci. Bioluminescent click beetles in the genus Pyrophorus (Coleoptera: Elateridae) provide an opportunity to explore the creative potential of intergenic exchange for gene family evolution. Pyrophorus beetles bioluminesce different light colors from a pair of dorsal light organs and a ventral light organ. The light organs are under the separate genetic control of dorsal and ventral luciferase loci. Here, we report that intergenic exchange is common between dorsal and ventral loci for beetles from Jamaica (P. plagiophthalamus), the Dominican Republic (P. mellifluous), Belize (P. luscus), and Trinidad (P. noctilucus). We also present evidence that periods of past geographic isolation for beetles on Jamaica, probably acting in concert with selection, built differentiated blocks of substitutions within dorsal and ventral P. plagiophthalamus luciferase loci. Gene flow and intergenic exchange subsequently shuffled these substitutions between dorsal and ventral loci to produce new color phenotypes on Jamaica, including a yellow-green polymorphism. We discuss the possibility of a previously unrecognized emergent evolutionary property of intergenic exchange for luciferase involving cycles of bioluminescent color change related to differences in selective constrains acting on dorsal versus ventral loci. We also explore whether intergenic exchange may commonly create novel variation and the potential for cyclic evolution in other multigene family systems.

  7. Repetitive sequence families in Alces alces americana.

    PubMed

    Blake, R D; Wang, J Z; Beauregard, L

    1997-05-01

    High-resolution derivative melting was used to obtain detailed distributions of local (G + C) contents in a number of ruminant DNAs. Profiles over low (G + C) regions [20-36% (G + C)] are congruent for all ruminants. This region represents 45-50% of the nuclear DNA content and primarily contains intergenic and intron sequences. The high (G + C) region, where most coding sequences are found [38-68% (G + C)], is marked by satellite bands denoting the presence of transcriptionally inert, tandemly repetitive sequence families. These bands can be analyzed for the abundance, base composition, and sequence divergence of satellite families with relatively high precision. Band patterns are unique to each species; even closely related species can be readily distinguished by their base distribution profiles. Variations in nuclear DNA contents in ruminants, determined by flow cytometry, are primarily due to variations in abundances of these repetitive sequence families. Thus, A. alces (moose) is found to have 8.85 +/- 0.2 pg DNA/cell, 25% more than the average in ruminants, while the base distribution curve indicates the presence of an unusually abundant satellite of 52.6% (G + C). The size (1 kb) and sequence of this satellite corresponds to satellite-I of other cervids, and in consequence it is designated Alces-I. The sequence of a cloned repeat of Alces-I has a length of 968 bp, a (G + C) content of 52.6%, and contributes 35%, or almost 3 million copies to the nuclear DNA, exceeding by approximately 300% the average array size of this repeat family in related cervids. In situ hybridization indicates the repeat is distributed throughout centromeric regions of all 62 acrocentric autosomes. Alces-I has much greater-than-expected numbers of GG, GA, and AG and far fewer numbers of TA and CG duplets, characteristics of all tandem repeats. The sequence is judged to be orthologous with satellite-I sequences from Rangifer tarandus (caribou), Capreolus capreolus (roe deer), Muntiacus

  8. Identification of Lactobacillus strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Dec, Marta; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Gnat, Sebastian; Puchalski, Andrzej; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2014-04-01

    The objective of our study was to identify Lactobacillus sp. strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP. All three techniques proved to be valuable tools for identification of avian lactobacilli and produced comparable classification results. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from 100% of geese aged 3 weeks to 4 years, but from only 25% of chicks aged 1-10 days. Among the 104 strains isolated, we distinguished 14 Lactobacillus species. The dominant species was Lactobacillus salivarius (35.6%), followed by Lactobacillus johnsonii (18.3%), Lactobacillus ingluviei (11.5%) and Lactobacillus agilis (7.7%). The intact-cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry enabled rapid species identification of the lactobacilli with minimal pretreatment. However, it produced more than one identification result for 11.5% examined strains (mainly of the species L. johnsonii). ITS-PCR distinguished 12 genotypes among the isolates, but was not able to differentiate closely related strains, i.e. between Lactobacillus amylovorus and Lactobacillus kitasatonis and between Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus zeae. These species were differentiated by ITS-PCR/RFLP using the restriction enzymes TaqI and MseI. The results obtained indicate that ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP assays could be used not only for interspecific, but also for intraspecific, typing.

  9. [Phylogenetic relations of Salix L. subg. Salix species (Salicaceae) according to sequencing data of intergenic spacers of chloroplasic genomes and ITS rDNA].

    PubMed

    Barkalov, V Iu; Kozyrenko, M M

    2014-08-01

    A phylogenetic analysis based on a comparison of nucleotide sequences of six regions from cpDNA and ITS rDNA (petN-psbM, trnD-trnT, trnC-petN, psaA-ycf3, petG-trnP, and rpoB-trnC) allowed for elucidating the relationship among species and sections belonging to the Salix subgenus and, more generally, to the Salix genus, as well as revealing the relations of the Chosenia genus. The definition of the subgenera of Pleuradenia (including the Urbanianea genus and the Chosenia genus), Salix (without the Triandrae section), Triandrae, and Longifoliae is essentially consistent with current classification schemes of the Salix genus. The previously defined genera of Chosenia and Toisusu (Urbanianea) are not only joined with the Salix genus but are also closely related between themselves. The Protitea subgenus only corresponds to the American species of the Humboldtianae section (S. humboldtiana, S. amygdaloides, S. gooddingii). The relationship of S. chaenomeloides, which is a nomenclatural type of this subgenus, as well as the relationship of the Wilsonia section, remains unresolved. The Humboldtianae section should be interpreted more narrowly, apparently, separating the Acmophillae and Tetraspermae sections from it. The monotypic American Floridanae section is related to the Salix, Salicaster, Tetraspermae, and Wilsonia.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD AND SPACER CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the heterogeneous, graphite moderated, fluid cooled type and shielding and spacing plugs for the coolant channels thereof are reported. In this design, the coolant passages extend horizontally through the moderator structure, accommodating the fuel elements in abutting end-to-end relationship, and have access openings through the outer shield at one face of the reactor to facilitate loading of the fuel elements. In the outer ends of the channels which extend through the shields are provided spacers and shielding plugs designed to offer minimal reslstance to coolant fluid flow while preventing emanation of harmful radiation through the access openings when closed between loadings.

  11. Repetitive resonant railgun power supply

    DOEpatents

    Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

    1985-06-19

    A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

  12. Repetitive resonant railgun power supply

    DOEpatents

    Honig, Emanuel M.; Nunnally, William C.

    1988-01-01

    A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

  13. Properties of cellulase immobilized on agarose gel with spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Chim-anage, P.; Kashiwagi, Y.; Magae, Y.; Ohta, T.; Sasaki, T.

    1986-12-01

    Cellulase produced by fungus Trichoderma viride was immobilized on agarose beads (Sepharose 4B) activated by cyanogen bromide and also on activated agarose beads that contained spacer arm (activated Ch-Sepharose 4B and Affi-Gel 15). The CMCase activity retained by immobilized cellulase on activated Sepharose containing the spacer tended to be higher than that immobilized without spacer, although the extent of protein immobilization was lower. Also, the higher substrate specificity for cellulase immobilized on beads with spacer was obtained for cellobiose, acid-swollen cellulose, or cellulose powder. The hydrolysis product from their substrates was mainly glucose. 10 references.

  14. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, P S; Taylor, W J

    2004-08-01

    Pain in the forearm is relatively common in the community. In the workplace forearm pain is associated with work involving frequent repetition, high forces, and prolonged abnormal postures. Nevertheless, other factors are involved in the presentation and the continuation of the pain. Notable among these factors are psychosocial issues and the workplace environment-the attitude to workers and their welfare, the physical conditions, and design of the job. Primary prevention may be effective but active surveillance is important with early intervention and an active management approach. Physical treatments have not been extensively evaluated. In the established case, management should be multidisciplinary, addressing physical aspects of the job but also addressing the "yellow, blue, and black flags" which should be viewed as obstacles to recovery. For the worker "on sick" a dialogue should be established between the worker, the primary care physician, and the workplace. Return to work should be encouraged and facilitated by medical interventions and light duty options. Rehabilitation programmes may be of use in chronic cases.

  15. Perceptual Repetition Blindness Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochhaus, Larry; Johnston, James C.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The phenomenon of repetition blindness (RB) may reveal a new limitation on human perceptual processing. Recently, however, researchers have attributed RB to post-perceptual processes such as memory retrieval and/or reporting biases. The standard rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm used in most RB studies is, indeed, open to such objections. Here we investigate RB using a "single-frame" paradigm introduced by Johnston and Hale (1984) in which memory demands are minimal. Subjects made only a single judgement about whether one masked target word was the same or different than a post-target probe. Confidence ratings permitted use of signal detection methods to assess sensitivity and bias effects. In the critical condition for RB a precue of the post-target word was provided prior to the target stimulus (identity precue), so that the required judgement amounted to whether the target did or did not repeat the precue word. In control treatments, the precue was either an unrelated word or a dummy.

  16. Neural Basis of Repetition Priming during Mathematical Cognition: Repetition Suppression or Repetition Enhancement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salimpoor, Valorie N.; Chang, Catie; Menon, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the neural basis of repetition priming (RP) during mathematical cognition. Previous studies of RP have focused on repetition suppression as the basis of behavioral facilitation, primarily using word and object identification and classification tasks. More recently, researchers have suggested associative stimulus-response learning…

  17. Differentiation of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans strains based on 16S-23S rDNA spacer polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergamo, Rogério F; Novo, Maria Teresa M; Veríssimo, Ricardo V; Paulino, Luciana C; Stoppe, Nancy C; Sato, Maria Inês Z; Manfio, Gilson P; Prado, Paulo Inácio; Garcia, Oswaldo; Ottoboni, Laura M M

    2004-09-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and sequence analyses of the PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) were used for differentiating Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans strains from other related acidithiobacilli, including A. ferrooxidans and A. caldus. RFLP fingerprints obtained with AluI, DdeI, HaeIII, HinfI and MspI enabled the differentiation of all Acidithiobacillus reference strains into species groups. The A. thiooxidans strains investigated (metal mine isolates) yielded identical RFLP patterns to the A. thiooxidans type strain (ATCC 19377(T)), except for strain DAMS, which had a distinct pattern for all enzymes tested. Fourteen A. ferrooxidans mine strains were assigned to 3 RFLP groups, the majority of which were grouped with A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270(T). The spacer region of one representative strain from each of the RFLP groups obtained was subjected to sequence analysis, in addition to eleven additional A. thiooxidans strains isolated from sediment and water samples, and A. caldus DSM 8584(T). The tRNA(IIe) and tRNA(Ala) genes, present in all strains analyzed, showed high sequence similarity. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS sequences differentiated all three Acidithiobacillus species. Inter- and infraspecific genetic variations detected were mainly due to the size and sequence polymorphism of the ITS3 region. Mantel tests showed no significant correlation between ITS sequence similarity and the geographical origin of strains. The results showed that the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region is a useful target for the development of molecular-based methods aimed at the detection, rapid differentiation and identification of acidithiobacilli.

  18. Molecular recordings by directed CRISPR spacer acquisition.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Seth L; Nivala, Jeff; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Church, George M

    2016-07-29

    The ability to write a stable record of identified molecular events into a specific genomic locus would enable the examination of long cellular histories and have many applications, ranging from developmental biology to synthetic devices. We show that the type I-E CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas system of Escherichia coli can mediate acquisition of defined pieces of synthetic DNA. We harnessed this feature to generate records of specific DNA sequences into a population of bacterial genomes. We then applied directed evolution so as to alter the recognition of a protospacer adjacent motif by the Cas1-Cas2 complex, which enabled recording in two modes simultaneously. We used this system to reveal aspects of spacer acquisition, fundamental to the CRISPR-Cas adaptation process. These results lay the foundations of a multimodal intracellular recording device.

  19. Molecular recordings by directed CRISPR spacer acquisition.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Seth L; Nivala, Jeff; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Church, George M

    2016-07-29

    The ability to write a stable record of identified molecular events into a specific genomic locus would enable the examination of long cellular histories and have many applications, ranging from developmental biology to synthetic devices. We show that the type I-E CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas system of Escherichia coli can mediate acquisition of defined pieces of synthetic DNA. We harnessed this feature to generate records of specific DNA sequences into a population of bacterial genomes. We then applied directed evolution so as to alter the recognition of a protospacer adjacent motif by the Cas1-Cas2 complex, which enabled recording in two modes simultaneously. We used this system to reveal aspects of spacer acquisition, fundamental to the CRISPR-Cas adaptation process. These results lay the foundations of a multimodal intracellular recording device. PMID:27284167

  20. Improvement of inhaler efficacy by home-made spacer.

    PubMed

    Sritara, P; Janvitayanuchit, S

    1993-12-01

    The delivery of aerosol from a metered dose inhaler (MDI) was reported to be more efficient with a spacer. Hence, a home-made spacer modified from a 950 ml low cost plastic bottle, was compared with a MDI and with a 750 ml imported spacer (Nebuhaler). On three consecutive days, at the same time of day, 20 adult patients with chronic asthma inhaled two puffs of terbutaline sulphate (0.5 mg), delivered from MDI alone, MDI with a 750 ml Nebuhlaer and MDI with a home-made spacer. The following measurements were made: forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and pulse rate. These measurements were carried out immediately before and at 5, 20, 60 min after inhalation of terbutaline. FEV1 was significantly increased (P < 0.05) at 5, 20 and 60 min after administration of terbutaline with MDI via either spacers than with MDI alone but no significant difference was observed between Nebuhaler and the home-made spacer. FVC and pulse rate showed no significant change with each method of administration. In conclusion, terbutaline delivered by MDI and home-made spacer was more effective in bronchodilatation than by MDI alone and was just as effective as MDI and Nebuhaler. The home-made spacer therefore offers a simple, inexpensive and more effective method for delivering aerosol drug. PMID:7798822

  1. Neural repetition suppression reflects fulfilled perceptual expectations

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, Christopher; Monti, Jim M.P.; Trittschuh, Emily H.; Mesulam, M.-Marsel; Egner, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Stimulus-evoked neural activity is attenuated upon stimulus repetition (‘repetition suppression’), a phenomenon attributed to largely automatic processes in sensory neurons. By manipulating the likelihood of stimulus repetition, we show that repetition suppression in the human brain is reduced when stimulus repetitions are improbable (and thus, unexpected). These data suggest that repetition suppression reflects a relative reduction in top-down perceptual ‘prediction error’ when processing an expected compared to an unexpected stimulus. PMID:19160497

  2. Paucity of moderately repetitive sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    We examined clones of renatured repetitive human DNA to find novel repetitive DNAs. After eliminating known repeats, the remaining clones were subjected to sequence analysis. These clones also corresponded to known repeats, but with greater sequence diversity. This indicates that either these libraries were depleted of short interspersed repeats in construction, or these repeats are much less prevalent in the human genome than is indicated by data from {und Xenopus} or sea urchin studies. We directly investigated the sequence composition of human DNA through traditional renaturation techniques with the goal of estimating the limits of abundance of repetitive sequence classes in human DNA. Our results sharply limit the maximum possible abundance to 1--2% of the human genome. Our estimate, minus the known repeats in this fraction, leaves about 1% (3 {times} 10{sup 7} nucleotides) of the human genome for novel repetitive elements. 2 refs. (MHB)

  3. A Perceptual Repetition Blindness Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochhaus, Larry; Johnston, James C.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Before concluding Repetition Blindness is a perceptual phenomenon, alternative explanations based on memory retrieval problems and report bias must be rejected. Memory problems were minimized by requiring a judgment about only a single briefly displayed field. Bias and sensitivity effects were empirically measured with an ROC-curve analysis method based on confidence ratings. Results from five experiments support the hypothesis that Repetition Blindness can be a perceptual phenomenon.

  4. Intergenic transcriptional interference is blocked by RNA polymerase III transcription factor TFIIIB in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Korde, Asawari; Rosselot, Jessica M; Donze, David

    2014-02-01

    The major function of eukaryotic RNA polymerase III is to transcribe transfer RNA, 5S ribosomal RNA, and other small non-protein-coding RNA molecules. Assembly of the RNA polymerase III complex on chromosomal DNA requires the sequential binding of transcription factor complexes TFIIIC and TFIIIB. Recent evidence has suggested that in addition to producing RNA transcripts, chromatin-assembled RNA polymerase III complexes may mediate additional nuclear functions that include chromatin boundary, nucleosome phasing, and general genome organization activities. This study provides evidence of another such "extratranscriptional" activity of assembled RNA polymerase III complexes, which is the ability to block progression of intergenic RNA polymerase II transcription. We demonstrate that the RNA polymerase III complex bound to the tRNA gene upstream of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATG31 gene protects the ATG31 promoter against readthrough transcriptional interference from the upstream noncoding intergenic SUT467 transcription unit. This protection is predominately mediated by binding of the TFIIIB complex. When TFIIIB binding to this tRNA gene is weakened, an extended SUT467-ATG31 readthrough transcript is produced, resulting in compromised ATG31 translation. Since the ATG31 gene product is required for autophagy, strains expressing the readthrough transcript exhibit defective autophagy induction and reduced fitness under autophagy-inducing nitrogen starvation conditions. Given the recent discovery of widespread pervasive transcription in all forms of life, protection of neighboring genes from intergenic transcriptional interference may be a key extratranscriptional function of assembled RNA polymerase III complexes and possibly other DNA binding proteins.

  5. Campylobacter jejuni acquire new host-derived CRISPR spacers when in association with bacteriophages harboring a CRISPR-like Cas4 protein

    PubMed Central

    Hooton, Steven P. T.; Connerton, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a worldwide cause of human diarrhoeal disease. Clustered Repetitively Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) and associated proteins allow Bacteria and Archaea to evade bacteriophage and plasmid infection. Type II CRISPR systems are found in association with combinations of genes encoding the CRISPR-associated Cas1, Cas2, Cas4 or Csn2, and Cas9 proteins. C. jejuni possesses a minimal subtype II-C CRISPR system containing cas1, cas2, and cas9 genes whilst cas4 is notably absent. Cas4 proteins possess 5′-3′ exonuclease activity to create recombinogenic-ends for spacer acquisition. Here we report a conserved Cas4-like protein in Campylobacter bacteriophages that creates a novel split arrangement between the bacteriophage and host that represents a new twist in the bacteriophage/host co-evolutionary arms race. The continuous association of bacteriophage and host in the carrier state life cycle of C. jejuni provided an opportunity to study spacer acquisition in this species. Remarkably all the spacer sequences observed were of host origin. We hypothesize that Campylobacter bacteriophages can use Cas4-like protein to activate spacer acquisition to use host DNA as an effective decoy to bacteriophage DNA. Bacteria that acquire self-spacers and escape phage infection must overcome CRISPR-mediated autoimmunity either by loss of the interference functions leaving them susceptible to foreign DNA incursion or tolerate changes in gene regulation. PMID:25601859

  6. Pervasive generation of oppositely oriented spacers during CRISPR adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Shmakov, Sergey; Savitskaya, Ekaterina; Semenova, Ekaterina; Logacheva, Maria D.; Datsenko, Kirill A.; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    During the process of prokaryotic CRISPR adaptation, a copy of a segment of foreign deoxyribonucleic acid referred to as protospacer is added to the CRISPR cassette and becomes a spacer. When a protospacer contains a neighboring target interference motif, the specific small CRISPR ribonucleic acid (crRNA) transcribed from expanded CRISPR cassette can protect a prokaryotic cell from virus infection or plasmid transformation and conjugation. We show that in Escherichia coli, a vast majority of plasmid protospacers generate spacers integrated in CRISPR cassette in two opposing orientations, leading to frequent appearance of complementary spacer pairs in a population of cells that underwent CRISPR adaptation. When a protospacer contains a spacer acquisition motif AAG, spacer orientation that generates functional protective crRNA is strongly preferred. All other protospacers give rise to spacers oriented in both ways at comparable frequencies. This phenomenon increases the repertoire of available spacers and should make it more likely that a protective crRNA is formed as a result of CRISPR adaptation. PMID:24728991

  7. Inhalational drug delivery from seven different spacer devices.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, P. W.; O'Callaghan, C.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A study was performed to determine in vitro the difference in drug output of seven currently available spacer devices when used with different inhaled medications. METHODS: A glass multistage liquid impinger (MSLI) was used to determine the amount of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, 5 mg), salbutamol (100 micrograms), or budesonide (200 micrograms) obtained in various particle size ranges from metered dose inhalers (MDIs) actuated directly into the MSLI or via one of seven different spacer devices; the Fisonair, Nebuhaler, Volumatic, Inspirease, Aerochamber, Aerosol Cloud Enhancer, and Dynahaler. RESULTS: In particles smaller than 5 microns in diameter the dose of DSCG recovered from the Fisonair and Nebuhaler was 118% and 124%, respectively, of that recovered using the MDI alone. The dose recovered from the smaller volume spacers was 90% (Inspirease), 36% (Aerochamber), 33% (Aerosol Cloud Enhancer), and 21% (Dynahaler) of that from the MDI alone. The Volumatic increased the amount of salbutamol in particles smaller than 5 microns to 117% of that from the MDI, and the Inspirease and Aerochamber spacers decreased it by nearly 50%. The amount of budesonide in small particles recovered after use of the Nebuhaler, Inspirease, and the Aerochamber was 92%, 101%, and 78%, respectively, of that from the MDI alone. CONCLUSIONS: Under the test conditions used, large volume spacers such as the Fisonair, Nebuhaler, and Volumatic delivered significantly more DSCG and salbutamol than the smaller spacers tested. The differences between spacers were less for budesonide than the other medications studied. This study shows that there are significant differences in the amount of drug available for inhalation when different spacers are used as inhalational aids with different drugs. Spacer devices need to be fully evaluated for each drug prescribed for them. Images PMID:8795674

  8. Electrostatic precipatator construction having ladder bar spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Jonelis, J.A.

    1984-10-30

    The present invention relates to an improved construction for an electrostatic precipitator having ladder bar spacers. The electrostatic precipitator collects solid particles carried by a flue gas from a source of combustion. The precipitator includes a plurality of spaced plates for collecting solid particles from the flue gas by electrostatic attraction of the solid particles to the plates. A second plurality of elongated electrodes is positioned among the plates. Each of the electrodes is mounted between a pair of adjacent plates. Each of the electrodes is parallel to the other electrodes and is parallel to the plates. A third plurality of ladder bars is positioned between adjacent plates to hold the plates in a flat attitude and to maintain adjacent surfaces of adjacent plates substantially equidistantly spaced from one another. Each of the ladder bars has a connector bar secured to one of the pair of adjacent surfaces. Each of the ladder bars has a fourth plurality of holder bars. Each of the holder bars having one end connected to its respective connector bar and extending outwardly from the connector bar toward the other of the pair of adjacent surfaces. A contact on the other end of each holder bar engages the other of the pair of adjacent surfaces to hold the pair of adjacent surfaces apart.

  9. Chronic occupational repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, B. A.; Forsythe, M. E.; Stanish, W. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review common repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) that occur in the workplace, emphasizing diagnosis, treatment, and etiology of these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from January 1966 to June 1999 focused on articles published since 1990 because RSIs are relatively new diagnoses. MeSH headings that were explored using the thesaurus included "cumulative trauma disorder," "overuse injury," and "repetitive strain injury." The search was limited to English articles only, and preference was given to randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Repetitive strain injuries result from repeated stress to the body's soft tissue structures including muscles, tendons, and nerves. They often occur in patients who perform repetitive movements either in their jobs or in extracurricular activities. Common RSIs include tendon-related disorders, such as rotator cuff tendonitis, and peripheral nerve entrapment disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. A careful history and physical examination often lead to the diagnosis, but newer imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, can help in refractory cases. Conservative management with medication, physiotherapy, or bracing is the mainstay of treatment. Surgery is reserved for cases that do not respond to treatment. CONCLUSION: Repetitive strain injury is common; primary care physicians must establish a diagnosis and, more importantly, its relationship to occupation. Treatment can be offered by family physicians who refer to specialists for cases refractory to conservative management. PMID:11228032

  10. Preclinical Evaluation of Bioabsorbable Polyglycolic Acid Spacer for Particle Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Mukumoto, Naritoshi; Sulaiman, Nor Shazrina Binti; Nagata, Masaaki; Yamada, Shigeru; Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Fukumoto, Takumi

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a polyglycolic acid (PGA) spacer through physical and animal experiments. Methods and Materials: The spacer was produced with surgical suture material made of PGA, forming a 3-dimensional nonwoven fabric. For evaluation or physical experiments, 150-MeV proton or 320-MeV carbon-ion beams were used to generate 60-mm width of spread-out Bragg peak. For animal experiments, the abdomens of C57BL/6 mice, with or without the inserted PGA spacers, were irradiated with 20 Gy of carbon-ion beam (290 MeV) using the spread-out Bragg peak. Body weight changes over time were scored, and radiation damage to the intestine was investigated using hematoxylin and eosin stain. Blood samples were also evaluated 24 days after the irradiation. Long-term thickness retention and safety were evaluated using crab-eating macaques. Results: No chemical or structural changes after 100 Gy of proton or carbon-ion irradiation were observed in the PGA spacer. Water equivalency of the PGA spacer was equal to the water thickness under wet condition. During 24 days' observation after 20 Gy of carbon-ion irradiation, the body weights of mice with the PGA spacer were relatively unchanged, whereas significant weight loss was observed in those mice without the PGA spacer (P<.05). In mice with the PGA spacer, villus and crypt structure were preserved after irradiation. No inflammatory reactions or liver or renal dysfunctions due to placement of the PGA spacer were observed. In the abdomen of crab-eating macaques, thickness of the PGA spacer was maintained 8 weeks after placement. Conclusions: The absorbable PGA spacer had water-equivalent, bio-compatible, and thickness-retaining properties. Although further evaluation is warranted in a clinical setting, the PGA spacer may be effective to stop proton or carbon-ion beams and to separate normal tissues from the radiation field.

  11. Between memory and destiny: repetition.

    PubMed

    Marucco, Norberto Carlos

    2007-04-01

    This essay focuses mainly on the topic of repetition (agieren)-on its metapsychological, clinical, and technical conceptions. It contains a core problem, that is, the question of the represented, the nonrepresented, and the unrepresentable in the psyche. This problem, in turn, brings to light the dialectical relation between drive and object and its specific articulation with the traumatic. The author attributes special significance to its clinical expression as 'destiny.' He points out a shift in the theory of the cure from recollection and the unveiling of unconscious desire, to the possibility of understanding 'pure' repetition, which would constitute the very essence of the drive. The author highlights three types of repetition, namely, 'representative' (oedipal) repetition, the repetition of the 'nonrepresented' (narcissistic), which may gain representation, and that of the 'unrepresentable' (sensory impressions, 'lived experiences from primal times,' 'prelinguistic signifiers,' 'ungovernable mnemic traces'). The concept-the metaphor-drive embryo brings the author close to the question of the archaic in psychoanalysis, where the repetition in the act would express itself. 'Another unconscious' would zealously conceal the entombed (verschüttet) that we are not yet able to describe-the 'innermost' rather than the 'buried' (untergegangen) or the 'annihilated' (zugrunde gegangen)-through a mechanism whose way of expression is repetition in the act. With 'Constructions in analysis' as its starting point, this paper suggests a different technical implementation from that of the Freudian construction; its main material is what emerges in the present of the transference as the repetition of 'something' lacking as history. The memory of the analytic process offers a historical diachrony whereby a temporality freed from repetition and utterly unique might unfold in the analysis. This diachrony would no longer be the historical reconstruction of material truth, but the

  12. Between memory and destiny: repetition.

    PubMed

    Marucco, Norberto Carlos

    2007-04-01

    This essay focuses mainly on the topic of repetition (agieren)-on its metapsychological, clinical, and technical conceptions. It contains a core problem, that is, the question of the represented, the nonrepresented, and the unrepresentable in the psyche. This problem, in turn, brings to light the dialectical relation between drive and object and its specific articulation with the traumatic. The author attributes special significance to its clinical expression as 'destiny.' He points out a shift in the theory of the cure from recollection and the unveiling of unconscious desire, to the possibility of understanding 'pure' repetition, which would constitute the very essence of the drive. The author highlights three types of repetition, namely, 'representative' (oedipal) repetition, the repetition of the 'nonrepresented' (narcissistic), which may gain representation, and that of the 'unrepresentable' (sensory impressions, 'lived experiences from primal times,' 'prelinguistic signifiers,' 'ungovernable mnemic traces'). The concept-the metaphor-drive embryo brings the author close to the question of the archaic in psychoanalysis, where the repetition in the act would express itself. 'Another unconscious' would zealously conceal the entombed (verschüttet) that we are not yet able to describe-the 'innermost' rather than the 'buried' (untergegangen) or the 'annihilated' (zugrunde gegangen)-through a mechanism whose way of expression is repetition in the act. With 'Constructions in analysis' as its starting point, this paper suggests a different technical implementation from that of the Freudian construction; its main material is what emerges in the present of the transference as the repetition of 'something' lacking as history. The memory of the analytic process offers a historical diachrony whereby a temporality freed from repetition and utterly unique might unfold in the analysis. This diachrony would no longer be the historical reconstruction of material truth, but the

  13. Bioinformatics analyses of Shigella CRISPR structure and spacer classification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Bing; Duan, Guangcai; Wang, Yingfang; Hong, Lijuan; Wang, Linlin; Guo, Xiangjiao; Xi, Yuanlin; Yang, Haiyan

    2016-03-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are inheritable genetic elements of a variety of archaea and bacteria and indicative of the bacterial ecological adaptation, conferring acquired immunity against invading foreign nucleic acids. Shigella is an important pathogen for anthroponosis. This study aimed to analyze the features of Shigella CRISPR structure and classify the spacers through bioinformatics approach. Among 107 Shigella, 434 CRISPR structure loci were identified with two to seven loci in different strains. CRISPR-Q1, CRISPR-Q4 and CRISPR-Q5 were widely distributed in Shigella strains. Comparison of the first and last repeats of CRISPR1, CRISPR2 and CRISPR3 revealed several base variants and different stem-loop structures. A total of 259 cas genes were found among these 107 Shigella strains. The cas gene deletions were discovered in 88 strains. However, there is one strain that does not contain cas gene. Intact clusters of cas genes were found in 19 strains. From comprehensive analysis of sequence signature and BLAST and CRISPRTarget score, the 708 spacers were classified into three subtypes: Type I, Type II and Type III. Of them, Type I spacer referred to those linked with one gene segment, Type II spacer linked with two or more different gene segments, and Type III spacer undefined. This study examined the diversity of CRISPR/cas system in Shigella strains, demonstrated the main features of CRISPR structure and spacer classification, which provided critical information for elucidation of the mechanisms of spacer formation and exploration of the role the spacers play in the function of the CRISPR/cas system.

  14. De novo DNA demethylation and noncoding transcription define active intergenic regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Felix; Smith, Andrew D; Gingeras, Thomas R; Hannon, Gregory J; Hodges, Emily

    2013-10-01

    Deep sequencing of mammalian DNA methylomes has uncovered a previously unpredicted number of discrete hypomethylated regions in intergenic space (iHMRs). Here, we combined whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data with extensive gene expression and chromatin-state data to define functional classes of iHMRs, and to reconstruct the dynamics of their establishment in a developmental setting. Comparing HMR profiles in embryonic stem and primary blood cells, we show that iHMRs mark an exclusive subset of active DNase hypersensitive sites (DHS), and that both developmentally constitutive and cell-type-specific iHMRs display chromatin states typical of distinct regulatory elements. We also observe that iHMR changes are more predictive of nearby gene activity than the promoter HMR itself, and that expression of noncoding RNAs within the iHMR accompanies full activation and complete demethylation of mature B cell enhancers. Conserved sequence features corresponding to iHMR transcript start sites, including a discernible TATA motif, suggest a conserved, functional role for transcription in these regions. Similarly, we explored both primate-specific and human population variation at iHMRs, finding that while enhancer iHMRs are more variable in sequence and methylation status than any other functional class, conservation of the TATA box is highly predictive of iHMR maintenance, reflecting the impact of sequence plasticity and transcriptional signals on iHMR establishment. Overall, our analysis allowed us to construct a three-step timeline in which (1) intergenic DHS are pre-established in the stem cell, (2) partial demethylation of blood-specific intergenic DHSs occurs in blood progenitors, and (3) complete iHMR formation and transcription coincide with enhancer activation in lymphoid-specified cells.

  15. Nuclear reactor spacer grid and ductless core component

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a nuclear reactor spacer grid member for use in a liquid cooled nuclear reactor and to a ductless core component employing a plurality of these spacer grid members. The spacer grid member is of the egg-shell type and is constructed so that the walls of the cell members of the grid member are formed of a single thickness of metal to avoid tolerance problems. Within each cell member is a hydraulic spring which laterally constrains the nuclear material bearing rod which passes through each cell member against a hardstop in response to coolant flow through the cell member. This hydraulic spring is also suitable for use in a water cooled nuclear reactor. A core component constructed of, among other components, a plurality of these spacer grid members, avoids the use of a full length duct by providing spacer sleeves about the sodium tubes passing through the spacer grid members at locations between the grid members, thereby maintaining a predetermined space between adjacent grid members.

  16. Constructive and Unconstructive Repetitive Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Edward R.

    2008-01-01

    The author reviews research showing that repetitive thought (RT) can have constructive or unconstructive consequences. The main unconstructive consequences of RT are (a) depression, (b) anxiety, and (c) difficulties in physical health. The main constructive consequences of RT are (a) recovery from upsetting and traumatic events, (b) adaptive…

  17. Unintended Imitation in Nonword Repetition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kappes, Juliane; Baumgaertner, Annette; Peschke, Claudia; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2009-01-01

    Verbal repetition is conventionally considered to require motor-reproduction of only the phonologically relevant content of a perceived linguistic stimulus, while imitation of incidental acoustic properties of the stimulus is not an explicit part of this task. Exemplar-based theories of speech processing, however, would predict that imitation…

  18. Repetitive elements in parasitic protozoa.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Christine

    2010-01-01

    A recent paper published in BMC Genomics suggests that retrotransposition may be active in the human gut parasite Entamoeba histolytica. This adds to our knowledge of the various types of repetitive elements in parasitic protists and the potential influence of such elements on pathogenicity.

  19. Modulation of gene expression in U251 glioblastoma cells by binding of mutant p53 R273H to intronic and intergenic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Brázdová, Marie; Quante, Timo; Tögel, Lars; Walter, Korden; Loscher, Christine; Tichý, Vlastimil; Činčárová, Lenka; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V.

    2009-01-01

    Missense point mutations in the TP53 gene are frequent genetic alterations in human tumor tissue and cell lines derived thereof. Mutant p53 (mutp53) proteins have lost sequence-specific DNA binding, but have retained the ability to interact in a structure-selective manner with non-B DNA and to act as regulators of transcription. To identify functional binding sites of mutp53, we established a small library of genomic sequences bound by p53R273H in U251 human glioblastoma cells using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Mutp53 binding to isolated DNA fragments confirmed the specificity of the ChIP. The mutp53 bound DNA sequences are rich in repetitive DNA elements, which are dispersed over non-coding DNA regions. Stable down-regulation of mutp53 expression strongly suggested that mutp53 binding to genomic DNA is functional. We identified the PPARGC1A and FRMD5 genes as p53R273H targets regulated by binding to intronic and intra-genic sequences. We propose a model that attributes the oncogenic functions of mutp53 to its ability to interact with intronic and intergenic non-B DNA sequences and modulate gene transcription via re-organization of chromatin. PMID:19139068

  20. Repetitive DNA in eukaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Olmo, Ettore; Heslop-Harrison, J S Pat

    2015-09-01

    Repetitive DNA--sequence motifs repeated hundreds or thousands of times in the genome--makes up the major proportion of all the nuclear DNA in most eukaryotic genomes. However, the significance of repetitive DNA in the genome is not completely understood, and it has been considered to have both structural and functional roles, or perhaps even no essential role. High-throughput DNA sequencing reveals huge numbers of repetitive sequences. Most bioinformatic studies focus on low-copy DNA including genes, and hence, the analyses collapse repeats in assemblies presenting only one or a few copies, often masking out and ignoring them in both DNA and RNA read data. Chromosomal studies are proving vital to examine the distribution and evolution of sequences because of the challenges of analysis of sequence data. Many questions are open about the origin, evolutionary mode and functions that repetitive sequences might have in the genome. Some, the satellite DNAs, are present in long arrays of similar motifs at a small number of sites, while others, particularly the transposable elements (DNA transposons and retrotranposons), are dispersed over regions of the genome; in both cases, sequence motifs may be located at relatively specific chromosome domains such as centromeres or subtelomeric regions. Here, we overview a range of works involving detailed characterization of the nature of all types of repetitive sequences, in particular their organization, abundance, chromosome localization, variation in sequence within and between chromosomes, and, importantly, the investigation of their transcription or expression activity. Comparison of the nature and locations of sequences between more, and less, related species is providing extensive information about their evolution and amplification. Some repetitive sequences are extremely well conserved between species, while others are among the most variable, defining differences between even closely relative species. These data suggest

  1. De Novo Identification of Regulatory Regions in Intergenic Spaces of Prokaryotic Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, P; Garcia, E; Mcloughlin, K; Ovcharenko, I

    2007-02-20

    This project was begun to implement, test, and experimentally validate the results of a novel algorithm for genome-wide identification of candidate transcription-factor binding sites in prokaryotes. Most techniques used to identify regulatory regions rely on conservation between different genomes or have a predetermined sequence motif(s) to perform a genome-wide search. Therefore, such techniques cannot be used with new genome sequences, where information regarding such motifs has not yet been discovered. This project aimed to apply a de novo search algorithm to identify candidate binding-site motifs in intergenic regions of prokaryotic organisms, initially testing the available genomes of the Yersinia genus. We retrofitted existing nucleotide pattern-matching algorithms, analyzed the candidate sites identified by these algorithms as well as their target genes to screen for meaningful patterns. Using properly annotated prokaryotic genomes, this project aimed to develop a set of procedures to identify candidate intergenic sites important for gene regulation. We planned to demonstrate this in Yersinia pestis, a model biodefense, Category A Select Agent pathogen, and then follow up with experimental evidence that these regions are indeed involved in regulation. The ability to quickly characterize transcription-factor binding sites will help lead to a better understanding of how known virulence pathways are modulated in biodefense-related organisms, and will help our understanding and exploration of regulons--gene regulatory networks--and novel pathways for metabolic processes in environmental microbes.

  2. Transcription through intergenic chromosomal memory elements of the Drosophila bithorax complex correlates with an epigenetic switch.

    PubMed

    Rank, Gerhard; Prestel, Matthias; Paro, Renato

    2002-11-01

    The proteins of the trithorax and Polycomb groups maintain the differential expression pattern of homeotic genes established by the early embryonic patterning system during development. These proteins generate stable and heritable chromatin structures by acting via particular chromosomal memory elements. We established a transgenic assay system showing that the Polycomb group response elements bxd and Mcp confer epigenetic inheritance throughout development. With previously published data for the Fab7 cellular memory module, we confirmed the cellular memory function of Polycomb group response elements. In Drosophila melanogaster, several of these memory elements are located in the large intergenic regulatory regions of the homeotic bithorax complex. Using a transgene assay, we showed that transcription through a memory element correlated with the relief of silencing imposed by the Polycomb group proteins and established an epigenetically heritable active chromatin mode. A memory element remodeled by the process of transcription was able to maintain active expression of a reporter gene throughout development. Thus, transcription appears to reset and change epigenetic marks at chromosomal memory elements regulated by the Polycomb and trithorax proteins. Interestingly, in the bithorax complex of D. melanogaster, the segment-specific expression of noncoding intergenic transcripts during embryogenesis seems to fulfill this switching role for memory elements regulating the homeotic genes. PMID:12391168

  3. Transcription through intergenic chromosomal memory elements of the Drosophila bithorax complex correlates with an epigenetic switch.

    PubMed

    Rank, Gerhard; Prestel, Matthias; Paro, Renato

    2002-11-01

    The proteins of the trithorax and Polycomb groups maintain the differential expression pattern of homeotic genes established by the early embryonic patterning system during development. These proteins generate stable and heritable chromatin structures by acting via particular chromosomal memory elements. We established a transgenic assay system showing that the Polycomb group response elements bxd and Mcp confer epigenetic inheritance throughout development. With previously published data for the Fab7 cellular memory module, we confirmed the cellular memory function of Polycomb group response elements. In Drosophila melanogaster, several of these memory elements are located in the large intergenic regulatory regions of the homeotic bithorax complex. Using a transgene assay, we showed that transcription through a memory element correlated with the relief of silencing imposed by the Polycomb group proteins and established an epigenetically heritable active chromatin mode. A memory element remodeled by the process of transcription was able to maintain active expression of a reporter gene throughout development. Thus, transcription appears to reset and change epigenetic marks at chromosomal memory elements regulated by the Polycomb and trithorax proteins. Interestingly, in the bithorax complex of D. melanogaster, the segment-specific expression of noncoding intergenic transcripts during embryogenesis seems to fulfill this switching role for memory elements regulating the homeotic genes.

  4. RNA 3′ processing functions of Arabidopsis FCA and FPA limit intergenic transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sonmez, Cagla; Bäurle, Isabel; Magusin, Andreas; Dreos, Rene; Laubinger, Sascha; Weigel, Detlef; Dean, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    The RNA-binding proteins FCA and FPA were identified based on their repression of the flowering time regulator FLC but have since been shown to have widespread roles in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to show that a wide spectrum of genes and transposable elements are misexpressed in the fca-9 fpa-7 (fcafpa) double mutant at two stages of seedling development. There was a significant bias for misregulated genomic segments mapping to the 3′ region of genes. In addition, the double mutant misexpressed a large number of previously unannotated genomic segments corresponding to intergenic regions. We characterized a subset of these misexpressed unannotated segments and established that they resulted from extensive transcriptional read-through, use of downstream polyadenylation sites, and alternative splicing. In some cases, the transcriptional read-through significantly reduced expression of the associated genes. FCA/FPA-dependent changes in DNA methylation were found at several loci, supporting previous associations of FCA/FPA function with chromatin modifications. Our data suggest that FCA and FPA play important roles in the A. thaliana genome in RNA 3′ processing and transcription termination, thus limiting intergenic transcription. PMID:21536901

  5. Repetition blindness for pseudoobject pictures.

    PubMed

    Arnell, K M; Jolicoeur, P

    1997-08-01

    In this study the nature of type activations that underlie repetition blindness (RB) was addressed. According to the token individuation hypothesis put forward to explain RB, both instances of a repeated stimulus make contact with the mental representation, or type, for that stimulus. In the resulting confusion only the first stimulus is encoded as an episodic instance or token. Type representations have traditionally been thought of as preexisting and are often linked within a network of nodes. The authors developed and tested a picture frequency task, which does not require stimulus naming, and used it to examine repetition performance for unfamiliar nonobject pictures. RB was found for these stimuli, despite the fact that they had no prior phonological or semantic representation. These results suggest that the reactivation of a newly formed visual type is sufficient to produce RB. Implications for the role of types in the token individuation hypothesis are discussed.

  6. Workshop on Repetitive Opening Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, M.; Schoenbach, K. H.

    1981-04-01

    A workshop on Repetitive Opening Switches was conducted by Texas Tech University for the U.S. Army Research Office. Several papers on a wide range of innovative opening switch concepts were presented. Discussions about the research needs to advance the state-of-the-art in this important, emerging field are summarized. A concensus on research topics and their importance is summarized and a suggested research priority list given.

  7. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, Robert K.; Meyne, Julianne

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  8. Diversity of Salmonella Strains Isolated from the Aquatic Environment as Determined by Serotyping and Amplification of the Ribosomal DNA Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Baudart, Julia; Lemarchand, Karine; Brisabois, Anne; Lebaron, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella species are pathogenic bacteria often detected in sewage, freshwater, marine coastal water, and groundwater. Salmonella spp. can survive for long periods in natural waters, and the persistence of specific and epidemic strains is of great concern in public health. However, the diversity of species found in the natural environment remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity of Salmonella strains isolated from different natural aquatic systems within a Mediterranean coastal watershed (river, wastewater, and marine coastal areas). A total of 574 strains isolated from these natural environments were identified by both conventional serotyping and the ribosomal spacer-heteroduplex polymorphism (RS-HP) method (M. A. Jensen and N. Straus, PCR Methods Appl. 3:186–194, 1993). More than 40 different serotypes were found, and some serotypes probably mobilized from widespread animal-rearing activities were detected only during storm events. These serotypes may be good indicators of specific contamination sources. Furthermore, the RS-HP method based on the PCR amplification of the intergenic spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes can produce amplicon profiles allowing the discrimination of species at both serotype and intraserotype levels. This method represents a powerful tool that could be used for rapid typing of Salmonella isolates. PMID:10742240

  9. Cultivar-level phylogeny using chloroplast DNA barcode psbK-psbI spacers for identification of Emirati date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) varieties.

    PubMed

    Enan, M R; Ahmed, A

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of genetic material for use as DNA barcodes is under constant evaluation and improvement as new barcodes offering better resolution and efficiency of amplification for specific species groups are identified. In this study, the chloroplast intergenic spacer psbK-psbI was evaluated for the first time as a DNA barcode for distinguishing date palm cultivars. Nucleotide sequences were aligned using MEGA 6.0 to calculate pairwise divergence among the cultivars. The analyzed data illustrated a considerable level of variability in the genetic pool of the selected cultivars (0.009). In fact, five haplotypes were detected among 30 cultivars examined, yielding a haplotype diversity of 0.685. An unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean phylogenetic tree was constructed and shows a well-defined relationship among date palm cultivar varieties. On the other hand, selective neutrality investigations using Tajima test and Fu and Li tests were negative, providing evidence that date palm has been undergoing rapid expansion and recent population growth. Thus, we suggest that the psbK-psbI spacer can be successfully used to construct reliable phylogenetic trees for P. dactylifera. PMID:27525916

  10. Diversity of Salmonella strains isolated from the aquatic environment as determined by serotyping and amplification of the ribosomal DNA spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Baudart, J; Lemarchand, K; Brisabois, A; Lebaron, P

    2000-04-01

    Salmonella species are pathogenic bacteria often detected in sewage, freshwater, marine coastal water, and groundwater. Salmonella spp. can survive for long periods in natural waters, and the persistence of specific and epidemic strains is of great concern in public health. However, the diversity of species found in the natural environment remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity of Salmonella strains isolated from different natural aquatic systems within a Mediterranean coastal watershed (river, wastewater, and marine coastal areas). A total of 574 strains isolated from these natural environments were identified by both conventional serotyping and the ribosomal spacer-heteroduplex polymorphism (RS-HP) method (M. A. Jensen and N. Straus, PCR Methods Appl. 3:186-194, 1993). More than 40 different serotypes were found, and some serotypes probably mobilized from widespread animal-rearing activities were detected only during storm events. These serotypes may be good indicators of specific contamination sources. Furthermore, the RS-HP method based on the PCR amplification of the intergenic spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes can produce amplicon profiles allowing the discrimination of species at both serotype and intraserotype levels. This method represents a powerful tool that could be used for rapid typing of Salmonella isolates.

  11. Impact of spacer thickness on biofouling in forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Valladares Linares, R; Bucs, Sz S; Li, Z; AbuGhdeeb, M; Amy, G; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-06-15

    Forward osmosis (FO) indirect desalination systems integrate wastewater recovery with seawater desalination. Niche applications for FO systems have been reported recently, due to the demonstrated advantages compared to conventional high-pressure membrane processes such as nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). Among them, wastewater recovery has been identified to be particularly suitable for practical applications. However, biofouling in FO membranes has rarely been studied in applications involving wastewater effluents. Feed spacers separating the membrane sheets in cross-flow systems play an important role in biofilm formation. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of feed spacer thickness (28, 31 and 46 mil) on biofouling development and membrane performance in a FO system, using identical cross-flow cells in parallel studies. Flux development, biomass accumulation, fouling localization and composition were determined and analyzed. For all spacer thicknesses, operated at the same feed flow and the same run time, the same amount of biomass was found, while the flux reduction decreased with thicker spacers. These observations are in good agreement with biofouling studies for RO systems, considering the key differences between FO and RO. Our findings contradict previous cross-flow studies on particulate/colloidal fouling, where higher cross-flow velocities improved system performance. Thicker spacers reduced the impact of biofouling on FO membrane flux.

  12. CRISPR interference and priming varies with individual spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chaoyou; Seetharam, Arun S; Musharova, Olga; Severinov, Konstantin; Brouns, Stan J J; Severin, Andrew J; Sashital, Dipali G

    2015-12-15

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated) systems allow bacteria to adapt to infection by acquiring 'spacer' sequences from invader DNA into genomic CRISPR loci. Cas proteins use RNAs derived from these loci to target cognate sequences for destruction through CRISPR interference. Mutations in the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and seed regions block interference but promote rapid 'primed' adaptation. Here, we use multiple spacer sequences to reexamine the PAM and seed sequence requirements for interference and priming in the Escherichia coli Type I-E CRISPR-Cas system. Surprisingly, CRISPR interference is far more tolerant of mutations in the seed and the PAM than previously reported, and this mutational tolerance, as well as priming activity, is highly dependent on spacer sequence. We identify a large number of functional PAMs that can promote interference, priming or both activities, depending on the associated spacer sequence. Functional PAMs are preferentially acquired during unprimed 'naïve' adaptation, leading to a rapid priming response following infection. Our results provide numerous insights into the importance of both spacer and target sequences for interference and priming, and reveal that priming is a major pathway for adaptation during initial infection.

  13. Mandrel and spacer engineering based self-aligned triple patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yijian; Cheng, Qi; Kang, Weiling

    2012-03-01

    Self-aligned triple patterning (SATP) technique offers both improved resolution and quasi-2D design flexibility for scaling integrated circuits down to sub-15nm half pitch. By implementation of active layout decomposition/synthesis using mandrel and spacer engineering, SATP process represents a prospective trend that not only drives up the feature density, but also breaks the 1-D gridded limitations posed to future device design. In this paper, we shall present the research progress made in optimizing SATP process to improve its lithographic performance. To solve the previously reported difficulties in etching small mandrels and removing sacrificial spacers, new materials are tested and a promising scheme (using oxide as the mandrel and poly/amorphous Si as the sacrificial spacer) is identified. In the new process, a diluted HF process is applied to shrink the mandrel (oxide) line CD and a highly selective dry etch (which does not attack the mandrel and structural spacer) is developed to strip the sacrificial Si spacers, resulting in significantly improved process performance. We also address the issue of reducing SATP process complexity by exploring the feasibility of a 2-mask concept for specific types of layout.

  14. Impact of spacer thickness on biofouling in forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Valladares Linares, R; Bucs, Sz S; Li, Z; AbuGhdeeb, M; Amy, G; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-06-15

    Forward osmosis (FO) indirect desalination systems integrate wastewater recovery with seawater desalination. Niche applications for FO systems have been reported recently, due to the demonstrated advantages compared to conventional high-pressure membrane processes such as nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). Among them, wastewater recovery has been identified to be particularly suitable for practical applications. However, biofouling in FO membranes has rarely been studied in applications involving wastewater effluents. Feed spacers separating the membrane sheets in cross-flow systems play an important role in biofilm formation. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of feed spacer thickness (28, 31 and 46 mil) on biofouling development and membrane performance in a FO system, using identical cross-flow cells in parallel studies. Flux development, biomass accumulation, fouling localization and composition were determined and analyzed. For all spacer thicknesses, operated at the same feed flow and the same run time, the same amount of biomass was found, while the flux reduction decreased with thicker spacers. These observations are in good agreement with biofouling studies for RO systems, considering the key differences between FO and RO. Our findings contradict previous cross-flow studies on particulate/colloidal fouling, where higher cross-flow velocities improved system performance. Thicker spacers reduced the impact of biofouling on FO membrane flux. PMID:24726992

  15. Uniformity of nucleosome preservation pattern in Mammalian sperm and its connection to repetitive DNA elements.

    PubMed

    Samans, Birgit; Yang, Yang; Krebs, Stefan; Sarode, Gaurav Vilas; Blum, Helmut; Reichenbach, Myriam; Wolf, Eckhard; Steger, Klaus; Dansranjavin, Temuujin; Schagdarsurengin, Undraga

    2014-07-14

    Nucleosome-to-protamine exchange during mammalian spermiogenesis is essential for compaction and protection of paternal DNA. It is interesting that, depending on the species, 1% to 15% of nucleosomes are retained, but the generalizability and biological function of this retention are unknown. Here, we show concordantly in human and bovine that nucleosomes remained in sperm chromatin predominantly within distal intergenic regions and introns and associated with centromere repeats and retrotransposons (LINE1 and SINEs). In contrast, nucleosome depletion concerned particularly exons, 5'-UTR, 3'-UTR, TSS, and TTS and was associated with simple and low-complexity repeats. Overlap of human and bovine genes exhibiting nucleosome preservation in the promoter and gene body revealed a significant enrichment of signal transduction and RNA- and protein-processing factors. Our study demonstrates the genome-wide uniformity of the nucleosome preservation pattern in mammalian sperm and its connection to repetitive DNA elements and suggests a function in preimplantation processes for paternally derived nucleosomes.

  16. Molecular Profiling of Microbial Communities from Contaminated Sources: Use of Subtractive Cloning Methods and rDNA Spacer Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Frank T.

    2001-04-10

    The major objective of this research was to provide appropriate sequences and assemble a DNA array of oligonucleotides to be used for rapid profiling of microbial populations from polluted areas and other areas of interest. The sequences to be assigned to the DNA array were chosen from cloned genomic DNA taken from groundwater sites having well characterized pollutant histories at Hanford Nuclear Plant and Lawrence Livermore Site 300. Glass-slide arrays were made and tested; and a new multiplexed, bead-based method was developed that uses nucleic acid hybridization on the surface of microscopic polystyrene spheres to identify specific sequences in heterogeneous mixtures of DNA sequences. The test data revealed considerable strain variation between sample sites showing a striking distribution of sequences. It also suggests that diversity varies greatly with bioremediation, and that there are many bacterial intergenic spacer region sequences that can indicate its effects. The bead method exhibited superior sequence discrimination and has features for easier and more accurate measurement.

  17. Genome-Wide Analyses in Bacteria Show Small-RNA Enrichment for Long and Conserved Intergenic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chen-Hsun; Liao, Rick; Chou, Brendan; Palumbo, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Interest in finding small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has significantly increased in recent years due to their regulatory functions. Development of high-throughput methods and more sophisticated computational algorithms has allowed rapid identification of sRNA candidates in different species. However, given their various sizes (50 to 500 nucleotides [nt]) and their potential genomic locations in the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions as well as in intergenic regions, identification and validation of true sRNAs have been challenging. In addition, the evolution of bacterial sRNAs across different species continues to be puzzling, given that they can exert similar functions with various sequences and structures. In this study, we analyzed the enrichment patterns of sRNAs in 13 well-annotated bacterial species using existing transcriptome and experimental data. All intergenic regions were analyzed by WU-BLAST to examine conservation levels relative to species within or outside their genus. In total, more than 900 validated bacterial sRNAs and 23,000 intergenic regions were analyzed. The results indicate that sRNAs are enriched in intergenic regions, which are longer and more conserved than the average intergenic regions in the corresponding bacterial genome. We also found that sRNA-coding regions have different conservation levels relative to their flanking regions. This work provides a way to analyze how noncoding RNAs are distributed in bacterial genomes and also shows conserved features of intergenic regions that encode sRNAs. These results also provide insight into the functions of regions surrounding sRNAs and into optimization of RNA search algorithms. PMID:25313390

  18. Genetic diversity of food-isolated Salmonella strains through Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC-PCR).

    PubMed

    Fendri, Imen; Ben Hassena, Amal; Grosset, Noel; Barkallah, Mohamed; Khannous, Lamia; Chuat, Victoria; Gautier, Michel; Gdoura, Radhouane

    2013-01-01

    All over the world, the incidence of Salmonella spp contamination on different food sources like broilers, clams and cow milk has increased rapidly in recent years. The multifaceted properties of Salomnella serovars allow the microorganism to grow and multiply in various food matrices, even under adverse conditions. Therefore, methods are needed to detect and trace this pathogen along the entire food supply network. In the present work, PFGE and ERIC-PCR were used to subtype 45 Salmonella isolates belonging to different serovars and derived from different food origins. Among these isolates, S. Enteritidis and S. Kentucky were found to be the most predominant serovars. The Discrimination Index obtained by ERIC-PCR (0.85) was slightly below the acceptable confidence value. The best discriminatory ability was observed when PFGE typing method was used alone (DI = 0.94) or combined with ERIC-PCR (DI = 0.93). A wide variety of profiles was observed between the different serovars using PFGE or/and ERIC-PCR. This diversity is particularly important when the sample origins are varied and even within the same sampling origin.

  19. Genetic Diversity of Food-Isolated Salmonella Strains through Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC-PCR)

    PubMed Central

    Fendri, Imen; Ben Hassena, Amal; Grosset, Noel; Barkallah, Mohamed; Khannous, Lamia; Chuat, Victoria; Gautier, Michel; Gdoura, Radhouane

    2013-01-01

    All over the world, the incidence of Salmonella spp contamination on different food sources like broilers, clams and cow milk has increased rapidly in recent years. The multifaceted properties of Salomnella serovars allow the microorganism to grow and multiply in various food matrices, even under adverse conditions. Therefore, methods are needed to detect and trace this pathogen along the entire food supply network. In the present work, PFGE and ERIC-PCR were used to subtype 45 Salmonella isolates belonging to different serovars and derived from different food origins. Among these isolates, S. Enteritidis and S. Kentucky were found to be the most predominant serovars. The Discrimination Index obtained by ERIC-PCR (0.85) was slightly below the acceptable confidence value. The best discriminatory ability was observed when PFGE typing method was used alone (DI = 0.94) or combined with ERIC-PCR (DI = 0.93). A wide variety of profiles was observed between the different serovars using PFGE or/and ERIC-PCR. This diversity is particularly important when the sample origins are varied and even within the same sampling origin. PMID:24312546

  20. Impact of Polycarbonate Spacers on Resistive Plate Chamber Efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucia, Nicholas

    2008-10-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory will measure the flavor dependent quark and anti-quark polarizations in the proton through parity violating W-production. A new dedicated muon trigger spectrometer is being built to select high momentum muons from the decay of W bosons. The muon spectrometer relies on Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) developed for the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. PHENIX continues to pursue detailed studies of CMS RPC technology to ensure that these detectors will be optimally deployed and operated in PHENIX. In this poster we present two dimensional efficiency measurements with cosmic rays in RPC prototypes. In particular we have studied the impact polycarbonate spacers used to define the 2 mm wide RPC gas gaps have on the detector efficiency. We will present two dimensional efficiency measurements in the region adjacent to the spacers including the radial dependence of the efficiency with respect to the center of the spacer.

  1. Spacer effect on nanostructures and self-assembly in organogels via some bolaform cholesteryl imide derivatives with different spacers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, new bolaform cholesteryl imide derivatives with different spacers were designed and synthesized. Their gelation behaviors in 23 solvents were investigated, and some of them were found to be low molecular mass organic gelators. The experimental results indicated that these as-formed organogels can be regulated by changing the flexible/rigid segments in spacers and organic solvents. Suitable combination of flexible/rigid segments in molecular spacers in the present cholesteryl gelators is favorable for the gelation of organic solvents. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy observations revealed that the gelator molecules self-assemble into different aggregates, from wrinkle and belt to fiber with the change of spacers and solvents. Spectral studies indicated that there existed different H-bond formations between imide groups and assembly modes, depending on the substituent spacers in molecular skeletons. The present work may give some insight into the design and character of new organogelators and soft materials with special molecular structures. PMID:24083361

  2. Measurements and sensitivities of LWR in poly spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayal, Guy; Shauly, Eitan; Levi, Shimon; Siany, Amit; Adan, Ofer; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2010-03-01

    LER and LWR have long been considered a primary issue in process development and monitoring. Development of a low power process flavors emphasizes the effect of LER, LWR on different aspects of the device. Gate level performance, particularly leakage current at the front end of line, resistance and reliability in the back-end layers. Traditionally as can be seen in many publications, for the front end of line the focus is mainly on Poly and Active area layers. Poly spacers contribution to the gate leakage, for example, is rarely discussed. Following our research done on sources of gate leakage, we found leakage current (Ioff) in some processes to be highly sensitive to changes in the width of the Poly spacers - even more strongly to the actual Poly gate CDs. Therefore we decided to measure Poly spacers LWR, its correlation to the LWR in the poly, and its sensitivity to changes in layout and OPC. In our last year publication, we defined the terms LLER (Local Line Edge Roughness) and LLWR (Local Line Width Roughness). The local roughness is measured as the 3-sigma value of the line edge/width in a 5-nm segment around the measurement point. We will use these terms in this paper to evaluate the Poly roughness impact on Poly spacer's roughness. A dedicated test chip was designed for the experiments, having various transistors layout configurations with different densities to cover the all range of process design rules. Applied Materials LER and LWR innovative algorithms were used to measure and characterize the spacer roughness relative to the distance from the active edges and from other spaces. To accurately measure all structures in a reasonable time, the recipes were automatically generated from CAD. On silicon, after poly spacers generation, the transistors no longer resemble the Poly layer CAD layout, their morphology is different compared with Photo/Etch traditional structures , and dimensions vary significantly. In this paper we present metrology and

  3. An intramedullary cement spacer in total hip arthroplasty .

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, R G; Thevarajan, K; Kok, C S; Sivapathasundaram, N; George, S V

    1998-02-01

    Revision arthroplasty of the hip is often complicated by infection, bone loss, and perioperative fracture of the femur. A simple, inexpensive spacer that keeps tissue planes intact and prevents soft tissue contracture during the interoperative period of a 2-stage revision is described. This can provide intramedullary support to a fractured or weak femur and enable local antibiotic delivery, as well as permit limited mobilization of the patient. It can be easily fabricated during surgery using universally available materials and can be tailored for specific requirements. Such a spacer was used in 5 cases. The experience is presented, and the technique and pitfalls are discussed. PMID:9526214

  4. Identification and Functional Prediction of Large Intergenic Noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recognized in recent years as key regulators of diverse cellular processes. Genome-wide large-scale projects have uncovered thousands of lncRNAs in many model organisms. Large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are lncRNAs that are transcribed from intergeni...

  5. CRISPR interference and priming varies with individual spacer sequences

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chaoyou; Seetharam, Arun S.; Musharova, Olga; Severinov, Konstantin; J. Brouns, Stan J.; Severin, Andrew J.; Sashital, Dipali G.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated) systems allow bacteria to adapt to infection by acquiring ‘spacer’ sequences from invader DNA into genomic CRISPR loci. Cas proteins use RNAs derived from these loci to target cognate sequences for destruction through CRISPR interference. Mutations in the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and seed regions block interference but promote rapid ‘primed’ adaptation. Here, we use multiple spacer sequences to reexamine the PAM and seed sequence requirements for interference and priming in the Escherichia coli Type I-E CRISPR–Cas system. Surprisingly, CRISPR interference is far more tolerant of mutations in the seed and the PAM than previously reported, and this mutational tolerance, as well as priming activity, is highly dependent on spacer sequence. We identify a large number of functional PAMs that can promote interference, priming or both activities, depending on the associated spacer sequence. Functional PAMs are preferentially acquired during unprimed ‘naïve’ adaptation, leading to a rapid priming response following infection. Our results provide numerous insights into the importance of both spacer and target sequences for interference and priming, and reveal that priming is a major pathway for adaptation during initial infection. PMID:26586800

  6. Filter holder assembly having extended collar spacer ring

    DOEpatents

    Alvin, Mary Anne; Bruck, Gerald J.

    2002-01-01

    A filter holder assembly is provided that utilizes a fail-safe regenerator unit with an annular spacer ring having an extended metal collar for containment and positioning of a compliant ceramic gasket used in the assembly. The filter holder assembly is disclosed for use with advanced composite, filament wound, and metal candle filters.

  7. Trestle #1, detail of stringers and spacers on northeast end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trestle #1, detail of stringers and spacers on northeast end of deck. View to southwest - Promontory Route Railroad Trestles, S.P. Trestle 779.91, One mile southwest of junction of State Highway 83 and Blue Creek, Corinne, Box Elder County, UT

  8. Performance Analysis and Test on the KAERI Devised Spacer Grids for PWRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kee-Nam; Lee, Soo-Bum

    Spacer grid which is one of the most important structural components in a pressurized light water reactor fuel assembly supports the fuel rods laterally and vertically. Based on design experiences and by scrutinizing the design features of advanced nuclear fuels and the international patents of spacer grids, KAERI has devised its own spacer grid shapes and acquired patents. In this study, a performance evaluation on two new spacer grid shapes devised by KAERI was carried out from mechanical/structural and thermohydraulic view points. And also a performance evaluation on two commercial spacer grid shapes was carried out for the sake of a comparison. The comparisons included the spring characteristics, fuel rod vibration characteristics, fretting wear resistance, impact strength characteristics, CHF enhancement, and pressure drop level of the spacer grid shapes. The comparison results have shown that the performances of the new spacer grid shapes are better or at least not worse than those of the commercial spacer grid shapes.

  9. Pressure rig for repetitive casting

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, P.; Hutto, W.R.; Philips, A.R.

    1989-09-12

    This patent describes a pressure rig for repetitive casting. It comprises: a hollow ceramic inner shell: an outer steel housing disposed around the outside of the ceramic inner shell. The housing having a pressure end at the lower end thereof and a mold end at the upper end thereof; a rubber diaphragm attached to the pressure end of the outer steel housing; a slideable transit plate located above the rubber diaphragm; a layer of blanket insulating material lining the remaining portion of the hollow ceramic inner shell, thereby defining an inner cavity wherein a casing material is located; a pressure means located at the lower end of the pressure rig for applying pressure to the lower end of the rubber diaphragm; whereby the casting material in the inner cavity is forced out of the pressure rig into a mold when pressure is applied to the lower end of the rubber diaphragm.

  10. Constructive and Unconstructive Repetitive Thought

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Edward R.

    2008-01-01

    The author reviews research showing that repetitive thought (RT) can have constructive or unconstructive consequences. The main unconstructive consequences of RT are (a) depression, (b) anxiety, and (c) difficulties in physical health. The main constructive consequences of RT are (a) recovery from upsetting and traumatic events, (b) adaptive preparation and anticipatory planning, (c) recovery from depression, and (d) uptake of health-promoting behaviors. Several potential principles accounting for these distinct consequences of RT are identified within this review: (a) the valence of thought content, (b) the intrapersonal and situational context in which RT occurs, and (c) the level of construal (abstract vs. concrete processing) adopted during RT. Of the existing models of RT, it is proposed that an elaborated version of the control theory account provides the best theoretical framework to account for its distinct consequences. PMID:18298268

  11. Pressure rig for repetitive casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter (Inventor); Hutto, William R. (Inventor); Philips, Albert R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is a pressure rig for repetitive casting of metal. The pressure rig performs like a piston for feeding molten metal into a mold. Pressure is applied to an expandable rubber diaphragm which expands like a balloon to force the metal into the mold. A ceramic cavity which holds molten metal is lined with blanket-type insulating material, necessitating only a relining for subsequent use and eliminating the lengthy cavity preparation inherent in previous rigs. In addition, the expandable rubber diaphragm is protected by the insulating material thereby decreasing its vulnerability to heat damage. As a result of the improved design the life expectancy of the pressure rig contemplated by the present invention is more than doubled. Moreover, the improved heat protection has allowed the casting of brass and other alloys with higher melting temperatures than possible in the conventional pressure rigs.

  12. Effect of spacer layers on current-voltage characteristics of resonant-tunneling diode

    SciTech Connect

    Remnev, M. A. Kateev, I. Yu.; Elesin, V. F.

    2010-08-15

    Using the numerical solution to the Schroedinger equation, current-voltage characteristics of the resonant-tunneling diode with spacer layers were obtained. The dependences of the peak current of the resonant-tunneling diode on the emitter spacer width were plotted. It was shown that the peak current depends periodically on the emitter spacer width. The constructed electron density diagrams showed that the increase in the peak current is associated with the resonant level in the emitter spacer region.

  13. A Nonword Repetition Task for Speakers with Misarticulations: The Syllable Repetition Task (SRT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; Campbell, Thomas F.; Dollaghan, Christine A.; Green, Jordan R.; Moore, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Conceptual and methodological confounds occur when non(sense) word repetition tasks are administered to speakers who do not have the target speech sounds in their phonetic inventories or who habitually misarticulate targeted speech sounds. In this article, the authors (a) describe a nonword repetition task, the Syllable Repetition Task…

  14. An Intergenic Regulatory Region Mediates Drosophila Myc -Induced Apoptosis and Blocks Tissue Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Can; Tintó, Sergio Casas; Li, Guangyao; Lin, Nianwei; Chung, Michelle; Moreno, Eduardo; Moberg, Kenneth H.; Zhou, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Induction of cell autonomous apoptosis following oncogene-induced overproliferation is a major tumor-suppressive mechanism in vertebrates. However the detailed mechanism mediating this process remains enigmatic. In this study we demonstrate that dMyc-induced cell-autonomous apoptosis in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster relies on an intergenic sequence termed the IRER (Irradiation Responsive Enhancer Region). The IRER mediates expression of surrounding pro-apoptotic genes, and we use an in vivo reporter of the IRER chromatin state to gather evidence that epigenetic control of DNA accessibility within the IRER is an important determinant of the strength of this response to excess dMyc. In prior work we showed that the IRER also mediates P53-dependent induction of pro-apoptotic genes following DNA damage, and the chromatin conformation within IRER is regulated by Polycomb group-mediated histone modifications. dMyc-induced apoptosis and the P53-mediated DNA damage response thus overlap in a requirement for the IRER. The epigenetic mechanisms controlling IRER accessibility appear to set thresholds for the P53 and dMyc-induced expression of apoptotic genes in vivo and may have a profound impact on cellular sensitivity to oncogene-induced stress. PMID:24931167

  15. A Discrete Class of Intergenic DNA Dictates Meiotic DNA Break Hotspots in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cam, Hugh P; Farah, Joseph A; Grewal, Shiv I. S; Smith, Gerald R

    2007-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) made by Spo11 (Rec12 in fission yeast), which becomes covalently linked to the DSB ends. Like recombination events, DSBs occur at hotspots in the genome, but the genetic factors responsible for most hotspots have remained elusive. Here we describe in fission yeast the genome-wide distribution of meiosis-specific Rec12-DNA linkages, which closely parallel DSBs measured by conventional Southern blot hybridization. Prominent DSB hotspots are located ∼65 kb apart, separated by intervals with little or no detectable breakage. Most hotspots lie within exceptionally large intergenic regions. Thus, the chromosomal architecture responsible for hotspots in fission yeast is markedly different from that of budding yeast, in which DSB hotspots are much more closely spaced and, in many regions of the genome, occur at each promoter. Our analysis in fission yeast reveals a clearly identifiable chromosomal feature that can predict the majority of recombination hotspots across a whole genome and provides a basis for searching for the chromosomal features that dictate hotspots of meiotic recombination in other organisms, including humans. PMID:17722984

  16. A Novel Intergenic ETnII-β Insertion Mutation Causes Multiple Malformations in Polypodia Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lehoczky, Jessica A.; Thomas, Peedikayil E.; Patrie, Kevin M.; Owens, Kailey M.; Villarreal, Lisa M.; Galbraith, Kenneth; Washburn, Joe; Johnson, Craig N.; Gavino, Bryant; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Wakenight, Paul; Law, William; Van Keuren, Margaret L.; Gavrilina, Galina; Hughes, Elizabeth D.; Saunders, Thomas L.; Brihn, Lesil; Nadeau, Joseph H.; Innis, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse early transposon insertions are responsible for ∼10% of spontaneous mutant phenotypes. We previously reported the phenotypes and genetic mapping of Polypodia, (Ppd), a spontaneous, X-linked dominant mutation with profound effects on body plan morphogenesis. Our new data shows that mutant mice are not born in expected Mendelian ratios secondary to loss after E9.5. In addition, we refined the Ppd genetic interval and discovered a novel ETnII-β early transposon insertion between the genes for Dusp9 and Pnck. The ETn inserted 1.6 kb downstream and antisense to Dusp9 and does not disrupt polyadenylation or splicing of either gene. Knock-in mice engineered to carry the ETn display Ppd characteristic ectopic caudal limb phenotypes, showing that the ETn insertion is the Ppd molecular lesion. Early transposons are actively expressed in the early blastocyst. To explore the consequences of the ETn on the genomic landscape at an early stage of development, we compared interval gene expression between wild-type and mutant ES cells. Mutant ES cell expression analysis revealed marked upregulation of Dusp9 mRNA and protein expression. Evaluation of the 5′ LTR CpG methylation state in adult mice revealed no correlation with the occurrence or severity of Ppd phenotypes at birth. Thus, the broad range of phenotypes observed in this mutant is secondary to a novel intergenic ETn insertion whose effects include dysregulation of nearby interval gene expression at early stages of development. PMID:24339789

  17. Comparative Expression Dynamics of Intergenic Long Noncoding RNAs in the Genus Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Kevin G.; Machado, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been annotated in eukaryotic genomes, but comparative transcriptomic approaches are necessary to understand their biological impact and evolution. To facilitate such comparative studies in Drosophila, we identified and characterized lncRNAs in a second Drosophilid—the evolutionary model Drosophila pseudoobscura. Using RNA-Seq and computational filtering of protein-coding potential, we identified 1,589 intergenic lncRNA loci in D. pseudoobscura. We surveyed multiple sex-specific developmental stages and found, like in Drosophila melanogaster, increasingly prolific lncRNA expression through male development and an overrepresentation of lncRNAs in the testes. Other trends seen in D. melanogaster, like reduced pupal expression, were not observed. Nonrandom distributions of female-biased and non-testis-specific male-biased lncRNAs between the X chromosome and autosomes are consistent with selection-based models of gene trafficking to optimize genomic location of sex-biased genes. The numerous testis-specific lncRNAs, however, are randomly distributed between the X and autosomes, and we cannot reject the hypothesis that many of these are likely to be spurious transcripts. Finally, using annotated lncRNAs in both species, we identified 134 putative lncRNA homologs between D. pseudoobscura and D. melanogaster and find that many have conserved developmental expression dynamics, making them ideal candidates for future functional analyses. PMID:27189981

  18. Computational identification of human long intergenic non-coding RNAs using a GA-SVM algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqiu; Li, Yang; Wang, Qi; Lv, Yingli; Wang, Shiyuan; Chen, Xi; Yu, Xuexin; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a new type of non-coding RNAs and are closely related with the occurrence and development of diseases. In previous studies, most lincRNAs have been identified through next-generation sequencing. Because lincRNAs exhibit tissue-specific expression, the reproducibility of lincRNA discovery in different studies is very poor. In this study, not including lincRNA expression, we used the sequence, structural and protein-coding potential features as potential features to construct a classifier that can be used to distinguish lincRNAs from non-lincRNAs. The GA-SVM algorithm was performed to extract the optimized feature subset. Compared with several feature subsets, the five-fold cross validation results showed that this optimized feature subset exhibited the best performance for the identification of human lincRNAs. Moreover, the LincRNA Classifier based on Selected Features (linc-SF) was constructed by support vector machine (SVM) based on the optimized feature subset. The performance of this classifier was further evaluated by predicting lincRNAs from two independent lincRNA sets. Because the recognition rates for the two lincRNA sets were 100% and 99.8%, the linc-SF was found to be effective for the prediction of human lincRNAs.

  19. In silico prediction of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in sheep.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Hosseinpour, Batool; Arefnezhad, Babak; Shamabadi, Narges; Salami, Seyed Alireza

    2016-04-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcribed RNA molecules >200 nucleotides in length that do not encode proteins and serve as key regulators of diverse biological processes. Recently, thousands of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs), a type of lncRNAs, have been identified in mammalians using massive parallel large sequencing technologies. The availability of the genome sequence of sheep (Ovis aries) has allowed us genomic prediction of non-coding RNAs. This is the first study to identify lincRNAs using RNA-seq data of eight different tissues of sheep, including brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, skin, and white adipose. A computational pipeline was employed to characterize 325 putative lincRNAs with high confidence from eight important tissues of sheep using different criteria such as GC content, exon number, gene length, co-expression analysis, stability, and tissue-specific scores. Sixty-four putative lincRNAs displayed tissues-specific expression. The highest number of tissues-specific lincRNAs was found in skin and brain. All novel lincRNAs that aligned to the human and mouse lincRNAs had conserved synteny. These closest protein-coding genes were enriched in 11 significant GO terms such as limb development, appendage development, striated muscle tissue development, and multicellular organismal development. The findings reported here have important implications for the study of sheep genome.

  20. Epistasis in intra- and inter-gene pool crosses of the common bean.

    PubMed

    Borel, J C; Ramalho, M A P; Abreu, A F B

    2016-02-26

    Epistasis has been shown to have an important role in the genetic control of several quantitative traits in the common bean. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of epistasis in intra- and inter-pool gene crosses of the common bean. Four elite lines adapted to Brazilian conditions were used as parents, two from the Andean gene pool (ESAL 686; BRS Radiante) and two from the Mesoamerican gene pool (BRSMG Majestoso; BRS Valente). Four F2 populations were obtained: "A" (ESAL 686 x BRS Radiante), "B" (BRSMG Majestoso x BRS Valente), "C" (BRS Radiante x BRSMG Majestoso), and "D" (BRS Valente x ESAL 686). A random sample of F2 plants from each population was backcrossed to parents and F1 individuals, according to the triple test cross. Three types of progenies from each population were evaluated in contiguous trials. Seed yield and 100-seed weight were evaluated. Dominance genetic variance was predominant in most cases. However, the estimates of genetic variance may be biased by the occurrence of linkage disequilibrium and epistasis. Epistasis was detected for both traits; however, the occurrence differed among the populations and between the two traits. The results of this study reinforce the hypothesis that epistasis is present in the genetic control of traits in the common bean and suggest that the phenomenon is more frequent in inter-gene pool crosses than in intra-gene pool crosses.

  1. The evolutionary landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events in insects

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yimeng; Zhou, Hongxia; Yu, Yao; Chen, Longxian; Hao, Pei; Li, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    To explore the landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events and characterize their functions and evolutionary dynamics, we conduct a mega-data study of a phylogeny containing eight species across five orders of class Insecta, a model system spanning 400 million years of evolution. A total of 1,627 trans-splicing events involving 2,199 genes are identified, accounting for 1.58% of the total genes. Homology analysis reveals that mod(mdg4)-like trans-splicing is the only conserved event that is consistently observed in multiple species across two orders, which represents a unique case of functional diversification involving trans-splicing. Thus, evolutionarily its potential for generating proteins with novel function is not broadly utilized by insects. Furthermore, 146 non-mod trans-spliced transcripts are found to resemble canonical genes from different species. Trans-splicing preserving the function of ‘breakup' genes may serve as a general mechanism for relaxing the constraints on gene structure, with profound implications for the evolution of genes and genomes. PMID:26521696

  2. The evolutionary landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events in insects.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yimeng; Zhou, Hongxia; Yu, Yao; Chen, Longxian; Hao, Pei; Li, Xuan

    2015-11-02

    To explore the landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events and characterize their functions and evolutionary dynamics, we conduct a mega-data study of a phylogeny containing eight species across five orders of class Insecta, a model system spanning 400 million years of evolution. A total of 1,627 trans-splicing events involving 2,199 genes are identified, accounting for 1.58% of the total genes. Homology analysis reveals that mod(mdg4)-like trans-splicing is the only conserved event that is consistently observed in multiple species across two orders, which represents a unique case of functional diversification involving trans-splicing. Thus, evolutionarily its potential for generating proteins with novel function is not broadly utilized by insects. Furthermore, 146 non-mod trans-spliced transcripts are found to resemble canonical genes from different species. Trans-splicing preserving the function of 'breakup' genes may serve as a general mechanism for relaxing the constraints on gene structure, with profound implications for the evolution of genes and genomes.

  3. Serial Position Effects in Nonword Repetition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, P.; Lipinski, J.; Abbs, B.; Lin, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    A growing body of research has emphasized the linkage between performance in immediate serial recall of lists, nonword repetition, and word learning. Recently, it has been reported that primacy and recency effects are obtained in repetition of individual syllables within nonwords (Gupta, in press). Five experiments examined whether such…

  4. Grade Repetition in Queensland State Prep Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    The current study considers grade repetition rates in the early years of schooling in Queensland state schools with specific focus on the pre-schooling year, Prep. In particular, it provides empirical evidence of grade repetition in Queensland state schools along with groups of students who are more often repeated. At the same time, much of the…

  5. Biomechanics of lateral interbody spacers: going wider for going stiffer.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Luiz; Turner, Alexander W L; Dooley, Zachary A; Parikh, Rachit D; Peterson, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the biomechanical stability of a large interbody spacer inserted by a lateral approach and compares the biomechanical differences with the more conventional transforaminal interbody fusion (TLIF), with and without supplemental pedicle screw (PS) fixation. Twenty-four L2-L3 functional spinal units (FSUs) were tested with three interbody cage options: (i) 18 mm XLIF cage, (ii) 26 mm XLIF cage, and (iii) 11 mm TLIF cage. Each spacer was tested without supplemental fixation, and with unilateral and bilateral PS fixation. Specimens were subjected to multidirectional nondestructive flexibility tests to 7.5 N·m. The range of motion (ROM) differences were first examined within the same group (per cage) using repeated-measures ANOVA, and then compared between cage groups. The 26 mm XLIF cage provided greater stability than the 18 mm XLIF cage with unilateral PS and 11 mm TLIF cage with bilateral PS. The 18 mm XLIF cage with unilateral PS provided greater stability than the 11 mm TLIF cage with bilateral PS. This study suggests that wider lateral spacers are biomechanically stable and offer the option to be used with less or even no supplemental fixation for interbody lumbar fusion.

  6. Structural design feasibility study of Space Station long spacer truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, Sasan C.; Funk, Gregory P.; Dohogne, Caroline A.

    1994-01-01

    The structural design and configuration feasibility of the long spacer truss assembly that will be used as part of the Space Station Freedom is the focus of this study. The structural analysis discussed herein is derived from the transient loading events presented in the Space Transportation System Interface Control Document (STS ICD). The transient loading events are liftoff, landing, and emergency landing loads. Quasi-static loading events were neglected in this study since the magnitude of the quasi-static acceleration factors is lower than that of the transient acceleration factors. Structural analysis of the proposed configuration of the long spacer truss with four longerons indicated that negative safety margins are possible. As a result, configuration changes were proposed. The primary configuration change suggested was to increase the number of truss longerons to six. The six-longeron truss appears to be a more promising structure than the four-longeron truss because it offers a positive margin of safety and more volume in its second bay (BAY2). This additional volume can be used for resupply of some of the orbital replacement units (such as a battery box). Note that the design effort on the long spacer truss has not fully begun and that calculations and reports of the negative safety margins are, to date, based on concept only.

  7. Effects of interspinous spacers on lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong; Nong, Lu-Ming; DU, Rui; Gao, Gong-Ming; Jiang, Yu-Qing; Xu, Nan-Wei

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the early effects of interspinous spacers on lumbar degenerative disease. The clinical outcomes of 23 patients with lumbar degenerative disease, treated using interspinous spacer implantation alone or combined with posterior lumbar fusion, were retrospectively studied and assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Pre-operative and post-operative interspinous distance, disc space height, foraminal width and height and segmental lordosis were determined. The early effects and complications associated with the interspinous spacers were recorded. The surgical procedures performed with the in-space treatment were easy and minimally invasive. The VAS scores and ODI were improved post-operatively compared with pre-operatively. Significant changes in the interspinous distance, disc space height, foraminal width and height and segmental lordosis were noted. In-space treatment for degenerative lumbar disease is easy and safe, with good early effects. The in-space system provides an alternative treatment for lumbar degenerative disease.

  8. Repetition priming results in sensitivity attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Allenmark, Fredrik; Hsu, Yi-Fang; Roussel, Cedric; Waszak, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Repetition priming refers to the change in the ability to perform a task on a stimulus as a consequence of a former encounter with that very same item. Usually, repetition results in faster and more accurate performance. In the present study, we used a contrast discrimination protocol to assess perceptual sensitivity and response bias of Gabor gratings that are either repeated (same orientation) or alternated (different orientation). We observed that contrast discrimination performance is worse, not better, for repeated than for alternated stimuli. In a second experiment, we varied the probability of stimulus repetition, thus testing whether the repetition effect is due to bottom-up or top-down factors. We found that it is top-down expectation that determines the effect. We discuss the implication of these findings for repetition priming and related phenomena as sensory attenuation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention. PMID:25819554

  9. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between Successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz.

  10. Improving electricity production in tubular microbial fuel cells through optimizing the anolyte flow with spiral spacers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Ge, Zheng; Grimaud, Julien; Hurst, Jim; He, Zhen

    2013-04-01

    The use of spiral spacers to create a helical flow for improving electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated in both laboratory and on-site tests. The lab tests found that the MFC with the spiral spacers produced more electricity than the one without the spiral spacers at different recirculation rates or organic loading rates, likely due to the improved transport/distribution of ions and electron mediators instead of the substrates because the organic removal efficiency was not obviously affected by the presence of the spiral spacers. The energy production in the MFC with the spiral spacers reached 0.071 or 0.073 kWh/kg COD in either vertical or horizontal installment. The examination of the MFCs installed in an aeration tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant confirmed the advantage of using the spiral spacers. Those results demonstrate that spiral spacers could be an effective approach to improve energy production in MFCs.

  11. Increased antibiotic release and equivalent biomechanics of a spacer cement without hard radio contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, R G; Kretzer, J P; Vogt, S; Büchner, H; Thomsen, M N; Lehner, B

    2015-10-01

    We compared a novel calcium carbonate spacer cement (Copal® spacem) to well-established bone cements. Electron microscopic structure and elution properties of the antibiotics ofloxacin, vancomycin, clindamycin, and gentamicin were examined. A knee wear simulator model for articulating cement spacers was established. Mechanical tests for bending strength, flexural modulus, and compressive and fatigue strength were performed. The electron microscopic analysis showed a microporous structure of the spacer cement, and this promoted a significantly higher and longer antibiotic elution. All spacer cement specimens released the antibiotics for a period of up to 50days with the exception of the vancomycin loading. The spacer cement showed significantly less wear scars and fulfilled the ISO 5833 requirements. The newly developed spacer cement is a hydrophilic antibiotic carrier with an increased release. Cement without hard radio contrast agents can improve tribological behaviour of spacers, and this may reduce reactive wear particles and abrasive bone defects.

  12. Strategies for Using Repetition as a Powerful Teaching Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Kirt

    2011-01-01

    Brain research indicates that repetition is of vital importance in the learning process. Repetition is an especially useful tool in the area of music education. The success of repetition can be enhanced by accurate and timely feedback. From "simple repetition" to "repetition with the addition or subtraction of degrees of freedom," there are many…

  13. Development and characterization of 3D-printed feed spacers for spiral wound membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Amber; Farhat, Nadia; Bucs, Szilárd S; Linares, Rodrigo Valladares; Picioreanu, Cristian; Kruithof, Joop C; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Kidwell, James; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S

    2016-03-15

    Feed spacers are important for the impact of biofouling on the performance of spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems. The objective of this study was to propose a strategy for developing, characterizing, and testing of feed spacers by numerical modeling, three-dimensional (3D) printing of feed spacers and experimental membrane fouling simulator (MFS) studies. The results of numerical modeling on the hydrodynamic behavior of various feed spacer geometries suggested that the impact of spacers on hydrodynamics and biofouling can be improved. A good agreement was found for the modeled and measured relationship between linear flow velocity and pressure drop for feed spacers with the same geometry, indicating that modeling can serve as the first step in spacer characterization. An experimental comparison study of a feed spacer currently applied in practice and a 3D printed feed spacer with the same geometry showed (i) similar hydrodynamic behavior, (ii) similar pressure drop development with time and (iii) similar biomass accumulation during MFS biofouling studies, indicating that 3D printing technology is an alternative strategy for development of thin feed spacers with a complex geometry. Based on the numerical modeling results, a modified feed spacer with low pressure drop was selected for 3D printing. The comparison study of the feed spacer from practice and the modified geometry 3D printed feed spacer established that the 3D printed spacer had (i) a lower pressure drop during hydrodynamic testing, (ii) a lower pressure drop increase in time with the same accumulated biomass amount, indicating that modifying feed spacer geometries can reduce the impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance. The combination of numerical modeling of feed spacers and experimental testing of 3D printed feed spacers is a promising strategy (rapid, low cost and representative) to develop advanced feed spacers aiming to reduce the impact of

  14. Development and characterization of 3D-printed feed spacers for spiral wound membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Amber; Farhat, Nadia; Bucs, Szilárd S; Linares, Rodrigo Valladares; Picioreanu, Cristian; Kruithof, Joop C; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Kidwell, James; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S

    2016-03-15

    Feed spacers are important for the impact of biofouling on the performance of spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems. The objective of this study was to propose a strategy for developing, characterizing, and testing of feed spacers by numerical modeling, three-dimensional (3D) printing of feed spacers and experimental membrane fouling simulator (MFS) studies. The results of numerical modeling on the hydrodynamic behavior of various feed spacer geometries suggested that the impact of spacers on hydrodynamics and biofouling can be improved. A good agreement was found for the modeled and measured relationship between linear flow velocity and pressure drop for feed spacers with the same geometry, indicating that modeling can serve as the first step in spacer characterization. An experimental comparison study of a feed spacer currently applied in practice and a 3D printed feed spacer with the same geometry showed (i) similar hydrodynamic behavior, (ii) similar pressure drop development with time and (iii) similar biomass accumulation during MFS biofouling studies, indicating that 3D printing technology is an alternative strategy for development of thin feed spacers with a complex geometry. Based on the numerical modeling results, a modified feed spacer with low pressure drop was selected for 3D printing. The comparison study of the feed spacer from practice and the modified geometry 3D printed feed spacer established that the 3D printed spacer had (i) a lower pressure drop during hydrodynamic testing, (ii) a lower pressure drop increase in time with the same accumulated biomass amount, indicating that modifying feed spacer geometries can reduce the impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance. The combination of numerical modeling of feed spacers and experimental testing of 3D printed feed spacers is a promising strategy (rapid, low cost and representative) to develop advanced feed spacers aiming to reduce the impact of

  15. Dispersed repetitive DNA sequence of Mucor racemosus.

    PubMed Central

    Dewar, R; Katayama, C; Sypherd, P S; Cihlar, R L

    1985-01-01

    A dispersed repetitive DNA sequence has been identified within the genome of the fungus Mucor racemosus. Recombinant phage clones, as well as a plasmid harboring the sequence, have been isolated. Examination of cloned fragments comprising part of the repetitive sequence has led to a partial characterization of the element. The sequence has been detected in other Mucor species, and although the apparent number and chromosomal position of the repetitive sequence vary from strain to strain, it is clear that at least portions of the element have been conserved. Images PMID:3980442

  16. Impact of ZnO embedded feed spacer on biofilm development in membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Ronen, Avner; Semiat, Raphael; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2013-11-01

    The concept of suppressing biofouling formation using an antibacterial feed spacer was investigated in a bench scale-cross flow system mimicking a spiral wound membrane configuration. An antibacterial composite spacer containing zinc oxide-nanoparticles was constructed by modification of a commercial polypropylene feed spacer using sonochemical deposition. The ability of the modified spacers to repress biofilm development on membranes was evaluated in flow-through cells simulating the flow conditions in commercial spiral wound modules. The experiments were performed at laminar flow (Re = 300) with a 200 kDa molecular weight cut off polysulfone ultrafiltration membrane using Pseudomonas putida S-12 as model biofilm bacteria. The modified spacers reduced permeate flux decrease at least by 50% compared to the unmodified spacers (control). The physical properties of the modified spacer and biofilm development were evaluated using high resolution/energy dispersive spectrometry-scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy imaging (HRSEM, EDS, AFM and CLSM). HRSEM images depicted significantly less bacteria attached to the membranes exposed to the modified spacer, mainly scattered and in a sporadic monolayer structure. AFM analysis indicated the influence of the modification on the spacer surface including a phase change on the upper surface. Dead-live staining assay by CLSM indicated that most of the bacterial cells attached on the membranes exposed to the modified spacer were dead in contrast to a developed biofilm which was predominant in the control samples.

  17. Chelate cooperativity and spacer length effects on the assembly thermodynamics and kinetics of divalent pseudorotaxanes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Nowosinski, Karol; Löw, Nora L; Dzyuba, Egor V; Klautzsch, Fabian; Schäfer, Andreas; Huuskonen, Juhani; Rissanen, Kari; Schalley, Christoph A

    2012-01-25

    Homo- and heterodivalent crown-ammonium pseudorotaxanes with different spacers connecting the two axle ammonium binding sites have been synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and ESI mass spectrometry. The homodivalent pseudorotaxanes are investigated with respect to the thermodynamics of divalent binding and to chelate cooperativity. The shortest spacer exhibits a chelate cooperativity much stronger than that of the longer spacers. On the basis of crystal structure, this can be explained by a noninnocent spacer, which contributes to the binding strength in addition to the two binding sites. Already very subtle changes in the spacer length, i.e., the introduction of an additional methylene group, cause substantial changes in the magnitude of cooperative binding as expressed in the large differences in effective molarity. With a similar series of heterodivalent pseudorotaxanes, the spacer effects on the barrier for the intramolecular threading step has been examined with the result that the shortest spacer causes a strained transition structure and thus the second binding event occurs slower than that of the longer spacers. The activation enthalpies and entropies show clear trends. While the longer spacers reduce the enthalpic strain that is present in the transition state for the shortest member of the series, the longer spacers become entropically slightly more unfavorable because of conformational fixation of the spacer chain during the second binding event. These results clearly show the noninnocent spacers to complicate the analysis of multivalent binding. An approximate description which considers the binding sites to be connected just by a flexible chain turns out to be more a rough approximation than a good model. The second conclusion from the results presented here is that multivalency is expressed in both the thermodynamics and the kinetics in different ways. A spacer optimized for strong binding is suboptimal for fast pseudorotaxane formation.

  18. Minor and repetitive head injury.

    PubMed

    Buki, Andras; Kovacs, Noemi; Czeiter, Endre; Schmid, Kara; Berger, Rachel P; Kobeissy, Firas; Italiano, Domenico; Hayes, Ronald L; Tortella, Frank C; Mezosi, Emese; Schwarcz, Attila; Toth, Arnold; Nemes, Orsolya; Mondello, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in the young, active population and expected to be the third leading cause of death in the whole world until 2020. The disease is frequently referred to as the silent epidemic, and many authors highlight the "unmet medical need" associated with TBI.The term traumatically evoked brain injury covers a heterogeneous group ranging from mild/minor/minimal to severe/non-salvageable damages. Severe TBI has long been recognized to be a major socioeconomical health-care issue as saving young lives and sometimes entirely restituting health with a timely intervention can indeed be extremely cost efficient.Recently it has been recognized that mild or minor TBI should be considered similarly important because of the magnitude of the patient population affected. Other reasons behind this recognition are the association of mild head injury with transient cognitive disturbances as well as long-term sequelae primarily linked to repeat (sport-related) injuries.The incidence of TBI in developed countries can be as high as 2-300/100,000 inhabitants; however, if we consider the injury pyramid, it turns out that severe and moderate TBI represents only 25-30 % of all cases, while the overwhelming majority of TBI cases consists of mild head injury. On top of that, or at the base of the pyramid, are the cases that never show up at the ER - the unreported injuries.Special attention is turned to mild TBI as in recent military conflicts it is recognized as "signature injury."This chapter aims to summarize the most important features of mild and repetitive traumatic brain injury providing definitions, stratifications, and triage options while also focusing on contemporary knowledge gathered by imaging and biomarker research.Mild traumatic brain injury is an enigmatic lesion; the classification, significance, and its consequences are all far less defined and explored than in more severe forms of brain injury

  19. Enhancing Asthma Medication Delivery: Spacers and Valved Holding Chambers.

    PubMed

    Schoessler, Sally; Winders, Tonya

    2016-07-01

    Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases managed by school nurses, and its management often includes the administration of bronchodilators delivered via a metered dose inhaler (MDI). The use of an MDI requires coordination and mastery of steps that must be performed correctly and in the proper order. These steps are greatly enhanced, especially in the pediatric population, through the use of medical devices-spacers and valved holding chambers. The purpose of this article is to review the rationale and implications for the use of these devices in the school setting. PMID:27194239

  20. Hydrodynamic evidence in support of spacer regions in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, K S; Shaw, B R

    1977-08-12

    Quasi-elastic light scattering and sedimentation velocity methods were used to study the hydrodynamic properties of purified dimer subunits obtained from partial digestion of chicken erythrocyte chromatin with staphylococcal nuclease. The experimental value of 1.87 +/- 0.08 X 10(-7) gram per second for the friction factor of these dimer subunits in low ionic strength buffer cannot be reasonably interpreted in terms of a contiguous sphere model. Analysis by means of an equivalent dimer method suggests that the spacer region accounts for a maximum of 19 percent of the friction properties of the dimer.

  1. Repetitive strain injury: causes, treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, Ann

    Repetitive strain injury (RSI) has become increasingly prevalent with the growth of computer-based and automated occupations. While environmental factors such as work stations and repetitive tasks are primary causes, a number of secondary causes can increase a person's risk of RSI. Various treatments provide relief but the rate of recovery varies widely. Prevention involves adopting a range of measures that will also promote recovery in those with RSI.

  2. A 500-ml plastic bottle: an effective spacer for children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Zar, Heather J; Asmus, Michael J; Weinberg, Eugene G

    2002-06-01

    Inhaled therapy using a metered-dose inhaler (MDI) with attached spacer has been increasingly recognized as the optimal method for delivering asthma medication for acute attacks and chronic prophylaxis. However, in developing countries the cost and availability of commercially produced spacers limit the use of MDI-spacer delivery systems. A 500-ml plastic bottle has been recently adapted to function as a spacer. This article reviews the current data on the efficacy of this bottle-spacer and discusses its advantages and limitations. It is concluded that a modified 500-ml plastic bottle is an effective spacer; modification and use of this device should be incorporated into international guidelines for the management of children with asthma.

  3. The Dunaliella salina organelle genomes: large sequences, inflated with intronic and intergenic DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David R.; Lee, Robert W.; Cushman, John C.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Tran, Duc; Polle, Juergen E.

    2010-05-07

    Abstract Background: Dunaliella salina Teodoresco, a unicellular, halophilic green alga belonging to the Chlorophyceae, is among the most industrially important microalgae. This is because D. salina can produce massive amounts of β-carotene, which can be collected for commercial purposes, and because of its potential as a feedstock for biofuels production. Although the biochemistry and physiology of D. salina have been studied in great detail, virtually nothing is known about the genomes it carries, especially those within its mitochondrion and plastid. This study presents the complete mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences of D. salina and compares them with those of the model green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. Results: The D. salina organelle genomes are large, circular-mapping molecules with ~60% noncoding DNA, placing them among the most inflated organelle DNAs sampled from the Chlorophyta. In fact, the D. salina plastid genome, at 269 kb, is the largest complete plastid DNA (ptDNA) sequence currently deposited in GenBank, and both the mitochondrial and plastid genomes have unprecedentedly high intron densities for organelle DNA: ~1.5 and ~0.4 introns per gene, respectively. Moreover, what appear to be the relics of genes, introns, and intronic open reading frames are found scattered throughout the intergenic ptDNA regions -- a trait without parallel in other characterized organelle genomes and one that gives insight into the mechanisms and modes of expansion of the D. salina ptDNA. Conclusions: These findings confirm the notion that chlamydomonadalean algae have some of the most extreme organelle genomes of all eukaryotes. They also suggest that the events giving rise to the expanded ptDNA architecture of D. salina and other Chlamydomonadales may have occurred early in the evolution of this lineage. Although interesting from a genome evolution standpoint, the D. salina organelle DNA sequences will aid in the development of a viable

  4. Global familiarity of visual stimuli affects repetition-related neural plasticity but not repetition priming

    PubMed Central

    Soldan, Anja; Zarahn, Eric; Hilton, H. John; Stern, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    In this study we tested the prediction of the component process model of priming (Henson, 2003) that repetition priming of familiar and unfamiliar objects produces qualitatively different neural repetition effects. In an fMRI study, subjects viewed four repetitions of familiar objects and globally unfamiliar objects with familiar components. Reliable behavioral priming occurred for both item types across the four presentations and was of a similar magnitude for both stimulus types. The imaging data was analyzed using multivariate linear modeling, which permits explicit testing of the hypothesis that the repetition effects for familiar and unfamiliar objects are qualitatively different (i.e., non-scaled versions of one another). The results showed the presence of two qualitatively different latent spatial patterns of repetition effects from presenation one to presentation four for familiar and unfamilar objects, indicating that familiarity with an object’s global structural, semantic, or lexical features is an important factor in priming-related neural plasticity. The first latent spatial pattern strongly weighted regions with a similar repetition effect for both item types. The second pattern strongly weighted regions contributing a repetition suppression effect for the familiar objects and repetition enhancement for the unfamiliar objects, particularly the posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and cingulate cortex. This differential repetition effect might reflect the formation of novel memory representations for the unfamiliar items, which already exist for the familiar objects, consistent with the component-process model of priming. PMID:17913513

  5. Functional analysis of transcribed spacers of yeast ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Musters, W; Boon, K; van der Sande, C A; van Heerikhuizen, H; Planta, R J

    1990-01-01

    Making use of an rDNA unit, containing oligonucleotide tags in both the 17S and 26S rRNA gene, we have analyzed the effect of various deletions in the External Transcribed Spacer (ETS) and in one of the Internal Transcribed Spacers 1 (ITS1) on the process of ribosome formation in yeast. By following the fate of the tagged transcripts of this rDNA unit in vivo by Northern hybridization we found that deleting various parts of the ETS prevents the accumulation of tagged 17S rRNA and its assembly into 40S subunits, but not the formation of 60S subunits. Deleting the central region of ITS1, including a processing site that is used in an early stage of the maturation process, was also found to prevent the accumulation of functional 49 S subunits, whereas no effect on the formation of 60S subunits was detected. The implications of these findings for yeast pre-rRNA processing are discussed. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2249660

  6. Delivery of beclomethasone dipropionate from a spacer device: what dose is available for inhalation?

    PubMed Central

    O'Callaghan, C.; Cant, M.; Robertson, C.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--It is common for inhaled steroids to be delivered through a large volume spacer device. Comparatively little is known about how this practice affects the dose of drug received by patients compared with drug delivered directly from a metered dose inhaler. METHODS--The amount of beclomethasone dipropionate, contained in particles of various size, available for inhalation from a 750 ml polycarbonate spacer (Volumatic) was determined by impinger measurement and high performance liquid chromatography. Three strengths of metered dose inhalers were studied (50 micrograms, 100 micrograms, and 250 micrograms/actuation). The effect of multiple actuations of beclomethasone dipropionate into a Volumatic spacer, and increasing residence times of drug within the spacer before inhalation, on the amount of drug available to the patient for inhalation was determined. RESULTS--The amount of beclomethasone dipropionate in particles < 5 microns when delivered by a spacer device or directly from a metered dose inhaler was similar. The total amount of beclomethasone dipropionate available for inhalation per actuation decreased by 20 micrograms with the 50 micrograms inhaler, 48 micrograms with the 100 micrograms inhaler, and 161 micrograms with the 250 micrograms inhaler, when given via the spacer compared with delivery directly from a metered dose inhaler. There was a progressive decrease in drug available for inhalation per actuation as the number of actuations into the spacer increased, for all strengths of beclomethasone dipropionate tested. A progressive decrease in drug recovered per actuation was also seen with increasing residence times of drug within the spacer before inhalation. CONCLUSIONS--Use of the spacer device significantly reduced the amount of nonrespirable beclomethasone dipropionate available for inhalation. The amount of beclomethasone dipropionate within respirable particles decreased considerably following multiple actuations into the spacer and with

  7. Molecular profiling of microbial communities from contaminated sources: Use of substractive cloning methods and rDNA spacer sequences. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    'This project is to develop molecular methods for rapid characterization of microbial communities in contaminated ecosystems. The authors are exploring the use of {sup 16}s ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) to profile community composition. The choice proves to be a good one: there are 200--550 bases of 1 to 3 variable regions from which to choose species-specific probes, as well as 2--4 stretches of conserved sequence from which to develop universal PCR (polymerase chain reaction) primers. Preliminary community characterization is complete, and several types of arrays are under development to determine the types of bacteria present and the status of the ground water. Profiling the community composition of polluted groundwater will impact the broad field of microbial ecology as well as mixed-waste bioremediation. Results The samples the authors have been analysing were provided by Dr. Fred Brockman from Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and were collected at the US DOE Hanford site, Washington state. The samples were microbial filtrates from ground water polluted with 2 mg/L carbon tetrachloride and 250 mg/L nitrate and subjected to enrichment (acetate + nitrate) and recirculation. This project is described in some detail in PNNL-11113, Accelerated In Situ Bioremediation of Groundwater, by M.J. Truex, B.S. Hooker, and D.B. Anderson, July 1996.'

  8. Variations in the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer of fibrolytic Butyrivibrio isolates from the reindeer rumen.

    PubMed

    Præsteng, Kirsti E; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O; Mathiesen, Svein D; Sundset, Monica A

    2011-07-01

    Strains of Butyrivibrio are principal cellulytic bacteria in the rumen of the High Arctic Svalbard reindeer ( Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus ). According to phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, Butyrivibrio can be divided into three subgroups within the Clostridia class of the phylum Firmicutes, but the current phenotypic and genotypic differentiation within the family Lachnospiraceae is insufficient. This current study describes the sequence diversity of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region of Butyrivibrio isolates from reindeer. A total of 17 different ITS sequences with sizes between 449 and 784 nt were obtained. Genes encoding tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala) were identified in four of the sequences. Phylogenetic neighbor-joining trees were constructed based on the ITS sequence and compared with a phylogenetic neighbor-joining tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences previously obtained for the same isolates. These comparisons indicated a better differentiation between strains in the ITS sequence than the 16S rRNA gene based tree. Through this study, a better means for identifying and tracking fibrolytic and potentially probiotic Butyrivibrio strains in reindeer and other ruminants has been provided.

  9. Cervical interfacet spacers and maintenance of cervical lordosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee A; Straus, David C; Traynelis, Vincent C

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The cervical interfacet spacer (CIS) is a relatively new technology that can increase foraminal height and area by facet distraction. These offer the potential to provide indirect neuroforaminal decompression while simultaneously enhancing fusion potential due to the relatively large osteoconductive surface area and compressive forces exerted on the grafts. These potential benefits, along with the relative ease of implantation during posterior cervical fusion procedures, make the CIS an attractive adjuvant in the management of cervical pathology. One concern with the use of interfacet spacers is the theoretical risk of inducing iatrogenic kyphosis. This work tests the hypothesis that interfacet spacers are associated with loss of cervical lordosis. METHODS Records from patients undergoing posterior cervical fusion at Rush University Medical Center between March 2011 and December 2012 were reviewed. The FacetLift CISs were used in all patients. Preoperative and postoperative radiographic data were reviewed and the Ishihara indices and cervical lordotic angles were measured and recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using STATA software. RESULTS A total of 64 patients were identified in whom 154 cervical levels were implanted with machined allograft interfacet spacers. Of these, 15 patients underwent anterior-posterior fusions, 4 underwent anterior-posterior-anterior fusions, and the remaining 45 patients underwent posterior-only fusions. In the 45 patients with posterior-only fusions, a total of 110 levels were treated with spacers. There were 14 patients (31%) with a single level treated, 16 patients (36%) with two levels treated, 5 patients (11%) with three levels treated, 5 patients (11%) with four levels treated, 1 patient (2%) with five levels treated, and 4 patients (9%) with six levels treated. Complete radiographic data were available in 38 of 45 patients (84%). On average, radiographic follow-up was obtained at 256.9 days (range 48-524 days

  10. Functional Characterization of MC1R-TUBB3 Intergenic Splice Variants of the Human Melanocortin 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Olivares, Conchi; Castejón-Griñán, Maria; Abrisqueta, Marta; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) expressed in melanocytes is a major determinant of skin pigmentation. It encodes a Gs protein-coupled receptor activated by α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH). Human MC1R has an inefficient poly(A) site allowing intergenic splicing with its downstream neighbour Tubulin-β-III (TUBB3). Intergenic splicing produces two MC1R isoforms, designated Iso1 and Iso2, bearing the complete seven transmembrane helices from MC1R fused to TUBB3-derived C-terminal extensions, in-frame for Iso1 and out-of-frame for Iso2. It has been reported that exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) might promote an isoform switch from canonical MC1R (MC1R-001) to the MC1R-TUBB3 chimeras, which might lead to novel phenotypes required for tanning. We expressed the Flag epitope-tagged intergenic isoforms in heterologous HEK293T cells and human melanoma cells, for functional characterization. Iso1 was expressed with the expected size. Iso2 yielded a doublet of Mr significantly lower than predicted, and impaired intracellular stability. Although Iso1- and Iso2 bound radiolabelled agonist with the same affinity as MC1R-001, their plasma membrane expression was strongly reduced. Decreased surface expression mostly resulted from aberrant forward trafficking, rather than high rates of endocytosis. Functional coupling of both isoforms to cAMP was lower than wild-type, but ERK activation upon binding of αMSH was unimpaired, suggesting imbalanced signaling from the splice variants. Heterodimerization of differentially labelled MC1R-001 with the splicing isoforms analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation was efficient and caused decreased surface expression of binding sites. Thus, UVR-induced MC1R isoforms might contribute to fine-tune the tanning response by modulating MC1R-001 availability and functional parameters. PMID:26657157

  11. Functional Characterization of MC1R-TUBB3 Intergenic Splice Variants of the Human Melanocortin 1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Olivares, Conchi; Castejón-Griñán, Maria; Abrisqueta, Marta; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) expressed in melanocytes is a major determinant of skin pigmentation. It encodes a Gs protein-coupled receptor activated by α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH). Human MC1R has an inefficient poly(A) site allowing intergenic splicing with its downstream neighbour Tubulin-β-III (TUBB3). Intergenic splicing produces two MC1R isoforms, designated Iso1 and Iso2, bearing the complete seven transmembrane helices from MC1R fused to TUBB3-derived C-terminal extensions, in-frame for Iso1 and out-of-frame for Iso2. It has been reported that exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) might promote an isoform switch from canonical MC1R (MC1R-001) to the MC1R-TUBB3 chimeras, which might lead to novel phenotypes required for tanning. We expressed the Flag epitope-tagged intergenic isoforms in heterologous HEK293T cells and human melanoma cells, for functional characterization. Iso1 was expressed with the expected size. Iso2 yielded a doublet of Mr significantly lower than predicted, and impaired intracellular stability. Although Iso1- and Iso2 bound radiolabelled agonist with the same affinity as MC1R-001, their plasma membrane expression was strongly reduced. Decreased surface expression mostly resulted from aberrant forward trafficking, rather than high rates of endocytosis. Functional coupling of both isoforms to cAMP was lower than wild-type, but ERK activation upon binding of αMSH was unimpaired, suggesting imbalanced signaling from the splice variants. Heterodimerization of differentially labelled MC1R-001 with the splicing isoforms analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation was efficient and caused decreased surface expression of binding sites. Thus, UVR-induced MC1R isoforms might contribute to fine-tune the tanning response by modulating MC1R-001 availability and functional parameters. PMID:26657157

  12. Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajiv; Belz, Jodi; Markovic, Stacey; Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William; Niedre, Mark; Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G.; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy-inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Methods and Materials: Here we have fabricated implantable nanoplatforms or chemoradiation therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow-release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemoradiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix and are physically identical in size to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5 mm × 0.8 mm). The silica nanoparticles, 250 nm in diameter, were conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug, and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology, and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with an anticancer drug, docetaxel. We evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results: The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked by the use of optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue in contrast to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer, which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth in contrast to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions: The imaging with the Cy7.5 spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in a slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, in contrast to the rapid clearance of the drugs when

  13. Influence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic spacer-containing enzyme conjugates on functional parameters of steroid immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Nara, Seema; Tripathi, Vinay; Chaube, Shail K; Rangari, Kiran; Singh, Harpal; Kariya, Kiran P; Shrivastav, Tulsidas G

    2008-02-01

    Introduction of spacers in coating steroid antigen or enzyme conjugates or immunogen is known to exert an influence on the sensitivity of steroid enzyme immunoassays. We have introduced hydrophobic and hydrophilic spacers between enzyme and steroid moieties and studied their effects on functional parameters of enzyme immunoassays, using cortisol as a model steroid. Cortisol-3-O-carboxymethyloxime-bovine serum albumin (F-3-O-CMO-BSA) was used as immunogen to raise the antiserum in New Zealand white rabbits. Three enzyme conjugates were prepared using cortisol-21-hemisuccinate (F-21-HS) as carboxylic derivative of cortisol and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as an enzyme label. These were F-21-HS-HRP (without spacer), F-21-HS-adipic acid dihydrazide-HRP (adipic acid dihydrazide as hydrophobic spacer), and F-21-HS-urea-HRP (urea as hydrophilic spacer). The influence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic spacers on the functional parameters of assays such as lower detection limit, ED50, and specificity was studied with reference to enzyme conjugate without spacer. The results of the present investigation revealed that the presence of a hydrophilic spacer in the enzyme conjugate decreases the lower detection limit, decreases the ED50, and marginally improves the specificity of assays. These improvements in functional parameters of assays may be due to the decreased magnitude of the overall hydrophobic interactions existing between the spacer in enzyme conjugate and the antigen binding site of the antibody. PMID:18023401

  14. Nanoparticles based brachytherapy spacers for delivery of localized combined chemo-radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajiv; Belz, Jodi; Markovic, Stacey; Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William; Niedre, Mark; Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Materials and Methods Here we have fabricated Implantable Nanoplatforms or Chemo-Radiation Therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemo-radiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-coglycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix, were physically identical (size) to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5mm×0.8mm). The silica nanoparticles with diameter 250nm conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with anticancer drug, docetaxel. We have evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked using optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue as opposed to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth as opposed to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions The imaging with the Cy7.5-spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel-spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, as opposed to rapid clearance of the drugs when administered systemically. The results demonstrate

  15. The Prevalence and Phenomenology of Repetitive Behavior in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Joanna; Oliver, Chris; Arron, Kate; Burbidge, Cheryl; Berg, Katy

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence and phenomenology of repetitive behavior in genetic syndromes to detail profiles of behavior. The Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire (RBQ) provides fine-grained identification of repetitive behaviors. The RBQ was employed to examine repetitive behavior in Angelman (N = 104), Cornelia de Lange (N = 101), Cri-du-Chat…

  16. Repetition Priming and Repetition Suppression: A Case for Enhanced Efficiency Through Neural Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Gotts, Stephen J.; Chow, Carson C.; Martin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Stimulus repetition in identification tasks leads to improved behavioral performance ("repetition priming") but attenuated neural responses ("repetition suppression") throughout task-engaged cortical regions. While it's clear that this pervasive brain-behavior relationship reflects some form of improved processing efficiency, the exact form that it takes remains elusive. In this Discussion Paper, we review four different theoretical proposals that have the potential to link repetition suppression and priming, with a particular focus on a proposal that stimulus repetition affects improved efficiency through enhanced neural synchronization. We argue that despite exciting recent work on the role of neural synchronization in cognitive processes such as attention and perception, similar studies in the domain of learning and memory - and priming, in particular - have been lacking. We emphasize the need for new studies with adequate spatiotemporal resolution, formulate several novel predictions, and discuss our ongoing efforts to disentangle the current proposals. PMID:23144664

  17. Chromatin diminution in the copepod Mesocyclops edax: elimination of both highly repetitive and nonhighly repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Christian; Drouin, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin diminution, a developmentally regulated process of DNA elimination, is found in numerous eukaryotic species. In the copepod Mesocyclops edax, some 90% of its genomic DNA is eliminated during the differentiation of embryonic cells into somatic cells. Previous studies have shown that the eliminated DNA contains highly repetitive sequences. Here, we sequenced DNA fragments from pre- and postdiminution cells to determine whether nonhighly repetitive sequences are also eliminated during the process of chromatin diminution. Comparative analyses of these sequences, as well as the sequences eliminated from the genome of the copepod Cyclops kolensis, show that they all share similar abundances of tandem repeats, dispersed repeats, transposable elements, and various coding and noncoding sequences. This suggests that, in the chromatin diminution observed in M. edax, both highly repetitive and nonhighly repetitive sequences are eliminated and that there is no bias in the type of nonhighly repetitive DNA being eliminated.

  18. Conservative treatment for repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Konijnenberg, H S; de Wilde, N S; Gerritsen, A A; van Tulder, M W; de Vet, H C

    2001-10-01

    Various conservative treatment options for repetitive strain injury are widely used, despite questionable evidence of their effectiveness. This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of these treatment options for relieving symptoms of repetitive strain injury and improving activities of daily living. Searches in Medline and Embase, with additional reference checking resulted in 15 eligible trials for this review. Methodological quality was assessed, and data-extraction was performed. With the use of a "best-evidence synthesis", no strong evidence was found for the effectiveness of any of the treatment options. There is limited evidence that multidisciplinary rehabilitation, ergonomic intervention measures, exercises, and spinal manipulation combined with soft tissue therapy are effective in providing symptom relief or improving activities of daily living. There is conflicting evidence for the effectiveness of behavioral therapy. In conclusion, little is known about the effectiveness of conservative treatment options for repetitive strain injury. To establish strong evidence, more high-quality trials are needed.

  19. Vibration of the Package of Rods Linked by Spacer Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeman, V.; Hlaváč, Z.

    This paper deals with modelling and vibration analysis of the large package of identical parallel rods which are linked by transverse springs (spacer grids) placed on several level spacings. The vibration of rods is caused by the support plate motion. The rod discretization by FEM is based on Rayleigh beam theory. With respect to cyclic and central package rod symmetry, the system is decomposed to identical revolved rod segments. The modal synthesis method with condensation of the rod segments is used for modelling and determination of steady forced vibration of the whole system. The presented method is the first step to modelling of the nuclear fuel assembly vibration caused by kinematical excitation determined by motion of the support plates which are part of the reactor core.

  20. Identification and Functional Prediction of Large Intergenic Noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Fu, Liyuan; Koganti, Prasanthi P; Wang, Lei; Hand, Jacqelyn M; Ma, Hao; Yao, Jianbo

    2016-04-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recognized in recent years as key regulators of diverse cellular processes. Genome-wide large-scale projects have uncovered thousands of lncRNAs in many model organisms. Large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are lncRNAs that are transcribed from intergenic regions of genomes. To date, no lincRNAs in non-model teleost fish have been reported. In this report, we present the first reference catalog of 9674 rainbow trout lincRNAs based on analysis of RNA-Seq data from 15 tissues. Systematic analysis revealed that lincRNAs in rainbow trout share many characteristics with those in other mammalian species. They are shorter and lower in exon number and expression level compared with protein-coding genes. They show tissue-specific expression pattern and are typically co-expressed with their neighboring genes. Co-expression network analysis suggested that many lincRNAs are associated with immune response, muscle differentiation, and neural development. The study provides an opportunity for future experimental and computational studies to uncover the functions of lincRNAs in rainbow trout.

  1. Shewanella knowledgebase: integration of the experimental data and computational predictions suggests a biological role for transcription of intergenic regions

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinets, Tatiana V; Romine, Margaret; Schmoyer, Denise D; Kora, Guruprasad H; Syed, Mustafa H; Leuze, Michael Rex; Serres, Margrethe H.; Park, Byung; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2010-01-01

    Shewanellae are facultative gamma-proteobacteria whose remarkable respiratory versatility has resulted in interest in their utility for bioremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides and for energy generation in microbial fuel cells. Extensive experimental efforts over the last several years and the availability of 21 sequenced Shewanella genomes made it possible to collect and integrate a wealth of information on the genus into one public resource providing new avenues for making biological discoveries and for developing a system level understanding of the cellular processes. The Shewanella knowledgebase was established in 2005 to provide a framework for integrated genome-based studies on Shewanella ecophysiology. The present version of the knowledgebase provides access to a diverse set of experimental and genomic data along with tools for curation of genome annotations and visualization and integration of genomic data with experimental data. As a demonstration of the utility of this resource, we examined a single microarray data set from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 for new insights into regulatory processes. The integrated analysis of the data predicted a new type of bacterial transcriptional regulation involving co-transcription of the intergenic region with the downstream gene and suggested a biological role for co-transcription that likely prevents the binding of a regulator of the upstream gene to the regulator binding site located in the intergenic region. Database URL: http://shewanella-knowledgebase.org:8080/Shewanella/ or http://spruce.ornl.gov:8080/Shewanella/

  2. The CASC15 long intergenic non-coding RNA locus is involved in melanoma progression and phenotype-switching

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Laurent; Liu, Michelle; Marzese, Diego M.; Wang, Hongwei; Chong, Kelly; Kawas, Neal; Donovan, Nicholas C; Kiyohara, Eiji; Hsu, Sandy; Nelson, Nellie; Izraely, Sivan; Sagi-Assif, Orit; Witz, Isaac P; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Luo, Yuling; Hoon, Dave SB

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, considerable advances have been made in the characterization of protein-coding alterations involved in the pathogenesis of melanoma. However, despite their growing implication in cancer, little is known about the role of long non-coding RNAs in melanoma progression. We hypothesized that copy number alterations of intergenic non-protein coding domains could help identify long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) associated with metastatic cutaneous melanoma. Among several candidates, our approach uncovered the chromosome 6p22.3 CASC15 lincRNA locus as a frequently gained genomic segment in metastatic melanoma tumors and cell lines. The locus was actively transcribed in metastatic melanoma cells, and up-regulation of CASC15 expression was associated with metastatic progression to brain metastasis in a mouse xenograft model. In clinical specimens, CASC15 levels increased during melanoma progression and were independent predictors of disease recurrence in a cohort of 141 patients with AJCC stage III lymph node metastasis. Moreover, siRNA knockdown experiments revealed that CASC15 regulates melanoma cell phenotype switching between proliferative and invasive states. Accordingly, CASC15 levels correlated with known gene signatures corresponding to melanoma proliferative and invasive phenotypes. These findings support a key role for CASC15 in metastatic melanoma. PMID:26016895

  3. Characterization of the intergenic RNA profile at abdominal-A and Abdominal-B in the Drosophila bithorax complex

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Esther; Calhoun, Vincent C.; Levine, Michael; Lewis, Edward B.; Drewell, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The correct spatial expression of two Drosophila bithorax complex (BX-C) genes, abdominal-A (abdA) and Abdominal-B (AbdB), is dependent on the 100-kb intergenic infraabdominal (iab) region. The iab region is known to contain a number of different domains (iab2 through iab8) that harbor cis-regulatory elements responsible for directing expression of abdA and AbdB in the second through eighth abdominal segments. Here, we use in situ hybridization to perform high-resolution mapping of the transcriptional activity in the iab control regions. We show that transcription of the control regions themselves is abundant and precedes activation of the abdA and AbdB genes. As with the homeotic genes of the BX-C, the transcription patterns of the RNAs from the iab control regions demonstrate colinearity with the sequence of the iab regions along the chromosome and the domains in the embryo under the control of the specific iab regions. These observations suggest that the intergenic RNAs may play a role in initiating cis regulation at the BX-C early in development. PMID:12481037

  4. Modified Open-door Laminoplasty Using Hydroxyapatite Spacers and Miniplates

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sung-Won; Kim, Bum-Joon; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Lim, Dong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cervical laminoplasty has been widely accepted as one of the major treatments for cervical myelopathy and various modifications and supplementary procedures have been devised to achieve both proper decompression and stability of the cervical spine. We present the retrospectively analyzed results of a modified unilateral open-door laminoplasty using hydroxyapatite (HA) spacers and malleable titanium miniplates. Methods From June 2008 to May 2012, among patients diagnosed with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, the patients who received laminoplasty were reviewed. Clinical outcome was assessed using Frankel grade and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score. The radiologic parameters were obtained from plain films, 3-dimensional computed tomography and magnetic resonance images. Results A total of 125 cervical laminae were operated in 38 patients. 11 patients received 4-level laminoplasty and 27 patients received 3-level laminoplasty. Postoperatively, the mean Frankel grade and JOA score were significantly improved from 3.97 to 4.55 and from 12.76 to 14.63, respectively (p<0.001). Radiologically, cervical curvature was worsened from 19.09 to 15.60 (p=0.025). The percentage of range of motion preservation was 73.32±22.39%. The axial dimension of the operated spinal canal was increased from 1.75 to 2.70 cm2 (p<0.001). Conclusion In the presenting study, unilateral open-door laminoplasty using HA spacers and miniplates appears to be a safe, rapid and easy procedure to obtain an immediate and rigid stabilization of the posterior elements of the cervical spine. This modified laminoplasty method showed effective expansion of the spinal canal and favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:25346767

  5. Single electron transistor with P-type sidewall spacer gates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Han; Li, Dong Hua; Lee, Joung-Eob; Kang, Kwon-Chil; Kim, Kyungwan; Park, Byung-Gook

    2011-07-01

    A single-electron transistor (SET) is one of the promising solutions to overcome the scaling limit of the Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET). Up to now, various kinds of SETs are being proposed and SETs with a dual gate (DG) structure using an electrical potential barrier have been demonstrated for room temperature operation. To operate DG-SETs, however, extra bias of side gates is necessary. It causes new problems that the electrode for side gates and the extra bias for electrical barrier increase the complexity in circuit design and operation power consumption, respectively. For the reason, a new mechanism using work function (WF) difference is applied to operate a SET at room temperature by three electrodes. Its structure consists of an undoped active region, a control gate, n-doped source/drain electrodes, and metal/silicide or p-type silicon side gates, and a SET with metal/silicide gates or p-type silicon gates forms tunnel barriers induced by work function between an undoped channel and grounded side gates. Via simulation, the effectiveness of the new mechanism is confirmed through various silicide materials that have different WF values. Furthermore, by considering the realistic conditions of the fabrication process, SET with p-type sidewall spacer gates was designed, and its brief fabrication process was introduced. The characteristics of its electrical barrier and the controllability of its control gate were also confirmed via simulation. Finally, a single-hole transistor with n-type sidewall spacer gates was designed. PMID:22121580

  6. Ertapenem Articulating Spacer for the Treatment of Polymicrobial Total Knee Arthroplasty Infection.

    PubMed

    Radoicic, Dragan; Milanovic, Milomir; Marinkovic, Jugoslav; Radoicic, Danica

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are the primary cause of early failure of the total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Polymicrobial TKA infections are often associated with a higher risk of treatment failure. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of ertapenem loaded spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial PJI. Methods. There were 18 patients enrolled; nine patients with polymicrobial PJI treated with ertapenem loaded articulating spacers were compared to the group of 9 patients treated with vancomycin or ceftazidime loaded spacers. Results. Successful reimplantation with revision implants was possible in 66.67%. Ertapenem spacers were used in 6 cases in primary two-stage procedure and in 3 cases in secondary spacer exchange. Successful infection eradication was achieved in all cases; final reimplantation with revision knee arthroplasty implants was possible in 6 cases. Conclusion. Ertapenem can be successfully used as antimicrobial addition to the cement spacers in two-stage revision treatment of polymicrobial PJIs. However, this type of spacer may also be useful in the treatment of infections caused by monomicrobial extended spectrum beta-lactamases producing gram-negative bacilli. Further clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ertapenem spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial and monomicrobial PJIs. PMID:27366173

  7. Patterning with amorphous carbon spacer for expanding the resolution limit of current lithography tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woo-Yung; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Choi-Dong; Sim, Guee-Hwang; Jeon, Sung-Min; Park, Sang-Wook; Lee, Byung-Seok; Park, Sung-Ki; Kim, Ji-Soo; Heon, Lee-Sang

    2007-03-01

    Double patterning technique using spacer which can avoid CD (Critical Dimension) uniformity problem mainly caused by overlay issue is one of the methods that could be applied to apply to manufacturing of memory devices. Though double exposure and etch technology (DEET) has comparative advantage in the number of process steps, it is required to dramatically improve overlay performance of current exposure tools for the realization of manufacturing. In this study, negative type-double pattering technique using spacer has been developed as the best way for the application of NAND flash memory device from the view point of CD uniformity and the number of mask layers used to complete double patterning. Negative type-double patterning technique using spacer consists of subsequent steps such as formation of poly line, spacer on sidewall of poly line, SOG gap fill into space between poly lines, SOG etch back, removal of spacer, and finally hard mask etch. We have used amorphous carbon as a spacer material to easily remove spacer from poly lines and adopted SOG material to easily fill in space between poly lines. When negative type-double patterning technique using spacer is applied to NAND flash memory device, we can expect that k1 factor of about 0.14~0.20 could be accomplished successfully.

  8. Transcriptional regulator-mediated activation of adaptation genes triggers CRISPR de novo spacer acquisition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Yingjun; Wang, Xiaodi; Ye, Qing; Li, Huan; Liang, Yunxiang; She, Qunxin; Peng, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of de novo spacer sequences confers CRISPR-Cas with a memory to defend against invading genetic elements. However, the mechanism of regulation of CRISPR spacer acquisition remains unknown. Here we examine the transcriptional regulation of the conserved spacer acquisition genes in Type I-A of Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A. Csa3a, a MarR-like transcription factor encoded by the gene located adjacent to csa1, cas1, cas2 and cas4 cluster, but on the reverse strand, was demonstrated to specifically bind to the csa1 and cas1 promoters with the imperfect palindromic sequence. Importantly, it was demonstrated that the transcription level of csa1, cas1, cas2 and cas4 was significantly enhanced in a csa3a-overexpression strain and, moreover, the Csa1 and Cas1 protein levels were increased in this strain. Furthermore, we demonstrated the hyperactive uptake of unique spacers within both CRISPR loci in the presence of the csa3a overexpression vector. The spacer acquisition process is dependent on the CCN PAM sequence and protospacer selection is random and non-directional. These results suggested a regulation mechanism of CRISPR spacer acquisition where a single transcriptional regulator senses the presence of an invading element and then activates spacer acquisition gene expression which leads to de novo spacer uptake from the invading element.

  9. Preliminary analysis and design optimization of the short spacer truss of Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendy, A. S.; Patnaik, S. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Berke, L.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis, dynamic simulation, and design optimization of the short spacer truss of the Space Station Freedom are presented in this report. The short spacer truss will be positioned between the integrated equipment assembly (IEA) and another truss, called the long spacer truss, in the Space Station Freedom. During its launch in the Space Shuttle, the truss will be subjected to considerable in-span distributed inertia loads due to shuttle accelerations. The short spacer truss, therefore, has been modeled as a space frame to account for flexural response. Several parameters have been assumed, since the design specifications are in the process of development; hence the results presented should be considered preliminary. However, the automated analysis and design capabilities that have been developed can readily be used to generate an optimum design of the short spacer truss once the actual specifications have been determined. This report includes static and dynamic analyses of the short spacer truss, which have been obtained with the linear elastic code LE-HOST (in these analyses, LE-HOST data files have been automated to facilitate their future use for different design specifications of the short spacer truss); the dynamic animation of the short spacer truss, which has been carried out by using the results of the dynamic analysis and a post-processing feature of the modeling code PATRAN; and the optimum-weight design of the spacer truss, which was obtained under prescribed stress, displacement, and frequency constraints by using the design code COMETBOARDS. Examination of the analysis and design results revealed that the design could be improved if the configuration of the short spacer truss were modified to a certain extent. A modified configuration, which may simplify fabrication, has been suggested. The performance of this configuration has been evaluated and was found to be satisfactory under both static and dynamic conditions.

  10. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Spacers for Anterior Cervical Fusion: A Retrospective Comparative Effectiveness Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lemcke, Johannes; Al-Zain, Ferass; Meier, Ullrich; Suess, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Background: Anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) is the standard surgical treatment for radiculopathy and myelopathy. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has an elasticity similar to bone and thus appears well suited for use as the implant in ACDF procedures. The aim of this study is to examine the clinical and radiographic outcome of patients treated with standing alone PEEK spacers without bone morphogenic protein (BMP) or plating and to examine the influence of the different design of the two spacers on the rate of subsidence and dislocation. Methods: This retrospective comparative study reviewed 335 patients treated by ACDF in a specialized urban hospital for radiculopathy or myelopathy due to degenerative pathologies. The Intromed PEEK spacer was used in 181 patients from 3/2002 to 11/2004, and the AMT SHELL spacer was implanted in 154 patients from 4/2004 to 12/2007. The follow-up rate was 100% at three months post-op and 82.7% (277 patients) at one year. The patients were assessed with the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) questionnaire and radiographically. Results: At the one-year follow-up there were 118/277 patients with an excellent clinical outcome on the JOA, 112/277 with a good outcome, 20/277 with a fair outcome, and 27/277 with a poor outcome. Subsidence was observed in 13.3% of patients with the Intromed spacer vs 8.4% of the patients with the AMT SHELL. Dislocation of the spacer was observed in 10 of the 181 patients with Intromed spacers but in none of the 154 patients with Shell spacers. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that ACDF with standing alone PEEK cages leads to excellent and good clinical outcomes. The differences we observed in the subsidence rate between the two spacers were not significant and cannot be related to a single design feature of the spacers. PMID:22016753

  11. FRB repetition and non-Poissonian statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Liam; Pen, Ue-Li; Oppermann, Niels

    2016-05-01

    We discuss some of the claims that have been made regarding the statistics of fast radio bursts (FRBs). In an earlier Letter, we conjectured that flicker noise associated with FRB repetition could show up in non-cataclysmic neutron star emission models, like supergiant pulses. We show how the current limits of repetition would be significantly weakened if their repeat rate really were non-Poissonian and had a pink or red spectrum. Repetition and its statistics have implications for observing strategy, generally favouring shallow wide-field surveys, since in the non-repeating scenario survey depth is unimportant. We also discuss the statistics of the apparent latitudinal dependence of FRBs, and offer a simple method for calculating the significance of this effect. We provide a generalized Bayesian framework for addressing this problem, which allows for direct model comparison. It is shown how the evidence for a steep latitudinal gradient of the FRB rate is less strong than initially suggested and simple explanations like increased scattering and sky temperature in the plane are sufficient to decrease the low-latitude burst rate, given current data. The reported dearth of bursts near the plane is further complicated if FRBs have non-Poissonian repetition, since in that case the event rate inferred from observation depends on observing strategy.

  12. Temporal Processing Capabilities in Repetition Conduction Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidiropoulos, Kyriakos; Ackermann, Hermann; Wannke, Michael; Hertrich, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the temporal resolution capacities of the central-auditory system in a subject (NP) suffering from repetition conduction aphasia. More specifically, the patient was asked to detect brief gaps between two stretches of broadband noise (gap detection task) and to evaluate the duration of two biphasic (WN-3) continuous noise…

  13. Assessment of anomalous sentences repetition test

    PubMed Central

    Rai, G S; Stewart, K; Scott, L C

    1990-01-01

    Use of Anomalous Sentences Repetition Test (ASRT) in 16 patients with diagnosis of dementia of Alzheimer's type, 16 normal elderly and 18 patients with depression revealed no difference in the age adjusted scores between the three groups, suggesting that it is not a good test for diagnosing dementia or differentiating dementia from depression. PMID:2391527

  14. Social Interaction and Repetitive Motor Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftin, Rachel L.; Odom, Samuel L.; Lantz, Johanna F.

    2008-01-01

    Students with autism have difficulty initiating social interactions and may exhibit repetitive motor behavior (e.g., body rocking, hand flapping). Increasing social interaction by teaching new skills may lead to reductions in problem behavior, such as motor stereotypies. Additionally, self-monitoring strategies can increase the maintenance of…

  15. Large-scale detection of repetitions.

    PubMed

    Smyth, W F

    2014-05-28

    Combinatorics on words began more than a century ago with a demonstration that an infinitely long string with no repetitions could be constructed on an alphabet of only three letters. Computing all the repetitions (such as ∙∙∙TTT ∙∙∙ or ∙∙∙ CGACGA ∙∙∙ ) in a given string x of length n is one of the oldest and most important problems of computational stringology, requiring time in the worst case. About a dozen years ago, it was discovered that repetitions can be computed as a by-product of the Θ(n)-time computation of all the maximal periodicities or runs in x. However, even though the computation is linear, it is also brute force: global data structures, such as the suffix array, the longest common prefix array and the Lempel-Ziv factorization, need to be computed in a preprocessing phase. Furthermore, all of this effort is required despite the fact that the expected number of runs in a string is generally a small fraction of the string length. In this paper, I explore the possibility that repetitions (perhaps also other regularities in strings) can be computed in a manner commensurate with the size of the output.

  16. Using Repetition to Make Ideas Stick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykins, Alicia N.

    2015-01-01

    In elementary school, the use of repetitive songs to help children remember concepts is commonplace and is usually very effective. Unfortunately for many students, this strategy is generally not used in later grades. A group of mathematics teachers at Westerville South High School in Westerville, Ohio, have taken this approach to a new creative…

  17. A repetitive elements perspective in Polycomb epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Casa, Valentina; Gabellini, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive elements comprise over two-thirds of the human genome. For a long time, these elements have received little attention since they were considered non-functional. On the contrary, recent evidence indicates that they play central roles in genome integrity, gene expression, and disease. Indeed, repeats display meiotic instability associated with disease and are located within common fragile sites, which are hotspots of chromosome re-arrangements in tumors. Moreover, a variety of diseases have been associated with aberrant transcription of repetitive elements. Overall this indicates that appropriate regulation of repetitive elements' activity is fundamental. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators that are essential for the normal development of multicellular organisms. Mammalian PcG proteins are involved in fundamental processes, such as cellular memory, cell proliferation, genomic imprinting, X-inactivation, and cancer development. PcG proteins can convey their activity through long-distance interactions also on different chromosomes. This indicates that the 3D organization of PcG proteins contributes significantly to their function. However, it is still unclear how these complex mechanisms are orchestrated and which role PcG proteins play in the multi-level organization of gene regulation. Intriguingly, the greatest proportion of Polycomb-mediated chromatin modifications is located in genomic repeats and it has been suggested that they could provide a binding platform for Polycomb proteins. Here, these lines of evidence are woven together to discuss how repetitive elements could contribute to chromatin organization in the 3D nuclear space.

  18. Large-scale detection of repetitions.

    PubMed

    Smyth, W F

    2014-05-28

    Combinatorics on words began more than a century ago with a demonstration that an infinitely long string with no repetitions could be constructed on an alphabet of only three letters. Computing all the repetitions (such as ∙∙∙TTT ∙∙∙ or ∙∙∙ CGACGA ∙∙∙ ) in a given string x of length n is one of the oldest and most important problems of computational stringology, requiring time in the worst case. About a dozen years ago, it was discovered that repetitions can be computed as a by-product of the Θ(n)-time computation of all the maximal periodicities or runs in x. However, even though the computation is linear, it is also brute force: global data structures, such as the suffix array, the longest common prefix array and the Lempel-Ziv factorization, need to be computed in a preprocessing phase. Furthermore, all of this effort is required despite the fact that the expected number of runs in a string is generally a small fraction of the string length. In this paper, I explore the possibility that repetitions (perhaps also other regularities in strings) can be computed in a manner commensurate with the size of the output. PMID:24751872

  19. Repetition effects in human ERPs to faces.

    PubMed

    Schweinberger, Stefan R; Neumann, Markus F

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, we review research conducted over the past 25 years addressing the effects of repeating various kinds of information in faces (e.g., pictorial, spatial configural, identity, semantic) on different components in human event-related brain potentials (ERPs). This body of evidence suggests that several ERP components are systematically linked to different functional components of face identity processing. Specifically, we argue (1) that repetition of the category of faces (categorical adaptation) strongly affects the occipitotemporal N170 amplitude, which is systematically suppressed when a face is preceded by another face, irrespective of its identity, whereas (2) the prototypicality of a face's second order spatial configuration has a prominent effect on the subsequent occipitotemporal P200. Longer-latency repetition effects are related to the processing of individual facial identities. These include (3) an ERP correlate of the transient activation of individual representations of repeated faces in the form of an enhanced occipitotemporal N250r as seen in repetition priming experiments, and (4) a correlate of the acquisition of individual face identity representations during learning as seen in a topographically similar long-lasting N250 effect. Finally, (5) the repetition of semantic information in familiar person recognition elicits a central-parietal N400 ERP effect. We hope that this overview will encourage researchers to further exploit the potential of ERPs to provide a continuous time window to neuronal correlates of multiple processes in face perception under comparatively natural viewing conditions. PMID:26672902

  20. Verbal Repetitions and Echolalia in Alzheimer's Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Da Cruz, Fernanda Miranda

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of echolalic repetition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A qualitative analysis of data from spontaneous conversations with MHI, a woman with AD, is presented. The data come from the DALI Corpus, a corpus of spontaneous conversations involving subjects with AD. This study argues that echolalic effects can be…

  1. Sentence Repetition: What Does the Task Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polišenská, Kamila; Chiat, Shula; Roy, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sentence repetition is gaining increasing attention as a source of information about children's sentence-level abilities in clinical assessment, and as a clinical marker of specific language impairment. However, it is widely debated what the task is testing and therefore how informative it is. Aims: (1) To evaluate the effects of…

  2. [Repetitive strain injuries. Forearm pain caused by tissue responses to repetitive strain].

    PubMed

    Sorgatz, H

    2002-10-01

    According to the National Research Council, painful work-related upper limb disorders are caused by different pathophysiological mechanisms, one of which is repetitive strain injury (RSI). Forearm pain, tenderness, and paresthesias are thought to result from a continual risk of exceeding limits of "cumulative trauma load tolerance" (CTLT, cf. NRC 2001) in soft tissue by thousands of high-frequency, repetitive movements. On the other hand, repetitive painful stimulations also produce neuroplastic changes in the spinal and supraspinal nociceptive systems. Thus, repetitive motor and nociceptive impulses become part of the same motor programs, which are also responsible for high-frequency movements and tissue damage. In this way RSI pain may be felt as a task-related response, even after all injuries are completely healed. Consequences of this neuroplastic CTLT model for RSI prevention and therapy are discussed.

  3. Employing 454 amplicon pyrosequencing to reveal intragenomic divergence in the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Daniel L; Carlsen, Tor; Henrik Nilsson, R; Davey, Marie; Schumacher, Trond; Kauserud, Håvard

    2013-01-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been accepted as a DNA barcoding marker for fungi and is widely used in phylogenetic studies; however, intragenomic ITS variability has been observed in a broad range of taxa, including prokaryotes, plants, animals, and fungi, and this variability has the potential to inflate species richness estimates in molecular investigations of environmental samples. In this study 454 amplicon pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region was applied to 99 phylogenetically diverse axenic single-spore cultures of fungi (Dikarya: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) to investigate levels of intragenomic variation. Three species (one Basidiomycota and two Ascomycota), in addition to a positive control species known to contain ITS paralogs, displayed levels of molecular variation indicative of intragenomic variation; taxon inflation due to presumed intragenomic variation was ≈9%. Intragenomic variability in the ITS region appears to be widespread but relatively rare in fungi (≈3–5% of species investigated in this study), suggesting this problem may have minor impacts on species richness estimates relative to PCR and/or pyrosequencing errors. Our results indicate that 454 amplicon pyrosequencing represents a powerful tool for investigating levels of ITS intragenomic variability across taxa, which may be valuable for better understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying concerted evolution of repetitive DNA regions. PMID:23789083

  4. Conservation of the Exon-Intron Structure of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes in Eutherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Chernikova, Diana; Managadze, David; Glazko, Galina V.; Makalowski, Wojciech; Rogozin, Igor B.

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of mammalian long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes is high, yet their functions remain largely unknown. One possible way to study this important question is to use large-scale comparisons of various characteristics of lincRNA with those of protein-coding genes for which a large body of functional information is available. A prominent feature of mammalian protein-coding genes is the high evolutionary conservation of the exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis of putative intron positions in lincRNA genes from various mammalian genomes suggests that some lincRNA introns have been conserved for over 100 million years, thus the primary and/or secondary structure of these molecules is likely to be functionally important. PMID:27429005

  5. Capturing intergenerativity: the use of student reflective journals to identify learning within an undergraduate course in gerontological nursing.

    PubMed

    Davies, Susan M; Reitmaier, Amy B; Smith, Linda Reveling; Mangan-Danckwart, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    The benefits of intergenerational contact between older and young adults have been demonstrated; yet, nursing programs have underexplored the potential of such relationships for enhancing student learning. This article presents an analysis of student reflective journals as part of an evaluation of an undergraduate gerontological nursing course. The course aims to create positive learning experiences by involving older adults as partners in student learning. Older adults are recruited to receive visits from a designated student to share aspects of their life and experiences. Students write reflective journals based on these visits as a method of evaluating their learning. A framework analysis of 80 journals completed by 59 students identified four major themes representing the impact of these visits on student learning: becoming aware, making connections, seeing the unique person, and valuing intergenerational relationships. The analysis suggests the relevance of the concept of intergenerativity in illuminating shared benefits of the practicum experience.

  6. Genome-wide CpG island methylation and intergenic demethylation propensities vary among different tumor sites

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Tae; Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic landscape of cancer includes both focal hypermethylation and broader hypomethylation in a genome-wide manner. By means of a comprehensive genomic analysis on 6637 tissues of 21 tumor types, we here show that the degrees of overall methylation in CpG island (CGI) and demethylation in intergenic regions, defined as ‘backbone’, largely vary among different tumors. Depending on tumor type, both CGI methylation and backbone demethylation are often associated with clinical, epidemiological and biological features such as age, sex, smoking history, anatomic location, histological type and grade, stage, molecular subtype and biological pathways. We found connections between CGI methylation and hypermutability, microsatellite instability, IDH1 mutation, 19p gain and polycomb features, and backbone demethylation with chromosomal instability, NSD1 and TP53 mutations, 5q and 19p loss and long repressive domains. These broad epigenetic patterns add a new dimension to our understanding of tumor biology and its clinical implications. PMID:26464434

  7. Conservation of the Exon-Intron Structure of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes in Eutherian Mammals.

    PubMed

    Chernikova, Diana; Managadze, David; Glazko, Galina V; Makalowski, Wojciech; Rogozin, Igor B

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of mammalian long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes is high, yet their functions remain largely unknown. One possible way to study this important question is to use large-scale comparisons of various characteristics of lincRNA with those of protein-coding genes for which a large body of functional information is available. A prominent feature of mammalian protein-coding genes is the high evolutionary conservation of the exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis of putative intron positions in lincRNA genes from various mammalian genomes suggests that some lincRNA introns have been conserved for over 100 million years, thus the primary and/or secondary structure of these molecules is likely to be functionally important. PMID:27429005

  8. A Nonword Repetition Task for Speakers with Misarticulations: The Syllable Repetition Task (SRT)

    PubMed Central

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; Campbell, Thomas F.; Dollaghan, Christine A.; Green, Jordan R.; Moore, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Conceptual and methodological confounds occur when non(sense) repetition tasks are administered to speakers who do not have the target speech sounds in their phonetic inventories or who habitually misarticulate targeted speech sounds. We describe a nonword repetition task, the Syllable Repetiton Task (SRT) that eliminates this confound and report findings from three validity studies. Method Ninety-five preschool children with Speech Delay and 63 with Typical Speech, completed an assessment battery that included the Nonword Repetition Task (NRT: Dollaghan & Campbell, 1998) and the SRT. SRT stimuli include only four of the earliest occurring consonants and one early occurring vowel. Results Study 1 findings indicated that the SRT eliminated the speech confound in nonword testing with speakers who misarticulate. Study 2 findings indicated that the accuracy of the SRT to identify expressive language impairment was comparable to findings for the NRT. Study 3 findings illustrated the SRT’s potential to interrogate speech processing constraints underlying poor nonword repetition accuracy. Results supported both memorial and auditory-perceptual encoding constraints underlying nonword repetition errors in children with speech-language impairment. Conclusion The SRT appears to be a psychometrically stable and substantively informative nonword repetition task for emerging genetic and other research with speakers who misarticulate. PMID:19635944

  9. If you negate, you may forget: negated repetitions impair memory compared with affirmative repetitions.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Ruth; Schul, Yaacov; Rosenthal, Meytal

    2014-08-01

    One of the most robust laws of memory is that repeated activation improves memory. Our study shows that the nature of repetition matters. Specifically, although both negated repetition and affirmative repetition improve memory compared with no repetition, negated repetition hinders memory compared with affirmative repetition. After showing participants different entities, we asked them about features of these entities, leading to either "yes" or "no" responses. Our findings show that correctly negating an incorrect feature of an entity elicits an active forgetting effect compared with correctly affirming its true features. For example, after seeing someone drink a glass of white wine, answering "no" to "was it red wine?" may lead one to greater memory loss of the individual drinking wine at all compared with answering "yes" to "was it white wine?" We find this negation-induced forgetting effect in 4 experiments that differ in (a) the meaning given for the negation, (b) the type of stimuli (visual or verbal), and (c) the memory measure (recognition or free recall). We discuss possible underlying mechanisms and offer theoretical and applied implications of the negation-induced forgetting effect in relation to other known inhibition effects. PMID:24635186

  10. Enhancing ligand-protein binding in affinity thermoprecipitation: elucidation of spacer effects

    PubMed

    Vaidya; Lele; Kulkarni; Mashelkar

    1999-08-20

    Copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide and N-acryloyl amino acid spacers of varying chain length were synthesized. p-Aminobenzamidine (PABA) was chemically linked to the pendant carboxyl groups of these polymers to obtain thermoprecipitating affinity polymers. The inhibition constant (Ki) of these polymers for trypsin decreased, i. e., the efficiency of PABA-trypsin binding increased with increase in the spacer chain length. The polymer to which PABA was linked through a spacer of five methylene groups exhibited eleven times lower Ki than that of the polymer containing PABA without a spacer. Investigations on model inhibitors N-acyl-p-aminobenzamidines showed that this enhancement in trypsin binding by the polymers was due to the spacer as well as to microenvironmental effects. Recovery and specific activity of the trypsin recovered increased with the spacer chain length. Separation of trypsin from a mixture of trypsin and chymotrypsin was also enhanced with the spacer chain length. The inhibition constants of these affinity polymers were not adversely affected by the crowding effect. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:10397880

  11. Impact Analysis and Test for the Spacer Grid Assembly of a Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kee-Nam; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Soo-Bum

    A spacer grid assembly is one of the main structural components of the nuclear fuel assembly for a Pressurized light Water Reactor (PWR). The spacer grid assembly supports and aligns the fuel rods, guides the fuel assemblies past each other during a handling and, if needed, sustains lateral seismic loads. The ability of a spacer grid assembly to resist these lateral loads is usually characterized in terms of its dynamic and static crush strengths, which are acquired from tests. In this study, a finite element analysis on the dynamic crush strength of spacer grid assembly specimens is carried out. Comparisons show that the analysis results are in good agreement with the test results to within about a 30 % difference range. Therefore, we could predict the crush strength of a spacer grid assembly in advance, before performing a dynamic crush test. And also a parametric study on the crush strength of a spacer grid assembly is carried out by adjusting the weld penetration depth for a sub-sized spacer grid, which also shows a good agreement between the test and analysis results.

  12. Biofouling of spiral-wound nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes: a feed spacer problem.

    PubMed

    Vrouwenvelder, J S; Graf von der Schulenburg, D A; Kruithof, J C; Johns, M L; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2009-02-01

    Biofouling was studied in full-scale and pilot-scale installations, test-rigs and membrane fouling monitors by conventional methods as well as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Independent of permeate production, the feed spacer channel pressure drop and biomass concentration increased similarly in a nanofiltration pilot installation. In the presence of a feed spacer the absolute feed channel pressure drop increase caused by biomass accumulation was much higher than when a feed spacer was absent: in both spiral-wound nanofiltration and reverse osmosis systems biofouling is dominantly a feed spacer problem. This conclusion is based on (i) in-situ visual observations of the fouling accumulation, (ii) in-situ non-destructive observations of the fouling accumulation and velocity distribution profiles using MRI, and (iii) differences in pressure drop and biomass development in monitors with and without feed spacer. MRI studies showed that even a restricted biofilm accumulation on the feed channel spacer influenced the velocity distribution profile strongly. Biofouling control should be focused on the development of low fouling feed spacers and hydrodynamic conditions to restrict the impact of biomass accumulation on the feed channel pressure drop increase.

  13. Analysis of the CYP21A2 gene with intergenic recombination and multiple gene deletions in the RCCX module.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shwu-Fen; Lee, Hsien-Hsiung

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent bimodular RCCX module of the RP1-C4A-CYP21A1P-TNXA-RP2-C4B-CYP21A2-TNXB gene sequence is located on chromosome 6p21.3. To determine RCCX alterations, we used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product containing the tenascin B (TNXB) and CYP21A2 genes with TaqI digestion and Southern blot analysis with AseI and NdeI endonuclease digestion of genomic DNA from congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients with common mutations resulting from an intergenic conversion of CYP21A1P, such as an I2 splice, I172N, V281L, F306-L307insT, Q318X, and R356W, and dual mutations of I236N/V237E in the CYP21A2 gene. The results showed that a 3.7-kb fragment of the CYP21A2 gene was detected in each case, and 21.6- and 11.3-kb DNA fragments were found in the RCCX region by a Southern blot analysis with these corresponding mutations. However, the IVS2-12A/C- > G (I2 splice) haplotype in combination with the 707-714delGAGACTAC (without the P30L mutation) mutation produced a 3.2-kb TaqI fragment in the PCR product analysis and a specific 9.3-kb fragment by the Southern blot method. Therefore, we concluded that the rearrangement in the RCCX region resulting from processing of either an intergenic recombination or multiple gene deletions can be identified by the PCR analysis and Southern blot method based on a fragment-distinguishing configuration without a family study.

  14. Genic and Intergenic SSR Database Generation, SNPs Determination and Pathway Annotations, in Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.).

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Morad M; Adawy, Sami S; El-Assal, Salah El-Din S; Hussein, Ebtissam H A

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out aiming to use the bioinformatics tools in order to identify and characterize, simple sequence repeats within the third Version of the date palm genome and develop a new SSR primers database. In addition single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are located within the SSR flanking regions were recognized. Moreover, the pathways for the sequences assigned by SSR primers, the biological functions and gene interaction were determined. A total of 172,075 SSR motifs was identified on date palm genome sequence with a frequency of 450.97 SSRs per Mb. Out of these, 130,014 SSRs (75.6%) were located within the intergenic regions with a frequency of 499 SSRs per Mb. While, only 42,061 SSRs (24.4%) were located within the genic regions with a frequency of 347.5 SSRs per Mb. A total of 111,403 of SSR primer pairs were designed, that represents 291.9 SSR primers per Mb. Out of the 111,403, only 31,380 SSR primers were in the genic regions, while 80,023 primers were in the intergenic regions. A number of 250,507 SNPs were recognized in 84,172 SSR flanking regions, which represents 75.55% of the total SSR flanking regions. Out of 12,274 genes only 463 genes comprising 896 SSR primers were mapped onto 111 pathways using KEGG data base. The most abundant enzymes were identified in the pathway related to the biosynthesis of antibiotics. We tested 1031 SSR primers using both publicly available date palm genome sequences as templates in the in silico PCR reactions. Concerning in vitro validation, 31 SSR primers among those used in the in silico PCR were synthesized and tested for their ability to detect polymorphism among six Egyptian date palm cultivars. All tested primers have successfully amplified products, but only 18 primers detected polymorphic amplicons among the studied date palm cultivars. PMID:27434138

  15. Diversification of the light-harvesting complex gene family via intra- and intergenic duplications in the coral symbiotic alga Symbiodinium.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Shinichiro; Shoguchi, Eiichi; Satoh, Nori; Minagawa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The light-harvesting complex (LHC) is an essential component in light energy capture and transduction to facilitate downstream photosynthetic reactions in plant and algal chloroplasts. The unicellular dinoflagellate alga Symbiodinium is an endosymbiont of cnidarian animals, including corals and sea anemones, and provides carbohydrates generated through photosynthesis to host animals. Although Symbiodinium possesses a unique LHC gene family, called chlorophyll a-chlorophyll c2-peridinin protein complex (acpPC), its genome-level diversity and evolutionary trajectories have not been investigated. Here, we describe a phylogenetic analysis revealing that many of the LHCs are encoded by highly duplicated genes with multi-subunit polyprotein structures in the nuclear genome of Symbiodinium minutum. This analysis provides an extended list of the LHC gene family in a single organism, including 80 loci encoding polyproteins composed of 145 LHC subunits recovered in the phylogenetic tree. In S. minutum, 5 phylogenetic groups of the Lhcf-type gene family, which is exclusively conserved in algae harboring secondary plastids of red algal origin, were identified. Moreover, 5 groups of the Lhcr-type gene family, of which members are known to be associated with PSI in red algal plastids and secondary plastids of red algal origin, were identified. Notably, members classified within a phylogenetic group of the Lhcf-type (group F1) are highly duplicated, which may explain the presence of an unusually large number of LHC genes in this species. Some gene units were homologous to other units within single loci of the polyprotein genes, whereas intergenic homologies between separate loci were conspicuous in other cases, implying that gene unit 'shuffling' by gene conversion and/or genome rearrangement might have been a driving force for diversification. These results suggest that vigorous intra- and intergenic gene duplication events have resulted in the genomic framework of

  16. Genic and Intergenic SSR Database Generation, SNPs Determination and Pathway Annotations, in Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.).

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Morad M; Adawy, Sami S; El-Assal, Salah El-Din S; Hussein, Ebtissam H A

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out aiming to use the bioinformatics tools in order to identify and characterize, simple sequence repeats within the third Version of the date palm genome and develop a new SSR primers database. In addition single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are located within the SSR flanking regions were recognized. Moreover, the pathways for the sequences assigned by SSR primers, the biological functions and gene interaction were determined. A total of 172,075 SSR motifs was identified on date palm genome sequence with a frequency of 450.97 SSRs per Mb. Out of these, 130,014 SSRs (75.6%) were located within the intergenic regions with a frequency of 499 SSRs per Mb. While, only 42,061 SSRs (24.4%) were located within the genic regions with a frequency of 347.5 SSRs per Mb. A total of 111,403 of SSR primer pairs were designed, that represents 291.9 SSR primers per Mb. Out of the 111,403, only 31,380 SSR primers were in the genic regions, while 80,023 primers were in the intergenic regions. A number of 250,507 SNPs were recognized in 84,172 SSR flanking regions, which represents 75.55% of the total SSR flanking regions. Out of 12,274 genes only 463 genes comprising 896 SSR primers were mapped onto 111 pathways using KEGG data base. The most abundant enzymes were identified in the pathway related to the biosynthesis of antibiotics. We tested 1031 SSR primers using both publicly available date palm genome sequences as templates in the in silico PCR reactions. Concerning in vitro validation, 31 SSR primers among those used in the in silico PCR were synthesized and tested for their ability to detect polymorphism among six Egyptian date palm cultivars. All tested primers have successfully amplified products, but only 18 primers detected polymorphic amplicons among the studied date palm cultivars.

  17. Genic and Intergenic SSR Database Generation, SNPs Determination and Pathway Annotations, in Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out aiming to use the bioinformatics tools in order to identify and characterize, simple sequence repeats within the third Version of the date palm genome and develop a new SSR primers database. In addition single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are located within the SSR flanking regions were recognized. Moreover, the pathways for the sequences assigned by SSR primers, the biological functions and gene interaction were determined. A total of 172,075 SSR motifs was identified on date palm genome sequence with a frequency of 450.97 SSRs per Mb. Out of these, 130,014 SSRs (75.6%) were located within the intergenic regions with a frequency of 499 SSRs per Mb. While, only 42,061 SSRs (24.4%) were located within the genic regions with a frequency of 347.5 SSRs per Mb. A total of 111,403 of SSR primer pairs were designed, that represents 291.9 SSR primers per Mb. Out of the 111,403, only 31,380 SSR primers were in the genic regions, while 80,023 primers were in the intergenic regions. A number of 250,507 SNPs were recognized in 84,172 SSR flanking regions, which represents 75.55% of the total SSR flanking regions. Out of 12,274 genes only 463 genes comprising 896 SSR primers were mapped onto 111 pathways using KEGG data base. The most abundant enzymes were identified in the pathway related to the biosynthesis of antibiotics. We tested 1031 SSR primers using both publicly available date palm genome sequences as templates in the in silico PCR reactions. Concerning in vitro validation, 31 SSR primers among those used in the in silico PCR were synthesized and tested for their ability to detect polymorphism among six Egyptian date palm cultivars. All tested primers have successfully amplified products, but only 18 primers detected polymorphic amplicons among the studied date palm cultivars. PMID:27434138

  18. Application of nanosilver surface modification to RO membrane and spacer for mitigating biofouling in seawater desalination.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Ling; Lin, Justin Chun-Te; Huang, Chihpin

    2009-08-01

    Biofouling is one the most critical problems in seawater desalination plants and science has not yet found effective ways to control it. Silver compounds and ions are historically recognized for their effective antimicrobial activity. Nanosilver particles have been applied as a biocide in many aspects of disinfection, including healthcare products and water treatment. This study proposes an innovative biofouling control approach by surface modification of the RO membrane and spacer with nanosilver coating. A chemical reduction method was used for directly coating nanosilver particles on the membrane sheet and spacer. The surface-modified membrane and spacer were tested for their antifouling performance in a cross-flow flat-sheet membrane cell, which is a part of a pilot plant in Wukan desalination plant. The silver-coating membranes and spacers, along with an unmodified membrane sheet, were tested in the membrane cell and compared on the basis of their antifouling performance. Permeate flux decline and salt rejection was continuously monitored through the testing period. Meanwhile regrowth of microbial populations on the membrane cell was quantified by a unique microbial counting every three to four days. The results showed that both silver-coated membrane (Ag-cM) with uncoated spacer and silver-coated spacer (Ag-cS) with uncoated membrane performed better than the unmodified membrane and spacer (Un-MS), in terms of much slower decrease in permeate flux and TDS rejection. However, the effect of silver-coated spacer on antimicrobial activity was more lasting. In the silver-coated spacer test, there was almost no multiplication of cells detected on the membrane during the whole testing period. Besides, the cells adhering to the membrane seemed to lose their activity quickly. According to the RO performance and microbial growth morphology, the nanosilver coating technology is valuable for use in biofouling control in seawater desalination.

  19. Modulation of porphyrin photoluminescence by nanoscale spacers on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y. C.; Zhang, Y.; Gao, H. Y.; Chen, L. G.; Gao, B.; He, W. Z.; Meng, Q. S.; Zhang, C.; Dong, Z. C.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate photoluminescence (PL) properties of quasi-monolayered tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) molecules on silicon substrates modulated by three different nanoscale spacers: native oxide layer (NOL), hydrogen (H)-passivated layer, and Ag nanoparticle (AgNP) thin film, respectively. In comparison with the PL intensity from the TPP molecules on the NOL-covered silicon, the fluorescence intensity from the molecules on the AgNP-covered surface was greatly enhanced while that for the H-passivated surface was found dramatically suppressed. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra indicated shortened lifetimes for TPP molecules in both cases, but the decay kinetics is believed to be different. The suppressed emission for the H-passivated sample was attributed to the weaker decoupling effect of the monolayer of hydrogen atoms as compared to the NOL, leading to increased nonradiative decay rate; whereas the enhanced fluorescence with shortened lifetime for the AgNP-covered sample is attributed not only to the resonant excitation by local surface plasmons, but also to the increased radiative decay rate originating from the emission enhancement in plasmonic "hot-spots".

  20. Analysis of Mammalian rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Annette W.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacers, ITS1 and ITS2, are widely used for eukaryote phylogenetic studies from the ordinal level to the species level, and there is even a database for ITS2 sequences. However, ITS regions have been ignored in mammalian phylogenetic studies, and only a few rodent and ape sequences are represented in GenBank. The reasons for this dearth, and the remedies, are described here. We have recovered these sequences, mostly >1 kb in length, for 36 mammalian species. Sequence alignment and transcript folding comparisons reveal the rRNA transcript secondary structure. Mammalian ITS regions, though quite long, still fold into the recognizable secondary structure of other eukaryotes. The ITS2 in particular bears the four standard helix loops, and loops II and III have the hallmark characters universal to eukaryotes. Both sequence and insertions/deletions of transcript secondary structure helices observed here support the four superorder taxonomy of Placentalia. On the family level, major unique indels, neatly excising entire helices, will be useful when additional species are represented, resulting in significant further understanding of the details of mammalian evolutionary history. Furthermore, the identification of a highly conserved element of ITS1 common to warm-blooded vertebrates may aid in deciphering the complex mechanism of RNA transcript processing. This is the last major group of terrestrial vertebrates for which rRNA ITS secondary structure has been resolved. PMID:24260162

  1. Augmented Fixation With Biodegradable Subacromial Spacer After Repair of Massive Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Murat; Akkaya, Mustafa; Gursoy, Safa; Isik, Cetin

    2015-01-01

    Unsuccessful outcomes after repair of massive rotator cuff ruptures accompanied by muscle atrophy and fatty degeneration are frequently associated with inadequate management and secondary tears. We report the functional differences after rotator cuff rupture repair with a biodegradable spacer application. In these patients, rotator cuff rupture repair should provide coverage of the humeral head. Subsequently, acromioplasty should be performed to allow adequate space for the subacromial spacer. Thereafter measurement of the intra-articular space required for application of the biodegradable spacer is performed. Using this method can decrease the rate of tears by providing a safe subacromial space in cases of massive rotator cuff rupture. PMID:26697306

  2. Optimization of Radiation Therapy Techniques for Prostate Cancer With Prostate-Rectum Spacers: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Gary; Benz, Eileen; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Miralbell, Raymond; Zilli, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Dose-escalated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer improves disease control but is also associated with worse rectal toxicity. A spacer placed between the prostate and rectum can be used to displace the anterior rectal wall outside of the high-dose radiation regions and potentially minimize radiation-induced rectal toxicity. This systematic review focuses on the published data regarding the different types of commercially available prostate-rectum spacers. Dosimetric results and preliminary clinical data using prostate-rectum spacers in patients with localized prostate cancer treated by curative radiation therapy are compared and discussed.

  3. Experimental Study of Two Phase Flow Behavior Past BWR Spacer Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnayake, Ruwan K.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Ivanov, K.N.; Cimbala, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    Performance of best estimate codes used in the nuclear industry can be significantly improved by reducing the empiricism embedded in their constitutive models. Spacer grids have been found to have an important impact on the maximum allowable Critical Heat Flux within the fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor core. Therefore, incorporation of suitable spacer grids models can improve the critical heat flux prediction capability of best estimate codes. Realistic modeling of entrainment behavior of spacer grids requires understanding the different mechanisms that are involved. Since visual information pertaining to the entrainment behavior of spacer grids cannot possibly be obtained from operating nuclear reactors, experiments have to be designed and conducted for this specific purpose. Most of the spacer grid experiments available in literature have been designed in view of obtaining quantitative data for the purpose of developing or modifying empirical formulations for heat transfer, critical heat flux or pressure drop. Very few experiments have been designed to provide fundamental information which can be used to understand spacer grid effects and phenomena involved in two phase flow. Air-water experiments were conducted to obtain visual information on the two-phase flow behavior both upstream and downstream of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) spacer grids. The test section was designed and constructed using prototypic dimensions such as the channel cross-section, rod diameter and other spacer grid configurations of a typical BWR fuel assembly. The test section models the flow behavior in two adjacent sub channels in the BWR core. A portion of a prototypic BWR spacer grid accounting for two adjacent channels was used with industrial mild steel rods for the purpose of representing the channel internals. Symmetry was preserved in this practice, so that the channel walls could effectively be considered as the channel boundaries. Thin films were established on the rod surfaces

  4. Titanium-copper-nitride coated spacers for two-stage revision of infected total hip endoprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Ellenrieder, Martin; Haenle, Maximilian; Lenz, Robert; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Within the first two years after total hip arthroplasty implant-associated infection has become the second most common reason for a revision surgery. Two-stage implant exchange is frequently conducted using temporary spacers made of antibiotic-loaded cement in order to prevent a bacterial colonization on the spacer. Avoiding several disadvantages of cement spacers, a conventional hemi-endoprosthesis was equipped with a copper-containing implant coating for inhibition of bacterial biofilms. In the present paper details of this novel treatment concept are presented including a case report. PMID:22242097

  5. Repetitively pulsed plasma illumination source improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Root, Robert G.; Falkos, Paul

    1999-05-01

    A repetitively pulsed broad band visible illumination system has been developed that is suitable for capturing images of high speed motion over sizable areas. At full pulse energy, a two lamp system can illuminate 60 square feet for movies at f/4 with 400 ASA color film and framing rates as high as 1700 fps. At reduced energy, for smaller area applications, the framing rate can be doubled. The short pulse length (4.5 microsecond(s) at full energy, 1.5 microsecond(s) at reduced energy) produces sharp images of high speed objects. This paper reports developments since the last presentation, including: (1) higher pulse repetition rates (a few kilohertz), (2) synchronization with high speed camera, (3) full scale burst of several thousand pulses, (4) characteristics of a compact demonstration system, and (5) demonstration of the ability of the short pulse to freeze motion.

  6. Repetition probability effects for inverted faces.

    PubMed

    Grotheer, Mareike; Hermann, Petra; Vidnyánszky, Zoltán; Kovács, Gyula

    2014-11-15

    It has been shown, that the repetition related reduction of the blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal is modulated by the probability of repetitions (P(rep)) for faces (Summerfield et al., 2008), providing support for the predictive coding (PC) model of visual perception (Rao and Ballard, 1999). However, the stage of face processing where repetition suppression (RS) is modulated by P(rep) is still unclear. Face inversion is known to interrupt higher level configural/holistic face processing steps and if modulation of RS by P(rep) takes place at these stages of face processing, P(rep) effects are expected to be reduced for inverted when compared to upright faces. Therefore, here we aimed at investigating whether P(rep) effects on RS observed for face stimuli originate at the higher-level configural/holistic stages of face processing by comparing these effects for upright and inverted faces. Similarly to previous studies, we manipulated P(rep) for pairs of stimuli in individual blocks of fMRI recordings. This manipulation significantly influenced repetition suppression in the posterior FFA, the OFA and the LO, independently of stimulus orientation. Our results thus reveal that RS in the ventral visual stream is modulated by P(rep) even in the case of face inversion and hence strongly compromised configural/holistic face processing. An additional whole-brain analysis could not identify any areas where the modulatory effect of probability was orientation specific either. These findings imply that P(rep) effects on RS might originate from the earlier stages of face processing.

  7. The apolipoprotein CIII enhancer regulates both extensive histone modification and intergenic transcription of human apolipoprotein AI/CIII/AIV genes but not apolipoprotein AV.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Jun; Wei, Yu-Sheng; Fu, Xiang-Hui; Hao, De-Long; Xue, Zheng; Gong, Huan; Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2008-10-17

    The apolipoprotein (apo) AI/CIII/AIV/AV cluster genes are expressed at different levels in the liver and intestine. The apoCIII enhancer, a common regulatory element, regulates the tissue-specific expression of apoAI, apoCIII, and apoAIV but not apoAV. To study this regulation at the chromatin level, the histone modifications and intergenic transcription in the human apoAI/CIII/AIV/AV cluster were investigated in HepG2 and Caco-2 cells and in the livers of transgenic mice carrying the human gene cluster constructs with or without the apoCIII enhancer. We found that both the promoters and the intergenic regions of the apoAI/CIII/AIV genes were hyperacetylated and formed an open subdomain that did not include the apoAV gene. Hepatic and intestinal intergenic transcripts were identified to transcribe bidirectionally with strand preferences along the cluster. The deletion of the apoCIII enhancer influenced both histone modification and intergenic transcription in the apoAI/CIII/AIV gene region. These results demonstrate that the apoCIII enhancer contributes to the maintenance of an active chromatin subdomain of the apoAI/CIII/AIV genes, but not apoAV.

  8. A cis-regulatory sequence from a short intergenic region gives rise to a strong microbe-associated molecular pattern-responsive synthetic promoter.

    PubMed

    Lehmeyer, Mona; Hanko, Erik K R; Roling, Lena; Gonzalez, Lilian; Wehrs, Maren; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    The high gene density in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves only relatively short intergenic regions for potential cis-regulatory sequences. To learn more about the regulation of genes harbouring only very short upstream intergenic regions, this study investigates a recently identified novel microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-responsive cis-sequence located within the 101 bp long intergenic region upstream of the At1g13990 gene. It is shown that the cis-regulatory sequence is sufficient for MAMP-responsive reporter gene activity in the context of its native promoter. The 3' UTR of the upstream gene has a quantitative effect on gene expression. In context of a synthetic promoter, the cis-sequence is shown to achieve a strong increase in reporter gene activity as a monomer, dimer and tetramer. Mutation analysis of the cis-sequence determined the specific nucleotides required for gene expression activation. In transgenic A. thaliana the synthetic promoter harbouring a tetramer of the cis-sequence not only drives strong pathogen-responsive reporter gene expression but also shows a high background activity. The results of this study contribute to our understanding how genes with very short upstream intergenic regions are regulated and how these regions can serve as a source for MAMP-responsive cis-sequences for synthetic promoter design.

  9. A cis-regulatory sequence from a short intergenic region gives rise to a strong microbe-associated molecular pattern-responsive synthetic promoter.

    PubMed

    Lehmeyer, Mona; Hanko, Erik K R; Roling, Lena; Gonzalez, Lilian; Wehrs, Maren; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    The high gene density in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves only relatively short intergenic regions for potential cis-regulatory sequences. To learn more about the regulation of genes harbouring only very short upstream intergenic regions, this study investigates a recently identified novel microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-responsive cis-sequence located within the 101 bp long intergenic region upstream of the At1g13990 gene. It is shown that the cis-regulatory sequence is sufficient for MAMP-responsive reporter gene activity in the context of its native promoter. The 3' UTR of the upstream gene has a quantitative effect on gene expression. In context of a synthetic promoter, the cis-sequence is shown to achieve a strong increase in reporter gene activity as a monomer, dimer and tetramer. Mutation analysis of the cis-sequence determined the specific nucleotides required for gene expression activation. In transgenic A. thaliana the synthetic promoter harbouring a tetramer of the cis-sequence not only drives strong pathogen-responsive reporter gene expression but also shows a high background activity. The results of this study contribute to our understanding how genes with very short upstream intergenic regions are regulated and how these regions can serve as a source for MAMP-responsive cis-sequences for synthetic promoter design. PMID:26833485

  10. Modeling repetitive motions using structured light.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Aliaga, Daniel G

    2010-01-01

    Obtaining models of dynamic 3D objects is an important part of content generation for computer graphics. Numerous methods have been extended from static scenarios to model dynamic scenes. If the states or poses of the dynamic object repeat often during a sequence (but not necessarily periodically), we call such a repetitive motion. There are many objects, such as toys, machines, and humans, undergoing repetitive motions. Our key observation is that when a motion-state repeats, we can sample the scene under the same motion state again but using a different set of parameters; thus, providing more information of each motion state. This enables robustly acquiring dense 3D information difficult for objects with repetitive motions using only simple hardware. After the motion sequence, we group temporally disjoint observations of the same motion state together and produce a smooth space-time reconstruction of the scene. Effectively, the dynamic scene modeling problem is converted to a series of static scene reconstructions, which are easier to tackle. The varying sampling parameters can be, for example, structured-light patterns, illumination directions, and viewpoints resulting in different modeling techniques. Based on this observation, we present an image-based motion-state framework and demonstrate our paradigm using either a synchronized or an unsynchronized structured-light acquisition method.

  11. The Dfam database of repetitive DNA families

    PubMed Central

    Hubley, Robert; Finn, Robert D.; Clements, Jody; Eddy, Sean R.; Jones, Thomas A.; Bao, Weidong; Smit, Arian F.A.; Wheeler, Travis J.

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA, especially that due to transposable elements (TEs), makes up a large fraction of many genomes. Dfam is an open access database of families of repetitive DNA elements, in which each family is represented by a multiple sequence alignment and a profile hidden Markov model (HMM). The initial release of Dfam, featured in the 2013 NAR Database Issue, contained 1143 families of repetitive elements found in humans, and was used to produce more than 100 Mb of additional annotation of TE-derived regions in the human genome, with improved speed. Here, we describe recent advances, most notably expansion to 4150 total families including a comprehensive set of known repeat families from four new organisms (mouse, zebrafish, fly and nematode). We describe improvements to coverage, and to our methods for identifying and reducing false annotation. We also describe updates to the website interface. The Dfam website has moved to http://dfam.org. Seed alignments, profile HMMs, hit lists and other underlying data are available for download. PMID:26612867

  12. The Dfam database of repetitive DNA families.

    PubMed

    Hubley, Robert; Finn, Robert D; Clements, Jody; Eddy, Sean R; Jones, Thomas A; Bao, Weidong; Smit, Arian F A; Wheeler, Travis J

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA, especially that due to transposable elements (TEs), makes up a large fraction of many genomes. Dfam is an open access database of families of repetitive DNA elements, in which each family is represented by a multiple sequence alignment and a profile hidden Markov model (HMM). The initial release of Dfam, featured in the 2013 NAR Database Issue, contained 1143 families of repetitive elements found in humans, and was used to produce more than 100 Mb of additional annotation of TE-derived regions in the human genome, with improved speed. Here, we describe recent advances, most notably expansion to 4150 total families including a comprehensive set of known repeat families from four new organisms (mouse, zebrafish, fly and nematode). We describe improvements to coverage, and to our methods for identifying and reducing false annotation. We also describe updates to the website interface. The Dfam website has moved to http://dfam.org. Seed alignments, profile HMMs, hit lists and other underlying data are available for download.

  13. The Dfam database of repetitive DNA families.

    PubMed

    Hubley, Robert; Finn, Robert D; Clements, Jody; Eddy, Sean R; Jones, Thomas A; Bao, Weidong; Smit, Arian F A; Wheeler, Travis J

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA, especially that due to transposable elements (TEs), makes up a large fraction of many genomes. Dfam is an open access database of families of repetitive DNA elements, in which each family is represented by a multiple sequence alignment and a profile hidden Markov model (HMM). The initial release of Dfam, featured in the 2013 NAR Database Issue, contained 1143 families of repetitive elements found in humans, and was used to produce more than 100 Mb of additional annotation of TE-derived regions in the human genome, with improved speed. Here, we describe recent advances, most notably expansion to 4150 total families including a comprehensive set of known repeat families from four new organisms (mouse, zebrafish, fly and nematode). We describe improvements to coverage, and to our methods for identifying and reducing false annotation. We also describe updates to the website interface. The Dfam website has moved to http://dfam.org. Seed alignments, profile HMMs, hit lists and other underlying data are available for download. PMID:26612867

  14. Phosphor thermometry at high repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, N.; Brübach, J.; Dreizler, A.

    2013-09-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilizing the luminescence properties of thermographic phosphors. Typically these ceramic materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Photomultipliers and high-speed camera systems are used to transiently detect the subsequently emitted luminescence decay point wise or two-dimensionally resolved. Based on appropriate calibration measurements, the luminescence lifetime is converted to temperature. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. For the first time, the authors realized a high-speed phosphor thermometry system combining a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterized regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating in terms of heating effects has been investigated. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of one sample per crank angle degree at an engine speed of 1000 rpm. This experiment has proven that high-speed phosphor thermometry is a promising diagnostic tool for the resolution of surface temperature transients.

  15. Apparatus and methods for aligning holes through wheels and spacers and stacking the wheels and spacers to form a turbine rotor

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Robert Randolph; Palmer, Gene David; Wilson, Ian David

    2000-01-01

    A gas turbine rotor stacking fixture includes upstanding bolts for reception in aligned bolt holes in superposed aft disk, wheels and spacers and upstanding alignment rods received in openings of the disk, wheels and spacers during the rotor stacking assembly. The axially registering openings enable insertion of thin-walled tubes circumferentially about the rim of the rotor, with tight tolerances to the openings to provide supply and return steam for cooling buckets. The alignment rods have radial dimensions substantially less than their dimensions in a circumferential direction to allow for radial opening misalignment due to thermal expansion, tolerance stack-up and wheel-to-spacer mismatch due to rabbet mechanical growth. The circumferential dimension of the alignment rods affords tightly toleranced alignment of the openings through which the cooling tubes are installed.

  16. Lingual Kinematics during Rapid Syllable Repetition in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Min Ney; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid syllable repetition tasks are commonly used in the assessment of motor speech disorders. However, little is known about the articulatory kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: To investigate and compare lingual kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in dysarthric…

  17. Repetition Blindness: An Emergent Property of Inter-Item Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alison L.; Still, Mary L.; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Repeating an item in a brief or rapid display usually produces faster or more accurate identification of the item (repetition priming), but sometimes produces the opposite effect (repetition blindness). We present a theory of short-term repetition effects, the "competition hypothesis," which explains these paradoxical outcomes. The central tenet…

  18. Repetitive Behaviours in Typically Developing 2-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leekam, Susan; Tandos, Jonathan; McConachie, Helen; Meins, Elizabeth; Parkinson, Kathryn; Wright, Charlotte; Turner, Michelle; Arnott, Bronia; Vittorini, Lucia; Le Couteur, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Background: Repetitive behaviours are an essential part of the diagnosis of autism but are also commonly seen in typically developing children. The current study investigated the frequency and factor structure of repetitive behaviours in a large community sample of 2-year-olds. Methods: A new measure, the Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire (RBQ-2)…

  19. Experimental models of repetitive brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Weber, John T

    2007-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs in a significant portion of trauma patients, especially in specific populations, such as child abuse victims or athletes involved in contact sports (e.g. boxing, football, hockey, and soccer). A continually emerging hypothesis is that repeated mild injuries may cause cumulative damage to the brain, resulting in long-term cognitive dysfunction. The growing attention to this hypothesis is reflected in several recent experimental studies of repeated mild TBI in vivo. These reports generally demonstrate cellular and cognitive dysfunction after repetitive injury using rodent TBI models. In some cases, data suggests that the effects of a second mild TBI may be synergistic, rather than additive. In addition, some studies have found increases in cellular markers associated with Alzheimer's disease after repeated mild injuries, which demonstrates a direct experimental link between repetitive TBI and neurodegenerative disease. To complement the findings from humans and in vivo experimentation, my laboratory group has investigated the effects of repeated trauma in cultured brain cells using a model of stretch-induced mechanical injury in vitro. In these studies, hippocampal cells exhibited cumulative damage when mild stretch injuries were repeated at either 1-h or 24-h intervals. Interestingly, the extent of damage to the cells was dependent on the time between repeated injuries. Also, a very low level of stretch, which produced no cell damage on its own, induced cell damage when it was repeated several times at a short interval (every 2 min). Although direct comparisons to the clinical situation are difficult, these types of repetitive, low-level, mechanical stresses may be similar to the insults received by certain athletes, such as boxers, or hockey and soccer players. This type of in vitro model could provide a reliable system in which to study the mechanisms underlying cellular dysfunction following repeated injuries. As

  20. Method of forming a spacer for field emission flat panel displays

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.

    1997-08-19

    Spacers are disclosed for applications such as field emission flat panel displays and vacuum microelectronics, and which involves the application of aerogel/xerogel technology to the formation of the spacer. In a preferred approach the method uses a mold and mold release agent wherein the gel precursor is a liquid which can be applied to the mold filling holes which expose the substrate (either the baseplate or the faceplate). A release agent is applied to the mold prior to precursor application to ease removal of the mold after formation of the dielectric spacer. The shrinkage of the gel during solvent extraction also improves mold removal. The final spacer material is a good dielectric, such as silica, secured to the substrate. 3 figs.

  1. Method of forming a spacer for field emission flat panel displays

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    Spacers for applications such as field emission flat panel displays and vacuum microelectronics, and which involves the application of aerogel/xerogel technology to the formation of the spacer. In a preferred approach the method uses a mold and mold release agent wherein the gel precursor is a liquid which can be applied to the mold filling holes which expose the substrate (either the baseplate or the faceplate). A release agent is applied to the mold prior to precursor application to ease removal of the mold after formation of the dielectric spacer. The shrinkage of the gel during solvent extraction also improves mold removal. The final spacer material is a good dielectric, such as silica, secured to the substrate.

  2. CRISPR Spacer Arrays for Detection of Viral Signatures from Acidic Hot Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, J. C.; Bateson, M. M.; Suciu, D.; Young, M. J.

    2010-04-01

    Viruses are the most abundant life-like entities on the planet Earth. Using CRISPR spacer sequences, we have developed a microarray-based approach to detecting viral signatures in the acidic hot springs of Yellowstone.

  3. Spacer geometry and particle deposition in spiral wound membrane feed channels.

    PubMed

    Radu, A I; van Steen, M S H; Vrouwenvelder, J S; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Picioreanu, C

    2014-11-01

    Deposition of microspheres mimicking bacterial cells was studied experimentally and with a numerical model in feed spacer membrane channels, as used in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems. In-situ microscopic observations in membrane fouling simulators revealed formation of specific particle deposition patterns for different diamond and ladder feed spacer orientations. A three-dimensional numerical model combining fluid flow with a Lagrangian approach for particle trajectory calculations could describe very well the in-situ observations on particle deposition in flow cells. Feed spacer geometry, positioning and cross-flow velocity sensitively influenced the particle transport and deposition patterns. The deposition patterns were not influenced by permeate production. This combined experimental-modeling approach could be used for feed spacer geometry optimization studies for reduced (bio)fouling.

  4. The Adult Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 (RBQ-2A): A Self-Report Measure of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Sarah L.; Uljarevic, Mirko; Baker, Emma K.; Richdale, Amanda L.; Jones, Catherine R. G.; Leekam, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    In two studies we developed and tested a new self-report measure of restricted and repetitive behaviours (RRB) suitable for adults. In Study 1, The Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 for adults (RBQ-2A) was completed by a sample of 163 neurotypical adults. Principal components analysis revealed two components: Repetitive Motor Behaviours and…

  5. Magnetic properties of exchange-coupled PtFe/Fe films with spacer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, W. B.; Liu, W.; Yang, F.; Li, D.; Delikanli, S.; Guo, S.; Gong, W. J.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2011-04-01

    The exchange coupling between PtFe and Fe in PtFe/Fe films with Cr2O3 or Cr2O3/Cu spacer layers is indirect and long range. Microstructures of as-deposited and annealed thin films are studied. Coercivity over 10 kOe is obtained in PtFe/Cr2O3(5 Å)/Fe(25 Å) films but decrease with thicker Cr2O3 spacer layer. Comparably, coercivity can be maintained at about 10 kOe if spacer layer is changed into Cr2O3(x Å)/Cu(5 Å) (5 Å ≤ x ≤ 25 Å). For a fixed total thickness of the spacer layers, the coercivity generally decreases with gradual replacement of Cr2O3 by Cu, indicating the different effects of spacer layers on mediating the exchange coupling between PtFe and Fe. Using Cr2O3 or Cr2O3/Cu as a spacer layer is a promising way for realizing exchange-coupled PtFe/Fe composite films.

  6. The nonsignaling extracellular spacer domain of chimeric antigen receptors is decisive for in vivo antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Hudecek, Michael; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Kosasih, Paula L; Silva-Benedict, Anne; Liu, Lingfeng; Rader, Christoph; Jensen, Michael C; Riddell, Stanley R

    2015-02-01

    The use of synthetic chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) to redirect T cells to recognize tumor provides a powerful new approach to cancer immunotherapy; however, the attributes of CARs that ensure optimal in vivo tumor recognition remain to be defined. Here, we analyze the influence of length and composition of IgG-derived extracellular spacer domains on the function of CARs. Our studies demonstrate that CD19-CARs with a long spacer from IgG4 hinge-CH2-CH3 are functional in vitro but lack antitumor activity in vivo due to interaction between the Fc domain within the spacer and the Fc receptor-bearing myeloid cells, leading to activation-induced T-cell death. We demonstrate that in vivo persistence and antitumor effects of CAR-T cells with a long spacer can be restored by modifying distinct regions in the CH2 domain that are essential for Fc receptor binding. Our studies demonstrate that modifications that abrogate binding to Fc receptors are crucial for CARs in which a long spacer is obligatory for tumor recognition as shown here for a ROR1-specific CAR. These results demonstrate that the length and composition of the extracellular spacer domain that lacks intrinsic signaling function can be decisive in the design of CARs for optimal in vivo activity.

  7. The Effect of Spacer Morphology on the Aerosolization Performance of Metered-Dose Inhalers

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Sepideh; Nokhodchi, Ali; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory drug delivery has been attracted great interest for the past decades, because of the high incidence of pulmonary diseases. However, despite its invaluable benefits, there are some major drawbacks in respiratory drug delivery, mainly due to the relatively high drug deposition in undesirable regions. One way to improve the efficiency of respiratory drug delivery through metered-dose inhalers (MDI) is placing a respiratory spacer between the inhaler exit and the mouth. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of type and shape of spacer on the aerosolization performance of MDIs. Methods: A commercial Beclomethasone Dipropionate (BDP) MDI alone or equipped with two different spacer devices (roller and pear type) widely distributed in the world pharmaceutical market was used. The effect of spacers was evaluated by calculating aerosolization indexes such as fine particle fraction (FPF), mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) using the next generation impactor. Results: Although one of the spacers resulted in superior outcomes than the other one, but it was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The results confirmed that the type and shape of spacer did not substantially influence the aerosolization performance of MDIs. PMID:27478789

  8. [Guidelines for redesigning jobs with repetitive tasks].

    PubMed

    Colombini, D; Occhipinti, E; Meroni, M; Menoni, O; Bergamasco, R; Girola, C; Grea, V; Vendola, D

    1996-01-01

    Preventive measures aimed at minimising the occurrence of work-related musculo-skeletal disorders of the upper limbs (WMSDs) associated with repetitive tasks can be divided into 3 categories: structural, organisational and educational. Whenever specific risk and injury assessments have shown the need for preventive action, this is most often implemented within the framework of a range of assorted measures. In particular, structural measures pertain to optimising the layout of the work area and furnishings, and the "ergonomic" properties of work tools and equipment. Such measures serve to alleviate the problems caused by the use of excessive force and improper postures. The authors refer to the principles guiding such structural measures, in the light of the extensive literature that has been published on the subject. Organisational (or re-organisational) measures essentially relate to job design (i.e. distribution of tasks, speeds and pauses). They serve to alleviate problems connected with highly repetitive and frequent actions, excessively lengthy tasks and inadequate recovery periods. Very few relevant findings are available: the authors therefore illustrate in some detail a practical trial conducted in a major engineering firm. The objective was to lower to acceptable limits the frequency of certain repetitive tasks performed by workers using their upper limbs. The trial made it possible to identify a suitable plan and schedule of measures taking into due consideration the impact of the plan on production levels (and costs). The fundamental principles guiding the adoption of specific educational and training programmes for the workers and their supervisors are presented and discussed.

  9. Repetitive DNA alterations in human skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Gil R H; Francisco, Guilherme; Teixeira, Lúcia V S; Romão-Correia, Rosana F; Sanches, José A; Neto, Cyro Festa; Ruiz, Itamar R G

    2004-11-01

    Repetitive sequences constitute landmarks for genome regulation, evolution, and chromatin architecture. Patterns of specific and non-specific repetitive sequences change in many types and stages of tumor cells, characterized by band loss, gain, and (de) increased staining of pre-existing bands. In this work, repetitive DNA was studied in search of genome instability of skin cancers: basal and squamous cell carcinomas (BCC and SCC), malignant melanoma (MM), melanocytic nevus (MN), and actinic keratosis (AK) lesions. DNAs were extracted from blood and tumor samples from 21 BCC, 7 SCC, 11 MM and 7 lesions. Banding patterns were obtained by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and specific D9S50 and D9S52 microsatellites (9p21). D9S50 patterns revealed microsatellite instability (MSI) and/or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 36% BCC, 25% SCC, and 57% MM tumors. D9S52 microsatellite showed 28.5%; 42.8%; and 71.4% altered tumors, respectively. No microsatellite alterations were found in MN and AK. On the other hand, genomic rearrangements detected by RAPD were present in 100% tumors. In BCC, the mean number of tumor DNA alterations showed predominant gain of bands. On the contrary, MM samples presented loss, or decreased intensity signal of RAPD bands. Genome alterations in skin cancers would result from chromosomal rearrangements, aneuploidy and/or polysomies. The low-cost and quick RAPD technique may reveal unknown genes or DNA sequences associated with tumor development and progression, and may be easily implemented in clinical diagnosis.

  10. Repetitive Head Impacts and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Alosco, Michael L; Huber, Bertrand R

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a distinctive neurodegenerative disease that occurs as a result of repetitive head impacts. CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathologic examination of brain tissue. CTE is a unique disorder with a pathognomonic lesion that can be reliably distinguished from other neurodegenerative diseases. CTE is associated with violent behaviors, explosivity, loss of control, depression, suicide, memory loss and cognitive changes. There is increasing evidence that CTE affects amateur athletes as well as professional athletes and military veterans. CTE has become a major public health concern.

  11. AUTOSIM: An automated repetitive software testing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, J. R.; Mcbride, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    AUTOSIM is a software tool which automates the repetitive run testing of software. This tool executes programming tasks previously performed by a programmer with one year of programming experience. Use of the AUTOSIM tool requires a knowledge base containing information about known faults, code fixes, and the fault diagnosis-correction process. AUTOSIM can be considered as an expert system which replaces a low level of programming expertise. Reference information about the design and implementation of the AUTOSIM software test tool provides flowcharts to assist in maintaining the software code and a description of how to use the tool.

  12. Repetitive Head Impacts and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Alosco, Michael L; Huber, Bertrand R

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a distinctive neurodegenerative disease that occurs as a result of repetitive head impacts. CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathologic examination of brain tissue. CTE is a unique disorder with a pathognomonic lesion that can be reliably distinguished from other neurodegenerative diseases. CTE is associated with violent behaviors, explosivity, loss of control, depression, suicide, memory loss and cognitive changes. There is increasing evidence that CTE affects amateur athletes as well as professional athletes and military veterans. CTE has become a major public health concern. PMID:27637402

  13. Software reliability: Repetitive run experimentation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, P. M.; Skrivan, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    A software experiment conducted with repetitive run sampling is reported. Independently generated input data was used to verify that interfailure times are very nearly exponentially distributed and to obtain good estimates of the failure rates of individual errors and demonstrate how widely they vary. This fact invalidates many of the popular software reliability models now in use. The log failure rate of interfailure time was nearly linear as a function of the number of errors corrected. A new model of software reliability is proposed that incorporates these observations.

  14. Pull-production in repetitive remanufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskey, D.W. Jr.

    1992-09-01

    In the past, production activity control practices in most repetitive remanufacturing facilities resembled those used in intermittent production operations. These operations were characterized by large amounts of work-in-process (WIP), frequent work stoppages due to part shortages, excessive overtime, low product velocity, informal scheduling between dependent operations, low employee and management moral, and a lot of wasted time, material, labor, and space. Improvement in production activity control (PAC) methods for repetitive remanufactures has been hampered by uncertainty in: supply of incoming assets, configuration of assets, process times to refurbish assets, and yields in reclamation processes. collectively these uncertainties make shop floor operations seem uncontrollable. However, one United States Army depot has taken on the challenge. Through management supported, cross-functional teams, the Tooele Army Depot has designed and implemented pull-production systems for two of its major products, with several others to follow. This article presents a generalized version of Tooele's pull-production system and highlights design characteristics which are specific to remanufacturing applications.

  15. Pull-production in repetitive remanufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskey, D.W. Jr.

    1992-09-01

    In the past, production activity control practices in most repetitive remanufacturing facilities resembled those used in intermittent production operations. These operations were characterized by large amounts of work-in-process (WIP), frequent work stoppages due to part shortages, excessive overtime, low product velocity, informal scheduling between dependent operations, low employee and management moral, and a lot of wasted time, material, labor, and space. Improvement in production activity control (PAC) methods for repetitive remanufactures has been hampered by uncertainty in: supply of incoming assets, configuration of assets, process times to refurbish assets, and yields in reclamation processes. collectively these uncertainties make shop floor operations seem uncontrollable. However, one United States Army depot has taken on the challenge. Through management supported, cross-functional teams, the Tooele Army Depot has designed and implemented pull-production systems for two of its major products, with several others to follow. This article presents a generalized version of Tooele`s pull-production system and highlights design characteristics which are specific to remanufacturing applications.

  16. Investigation of a repetitive pulsed electrothermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Fleischer, D.; Goldstein, S. A.; Tidman, D. A.; Winsor, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A pulsed electrothermal (PET) thruster with 1000:1 ratio nozzle is tested in a repetitive mode on water propellant. The thruster is driven by a 60J pulse forming network at repetition rates up to 10 Hz (600W). The pulse forming network has a .31 ohm impedance, well matched to the capillary discharge resistance of .40 ohm, and is directly coupled to the thruster electrodes without a switch. The discharge is initiated by high voltage breakdown, typically at 2500V, through the water vapor in the interelectrode gap. Water is injected as a jet through a .37 mm orifice on the thruster axis. Thruster voltage, current and impulse bit are recorded for several seconds at various power supply currents. Thruster to power ratio is typically T/P = .07 N/kW. Tank background pressure precludes direct measurement of exhaust velocity which is inferred from calculated pressure and temperature in the discharge to be about 14 km/sec. Efficiency, based on this velocity and measured T/P is .54 + or - .07. Thruster ablation is zero at the throat and becomes measurable further upstream, indicating that radiative ablation is occurring late in the pulse.

  17. Evidence for RNA synthesis in the intergenic region between enhancer and promoter and its inhibition by insulators in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tchurikov, Nickolai A; Kretova, Olga V; Moiseeva, Evgenia D; Sosin, Dmitri V

    2009-01-01

    Uncovering the nature of communication between enhancers, promoters and insulators is important for understanding the fundamental mechanisms that ensure appropriate gene expression levels. Here we describe an approach employing transient expression of genetic luciferase reporter gene constructs with quantitative RT-PCR analysis of transcription between an enhancer and Hsp70 promoter. We tested genetic constructs containing gypsy and/or Fab7 insulators in different orientations, and an enhancer from copia LTR-retroelement [(enh)copia]. A single gypsy or Fab7 insulator inserted between the promoter and enhancer in any polarity reduced enhancer action. A pair of insulators flanking the gene in any orientation exhibited increased insulation activity. We detected promoter-independent synthesis of non-coding RNA in the intergenic region of the constructs, which was induced by the enhancer in both directions and repressed by a single insulator or a pair of insulators. These results highlight the involvement of RNA-tracking mechanisms in the communications between enhancers and promoters, which are inhibited by insulators.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in chickpea and their potential role in flower development.

    PubMed

    Khemka, Niraj; Singh, Vikash Kumar; Garg, Rohini; Jain, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs constitute a major portion of the transcriptome in most of eukaryotes. Long non-coding transcripts originating from the DNA segment present between the protein coding genes are termed as long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs). Several evidences suggest the role of lincRNAs in regulation of various biological processes. In this study, we identified a total of 2248 lincRNAs in chickpea using RNA-seq data from eight successive stages of flower development and three vegetative tissues via an optimized pipeline. Different characteristic features of lincRNAs were studied and compared with those of predicted mRNAs in chickpea. Further, we utilized a method using network propagation algorithm to reveal the putative function of lincRNAs in plants. In total, at least 79% of the identified chickpea lincRNAs were assigned with a putative function. A comprehensive expression profiling revealed differential expression patterns and tissue specificity of lincRNAs in different stages of flower development in chickpea. In addition, potential lincRNAs-miRNA interactions were explored for the predicted lincRNAs in chickpea. These findings will pave the way for understanding the role of lincRNAs in the regulatory mechanism underlying flower development in chickpea and other legumes. PMID:27628568

  19. Identification of chimeric TSNAX-DISC1 resulting from intergenic splicing in endometrial carcinoma through high-throughput RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Zheng, Jian; Li, Hua; Deng, Jieqiong; Hu, Min; Wu, Hongchun; Li, Wei; Li, Fang; Lan, Xun; Lu, Jiachun; Zhou, Yifeng

    2014-12-01

    Gene fusion is among the primary processes that generate new genes and has been well characterized as potent pathway of oncogenesis. Here, by high-throughput RNA sequencing in nine paired human endometrial carcinoma (EC) and matched non-cancerous tissues, we obtained that chimeric translin-associated factor X-disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (TSNAX-DISC1) occurred significantly upregulated in multiple EC samples. Experimental investigation showed that TSNAX-DISC1 appears to be formed by splicing without chromosomal rearrangement. The chimera expression inversely correlated with the binding of CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) to the insulators. Subsequent investigations indicate that long intergenic non-coding RNA lincRNA-NR_034037, separating TSNAX from DISC1, regulates TSNAX -DISC1 production and TSNAX/DISC1 expression levels by extricating CTCF from insulators. Dysregulation of TSNAX influences steroidogenic factor-1-stimulated transcription on the StAR promoter, altering progesterone actions, implying the association with cancer. Together, these results advance our understanding of the mechanism in which lincRNA-NR_034037 regulates TSNAX-DISC1 formation programs that tightly regulate EC development.

  20. Identification of chimeric TSNAX-DISC1 resulting from intergenic splicing in endometrial carcinoma through high-throughput RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Zheng, Jian; Li, Hua; Deng, Jieqiong; Hu, Min; Wu, Hongchun; Li, Wei; Li, Fang; Lan, Xun; Lu, Jiachun; Zhou, Yifeng

    2014-12-01

    Gene fusion is among the primary processes that generate new genes and has been well characterized as potent pathway of oncogenesis. Here, by high-throughput RNA sequencing in nine paired human endometrial carcinoma (EC) and matched non-cancerous tissues, we obtained that chimeric translin-associated factor X-disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (TSNAX-DISC1) occurred significantly upregulated in multiple EC samples. Experimental investigation showed that TSNAX-DISC1 appears to be formed by splicing without chromosomal rearrangement. The chimera expression inversely correlated with the binding of CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) to the insulators. Subsequent investigations indicate that long intergenic non-coding RNA lincRNA-NR_034037, separating TSNAX from DISC1, regulates TSNAX -DISC1 production and TSNAX/DISC1 expression levels by extricating CTCF from insulators. Dysregulation of TSNAX influences steroidogenic factor-1-stimulated transcription on the StAR promoter, altering progesterone actions, implying the association with cancer. Together, these results advance our understanding of the mechanism in which lincRNA-NR_034037 regulates TSNAX-DISC1 formation programs that tightly regulate EC development. PMID:25239642

  1. Genome-wide identification of long intergenic noncoding RNA genes and their potential association with domestication in pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong-Yin; Li, Ai-Min; Adeola, Adeniyi C; Liu, Yan-Hu; Irwin, David M; Xie, Hai-Bing; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2014-06-02

    Thousands of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) have been identified in the human and mouse genomes, some of which play important roles in fundamental biological processes. The pig is an important domesticated animal, however, pig lincRNAs remain poorly characterized and it is unknown if they were involved in the domestication of the pig. Here, we used available RNA-seq resources derived from 93 samples and expressed sequence tag data sets, and identified 6,621 lincRNA transcripts from 4,515 gene loci. Among the identified lincRNAs, some lincRNA genes exhibit synteny and sequence conservation, including linc-sscg2561, whose gene neighbor Dnmt3a is associated with emotional behaviors. Both linc-sscg2561 and Dnmt3a show differential expression in the frontal cortex between domesticated pigs and wild boars, suggesting a possible role in pig domestication. This study provides the first comprehensive genome-wide analysis of pig lincRNAs.

  2. Functional analysis of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in phosphate-starved rice using competing endogenous RNA network

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xi-Wen; Zhou, Xiong-Hui; Wang, Rui-Ru; Peng, Wen-Lei; An, Yue; Chen, Ling-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) may play widespread roles in gene regulation and other biological processes, however, a systematic examination of the functions of lincRNAs in the biological responses of rice to phosphate (Pi) starvation has not been performed. Here, we used a computational method to predict the functions of lincRNAs in Pi-starved rice. Overall, 3,170 lincRNA loci were identified using RNA sequencing data from the roots and shoots of control and Pi-starved rice. A competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) network was constructed for each tissue by considering the competing relationships between lincRNAs and genes, and the correlations between the expression levels of RNAs in ceRNA pairs. Enrichment analyses showed that most of the communities in the networks were related to the biological processes of Pi starvation. The lincRNAs in the two tissues were individually functionally annotated based on the ceRNA networks, and the differentially expressed lincRNAs were biologically meaningful. For example, XLOC_026030 was upregulated from 3 days after Pi starvation, and its functional annotation was ‘cellular response to Pi starvation’. In conclusion, we systematically annotated lincRNAs in rice and identified those involved in the biological response to Pi starvation. PMID:26860696

  3. A New Intergenic α-Globin Deletion (α-αΔ125) Found in a Kabyle Population.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Lacan, Philippe; Cadet, Estelle; Bignet, Patricia; Dumesnil, Cécile; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Joly, Philippe; Rochette, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    We have identified a deletion of 125 bp (α-α(Δ125)) (NG_000006.1: g.37040_37164del) in the α-globin gene cluster in a Kabyle population. A combination of singlex and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays have been used to identify the molecular defect. Sequencing of the abnormal PCR amplification product revealed a novel α1-globin promoter deletion. The endpoints of the deletion were characterized by sequencing the deletion junctions of the mutated allele. The observed deletion was located 378 bp upstream of the α1-globin gene transcription initiation site and leaves the α2 gene intact. In some patients, the α-α(Δ125) deletion was shown to segregate with Hb S (HBB: c.20A>T) and/or Hb C (HBB: c.19G>A) or a β-thalassemic allele. The α-α(Δ125) deletion has no discernible effect on red cell indices when inherited with no other abnormal globin genes. The family study demonstrated that the deletion is heritable. This is the only example of an intergenic α2-α1 non coding DNA deletion, leaving the α2-globin gene and the α1 coding part intact.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in chickpea and their potential role in flower development

    PubMed Central

    Khemka, Niraj; Singh, Vikash Kumar; Garg, Rohini; Jain, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs constitute a major portion of the transcriptome in most of eukaryotes. Long non-coding transcripts originating from the DNA segment present between the protein coding genes are termed as long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs). Several evidences suggest the role of lincRNAs in regulation of various biological processes. In this study, we identified a total of 2248 lincRNAs in chickpea using RNA-seq data from eight successive stages of flower development and three vegetative tissues via an optimized pipeline. Different characteristic features of lincRNAs were studied and compared with those of predicted mRNAs in chickpea. Further, we utilized a method using network propagation algorithm to reveal the putative function of lincRNAs in plants. In total, at least 79% of the identified chickpea lincRNAs were assigned with a putative function. A comprehensive expression profiling revealed differential expression patterns and tissue specificity of lincRNAs in different stages of flower development in chickpea. In addition, potential lincRNAs-miRNA interactions were explored for the predicted lincRNAs in chickpea. These findings will pave the way for understanding the role of lincRNAs in the regulatory mechanism underlying flower development in chickpea and other legumes. PMID:27628568

  5. Pan-Cancer Analyses Reveal Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs Relevant to Tumor Diagnosis, Subtyping and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ching, Travers; Peplowska, Karolina; Huang, Sijia; Zhu, Xun; Shen, Yi; Molnar, Janos; Yu, Herbert; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Fogelgren, Ben; Fan, Rong; Garmire, Lana X

    2016-05-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a relatively new class of non-coding RNAs that have the potential as cancer biomarkers. To seek a panel of lincRNAs as pan-cancer biomarkers, we have analyzed transcriptomes from over 3300 cancer samples with clinical information. Compared to mRNA, lincRNAs exhibit significantly higher tissue specificities that are then diminished in cancer tissues. Moreover, lincRNA clustering results accurately classify tumor subtypes. Using RNA-Seq data from thousands of paired tumor and adjacent normal samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we identify six lincRNAs as potential pan-cancer diagnostic biomarkers (PCAN-1 to PCAN-6). These lincRNAs are robustly validated using cancer samples from four independent RNA-Seq data sets, and are verified by qPCR in both primary breast cancers and MCF-7 cell line. Interestingly, the expression levels of these six lincRNAs are also associated with prognosis in various cancers. We further experimentally explored the growth and migration dependence of breast and colon cancer cell lines on two of the identified lncRNAs. In summary, our study highlights the emerging role of lincRNAs as potentially powerful and biologically functional pan-cancer biomarkers and represents a significant leap forward in understanding the biological and clinical functions of lincRNAs in cancers.

  6. A p53-bound enhancer region controls a long intergenic noncoding RNA required for p53 stress response.

    PubMed

    Melo, C A; Léveillé, N; Rooijers, K; Wijchers, P J; Geeven, G; Tal, A; Melo, S A; de Laat, W; Agami, R

    2016-08-18

    Genome-wide chromatin studies identified the tumor suppressor p53 as both a promoter and an enhancer-binding transcription factor. As an enhancer factor, p53 can induce local production of enhancer RNAs, as well as transcriptional activation of distal neighboring genes. Beyond the regulation of protein-coding genes, p53 has the capacity to regulate long intergenic noncoding RNA molecules (lincRNAs); however, their importance to the p53 tumor suppressive function remains poorly characterized. Here, we identified and characterized a novel p53-bound intronic enhancer that controls the expression of its host, the lincRNA00475 (linc-475). We demonstrate the requirement of linc-475 for the proper induction of a p53-dependent cell cycle inhibitory response. We further confirm the functional importance of linc-475 in the maintenance of CDKN1A/p21 levels, a cell cycle inhibitor and a major p53 target gene, following p53 activation. Interestingly, loss of linc-475 reduced the binding of both p53 and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) to the promoter of p21, attenuating its transcription rate following p53 activation. Altogether, our data suggest a direct role of p53-bound enhancer domains in the activation of lincRNAs required for an efficient p53 transcriptional response.

  7. Effect of Varying Layers of Two Die Spacers on Precementation Space of Full Coverage Restorations.

    PubMed

    Mule, Shivkumar A; Dange, Shankar P; Khalikar, Arun N; Vaidya, Smita P

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of varying layers of two commercially available die spacers on pre-cementation space of full coverage restorations in vitro and in vivo. Seven dies were prepared for each of 15 subjects. On three dies 1, 2, 3 layers of Pico-fit and on other three dies 1, 2, 3 layers of Yeti die spacers applied, wax pattern fabricated, invested and cast. Metal copings seated in vitro on die without die spacer and on prepared tooth of respective subject with fit-checker. Thickness of fit checker was measured using micrometer at mid-axial, mid-occlusal and near finish line locations that provided pre-cementation space. Result of ANOVA tests suggested significant difference among groups with varying layers. There was no significant difference between pre-cementation space achieved with Pico-fit and Yeti die spacers. The r values suggested positive correlation between the respective pair of in vivo and in vitro groups. (1) There was significant difference between pre-cementation space at mid-axial and mid-occlusal sites achieved with 1, 2 and 3 layers of die spacers except between 1 and 2 layers and 1 and 3 layers at mid-occlusal site. (2) Pre-cementation space achieved with Pico-fit and Yeti die spacers did not differ significantly for same location, layers and in vitro and in vivo. (3) Pre-cementation space achieved in vitro was analogous to pre-cementation space achieved in vivo for respective location, layers and die spacer.

  8. Effects of spacer chain length of amino acid-based gemini surfactants on wormlike micelle formation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Nomura, Kazuyuki; Shrestha, Rekha Goswami; Endo, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Kazutami; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    We studied the effects of the spacer chain length of amino acid-based gemini surfactants on the formation of wormlike micelles in aqueous solutions. The surfactants used were synthesized by reacting dodecanoylglutamic acid anhydride with diamine compounds (ethylenediamine, pentanediamine, and octanediamine), and were abbreviated as 12-GsG-12 (s: the spacer chain length of 2, 5, and 8 methylene units). These surfactants yielded viscoelastic wormlike micellar solutions at pH 9 upon mixing with a cationic monomeric surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HTAB). We found that the rheological behavior was strongly dependent on the spacer chain length and HTAB concentration. When the shortest spacer chain analogue (12-G2G-12) was used, an increased HTAB concentration resulted in the following structural transformations of the micelles: (i) spherical or rodlike micelles; (ii) anionic wormlike micelles exhibiting a transient network structure; (iii) anionic wormlike micelles with a micellar branching or interconnected structure; and (iv) cationic wormlike micelles. Similarly, when the middle spacer chain analogue (12-G5G-12) was used, a structural transformation from anionic to cationic wormlike micelles occurs; however, molecular aggregates with a lower positive curvature were also formed in this transition region. When the longest spacer analogue (12-G8G-12) was used, the formation of cation-rich molecular aggregates was not observed. These transition behaviors were attributed to the packing geometry of the gemini surfactants with HTAB. Additionally, as the spacer chain length increased, the zero-shear viscosity in the anionic wormlike micellar region decreased, suggesting limited one-dimensional micellar growth of spherical, rodlike, or anionic wormlike micelles.

  9. Development of an innovative spacer grid model utilizing computational fluid dynamics within a subchannel analysis tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramova, Maria

    In the past few decades the need for improved nuclear reactor safety analyses has led to a rapid development of advanced methods for multidimensional thermal-hydraulic analyses. These methods have become progressively more complex in order to account for the many physical phenomena anticipated during steady state and transient Light Water Reactor (LWR) conditions. The advanced thermal-hydraulic subchannel code COBRA-TF (Thurgood, M. J. et al., 1983) is used worldwide for best-estimate evaluations of the nuclear reactor safety margins. In the framework of a joint research project between the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) and AREVA NP GmbH, the theoretical models and numerics of COBRA-TF have been improved. Under the name F-COBRA-TF, the code has been subjected to an extensive verification and validation program and has been applied to variety of LWR steady state and transient simulations. To enable F-COBRA-TF for industrial applications, including safety margins evaluations and design analyses, the code spacer grid models were revised and substantially improved. The state-of-the-art in the modeling of the spacer grid effects on the flow thermal-hydraulic performance in rod bundles employs numerical experiments performed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. Because of the involved computational cost, the CFD codes cannot be yet used for full bundle predictions, but their capabilities can be utilized for development of more advanced and sophisticated models for subchannel-level analyses. A subchannel code, equipped with improved physical models, can be then a powerful tool for LWR safety and design evaluations. The unique contributions of this PhD research are seen as development, implementation, and qualification of an innovative spacer grid model by utilizing CFD results within a framework of a subchannel analysis code. Usually, the spacer grid models are mostly related to modeling of the entrainment and deposition phenomena and the heat

  10. The CRISPR RNA-guided surveillance complex in Escherichia coli accommodates extended RNA spacers

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Michelle L.; Jackson, Ryan N.; Denny, Steven R.; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Maksimchuk, Kenneth R.; Lin, Wayne; Bothner, Brian; Wiedenheft, Blake; Beisel, Chase L.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea acquire resistance to foreign genetic elements by integrating fragments of foreign DNA into CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) loci. In Escherichia coli, CRISPR-derived RNAs (crRNAs) assemble with Cas proteins into a multi-subunit surveillance complex called Cascade (CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense). Cascade recognizes DNA targets via protein-mediated recognition of a protospacer adjacent motif and complementary base pairing between the crRNA spacer and the DNA target. Previously determined structures of Cascade showed that the crRNA is stretched along an oligomeric protein assembly, leading us to ask how crRNA length impacts the assembly and function of this complex. We found that extending the spacer portion of the crRNA resulted in larger Cascade complexes with altered stoichiometry and preserved in vitro binding affinity for target DNA. Longer spacers also preserved the in vivo ability of Cascade to repress target gene expression and to recruit the Cas3 endonuclease for target degradation. Finally, longer spacers exhibited enhanced silencing at particular target locations and were sensitive to mismatches within the extended region. These findings demonstrate the flexibility of the Type I-E CRISPR machinery and suggest that spacer length can be modified to fine-tune Cascade activity. PMID:27174938

  11. Ternary DNA chip based on a novel thymine spacer group chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanli; Yildiz, Umit Hakan; Peh, Jaime; Liedberg, Bo

    2015-01-01

    A novel thymine-based surface chemistry suitable for label-free electrochemical DNA detection is described. It involves a simple two-step sequential process: immobilization of 9-mer thymine-terminated probe DNAs followed by backfilling with 9-mer thymine-based spacers (T9). As compared to commonly used organic spacer groups like 2-mercaptoethanol, 3-mercapto-1-propanol and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol, the 9-mer thymine-based spacers offer a 10-fold improvement in discriminating between complementary and non-complementary target hybridization, which is due mainly to facilitated transport of the redox probes through the probe-DNA/T9 layers. Electrochemical measurements, complemented with Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM-D) binding analyses, reveal that optimum selectivity between complementary and non-complementary hybridization is obtained for a sensing surface prepared using probe-DNA and backfiller T9 at equimolar concentration (1:1). At this particular ratio, the probe-DNAs are preferentially oriented and easily accessible to yield a sensing surface with favorable hybridization and electron transfer characteristics. Our findings suggest that oligonucleotide-based spacer groups offer an attractive alternative to short organic thiol spacers in the design of future DNA biochips. PMID:25465760

  12. Influence of length and flexibility of spacers on the binding affinity of divalent ligands.

    PubMed

    Liese, Susanne; Netz, Roland R

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantitative model for the binding of divalent ligand-receptor systems. We study the influence of length and flexibility of the spacers on the overall binding affinity and derive general rules for the optimal ligand design. To this end, we first compare different polymeric models and determine the probability to simultaneously bind to two neighboring receptor binding pockets. In a second step the binding affinity of divalent ligands in terms of the IC50 value is derived. We find that a divalent ligand has the potential to bind more efficiently than its monovalent counterpart only, if the monovalent dissociation constant is lower than a critical value. This critical monovalent dissociation constant depends on the ligand-spacer length and flexibility as well as on the size of the receptor. Regarding the optimal ligand-spacer length and flexibility, we find that the average spacer length should be equal or slightly smaller than the distance between the receptor binding pockets and that the end-to-end spacer length fluctuations should be in the same range as the size of a receptor binding pocket.

  13. Influence of length and flexibility of spacers on the binding affinity of divalent ligands

    PubMed Central

    Liese, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present a quantitative model for the binding of divalent ligand–receptor systems. We study the influence of length and flexibility of the spacers on the overall binding affinity and derive general rules for the optimal ligand design. To this end, we first compare different polymeric models and determine the probability to simultaneously bind to two neighboring receptor binding pockets. In a second step the binding affinity of divalent ligands in terms of the IC50 value is derived. We find that a divalent ligand has the potential to bind more efficiently than its monovalent counterpart only, if the monovalent dissociation constant is lower than a critical value. This critical monovalent dissociation constant depends on the ligand-spacer length and flexibility as well as on the size of the receptor. Regarding the optimal ligand-spacer length and flexibility, we find that the average spacer length should be equal or slightly smaller than the distance between the receptor binding pockets and that the end-to-end spacer length fluctuations should be in the same range as the size of a receptor binding pocket. PMID:26124882

  14. CFD study of isothermal water flow in rod bundle with split-type spacer grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batta, A.; Class, A. G.

    2014-06-01

    The design of rod bundles in nuclear application nowadays is assessed by CFD (computational fluid dynamics). The accuracy of CFD models need validation. Within the OECD/NEA benchmark MATiS-H (Measurement and Analysis of Turbulent Mixing in Sub-channels - Horizontal) a single-phase water flow in a 5x5 rod bundle is studied. In the benchmark, two types of spacer grids are tested, the swirl type and the split type, where the current study focuses on the split type spacer grid. Comparison of CFD results obtained at Karlsruhe Institut of Technology (KIT) with experimental results of KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) are presented. In the benchmark velocities components along selected lines downstream of the spacer grid are measured and compared to CFD results. The CFD code STAR CCM+ with the Realized k-ɛ model is used. Comparisons with experimental results show quantitative and qualitative agreement for the averaged values of velocity components. Comparisons of results to other benchmark partners using different modeling show that the selected mesh size and models for the analysis of the current case gives relatively accurate results. However, the used turbulent model (Realized k-ɛ does not capture the turbulent intensity correctly. Computation shows that the flow has very high mixing due to the spacer grid, which does not decay within the measurements domain (z/ DH =0-10 downstream of spacer grid). The same conclusion can be drawn from experimental data.

  15. Monobenzoporphyrins as Sensitizers for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Observation of Significant Spacer-Group Effect.

    PubMed

    Jinadasa, R G Waruna; Li, Bihong; Schmitz, Benjamin; Kumar, Siddhartha; Hu, Yi; Kerr, Lei; Wang, Hong

    2016-08-23

    A series of monobenzoporphyrins (WH1-WH4) bearing different conjugated spacer groups were designed and synthesized as sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells. Although a phenyl spacer only has a minimal impact on the absorption bands of the monobenzoporphyrin, an ethynylphenyl (WH3) or a vinyl (WH4) spacer redshifts and broadens the absorption bands of the dyes to result in much enhanced light-harvesting ability. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on these monobenzoporphyrin dyes displayed remarkable differences in power conversion efficiencies (PCEs). The monobenzoporphyrin bearing no spacer (WH1) resulted in a PCE of only 0.5 %; in contrast, the monobenzoporphyrin bearing vinyl spacers (WH4) achieved a PCE of 5.2 %. The high efficiency of the WH4 cell is attributed to the higher light-harvesting ability, the lesser extent of aggregation on the TiO2 surface, and the more favorable electron-density distributions of the HOMO and LUMO for electron injection and collection. This work demonstrates the exceptional tunability of benzoporphyrins as sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells. PMID:27469616

  16. Adverse impact of feed channel spacers on the performance of pressure retarded osmosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Chang; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-04-17

    This article analyzes the influence of feed channel spacers on the performance of pressure retarded osmosis (PRO). Unlike forward osmosis (FO), an important feature of PRO is the application of hydraulic pressure on the high salinity (draw solution) side to retard the permeating flow for energy conversion. We report the first observation of membrane deformation under the action of the high hydraulic pressure on the feed channel spacer and the resulting impact on membrane performance. Because of this observation, reverse osmosis and FO tests that are commonly used for measuring membrane transport properties (water and salt permeability coefficients, A and B, respectively) and the structural parameter (S) can no longer be considered appropriate for use in PRO analysis. To accurately predict the water flux as a function of applied hydraulic pressure difference and the resulting power density in PRO, we introduced a new experimental protocol that accounts for membrane deformation in a spacer-filled channel to determine the membrane properties (A, B, and S). PRO performance model predictions based on these determined A, B, and S values closely matched experimental data over a range of draw solution concentrations (0.5 to 2 M NaCl). We also showed that at high pressures feed spacers block the permeation of water through the membrane area in contact with the spacer, a phenomenon that we term the shadow effect, thereby reducing overall water flux. The implications of the results for power generation by PRO are evaluated and discussed.

  17. Monobenzoporphyrins as Sensitizers for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Observation of Significant Spacer-Group Effect.

    PubMed

    Jinadasa, R G Waruna; Li, Bihong; Schmitz, Benjamin; Kumar, Siddhartha; Hu, Yi; Kerr, Lei; Wang, Hong

    2016-08-23

    A series of monobenzoporphyrins (WH1-WH4) bearing different conjugated spacer groups were designed and synthesized as sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells. Although a phenyl spacer only has a minimal impact on the absorption bands of the monobenzoporphyrin, an ethynylphenyl (WH3) or a vinyl (WH4) spacer redshifts and broadens the absorption bands of the dyes to result in much enhanced light-harvesting ability. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on these monobenzoporphyrin dyes displayed remarkable differences in power conversion efficiencies (PCEs). The monobenzoporphyrin bearing no spacer (WH1) resulted in a PCE of only 0.5 %; in contrast, the monobenzoporphyrin bearing vinyl spacers (WH4) achieved a PCE of 5.2 %. The high efficiency of the WH4 cell is attributed to the higher light-harvesting ability, the lesser extent of aggregation on the TiO2 surface, and the more favorable electron-density distributions of the HOMO and LUMO for electron injection and collection. This work demonstrates the exceptional tunability of benzoporphyrins as sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

  18. Airflows after inhalation of terbutaline sulphate aerosol from a 750-ml spacer for four weeks.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, N E; Hidinger, K G; Rosenhall, L; Hagstad, H; Löfgren, L; Perk, J; Stiksa, G; Ström, K

    1986-01-01

    Terbutaline sulphate was administered to 40 adult asthmatic patients via an ordinary metered-dose inhaler (MDI) or one connected to a 750-ml spacer in an open, randomized, crossover study. Spirometry was obtained before the start of the study and again after four weeks of treatment with each inhaler. The patients recorded on a diary card the severity of their asthma symptoms and the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) in the morning before and after drug administration and in the evening. Preinhalation spirometric values were higher after four weeks with the 750-ml spacer than at the start of the study (P less than or equal to 0.05). Daily morning and evening PEFR values were higher after use of the 750-ml spacer than after use of the ordinary MDI (P less than 0.05). Daily symptom scores were generally low. A significantly better effect (P less than or equal to 0.05) with the 750-ml spacer was achieved only in daytime dyspnea. The investigators conclude that the attachment of a 750-ml spacer to an ordinary metered-dose inhaler can improve the efficacy of terbutaline sulphate in the long-term treatment of asthma. PMID:3698068

  19. New titanium spacer for cervical laminoplasty: initial clinical experience. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Tani, Satoshi; Suetsua, Futoshi; Mizuno, Junichi; Uchikado, Hisaaki; Nagashima, Hiroyasu; Akiyama, Masahiko; Isoshima, Akira; Ohashi, Hiroki; Hirano, Yoshitaka; Abe, Toshiaki

    2010-01-01

    Many commercially available hydroxyapatite (HA) spacers for cervical laminoplasty have been introduced but have disadvantages such as lack of plasticity, easy cracking, and occasional difficulty in fixation by sutures. Here we present the short-term results of a newly designed titanium spacer (Laminoplasty Basket) in open-door cervical laminoplasty, and evaluated clinically and radiologically. The titanium box-shaped spacer with two arms for fixation was easily inserted and fixed into the laminoplasty space with 4-mm or 5-mm length screws after the posterior cervical arch was repositioned for the canal expansion. Twenty-one patients with cervical myelopathy due to spondylosis or ossification of the longitudinal ligament or developmental narrow canal observed for more than 6 months postoperatively were enrolled in this study. The neurological condition of these patients improved from 9.4 points on the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale preoperatively to 13.5 points at 6 months after surgery. Postoperative radiological evaluation showed no laminar closure or implant failure and cervical spine curvature was maintained. These results seemed to have no significant difference compared with those using HA spacers. This titanium spacer is a potential substitute for conventional HA or other similar devices in cervical laminoplasty. PMID:21206196

  20. Detection and characterization of spacer integration intermediates in type I-E CRISPR-Cas system.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Zihni; Hermanns, Veronica; Wurm, Reinhild; Wagner, Rolf; Pul, Ümit

    2014-07-01

    The adaptation against foreign nucleic acids by the CRISPR-Cas system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and CRISPR-associated proteins) depends on the insertion of foreign nucleic acid-derived sequences into the CRISPR array as novel spacers by still unknown mechanism. We identified and characterized in Escherichia coli intermediate states of spacer integration and mapped the integration site at the chromosomal CRISPR array in vivo. The results show that the insertion of new spacers occurs by site-specific nicking at both strands of the leader proximal repeat in a staggered way and is accompanied by joining of the resulting 5'-ends of the repeat strands with the 3'-ends of the incoming spacer. This concerted cleavage-ligation reaction depends on the metal-binding center of Cas1 protein and requires the presence of Cas2. By acquisition assays using plasmid-located CRISPR array with mutated repeat sequences, we demonstrate that the primary sequence of the first repeat is crucial for cleavage of the CRISPR array and the ligation of new spacer DNA.

  1. Context and repetition in word learning

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Jessica S.

    2013-01-01

    Young children learn words from a variety of situations, including shared storybook reading. A recent study by Horst et al. (2011a) demonstrates that children learned more new words during shared storybook reading if they were read the same stories repeatedly than if they were read different stories that had the same number of target words. The current paper reviews this study and further examines the effect of contextual repetition on children's word learning in both shared storybook reading and other situations, including fast mapping by mutual exclusivity. The studies reviewed here suggest that the same cognitive mechanisms support word learning in a variety of situations. Both practical considerations for experimental design and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:23580347

  2. Context and repetition in word learning.

    PubMed

    Horst, Jessica S

    2013-01-01

    Young children learn words from a variety of situations, including shared storybook reading. A recent study by Horst et al. (2011a) demonstrates that children learned more new words during shared storybook reading if they were read the same stories repeatedly than if they were read different stories that had the same number of target words. The current paper reviews this study and further examines the effect of contextual repetition on children's word learning in both shared storybook reading and other situations, including fast mapping by mutual exclusivity. The studies reviewed here suggest that the same cognitive mechanisms support word learning in a variety of situations. Both practical considerations for experimental design and directions for future research are discussed.

  3. A review of neuroimaging findings in repetitive brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Koerte, Inga K; Lin, Alexander P; Willems, Anna; Muehlmann, Marc; Hufschmidt, Jakob; Coleman, Michael J; Green, Isobel; Liao, Huijun; Tate, David F; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Pasternak, Ofer; Bouix, Sylvain; Rathi, Yogesh; Bigler, Erin D; Stern, Robert A; Shenton, Martha E

    2015-05-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease confirmed at postmortem. Those at highest risk are professional athletes who participate in contact sports and military personnel who are exposed to repetitive blast events. All neuropathologically confirmed CTE cases, to date, have had a history of repetitive head impacts. This suggests that repetitive head impacts may be necessary for the initiation of the pathogenetic cascade that, in some cases, leads to CTE. Importantly, while all CTE appears to result from repetitive brain trauma, not all repetitive brain trauma results in CTE. Magnetic resonance imaging has great potential for understanding better the underlying mechanisms of repetitive brain trauma. In this review, we provide an overview of advanced imaging techniques currently used to investigate brain anomalies. We also provide an overview of neuroimaging findings in those exposed to repetitive head impacts in the acute/subacute and chronic phase of injury and in more neurodegenerative phases of injury, as well as in military personnel exposed to repetitive head impacts. Finally, we discuss future directions for research that will likely lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms separating those who recover from repetitive brain trauma vs. those who go on to develop CTE. PMID:25904047

  4. A review of neuroimaging findings in repetitive brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Koerte, Inga K; Lin, Alexander P; Willems, Anna; Muehlmann, Marc; Hufschmidt, Jakob; Coleman, Michael J; Green, Isobel; Liao, Huijun; Tate, David F; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Pasternak, Ofer; Bouix, Sylvain; Rathi, Yogesh; Bigler, Erin D; Stern, Robert A; Shenton, Martha E

    2015-05-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease confirmed at postmortem. Those at highest risk are professional athletes who participate in contact sports and military personnel who are exposed to repetitive blast events. All neuropathologically confirmed CTE cases, to date, have had a history of repetitive head impacts. This suggests that repetitive head impacts may be necessary for the initiation of the pathogenetic cascade that, in some cases, leads to CTE. Importantly, while all CTE appears to result from repetitive brain trauma, not all repetitive brain trauma results in CTE. Magnetic resonance imaging has great potential for understanding better the underlying mechanisms of repetitive brain trauma. In this review, we provide an overview of advanced imaging techniques currently used to investigate brain anomalies. We also provide an overview of neuroimaging findings in those exposed to repetitive head impacts in the acute/subacute and chronic phase of injury and in more neurodegenerative phases of injury, as well as in military personnel exposed to repetitive head impacts. Finally, we discuss future directions for research that will likely lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms separating those who recover from repetitive brain trauma vs. those who go on to develop CTE.

  5. The use of repetition suppression paradigms in developmental cognitive neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Nordt, Marisa; Hoehl, Stefanie; Weigelt, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Repetition suppression paradigms allow a more detailed look at brain functioning than classical paradigms and have been applied vigorously in adult cognitive neuroscience. These paradigms are well suited for studies in the field of developmental cognitive neuroscience as they can be applied without collecting a behavioral response and across all age groups. Furthermore, repetition suppression paradigms can be employed in various neuroscience techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG). In the present article we review studies using repetition suppression paradigms in developmental cognitive neuroscience covering the age range from infancy to adolescence. Our first goal is to point out characteristics of developmental repetition suppression effects. In doing so, we discuss the relationship of the direction of repetition effects (suppression vs enhancement) with developmental factors, and address the question how the direction of repetition effects might be related to looking-time effects in behavioral infant paradigms, the most prominently used behavioral measure in infant research. To highlight the potential of repetition suppression paradigms, our second goal is to provide an overview on the insights recently obtained by applying repetition paradigms in neurodevelopmental studies, including research on children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We conclude that repetition suppression paradigms are valuable tools for investigating neurodevelopmental processes, while at the same time we highlight the necessity for further studies that disentangle methodological and developmental factors.

  6. Interference-driven spacer acquisition is dominant over naive and primed adaptation in a native CRISPR–Cas system

    PubMed Central

    Staals, Raymond H. J.; Jackson, Simon A.; Biswas, Ambarish; Brouns, Stan J. J.; Brown, Chris M.; Fineran, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas systems provide bacteria with adaptive immunity against foreign nucleic acids by acquiring short, invader-derived sequences called spacers. Here, we use high-throughput sequencing to analyse millions of spacer acquisition events in wild-type populations of Pectobacterium atrosepticum. Plasmids not previously encountered, or plasmids that had escaped CRISPR–Cas targeting via point mutation, are used to provoke naive or primed spacer acquisition, respectively. The origin, location and order of spacer acquisition show that spacer selection through priming initiates near the site of CRISPR–Cas recognition (the protospacer), but on the displaced strand, and is consistent with 3′–5′ translocation of the Cas1:Cas2-3 acquisition machinery. Newly acquired spacers determine the location and strand specificity of subsequent spacers and demonstrate that interference-driven spacer acquisition (‘targeted acquisition') is a major contributor to adaptation in type I-F CRISPR–Cas systems. Finally, we show that acquisition of self-targeting spacers is occurring at a constant rate in wild-type cells and can be triggered by foreign DNA with similarity to the bacterial chromosome. PMID:27694798

  7. Exchange coupling in hard/soft-magnetic multilayer films with non-magnetic spacer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, W. B.; Liu, W.; Gong, W. J.; Liu, X. H.; Guo, S.; Yang, F.; Wang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2012-04-01

    The exchange coupling in textured HM/NM/α-Fe/NM/HM multilayer films (HM = NdFeB or PrFeB hard magnetic layers; NM = nonmagnetic Mo, Cu, and Cr layer) is shown to be indirect and long-range. The influences of thickness of NM spacer layer and HM layer, the material of HM phase and NM spacer layers, and the texture of HM layer, on the effective critical correlation length (Lexeff) and exchange-coupling between soft-magnetic (SM) and HM layers are investigated. A non-linear dependence of Lexeff on the thickness of NM spacer layer is observed. Magnetostatic interaction may lead to the observed non-linear dependence.

  8. Synthetically programmable nanoparticle superlattices using a hollow three-dimensional spacer approach

    SciTech Connect

    Auyeung, Evelyn; Cutler, Joshua I.; Macfarlane, Robert J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Wu, Jinsong; Liu, George; Zhang, Ke; Osberg, Kyle D.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2013-04-08

    Crystalline nanoparticle arrays and superlattices with well-defined geometries can be synthesized by using appropriate electrostatic, hydrogen-bonding or biological recognition interactions. Although superlattices with many distinct geometries can be produced using these approaches, the library of achievable lattices could be increased by developing a strategy that allows some of the nanoparticles within a binary lattice to be replaced with 'spacer' entities that are constructed to mimic the behaviour of the nanoparticles they replace, even though they do not contain an inorganic core. The inclusion of these spacer entities within a known binary superlattice would effectively delete one set of nanoparticles without affecting the positions of the other set. Here, we show how hollow DNA nanostructures can be used as 'three-dimensional spacers' within nanoparticle superlattices assembled through programmable DNA interactions. We show that this strategy can be used to form superlattices with five distinct symmetries, including one that has never before been observed in any crystalline material.

  9. AA stacking, tribological and electronic properties of double-layer graphene with krypton spacer.

    PubMed

    Popov, Andrey M; Lebedeva, Irina V; Knizhnik, Andrey A; Lozovik, Yurii E; Potapkin, Boris V; Poklonski, Nikolai A; Siahlo, Andrei I; Vyrko, Sergey A

    2013-10-21

    Structural, energetic, and tribological characteristics of double-layer graphene with commensurate and incommensurate krypton spacers of nearly monolayer coverage are studied within the van der Waals-corrected density functional theory. It is shown that when the spacer is in the commensurate phase, the graphene layers have the AA stacking. For this phase, the barriers to relative in-plane translational and rotational motion and the shear mode frequency of the graphene layers are calculated. For the incommensurate phase, both of the barriers are found to be negligibly small. A considerable change of tunneling conductance between the graphene layers separated by the commensurate krypton spacer at their relative subangstrom displacement is revealed by the use of the Bardeen method. The possibility of nanoelectromechanical systems based on the studied tribological and electronic properties of the considered heterostructures is discussed.

  10. Rotor bore and turbine rotor wheel/spacer heat exchange flow circuit

    DOEpatents

    Caruso, Philip M.; Eldrid, Sacheverel Quentin; Ladhani, Azad A.; DeMania, Alan Richard; Palmer, Gene David; Wilson, Ian David; Rathbun, Lisa Shirley; Akin, Robert Craig

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine having closed-circuit steam-cooling passages about the rim of the rotor during steady-state operation, compressor discharge air is supplied to the rotor bore for passage radially outwardly into the wheel space cavities between the wheels and spacers. Communicating slots and channels in the spacers and wheels at circumferentially spaced positions enable egress of the compressor discharge air into the hot gas flow path. At turbine startup, cooling air flows through the closed-circuit steam passages to cool the outer rim of the rotor while compressor discharge air pre-warms the wheels and spacers. At steady-state, cooling steam is supplied in the closed-circuit steam-cooling passages and compressor discharge air is supplied through the bore and into the wheel space cavities to cool the rotor.

  11. Custom Anatomical 3D Spacer for Temporomandibular Joint Resection and Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Green, John Marshall; Lawson, Sarah T; Liacouras, Peter C; Wise, Edward M; Gentile, Michael A; Grant, Gerald Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Two cases are presented using a two-stage approach and a custom antibiotic spacer placement. Temporomandibular reconstruction can be very demanding and accomplished with a variety of methods in preparation of a total joint and ramus reconstruction with total joint prostheses (TMJ Concepts, Ventura, CA). Three-dimensional reconstructions from diagnostic computed tomography were used to establish a virtually planned resection which included the entire condyle-ramus complex. From these data, digital designs were used to manufacture molds to facilitate intraoperative fabrication of precise custom anatomic spacers from rapidly setting antibiotic-impregnated polymethyl methacrylate. Molds were manufactured using vat polymerization (stereolithography) with a photopolymer in the first case and powder bed fusion (electron beam melting) with Ti6AL4V for the second. Surgical methodology and the use of molds for intraoperative spacer fabrication for each case are discussed. PMID:26889353

  12. Necessity of the spacer peptide between CA and NC in the Rous sarcoma virus gag protein.

    PubMed

    Craven, R C; Leure-duPree, A E; Erdie, C R; Wilson, C B; Wills, J W

    1993-10-01

    A mutant of Rous sarcoma virus was constructed in which the nine amino acids that separate the CA and NC sequences in the Gag protein were deleted. The spacer peptide deletion mutant produced particles containing the normal complement of viral RNA and all of the viral proteins, including reverse transcriptase. Though electron microscopy revealed particles of normal morphology, the particles were noninfectious. The normally slow maturation of the CA protein, which involves cleavage of the spacer peptide from the carboxy terminus, was bypassed in this mutant, and the association between CA and the internal components of the core appears to have been disrupted. The results suggest that the spacer peptide has an essential role in directing folding and/or oligomerization of the CA subunits within the capsid structure.

  13. Stable inverted small molecular organic solar cells using a p-doped optical spacer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Seo, Ji-Won; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    We report inverted small molecular organic solar cells using a doped window layer as an optical spacer. The optical spacer was used to shift the optical field distribution inside the active layers, generating more charge carriers from sunlight. In this report, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)-benzidine (MeO-TPD) was doped with 2,2-(perfluoronaphthalene-2,6-diylidene)dimalononitrile (F6-TCNNQ), a p-type dopant material. P-doped MeO-TPD was adopted as an optical spacer because it has a large energy band gap, and its conductivity can be increased by several orders of magnitude through a doping process. As a result, a power conversion efficiency of 4.15% was achieved with the doped window layer of optimized thickness. Lastly, we present significantly improved stability of the inverted devices with the MeO-TPD layer. PMID:25407588

  14. First complete genome sequence of a capsicum chlorosis tospovirus isolate from Australia with an unusually large S RNA intergenic region.

    PubMed

    Widana Gamage, Shirani; Persley, Denis M; Higgins, Colleen M; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2015-03-01

    The first complete genome sequence of capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) from Australia was determined using a combination of Illumina HiSeq RNA and Sanger sequencing technologies. Australian CaCV had a tripartite genome structure like other CaCV isolates. The large (L) RNA was 8913 nucleotides (nt) in length and contained a single open reading frame (ORF) of 8634 nt encoding a predicted RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) in the viral-complementary (vc) sense. The medium (M) and small (S) RNA segments were 4846 and 3944 nt in length, respectively, each containing two non-overlapping ORFs in ambisense orientation, separated by intergenic regions (IGR). The M segment contained ORFs encoding the predicted non-structural movement protein (NSm; 927 nt) and precursor of glycoproteins (GP; 3366 nt) in the viral sense (v) and vc strand, respectively, separated by a 449-nt IGR. The S segment coded for the predicted nucleocapsid (N) protein (828 nt) and non-structural suppressor of silencing protein (NSs; 1320 nt) in the vc and v strand, respectively. The S RNA contained an IGR of 1663 nt, being the largest IGR of all CaCV isolates sequenced so far. Comparison of the Australian CaCV genome with complete CaCV genome sequences from other geographic regions showed highest sequence identity with a Taiwanese isolate. Genome sequence comparisons and phylogeny of all available CaCV isolates provided evidence for at least two highly diverged groups of CaCV isolates that may warrant re-classification of AIT-Thailand and CP-China isolates as unique tospoviruses, separate from CaCV.

  15. Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs Mediate the Human Chondrocyte Inflammatory Response and Are Differentially Expressed in Osteoarthritis Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Mark J.; Philp, Ashleigh M.; Heward, James A.; Roux, Benoit T.; Walsh, David A.; Davis, Edward T.; Lindsay, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), including long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs), antisense RNAs, and pseudogenes, associated with the inflammatory response in human primary osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes and to explore their expression and function in OA. Methods OA cartilage was obtained from patients with hip or knee OA following joint replacement surgery. Non‐OA cartilage was obtained from postmortem donors and patients with fracture of the neck of the femur. Primary OA chondrocytes were isolated by collagenase digestion. LncRNA expression analysis was performed by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) and quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Modulation of lncRNA chondrocyte expression was achieved using LNA longRNA GapmeRs (Exiqon). Cytokine production was measured with Luminex. Results RNAseq identified 983 lncRNAs in primary human hip OA chondrocytes, 183 of which had not previously been identified. Following interleukin‐1β (IL‐1β) stimulation, we identified 125 lincRNAs that were differentially expressed. The lincRNA p50‐associated cyclooxygenase 2–extragenic RNA (PACER) and 2 novel chondrocyte inflammation–associated lincRNAs (CILinc01 and CILinc02) were differentially expressed in both knee and hip OA cartilage compared to non‐OA cartilage. In primary OA chondrocytes, these lincRNAs were rapidly and transiently induced in response to multiple proinflammatory cytokines. Knockdown of CILinc01 and CILinc02 expression in human chondrocytes significantly enhanced the IL‐1–stimulated secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusion The inflammatory response in human OA chondrocytes is associated with widespread changes in the profile of lncRNAs, including PACER, CILinc01, and CILinc02. Differential expression of CILinc01 and CIinc02 in hip and knee OA cartilage, and their role in modulating cytokine production during the chondrocyte inflammatory response, suggest that they may play an important role

  16. Identification of Aedes aegypti Long Intergenic Non-coding RNAs and Their Association with Wolbachia and Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Etebari, Kayvan; Asad, Sultan; Zhang, Guangmei; Asgari, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are appearing as an important class of regulatory RNAs with a variety of biological functions. The aim of this study was to identify the lincRNA profile in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and evaluate their potential role in host-pathogen interaction. The majority of previous RNA-Seq transcriptome studies in Ae. aegypti have focused on the expression pattern of annotated protein coding genes under different biological conditions. Here, we used 35 publically available RNA-Seq datasets with relatively high depth to screen the Ae. aegypti genome for lincRNA discovery. This led to the identification of 3,482 putative lincRNAs. These lincRNA genes displayed a slightly lower GC content and shorter transcript lengths compared to protein-encoding genes. Ae. aegypti lincRNAs also demonstrate low evolutionary sequence conservation even among closely related species such as Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles gambiae. We examined their expression in dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and Wolbachia infected and non-infected adult mosquitoes and Aa20 cells. The results revealed that DENV-2 infection increased the abundance of a number of host lincRNAs, from which some suppress viral replication in mosquito cells. RNAi-mediated silencing of lincRNA_1317 led to enhancement in viral replication, which possibly indicates its potential involvement in the host anti-viral defense. A number of lincRNAs were also differentially expressed in Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes. The results will facilitate future studies to unravel the function of lncRNAs in insects and may prove to be beneficial in developing new ways to control vectors or inhibit replication of viruses in them. PMID:27760142

  17. Increased expression of long intergenic non-coding RNA LINC00152 in gastric cancer and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Pang, Qianqian; Ge, Jiaxin; Shao, Yongfu; Sun, Weiliang; Song, Haojun; Xia, Tian; Xiao, Bingxiu; Guo, Junming

    2014-06-01

    It has been known that differential expression of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) plays critical roles in carcinogenesis. However, the significance of lncRNA, especially long intergenic ncRNA (lincRNA, the main type of lncRNA family), in the diagnosis of gastric cancer is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the expression level of LINC00152, a newfound lincRNA, in gastric carcinoma and its clinical association. The expression of LINC00152 in 71 pairs of tumorous and adjacent normal tissues from patients with gastric cancer was detected by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. And then, the potential associations between its level in gastric cancer tissue and the clinicopathological features were analyzed. Finally, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed for differentiating patients with gastric cancer from patients with benign gastric diseases. The results showed that the expression level of LINC00152 in gastric carcinoma was significantly increased, compared with matched normal tissue (P=0.045) and normal mucosa from health control (P=0.004), respectively. Levels of LINC00152 in gastric cancer cell lines, BGC-823, MGC-803, and SGC-7901, were significantly higher than those in human normal gastric epithelial cell line GES-1. In addition, high expression of LINC00152 was correlated with invasion (P=0.042). LINC00152 levels in gastric juice from patients with gastric cancer were further found significantly higher than those from normal controls (P=0.002). Moreover, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was up to 0.645 (95 % CI=0.559-0.740, P=0.003). This study highlights that lincRNA LINC00152 might be a novel biomarker for predicting gastric cancer.

  18. Concerted Actions of a Thermo-labile Regulator and a Unique Intergenic RNA Thermosensor Control Yersinia Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kortmann, Jens; Seekircher, Stephanie; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Berger, Evelin; Pisano, Fabio; Thiermann, Tanja; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Narberhaus, Franz; Dersch, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Expression of all Yersinia pathogenicity factors encoded on the virulence plasmid, including the yop effector and the ysc type III secretion genes, is controlled by the transcriptional activator LcrF in response to temperature. Here, we show that a protein- and RNA-dependent hierarchy of thermosensors induce LcrF synthesis at body temperature. Thermally regulated transcription of lcrF is modest and mediated by the thermo-sensitive modulator YmoA, which represses transcription from a single promoter located far upstream of the yscW-lcrF operon at moderate temperatures. The transcriptional response is complemented by a second layer of temperature-control induced by a unique cis-acting RNA element located within the intergenic region of the yscW-lcrF transcript. Structure probing demonstrated that this region forms a secondary structure composed of two stemloops at 25°C. The second hairpin sequesters the lcrF ribosomal binding site by a stretch of four uracils. Opening of this structure was favored at 37°C and permitted ribosome binding at host body temperature. Our study further provides experimental evidence for the biological relevance of an RNA thermometer in an animal model. Following oral infections in mice, we found that two different Y. pseudotuberculosis patient isolates expressing a stabilized thermometer variant were strongly reduced in their ability to disseminate into the Peyer's patches, liver and spleen and have fully lost their lethality. Intriguingly, Yersinia strains with a destabilized version of the thermosensor were attenuated or exhibited a similar, but not a higher mortality. This illustrates that the RNA thermometer is the decisive control element providing just the appropriate amounts of LcrF protein for optimal infection efficiency. PMID:22359501

  19. Procedures for Generating CRISPR Mutants with Novel Spacers Acquired from Viruses or Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Marie-Ève; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Moineau, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems provide immunity in bacteria and archaea against nucleic acids in the form of viral genomes and plasmids, and influence their coevolution. The first main step of CRISPR-Cas activity is the immune adaptation through spacer(s) acquisition into an active CRISPR locus. This step is also mandatory for the final stage of CRISPR-Cas activity, namely interference. This chapter describes general procedures for studying the CRISPR adaptation step, accomplished by producing bacteriophage-insensitive mutants (BIMs) or plasmid-interfering mutants (PIMs) using various spacer acquisition analyses and experiments. Since each bacterial or archaeal species (and even strain) needs specific conditions to optimize the acquisition process, the protocols described below should be thought of as general guidelines and may not be applicable universally, without modification. Because Streptococcus thermophilus was used as the model system in the first published study on novel spacer acquisition and in many studies ever since, the protocols in this chapter describe specific conditions, media, and buffers that have been used with this microorganism. Details for other species will be given when possible, but readers should first evaluate the best growth and storage conditions for each bacterium-foreign element pair (named the procedure settings) and bear in mind the specificity and variability of CRISPR-Cas types and subtypes. Also, we suggest to be mindful of the fact that some CRISPR-Cas systems are not "naturally" active in terms of the ability to acquire novel CRISPR spacers, and that some systems may require specific conditions to induce the CRISPR-Cas activity for spacer acquisition.

  20. Flunisolide hydrofluoroalkane with integrated spacer for treating asthma: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Berger, William E; Tashkin, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    Flunisolide hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) with integrated spacer is the most recent reformulated inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) for asthma available in the United States. It is the only product that combines a corticosteroid extrafine aerosol with a built-in spacer. The potential clinical benefit of the flunisolide HFA formulation and its integrated spacer for treating persistent asthma was assessed through a comprehensive review of the published literature and data from the past 10 years focusing on (1) flunisolide, the molecule, and the impact of the HFA reformulation; (2) updated information on the anti-inflammatory response to flunisolide HFA, particularly in the distal airways; and (3) the usefulness of an integrated spacer. Flunisolide HFA was found effective and safe in clinical studies and comparable with the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) formulation, but at about one-third the dose of flunisolide CFC, likely reflecting both the device and the particle size of the reformulated product. Compared with the CFC formulation, the extrafine aerosol and smaller particle size of flunisolide HFA substantially increased pulmonary deposition and decreased oropharyngeal deposition. The integrated spacer further enhanced the pulmonary/oropharyngeal deposition ratio. Examination of lung biopsy specimens indicated a favorable anti-inflammatory response to flunisolide HFA in peripheral airways. Pediatric studies showed no significant effects on growth. The data indicate that flunisolide HFA is a safe and effective maintenance therapy for asthma patients. The integrated spacer may provide an added advantage for patients, especially those who may be more likely to experience adverse effects of ICSs, both local and systemic, including children susceptible to adverse effects on growth. PMID:25635610

  1. Flunisolide hydrofluoroalkane with integrated spacer for treating asthma: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Berger, William E; Tashkin, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    Flunisolide hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) with integrated spacer is the most recent reformulated inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) for asthma available in the United States. It is the only product that combines a corticosteroid extrafine aerosol with a built-in spacer. The potential clinical benefit of the flunisolide HFA formulation and its integrated spacer for treating persistent asthma was assessed through a comprehensive review of the published literature and data from the past 10 years focusing on (1) flunisolide, the molecule, and the impact of the HFA reformulation; (2) updated information on the anti-inflammatory response to flunisolide HFA, particularly in the distal airways; and (3) the usefulness of an integrated spacer. Flunisolide HFA was found effective and safe in clinical studies and comparable with the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) formulation, but at about one-third the dose of flunisolide CFC, likely reflecting both the device and the particle size of the reformulated product. Compared with the CFC formulation, the extrafine aerosol and smaller particle size of flunisolide HFA substantially increased pulmonary deposition and decreased oropharyngeal deposition. The integrated spacer further enhanced the pulmonary/oropharyngeal deposition ratio. Examination of lung biopsy specimens indicated a favorable anti-inflammatory response to flunisolide HFA in peripheral airways. Pediatric studies showed no significant effects on growth. The data indicate that flunisolide HFA is a safe and effective maintenance therapy for asthma patients. The integrated spacer may provide an added advantage for patients, especially those who may be more likely to experience adverse effects of ICSs, both local and systemic, including children susceptible to adverse effects on growth.

  2. New clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat locus spacer pair typing method based on the newly incorporated spacer for Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Li, Peng; Xie, Jing; Yi, Shengjie; Yang, Chaojie; Wang, Jian; Sun, Jichao; Liu, Nan; Wang, Xu; Wu, Zhihao; Wang, Ligui; Hao, Rongzhang; Wang, Yong; Jia, Leili; Li, Kaiqin; Qiu, Shaofu; Song, Hongbin

    2014-08-01

    A clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) typing method has recently been developed and used for typing and subtyping of Salmonella spp., but it is complicated and labor intensive because it has to analyze all spacers in two CRISPR loci. Here, we developed a more convenient and efficient method, namely, CRISPR locus spacer pair typing (CLSPT), which only needs to analyze the two newly incorporated spacers adjoining the leader array in the two CRISPR loci. We analyzed a CRISPR array of 82 strains belonging to 21 Salmonella serovars isolated from humans in different areas of China by using this new method. We also retrieved the newly incorporated spacers in each CRISPR locus of 537 Salmonella isolates which have definite serotypes in the Pasteur Institute's CRISPR Database to evaluate this method. Our findings showed that this new CLSPT method presents a high level of consistency (kappa = 0.9872, Matthew's correlation coefficient = 0.9712) with the results of traditional serotyping, and thus, it can also be used to predict serotypes of Salmonella spp. Moreover, this new method has a considerable discriminatory power (discriminatory index [DI] = 0.8145), comparable to those of multilocus sequence typing (DI = 0.8088) and conventional CRISPR typing (DI = 0.8684). Because CLSPT only costs about $5 to $10 per isolate, it is a much cheaper and more attractive method for subtyping of Salmonella isolates. In conclusion, this new method will provide considerable advantages over other molecular subtyping methods, and it may become a valuable epidemiologic tool for the surveillance of Salmonella infections.

  3. Production Principles and Technological Development of Novel Woven Spacer Preforms and Integrated Stiffener Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torun, Ahmet R.; Mountasir, Adil; Hoffmann, Gerald; Cherif, Chokri

    2013-06-01

    3D textile preforms offer a high potential to increase mechanical properties of composites and/or decrease manufacturing costs. Within the scope of this study, production principles were developed for complex spacer preforms and integrated stiffeners. These principles were applied through technological further development of the well-known face-to-face and terry weaving techniques. Various woven preforms were produced with Glass fibre/Polypropylene (GF/PP) Commingled yarns, however, the technology is suitable for any type of reinforcement yarns. U-shaped woven spacer preform was consolidated into a sandwich composite component for lightweight applications.

  4. Preference of temporary restorations and spacers: a survey of Diplomates of the American Board of Endodontists.

    PubMed

    Vail, Mychel Macapagal; Steffel, Charles L

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to survey Diplomates of the American Board of Endodontists to determine their preferences in temporary restorations used during and following endodontic therapy and if cotton pellets are used as spacers. The survey asked which primary temporary material was used in anterior and posterior teeth to close access openings. Also, the endodontists were asked if they preferred a double seal and if they used cotton pellets as spacers. Eighty percent (507 of 603) of the surveys were returned. Cavit was the temporary restoration of choice for both anterior and posterior teeth, 48% and 54%, respectively. The majority of Diplomates, 83%, placed a cotton pellet beneath the temporary restorations.

  5. Heterogeneous diversity of spacers within CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats).

    PubMed

    He, Jiankui; Deem, Michael W

    2010-09-17

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in bacterial and archaeal DNA have recently been shown to be a new type of antiviral immune system in these organisms. We here study the diversity of spacers in CRISPR under selective pressure. We propose a population dynamics model that explains the biological observation that the leader-proximal end of CRISPR is more diversified and the leader-distal end of CRISPR is more conserved. This result is shown to be in agreement with recent experiments. Our results show that the CRISPR spacer structure is influenced by and provides a record of the viral challenges that bacteria face.

  6. Heterogeneous Diversity of Spacers within CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiankui; Deem, Michael W.

    2010-09-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in bacterial and archaeal DNA have recently been shown to be a new type of antiviral immune system in these organisms. We here study the diversity of spacers in CRISPR under selective pressure. We propose a population dynamics model that explains the biological observation that the leader-proximal end of CRISPR is more diversified and the leader-distal end of CRISPR is more conserved. This result is shown to be in agreement with recent experiments. Our results show that the CRISPR spacer structure is influenced by and provides a record of the viral challenges that bacteria face.

  7. Multilayer barrier films comprising nitrogen spacers between free-standing barrier layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstrom, Jimmy Erik

    The air sensitivity of organic electronic devices has delayed the broad commercialization of the printed "plastics" electronics technology. The vacuum deposition methods used to fabricate multi-layers which fulfill the encapsulation requirements for plastic electronic devices are complex and expensive. Fully printed "plastic" electronics requires the development of encapsulation architectures which comprise solution deposited barriers and/or low-cost free-standing barrier films based on polymers, e.g. poly ethylene terephthalate (PET). One way to reach this goal is the insertion of contaminant-free (e.g. pure N2) gas-phase spacers between free-standing barrier films in a multilayer structure. The spacers themselves do not exhibit any barrier properties (diffusion of gas permeants in a gas phase is orders of magnitude faster than in a solid), but they delay the attainment of steady state. The spacer also reduces the chemical potential gradient across downstream barrier layers during the transient regime, reducing permeation rate to the device. Furthermore, if sorption is not fully equilibrated and introduces a kinetic barrier to transport, the additional sorption and desorption steps needed for permeant to reach the device may also slow the steady-state permeation rate. Encapsulation architectures utilizing both single-matrix (without nitrogen spacers) and multiple-matrix structures (with nitrogen spacers) were fabricated in this study, including Russian Doll structures utilizing pairs of free-standing barrier films and epoxy seals separated by nitrogen spacers. This structure enables the use of low-cost epoxy to attach two or more free-standing barrier films to a substrate with improved barrier performance. The performance of various Russian Doll encapsulations was evaluated with the calcium thin film optical transmission test, showing improved performance of the Russian doll configuration relative to a non-nested barrier/spacer architecture, and demonstrating that

  8. Role of the conjugated spacer in the optimization of second-order nonlinear chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Moreno, Javier; Clays, Koen; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2009-08-01

    We investigate the role of the conjugated spacer in the optimization of the first hyperpolarizability of organic chromophores. We propose a novel strategy for the optimization of the first hyperpolarizability that is based on the variation of the degree of conjugation for the bridge that separates the donor and acceptors at the end of push-pull type chromophores. The correlation between the type of conjugated spacer and the experimental nonlinear performance of the chromophores is investigated and interpreted in the context of the quantum limits.

  9. The golden ratio of gait harmony: repetitive proportions of repetitive gait phases.

    PubMed

    Iosa, Marco; Fusco, Augusto; Marchetti, Fabio; Morone, Giovanni; Caltagirone, Carlo; Paolucci, Stefano; Peppe, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In nature, many physical and biological systems have structures showing harmonic properties. Some of them were found related to the irrational number φ known as the golden ratio that has important symmetric and harmonic properties. In this study, the spatiotemporal gait parameters of 25 healthy subjects were analyzed using a stereophotogrammetric system with 25 retroreflective markers located on their skin. The proportions of gait phases were compared with φ, the value of which is about 1.6180. The ratio between the entire gait cycle and stance phase resulted in 1.620 ± 0.058, that between stance and the swing phase was 1.629 ± 0.173, and that between swing and the double support phase was 1.684 ± 0.357. All these ratios did not differ significantly from each other (F = 0.870, P = 0.422, repeated measure analysis of variance) or from φ (P = 0.670, 0.820, 0.422, resp., t-tests). The repetitive gait phases of physiological walking were found in turn in repetitive proportions with each other, revealing an intrinsic harmonic structure. Harmony could be the key for facilitating the control of repetitive walking. Harmony is a powerful unifying factor between seemingly disparate fields of nature, including human gait.

  10. GRAPE - GIS Repetition Using Audio-Visual Repetition Units and its Leanring Effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederhuber, M.; Brugger, S.

    2011-09-01

    A new audio-visual learning medium has been developed at the Department of Environmental Sciences at ETH Zurich (Switzerland), for use in geographical information sciences (GIS) courses. This new medium, presented in the form of Repetition Units, allows students to review and consolidate the most important learning concepts on an individual basis. The new material consists of: a) a short enhanced podcast (recorded and spoken slide show) with a maximum duration of 5 minutes, which focuses on only one important aspect of a lecture's theme; b) one or two relevant exercises, covering different cognitive levels of learning, with a maximum duration of 10 minutes; and c), solutions for the exercises. During a pilot phase in 2010, six Repetition Units were produced by the lecturers. Twenty more Repetition Units will be produced by our students during the fall semester of 2011 and 2012. The project is accompanied by a 5-year study (2009 - 2013) that investigates learning success using the new material, focussing on the question, whether or not the new material help to consolidate and refresh basic GIS knowledge. It will be analysed based on longitudinal studies. Initial results indicate that the new medium helps to refresh knowledge as the test groups scored higher than the control group. These results are encouraging and suggest that the new material with its combination of short audio-visual podcasts and relevant exercises help to consolidate students' knowledge.

  11. Hole-transfer induced energy transfer in perylene diimide dyads with a donor-spacer-acceptor motif.

    PubMed

    Kölle, Patrick; Pugliesi, Igor; Langhals, Heinz; Wilcken, Roland; Esterbauer, Andreas J; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Riedle, Eberhard

    2015-10-14

    We investigate the photoinduced dynamics of perylene diimide dyads based on a donor-spacer-acceptor motif with polyyne spacers of varying length by pump-probe spectroscopy, time resolved fluorescence, chemical variation and quantum chemistry. While the dyads with pyridine based polyyne spacers undergo energy transfer with near-unity quantum efficiency, in the dyads with phenyl based polyyne spacers the energy transfer efficiency drops below 50%. This suggests the presence of a competing electron transfer process from the spacer to the energy donor as the excitation sink. Transient absorption spectra, however, reveal that the spacer actually mediates the energy transfer dynamics. The ground state bleach features of the polyyne spacers appear due to the electron transfer decay with the same time constant present in the rise of the ground state bleach and stimulated emission of the perylene energy acceptor. Although the electron transfer process initially quenches the fluorescence of the donor it does not inhibit energy transfer to the perylene energy acceptor. The transient signatures reveal that electron and energy transfer processes are sequential and indicate that the donor-spacer electron transfer state itself is responsible for the energy transfer. Through the introduction of a Dexter blocker unit into the spacer we can clearly exclude any through bond Dexter-type energy transfer. Ab initio calculations on the donor-spacer and the donor-spacer-acceptor systems reveal the existence of a bright charge transfer state that is close in energy to the locally excited state of the acceptor. Multipole-multipole interactions between the bright charge transfer state and the acceptor state enable the energy transfer. We term this mechanism coupled hole-transfer FRET. These dyads represent a first example that shows how electron transfer can be connected to energy transfer for use in novel photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices. PMID:26347443

  12. Early Grade Repetition and Inattention Associated with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coude, Francois X.; Mignot, Claire; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Munnich, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors analyze the occurrence of grade repetition and inattention in children diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Method: The participant group consisted of 310 patients with NF1 and a control group of 242 individuals. The number of grade repetitions for each participant during his or her time in elementary, middle, and…

  13. Pre-Lexical Disorders in Repetition Conduction Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidiropoulos, Kyriakos; de Bleser, Ria; Ackermann, Hermann; Preilowski, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    At the level of clinical speech/language evaluation, the repetition type of conduction aphasia is characterized by repetition difficulties concomitant with reduced short-term memory capacities, in the presence of fluent spontaneous speech as well as unimpaired naming and reading abilities. It is still unsettled which dysfunctions of the…

  14. Conversational Characteristics of Children with Fragile X Syndrome: Repetitive Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belser, Richard C.; Sudhalter, Vicki

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of the production of repetitive speech during conversations in 30 people with either fragile X syndrome, autistic disorder, or mental retardation not caused by fragile X found repetitive speech more prevalent among those with fragile X. Results support the hypothesis that such speech dysfluency reflects the effects of physiological…

  15. A Negative Effect of Repetition in Episodic Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Daniel J.; Mulligan, Neil W.

    2012-01-01

    One of the foundational principles of human memory is that repetition (i.e., being presented with a stimulus multiple times) improves recall. In the current study a group of participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once, a negative repetition effect. Such a…

  16. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  17. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  18. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  19. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  20. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  1. 10 CFR 61.21 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 61.21 Section 61.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.21 Elimination of repetition. In its application, the applicant may incorporate by...

  2. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  3. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  4. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  5. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  6. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  7. 10 CFR 61.21 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 61.21 Section 61.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.21 Elimination of repetition. In its application, the applicant may incorporate by...

  8. 10 CFR 61.21 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 61.21 Section 61.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.21 Elimination of repetition. In its application, the applicant may incorporate by...

  9. 10 CFR 61.21 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 61.21 Section 61.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.21 Elimination of repetition. In its application, the applicant may incorporate by...

  10. 10 CFR 61.21 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 61.21 Section 61.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.21 Elimination of repetition. In its application, the applicant may incorporate by...

  11. Varieties of Repetitive Behavior in Autism: Comparisons to Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodfish, James W.; Symons, Frank J.; Parker, Dawn E.; Lewis, Mark H.

    2000-01-01

    A study compared specific repetitive behaviors in 32 adults with autism with 34 controls with mental retardation. The occurrence of each behavior category, except dyskinesias, was higher in individuals with autism and they showed a greater number of topographies of stereotypy and compulsions. Repetitive behavior severity also predicated autism…

  12. Repetition Blindness: Out of Sight or Out of Mind?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alison L.; Harris, Catherine L.

    2004-01-01

    Does repetition blindness represent a failure of perception or of memory? In Experiment 1, participants viewed rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) sentences. When critical words (C1 and C2) were orthographically similar, C2 was frequently omitted from serial report; however, repetition priming for C2 on a postsentence lexical decision task was…

  13. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  14. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  15. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  16. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  17. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  18. Transgenerational effects of environmental enrichment on repetitive motor behavior development.

    PubMed

    Bechard, Allison R; Lewis, Mark H

    2016-07-01

    The favorable consequences of environmental enrichment (EE) on brain and behavior development are well documented. Much less is known, however, about transgenerational benefits of EE on non-enriched offspring. We explored whether transgenerational effects of EE might extend to the development of repetitive motor behaviors in deer mice. Repetitive motor behaviors are invariant patterns of movement that, across species, can be reduced by EE. We found that EE not only attenuated the development of repetitive behavior in dams, but also in their non-enriched offspring. Moreover, maternal behavior did not seem to mediate the transgenerational effect we found, although repetitive behavior was affected by reproductive experience. These data support a beneficial transgenerational effect of EE on repetitive behavior development and suggest a novel benefit of reproductive experience.

  19. Transgenerational effects of environmental enrichment on repetitive motor behavior development.

    PubMed

    Bechard, Allison R; Lewis, Mark H

    2016-07-01

    The favorable consequences of environmental enrichment (EE) on brain and behavior development are well documented. Much less is known, however, about transgenerational benefits of EE on non-enriched offspring. We explored whether transgenerational effects of EE might extend to the development of repetitive motor behaviors in deer mice. Repetitive motor behaviors are invariant patterns of movement that, across species, can be reduced by EE. We found that EE not only attenuated the development of repetitive behavior in dams, but also in their non-enriched offspring. Moreover, maternal behavior did not seem to mediate the transgenerational effect we found, although repetitive behavior was affected by reproductive experience. These data support a beneficial transgenerational effect of EE on repetitive behavior development and suggest a novel benefit of reproductive experience. PMID:27059336

  20. Repetition is easy: Why repeated referents have reduced prominence

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tuan Q.; Watson, Duane G.

    2011-01-01

    The repetition and predictability of a word in a conversation are two factors that are believed to affect whether or not it is emphasized: predictable, repeated words are less acoustically prominent than unpredictable, new words. However, because predictability and repetition are correlated, it is unclear whether speakers lengthen unpredictable words to facilitate comprehension or whether this lengthening is the result of difficulties in accessing a new (non-repeated) lexical item. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between acoustic prominence, repetition, and predictability in a description task. In Experiment 1, we find that repeated referents are produced with reduced prominence, even when these referents are unexpected. In Experiment 2, we find that predictability and repetition both have independent effects on duration and intensity. However, word duration was primarily determined by repetition, and intensity was primarily determined by predictability. The data are most consistent with an account in which multiple cognitive factors influence the acoustic prominence of a word. PMID:21156876

  1. Repetition and Emotive Communication in Music Versus Speech

    PubMed Central

    Margulis, Elizabeth Hellmuth

    2013-01-01

    Music and speech are often placed alongside one another as comparative cases. Their relative overlaps and disassociations have been well explored (e.g., Patel, 2008). But one key attribute distinguishing these two domains has often been overlooked: the greater preponderance of repetition in music in comparison to speech. Recent fMRI studies have shown that familiarity – achieved through repetition – is a critical component of emotional engagement with music (Pereira et al., 2011). If repetition is fundamental to emotional responses to music, and repetition is a key distinguisher between the domains of music and speech, then close examination of the phenomenon of repetition might help clarify the ways that music elicits emotion differently than speech. PMID:23576998

  2. Self-controlled KR schedules: does repetition order matter?

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jae T; Carter, Michael J; Hansen, Steve

    2013-08-01

    The impact of an experimenter-defined repetition schedule on the utility of a self-controlled KR context during motor skill acquisition was examined. Participants were required to learn three novel spatial-temporal tasks in either a random or blocked repetition schedule with or without the opportunity to control their KR. Results from the retention period showed that participants provided control over their KR schedule in a random repetition schedule demonstrated superior learning. However, performance measures from the transfer test showed that, independent of repetition schedule, learners provided the opportunity to control their KR schedule demonstrated superior transfer performance compared to their yoked counterparts. The dissociated impact of repetition schedule and self-controlled KR schedules on retention and transfer is discussed.

  3. The repetition of large-earthquake ruptures.

    PubMed Central

    Sieh, K

    1996-01-01

    This survey of well-documented repeated fault rupture confirms that some faults have exhibited a "characteristic" behavior during repeated large earthquakes--that is, the magnitude, distribution, and style of slip on the fault has repeated during two or more consecutive events. In two cases faults exhibit slip functions that vary little from earthquake to earthquake. In one other well-documented case, however, fault lengths contrast markedly for two consecutive ruptures, but the amount of offset at individual sites was similar. Adjacent individual patches, 10 km or more in length, failed singly during one event and in tandem during the other. More complex cases of repetition may also represent the failure of several distinct patches. The faults of the 1992 Landers earthquake provide an instructive example of such complexity. Together, these examples suggest that large earthquakes commonly result from the failure of one or more patches, each characterized by a slip function that is roughly invariant through consecutive earthquake cycles. The persistence of these slip-patches through two or more large earthquakes indicates that some quasi-invariant physical property controls the pattern and magnitude of slip. These data seem incompatible with theoretical models that produce slip distributions that are highly variable in consecutive large events. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 7 Fig. 9 PMID:11607662

  4. A chenopod extensin lacks repetitive tetrahydroxyproline blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiongbiao; Kieliszewski, M.; Lamport, D.T.A. )

    1990-02-01

    An extensin isolated from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) cell suspension cultures fulfills all criteria for membership of the extensin family save one, notably, lack of the diagnostic pentamer Ser-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp. However, sequence analysis of the major tryptic peptides shows that sugar beet extensin shares a motif in common with tomato extensin P1 but differs by the position of an insertion sequence (X) or (Y) which, in sugar beet, splits the tetrahydroxyproline block: Ser-Hyp-Hyp-(X)-Hyp-Hyp-Thr-Hyp-Val-Tyr-Lys, where (X) is (Val-His-Glu/Lys-Tyr-Pro), while in tomato the insertion sequence (Y) = (Val-Lys-Pro-Tyr-His-Pro) and, when it occurs, immediately follows the tetrahydroxyproline block: Ser-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-(Y)-Thr-Hyp-Val-Tyr-Lys. Based on these data were reinterpret three highly repetitive cDNA sequences, including nodulin N75 from soybean and wound-induced P33 of carrot, as extensins with split tetra(hydroxy)proline blocks.

  5. Understanding communicative actions: a repetitive TMS study.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Arjen; Noordzij, Matthijs L; Volman, Inge; Verhagen, Lennart; Overeem, Sebastiaan; van Elswijk, Gijs; Bloem, Bas; Hagoort, Peter; Toni, Ivan

    2014-02-01

    Despite the ambiguity inherent in human communication, people are remarkably efficient in establishing mutual understanding. Studying how people communicate in novel settings provides a window into the mechanisms supporting the human competence to rapidly generate and understand novel shared symbols, a fundamental property of human communication. Previous work indicates that the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) is involved when people understand the intended meaning of novel communicative actions. Here, we set out to test whether normal functioning of this cerebral structure is required for understanding novel communicative actions using inhibitory low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). A factorial experimental design contrasted two tightly matched stimulation sites (right pSTS vs left MT+, i.e., a contiguous homotopic task-relevant region) and tasks (a communicative task vs a visual tracking task that used the same sequences of stimuli). Overall task performance was not affected by rTMS, whereas changes in task performance over time were disrupted according to TMS site and task combinations. Namely, rTMS over pSTS led to a diminished ability to improve action understanding on the basis of recent communicative history, while rTMS over MT+ perturbed improvement in visual tracking over trials. These findings qualify the contributions of the right pSTS to human communicative abilities, showing that this region might be necessary for incorporating previous knowledge, accumulated during interactions with a communicative partner, to constrain the inferential process that leads to action understanding. PMID:24268321

  6. Development of a repetitive compact torus injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchi, Takumi; McColl, David; Dreval, Mykola; Rohollahi, Akbar; Xiao, Chijin; Hirose, Akira; Zushi, Hideki

    2013-10-01

    A system for Repetitive Compact Torus Injection (RCTI) has been developed at the University of Saskatchewan. CTI is a promising fuelling technology to directly fuel the core region of tokamak reactors. In addition to fuelling, CTI has also the potential for (a) optimization of density profile and thus bootstrap current and (b) momentum injection. For steady-state reactor operation, RCTI is necessary. The approach to RCTI is to charge a storage capacitor bank with a large capacitance and quickly charge the CT capacitor bank through a stack of integrated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). When the CT bank is fully charged, the IGBT stack will be turned off to isolate banks, and CT formation/acceleration sequence will start. After formation of each CT, the fast bank will be replenished and a new CT will be formed and accelerated. Circuits for the formation and the acceleration in University of Saskatchewan CT Injector (USCTI) have been modified. Three CT shots at 10 Hz or eight shots at 1.7 Hz have been achieved. This work has been sponsored by the CRC and NSERC, Canada.

  7. Repetitive Interrogation of 2-Level Quantum Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.

    2010-01-01

    Trapped ion clocks derive information from a reference atomic transition by repetitive interrogations of the same quantum system, either a single ion or ionized gas of many millions of ions. Atomic beam frequency standards, by contrast, measure reference atomic transitions in a continuously replenished "flow through" configuration where initial ensemble atomic coherence is zero. We will describe some issues and problems that can arise when atomic state selection and preparation of the quantum atomic system is not completed, that is, optical pumping has not fully relaxed the coherence and also not fully transferred atoms to the initial state. We present a simple two-level density matrix analysis showing how frequency shifts during the state-selection process can cause frequency shifts of the measured clock transition. Such considerations are very important when a low intensity lamp light source is used for state selection, where there is relatively weak relaxation and re-pumping of ions to an initial state and much weaker 'environmental' relaxation of the atomic coherence set-up in the atomic sample.

  8. Understanding communicative actions: a repetitive TMS study.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Arjen; Noordzij, Matthijs L; Volman, Inge; Verhagen, Lennart; Overeem, Sebastiaan; van Elswijk, Gijs; Bloem, Bas; Hagoort, Peter; Toni, Ivan

    2014-02-01

    Despite the ambiguity inherent in human communication, people are remarkably efficient in establishing mutual understanding. Studying how people communicate in novel settings provides a window into the mechanisms supporting the human competence to rapidly generate and understand novel shared symbols, a fundamental property of human communication. Previous work indicates that the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) is involved when people understand the intended meaning of novel communicative actions. Here, we set out to test whether normal functioning of this cerebral structure is required for understanding novel communicative actions using inhibitory low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). A factorial experimental design contrasted two tightly matched stimulation sites (right pSTS vs left MT+, i.e., a contiguous homotopic task-relevant region) and tasks (a communicative task vs a visual tracking task that used the same sequences of stimuli). Overall task performance was not affected by rTMS, whereas changes in task performance over time were disrupted according to TMS site and task combinations. Namely, rTMS over pSTS led to a diminished ability to improve action understanding on the basis of recent communicative history, while rTMS over MT+ perturbed improvement in visual tracking over trials. These findings qualify the contributions of the right pSTS to human communicative abilities, showing that this region might be necessary for incorporating previous knowledge, accumulated during interactions with a communicative partner, to constrain the inferential process that leads to action understanding.

  9. Can the Edinburgh Risk of Repetition Scale Predict Repetition of Deliberate Self-Poisoning in an Australian Clinical Setting?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Gregory Leigh; Clover, Kerrie Ann; Bryant, Jennifer Lynn; Whyte, Ian MacGregor

    2002-01-01

    Tests the ability of the Edinburgh Risk of Repetition Scale (ERRS) to identify patients at high risk for repeat deliberate self-poisoning (DSP). A statistically significant relationship between ERRS scores and repetition was observed; however, sensitivity and specificity were low. The ERRS had limited value in identifying patients at high risk of…

  10. Joint perpendicular anisotropy and strong interlayer exchange coupling in systems with thin vanadium spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Devolder, T. Le Goff, A.; Eimer, S.; Adam, J.-P.

    2015-04-28

    We study the influence of the insertion of a vanadium spacer layer between an FeCoB layer and a [Co/Ni] multilayer in an MgO substrate-based system mimicking the reference system of a perpendicular anisotropy magnetic tunnel junction. The anisotropy of the [Co/Ni] multilayer gradually improves with the vanadium thicknesses t, up to an optimized state for t = 8 Å, with little influence of the thermal annealing. The interlayer exchange coupling is ferromagnetic and very strong for t≤6 Å. It can be adjusted by thermal treatment at t = 8 Å from no coupling in the as-grown state to more than 2 mJ/m{sup 2} after 250 °C annealing. For this spacer thickness, the magnetic properties are consistent with the occurrence of a bcc (001) to an fcc (111) crystalline structure transition at the vanadium spacer. The remaining interlayer exchange coupling at t = 8 Å is still substantially higher than the one formerly obtained with a Tantalum spacer, which holds promise for further optimization of the reference layers of tunnel junctions meant for magnetic random access memories.

  11. Influence of the spacer on the inhibitory effect of different polycarbophil-protease inhibitor conjugates.

    PubMed

    Marschütz, M K; Veronese, F M; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2001-09-01

    Within the present study various polycarbophil (PCP)-serine protease inhibitor conjugates were synthesized and the influence of different spacers on their inhibitory efficacy was evaluated in vitro. Results demonstrated that 4.2+/-0.15 units (n=3; +/-SD) of alpha-chymotrypsin were inhibited by 50% utilizing 0.86% (w/v) of a PCP-tetramethylenediamine (TMDA)-chymostatin 20:1 conjugate. In contrast, only 0.6+/-0.05 units (n=3; +/-SD) of alpha-chymotrypsin were inhibited by a corresponding PCP-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-chymostatin conjugate. Inhibitory effects of PCP-TMDA-antipain and -elastatinal conjugates towards trypsin and elastase, respectively, were also significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of corresponding PCP-PEG-inhibitor conjugates. Hence, the great impact of the molecular size as well as the structure of the spacer on resulting polymer-inhibitor conjugates could be demonstrated. The small and rigid C4-spacer TMDA (molecular weight (MW) 161.1) was thereby shown to be highly advantageous over a long, hydrophilic and flexible PEG-diamine spacer (MW 3400). Results obtained should provide helpful basic knowledge for the development of mucoadhesive polymer-inhibitor conjugates used as auxiliary agents for the oral administration of peptide drugs.

  12. Plane wave scattering from a plasmonic nanowire array spacer-separated from a plasmonic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Arun; Trivedi, Rahul; Dhawan, Anuj

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical analysis of the electromagnetic response of a plasmonic nanowire-spacer-plasmonic film system. The analytical solution presented in this paper is a full-wave solution, which is used to compute the fields scattered by the plasmonic nanostructure system on illumination by a plane electromagnetic wave. The physical structure comprises of an array of plasmonic nanowires made of a plasmonic metal such as gold or silver placed over a plasmonic film of the same material and separated from it by a dielectric spacer such as silica or alumina. Such a nanostructure exhibits a spectrum that is extremely sensitive to various geometric and electromagnetic parameters such as spacer thickness and spacer refractive index, which makes it favourable for various sensing applications such as chemical and biological sensing, strain sensing, position sensing, vibration sensing, and thickness sensing. We report a comparison of our analytical solution with a numerical rigorous coupled wave analysis of the same structure with the plasmonic medium being treated as local in nature.

  13. Novel mutation in spacer region of POLG associated with ataxia neuropathy spectrum and gastroparesis.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Alionka; Glibert, Gerald; Dachy, Bernard; Dan, Bernard

    2012-09-25

    Clinical expression of POLG mutations is largely variable. We present a patient with a new mutation in spacer region of mitochondrial polymerase gamma protein (P765T). The clinical picture is characterized by the presence of sensory-ataxic neuropathy, ophthalmoplegia, dysarthria and gastroparesis, which had not been previously observed in ataxia neuropathy spectrum. PMID:22805437

  14. An evaluation of logic regression-based biomarker discovery across multiple intergenic regions for predicting host specificity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Shuai; Li, Qiaozhi; Yasui, Yutaka; Banting, Graham; Edge, Thomas A; Topp, Edward; McAllister, Tim A; Neumann, Norman F

    2016-10-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that E. coli appears to display some level of host adaptation and specificity. Recent studies in our laboratory support these findings as determined by logic regression modeling of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in intergenic regions (ITGRs). We sought to determine the degree of host-specific information encoded in various ITGRs across a library of animal E. coli isolates using both whole genome analysis and a targeted ITGR sequencing approach. Our findings demonstrated that ITGRs across the genome encode various degrees of host-specific information. Incorporating multiple ITGRs (i.e., concatenation) into logic regression model building resulted in greater host-specificity and sensitivity outcomes in biomarkers, but the overall level of polymorphism in an ITGR did not correlate with the degree of host-specificity encoded in the ITGR. This suggests that distinct SNPs in ITGRs may be more important in defining host-specificity than overall sequence variation, explaining why traditional unsupervised learning phylogenetic approaches may be less informative in terms of revealing host-specific information encoded in DNA sequence. In silico analysis of 80 candidate ITGRs from publically available E. coli genomes was performed as a tool for discovering highly host-specific ITGRs. In one ITGR (ydeR-yedS) we identified a SNP biomarker that was 98% specific for cattle and for which 92% of all E. coli isolates originating from cattle carried this unique biomarker. In the case of humans, a host-specific biomarker (98% specificity) was identified in the concatenated ITGR sequences of rcsD-ompC, ydeR-yedS, and rclR-ykgE, and for which 78% of E. coli originating from humans carried this biomarker. Interestingly, human-specific biomarkers were dominant in ITGRs regulating antibiotic resistance, whereas in cattle host-specific biomarkers were found in ITGRs involved in stress regulation. These data suggest that evolution towards host

  15. Hepatic Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs: High Promoter Conservation and Dynamic, Sex-Dependent Transcriptional Regulation by Growth Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Melia, Tisha; Hao, Pengying; Yilmaz, Feyza

    2015-01-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are increasingly recognized as key chromatin regulators, yet few studies have characterized lincRNAs in a single tissue under diverse conditions. Here, we analyzed 45 mouse liver RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data sets collected under diverse conditions to systematically characterize 4,961 liver lincRNAs, 59% of them novel, with regard to gene structures, species conservation, chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, and epigenetic states. To investigate the potential for functionality, we focused on the responses of the liver lincRNAs to growth hormone stimulation, which imparts clinically relevant sex differences to hepatic metabolism and liver disease susceptibility. Sex-biased expression characterized 247 liver lincRNAs, with many being nuclear RNA enriched and regulated by growth hormone. The sex-biased lincRNA genes are enriched for nearby and correspondingly sex-biased accessible chromatin regions, as well as sex-biased binding sites for growth hormone-regulated transcriptional activators (STAT5, hepatocyte nuclear factor 6 [HNF6], FOXA1, and FOXA2) and transcriptional repressors (CUX2 and BCL6). Repression of female-specific lincRNAs in male liver, but not that of male-specific lincRNAs in female liver, was associated with enrichment of H3K27me3-associated inactive states and poised (bivalent) enhancer states. Strikingly, we found that liver-specific lincRNA gene promoters are more highly species conserved and have a significantly higher frequency of proximal binding by liver transcription factors than liver-specific protein-coding gene promoters. Orthologs for many liver lincRNAs were identified in one or more supraprimates, including two rat lincRNAs showing the same growth hormone-regulated, sex-biased expression as their mouse counterparts. This integrative analysis of liver lincRNA chromatin states, transcription factor occupancy, and growth hormone regulation provides novel insights into the

  16. Genetic diversity, inter-gene pool introgression and nutritional quality of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Blair, Matthew W; González, Laura F; Kimani, Paul M; Butare, Louis

    2010-07-01

    The Great Lakes region of Central Africa is a major producer of common beans in Africa. The region is known for high population density and small average farm size. The common bean represents the most important legume crop of the region, grown on over a third of the cultivated land area, and the per capita consumption is among the highest in the world for the food crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity in a collection of 365 genotypes from the Great Lakes region of Central Africa, including a large group of landraces from Rwanda as well as varieties from primary centers of diversity and from neighboring countries of Central Africa, such as the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, using 30 fluorescently labeled microsatellite markers and automated allele detection. In addition, the landraces were evaluated for their seed iron and zinc concentration to determine if genetic diversity influenced nutritional quality. Principal coordinate and neighbor-joining analyses allowed the separation of the landraces into 132 Andean and 195 Mesoamerican (or Middle American) genotypes with 32 landraces and 6 varieties intermediate between the gene pools and representing inter-gene pool introgression in terms of seed characteristics and alleles. Genetic diversity and the number of alleles were high for the collection, reflecting the preference for a wide range of seed types in the region and no strong commercial class preference, although red, red mottled and brown seeded beans were common. Observed heterozygosity was also high and may be explained by the common practice of maintaining seed and plant mixtures, a coping strategy practiced by Central African farmers to reduce the effects of abiotic and biotic stresses. Finally, nutritional quality differed between the gene pools with respect to seed iron and zinc concentration, while genotypes from the intermediate group were notably high in both minerals. In conclusion, this study has shown that

  17. An evaluation of logic regression-based biomarker discovery across multiple intergenic regions for predicting host specificity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Shuai; Li, Qiaozhi; Yasui, Yutaka; Banting, Graham; Edge, Thomas A; Topp, Edward; McAllister, Tim A; Neumann, Norman F

    2016-10-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that E. coli appears to display some level of host adaptation and specificity. Recent studies in our laboratory support these findings as determined by logic regression modeling of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in intergenic regions (ITGRs). We sought to determine the degree of host-specific information encoded in various ITGRs across a library of animal E. coli isolates using both whole genome analysis and a targeted ITGR sequencing approach. Our findings demonstrated that ITGRs across the genome encode various degrees of host-specific information. Incorporating multiple ITGRs (i.e., concatenation) into logic regression model building resulted in greater host-specificity and sensitivity outcomes in biomarkers, but the overall level of polymorphism in an ITGR did not correlate with the degree of host-specificity encoded in the ITGR. This suggests that distinct SNPs in ITGRs may be more important in defining host-specificity than overall sequence variation, explaining why traditional unsupervised learning phylogenetic approaches may be less informative in terms of revealing host-specific information encoded in DNA sequence. In silico analysis of 80 candidate ITGRs from publically available E. coli genomes was performed as a tool for discovering highly host-specific ITGRs. In one ITGR (ydeR-yedS) we identified a SNP biomarker that was 98% specific for cattle and for which 92% of all E. coli isolates originating from cattle carried this unique biomarker. In the case of humans, a host-specific biomarker (98% specificity) was identified in the concatenated ITGR sequences of rcsD-ompC, ydeR-yedS, and rclR-ykgE, and for which 78% of E. coli originating from humans carried this biomarker. Interestingly, human-specific biomarkers were dominant in ITGRs regulating antibiotic resistance, whereas in cattle host-specific biomarkers were found in ITGRs involved in stress regulation. These data suggest that evolution towards host

  18. Velocity and turbulence distributions in wall subchannels of a road bundle in three axial planes downstream of a spacer grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehme, K.

    1987-03-01

    The velocity, turbulence, and temperature distributions in nuclear fuel element bundles of nuclear reactors were investigated. The mean velocity, the wall shear stresses, and the turbulence were measured in two wall subchannels of a rod bundle of four parallel rods, arranged in a rectangular channel, for three axial planes. A spacer grid was inserted in the rod bundle, for ratios between the distance spacer grid/measuring plane and the hydraulic diameter (LIDh) of 40.4, 32.8 and 16.9. The Reynolds number was 145,000. The results show that the distributions of the velocity and the turbulence are affected by the spacer grid, already for LIDh = 40.4. The effects of the spacer grid increase with decreasing distance to the spacer grid.

  19. Removed antibiotic-impregnated cement spacers in two-stage revision joint arthroplasty do not show biofilm formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Justin W; Guillot, Stacey J; Redick, Jan A; Browne, James A

    2012-12-01

    Use of antibiotic-impregnated spacers is common in the two-stage approach to treatment of periprosthetic joint infection despite the lack of information regarding in vivo performance of these implants. Antibiotic elution levels likely often fall below the minimal inhibitory concentration need to inhibit bacterial growth, raising concern that the spacers themselves may provide a potential attachment site for biofilm formation. Advanced microscopy was used in this study to evaluate the surface characteristics of antibiotic-eluting spacers collected at the time of prosthesis reimplantation from 6 patients undergoing two-stage treatment for an infected total joint arthroplasty. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal scanning microscopy of the removed spacers revealed modest fibrous matrix formation and inflammatory cells with no biofilm or bacteria detected. This study supports the continued use of antibiotic spacers in the treatment of periprosthetic joint infection.

  20. Hydrogel Spacer Prospective Multicenter Randomized Controlled Pivotal Trial: Dosimetric and Clinical Effects of Perirectal Spacer Application in Men Undergoing Prostate Image Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mariados, Neil; Sylvester, John; Shah, Dhiren; Karsh, Lawrence; Hudes, Richard; Beyer, David; Kurtzman, Steven; Bogart, Jeffrey; Hsi, R. Alex; Kos, Michael; Ellis, Rodney; Logsdon, Mark; Zimberg, Shawn; Forsythe, Kevin; Zhang, Hong; Soffen, Edward; Francke, Patrick; Mantz, Constantine; Rossi, Peter; DeWeese, Theodore; and others

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Perirectal spacing, whereby biomaterials are placed between the prostate and rectum, shows promise in reducing rectal dose during prostate cancer radiation therapy. A prospective multicenter randomized controlled pivotal trial was performed to assess outcomes following absorbable spacer (SpaceOAR system) implantation. Methods and Materials: Overall, 222 patients with clinical stage T1 or T2 prostate cancer underwent computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans for treatment planning, followed with fiducial marker placement, and were randomized to receive spacer injection or no injection (control). Patients received postprocedure CT and MRI planning scans and underwent image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). Spacer safety and impact on rectal irradiation, toxicity, and quality of life were assessed throughout 15 months. Results: Spacer application was rated as “easy” or “very easy” 98.7% of the time, with a 99% hydrogel placement success rate. Perirectal spaces were 12.6 ± 3.9 mm and 1.6 ± 2.0 mm in the spacer and control groups, respectively. There were no device-related adverse events, rectal perforations, serious bleeding, or infections within either group. Pre-to postspacer plans had a significant reduction in mean rectal V70 (12.4% to 3.3%, P<.0001). Overall acute rectal adverse event rates were similar between groups, with fewer spacer patients experiencing rectal pain (P=.02). A significant reduction in late (3-15 months) rectal toxicity severity in the spacer group was observed (P=.04), with a 2.0% and 7.0% late rectal toxicity incidence in the spacer and control groups, respectively. There was no late rectal toxicity greater than grade 1 in the spacer group. At 15 months 11.6% and 21.4% of spacer and control patients, respectively, experienced 10-point declines in bowel quality of life. MRI scans at 12 months verified spacer absorption. Conclusions: Spacer

  1. Skill learning in mirror reading: how repetition determines acquisition.

    PubMed

    Ofen-Noy, N; Dudai, Y; Karni, A

    2003-07-01

    Practice makes perfect, but the role of repetitions in skill learning is not yet fully understood. For example, given a similar number of trials on a given task, it is debated whether repeating and non-repeating items are learned by the same neural process. When one is given training with both types of items--does one learn two separate skills, or only one? Here we show, using a mirror reading task, that practice trials with trial-unique words, and practice trials with repeated words, count towards learning to a different degree. There was no interaction between the time-course of learning repeated and unique words even within the same individuals given mixed training. While repeated words were learned faster than unique words, the repetitions-dependent gains diminished with training beyond a small number of repetitions. Moreover, the gains in performance could not be accounted for solely by the number of repetitions, as assumed by power-law models of learning; rather, the passage of time was a critical factor. Finally, our results suggest that although both repeated and new words were learned by both declarative and procedural memory mechanisms, even a single repetition of specific words could lead to the establishment of a selective differential representation in memory. The results are compatible with the notion of a repetition-sensitive process, triggered by specific repeating events. This 'repetition counter' may be a critical trigger for the effective formation of procedural as well as some type of declarative memory.

  2. Functional analysis of developmentally regulated chromatin-hypersensitive domains carrying the alpha 1-fetoprotein gene promoter and the albumin/alpha 1-fetoprotein intergenic enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, D; Thomassin, H; Allard, D; Guertin, M; Hamel, D; Blaquière, M; Beauchemin, M; LaRue, H; Estable-Puig, M; Bélanger, L

    1993-01-01

    During liver development, the tandem alpha 1-fetoprotein (AFP)/albumin locus is triggered at the AFP end and then asymmetrically enhanced; this is followed by autonomous repression of the AFP-encoding gene. To understand this regulation better, we characterized the two early developmental stage-specific DNase I-hypersensitive (DH) sites so far identified in rat liver AFP/albumin chromatin: an intergenic DH-enhancer site and the AFP DH-promoter site. Mutation-transfection analyses circumscribed the DH-enhancer domain to a 200-bp DNA segment stringently conserved among species. Targeted mutations, DNA-protein-binding assays, and coexpression experiments pinpointed C/EBP as the major activatory component of the intergenic enhancer. Structure-function relationships at the AFP DH-promoter site defined a discrete glucocorticoid-regulated domain activated cooperatively by HNF1 and a highly specific AFP transcription factor, FTF, which binds to a steroid receptor recognition motif. The HNF1/FTF/DNA complex is deactivated by glucocorticoid receptors or by the ubiquitous factor NF1, which eliminates HNF1 by competition at an overlapping, high-affinity binding site. We propose that the HNF1-NF1 site might serve as a developmental switch to direct autonomous AFP gene repression in late liver development. We also conclude that the intergenic enhancer is driven by C/EBP alpha primarily to fulfill albumin gene activation functions at early developmental stages. Factor FTF seems to be the key regulator of AFP gene-specific functions in carcinoembryonic states. Images PMID:7680097

  3. Molecular instability in the COII-tRNA(Lys) intergenic region of the human mitochondrial genome: multiple origins of the 9-bp deletion and heteroplasmy for expanded repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, M G; Cook, C E; Miller, K W; Waring, M J; Hagelberg, E

    1998-01-01

    We have identified two individuals from Glasgow in Scotland who have a deletion of one of two copies of the intergenic 9-bp sequence motif CCCCCTCTA, located between the cytochrome oxidase II (COII) and lysine tRNA (tRNA(Lys)) genes of the human mitochondrial genome. Although this polymorphism is common in Africa and Asia, it has not been reported in Northern Europe. Analysis of the mitochondrial DNA control region sequences of these two individuals suggests that they belong to a lineage that originated independently of the previously characterized African and Asian 9-bp deleted lineages. Among the Scottish population we have also identified a maternal lineage of three generations exhibiting heteroplasmy for two, three and four copies of the CCCCCTCTA motif. Polymerase chain reaction amplification across the COII-tRNA(Lys) intergenic region of these individuals gives different ratios of the three product lengths that are dependent on the concentration of the DNA-binding dye crystal violet. To investigate whether changes in repeat number were generated de novo, we constructed clones containing known numbers of the CCCCCTCTA motif. In the presence of high concentrations of crystal violet we obtained two, three and four copies of this motif when the amplification template contained only four copies. Various DNA-binding drugs are known to stabilize bulged structures in DNA and contribute to the process of slipped-strand mispairing during DNA replication. These results suggest that the COII-tRNA(Lys) intergenic region is unstable owing to slipped-strand mispairing. Although sequences containing four copies of the CCCCCTCTA motif are less stable in vitro, we observed an increase in the proportion of mitochondrial genomes with four repeats between-a mother and a daughter in the heteroplasmic lineage. From this we conclude that drift in the germ-line lineage is a main factor in the maintenance or loss of heteroplasmy. PMID:9684291

  4. Repetition enhancement and memory effects for duration.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Martin; Thompson, James C

    2015-06-01

    A remarkable aspect of conscious perception is that moments carryover from one to the next, also known as temporal continuity. This ability is thus crucial for detecting regularities, such as in speech and music, and may rely on an accurate perception of time. Investigations of human time perception have detailed two electroencephalographic (EEG) components associated with timing, the contingent negative variation (CNV) and late positive component of timing (LPCt); however, the precise roles of these components in timing remain elusive. Recently, we demonstrated that the perception of duration is influenced by durations presented on prior trials, which we explained by the creation of an implicit memory standard that adapts to local changes in sequence presentation. Here, we turn to the neural basis of this effect. Human participants performed a temporal bisection task in which they were required to classify the duration of auditory stimuli into short and long duration categories; crucially, the presentation order was first-order counterbalanced, allowing us to measure the effect of each presented duration on the next. EEG recordings revealed that the CNV and LPCt signals both covaried with the duration presented on the current trial, with CNV predicting reaction time and LPCt predicting choice. Additionally, both signals covaried with the duration presented in the prior trial but in different ways, with the CNV amplitude reflecting the change in the memory standard and the LPCt reflecting decision uncertainty. Furthermore, we observed a repetition enhancement effect of duration only for the CNV, suggesting that this signal additionally indexes the similarity of successive durations. These findings demonstrate dissociable roles for the CNV and LPCt, and demonstrate that both signals are continuously updated on a trial-by-trial basis that reflects shifts in temporal decisions. PMID:25818689

  5. Epithelial topography for repetitive tooth formation

    PubMed Central

    Gaete, Marcia; Fons, Juan Manuel; Popa, Elena Mădălina; Chatzeli, Lemonia; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the formation of repetitive ectodermally derived organs such as mammary glands, lateral line and teeth, the tissue primordium iteratively initiates new structures. In the case of successional molar development, new teeth appear sequentially in the posterior region of the jaw from Sox2+ cells in association with the posterior aspect of a pre-existing tooth. The sequence of molar development is well known, however, the epithelial topography involved in the formation of a new tooth is unclear. Here, we have examined the morphology of the molar dental epithelium and its development at different stages in the mouse in vivo and in molar explants. Using regional lineage tracing we show that within the posterior tail of the first molar the primordium for the second and third molar are organized in a row, with the tail remaining in connection with the surface, where a furrow is observed. The morphology and Sox2 expression of the tail retains characteristics reminiscent of the earlier stages of tooth development, such that position along the A-P axes of the tail correlates with different temporal stages. Sox9, a stem/progenitor cell marker in other organs, is expressed mainly in the suprabasal epithelium complementary with Sox2 expression. This Sox2 and Sox9 expressing molar tail contains actively proliferating cells with mitosis following an apico-basal direction. Snail2, a transcription factor implicated in cell migration, is expressed at high levels in the tip of the molar tail while E-cadherin and laminin are decreased. In conclusion, our studies propose a model in which the epithelium of the molar tail can grow by posterior movement of epithelial cells followed by infolding and stratification involving a population of Sox2+/Sox9+ cells. PMID:26538639

  6. Repetition enhancement and memory effects for duration.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Martin; Thompson, James C

    2015-06-01

    A remarkable aspect of conscious perception is that moments carryover from one to the next, also known as temporal continuity. This ability is thus crucial for detecting regularities, such as in speech and music, and may rely on an accurate perception of time. Investigations of human time perception have detailed two electroencephalographic (EEG) components associated with timing, the contingent negative variation (CNV) and late positive component of timing (LPCt); however, the precise roles of these components in timing remain elusive. Recently, we demonstrated that the perception of duration is influenced by durations presented on prior trials, which we explained by the creation of an implicit memory standard that adapts to local changes in sequence presentation. Here, we turn to the neural basis of this effect. Human participants performed a temporal bisection task in which they were required to classify the duration of auditory stimuli into short and long duration categories; crucially, the presentation order was first-order counterbalanced, allowing us to measure the effect of each presented duration on the next. EEG recordings revealed that the CNV and LPCt signals both covaried with the duration presented on the current trial, with CNV predicting reaction time and LPCt predicting choice. Additionally, both signals covaried with the duration presented in the prior trial but in different ways, with the CNV amplitude reflecting the change in the memory standard and the LPCt reflecting decision uncertainty. Furthermore, we observed a repetition enhancement effect of duration only for the CNV, suggesting that this signal additionally indexes the similarity of successive durations. These findings demonstrate dissociable roles for the CNV and LPCt, and demonstrate that both signals are continuously updated on a trial-by-trial basis that reflects shifts in temporal decisions.

  7. Assessing host-specificity of Escherichia coli using a supervised learning logic-regression-based analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in intergenic regions.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Shuai; Li, Qiaozhi; Yasui, Yutaka; Edge, Thomas; Topp, Edward; Neumann, Norman F

    2015-11-01

    Host specificity in E. coli is widely debated. Herein, we used supervised learning logic-regression-based analysis of intergenic DNA sequence variability in E. coli in an attempt to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) biomarkers of E. coli that are associated with natural selection and evolution toward host specificity. Seven-hundred and eighty strains of E. coli were isolated from 15 different animal hosts. We utilized logic regression for analyzing DNA sequence data of three intergenic regions (flanked by the genes uspC-flhDC, csgBAC-csgDEFG, and asnS-ompF) to identify genetic biomarkers that could potentially discriminate E. coli based on host sources. Across 15 different animal hosts, logic regression successfully discriminated E. coli based on animal host source with relatively high specificity (i.e., among the samples of the non-target animal host, the proportion that correctly did not have the host-specific marker pattern) and sensitivity (i.e., among the samples from a given animal host, the proportion that correctly had the host-specific marker pattern), even after fivefold cross validation. Permutation tests confirmed that for most animals, host specific intergenic biomarkers identified by logic regression in E. coli were significantly associated with animal host source. The highest level of biomarker sensitivity was observed in deer isolates, with 82% of all deer E. coli isolates displaying a unique SNP pattern that was 98% specific to deer. Fifty-three percent of human isolates displayed a unique biomarker pattern that was 98% specific to humans. Twenty-nine percent of cattle isolates displayed a unique biomarker that was 97% specific to cattle. Interestingly, even within a related host group (i.e., Family: Canidae [domestic dogs and coyotes]), highly specific SNP biomarkers (98% and 99% specificity for dog and coyotes, respectively) were observed, with 21% of dog E. coli isolates displaying a unique dog biomarker and 61% of coyote isolates

  8. Contextual repetition facilitates word learning via fast mapping.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Emma L; Horst, Jessica S

    2014-10-01

    The current study explores whether contextual repetition during fast mapping facilitates word learning. Three-year-old children completed fast mapping and test trials using a touchscreen computer. For half of the children, the non-targets (competitors) repeated across learning trials and for other children there was no repetition. All children received the same test trials. Children who experienced contextual repetition, that is, children for whom the competitors repeated during the initial fast mapping task, demonstrated word learning. These data demonstrate that children's word learning is facilitated by the presence of extraneous yet predictable information in the initial fast mapping task.

  9. Effect of multiple actuations, delayed inhalation and antistatic treatment on the lung bioavailability of salbutamol via a spacer device.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, D. J.; Lipworth, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to extend previous in vitro observations regarding the effects of multiple actuations of aerosols into spacer devices, delayed inhalation, and antistatic treatment of spacer devices on the amount of drug delivered for inhalation. An in vivo study of lung bioavailability of salbutamol from a large volume (Volumatic) spacer was conducted. METHODS: Ten healthy volunteers of mean age 20.5 years with a mean forced expiratory volume in one second of 112.1% predicted were studied in a randomised single blind (investigator blind) crossover study. 1200 micrograms of salbutamol was given with mouth rinsing (100 micrograms/puff) on four study days: single puffs via spacer, multiple puffs via spacer (3 x 4 puffs), single puffs with 20 second delay before inhalation via spacer, and single puffs via an antistatic treated spacer. All spacers, including those treated with antistatic, were prewashed prior to each study day. Measurements of lung bioavailability were made at five, 10, and 20 minutes after inhalation to determine peak (Cmax) and average (Cav) plasma salbutamol levels. Systemic beta 2 responses including finger tremor, heart rate, and plasma potassium levels were also evaluated. RESULTS: Single puffs from the spacer produced higher plasma salbutamol levels and greater systemic beta 2 responses than either multiple puffs or single puffs with delayed inhalation for a 1200 micrograms dose. For Cmax this amounted to a 1.93-fold (95% CI 1.68 to 2.19) greater lung bioavailability for single puffs than for multiple puffs and a 1.80-fold (95% CI 1.59 to 2.00) greater lung bioavailability for single puffs than for single puffs with a 20 second delay. Comparison of the normal and antistatic treated spacers (both prewashed) revealed differences for Cmax with levels 1.23-fold (95% CI 1.04 to 1.41) greater for the normal spacer. CONCLUSIONS: Delayed inhalation from a Volumatic spacer and the use of multiple puffs results in a considerable

  10. DNA sequence heterogeneity in the three copies of the long 16S-23S rDNA spacer of Enterococcus faecalis isolates.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, V; Rao, Y; Pearson, S R; Bates, S M; Mayall, B C

    1999-07-01

    The possibility of intragenic heterogeneity between copies of the long intergenic (16S-23S rDNA) spacer region (LISR) was investigated by specific amplification of this region from 21 Enterococcus faecalis isolates. Three copies of the LISR (rrnA, B and C) were demonstrated by hybridization of the LISR to genomic DNA cleaved with I-Ceul and SmaI. When the LISR amplicon was digested with Tsp509I, two known nucleotide substitutions were detected, one 4 nt upstream from the 5' end of the tRNA(ala) gene (allele rrnB has the Tsp509I site and rrnA and C do not) and the other 22 nt downstream from the 3' end of the tRNA(ala) gene (rrnC has the Tsp509I site). Sequence differences at these sites were detected at the allelic level (alleles rrnA, B and C) and different combinations of these alleles were designated Tsp Types. Using densitometry to analyse bands from electrophoresis gels, the intra-isolate ratios of the separate alleles (rrnA:rrnB:rrnC) were determined in each Tsp Type: I (0:3:0), II (1:2:0), III (2:0:1), IV (3:0:0), V (2:1:0) and VI (1:1:1). Sequence variation between the three copies of the LISR was confirmed by the detection of at least five other intra-isolate nucleotide substitutions using heteroduplex analysis by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) that were not detected by Tsp509I cleavage. Perpendicular denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was capable of resolving homoduplexes; six to seven out of a possible nine curves were obtained in some isolates. In the isolate where seven curves were obtained one or more further nucleotide substitutions, not detected by Tsp509I cleavage or CSGE, were detected. On the basis of LISR sequence heterogeneity, isolates were categorized into homogeneous (only one allele sequence present) and heterogeneous (two or three allele sequences present). The transition between homogeneous and heterogeneous LISRs may be useful in studying evolutionary mechanisms between E. faecalis isolates.

  11. Modified 16S-23S rRNA intergenic region restriction endonuclease analysis for species identification of Enterococcus strains isolated from pigs, compared with identification using classical methods and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nowakiewicz, Aneta; Ziółkowska, Grażyna; Zięba, Przemysław; Trościańczyk, Aleksandra; Banach, Tomasz; Kowalski, Cezary

    2015-03-01

    Fast and reliable identification of bacteria to at least the species level is currently the basis for correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment of infections. This is particularly important in the case of bacteria of the genus Enterococcus, whose resistance profile is often correlated with their species (e.g. resistance to vancomycin). In this study, we evaluated restriction endonuclease analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region for species identification of Enterococcus. The utility of the method was compared with that of phenotypic methods [biochemical profile evaluation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)]. Identification was based on 21 Enterococcus reference strains, of the species E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. hirae, E. durans, E. casseliflavus, E. gallinarum, E. avium, E. cecorum and E. columbae, and 47 Enterococcus field strains isolated from pigs. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the ITS-PCR product using HinfI, RsaI and MboI, in the order specified, enabled species differentiation of the Enterococcus reference and field strains, and in the case of the latter, the results of species identification were identical (47/47) to those obtained by MALDI-TOF MS. Moreover, as a result of digestion with MboI, a unique restriction profile was also obtained for the strains (3/3) identified by MALDI-TOF MS as E. thailandicus. In our opinion, restriction endonuclease analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region of Enterococcus may be a simple and relatively fast (less than 4 h) alternative method for identifying the species occurring most frequently in humans and animals.

  12. The repetitive high energy pulsed power module

    SciTech Connect

    Harjes, H.C.; Reed, K.W.; Buttram, M.T.; Turman, B.N.; Neau, E.L.; Martinez, L.; Adcock, J.; Weinbrecht, E.A.; Mann, G.A.; Morgan, F.A.; Laderach, G.E.; Pena, G.; Butler, M.; Schneider, L.X.; Wavrik, R.W.; Penn, K.J.; Weber, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    High average power magnetic pulse compression systems are being considered for use in several applications. One of the key issues in the design of a pulsed power driver for these applications is component reliability, efficiency, and lifetime. In the Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) module, pulse compression is done exclusively with magnetic switches (saturable reactors) because such switches have the potential of performing efficiently and reliably for >10{sup 10} shots. The objective of the RHEPP project is to explore the feasibility of using magnetic pulse compression technology in continuous high average power applications. The RHEPP system consists of a compressor which drives a linear induction voltage adder with a diode load. Prime power for the module is supplied by a 600 kW, 120 Hz, alternator (furnished by Westinghouse Electric Corporation). At present, construction and initial testing in a bipolar mode of the first two stages of the compressor has been completed. This system has operated for a total of 332 minutes (4.8 {times} 10{sup 6} pulses) at full power (600 kW) with an efficiency of 94+/{minus}3%. The first stage magnetic switch (MS1) has a pulse compression factor of 8.4 (4.2 ms to 500 {mu}s time to peak). It has two, parallel connected, 67 turn copper coils and a 760 kg core of 2 mil silicon steel with a magnetic cross sectional area of 0. 065 m{sup 2}. The second stage magnetic switch (MS2) has a pulse compression factor of 3 (500 {mu}s to 170 {mu}s). It has two, parallel connected, 36 turn copper coils and a 361 kg core of field annealed 2605CO Metglas with a magnetic area of 0.019 m{sup 2}. A discussion of RHEPP compressor design effort and its baseline design is given. In addition, initial results from the operation of the first two stages are presented. 11 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Neural dynamics during repetitive visual stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoneva, Tsvetomira; Garcia-Molina, Gary; Desain, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), the brain responses to repetitive visual stimulation (RVS), are widely utilized in neuroscience. Their high signal-to-noise ratio and ability to entrain oscillatory brain activity are beneficial for their applications in brain-computer interfaces, investigation of neural processes underlying brain rhythmic activity (steady-state topography) and probing the causal role of brain rhythms in cognition and emotion. This paper aims at analyzing the space and time EEG dynamics in response to RVS at the frequency of stimulation and ongoing rhythms in the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands. Approach.We used electroencephalography (EEG) to study the oscillatory brain dynamics during RVS at 10 frequencies in the gamma band (40-60 Hz). We collected an extensive EEG data set from 32 participants and analyzed the RVS evoked and induced responses in the time-frequency domain. Main results. Stable SSVEP over parieto-occipital sites was observed at each of the fundamental frequencies and their harmonics and sub-harmonics. Both the strength and the spatial propagation of the SSVEP response seem sensitive to stimulus frequency. The SSVEP was more localized around the parieto-occipital sites for higher frequencies (>54 Hz) and spread to fronto-central locations for lower frequencies. We observed a strong negative correlation between stimulation frequency and relative power change at that frequency, the first harmonic and the sub-harmonic components over occipital sites. Interestingly, over parietal sites for sub-harmonics a positive correlation of relative power change and stimulation frequency was found. A number of distinct patterns in delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (15-30 Hz) bands were also observed. The transient response, from 0 to about 300 ms after stimulation onset, was accompanied by increase in delta and theta power over fronto-central and occipital sites, which returned to baseline

  14. An experimental study on the effect of spacer on concentration polarization in a long channel reverse osmosis membrane cell.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Ng, H Y

    2010-01-01

    This study was to experimentally investigate the performance and organic fouling behaviour in a 1-m long RO membrane channel with or without spacer for desalting. It was found that local permeate flux distributed heterogeneously along the long membrane channel without a spacer inserted due to exponential growth of concentration polarization, which also resulted in decreasing salt rejection and increasing organic fouling along the membrane channel in the downstream direction. This heterogeneity could be lessened by inserting a spacer into the channel, which mitigated concentration polarization due to the enhanced turbulence caused by a spacer, especially at the downstream portion of the channel. However, in the upstream of the channel, inserting a spacer exerted an additional vertical resistance which might counteract the effect of concentration polarization mitigation by a spacer and caused a lower permeate flux. This suggests that it is necessary to consider the integral effect of spacer for designing an RO membrane module and an overall RO system in order to prevent extra resistance, reduce concentration polarization and membrane fouling. PMID:20389001

  15. Distractibility during infants' examining and repetitive rhythmic activity.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, E J; Ruff, H A

    1998-05-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the role of examining and repetitive rhythmic activity in infants' exploration of novel objects. Sixteen 8-month-old infants played with novel toys as auditory-visual slide distractors occurred on one side at random intervals. The results showed that examining, but not repetitive activities, declined with exposure to the objects. They also showed that infants had different patterns of distractibility during examining and repetitive rhythmic activities. The infants were slower to turn to the distractor if they were examining the toy than if they were engaged in other activity, but the probability of a response did not differ. In contrast, when engaged in repetitive rhythmic activity, infants were less likely to respond to the distractor than when engaged in other activities, including examining; the speed with which they responded, however, did not differ. The results suggest that, during these two activities, the mechanisms for resisting distraction are quite different. PMID:9589216

  16. Fixture tests bellows reliability through repetitive pressure/temperature cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, C.

    1967-01-01

    Fixture explores the reliability of bellows used in precision in inertial systems. The fixture establishes the ability of the bellows to withstand repetitive over-stress pressure cycling at elevated temperatures. It is applicable in quality control and reliability programs.

  17. Repetition in visual word identification: benefits and costs.

    PubMed

    Burt, Jennifer S; Kipps, Tahli J; Matthews, Julian R

    2014-10-01

    University students performed lexical tasks with visually presented target words after the presentation of an identical or unrelated prime, at short (80-120 ms) or longer (410-710 ms) prime-target stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). Experiment 1 showed perceptual identification benefits in vocal responding at a short SOA that were reduced (accuracy) or reversed (latency) at a longer SOA. Experiment 2 showed a transition from a repetition benefit to a cost over 3 SOAs in a target-masked version of the lexical decision task (LDT; target displayed for only 141 ms). In Experiment 3 the repetition cost was replicated at a 530-ms SOA in the LDT with masked targets, but a repetition benefit was observed in the conventional LDT (target displayed until response). The dependence of repetition costs on target masking is more consistent with biases based on episodic confusions than refractoriness of lexical representations.

  18. Repetitive behaviour in kennelled domestic dog: stereotypical or not?

    PubMed

    Denham, Hamish D C; Bradshaw, John W S; Rooney, Nicola J

    2014-04-10

    Repetitive behaviour is common in kennelled dogs, yet its motivational basis remains relatively unexplored. We examine the repetitive behaviour of 30 kennelled working dogs in ten contexts both coinciding with, and in the absence of, commonly occurring arousing stimuli, such as care staff, other dogs and food preparation. A large proportion (93%) of subjects performed some repetitive behaviour, most commonly bouncing, but only 17% in the absence of the arousing stimuli. Subjects could be divided into four groups according to the stimuli eliciting, and the duration, of their repetitive behaviour, and these groups were compared on the basis of their cortisol response to an acute psychogenic stressor--a veterinary examination. Urinary cortisol/creatinine response curves differed significantly between the groups. In particular, those dogs which performed repetitive behaviour at times of minimal stimulation, showed a distinctly different pattern of response, with cortisol levels decreasing, as compared to increasing, after the veterinary examination. We conclude that dogs showing repetitive behaviours at times of high arousal are motivationally distinct from those "stereotyping" in the absence of stimulation. We suggest that those dogs showing spontaneous repetitive behaviours may have past experiences and/or temperaments that affect both their reactions to a veterinary examination and to long-term kennelling. For example, some dogs may find isolation from humans particularly aversive, hence affecting their reactions both to being left in a kennel and to being taken to the veterinary surgeon. Alternatively, such dogs may have atypical responsiveness of their hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, possibly brought about through chronic stress. High levels of repetitive behaviours in response to inaccessible husbandry events may be explained if such behaviour has inadvertently been reinforced by attention from staff, and therefore may not always be indicative of

  19. Repetition of Attempted Suicide Among Immigrants in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Lipsicas, Cendrine Bursztein; Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik; Wasserman, Danuta; Apter, Alan; Kerkhof, Ad; Michel, Konrad; Renberg, Ellinor Salander; van Heeringen, Kees; Värnik, Airi; Schmidtke, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare frequencies of suicide attempt repetition in immigrants and local European populations, and the timing of repetition in these groups. Method: Data from 7 European countries, comprising 10 574 local and 3032 immigrant subjects, were taken from the World Health Organization European Multicentre Study on Suicidal Behaviour and the ensuing Monitoring Suicidal Behaviour in Europe (commonly referred to as MONSUE) project. The relation between immigrant status and repetition of suicide attempt within 12-months following first registered attempt was analyzed with binary logistic regression, controlling for sex, age, and method of attempt. Timing of repetition was controlled for sex, age, and the recommended type of aftercare. Results: Lower odds of repeating a suicide attempt were found in Eastern European (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.41 to 0.61, P < 0.001) and non-European immigrants (OR 0.68; 95% CI 0.51 to 0.90, P < 0.05), compared with the locals. Similar patterns were identified in the sex-specific analysis. Eastern European immigrants tended to repeat their attempt much later than locals (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.35 to 0.93, P < 0.05). In general, 32% of all repetition occurred within 30 days. Repetition tended to decrease with age and was more likely in females using harder methods in their index attempt (OR 1.29; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.54, P < 0.01). Large variations in the general repetition frequency were identified between the collecting centres, thus influencing the results. Conclusions: The lower repetition frequencies in non-Western immigrants, compared with locals, in Europe stands in contrast to their markedly higher tendency to attempt suicide in general, possibly pointing to situational stress factors related to their suicidal crisis that are less persistent over time. Our findings also raise the possibility that suicide attempters and repeaters constitute only partially overlapping populations. PMID:25565687

  20. Repetitive strain injuries: has the Australian epidemic burnt out?

    PubMed

    Awerbuch, M

    2004-07-01

    In the 1980s Australia experienced an epidemic of medically certified claims for non-specific arm symptoms described as repetitive strain injury. Although a number of factors were mooted as causal of the epidemic, no single factor emerged as a compelling putative candidate. The present paper discusses the results of research which was published only after the epidemic had waned. It provides possible insights into the rise and fall of repetitive strain injury.

  1. A comparative evaluation of application techniques of a paint-on die spacer in grooves: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Vaishali, K; Prasad, D Krishna; Shetty, Manoj

    2013-12-01

    The use of paint-on die spacer to improve the seating of casting has become quite popular in the recent years. The generally accepted range of paint-on die spacer is approximately 20-40 μm, which suggests a range of tolerance. The painting of the retentive grooves with die spacer has always been a subject of debate. The primary purpose of this study was to determine if there was a tendency for the paint-on die spacer to accumulate in grooves of tooth preparation in sufficient thickness to exceed this accepted range of tolerance when applied using two different techniques. Eight die stone blocks with three grooves each were prepared. Half the samples were painted in unidirectional method and the other halves were painted using the haphazard method of application. The thickness of the die spacer was measured at different positions using 200× magnification and the mean and standard deviations were calculated. On analysis it was seen that the thickness of the paint-on die spacer in grooves was in the range of 20-40 μm for unidirectional method of application, whereas in haphazard method of application the thickness of the paint-on die spacer was in the range of 28-132 μm. From the above study it was concluded that the method of application influenced the thickness of the paint-on die spacer. The recommended thickness of the die spacer was achieved on unidirectional method of application.

  2. [Analysis of fragments of intergenome spacers of human body observed in chromosomes containing no nuclear organization].

    PubMed

    Kupriyanova, N S; Nechvolodov, K K; Korsunenko, A V

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repetitions of rDNA provide so-called nuclear organizations (NOR). On the other hand, rDNA-structures are observed in some NOR chromosomes. It was demonstrated that, in addition to ribosome biogenesis, nucleoli provided a number of functions: cell cycle regulation, stress-induced response, transcription regulation, which often induced cell cascades. The mechanisms of the induction of rDNA segments in NOR chromosomes are obscure and require further research. About 1/3 repetitions are associated with nucleoli and SINE/Alu repetitions, homogeneous repetition, and tandem repetition. Perhaps, relative position of nucleoli and chromosomes may facilitate/prevent interaction of chromosomes with rDNA clusters. The variability of two larger repetitions in the central part of rMGS, LR1, and LR2 similar by -90% and separated by several hundred pairs of bases from each other was studied in our previous works. This work was devoted to the search for the LR1-LR2 segments in other chromosomes, characterization of their terminal tips at rupture points and genome areas of incorporation of the LR1-LR2 segments.

  3. The intergenic region of maize streak virus contains a GC-rich element that activates rightward transcription and binds maize nuclear factors.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, C; Schwarz, J J; Black, D M; Schneider, M; Howell, S H

    1990-12-01

    Maize streak virus (MSV) is transcribed bidirectionally from an intergenic region and rightward transcription produces an RNA that encodes the coat protein. The intergenic region contains promoter elements required for rightward transcription including an upstream activating sequence (UAS) which endows the promoter with full activity in a maize transient expression system. The UAS contains two GC-rich repeats (GC boxes) and a long inverted repeat or hairpin with a loop harboring a TAATATTAC sequence common to all geminiviruses. Deletions through the UAS demonstrated the presence of an element, called the rightward promoter element (rpe1), which is responsible for transcriptional activation. Rpe1 includes the two GC-rich boxes, which are similar in sequence to Sp1 binding sites in mammalian cells, but not the conserved hairpin loop. Rpe1 binds maize nuclear factors in vitro and the characteristics of the binding interaction have been determined by 1) binding competition with oligonucleotides, 2) methidiumpropyl-EDTA footprinting and 3) methylation interference assays. Binding of maize nuclear factors to the UAS generates two major bands, slow and fast migrating bands, in gel retardation assays. Footprinting and factor titration data suggest that the fast bands arise by the binding of factors to one GC box while the slow bands are generated by factors binding to both boxes. The data further indicate that the factors bind to the two GC-rich boxes with little cooperativity and bind on opposite faces of the DNA helix.

  4. Evidence for Introduction Bottleneck and Extensive Inter-Gene Pool (Mesoamerica x Andes) Hybridization in the European Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Gioia, Tania; Logozzo, Giuseppina; Attene, Giovanna; Bellucci, Elisa; Benedettelli, Stefano; Negri, Valeria; Papa, Roberto; Spagnoletti Zeuli, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Common bean diversity within and between Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools was compared in 89 landraces from America and 256 landraces from Europe, to elucidate the effects of bottleneck of introduction and selection for adaptation during the expansion of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Europe. Thirteen highly polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers (nuSSRs) were used to complement chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSRs) and nuclear markers (phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1) data from previous studies. To verify the extent of the introduction bottleneck, inter-gene pool hybrids were distinguished from “pure” accessions. Hybrids were identified on the basis of recombination of gene pool specific cpSSR, phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1 markers with a Bayesian assignments based on nuSSRs, and with STRUCTURE admixture analysis. More hybrids were detected than previously, and their frequency was almost four times larger in Europe (40.2%) than in America (12.3%). The genetic bottleneck following the introduction into Europe was not evidenced in the analysis including all the accessions, but it was significant when estimated only with “pure” accessions, and five times larger for Mesoamerican than for Andean germplasm. The extensive inter-gene pool hybridization generated a large amount of genotypic diversity that mitigated the effects of the bottleneck that occurred when common bean was introduced in Europe. The implication for evolution and the advantages for common bean breeding are discussed. PMID:24098412

  5. The intergenic region between the divergently transcribed niiA and niaD genes of Aspergillus nidulans contains multiple NirA binding sites which act bidirectionally.

    PubMed Central

    Punt, P J; Strauss, J; Smit, R; Kinghorn, J R; van den Hondel, C A; Scazzocchio, C

    1995-01-01

    The niaD and niiA genes of Aspergillus nidulans, which code, respectively, for nitrate and nitrite reductases, are divergently transcribed, and their ATGs are separated by 1,200 bp. The genes are under the control of the positively acting NirA transcription factor, which mediates nitrate induction. The DNA binding domain of NirA was expressed as a fusion protein with the glutathione S-transferase of Schistosoma japonicum. Gel shift and footprint experiments have shown that in the intergenic region there are four binding sites for the NirA transcription factor. These sites can be represented by the nonpalindromic consensus 5'CTCCGHGG3'. Making use of a bidirectional expression vector, we have analyzed the role of each of the sites in niaD and niiA expression. The sites were numbered from the niiA side. It appeared that site 1 is necessary for the inducibility of niiA only, while sites 2, 3, and to a lesser extent 4 (which is nearer to and strongly affects niaD) act bidirectionally. The results also suggest that of the 10 binding sites for the AreA protein, which mediates nitrogen metabolite repression, those which are centrally located are physiologically important. The insertion of an unrelated upstream activating sequence into the intergenic region strongly affected the expression of both genes, irrespective of the orientation in which the element was inserted. PMID:7565720

  6. Identification of SmtB/ArsR cis elements and proteins in archaea using the Prokaryotic InterGenic Exploration Database (PIGED).

    PubMed

    Bose, Michael; Slick, David; Sarto, Mickey J; Murphy, Patrick; Roberts, David; Roberts, Jacqueline; Barber, Robert D

    2006-08-01

    Microbial genome sequencing projects have revealed an apparently wide distribution of SmtB/ArsR metal-responsive transcriptional regulators among prokaryotes. Using a position-dependent weight matrix approach, prokaryotic genome sequences were screened for SmtB/ArsR DNA binding sites using data derived from intergenic sequences upstream of orthologous genes encoding these regulators. Sixty SmtB/ArsR operators linked to metal detoxification genes, including nine among various archaeal species, are predicted among 230 annotated and draft prokaryotic genome sequences. Independent multiple sequence alignments of putative operator sites and corresponding winged helix-turn-helix motifs define sequence signatures for the DNA binding activity of this SmtB/ArsR subfamily. Prediction of an archaeal SmtB/ArsR based upon these signature sequences is confirmed using purified Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A protein and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Tools used in this study have been incorporated into a web application, the Prokaryotic InterGenic Exploration Database (PIGED; http://bioinformatics.uwp.edu/~PIGED/home.htm), facilitating comparable studies. Use of this tool and establishment of orthology based on DNA binding signatures holds promise for deciphering potential cellular roles of various archaeal winged helix-turn-helix transcriptional regulators.

  7. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R. Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H.; Akiyama, M.; Lukeš, P.

    2014-09-28

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H₂O₂ and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  8. FMRI repetition suppression for voices is modulated by stimulus expectations.

    PubMed

    Andics, Attila; Gál, Viktor; Vicsi, Klára; Rudas, Gábor; Vidnyánszky, Zoltán

    2013-04-01

    According to predictive coding models of sensory processing, stimulus expectations have a profound effect on sensory cortical responses. This was supported by experimental results, showing that fMRI repetition suppression (fMRI RS) for face stimuli is strongly modulated by the probability of stimulus repetitions throughout the visual cortical processing hierarchy. To test whether processing of voices is also affected by stimulus expectations, here we investigated the effect of repetition probability on fMRI RS in voice-selective cortical areas. Changing ('alt') and identical ('rep') voice stimulus pairs were presented to the listeners in blocks, with a varying probability of alt and rep trials across blocks. We found auditory fMRI RS in the nonprimary voice-selective cortical regions, including the bilateral posterior STS, the right anterior STG and the right IFC, as well as in the IPL. Importantly, fMRI RS effects in all of these areas were strongly modulated by the probability of stimulus repetition: auditory fMRI RS was reduced or not present in blocks with low repetition probability. Our results revealed that auditory fMRI RS in higher-level voice-selective cortical regions is modulated by repetition probabilities and thus suggest that in audition, similarly to the visual modality, processing of sensory information is shaped by stimulus expectation processes. PMID:23268783

  9. Comparison of conventional paint-on die spacers and those used with the all-ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Campbell, S D

    1990-02-01

    The study compared the thickness of conventional (Tru-Fit and Belle de St. Claire) and all-ceramic (Dicor and Cerestore) die spacers. Three coats of Tru-Fit, two coats of Belle de St. Claire, and two coats of Cerestore die spacers provided a 25 microns thickness. A single coat of the Dicor spacer resulted in a 37 microns layer. A significantly thinner layer occurred at the convex occlusal line angles for all of the materials tested. This could impede the flow of the luting agent at the time of cementation. PMID:2406424

  10. Synthesis, Characterization and Biological Studies of New Linear Thermally Stable Schiff Base Polymers with Flexible Spacers.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Farah; Khuhawar, Muhammad Yar; Jahangir, Taj Muhammad; Channar, Abdul Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Five new linear Schiff base polymers having azomethine structures, ether linkages and extended aliphatic chain lengths with flexible spacers were synthesized by polycondensation of dialdehyde (monomer) with aliphatic and aromatic diamines. The formation yields of monomer and polymers were obtained within 75-92%. The polymers with flexible spacers of n-hexane were somewhat soluble in acetone, chloroform, THF, DMF and DMSO on heating. The monomer and polymers were characterized by melting point, elemental microanalysis, FT-IR, (1)HNMR, UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), fluorescence emission, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and viscosities and thermodynamic parameters measurements of their dilute solutions. The studies supported formation of the monomer and polymers and on the basis of these studies their structures have been assigned. The synthesized polymers were tested for their antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  11. Direct CRISPR spacer acquisition from RNA by a natural reverse transcriptase-Cas1 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Silas, Sukrit; Mohr, Georg; Sidote, David J; Markham, Laura M; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Bhaya, Devaki; Lambowitz, Alan M; Fire, Andrew Z

    2016-02-26

    CRISPR systems mediate adaptive immunity in diverse prokaryotes. CRISPR-associated Cas1 and Cas2 proteins have been shown to enable adaptation to new threats in type I and II CRISPR systems by the acquisition of short segments of DNA (spacers) from invasive elements. In several type III CRISPR systems, Cas1 is naturally fused to a reverse transcriptase (RT). In the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea (MMB-1), we showed that a RT-Cas1 fusion protein enables the acquisition of RNA spacers in vivo in a RT-dependent manner. In vitro, the MMB-1 RT-Cas1 and Cas2 proteins catalyze the ligation of RNA segments into the CRISPR array, which is followed by reverse transcription. These observations outline a host-mediated mechanism for reverse information flow from RNA to DNA. PMID:26917774

  12. Spacer/Linker Based Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Mutual Prodrugs as Antiinflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    Velingkar, V. S.; Jain, D. R.; Ahire, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    Mutual prodrugs of some antiinflammatory agents were synthesized with the aim of improving the therapeutic index through prevention of gastrointestinal complications and to check the efficiency of release of the parent drug in presence of spacer. These mutual prodrugs were synthesized by direct condensation method using dicyclohexyl carbodiimide as a coupling agent and glycine as a spacer. The title compounds were characterized by spectral techniques and the release of the parent drug from mutual prodrug was studied in two different non-enzymatic buffer solutions at pH 1.2, pH 7.4 and in 80% human plasma. All mutual prodrugs exhibited encouraging hydrolysis profile in 80% human plasma. Biological activity of title compounds was studied by carrageenan-induced paw edema method. From the results obtained, it was concluded that these compounds retain the antiinflammatory action. PMID:21694998

  13. Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer from serofluid dish, a traditional Chinese fermented food.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Zhao, Yang; Wu, Zhengrong; Liu, Ronghui; Xu, Ruixiang; Yan, Lei; Li, Hongyu

    2016-03-01

    Serofluid dish (or Jiangshui, in Chinese), a traditional food in the Chinese culture for thousands of years, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this work, microorganism community of the fermented serofluid dish was investigated by the culture-independent method. The metagenomic data in this article contains the sequences of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rRNA genes from 12 different serofluid dish samples. The metagenome comprised of 50,865 average raw reads with an average of 8,958,220 bp and G + C content is 45.62%. This is the first report on metagenomic data of fungal ITS from serofluid dish employing Illumina platform to profile the fungal communities of this little known fermented food from Gansu Province, China. The Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer can be accessed at NCBI, SRA database accession no. SRP067411. PMID:26981389

  14. Effect of spacer layer on the magnetization dynamics of permalloy/rare-earth/permalloy trilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chen Yin, Yuli; Zhang, Dong; Jiang, Sheng; Yue, Jinjin; Zhai, Ya; Du, Jun; Zhai, Hongru

    2015-05-07

    The permalloy/rare-earth/permalloy trilayers with different types (Gd and Nd) and thicknesses of spacer layer are investigated using frequency dependence of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements at room temperature, which shows different behaviors with different rare earth spacer layers. By fitting the frequency dependence of the FMR resonance field and linewidth, we find that the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy retains its value for all samples, the perpendicular anisotropy remains almost unchanged for different thickness of Gd layer but the values are tailored by different thicknesses of Nd layer. The Gilbert damping is almost unchanged with different thicknesses of Gd; however, the Gilbert damping is significantly enhanced from 8.4×10{sup −3} to 20.1×10{sup −3} with 6 nm of Nd and then flatten out when the Nd thickness rises above 6 nm.

  15. Synthesis, Characterization and Biological Studies of New Linear Thermally Stable Schiff Base Polymers with Flexible Spacers.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Farah; Khuhawar, Muhammad Yar; Jahangir, Taj Muhammad; Channar, Abdul Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Five new linear Schiff base polymers having azomethine structures, ether linkages and extended aliphatic chain lengths with flexible spacers were synthesized by polycondensation of dialdehyde (monomer) with aliphatic and aromatic diamines. The formation yields of monomer and polymers were obtained within 75-92%. The polymers with flexible spacers of n-hexane were somewhat soluble in acetone, chloroform, THF, DMF and DMSO on heating. The monomer and polymers were characterized by melting point, elemental microanalysis, FT-IR, (1)HNMR, UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), fluorescence emission, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and viscosities and thermodynamic parameters measurements of their dilute solutions. The studies supported formation of the monomer and polymers and on the basis of these studies their structures have been assigned. The synthesized polymers were tested for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. PMID:26970795

  16. Sequence variation in the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer of Tridacna crocea.

    PubMed

    Yu, E T; Juinio-Meñez, M A; Monje, V D

    2000-11-01

    DNA-based genetic markers are needed to augment existing allozyme markers in the assessment of genetic diversity of wild giant clam populations. The dearth of polymorphic mitochondrial DNA regions amplified from known universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers has led us to search other regions of the genome for viable sources of DNA polymorphism. We have designed tridacnid-specific PCR primers for the amplification of internal transcribed spacer regions. Sequences of the first internal transcribed spacer segment (ITS-1) revealed very high polymorphism, showing 29% variation arising from base substitutions alone. Preliminary restriction analysis of the ITS regions using 8 restriction enzymes revealed cryptic changes in the DNA sequence. These mutations are promising as marker tools for differentiating geographically separated populations. Such variation in the ITS region can possibly be used for population genetic analysis.

  17. The effect of charge-reversal amphiphile spacer composition on DNA and siRNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiang; Prata, Carla A. H.; McIntosh, Thomas J.; Barthélémy, Philippe; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    A series of charge-reversal amphiphiles with different spacers separating the head group from the hydrophobic chains are described for delivery of DNA and siRNA. Among them, the amphiphiles possessing a glycine spacer (e.g., B-GlyGly) showed effective DNA transfection in CHO and NIH 3T3 cells as well as siRNA gene knockdown in HepG2 and UASMC cells. Ethidium bromide quenching assays revealed that DNA was released the fastest from the lipoplex of B-GlyGly in the presence of esterase. Also, X-ray diffraction results indicated that the DNA was located between the adjacent lipid bilayers in the lipoplex of B-GlyGly. These distinct features appear to be required for high transfection activity. PMID:20433165

  18. Analysis of sound absorption of tuck spacer fabrics to reduce automotive noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Tilak; Monaragala, Ravindra; Needham, Peter; Lay, Edward

    2007-08-01

    Textiles are widely used in the automotive industry to provide both comfort to the passengers and an aesthetic appearance to the automotive interior. They can also be used to reduce automotive interior noise, which can make automotive travel safer and more comfortable. Knitted fabrics are used widely in automotive upholstery; however, the sound absorbency of a single layer of a knitted fabric is inadequate for the reduction of automotive interior noise. This paper investigates the sound absorbency of a novel knitted spacer fabric, which can be used in automotive upholstery and has the potential for greater sound absorbency than a conventional plain knitted fabric and its derivatives. The spacer fabric is modelled as a porous sound absorber and its sound absorbency is studied with regard to its structural parameters.

  19. Enhanced spin-torque in double tunnel junctions using a nonmagnetic-metal spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H.; Cheng, Y. H.; Ko, C. W.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2015-10-12

    This study proposes an enhancement in the spin-transfer torque of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) designed with double-barrier layer structure using a nonmagnetic metal spacer, as a replacement for the ferromagnetic material, which is traditionally used in these double-barrier stacks. Our calculation results show that the spin-transfer torque and charge current density of the proposed double-barrier MTJ can be as much as two orders of magnitude larger than the traditional double-barrier one. In other words, the proposed double-barrier MTJ has a spin-transfer torque that is three orders larger than that of the single-barrier stack. This improvement may be attributed to the quantum-well states that are formed in the nonmagnetic metal spacer and the resonant tunneling mechanism that exists throughout the system.

  20. Synthesis of photoresponsive cholesterol-based azobenzene organogels: dependence on different spacer lengths.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuchun; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    A series of azobenzene-cholesterol organogel compounds (M 0 -M 12 ) with different spacers were designed and synthesized. The molecular structures were confirmed by (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The rapid and reversible photoresponsive properties of the compounds were investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy. Their thermal phase behaviors were studied by DSC. The length of the spacer plays a crucial role in the gelation. Compound M 6 is the only one that can gelate in ethanol, isopropanol and 1-butanol and the reversible gel-sol transitions are also investigated. To obtain visual insight into the microstructure of the gels, the typical structures of the xerogels were studied by SEM. Morphologies of the aggregates change from flower-like, network and rod with different sizes. By using IR and XRD characterization, it is found that intermolecular H-bonding, the solvents and van der Waals interaction are the main contributions to the specific superstructure.

  1. Effect of siloxane spacer length on organosilicon bi-quaternary ammonium amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chuanming; Cui, Yuezhi; Yang, Pengfei; Zhang, Huayong; Mao, Dejiang; Cui, Xiao; Li, Junying

    2015-04-01

    A series of organosilicon Bola-form bi-quaternary ammonium amphiphiles, [OH5C3(C2H5)2N+-(CH2)3-Si(CH2)3-O-(Si(CH3)2O)n-Si(CH2)3⋯(CH2)3-N+(C2H5)2C3H5O]Cl2- (SinN2Cl2, n=0, 4, 6, 8), with the same headgroups and different length of hydrophobic linkage has been synthesized. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of each amphiphiles was determined by equilibrium surface tension. With the increased length of hydrophobic siloxane spacer, the CMC values follow the order of Si8N2Cl2spacer and its internal oxygen atom, which make the molecular stretch free. The antimicrobial property of Si4N2Cl2 is more effective than others below the concentration of CMC, while the antimicrobial property of Si8N2Cl2 is more effective above the concentration of CMC, which indicated that both the adsorbability in formation of micellar and the hydrophobicity arising from the different length of siloxane spacer are important to inhibit microbe. Moreover, their wetting ability has been characterized by contact angles on various material surfaces. It shows that the higher weight of lipophilic siloxane spacer leads to lower contact angels.

  2. Treatment of persistent extraarticular infection using a temporary cement spacer on the tibia after ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang Am; Lee, Soo Chan; Song, Moon Bok; Lee, Choon Key

    2008-01-01

    Postoperative infection after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is an uncommon but serious complication. Although several treatments for intraarticular infection have been reported, no report has been recorded on the treatment of persistent extraarticular infections. The authors experienced reconstructed graft removal due to a refractory extraarticular infection on tibia. Early ACL reimplantation was performed using a temporary cement spacer containing antibiotics and a irradiated bone patellar tendon bone allograft.

  3. Molecular Identification of Two Strains of Phellinus sp. by Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Two species of cultivated Phellinus sp. were identified as P. baumii by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis. The fruit bodies of the examined strains were similar to those of naturally occurring strains, having a bracket-like form, yellow-to-orange color, and poroid hymenial surfaces. The DNA sequences of ITS region of both strains showed a homology of 99% with ITS1 to ITS2 sequences of P. (Inonotus) baumii strain PB0806. PMID:22783119

  4. Numerical study on the effect of design parameters and spacers on RPC signal and timing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jash, A.; Majumdar, N.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Saha, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical calculations have been performed to understand the reason for the observed non-uniform response of a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) in a few critical regions such as near edge spacers and corners of the device. In this context, the signal from a RPC due to the passage of muons through different regions has been computed. Also, a simulation of RPC timing properties is presented along with the effect of the applied field, gas mixture and geometrical components.

  5. Indirect adaptive stabilization of a large, flexible, spinning spacering Simulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamm, A. L.; Johnson, C. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A recently formulated approach to the adaptive control of distributed systems combines the simultaneous identification and control philosophy of indirect adaptive control with a modal expansion description of distributed systems. The regulation of a large, flexible, spinning spacering, one half of a dual momentum control device proposed for attitude control of large space systems, provides the example upon which the capabilities of such a synthesis method are tested via simulation.

  6. Treatment of persistent extraarticular infection using a temporary cement spacer on the tibia after ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang Am; Lee, Soo Chan; Song, Moon Bok; Lee, Choon Key

    2008-01-01

    Postoperative infection after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is an uncommon but serious complication. Although several treatments for intraarticular infection have been reported, no report has been recorded on the treatment of persistent extraarticular infections. The authors experienced reconstructed graft removal due to a refractory extraarticular infection on tibia. Early ACL reimplantation was performed using a temporary cement spacer containing antibiotics and a irradiated bone patellar tendon bone allograft. PMID:17899003

  7. Plastic bottles as spacers for a pressurized metered-dose inhaler: in vitro characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kissoon, N; Teelucksingh, S; Blake, K V; Kesser, B; Murphy, S P; Geller, D

    2001-09-01

    Homemade spacer devices are commonly used by children with asthma to improve aerosol deposition from pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDI); however, the efficacy and efficiency of these devices are not fully characterized. We determined the quality of fine particle fraction (< 4.7 microns) and ultrafine particle fraction (< 3.3 microns) of three bottles (from 280 ml to 500 ml) commonly used as spacers in Trinidad and Tobago and compared their performance to the commercially available valved holding chamber (OpT) and pMDI. These data were obtained in vitro using a cascade impactor. All 3 bottles and the OpT were similar (p > 0.05) in reducing the amount of albuterol emitted as large particles (> 4.7 microns) to less than 10 micrograms. The different sized bottles (from 280 ml to 500 ml) produced identical quantities of albuterol in the fine particle and ultrafine particle ranges (p > 0.05). All of the sample bottle spacers emitted a higher amount (p < 0.002) of fine and ultrafine particles than the OpT and pMDI alone. The OpT resulted in a significantly higher fraction of fine particles (p < 0.05) and a greater quantity of drug (p < 0.05) in the ultrafine range as compared to the MDI only. The sizes of particles obtained from the bottle spacers are those that have a high probability of reaching the lower airway; however, the clinical relevance of these findings remains to be determined. PMID:11769021

  8. Accuracy of Different Putty-Wash Impression Techniques with Various Spacer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Aman; Singh, Vijay Pratap

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the most important steps is accurate impression making for fabrication of fixed partial denture. The two different putty-wash techniques that are commonly used are: (1) Putty-wash one-step technique, (2) putty-wash two-step technique. A uniform wash space is needed for an accurate impression. Nissan et al recommended the use of two-step technique for accurate impression making as there is uniform wash space for the light body material to polymerize. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of stone casts obtained from different putty-wash impression techniques using various spacer thickness. The critical factor that influences the accuracy of putty-wash impression techniques is the controlled wash bulk which is absent in one-step putty-wash impression technique and with polyethylene spacer was used. How to cite this article: Chugh A, Arora A, Singh VP. Accuracy of Different Putty-Wash Impression Techniques with Various Spacer Thickness. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(1):33-38. PMID:25206132

  9. [The use of SPACER in the surgical treatment of periendoprosthetic hip infections--own experience].

    PubMed

    Zieńczuk, Witold; Janowiec, Sebastian; Bednarenko, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    The work presents the results of the treatment of 6 patients with periendoprosthetic hip infection with the use of the spacer in the Orthopaetic-Traumatic Ward between 01. 09. 2010 and 31. 12. 2013. Each case of infection was treated in two stages. In the first stage, the primary endoprothesis and inflammatory site were removed, and SPACER was implanted. In the second stage, after subsidence of clinical and laboratory symptoms of infection, the surgery was performed involving exchange of the SPACER to a revisory endoprothesis . All the patients were administered Vancomicine intravenously from the day of surgery until the results of bacterial culture were obtained. Then the antibiotic was given intravenously according to the antibiogram for 10 days; in case of negative culture, the therapy with Vancmicinewas continued for 10 days. This was followed by the administration of an oral antibiotic according to antibiogram for 6 weeks, and in case of negative culture, Biseptol 2 x 960 mg was given also for 6 weeks. The second stage of the procedure was carried out between the third and sixth month after the first surgery. In 5 patients inflammatory condition subsided, and a functional result was assessed by the patients as good. In one case inflammation did not heal and the patient remains with "hanging hip"; the result of the treatment was assessed as bad. PMID:26827556

  10. Plane wave scattering from a plasmonic nanowire array spacer-separated from a plasmonic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Arun; Trivedi, Rahul; Dhawan, Anuj

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical analysis of the electromagnetic response of a plasmonic nanowire–spacer–plasmonic film system. The analytical solution presented in this paper is a full-wave solution, which is used to compute the fields scattered by the plasmonic nanostructure system on illumination by a plane electromagnetic wave. The physical structure comprises of an array of plasmonic nanowires made of a plasmonic metal such as gold or silver placed over a plasmonic film of the same material and separated from it by a dielectric spacer such as silica or alumina. Such a nanostructure exhibits a spectrum that is extremely sensitive to various geometric and electromagnetic parameters such as spacer thickness and spacer refractive index, which makes it favourable for various sensing applications such as chemical and biological sensing, strain sensing, position sensing, vibration sensing, and thickness sensing. We report a comparison of our analytical solution with a numerical rigorous coupled wave analysis of the same structure with the plasmonic medium being treated as local in nature.

  11. Effects of water-soluble spacers on the hydrophobic association of fluorocarbon modified polyacrylamide

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, F.S.; Hogen-Esch, T.E.

    1993-12-31

    A number of acrylamide-acrylate copolymers were synthesized in which the acrylate (CH{sub 2}=CHCOO(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub n}R{sub t}) is hydrophobic on account of the presence of a 1,1-dihydroperfluorooctyl group (R{sub F}) connected to the acrylate via a-(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub n} hydrophobic spacer (n=0-3). Copolymerization of the two comonomers was carried out in aqueous media in the presence of potassium perfluoro octanoate and acetone (10 vol%) and was initiated by sodium metabisufite and ammonium persulfate at 50{degrees}C. The Brookfield viscosities measured at 0.4 sec{sup {minus}1} as a function of comonomer molar content gave bell-shaped curves having maxima at .10-.15 mole% comonomer except for the comonomer without hydrophilic spacer (n=0) where the maximum is at .60 mole%. The viscosity maxima of the copolymers are quite dependent on the value of n giving the highest viscosities at n=3 (45,000 cp) that decreases value of n. The increased effectiveness of the longer spacers is attributed to decreased intermolecular excluded volume effects in the formation of the polymer assemblies.

  12. Accuracy of different putty-wash impression techniques with various spacer thickness.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Anshul; Arora, Aman; Singh, Vijay Pratap

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important steps is accurate impression making for fabrication of fixed partial denture. The two different putty-wash techniques that are commonly used are: (1) Putty-wash one-step technique, (2) putty-wash two-step technique. A uniform wash space is needed for an accurate impression. Nissan et al recommended the use of two-step technique for accurate impression making as there is uniform wash space for the light body material to polymerize. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of stone casts obtained from different putty-wash impression techniques using various spacer thickness. The critical factor that influences the accuracy of putty-wash impression techniques is the controlled wash bulk which is absent in one-step putty-wash impression technique and with polyethylene spacer was used. How to cite this article: Chugh A, Arora A, Singh VP. Accuracy of Different Putty-Wash Impression Techniques with Various Spacer Thickness. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(1):33-38.

  13. Heat transfer enhancement with mixing vane spacers using the field synergy principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lixin; Zhou, Mengjun; Tian, Zihao

    2016-08-01

    The single-phase heat transfer characteristics in a PWR fuel assembly are important. Many investigations attempt to obtain the heat transfer characteristics by studying the flow features in a 5´5 rod bundle with a spacer grid. The field synergy principle is used to discuss the mechanism of heat transfer enhancement using mixing vanes according to computational fluid dynamics results, including a spacer grid without mixing vanes, one with a split mixing vane, and one with a separate mixing vane. The results show that the field synergy principle is feasible to explain the mechanism of heat transfer enhancement in a fuel assembly. The enhancement in subchannels is more effective than on the rod's surface. If the pressure loss is ignored, the performance of the split mixing vane is superior to the separate mixing vane based on the enhanced heat transfer. Increasing the blending angle of the split mixing vane improves heat transfer enhancement, the maximum of which is 7.1%. Increasing the blending angle of the separate mixing vane did not significantly enhance heat transfer in the rod bundle, and even prevented heat transfer at a blending angle of 50°. This finding testifies to the feasibility of predicting heat transfer in a rod bundle with a spacer grid by field synergy, and upon comparison with analyzed flow features only, the field synergy method may provide more accurate guidance for optimizing the use of mixing vanes.

  14. Design, Synthesis and Hydrolytic Behavior of Mutual Prodrugs of NSAIDs with Gabapentin Using Glycol Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Monther Faisal; Alsaad, Hiba Najeh

    2012-01-01

    The free –COOH present in NSAIDs is thought to be responsible for the GI irritation associated with all traditional NSAIDs. Exploitation of mutual prodrugs is an approach wherein the NSAID is covalently bounded to a second pharmacologically active carrier/drug with the ultimate aim of reducing the gastric irritation. In this study some NSAIDs were conjugated with gabapentin via ester bonds using glycol spacers with the expectation of reducing gastric adverse effects and obtaining synergistic analgesic effects. The kinetics of ester hydrolysis were studied in two different non enzymatic buffer solutions at pH 1.2 and 7.4, as well as in 80% human plasma using HPLC with chloroform -methanol as mobile phase. Compounds 9a–c with ethylene glycol spacers showed significant stability at buffer solutions with half lives ranging from about 8–25 h, while the underwent a reasonable plasma hydrolysis (49%–88%) in 2 h. Compound 9d with a propylene glycol spacer shows a higher rate of enzymatic hydrolysis than the corresponding ethylene glycol compound 9c. The result of compounds 9a-c indicate that these compounds may be stable during their passage through the GIT until reaching the blood circulation. PMID:24281258

  15. Transport and deposition of pharmaceutical particles in three commercial spacer-MDI combinations.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, A; Normandie, M; Yousefi, M; Saidi, M S; Ahmadi, G

    2014-11-01

    Respiratory drug delivery has been under the research spotlight for the past few decades, mainly due to the high incidence of pulmonary diseases and the fact that this type of delivery offers the highest efficiency for treatment. Despite its invaluable benefits, there are some major drawbacks to respiratory drug delivery, the most important of which being poor delivery efficiency and relatively high drug deposition in undesirable regions, such as the mouth cavity. One way to improve the efficiency of respiratory drug delivery with metered-dose inhalers is placing a respiratory spacer between the inhaler exit and the mouth. It is argued that high drug deposition in the immediate airways of the respiratory system is strongly affected by relatively high initial momentum of pharmaceutical particles leaving the inhaler. A respiratory spacer, however, can provide an expansion region in which the initial momentum of particles can subside. As a result, particles enter the patient׳s oral cavity more gradually and are more likely to reach the desired regions. In this study, the effectiveness of using three commercial spacers paired with a commercial inhaler is examined through numerical investigation of fluid flow and particle transport phenomena. Particles ranging from 1 to 50 µm in diameter are tracked using a Lagrangian point of view and fluid flow fields are resolved using the LRN k-ω turbulence model. A novel particle injection method is introduced and is demonstrated to be able to adequately capture the effects of particle initial momentum. Lastly, a few design suggestions are made.

  16. Structure and variation of human ribosomal DNA: the external transcribed spacer and adjacent regions.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, G N; Szura, L L; Rushford, C; Jackson, D; Erickson, J

    1982-01-01

    A group of human ribosomal DNA (rDNA) recombinants that include the probable site for initiation of transcription have been examined for sequence polymorphism. A detailed restriction map of one rDNA insert was constructed using plasmid subclones and end-labeled segments. Comparison of 16 similar rDNA inserts by restriction and heteroduplex analysis demonstrated striking conservation of the external transcribed spacer and 18S gene regions, but defined a region where restriction sites for the enzymes Sma I, Hpa II, and Hha I become frequent or variable. This region extends for about 400--800 base pairs (bp) at the left end of the rDNA insert and is postulated to contain nontranscribed spacer sequences. The use of cloned rDNA segments as probes for the restriction analysis of genomic rDNA has demonstrated certain fixed sites in the nontranscribed spacer that do not vary significantly among different individuals or tumor cell lines. In contrast, restriction with the enzyme Sal I reveals several variable fragments, one of which has been found only in a retinoblastoma cell line. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6282117

  17. Place field repetition and spatial learning in a multicompartment environment

    PubMed Central

    Grieves, Roddy M.; Jenkins, Bryan W.; Harland, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have shown that place cells in the hippocampus possess firing fields that repeat in physically similar, parallel environments. These results imply that it should be difficult for animals to distinguish parallel environments at a behavioral level. To test this, we trained rats on a novel odor‐location task in an environment with four parallel compartments which had previously been shown to yield place field repetition. A second group of animals was trained on the same task, but with the compartments arranged in different directions, an arrangement we hypothesised would yield less place field repetition. Learning of the odor‐location task in the parallel compartments was significantly impaired relative to learning in the radially arranged compartments. Fewer animals acquired the full discrimination in the parallel compartments compared to those trained in the radial compartments, and the former also required many more sessions to reach criterion compared to the latter. To confirm that the arrangement of compartments yielded differences in place cell repetition, in a separate group of animals we recorded from CA1 place cells in both environments. We found that CA1 place cells exhibited repeated fields across four parallel local compartments, but did not do so when the same compartments were arranged radially. To confirm that the differences in place field repetition across the parallel and radial compartments depended on their angular arrangement, and not incidental differences in access to an extra‐maze visual landmark, we repeated the recordings in a second set of rats in the absence of the orientation landmark. We found, once again, that place fields showed repetition in parallel compartments, and did not do so in radially arranged compartments. Thus place field repetition, or lack thereof, in these compartments was not dependent on extra‐maze cues. Together, these results imply that place field repetition constrains spatial learning

  18. Place field repetition and spatial learning in a multicompartment environment.

    PubMed

    Grieves, Roddy M; Jenkins, Bryan W; Harland, Bruce C; Wood, Emma R; Dudchenko, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that place cells in the hippocampus possess firing fields that repeat in physically similar, parallel environments. These results imply that it should be difficult for animals to distinguish parallel environments at a behavioral level. To test this, we trained rats on a novel odor-location task in an environment with four parallel compartments which had previously been shown to yield place field repetition. A second group of animals was trained on the same task, but with the compartments arranged in different directions, an arrangement we hypothesised would yield less place field repetition. Learning of the odor-location task in the parallel compartments was significantly impaired relative to learning in the radially arranged compartments. Fewer animals acquired the full discrimination in the parallel compartments compared to those trained in the radial compartments, and the former also required many more sessions to reach criterion compared to the latter. To confirm that the arrangement of compartments yielded differences in place cell repetition, in a separate group of animals we recorded from CA1 place cells in both environments. We found that CA1 place cells exhibited repeated fields across four parallel local compartments, but did not do so when the same compartments were arranged radially. To confirm that the differences in place field repetition across the parallel and radial compartments depended on their angular arrangement, and not incidental differences in access to an extra-maze visual landmark, we repeated the recordings in a second set of rats in the absence of the orientation landmark. We found, once again, that place fields showed repetition in parallel compartments, and did not do so in radially arranged compartments. Thus place field repetition, or lack thereof, in these compartments was not dependent on extra-maze cues. Together, these results imply that place field repetition constrains spatial learning.

  19. Visible light dynamical diffraction in a 1-D photonic crystal-based interferometer with an extremely thin spacer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, I. R.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of light diffraction in a Fabry-Pérot-like interferometer composed of two 1-D photonic crystals and a nanometer-thick spacer layer are analytically investigated. It is shown that the resonant enhancement of light wave intensity in such a layer is possible because of light dynamical diffraction from the photonic crystals of the interferometer. Numerical simulations of (i) light reflectivity and transmittance curves of the interferometer having an ultra-thin spacer layer (its thickness changes from less than 1 nm to about 10 nm) and (ii) the resonant distribution of the light wave intensity in the vicinity of the layer are performed. Based on the numerical simulations, potentialities for the determination of the structural parameters (e.g., thicknesses and refraction indexes) of ultra-thin spacer films are discussed. A difference is found to appear in resonant intensity enhancements inside the ultra-thin spacer layers between s- and p-polarized light waves.

  20. Binding of 12-s-12 dimeric surfactants to calf thymus DNA: Evaluation of the spacer length influence.

    PubMed

    Sarrión, Beatriz; Bernal, Eva; Martín, Victoria Isabel; López-López, Manuel; López-Cornejo, Pilar; García-Calderón, Margarita; Moyá, María Luisa

    2016-08-01

    Several cationic dimeric surfactants have shown high affinity towards DNA. Bis-quaternary ammonium salts (m-s-m) have been the most common type of dimeric surfactants investigated and it is generally admitted that those that posses a short spacer (s≤3) show better efficiency to bind or compact DNA. However, experimental results in this work show that 12-s-12 surfactants with long spacers make the surfactant/ctDNA complexation more favorable than those with short spacers. A larger contribution of the hydrophobic interactions, which control the binding Gibbs energy, as well as a higher average charge of the surfactant molecules bound to the nucleic acid, which favors the electrostatic attractions, could explain the experimental observations. Dimeric surfactants with intermediate spacer length seem to be the less efficient for DNA binding.

  1. Modifying exchange-spring behavior of CoPt/NiFe bilayer by inserting a Pt or Ru spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Jen-Hwa Tsai, C. L.; Lee, C.-M.; Saravanan, P.

    2015-05-07

    We herein explore the possibility of obtaining tunable tilted magnetic anisotropy in ordered-CoPt (5 nm)/NiFe(t{sub NiFe}) bilayers through modifying their exchange spring behavior by inserting Pt and Ru-spacers. The tuning process of tilt angle magnetization of NiFe-layer was systematically investigated by varying the Pt or Ru thickness (t{sub Pt} or t{sub Ru}) from 0 to 8 nm at different thicknesses of NiFe (t{sub NiFe} = 1.5, 4.0, and 6.0 nm). Polar magneto-optic Kerr effect (p-MOKE) studies reveal that the bilayers grown in absence of spacers exhibit almost a rectangular hysteresis loop. With the insertion of Pt-spacer, the loop becomes more and more tilted as t{sub Pt} increases; whereas, in the case of Ru-spacer, the nature of the loops is not simply changing in one direction. The estimated SQR{sub ⊥} (= θ{sub r}/θ{sub s}) values from the p-MOKE loops are found to monotonically decrease with increasing t{sub Pt} when t{sub Pt} ≦ 4 nm. In contrast, in the case of Ru-spacer, an oscillatory behavior for the SQR{sub ⊥} values is apparent when t{sub Ru} ≦ 4 nm. As a result, an oscillatory tilted angle of NiFe spin configuration was obtained in the case of Ru-spacer; while a decoupling effect was prominent for the Pt-spacer. The results of present study reveal that the insertion of Pt and Ru-spacers as an appropriate means for realizing tunable tilted magnetic anisotropy in the CoPt/NiFe exchange springs.

  2. Postfusion magnetic resonance imaging artifacts caused by a titanium, cobalt-chromium-molybdenum, and carbon intervertebral disc spacer.

    PubMed

    Ernstberger, Thorsten; Heidrich, Gabert

    2007-04-01

    Intervertebral spacers for anterior spine fusion are made of different materials, such as titanium and CoCrMo-alloys or carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP). Implant-related susceptibility artifacts can decrease the quality of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. This cadaveric study aimed to demonstrate the extent that implant-related MRI artifacting affects the postfusion differentiation of the spinal canal (SC) and intervertebral disc space (IDS). In 6 cadaveric porcine spines, we evaluated the postimplantation MRI scans of a titanium, CoCrMo-spacer and CFRP-spacer that differed in shape and surface qualities. A spacer made of human cortical bone was used as a control. A defined evaluation unit was divided into regions of interest (ROI) to characterize the SC and IDS. Considering 15 different MRI sequences read independently by an interobserver-validated team of specialists artifact-affected image quality of the median MRI slice was rated on a score of 0-1-2-3. A maximum score of 15 points for the SC and 9 points for the IDS (100%) was possible. Turbo spin echo sequences produced the best scores for both spacers and the control. Only the control achieved a score of 100%. For the IDS the CoCrMo-spacer, titanium and CFRP-spacer maximally scored 0%, 0% and 74%, for the SC 60%, 80% and 99%, respectively. By using favored T1 TSE sequences the CFRP-spacer represented clear advantages in postfusion spinal imaging. Independent of artifact dimensions the used scoring system allowed us to create an implant-related ranking of MRI scan quality in reference to the bone control.

  3. Analysis of the pan genome of Campylobacter jejuni isolates recovered from poultry by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and repetitive sequence polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) reveals different discriminatory capabilities.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Melissa K; Lane, Alison B; Law, Bibiana F; Miller, William G; Joens, Lynn A; Konkel, Michael E; White, Bryan A

    2009-11-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the leading bacterial causes of food-borne illness in the USA. Molecular typing methods are often used in food safety for identifying sources of infection and pathways of transmission. Moreover, the identification of genetically related isolates (i.e., clades) may facilitate the development of intervention strategies for control and prevention of food-borne diseases. We analyzed the pan genome (i.e., core and variable genes) of 63 C. jejuni isolates recovered from chickens raised in conventional, organic, and free-range poultry flocks to gain insight into the genetic diversity of C. jejuni isolates recovered from different environments. We assessed the discriminatory power of three genotyping methods [i.e., pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR)]. The rep-PCR fingerprint was generated by determining the presence of repetitive sequences that are interspersed throughout the genome via repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR), and BOX element PCR (BOX-PCR) and combining the data to form a composite fingerprint. The genetic fingerprints were subjected to computer-assisted pattern analysis. Comparison of the three genotypic methods revealed that repREB-PCR showed greater discriminatory power than PFGE and MLST. ERIC-PCR and BOX-PCR yielded the highest number of PCR products and greatest reproducibility. Regardless of the genotyping method, C. jejuni isolates recovered from chickens reared in conventional, organic, and free-range environments all exhibit a high level of genotypic diversity.

  4. Intergenic sequence between Arabidopsis caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic/heat shock protein100 and choline kinase genes functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ratnesh Chandra; Grover, Anil

    2014-11-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the At1g74310 locus encodes for caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic (ClpB-C)/heat shock protein100 protein (AtClpB-C), which is critical for the acquisition of thermotolerance, and At1g74320 encodes for choline kinase (AtCK2) that catalyzes the first reaction in the Kennedy pathway for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. Previous work has established that the knockout mutants of these genes display heat-sensitive phenotypes. While analyzing the AtClpB-C promoter and upstream genomic regions in this study, we noted that AtClpB-C and AtCK2 genes are head-to-head oriented on chromosome 1 of the Arabidopsis genome. Expression analysis showed that transcripts of these genes are rapidly induced in response to heat stress treatment. In stably transformed Arabidopsis plants harboring this intergenic sequence between head-to-head oriented green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter genes, both transcripts and proteins of the two reporters were up-regulated upon heat stress. Four heat shock elements were noted in the intergenic region by in silico analysis. In the homozygous transfer DNA insertion mutant Salk_014505, 4,393-bp transfer DNA is inserted at position -517 upstream of ATG of the AtClpB-C gene. As a result, AtCk2 loses proximity to three of the four heat shock elements in the mutant line. Heat-inducible expression of the AtCK2 transcript was completely lost, whereas the expression of AtClpB-C was not affected in the mutant plants. Our results suggest that the 1,329-bp intergenic fragment functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter and the region governing the heat inducibility is possibly shared between the two genes. We propose a model in which AtClpB-C shares its regulatory region with heat-induced choline kinase, which has a possible role in heat signaling.

  5. Repetitively Q-switched Nd:BeL lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, J.; Birnbaum, M.; Deshazer, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical characteristics which will ultimately limit the performance of Nd:BeL at high average power levels were investigated. The output beam characteristics (pulse width, peak power, beam dimensions and collimation) were determined at high repetition rates for both Nd:BeL and Nd:YAG. The output of Nd:BeL was shown to exceed that of Nd:YAG by a factor of 2.7 at low Q-switched repetition rates (1 Hz). This result follows from the smaller stimulated emission cross section of x-axis Nb:BeL compared to that of NdYAG by the same factor. At high repetition rates (10 Hz) the output of Nd:Bel falls to a level of three-fifths of its low repetition rate value while under similar tests the output of Nd:YAG remains essentially constant. A comparison of the measured values of the elasto-optic coefficients, the dn/dT values and the linear expansion coefficients for BeL and YAG failed to provide an explanation for the performance of BeL; however, thermal lensing was observed in Nd:BeL. Results imply that the output of a high repetition rate Q-switched Nd:BeL laser (high thermal loading) could be dramatically increased by utilization of a resonator design to compensate for the thermal lensing effects.

  6. Characterizing exploration behavior in spatial neglect: omissions and repetitive search.

    PubMed

    Olk, Bettina; Harvey, Monika

    2006-11-01

    In search tasks, patients with spatial neglect typically fail to respond to stimuli on the contralesional side. Such behavior has been associated with hyperattention to the ipsilesional side and a deficit in disengaging from attended stimuli. The present study investigated whether such explanations can also account for a further kind of behavior frequently shown by neglect patients: repetitive returns to previously indicated stimuli, particularly on the ipsilesional side. A group of neglect patients was tested along with a group of healthy participants and a patient control group without neglect. Participants performed an exploration task in which they searched for targets defined by their shape or for all stimuli either with the aid of vision or blindfolded. The results showed differential effects of reducing the salience of visual stimuli by blindfolding. For a subgroup of patients, detection rate improved, while for others the percentage of omissions increased. However, contrary to the control groups, blindfolding had no effect on repetitive search in the neglect group, inconsistent with hyperattention, a disengage or impaired working memory deficits. The rate of repetitive returns to previously indicated locations did not seem to be associated with the percentage of omitted stimuli, suggesting that repetitive returns may be best explained by a disruption of systematic search and lack of volitional control in spatial neglect. The results further underline the importance of considering repetitive search behavior in addition to omissions in standard neglect assessments. PMID:16979143

  7. Selective scanpath repetition during memory-guided visual search

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Jordana S.; Bone, Michael B.; Dragan, Michelle C.; Hoffman, Kari L.; Buchsbaum, Bradley R.; Ryan, Jennifer D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Visual search efficiency improves with repetition of a search display, yet the mechanisms behind these processing gains remain unclear. According to Scanpath Theory, memory retrieval is mediated by repetition of the pattern of eye movements or “scanpath” elicited during stimulus encoding. Using this framework, we tested the prediction that scanpath recapitulation reflects relational memory guidance during repeated search events. Younger and older subjects were instructed to find changing targets within flickering naturalistic scenes. Search efficiency (search time, number of fixations, fixation duration) and scanpath similarity (repetition) were compared across age groups for novel (V1) and repeated (V2) search events. Younger adults outperformed older adults on all efficiency measures at both V1 and V2, while the search time benefit for repeated viewing (V1–V2) did not differ by age. Fixation-binned scanpath similarity analyses revealed repetition of initial and final (but not middle) V1 fixations at V2, with older adults repeating more initial V1 fixations than young adults. In young adults only, early scanpath similarity correlated negatively with search time at test, indicating increased efficiency, whereas the similarity of V2 fixations to middle V1 fixations predicted poor search performance. We conclude that scanpath compression mediates increased search efficiency by selectively recapitulating encoding fixations that provide goal-relevant input. Extending Scanpath Theory, results suggest that scanpath repetition varies as a function of time and memory integrity. PMID:27570471

  8. Characterizing exploration behavior in spatial neglect: omissions and repetitive search.

    PubMed

    Olk, Bettina; Harvey, Monika

    2006-11-01

    In search tasks, patients with spatial neglect typically fail to respond to stimuli on the contralesional side. Such behavior has been associated with hyperattention to the ipsilesional side and a deficit in disengaging from attended stimuli. The present study investigated whether such explanations can also account for a further kind of behavior frequently shown by neglect patients: repetitive returns to previously indicated stimuli, particularly on the ipsilesional side. A group of neglect patients was tested along with a group of healthy participants and a patient control group without neglect. Participants performed an exploration task in which they searched for targets defined by their shape or for all stimuli either with the aid of vision or blindfolded. The results showed differential effects of reducing the salience of visual stimuli by blindfolding. For a subgroup of patients, detection rate improved, while for others the percentage of omissions increased. However, contrary to the control groups, blindfolding had no effect on repetitive search in the neglect group, inconsistent with hyperattention, a disengage or impaired working memory deficits. The rate of repetitive returns to previously indicated locations did not seem to be associated with the percentage of omitted stimuli, suggesting that repetitive returns may be best explained by a disruption of systematic search and lack of volitional control in spatial neglect. The results further underline the importance of considering repetitive search behavior in addition to omissions in standard neglect assessments.

  9. Chromosomal distribution and evolution of repetitive DNAs in fish.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, M B; Bertollo, L A C

    2012-01-01

    Fish exhibit the greatest diversity of all vertebrates, making this group extremely attractive for the study of a number of evolutionary questions. Fish genomes have intrinsic characteristics that may be responsible for the amazing diversity of fish species observed, but little is known about their structure and organization. A large amount of data from mapping of repetitive DNA sequences of several species has been generated, providing an important source of information for better understanding the involvement of repetitive DNA sequences in chromosomal organization. Almost all classes of repeated DNAs have been mapped in fishes, and all fish genomes analyzed contain at least one, mostly all types of repetitive DNAs. DNA sequence data combined with the chromosomal mapping of these repeated elements by means of cytogenetic techniques can provide a clearer picture of the genome, which is not yet clearly defined, even if already sequenced. In this chapter, we do not aim to analyze all available data on the chromosomal distribution of repetitive DNAs in fish species, but instead wish to draw attention to the impact of repetitive DNA sequences on fish karyotyping and genome evolution, with a particular focus on B chromosome origin and maintenance and on the differentiation of sex chromosomes. We also discuss the integration of chromosome analysis and genomic data, which represents a promising tool for fish cytogenomics.

  10. Flexible high-repetition-rate ultrafast fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dong; Liu, Xueming; Sun, Zhipei; Lu, Hua; Han, Dongdong; Wang, Guoxi; Wang, Fengqiu

    2013-01-01

    High-repetition-rate pulses have widespread applications in the fields of fiber communications, frequency comb, and optical sensing. Here, we have demonstrated high-repetition-rate ultrashort pulses in an all-fiber laser by exploiting an intracavity Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) as a comb filter. The repetition rate of the laser can be tuned flexibly from about 7 to 1100 GHz by controlling the optical path difference between the two arms of the MZI. The pulse duration can be reduced continuously from about 10.1 to 0.55 ps with the spectral width tunable from about 0.35 to 5.7 nm by manipulating the intracavity polarization controller. Numerical simulations well confirm the experimental observations and show that filter-driven four-wave mixing effect, induced by the MZI, is the main mechanism that governs the formation of the high-repetition-rate pulses. This all-fiber-based laser is a simple and low-cost source for various applications where high-repetition-rate pulses are necessary. PMID:24226153

  11. A Rationale for Going Back to the Future: Use of Disposable Spacers for Pressurised Metered Dose Inhalers.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Mark; Bruin, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of pressurised metered dose inhalers (MDIs) in the mid-1950s completely transformed respiratory treatment. Despite decades of availability and healthcare support and development of teaching aids and devices to promote better use, poor pMDI user technique remains a persistent issue. The main pMDI user aid is the spacer/valved holding chamber (VHC) device. Spacer/chamber features (size, shape, configuration, construction material, and hygiene considerations) can vie with clinical effectiveness (to deliver the same dose as a correctly used pMDI), user convenience, cost, and accessibility. Unsurprisingly, improvised, low-cost alternatives (plastic drink bottles, paper cups, and paper towel rolls) have been pressed into seemingly effective service. A UK law change permitting schools to hold emergency inhalers and spacers has prompted a development project to design a low-cost, user-friendly, disposable, and recyclable spacer. This paper spacer requires neither preuse priming nor washing, and has demonstrated reproducible lung delivery of salbutamol sulphate pMDI, comparable to an industry-standard VHC, an alternative paperboard VHC, and pMDI alone. This new device appears to perform better than these other VHC devices at the low flow rates thought achievable by paediatric patients. The data suggest that this disposable spacer may have a place in the single-use emergency setting. PMID:26491563

  12. The non-signaling extracellular spacer domain of chimeric antigen receptors is decisive for in vivo antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hudecek, Michael; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Kosasih, Paula L.; Silva-Benedict, Anne; Liu, Lingfeng; Rader, Christoph; Jensen, Michael C.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2015-01-01

    The use of synthetic chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) to redirect T cells to recognize tumor provides a powerful new approach to cancer immunotherapy; however the attributes of CARs that ensure optimal in vivo tumor recognition remain to be defined. Here, we analyze the influence of length and composition of IgG-derived extracellular spacer domains on the function of CARs. Our studies demonstrate that CD19-CARs with a long spacer from IgG4 hinge-CH2-CH3 are functional in vitro but lack antitumor activity in vivo due to interaction between the Fc domain within the spacer and the Fc receptor-bearing myeloid cells, leading to activation-induced T-cell death. We demonstrate that in vivo persistence and antitumor effects of CAR-T-cells with a long spacer can be restored by modifying distinct regions in the CH2 domain that are essential for Fc receptor binding. Our studies demonstrate that modifications that abrogate binding to Fc receptors are crucial for CARs in which a long spacer is obligatory for tumor recognition as shown here for a ROR1-specific CAR. These results demonstrate that the length and composition of the extracellular spacer domain that lacks intrinsic signaling function can be decisive in the design of CARs for optimal in vivo activity. PMID:25212991

  13. A Rationale for Going Back to the Future: Use of Disposable Spacers for Pressurised Metered Dose Inhalers

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Mark; Bruin, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of pressurised metered dose inhalers (MDIs) in the mid-1950s completely transformed respiratory treatment. Despite decades of availability and healthcare support and development of teaching aids and devices to promote better use, poor pMDI user technique remains a persistent issue. The main pMDI user aid is the spacer/valved holding chamber (VHC) device. Spacer/chamber features (size, shape, configuration, construction material, and hygiene considerations) can vie with clinical effectiveness (to deliver the same dose as a correctly used pMDI), user convenience, cost, and accessibility. Unsurprisingly, improvised, low-cost alternatives (plastic drink bottles, paper cups, and paper towel rolls) have been pressed into seemingly effective service. A UK law change permitting schools to hold emergency inhalers and spacers has prompted a development project to design a low-cost, user-friendly, disposable, and recyclable spacer. This paper spacer requires neither preuse priming nor washing, and has demonstrated reproducible lung delivery of salbutamol sulphate pMDI, comparable to an industry-standard VHC, an alternative paperboard VHC, and pMDI alone. This new device appears to perform better than these other VHC devices at the low flow rates thought achievable by paediatric patients. The data suggest that this disposable spacer may have a place in the single-use emergency setting. PMID:26491563

  14. Species-level identification of isolates of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex by sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene spacer region.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsien Chang; Wei, Yu Fang; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Tang, Chung Tao; Chang, Tsung Chain

    2005-04-01

    The species Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, A. baumannii, genomic species 3, and genomic species 13TU included in the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex are genetically highly related and difficult to distinguish phenotypically. Except for A. calcoaceticus, they are all important nosocomial species. In the present study, the usefulness of the 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer (ITS) sequence for the differentiation of (genomic) species in the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex was evaluated. The ITSs of 11 reference strains of the complex and 17 strains of other (genomic) species of Acinetobacter were sequenced. The ITS lengths (607 to 638 bp) and sequences were highly conserved for strains within the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. Intraspecies ITS sequence similarities ranged from 0.99 to 1.0, whereas interspecies similarities varied from 0.86 to 0.92. By using these criteria, 79 clinical isolates identified as A. calcoaceticus (18 isolates) or A. baumannii (61 isolates) with the API 20 NE system (bioMerieux Vitek, Marcy l'Etoile, France) were identified as A. baumannii (46 isolates), genomic species 3 (19 isolates), and genomic species 13TU (11 isolates) by ITS sequencing. An identification rate of 96.2% (76 of 79 isolates) was obtained by using ITS sequence analysis for identification of isolates in the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex, and the accuracy of the method was confirmed for a subset of strains by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis and genomic DNA analysis by AFLP analysis by using libraries of profiles of reference strains. In conclusion, ITS sequence-based identification is reliable and provides a promising tool for elucidation of the clinical significance of the different species of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex.

  15. Masked repetition priming and proportion effects under cognitive load.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Glen E; Stalinski, Stephanie M

    2008-06-01

    The authors used a cognitive load manipulation (rehearsing a string of digits during the trial) to test the automaticity of (a) masked repetition priming and (b) the masked repetition proportion (RP) effect (i.e., greater priming when the proportion of repetition-prime trials is higher) in the lexical decision task. The RP (.2 vs. .8) was varied across blocks. Masked priming was not reduced under load compared with a no-load group. Surprisingly, only the load group showed an RP effect in response latencies, although the no-load group showed an RP effect in the error rates. Our results show that masked priming is automatic, yet the influence of masked primes can nonetheless be adjusted at an unconscious level. Implications for accounts of masked priming are discussed. PMID:18572990

  16. Body-focused repetitive behavior disorders in ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Stein, Dan J

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the question of how body-focused repetitive behavior disorders (e.g., trichotillomania and skin-picking disorder) should be characterized in ICD-11. The article reviews the historical nosology of the two disorders and the current approaches in DSM-5 and ICD-10. Although data are limited and mixed regarding the optimal relationship between body-focused repetitive behavior disorders and nosological categories, these conditions should be included within the obsessive-compulsive and related disorders category, as this is how most clinicians see these behaviors, and as this may optimize clinical utility. The descriptions of these disorders should largely mirror those in DSM-5, given the evidence from recent field surveys. The recommendations regarding ICD-11 and body-focused repetitive behavior disorders should promote the global identification and treatment of these conditions in primary care settings. PMID:25388613

  17. Body-focused repetitive behavior disorders in ICD-11.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Stein, Dan J

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the question of how body-focused repetitive behavior disorders (e.g., trichotillomania and skin-picking disorder) should be characterized in ICD-11. The article reviews the historical nosology of the two disorders and the current approaches in DSM-5 and ICD-10. Although data are limited and mixed regarding the optimal relationship between body-focused repetitive behavior disorders and nosological categories, these conditions should be included within the obsessive-compulsive and related disorders category, as this is how most clinicians see these behaviors, and as this may optimize clinical utility. The descriptions of these disorders should largely mirror those in DSM-5, given the evidence from recent field surveys. The recommendations regarding ICD-11 and body-focused repetitive behavior disorders should promote the global identification and treatment of these conditions in primary care settings.

  18. Repeated text in unrelated passages: Repetition versus meaning selection effects.

    PubMed

    Klin, Celia M; Drumm, April M; Ralano, Angela S

    2009-07-01

    Despite previous findings, Klin, Ralano, and Weingartner (2007) found transfer benefits across unrelated passages. After processing an ambiguous phrase in Story A that was biased toward its sarcastic meaning, readers were more likely to interpret the identical phrase in Story B as sarcastic, even though it contained no disambiguating information. In the present experiments, we found both repetition effects (a benefit for the lexical items) and meaning selection effects (a benefit for the selected meaning of the phrase) with short delays between Stories A and B; with longer delays, only repetition effects were found. Whereas decreasing the elaboration of the phrase eliminated both effects, moving the disambiguating context from before to after the phrase eliminated meaning selection effects only. We conclude that meaning selection effects, which are based on conceptual overlap, are more sensitive to context changes and less robust than repetition effects, which are based on both perceptual and conceptual overlap.

  19. Repetition-induced plasticity of motor representations of action sounds.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Nathalie M-P; Simonin, Alexandre; Clarke, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Action-related sounds are known to increase the excitability of motoneurones within the primary motor cortex (M1), but the role of this auditory input remains unclear. We investigated repetition priming-induced plasticity, which is characteristic of semantic representations, in M1 by applying transcranial magnetic stimulation pulses to the hand area. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were larger while subjects were listening to sounds related versus unrelated to manual actions. Repeated exposure to the same manual-action-related sound yielded a significant decrease in MEPs when right, hand area was stimulated; no repetition effect was observed for manual-action-unrelated sounds. The shared repetition priming characteristics suggest that auditory input to the right primary motor cortex is part of auditory semantic representations. PMID:23064984

  20. Harmonic Current Suppression for PMSM by Repetitive Perfect Tracking Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    PM motor drives are widely used for high performance servo applications. However, PM motor has imperfect sinusoidal flux distribution which causes harmonic current. Dead time of inverter and current measurement error leads to harmonic current, too. The repetitive control method was applied to the harmonic current suppression. For the repetitive control which is based on the internal model principle, the characteristic of the harmonic suppression is excellent. However, it amplifies inter-harmonic components. The inter-harmonic components have frequencies with non-integral multiples of the fundamental frequency. Therefore, the feedforward compensation is applied for the harmonic current to improve a suppression characteristic. Authors proposed harmonic current suppression control of PM motor in αβ coordinate by using repetitive perfect tracking control with PWM-hold model. Finally, we show the advantages of proposed method by simulations and experiments.

  1. Evidence for Regulation of ECM3 Expression by Methylation of Histone H3 Lysine 4 and Intergenic Transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Raupach, Elizabeth A.; Martens, Joseph A.; Arndt, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription of nonprotein-coding DNA is widespread in eukaryotes and plays important regulatory roles for many genes, including genes that are misregulated in cancer cells. Its pervasiveness presents the potential for a wealth of diverse regulatory roles for noncoding transcription. We previously showed that the act of transcribing noncoding DNA (ncDNA) across the promoter of the protein-coding SER3 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae positions nucleosomes over the upstream activating sequences, leading to strong repression of SER3 transcription. To explore the possibility of other regulatory roles for ncDNA transcription, we selected six candidate S. cerevisiae genes that express ncRNAs over their promoters and analyzed the regulation of one of these genes, ECM3, in detail. Because noncoding transcription can lead to changes in the local chromatin landscape that impinge on the expression of nearby coding genes, we surveyed the effects of various chromatin regulators on the expression of ECM3. These analyses identified roles for the Paf1 complex in positively regulating ECM3 transcription through methylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (K4) and for Paf1 in controlling the pattern of intergenic transcription at this locus. By deleting a putative promoter for the noncoding transcription unit that lies upstream of ECM3, we provide evidence for a positive correlation between intergenic transcription and ECM3 expression. Our results are consistent with a model in which cotranscriptional methylation of histone H3 K4, mediated by the Paf1 complex and noncoding transcription, leads to activation of ECM3 transcription. PMID:27449519

  2. Identification of a novel DRB1 allele through intergenic recombination between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB3∗02 in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weijin; Liu, Xiangjun; Li, Erwei; Zhao, Chenyan; Liu, Qiang; Liang, Zhenglun; Wang, Youchun; Lu, Fengmin

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a novel DRB1 allele was revealed by routine HLA-SBT typing noted for its extensive mismatches to any known DRB1 alleles within the exon 2. Sequences containing the exons 2, 3 of HLA-DRB1, their surrounding introns, and the full-length cDNA of DRB1 were analyzed to determine a possible recombination event. Interestingly, the sequences of entire exon 2 were characterized as DRB3(∗)02:02:01:01/02; while exon 3 were characterized as DRB1(∗)14 like alleles. Further analysis of the sequences using Simplot software suggested that an intergenic recombinant event (i.e. exchange of sequence between non-allelic genes) may have occurred between DRB3(∗)02 allele and DRB1(∗)14 like allele, and the recombination sites are located at intron 1 and the boundary of exon 2 and intron 2 of DRB1. There are 5 CGGGG sequences flanking each side of exon 2 could serve as potential recombination site. Moreover, the full-length cDNA of the novel allele has been identified. The exon 1 and exon 3 to exon 6 share the same sequence as DRB1(∗)14 like alleles. At the mRNA level, the new allele has no significant difference when compared with the other DRB1 allele. This novel recombinant allele is also found to be paternally inherited. In conclusion, this is the first report of a DRB1 and DRB3 intergenic recombination event involving whole exon 2, which generate a new DRB1(∗)14:141.

  3. Genome-Wide Anaplasma phagocytophilum AnkA-DNA Interactions Are Enriched in Intergenic Regions and Gene Promoters and Correlate with Infection-Induced Differential Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dumler, J. Stephen; Sinclair, Sara H.; Pappas-Brown, Valeria; Shetty, Amol C.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum, an obligate intracellular prokaryote, infects neutrophils, and alters cardinal functions via reprogrammed transcription. Large contiguous regions of neutrophil chromosomes are differentially expressed during infection. Secreted A. phagocytophilum effector AnkA transits into the neutrophil or granulocyte nucleus to complex with DNA in heterochromatin across all chromosomes. AnkA binds to gene promoters to dampen cis-transcription and also has features of matrix attachment region (MAR)-binding proteins that regulate three-dimensional chromatin architecture and coordinate transcriptional programs encoded in topologically-associated chromatin domains. We hypothesize that identification of additional AnkA binding sites will better delineate how A. phagocytophilum infection results in reprogramming of the neutrophil genome. Using AnkA-binding ChIP-seq, we showed that AnkA binds broadly throughout all chromosomes in a reproducible pattern, especially at: (i) intergenic regions predicted to be MARs; (ii) within predicted lamina-associated domains; and (iii) at promoters ≤ 3000 bp upstream of transcriptional start sites. These findings provide genome-wide support for AnkA as a regulator of cis-gene transcription. Moreover, the dominant mark of AnkA in distal intergenic regions known to be AT-enriched, coupled with frequent enrichment in the nuclear lamina, provides strong support for its role as a MAR-binding protein and genome “re-organizer.” AnkA must be considered a prime candidate to promote neutrophil reprogramming and subsequent functional changes that belie improved microbial fitness and pathogenicity. PMID:27703927

  4. beta-Cyclodextrin derivatives as carriers to enhance the antiviral activity of an antisense oligonucleotide directed toward a coronavirus intergenic consensus sequence.

    PubMed

    Abdou, S; Collomb, J; Sallas, F; Marsura, A; Finance, C

    1997-01-01

    The ability of cyclodextrins to enhance the antiviral activity of a phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotide has been investigated. A 18-mer oligodeoxynucleotide complementary to the initiation region of the mRNA coding for the spike protein and containing the intergenic consensus sequence of an enteric coronavirus has been tested for antiviral action against virus growth in human adenocarcinoma cells. The phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotide only showed a limited effect on virus growth rate (from 12 to 34% viral inhibition in cells treated with 7.5 to 25 microM oligodeoxynucleotide, respectively, at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1 infectious particle per cell). In the same conditions, the phosphorothioate analogue exhibited stronger antiviral activity, the inhibition increased from 56 to 90%. The inhibitory effect of this analogue was antisense and sequence-specific. Northern blot analysis showed that the sequence-dependent mechanism of action appears to be the inhibition of mRNA transcription. We conclude that the coronavirus intergenic consensus sequence is a good target for an antisense oligonucleotide antiviral action. The properties of the phosphodiester oligonucleotide was improved after its complexation with cyclodextrins. The most important increase of the antiviral activity (90% inhibition) was obtained with only 7.5 microM oligonucleotide complexed to a cyclodextrin derivative, 6-deoxy-6-S-beta-D-galactopyranosyl-6-thio-cyclomalto-heptaose+ ++ in a molar ratio of 1:100. These studies suggest that the use of cyclodextrin derivatives as carrier for phosphodiester oligonucleotides delivery may be an effective method for increasing the therapeutic potential of these compounds in viral infections. PMID:9672621

  5. Oral Language Skills Moderate Nonword Repetition Skills in Children with Dyslexia: A Meta-Analysis of the Role of Nonword Repetition Skills in Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melby-Lervag, Monica; Lervag, Arne

    2012-01-01

    We present a meta-analysis reviewing studies that have focused on the relationship between dyslexia and nonword repetition. The results show that children with dyslexia have poorer nonword repetition skills when compared to both chronological-age and reading-level controls. However, the severity of the nonword repetition problem varies…

  6. Repetition of Deliberate Self-Harm: A Study of the Characteristics and Subsequent Deaths in Patients Presenting to a General Hospital According to Extent of Repetition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haw, Camilla; Bergen, Helen; Casey, Deborah; Hawton, Keith

    2007-01-01

    Repetition of deliberate self-harm (DSH) is common. Some patients repeat multiple times. We have investigated the characteristics of repeaters, and mortality in three groups of DSH patients by repetition status. Data collected by the Oxford Monitoring System for Attempted Suicide were used to examine the pattern of repetition of DSH patients…

  7. Medium Repetition Rate TEA Laser For Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Bruno

    1987-09-01

    The design and performance of an inexpensive compact repetitively pulsed TEA CO2 laser is described. The device uses a modified corona preionization technique and a fast transverse gas flow to achieve high repetition rates. An output energy of 500 mJ per pulse and an out-put power of 6.2W at 40Hz have been obtained. Due to the small energy needed for preionization, the efficiency of the device is high, whereas the gas dissociation is low when compared with commercial laser systems. This results in the relatively small fresh laser gas exchange of 20 ltr h-1 for long term operation.

  8. Prediction of Muscle Performance During Dynamic Repetitive Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byerly, D. L.; Byerly, K. A.; Sognier, M. A.; Squires, W. G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for predicting human muscle performance was developed. Eight test subjects performed a repetitive dynamic exercise to failure using a Lordex spinal machine. Electromyography (EMG) data was collected from the erector spinae. Evaluation of the EMG data using a 5th order Autoregressive (AR) model and statistical regression analysis revealed that an AR parameter, the mean average magnitude of AR poles, can predict performance to failure as early as the second repetition of the exercise. Potential applications to the space program include evaluating on-orbit countermeasure effectiveness, maximizing post-flight recovery, and future real-time monitoring capability during Extravehicular Activity.

  9. Psychopharmacologic interventions for repetitive behaviors in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Soorya, Latha; Kiarashi, Jessica; Hollander, Eric

    2008-10-01

    This article provides an overview of psychopharmacological treatments for repetitive behaviors in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in the context of current conceptualizations of this understudied core symptom domain. The available literature on the widely used selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), including fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, citalopram, escitalopram, and sertraline, are reviewed. In addition to SSRIs, research on effects of other pharmacologic interventions such as divalproex sodium, risperidone, and the neuropeptide oxytocin are presented. To date, data are mixed for interventions commonly prescribed in clinical practice and suggest several areas of investigation in advancing research on the medication management of repetitive behaviors.

  10. Characterizing caregiver responses to restricted and repetitive behaviors in toddlers with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Clare; Gulsrud, Amanda; Shih, Wendy; Hovsepyan, Lilit; Kasari, Connie

    2016-04-01

    Restricted and repetitive behaviors are a core feature of autism spectrum disorder. This descriptive study documented the presence of restricted and repetitive behaviors in 85 toddlers with autism spectrum disorder as they interacted with their caregiver in a play interaction. For each child restricted and repetitive behavior, a caregiver response/non-response was coded. Caregiver responses were rated as successful or unsuccessful. In all, 83 toddlers demonstrated at least one restricted and repetitive behavior in 10 min. The most common child restricted and repetitive behavior was repetitive object use with 72 children displaying at least one instance of this category of restricted and repetitive behavior. Overall, caregivers responded to fewer than half of their child's restricted and repetitive behaviors, and caregiver response varied by child restricted and repetitive behavior type. The most common response was redirection. Success varied by child restricted and repetitive behavior type and caregiver response--redirections were most successful for child verbal and motor restricted and repetitive behaviors, whereas physical or verbal responses were rated more successful for repetitive object use and visual restricted and repetitive behaviors. This study represents the first attempt to characterize how caregivers respond to restricted and repetitive behaviors. Toddlers with autism spectrum disorder are already demonstrating a variety of restricted and repetitive behaviors within the context of a free play sessions, and caregivers differentially and naturally respond to them.

  11. Diversity in a Polymicrobial Community Revealed by Analysis of Viromes, Endolysins and CRISPR Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Treangen, Todd J.; Koren, Sergey; Pop, Mihai; Bhaya, Devaki

    2016-01-01

    The polymicrobial biofilm communities in Mushroom and Octopus Spring in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are well characterized, yet little is known about the phage populations. Dominant species, Synechococcus sp. JA-2-3B'a(2–13), Synechococcus sp. JA-3-3Ab, Chloroflexus sp. Y-400-fl, and Roseiflexus sp. RS-1, contain multiple CRISPR-Cas arrays, suggesting complex interactions with phage predators. To analyze phage populations from Octopus Spring biofilms, we sequenced a viral enriched fraction. To assemble and analyze phage metagenomic data, we developed a custom module, VIRITAS, implemented within the MetAMOS framework. This module bins contigs into groups based on tetranucleotide frequencies and CRISPR spacer-protospacer matching and ORF calling. Using this pipeline we were able to assemble phage sequences into contigs and bin them into three clusters that corroborated with their potential host range. The virome contained 52,348 predicted ORFs; some were clearly phage-like; 9319 ORFs had a recognizable Pfam domain while the rest were hypothetical. Of the recognized domains with CRISPR spacer matches, was the phage endolysin used by lytic phage to disrupt cells. Analysis of the endolysins present in the thermophilic cyanophage contigs revealed a subset of characterized endolysins as well as a Glyco_hydro_108 (PF05838) domain not previously associated with sequenced cyanophages. A search for CRISPR spacer matches to all identified phage endolysins demonstrated that a majority of endolysin domains were targets. This strategy provides a general way to link host and phage as endolysins are known to be widely distributed in bacteriophage. Endolysins can also provide information about host cell wall composition and have the additional potential to be used as targets for novel therapeutics. PMID:27611571

  12. Diversity in a Polymicrobial Community Revealed by Analysis of Viromes, Endolysins and CRISPR Spacers.

    PubMed

    Davison, Michelle; Treangen, Todd J; Koren, Sergey; Pop, Mihai; Bhaya, Devaki

    2016-01-01

    The polymicrobial biofilm communities in Mushroom and Octopus Spring in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are well characterized, yet little is known about the phage populations. Dominant species, Synechococcus sp. JA-2-3B'a(2-13), Synechococcus sp. JA-3-3Ab, Chloroflexus sp. Y-400-fl, and Roseiflexus sp. RS-1, contain multiple CRISPR-Cas arrays, suggesting complex interactions with phage predators. To analyze phage populations from Octopus Spring biofilms, we sequenced a viral enriched fraction. To assemble and analyze phage metagenomic data, we developed a custom module, VIRITAS, implemented within the MetAMOS framework. This module bins contigs into groups based on tetranucleotide frequencies and CRISPR spacer-protospacer matching and ORF calling. Using this pipeline we were able to assemble phage sequences into contigs and bin them into three clusters that corroborated with their potential host range. The virome contained 52,348 predicted ORFs; some were clearly phage-like; 9319 ORFs had a recognizable Pfam domain while the rest were hypothetical. Of the recognized domains with CRISPR spacer matches, was the phage endolysin used by lytic phage to disrupt cells. Analysis of the endolysins present in the thermophilic cyanophage contigs revealed a subset of characterized endolysins as well as a Glyco_hydro_108 (PF05838) domain not previously associated with sequenced cyanophages. A search for CRISPR spacer matches to all identified phage endolysins demonstrated that a majority of endolysin domains were targets. This strategy provides a general way to link host and phage as endolysins are known to be widely distributed in bacteriophage. Endolysins can also provide information about host cell wall composition and have the additional potential to be used as targets for novel therapeutics. PMID:27611571

  13. Ilizarov bone transport combined with antibiotic cement spacer for infected tibial nonunion

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jing; Min, Li; Xiang, Zhou; Huang, Fuguo; Tu, Chongqi; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the curative effect of Ilizarov bone transport combined with antibiotic cement spacer for infected tibial nonunion with bone defect. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 58 patients with infected tibial nonunion from January 2008 to March 2011 at our institution. Patients were treated with complete debridement, radical sequestrectomy, antibiotic cement spacer implantation, bone transport using the Ilizarov external fixator, and soft tissue reconstruction. Clinical efficacy was assessed using Paley’s grading system and patient satisfaction at the last follow-up. Results: Follow-up ranged from 24 to 63 months (average, 31.6 months). Mean size of the tibial defect was 9.2 cm (range, 6-15 cm). The soft tissue defect was closed successfully in all cases. Patients eventually achieved union with a mean bone union index of 1.2 months/cm at an average of 10.6 months (range, 8-31 months). In terms of Paley grade, 30 patients had excellent results, 23 good, and 5 fair. Functional results were excellent in 28 patients, good in 18, and fair in 12. Thirty-five patients felt extremely satisfied, 18 satisfied, and 5 acceptable with the functional outcome. Complications included pin site infection in 18 cases, limb length discrepancy less than 1.5 cm in 10, knee stiffness in 5, equinus deformity in 4, infectious recurrence in 1 and pin breakage in 1. There was no refracture at the reconstruction site. Conclusion: Ilizarov bone transport combined with antibiotic cement spacer is a versatile and effective method for treatment of infected tibial nonunion. PMID:26309700

  14. Molecular design of spacer-N-linked sialoglycopolypeptide as polymeric inhibitors against influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Makoto; Hidari, Kazuya I P J; Kozaki, Wataru; Murata, Takeomi; Hiratake, Jun; Park, Enoch Y; Suzuki, Takashi; Usui, Taichi

    2009-07-13

    A series of spacer-N-linked glycopolymers carrying long/short α2,3/6 sialylated glycan were designed as polymeric inhibitors of influenza virus. Lactose (Lac) and N-acetyllactosamine (LN: Galβ1,4GlcNAc) were first converted to spacer-N-linked disaccharide glycosides, followed by consecutive enzymatic addition of GlcNAc and Gal residues to the glycosides. The resulting spacer-N-linked glycosides with di-, tetra-, and hexasaccharides carrying a Lac, LN, lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT: Galβ1,4GlcNAcβ1,3Galβ1,4Glc), and LNβ1,3LNnT were coupled to the carboxy group of γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA) and enzymatically converted to glycopolypeptides carrying α2,3/6 sialylated glycans. The interactions of a series of sialoglycopolypeptides with avian and human influenza virus strains were investigated using a hemagglutination inhibition assay. The avian virus A/Duck/HongKong/313/4/78 (H5N3) bound specifically, regardless of the structure of the asialo portion. In contrast, human virus A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2) bound preferentially to long α2,6sialylated glycans with penta- or heptasaccharides in a glycan length-dependent manner. Furthermore, the Sambucus sieboldiana (SNA) lectin was also useful as a model of human virus hemagglutinin (HA) for understanding the carbohydrate binding properties, because the recognition motifs of the inner sugar in the receptor were very similar.

  15. Current–voltage characteristics of organic heterostructure devices with insulating spacer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Sun; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Saxena, Avadh; Smith, Darryl L.; Ruden, P. Paul

    2015-05-14

    The dark current density in donor/acceptor organic planar heterostructure devices at a given forward voltage bias can either increase or decrease when an insulating spacer layer is added between the donor and acceptor layers. The dominant current flow process in these systems involves the formation and subsequent recombination of interfacial exciplex states. If the exciplex recombination rate limits current flow, an insulating interface layer decreases the dark current. However, if the exciplex formation rate limits the current, an insulating interface layer may increase the dark current. As a result, we present a device model to describe this behavior, and we discuss relevant experimental data.

  16. Graphene-based thin film supercapacitor with graphene oxide as dielectric spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinzhang; Galpaya, Dilini; Notarianni, Marco; Yan, Cheng; Motta, Nunzio

    2013-08-01

    Thin film supercapacitors are produced by using electrochemically exfoliated graphene (G) and wet-chemically produced graphene oxide (GO). Either G/GO/G stacked film or sole GO film are sandwiched by two Au films to make devices, where GO is the dielectric spacer. The addition of graphene film can increase the capacitance about two times, compared to the simple Au electrode. It is found that the GO film has very high dielectric constant, accounting for the high capacitance. AC measurement reveals that the relative permittivity of GO is in the order of 104 within the frequency range of 0.1-70 Hz.

  17. Current–voltage characteristics of organic heterostructure devices with insulating spacer layers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yin, Sun; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Saxena, Avadh; Smith, Darryl L.; Ruden, P. Paul

    2015-05-14

    The dark current density in donor/acceptor organic planar heterostructure devices at a given forward voltage bias can either increase or decrease when an insulating spacer layer is added between the donor and acceptor layers. The dominant current flow process in these systems involves the formation and subsequent recombination of interfacial exciplex states. If the exciplex recombination rate limits current flow, an insulating interface layer decreases the dark current. However, if the exciplex formation rate limits the current, an insulating interface layer may increase the dark current. As a result, we present a device model to describe this behavior, and wemore » discuss relevant experimental data.« less

  18. Magnetotransport properties of spin-valve structures with Mg spacer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Boubeta, C.; Ferrante, Y.; Parkin, S. S. P.

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical prediction by Wang et al. [Phys. Rev. B 82, 054405 (2010)] suggests the preferential transmission of majority-spin states with Δ1 symmetry across a magnesium interlayer in Fe/Mg/MgO/Fe based magnetic tunnel junctions. Here, we report experiments to probe this question in CoFe/Mg/CoFe structures. We find that the strength of the interlayer coupling decays exponentially with increasing the spacer thickness, however, a non-monotonic variation of the magnetoresistance as a function of the Mg layer is observed. These data may help revisit the role of the insertion of a Mg interface layer in MgO-based devices.

  19. Spacer defined double patterning for (sub-)20nm half pitch single damascene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluijs, Janko; Siew, Yong Kong; Kunnen, Eddy; Vangoidsenhoven, Diziana; Demuynck, Steven; Wiaux, Vincent; Dekkers, Harold; Beyer, Gerald

    2011-04-01

    The spacer defined double patterning (SDDP) approach for 20nm half pitch (HP) single damascene Cu interconnect structures using immersion lithography is being reviewed. Final results on wafer will be shown, focusing on critical double patterning topics such as CD & overlay budget and line edge roughness (LER); and their impact on the electrical functioning of the back-end-of-line test structures. The feasibility of extending the SDDP technique down to 15nm HP structures is also discussed. The 30nm line/space structures patterned in resist, required as a starting point for this exercise, will be patterned using EUV lithography.

  20. Comparing one repetition maximum and three repetition maximum between conventional and eccentrically loaded deadlifts.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Alan; DeBeliso, Mark; Sevene, Trish G; Adams, Kent J

    2014-07-01

    This study determined if an eccentrically loaded deadlift yields a higher 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and 3RM than a conventional deadlift and if the 1RM conventional and eccentrically loaded deadlift can be accurately estimated from the 3RM (3RM = 93% of 1RM). Division 1 football players (n = 15; 20.3 ± 1.9 years; 95.8 ± 18.2 kg; 184.4 ± 6.6 cm) participated. Deadlift 1RM and 3RM were measured in the conventional and eccentrically loaded deadlift. Dependent t-tests showed no significant difference between the 3RM and 1RM conventional deadlift and the 3RM and 1RM eccentrically loaded deadlift (p = 0.30 and p = 0.20, respectively). Pearson correlation between the 1RM conventional deadlift estimate and 1RM conventional deadlift actual was r = 0.91 (p ≤ 0.01); a dependent t-test indicated the 1RM conventional deadlift estimate was significantly less than the 1RM conventional deadlift actual (p = 0.007). Pearson correlation between the 1RM eccentrically loaded deadlift estimate and 1RM eccentrically loaded deadlift actual was r = 0.84 (p ≤ 0.01); a dependent t-test indicated the 1RM eccentrically loaded deadlift estimate was nearly significantly less than the 1RM eccentrically loaded deadlift actual (p = 0.061). Results suggest that conventional and eccentrically loaded deadlifts may be interchangeable within a training program; this may elicit the benefits of using a broader variety of ground-based multijoint compound movements in an athlete's strength and power training. Additionally, because of differences between predicted and actual 1RM scores in the deadlift, strength coaches should prioritize actual 1RM testing of their athletes to optimize deadlift training loads across the RM continuum. PMID:24276311