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Sample records for intergenic spacers repetitive

  1. Cytomolecular Analysis of Ribosomal DNA Evolution in a Natural Allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum and Its Putative Ancestors—Dissecting Complex Repetitive Structure of Intergenic Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Borowska-Zuchowska, Natalia; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon associated with nuclear 35S rRNA genes and consists in selective suppression of gene loci inherited from one of the progenitors in the allopolyploid. Our understanding of the exact mechanisms that determine this process is still fragmentary, especially in case of the grass species. This study aimed to shed some light on the molecular basis of this genome-specific inactivation of 35S rDNA loci in an allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum (2n = 30), which arose from the interspecific hybridization between two diploid ancestors that were very similar to modern B. distachyon (2n = 10) and B. stacei (2n = 20). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization with 25S rDNA and chromosome-specific BAC clones as probes we revealed that the nucleolar dominance is present not only in meristematic root-tip cells but also in differentiated cell fraction of B. hybridum. Additionally, the intergenic spacers (IGSs) from both of the putative ancestors and the allotetraploid were sequenced and analyzed. The presumptive transcription initiation sites, spacer promoters and repeated elements were identified within the IGSs. Two different length variants, 2.3 and 3.5 kb, of IGSs were identified in B. distachyon and B. stacei, respectively, however only the IGS that had originated from B. distachyon-like ancestor was present in the allotetraploid. The amplification pattern of B. hybridum IGSs suggests that some genetic changes occurred in inactive B. stacei-like rDNA loci during the evolution of the allotetraploid. We hypothesize that their preferential silencing is an effect of structural changes in the sequence rather than just the result of the sole inactivation at the epigenetic level. PMID:27790225

  2. Cytomolecular Analysis of Ribosomal DNA Evolution in a Natural Allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum and Its Putative Ancestors-Dissecting Complex Repetitive Structure of Intergenic Spacers.

    PubMed

    Borowska-Zuchowska, Natalia; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar dominance is an epigenetic phenomenon associated with nuclear 35S rRNA genes and consists in selective suppression of gene loci inherited from one of the progenitors in the allopolyploid. Our understanding of the exact mechanisms that determine this process is still fragmentary, especially in case of the grass species. This study aimed to shed some light on the molecular basis of this genome-specific inactivation of 35S rDNA loci in an allotetraploid Brachypodium hybridum (2n = 30), which arose from the interspecific hybridization between two diploid ancestors that were very similar to modern B. distachyon (2n = 10) and B. stacei (2n = 20). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization with 25S rDNA and chromosome-specific BAC clones as probes we revealed that the nucleolar dominance is present not only in meristematic root-tip cells but also in differentiated cell fraction of B. hybridum. Additionally, the intergenic spacers (IGSs) from both of the putative ancestors and the allotetraploid were sequenced and analyzed. The presumptive transcription initiation sites, spacer promoters and repeated elements were identified within the IGSs. Two different length variants, 2.3 and 3.5 kb, of IGSs were identified in B. distachyon and B. stacei, respectively, however only the IGS that had originated from B. distachyon-like ancestor was present in the allotetraploid. The amplification pattern of B. hybridum IGSs suggests that some genetic changes occurred in inactive B. stacei-like rDNA loci during the evolution of the allotetraploid. We hypothesize that their preferential silencing is an effect of structural changes in the sequence rather than just the result of the sole inactivation at the epigenetic level.

  3. Molecular characterization of ribosomal intergenic spacer in the tadpole shrimp Triops cancriformis (Crustacea, Branchiopoda, Notostraca).

    PubMed

    Luchetti, Andrea; Scanabissi, Franca; Mantovani, Barbara

    2006-08-01

    Nuclear ribosomal DNA constitutes a multigene family, with tandemly arranged units linked by an intergenic spacer (IGS), which contains initiation/termination transcription signals and usually tandemly arranged subrepeats. The structure and variability of the IGS region are analyzed here in hermaphroditic and parthenogenetic populations of the "living fossil" Triops cancriformis (Branchiopoda, Notostraca). The results indicate the presence of concerted evolution at the population level for this G+C-rich IGS region as a whole, with the major amount of genetic variability found outside the subrepeat region. The subrepeats region is composed of 3 complete repeats (a, c, d) intermingled with 3 repeat fragments (b, e, f) and unrelated sequences. The most striking datum is the absolute identity of subrepeats (except type d) occupying the same position in different individuals/populations. A putative promoter sequence is present upstream of the 18S rRNA gene, but not in subrepeats, which is at variance with other arthropod IGSs. The absence of a promoter sequence in the subrepeats and subrepeat sequence conservation suggests that this region acts as an enhancer simply by its repetitive nature, as observed in some vertebrates. The putative external transcribed spacer (840 bp) shows hairpin structures, as in yeasts, protozoans, Drosophila, and vertebrates.

  4. Structure and organization of the rDNA intergenic spacer in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush).

    PubMed

    Reed, K M; Phillips, R B

    2000-01-01

    A total-genomic cosmid library was created to isolate complete copies of the rDNA cistron of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in order to study the structure and organization of the intergenic spacer (IGS) in this species. A total of 60 rDNA-positive clones (average inserts > 25 kb) was recovered by screening the library with a rDNA-specific probe. Positive clones were assayed for the presence of the two internal rDNA spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2) and the entire IGS fragment was successfully amplified from 42 clones by PCR. Length of the IGS fragments ranged from 9.4 to 17.8 kb. Comparative restriction mapping of the IGS-PCR products of several clones indicated two regions of extensive length variation surrounding a central region with sequence conservation. DNA sequence analysis was used to investigate the molecular basis of the IGS length variation and focused on identifying the region responsible for this variation. Over 9 kb of DNA sequence was obtained for one clone (A1) with a total IGS length of approximately 12.4 kb. Sequence of a conserved central region contained two open reading frames and a number of short direct repeats. Length variation in the IGS was determined by RFLP to result from differences in the number of copies of repetitive DNA sequences. These included an 89-bp tandem repeat (alpha repeats), an 82-bp element (beta repeats), a 168-177-bp element (chi repeats), and a 179-201-bp element (delta repeats). Overall nucleotide composition of the IGS was biased towards A and T (%GC = 47.4). Maintenance of discrete rDNA-length variants in lake trout suggests that the rate of gene conversion is insufficient to produce homogeneous copies across the genome.

  5. The calmodulin intergenic spacer as molecular target for characterization of Leishmania species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human leishmaniasis is a neglected disease caused by parasites of the genus Leishmania. Clinical aspects of this disease can vary significantly, reflecting the wide range of parasites in the genus Leishmania. Knowing accurately the Leishmania species infecting humans is important for clinical case management and evaluation of epidemiological risk. Calmodulin is an essential gene in trypanosomatids that modulates the calcium metabolism in various cellular activities. Despite its strong conservation in trypanosomatids, it has been recently observed that its untranslated regions (UTR) diverge among species. Methods In this study we analyzed the sequences and the absolute dinucleotide frequency of the intergenic spacer of the calmodulin gene (containing both, 3′ and 5′UTR) in nine reference Leishmania species and ten clinical isolates obtained from patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Results We show that the short calmodulin intergenic spacers exhibit features that make them interesting for applications in molecular characterization and phylogenetic studies of Leishmania. Dendrograms based on sequence alignments and on the dinucleotide frequency indicate that this particular region of calmodulin gene might be useful for species typing between the Leishmania and Viannia subgenera. Conclusions Mutations and composition of the calmodulin intergenic spacer from Leishmania species might have taxonomic value as parameters to define if an isolate is identical to a certain species or belongs to one of the two current subgenera. PMID:24438764

  6. Molecular analysis of a NOR site polymorphism in brown trout (Salmo trutta): organization of rDNA intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Castro, J; Sánchez, L; Martínez, P; Lucchini, S D; Nardi, I

    1997-12-01

    Using restriction endonuclease mapping, we have analyzed the organization of rDNA (DNA coding for ribosomal RNA (rRNA)) units in the salmonid fish Salmo trutta, as an initial step toward understand the molecular basis of a nucleolar organizer region (NOR) site polymorphism detected in this species. The size of the rDNA units ranged between 15 and 23 kb, with remarkable variation both within individuals and between populations. Three regions of internal tandem repetitiveness responsible for this length polymorphism were located to the intergenic spacers. NOR site polymorphic individuals showed a higher number of length classes, in some cases forming a complete 1 kb fragment ladder. The amount of rRNA genes was as much as 8-fold higher in polymorphic individuals compared with standard individuals. All individuals from the most polymorphic population showed a 14-kb insertion of unknown nature in a small proportion (below 25%) of the 28S rRNA genes.

  7. [Comparative characteristics of intergenic spacers of ribosomal RNA gene cluster in mosquitoes of the genus Culex (Diptera: Culicidae)].

    PubMed

    Shaĭkevich, E V; Zagoskin, M V; Mukha, D V

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of intergenic spacer of ribosomal RNA gene cluster (rIGS) were identified in mosquitoes Culex modestus, Culex torrentium and Culex pipiens pallens. The level of interpopulation variability of the rIGS in the subspecies C. pipiens pipiens (form pipiens--mosquitoes that inhabit the open waters, and form molestus--mosquitoes that inhabit basements) living in Russia was estimated. No extensive repetitive sequences characteristic of the rIGS of all previously described species of mosquitoes were found within the rIGS of Culex mosquitoes. At the same time, evolutionarily conserved motifs and relatively short degenerate sequences of different classes of transposable elements, as well as multiple blocks of variable microsatellite repeats were identified. Our data demonstrated that the rIGS of Culex mosquitoes can be considered as a promising molecular marker for the analysis of population and phylogenetic relationships within this group of insects.

  8. Molecular Identification of Closely Related Candida Species Using Two Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Fingerprinting Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cornet, Muriel; Sendid, Boualem; Fradin, Chantal; Gaillardin, Claude; Poulain, Daniel; Nguyen, Huu-Vang

    2011-01-01

    Recent changes in the epidemiology of candidiasis highlighted an increase in non- Candida albicans species emphasizing the need for reliable identification methods. Molecular diagnostics in fungal infections may improve species characterization, particularly in cases of the closely related species in the Candida complexes. We developed two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism assays, targeting either a part of the intergenic spacer 2 or the entire intergenic spacer (IGS) of ribosomal DNA using a panel of 270 isolates. A part of the intergenic spacer was used for discrimination between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and between species of the C. glabrata complex (C. glabrata/C. bracarensis/C. nivariensis). The whole IGS was applied to C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis, and to separate C. famata (Debaryomyces hansenii) from C. guilliermondii (Pichia guilliermondii) and from the other species within this complex (ie, C. carpophila, C. fermentati and C. xestobii). Sharing similar biochemical patterns, Pichia norvegensis and C. inconspicua exhibited specific IGS profiles. Our study confirmed that isolates of C. guilliermondii were frequently mis-identified as C. famata. As much as 67% of the clinical isolates phenotypically determined as C. famata were recognized mostly as true P. guilliermondii. Conversely, 44% of the isolates initially identified as C. guilliermondii were corrected by the IGS fingerprints as C. parapsilosis, C. fermentati, or C. zeylanoides. These two PCR/restriction fragment length polymorphism methods may be used as reference tools [either alternatively or adjunctively to the existing ribosomal DNA (26S or ITS) sequence comparisons] for unambiguous determination of the Candida species for which phenotypic characterization remains problematic. PMID:21227390

  9. Sequence organization of the Acanthamoeba rRNA intergenic spacer: identification of transcriptional enhancers.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Q; Zwick, M G; Paule, M R

    1994-01-01

    The primary sequence of the entire 2330 bp intergenic spacer of the A.castellanii ribosomal RNA gene was determined. Repeated sequence elements averaging 140 bp were identified and found to bind a protein required for optimum initiation at the core promoter. These repeated elements were shown to stimulate rRNA transcription by RNA polymerase I in vitro. The repeats inhibited transcription when placed in trans, and stimulated transcription when in cis, in either orientation, but only when upstream of the core promoter. Thus, these repeated elements have characteristics similar to polymerase I enhancers found in higher eukaryotes. The number of rRNA repeats in Acanthamoeba cells was determined to be 24 per haploid genome, the lowest number so far identified in any eukaryote. However, because Acanthamoeba is polyploid, each cell contains approximately 600 rRNA genes. Images PMID:7984432

  10. Characterization of Bacterial and Fungal Soil Communities by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis Fingerprints: Biological and Methodological Variability

    PubMed Central

    Ranjard, L.; Poly, F.; Lata, J.-C.; Mougel, C.; Thioulouse, J.; Nazaret, S.

    2001-01-01

    Automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was used to characterise bacterial (B-ARISA) and fungal (F-ARISA) communities from different soil types. The 16S-23S intergenic spacer region from the bacterial rRNA operon was amplified from total soil community DNA for B-ARISA. Similarly, the two internal transcribed spacers and the 5.8S rRNA gene (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) from the fungal rRNA operon were amplified from total soil community DNA for F-ARISA. Universal fluorescence-labeled primers were used for the PCRs, and fragments of between 200 and 1,200 bp were resolved on denaturing polyacrylamide gels by use of an automated sequencer with laser detection. Methodological (DNA extraction and PCR amplification) and biological (inter- and intrasite) variations were evaluated by comparing the number and intensity of peaks (bands) between electrophoregrams (profiles) and by multivariate analysis. Our results showed that ARISA is a high-resolution, highly reproducible technique and is a robust method for discriminating between microbial communities. To evaluate the potential biases in community description provided by ARISA, we also examined databases on length distribution of ribosomal intergenic spacers among bacteria (L. Ranjard, E. Brothier, and S. Nazaret, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:5334–5339, 2000) and fungi. PMID:11571146

  11. Combined eukaryotic and bacterial community fingerprinting of natural freshwater biofilms using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Lise C; Vincent-Hubert, Françoise; Gaubert, Philippe; Bouchez, Théodore; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène

    2010-12-01

    Biofilms are complex communities playing an important role in aquatic ecosystems. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) has been used successfully to explore biofilm bacterial diversity. However, a gap remains to be filled as regards its application to biofilm eukaryotic populations. The aim of this study is to use ARISA to detect eukaryotic population shifts in biofilm. We designed a new set of primers to focus specifically on the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of diatoms and tested it on natural biofilms. Additionally, we tested universal primers, used previously to perform ARISA on fungal communities. Cloning and sequencing showed that the universal primer set amplified various eukaryotes, whereas the new set was diatom specific. The new set amplified a wider variety of diatoms. Therefore, the universal set is appropriate to study the general eukaryotic population shifts in biofilms, whereas the new set is more appropriate to study diatoms specifically. We used both primer sets, along with a bacterial set, to study the population shifts in natural river biofilms. Principal component analysis of the ARISA fingerprints revealed seasonal shifts that did not coincide for bacterial and eukaryotic communities. Therefore, the use of both eukaryotic and bacterial primers provides a useful insight to assess microbial succession in biofilms.

  12. Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer 1 Based Characterization of Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) Strains.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk Woo; Choi, Min Ah; Kim, Dae Wook; Oh, Youn-Lee; Hyun, Min Woo; Kong, Won-Sik; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-12-01

    Breeding the button mushroom requires genetic information about its strains. This study was undertaken to genetically characterize four domestically bred button mushroom strains (Saea, Saejung, Saedo, Saeyeon cultivars) and to assess the possibility of using the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region of rDNA as a genetically variable region in the genetic characterization. For the experiment, 34 strains of Agaricus bisporus, two strains of A. bitorquis, and one strain of A. silvaticus, from 17 countries were used. Nucleotide sequence analysis of IGS1 rDNA in these 37 Agaricus strains confirmed that genetic variations exist, not only among the four domestic strains, but also between the four domestic strains and foreign strains. Crossing two different haploid strains of A. bisporus seems to generate genetic variation in the IGS1 region in their off-spring haploid strains. Phylogenetic analysis based on the IGS1 sequence revealed all A. bisporus strains could be differentiated from A. silvaticus and A. bitorquis strains. Five genetic groups were resolved among A. bisporus strains. Saejung and Saeyeon cultivars formed a separate genetic group. Our results suggest that IGS1 could be complementarily applied in the polymorphism analysis of button mushroom.

  13. Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer 1 Based Characterization of Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuk Woo; Choi, Min Ah; Kim, Dae Wook; Oh, Youn-Lee; Hyun, Min Woo; Kong, Won-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Breeding the button mushroom requires genetic information about its strains. This study was undertaken to genetically characterize four domestically bred button mushroom strains (Saea, Saejung, Saedo, Saeyeon cultivars) and to assess the possibility of using the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region of rDNA as a genetically variable region in the genetic characterization. For the experiment, 34 strains of Agaricus bisporus, two strains of A. bitorquis, and one strain of A. silvaticus, from 17 countries were used. Nucleotide sequence analysis of IGS1 rDNA in these 37 Agaricus strains confirmed that genetic variations exist, not only among the four domestic strains, but also between the four domestic strains and foreign strains. Crossing two different haploid strains of A. bisporus seems to generate genetic variation in the IGS1 region in their off-spring haploid strains. Phylogenetic analysis based on the IGS1 sequence revealed all A. bisporus strains could be differentiated from A. silvaticus and A. bitorquis strains. Five genetic groups were resolved among A. bisporus strains. Saejung and Saeyeon cultivars formed a separate genetic group. Our results suggest that IGS1 could be complementarily applied in the polymorphism analysis of button mushroom. PMID:28154490

  14. Structure of Intergenic Spacer IGS1 of Ribosomal Operon from Schistidium Mosses.

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatova, E A; Ignatov, M S; Goryunov, D V; Troitsky, A V

    2015-11-01

    The structure of the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) of the ribosomal operon from 12 species of Schistidium mosses was studied. In the IGS1 sequences of these species, three conserved regions and two areas of GC- and A-enriched repeats were identified. All of the studied mosses have a conserved pyrimidine-enriched motif at the 5'-end of IGS1. Species-specific nucleotide substitutions and insertions were found in the conserved areas. The repeated units contain single nucleotide substitutions that make unique the majority of repeated units. The positions of such repeats in IGS1 are species-specific, but their number can vary within the species and among operons of the same specimen. The comparison of IGS1 sequences from the Schistidium species and from representatives of ten other moss genera revealed the presence of common conserved motifs with similar localization. Presumably, these motifs are elements of termination of the pre-rRNA transcription and processing of rRNA.

  15. Potential application of ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis to the microbial community analysis of agronomic products.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Seishi; Fujimura, Tatsuhito; Ytow, Nozomi

    2005-07-13

    Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) has been applied to the microbial community analysis of agronomic products in combination with a simple and rapid DNA extraction method, consisting of a one-step extraction and two-step purification, for a variety of agronomic products. RISA appears to be a useful tool for the study of the community structures of food-associated microbes and their use as a unique fingerprinting signature for each agronomic product. Sequencing analyses of amplicons generated from RISA suggest that this method can detect conventional microbes. In the case of RISA of wasabi paste DNA, the sequences of the amplicons showed high similarity to the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris and the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis, whereas several food-associated bacteria (Lactococcus lactis, Lactococcus raffinolactis, and Lactococcus sakei) were detected using this technique in sausage DNA. Unexpectedly, the sequencing analyses also revealed the presence of several microbes that possessed high similarity to human bacterial pathogens such as Weissella confusa and Yersinia pestis. The results suggest that RISA will be a useful method for routine microbial community analysis in agronomic products.

  16. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis as a tool for monitoring methanogenic Archaea changes in an anaerobic digester.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Slawomir; Bułkowska, Katarzyna; Dabrowska, Dorota; Kaczmarczyk, Dariusz; Kowal, Przemyslaw; Możejko, Justyna

    2013-08-01

    The applicability of a newly-designed PCR primer pair in examination of methanogenic Archaea in a digester treating plant biomass was evaluated by Ribosmal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA). To find a suitable approach, three variants of RISA were tested: (1) standard, polyacrylamide gel-based, (2) automated, utilized capillary electrophoresis (GA-ARISA), and (3) automated microfluidics-based (MF-ARISA). All three techniques yielded a consistent picture of archaeal community structure changes during anaerobic digestion monitored for more than 6 weeks. While automated variants were more practical for handling and rapid analysis of methanogenic Archaea, the gel-based technique was advantageous when micro-organism identification was required. A DNA-sequence analysis of dominant bands extracted from the gel revealed that the main role in methane synthesis was played by micro-organisms affiliated with Methanosarcina barkeri. The obtained results revealed that RISA is a robust method allowing for detailed analysis of archaeal community structure during organic biomass conversion into biogas. In addition, our results showed that GA-ARISA has a higher resolution and reproducibility than other variants of RISA and could be used as a technique for tracking changes in methanogenic Archaea in an anaerobic digester.

  17. Development of Specific Nested Oligonucleotide PCR Primers for the Streptococcus iniae 16S-23S Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, Brian R.; Fuller, Jeffrey D.; de Azavedo, Joyce; Low, Donald E.; Bercovier, Herve; Frelier, Paul F.

    1998-01-01

    Streptococcus iniae is a cause of septicemia, meningoencephalitis, and death in farmed fish and of cellulitis in human beings. A set of nested oligonucleotide PCR primers that specifically amplified a 373-bp subunit from a variety of clinical isolates from farmed fish and human patients were constructed from a 524-bp consensus sequence of the S. iniae 16S-23S ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer. PMID:9705438

  18. Comparison of Primer Sets for Use in Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of Aquatic Bacterial Communities: an Ecological Perspective▿

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stuart E.; Shade, Ashley L.; McMahon, Katherine D.; Kent, Angela D.

    2007-01-01

    Two primer sets for automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) were used to assess the bacterial community composition (BCC) in Lake Mendota, Wisconsin, over 3 years. Correspondence analysis revealed differences in community profiles generated by different primer sets, but overall ecological patterns were conserved in each case. ARISA is a powerful tool for evaluating BCC change through space and time, regardless of the specific primer set used. PMID:17122397

  19. Unusual structure of ribosomal DNA in the copepod Tigriopus californicus: intergenic spacer sequences lack internal subrepeats.

    PubMed

    Burton, R S; Metz, E C; Flowers, J M; Willett, C S

    2005-01-03

    Eukaryotic nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is typically arranged as a series of tandem repeats coding for 18S, 5.8S, and 28S ribosomal RNAs. Transcription of rDNA repeats is initiated in the intergenic spacer (IGS) region upstream of the 18S gene. The IGS region itself typically consists of a set of subrepeats that function as transcriptional enhancers. Two important evolutionary forces have been proposed to act on the IGS region: first, selection may favor changes in the number of subrepeats that adaptively adjust rates of rDNA transcription, and second, coevolution of IGS sequence with RNA polymerase I transcription factors may lead to species specificity of the rDNA transcription machinery. To investigate the potential role of these forces on population differentiation and hybrid breakdown in the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus, we have characterized the rDNA of five T. californicus populations from the Pacific Coast of North America and one sample of T. brevicornicus from Scotland. Major findings are as follows: (1) the structural genes for 18S and 28S are highly conserved across T. californicus populations, in contrast to other nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes previously studied in these populations. (2) There is extensive differentiation among populations in the IGS region; in the extreme, no homology is observed across the IGS sequences (>2 kb) from the two Tigriopus species. (3) None of the Tigriopus IGS sequences have the subrepeat structure common to other eukaryotic IGS regions. (4) Segregation of rDNA in laboratory crosses indicates that rDNA is located on at least two separate chromosomes in T. californicus. These data suggest that although IGS length polymorphism does not appear to play the adaptive role hypothesized in some other eukaryotic systems, sequence divergence in the rDNA promoter region within the IGS could lead to population specificity of transcription in hybrids.

  20. Diversity and Inheritance of Intergenic Spacer Sequences of 45S Ribosomal DNA among Accessions of Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kiwoung; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yi, Go-Eun; Lee, Jonghoon; Chung, Mi-Young; Yang, Tae-Jin; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-12-03

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of plants is present in high copy number and shows variation between and within species in the length of the intergenic spacer (IGS). The 45S rDNA of flowering plants includes the 5.8S, 18S and 25S rDNA genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2), and the intergenic spacer 45S-IGS (25S-18S). This study identified six different types of 45S-IGS, A to F, which at 363 bp, 1121 bp, 1717 bp, 1969 bp, 2036 bp and 2111 bp in length, respectively, were much shorter than the reported reference IGS sequences in B. oleracea var. alboglabra. The shortest two IGS types, A and B, lacked the transcription initiation site, non-transcribed spacer, and external transcribed spacer. Functional behavior of those two IGS types in relation to rRNA synthesis is a subject of further investigation. The other four IGSs had subtle variations in the transcription termination site, guanine-cytosine (GC) content, and number of tandem repeats, but the external transcribed spacers of these four IGSs were quite similar in length. The 45S IGSs were found to follow Mendelian inheritance in a population of 15 F₁s and their 30 inbred parental lines, which suggests that these sequences could be useful for development of new breeding tools. In addition, this study represents the first report of intra-specific (within subspecies) variation of the 45S IGS in B. oleracea.

  1. Diversity and Inheritance of Intergenic Spacer Sequences of 45S Ribosomal DNA among Accessions of Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kiwoung; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yi, Go-Eun; Lee, Jonghoon; Chung, Mi-Young; Yang, Tae-Jin; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of plants is present in high copy number and shows variation between and within species in the length of the intergenic spacer (IGS). The 45S rDNA of flowering plants includes the 5.8S, 18S and 25S rDNA genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2), and the intergenic spacer 45S-IGS (25S-18S). This study identified six different types of 45S-IGS, A to F, which at 363 bp, 1121 bp, 1717 bp, 1969 bp, 2036 bp and 2111 bp in length, respectively, were much shorter than the reported reference IGS sequences in B. oleracea var. alboglabra. The shortest two IGS types, A and B, lacked the transcription initiation site, non-transcribed spacer, and external transcribed spacer. Functional behavior of those two IGS types in relation to rRNA synthesis is a subject of further investigation. The other four IGSs had subtle variations in the transcription termination site, guanine-cytosine (GC) content, and number of tandem repeats, but the external transcribed spacers of these four IGSs were quite similar in length. The 45S IGSs were found to follow Mendelian inheritance in a population of 15 F1s and their 30 inbred parental lines, which suggests that these sequences could be useful for development of new breeding tools. In addition, this study represents the first report of intra-specific (within subspecies) variation of the 45S IGS in B. oleracea. PMID:26633391

  2. Identification and detection of Trypanosoma cruzi by using a DNA amplification fingerprint obtained from the ribosomal intergenic spacer.

    PubMed Central

    González, N; Galindo, I; Guevara, P; Novak, E; Scorza, J V; Añez, N; Da Silveira, J F; Ramírez, J L

    1994-01-01

    We designed a PCR assay targeted on repeated elements of the ribosomal intergenic spacer which produces highly polymorphic DNA band patterns for different strains of Trypanosoma cruzi. By labeling the PCR products with digoxigenin and by chemiluminescence detection, we improved the assay sensitivity by three orders of magnitude to get T. cruzi strain fingerprints in feces of the trypanosome-infected triatomine bug vector. We also developed a capture assay for the digoxigenin-labeled PCR products that allowed us to detect T. cruzi in triatomine bug vector feces and in human serum samples with a solid support. Images PMID:8126172

  3. Cultivation-Independent Characterization of Methylobacterium Populations in the Plant Phyllosphere by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Knief, Claudia; Frances, Lisa; Cantet, Franck; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Methylobacterium are widespread in the environment, but their ecological role in ecosystems, such as the plant phyllosphere, is not very well understood. To gain better insight into the distribution of different Methylobacterium species in diverse ecosystems, a rapid and specific cultivation-independent method for detection of these organisms and analysis of their community structure is needed. Therefore, 16S rRNA gene-targeted primers specific for this genus were designed and evaluated. These primers were used in PCR in combination with a reverse primer that binds to the tRNAAla gene, which is located upstream of the 23S rRNA gene in the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (IGS). PCR products that were of different lengths were obtained due to the length heterogeneity of the IGS of different Methylobacterium species. This length variation allowed generation of fingerprints of Methylobacterium communities in environmental samples by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. The Methylobacterium communities on leaves of different plant species in a natural field were compared using this method. The new method allows rapid comparisons of Methylobacterium communities and is thus a useful tool to study Methylobacterium communities in different ecosystems. PMID:18263752

  4. Highly rearranged and size-variable chloroplast genomes in conifers II clade (cupressophytes): evolution towards shorter intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chung-Shien; Chaw, Shu-Miaw

    2014-04-01

    Although conifers are of immense ecological and economic value, bioengineering of their chloroplasts remains undeveloped. Understanding the chloroplast genomic organization of conifers can facilitate their bioengineering. Members of the conifer II clade (or cupressophytes) are highly diverse in both morphologic features and chloroplast genomic organization. We compared six cupressophyte chloroplast genomes (cpDNAs) that represent four of the five cupressophyte families, including three genomes that are first reported here (Agathis dammara, Calocedrus formosana and Nageia nagi). The six cupressophyte cpDNAs have lost a pair of large inverted repeats (IRs) and vary greatly in size, organization and tRNA copies. We demonstrate that cupressophyte cpDNAs have evolved towards reduced size, largely due to shrunken intergenic spacers. In cupressophytes, cpDNA rearrangements are capable of extending intergenic spacers, and synonymous mutations are negatively associated with the size and frequency of rearrangements. The variable cpDNA sizes of cupressophytes may have been shaped by mutational burden and genomic rearrangements. On the basis of cpDNA organization, our analyses revealed that in gymnosperms, cpDNA rearrangements are phylogenetically informative, which supports the 'gnepines' clade. In addition, removal of a specific IR influences the minimal rearrangements required for the gnepines and cupressophyte clades, whereby Pinaceae favours the removal of IRB but cupressophytes exclusion of IRA. This result strongly suggests that different IR copies have been lost from conifers I and II. Our data help understand the complexity and evolution of cupressophyte cpDNAs.

  5. The Mitochondrial Genome of the Leaf-Cutter Ant Atta laevigata: A Mitogenome with a Large Number of Intergenic Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Rodovalho, Cynara de Melo; Lyra, Mariana Lúcio; Ferro, Milene; Bacci, Maurício

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata, assembled using transcriptomic libraries from Sanger and Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS), and PCR products. This mitogenome was found to be very large (18,729 bp), given the presence of 30 non-coding intergenic spacers (IGS) spanning 3,808 bp. A portion of the putative control region remained unsequenced. The gene content and organization correspond to that inferred for the ancestral pancrustacea, except for two tRNA gene rearrangements that have been described previously in other ants. The IGS were highly variable in length and dispersed through the mitogenome. This pattern was also found for the other hymenopterans in particular for the monophyletic Apocrita. These spacers with unknown function may be valuable for characterizing genome evolution and distinguishing closely related species and individuals. NGS provided better coverage than Sanger sequencing, especially for tRNA and ribosomal subunit genes, thus facilitating efforts to fill in sequence gaps. The results obtained showed that data from transcriptomic libraries contain valuable information for assembling mitogenomes. The present data also provide a source of molecular markers that will be very important for improving our understanding of genomic evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships among hymenopterans. PMID:24828084

  6. The mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata: a mitogenome with a large number of intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Rodovalho, Cynara de Melo; Lyra, Mariana Lúcio; Ferro, Milene; Bacci, Maurício

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata, assembled using transcriptomic libraries from Sanger and Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS), and PCR products. This mitogenome was found to be very large (18,729 bp), given the presence of 30 non-coding intergenic spacers (IGS) spanning 3,808 bp. A portion of the putative control region remained unsequenced. The gene content and organization correspond to that inferred for the ancestral pancrustacea, except for two tRNA gene rearrangements that have been described previously in other ants. The IGS were highly variable in length and dispersed through the mitogenome. This pattern was also found for the other hymenopterans in particular for the monophyletic Apocrita. These spacers with unknown function may be valuable for characterizing genome evolution and distinguishing closely related species and individuals. NGS provided better coverage than Sanger sequencing, especially for tRNA and ribosomal subunit genes, thus facilitating efforts to fill in sequence gaps. The results obtained showed that data from transcriptomic libraries contain valuable information for assembling mitogenomes. The present data also provide a source of molecular markers that will be very important for improving our understanding of genomic evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships among hymenopterans.

  7. High prevalence of spotted fever group rickettsiae in Amblyomma variegatum from Uganda and their identification using sizes of intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Ryo; Qiu, Yongjin; Igarashi, Manabu; Magona, Joseph W; Zhou, Lijia; Ito, Kimihito; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2013-12-01

    The spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae are obligate intracellular bacteria transmitted by ticks that cause several tick-borne rickettsioses in humans worldwide. This study was intended to determine the prevalence of SFG rickettsiae in Amblyomma variegatum from 7 districts across Uganda. In addition to sequencing of gltA and ompA genes, identification of Rickettsia species based on the sizes of highly variable intergenic spacers, namely, dksA-xerC, mppA-purC, and rpmE-tRNA(fMet) was carried out. Application of multiplex PCR for simultaneous amplification of 3 spacers combined with capillary electrophoresis separation allowed simple, accurate, and high-throughput fragment sizing with considerable time and cost savings. Rickettsia genus-specific real-time PCR detected 136 positives out of 140 samples, giving an overall prevalence of 97.1%. Most samples (n=113) had a size combination of 225, 195, and 341 bp for dksA-xerC, mppA-purC, and rpmE-tRNA(fMet), respectively, which was identical to that of R. africae, a causative agent of African tick bite fever. In addition, several samples had size variants in either dksA-xerC or rpmE-tRNA(fMet). Nonetheless, the partial sequences of gltA and ompA genes of samples of all size combinations showed the greatest similarity to R. africae (99.3-100% for gltA and 98.1-100% for ompA). Given these results, it is highly possible that the tested ticks were infected with R. africae or closely related species. This is a first report on molecular genetic detection of R. africae and its high endemicity in Uganda. Clinicians in this country should be aware of this pathogen as a cause of non-malarial febrile illness. This study provided a starting point for the development of Rickettsia species identification based on the sizes of intergenic spacers. The procedure is simple, rapid, and cost-effective to perform; hence it might be particularly well suited for preliminary species identification in epidemiological investigations. The results

  8. Correlation of maple sap composition with bacterial and fungal communities determined by multiplex automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (MARISA).

    PubMed

    Filteau, Marie; Lagacé, Luc; LaPointe, Gisèle; Roy, Denis

    2011-08-01

    During collection, maple sap is contaminated by bacteria and fungi that subsequently colonize the tubing system. The bacterial microbiota has been more characterized than the fungal microbiota, but the impact of both components on maple sap quality remains unclear. This study focused on identifying bacterial and fungal members of maple sap and correlating microbiota composition with maple sap properties. A multiplex automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (MARISA) method was developed to presumptively identify bacterial and fungal members of maple sap samples collected from 19 production sites during the tapping period. Results indicate that the fungal community of maple sap is mainly composed of yeast related to Mrakia sp., Mrakiella sp., Guehomyces pullulans, Cryptococcus victoriae and Williopsis saturnus. Mrakia, Mrakiella and Guehomyces peaks were identified in samples of all production sites and can be considered dominant and stable members of the fungal microbiota of maple sap. A multivariate analysis based on MARISA profiles and maple sap chemical composition data showed correlations between Candida sake, Janthinobacterium lividum, Williopsis sp., Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Mrakia sp., Rhodococcus sp., Pseudomonas tolaasii, G. pullulans and maple sap composition at different flow periods. This study provides new insights on the relationship between microbial community and maple sap quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of mitochondrial control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNAs of Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Norma Machado; de Souza Dias, Aline; da Silva Valente, Vera Lúcia; Valiati, Victor Hugo

    2009-12-01

    The control region in insects is the major noncoding region in animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and is responsible for a large part of the variation in the DNA sequence and size of the genome of this organelle. In this study, the mtDNA control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNA genes of a Zaprionus indianus strain were cloned, sequenced and compared with other Drosophila species. The overall A+T content in the Z. indianus control region is 94.3%, and a comparison with other Drosophila species demonstrated that the most conserved region appears to be the 420 base pairs nearest to the tRNA(ile), similar to the findings of other authors. We also describe conserved sequence blocks, including a poly-T involved in the replication process of Drosophila mtDNA; a putative secondary structure also involved in the replication process and repeated sequences. tRNA(ile) sequence demonstrated the greatest variability when the tRNA sequences of species were compared.

  10. Comparison of (GTG)5-oligonucleotide and ribosomal intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS)-PCR for molecular typing of Klebsiella isolates.

    PubMed

    Ryberg, Anna; Olsson, Crister; Ahrné, Siv; Monstein, Hans-Jürg

    2011-02-01

    Molecular typing of Klebsiella species has become important for monitoring dissemination of β-lactamase-producers in hospital environments. The present study was designed to evaluate poly-trinucleotide (GTG)(5)- and rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS)-PCR fingerprint analysis for typing of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca isolates. Multiple displacement amplified DNA derived from 19 K. pneumoniae (some with an ESBL-phenotype), 35 K. oxytoca isolates, five K. pneumoniae, two K. oxytoca, three Raoultella, and one Enterobacter aerogenes type and reference strains underwent (GTG)(5) and ITS-PCR analysis. Dendrograms were constructed using cosine coefficient and the Neighbour joining method. (GTG)(5) and ITS-PCR analysis revealed that K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca isolates, reference and type strains formed distinct cluster groups, and tentative subclusters could be established. We conclude that (GTG)(5) and ITS-PCR analysis combined with automated capillary electrophoresis provides promising tools for molecular typing of Klebsiella isolates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A comparison of fungal communities from four salt marsh plants using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA).

    PubMed

    Torzilli, Albert P; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Chalkley, David; Gillevet, Patrick M

    2006-01-01

    Fungal decomposers are important contributors to the detritus-based food webs of salt marsh ecosystems. Knowing the composition of salt marsh fungal communities is essential in understanding how detritus processing is affected by changes in community dynamics. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was used to examine the composition of fungal communities associated with four temperate salt marsh plants, Spartina alterniflora (short and tall forms), Juncus roemerianus, Distichlis spicata and Sarcocornia perennis. Plant tissues were homogenized and subjected to a particle-filtration protocol that yielded 106 microm particulate fractions, which were used as a source of fungal isolates and fungal DNA. Genera identified from sporulating cultures demonstrated that the 106 microm particles from each host plant were reliable sources of fungal DNA for ARISA. Analysis of ARISA data by principal component analysis (PCA), principal coordinate analysis (PCO) and species diversity comparisons indicated that the fungal communities from the two grasses, S. alterniflora and D. spicata were more similar to each other than they were to the distinct communities associated with J. roemerianus and S. perennis. Principal component analysis also showed no consistent, seasonal pattern in the composition of these fungal communities. Comparisons of ARISA fingerprints from the different fungal communities and those from pure cultures of selected Spartina ascomycetes supported the host/substrate specificity observed for the fungal communities.

  12. Bat white-nose syndrome: A real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructans

    Treesearch

    Laura K Muller; Jeffrey M. Lorch; Daniel L. Lindner; Michael O' Connor; Andrea Gargas; David S. Blehert

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Geomyces destructans is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that has killed millions of North American hibernating bats. We describe a real-time TaqMan PCR test that detects DNA from G. destructans by targeting a portion of the multicopy intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene complex. The...

  13. Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequence Repeats in Yersiniae: Genomic Organization and Functional Properties

    PubMed Central

    De Gregorio, Eliana; Silvestro, Giustina; Petrillo, Mauro; Carlomagno, Maria Stella; Di Nocera, Pier Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Genome-wide analyses carried out in silico revealed that the DNA repeats called enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences (ERICs), which are present in several Enterobacteriaceae, are overrepresented in yersiniae. From the alignment of DNA regions from the wholly sequenced Yersinia enterocolitica 8081 and Yersinia pestis CO92 strains, we could establish that ERICs are miniature mobile elements whose insertion leads to duplication of the dinucleotide TA. ERICs feature long terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) and can fold as RNA into hairpin structures. The proximity to coding regions suggests that most Y. enterocolitica ERICs are cotranscribed with flanking genes. Elements which either overlap or are located next to stop codons are preferentially inserted in the same (or B) orientation. In contrast, ERICs located far apart from open reading frames are inserted in the opposite (or A) orientation. The expression of genes cotranscribed with A- and B-oriented ERICs has been monitored in vivo. In mRNAs spanning B-oriented ERICs, upstream gene transcripts accumulated at lower levels than downstream gene transcripts. This difference was abolished by treating cells with chloramphenicol. We hypothesize that folding of B-oriented elements is impeded by translating ribosomes. Consequently, upstream RNA degradation is triggered by the unmasking of a site for the RNase E located in the right-hand TIR of ERIC. A-oriented ERICs may act in contrast as upstream RNA stabilizers or may have other functions. The hypothesis that ERICs act as regulatory RNA elements is supported by analyses carried out in Yersinia strains which either lack ERIC sequences or carry alternatively oriented ERICs at specific loci. PMID:16291667

  14. PCR-based method for targeting 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions among Vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genus Vibrio is a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria comprised of 74 species. Furthermore, the genus has and is expected to continue expanding with the addition of several new species annually. Consequently, it is of paramount importance to have a method which is able to reliably and efficiently differentiate the numerous Vibrio species. Results In this study, a novel and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based intergenic spacer (IGS)-typing system for vibrios was developed that is based on the well-known IGS regions located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes on the bacterial chromosome. The system was optimized to resolve heteroduplex formation as well as to take advantage of capillary gel electrophoresis technology such that reproducible analyses could be achieved in a rapid manner. System validation was achieved through testing of 69 archetypal Vibrio strains, representing 48 Vibrio species, from which an 'IGS-type' profile database was generated. These data, presented here in several cluster analyses, demonstrated successful differentiation of the 69 type strains showing that this PCR-based fingerprinting method easily discriminates bacterial strains at the species level among Vibrio. Furthermore, testing 36 strains each of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, important food borne pathogens, isolated from a variety of geographical locations with the IGS-typing method demonstrated distinct IGS-typing patterns indicative of subspecies divergence in both populations making this technique equally useful for intraspecies differentiation, as well. Conclusion This rapid, reliable and efficient IGS-typing system, especially in combination with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, has the capacity to not only discern and identify vibrios at the species level but, in some cases, at the sub-species level, as well. This procedure is particularly well-suited for preliminary species identification and, lends itself nicely to epidemiological investigations

  15. Nested PCR targeting intergenic spacer (IGS) in genotyping of Giardia duodenalis isolated from symptomatic and asymptomatic infected Egyptian school children.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Eman M; Ismail, Ola A; Mokhtar, Amira B; Mohamed, Samer E; Saad, Rania M

    2017-02-01

    Distinct sequences of Giardia duodenalis assemblages raised the hypothesis that certain assemblages may contribute to its clinical outcome. However, sequences analysis is time consuming, expensive, and needs many manual operations. Nested PCR targeting intergenic spacer (IGS) region was applied successfully to genotype G. duodenalis. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of G. duodenalis assemblages among giardiasis school children and its relation to the presence of symptoms using nested IGS/PCR. Of 65 microscopically confirmed Giardia-positive samples, 65 samples were genotyped proving high sensitivity (92.3%) of IGS/PCR. Negative IGS/PCR samples were also negative for β-giardin gene. Subassemblage AI was the commonest with 66.6% (20/30) among asymptomatic children compared to 53.3% (16/30) of symptomatic, while assemblage B was found in 40% (12/30) of symptomatic compared to 20% (6/30) of asymptomatic. The difference was significant. AII was only found in asymptomatic with 13.4% (4/30), while mixed infections (AI&B) were recorded only in 6.6% (2/30) of symptomatic group. A significant relation was found between younger children susceptibility for AI and B infections as presented in 77.7 (12/16) and 83.3% (10/12) of symptomatic, respectively, and 80 (16/80) and 33.4% (2/4) of asymptomatic, respectively. Significant relations were found between AI with intermittent diarrhea and B with chronic. A significant relation was found between assemblage distributions and heavy infection intensity. In conclusion, higher incidence of assemblage B among symptomatic children compared to asymptomatic could denote its possible pathogenic potential.

  16. Ribosomal RNA gene silencing in interpopulation hybrids of Tigriopus californicus: nucleolar dominance in the absence of intergenic spacer subrepeats.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Jonathan M; Burton, Ronald S

    2006-07-01

    A common feature of interspecific animal and plant hybrids is the uniparental silencing of ribosomal RNA gene transcription, or nucleolar dominance. A leading explanation for the genetic basis of nucleolar dominance in animal hybrids is the enhancer-imbalance model. The model proposes that limiting transcription factors are titrated by a greater number of enhancer-bearing subrepeat elements in the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the dominant cluster of genes. The importance of subrepeats for nucleolar dominance has repeatedly been supported in competition assays between Xenopus laevis and X. borealis minigene constructs injected into oocytes. However, a more general test of the importance of IGS subrepeats for nuclear dominance in vivo has not been conducted. In this report, rRNA gene expression was examined in interpopulation hybrids of the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus. This species offers a rare opportunity to test the role of IGS subrepeats in nucleolar dominance because the internal subrepeat structure, found in the IGS of virtually all animal and plant species, is absent in T. californicus. Our results clearly establish that nucleolar dominance occurs in F1 and F2 interpopulation hybrids of this species. In the F2 generation, nucleolar dominance appears to break down in some hybrids in a fashion that is inconsistent with a transcription factor titration model. These results are significant because they indicate that nucleolar dominance can be established and maintained without enhancer-bearing repeat elements in the IGS. This challenges the generality of the enhancer-imbalance model for nucleolar dominance and suggests that dominance of rRNA transcription in animals may be determined by epigenetic factors as has been established in plants.

  17. Ribosomal RNA Gene Silencing in Interpopulation Hybrids of Tigriopus californicus: Nucleolar Dominance in the Absence of Intergenic Spacer Subrepeats

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Jonathan M.; Burton, Ronald S.

    2006-01-01

    A common feature of interspecific animal and plant hybrids is the uniparental silencing of ribosomal RNA gene transcription, or nucleolar dominance. A leading explanation for the genetic basis of nucleolar dominance in animal hybrids is the enhancer-imbalance model. The model proposes that limiting transcription factors are titrated by a greater number of enhancer-bearing subrepeat elements in the intergenic spacer (IGS) of the dominant cluster of genes. The importance of subrepeats for nucleolar dominance has repeatedly been supported in competition assays between Xenopus laevis and X. borealis minigene constructs injected into oocytes. However, a more general test of the importance of IGS subrepeats for nuclear dominance in vivo has not been conducted. In this report, rRNA gene expression was examined in interpopulation hybrids of the marine copepod Tigriopus californicus. This species offers a rare opportunity to test the role of IGS subrepeats in nucleolar dominance because the internal subrepeat structure, found in the IGS of virtually all animal and plant species, is absent in T. californicus. Our results clearly establish that nucleolar dominance occurs in F1 and F2 interpopulation hybrids of this species. In the F2 generation, nucleolar dominance appears to break down in some hybrids in a fashion that is inconsistent with a transcription factor titration model. These results are significant because they indicate that nucleolar dominance can be established and maintained without enhancer-bearing repeat elements in the IGS. This challenges the generality of the enhancer-imbalance model for nucleolar dominance and suggests that dominance of rRNA transcription in animals may be determined by epigenetic factors as has been established in plants. PMID:16648582

  18. The 5S rRNA and the rRNA intergenic spacer of the two varieties of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Fan, M; Chen, L C; Ragan, M A; Gutell, R R; Warner, J R; Currie, B P; Casadevall, A

    1995-01-01

    The intergenic spacers (IGS) separating the 23S-like and 16S-like rDNAs of the two varieties of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans were amplified, cloned and sequenced. The C. neoformans var. neoformans IGS was 2421 nt with 5S rRNA at positions 1228-1345 3' of the 23S-like rRNA. The C. neoformans var. gattii IGS was 2480 nt with 5S rRNA at positions 1268-1385 3' of the 23S-like rRNA. For both varieties the 5S rDNA genes were in the same orientation as the 16S-5.8-23S genes and encode a 118 nt molecule of identical sequence. Phylogenetic comparison of C. neoformans 5S rDNA with that of other fungi placed this fungus in close relationship with other basidiomycetes including Tremella mesenterica, Bullera alba, and Cryptococcus laurentii. A secondary structure model for the deduced 5S rRNA was constructed by comparative sequence analysis. Polymerase chain reaction-amplified IGS of 12 C. neoformans var. neoformans strains revealed extensive size variation ranging from 100 to 300 nt. Size variation between strains in the length of the IGS may be useful for distinguishing strains. Structurally, the IGS were characterized by the presence of occasional short direct GC-rich 19-nt repeats. Overall IGS sequence identity between the C. neoformans varieties was only 78.5%, in sharp contrast to the identical or nearly identical sequences for the rDNA genes, and suggests rapid evolution for IGS sequences.

  19. Inter- and intraspecific genomic variability of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer regions (ISR) in representatives of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yong-Qing; Yang, Yuan; Bao, Jing-Ting; He, Kai-Yu; Li, Hong-Yu

    2007-05-01

    The complete sequences of 32 intergenic spacer regions (ISR) from Acidithiobacillus strains, including 29 field strains isolated from coal, copper, molybdenum mine wastes or sediment of different geoclimatic regions in China, reference strain ATCC19859 and the type strains of the two species were determined. These data, together with other sequences available in the GenBank database, were used to carry out the first detailed assessment of the inter- and intraspecific genomic variability of the ISR sequences and to infer phylogenetic relationships within the genus. The total length of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions of the Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains ranged from 451 to 490 bp, and from 434 to 456 bp, respectively. The degree of intrageneric ISR sequence similarity was higher than the degree of intergeneric similarity, and the overall similarity values of the ISRs varied from 60.49% to 84.71% between representatives of different species of the genus Acidithiobacillus. Sequences from the spacer of the A. thiooxidans and A. ferrooxidans strains ranged from 86.71% to 99.56% and 92.36% to 100% similarity, respectively. All Acidithiobacillus strains were separated into three phylogenetic major clusters and seven phylogenetic groups. ISR may be a potential target for the development of in situ hybridization probe aimed at accurately detecting acidithiobacilli in the various acidic environments.

  20. Paenibacillus larvae 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions: DNA fingerprinting and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2012-07-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American foulbrood in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae. PCR amplification of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the amplified DNA, was performed using genomic DNA collected from 134 P. larvae strains isolated in Connecticut, six Northern Regional Research Laboratory stock strains, four strains isolated in Argentina, and one strain isolated in Chile. Following electrophoresis of amplified DNA, all isolates exhibited a common migratory profile (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint pattern) of six DNA bands. This profile represented a unique ITS-PCR DNA fingerprint that was useful as a fast, simple, and accurate procedure for identification of P. larvae. Digestion of ITS-PCR amplified DNA, using mung bean nuclease prior to electrophoresis, characterized only three of the six electrophoresis bands as homoduplex DNA and indicating three true ITS regions. These three ITS regions, DNA migratory band sizes of 915, 1010, and 1474 bp, signify a minimum of three types of rrn operons within P. larvae. DNA sequence analysis of ITS region DNA, using P. larvae NRRL B-3553, identified the 3' terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA gene, 5' terminal nucleotides of the 23S rRNA gene, and the complete DNA sequences of the 5S rRNA, tRNA(ala), and tRNA(ile) genes. Gene organization within the three rrn operon types was 16S-23S, 16S-tRNA(ala)-23S, and l6S-5S-tRNA(ile)-tRNA(ala)-23S and these operons were named rrnA, rrnF, and rrnG, respectively. The 23S rRNA gene was shown by I-CeuI digestion and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to be present as seven copies. This was suggestive of seven rrn operon copies within the P. larvae genome. Investigation of the 16S-23S rDNA regions of this bacterium has aided the development of a diagnostic procedure and has helped genomic mapping investigations via characterization of the ITS regions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc

  1. Detection of two Bartonella tamiae-like sequences in Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) using 16S-23S intergenic spacer region-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Billeter, Sarah A; Miller, Melissa K; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Levy, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    Four hundred and sixty-six questing Amblyomma americanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae) from Carolina County, VA, and 98 questing A. americanum from Chatham County, NC, were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the Bartonella 16S-23S intergenic spacer region. Two amplicons, approximately 270-280 bp, were detected in two ticks from Virginia. Based upon PCR and sequencing, an adult male and adult female tick harbored DNA sequences closely related to Bartonella tamiae (DQ395180). Bartonella DNA was not detected in A. americanum from North Carolina. Potential transmission of Bartonella spp. by A. americanum should be the focus of future experimental studies.

  2. Bacterial diversity in water samples from uranium wastes as demonstrated by 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrievals.

    PubMed

    Radeva, Galina; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial diversity was assessed in water samples collected from several uranium mining wastes in Ger many and in the United States by using 16S rDNA and ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrievals. The results obtained using the 16S rDNA retrieval showed that the samples collected from the uranium mill tailings of Schlema/Alberoda, Germany, were predominated by Nitrospina-like bacteria, whereas those from the mill tailings of Shiprock, New Mexico, USA, were predominated by gamma-Pseudomonas and Frauteria spp. Additional smaller populations of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group and alpha- and delta-Proteobacteria were identified in the Shiprock samples as well. Proteobacteria and Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides were also found in the third uranium mill tailings studied, Gittersee/Coschütz, Germany, but the groups of the predominant clones were rather small. Most of the clones of the Gittersee/Coschütz samples represented individual sequences, which indicates a high level of bacterial diversity. The samples from the fourth uranium waste studied, Steinsee Deponie B1, Germany, were predominantly occupied by Acinetobacter spp. The ribosomal intergenic spacer amplification retrieval provided results complementary to those obtained by the 16S rDNA analyses. For instance, in the Shiprock samples, an additional predominant bacterial group was identified and affiliated with Nitrosomonas sp., whereas in the Gittersee/Coschütz samples, anammox populations were identified that were not retrieved by the applied 16S rDNA approach.

  3. Sequencing Bands of Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis Fingerprints for Characterization and Microscale Distribution of Soil Bacterium Populations Responding to Mercury Spiking

    PubMed Central

    Ranjard, Lionel; Brothier, Elisabeth; Nazaret, Sylvie

    2000-01-01

    Two major emerging bands (a 350-bp band and a 650-bp band) within the RISA (ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) profile of a soil bacterial community spiked with Hg(II) were selected for further identification of the populations involved in the response of the community to the added metal. The bands were cut out from polyacrylamide gels, cloned, characterized by restriction analysis, and sequenced for phylogenetic affiliation of dominant clones. The sequences were the intergenic spacer between the rrs and rrl genes and the first 130 nucleotides of the rrl gene. Comparison of sequences derived from the 350-bp band to The GenBank database permitted us to identify the bacteria as being mostly close relatives to low G+C firmicutes (Clostridium-like genera), while the 650-bp band permitted us to identify the bacteria as being mostly close relatives to β-proteobacteria (Ralstonia-like genera). Oligonucleotide probes specific for the identified dominant bacteria were designed and hybridized with the RISA profiles derived from the control and spiked communities. These studies confirmed the contribution of these populations to the community response to the metal. Hybridization of the RISA profiles from subcommunities (bacterial pools associated with different soil microenvironments) also permitted to characterize the distribution and the dynamics of these populations at a microscale level following mercury spiking. PMID:11097911

  4. An assessment of the phylogenetic relationship among sugarcane and related taxa based on the nucleotide sequence of 5S rRNA intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y B; Burner, D M; Legendre, B L

    2000-01-01

    5S rRNA intergenic spacers were amplified from two elite sugarcane (Saccharum hybrids) cultivars and their related taxa by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with 5S rDNA consensus primers. Resulting PCR products were uniform in length from each accession but exhibited some degree of length variation among the sugarcane accessions and related taxa. These PCR products did not always cross hybridize in Southern blot hybridization experiments. These PCR products were cloned into a commercial plasmid vector PCR 2.1 and sequenced. Direct sequencing of cloned PCR products revealed spacer length of 231-237 bp for S. officinarum, 233-237 for sugarcane cultivars, 228-238 bp for S. spontaneum, 239-252 bp for S. giganteum, 385-410 bp for Erianthus spp., 226-230 bp for Miscanthus sinensis Zebra, 206-207 bp for M. sinensis IMP 3057, 207-209 bp for Sorghum bicolor, and 247-249 bp for Zea mays. Nucleotide sequence polymorphism were found at both the segment and single nucleotide level. A consensus sequence for each taxon was obtained by Align X. Multiple sequences were aligned and phylogenetic trees constructed using Align X. CLUSTAL and DNAMAN programs. In general, accessions of the following taxa tended to group together to form distinct clusters: S. giganteum, Erianthus spp., M. sinensis, S. bicolor, and Z. mays. However, the two S. officinarum clones and two sugarcane cultivars did not form distinct clusters but interrelated within the S. spontaneum cluster. The disclosure of these 5S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences will facilitate marker-assisted breeding in sugarcane.

  5. Spider minor ampullate silk proteins contain new repetitive sequences and highly conserved non-silk-like "spacer regions".

    PubMed

    Colgin, M A; Lewis, R V

    1998-03-01

    Spider minor ampullate silk is a strong non-elastic deformably stretchable silk used in web formation. This silk from Nephila clavipes is composed of two proteins, MiSp 1 and 2, whose transcripts are 9.5 and 7.5 kb, respectively, as determined by Northern blots. Both MiSp proteins are organized into a predominantly repetitive region and a small nonrepetitive carboxy terminal region. These highly repetitive regions are composed mainly of glycine and alanine, but also contain tyrosine, glutamine, and arginine. The sequences are mainly GGX and GA repeats. The repetitive regions are interrupted by nonrepetitive serine-rich spacer regions. Although the sequences of the spacer regions differ from the repetitive regions, sequences of the spacers from different regions of the proteins are nearly identical. The sequence differences between major and minor ampullate silks may explain the differing mechanical properties of the fibers.

  6. Sequencing of the intergenic 16S-23S rRNA spacer (ITS) region of Mollicutes species and their identification using microarray-based assay and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Volokhov, Dmitriy V; George, Joseph; Liu, Sue X; Ikonomi, Pranvera; Anderson, Christine; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2006-08-01

    We have completed sequencing the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region of most known Mycoplasma , Acholeplasma , Ureaplasma , Mesoplasma , and Spiroplasma species. Analysis of the sequence data revealed a significant interspecies variability and low intraspecies polymorphism of the ITS region among Mollicutes . This finding enabled the application of a combined polymerase chain reaction-microarray technology for identifying Mollicutes species. The microarray included individual species-specific oligonucleotide probes for characterizing human Mollicutes species and other species known to be common cell line contaminants. Evaluation of the microarray was conducted using multiple, previously characterized, Mollicutes species. The microarray analysis of the samples used demonstrated a highly specific assay, which is capable of rapid and accurate discrimination among Mollicutes species.

  7. Analysis of ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences in species and populations of Gyrodactylus (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) from salmonid fish in Northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, C O; Collins, C M; Malmberg, G; Mo, T A

    2003-12-29

    The intergenic spacer (IGS) region of ribosomal RNA genes was amplified and sequenced from a variety of Gyrodactylus specimens collected from wild and farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and grayling Thymallus thymallus, from various locations in Northern Europe. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences confirmed the distinction between G. salaris Malmberg, 1957 and G. thymalli Zitnan, 1960, supporting their validity as separate species. G. salaris adapted to rainbow trout are also distinct from the parasites found on Atlantic salmon, supporting the existence of a rainbow-trout form that was initially identified on the basis of morphological differences. Analysis of the IGS did not provide good resolution of different populations of G. salaris sensu stricto, but was consistent with epidemiological evidence which indicates that introduction of the parasite to Norway was recent and limited. The IGS may be helpful in distinguishing forms of G. salaris that are pathogenic to Atlantic salmon from those that are not.

  8. Chloroplast Genome Differences between Asian and American Equisetum arvense (Equisetaceae) and the Origin of the Hypervariable trnY-trnE Intergenic Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Kim, Ki-Joong

    2014-01-01

    Comparative analyses of complete chloroplast (cp) DNA sequences within a species may provide clues to understand the population dynamics and colonization histories of plant species. Equisetum arvense (Equisetaceae) is a widely distributed fern species in northeastern Asia, Europe, and North America. The complete cp DNA sequences from Asian and American E. arvense individuals were compared in this study. The Asian E. arvense cp genome was 583 bp shorter than that of the American E. arvense. In total, 159 indels were observed between two individuals, most of which were concentrated on the hypervariable trnY-trnE intergenic spacer (IGS) in the large single-copy (LSC) region of the cp genome. This IGS region held a series of 19 bp repeating units. The numbers of the 19 bp repeat unit were responsible for 78% of the total length difference between the two cp genomes. Furthermore, only other closely related species of Equisetum also show the hypervariable nature of the trnY-trnE IGS. By contrast, only a single indel was observed in the gene coding regions: the ycf1 gene showed 24 bp differences between the two continental individuals due to a single tandem-repeat indel. A total of 165 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were recorded between the two cp genomes. Of these, 52 SNPs (31.5%) were distributed in coding regions, 13 SNPs (7.9%) were in introns, and 100 SNPs (60.6%) were in intergenic spacers (IGS). The overall difference between the Asian and American E. arvense cp genomes was 0.12%. Despite the relatively high genetic diversity between Asian and American E. arvense, the two populations are recognized as a single species based on their high morphological similarity. This indicated that the two regional populations have been in morphological stasis. PMID:25157804

  9. Differentiation of Acinetobacter baumannii biotypes by amplification of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Garcia, A; Montoya, R; Bello, H; Gonzalez, G; Dominguez, M; Zemelman, R

    1996-01-01

    Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (32 strains) from blood samples obtained from patients in five Chilean hospitals were identified and biotyped according to their phenotypic properties. They were also submitted to random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) using eight randomly designed 10-mers and the core sequence of M13 phage (15-mers) as well as amplification of the spacer regions between 16S and 23S genes in the prokaryotic rRNA genetic loci. With some primers, RAPD discriminated between biotypes, whereas with others each isolate showed a particular profile. When amplification of spacer regions was performed, a clear correlation between patterns and biotypes was found. This last technique allowed correct biotyping of clinical isolates. Both genetic methods might be used for the identification of A. baumannii biotypes.

  10. Effectiveness of enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR and random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting for Helicobacter pylori strain differentiation.

    PubMed

    Finger, S Alison; Velapatiño, Billie; Kosek, Margaret; Santivañez, Livia; Dailidiene, Daiva; Quino, Willi; Balqui, Jacqueline; Herrera, Phabiola; Berg, Douglas E; Gilman, Robert H

    2006-07-01

    We compared the robustness and discriminatory power of the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting methods for detecting cases of mixed Helicobacter pylori infection in Peruvian shantytown residents. H. pylori isolates from 63 participants were cultured, and five single colonies and a pool of additional colonies from each participant were analyzed by ERIC-PCR and by RAPD tests with four 10-nucleotide primers (one primer per reaction). There was 94% agreement between the ERIC and RAPD profiles in classifying sets of isolates as uniform versus closely related but not identical versus probably unrelated, indicating a high kappa statistic of 0.8942. Subtle differences in related ERIC or RAPD patterns likely reflect gene transfer between strains, recombination, and/or mutation, whereas markedly different patterns reflect infection by unrelated strains. At least half of infected shantytown residents seemed to carry more than one H. pylori strain, although in 19 of 31 persons, the strains were closely related. Three RAPD tests, each with a different primer, were needed to achieve the sensitivity of one ERIC test. ERIC-PCR constitutes a resource- and time-efficient method for H. pylori strain differentiation.

  11. Effectiveness of Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus PCR and Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Fingerprinting for Helicobacter pylori Strain Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Finger, S. Alison; Velapatiño, Billie; Kosek, Margaret; Santivañez, Livia; Dailidiene, Daiva; Quino, Willi; Balqui, Jacqueline; Herrera, Phabiola; Berg, Douglas E.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    We compared the robustness and discriminatory power of the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting methods for detecting cases of mixed Helicobacter pylori infection in Peruvian shantytown residents. H. pylori isolates from 63 participants were cultured, and five single colonies and a pool of additional colonies from each participant were analyzed by ERIC-PCR and by RAPD tests with four 10-nucleotide primers (one primer per reaction). There was 94% agreement between the ERIC and RAPD profiles in classifying sets of isolates as uniform versus closely related but not identical versus probably unrelated, indicating a high kappa statistic of 0.8942. Subtle differences in related ERIC or RAPD patterns likely reflect gene transfer between strains, recombination, and/or mutation, whereas markedly different patterns reflect infection by unrelated strains. At least half of infected shantytown residents seemed to carry more than one H. pylori strain, although in 19 of 31 persons, the strains were closely related. Three RAPD tests, each with a different primer, were needed to achieve the sensitivity of one ERIC test. ERIC-PCR constitutes a resource- and time-efficient method for H. pylori strain differentiation. PMID:16820463

  12. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) PCR based genetic diversity of Xanthomonas spp. and its relation to xanthan production

    PubMed Central

    Asgarani, Ezat; Ghashghaei, Tahereh; Soudi, Mohammad Reza; Alimadadi, Nayyereh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The genus Xanthomonas is composed of phytopathogenic bacterial species. In addition to causing crops diseases, most of the Xanthomonas species especially Xanthomonas campestris produce xanthan gum via an aerobic fermentation process. Xanthan gum is, an important exopolysaccharide from Xanthomonas campestris, mainly used in the food, petroleum and other industries. the purpose of this study was assessment of relationship between genetic diversity and xanthan production in Xanthomonas spp. Materials and Methods: In this study 15 strains of Xanthomonas spp. which had previously been isolated from soils of vegetable farms, were discriminated from each other using Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC) PCR and 16S rDNA sequencing methods. Xanthan production of strains was measured in 250 ml flask. The results of ERIC PCR and xanthan production was compared. Results: ERIC-PCR patterns not only could differentiate all Xanthomonas campestis from the control i.e. Xanthomonas translucent but also discriminate strains of Xanthomonas to three clusters with 40% similarity based on Jaccard’s coefficient. This clustering of the strains was in agreement with other characteristics including xanthan production and biochemical features. Discussion: The results showed that genomic fingerprinting conferred adequate genetic data for discriminating between strains of the species Xanthomonas campestris. The data indicated a partial relationship between ERIC-PCR patterns and xanthan production by the strains. Conclusion: Further development of experiments may result in making good prediction about xanthan production capability of the Xanthomonas strains on the basis of ERIC-PCR method. PMID:26644872

  13. Molecular typing among beef isolates of Escherichia coli using consensus repetitive intergenic enterobacteria-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoolkifli, Nurliyana Wan; Mutalib, Sahilah Abd

    2013-11-01

    Genomic DNA of Escherichia coli were characterized by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-Polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and the presence of Shiga toxin gene-I (Stx1) and Shiga toxin gene-2 (Stx2). These isolates were originated from imported raw beef which are come from two countries namely Australia and India. The isolation of E. coli was conducted by using Eosin Methylene Blue Agar (EMBA). A total of 94 strains had been isolated from 30 samples of imported raw beefand 42 strains had been detected positively E. coli by doing biochemical tests. All strains had been tested and the results of biochemical tests showed that 3 strains were from Australia samples while the other 39 strains were from India samples. The biochemical tests used are Indole test, Methyl Red test, Voges-Proskauer test and Citrate test. All the 42 strains were examined for Shiga toxin (stx1 and stx2) gene detection by two pair primers which are stx2F (5'-TTCTTCGGTATCCTATTCCC-3'), stx2R (5'-ATGCATCTCTGGTCATTGTA-3'), stx1F (5'-CAGTTAATGTGGTGGCGAAG-3'), and stx1R (5'-CTGTCACAGTAACAACCGT-3'). The results showed that none of the strains are positive for Shiga toxin gene. Application of ERIC-PCR method towards E. coli had successfully shown the high diversity polymorphism in 21 different genome types of DNA with primers ERIC1R (5'- CACTTAGGGGTCCTCGAATGTA- 3') and ERIC2R (5'- AAGTAAGTGACTGGGGTGACGC- 3').

  14. Comparison of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR and biochemical tests to characterize Lactococcus garvieae.

    PubMed

    Ture, M; Altinok, I; Capkin, E

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical test, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence PCR (ERIC-PCR) were used to compare 42 strains of Lactococcus garvieae isolated from different regions of Turkey, Italy, France and Spain. Twenty biotypes of L. garvieae were formed based on 54 biochemical tests. ERIC-PCR of genomic DNA from different L. garvieae strains resulted in amplification of multiple fragments of DNA in sizes ranging between 200 and 5000 bp with various band intensities. After cutting DNA with ApaI restriction enzyme and running on the PFGE, 11–22 resolvable bands ranging from 2 to 194 kb were observed. Turkish isolates were grouped into two clusters, and only A58 (Italy) strain was connected with Turkish isolates. Similarities between Turkish, Spanish, Italian and French isolates were <50% except 216-6 Rize strain. In Turkey, first lactococcosis occurred in Mugla, and then, it has been spread all over the country. Based on ERIC-PCR, Spanish and Italian strains of L. garvieae were related to Mugla strains. Therefore, after comparing PFGE profiles, ERIC-PCR profiles and phenotypic characteristics of 42 strains of L. garvieae, there were no relationships found between these three typing methods. PFGE method was more discriminative than the other methods. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) PCR based genetic diversity of Xanthomonas spp. and its relation to xanthan production.

    PubMed

    Asgarani, Ezat; Ghashghaei, Tahereh; Soudi, Mohammad Reza; Alimadadi, Nayyereh

    2015-02-01

    The genus Xanthomonas is composed of phytopathogenic bacterial species. In addition to causing crops diseases, most of the Xanthomonas species especially Xanthomonas campestris produce xanthan gum via an aerobic fermentation process. Xanthan gum is, an important exopolysaccharide from Xanthomonas campestris, mainly used in the food, petroleum and other industries. the purpose of this study was assessment of relationship between genetic diversity and xanthan production in Xanthomonas spp. In this study 15 strains of Xanthomonas spp. which had previously been isolated from soils of vegetable farms, were discriminated from each other using Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC) PCR and 16S rDNA sequencing methods. Xanthan production of strains was measured in 250 ml flask. The results of ERIC PCR and xanthan production was compared. ERIC-PCR patterns not only could differentiate all Xanthomonas campestis from the control i.e. Xanthomonas translucent but also discriminate strains of Xanthomonas to three clusters with 40% similarity based on Jaccard's coefficient. This clustering of the strains was in agreement with other characteristics including xanthan production and biochemical features. The results showed that genomic fingerprinting conferred adequate genetic data for discriminating between strains of the species Xanthomonas campestris. The data indicated a partial relationship between ERIC-PCR patterns and xanthan production by the strains. Further development of experiments may result in making good prediction about xanthan production capability of the Xanthomonas strains on the basis of ERIC-PCR method.

  16. Utility of indels for species-level identification of a biologically complex plant group: a study with intergenic spacer in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Mahadani, Pradosh; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2014-11-01

    The Consortium of Barcode of Life plant working group proposed to use the defined portion of plastid genes rbcL and matK either singly or in combination as the standard DNA barcode for plants. But DNA barcode based identification of biologically complex plant groups are always a challenging task due to the occurrence of natural hybridization. Here, we examined the use of indels polymorphism in trnH-psbA and trnL-trnF sequences for rapid species identification of citrus. DNA from young leaves of selected citrus species were isolated and matK gene (~800 bp) and trnH-psbA spacer (~450 bp) of Chloroplast DNA was amplified for species level identification. The sequences within the group taxa of Citrus were aligned using the ClustalX program. With few obvious misalignments were corrected manually using the similarity criterion. We identified a 54 bp inverted repeat or palindrome sequence (27-80 regions) and 6 multi residues indel coding regions. Large inverted repeats in cpDNA provided authentication at the higher taxonomic levels. These diagnostics indel marker from trnH-psbA were successful in identifying different species (5 out of 7) within the studied Citrus except Citrus limon and Citrus medica. These two closely related species are distinguished through the 6 bp deletion in trnL-trnF. This study demonstrated that the indel polymorphism based approach easily characterizes the Citrus species and the same may be applied in other complex groups. Likewise other indels occurring intergenic spacer of chloroplast regions may be tested for rapid identification of other secondary citrus species.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships within Chamaecrista sect. Xerocalyx (Leguminosae, Caesalpinioideae) inferred from the cpDNA trnE-trnT intergenic spacer and nrDNA ITS sequences

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Davi Coe; Lima, João Paulo Matos Santos; Fernandes, Afrânio Gomes; Nunes, Edson Paula; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa

    2011-01-01

    Chamaecrista belongs to subtribe Cassiinae (Caesalpinioideae), and it comprises over 330 species, divided into six sections. The section Xerocalyx has been subjected to a profound taxonomic shuffling over the years. Therefore, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis using a cpDNA trnE-trnT intergenic spacer and nrDNA ITS/5.8S sequences from Cassiinae taxa, in an attempt to elucidate the relationships within this section from Chamaecrista. The tree topology was congruent between the two data sets studied in which the monophyly of the genus Chamaecrista was strongly supported. Our analyses reinforce that new sectional boundaries must be defined in the Chamaecrista genus, especially the inclusion of sections Caliciopsis and Xerocalyx in sect. Chamaecrista, considered here paraphyletic. The section Xerocalyx was strongly supported as monophyletic; however, the current data did not show C. ramosa (microphyllous) and C. desvauxii (macrophyllous) and their respective varieties in distinct clades, suggesting that speciation events are still ongoing in these specimens. PMID:21734825

  18. Bat white-nose syndrome: a real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructans.

    PubMed

    Muller, Laura K; Lorch, Jeffrey M; Lindner, Daniel L; O'Connor, Michael; Gargas, Andrea; Blehert, David S

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Geomyces destructans is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that has killed millions of North American hibernating bats. We describe a real-time TaqMan PCR test that detects DNA from G. destructans by targeting a portion of the multicopy intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene complex. The test is highly sensitive, consistently detecting as little as 3.3 fg genomic DNA from G. destructans. The real-time PCR test specifically amplified genomic DNA from G. destructans but did not amplify target sequence from 54 closely related fungal isolates (including 43 Geomyces spp. isolates) associated with bats. The test was qualified further by analyzing DNA extracted from 91 bat wing skin samples, and PCR results matched histopathology findings. These data indicate the real-time TaqMan PCR method described herein is a sensitive, specific and rapid test to detect DNA from G. destructans and provides a valuable tool for WNS diagnostics and research.

  19. Accurate and sensitive real-time PCR assays using intergenic spacer 1 region to differentiate Cryptococcus gattii sensu lato and Cryptococcus neoformans sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Eliandro Reis; Azevedo, Caroline Souza; Panagio, Luciano Aparecido; Pelisson, Marsileni; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Venancio, Emerson José; Barros, Tânia Fraga; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, two accurate and sensitive real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to differentiate pathogenic Cryptococcus gattii sensu lato (s.l.) and C. neoformans sensu lato (s.l.) targeting the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region from rDNA locus were developed. Specific primers were designed based on their IGS1 sequence analyses and the optimal real-time PCR assays showed that the dissociation curves generated two different melting peaks, at 82.8 and 84.2ºC for C. gattii s.l. and C. neoformans s.l., respectively. No amplifications were observed in the negative template control. The minimum limit of detection of both primers was 100 plasmid copies per reaction, and they were highly specific when tested with a range of fungal DNAs. Overall, the results showed that the designed primers completely differentiated C. gattii s.l. and C. neoformans s.l. from clinical and environmental sources with great accuracy when compared to phenotypic identification, with no cross-reactivity to other fungal DNA.

  20. Dynamic changes in the distribution of a satellite homologous to intergenic 26-18S rDNA spacer in the evolution of Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, K Y; Skalicka, K; Koukalova, B; Volkov, R A; Matyasek, R; Hemleben, V; Leitch, A R; Kovarik, A

    2004-01-01

    An approximately 135-bp sequence called the A1/A2 repeat was isolated from the transcribed region of the 26-18S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) of Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and Southern blot analysis revealed its occurrence as an independent satellite (termed an A1/A2 satellite) outside of rDNA loci in species of Nicotiana section Tomentosae. The chromosomal location, patterns of genomic dispersion, and copy numbers of its tandemly arranged units varied between the species. In more distantly related Nicotiana species the A1/A2 repeats were found only at the nucleolar organizer regions (NOR). There was a trend toward the elimination of the A1/A2 satellite in N. tabacum (tobacco), an allotetraploid with parents closely related to the diploids N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis. This process may have already commenced in an S(3) generation of synthetic tobacco. Cytosine residues in the IGS were significantly hypomethylated compared with the A1/A2 satellite. There was no clear separation between the IGS and satellite fractions in sequence analysis of individual clones and we found no evidence for CG suppression. Taken together the data indicate a dynamic nature of the A1/A2 repeats in Nicotiana genomes, with evidence for recurrent integration, copy number expansions, and contractions. PMID:15126410

  1. Host selectivity and genetic variation of Discula umbrinella isolates from two oak species: analyses of intergenic spacer region sequences of ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan D

    2006-10-01

    Discula umbrinella, a fungal endophyte of oak species, colonizes and reproduces on leaves of Quercus alba and Q. rubra in forest ecosystems. Twenty-nine isolates collected from leaves of both oak species (16 from Q. alba and 13 from Q. rubra) were assayed for oak species preference and genetic variation based on primer-specific polymerase chain reactions for the intergenic spacer region (IGS) of ribosomal DNA. DNA sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction products revealed a 10-bp insertion (237-247 bp) at the 3' end of the IGS region present in nine isolates and absent in 20 of the isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of the IGS region using the neighbor-joining method identified IGS groups (groups I-V) based on single nucleotide sequence differences. Host selectivity and geographic origin of isolates were correlated in some instances with the IGS groups. Isolates within each IGS group were further analyzed for nucleotide polymorphisms to confirm genotype identity and genotype diversity. Ten different genotypes (Va-Vj) were identified among the isolates analyzed. Genotype diversity was greatest in IGS groups I, IV, and V. Seventy percent of the genotypes (Vc, Vd, Ve, Vf, Vg,Vi, and Vj) contained isolates with single tree species preferences.

  2. Molecular characterization of Streptococcus suis strains by 16S–23S intergenic spacer polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis

    PubMed Central

    Le Devendec, Laëtitia; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Kobisch, Marylène

    2006-01-01

    Abstract We developed a new molecular method of typing Streptococcus suis based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a large fragment of rRNA genes, including a part of the 16S and 23S genes and the 16S–23S intergenic spacer region (ISR), followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis with RsaI or MboII endonuclease. The 16S–23S ISRs of 5 S. suis isolates were sequenced and compared. Size and sequence polymorphisms were observed between the S735 reference strain and the 4 wild-type strains. The genetic relationships between 138 independent S. suis strains belonging to various serotypes, isolated from swine or human cases, were determined. The discriminatory power of the method was > 0.95, the threshold value for interpreting typing results with confidence (0.954 with RsaI and 0.984 with RsaI plus MboII). The in vitro reproducibility was 100%. The strains isolated from humans were less genetically diverse than the strains isolated from pigs. For the first time, 2 molecular patterns (R6, M9) were significantly associated with S. suis serotype 2 strains. This genetic tool could be valuable in distinguishing individual isolates of S. suis during epidemiologic investigations. PMID:16639941

  3. Bat white-nose syndrome: a real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructanstructans.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muller, Laura K.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Lindner, Daniel L.; O'Connor, Michael; Gargas, Andrea; Blehert, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Geomyces destructans is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that has killed millions of North American hibernating bats. We describe a real-time TaqMan PCR test that detects DNA from G. destructans by targeting a portion of the multicopy intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene complex. The test is highly sensitive, consistently detecting as little as 3.3 fg of genomic DNA from G. destructans. The real-time PCR test specifically amplified genomic DNA from G. destructans but did not amplify target sequence from 54 closely related fungal isolates (including 43 Geomyces spp. isolates) associated with bats. The test was further qualified by analyzing DNA extracted from 91 bat wing skin samples, and PCR results matched histopathology findings. These data indicate the real-time TaqMan PCR method described herein is a sensitive, specific, and rapid test to detect DNA from G. destructans and provides a valuable tool for WNS diagnostics and research.

  4. An AluI fragment isolated from lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), maps to the intergenic spacer region of the rDNA cistron.

    PubMed

    Reed, K M; Oakley, T H; Phillips, R B

    1997-02-20

    The relationship between a 217-bp AluI fragment (SnAluI-33c) from lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) which hybridizes to the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) and the ribosomal RNA genes was examined by Southern analysis and comparative hybridization. Restriction enzymes with recognition sites mapped in the lake trout rDNA cistron were used to digest genomic DNA into fragments of predetermined size. Comparison of the hybridization pattern of SnAluI-33c with those of two rDNA-specific probes placed this fragment within the intergenic spacer region of the rDNA cistron, approximately 3 kb upstream (5') of the 18S gene. This finding is consistent with in situ hybridization experiments showing hybridization of this fragment to sites of rDNA [Reed, K.M. and Phillips, R.B., Cytogenet. Cell Genet. 70 (1995) 104-107]. Based on cross hybridization and sequence comparisons, homologous sequences are present in other salmonid species.

  5. PCR-based analysis of the intergenic spacers of the Nor loci on the A genomes of Triticum diploids and polyploids.

    PubMed

    Sallares, R; Brown, T A

    1999-02-01

    We present DNA sequence data showing population variation in the intergenic spacer (IGS) regions of the ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) on the A genomes of 27 diploid and polyploid wheats. PCRs (polymerase chain reactions) specific for the A(m) genome gave products with five populations of Triticum monococcum but did not give products with AABB or AABBDD wheats. PCRs specific to the A(u) genome of T. urartu gave products with all the AABB and AABBDD polyploids that were tested, but not with T. monococcum. AAGG tetraploids gave products only with the A(u)-specific primers, but the AAAAGG hexaploid T. zhukovskyi gave products with both the A(u) and A(m) primers. Phylogenetic analysis showed a substantial degree of IGS divergence for both the A(m) and A(u) genomes in diploids and polyploids compared with other genomes of Triticum and Aegilops. The rate of evolution of the IGS is much greater than previously reported for the internal transcribed region of the rDNAs but the view that the IGS only gives random noise is rejected, the IGS sequences presented here reflecting the general evolutionary trends affecting the wheat genome as a whole.

  6. Variation in 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions in Photobacterium damselae: a mosaic-like structure.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Carlos R; Collins, Matthew D; Romalde, Jesús L; Toranzo, Alicia E

    2005-02-01

    Phenotypically, Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida and P. damselae subsp. damselae are easily distinguished. However, their 16S rRNA gene sequences are identical, and attempts to discriminate these two subspecies by molecular tools are hampered by their high level of DNA-DNA similarity. The 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS) were sequenced in two strains of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida and two strains of P. damselae subsp. damselae to determine the level of molecular diversity in this DNA region. A total of 17 different ITS variants, ranging from 803 to 296 bp were found, some of which were subspecies or strain specific. The largest ITS contained four tRNA genes (tDNAs) coding for tRNA(Glu(UUC)), tRNA(Lys(UUU)), tRNA(Val(UAC)), and tRNA(Ala(GGC)). Five amplicons contained tRNA(Glu(UUC)) combined with two additional tRNA genes, including tRNA(Lys(UUU)), tRNA(Val(UAC)), or tRNA(Ala(UGC)). Five amplicons contained tRNA(Ile(GAU)) and tRNA(Ala(UGC)). Two amplicons contained tRNA(Glu(UUC)) and tRNA(Ala(UGC)). Two different isoacceptor tRNA(Ala) genes (GGC and UGC anticodons) were found. The five smallest amplicons contained no tRNA genes. The tRNA-gene combinations tRNA(Glu(UUC))-tRNA(Val(UAC))-tRNA(Ala(UGC)) and tRNA(Glu(UUC))-tRNA(Ala(UGC)) have not been previously reported in bacterial ITS regions. The number of copies of the ribosomal operon (rrn) in the P. damselae chromosome ranged from at least 9 to 12. For ITS variants coexisting in two strains of different subspecies or in strains of the same subspecies, nucleotide substitution percentages ranged from 0 to 2%. The main source of variation between ITS variants was due to different combinations of DNA sequence blocks, constituting a mosaic-like structure.

  7. Identification of virulence factors in 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer genotyped Staphylococcus aureus isolated from water buffaloes and small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Zottola, T; Locatelli, C; Pollera, C; Castiglioni, B; Scaccabarozzi, L; Moroni, P

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human and animal pathogen, and is regarded as an important cause of intramammary infection (IMI) in ruminants. Staphylococcus aureus genetic variability and virulence factors have been well studied in veterinary medicine, especially in cows as support for control and management of IMI. The aim of the present study was to genotype 71 Staph. aureus isolates from the bulk tank and foremilk of water buffaloes (n=40) and from udder tissue (n=7) and foremilk (n=24) from small ruminants. The method used was previously applied to bovine Staph. aureus and is based on the amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. The technique applied was able to identify different Staph. aureus genotypes isolated from dairy species other than the bovine species, and cluster the genotypes according to species and herds. Virulence gene distribution was consistent with genotype differentiation. The isolates were also characterized through determination of the presence of 19 virulence-associated genes by specific PCR. Enterotoxins A, C, D, G, I, J, and L were associated with Staph. aureus isolates from buffaloes, whereas enterotoxins C and L were linked to small ruminants. Genes coding for methicillin resistance, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, exfoliative toxins A and B, and enterotoxins B, E, and H were undetected. These findings indicate that RNA template-specific PCR is a valid technique for typing Staph. aureus from buffaloes and small ruminants and is a useful tool for understanding udder infection epidemiology. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA fingerprinting of Paenibacillus popilliae and Paenibacillus lentimorbus using PCR-amplified 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2009-01-01

    Failure to identify correctly the milky disease bacteria, Paenibacillus popilliae and Paenibacillus lentimorbus, has resulted in published research errors and commercial production problems. A DNA fingerprinting procedure, using PCR amplification of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, has been shown to easily and accurately identify isolates of milky disease bacteria. Using 34 P. popilliae and 15 P. lentimorbus strains, PCR amplification of different ITS regions produced three DNA fingerprints. For P. lentimorbus phylogenic group 2 strains and for all P. popilliae strains tested, electrophoresis of amplified DNA produced a migratory pattern (i.e., ITS-PCR fingerprint) exhibiting three DNA bands. P. lentimorbus group 1 strains also produced this ITS-PCR fingerprint. However, the fingerprint was phase-shifted toward larger DNA sizes. Alignment of the respective P. popilliae and P. lentimorbus group 1 ITS DNA sequences showed extensive homology, except for a 108bp insert in all P. lentimorbus ITS regions. This insert occurred at the same location relative to the 23S rDNA and accounted for the phase-shift difference in P. lentimorbus group 1 DNA fingerprints. At present, there is no explanation for this 108bp insert. The third ITS-PCR fingerprint, produced by P. lentimorbus group 3 strains, exhibited approximately eight DNA bands. Comparison of the three fingerprints of milky disease bacteria to the ITS-PCR fingerprints of other Paenibacillus species demonstrated uniqueness. ITS-PCR fingerprinting successfully identified eight unknown isolates as milky disease bacteria. Therefore, this procedure can serve as a standard protocol to identify P. popilliae and P. lentimorbus.

  9. Population genetic structure and phylogeographical pattern of a relict tree fern, Alsophila spinulosa (Cyatheaceae), inferred from cpDNA atpB- rbcL intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Su, Yingjuan; Wang, Ting; Zheng, Bo; Jiang, Yu; Chen, Guopei; Gu, Hongya

    2004-11-01

    Sequences of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) atpB- rbcL intergenic spacers of individuals of a tree fern species, Alsophila spinulosa, collected from ten relict populations distributed in the Hainan and Guangdong provinces, and the Guangxi Zhuang region in southern China, were determined. Sequence length varied from 724 bp to 731 bp, showing length polymorphism, and base composition was with high A+T content between 63.17% and 63.95%. Sequences were neutral in terms of evolution (Tajima's criterion D=-1.01899, P>0.10 and Fu and Li's test D*=-1.39008, P>0.10; F*=-1.49775, P>0.10). A total of 19 haplotypes were identified based on nucleotide variation. High levels of haplotype diversity (h=0.744) and nucleotide diversity (Dij=0.01130) were detected in A. spinulosa, probably associated with its long evolutionary history, which has allowed the accumulation of genetic variation within lineages. Both the minimum spanning network and neighbor-joining trees generated for haplotypes demonstrated that current populations of A. spinulosa existing in Hainan, Guangdong, and Guangxi were subdivided into two geographical groups. An analysis of molecular variance indicated that most of the genetic variation (93.49%, P<0.001) was partitioned among regions. Wright's isolation by distance model was not supported across extant populations. Reduced gene flow by the Qiongzhou Strait and inbreeding may result in the geographical subdivision between the Hainan and Guangdong + Guangxi populations (FST=0.95, Nm=0.03). Within each region, the star-like pattern of phylogeography of haplotypes implied a population expansion process during evolutionary history. Gene genealogies together with coalescent theory provided significant information for uncovering phylogeography of A. spinulosa.

  10. Specific Detection of Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium Strains Colonizing Rice (Oryza sativa) Roots by 16S-23S Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer-Targeted PCR

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhiyuan; Hurek, Thomas; Vinuesa, Pablo; Müller, Peter; Ladha, Jagdish K.; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    In addition to forming symbiotic nodules on legumes, rhizobial strains are members of soil or rhizosphere communities or occur as endophytes, e.g., in rice. Two rhizobial strains which have been isolated from root nodules of the aquatic legumes Aeschynomene fluminensis (IRBG271) and Sesbania aculeata (IRBG74) were previously found to promote rice growth. In addition to analyzing their phylogenetic positions, we assessed the suitability of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences for the differentiation of closely related rhizobial taxa and for the development of PCR protocols allowing the specific detection of strains in the environment. 16S rDNA sequence analysis (sequence identity, 99%) and phylogenetic analysis of IGS sequences showed that strain IRBG271 was related to but distinct from Bradyrhizobium elkanii. Rhizobium sp. (Sesbania) strain IRBG74 was located in the Rhizobium-Agrobacterium cluster as a novel lineage according to phylogenetic 16S rDNA analysis (96.8 to 98.9% sequence identity with Agrobacterium tumefaciens; emended name, Rhizobium radiobacter). Strain IRBG74 harbored four copies of rRNA operons whose IGS sequences varied only slightly (2 to 9 nucleotides). The IGS sequence analyses allowed intraspecies differentiation, especially in the genus Bradyrhizobium, as illustrated here for strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, B. elkanii, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense, and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Chamaecytisus) strain BTA-1. It also clearly differentiated fast-growing rhizobial species and strains, albeit with lower statistical significance. Moreover, the high sequence variability allowed the development of highly specific IGS-targeted nested-PCR assays. Strains IRBG74 and IRBG271 were specifically detected in complex DNA mixtures of numerous related bacteria and in the DNA of roots of gnotobiotically cultured or even of soil-grown rice plants after inoculation. Thus, IGS sequence analysis is an attractive technique for both microbial

  11. Rapid Identification and Differentiation of the Soft Rot Erwinias by 16S-23S Intergenic Transcribed Spacer-PCR and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Toth, I. K.; Avrova, A. O.; Hyman, L. J.

    2001-01-01

    Current identification methods for the soft rot erwinias are both imprecise and time-consuming. We have used the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) to aid in their identification. Analysis by ITS-PCR and ITS-restriction fragment length polymorphism was found to be a simple, precise, and rapid method compared to current molecular and phenotypic techniques. The ITS was amplified from Erwinia and other genera using universal PCR primers. After PCR, the banding patterns generated allowed the soft rot erwinias to be differentiated from all other Erwinia and non-Erwinia species and placed into one of three groups (I to III). Group I comprised all Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica and subsp. betavasculorum isolates. Group II comprised all E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, subsp. odorifera, and subsp. wasabiae and E. cacticida isolates, and group III comprised all E. chrysanthemi isolates. To increase the level of discrimination further, the ITS-PCR products were digested with one of two restriction enzymes. Digestion with CfoI identified E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica and subsp. betavasculorum (group I) and E. chrysanthemi (group III) isolates, while digestion with RsaI identified E. carotovora subsp. wasabiae, subsp. carotovora, and subsp. odorifera/carotovora and E. cacticida isolates (group II). In the latter case, it was necessary to distinguish E. carotovora subsp. odorifera and subsp. carotovora using the α-methyl glucoside test. Sixty suspected soft rot erwinia isolates from Australia were identified as E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, E. chrysanthemi, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, and non-soft rot species. Ten “atypical” E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica isolates were identified as E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, subsp. carotovora, and subsp. betavasculorum and non-soft rot species, and two “atypical” E. carotovora subsp. carotovora isolates were identified as E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and subsp. atroseptica. PMID:11526007

  12. Comparison of soil fungal community structure in different peanut rotation sequences using ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis in relation to aflatoxin-producing fungi.

    PubMed

    Sudini, H; Arias, C R; Liles, M R; Bowen, K L; Huettel, R N

    2011-01-01

    The present study focuses on determining soil fungal community structure in different peanut-cropping sequences by using a high-resolution DNA fingerprinting technique: ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). This study was initiated to determine fungal community profiles in four peanut-cropping sequences (continuous peanut, 4 years of continuous bahiagrass followed by peanut, peanut-corn-cotton, and peanut-cotton rotations), with a special focus to evaluate whether the profiles under investigation may have also indicated microbial differences that could affect Aspergillus flavus populations. Results indicated 75% similarities among fungal communities from the same cropping sequences as well as with similar times of sampling. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based detection of A. flavus directly from these soils was carried out using A. flavus-specific primers (FLA1 and FLA2) and also through quantitative estimation on A. flavus and A. parasiticus agar medium. Population levels of A. flavus in soil samples ranged from zero to 1.2 × 10(3) CFU g(-1) of soil (based on culturable methods); however, the fungus was not detected with A. flavus-specific primers. The minimum threshold limit at which these aflatoxin-producing fungi could be detected from the total soil genomic DNA was determined through artificial inoculation of samples with 10-fold increases in concentrations. The results indicated that a minimum population density of 2.6 × 10(6) CFU g(-1) of soil is required for PCR detection in our conditions. These results are useful in further determining the relative population levels of these fungi in peanut soils with other soil fungi. This is a new approach to understanding soil fungal communities and how they might change over time and under different rotation systems.

  13. Evolution of the rpoB-psbZ region in fern plastid genomes: notable structural rearrangements and highly variable intergenic spacers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The rpoB-psbZ (BZ) region of some fern plastid genomes (plastomes) has been noted to go through considerable genomic changes. Unraveling its evolutionary dynamics across all fern lineages will lead to clarify the fundamental process shaping fern plastome structure and organization. Results A total of 24 fern BZ sequences were investigated with taxon sampling covering all the extant fern orders. We found that: (i) a tree fern Plagiogyria japonica contained a novel gene order that can be generated from either the ancestral Angiopteris type or the derived Adiantum type via a single inversion; (ii) the trnY-trnE intergenic spacer (IGS) of the filmy fern Vandenboschia radicans was expanded 3-fold due to the tandem 27-bp repeats which showed strong sequence similarity with the anticodon domain of trnY; (iii) the trnY-trnE IGSs of two horsetail ferns Equisetum ramosissimum and E. arvense underwent an unprecedented 5-kb long expansion, more than a quarter of which was consisted of a single type of direct repeats also relevant to the trnY anticodon domain; and (iv) ycf66 has independently lost at least four times in ferns. Conclusions Our results provided fresh insights into the evolutionary process of fern BZ regions. The intermediate BZ gene order was not detected, supporting that the Adiantum type was generated by two inversions occurring in pairs. The occurrence of Vandenboschia 27-bp repeats represents the first evidence of partial tRNA gene duplication in fern plastomes. Repeats potentially forming a stem-loop structure play major roles in the expansion of the trnY-trnE IGS. PMID:21486489

  14. Evolution of the rpoB-psbZ region in fern plastid genomes: notable structural rearrangements and highly variable intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Su, Ying-Juan; Wang, Ting

    2011-04-13

    The rpoB-psbZ (BZ) region of some fern plastid genomes (plastomes) has been noted to go through considerable genomic changes. Unraveling its evolutionary dynamics across all fern lineages will lead to clarify the fundamental process shaping fern plastome structure and organization. A total of 24 fern BZ sequences were investigated with taxon sampling covering all the extant fern orders. We found that: (i) a tree fern Plagiogyria japonica contained a novel gene order that can be generated from either the ancestral Angiopteris type or the derived Adiantum type via a single inversion; (ii) the trnY-trnE intergenic spacer (IGS) of the filmy fern Vandenboschia radicans was expanded 3-fold due to the tandem 27-bp repeats which showed strong sequence similarity with the anticodon domain of trnY; (iii) the trnY-trnE IGSs of two horsetail ferns Equisetum ramosissimum and E. arvense underwent an unprecedented 5-kb long expansion, more than a quarter of which was consisted of a single type of direct repeats also relevant to the trnY anticodon domain; and (iv) ycf66 has independently lost at least four times in ferns. Our results provided fresh insights into the evolutionary process of fern BZ regions. The intermediate BZ gene order was not detected, supporting that the Adiantum type was generated by two inversions occurring in pairs. The occurrence of Vandenboschia 27-bp repeats represents the first evidence of partial tRNA gene duplication in fern plastomes. Repeats potentially forming a stem-loop structure play major roles in the expansion of the trnY-trnE IGS.

  15. Sequence diversity in the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) of the rRNA operons in representatives of the Escherichia coli ECOR collection.

    PubMed

    Antón, A I; Martínez-Murcia, A J; Rodríguez-Valera, F

    1998-07-01

    The ribosomal RNA multigene family in Escherichia coli comprises seven rrn operons of similar, but not identical, sequence. Four operons (rrnC, B, G, and E) contain genes in the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) for tRNA(Glu-2) and three (rrnA, D, and H) contain genes for tRNA(Ile-1) and tRNA(Ala-1B). To increase our understanding of their molecular evolution, we have determined the ISR sequence of the seven operons in a set of 12 strains from the ECOR collection. Each operon was specifically amplified using polymerase chain reaction primers designed from genes or open reading frames located upstream of the 16S rRNA genes in E. coli K12. With a single exception (ECOR 40), ISRs containing one or two tRNA genes were found at the same respective loci as those of strain K12. Intercistronic heterogeneity already found in K12 was representative of most variation among the strains studied and the location of polymorphic sites was the same. Dispersed nucleotide substitutions were very few but 21 variable sites were found grouped in a stem-loop, although the secondary structure was conserved. Some regions were found in which a stretch of nucleotides was substituted in block by one alternative, apparently unrelated, sequence (as illustrated by the known putative insertion of rsl in K12). Except for substitutions of different sizes and insertions/deletions found in the ISR, the pattern of nucleotide variation is very similar to that found for the 16S rRNA gene in E. coli. Strains K12 and ECOR 40 showed the highest intercistronic heterogeneity. Most strains showed a strong tendency to homogenization. Concerted evolution could explain the notorious conservation of this region that is supposed to have low functional restrictions.

  16. Identification of Lactobacillus isolates from the gastrointestinal tract, silage, and yoghurt by 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region sequence comparisons.

    PubMed

    Tannock, G W; Tilsala-Timisjarvi, A; Rodtong, S; Ng, J; Munro, K; Alatossava, T

    1999-09-01

    Lactobacillus isolates were identified by PCR amplification and sequencing of the region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (spacer region). The sequences obtained from the isolates were compared to those of reference strains held in GenBank. A similarity of 97.5% or greater was considered to provide identification. To check the reliability of the method, the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced in the case of isolates whose spacer region sequences were less than 99% similar to that of a reference strain. Confirmation of identity was obtained in all instances. Spacer region sequencing provided rapid and accurate identification of Lactobacillus isolates obtained from gastrointestinal, yoghurt, and silage samples. It had an advantage over 16S V2-V3 sequence comparisons because it distinguished between isolates of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

  17. Precise molecular weight determination of PCR products of the rRNA intergenic spacer region using electrospray quadrupole mass spectrometry for differentiation of B. subtilis and B. atrophaeus, closely related species of bacilli.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Y A; Nagpal, M; Krahmer, M T; Fox, K F; Fox, A

    2000-05-01

    Assessment of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region (ISR) sequence variability is an important supplement to 16S rRNA sequencing for differentiating closely related bacterial species. Species differentiation can also be achieved by determination of approximate size of PCR (polymerase chain reaction) products of ISRs, based on their relative electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels. Closely-related species can have ISR PCR products that are similar in size. More precise molecular weight (M.W.) determination of these products might allow improved discrimination of such species. Electrospray quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-MS) has the potential to provide such precision. For ESI-Q-MS analysis, size limitation of PCR products is currently limited to around 130 base pairs (bp). Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus atrophaeus are two closely related species with few distinguishing phenotypic characteristics. B. subtilis has recently been sub-divided into two subgroups, W23 (type strain, W23) and 168 (type strain, 168). PCR products amplified from the ISR including the 5' terminal end of the 23S rRNA and a conserved portion of the ISR were analyzed by ESI-Q-MS. A 119 or 120 bp PCR product was produced for B. atrophaeus strains. However, strains of B. subtilis subgroups W23 and 168 each produced 114 bp products. In summary, a mass spectrometry method was developed for differentiation of B. subtilis and B. atrophaeus. Also, the genetic similarity of B. subtilis subgroups W23 and 168 was confirmed. Accurate determination of the molecular weight of PCR products from the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region using electrospray quadrupole mass spectrometry has great potential as a general technique for characterizing closely related bacterial species.

  18. The 28S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer from Crithidia fasciculata: repeated sequences, length heterogeneity, putative processing sites and potential interactions between U3 small nucleolar RNA and the ribosomal RNA precursor.

    PubMed

    Schnare, M N; Collings, J C; Spencer, D F; Gray, M W

    2000-09-15

    In Crithidia fasciculata, the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene repeats range in size from approximately 11 to 12 kb. This length heterogeneity is localized to a region of the intergenic spacer (IGS) that contains tandemly repeated copies of a 19mer sequence. The IGS also contains four copies of an approximately 55 nt repeat that has an internal inverted repeat and is also present in the IGS of Leishmania species. We have mapped the C.fasciculata transcription initiation site as well as two other reverse transcriptase stop sites that may be analogous to the A0 and A' pre-rRNA processing sites within the 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) of other eukaryotes. Features that could influence processing at these sites include two stretches of conserved primary sequence and three secondary structure elements present in the 5' ETS. We also characterized the C.fasciculata U3 snoRNA, which has the potential for base-pairing with pre-rRNA sequences. Finally, we demonstrate that biosynthesis of large subunit rRNA in both C. fasciculata and Trypanosoma brucei involves 3'-terminal addition of three A residues that are not present in the corresponding DNA sequences.

  19. Comparative analysis of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae and pv. phaseolicola based on phaseolotoxin-resistant ornithine carbamoyltransferase gene (argK) and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Sawada, H; Takeuchi, T; Matsuda, I

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, which causes halo blight on various legumes, and pv. actinidiae, responsible for canker or leaf spot on actinidia plants, are known as phaseolotoxin producers, and the former possesses phaseolotoxin-resistant ornithine carbamoyltransferase (ROCT) which confers resistance to the toxin. We confirmed that the latter is also resistant to phaseolotoxin and possesses ROCT, and we compared the two pathovars by using sequence data of the ROCT gene and the intergenic spacer region located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (16S-23S spacer region) as an index. It was found that the identical ROCT gene (argK) is contained not only in bean isolates of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola in Mexico and the United States but also in bean isolates in Japan and Canada, and that it is also distributed in the kudzu (Pueraria lobata) isolates of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola. Moreover, the kiwifruit and tara vine isolates of P. syringae pv. actinidiae were also found to possess the identical argK. On the contrary, the 16S-23S spacer regions showed a significant level of sequence variation between P. syringae pv. actinidiae and pv. phaseolicola, suggesting that these two pathovars evolved differently from each other in the phylogenetic development. The fact that even synonymous substitution has not occurred in argK among these strains despite their extreme differences in phylogenetic evolution and geographical distribution suggests that it was only recently in evolutionary time that argK was transferred from its origin to P. syringae pv. actinidiae and/or pv. phaseolicola.

  20. Comparative analysis of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae and pv. phaseolicola based on phaseolotoxin-resistant ornithine carbamoyltransferase gene (argK) and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, H; Takeuchi, T; Matsuda, I

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, which causes halo blight on various legumes, and pv. actinidiae, responsible for canker or leaf spot on actinidia plants, are known as phaseolotoxin producers, and the former possesses phaseolotoxin-resistant ornithine carbamoyltransferase (ROCT) which confers resistance to the toxin. We confirmed that the latter is also resistant to phaseolotoxin and possesses ROCT, and we compared the two pathovars by using sequence data of the ROCT gene and the intergenic spacer region located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (16S-23S spacer region) as an index. It was found that the identical ROCT gene (argK) is contained not only in bean isolates of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola in Mexico and the United States but also in bean isolates in Japan and Canada, and that it is also distributed in the kudzu (Pueraria lobata) isolates of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola. Moreover, the kiwifruit and tara vine isolates of P. syringae pv. actinidiae were also found to possess the identical argK. On the contrary, the 16S-23S spacer regions showed a significant level of sequence variation between P. syringae pv. actinidiae and pv. phaseolicola, suggesting that these two pathovars evolved differently from each other in the phylogenetic development. The fact that even synonymous substitution has not occurred in argK among these strains despite their extreme differences in phylogenetic evolution and geographical distribution suggests that it was only recently in evolutionary time that argK was transferred from its origin to P. syringae pv. actinidiae and/or pv. phaseolicola. PMID:8979356

  1. Implications of Molecular Genotyping of Helicobacter pylori Isolates from Different Human Populations by Genomic Fingerprinting of Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Regions for Strain Identification and Geographic Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Abid; Kauser, Farhana; Khan, Aleem A.; Tiwari, Santosh; Habibullah, Chittoor M.; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2004-01-01

    Biogeographic partitioning of the genome is typical of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. Such population-specific evolution could serve as a model for understanding host-pathogen interaction and the impact of genetic drift and recombination on insular populations. With a total of 320 isolates from six geographic regions (Japan, India, England, Spain, Ireland, Africa, and Peru) analyzed by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-based genotyping, we examined genetic affinities among various H. pylori populations in the world. Several strain-specific and region-specific differences were observed by ERIC-based typing. Polymorphic ERIC patterns indicated that the ERIC sequences are in fact dispersed in the H. pylori chromosome at different locations separated by various distances. Phylogenetic analysis of 61 representative isolates revealed three distinct genetic clusters populated by isolates with shared ERIC types independent of the cag right-junction motif type and vacA allele status. Among the notable genetic relationships were the genotypic similarities between Irish and Japanese and between Peruvian and Japanese isolates. Insular genotypic characteristics of Irish isolates amid genetic similarity to East Asian, as well as North European, strains have been once again proved in this study. Peruvian genotypes were more similar to those of Japanese isolates than to those of Iberian or European isolates. Given the current debate on the origin and age of present-day H. pylori, this is a significant finding that supports the possibility of ancient colonization of Amerindians with East Asian strains. Genotypic data presented here will be additionally helpful in realizing the importance of H. pylori geographical genomics in the development of gastroduodenal pathology. PMID:15184407

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in different geographic regions and transmission cycles based on a microsatellite motif of the intergenic spacer of spliced leader genes✯

    PubMed Central

    Cura, Carolina I.; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M.; Duffy, Tomás; Burgos, Juan M.; Rodriguero, Marcela; Cardinal, Marta V.; Kjos, Sonia; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Blanchet, Denis; De Pablos, Luis M.; Tomasini, Nicolás; Silva, Alex Da; Russomando, Graciela; Cuba Cuba, Cesar A.; Aznar, Christine; Abate, Teresa; Levin, Mariano J.; Osuna, Antonio; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Diosque, Patricio; Solari, Aldo; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2011-01-01

    The intergenic region of spliced-leader (SL-IR) genes from 105 Trypanosoma cruzi I (Tc I) infected biological samples, culture isolates and stocks from 11 endemic countries, from Argentina to the USA were characterised, allowing identification of 76 genotypes with 54 polymorphic sites from 123 aligned sequences. On the basis of the microsatellite motif proposed by Herrera et al. (2007) to define four haplotypes in Colombia, we could classify these genotypes into four distinct Tc I SL-IR groups, three corresponding to the former haplotypes Ia (11 genotypes), Ib (11 genotypes) and Id (35 genotypes); and one novel group, Ie (19 genotypes). Genotypes harboring the Tc Ic motif were not detected in our study. Tc Ia was associated with domestic cycles in southern and northern South America and sylvatic cycles in Central and North America. Tc Ib was found in all transmission cycles from Colombia. Tc Id was identified in all transmission cycles from Argentina and Colombia, including Chagas cardiomyopathy patients, sylvatic Brazilian samples and human cases from French Guiana, Panama and Venezuela. Tc Ie gathered five samples from domestic Triatoma infestans from northern Argentina, nine samples from wild Mepraia spinolai and Mepraia gajardoi and two chagasic patients from Chile and one from a Bolivian patient with chagasic reactivation. Mixed infections by Tc Ia + Tc Id, Tc Ia + Tc Ie and Tc Id + Tc Ie were detected in vector faeces and isolates from human and vector samples. In addition, Tc Ia and Tc Id were identified in different tissues from a heart transplanted Chagas cardiomyopathy patient with reactivation, denoting histotropism. Trypanosoma cruzi I SL-IR genotypes from parasites infecting Triatoma gerstaeckeri and Didelphis virginiana from USA, T. infestans from Paraguay, Rhodnius nasutus and Rhodnius neglectus from Brazil and M. spinolai and M. gajardoi from Chile are to our knowledge described for the first time. PMID:20670628

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes in different geographical regions and transmission cycles based on a microsatellite motif of the intergenic spacer of spliced-leader genes.

    PubMed

    Cura, Carolina I; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M; Duffy, Tomás; Burgos, Juan M; Rodriguero, Marcela; Cardinal, Marta V; Kjos, Sonia; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Blanchet, Denis; De Pablos, Luis M; Tomasini, Nicolás; da Silva, Alexandre; Russomando, Graciela; Cuba, Cesar A Cuba; Aznar, Christine; Abate, Teresa; Levin, Mariano J; Osuna, Antonio; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Diosque, Patricio; Solari, Aldo; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Schijman, Alejandro G

    2010-12-01

    The intergenic region of spliced-leader (SL-IR) genes from 105 Trypanosoma cruzi I (Tc I) infected biological samples, culture isolates and stocks from 11 endemic countries, from Argentina to the USA were characterised, allowing identification of 76 genotypes with 54 polymorphic sites from 123 aligned sequences. On the basis of the microsatellite motif proposed by Herrera et al. (2007) to define four haplotypes in Colombia, we could classify these genotypes into four distinct Tc I SL-IR groups, three corresponding to the former haplotypes Ia (11 genotypes), Ib (11 genotypes) and Id (35 genotypes); and one novel group, Ie (19 genotypes). Genotypes harbouring the Tc Ic motif were not detected in our study. Tc Ia was associated with domestic cycles in southern and northern South America and sylvatic cycles in Central and North America. Tc Ib was found in all transmission cycles from Colombia. Tc Id was identified in all transmission cycles from Argentina and Colombia, including Chagas cardiomyopathy patients, sylvatic Brazilian samples and human cases from French Guiana, Panama and Venezuela. Tc Ie gathered five samples from domestic Triatoma infestans from northern Argentina, nine samples from wild Mepraia spinolai and Mepraia gajardoi and two chagasic patients from Chile and one from a Bolivian patient with chagasic reactivation. Mixed infections by Tc Ia+Tc Id, Tc Ia+Tc Ie and Tc Id+Tc Ie were detected in vector faeces and isolates from human and vector samples. In addition, Tc Ia and Tc Id were identified in different tissues from a heart transplanted Chagas cardiomyopathy patient with reactivation, denoting histotropism. Trypanosoma cruzi I SL-IR genotypes from parasites infecting Triatoma gerstaeckeri and Didelphis virginiana from USA, T. infestans from Paraguay, Rhodnius nasutus and Rhodnius neglectus from Brazil and M. spinolai and M. gajardoi from Chile are to our knowledge described for the first time. Copyright © 2010 Australian Society for Parasitology

  4. Genetic variability within Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato genospecies established by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer in ixodes ricinus ticks from the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Derdáková, Markéta; Beati, Lorenza; Pet'ko, Branislav; Stanko, Michal; Fish, Durland

    2003-01-01

    In Europe the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex is represented by five distinct genospecies: Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia garinii, Borrelia valaisiana, and Borrelia lusitaniae. These taxonomic entities are known to differ in their specific associations with vertebrate hosts and to provoke distinct clinical manifestations in human patients. However, exceptions to these rules have often been observed, indicating that strains belonging to a single genospecies may be more heterogeneous than expected. It is, therefore, important to develop alternative identification tools which are able to distinguish Borrelia strains not only at the specific level but also at the intraspecific level. DNA from a sample of 370 Ixodes ricinus ticks collected in the Czech Republic was analyzed by PCR for the presence of a approximately 230-bp fragment of the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer of Borrelia spp. A total of 20.5% of the ticks were found to be positive. The infecting genospecies were identified by analyzing the amplified products by the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method with restriction enzyme MseI and by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. The two methods were compared, and PCR-SSCP analysis appeared to be a valuable tool for rapid identification of spirochetes at the intraspecific level, particularly when large samples are examined. Furthermore, by using PCR-SSCP analysis we identified a previously unknown Borrelia genotype, genotype I-77, which would have gone unnoticed if RFLP analysis alone had been used.

  5. Sequence Analysis and Comparison of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA and 16S/23S Intergenic Spacer Region of Greening Bacterium Associated with Yellowing Disease (Huanglongbing) of Kinnow Mandarin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, K N; Baranwal, V K; Haq, Q M R

    2012-03-01

    High incidence (up to 40%) of symptoms of yellowing and yellow mottling was observed in 5-8 years old orchards of kinnow mandarin {Citrus reticulate Balanco ('King' × 'Willow mandarin')} in the Punjab state of India during a survey in January 2007. These symptoms are often confused with nutrient deficiency and other stress related disorders. However, a greening bacterium has been attributed to cause the disease. The disease was graft transmissible and sequencing of 16S rRNA, 16S/23S intergenic spacer region and 23S rRNA of the greening bacterium associated with yellowing disease in kinnow mandarin confirmed it to be Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus ('Ca L. asiaticus') showing maximum identity of 95.9% with 'Ca L. asiaticus' from USA and Brazil in 16S rRNA. The study indicates definite association of 'Ca L. asiaticus' with yellowing/chlorotic mottling symptoms of greening disease of kinnow mandarin in Punjab state of India.

  6. Genetic Variability within Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Genospecies Established by PCR-Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism Analysis of the rrfA-rrlB Intergenic Spacer in Ixodes ricinus Ticks from the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Derdáková, Markéta; Beati, Lorenza; Pet'ko, Branislav; Stanko, Michal; Fish, Durland

    2003-01-01

    In Europe the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex is represented by five distinct genospecies: Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia garinii, Borrelia valaisiana, and Borrelia lusitaniae. These taxonomic entities are known to differ in their specific associations with vertebrate hosts and to provoke distinct clinical manifestations in human patients. However, exceptions to these rules have often been observed, indicating that strains belonging to a single genospecies may be more heterogeneous than expected. It is, therefore, important to develop alternative identification tools which are able to distinguish Borrelia strains not only at the specific level but also at the intraspecific level. DNA from a sample of 370 Ixodes ricinus ticks collected in the Czech Republic was analyzed by PCR for the presence of a ∼230-bp fragment of the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer of Borrelia spp. A total of 20.5% of the ticks were found to be positive. The infecting genospecies were identified by analyzing the amplified products by the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method with restriction enzyme MseI and by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. The two methods were compared, and PCR-SSCP analysis appeared to be a valuable tool for rapid identification of spirochetes at the intraspecific level, particularly when large samples are examined. Furthermore, by using PCR-SSCP analysis we identified a previously unknown Borrelia genotype, genotype I-77, which would have gone unnoticed if RFLP analysis alone had been used. PMID:12514035

  7. Assessment of the genetic diversity of Frankia microsymbionts of Elaeagnus angustifolia L. plants growing in a Tunisian date-palm oasis by analysis of PCR amplified nifD-K intergenic spacer.

    PubMed

    Gtari, Maher; Daffonchio, Daniele; Boudabous, Abdellatif

    2007-03-01

    Diversity of Frankia microsymbionts of non-native Elaeagnus angustifolia L. plants spontaneously growing in a Tunisian desertic retreat area, the date-palm oasis of Tozeur, was investigated by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and PCR-sequencing techniques targeting the nifD-K intergenic spacer. Three PCR-RFLP haplotypes (I, II, and III) were detected among collected nodules. Haplotype I was detected at all five sampling sites and dominated the other haplotypes present at these sites. This haplotype was also exhibited by strain BMG5.10, which was isolated by a plant-capturing assay in 1998 from soil collected in the same locality, qualifying it to be the most competitive haplotype in the edapho-climatic condition of the studied desertic date-palm oasis. nifD-K sequences of the three haplotypes formed a closely related phylogenetic subgroup. These results suggest that Frankia variability is constrained by severe edapho-climatic conditions of retreated desert in Tunisian area.

  8. Molecular organization of 5S rDNAs in Rajidae (Chondrichthyes): Structural features and evolution of piscine 5S rRNA genes and nontranscribed intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Pasolini, Paola; Costagliola, Domenico; Rocco, Lucia; Tinti, Fausto

    2006-05-01

    The genomic and gene organisation of 5S rDNA clusters have been extensively characterized in bony fish and eukaryotes, providing general issues for understanding the molecular evolution of this multigene DNA family. By contrast, the 5S rDNA features have been rarely investigated in cartilaginous fish (only three species). Here, we provide evidence for a dual 5S rDNA gene system in the Rajidae by sequence analysis of the coding region (5S) and adjacent nontranscribed spacer (NTS) in five Mediterranean species of rays (Rajidae), and in a large number of piscine taxa including lampreys and bony fish. As documented in several bony fish, two functional 5S rDNA types were found here also in the rajid genome: a short one (I) and a long one (II), distinguished by distinct 5S and NTS sequences. That the ancestral piscine genome had these two 5S rDNA loci might be argued from the occurrence of homologous dual gene systems that exist in several fish taxa and from 5S phylogenetic relationships. An extensive analysis of NTS-II sequences of Rajidae and Dasyatidae revealed the occurrence of large simple sequence repeat (SSR) regions that are formed by microsatellite arrays. The localization and organization of SSR within the NTS-II are conserved in Rajiformes since the Upper Cretaceous. The direct correlation between the SSRs extension and the NTS length indicated that they might play a role in the maintenance of the larger 5S rDNA clusters in rays. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that NTS-II is a valuable systematic tool limited to distantly related taxa of Rajiformes.

  9. Development and Validation of an Improved PCR Method Using the 23S-5S Intergenic Spacer for Detection of Rickettsiae in Dermacentor variabilis Ticks and Tissue Samples from Humans and Laboratory Animals

    PubMed Central

    Kakumanu, Madhavi L.; Ponnusamy, Loganathan; Sutton, Haley T.; Meshnick, Steven R.; Nicholson, William L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel nested PCR assay was developed to detect Rickettsia spp. in ticks and tissue samples from humans and laboratory animals. Primers were designed for the nested run to amplify a variable region of the 23S-5S intergenic spacer (IGS) of Rickettsia spp. The newly designed primers were evaluated using genomic DNA from 11 Rickettsia species belonging to the spotted fever, typhus, and ancestral groups and, in parallel, compared to other Rickettsia-specific PCR targets (ompA, gltA, and the 17-kDa protein gene). The new 23S-5S IGS nested PCR assay amplified all 11 Rickettsia spp., but the assays employing other PCR targets did not. The novel nested assay was sensitive enough to detect one copy of a cloned 23S-5S IGS fragment from “Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii.” Subsequently, the detection efficiency of the 23S-5S IGS nested assay was compared to those of the other three assays using genomic DNA extracted from 40 adult Dermacentor variabilis ticks. The nested 23S-5S IGS assay detected Rickettsia DNA in 45% of the ticks, while the amplification rates of the other three assays ranged between 5 and 20%. The novel PCR assay was validated using clinical samples from humans and laboratory animals that were known to be infected with pathogenic species of Rickettsia. The nested 23S-5S IGS PCR assay was coupled with reverse line blot hybridization with species-specific probes for high-throughput detection and simultaneous identification of the species of Rickettsia in the ticks. “Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii,” R. montanensis, R. felis, and R. bellii were frequently identified species, along with some potentially novel Rickettsia strains that were closely related to R. bellii and R. conorii. PMID:26818674

  10. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Legionella by sequencing the 23S-5S ribosomal intergenic spacer region: from phylogeny to direct identification of isolates at the species level from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Grattard, Florence; Ginevra, Christophe; Riffard, Serge; Ros, Alain; Jarraud, Sophie; Etienne, Jerome; Pozzetto, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the interest of the hypervariable 23S-5S ribosomal intergenic spacer region (ISR) of the genus Legionella to analyze the phylogenic diversity of Legionella at the species and subspecies levels and to identify isolates directly from clinical specimens. The method, using a real-time PCR assay with a single primer pair followed by sequencing, was able to identify correctly 49 reference strains of Legionella belonging to 37 different species, including those implicated in human infections, and to clearly differentiate the three subspecies of L. pneumophila. Based on sequence similarities, the 23S-5S ISR sequences were much more variable than the rpoB and mip sequences (P<0.0001 by the Wilcoxon signed rank test). The 23S-5S ISR method was able to cluster Legionella species in accordance with phenotypic traits, such as autofluorescence or fatty acid membrane composition. Using maximum parsimony methods, the rpoB and 23S-5S ISR data sets were shown to be incongruent (P<0.001). In contrast, the 23S-5S ISR and the mip data sets were found to be congruent (P=0.313), suggesting the interest of combining these two regions to demonstrate phylogenetic links between Legionella species. This molecular assay was shown able to both detect Legionella DNA directly in respiratory specimens from patients exhibiting a Legionella infection and provide accurate identification of the bacterium at the species level in the tested specimens. These properties open a wide range of applications to the 23S-5S ISR sequencing method, from taxonomic analyses to clinical and epidemiological investigations.

  11. Development and Validation of an Improved PCR Method Using the 23S-5S Intergenic Spacer for Detection of Rickettsiae in Dermacentor variabilis Ticks and Tissue Samples from Humans and Laboratory Animals.

    PubMed

    Kakumanu, Madhavi L; Ponnusamy, Loganathan; Sutton, Haley T; Meshnick, Steven R; Nicholson, William L; Apperson, Charles S

    2016-04-01

    A novel nested PCR assay was developed to detectRickettsiaspp. in ticks and tissue samples from humans and laboratory animals. Primers were designed for the nested run to amplify a variable region of the 23S-5S intergenic spacer (IGS) ofRickettsiaspp. The newly designed primers were evaluated using genomic DNA from 11Rickettsiaspecies belonging to the spotted fever, typhus, and ancestral groups and, in parallel, compared to otherRickettsia-specific PCR targets (ompA,gltA, and the 17-kDa protein gene). The new 23S-5S IGS nested PCR assay amplified all 11Rickettsiaspp., but the assays employing other PCR targets did not. The novel nested assay was sensitive enough to detect one copy of a cloned 23S-5S IGS fragment from "CandidatusRickettsia amblyommii." Subsequently, the detection efficiency of the 23S-5S IGS nested assay was compared to those of the other three assays using genomic DNA extracted from 40 adultDermacentor variabilisticks. The nested 23S-5S IGS assay detectedRickettsiaDNA in 45% of the ticks, while the amplification rates of the other three assays ranged between 5 and 20%. The novel PCR assay was validated using clinical samples from humans and laboratory animals that were known to be infected with pathogenic species ofRickettsia The nested 23S-5S IGS PCR assay was coupled with reverse line blot hybridization with species-specific probes for high-throughput detection and simultaneous identification of the species ofRickettsiain the ticks. "CandidatusRickettsia amblyommii,"R. montanensis,R. felis, andR. belliiwere frequently identified species, along with some potentially novelRickettsiastrains that were closely related toR. belliiandR. conorii. Copyright © 2016 Kakumanu et al.

  12. The repetitive component of the A genome of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) and its role in remodelling intergenic sequence space since its evolutionary divergence from the B genome

    PubMed Central

    Bertioli, David J.; Vidigal, Bruna; Nielen, Stephan; Ratnaparkhe, Milind B.; Lee, Tae-Ho; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C. M.; Kim, Changsoo; Guimarães, Patricia M.; Seijo, Guillermo; Schwarzacher, Trude; Paterson, Andrew H.; Heslop-Harrison, Pat; Araujo, Ana C. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is an allotetraploid (AABB-type genome) of recent origin, with a genome of about 2·8 Gb and a high repetitive content. This study reports an analysis of the repetitive component of the peanut A genome using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from A. duranensis, the most probable A genome donor, and the probable consequences of the activity of these elements since the divergence of the peanut A and B genomes. Methods The repetitive content of the A genome was analysed by using A. duranensis BAC clones as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (BAC-FISH), and by sequencing and characterization of 12 genomic regions. For the analysis of the evolutionary dynamics, two A genome regions are compared with their B genome homeologues. Key Results BAC-FISH using 27 A. duranensis BAC clones as probes gave dispersed and repetitive DNA characteristic signals, predominantly in interstitial regions of the peanut A chromosomes. The sequences of 14 BAC clones showed complete and truncated copies of ten abundant long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, characterized here. Almost all dateable transposition events occurred <3·5 million years ago, the estimated date of the divergence of A and B genomes. The most abundant retrotransposon is Feral, apparently parasitic on the retrotransposon FIDEL, followed by Pipa, also non-autonomous and probably parasitic on a retrotransposon we named Pipoka. The comparison of the A and B genome homeologous regions showed conserved segments of high sequence identity, punctuated by predominantly indel regions without significant similarity. Conclusions A substantial proportion of the highly repetitive component of the peanut A genome appears to be accounted for by relatively few LTR retrotransposons and their truncated copies or solo LTRs. The most abundant of the retrotransposons are non-autonomous. The activity of these retrotransposons has been a very significant driver of genome

  13. The repetitive component of the A genome of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) and its role in remodelling intergenic sequence space since its evolutionary divergence from the B genome.

    PubMed

    Bertioli, David J; Vidigal, Bruna; Nielen, Stephan; Ratnaparkhe, Milind B; Lee, Tae-Ho; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C M; Kim, Changsoo; Guimarães, Patricia M; Seijo, Guillermo; Schwarzacher, Trude; Paterson, Andrew H; Heslop-Harrison, Pat; Araujo, Ana C G

    2013-08-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is an allotetraploid (AABB-type genome) of recent origin, with a genome of about 2·8 Gb and a high repetitive content. This study reports an analysis of the repetitive component of the peanut A genome using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from A. duranensis, the most probable A genome donor, and the probable consequences of the activity of these elements since the divergence of the peanut A and B genomes. The repetitive content of the A genome was analysed by using A. duranensis BAC clones as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (BAC-FISH), and by sequencing and characterization of 12 genomic regions. For the analysis of the evolutionary dynamics, two A genome regions are compared with their B genome homeologues. BAC-FISH using 27 A. duranensis BAC clones as probes gave dispersed and repetitive DNA characteristic signals, predominantly in interstitial regions of the peanut A chromosomes. The sequences of 14 BAC clones showed complete and truncated copies of ten abundant long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, characterized here. Almost all dateable transposition events occurred <3·5 million years ago, the estimated date of the divergence of A and B genomes. The most abundant retrotransposon is Feral, apparently parasitic on the retrotransposon FIDEL, followed by Pipa, also non-autonomous and probably parasitic on a retrotransposon we named Pipoka. The comparison of the A and B genome homeologous regions showed conserved segments of high sequence identity, punctuated by predominantly indel regions without significant similarity. A substantial proportion of the highly repetitive component of the peanut A genome appears to be accounted for by relatively few LTR retrotransposons and their truncated copies or solo LTRs. The most abundant of the retrotransposons are non-autonomous. The activity of these retrotransposons has been a very significant driver of genome evolution since the evolutionary divergence of the A

  14. Intranuclear Anchoring of Repetitive DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Weipoltshammer, Klara; Schöfer, Christian; Almeder, Marlene; Philimonenko, Vlada V.; Frei, Klemens; Wachtler, Franz; Hozák, Pavel

    1999-01-01

    Centromeres, telomeres, and ribosomal gene clusters consist of repetitive DNA sequences. To assess their contributions to the spatial organization of the interphase genome, their interactions with the nucleoskeleton were examined in quiescent and activated human lymphocytes. The nucleoskeletons were prepared using “physiological” conditions. The resulting structures were probed for specific DNA sequences of centromeres, telomeres, and ribosomal genes by in situ hybridization; the electroeluted DNA fractions were examined by blot hybridization. In both nonstimulated and stimulated lymphocytes, centromeric alpha-satellite repeats were almost exclusively found in the eluted fraction, while telomeric sequences remained attached to the nucleoskeleton. Ribosomal genes showed a transcription-dependent attachment pattern: in unstimulated lymphocytes, transcriptionally inactive ribosomal genes located outside the nucleolus were eluted completely. When comparing transcription unit and intergenic spacer, significantly more of the intergenic spacer was removed. In activated lymphocytes, considerable but similar amounts of both rDNA fragments were eluted. The results demonstrate that: (a) the various repetitive DNA sequences differ significantly in their intranuclear anchoring, (b) telomeric rather than centromeric DNA sequences form stable attachments to the nucleoskeleton, and (c) different attachment mechanisms might be responsible for the interaction of ribosomal genes with the nucleoskeleton. PMID:10613900

  15. Comparison of the small 16S to 23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) of the rRNA operons of some Escherichia coli strains of the ECOR collection and E. coli K-12.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, J; Martínez-Murcia, A; Antón, A I; Rodríguez-Valera, F

    1996-11-01

    Several 16S to 23S spacers of 354 bp have been sequenced from six Escherichia coli strains belonging to the ECOR collection. Four phylogenetically informative variable sites were identified. The results of their comparison confirm the existence of two major phylogenetic branches in this species, as previously reported. Remarkable intercistronic heterogeneity was found in strain ECOR35 and its closest relatives, in which at least one of the operons has suffered a major mutagenic event or has an independent phylogenetic origin.

  16. Differentiation of Debaryomyces hansenii and Candida famata by rRNA gene intergenic spacer fingerprinting and reassessment of phylogenetic relationships among D. hansenii, C. famata, D. fabryi, C. flareri (=D. subglobosus) and D. prosopidis: description of D. vietnamensis sp. nov. closely related to D. nepalensis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huu-Vang; Gaillardin, Claude; Neuvéglise, Cécile

    2009-06-01

    The intergenic spacer rDNA amplification and AluI fingerprinting (IGSAF) method detected four distinct groups among 170 Debaryomyces hansenii strains: D. hansenii var. hansenii; Candida famata var. famata; D. hansenii var. fabryi and C. famata var. flareri. IGS sequence comparison of representative strains showed that D. hansenii var. hansenii and C. famata var. famata belonged to one species, whereas D. hansenii var. fabryi and C. famata var. flareri belonged to two different ones. This confirmed the following three species recently reinstated: D. hansenii (=C. famata), Debaryomyces fabryi and Debaryomyces subglobosus (=Candida flareri). Accordingly, growth at 37 degrees C may no longer be used to differentiate D. hansenii from D. fabryi. Riboflavin production is more specific for D. fabryi and D. subglobosus strains. IGSAF identified all the other 17 species of the genus Debaryomyces, six of them sharing with D. hansenii an rRNA gene unit harbouring two 5S rRNA genes. The phylogenetic tree established with IGS sequences was congruent with the one based on ACT1, GPD1 and COX2 sequences depicting a distinct D. hansenii clade close to the D. subglobosus, Debaryomyces prosopidis and D. fabryi clade. Description of Debaryomyces vietnamensis sp. nov. (type strain CBS 10535(T), MUCL 51648(T)), closely related to Debaryomyces nepalensis is given.

  17. Activated levels of rRNA synthesis in fission yeast are driven by an intergenic rDNA region positioned over 2500 nucleotides upstream of the initiation site.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z; Zhao, A; Chen, L; Pape, L

    1997-01-01

    RNA polymerase I-catalyzed synthesis of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe approximately 37S pre-rRNAs was shown to be sensitive to regulatory sequences located several kilobases upstream of the initiation site for the rRNA gene. An in vitro transcription system for RNA polymerase I-catalyzed RNA synthesis was established that supports correct and activated transcription from templates bearing a full S. pombe rRNA gene promoter. A 780 bp region starting at -2560 significantly stimulates transcription of ac is-located rDNA promoter and competes with an rDNA promoter in trans, thus displaying some of the activities of rDNA transcriptional enhancers in vitro. Deletion of a 30 bp enhancer-homologous domain in this 780 bp far upstream region blocked its cis-stimulatory effect. The sequence of the S. pombe 3.5 kb intergenic spacer was determined and its organization differs from that of vertebrate, Drosophila, Acanthamoeba and plant intergenic rDNA spacers: it does not contain multiple, imperfect copies of the rRNA gene promoter nor repetitive elements of 140 bp, as are found in vertebrate rDNA enhancers. PMID:9016610

  18. RNA polymerase beta subunit (rpoB) gene and the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer region (ITS) as complementary molecular markers in addition to the 16S rRNA gene for phylogenetic analysis and identification of the species of the family Mycoplasmataceae.

    PubMed

    Volokhov, Dmitriy V; Simonyan, Vahan; Davidson, Maureen K; Chizhikov, Vladimir E

    2012-01-01

    Conventional classification of the species in the family Mycoplasmataceae is mainly based on phenotypic criteria, which are complicated, can be difficult to measure, and have the potential to be hampered by phenotypic deviations among the isolates. The number of biochemical reactions suitable for phenotypic characterization of the Mycoplasmataceae is also very limited and therefore the strategy for the final identification of the Mycoplasmataceae species is based on comparative serological results. However, serological testing of the Mycoplasmataceae species requires a performance panel of hyperimmune sera which contains anti-serum to each known species of the family, a high level of technical expertise, and can only be properly performed by mycoplasma-reference laboratories. In addition, the existence of uncultivated and fastidious Mycoplasmataceae species/isolates in clinical materials significantly complicates, or even makes impossible, the application of conventional bacteriological tests. The analysis of available genetic markers is an additional approach for the primary identification and phylogenetic classification of cultivable species and uncultivable or fastidious organisms in standard microbiological laboratories. The partial nucleotide sequences of the RNA polymerase β-subunit gene (rpoB) and the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) were determined for all known type strains and the available non-type strains of the Mycoplasmataceae species. In addition to the available 16S rRNA gene data, the ITS and rpoB sequences were used to infer phylogenetic relationships among these species and to enable identification of the Mycoplasmataceae isolates to the species level. The comparison of the ITS and rpoB phylogenetic trees with the 16S rRNA reference phylogenetic tree revealed a similar clustering patterns for the Mycoplasmataceae species, with minor discrepancies for a few species that demonstrated higher divergence of their ITS and rpoB in

  19. Multigene family of ribosomal DNA in Drosophila melanogaster reveals contrasting patterns of homogenization for IGS and ITS spacer regions. A possible mechanism to resolve this paradox.

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, C; González, A I; de la Fuente; Dover, G A

    1998-01-01

    The multigene family of rDNA in Drosophila reveals high levels of within-species homogeneity and between-species diversity. This pattern of mutation distribution is known as concerted evolution and is considered to be due to a variety of genomic mechanisms of turnover (e.g., unequal crossing over and gene conversion) that underpin the process of molecular drive. The dynamics of spread of mutant repeats through a gene family, and ultimately through a sexual population, depends on the differences in rates of turnover within and between chromosomes. Our extensive molecular analysis of the intergenic spacer (IGS) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) spacer regions within repetitive rDNA units, drawn from the same individuals in 10 natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster collected along a latitudinal cline on the east coast of Australia, indicates a relatively fast rate of X-Y and X-X interchromosomal exchanges of IGS length variants in agreement with a multilineage model of homogenization. In contrast, an X chromosome-restricted 24-bp deletion in the ITS spacers is indicative of the absence of X-Y chromosome exchanges for this region that is part of the same repetitive rDNA units. Hence, a single lineage model of homogenization, coupled to drift and/or selection, seems to be responsible for ITS concerted evolution. A single-stranded exchange mechanism is proposed to resolve this paradox, based on the role of the IGS region in meiotic pairing between X and Y chromosomes in D. melanogaster. PMID:9584100

  20. Nuclear ribosomal spacer regions in plant phylogenetics: problems and prospects.

    PubMed

    Poczai, Péter; Hyvönen, Jaakko

    2010-04-01

    The nuclear ribosomal locus coding for the large subunit is represented in tandem arrays in the plant genome. These consecutive gene blocks, consisting of several regions, are widely applied in plant phylogenetics. The regions coding for the subunits of the rRNA have the lowest rate of evolution. Also the spacer regions like the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and external transcribed spacers (ETS) are widely utilized in phylogenetics. The fact, that these regions are present in many copies in the plant genome is an advantage for laboratory practice but might be problem for phylogenetic analysis. Beside routine usage, the rDNA regions provide the great potential to study complex evolutionary mechanisms, such as reticulate events or array duplications. The understanding of these processes is based on the observation that the multiple copies of rDNA regions are homogenized through concerted evolution. This phenomenon results to paralogous copies, which can be misleading when incorporated in phylogenetic analyses. The fact that non-functional copies or pseudogenes can coexist with ortholougues in a single individual certainly makes also the analysis difficult. This article summarizes the information about the structure and utility of the phylogenetically informative spacer regions of the rDNA, namely internal- and external transcribed spacer regions as well as the intergenic spacer (IGS).

  1. Direct identification of slowly growing Mycobacterium species by analysis of the intergenic 16S-23S rDNA spacer region (ISR) using a GelCompar II database containing sequence based optimization for restriction fragment site polymorphisms (RFLPs) for 12 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, Volker; Harford, Cate; Bywater, Judy; Mayall, Barrie C

    2006-02-01

    To obtain Mycobacterium species identification directly from clinical specimens and cultures, the 16S-23S rDNA spacer (ISR) was amplified using previously published primers that detect all Mycobacterium species. The restriction enzyme that could potentially produce the most restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) was determined from all available ISR DNA sequences in GenBank to produce a novel data set of RFLPs for 31 slowly growing Mycobacterium species. Subsequently a GelCompar II database was constructed from RFLPs for 10 enzymes that have been used in the literature to differentiate slowly growing Mycobacterium species. The combination of Sau96I and HaeIII were the best choice of enzymes for differentiating clinically relevant slowly growing Mycobacterium species. A total of 392 specimens were studied by PCR with 195 negative and 197 positive specimens. The ISR-PCR product was digested with HaeIII (previously reported) and Sau96I (new to this study) to obtain a Mycobacterium species identification based on the ISR-RFLPs. The species identification obtained by ISR-RFLP was confirmed by DNA sequencing (isolate numbers are shown in parentheses) for M. avium (3), M. intracellulare (4), M. avium complex (1), M. gordonae (2) and M. tuberculosis (1). The total number of specimens (99) identified were from culture (67), Bactectrade mark 12B culture bottles (11), EDTA blood (3), directly from smear positive specimens (13), tissue (4) and urine (1). Direct species identification was obtained from all 13/13 smear positive specimens. The total number of specimens (99) were identified as M. tuberculosis (41), M. avium (7), M. avium complex (11), M. intracellulare MIN-A (20), M. flavescens (2), M. fortuitum (10), M. gordonae (4), M. shimoidei (1), M. ulcerans (1) and M. chelonae (2). This method reduces the time taken for Mycobacterium species identification from 8-10 weeks for culture and biochemical identification; to 4-6 weeks for culture and ISR-RFLP; to 2 days

  2. Intergenic and repeat transcription in human, chimpanzee and macaque brains measured by RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Xu, Augix Guohua; He, Liu; Li, Zhongshan; Xu, Ying; Li, Mingfeng; Fu, Xing; Yan, Zheng; Yuan, Yuan; Menzel, Corinna; Li, Na; Somel, Mehmet; Hu, Hao; Chen, Wei; Pääbo, Svante; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2010-07-01

    Transcription is the first step connecting genetic information with an organism's phenotype. While expression of annotated genes in the human brain has been characterized extensively, our knowledge about the scope and the conservation of transcripts located outside of the known genes' boundaries is limited. Here, we use high-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to characterize the total non-ribosomal transcriptome of human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque brain. In all species, only 20-28% of non-ribosomal transcripts correspond to annotated exons and 20-23% to introns. By contrast, transcripts originating within intronic and intergenic repetitive sequences constitute 40-48% of the total brain transcriptome. Notably, some repeat families show elevated transcription. In non-repetitive intergenic regions, we identify and characterize 1,093 distinct regions highly expressed in the human brain. These regions are conserved at the RNA expression level across primates studied and at the DNA sequence level across mammals. A large proportion of these transcripts (20%) represents 3'UTR extensions of known genes and may play roles in alternative microRNA-directed regulation. Finally, we show that while transcriptome divergence between species increases with evolutionary time, intergenic transcripts show more expression differences among species and exons show less. Our results show that many yet uncharacterized evolutionary conserved transcripts exist in the human brain. Some of these transcripts may play roles in transcriptional regulation and contribute to evolution of human-specific phenotypic traits.

  3. Intergenic and Repeat Transcription in Human, Chimpanzee and Macaque Brains Measured by RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Li, Mingfeng; Fu, Xing; Yan, Zheng; Yuan, Yuan; Menzel, Corinna; Li, Na; Somel, Mehmet; Hu, Hao; Chen, Wei; Pääbo, Svante; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    Transcription is the first step connecting genetic information with an organism's phenotype. While expression of annotated genes in the human brain has been characterized extensively, our knowledge about the scope and the conservation of transcripts located outside of the known genes' boundaries is limited. Here, we use high-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to characterize the total non-ribosomal transcriptome of human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque brain. In all species, only 20–28% of non-ribosomal transcripts correspond to annotated exons and 20–23% to introns. By contrast, transcripts originating within intronic and intergenic repetitive sequences constitute 40–48% of the total brain transcriptome. Notably, some repeat families show elevated transcription. In non-repetitive intergenic regions, we identify and characterize 1,093 distinct regions highly expressed in the human brain. These regions are conserved at the RNA expression level across primates studied and at the DNA sequence level across mammals. A large proportion of these transcripts (20%) represents 3′UTR extensions of known genes and may play roles in alternative microRNA-directed regulation. Finally, we show that while transcriptome divergence between species increases with evolutionary time, intergenic transcripts show more expression differences among species and exons show less. Our results show that many yet uncharacterized evolutionary conserved transcripts exist in the human brain. Some of these transcripts may play roles in transcriptional regulation and contribute to evolution of human-specific phenotypic traits. PMID:20617162

  4. Characterization of IS6110 insertions in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Turcios, L; Casart, Y; Florez, I; de Waard, J; Salazar, L

    2009-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with identical IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns are considered to be clonally related. The presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region, one preferential locus for the integration of IS6110, was evaluated in 125 M. tuberculosis isolates. Five isolates had IS6110 inserted in this region, and two consisted of a mix of isogenic strains that putatively have evolved during a single infection. Strains from the same isolate had identical spoligo and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat profiles, but had slight variations in IS6110 RFLP patterns, due to the presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region. Duplication of the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region was found in one isogenic strain.

  5. 100 Repetitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    One hundred repetitions--100 "useful" repetitions. This notion has guided the author's work in alternative education programs for almost 20 years, dealing with the most challenging students, from addicts to conduct-disordered adolescents to traumatized 5th graders. There are no magic tricks. The role of educators is to align with the healthy…

  6. 100 Repetitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    One hundred repetitions--100 "useful" repetitions. This notion has guided the author's work in alternative education programs for almost 20 years, dealing with the most challenging students, from addicts to conduct-disordered adolescents to traumatized 5th graders. There are no magic tricks. The role of educators is to align with the healthy…

  7. The disparate nature of "intergenic" polyadenylation sites.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Fabrice; Granjeaud, Samuel; Ara, Takeshi; Ghattas, Badih; Gautheret, Daniel

    2006-10-01

    The termination of mature eukaryotic mRNAs occurs at specific polyadenylation sites located downstream from stop codons in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR). An accurate delineation of these sites is essential for the study of 3'-UTR-based gene regulation and for the design of pertinent probes for transcriptome analysis. Although typical poly(A) sites are located between 0 and 2 kb from the stop codon, EST sequence analyses have identified sites located at unexpectedly long ranges (5-10 kb) in a number of genes. Here we perform a complete mapping of EST and full-length cDNA sequences on the mouse and human genome to observe putative poly(A) sites extending beyond annotated 3'-ends and into the intergenic regions. We introduce several quality parameters for poly(A) site prediction and train a classification tree to associate P-values to predicted sites. We observe a higher than background level of high-scoring sites up to 12-15 kb past the stop codon, both in human and mouse. This leads to an estimate of about 5000 human genes having unreported 3'-end extensions and about 3500 novel polyadenylated transcripts lying in present "intergenic" regions. These high-scoring, long-range poly(A) sites corresponding to novel transcripts and gene extensions should be incorporated into current human and mouse gene repositories.

  8. Improving Resident Knowledge of Spacers.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, Brian; Al Katranji, Khalid; Woodall, Meredith; Shepherd, Meagan; Flesher, Susan L

    2016-10-01

    Studies show the delivery of inhaled medications is maximized when a metered-dose inhaler (MDI) with a spacer is utilized. Our residents expressed concern with their knowledge of MDIs and spacers. This study was designed to address those concerns. Residents were given a 12-question pre-intervention, self-assessment questionnaire that explored their overall knowledge and comfort in utilizing MDI with spacers. Participants then received educational intervention via multimedia videos and a demonstration of proper use of MDI with spacer. Participants were given the same questionnaire immediately following the education and again 3 months later. Improvement was significant (P < .05) for each element studied as derived from the 12 questions. Improvement remained significant when these variables were assessed in the 3-month follow-up. In this study, we successfully improved the ability of our residents to deliver quality care by improving their knowledge and confidence in utilizing MDIs with spacers. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. RISSC: a novel database for ribosomal 16S–23S RNA genes spacer regions

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, Jesús; Bescós, Ignacio; Rodríguez-Sala, Jesús Javier; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    A novel database, under the acronym RISSC (Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Sequence Collection), has been created. It compiles more than 1600 entries of edited DNA sequence data from the 16S–23S ribosomal spacers present in most prokaryotes and organelles (e.g. mitochondria and chloroplasts) and is accessible through the Internet (http://ulises.umh.es/RISSC), where systematic searches for specific words can be conducted, as well as BLAST-type sequence searches. Additionally, a characteristic feature of this region, the presence/absence and nature of tRNA genes within the spacer, is included in all the entries, even when not previously indicated in the original database. All these combined features could provide a useful documen­tation tool for studies on evolution, identification, typing and strain characterization, among others. PMID:11125084

  10. Identification of Swertia mussotii and its adulterant Swertia species by 5S rRNA gene spacer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Man-Tang; Wong, Ka-Lok; Zong, Yu-Ying; Shaw, Pang-Chui; Che, Chun-Tao

    2008-03-01

    This research focused on analyzing the differences of 5S rRNA gene spacer sequences on Swertia mussotii and its commonly used adulterants, including S. franchetiana, S. wolfangiana and S. chirayita. DNA was extracted from the collected Swertia samples. 5S rRNA intergenic spacers were amplified by PCR, sequenced and analyzed. 5S rRNA gene spacer sequences were different between S. mussotii and its other three adulterants. Sequence divergence among species ranged from 30.6% to 65.0%. 5S rRNA spacers may be used as molecular authentication markers to differentiate S. mussotii and other commonly used Swertia adulterants. This result provides reliable and simple reference for the authentication of Swertia genus species.

  11. Repetition reduction: Lexical repetition in the absence of referent repetition

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tuan Q.; Watson, Duane G.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated words are produced with reduced acoustic prominence compared to words that are new to a discourse. Although these effects are often attributed to priming in the production system, the locus of the effect within the production system remains unresolved because in natural speech, repetition often involves repetition of referents and lexical items simultaneously. Therefore, repetition reduction could be due to repeated mention of a referent, or repetition of a word or referring expression. In our study, we test whether repetition reduction is due to repetition of lexical items or repeated mention of referents using an event description task. The results show that repeated lexical items lead to reduced duration and intensity even in the absence of referent repetition whereas repeated referents lead to reduced intensity alone. The general pattern suggests that repetition reduction is due most strongly to repetition of the lexical item, rather than repeated mention of the referent. PMID:24548320

  12. Minimal intraspecific variation in the sequence of the transcribed spacer regions of the ribosomal DNA of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush).

    PubMed

    Zhuo, L; Sajdak, S L; Phillips, R B

    1994-08-01

    Intraspecific variation in the sequence of the transcribed spacer regions of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in lake trout was examined by restriction mapping and sequencing of these regions amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. The length of the first internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-1) was 566 bases and the second internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-2) was 368 bases in lake trout. When the 1.4-kb region including the ITS-1, the 5.8S coding region, and the ITS-2 was amplified from 12 individuals from four populations and digested with eight different enzymes only one intraindividual polymorphism was found that occurred in each population. When the amplified ITS-1 region was sequenced from an additional 10 individuals from five populations, no interindividual variation was found in the sequence. A 6-kb portion of the rDNA repeat unit including 1.6 kb of the 18S coding region, the 5' external spacer region (5' ETS), and part of the adjacent intergenic spacer was cloned and a restriction map was prepared for these regions in lake trout. No intraspecific variation was found in the region adjacent to the 18S rDNA, which includes the 5' ETS, although intraspecific and intraindividual length variation was found in the intergenic spacer region 3-6 kb from the 18S. Sequencing of a 609-b segment of the 5' ETS adjacent to the 18S coding region revealed the presence of two 41-b repeats. The 198-b sequence between the repeats had some similarity to the 18S coding region of other fishes. Primers were designed for amplification of 559 b of the 5' ETS using the polymerase chain reaction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Generator stator core vent duct spacer posts

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, John Wesley; Tong, Wei

    2003-06-24

    Generator stator cores are constructed by stacking many layers of magnetic laminations. Ventilation ducts may be inserted between these layers by inserting spacers into the core stack. The ventilation ducts allow for the passage of cooling gas through the core during operation. The spacers or spacer posts are positioned between groups of the magnetic laminations to define the ventilation ducts. The spacer posts are secured with longitudinal axes thereof substantially parallel to the core axis. With this structure, core tightness can be assured while maximizing ventilation duct cross section for gas flow and minimizing magnetic loss in the spacers.

  14. Spacer grid assembly and locking mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Jr., Harold J.; Veca, Anthony R.; Donck, Harry A.

    1982-01-01

    A spacer grid assembly is disclosed for retaining a plurality of fuel rods in substantially parallel spaced relation, the spacer grids being formed with rhombic openings defining contact means for engaging from one to four fuel rods arranged in each opening, the spacer grids being of symmetric configuration with their rhombic openings being asymmetrically offset to permit inversion and relative rotation of the similar spacer grids for improved support of the fuel rods. An improved locking mechanism includes tie bars having chordal surfaces to facilitate their installation in slotted circular openings of the spacer grids, the tie rods being rotatable into locking engagement with the slotted openings.

  15. Development of high performance BWR spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Morooka, Shinichi; Shirakawa, Kenetu; Mitutake, Tohru; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Yano, Takashi; Kimura, Jiro

    1996-07-01

    The spacer has a significant effect on thermal hydraulic performance of BWR fuel assembly. The purpose of this study is to develop a new BWR spacer with high critical power and low pressure drop performance. The developed high performance spacer is a ferrule type spacer with twisted tape and improved flow tab. This spacer is called CYCLONE spacer. Critical power and pressure drop have been measured at BEST (BWR Experimental Loop for Stability and Transient test) of Toshiba Corporation. The test bundle consists of electrically heated rods in a 4x4 array configuration. These heater rods are indirectly heated. The heated length and outer diameter of the heater rod, as well as the number and the axial locations of the spacers, are the same as for those for a BWR fuel assembly. The axial power shape is stepped cosine (1.4 of the maximum peaking factor). Two test assemblies with different radial power distribution have been used. One test assembly has the maximum power rods at the center of the test assembly and the other has the maximum power rods near the channel wall. The results show that the critical power performance of CYCLONE spacer is 10 to 25 % higher than that of the ferrule spacers, while the pressure drop for CYCLONE spacer is nearly equal to that of the ferrule spacer.

  16. Low abundant spacer 5S rRNA transcripts are frequently polyadenylated in Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Fulnecek, Jaroslav; Kovarik, Ales

    2007-11-01

    In plants, 5S rRNA genes (5S rDNA) encoding 120-nt structural RNA molecules of ribosomes are organized in tandem arrays comprising thousands of units. Failure to correctly terminate transcription would generate longer inaccurately processed transcripts interfering with ribosome biogenesis. Hence multiple termination signals occur immediately after the 5S rRNA coding sequence. To obtain information about the efficiency of termination of 5S rDNA transcription in plants we analyzed 5S rRNA pools in three Nicotiana species, N. sylvestris, N. tomentosiformis and N. tabacum. In addition to highly abundant 120-nt 5S rRNA transcripts, we also detected RNA species composed of a genic region and variable lengths of intergenic sequences. These genic-intergenic RNA molecules occur at a frequency severalfold lower than the mature 120-nt transcripts, and are posttranscriptionally modified by polyadenylation at their 3' end in contrast to 120-nt transcripts. An absence of 5S small RNAs (smRNA) argue against a dominant role for the smRNA biosynthesis pathway in the degradation of aberrant 5S rRNA in Nicotiana. This work is the first description of polyadenylated 5S rRNA species in higher eukaryotes originating from a read-through transcription into the intergenic spacer. We propose that polyadenylation may function in a "quality control" pathway ensuring that only correctly processed molecules enter the ribosome biogenesis.

  17. Characteristics and significance of intergenic polyadenylated RNA transcription in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Moghe, Gaurav D; Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D; Seddon, Alex E; Yin, Shan; Chen, Yani; Juntawong, Piyada; Brandizzi, Federica; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome is the most well-annotated plant genome. However, transcriptome sequencing in Arabidopsis continues to suggest the presence of polyadenylated (polyA) transcripts originating from presumed intergenic regions. It is not clear whether these transcripts represent novel noncoding or protein-coding genes. To understand the nature of intergenic polyA transcription, we first assessed its abundance using multiple messenger RNA sequencing data sets. We found 6,545 intergenic transcribed fragments (ITFs) occupying 3.6% of Arabidopsis intergenic space. In contrast to transcribed fragments that map to protein-coding and RNA genes, most ITFs are significantly shorter, are expressed at significantly lower levels, and tend to be more data set specific. A surprisingly large number of ITFs (32.1%) may be protein coding based on evidence of translation. However, our results indicate that these "translated" ITFs tend to be close to and are likely associated with known genes. To investigate if ITFs are under selection and are functional, we assessed ITF conservation through cross-species as well as within-species comparisons. Our analysis reveals that 237 ITFs, including 49 with translation evidence, are under strong selective constraint and relatively distant from annotated features. These ITFs are likely parts of novel genes. However, the selective pressure imposed on most ITFs is similar to that of randomly selected, untranscribed intergenic sequences. Our findings indicate that despite the prevalence of ITFs, apart from the possibility of genomic contamination, many may be background or noisy transcripts derived from "junk" DNA, whose production may be inherent to the process of transcription and which, on rare occasions, may act as catalysts for the creation of novel genes.

  18. Strain typing of Zygosaccharomyces yeast species using a single molecular method based on polymorphism of the intergenic spacer region (IGS).

    PubMed

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2010-08-15

    Unlike previously reported methods that need a combination of several typing techniques, we have developed a single method for strain typing of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Z. mellis and Z. rouxii spoilage species. Strains belonging to other species have also been included for comparison. We have demonstrated that the IGS-PCR RFLP method has a high discriminative power. Considering the three endonucleases used in this work, we have obtained a variability of 100% for Z. mellis and Z. rouxii strains and up to 70% for Z. bailii. We have also detected two misidentified Z. mellis strains (CBS 711 and CBS 7412) which have RFLP patterns with a set of bands characteristic of Z. rouxii strains. Sequencing of 26S rDNA D1/D2 domains and the 5.8-ITS rDNA region confirmed these strains as Z. rouxii. The method also groups three certified hybrid strains of Zygosaccharomyces in a separate cluster.

  19. Repetition Reduction: Lexical Repetition in the Absence of Referent Repetition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Tuan Q.; Watson, Duane G.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to words that are new to a discourse, repeated words are produced with reduced acoustic prominence. Although these effects are often attributed to priming in the production system, the locus of the effect within the production system remains unresolved because, in natural speech, repetition often involves repetition of referents and…

  20. Repetition Reduction: Lexical Repetition in the Absence of Referent Repetition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Tuan Q.; Watson, Duane G.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to words that are new to a discourse, repeated words are produced with reduced acoustic prominence. Although these effects are often attributed to priming in the production system, the locus of the effect within the production system remains unresolved because, in natural speech, repetition often involves repetition of referents and…

  1. Communication between binding sites is required for YqjI regulation of target promoters within the yqjH-yqjI intergenic region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suning; Blahut, Matthew; Wu, Yun; Philipkosky, Katherine E; Outten, F Wayne

    2014-09-01

    The nickel-responsive transcription factor YqjI represses its own transcription and transcription of the divergent yqjH gene, which encodes a novel ferric siderophore reductase. The intergenic region between the two promoters is complex, with multiple sequence features that may impact YqjI-dependent regulation of its two target promoters. We utilized mutagenesis and DNase I footprinting to characterize YqjI regulation of the yqjH-yqjI intergenic region. The results show that YqjI binding results in an extended footprint at the yqjI promoter (site II) compared to the yqjH promoter (site I). Mutagenesis of in vivo gene reporter constructs revealed that the two YqjI binding sites, while separated by nearly 200 bp, appear to communicate in order to provide full YqjI-dependent regulation at the two target promoters. Thus, YqjI binding at both promoters is required for full repression of either promoter, suggesting that the two YqjI binding sites cooperate to control transcription from the divergent promoters. Furthermore, internal deletions that shorten the total length of the intergenic region disrupt the ability of YqjI to regulate the yqjH promoter. Finally, mutagenesis of the repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) elements within the yqjH-yqjI intergenic region shows that these sequences are not required for YqjI regulation. These studies provide a complex picture of novel YqjI transcriptional regulation within the yqjH-yqjI intergenic region and suggest a possible model for communication between the YqjI binding sites at each target promoter.

  2. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Cattani, Amanda Malvessi; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Guedes, Rafael Lucas Muniz; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5' upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile.

  3. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cattani, Amanda Malvessi; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Guedes, Rafael Lucas Muniz; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5’ upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile. PMID:28005945

  4. The mitochondrial genomes of sponges provide evidence for multiple invasions by Repetitive Hairpin-forming Elements (RHE)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial (mt) genomes of sponges possess a variety of features, which appear to be intermediate between those of Eumetazoa and non-metazoan opisthokonts. Among these features is the presence of long intergenic regions, which are common in other eukaryotes, but generally absent in Eumetazoa. Here we analyse poriferan mitochondrial intergenic regions, paying particular attention to repetitive sequences within them. In this context we introduce the mitochondrial genome of Ircinia strobilina (Lamarck, 1816; Demospongiae: Dictyoceratida) and compare it with mtDNA of other sponges. Results Mt genomes of dictyoceratid sponges are identical in gene order and content but display major differences in size and organization of intergenic regions. An even higher degree of diversity in the structure of intergenic regions was found among different orders of demosponges. One interesting observation made from such comparisons was of what appears to be recurrent invasions of sponge mitochondrial genomes by repetitive hairpin-forming elements, which cause large genome size differences even among closely related taxa. These repetitive hairpin-forming elements are structurally and compositionally divergent and display a scattered distribution throughout various groups of demosponges. Conclusion Large intergenic regions of poriferan mt genomes are targets for insertions of repetitive hairpin- forming elements, similar to the ones found in non-metazoan opisthokonts. Such elements were likely present in some lineages early in animal mitochondrial genome evolution but were subsequently lost during the reduction of intergenic regions, which occurred in the Eumetazoa lineage after the split of Porifera. Porifera acquired their elements in several independent events. Patterns of their intra-genomic dispersal can be seen in the mt genome of Vaceletia sp. PMID:20003196

  5. Randomized trial of spacers in asthma.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Baljit; Mathew, Joseph L; Singh, Meenu

    2007-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of all types of spacers commonly available to children in India. 150 children 5-14 yr of age with persistent asthma presenting with peak expiratory flow (PEF) < 70% of personal best were randomized to receive 200 mg salbutamol through one of five spacers: A) 750 ml spacer with valve, B) 165 ml spacer with valve, C) 250 ml spacer without valve, D) 1000 ml indigenously made spacer without valve and E) 500 ml indigenously made spacer without valve. PEF measurement was repeated 15 minutes later. Children> 8 yr old performed spirometry in addition to PEF. Absolute change and percentage improvement of PEF and FEV1 were compared among the groups. Subjects in all groups had comparable baseline demographic characteristics and PEF. All showed significant improvement in PEF and FEV1 over baseline values. The change in PEF and percentage improvement were comparable among all five groups (p=0.780 and p=0.955 respectively). Likewise change in FEV1 and percentage improvement were also comparable. The five groups showed no difference in efficacy, irrespective of severity of baseline airway obstruction. The five spacers were equally efficacious for the delivery of bronchodilator in children with moderate persistent asthma presenting with airway obstruction.

  6. Molecular Systematics of Genus Atractylodes (Compositae, Cardueae): Evidence from Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) and trnL-F Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hua-Sheng; Yuan, Qing-Jun; Li, Qian-Quan; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2012-01-01

    To determine the evolutionary relationships among all members of the genus Atractylodes (Compositae, Cardueae), we conducted molecular phylogenetic analyses of one nuclear DNA (nrDNA) region (internal transcribed spacer, ITS) and one chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) region (intergenic spacer region of trnL-F). In ITS and ITS + trnL-F trees, all members of Atractylodes form a monophyletic clade. Atractylodes is a sister group of the Carlina and Atractylis branch. Atractylodes species were distributed among three clades: (1) A. carlinoides (located in the lowest base of the Atractylodes phylogenetic tree), (2) A. macrocephala, and (3) the A. lancea complex, including A. japonica, A. coreana, A. lancea, A. lancea subsp. luotianensis, and A. chinensis. The taxonomic controversy over the classification of species of Atractylodes is mainly concentrated in the A. lancea complex. In base on molecular results, the intraspecific division of Atractylodes lancea is not supported, and A. coreana should be treated as a synonym A. chinensis. PMID:23203084

  7. Molecular systematics of Genus Atractylodes (Compositae, Cardueae): evidence from Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) and trnL-F sequences.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hua-Sheng; Yuan, Qing-Jun; Li, Qian-Quan; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2012-11-09

    To determine the evolutionary relationships among all members of the genus Atractylodes (Compositae, Cardueae), we conducted molecular phylogenetic analyses of one nuclear DNA (nrDNA) region (internal transcribed spacer, ITS) and one chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) region (intergenic spacer region of trnL-F). In ITS and ITS + trnL-F trees, all members of Atractylodes form a monophyletic clade. Atractylodes is a sister group of the Carlina and Atractylis branch. Atractylodes species were distributed among three clades: (1) A. carlinoides (located in the lowest base of the Atractylodes phylogenetic tree), (2) A. macrocephala, and (3) the A. lancea complex, including A. japonica, A. coreana, A. lancea, A. lancea subsp. luotianensis, and A. chinensis. The taxonomic controversy over the classification of species of Atractylodes is mainly concentrated in the A. lancea complex. In base on molecular results, the intraspecific division of Atractylodes lancea is not supported, and A. coreana should be treated as a synonym A. chinensis.

  8. Repetitive sequence variation and dynamics in the ribosomal DNA array of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as revealed by whole-genome resequencing

    PubMed Central

    James, Stephen A.; O'Kelly, Michael J.T.; Carter, David M.; Davey, Robert P.; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Roberts, Ian N.

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) plays a key role in ribosome biogenesis, encoding genes for the structural RNA components of this important cellular organelle. These genes are vital for efficient functioning of the cellular protein synthesis machinery and as such are highly conserved and normally present in high copy numbers. In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, there are more than 100 rDNA repeats located at a single locus on chromosome XII. Stability and sequence homogeneity of the rDNA array is essential for function, and this is achieved primarily by the mechanism of gene conversion. Detecting variation within these arrays is extremely problematic due to their large size and repetitive structure. In an attempt to address this, we have analyzed over 35 Mbp of rDNA sequence obtained from whole-genome shotgun sequencing (WGSS) of 34 strains of S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectation, we find significant rDNA sequence variation exists within individual genomes. Many of the detected polymorphisms are not fully resolved. For this type of sequence variation, we introduce the term partial single nucleotide polymorphism, or pSNP. Comparative analysis of the complete data set reveals that different S. cerevisiae genomes possess different patterns of rDNA polymorphism, with much of the variation located within the rapidly evolving nontranscribed intergenic spacer (IGS) region. Furthermore, we find that strains known to have either structured or mosaic/hybrid genomes can be distinguished from one another based on rDNA pSNP number, indicating that pSNP dynamics may provide a reliable new measure of genome origin and stability. PMID:19141593

  9. LISA telescope spacer design investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjuan, Josep; Mueller, Guido; Livas, Jeffrey; Preston, Alix; Arsenovic, Petar; Castellucci, Kevin; Generie, Joseph; Howard, Joseph; Stebbins, Robin

    ) and materials such as Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) are considered to be used in the telescope spacer structure. We will describe our experimental efforts to understand and quantify the behavior of different materials and also discuss a first investigation of a specific on-axis SiC telescope spacer for LISA. This work is supported by NASA contract 00069955.

  10. Distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in eubacteria and application to fingerprinting of bacterial genomes.

    PubMed Central

    Versalovic, J; Koeuth, T; Lupski, J R

    1991-01-01

    Dispersed repetitive DNA sequences have been described recently in eubacteria. To assess the distribution and evolutionary conservation of two distinct prokaryotic repetitive elements, consensus oligonucleotides were used in polymerase chain reaction [PCR] amplification and slot blot hybridization experiments with genomic DNA from diverse eubacterial species. Oligonucleotides matching Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic [REP] elements and Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus [ERIC] sequences were synthesized and tested as opposing PCR primers in the amplification of eubacterial genomic DNA. REP and ERIC consensus oligonucleotides produced clearly resolvable bands by agarose gel electrophoresis following PCR amplification. These band patterns provided unambiguous DNA fingerprints of different eubacterial species and strains. Both REP and ERIC probes hybridized preferentially to genomic DNA from Gram-negative enteric bacteria and related species. Widespread distribution of these repetitive DNA elements in the genomes of various microorganisms should enable rapid identification of bacterial species and strains, and be useful for the analysis of prokaryotic genomes. Images PMID:1762913

  11. RNA polymerase V-dependent small RNAs in Arabidopsis originate from small, intergenic loci including most SINE repeats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzuu-fen; Gurazada, Sai Guna Ranjan; Zhai, Jixian; Li, Shengben; Simon, Stacey A; Matzke, Marjori A; Chen, Xuemei; Meyers, Blake C

    2012-07-01

    In plants, heterochromatin is maintained by a small RNA-based gene silencing mechanism known as RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). RdDM requires the non-redundant functions of two plant-specific DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAP), RNAP IV and RNAP V. RNAP IV plays a major role in siRNA biogenesis, while RNAP V may recruit DNA methylation machinery to target endogenous loci for silencing. Although small RNA-generating regions that are dependent on both RNAP IV and RNAP V have been identified previously, the genomic loci targeted by RNAP V for siRNA accumulation and silencing have not been described extensively. To characterize the RNAP V-dependent, heterochromatic siRNA-generating regions in the Arabidopsis genome, we deeply sequenced the small RNA populations of wild-type and RNAP V null mutant (nrpe1) plants. Our results showed that RNAP V-dependent siRNA-generating loci are associated predominately with short repetitive sequences in intergenic regions. Suppression of small RNA production from short repetitive sequences was also prominent in RdDM mutants including dms4, drd1, dms3 and rdm1, reflecting the known association of these RdDM effectors with RNAP V. The genomic regions targeted by RNAP V were small, with an estimated average length of 238 bp. Our results suggest that RNAP V affects siRNA production from genomic loci with features dissimilar to known RNAP IV-dependent loci. RNAP V, along with RNAP IV and DRM1/2, may target and silence a set of small, intergenic transposable elements located in dispersed genomic regions for silencing. Silencing at these loci may be actively reinforced by RdDM.

  12. Heterogeneity within the gram-positive anaerobic cocci demonstrated by analysis of 16S-23S intergenic ribosomal RNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Hill, K E; Davies, C E; Wilson, M J; Stephens, P; Lewis, M A O; Hall, V; Brazier, J; Thomas, D W

    2002-11-01

    Peptostreptococci are gram-positive, strictly anaerobic bacteria which, although regarded as members of the commensal human microflora, are also frequently isolated from sites of clinical infection. The study of this diverse group of opportunist pathogens has been hindered by an inadequate taxonomy and the lack of a valid identification scheme. Recent re-classification of the Peptostreptococcus family into five distinct genus groups has helped to clarify the situation. However, this has been on the basis of 16S rRNA sequence determinations, which are both time-consuming and expensive. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA spacer polymorphisms for the rapid differentiation of the currently recognised taxa within the group of anaerobic gram-positive cocci. A collection comprising 19 reference strains with representatives of each of the 15 species, two close relatives and two of the well-characterised groups, together with 38 test strains was studied. All strains were identified to species group level by phenotypic means. Amplification of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) with universal primers produced distinct banding patterns for all the 19 reference strains and the patterns could be differentiated easily visually. However, of the 38 test strains, less than half could be speciated from ISR analysis alone. Only five groups produced correlating banding patterns for all members tested (Peptoniphilus lacrimalis, P. ivorii, Anaerococcus octavius, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius and Micromonas micros). For other species, either the type strain differed significantly from other species members (e.g., A. hydrogenalis) or there appeared to be considerable intra-species variation (e.g., A. vaginalis). Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences for the 'trisimilis' and 'betaGAL' groups showed that both are most closely related to the Anaerococcus group. This work highlights the heterogeneous nature of a number of Peptostreptococcus

  13. The Negative Repetition Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  14. The Negative Repetition Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  15. Pervasive Transcription of the Human Genome Produces Thousands of Previously Unidentified Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Known protein coding gene exons compose less than 3% of the human genome. The remaining 97% is largely uncharted territory, with only a small fraction characterized. The recent observation of transcription in this intergenic territory has stimulated debate about the extent of intergenic transcription and whether these intergenic RNAs are functional. Here we directly observed with a large set of RNA-seq data covering a wide array of human tissue types that the majority of the genome is indeed transcribed, corroborating recent observations by the ENCODE project. Furthermore, using de novo transcriptome assembly of this RNA-seq data, we found that intergenic regions encode far more long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) than previously described, helping to resolve the discrepancy between the vast amount of observed intergenic transcription and the limited number of previously known lincRNAs. In total, we identified tens of thousands of putative lincRNAs expressed at a minimum of one copy per cell, significantly expanding upon prior lincRNA annotation sets. These lincRNAs are specifically regulated and conserved rather than being the product of transcriptional noise. In addition, lincRNAs are strongly enriched for trait-associated SNPs suggesting a new mechanism by which intergenic trait-associated regions may function. These findings will enable the discovery and interrogation of novel intergenic functional elements. PMID:23818866

  16. Roles of repetitive sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships in the Gesnerioideae (Gesneriaceae) based on nrDNA ITS and cpDNA trnL-F and trnE-T spacer region sequences.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Elizabeth A; Roalson, Eric H; Skog, Laurence E; Boggan, John K; Idnurm, Alexander

    2002-02-01

    The Gesnerioideae includes most of the New World members of the Gesneriaceae family and is currently considered to include five tribes: Beslerieae, Episcieae, Gesnerieae, Gloxinieae, and Napeantheae. This study presents maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS), and the chloroplast DNA trnL intron, trnL-trnF intergenic spacer region, and trnE-trnT intergenic spacer region sequences. The ITS and cpDNA data sets strongly support the monophyly of a Beslerieae/Napeantheae clade; an Episcieae clade; a Gesnerieae clade; a Gloxinieae clade minus Sinningia, Sinningia relatives, and Gloxinia sarmentiana; and a Sinningia/Paliavana/Vanhouttea clade. This is the first study to provide strong statistical support for these tribes/clades. These analyses suggest that Sinningia and relatives should be considered as a separate tribe. Additionally, generic relationships are explored, including the apparent polyphyly of Gloxinia. Chromosome number changes are minimized on the proposed phylogeny, with the exception of the n = 11 taxa of the Gloxinieae. Scaly rhizomes appear to have been derived once in the Gloxinieae sensu stricto. The number of derivations of the inferior ovary is unclear: either there was one derivation with a reversal to a superior ovary in the Episcieae, or there were multiple independent derivations of the inferior ovary.

  18. Genetic variability and geographical diversity of the main Chagas' disease vector Panstrongylus megistus (Hemiptera: Triatominae) in Brazil based on ribosomal DNA intergenic sequences.

    PubMed

    Cavassin, Francelisse Bridi; Kuehn, Christian Collins; Kopp, Rogério Luiz; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanette; Da Rosa, João Aristeu; Luz, Ennio; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Bargues, María Dolores

    2014-05-01

    Studies were made on the ribosomal DNA intergenic region, comprising complete internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 sequences, of populations of the triatomine Panstrongylus megistus, the most important vector of Chagas' disease in Brazil since Triatoma infestans eradication. Specimens were from 26 localities of Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, Paraná, São Paulo, Minas Gerais, Bahia, and Sergipe states. In total, 21 ITS-1 and 12 ITS-2 haplotypes were found. Nucleotide differences were higher in ITS-1 (3.00%) than in ITS-2 (1.33%). The intergenic region was 1,513-1,522-bp-long (mean 1,516.9 bp), providing 26 combined haplotypes. The combination of microsatellites found in both ITSs may be of applied usefulness, to assess interpopulation specimen exchange and potential recolonizations after vector elimination by control implementation. Network results suggest that São Paulo may be considered one of the spreading centers of this species. Molecular clock datation suggests that P. megistus populations are diversifying at least since 4.54 million years ago, with diversification still ongoing today by geographical isolation of populations. Evidence is provided about the relationship of genetic diversity with geographical spread that characterizes a major vector and explains its ability to colonize distant areas and different ecotopes, including human habitats, and consequently its importance in Chagas' disease epidemiology.

  19. Investigation and analysis of dual-k spacer with different materials and spacer lengths for nanowire-FET performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hyungwoo; Kim, Jongsu; Kang, Myounggon; Shin, Hyungcheol

    2017-10-01

    In this work, dual-k spacer structures are investigated using a variety of materials along the high-k spacer length in detail. It is known that not only the higher permittivity materials of high-k spacer boost the on-current but also lower permittivity materials of low-k spacer effectively reduce the off-current. By compared the results of other various single spacers and dual-k spacers, it is HfO2/Vacuum dual-k spacer that shows relatively higher ION, ION/IOFF, better immunity of short channel effects and outstanding device performances.

  20. Comparative evaluation of market spacer and home made spacer in the management of bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar; Vatsa, H K; Gaur, S N

    2002-03-01

    A study was conducted to compare the efficacy of market available spacer (with valve) and home made spacer (without valve)--Bislery bottle. Fifteen patients of bronchial asthma were included in the study. With the use of both devices there was significant bronchodilator effect. The reversibility using Bislery bottle was same as with spacer (market available) while comparing the FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC %, FEF 25-75 and PEFR value. The difference in percent change in reversibility values by both the devices was not statistically significant (p < 0.05). We concluded that the Bislery bottle (without valve) is very cheap compared to market-available spacer and is equally effective which, therefore, can be substituted in bronchial asthma patients, who are unable to afford the cost of market available spacers.

  1. The ribosomal gene spacer region in archaebacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achenbach-Richter, L.; Woese, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Sequences for the spacer regions that separate the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA genes have been determined for four more (strategically placed) archaebacteria. These confirm the general rule that methanogens and extreme halophiles have spacers that contain a single tRNAala gene, while tRNA genes are not found in the spacer region of the true extreme thermophiles. The present study also shows that the spacer regions from the sulfate reducing Archaeglobus and the extreme thermophile Thermococcus (both of which cluster phylogenetically with the methanogens and extreme halophiles) contain each a tRNAala gene. Thus, not only all methanogens and extreme halophiles show this characteristic, but all organisms on the "methanogen branch" of the archaebacterial tree appear to do so. The finding of a tRNA gene in the spacer region of the extreme thermophile Thermococcus celer is the first known phenotypic property that links this organism with its phylogenetic counterparts, the methanogens, rather than with its phenotypic counterparts, the sulfur-dependent extreme thermophiles.

  2. 45S rDNA external transcribed spacer organization reveals new phylogenetic relationships in Avena genus.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joana; Viegas, Wanda; Silva, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    The genus Avena comprises four distinct genomes organized in diploid (AA or CC), tetraploid (AABB or AACC) and hexaploid species (AACCDD), constituting an interesting model for phylogenetic analysis. The aim of this work was to characterize 45S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) variability in distinct species representative of Avena genome diversity-A. strigosa (AA), A. ventricosa (CvCv), A. eriantha (CpCp), A. barbata (AABB), A. murphyi (AACC), A. sativa (AACCDD) and A. sterilis (AACCDD) through the assessment of the 5' external transcribed spacer (5'-ETS), a promising IGS region for phylogenetic studies poorly studied in Avena genus. In this work, IGS length polymorphisms were detected mainly due to distinct 5'-ETS sequence types resulting from major differences in the number and organization of repeated motifs. Although species with A genome revealed a 5'-ETS organization (A-organization) similar to the one previously described in A. sativa, a distinct organization was unraveled in C genome diploid species (C-organization). Interestingly, such new organization presents a higher similarity with other Poaceae species than A-genome sequences, supporting the hypothesis of C-genome being the ancestral Avena genome. Additionally, polyploid species with both genomes mainly retain the A-genome 5'-ETS organization, confirming the preferential elimination of C-genome sequences in Avena polyploid species. Moreover, 5'-ETS sequences phylogenetic analysis consistently clustered the species studied according to ploidy and genomic constitution supporting the use of ribosomal genes to highlight Avena species evolutive pathways.

  3. Trialogue: Preparation, Repetition and...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberg, Antoinette; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This paper interrogates both curriculum theory and the limits and potentials of textual forms. A set of overlapping discourses (a trialogue) focuses on inquiring into the roles of obsession and repetition in creating deeply interpretive locations for understanding. (SM)

  4. Repetition priming in music.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Sean; Palmer, Caroline

    2008-06-01

    The authors explore priming effects of pitch repetition in music in 3 experiments. Musically untrained participants heard a short melody and sang the last pitch of the melody as quickly as possible. Each experiment manipulated (a) whether or not the tone to be sung (target) was heard earlier in the melody (primed) and (b) the prime-target distance (measured in events). Experiment 1 used variable-length melodies, whereas Experiments 2 and 3 used fixed-length melodies. Experiment 3 changed the timbre of the target tone. In all experiments, fast-responding participants produced repeated tones faster than nonrepeated tones, and this repetition benefit decreased as prime-target distances increased. All participants produced expected tonic endings faster than less expected nontonic endings. Repetition and tonal priming effects are compared with harmonic priming effects in music and with repetition priming effects in language.

  5. Characterizing temporal repetition

    SciTech Connect

    Cukierman, D.; Delgrande, J.

    1996-12-31

    We are investigating the representation and reasoning about schedulable, repeated activities, specified using calendars. Examples of such activities include meeting every Tuesday and Thursday during a semester and attending a seminar every first day of a month. This research provides for a valuable framework for scheduling systems, financial systems and, in general, date-based systems. Very recently work has been done related to reasoning about repetition in the Artificial Intelligence community and others. A partial reference list is provided here. However, to our knowledge no extensive taxonomy of repetition has been proposed in the literature. We believe that reasoning about repeated activities calls for a study and precise definition of the topological characteristics in a repetitive series. In this abstract we summarize a proposal to classify types of repetition according to parameters. The combination of all possible values of these parameters provides a complete taxonomy of repetitive classes with respect to the proposed parameters. Several notions of repetition are considered, some are extremely general, some are very specific.

  6. Indirect decentralized repetitive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soo Cheol; Longman, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    Learning control refers to controllers that learn to improve their performance at executing a given task, based on experience performing this specific task. In a previous work, the authors presented a theory of indirect decentralized learning control based on use of indirect adaptive control concepts employing simultaneous identification and control. This paper extends these results to apply to the indirect repetitive control problem in which a periodic (i.e., repetitive) command is given to a control system. Decentralized indirect repetitive control algorithms are presented that have guaranteed convergence to zero tracking error under very general conditions. The original motivation of the repetitive control and learning control fields was learning in robots doing repetitive tasks such as on an assembly line. This paper starts with decentralized discrete time systems, and progresses to the robot application, modeling the robot as a time varying linear system in the neighborhood of the desired trajectory. Decentralized repetitive control is natural for this application because the feedback control for link rotations is normally implemented in a decentralized manner, treating each link as if it is independent of the other links.

  7. Intergenic transcription through a polycomb group response element counteracts silencing.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Prestel, Matthias; Paro, Renato

    2005-03-15

    Polycomb group response elements (PREs) mediate the mitotic inheritance of gene expression programs and thus maintain determined cell fates. By default, PREs silence associated genes via the targeting of Polycomb group (PcG) complexes. Upon an activating signal, however, PREs recruit counteracting trithorax group (trxG) proteins, which in turn maintain target genes in a transcriptionally active state. Using a transgenic reporter system, we show that the switch from the silenced to the activated state of a PRE requires noncoding transcription. Continuous transcription through the PRE induced by an actin promoter prevents the establishment of PcG-mediated silencing. The maintenance of epigenetic activation requires transcription through the PRE to proceed at least until embryogenesis is completed. At the homeotic bithorax complex of Drosophila, intergenic PRE transcripts can be detected not only during embryogenesis, but also at late larval stages, suggesting that transcription through endogenous PREs is required continuously as an anti-silencing mechanism to prevent the access of repressive PcG complexes to the chromatin. Furthermore, all other PREs outside the homeotic complex we tested were found to be transcribed in the same tissue as the mRNA of the corresponding target gene, suggesting that anti-silencing by transcription is a fundamental aspect of the cellular memory system.

  8. Separator-spacer for electrochemical systems

    DOEpatents

    Grimes, Patrick G.; Einstein, Harry; Newby, Kenneth R.; Bellows, Richard J.

    1983-08-02

    An electrochemical cell construction features a novel co-extruded plastic electrode in an interleaved construction with a novel integral separator-spacer. Also featured is a leak and impact resistant construction for preventing the spill of corrosive materials in the event of rupture.

  9. Funhaler spacer: improving adherence without compromising delivery

    PubMed Central

    Watt, P; Clements, B; Devadason, S; Chaney, G

    2003-01-01

    A novel asthma spacer device, the "Funhaler", incorporates incentive toys which are isolated from the main inspiratory circuit by a valve. Here we show that its use does not compromise drug delivery. Improved adherence combined with satisfactory delivery characteristics suggest that the Funhaler may be useful for management of young asthmatics. PMID:12818901

  10. [Identification of Salvia shandongensis new species based on sequences of the plastid psbA-trnH intergenic region].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Juan; Han, Jian-Ping; Li, Jian-Xiu; Chen, Xiao-Chen; Zhang, Long-Fei; Li, Jia; Gu, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Yong-Qing

    2013-08-01

    To identify Salvia shandongensis and its relatives at molecular level, the psbA-trnH intergenic region of three species including Salvia shandongensis, Salvia miltiorrhiza and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba were amplified and sequenced. Sequences were assembled with CodonCode Aligner. The K2P genetic distances between Salvia shandongensis and its relatives were calculated and UPGMA tree was performed by MEGA5.0. The results indicated that the lengths of psbA-trnH regions of Salvia shandongensis were about 391 bp, while the lengths of psbA-trnH regions of Salvia miltiorrhiza and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba were about 386 bp. The psbA-trnH sequences showed considerable variations between species and thus were revealed as a promising candidate for barcoding of Salvia shandongensis and its relatives. The intra-specific genetic distances of Salvia shandongensis were 0, while the intra-specific genetic distances of Salvia miltiorrhiza and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba were 0.002 and 0.001 respectively. Additionally, the genetic distance of Salvia shandongensis and Salvia miltiorrhiza ranged from 0.034 to 0.04, and the genetic distance of Salvia shandongensis and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba ranged from 0.005 to 0.008, the intra-specific genetic distances of Salvia shandongensis were much smaller than that of Salvia miltiorrhiza and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba; clustering results showed that there were obvious differences between Salvia shandongensis, Salvia miltiorrhiza and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba, which was consistent with morphological characteristics. This study not only firstly provides the scientific basis for establishing the taxonomy position in molecular level and revealing their genetic relationships of S. shandongensis, S. miltiorrhiza and S. miltiorrhiza f. alba; but also provides DNA molecular identification scientific basis for the development of new medicinal plant resources of Salvia shandongensis. Our results suggest that the psbA-trnH intergenic spacer region can be used as a

  11. The Mitochondrial Genome of Conus textile, coxI-coxII Intergenic Sequences and Conoidean Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K; Stevenson, Bradford J.; Ownby, John-Paul; Cady, Matthew T.; Watkins, Maren; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2009-01-01

    The cone snails belong to the superfamily Conoidea, comprising ∼10,000 venomous marine gastropods. We determined the complete mitochondrial DNA sequence of Conus textile. The gene order is identical in Conus textile, Lophiotoma cerithiformis (another Conoidean gastropod), and the neogastropod Ilyanassa obsoleta, (not in the superfamily Conoidea). However, the intergenic interval between the coxI/coxII genes, was much longer in C. textile (165 bp) than in any other previously analyzed gastropod. We used the intergenic region to evaluate evolutionary patterns. In most neogastropods and three conidean families the intergenic interval is small (<30 nucleotides). Within Conus, the variation is from 130-170 bp, and each different clade within Conus has a narrower size distribution. In Conasprella, a subgenus traditionally assigned to Conus, the intergenic regions vary between 200-500 bp, suggesting that the species in Conasprella are not congeneric with Conus. The intergenic region was used for phylogenetic analysis of a group of fish-hunting Conus, despite the short length resolution was better than using standard markers. Thus, the coxI/coxII intergenic region can be used both to define evolutionary relationships between species in a clade, and to understand broad evolutionary patterns across the large superfamily Conoidea. PMID:17936021

  12. Repetition through Successive Approximations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littell, Katherine M.

    This study was conducted in an attempt to provide an alternative to the long-established method of tape listening and repetition drills, a method that has had disappointing results. It is suggested that the rate of speed of phonic presentation is not commensurate with the rate of comprehension. The proposed method seeks to prevent cognitive…

  13. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, S T

    2001-05-01

    Repetitive strain injury is a group of musculoskeletal disorders affecting muscles, tendons, nerves and blood vessels. These disorders could be attributed to occupational causes; however non-occupational causes should be excluded. The management of these cases required a multidisciplinary team approach.

  14. Repetition Priming in Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Sean; Palmer, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    The authors explore priming effects of pitch repetition in music in 3 experiments. Musically untrained participants heard a short melody and sang the last pitch of the melody as quickly as possible. Each experiment manipulated (a) whether or not the tone to be sung (target) was heard earlier in the melody (primed) and (b) the prime-target distance…

  15. Allele-specific germ cell epimutation in the spacer promoter of the 45S ribosomal RNA gene after Cr(III) exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Shiao, Y.-H. . E-mail: shiao@mail.ncifrcf.gov; Crawford, Erik B.; Anderson, Lucy M.; Patel, Pritesh; Ko, Kinarm

    2005-06-15

    Paternal exposure of mice to Cr(III) causes increased tumor risk in offspring; an epigenetic mechanism has been hypothesized. Representational difference analysis of gene methylation in sperm revealed hypomethylation in the 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene after Cr(III) exposure, compared with controls. The most striking effects were seen in the rRNA spacer promoter, a region in the intergenic region of rRNA gene clusters that can influence transcription. Methylation of the rRNA spacer promoter has not been studied heretofore. Sperm DNAs from Cr(III)-treated and control mice were modified by the bisulfite method followed by PCR amplification of the spacer promoter, including 27 CpG sites. Cloning and dideoxy sequencing identified sequence variants (T or G at base -2214) in the spacer promoter. The T allele had less DNA methylation than the G allele in control mice (17 of 17 clones vs. 42 of 72 clones, P = 0.0004). In spite of diversity of sperm DNA methylation patterns, the DNA clones from Cr(III)-exposed mice had fewer methylated CpG sites, by an average of 19% (P < 0.0001). This difference was limited to the G allele. The pyrosequencing technique was applied to quantify the percentage of methylation directly from amplified PCR products. Strikingly, for nine CpG sites including the spacer promoter core region, hypomethylation was highly significant in the Cr(III)-treated group (paired T test, P < 0.0001). Thus, one allele of the 45S rRNA spacer promoter is hypomethylated in sperm germ cells after Cr(III) exposure. This epimutation may lead to increase of tumor risk in the offspring.

  16. Tube support grid and spacer therefor

    DOEpatents

    Ringsmuth, Richard J.; Kaufman, Jay S.

    1986-01-01

    A tube support grid and spacers therefor provide radially inward preloading of heat exchange tubes to minimize stress upon base welds due to differential thermal expansion. The grid comprises a concentric series of rings and spacers with opposing concave sides for conforming to the tubes and V-shaped ends to provide resilient flexibility. The flexibility aids in assembly and in transmitting seismic vibrations from the tubes to a shroud. The tube support grid may be assembled in place to achieve the desired inwardly radial preloading of the heat exchange tubes. Tab and slot assembly further minimizes stresses in the system. The radii of the grid rings may be preselected to effect the desired radially inward preloading.

  17. Heterogeneous diversity of spacers within CRISPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael; He, Jiankui

    2011-03-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in bacterial and archaeal DNA have recently been shown to be a new type of anti-viral immune system in these organisms. We here study the diversity of spacers in CRISPR under selective pressure. We propose a population dynamics model that explains the biological observation that the leader-proximal end of CRISPR is more diversified and the leader-distal end of CRISPR is more conserved. This result is shown to be in agreement with recent experiments. Our results show that the CRISPR spacer structure is influenced by and provides a record of the viral challenges that bacteria face. 1) J. He and M. W. Deem, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 (2010) 128102

  18. Improved nuclear fuel assembly grid spacer

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, John; Kaplan, Samuel

    1977-01-01

    An improved fuel assembly grid spacer and method of retaining the basic fuel rod support elements in position within the fuel assembly containment channel. The improvement involves attachment of the grids to the hexagonal channel and of forming the basic fuel rod support element into a grid structure, which provides a design which is insensitive to potential channel distortion (ballooning) at high fluence levels. In addition the improved method eliminates problems associated with component fabrication and assembly.

  19. Typing of Listeria monocytogenes Strains by Repetitive Element Sequence-Based PCR

    PubMed Central

    Jeršek, B.; Gilot, P.; Gubina, M.; Klun, N.; Mehle, J.; Tcherneva, E.; Rijpens, N.; Herman, L.

    1999-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes strains possess short repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) elements and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequences. We used repetitive element sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) to evaluate the potential of REP and ERIC elements for typing L. monocytogenes strains isolated from humans, animals, and foods. On the basis of rep-PCR fingerprints, L. monocytogenes strains were divided into four major clusters matching origin of isolation. rep-PCR fingerprints of human and animal isolates were different from those of food isolates. Computer evaluation of rep-PCR fingerprints allowed discrimination among the tested serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, 3b, and 4b within each major cluster. The index of discrimination calculated for 52 epidemiologically unrelated isolates of L. monocytogenes was 0.98 for REP- and ERIC-PCR. Our results suggest that rep-PCR can provide an alternative method for L. monocytogenes typing. PMID:9854072

  20. Intergenic complementation truncation mutants of cyclin-dependent kinase.

    PubMed

    Bitter, G A; Tsai, M M; Putzke, A P; Leong, K

    2000-03-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes PHO80 and PHO85 encode, respectively, a cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase, which negatively regulate PHO5 gene transcription by phosphorylating the transcription activator Pho4p. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are highly conserved proteins, both within and between species. It was previously demonstrated, using reporter genes activated in yeast by Pho4p, that hybrid proteins in which over two-thirds of Pho85p were replaced with the homologous region from human Cdk2 retained the function of native Pho85p with respect to promoter repression. In the present study, various truncated forms of the hybrid human-yeast CDKs were tested for function. Surprisingly, truncations in which significant portions of the C-terminal region of the 291-residue hybrid CDK were deleted retained activity. Genes encoding human Cdk2 proteins which terminated after amino acids 151, 140, 130, 120 and 90 each complement a chromosomal pho85 gene disruption in which the HIS3 gene is inserted at codon 49. Truncated Cdk2 proteins containing less than 60 amino acids failed to complement the pho85::HIS3 gene disruption. Although the functional C-terminal truncations disrupt the ATP-binding and active sites of Cdk2, reporter gene repression mediated by these truncated proteins is apparently due to phosphorylation of Pho4p, since a gene in which the essential lysine codon at position 33 was converted to an arginine codon does not complement the chromosomal gene disruption. The human Cdk2 truncations were demonstrated to function through intergenic complementation. The intact Cdk2-Pho85 hybrid CDK complemented the pho85 mutation in yeast strains in which the entire PHO85 coding region was deleted from chromosome XVI. The C-terminal Cdk2 truncations, however, were non-functional in these strains and thus dependent for activity on the pho85 coding region which remained in the mutant pho85::HIS3 chromosomal locus. These genetic results are consistent with a model

  1. Molecular profiling of microbial communities from contaminated sources: Use of subtractive cloning methods and rDNA spacer sequences. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, F.T.

    1998-06-01

    'The major objective of the research is to provide appropriate sequences and to assemble a high-density DNA array of oligonucleotides that can be used for rapid profiling of microbial populations from polluted areas. The sequences to be assigned to the DNA array are chosen from from cloned genomic DNA sequences (the ribosomal operon, described below) from groundwater at DOE sites containing organic solvents. The sites, Hanford Nuclear Plant and Lawrence Livermore Site 300, have well characterized pollutant histories, which have been provided by the collaborators. At this mid-point of the project, over 60 unique sequence classes of intergenic spacer region have been idedntified from the first sample site. The use of these sequences as hybridization probes, and their frequency of occurrence, allow a clear distinction between bacterial communities before and after remediation by acetate/nitrate pumping. The authors have developed the hybridization conditions for identifying PCR products in a 96 well format, a versatile alignment and visualization program (acronym: MALIGN) developed by Dr. Dennis Maeder, has been used to align the ISRs, which are variable in length and sometimes in position of the tRNAs. Finally, in collaboration with Dr. W. Chen and Dr. J. Zhou at ORNL, they have significant evidence that mass spectrometer analysis can be used to determine the lengths of PCR amplified intergenic spacer DNA.'

  2. Self-aligned quadruple patterning using spacer on spacer integration optimization for N5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibaut, Sophie; Raley, Angélique; Mohanty, Nihar; Kal, Subhadeep; Liu, Eric; Ko, Akiteru; O'Meara, David; Tapily, Kandabara; Biolsi, Peter

    2017-04-01

    To meet scaling requirements, the semiconductor industry has extended 193nm immersion lithography beyond its minimum pitch limitation using multiple patterning schemes such as self-aligned double patterning, self-aligned quadruple patterning and litho-etch / litho etch iterations. Those techniques have been declined in numerous options in the last few years. Spacer on spacer pitch splitting integration has been proven to show multiple advantages compared to conventional pitch splitting approach. Reducing the number of pattern transfer steps associated with sacrificial layers resulted in significant decrease of cost and an overall simplification of the double pitch split technique. While demonstrating attractive aspects, SAQP spacer on spacer flow brings challenges of its own. Namely, material set selections and etch chemistry development for adequate selectivities, mandrel shape and spacer shape engineering to improve edge placement error (EPE). In this paper we follow up and extend upon our previous learning and proceed into more details on the robustness of the integration in regards to final pattern transfer and full wafer critical dimension uniformity. Furthermore, since the number of intermediate steps is reduced, one will expect improved uniformity and pitch walking control. This assertion will be verified through a thorough pitch walking analysis.

  3. Camera: a competitive gene set test accounting for inter-gene correlation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Smyth, Gordon K

    2012-09-01

    Competitive gene set tests are commonly used in molecular pathway analysis to test for enrichment of a particular gene annotation category amongst the differential expression results from a microarray experiment. Existing gene set tests that rely on gene permutation are shown here to be extremely sensitive to inter-gene correlation. Several data sets are analyzed to show that inter-gene correlation is non-ignorable even for experiments on homogeneous cell populations using genetically identical model organisms. A new gene set test procedure (CAMERA) is proposed based on the idea of estimating the inter-gene correlation from the data, and using it to adjust the gene set test statistic. An efficient procedure is developed for estimating the inter-gene correlation and characterizing its precision. CAMERA is shown to control the type I error rate correctly regardless of inter-gene correlations, yet retains excellent power for detecting genuine differential expression. Analysis of breast cancer data shows that CAMERA recovers known relationships between tumor subtypes in very convincing terms. CAMERA can be used to analyze specified sets or as a pathway analysis tool using a database of molecular signatures.

  4. 45S rDNA external transcribed spacer organization reveals new phylogenetic relationships in Avena genus

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Joana; Viegas, Wanda

    2017-01-01

    The genus Avena comprises four distinct genomes organized in diploid (AA or CC), tetraploid (AABB or AACC) and hexaploid species (AACCDD), constituting an interesting model for phylogenetic analysis. The aim of this work was to characterize 45S rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS) variability in distinct species representative of Avena genome diversity–A. strigosa (AA), A. ventricosa (CvCv), A. eriantha (CpCp), A. barbata (AABB), A. murphyi (AACC), A. sativa (AACCDD) and A. sterilis (AACCDD) through the assessment of the 5’ external transcribed spacer (5’-ETS), a promising IGS region for phylogenetic studies poorly studied in Avena genus. In this work, IGS length polymorphisms were detected mainly due to distinct 5’-ETS sequence types resulting from major differences in the number and organization of repeated motifs. Although species with A genome revealed a 5’-ETS organization (A-organization) similar to the one previously described in A. sativa, a distinct organization was unraveled in C genome diploid species (C-organization). Interestingly, such new organization presents a higher similarity with other Poaceae species than A-genome sequences, supporting the hypothesis of C-genome being the ancestral Avena genome. Additionally, polyploid species with both genomes mainly retain the A-genome 5’-ETS organization, confirming the preferential elimination of C-genome sequences in Avena polyploid species. Moreover, 5’-ETS sequences phylogenetic analysis consistently clustered the species studied according to ploidy and genomic constitution supporting the use of ribosomal genes to highlight Avena species evolutive pathways. PMID:28448637

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD AND SPACER CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the heterogeneous, graphite moderated, fluid cooled type and shielding and spacing plugs for the coolant channels thereof are reported. In this design, the coolant passages extend horizontally through the moderator structure, accommodating the fuel elements in abutting end-to-end relationship, and have access openings through the outer shield at one face of the reactor to facilitate loading of the fuel elements. In the outer ends of the channels which extend through the shields are provided spacers and shielding plugs designed to offer minimal reslstance to coolant fluid flow while preventing emanation of harmful radiation through the access openings when closed between loadings.

  6. Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Games, and the Internet Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries KidsHealth > For Parents > Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries ... and how to prevent them. About Repetitive Stress Injuries Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are conditions caused by ...

  7. Phylogeography and conservation genetics of Hygrophila pogonocalyx (Acanthaceae) based on atpB-rbcL noncoding spacer cpDNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jao-Ching; Wang, Wei-Kuang; Peng, Ching-I; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh

    2005-02-01

    Genetic variation in the atpB-rbcL intergenic spacer region of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) was investigated in Hygrophila pogonocalyx Hayata (Acanthaceae), an endangered and endemic species in Taiwan. In this aquatic species, seed dispersal from capsules via elasticity is constrained by gravity and is thereby confined within populations, resulting in limited gene flow between populations. In this study, a total of 849 bp of the cpDNA atpB-rbcL spacer were sequenced from eight populations of H. pogonocalyx. Nucleotide diversity in the cpDNA is low (theta = 0.00343+/-0.00041). The distribution of genetic variation among populations agrees with an "isolation-by-distance" model. Two geographically correlated groups, the western and eastern regions, were identified in a neighbor-joining tree and a minimum-spanning network. Phylogeographical analyses based on the cpDNA network suggest that the present-day differentiation between western and eastern groups of H. pogonocalyx resulted from past fragmentation. The differentiation between eastern and western populations may be ascribed to isolation since the formation of the Central Mountain Range about 5 million years ago, which is consistent with the rate estimates based on a molecular clock of cpDNA.

  8. Identification of Lactobacillus strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Dec, Marta; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Gnat, Sebastian; Puchalski, Andrzej; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2014-04-01

    The objective of our study was to identify Lactobacillus sp. strains of goose origin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP. All three techniques proved to be valuable tools for identification of avian lactobacilli and produced comparable classification results. Lactobacillus strains were isolated from 100% of geese aged 3 weeks to 4 years, but from only 25% of chicks aged 1-10 days. Among the 104 strains isolated, we distinguished 14 Lactobacillus species. The dominant species was Lactobacillus salivarius (35.6%), followed by Lactobacillus johnsonii (18.3%), Lactobacillus ingluviei (11.5%) and Lactobacillus agilis (7.7%). The intact-cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry enabled rapid species identification of the lactobacilli with minimal pretreatment. However, it produced more than one identification result for 11.5% examined strains (mainly of the species L. johnsonii). ITS-PCR distinguished 12 genotypes among the isolates, but was not able to differentiate closely related strains, i.e. between Lactobacillus amylovorus and Lactobacillus kitasatonis and between Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus zeae. These species were differentiated by ITS-PCR/RFLP using the restriction enzymes TaqI and MseI. The results obtained indicate that ITS-PCR and ITS-PCR/RFLP assays could be used not only for interspecific, but also for intraspecific, typing.

  9. [Phylogenetic relations of Salix L. subg. Salix species (Salicaceae) according to sequencing data of intergenic spacers of chloroplasic genomes and ITS rDNA].

    PubMed

    Barkalov, V Iu; Kozyrenko, M M

    2014-08-01

    A phylogenetic analysis based on a comparison of nucleotide sequences of six regions from cpDNA and ITS rDNA (petN-psbM, trnD-trnT, trnC-petN, psaA-ycf3, petG-trnP, and rpoB-trnC) allowed for elucidating the relationship among species and sections belonging to the Salix subgenus and, more generally, to the Salix genus, as well as revealing the relations of the Chosenia genus. The definition of the subgenera of Pleuradenia (including the Urbanianea genus and the Chosenia genus), Salix (without the Triandrae section), Triandrae, and Longifoliae is essentially consistent with current classification schemes of the Salix genus. The previously defined genera of Chosenia and Toisusu (Urbanianea) are not only joined with the Salix genus but are also closely related between themselves. The Protitea subgenus only corresponds to the American species of the Humboldtianae section (S. humboldtiana, S. amygdaloides, S. gooddingii). The relationship of S. chaenomeloides, which is a nomenclatural type of this subgenus, as well as the relationship of the Wilsonia section, remains unresolved. The Humboldtianae section should be interpreted more narrowly, apparently, separating the Acmophillae and Tetraspermae sections from it. The monotypic American Floridanae section is related to the Salix, Salicaster, Tetraspermae, and Wilsonia.

  10. Extraordinary ribosomal spacer length heterogeneity in a neotyphodium endophyte hybrid: implications for concerted evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Ganley, A R; Scott, B

    1998-01-01

    An extraordinary level of length heterogeneity was found in the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of an asexual hybrid Neotyphodium grass endophyte, isolate Lp1. This hybrid Neotyphodium endophyte is an interspecific hybrid between two grass endophytes, Neotyphodium lolii, and a sexual form, Epichlöe typhina, and the length heterogeneity was not found in either of these progenitor species. The length heterogeneity in the hybrid is localized to the intergenic spacer (IGS) and is the result of copy-number variation of a tandemly repeated subrepeat class within the IGS, the 111-/119-bp subrepeats. Copy number variation of this subrepeat class appears to be a consequence of mitotic unequal crossing over that occurs between these subrepeats. This implies that unequal crossing over plays a role in the concerted evolution of the whole rDNA. Changes in the pattern of IGS length variants occurred in just two rounds of single-spore purification. Analysis of the IGS length heterogeneity revealed features that are unexpected in a simple model of unequal crossing over. Potential refinements of the molecular details of unequal crossing over are presented, and we also discuss evidence for a combination of homogenization mechanisms that drive the concerted evolution of the Lp1 rDNA. PMID:9832538

  11. Properties of cellulase immobilized on agarose gel with spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Chim-anage, P.; Kashiwagi, Y.; Magae, Y.; Ohta, T.; Sasaki, T.

    1986-12-01

    Cellulase produced by fungus Trichoderma viride was immobilized on agarose beads (Sepharose 4B) activated by cyanogen bromide and also on activated agarose beads that contained spacer arm (activated Ch-Sepharose 4B and Affi-Gel 15). The CMCase activity retained by immobilized cellulase on activated Sepharose containing the spacer tended to be higher than that immobilized without spacer, although the extent of protein immobilization was lower. Also, the higher substrate specificity for cellulase immobilized on beads with spacer was obtained for cellobiose, acid-swollen cellulose, or cellulose powder. The hydrolysis product from their substrates was mainly glucose. 10 references.

  12. The development process for a new spacer device.

    PubMed

    Watson, Paul

    The British Thoracic Society and Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network recommend that children up to the age of five should use a pressurised metered dose inhaler with a spacer device to deliver inhaled steroids. However, large-volume spacers can be cumbersome, which is why I designed a smaller, more portable device to encourage spacer use. After prototypes were made, the idea was presented to the local NHS innovations department. With its advice and assistance, a collapsible spacer device has been developed. This article describes the product development process.

  13. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    van Tulder, Maurits; Malmivaara, Antti; Koes, Bart

    2007-05-26

    Repetitive strain injury remains a controversial topic. The term repetitive strain injury includes specific disorders such as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, Guyon canal syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, and tendonitis of the wrist or hand. The diagnosis is usually made on the basis of history and clinical examination. Large high-quality studies using newer imaging techniques, such as MRI and ultrasonography are few. Consequently, the role of such imaging in diagnosis of upper limb disorders remains unclear. In many cases, no specific diagnosis can be established and complaints are labelled as non-specific. Little is known about the effectiveness of treatment options for upper limb disorders. Strong evidence for any intervention is scarce and the effect, if any, is mainly short-term pain relief. Exercise is beneficial for non-specific upper limb disorders. Immobilising hand braces and open carpal tunnel surgery release are beneficial for carpal tunnel syndrome, and topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroid injections are helpful for lateral epicondylitis. Exercise is probably beneficial for neck pain, as are corticosteroid injections and exercise for shoulder pain. Although upper limb disorders occur frequently in the working population, most trials have not exclusively included a working population or assessed effects on work-related outcomes. Further high-quality trials should aim to include sufficient sample sizes, working populations, and work-related outcomes.

  14. Development of an Intelligent Spacer Data Logger System.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Chris; Smith, Nicholas J; Barry, Peter W; Denyer, John

    2017-08-28

    Although delivery of drugs from pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) via spacer devices is widespread it cannot be assumed that patients take their medication as prescribed or use their spacer appropriately. We developed a Spacer Data Logger device to record patient adherence and whether patients had shaken the pMDI, actuated it soon after shaking, and inhaled a sufficient volume from it. We report an assessment of the Spacer Data Logger to measure and record that the pMDI was adequately shaken, the time to actuation, and the volume "inhaled" from the spacer up to 26 seconds after actuation. The effect of a delay in actuation following shaking on the dose available for inhalation from the spacer and the effect of a delay in extraction of aerosol from the spacer were assessed using different strengths of beclomethasone dipropionate (50 and 100 μg) and fluticasone propionate (50, 125 and 250 μg). The volumes measured by the Spacer Data Logger were in close agreement with the reference volumes of four simulated breathing patterns. A delay between shaking and actuating the pMDI resulted in a significant increase in the dose available for inhalation after only 4 seconds for the 50 and 250 μg strengths of fluticasone propionate pMDIs (p = 0.004 and p < 0.001, respectively). A delay between actuation of the drug into the spacer and "inhalation" of aerosol from the spacer also resulted in a steady decline in the dose available from the spacer (p < 0.0001). These results confirmed the importance of using the pMDI spacer correctly by actuating directly after shaking and inhaling the aerosol from the spacer as soon after actuation as possible to optimize the dose available for inhalation. The Spacer Data Logger should be a useful tool to determine adherence to and "optimum" use of pMDI spacers in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  15. Use of the CP and CPm Intergene Sequences to Discriminate CTV Strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is a need to develop a rapid assay to distinguish potentially mild vs severe strains of Citrus tristeza virus. Multiple alignment performed on the coat protein (CP) and the minor coat protein (CPm) intergene sequences (~80-100 bp) from different CTV isolates revealed that severe strains (VT, ...

  16. Ribosomal operon intergenic sequence region (ISR) heterogeneity in Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are closely related species that can not be distinguished by their 16S or 23S rRNA gene sequences. However, the intergenic sequence region (ISR) that is between the 16S and 23S genes is markedly different and characteristic for each species. A peculiarit...

  17. Molecular recordings by directed CRISPR spacer acquisition.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Seth L; Nivala, Jeff; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Church, George M

    2016-07-29

    The ability to write a stable record of identified molecular events into a specific genomic locus would enable the examination of long cellular histories and have many applications, ranging from developmental biology to synthetic devices. We show that the type I-E CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas system of Escherichia coli can mediate acquisition of defined pieces of synthetic DNA. We harnessed this feature to generate records of specific DNA sequences into a population of bacterial genomes. We then applied directed evolution so as to alter the recognition of a protospacer adjacent motif by the Cas1-Cas2 complex, which enabled recording in two modes simultaneously. We used this system to reveal aspects of spacer acquisition, fundamental to the CRISPR-Cas adaptation process. These results lay the foundations of a multimodal intracellular recording device.

  18. Mask specification guidelines in spacer patterning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Kohji; Mukai, Hidefumi; Miyoshi, Seiro; Yamaguchi, Shinji; Mashita, Hiromitsu; Kobayashi, Yuuji; Kawano, Kenji; Hirano, Takashi

    2008-11-01

    We have studied both the mask CD specification and the mask defect specification for spacer patterning technology (SPT). SPT has the possibility of extending optical lithography to below 40nm half-pitch devices. Since SPT necessitates somewhat more complicated wafer process flow, the CD error and mask defect printability on wafers involve more process factors compared with conventional single-exposure process (SEP). This feature of SPT implies that it is very important to determine mask-related specifications for SPT in order to select high-end mask fabrication strategies; those are for mask writing tools, mask process development, materials, inspection tools, and so on. Our experimental studies reveal that both mask CD specification and mask defect specification are somehow relaxed from those in ITRS2007. This is most likely because SPT reduces mask CD error enhanced factor (MEF) and the reduction of line-width roughness (LWR).

  19. Molecular recordings by directed CRISPR spacer acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Shipman, Seth L; Nivala, Jeff; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Church, George M

    2016-01-01

    The ability to write a stable record of identified molecular events into a specific genomic locus would enable the examination of long cellular histories and have many applications, ranging from developmental biology to synthetic devices. We show that the type I-E CRISPR-Cas system of E. coli can mediate acquisition of defined pieces of synthetic DNA. We harnessed this feature to generate records of specific DNA sequences into a population of bacterial genomes. We then applied directed evolution to alter the recognition of a protospacer adjacent motif by the Cas1-Cas2 complex, which enabled recording in two modes simultaneously. We used this system to reveal aspects of spacer acquisition, fundamental to the CRISPR-Cas adaptation process. These results lay the foundations of a multimodal intracellular recording device. PMID:27284167

  20. Medpor lower eyelid spacer: does it biointegrate?

    PubMed

    Mavrikakis, Ioannis; Francis, Nick; Poitelea, Cornelia; Parkin, Ben; Brittain, Paul; Olver, Jane

    2009-01-01

    To report the histopathologic findings of explanted Medpor lower eyelid spacers (LES) in complicated cases. Four cases of lower eyelid retraction due to thyroid orbitopathy (n = 2), facial nerve palsy (n = 1), and post-enucleation socket syndrome (n = 1) were treated with Medpor LES. All implants were removed between 6 months to 2 years following their original insertion due to exposure, poor stability, or contour. Histopathology of the implants showed fibrosis and vascularization although clinically, at the time of removal, did not appear vascularized. In addition, immunohistochemistry was positive for Factor VIII related antigen and CD34, thus highlighting the presence of vessels in the pores and around the implant. To our knowledge, we are the first to report histopathologic findings of explanted high-density porous polyethylene implants from the lower eyelid in humans. Although this study shows that Medpor LES does biointegrate, we advocate using it sparingly due to associated complications such as exposure, poor stability, and contour.

  1. Targeting drugs to the airways: The role of spacer devices.

    PubMed

    Lavorini, Federico; Fontana, Giovanni A

    2009-01-01

    Spacer devices are inhalation aids of varying dimension and complexity, specifically designed to overcome problems with the use of pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). The aim of this review is to examine the current understanding about these inhalation devices and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. The pertinent literature concerning the characteristics and effects of spacers on delivery and lung deposition of inhaled medications, as well as their clinical efficacy in patients with reversible airway obstruction, is examined. Spacers minimise problems of poor inhalation technique with pMDI, reduce oropharyngeal deposition and increase lung deposition. Spacers improve the clinical effect of inhaled medications, especially in patients unable to use a pMDI properly. Compared to both pMDIs and dry-powder inhalers, spacers may increase the response to beta-adrenergic bronchodilators, even in patients with correct inhalation technique. A pMDI plus spacer has proven to be viable lower cost alternative to the use of a nebuliser for delivering large bronchodilator doses in patients with severe acute asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The use of large-volume spacers is recommended for delivering high doses of inhaled corticosteroids, and may permit a lower maintenance dose to be used. pMDIs may be routinely fitted with a spacer, especially in situations where correct pMDI use is unlikely.

  2. A non-electrostatic spacer for aerosol delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Bisgaard, H; Anhøj, J; Klug, B; Berg, E

    1995-01-01

    A pear shaped non-electrostatic spacer, composed of steel with a volume of 250 ml and equipped with a facemask containing integrated inlet and outlet valves for inspiration and expiration, was compared with three plastic spacers. The plastic spacers were primed with repeated puffs from a budesonide pressurised metered dose inhaler (p-MDI) to minimise the electrostatic charge on the plastic. The procedure prolonged the half life (t1/2) of the aerosol in the Nebuhaler from nine to 32 seconds. A normal cleaning procedure reduced the aerosol t1/2 back to baseline. The t1/2 of the aerosol in the metal spacer was 27 seconds and independent of the use of p-MDI. In vitro the maximum dose of budesonide from a p-MDI, expressed as a percentage of the nominal dose, was 56% from the non-electrostatic spacer, 61% from the Nebuhaler, 45% from the Babyhaler, and 30% from the AeroChamber. In 124 children, age 6 months to 6 years, suspected to have asthma the non-electrostatic spacer delivered a mean total dose of budesonide aerosol of 39% of the nominal dose, which was significantly higher than the Babyhaler (28%), the Nebuhaler (21%), and the AeroChamber (19%). These differences were most pronounced in children younger than 4 years. The improved dose delivery from the small volume non-electrostatic spacer is probably related to the non-electrostatic spacer material and the valves which assured unidirectional airflow from the spacer without adding any dead space in the inspiratory channel. The non-electro-static spacer should improve the cost effectiveness of aerosol treatment and, as the counteracting effects of proming and recharging of the plastic from cleaning are avoided, should deliver a more reliable dose. PMID:7492160

  3. Repetitive resonant railgun power supply

    DOEpatents

    Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

    1985-06-19

    A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

  4. Repetitive resonant railgun power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, Emanuel M.; Nunnally, William C.

    1988-01-01

    A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

  5. Repetition Blindness for Rotated Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, William G.; Zhou, Guomei; Man, Wai-Fung; Harris, Irina M.

    2010-01-01

    Repetition blindness (RB) is the finding that observers often miss the repetition of an item within a rapid stream of words or objects. Recent studies have shown that RB for objects is largely unaffected by variations in viewpoint between the repeated items. In 5 experiments, we tested RB under different axes of rotation, with different types of…

  6. Repetition priming: Is music special?

    PubMed

    Bigand, E; Tillmann, B; Poulin-Charronnat, B; Manderlier, D

    2005-11-01

    Using short and long contexts, the present study investigated musical priming effects that are based on chord repetition and harmonic relatedness. A musical target (a chord) was preceded by either an identical prime or a different but harmonically related prime. In contrast to words, pictures, and environmental sounds, chord processing was not facilitated by repetition. Experiments 1 and 2 using single-chord primes showed either no significant difference between chord repetition and harmonic relatedness or facilitated processing for harmonically related targets. Experiment 3 using longer prime contexts showed that musical priming depended more on the musical function of the target in the preceding context than on target repetition. The effect of musical function was decreased, but not qualitatively changed, by chord repetition. The outcome of this study challenges predictions of sensory approaches and supports a cognitive approach of musical priming.

  7. Symmetry and repetition in perspective.

    PubMed

    van der Vloed, Gert; Csathó, Arpád; van der Helm, Peter A

    2005-09-01

    Although ecologically relevant, perspective views of symmetries and repetitions have hardly been investigated. Any symmetry or repetition that is not oriented orthogonally to the line of sight yields perspective distortions on the retina. In this study, these distortions are analyzed in terms of first-order structures (i.e., virtual lines between corresponding points) and second-order structures (i.e., correlation quadrangles formed by two virtual lines). In the literature, these structures have been proposed to guide the detection of fron to parallel symmetry and repetition. But what about perspective views? First, the analysis in this study shows that perspective distorts the retinal first-order and second-order structures of symmetry and repetition differently. Second, the results of two experiments on this distortion difference suggest that, in perspective views, symmetry and repetition detection is not preceded by normalization but occurs directly on the basis of the retinal first-order and second-order structures.

  8. Campylobacter jejuni acquire new host-derived CRISPR spacers when in association with bacteriophages harboring a CRISPR-like Cas4 protein

    PubMed Central

    Hooton, Steven P. T.; Connerton, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a worldwide cause of human diarrhoeal disease. Clustered Repetitively Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) and associated proteins allow Bacteria and Archaea to evade bacteriophage and plasmid infection. Type II CRISPR systems are found in association with combinations of genes encoding the CRISPR-associated Cas1, Cas2, Cas4 or Csn2, and Cas9 proteins. C. jejuni possesses a minimal subtype II-C CRISPR system containing cas1, cas2, and cas9 genes whilst cas4 is notably absent. Cas4 proteins possess 5′-3′ exonuclease activity to create recombinogenic-ends for spacer acquisition. Here we report a conserved Cas4-like protein in Campylobacter bacteriophages that creates a novel split arrangement between the bacteriophage and host that represents a new twist in the bacteriophage/host co-evolutionary arms race. The continuous association of bacteriophage and host in the carrier state life cycle of C. jejuni provided an opportunity to study spacer acquisition in this species. Remarkably all the spacer sequences observed were of host origin. We hypothesize that Campylobacter bacteriophages can use Cas4-like protein to activate spacer acquisition to use host DNA as an effective decoy to bacteriophage DNA. Bacteria that acquire self-spacers and escape phage infection must overcome CRISPR-mediated autoimmunity either by loss of the interference functions leaving them susceptible to foreign DNA incursion or tolerate changes in gene regulation. PMID:25601859

  9. Spacer effect on nanostructures and self-assembly in organogels via some bolaform cholesteryl imide derivatives with different spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Tifeng; Gao, Fengqing; Zhang, Qingrui; Zhou, Jingxin; Gao, Faming

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, new bolaform cholesteryl imide derivatives with different spacers were designed and synthesized. Their gelation behaviors in 23 solvents were investigated, and some of them were found to be low molecular mass organic gelators. The experimental results indicated that these as-formed organogels can be regulated by changing the flexible/rigid segments in spacers and organic solvents. Suitable combination of flexible/rigid segments in molecular spacers in the present cholesteryl gelators is favorable for the gelation of organic solvents. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy observations revealed that the gelator molecules self-assemble into different aggregates, from wrinkle and belt to fiber with the change of spacers and solvents. Spectral studies indicated that there existed different H-bond formations between imide groups and assembly modes, depending on the substituent spacers in molecular skeletons. The present work may give some insight into the design and character of new organogelators and soft materials with special molecular structures.

  10. Repetitive sequences in the ITS1 region of the ribosomal DNA of Tunga penetrans and other flea species (Insecta, Siphonaptera).

    PubMed

    Gamerschlag, Sara; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Heukelbach, Jörg; Feldmeier, Hermann; D'Haese, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    Different Tunga penetrans isolates from various hosts obtained from South America (Fortaleza. Brazil) have been studied by nucleotide sequence comparison of the first and the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS1, ITS2) of the ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) and part of the mitochondrial 16S rDNA. Results show no significant host-dependent sequence differences. No indication for intraindividual and intraspecific polymorphisms could be detected. Comparing the ITS1 spacer region of T. penetrans from South America with that from Africa (Togo, Cameroon), distinct length variations have been observed caused by a repetitive sequence motif of 99 bp. The ITS1 from the South American T. penetrans contain two tandemly repeated copies, whereas four of these units are present in the spacer of the African T. penetrans. The absence of homogenization of these units indicates a recent separation of both populations. However, the different number of repetitions together with two base substitutions put the evolutionary distance of only 135 years as postulated for the transfer of T. penetrans from South America to Africa into question. Repetitive sequences could also be detected within the ITS1 rDNA region of other flea species Ctenocephalides felis, Echidnophaga gallinacea, Pulex irritans, Spilopsyllus cuniculi, and Xenopsylla cheopis. The repeat units with lengths from 10 to 99 bp are arranged in pure tandem or interspersed. The repetitive elements observed in the ITS1 of various flea species may serve as a valuable tool for phylogeographic studies.

  11. Distinct patterns of simple sequence repeats and GC distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of primate genomes.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wen-Hua; Yan, Chao-Chao; Li, Wu-Jiao; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Li, Guang-Zhou; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Hu, Ting-Zhang; Li, Jing; Yue, Bi-Song

    2016-09-16

    As the first systematic examination of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and guanine-cytosine (GC) distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of ten primates, our study showed that SSRs and GC displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation. Our results suggest that the majority of SSRs are distributed in non-coding regions, such as the introns, TEs, and intergenic regions. In these primates, trinucleotide perfect (P) SSRs were the most abundant repeats type in the 5'UTRs and CDSs, whereas, mononucleotide P-SSRs were the most in the intron, 3'UTRs, TEs, and intergenic regions. The GC-contents varied greatly among different intragenic and intergenic regions: 5'UTRs > CDSs > 3'UTRs > TEs > introns > intergenic regions, and high GC-content was frequently distributed in exon-rich regions. Our results also showed that in the same intragenic and intergenic regions, the distribution of GC-contents were great similarity in the different primates. Tri- and hexanucleotide P-SSRs had the most GC-contents in the 5'UTRs and CDSs, whereas mononucleotide P-SSRs had the least GC-contents in the six genomic regions of these primates. The most frequent motifs for different length varied obviously with the different genomic regions.

  12. Distinct patterns of simple sequence repeats and GC distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of primate genomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wu-Jiao; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Li, Guang-Zhou; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Hu, Ting-Zhang; Li, Jing; Yue, Bi-Song

    2016-01-01

    As the first systematic examination of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and guanine-cytosine (GC) distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of ten primates, our study showed that SSRs and GC displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation. Our results suggest that the majority of SSRs are distributed in non-coding regions, such as the introns, TEs, and intergenic regions. In these primates, trinucleotide perfect (P) SSRs were the most abundant repeats type in the 5′UTRs and CDSs, whereas, mononucleotide P-SSRs were the most in the intron, 3′UTRs, TEs, and intergenic regions. The GC-contents varied greatly among different intragenic and intergenic regions: 5′UTRs > CDSs > 3′UTRs > TEs > introns > intergenic regions, and high GC-content was frequently distributed in exon-rich regions. Our results also showed that in the same intragenic and intergenic regions, the distribution of GC-contents were great similarity in the different primates. Tri- and hexanucleotide P-SSRs had the most GC-contents in the 5′UTRs and CDSs, whereas mononucleotide P-SSRs had the least GC-contents in the six genomic regions of these primates. The most frequent motifs for different length varied obviously with the different genomic regions. PMID:27644032

  13. Perceptual Repetition Blindness Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochhaus, Larry; Johnston, James C.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The phenomenon of repetition blindness (RB) may reveal a new limitation on human perceptual processing. Recently, however, researchers have attributed RB to post-perceptual processes such as memory retrieval and/or reporting biases. The standard rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm used in most RB studies is, indeed, open to such objections. Here we investigate RB using a "single-frame" paradigm introduced by Johnston and Hale (1984) in which memory demands are minimal. Subjects made only a single judgement about whether one masked target word was the same or different than a post-target probe. Confidence ratings permitted use of signal detection methods to assess sensitivity and bias effects. In the critical condition for RB a precue of the post-target word was provided prior to the target stimulus (identity precue), so that the required judgement amounted to whether the target did or did not repeat the precue word. In control treatments, the precue was either an unrelated word or a dummy.

  14. Orthographic repetition blindness.

    PubMed

    Harris, C L; Morris, A L

    2000-11-01

    Repetition blindness (RB) is the failure to report the second occurrence of a repeated word, when words are sequentially and briefly displayed (Kanwisher, 1987). RB is also observed for non-identical words, such as home, dome. Explanations for non-identity RB assume that similarity at the level of the whole word causes the second word to be suppressed ("similarity inhibition"). Three experiments demonstrate that RB is robust for diverse types of orthographic relatedness, including critical words that share only their first initial letter, their last two letters, first three letters, middle three letters, beginning and final letters, three alternating letters, and three non-aligned letters (as in chance hand). The theoretical construct of similarity inhibition may be able to account for these data, although one mechanism previously proposed in the literature, neighbourhood inhibition, is probably not a useful way to explain the data on RB for words sharing only one or two letters. We introduce an alternative explanation for orthographic RB: Only the repeated letters are suppressed, and amount of RB depends on how easily the perceiver can reconstruct the target word from the non-suppressed letters.

  15. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, P S; Taylor, W J

    2004-08-01

    Pain in the forearm is relatively common in the community. In the workplace forearm pain is associated with work involving frequent repetition, high forces, and prolonged abnormal postures. Nevertheless, other factors are involved in the presentation and the continuation of the pain. Notable among these factors are psychosocial issues and the workplace environment-the attitude to workers and their welfare, the physical conditions, and design of the job. Primary prevention may be effective but active surveillance is important with early intervention and an active management approach. Physical treatments have not been extensively evaluated. In the established case, management should be multidisciplinary, addressing physical aspects of the job but also addressing the "yellow, blue, and black flags" which should be viewed as obstacles to recovery. For the worker "on sick" a dialogue should be established between the worker, the primary care physician, and the workplace. Return to work should be encouraged and facilitated by medical interventions and light duty options. Rehabilitation programmes may be of use in chronic cases.

  16. Perceptual repetition blindness effects.

    PubMed

    Hochhaus, L; Johnston, J C

    1996-04-01

    Repetition blindness (RB) may reveal a new limitation on human perceptual processing. Recently, however, researchers have attributed RB to postperceptual processes. The standard rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm used in most RB studies is open to such objections. The "single-frame" paradigm introduced by J. C. Johnston and B. L. Hale (1984) allowed investigation of RB with minimal memory demands. Participants made a judgment about whether 1 masked target word was the same or different than a posttarget probe. Confidence ratings permitted use of signal detection methods. In the critical condition for RB, a precue of the posttarget word was provided prior to the target stimulus so that the required judgment amounted to whether the target did or did not repeat the precue word. In control treatments, the precue was an unrelated word or a dummy. Results showed that perceptual sensitivity was significantly reduced in the RB condition relative to baseline control conditions. The data showed that RB can be obtained under conditions in which memory problems are minimal and perceptual sensitivity is assessed independently of biases. RB therefore can be a perceptual phenomenon.

  17. Neural Basis of Repetition Priming during Mathematical Cognition: Repetition Suppression or Repetition Enhancement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salimpoor, Valorie N.; Chang, Catie; Menon, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the neural basis of repetition priming (RP) during mathematical cognition. Previous studies of RP have focused on repetition suppression as the basis of behavioral facilitation, primarily using word and object identification and classification tasks. More recently, researchers have suggested associative stimulus-response learning…

  18. Neural Basis of Repetition Priming during Mathematical Cognition: Repetition Suppression or Repetition Enhancement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salimpoor, Valorie N.; Chang, Catie; Menon, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the neural basis of repetition priming (RP) during mathematical cognition. Previous studies of RP have focused on repetition suppression as the basis of behavioral facilitation, primarily using word and object identification and classification tasks. More recently, researchers have suggested associative stimulus-response learning…

  19. Pervasive generation of oppositely oriented spacers during CRISPR adaptation.

    PubMed

    Shmakov, Sergey; Savitskaya, Ekaterina; Semenova, Ekaterina; Logacheva, Maria D; Datsenko, Kirill A; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-05-01

    During the process of prokaryotic CRISPR adaptation, a copy of a segment of foreign deoxyribonucleic acid referred to as protospacer is added to the CRISPR cassette and becomes a spacer. When a protospacer contains a neighboring target interference motif, the specific small CRISPR ribonucleic acid (crRNA) transcribed from expanded CRISPR cassette can protect a prokaryotic cell from virus infection or plasmid transformation and conjugation. We show that in Escherichia coli, a vast majority of plasmid protospacers generate spacers integrated in CRISPR cassette in two opposing orientations, leading to frequent appearance of complementary spacer pairs in a population of cells that underwent CRISPR adaptation. When a protospacer contains a spacer acquisition motif AAG, spacer orientation that generates functional protective crRNA is strongly preferred. All other protospacers give rise to spacers oriented in both ways at comparable frequencies. This phenomenon increases the repertoire of available spacers and should make it more likely that a protective crRNA is formed as a result of CRISPR adaptation.

  20. Advanced hole patterning technology using soft spacer materials (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Keun; Hustad, Phillip D.; Aqad, Emad; Valeri, David; Wagner, Mike D.; Li, Mingqi

    2017-03-01

    A continuing goal in integrated circuit industry is to increase density of features within patterned masks. One pathway being used by the device manufacturers for patterning beyond the 80nm pitch limitation of 193 immersion lithography is the self-aligned spacer double patterning (SADP). Two orthogonal line space patterns with subsequent SADP can be used for contact holes multiplication. However, a combination of two immersion exposures, two spacer deposition processes, and two etch processes to reach the desired dimensions makes this process expensive and complicated. One alternative technique for contact hole multiplication is the use of an array of pillar patterns. Pillars, imaged with 193 immersion photolithography, can be uniformly deposited with spacer materials until a hole is formed in the center of 4 pillars. Selective removal of the pillar core gives a reversal of phases, a contact hole where there was once a pillar. However, the highly conformal nature of conventional spacer materials causes a problem with this application. The new holes, formed between 4 pillars, by this method have a tendency to be imperfect and not circular. To improve the contact hole circularity, this paper presents the use of both conventional spacer material and soft spacer materials. Application of soft spacer materials can be achieved by an existing coating track without additional cost burden to the device manufacturers.

  1. Preclinical Evaluation of Bioabsorbable Polyglycolic Acid Spacer for Particle Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Mukumoto, Naritoshi; Sulaiman, Nor Shazrina Binti; Nagata, Masaaki; Yamada, Shigeru; Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Fukumoto, Takumi

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a polyglycolic acid (PGA) spacer through physical and animal experiments. Methods and Materials: The spacer was produced with surgical suture material made of PGA, forming a 3-dimensional nonwoven fabric. For evaluation or physical experiments, 150-MeV proton or 320-MeV carbon-ion beams were used to generate 60-mm width of spread-out Bragg peak. For animal experiments, the abdomens of C57BL/6 mice, with or without the inserted PGA spacers, were irradiated with 20 Gy of carbon-ion beam (290 MeV) using the spread-out Bragg peak. Body weight changes over time were scored, and radiation damage to the intestine was investigated using hematoxylin and eosin stain. Blood samples were also evaluated 24 days after the irradiation. Long-term thickness retention and safety were evaluated using crab-eating macaques. Results: No chemical or structural changes after 100 Gy of proton or carbon-ion irradiation were observed in the PGA spacer. Water equivalency of the PGA spacer was equal to the water thickness under wet condition. During 24 days' observation after 20 Gy of carbon-ion irradiation, the body weights of mice with the PGA spacer were relatively unchanged, whereas significant weight loss was observed in those mice without the PGA spacer (P<.05). In mice with the PGA spacer, villus and crypt structure were preserved after irradiation. No inflammatory reactions or liver or renal dysfunctions due to placement of the PGA spacer were observed. In the abdomen of crab-eating macaques, thickness of the PGA spacer was maintained 8 weeks after placement. Conclusions: The absorbable PGA spacer had water-equivalent, bio-compatible, and thickness-retaining properties. Although further evaluation is warranted in a clinical setting, the PGA spacer may be effective to stop proton or carbon-ion beams and to separate normal tissues from the radiation field.

  2. Inhaler spacer devices to treat asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Watson, Paul

    Drawing on literature searches and professional experience, this article discusses the treatment of asthma with pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). It demonstrates the need for pMDIs, and presents the health and cost benefits of using a pMDI through a spacer device. Through the review and evaluation of studies, it demonstrates the importance of correct asthma management and the use of spacers. Although there are many types of spacer, and patients often have less than optimal technique, there is evidence to support the overall benefits of use against non-use.

  3. Conserved intergenic sequences revealed by CTAG-profiling in Salmonella: thermodynamic modeling for function prediction

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Le; Zhu, Songling; Mastriani, Emilio; Fang, Xin; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Li, Yong-Guo; Johnston, Randal N.; Guo, Zheng; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Highly conserved short sequences help identify functional genomic regions and facilitate genomic annotation. We used Salmonella as the model to search the genome for evolutionarily conserved regions and focused on the tetranucleotide sequence CTAG for its potentially important functions. In Salmonella, CTAG is highly conserved across the lineages and large numbers of CTAG-containing short sequences fall in intergenic regions, strongly indicating their biological importance. Computer modeling demonstrated stable stem-loop structures in some of the CTAG-containing intergenic regions, and substitution of a nucleotide of the CTAG sequence would radically rearrange the free energy and disrupt the structure. The postulated degeneration of CTAG takes distinct patterns among Salmonella lineages and provides novel information about genomic divergence and evolution of these bacterial pathogens. Comparison of the vertically and horizontally transmitted genomic segments showed different CTAG distribution landscapes, with the genome amelioration process to remove CTAG taking place inward from both terminals of the horizontally acquired segment. PMID:28262684

  4. Conserved intergenic sequences revealed by CTAG-profiling in Salmonella: thermodynamic modeling for function prediction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Le; Zhu, Songling; Mastriani, Emilio; Fang, Xin; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Li, Yong-Guo; Johnston, Randal N; Guo, Zheng; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-03-06

    Highly conserved short sequences help identify functional genomic regions and facilitate genomic annotation. We used Salmonella as the model to search the genome for evolutionarily conserved regions and focused on the tetranucleotide sequence CTAG for its potentially important functions. In Salmonella, CTAG is highly conserved across the lineages and large numbers of CTAG-containing short sequences fall in intergenic regions, strongly indicating their biological importance. Computer modeling demonstrated stable stem-loop structures in some of the CTAG-containing intergenic regions, and substitution of a nucleotide of the CTAG sequence would radically rearrange the free energy and disrupt the structure. The postulated degeneration of CTAG takes distinct patterns among Salmonella lineages and provides novel information about genomic divergence and evolution of these bacterial pathogens. Comparison of the vertically and horizontally transmitted genomic segments showed different CTAG distribution landscapes, with the genome amelioration process to remove CTAG taking place inward from both terminals of the horizontally acquired segment.

  5. Trypanosoma brucei: Enrichment by UV of intergenic transcripts from the variable surface glycoprotein gene expression site

    SciTech Connect

    Coquelet, H.; Tebabi, P.; Pays, A.; Steinert, M.; Pays, E. )

    1989-09-01

    The expression site for the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene AnTat 1.3A of Trypanosoma brucei is 45 kilobases long and encompasses seven expression site-associated genes (ESAGs). After UV irradiation, several large transcripts from the putative promoter region were strongly enriched. We report that one such major transcript starts near the poly(A) addition site of the first gene (ESAG 7), spans the intergenic region, and extends to the poly(A) addition site of the second gene (ESAG 6), thus bypassing the normal 3' splice site of the ESAG 6 mRNA. Since this transcript is spliced, we conclude that UV irradiation does not inhibit splicing but stabilizes unstable processing products. This demonstrates that at least some intergenic regions of the VSG gene expression site are continuously transcribed in accordance with a polycistronic transcription model.

  6. Conserved intergenic sequences revealed by CTAG-profiling in Salmonella: thermodynamic modeling for function prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Le; Zhu, Songling; Mastriani, Emilio; Fang, Xin; Zhou, Yu-Jie; Li, Yong-Guo; Johnston, Randal N.; Guo, Zheng; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-03-01

    Highly conserved short sequences help identify functional genomic regions and facilitate genomic annotation. We used Salmonella as the model to search the genome for evolutionarily conserved regions and focused on the tetranucleotide sequence CTAG for its potentially important functions. In Salmonella, CTAG is highly conserved across the lineages and large numbers of CTAG-containing short sequences fall in intergenic regions, strongly indicating their biological importance. Computer modeling demonstrated stable stem-loop structures in some of the CTAG-containing intergenic regions, and substitution of a nucleotide of the CTAG sequence would radically rearrange the free energy and disrupt the structure. The postulated degeneration of CTAG takes distinct patterns among Salmonella lineages and provides novel information about genomic divergence and evolution of these bacterial pathogens. Comparison of the vertically and horizontally transmitted genomic segments showed different CTAG distribution landscapes, with the genome amelioration process to remove CTAG taking place inward from both terminals of the horizontally acquired segment.

  7. [Repetitive monomorphic ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Maia, I G; Cruz Filho, F; Costa, A M; Boghossian, S H; Fagundes, M; Ribeiro, J C; Sá, R; Alves, P A

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate retrospectively clinical features of repetitive monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (RMVT). Files of 11 patients with RMVT were analyzed (9 females, mean-age 37 +/- 17 years). All patients were submitted to clinical evaluation, ECG, Holter monitoring stress test, high-resolution ECG and echocardiogram; they were treated with antiarrhythmic drugs. Patients were in NYHA class I or II, 9 asymptomatics and 2 with palpitations. The ECG was normal in all of them. Cardiac memory was observed in 3. A left bundle branch block with inferior axis deviation in the frontal plane was present during RMVT in all patients (right ventricular outflow tract focus). Holter monitoring revealed mean of 12031 +/- 8345 isolated PVC/24h; 2892 +/- 234 ventricular couplets/24h and 1367 +/- 890 VTs/24h (mainly nonsustained). In 6 patients RMVT was suppressed during maximal exercise treadmill. High-resolution ECG was negative in all group. Five patients had a normal echocardiogram while 5 showed mitral valve prolapse. One patient developed tachycardiomyopathy. The arrhythmia was controlled with 320mg of oral sotalol in 3 of 4 that used this drug and with 120mg oral propranolol in one of 6 that used this drug. Drug resistance was present in the others. The mean follow-up period was 38 +/- 16 months. The results demonstrate that RMVT is a benign form of VT with no detectable anatomic substract by the currently used methods. It is probably induced by nonreentrant mechanism and frequently drug resistance is observed. Among the antiarrhythmic drugs commonly used, sotalol showed to be the most effective.

  8. [Repetitive work and psychosomatic complaints].

    PubMed

    Liebrich, J; Geiger, L; Rupp, M

    1978-08-01

    200 workers of the Swiss watch industry were examined in an interdisciplinary study on the effect of repetitive work on the wellbeing of the worker. Women doing repetitive work with little autonomy complained more often about psychosomatic problems than the male workers doing non-repetitive work. This difference is interpreted as a difference of sexe rather than one of the work situation. However, there is a significant difference in the complaint about nervosity between women being paid monthly and women who were paid by piece or by hour with a premium.

  9. [Analysis of the sequences of internal transcribed spacers ITS1, ITS2 and the 5.8S ribosomal gene of species of the Amaranthus genus].

    PubMed

    Slugina, M A; Torres Minho, K; Filiushin, M A

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the sequence ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 in 11 samples of the amaranth species (Amaranthus caudatus, A. cruentus, A. hybridus, A. tricolor, A. paniculatus, A. hypohondriacus) was performed. It has been shown that the variability of the sequences of the intergenic spacers ITS1, ITS2 and 5.8S rRNA gene of the amaranth species analyzed is extremely low. A possible secondary structure of the 5.8S rRNA molecule was determined for the first time; three conservative motifs were identified. A single nucleotide substitution found in A. hybridus did not change the loop topology. In the sample of Celosia cristata taken as an external group, a four-nucleotide insertion in the 5'-end of the gene and a one-nucleotide deletion in the fourth hairpin not affecting the general topology of the 5.8S rRNA molecule were found.

  10. Emotional response to musical repetition.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Steven R; Palmer, Caroline; Schubert, Emery

    2012-06-01

    Two experiments examined the effects of repetition on listeners' emotional response to music. Listeners heard recordings of orchestral music that contained a large section repeated twice. The music had a symmetric phrase structure (same-length phrases) in Experiment 1 and an asymmetric phrase structure (different-length phrases) in Experiment 2, hypothesized to alter the predictability of sensitivity to musical repetition. Continuous measures of arousal and valence were compared across music that contained identical repetition, variation (related), or contrasting (unrelated) structure. Listeners' emotional arousal ratings differed most for contrasting music, moderately for variations, and least for repeating musical segments. A computational model for the detection of repeated musical segments was applied to the listeners' emotional responses. The model detected the locations of phrase boundaries from the emotional responses better than from performed tempo or physical intensity in both experiments. These findings indicate the importance of repetition in listeners' emotional response to music and in the perceptual segmentation of musical structure.

  11. Repetitively pumped electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, L.G.

    1979-07-24

    Disclosed is an apparatus for producing fast, repetitive pulses of controllable length of an electron beam by phased energy storage in a transmission line of length matched to the number of pulses and specific pulse lengths desired. 12 figs.

  12. Paucity of moderately repetitive sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    We examined clones of renatured repetitive human DNA to find novel repetitive DNAs. After eliminating known repeats, the remaining clones were subjected to sequence analysis. These clones also corresponded to known repeats, but with greater sequence diversity. This indicates that either these libraries were depleted of short interspersed repeats in construction, or these repeats are much less prevalent in the human genome than is indicated by data from {und Xenopus} or sea urchin studies. We directly investigated the sequence composition of human DNA through traditional renaturation techniques with the goal of estimating the limits of abundance of repetitive sequence classes in human DNA. Our results sharply limit the maximum possible abundance to 1--2% of the human genome. Our estimate, minus the known repeats in this fraction, leaves about 1% (3 {times} 10{sup 7} nucleotides) of the human genome for novel repetitive elements. 2 refs. (MHB)

  13. 14. TYPICAL WORK DECK SHOWING RING SPACERS, CABLE DRUMS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. TYPICAL WORK DECK SHOWING RING SPACERS, CABLE DRUMS AND OTHER SPECIALIZED HARDWARE; VIEW TO SOUTH. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28416, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  14. Technique for adapting a spacer for a custom impression tray.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harsimran; Nanda, Aditi; Verma, Mahesh; Koli, Dheeraj

    2016-12-01

    A method of adapting a spacer for the custom trays used to make a definite impression for complete dentures is presented. The technique can be used under a variety of conditions and offers several advantages.

  15. A Perceptual Repetition Blindness Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochhaus, Larry; Johnston, James C.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Before concluding Repetition Blindness is a perceptual phenomenon, alternative explanations based on memory retrieval problems and report bias must be rejected. Memory problems were minimized by requiring a judgment about only a single briefly displayed field. Bias and sensitivity effects were empirically measured with an ROC-curve analysis method based on confidence ratings. Results from five experiments support the hypothesis that Repetition Blindness can be a perceptual phenomenon.

  16. Improvement of pressurised aerosol deposition with Nebuhaler spacer device.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S P; Millar, A B; Lennard-Jones, T R; Morén, F; Clarke, S W

    1984-01-01

    The effect on aerosol deposition from a pressurised metered dose inhaler of a 750 cm3 spacer device with a one way inhalation valve (Nebuhaler, Astra Pharmaceuticals) was assessed by means of an in vivo radiotracer technique. Nine patients with obstructive lung disease took part in the study. The pattern of deposition associated with use of a metered dose inhaler alone was compared with that achieved with the spacer used both for inhalation of single puffs of aerosol and for inhalation of four puffs actuated in rapid succession and then inhaled simultaneously. On each occasion there was a delay of 1 s between aerosol release and inhalation, simulating poor inhaler technique. With the metered dose inhaler alone, a mean (SEM) 8.7 (1.8)% of the dose reached the lungs and 80.9 (1.9)% was deposited in the oropharynx. With single puffs from the spacer 20.9 (1.6)% of the dose (p less than 0.01) reached the lungs, only 16.5 (2.3)% (p less than 0.01) was deposited in the oropharynx, and 55.8 (3.1)% was retained within the spacer itself. With four puffs from the spacer 15.2 (1.5)% reached the lungs (p = 0.02 compared with the metered dose inhaler alone, p less than 0.01 compared with single puffs from the spacer), 11.4 (1.2)% was deposited in the oropharynx, and 67.5 (1.8)% in the device itself. It is concluded that the spacer device gives lung deposition of metered dose aerosols comparable to or greater than a correctly used inhaler and oropharyngeal deposition is greatly reduced. The spacer should be used preferably for the inhalation of single puffs of aerosol but may also be used for the inhalation of up to four puffs actuated in rapid succession and then inhaled simultaneously. Images PMID:6440305

  17. Bioinformatics analyses of Shigella CRISPR structure and spacer classification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, Bing; Duan, Guangcai; Wang, Yingfang; Hong, Lijuan; Wang, Linlin; Guo, Xiangjiao; Xi, Yuanlin; Yang, Haiyan

    2016-03-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are inheritable genetic elements of a variety of archaea and bacteria and indicative of the bacterial ecological adaptation, conferring acquired immunity against invading foreign nucleic acids. Shigella is an important pathogen for anthroponosis. This study aimed to analyze the features of Shigella CRISPR structure and classify the spacers through bioinformatics approach. Among 107 Shigella, 434 CRISPR structure loci were identified with two to seven loci in different strains. CRISPR-Q1, CRISPR-Q4 and CRISPR-Q5 were widely distributed in Shigella strains. Comparison of the first and last repeats of CRISPR1, CRISPR2 and CRISPR3 revealed several base variants and different stem-loop structures. A total of 259 cas genes were found among these 107 Shigella strains. The cas gene deletions were discovered in 88 strains. However, there is one strain that does not contain cas gene. Intact clusters of cas genes were found in 19 strains. From comprehensive analysis of sequence signature and BLAST and CRISPRTarget score, the 708 spacers were classified into three subtypes: Type I, Type II and Type III. Of them, Type I spacer referred to those linked with one gene segment, Type II spacer linked with two or more different gene segments, and Type III spacer undefined. This study examined the diversity of CRISPR/cas system in Shigella strains, demonstrated the main features of CRISPR structure and spacer classification, which provided critical information for elucidation of the mechanisms of spacer formation and exploration of the role the spacers play in the function of the CRISPR/cas system.

  18. Nuclear reactor spacer grid and ductless core component

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a nuclear reactor spacer grid member for use in a liquid cooled nuclear reactor and to a ductless core component employing a plurality of these spacer grid members. The spacer grid member is of the egg-shell type and is constructed so that the walls of the cell members of the grid member are formed of a single thickness of metal to avoid tolerance problems. Within each cell member is a hydraulic spring which laterally constrains the nuclear material bearing rod which passes through each cell member against a hardstop in response to coolant flow through the cell member. This hydraulic spring is also suitable for use in a water cooled nuclear reactor. A core component constructed of, among other components, a plurality of these spacer grid members, avoids the use of a full length duct by providing spacer sleeves about the sodium tubes passing through the spacer grid members at locations between the grid members, thereby maintaining a predetermined space between adjacent grid members.

  19. The evolution of spacers and valved holding chambers.

    PubMed

    Nikander, Kurt; Nicholls, Clare; Denyer, John; Pritchard, John

    2014-08-01

    Spacers and valved holding chambers (VHCs) are pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI) accessory devices, designed to overcome problems that patients commonly experience when administering aerosol via a pMDI. Spacers were developed in direct response to patient-related issues with pMDI technique, particularly, poor coordination between actuation and inhalation, and local side-effects arising from oropharyngeal deposition. Current clinical guidelines indicate the need for widespread prescription and use of spacers, but, despite their apparent ubiquity, the devices themselves are, unfortunately, all too commonly "disused" by patients. An understanding of the background from which spacers developed, and the key factors influencing the optimization of the spacer and the later VHC, is crucial to developing an appreciation of the potential of these devices, both contemporary and future, for improving the delivery of pressurized aerosols to patients. This review, informed by a full patent search and an extensive scientific literature review, takes into account the clinical and laboratory evidence, commercial developments, and the sometimes serendipitous details of scientific anecdotes to form a comprehensive perspective on the evolution of spacers, from their origins, in the early days of the pMDI, up to the present day.

  20. Sidewall spacer optimization for steep switching junctionless transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manish; Kranti, Abhinav

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we analyze the impact of a high permittivity (high-κ) sidewall spacer and gate dielectric on the occurrence of sub-60 mV/decade subthreshold swing (S-swing) in symmetrical junctionless (JL) double gate (DG) transistors. It is shown that steep S-swing values (≤10 mV/decade) can be achieved in JL devices with a combination of a high permittivity (high-κ) gate dielectric and a narrow low permittivity (low-κ) sidewall spacer. Implementation of a wider high-κ spacer will diminish the degree of impact ionization by the influence of the fringing component of the gate electric field, and will not be useful for steep off-to-on current transition. A wider spacer with low-κ and a narrow spacer with high-κ permittivity will be useful to limit the latching effect that can occur at lower temperatures (250 K). For high temperature operation, the decrease in the impact ionization rate can be compensated by designing a JL transistor with a thicker silicon film. The work demonstrates opportunities to enhance impact ionization at sub bandgap voltages, and proposes optimal guidelines for selecting a sidewall spacer to facilitate steep switching in JL transistors.

  1. Novel spacer device does not improve adherence in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Burgess, S W; Sly, P D; Cooper, D M; Devadason, S G

    2007-08-01

    The Funhaler (FH) is a novel spacer device (holding chamber) that has been designed to improve adherence and aerosol delivery in young asthmatic children using a metered dose inhaler. A pilot study reported a 38% increase in parent-reported adherence over 2 weeks compared with the child's normal spacer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the FH would be associated with superior adherence in the medium term (3 months) using an objective assessment. Forty-seven children aged 18 months to 7 years were randomised to a FH or control small volume spacer. Participants were reviewed monthly for 3 months. Adherence was measured using an electronic monitoring device (Smartinhaler). Disease control was based on symptom scores and exacerbation rates. Twenty-six children were randomised to the FH and 21 to the control spacer. Three children withdrew (FH = 2). Median adherence each month for the 3 months was 74%, 54%, and 46% for the FH and 70%, 73%, and 54% for the control spacer. The difference in adherence was not statistically significant (P = 0.47, 0.37, and 0.23, respectively). There was also no significant difference in exacerbation rates or symptom scores. Seven of the FHs broke during the study. The FH was preferred by 21/24 parents randomised to the FH compared with their child's normal spacer. Despite the FH being popular with children and parents its use was not associated with improved adherence or disease control. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Multilocus spacer analysis revealed highly homogeneous genetic background of Asian type of Borrelia miyamotoi.

    PubMed

    Mukhacheva, Tatyana A; Salikhova, Irina I; Kovalev, Sergey Y

    2015-04-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi, a member of the relapsing fever group borreliae, was first isolated in Japan and subsequently found in Ixodes ticks in North America, Europe and Russia. Currently, there are three types of B. miyamotoi: Asian or Siberian (transmitted mainly by Ixodes persulcatus), European (Ixodesricinus) and American (Ixodesscapularis and Ixodespacificus). Despite the great genetic distances between B. miyamotoi types, isolates within a type are characterised by an extremely low genetic variability. In particular, strains of B. miyamotoi of Asian type, isolated in Russia from the Baltic sea to the Far East, have been shown to be identical based on the analysis of several conventional genetic markers, such as 16S rRNA, flagellin, outer membrane protein p66 and glpQ genes. Thus, protein or rRNA - coding genes were shown not to be informative enough in studying genetic diversity of B. miyamotoi within a type. In the present paper, we have attempted to design a new multilocus technique based on eight non-coding intergenic spacers (3686bp in total) and have applied it to the analysis of intra-type genetic variability of В. miyamotoi detected in different regions of Russia and from two tick species, I. persulcatus and Ixodespavlovskyi. However, even though potentially the most variable loci were selected, no genetic variability between studied DNA samples was found, except for one nucleotide substitution in two of them. The sequences obtained were identical to those of the reference strain FR64b. Analysis of the data obtained with the GenBank sequences indicates a highly homogeneous genetic background of B. miyamotoi from the Baltic Sea to the Japanese Islands. In this paper, a hypothesis of clonal expansion of B. miyamotoi is discussed, as well as possible mechanisms for the rapid dissemination of one B. miyamotoi clone over large distances.

  3. Chronic occupational repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, B A; Forsythe, M E; Stanish, W D

    2001-02-01

    To review common repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) that occur in the workplace, emphasizing diagnosis, treatment, and etiology of these conditions. A MEDLINE search from January 1966 to June 1999 focused on articles published since 1990 because RSIs are relatively new diagnoses. MeSH headings that were explored using the thesaurus included "cumulative trauma disorder," "overuse injury," and "repetitive strain injury." The search was limited to English articles only, and preference was given to randomized controlled trials. Repetitive strain injuries result from repeated stress to the body's soft tissue structures including muscles, tendons, and nerves. They often occur in patients who perform repetitive movements either in their jobs or in extracurricular activities. Common RSIs include tendon-related disorders, such as rotator cuff tendonitis, and peripheral nerve entrapment disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. A careful history and physical examination often lead to the diagnosis, but newer imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, can help in refractory cases. Conservative management with medication, physiotherapy, or bracing is the mainstay of treatment. Surgery is reserved for cases that do not respond to treatment. Repetitive strain injury is common; primary care physicians must establish a diagnosis and, more importantly, its relationship to occupation. Treatment can be offered by family physicians who refer to specialists for cases refractory to conservative management.

  4. Chronic occupational repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, B. A.; Forsythe, M. E.; Stanish, W. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review common repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) that occur in the workplace, emphasizing diagnosis, treatment, and etiology of these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from January 1966 to June 1999 focused on articles published since 1990 because RSIs are relatively new diagnoses. MeSH headings that were explored using the thesaurus included "cumulative trauma disorder," "overuse injury," and "repetitive strain injury." The search was limited to English articles only, and preference was given to randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Repetitive strain injuries result from repeated stress to the body's soft tissue structures including muscles, tendons, and nerves. They often occur in patients who perform repetitive movements either in their jobs or in extracurricular activities. Common RSIs include tendon-related disorders, such as rotator cuff tendonitis, and peripheral nerve entrapment disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. A careful history and physical examination often lead to the diagnosis, but newer imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, can help in refractory cases. Conservative management with medication, physiotherapy, or bracing is the mainstay of treatment. Surgery is reserved for cases that do not respond to treatment. CONCLUSION: Repetitive strain injury is common; primary care physicians must establish a diagnosis and, more importantly, its relationship to occupation. Treatment can be offered by family physicians who refer to specialists for cases refractory to conservative management. PMID:11228032

  5. Perforation of the sigmoid colon due to intradiscal spacer dislocation.

    PubMed

    Ruf, Michael; Voigt, Andreas; Kupczyk-Joeris, Dieter; Merk, Harry R

    2011-07-01

    A case of late dislocation of a disc spacer L5/S1 with perforation of the sigmoid colon and transanal passage 4 years after implantation is reported. The objective is to describe an uncommon complication of anterior endoscopic spondylodesis L5/S1. To our knowledge, this is the first report on this rare complication. A 39-year-old patient suffering from a spondylolisthesis L5/S1 (Meyerding grade 2) with bilateral lysis L5 was operated with posterior instrumentation L5/S1 and anterior endoscopic insertion of two disc spacers. 4 years after surgery the patient noticed one of the spacers in the toilet. Radiographic examination of the colon with contrast dye revealed a perforation at the distal sigmoid colon. At the lumbosacral junction there was a bony defect at the site of the absent spacer and an anterior dislocation of the second spacer. A partial resection of the colon at the perforation site with end-to-end anastomosis was performed. The second spacer was removed, and the defect was packed with autologous cancellous bone and local antibiotics. The further course was uneventful. 2 weeks postoperatively the patient was discharged without signs of infection. The radiographic examination after 6 months showed healing of the bone graft with bony fusion L5/S1. In case of incomplete or absent bony fusion the dislocation of intradiscal spacers may arise even years after the primary surgery. In consequence periodical radiographic examinations of spinal instrumentations are recommended until complete bony fusion occurred. Unclear abdominal symptoms following anterior spine surgery require immediate examination.

  6. Reducing electrostatic charge on spacer devices and bronchodilator response

    PubMed Central

    Wildhaber, Johannes H; Waterer, Grant W; Hall, Graham L; Summers, Quentin A

    2000-01-01

    Aims Plastic spacers are widely used with pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDI). Reducing electrostatic charge by washing spacers with detergent has been shown to greatly improve in vitro and in vivo drug delivery. We assessed whether this finding is associated with an improved bronchodilator response in adult asthmatics. Methods Twenty subjects (age 18–65 years) with a known bronchodilator response inhaled in random order salbutamol from a pMDI (Ventolin®) through an untreated new spacer (Volumatic®) and through a detergent washed spacer. Patients received the following doses of salbutamol via pMDI at 20 min intervals: 100 µg, 100 µg, 200 µg, 400 µg, 800 µg. Spirometry, heart rate and blood pressure were checked prior to each dose and 20 min after the last dose. Results There were no differences between baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) using either spacer (2.61 ± 0.56 and 2.52 ± 0.45 l, untreated and treated with detergent, respectively; mean ±s.d.). The provocation dose required to cause a clinically significant improvement of 10% in FEV1 (PD10) was significantly lower when the detergent treated spacer was used (1505 ± 1335 and 430 ± 732 µg, untreated and treated, respectively, P < 0.002). Conclusions We have demonstrated an improvement in bronchodilator response, in adult asthmatics, after reducing the electrostatic charge in a spacer device by washing it with ordinary household detergent. This finding stresses the importance of an optimal choice of delivery device for asthma medication. PMID:10971314

  7. Between memory and destiny: repetition.

    PubMed

    Marucco, Norberto Carlos

    2007-04-01

    This essay focuses mainly on the topic of repetition (agieren)-on its metapsychological, clinical, and technical conceptions. It contains a core problem, that is, the question of the represented, the nonrepresented, and the unrepresentable in the psyche. This problem, in turn, brings to light the dialectical relation between drive and object and its specific articulation with the traumatic. The author attributes special significance to its clinical expression as 'destiny.' He points out a shift in the theory of the cure from recollection and the unveiling of unconscious desire, to the possibility of understanding 'pure' repetition, which would constitute the very essence of the drive. The author highlights three types of repetition, namely, 'representative' (oedipal) repetition, the repetition of the 'nonrepresented' (narcissistic), which may gain representation, and that of the 'unrepresentable' (sensory impressions, 'lived experiences from primal times,' 'prelinguistic signifiers,' 'ungovernable mnemic traces'). The concept-the metaphor-drive embryo brings the author close to the question of the archaic in psychoanalysis, where the repetition in the act would express itself. 'Another unconscious' would zealously conceal the entombed (verschüttet) that we are not yet able to describe-the 'innermost' rather than the 'buried' (untergegangen) or the 'annihilated' (zugrunde gegangen)-through a mechanism whose way of expression is repetition in the act. With 'Constructions in analysis' as its starting point, this paper suggests a different technical implementation from that of the Freudian construction; its main material is what emerges in the present of the transference as the repetition of 'something' lacking as history. The memory of the analytic process offers a historical diachrony whereby a temporality freed from repetition and utterly unique might unfold in the analysis. This diachrony would no longer be the historical reconstruction of material truth, but the

  8. Intergenic GWAS SNPs are key components of the spatial and regulatory network for human growth.

    PubMed

    Schierding, William; Antony, Jisha; Cutfield, Wayne S; Horsfield, Julia A; O'Sullivan, Justin M

    2016-08-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies has resulted in the identification of hundreds of genetic variants associated with growth and stature. Determining how these genetic variants influence growth is important, but most are non-coding, and there is little understanding of how these variants contribute to adult height. To determine the mechanisms by which human variation contributes to growth, we combined spatial genomic connectivity (high-throughput conformation capture) with functional (gene expression, expression Quantitative Trait Loci) data to determine how non-genic loci associated with infant length, pubertal and adult height and contribute to gene regulatory networks. This approach identified intergenic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ∼85 kb upstream of FBXW11 that spatially connect with distant loci. These regulatory connections are reinforced by evidence of SNP-enhancer effects and altered expression in genes influencing the action of human growth hormone. Functional assays provided evidence for enhancer activity of the intergenic region near FBXW11 that harbors SNP rs12153391, which is associated with an expression Quantitative Trait Loci. Our results suggest that variants in this locus have genome-wide effects as key modifiers of growth (both overgrowth and short stature) acting through a regulatory network. We believe that the genes and pathways connected with this regulatory network are potential targets that could be investigated for diagnostic, prenatal and carrier testing for growth disorders. Finally, the regulatory networks we generated illustrate the power of using existing datasets to interrogate the contribution of intergenic SNPs to common syndromes/diseases.

  9. Age-dependent differential expression profile of a novel intergenic long noncoding RNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2015-12-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are ≥ 200 nt long, abundant class of non-protein coding RNAs that are transcribed in complex, sense- and antisense patterns from the intergenic and intronic regions of mammalian genome. Mammalian central nervous system constitutes the largest repertoire of noncoding transcripts that are known to be expressed in developmentally regulated and cell-type specific manners. Although many lncRNAs, functioning in the brain development and diseases are known, none involved in brain aging has been reported so far. Here, we report involvement of a novel, repeat sequence (simple repeats and SINES)-containing, trans-spliced, long intergenic non-protein coding RNA (lincRNA), named as LINC-RBE (rat brain expressed transcript) involved in maturation and aging of mammalian brain. The LINC-RBE is strongly expressed in the rat brain and the upstream/downstream sequences of its DNA in the chromosome 5 contain binding sites for many cell growth, survival and development-specific transcriptional factors. Through RT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization, LINC-RBE was found to be expressed in an age-dependent manner with significantly higher level of expression in the brain of adult (16 week) compared to both immature (4 week) and old (70 week) rats. Moreover, the expression pattern of the LINC-RBE showed distinct association with the specific neuro-anatomical regions, cell types and sub-cellular compartments of the rat brain in an age-related manner. Thus, its expression increased from immature stage to adulthood and declined further in old age. This is a first-time report of involvement of an intergenic repeat sequence-containing lncRNA in different regions of the rat brain in an age-dependent manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional characterization of SNPs in CHRNA3/B4 intergenic region associated with drug behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Flora, Amber V; Zambrano, Cristian A; Gallego, Xavier; Miyamoto, Jill H; Johnson, Krista A; Cowan, Katelyn A; Stitzel, Jerry A; Ehringer, Marissa A

    2013-01-01

    The cluster of human neuronal nicotinic receptor genes (CHRNA5/A3/B4) (15q25.1) has been associated with a variety of smoking and drug-related behaviors, as well as risk for lung cancer. CHRNA3/B4 intergenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs1948 and rs8023462 have been associated with early initiation of alcohol and tobacco use, and rs6495309 has been associated with nicotine dependence and risk for lung cancer. An in vitro luciferase expression assay was used to determine whether these SNPs and surrounding sequences contribute to differences in gene expression using cell lines either expressing proteins characteristic of neuronal tissue or derived from lung cancers. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) were performed to investigate whether nuclear proteins from these cell lines bind SNP alleles differentially. Results from expression assays were dependent on cell culture type and haplotype. EMSAs indicated that rs8023462 and rs6495309 bind nuclear proteins in an allele-specific way. Additionally, GATA transcription factors appeared to bind rs8023462 only when the minor/risk allele was present. Much work has been done to describe the rat Chrnb4/a3 intergenic region, but few studies have examined the human intergenic region effects on expression; therefore, these studies greatly aid human genetic research as it relates to observed nicotine phenotypes, lung cancer risk and potential underlying genetic mechanisms. Data from these experiments support the hypothesis that SNPs associated with human addiction-related phenotypes and lung cancer risk can affect gene expression, and are potential therapeutic targets. Additionally, this is the first evidence that rs8023462 interacts with GATA transcription factors to influence gene expression. PMID:23872218

  11. Age-dependent differential expression profile of a novel intergenic long noncoding RNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2015-11-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are ≥200 nt long, abundant class of non-protein coding RNAs that are transcribed in complex, sense- and antisense patterns from the intergenic and intronic regions of mammalian genome. Mammalian central nervous system constitutes the largest repertoire of noncoding transcripts that are known to be expressed in developmentally regulated and cell-type specific manners. Although many lncRNAs, functioning in the brain development and diseases are known, none involved in brain aging has been reported so far. Here, we report involvement of a novel, repeat sequence (simple repeats and SINES)-containing, trans-spliced, long intergenic non-protein coding RNA (lincRNA), named as LINC-RBE (rat brain expressed transcript) involved in maturation and aging of mammalian brain. The LINC-RBE is strongly expressed in the rat brain and the upstream/downstream sequences of its DNA in the chromosome 5 contain binding sites for many cell growth, survival and development-specific transcriptional factors. Through RT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization, LINC-RBE was found to be expressed in an age-dependent manner with significantly higher level of expression in the brain of adult (16 weeks) compared to both immature (4 weeks) and old (70 weeks) rats. Moreover, the expression pattern of the LINC-RBE showed distinct association with the specific neuro-anatomical regions, cell types and sub-cellular compartments of the rat brain in an age-related manner. Thus, its expression increased from immature stage to adulthood and declined further in old age. This is a first-time report of involvement of an intergenic repeat sequence-containing lncRNA in different regions of the rat brain in an age-dependent manner.

  12. CRISPR interference and priming varies with individual spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chaoyou; Seetharam, Arun S; Musharova, Olga; Severinov, Konstantin; Brouns, Stan J J; Severin, Andrew J; Sashital, Dipali G

    2015-12-15

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated) systems allow bacteria to adapt to infection by acquiring 'spacer' sequences from invader DNA into genomic CRISPR loci. Cas proteins use RNAs derived from these loci to target cognate sequences for destruction through CRISPR interference. Mutations in the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and seed regions block interference but promote rapid 'primed' adaptation. Here, we use multiple spacer sequences to reexamine the PAM and seed sequence requirements for interference and priming in the Escherichia coli Type I-E CRISPR-Cas system. Surprisingly, CRISPR interference is far more tolerant of mutations in the seed and the PAM than previously reported, and this mutational tolerance, as well as priming activity, is highly dependent on spacer sequence. We identify a large number of functional PAMs that can promote interference, priming or both activities, depending on the associated spacer sequence. Functional PAMs are preferentially acquired during unprimed 'naïve' adaptation, leading to a rapid priming response following infection. Our results provide numerous insights into the importance of both spacer and target sequences for interference and priming, and reveal that priming is a major pathway for adaptation during initial infection.

  13. Conservation of sequence in recombination signal sequence spacers.

    PubMed Central

    Ramsden, D A; Baetz, K; Wu, G E

    1994-01-01

    The variable domains of immunoglobulins and T cell receptors are assembled through the somatic, site specific recombination of multiple germline segments (V, D, and J segments) or V(D)J rearrangement. The recombination signal sequence (RSS) is necessary and sufficient for cell type specific targeting of the V(D)J rearrangement machinery to these germline segments. Previously, the RSS has been described as possessing both a conserved heptamer and a conserved nonamer motif. The heptamer and nonamer motifs are separated by a 'spacer' that was not thought to possess significant sequence conservation, however the length of the spacer could be either 12 +/- 1 bp or 23 +/- 1 bp long. In this report we have assembled and analyzed an extensive data base of published RSS. We have derived, through extensive consensus comparison, a more detailed description of the RSS than has previously been reported. Our analysis indicates that RSS spacers possess significant conservation of sequence, and that the conserved sequence in 12 bp spacers is similar to the conserved sequence in the first half of 23 bp spacers. PMID:8208601

  14. Impact of spacer thickness on biofouling in forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Valladares Linares, R; Bucs, Sz S; Li, Z; AbuGhdeeb, M; Amy, G; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-06-15

    Forward osmosis (FO) indirect desalination systems integrate wastewater recovery with seawater desalination. Niche applications for FO systems have been reported recently, due to the demonstrated advantages compared to conventional high-pressure membrane processes such as nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). Among them, wastewater recovery has been identified to be particularly suitable for practical applications. However, biofouling in FO membranes has rarely been studied in applications involving wastewater effluents. Feed spacers separating the membrane sheets in cross-flow systems play an important role in biofilm formation. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of feed spacer thickness (28, 31 and 46 mil) on biofouling development and membrane performance in a FO system, using identical cross-flow cells in parallel studies. Flux development, biomass accumulation, fouling localization and composition were determined and analyzed. For all spacer thicknesses, operated at the same feed flow and the same run time, the same amount of biomass was found, while the flux reduction decreased with thicker spacers. These observations are in good agreement with biofouling studies for RO systems, considering the key differences between FO and RO. Our findings contradict previous cross-flow studies on particulate/colloidal fouling, where higher cross-flow velocities improved system performance. Thicker spacers reduced the impact of biofouling on FO membrane flux. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Space Station Long Spacer Element begins processing at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Long Spacer, a component of the International Space Station, arrives and is moved to its test stand in the northeast corner of the high bay in KSC's Space Station Processing Facility. The Long Spacer provides structural support for the outboard Photovoltaic Modules that supply power to the station. Now just a structure, the Long Spacer will have attached to it as part of processing a heat dissipation radiator and two Pump and Flow Control subassemblies that circulate ammonia to cool the solar array electronics. Also to be mounted are ammonia fluid lines as part of the cooling system and the cabling necessary for power and control of the station. The Long Spacer becomes an integral part of a station truss segment when it is mated with the Integrated Equipment Assembly, which stores the electrical power generated by the solar arrays for use by the station modules. The Long Spacer is being processed in preparation for STS-97, currently planned for launch aboard Discovery in April 1999.

  16. Gas-insulated substation spacer surface degradation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, F.Y.; Braun, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The objective of the project was to develop surface analysis techniques which can correlate the performance of spacers in SF{sub 6} insulated switchgear with changes in their dielectric and chemical characteristics after exposure to SF{sub 6} arcing byproducts and low energy flashovers. Critical material parameters responsible for spacer performance were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and electrical surface resistance measurements. Results related to arc byproduct resistance and tracking resistance of seven types of filled epoxy spacer materials are presented. Degradation mechanisms have been proposed to explain the differing material behaviour. The study shows that the interaction of certain types of filler and resin systems with the SF{sub 6} spark and the decomposed gas is responsible for the degradation in impulse withstand performance. A practical technique using surface electrical resistance to detect degraded spacer after exposure to large quantities of arc byproducts has been developed and the construction of a probe for spacer surface assessment was described. 15 refs., 28 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Diversity of Salmonella Strains Isolated from the Aquatic Environment as Determined by Serotyping and Amplification of the Ribosomal DNA Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Baudart, Julia; Lemarchand, Karine; Brisabois, Anne; Lebaron, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella species are pathogenic bacteria often detected in sewage, freshwater, marine coastal water, and groundwater. Salmonella spp. can survive for long periods in natural waters, and the persistence of specific and epidemic strains is of great concern in public health. However, the diversity of species found in the natural environment remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity of Salmonella strains isolated from different natural aquatic systems within a Mediterranean coastal watershed (river, wastewater, and marine coastal areas). A total of 574 strains isolated from these natural environments were identified by both conventional serotyping and the ribosomal spacer-heteroduplex polymorphism (RS-HP) method (M. A. Jensen and N. Straus, PCR Methods Appl. 3:186–194, 1993). More than 40 different serotypes were found, and some serotypes probably mobilized from widespread animal-rearing activities were detected only during storm events. These serotypes may be good indicators of specific contamination sources. Furthermore, the RS-HP method based on the PCR amplification of the intergenic spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes can produce amplicon profiles allowing the discrimination of species at both serotype and intraserotype levels. This method represents a powerful tool that could be used for rapid typing of Salmonella isolates. PMID:10742240

  18. Cultivar-level phylogeny using chloroplast DNA barcode psbK-psbI spacers for identification of Emirati date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) varieties.

    PubMed

    Enan, M R; Ahmed, A

    2016-08-05

    The efficacy of genetic material for use as DNA barcodes is under constant evaluation and improvement as new barcodes offering better resolution and efficiency of amplification for specific species groups are identified. In this study, the chloroplast intergenic spacer psbK-psbI was evaluated for the first time as a DNA barcode for distinguishing date palm cultivars. Nucleotide sequences were aligned using MEGA 6.0 to calculate pairwise divergence among the cultivars. The analyzed data illustrated a considerable level of variability in the genetic pool of the selected cultivars (0.009). In fact, five haplotypes were detected among 30 cultivars examined, yielding a haplotype diversity of 0.685. An unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean phylogenetic tree was constructed and shows a well-defined relationship among date palm cultivar varieties. On the other hand, selective neutrality investigations using Tajima test and Fu and Li tests were negative, providing evidence that date palm has been undergoing rapid expansion and recent population growth. Thus, we suggest that the psbK-psbI spacer can be successfully used to construct reliable phylogenetic trees for P. dactylifera.

  19. Molecular Profiling of Microbial Communities from Contaminated Sources: Use of Subtractive Cloning Methods and rDNA Spacer Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Frank T.

    2001-04-10

    The major objective of this research was to provide appropriate sequences and assemble a DNA array of oligonucleotides to be used for rapid profiling of microbial populations from polluted areas and other areas of interest. The sequences to be assigned to the DNA array were chosen from cloned genomic DNA taken from groundwater sites having well characterized pollutant histories at Hanford Nuclear Plant and Lawrence Livermore Site 300. Glass-slide arrays were made and tested; and a new multiplexed, bead-based method was developed that uses nucleic acid hybridization on the surface of microscopic polystyrene spheres to identify specific sequences in heterogeneous mixtures of DNA sequences. The test data revealed considerable strain variation between sample sites showing a striking distribution of sequences. It also suggests that diversity varies greatly with bioremediation, and that there are many bacterial intergenic spacer region sequences that can indicate its effects. The bead method exhibited superior sequence discrimination and has features for easier and more accurate measurement.

  20. Wheeze in childhood: is the spacer good enough?

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Veena; Rajendra, Barathi; How, Choon How; Ang, Seng Bin

    2014-01-01

    Max was treated with SABA using an MDI and spacer with facemask and responded well to the initial treatment. You explained to the parents that nebulisers are neither required nor recommended in the treatment of wheezing in their child’s situation. You advised the parents on the proper technique of MDI use with spacer and facemask, as well as care of the equipment. You also gave them a clearly written action plan regarding the efficient management of the next episode of wheeze with MDI and spacer. You further explained the side effects of oral bronchodilators and nebulisers, and why you refrained from using them. Max was given a follow-up appointment to assess his progress, and his parents were advised on the situations when they should go to a doctor or the emergency department. PMID:25631964

  1. Wheeze in childhood: is the spacer good enough?

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, Veena; Rajendra, Barathi; How, Choon How; Ang, Seng Bin

    2014-11-01

    Max was treated with SABA using an MDI and spacer with facemask and responded well to the initial treatment. You explained to the parents that nebulisers are neither required nor recommended in the treatment of wheezing in their child's situation. You advised the parents on the proper technique of MDI use with spacer and facemask, as well as care of the equipment. You also gave them a clearly written action plan regarding the efficient management of the next episode of wheeze with MDI and spacer. You further explained the side effects of oral bronchodilators and nebulisers, and why you refrained from using them. Max was given a follow-up appointment to assess his progress, and his parents were advised on the situations when they should go to a doctor or the emergency department.

  2. Partial Deletion of the L-Segment Intergenic Region Produces an Attenuated Machupo Virus that Protects Guinea Pigs Against Lethal Guanarito Virus Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-11

    1 Golden, J.W. et al. Machupo virus live-attenuated vaccine Partial deletion of the L-segment intergenic region produces an attenuated Machupo...had a 35 nucleotide deletion in the L-segment non-coding intergenic region . Contrary to Car91, Car68 produced a lethal infection in guinea pigs with...Keywords: Arenavirus, Machupo virus, Guanarito virus, intergenic region , live-attenuated vaccines, cross-protection 45 TR-17-030 DISTRIBUTION

  3. Precautions regarding Nonword Repetition Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Using nonword repetition tasks as an experimental approach with both adults and children has become quite common in the past 10 to 15 years for studying lexical learning and phonological processing (e.g., Bailey & Hahn, 2001; Gathercole, Frankish, Pickering & Peaker, 1998; Munson, Edwards, & Beckman, 2005; Storkel, 2001; Vitevich & Luce, 2005). In…

  4. Constructive and Unconstructive Repetitive Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Edward R.

    2008-01-01

    The author reviews research showing that repetitive thought (RT) can have constructive or unconstructive consequences. The main unconstructive consequences of RT are (a) depression, (b) anxiety, and (c) difficulties in physical health. The main constructive consequences of RT are (a) recovery from upsetting and traumatic events, (b) adaptive…

  5. Repetition Blindness Occurs in Nonwords

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Catherine L.; Morris, Alison L.

    2004-01-01

    Theorists have predicted that repetition blindness (RB) should be absent for nonwords because they do not activate preexisting mental types. The authors hypothesized that RB would be observed for nonwords because RB can occur at a sublexical level. Four experiments showed that RB is observed for word-nonword pairs (noon noof), orthographically…

  6. Constructive and Unconstructive Repetitive Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Edward R.

    2008-01-01

    The author reviews research showing that repetitive thought (RT) can have constructive or unconstructive consequences. The main unconstructive consequences of RT are (a) depression, (b) anxiety, and (c) difficulties in physical health. The main constructive consequences of RT are (a) recovery from upsetting and traumatic events, (b) adaptive…

  7. Spacer-related problems in two-stage revision knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Struelens, Bernard; Claes, Steven; Bellemans, Johan

    2013-08-01

    Although articulated cement spacers are frequently used in a staged approach of an infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA), no data are available on the incidence and type of spacer-related problems in these patients. A retrospective analysis of 154 patients who underwent a two-stage revision procedure for an infected TKA was performed. All patients received an articulating cement spacer at the implant removal procedure; their radiographs were analyzed for spacer-related issues such as spacer dislocation, fracture, tilting or translation, and knee subluxation. In 43% of the patients, the spacer was considered as optimal. The main finding of this study is the large incidence (57%) of spacer-specific problems in two-stage revision knee arthroplasty for infected TKA. Spacer tilting and mediolateral translation were found to be the most frequent spacer-specific problems, in 24% and 21% of the cases respectively. These were considered as minor problems. Major problems were seen in 12 % : in 3% of the knees the spacer had dislocated, in 5% the spacer fractured and in 4%, although the spacer seemed to be adequately positioned relative to the femoral and tibial bone, frank knee subluxation could be noted. The impact of spacer-specific problems with articulating cement spacers on final outcome in two-stage revision knee surgery will be further investigated.

  8. De Novo Identification of Regulatory Regions in Intergenic Spaces of Prokaryotic Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, P; Garcia, E; Mcloughlin, K; Ovcharenko, I

    2007-02-20

    This project was begun to implement, test, and experimentally validate the results of a novel algorithm for genome-wide identification of candidate transcription-factor binding sites in prokaryotes. Most techniques used to identify regulatory regions rely on conservation between different genomes or have a predetermined sequence motif(s) to perform a genome-wide search. Therefore, such techniques cannot be used with new genome sequences, where information regarding such motifs has not yet been discovered. This project aimed to apply a de novo search algorithm to identify candidate binding-site motifs in intergenic regions of prokaryotic organisms, initially testing the available genomes of the Yersinia genus. We retrofitted existing nucleotide pattern-matching algorithms, analyzed the candidate sites identified by these algorithms as well as their target genes to screen for meaningful patterns. Using properly annotated prokaryotic genomes, this project aimed to develop a set of procedures to identify candidate intergenic sites important for gene regulation. We planned to demonstrate this in Yersinia pestis, a model biodefense, Category A Select Agent pathogen, and then follow up with experimental evidence that these regions are indeed involved in regulation. The ability to quickly characterize transcription-factor binding sites will help lead to a better understanding of how known virulence pathways are modulated in biodefense-related organisms, and will help our understanding and exploration of regulons--gene regulatory networks--and novel pathways for metabolic processes in environmental microbes.

  9. Pentamer vocabularies characterizing introns and intron-like intergenic tracts from Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bultrini, Emanuele; Pizzi, Elisabetta; Del Giudice, Paolo; Frontali, Clara

    2003-01-30

    Overall compositional properties at the level of bases, dinucleotides and longer oligos characterize genomes of different species. In Caenorhabditis elegans, using recurrence analysis, we recognized the existence of a long-range correlation in the oligonucleotide usage of introns and intergenic regions. Through correlation analysis, this is confirmed here to be a genome-wide property of C. elegans non-coding portions. We then investigate the possibility of extracting a typical vocabulary through statistical analysis of experimentally confirmed introns of sufficient length (>1 kb), deprived of known splice signals, the focus being on distributed lexical features rather than on localized motifs. Lexical preferences typical of introns could be exposed using principal component analysis of pentanucleotide frequency distributions, both in C. elegans and in Drosophila melanogaster. In either species, the introns' pentamer preferences are largely shared by intergenic tracts. The pentamer vocabularies extracted for the two species exhibit interesting symmetry properties and overlap in part. A more extensive investigation of the interspecies relationship at the level of oligonucleotide preferences in non-coding regions, not related by sequence similarity, might form the basis of new approaches for the study of the evolutionary behaviour of these regions.

  10. Measurements and sensitivities of LWR in poly spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayal, Guy; Shauly, Eitan; Levi, Shimon; Siany, Amit; Adan, Ofer; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2010-03-01

    LER and LWR have long been considered a primary issue in process development and monitoring. Development of a low power process flavors emphasizes the effect of LER, LWR on different aspects of the device. Gate level performance, particularly leakage current at the front end of line, resistance and reliability in the back-end layers. Traditionally as can be seen in many publications, for the front end of line the focus is mainly on Poly and Active area layers. Poly spacers contribution to the gate leakage, for example, is rarely discussed. Following our research done on sources of gate leakage, we found leakage current (Ioff) in some processes to be highly sensitive to changes in the width of the Poly spacers - even more strongly to the actual Poly gate CDs. Therefore we decided to measure Poly spacers LWR, its correlation to the LWR in the poly, and its sensitivity to changes in layout and OPC. In our last year publication, we defined the terms LLER (Local Line Edge Roughness) and LLWR (Local Line Width Roughness). The local roughness is measured as the 3-sigma value of the line edge/width in a 5-nm segment around the measurement point. We will use these terms in this paper to evaluate the Poly roughness impact on Poly spacer's roughness. A dedicated test chip was designed for the experiments, having various transistors layout configurations with different densities to cover the all range of process design rules. Applied Materials LER and LWR innovative algorithms were used to measure and characterize the spacer roughness relative to the distance from the active edges and from other spaces. To accurately measure all structures in a reasonable time, the recipes were automatically generated from CAD. On silicon, after poly spacers generation, the transistors no longer resemble the Poly layer CAD layout, their morphology is different compared with Photo/Etch traditional structures , and dimensions vary significantly. In this paper we present metrology and

  11. Genome-Wide Analyses in Bacteria Show Small-RNA Enrichment for Long and Conserved Intergenic Regions

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chen-Hsun; Liao, Rick; Chou, Brendan; Palumbo, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Interest in finding small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has significantly increased in recent years due to their regulatory functions. Development of high-throughput methods and more sophisticated computational algorithms has allowed rapid identification of sRNA candidates in different species. However, given their various sizes (50 to 500 nucleotides [nt]) and their potential genomic locations in the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions as well as in intergenic regions, identification and validation of true sRNAs have been challenging. In addition, the evolution of bacterial sRNAs across different species continues to be puzzling, given that they can exert similar functions with various sequences and structures. In this study, we analyzed the enrichment patterns of sRNAs in 13 well-annotated bacterial species using existing transcriptome and experimental data. All intergenic regions were analyzed by WU-BLAST to examine conservation levels relative to species within or outside their genus. In total, more than 900 validated bacterial sRNAs and 23,000 intergenic regions were analyzed. The results indicate that sRNAs are enriched in intergenic regions, which are longer and more conserved than the average intergenic regions in the corresponding bacterial genome. We also found that sRNA-coding regions have different conservation levels relative to their flanking regions. This work provides a way to analyze how noncoding RNAs are distributed in bacterial genomes and also shows conserved features of intergenic regions that encode sRNAs. These results also provide insight into the functions of regions surrounding sRNAs and into optimization of RNA search algorithms. PMID:25313390

  12. Genome-wide analyses in bacteria show small-RNA enrichment for long and conserved intergenic regions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chen-Hsun; Liao, Rick; Chou, Brendan; Palumbo, Michael; Contreras, Lydia M

    2015-01-01

    Interest in finding small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has significantly increased in recent years due to their regulatory functions. Development of high-throughput methods and more sophisticated computational algorithms has allowed rapid identification of sRNA candidates in different species. However, given their various sizes (50 to 500 nucleotides [nt]) and their potential genomic locations in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions as well as in intergenic regions, identification and validation of true sRNAs have been challenging. In addition, the evolution of bacterial sRNAs across different species continues to be puzzling, given that they can exert similar functions with various sequences and structures. In this study, we analyzed the enrichment patterns of sRNAs in 13 well-annotated bacterial species using existing transcriptome and experimental data. All intergenic regions were analyzed by WU-BLAST to examine conservation levels relative to species within or outside their genus. In total, more than 900 validated bacterial sRNAs and 23,000 intergenic regions were analyzed. The results indicate that sRNAs are enriched in intergenic regions, which are longer and more conserved than the average intergenic regions in the corresponding bacterial genome. We also found that sRNA-coding regions have different conservation levels relative to their flanking regions. This work provides a way to analyze how noncoding RNAs are distributed in bacterial genomes and also shows conserved features of intergenic regions that encode sRNAs. These results also provide insight into the functions of regions surrounding sRNAs and into optimization of RNA search algorithms.

  13. Filter holder assembly having extended collar spacer ring

    DOEpatents

    Alvin, Mary Anne; Bruck, Gerald J.

    2002-01-01

    A filter holder assembly is provided that utilizes a fail-safe regenerator unit with an annular spacer ring having an extended metal collar for containment and positioning of a compliant ceramic gasket used in the assembly. The filter holder assembly is disclosed for use with advanced composite, filament wound, and metal candle filters.

  14. Trestle #1, detail of spacer and bolt assembly with tie ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trestle #1, detail of spacer and bolt assembly with tie and guard timber, southwest end of deck. View to east-northeast - Promontory Route Railroad Trestles, S.P. Trestle 779.91, One mile southwest of junction of State Highway 83 and Blue Creek, Corinne, Box Elder County, UT

  15. CRISPR interference and priming varies with individual spacer sequences

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chaoyou; Seetharam, Arun S.; Musharova, Olga; Severinov, Konstantin; J. Brouns, Stan J.; Severin, Andrew J.; Sashital, Dipali G.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated) systems allow bacteria to adapt to infection by acquiring ‘spacer’ sequences from invader DNA into genomic CRISPR loci. Cas proteins use RNAs derived from these loci to target cognate sequences for destruction through CRISPR interference. Mutations in the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and seed regions block interference but promote rapid ‘primed’ adaptation. Here, we use multiple spacer sequences to reexamine the PAM and seed sequence requirements for interference and priming in the Escherichia coli Type I-E CRISPR–Cas system. Surprisingly, CRISPR interference is far more tolerant of mutations in the seed and the PAM than previously reported, and this mutational tolerance, as well as priming activity, is highly dependent on spacer sequence. We identify a large number of functional PAMs that can promote interference, priming or both activities, depending on the associated spacer sequence. Functional PAMs are preferentially acquired during unprimed ‘naïve’ adaptation, leading to a rapid priming response following infection. Our results provide numerous insights into the importance of both spacer and target sequences for interference and priming, and reveal that priming is a major pathway for adaptation during initial infection. PMID:26586800

  16. Ralstonia paucula (Formerly CDC Group IV c-2): Unsuccessful Strain Differentiation with PCR-Based Methods, Study of the 16S-23S Spacer of the rRNA Operon, and Comparison with Other Ralstonia Species (R. eutropha, R. pickettii, R. gilardii, and R. solanacearum)

    PubMed Central

    Moissenet, Didier; Bidet, Philippe; Garbarg-Chenon, Antoine; Arlet, Guillaume; Vu-Thien, Hoang

    2001-01-01

    Ralstonia paucula (formerly CDC group IV c-2) can cause serious human infections. Confronted in 1995 with five cases of nosocomial bacteremia, we found that pulsed-field gel electrophoresis could not distinguish between the isolates and that randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis was poorly discriminatory. In this study, we used PCR-ribotyping and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the spacer 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA); both methods were unable to differentiate R. paucula isolates. Eighteen strains belonging to other Ralstonia species (one R. eutropha strain, six R. pickettii strains, three R. solanacearum strains, and eight R. gilardii strains) were also tested by PCR-ribotyping, which failed to distinguish between the four species. The 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer of R. paucula contains the tRNAIle and tRNAAla genes, which are identical to genes described for R. pickettii and R. solanacearum. PMID:11136807

  17. Ralstonia paucula (Formerly CDC group IV c-2): unsuccessful strain differentiation with PCR-based methods, study of the 16S-23S spacer of the rRNA operon, and comparison with other Ralstonia species (R. eutropha, R. pickettii, R. gilardii, and R. solanacearum).

    PubMed

    Moissenet, D; Bidet, P; Garbarg-Chenon, A; Arlet, G; Vu-Thien, H

    2001-01-01

    Ralstonia paucula (formerly CDC group IV c-2) can cause serious human infections. Confronted in 1995 with five cases of nosocomial bacteremia, we found that pulsed-field gel electrophoresis could not distinguish between the isolates and that randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis was poorly discriminatory. In this study, we used PCR-ribotyping and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the spacer 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA); both methods were unable to differentiate R. paucula isolates. Eighteen strains belonging to other Ralstonia species (one R. eutropha strain, six R. pickettii strains, three R. solanacearum strains, and eight R. gilardii strains) were also tested by PCR-ribotyping, which failed to distinguish between the four species. The 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer of R. paucula contains the tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala) genes, which are identical to genes described for R. pickettii and R. solanacearum.

  18. Under Pressure: The Utility of Spacers in Univalved Fiberglass Casts.

    PubMed

    Kleis, Kevin; Schlechter, John A; Doan, Joshua D; Farnsworth, Christine L; Edmonds, Eric W

    2017-02-24

    Univalving fiberglass casts after fracture manipulation or extremity surgery reduces the risk of developing compartment syndrome (CS). Previous experiments have demonstrated that univalving decreases intracompartmental pressures (ICPs), but increases the risk for loss of fracture reduction due to altering the mechanical properties of the cast. The purpose of this study was to correlate cast valve width within a univalved cast model to decreasing ICP. Saline bags (1 L) were covered with stockinette, Webril, and fiberglass tape then connected to an arterial pressure line monitor. Resting pressure was recorded. A water column was added to simulate 2 groups (n=5 each) of clinical CS: low pressure CS (LPCS range, 28 to 31 mm Hg) and high pressure CS (HPCS, range, 64 to 68 mm Hg). After the designated pressure was reached, the fiberglass was cut (stockinette and Webril remained intact). Cast spacers were inserted into each univalve and secured with varying widths: position #1 (3 mm wide), #2 (6 mm), #3 (9 mm), and #4 (12 mm). Pressure was recorded after cutting the fiberglass and following each spacer placement. In LPCS and HPCS groups, after univalve and placement of spacer position #1, pressure dropped by a mean of 52% and 58%, respectively. Spacer #2, decreased the pressure by a mean of 78% and 80%, respectively. Both spacer sizes significantly decreased the underlying pressure in both groups. Spacer #3 and #4 progressively reduced pressure within the cast, but not statistically significantly more than the previous spacer widths. This experimental model replicates the iatrogenic elevation in interstitial compartment pressure due to rigid cast application, not necessarily a self-sustained true CS. Increasing the univalved cast spread by ≥9 mm of the initial cast diameter will reduce pressure to a pre-CS level; however, a spread of only 6 mm can effectively reduce the pressure to <30 mm Hg depending on the initial elevated ICP. Cutting the Webril and stockinette in

  19. 3-D flow analyses for design of nuclear fuel spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Karouta, Z.; GU, Chun-Yuan; Schoelin, B.

    1995-09-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code, CFDS-FLOW3D, was used to develop improved fuel designs for PWR cores. It was used primarily to understand the fluid dynamics of grid spacers, the mass transfer between subchannels caused by spacers and in the long term to develop two-phase models which enable prediction of critical heat flux in PWR fuel. A single subchannel of one grid span was modeled. In this model different spacer designs with mixing devices were analyzed. A special treatment of the boundary condition was developed making use of flow symmetry to model the mass transfer between different subchannels and minimize the size of the computational model. This reduced the computational model to a fraction of a subchannel using traditional periodic boundary conditions. The Navier-Stokes equation was solved for the liquid and the flow turbulence was modeled by k-{xi} turbulence model. The spacer and mixing device were treated as infinite thin surfaces in the model and a zero velocity condition and turbulent wall function were applied on each side of the thin surfaces. This approach simulated the swirl from the mixing devices well, but had the drawback of not predicting pressure drop accurately since the wake behind the plates and the acceleration effect of the spacers were ignored. CFDS-FLOW3D models with mixing devices were applied in the single-phase flow regime. Velocity profiles from the CFDS-FLOW3D models were compared to Laser Doppler Velocimeter measurements taken from the flow field downstream of spaces in a full scale, cold water test loop. The predicted axial and lateral velocity profiles were in good agreement with the measurements. The evaluation of the performance of different spacer devices was made by comparing the swirl ratio downstream of the grid spacers. It is planned to evaluate heat transfer coefficient downstream of the spaces, to implement two-phase flow models, and to model the superheated boundary layer on the surface of the fuel rod.

  20. Expectancy and Repetition in Task Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthruff, E.; Remington, R. W.; Johnston, James C.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We studied the mechanisms of task preparation using a design that pitted task expectancy against task repetition. In one experiment, two simple cognitive tasks were presented in a predictable sequence containing both repetitions and non-repetitions. The typical task sequence was AABBAABB. Occasional violations of this sequence allowed us to measure the effects of valid versus invalid expectancy. With this design, we were able to study the effects of task expectancy, task repetition, and interaction.

  1. Repetitively pulsed vacuum insulator flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, J.W.; Buttram, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the flashover strength of various vacuum insulators under conditions of repetitive pulsing. The pulse duration was 30 ns, and the thickness of a typical insulator sample was 1.8 cm. Data were taken for 45 insulators from five different materials. An insulator was subjected to an extended series of pulses at a given repetition rate and field. If flashover was not detected, the field level was increased and the sequence repeated. At rates up to 50 pulses per second, there was no apparent dependence of flashover field on rate. In addition, some ''single shot'' data were taken, including various modifications of the geometries and surface textures of the insulators. Only two to the modifications increased the flashover strength significantly over that of a 45 sample: (1) annealing some plastics (roughly a 35% increase), and (2) extending the insulator to cover the surfaces of both electrodes (an increase of nearly a factor of two).

  2. Wear Performance of Calcium Carbonate-Containing Knee Spacers.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Ulrike; Reinders, Joern; Smith-Romanski, Sydney; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2017-07-15

    Articulating spacers should be wear-resistant and load-bearing to avoid prolonged immobilization of the patient and to reduce morbidity. However, due to the articulation of both components, a release of cement wear particles is to be expected. The aim of this study was to investigate the wear performance of a new spacer cement that contains calcium carbonate as a radio-opaque substance, in comparison to an established barium sulphate-containing spacer material, and also to characterize the amount, morphology, and size distributions of the released cement particles in detail. Force-controlled simulation was carried out on an AMTI knee simulator. The test parameters were in accordance with the standard ISO 14243-1 with a 50% reduced axial force. Tests were run for 500,000 cycles at a frequency of 1 Hz. For wear analysis, photographic documentation of the wear scars, gravimetric wear measurements and wear particle analysis were performed. The barium sulphate spacer material showed a total articular wear of 375.53 ± 161.22 mg. For the calcium carbonate-containing cement, reduced articular wear of 136.32 ± 37.58 mg was determined. Isolated cement wear particles of the barium sulphate-containing cement had a diameter of 0.429 ± 0.224 μm and were significantly larger compared to the calcium carbonate-containing cement (0.380 ± 0.216 μm, p = 0.02). The calcium carbonate-containing cement showed better wear performance in terms of gravimetric wear and particle release. Thus, calcium carbonate seems to be a promising material as a radio-opaque substrate in cement spacers.

  3. Implementation of spacer therapy for acute asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Vandeleur, M; Chróinín, M N Ní

    2009-09-01

    The aim was to develop and implement an evidence based guideline for the treatment of acute asthma using a metered dose inhaler and spacer combination. Children admitted to Cork University Hospital Paediatric Department with acute asthma were identified during two identical 2 month seasonal periods before (2005) and after (2006) implementation of the new guidelines in September 2006. Pre-intervention and post-intervention audits by case note review were performed to determine the impact of and compliance with this evidence-based guideline emphasising patient assessment, spacer delivered bronchodilator and specific discharge criteria. Patients had similar characteristics during the two study periods. There was a raised threshold for admission after guideline implementation with 11/52 patients having mild exacerbations in 2006, compared to 21/36 in 2005. Duration of admission was less in the post-implementation group for equivalent exacerbation severity e.g. for moderate severity; 28 hours in 2005, 23 hours in 2006. Duration of bronchodilator therapy was shorter in 2006 and more likely to be given by spacer device earlier for equivalent levels of severity e.g. for moderate exacerbations, in 2006 the average length of salbutamol therapy was 18 hours with 12 hours by spacer device, in 2005 the average length of therapy was 25 hours with 3 hours by spacer. There was earlier initiation of oral corticosteroids; the average time to administration was 56 minutes in 2006 and 227 minutes in 2005. There was an improved documentation of asthma education in 2006 e.g. inhaler technique was reviewed in 37/52 in 2006, 21/35 in 2005 and better use of written action plans.

  4. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, Robert K.; Meyne, Julianne

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  5. Genetic Diversity of Food-Isolated Salmonella Strains through Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC-PCR)

    PubMed Central

    Fendri, Imen; Ben Hassena, Amal; Grosset, Noel; Barkallah, Mohamed; Khannous, Lamia; Chuat, Victoria; Gautier, Michel; Gdoura, Radhouane

    2013-01-01

    All over the world, the incidence of Salmonella spp contamination on different food sources like broilers, clams and cow milk has increased rapidly in recent years. The multifaceted properties of Salomnella serovars allow the microorganism to grow and multiply in various food matrices, even under adverse conditions. Therefore, methods are needed to detect and trace this pathogen along the entire food supply network. In the present work, PFGE and ERIC-PCR were used to subtype 45 Salmonella isolates belonging to different serovars and derived from different food origins. Among these isolates, S. Enteritidis and S. Kentucky were found to be the most predominant serovars. The Discrimination Index obtained by ERIC-PCR (0.85) was slightly below the acceptable confidence value. The best discriminatory ability was observed when PFGE typing method was used alone (DI = 0.94) or combined with ERIC-PCR (DI = 0.93). A wide variety of profiles was observed between the different serovars using PFGE or/and ERIC-PCR. This diversity is particularly important when the sample origins are varied and even within the same sampling origin. PMID:24312546

  6. The callipyge mutation enhances bidirectional long-range DLK1-GTL2 intergenic transcription in cis

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Haruko; Caiment, Florian; Smit, Maria; Hiard, Samuel; Tordoir, Xavier; Cockett, Noelle; Georges, Michel; Charlier, Carole

    2006-01-01

    The callipyge mutation (CLPG) is an A to G transition that affects a muscle-specific long-range control element located in the middle of the 90-kb DLK1-GTL2 intergenic (IG) region. It causes ectopic expression of a 327-kb cluster of imprinted genes in skeletal muscle, resulting in the callipyge muscular hypertrophy and its non-Mendelian inheritance pattern known as polar overdominance. We herein demonstrate that the CLPG mutation alters the muscular epigenotype of the DLK1-GTL2 IG region in cis, including hypomethylation, acquisition of novel DNase-I hypersentivite sites, and, most strikingly, strongly enhanced bidirectional, long-range IG transcription. The callipyge phenotype thus emerges as a unique model to study the functional significance of IG transcription, which recently has proven to be a widespread, yet elusive, feature of the mammalian genome. PMID:16690740

  7. Effect of spacer layers on current-voltage characteristics of resonant-tunneling diode

    SciTech Connect

    Remnev, M. A. Kateev, I. Yu.; Elesin, V. F.

    2010-08-15

    Using the numerical solution to the Schroedinger equation, current-voltage characteristics of the resonant-tunneling diode with spacer layers were obtained. The dependences of the peak current of the resonant-tunneling diode on the emitter spacer width were plotted. It was shown that the peak current depends periodically on the emitter spacer width. The constructed electron density diagrams showed that the increase in the peak current is associated with the resonant level in the emitter spacer region.

  8. Optimizing Soft Tissue Management and Spacer Design in Segmental Bone Defects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    specifically aims to assess the effects of surgical technique and spacer design in optimizing the biology of the “Induced Membrane” (IM), and to define...to look at the effects of spacer texture and membrane scraping on CT-2.5, X-ray. 2. Effects of spacer texture in predicting IM Biology : The effects...of nine biological metrics to predict spacer texture were analyzed using a logistics regression technique (Table IM 21 Biology ). Variables with a

  9. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Evolutionary Analysis of Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs in Cucumber

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhiqiang; Fan, Chunyan; Cheng, Tian; Su, Ya; Wei, Qiang; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are intergenic transcripts with a length of at least 200 nt that lack coding potential. Emerging evidence suggests that lincRNAs from animals participate in many fundamental biological processes. However, the systemic identification of lincRNAs has been undertaken in only a few plants. We chose to use cucumber (Cucumis sativus) as a model to analyze lincRNAs due to its importance as a model plant for studying sex differentiation and fruit development and the rich genomic and transcriptome data available. The application of a bioinformatics pipeline to multiple types of gene expression data resulted in the identification and characterization of 3,274 lincRNAs. Next, 10 lincRNAs targeted by 17 miRNAs were also explored. Based on co-expression analysis between lincRNAs and mRNAs, 94 lincRNAs were annotated, which may be involved in response to stimuli, multi-organism processes, reproduction, reproductive processes, and growth. Finally, examination of the evolution of lincRNAs showed that most lincRNAs are under purifying selection, while 16 lincRNAs are under natural selection. Our results provide a rich resource for further validation of cucumber lincRNAs and their function. The identification of lincRNAs targeted by miRNAs offers new clues for investigations into the role of lincRNAs in regulating gene expression. Finally, evaluation of the lincRNAs suggested that some lincRNAs are under positive and balancing selection. PMID:25799544

  10. Identification and Functional Prediction of Large Intergenic Noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recognized in recent years as key regulators of diverse cellular processes. Genome-wide large-scale projects have uncovered thousands of lncRNAs in many model organisms. Large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are lncRNAs that are transcribed from intergeni...

  11. Intergenic Sequence Ribotyping using a region neighboring dkgB links genovar to Kauffman-White serotype of Salmonella enterica

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty six (36) unique sequences which varied in length from 258bp to 530bp were found for Salmonella enterica strains and isolates that are not present in public databases following BLAST analysis searches for similarity. The sequences were found by application of Intergenic Sequence Ribotyping (IS...

  12. Use of the Coat Protein (CP) and minor CP Intergene Sequence to Discriminate Severe Strains of Citrus tristeza virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A rapid assay is a needed to differentiate mild vs severe strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV). Multiple alignment performed on the coat protein (CP) and the minor coat protein (CPm) intergene sequences (~80-100 bp) from different CTV isolates revealed that severe strains generally associated wit...

  13. Intergenic variants may predispose to major depression disorder through regulation of long non-coding RNA expression.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ning; Rao, Shuquan; Du, Tingfu; Hu, Huiling; Liu, Zeyue; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2017-02-15

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified numerous genetic variants for major depressive disorder (MDD) although most of the genetic variants are intergenic. It has been found that approximately 54% of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are located in the intergenic regions. We hypothesized that intergenic variants might be involved in the pathogenesis of MDD through regulating the expression of lncRNAs where these variants are located. In this study, several MDD-associated SNPs in three known intergenic lncRNAs were initially genotyped among 978 patients with MDD and 1176 controls, and the real-time PCR assay was performed to quantify the expression of LINC01108 and LINC00578 in peripheral blood cells from 20 MDD patients and 20 controls. The results showed that rs12526133 present in LINC01108 was strongly associated with MDD (χ(2)=11.68, P=6.3E-04), and LINC01108 expression was significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group (FC=1.90, P<0.001). The expression of LINC00998 was significantly lower in MDD patients than controls based on microarray analysis (FC=0.11, P<0.001), so that its tag SNPs were genotyped and rs2272260 in LINC00998 was found to be associated with MDD (χ(2)=26.39, P=2.8E-07). This work suggests that non-coding variants may play an important role in conferring risk of MDD.

  14. Molecular Analysis of Promoter and Intergenic Region Attenuator of the Vibrio vulnificus prx1ahpF Operon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Sung; Lim, Jong Gyu; Han, Kook; Lee, Younghoon; Choi, Sang Ho

    2015-08-01

    Prx1, an AhpF-dependent 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx), was previously identified in Vibrio vulnificus, a facultative aerobic pathogen. In the present study, transcription of the V. vulnificus prx1ahpF genes, which are adjacently located on the chromosome, was evaluated by analyzing the promoter and intergenic region of the two genes. Northern blot analyses revealed that transcription of prx1ahpF results in two transcripts, the prx1 and prx1ahpF transcripts. Primer extension analysis and a point mutational analysis of the promoter region showed that the two transcripts are generated from a single promoter. In addition, the 3' end of the prx1 transcript at the prx1ahpF intergenic region was determined by a 3'RACE assay. These results suggested that the prx1ahpF genes are transcribed as an operon, and the prx1 transcript was produced by transcriptional termination in the intergenic region. RNA secondary structure prediction of the prx1ahpF intergenic region singled out a stem-loop structure without poly(U) tract, and a deletion analysis of the intergenic region showed that the atypical stem-loop structure acts as the transcriptional attenuator to result in the prx1 and prx1ahpF transcripts. The combined results demonstrate that the differential expression of prx1 and ahpF is accomplished by the cis-acting transcriptional attenuator located between the two genes and thereby leads to the production of a high level of Prx1 and a low level of AhpF.

  15. Circuit considerations for repetitive railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Honih, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    Railgun electromagnetic launchers have significant military and scientific potential. They provide direct conversion of electrical energy to projectile kinetic energy, and they offer the hope of achieving projectile velocities greatly exceeding the limits of conventional guns. With over 10 km/sec already demonstrated, railguns are attracting attention for tactical and strategic weapons systems and for scientific equation-of-state research. The full utilization of railguns will require significant improvements in every aspect of system design - projectile, barrel, and power source - to achieve operation on a large scale. This paper will review fundamental aspects of railguns, with emphasis on circuit considerations and repetitive operation.

  16. Phylogenetic diversity based on rrs, atpD, recA genes and 16S-23S intergenic sequence analyses of rhizobial strains isolated from Vicia faba and Pisum sativum in Peru.

    PubMed

    Santillana, Nery; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha Helena; García-Fraile, Paula; Velázquez, Encarna; Zúñiga, Doris

    2008-03-01

    In this study 17 isolates from effective nodules of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum var. macrocarpum growing in different soils from Peru were isolated and characterized. The isolates, presenting 11 different RAPD profiles, were distributed in three groups on the basis of their 16S-RFLP patterns. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains from 16S-RFLP groups I, II and III were closely related (identities higher than 99.5%) to Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii DSM 30141 (=ATCC 14480), R. leguminosarum bv. viciae DSM 30132(T) and Rhizobium etli CFN42(T) (=USDA 9032(T)), respectively. The analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) and two housekeeping genes, atpD and recA, confirmed the identification of strains from group I, however those from groups II and III were phylogenetically divergent to strains DSM 30132(T) and CFN42(T). These results support the fact that the 16S rRNA gene is not adequate for identification at species level within genus Rhizobium and suggest the existence of putative new species within the phylogenetic group of R. leguminosarum. They also confirm the need of a taxonomic revision of R. leguminosarum since the reference strains of the three biovars included in this study are phylogenetically divergent according to their ITS, atpD and recA gene sequences.

  17. DNA barcode and identification of the varieties and provenances of Taiwan's domestic and imported made teas using ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 sequences.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Yen, Cheng-En; Chang, Chieh

    2017-04-01

    The major aim of made tea identification is to identify the variety and provenance of the tea plant. The present experiment used 113 tea plants [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] housed at the Tea Research and Extension Substation, from which 113 internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) fragments, 104 trnL intron, and 98 trnL-trnF intergenic sequence region DNA sequences were successfully sequenced. The similarity of the ITS2 nucleotide sequences between tea plants housed at the Tea Research and Extension Substation was 0.379-0.994. In this polymerase chain reaction-amplified noncoding region, no varieties possessed identical sequences. Compared with the trnL intron and trnL-trnF intergenic sequence fragments of chloroplast cpDNA, the proportion of ITS2 nucleotide sequence variation was large and is more suitable for establishing a DNA barcode database to identify tea plant varieties. After establishing the database, 30 imported teas and 35 domestic made teas were used in this model system to explore the feasibility of using ITS2 sequences to identify the varieties and provenances of made teas. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using ITS2 sequences with the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean, which indicated that the same variety of tea plant is likely to be successfully categorized into one cluster, but contamination from other tea plants was also detected. This result provides molecular evidence that the similarity between important tea varieties in Taiwan remains high. We suggest a direct, wide collection of made tea and original samples of tea plants to establish an ITS2 sequence molecular barcode identification database to identify the varieties and provenances of tea plants. The DNA barcode comparison method can satisfy the need for a rapid, low-cost, frontline differentiation of the large amount of made teas from Taiwan and abroad, and can provide molecular evidence of their varieties and provenances. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Sidewall spacer quadruple patterning for 15nm half-pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ping; Chen, Yongmei; Chen, Yijian; Miao, Liyan; Sun, Shiyu; Kim, Sung-Woo; Berger, Ami; Mao, Daxin; Bencher, Christ; Hung, Raymond; Ngai, Chris

    2011-04-01

    193nm immersion lithography, with the single-exposure resolution limitation of half-pitch 38nm, has extended its patterning capability to about 20nm using the double-patterning technique[1]. Despite the non-trivial sub-20nm patterning challenges, several NAND Flash manufacturers are already pursuing for sub-16nm patterning technology. 25nm NAND flash memory has already begun production in 2010, and given the typical 2-year scaling cycle, sub-16nm NAND devices should see pilot or mass production as early as 2014. Using novel patterning techniques such as sidewall spacer quadruple patterning (upon 120nm to 128nm pitch using dry ArF lithography) or triple patterning (upon 90nm pitch using immersion ArF lithography), we are able to extend optical lithography to sub-16nm half-pitch and demonstrate the lithographic performance that can nearly meet the ITRS roadmap requirements. In this paper, we conduct an in-depth review and demonstration of sidewall spacer quadruple patterning; including 300mm wafer level data of the mean values and CDU along with a mathematical assessment of the various data pools for sub-16nm lines and spaces. By understanding which processes (lithography, deposition, and etch) define the critical dimension of each data pool, we can make predictions of CDU capability for the sidewall spacer quad patterning. Our VeritySEM4i CD SEM tool demonstrated high measurement yield during fully automated measurements, which enables accurate lines, spaces and CDU measurements of the sub-16nm. The patterns generated from the sidewall spacer quadruple patterning techniques are used as a hardmask to transfer sub-16nm lines and spaces patterns to underneath amorphous silicon and silicon oxide layers, or poly silicon layer for 1X STI or poly gate applications.

  19. Structural design feasibility study of Space Station long spacer truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, Sasan C.; Funk, Gregory P.; Dohogne, Caroline A.

    1994-01-01

    The structural design and configuration feasibility of the long spacer truss assembly that will be used as part of the Space Station Freedom is the focus of this study. The structural analysis discussed herein is derived from the transient loading events presented in the Space Transportation System Interface Control Document (STS ICD). The transient loading events are liftoff, landing, and emergency landing loads. Quasi-static loading events were neglected in this study since the magnitude of the quasi-static acceleration factors is lower than that of the transient acceleration factors. Structural analysis of the proposed configuration of the long spacer truss with four longerons indicated that negative safety margins are possible. As a result, configuration changes were proposed. The primary configuration change suggested was to increase the number of truss longerons to six. The six-longeron truss appears to be a more promising structure than the four-longeron truss because it offers a positive margin of safety and more volume in its second bay (BAY2). This additional volume can be used for resupply of some of the orbital replacement units (such as a battery box). Note that the design effort on the long spacer truss has not fully begun and that calculations and reports of the negative safety margins are, to date, based on concept only.

  20. Nebulizer and spacer device maintenance in children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Tay, Ee Tein; Needleman, Joshua P; Avner, Jeffrey R

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate inhalation device cleaning practices of children with asthma and its effect on their asthma morbidity. A survey of patients aged 4 to 18 years admitted to an urban pediatric emergency department (ED) with an acute asthma exacerbation. Questions included demographics, asthma history, preference of delivery devices, and frequency of device cleaning. Patients were followed until their disposition from the ED, or until the end of their hospitalization, if admitted. 220 subjects completed the survey. Mean age was 9.2 (+/- 3.9) years-old. One hundred and four (47.3%) patients used both nebulizers and spacer devices, while 18 (8.1%) used spacers only and 98 (44.5%) used nebulizers alone. Seventy-seven (38.1%; 95%CI: 31.7%-45.0%) patients cleaned their nebulizers and 57 (46.7%; 95%CI: 38.1%-55.4%) cleaned their spacer devices after each use as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control. There were no detectable differences in visit admission rate, total number of previous admissions, number of asthma exacerbations per year, and number of ED visits in one year between users who cleaned their devices after every, or every other use, compared to those who cleaned their devices less frequently. Although the majority of patients did not follow accepted guidelines for inhalation device cleaning, further studies are necessary to correlate cleaning practices to patients' clinical outcome.

  1. Neuroimaging in repetitive brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Ng, Thomas Sc; Lin, Alexander P; Koerte, Inga K; Pasternak, Ofer; Liao, Huijun; Merugumala, Sai; Bouix, Sylvain; Shenton, Martha E

    2014-01-01

    Sports-related concussions are one of the major causes of mild traumatic brain injury. Although most patients recover completely within days to weeks, those who experience repetitive brain trauma (RBT) may be at risk for developing a condition known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). While this condition is most commonly observed in athletes who experience repetitive concussive and/or subconcussive blows to the head, such as boxers, football players, or hockey players, CTE may also affect soldiers on active duty. Currently, the only means by which to diagnose CTE is by the presence of phosphorylated tau aggregations post-mortem. Non-invasive neuroimaging, however, may allow early diagnosis as well as improve our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of RBT. The purpose of this article is to review advanced neuroimaging methods used to investigate RBT, including diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, functional magnetic resonance imaging, susceptibility weighted imaging, and positron emission tomography. While there is a considerable literature using these methods in brain injury in general, the focus of this review is on RBT and those subject populations currently known to be susceptible to RBT, namely athletes and soldiers. Further, while direct detection of CTE in vivo has not yet been achieved, all of the methods described in this review provide insight into RBT and will likely lead to a better characterization (diagnosis), in vivo, of CTE than measures of self-report.

  2. Neuroimaging in repetitive brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sports-related concussions are one of the major causes of mild traumatic brain injury. Although most patients recover completely within days to weeks, those who experience repetitive brain trauma (RBT) may be at risk for developing a condition known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). While this condition is most commonly observed in athletes who experience repetitive concussive and/or subconcussive blows to the head, such as boxers, football players, or hockey players, CTE may also affect soldiers on active duty. Currently, the only means by which to diagnose CTE is by the presence of phosphorylated tau aggregations post-mortem. Non-invasive neuroimaging, however, may allow early diagnosis as well as improve our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of RBT. The purpose of this article is to review advanced neuroimaging methods used to investigate RBT, including diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, functional magnetic resonance imaging, susceptibility weighted imaging, and positron emission tomography. While there is a considerable literature using these methods in brain injury in general, the focus of this review is on RBT and those subject populations currently known to be susceptible to RBT, namely athletes and soldiers. Further, while direct detection of CTE in vivo has not yet been achieved, all of the methods described in this review provide insight into RBT and will likely lead to a better characterization (diagnosis), in vivo, of CTE than measures of self-report. PMID:25031630

  3. Child and parent satisfaction with the use of spacer devices in acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Cotterell, E M; Gazarian, M; Henry, R L; O'Meara, M W; Wales, S R

    2002-12-01

    To evaluate child and parent satisfaction with the use of spacers in acute asthma. All parents of children presenting to the emergency department of Sydney Children's Hospital over a 3-month period with mild to moderately severe acute asthma who were treated with bronchodilators by spacer device were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire. Children aged 8 years and older completed a separate questionnaire independently. One hundred and eleven of 158 parents (70%) responded. The majority (84%) found it 'easy' or 'very easy' to use the spacer and 85% reported that they intended to use the spacer at home. Of those parents who had previously used a nebulizer (n = 73), 84% said that the spacer was easier to use, 77% said that the spacer was better tolerated by their child and 84% said that overall they preferred the spacer. Seventeen of 31 children aged 8-14 years treated with a spacer (55%) responded to the satisfaction survey. All respondents found it 'easy' or 'OK' to use the spacer and the majority (82%) 'liked it' or thought 'it was OK'. The majority of children (82%) said that they preferred using spacers because it was quicker (29%) or easier to use (53%). The use of spacer devices in mild to moderately severe acute asthma is highly acceptable for children and parents; the majority prefer this mode of drug delivery to nebulization.

  4. Improving electricity production in tubular microbial fuel cells through optimizing the anolyte flow with spiral spacers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Ge, Zheng; Grimaud, Julien; Hurst, Jim; He, Zhen

    2013-04-01

    The use of spiral spacers to create a helical flow for improving electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated in both laboratory and on-site tests. The lab tests found that the MFC with the spiral spacers produced more electricity than the one without the spiral spacers at different recirculation rates or organic loading rates, likely due to the improved transport/distribution of ions and electron mediators instead of the substrates because the organic removal efficiency was not obviously affected by the presence of the spiral spacers. The energy production in the MFC with the spiral spacers reached 0.071 or 0.073 kWh/kg COD in either vertical or horizontal installment. The examination of the MFCs installed in an aeration tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant confirmed the advantage of using the spiral spacers. Those results demonstrate that spiral spacers could be an effective approach to improve energy production in MFCs.

  5. Development and characterization of 3D-printed feed spacers for spiral wound membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Amber; Farhat, Nadia; Bucs, Szilárd S; Linares, Rodrigo Valladares; Picioreanu, Cristian; Kruithof, Joop C; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Kidwell, James; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S

    2016-03-15

    Feed spacers are important for the impact of biofouling on the performance of spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems. The objective of this study was to propose a strategy for developing, characterizing, and testing of feed spacers by numerical modeling, three-dimensional (3D) printing of feed spacers and experimental membrane fouling simulator (MFS) studies. The results of numerical modeling on the hydrodynamic behavior of various feed spacer geometries suggested that the impact of spacers on hydrodynamics and biofouling can be improved. A good agreement was found for the modeled and measured relationship between linear flow velocity and pressure drop for feed spacers with the same geometry, indicating that modeling can serve as the first step in spacer characterization. An experimental comparison study of a feed spacer currently applied in practice and a 3D printed feed spacer with the same geometry showed (i) similar hydrodynamic behavior, (ii) similar pressure drop development with time and (iii) similar biomass accumulation during MFS biofouling studies, indicating that 3D printing technology is an alternative strategy for development of thin feed spacers with a complex geometry. Based on the numerical modeling results, a modified feed spacer with low pressure drop was selected for 3D printing. The comparison study of the feed spacer from practice and the modified geometry 3D printed feed spacer established that the 3D printed spacer had (i) a lower pressure drop during hydrodynamic testing, (ii) a lower pressure drop increase in time with the same accumulated biomass amount, indicating that modifying feed spacer geometries can reduce the impact of accumulated biomass on membrane performance. The combination of numerical modeling of feed spacers and experimental testing of 3D printed feed spacers is a promising strategy (rapid, low cost and representative) to develop advanced feed spacers aiming to reduce the impact of

  6. [Repetition and fear of dying].

    PubMed

    Lerner, B D

    1995-03-01

    In this paper a revision is made of the qualifications of Repetition (R) in Freuds work, i.e. its being at the service of the Pleasure Principle and, beyond it, the binding of free energy due to trauma. Freud intends to explain with this last concept the "fort-da" and the traumatic dreams (obsessively reiterated self-reproaches may be added to them). The main thesis of this work is that R. is not only a defense against the recollection of the ominous past (as in the metaphorical deaths of abandonment and desertion) but also a way of maintaining life and identify fighting against the inescapable omninous future (known but yet experienced), i.e. our own death. Some forms of R. like habits, identificatory behaviors and sometimes even magic, are geared to serve the life instinct. A literary illustration shows this desperate fight.

  7. Pressure rig for repetitive casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter (Inventor); Hutto, William R. (Inventor); Philips, Albert R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is a pressure rig for repetitive casting of metal. The pressure rig performs like a piston for feeding molten metal into a mold. Pressure is applied to an expandable rubber diaphragm which expands like a balloon to force the metal into the mold. A ceramic cavity which holds molten metal is lined with blanket-type insulating material, necessitating only a relining for subsequent use and eliminating the lengthy cavity preparation inherent in previous rigs. In addition, the expandable rubber diaphragm is protected by the insulating material thereby decreasing its vulnerability to heat damage. As a result of the improved design the life expectancy of the pressure rig contemplated by the present invention is more than doubled. Moreover, the improved heat protection has allowed the casting of brass and other alloys with higher melting temperatures than possible in the conventional pressure rigs.

  8. Repetition blindness is orientation blind.

    PubMed

    Corballis, Michael C; Armstrong, Cole

    2007-03-01

    In identifying rapid sequences of three letters, subjects were worse at identifying the first and third letters when they were the same than when they were different, indicating repetition blindness (RB). This effect occurred regardless of the angular orientations of the letters, but was more pronounced when the orientations of the repeated letters were different than when they were the same. In a second experiment, RB was also evident when the first and third letters were lowercase bs or ds, presented upright or inverted, even though they are differently named when inverted (q and p, respectively). Conversely, a third experiment showed that RB occurred when the letters had the same names but were repeated in different case. These results suggest that the early extraction of letter shape is independent of its orientation and left-right sense, and that RB can occur at the levels of both shape and name.

  9. Constructive and Unconstructive Repetitive Thought

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Edward R.

    2008-01-01

    The author reviews research showing that repetitive thought (RT) can have constructive or unconstructive consequences. The main unconstructive consequences of RT are (a) depression, (b) anxiety, and (c) difficulties in physical health. The main constructive consequences of RT are (a) recovery from upsetting and traumatic events, (b) adaptive preparation and anticipatory planning, (c) recovery from depression, and (d) uptake of health-promoting behaviors. Several potential principles accounting for these distinct consequences of RT are identified within this review: (a) the valence of thought content, (b) the intrapersonal and situational context in which RT occurs, and (c) the level of construal (abstract vs. concrete processing) adopted during RT. Of the existing models of RT, it is proposed that an elaborated version of the control theory account provides the best theoretical framework to account for its distinct consequences. PMID:18298268

  10. Interbody Spacer Material Properties and Design Conformity for Reducing Subsidence During Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chatham, Lillian S; Patel, Vikas V; Yakacki, Christopher M; Dana Carpenter, R

    2017-05-01

    There is a need to better understand the effects of intervertebral spacer material and design on the stress distribution in vertebral bodies and endplates to help reduce complications such as subsidence and improve outcomes following lumbar interbody fusion. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of spacer material on the stress and strain in the lumbar spine after interbody fusion with posterior instrumentation. A standard spacer was also compared with a custom-fit spacer, which conformed to the vertebral endplates, to determine if a custom fit would reduce stress on the endplates. A finite element (FE) model of the L4-L5 motion segment was developed from computed tomography (CT) images of a cadaveric lumbar spine. An interbody spacer, pedicle screws, and posterior rods were incorporated into the image-based model. The model was loaded in axial compression, and strain and stress were determined in the vertebra, spacer, and rods. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), titanium, poly(para-phenylene) (PPP), and porous PPP (70% by volume) were used as the spacer material to quantify the effects on stress and strain in the system. Experimental testing of a cadaveric specimen was used to validate the model's results. There were no large differences in stress levels (<3%) at the bone-spacer interfaces and the rods when PEEK was used instead of titanium. Use of the porous PPP spacer produced an 8-15% decrease of stress at the bone-spacer interfaces and posterior rods. The custom-shaped spacer significantly decreased (>37%) the stress at the bone-spacer interfaces for all materials tested. A 28% decrease in stress was found in the posterior rods with the custom spacer. Of all the spacer materials tested with the custom spacer design, 70% porous PPP resulted in the lowest stress at the bone-spacer interfaces. The results show the potential for more compliant materials to reduce stress on the vertebral endplates postsurgery. The custom spacer provided a

  11. The evolutionary landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events in insects

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yimeng; Zhou, Hongxia; Yu, Yao; Chen, Longxian; Hao, Pei; Li, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    To explore the landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events and characterize their functions and evolutionary dynamics, we conduct a mega-data study of a phylogeny containing eight species across five orders of class Insecta, a model system spanning 400 million years of evolution. A total of 1,627 trans-splicing events involving 2,199 genes are identified, accounting for 1.58% of the total genes. Homology analysis reveals that mod(mdg4)-like trans-splicing is the only conserved event that is consistently observed in multiple species across two orders, which represents a unique case of functional diversification involving trans-splicing. Thus, evolutionarily its potential for generating proteins with novel function is not broadly utilized by insects. Furthermore, 146 non-mod trans-spliced transcripts are found to resemble canonical genes from different species. Trans-splicing preserving the function of ‘breakup' genes may serve as a general mechanism for relaxing the constraints on gene structure, with profound implications for the evolution of genes and genomes. PMID:26521696

  12. Long intergenic non-coding RNA expression signature in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Wagner, Erin K.; Guo, Xingyi; May, Isaac; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; He, Chunyan; Long, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease, characterized by gene deregulation. There is less systematic investigation of the capacity of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) as biomarkers associated with breast cancer pathogenesis or several clinicopathological variables including receptor status and patient survival. We designed a two-stage study, including 1,000 breast tumor RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) as the discovery stage, and RNA-seq data of matched tumor and adjacent normal tissue from 50 breast cancer patients as well as 23 normal breast tissue from healthy women as the replication stage. We identified 83 lincRNAs showing the significant expression changes in breast tumors with a false discovery rate (FDR) < 1% in the discovery dataset. Thirty-seven out of the 83 were validated in the replication dataset. Integrative genomic analyses suggested that the aberrant expression of these 37 lincRNAs was probably related with the expression alteration of several transcription factors (TFs). We observed a differential co-expression pattern between lincRNAs and their neighboring genes. We found that the expression levels of one lincRNA (RP5-1198O20 with Ensembl ID ENSG00000230615) were associated with breast cancer survival with P < 0.05. Our study identifies a set of aberrantly expressed lincRNAs in breast cancer. PMID:27897201

  13. Disruption of a large intergenic noncoding RNA in subjects with neurodevelopmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Talkowski, Michael E; Maussion, Gilles; Crapper, Liam; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Blumenthal, Ian; Hanscom, Carrie; Chiang, Colby; Lindgren, Amelia; Pereira, Shahrin; Ruderfer, Douglas; Diallo, Alpha B; Lopez, Juan Pablo; Turecki, Gustavo; Chen, Elizabeth S; Gigek, Carolina; Harris, David J; Lip, Va; An, Yu; Biagioli, Marta; Macdonald, Marcy E; Lin, Michael; Haggarty, Stephen J; Sklar, Pamela; Purcell, Shaun; Kellis, Manolis; Schwartz, Stuart; Shaffer, Lisa G; Natowicz, Marvin R; Shen, Yiping; Morton, Cynthia C; Gusella, James F; Ernst, Carl

    2012-12-07

    Large intergenic noncoding (linc) RNAs represent a newly described class of ribonucleic acid whose importance in human disease remains undefined. We identified a severely developmentally delayed 16-year-old female with karyotype 46,XX,t(2;11)(p25.1;p15.1)dn in the absence of clinically significant copy number variants (CNVs). DNA capture followed by next-generation sequencing of the translocation breakpoints revealed disruption of a single noncoding gene on chromosome 2, LINC00299, whose RNA product is expressed in all tissues measured, but most abundantly in brain. Among a series of additional, unrelated subjects referred for clinical diagnostic testing who showed CNV affecting this locus, we identified four with exon-crossing deletions in association with neurodevelopmental abnormalities. No disruption of the LINC00299 coding sequence was seen in almost 14,000 control subjects. Together, these subjects with disruption of LINC00299 implicate this particular noncoding RNA in brain development and raise the possibility that, as a class, abnormalities of lincRNAs may play a significant role in human developmental disorders. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transposable Element Insertions in Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Sivakumar; Chernikova, Diana; Rogozin, Igor B.; Poliakov, Eugenia; Managadze, David; Koonin, Eugene V.; Milanesi, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are abundant in mammalian genomes and appear to have contributed to the evolution of their hosts by providing novel regulatory or coding sequences. We analyzed different regions of long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes in human and mouse genomes to systematically assess the potential contribution of TEs to the evolution of the structure and regulation of expression of lincRNA genes. Introns of lincRNA genes contain the highest percentage of TE-derived sequences (TES), followed by exons and then promoter regions although the density of TEs is not significantly different between exons and promoters. Higher frequencies of ancient TEs in promoters and exons compared to introns implies that many lincRNA genes emerged before the split of primates and rodents. The content of TES in lincRNA genes is substantially higher than that in protein-coding genes, especially in exons and promoter regions. A significant positive correlation was detected between the content of TEs and evolutionary rate of lincRNAs indicating that inserted TEs are preferentially fixed in fast-evolving lincRNA genes. These results are consistent with the repeat insertion domains of LncRNAs hypothesis under which TEs have substantially contributed to the origin, evolution, and, in particular, fast functional diversification, of lincRNA genes. PMID:26106594

  15. α-MSH regulates intergenic splicing of MC1R and TUBB3 in human melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dalziel, Martin; Kolesnichenko, Marina; das Neves, Ricardo Pires; Iborra, Francisco; Goding, Colin; Furger, André

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing enables higher eukaryotes to increase their repertoire of proteins derived from a restricted number of genes. However, the possibility that functional diversity may also be augmented by splicing between adjacent genes has been largely neglected. Here, we show that the human melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene, a critical component of the facultative skin pigmentation system, has a highly complex and inefficient poly(A) site which is instrumental in allowing intergenic splicing between this locus and its immediate downstream neighbour tubulin-β-III (TUBB3). These transcripts, which produce two distinct protein isoforms localizing to the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum, seem to be restricted to humans as no detectable chimeric mRNA could be found in MC1R expressing mouse melanocytes. Significantly, treatment with the MC1R agonist α-MSH or activation of the stress response kinase p38-MAPK, both key molecules associated with ultraviolet radiation dermal insult and subsequent skin tanning, result in a shift in expression from MC1R in favour of chimeric MC1R-TUBB3 isoforms in cultured melanocytes. We propose that these chimeric proteins serve to equip melanocytes with novel cellular phenotypes required as part of the pigmentation response. PMID:21071418

  16. Explaining the disease phenotype of intergenic SNP through predicted long range regulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingqi; Tian, Weidong

    2016-10-14

    Thousands of disease-associated SNPs (daSNPs) are located in intergenic regions (IGR), making it difficult to understand their association with disease phenotypes. Recent analysis found that non-coding daSNPs were frequently located in or approximate to regulatory elements, inspiring us to try to explain the disease phenotypes of IGR daSNPs through nearby regulatory sequences. Hence, after locating the nearest distal regulatory element (DRE) to a given IGR daSNP, we applied a computational method named INTREPID to predict the target genes regulated by the DRE, and then investigated their functional relevance to the IGR daSNP's disease phenotypes. 36.8% of all IGR daSNP-disease phenotype associations investigated were possibly explainable through the predicted target genes, which were enriched with, were functionally relevant to, or consisted of the corresponding disease genes. This proportion could be further increased to 60.5% if the LD SNPs of daSNPs were also considered. Furthermore, the predicted SNP-target gene pairs were enriched with known eQTL/mQTL SNP-gene relationships. Overall, it's likely that IGR daSNPs may contribute to disease phenotypes by interfering with the regulatory function of their nearby DREs and causing abnormal expression of disease genes. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. The evolutionary landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events in insects.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yimeng; Zhou, Hongxia; Yu, Yao; Chen, Longxian; Hao, Pei; Li, Xuan

    2015-11-02

    To explore the landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events and characterize their functions and evolutionary dynamics, we conduct a mega-data study of a phylogeny containing eight species across five orders of class Insecta, a model system spanning 400 million years of evolution. A total of 1,627 trans-splicing events involving 2,199 genes are identified, accounting for 1.58% of the total genes. Homology analysis reveals that mod(mdg4)-like trans-splicing is the only conserved event that is consistently observed in multiple species across two orders, which represents a unique case of functional diversification involving trans-splicing. Thus, evolutionarily its potential for generating proteins with novel function is not broadly utilized by insects. Furthermore, 146 non-mod trans-spliced transcripts are found to resemble canonical genes from different species. Trans-splicing preserving the function of 'breakup' genes may serve as a general mechanism for relaxing the constraints on gene structure, with profound implications for the evolution of genes and genomes.

  18. Dysregulated long intergenic non-coding RNA modules contribute to heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxin; Yu, Fulong; Lan, Yujia; Xu, Jinyuan; Pang, Bo; Han, Dong; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are emerging as important regulatory molecules involved in diseases including heart failure. However, little is known about how the lincRNAs work together with protein-coding genes (PCGs) contributing to the pathogenesis of heart failure. In this study, we constructed a comprehensive transcriptome profile of lincRNAs, PCGs and miRNAs using RNA-seq and miRNA-seq data of 16 heart failure patients (HFs) and 8 non-failing individuals (NFs). Through integrating lincRNA and PCG expression profiles, we identified HF-associated lincRNA modules. We identified a heart-specific lincRNA module which was significantly enriched for differentially expressed lincRNAs and PCGs. This module was associated with heart failure rather than with other clinical traits such as sex, age, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Moreover, the module was significantly correlated with certain indicators of left ventricular function like ejection fraction and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, implying the potential of its components as crucial biomarkers. Apart from enhancer-like function, lincRNAs in this module could act as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) to regulate genes which were associated with left-ventricular systolic function. Our work provided deep insights into the critical roles of lincRNAs in the pathology of heart failure and suggested that they could be valuable biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:28040802

  19. Exploiting identifiability and intergene correlation for improved detection of differential expression.

    PubMed

    Deller, J R; Radha, Hayder; McCormick, J Justin

    2013-01-01

    Accurate differential analysis of microarray data strongly depends on effective treatment of intergene correlation. Such dependence is ordinarily accounted for in terms of its effect on significance cutoffs. In this paper, it is shown that correlation can, in fact, be exploited to share information across tests and reorder expression differentials for increased statistical power, regardless of the threshold. Significantly improved differential analysis is the result of two simple measures: (i) adjusting test statistics to exploit information from identifiable genes (the large subset of genes represented on a microarray that can be classified a priori as nondifferential with very high confidence], but (ii) doing so in a way that accounts for linear dependencies among identifiable and nonidentifiable genes. A method is developed that builds upon the widely used two-sample t-statistic approach and uses analysis in Hilbert space to decompose the nonidentified gene vector into two components that are correlated and uncorrelated with the identified set. In the application to data derived from a widely studied prostate cancer database, the proposed method outperforms some of the most highly regarded approaches published to date. Algorithms in MATLAB and in R are available for public download.

  20. Explaining the disease phenotype of intergenic SNP through predicted long range regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingqi; Tian, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of disease-associated SNPs (daSNPs) are located in intergenic regions (IGR), making it difficult to understand their association with disease phenotypes. Recent analysis found that non-coding daSNPs were frequently located in or approximate to regulatory elements, inspiring us to try to explain the disease phenotypes of IGR daSNPs through nearby regulatory sequences. Hence, after locating the nearest distal regulatory element (DRE) to a given IGR daSNP, we applied a computational method named INTREPID to predict the target genes regulated by the DRE, and then investigated their functional relevance to the IGR daSNP's disease phenotypes. 36.8% of all IGR daSNP-disease phenotype associations investigated were possibly explainable through the predicted target genes, which were enriched with, were functionally relevant to, or consisted of the corresponding disease genes. This proportion could be further increased to 60.5% if the LD SNPs of daSNPs were also considered. Furthermore, the predicted SNP-target gene pairs were enriched with known eQTL/mQTL SNP-gene relationships. Overall, it's likely that IGR daSNPs may contribute to disease phenotypes by interfering with the regulatory function of their nearby DREs and causing abnormal expression of disease genes. PMID:27280978

  1. A long-term demasculinization of X-linked intergenic noncoding RNAs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ge; Vibranovski, Maria D; Zhang, Li; Li, Zheng; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yong E; Li, Xinmin; Zhang, Wenxia; Fan, Qichang; VanKuren, Nicholas W; Long, Manyuan; Wei, Liping

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies have revealed key roles of noncoding RNAs in sex-related pathways, but little is known about the evolutionary forces acting on these noncoding RNAs. Profiling the transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster with whole-genome tiling arrays found that 15% of male-biased transcribed fragments are intergenic noncoding RNAs (incRNAs), suggesting a potentially important role for incRNAs in sex-related biological processes. Statistical analysis revealed a paucity of male-biased incRNAs and coding genes on the X chromosome, suggesting that similar evolutionary forces could be affecting the genomic organization of both coding and noncoding genes. Expression profiling across germline and somatic tissues further suggested that both male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) and sexual antagonism could contribute to the chromosomal distribution of male-biased incRNAs. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the evolutionary age of male-biased incRNAs is a significant predictor of their chromosomal locations. In addition to identifying abundant sex-biased incRNAs in the fly genome, our work unveils a global picture of the complex interplay between noncoding RNAs and sexual chromosome evolution.

  2. Comparative Expression Dynamics of Intergenic Long Noncoding RNAs in the Genus Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Kevin G.; Machado, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been annotated in eukaryotic genomes, but comparative transcriptomic approaches are necessary to understand their biological impact and evolution. To facilitate such comparative studies in Drosophila, we identified and characterized lncRNAs in a second Drosophilid—the evolutionary model Drosophila pseudoobscura. Using RNA-Seq and computational filtering of protein-coding potential, we identified 1,589 intergenic lncRNA loci in D. pseudoobscura. We surveyed multiple sex-specific developmental stages and found, like in Drosophila melanogaster, increasingly prolific lncRNA expression through male development and an overrepresentation of lncRNAs in the testes. Other trends seen in D. melanogaster, like reduced pupal expression, were not observed. Nonrandom distributions of female-biased and non-testis-specific male-biased lncRNAs between the X chromosome and autosomes are consistent with selection-based models of gene trafficking to optimize genomic location of sex-biased genes. The numerous testis-specific lncRNAs, however, are randomly distributed between the X and autosomes, and we cannot reject the hypothesis that many of these are likely to be spurious transcripts. Finally, using annotated lncRNAs in both species, we identified 134 putative lncRNA homologs between D. pseudoobscura and D. melanogaster and find that many have conserved developmental expression dynamics, making them ideal candidates for future functional analyses. PMID:27189981

  3. Comparative Mitogenomic Analyses of Praying Mantises (Dictyoptera, Mantodea): Origin and Evolution of Unusual Intergenic Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-Li; Ye, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Praying mantises are a diverse group of predatory insects. Although some Mantodea mitogenomes have been reported, a comprehensive comparative and evolutionary genomic study is lacking for this group. In the present study, four new mitogenomes were sequenced, annotated, and compared to the previously published mitogenomes of other Mantodea species. Most Mantodea mitogenomes share a typical set of mitochondrial genes and a putative control region (CR). Additionally, and most intriguingly, another large non-coding region (LNC) was detected between trnM and ND2 in all six Paramantini mitogenomes examined. The main section in this common region of Paramantini may have initially originated from the corresponding control region for each species, whereas sequence differences between the LNCs and CRs and phylogenetic analyses indicate that LNC and CR are largely independently evolving. Namely, the LNC (the duplicated CR) may have subsequently degenerated during evolution. Furthermore, evidence suggests that special intergenic gaps have been introduced in some species through gene rearrangement and duplication. These gaps are actually the original abutting sequences of migrated or duplicated genes. Some gaps (G5 and G6) are homologous to the 5' and 3' surrounding regions of the duplicated gene in the original gene order, and another specific gap (G7) has tandem repeats. We analysed the phylogenetic relationships of fifteen Mantodea species using 37 concatenated mitochondrial genes and detected several synapomorphies unique to species in some clades. PMID:28367101

  4. Molecular typing of isolates of Rickettsia rickettsii by use of DNA sequencing of variable intergenic regions.

    PubMed

    Karpathy, Sandor E; Dasch, Gregory A; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-08-01

    Rickettsia rickettsii, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, is found throughout the Americas, where it is associated with different animal reservoirs and tick vectors. No molecular typing system currently exists to allow for the robust differentiation of isolates of R. rickettsii. Analysis of eight completed genome sequences of rickettsial species revealed a high degree of sequence conservation within the coding regions of chromosomes in the genus. Intergenic regions between coding sequences should be under less selective pressure to maintain this conservation and thus should exhibit greater nucleotide polymorphisms. Utilizing these polymorphisms, we developed a molecular typing system that allows for the genetic differentiation of isolates of R. rickettsii. This typing system was applied to a collection of 38 different isolates collected from humans, animals, and tick vectors from different geographic locations. Serotypes 364D, from Dermacentor occidentalis ticks, and Hlp, from Haemaphysalis leporispalustris ticks, appear to be distinct genotypes that may not belong to the species R. rickettsii. We were also able to differentiate 36 historical isolates of R. rickettsii into three different phylogenetic clades containing seven different genotypes. This differentiation correlated well, but not perfectly, with the geographic origin and likely tick vectors associated with the isolates. The few apparent typing discrepancies found suggest that the molecular ecology of R. rickettsii needs more investigation.

  5. Decoupling of DNA methylation and activity of intergenic LINE-1 promoters in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vafadar-Isfahani, Natasha; Parr, Christina; McMillan, Lara E.; Sanner, Juliane; Yeo, Zhao; Saddington, Stephen; Peacock, Oliver; Cruickshanks, Hazel A.; Meehan, Richard R.; Lund, Jonathan N.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hypomethylation of LINE-1 repeats in cancer has been proposed as the main mechanism behind their activation; this assumption, however, was based on findings from early studies that were biased toward young and transpositionally active elements. Here, we investigate the relationship between methylation of 2 intergenic, transpositionally inactive LINE-1 elements and expression of the LINE-1 chimeric transcript (LCT) 13 and LCT14 driven by their antisense promoters (L1-ASP). Our data from DNA modification, expression, and 5′RACE analyses suggest that colorectal cancer methylation in the regions analyzed is not always associated with LCT repression. Consistent with this, in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells lacking DNA methyltransferases DNMT1 or DNMT3B, LCT13 expression decreases, while cells lacking both DNMTs or treated with the DNMT inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5-aza) show no change in LCT13 expression. Interestingly, levels of the H4K20me3 histone modification are inversely associated with LCT13 and LCT14 expression. Moreover, at these LINE-1s, H4K20me3 levels rather than DNA methylation seem to be good predictor of their sensitivity to 5-aza treatment. Therefore, by studying individual LINE-1 promoters we have shown that in some cases these promoters can be active without losing methylation; in addition, we provide evidence that other factors (e.g., H4K20me3 levels) play prominent roles in their regulation. PMID:28300471

  6. Evolutionarily conserved long intergenic non-coding RNAs in the eye

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Debarshi; Kevany, Brian M.; Bai, Xiaodong; Maeda, Tadao; Sears, Jonathan E.; Khalil, Ahmad M.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    The discovery that the mammalian transcriptome encodes thousands of long intergenic non-coding (linc) RNA transcripts, together with recent evidence that lincRNAs can regulate protein-coding genes, has added a new level of complexity to cellular transcriptional/translational regulation. Indeed several reports now link mutations in lincRNAs to heritable human disorders. Here, we identified a subset of lincRNAs in terminally differentiated adult human retinal neurons based on their sequence conservation across species. RNA sequencing of eye tissue from several mammalian species with varied rod/cone photoreceptor content identified 18 lincRNAs that were highly conserved across these species. Sixteen of the 18 were conserved in human retinal tissue with 14 of these also conserved in the macular region. A subset of lincRNAs exhibited restricted tissue expression profiles in mice, with preferential expression in the retina. Mouse models with different populations of retinal cells as well as in situ hybridization provided evidence that these lincRNAs localized to specific retinal compartments, most notably to the photoreceptor neuronal layer. Computational genomic loci and promoter region analyses provided a basis for regulated expression of these conserved lincRNAs in retinal post-mitotic neurons. This combined approach identified several lincRNAs that could be critical for retinal and visual maintenance in adults. PMID:23562822

  7. Computational identification of human long intergenic non-coding RNAs using a GA-SVM algorithm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqiu; Li, Yang; Wang, Qi; Lv, Yingli; Wang, Shiyuan; Chen, Xi; Yu, Xuexin; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a new type of non-coding RNAs and are closely related with the occurrence and development of diseases. In previous studies, most lincRNAs have been identified through next-generation sequencing. Because lincRNAs exhibit tissue-specific expression, the reproducibility of lincRNA discovery in different studies is very poor. In this study, not including lincRNA expression, we used the sequence, structural and protein-coding potential features as potential features to construct a classifier that can be used to distinguish lincRNAs from non-lincRNAs. The GA-SVM algorithm was performed to extract the optimized feature subset. Compared with several feature subsets, the five-fold cross validation results showed that this optimized feature subset exhibited the best performance for the identification of human lincRNAs. Moreover, the LincRNA Classifier based on Selected Features (linc-SF) was constructed by support vector machine (SVM) based on the optimized feature subset. The performance of this classifier was further evaluated by predicting lincRNAs from two independent lincRNA sets. Because the recognition rates for the two lincRNA sets were 100% and 99.8%, the linc-SF was found to be effective for the prediction of human lincRNAs.

  8. Annotating long intergenic non-coding RNAs under artificial selection during chicken domestication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Mei; Xu, Hai-Bo; Wang, Ming-Shan; Otecko, Newton Otieno; Ye, Ling-Qun; Wu, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2017-08-15

    Numerous biological functions of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) have been identified. However, the contribution of lincRNAs to the domestication process has remained elusive. Following domestication from their wild ancestors, animals display substantial changes in many phenotypic traits. Therefore, it is possible that diverse molecular drivers play important roles in this process. We analyzed 821 transcriptomes in this study and annotated 4754 lincRNA genes in the chicken genome. Our population genomic analysis indicates that 419 lincRNAs potentially evolved during artificial selection related to the domestication of chicken, while a comparative transcriptomic analysis identified 68 lincRNAs that were differentially expressed under different conditions. We also found 47 lincRNAs linked to special phenotypes. Our study provides a comprehensive view of the genome-wide landscape of lincRNAs in chicken. This will promote a better understanding of the roles of lincRNAs in domestication, and the genetic mechanisms associated with the artificial selection of domestic animals.

  9. Integrative annotation of human large intergenic noncoding RNAs reveals global properties and specific subclasses

    PubMed Central

    Cabili, Moran N.; Trapnell, Cole; Goff, Loyal; Koziol, Magdalena; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Regev, Aviv; Rinn, John L.

    2011-01-01

    Large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of diverse cellular processes. Determining the function of individual lincRNAs remains a challenge. Recent advances in RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and computational methods allow for an unprecedented analysis of such transcripts. Here, we present an integrative approach to define a reference catalog of >8000 human lincRNAs. Our catalog unifies previously existing annotation sources with transcripts we assembled from RNA-seq data collected from ∼4 billion RNA-seq reads across 24 tissues and cell types. We characterize each lincRNA by a panorama of >30 properties, including sequence, structural, transcriptional, and orthology features. We found that lincRNA expression is strikingly tissue-specific compared with coding genes, and that lincRNAs are typically coexpressed with their neighboring genes, albeit to an extent similar to that of pairs of neighboring protein-coding genes. We distinguish an additional subset of transcripts that have high evolutionary conservation but may include short ORFs and may serve as either lincRNAs or small peptides. Our integrated, comprehensive, yet conservative reference catalog of human lincRNAs reveals the global properties of lincRNAs and will facilitate experimental studies and further functional classification of these genes. PMID:21890647

  10. Impact of ZnO embedded feed spacer on biofilm development in membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Ronen, Avner; Semiat, Raphael; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2013-11-01

    The concept of suppressing biofouling formation using an antibacterial feed spacer was investigated in a bench scale-cross flow system mimicking a spiral wound membrane configuration. An antibacterial composite spacer containing zinc oxide-nanoparticles was constructed by modification of a commercial polypropylene feed spacer using sonochemical deposition. The ability of the modified spacers to repress biofilm development on membranes was evaluated in flow-through cells simulating the flow conditions in commercial spiral wound modules. The experiments were performed at laminar flow (Re = 300) with a 200 kDa molecular weight cut off polysulfone ultrafiltration membrane using Pseudomonas putida S-12 as model biofilm bacteria. The modified spacers reduced permeate flux decrease at least by 50% compared to the unmodified spacers (control). The physical properties of the modified spacer and biofilm development were evaluated using high resolution/energy dispersive spectrometry-scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy imaging (HRSEM, EDS, AFM and CLSM). HRSEM images depicted significantly less bacteria attached to the membranes exposed to the modified spacer, mainly scattered and in a sporadic monolayer structure. AFM analysis indicated the influence of the modification on the spacer surface including a phase change on the upper surface. Dead-live staining assay by CLSM indicated that most of the bacterial cells attached on the membranes exposed to the modified spacer were dead in contrast to a developed biofilm which was predominant in the control samples.

  11. Two-stage revision of hip prosthesis infection using a hip spacer with stabilising proximal cementation.

    PubMed

    Gil Gonzalez, Sergi; Marqués López, Fernando; Rigol Ramon, Pau; Mestre Cortadellas, Carlos; Cáceres Palou, Enric; León García, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    Two-stage revision hip arthroplasty for infection using an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer has been used frequently with good results. However, spacer instability is also frequent. Proximal cementation of the spacer could avoid spacer dislocation. We retrospectively assessed 35 patients in whom a 2-stage revision hip arthroplasty for infection was carried out using an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer with gentamicin (Spacer-G) in which the spacer was proximally cemented in 16 patients. The mean follow-up was 32 months. We assessed spacer stability and infection elimination. There were 8 spacer dislocations (22.9%), 5 in hips without proximal cementation and 2 in hips with proximal cementation (p>0.05). There was no fracture in any hip. Reinfection occurred in 5 hips (14.3%), in 3 with the same microorganism, while 2 had a different microorganism. Our results indicate that the proximal cementation of the spacer prevents its dislocation. Infection was eliminated in 86% of the hips.

  12. Socio-Economic Status Affects Sentence Repetition, but Not Non-Word Repetition, in Chilean Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balladares, Jaime; Marshall, Chloë; Griffiths, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Sentence repetition and non-word repetition tests are widely used measures of language processing which are sensitive to language ability. Surprisingly little previous work has investigated whether children's socio-economic status (SES) affects their sentence and non-word repetition accuracy. This study investigates sentence and non-word…

  13. A Nonword Repetition Task for Speakers with Misarticulations: The Syllable Repetition Task (SRT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; Campbell, Thomas F.; Dollaghan, Christine A.; Green, Jordan R.; Moore, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Conceptual and methodological confounds occur when non(sense) word repetition tasks are administered to speakers who do not have the target speech sounds in their phonetic inventories or who habitually misarticulate targeted speech sounds. In this article, the authors (a) describe a nonword repetition task, the Syllable Repetition Task…

  14. Definitive Treatment of Infected Shoulder Arthroplasty With a Cement Spacer.

    PubMed

    Mahure, Siddharth A; Mollon, Brent; Yu, Stephen; Kwon, Young W; Zuckerman, Joseph D

    2016-09-01

    Infection in the setting of shoulder arthroplasty can result in significant pain, loss of function, and the need for additional surgery. As the use of shoulder arthroplasty increases, the medical and economic burdens of periprosthetic joint infection increase as well. The ideal management of infected shoulder prostheses has not been established. This report describes 9 patients from a single institution who had an infected shoulder arthroplasty that was definitively managed with a cement spacer. All patients had a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. Of the 9 patients in this study, 6 were men. Mean age was 73±9 years. Of the study patients, 1 had diabetes, 2 presented with Parkinson's disease, and 5 had a history of tobacco use. Average body mass index was 27.9±7 kg/m(2). After mean follow-up of 4 years, none of the patients had clinical or radiographic evidence of infection. Functional outcomes, as measured by American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores, were good or fair in 89% of patients, and the average American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score was 57. A review of recent literature suggested that the current findings were similar to those in studies reporting 1- or 2-stage revision procedures. Although cement spacers are typically used as part of a 2-stage revision procedure, the current findings suggest that cement spacers can be used effectively to eradicate infection and allow for acceptable functional recovery and range of motion in patients who have severe medical comorbidities and cannot tolerate additional surgery. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):e924-e930.].

  15. CtBP Levels Control Intergenic Transcripts, PHO/YY1 DNA Binding, and PcG Recruitment to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Arindam; Atchison, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Carboxy-terminal binding protein (CtBP) is a well-known corepressor of several DNA binding transcription factors in Drosophila as well as in mammals. CtBP is implicated in Polycomb Group (PcG) complex-mediated transcriptional repression because it can bind to some PcG proteins, and mutation of the ctbp gene in flies results in lost PcG protein recruitment to Polycomb Response Elements (PREs) and lost PcG repression. However, the mechanism of reduced PcG DNA binding in CtBP mutant backgrounds is unknown. We show here that in a Drosophila CtBP mutant background, intergenic transcripts are induced across several PRE sequences and this corresponds to reduced DNA binding by PcG proteins Pleiohomeotic (PHO) and Polycomb (Pc), and reduced trimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 27, a hallmark of PcG repression. Restoration of CtBP levels by expression of a CtBP transgene results in repression of intergenic transcripts, restored PcG binding, and elevated trimethylation of H3 on lysine 27. Our results support a model in which CtBP regulates expression of intergenic transcripts that controls DNA binding by PcG proteins and subsequent histone modifications and transcriptional activity. PMID:20082324

  16. Copy Number Variations in Candidate Genes and Intergenic Regions Affect Body Mass Index and Abdominal Obesity in Mexican Children

    PubMed Central

    Burguete-García, Ana Isabel; Bonnefond, Amélie; Peralta-Romero, Jesús; Froguel, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Increase in body weight is a gradual process that usually begins in childhood and in adolescence as a result of multiple interactions among environmental and genetic factors. This study aimed to analyze the relationship between copy number variants (CNVs) in five genes and four intergenic regions with obesity in Mexican children. Methods. We studied 1423 children aged 6–12 years. Anthropometric measurements and blood levels of biochemical parameters were obtained. Identification of CNVs was performed by real-time PCR. The effect of CNVs on obesity or body composition was assessed using regression models adjusted for age, gender, and family history of obesity. Results. Gains in copy numbers of LEPR and NEGR1 were associated with decreased body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and risk of abdominal obesity, whereas gain in ARHGEF4 and CPXCR1 and the intergenic regions 12q15c, 15q21.1a, and 22q11.21d and losses in INS were associated with increased BMI and WC. Conclusion. Our results indicate a possible contribution of CNVs in LEPR, NEGR1, ARHGEF4, and CPXCR1 and the intergenic regions 12q15c, 15q21.1a, and 22q11.21d to the development of obesity, particularly abdominal obesity in Mexican children. PMID:28428959

  17. Genome-Wide Prediction and Validation of Intergenic Enhancers in Arabidopsis Using Open Chromatin Signatures[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Wenli; Jiang, Jiming

    2015-01-01

    Enhancers are important regulators of gene expression in eukaryotes. Enhancers function independently of their distance and orientation to the promoters of target genes. Thus, enhancers have been difficult to identify. Only a few enhancers, especially distant intergenic enhancers, have been identified in plants. We developed an enhancer prediction system based exclusively on the DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. A set of 10,044 DHSs located in intergenic regions, which are away from any gene promoters, were predicted to be putative enhancers. We examined the functions of 14 predicted enhancers using the β-glucuronidase gene reporter. Ten of the 14 (71%) candidates were validated by the reporter assay. We also designed 10 constructs using intergenic sequences that are not associated with DHSs, and none of these constructs showed enhancer activities in reporter assays. In addition, the tissue specificity of the putative enhancers can be precisely predicted based on DNase I hypersensitivity data sets developed from different plant tissues. These results suggest that the open chromatin signature-based enhancer prediction system developed in Arabidopsis may serve as a universal system for enhancer identification in plants. PMID:26373455

  18. Magnetic decoupling of ferromagnetic metals through a graphene spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, I.; Papagno, M.; Ferrari, L.; Sheverdyaeva, P. M.; Mahatha, S. K.; Pacilé, D.; Carbone, C.

    2017-03-01

    We study the magnetic coupling between different ferromagnetic metals (FMs) across a graphene (G) layer, and the role of graphene as a thin covalent spacer. Starting with G grown on a FM substrate (Ni or Co), we deposited on top at room temperature several FM metals (Fe, Ni, Co). By measuring the dichroic effect of 3p photoemission lines we detect the magnetization of the substrate and the sign of the exchange coupling in FM overlayer at room temperature. We show that the G layer magnetically decouples the FM metals.

  19. Enhancing Asthma Medication Delivery: Spacers and Valved Holding Chambers.

    PubMed

    Schoessler, Sally; Winders, Tonya

    2016-07-01

    Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases managed by school nurses, and its management often includes the administration of bronchodilators delivered via a metered dose inhaler (MDI). The use of an MDI requires coordination and mastery of steps that must be performed correctly and in the proper order. These steps are greatly enhanced, especially in the pediatric population, through the use of medical devices-spacers and valved holding chambers. The purpose of this article is to review the rationale and implications for the use of these devices in the school setting. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Serial Position Effects in Nonword Repetition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, P.; Lipinski, J.; Abbs, B.; Lin, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    A growing body of research has emphasized the linkage between performance in immediate serial recall of lists, nonword repetition, and word learning. Recently, it has been reported that primacy and recency effects are obtained in repetition of individual syllables within nonwords (Gupta, in press). Five experiments examined whether such…

  1. Repetitions: A Cross-Cultural Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murata, Kumiko

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated how repetition is used in conversation among native speakers of British English, native speakers of Japanese, and Japanese speakers of English. Five interactional functions of repetition (interruption-orientated, solidarity, silence-avoidance, hesitation, and reformulation) were identified, as well as the cultural factors…

  2. Grade Repetition in Queensland State Prep Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    The current study considers grade repetition rates in the early years of schooling in Queensland state schools with specific focus on the pre-schooling year, Prep. In particular, it provides empirical evidence of grade repetition in Queensland state schools along with groups of students who are more often repeated. At the same time, much of the…

  3. Task Repetition and Second Language Speech Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Craig; Kormos, Judit; Minn, Danny

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between the repetition of oral monologue tasks and immediate gains in L2 fluency. It considers the effect of aural-oral task repetition on speech rate, frequency of clause-final and midclause filled pauses, and overt self-repairs across different task types and proficiency levels and relates these findings to…

  4. Repetition priming results in sensitivity attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Allenmark, Fredrik; Hsu, Yi-Fang; Roussel, Cedric; Waszak, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Repetition priming refers to the change in the ability to perform a task on a stimulus as a consequence of a former encounter with that very same item. Usually, repetition results in faster and more accurate performance. In the present study, we used a contrast discrimination protocol to assess perceptual sensitivity and response bias of Gabor gratings that are either repeated (same orientation) or alternated (different orientation). We observed that contrast discrimination performance is worse, not better, for repeated than for alternated stimuli. In a second experiment, we varied the probability of stimulus repetition, thus testing whether the repetition effect is due to bottom-up or top-down factors. We found that it is top-down expectation that determines the effect. We discuss the implication of these findings for repetition priming and related phenomena as sensory attenuation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention. PMID:25819554

  5. A new, simple method of making a spacer in interstitial brachytherapy for mobile tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, K; Kawazu, T; Morita, M; Uehara, S; Kunitake, N; Kanda, S

    2000-04-01

    This article demonstrates a new method of making a spacer that increases the distance between the mandible and implanted radioactive sources in interstitial brachytherapy for patients with mobile tongue cancer. Fifty-three patients with mobile tongue cancer underwent interstitial brachytherapy with spacers made by this new technique. Our spacer is not difficult to create or to use. The spacer was made from a plastic splint by using thermoforming techniques and quick self-curing resin, which did not need waxing, wiring, or casting. The surface of the spacer, which comes in contact with the tongue, is smooth because it is covered with tissue-conditioning material. There were no complaints of pain from the patients. Osteoradionecrosis of the mandible developed in only 1 (1.9%) of these patients. This spacer is simple to make and prevented osteoradionecrosis.

  6. A 500-ml plastic bottle: an effective spacer for children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Zar, Heather J; Asmus, Michael J; Weinberg, Eugene G

    2002-06-01

    Inhaled therapy using a metered-dose inhaler (MDI) with attached spacer has been increasingly recognized as the optimal method for delivering asthma medication for acute attacks and chronic prophylaxis. However, in developing countries the cost and availability of commercially produced spacers limit the use of MDI-spacer delivery systems. A 500-ml plastic bottle has been recently adapted to function as a spacer. This article reviews the current data on the efficacy of this bottle-spacer and discusses its advantages and limitations. It is concluded that a modified 500-ml plastic bottle is an effective spacer; modification and use of this device should be incorporated into international guidelines for the management of children with asthma.

  7. Strategies for Using Repetition as a Powerful Teaching Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Kirt

    2011-01-01

    Brain research indicates that repetition is of vital importance in the learning process. Repetition is an especially useful tool in the area of music education. The success of repetition can be enhanced by accurate and timely feedback. From "simple repetition" to "repetition with the addition or subtraction of degrees of freedom," there are many…

  8. Strategies for Using Repetition as a Powerful Teaching Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Kirt

    2011-01-01

    Brain research indicates that repetition is of vital importance in the learning process. Repetition is an especially useful tool in the area of music education. The success of repetition can be enhanced by accurate and timely feedback. From "simple repetition" to "repetition with the addition or subtraction of degrees of freedom," there are many…

  9. Optimizing Soft Tissue Management and Spacer Design in Segmental Bone Defects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    3. Debride 10 grams of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles. 4. Place an interlocking intramedullary nail using a custom spacer to maintain...5-cm defect length. 5. Place a pre-molded 5 cm long x 2 cm diameter PMMA spacer around the nail in the defect. 6. Irrigate the wound with normal...using a “bomb bay door opening”. 4. Remove the spacer without damaging the membrane or nail . 5. Collect appropriate IM samples as defined below (see

  10. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between Successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz.

  11. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher is described suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz. 14 figs.

  12. Intergenic Sequence Comparison of Escherichia coli Isolates Reveals Lifestyle Adaptations but Not Host Specificity▿

    PubMed Central

    White, A. P.; Sibley, K. A.; Sibley, C. D.; Wasmuth, J. D.; Schaefer, R.; Surette, M. G.; Edge, T. A.; Neumann, N. F.

    2011-01-01

    Establishing the risk of human infection is one of the goals of public health. For bacterial pathogens, the virulence and zoonotic potential can often be related to their host source. Escherichia coli bacteria are common contaminants of water associated with human recreation and consumption, and many strains are pathogenic. In this study, we analyzed three promoter-containing intergenic regions from 284 diverse E. coli isolates in an attempt to identify molecular signatures associated with specific host types. Promoter sequences controlling production of curli fimbriae, flagella, and nutrient import yielded a phylogenetic tree with isolates clustered by established phylogenetic grouping (A, B1, B2, and D) but not by host source. Virulence genes were more prevalent in groups B2 and D isolates and in human isolates. Group B1 isolates, primarily from nonhuman sources, were the most genetically similar, indicating that they lacked molecular adaptations to specific host environments and were likely host generalists. Conversely, B2 isolates, primarily from human sources, displayed greater genetic distances and were more likely to be host adapted. In agreement with these hypotheses, prevalence of σS activity and the rdar morphotype, phenotypes associated with environmental survival, were significantly higher in B1 isolates than in B2 isolates. Based on our findings, we speculate that E. coli host specificity is not defined by genome-wide sequence changes but, rather, by the presence or absence of specific genes and associated promoter elements. Furthermore, the requirements for colonization of the human gastrointestinal tract may lead to E. coli lifestyle changes along with selection for increased virulence. PMID:21908635

  13. Systematically profiling and annotating long intergenic non-coding RNAs in human embryonic stem cell

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While more and more long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) were identified to take important roles in both maintaining pluripotency and regulating differentiation, how these lincRNAs may define and drive cell fate decisions on a global scale are still mostly elusive. Systematical profiling and comprehensive annotation of embryonic stem cells lincRNAs may not only bring a clearer big picture of these novel regulators but also shed light on their functionalities. Results Based on multiple RNA-Seq datasets, we systematically identified 300 human embryonic stem cell lincRNAs (hES lincRNAs). Of which, one forth (78 out of 300) hES lincRNAs were further identified to be biasedly expressed in human ES cells. Functional analysis showed that they were preferentially involved in several early-development related biological processes. Comparative genomics analysis further suggested that around half of the identified hES lincRNAs were conserved in mouse. To facilitate further investigation of these hES lincRNAs, we constructed an online portal for biologists to access all their sequences and annotations interactively. In addition to navigation through a genome browse interface, users can also locate lincRNAs through an advanced query interface based on both keywords and expression profiles, and analyze results through multiple tools. Conclusions By integrating multiple RNA-Seq datasets, we systematically characterized and annotated 300 hES lincRNAs. A full functional web portal is available freely at http://scbrowse.cbi.pku.edu.cn. As the first global profiling and annotating of human embryonic stem cell lincRNAs, this work aims to provide a valuable resource for both experimental biologists and bioinformaticians. PMID:24564552

  14. The RIB element in the goaG-pspF intergenic region of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, G; Model, P

    1997-05-01

    The sequence (2,700 bp) between the aldH and pspF genes of Escherichia coli was determined. The pspF gene encodes a sigma54 transcriptional activator of the phage shock protein (psp) operon (pspA to pspE). Downstream of the pspF transcribed region are two open reading frames (ORFs), ordL and goaG, convergently oriented with respect to pspF. These two ORFs, together with the adjacent aldH gene, may constitute a novel operon (aldH-ordL-goaG). The goaG-pspF intergenic region contains a complex extragenic mosaic element, RIB. The structure of this RIB element, which belongs to the BIME-1 family, is Y(REP1) > 16 < Z1(REP2), where Y and Z1 are palindromic units and the central 16 bases contain an L motif with an ihf consensus sequence. DNA fragments containing the L motif of the psp RIB element effectively bind integration host factor (IHF), while the Y palindromic unit (REP1) of the same RIB element binds DNA gyrase weakly. Computer prediction of the pspF mRNA secondary structure suggested that the transcribed stem-loop structures formed by the 3'-flanking region of the pspF transcript containing the RIB element can stabilize and protect pspF mRNA. Analysis of pspF steady-state mRNA levels showed that transcripts with an intact RIB element are much more abundant than those truncated at the 3' end by deletion of either the entire RIB element or a single Z1 sequence (REP2). Thus, the pspF 3'-flanking region containing the RIB element has an important role in the stabilization of the pspF transcript.

  15. Systematically characterizing dysfunctional long intergenic non-coding RNAs in multiple brain regions of major psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongying; Li, Feng; Deng, Yulan; Liu, Ling; Lan, Yujia; Zhang, Xinxin; Zhao, Tingting; Xu, Chaohan; Xu, Chun; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are severe neuropsychiatric disorders with serious impact on patients, together termed “major psychosis”. Recently, long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) were reported to play important roles in mental diseases. However, little was known about their molecular mechanism in pathogenesis of SZ and BD. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on 82 post-mortem brain tissues from three brain regions (orbitofrontal cortex (BA11), anterior cingulate cortex (BA24) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA9)) of patients with SZ and BD and control subjects, generating over one billion reads. We characterized lincRNA transcriptome in the three brain regions and identified 20 differentially expressed lincRNAs (DELincRNAs) in BA11 for BD, 34 and 1 in BA24 and BA9 for SZ, respectively. Our results showed that these DELincRNAs exhibited brain region-specific patterns. Applying weighted gene co-expression network analysis, we revealed that DELincRNAs together with other genes can function as modules to perform different functions in different brain regions, such as immune system development in BA24 and oligodendrocyte differentiation in BA9. Additionally, we found that DNA methylation alteration could partly explain the dysregulation of lincRNAs, some of which could function as enhancers in the pathogenesis of major psychosis. Together, we performed systematical characterization of dysfunctional lincRNAs in multiple brain regions of major psychosis, which provided a valuable resource to understand their roles in SZ and BD pathology and helped to discover novel biomarkers. PMID:27661005

  16. Genome-wide identification and characterization of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianqin; Wu, Bin; Xu, Jiang; Liu, Chang

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a white-rot fungus best-known for its medicinal activities. We have previously sequenced its genome and annotated the protein coding genes. However, long non-coding RNAs in G. lucidum genome have not been analyzed. In this study, we have identified and characterized long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNA) in G. lucidum systematically. We developed a computational pipeline, which was used to analyze RNA-Seq data derived from G. lucidum samples collected from three developmental stages. A total of 402 lincRNA candidates were identified, with an average length of 609 bp. Analysis of their adjacent protein-coding genes (apcGenes) revealed that 46 apcGenes belong to the pathways of triterpenoid biosynthesis and lignin degradation, or families of cytochrome P450, mating type B genes, and carbohydrate-active enzymes. To determine if lincRNAs and these apcGenes have any interactions, the corresponding pairs of lincRNAs and apcGenes were analyzed in detail. We developed a modified 3' RACE method to analyze the transcriptional direction of a transcript. Among the 46 lincRNAs, 37 were found unidirectionally transcribed, and 9 were found bidirectionally transcribed. The expression profiles of 16 of these 37 lincRNAs were found to be highly correlated with those of the apcGenes across the three developmental stages. Among them, 11 are positively correlated (r>0.8) and 5 are negatively correlated (r<-0.8). The co-localization and co-expression of lincRNAs and those apcGenes playing important functions is consistent with the notion that lincRNAs might be important regulators for cellular processes. In summary, this represents the very first study to identify and characterize lincRNAs in the genomes of basidiomycetes. The results obtained here have laid the foundation for study of potential lincRNA-mediated expression regulation of genes in G. lucidum.

  17. The music of trees: the intergenerative tie between primary care and public health.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Stories help us frame and understand complex ideas and challenges. Metaphors are particularly powerful linguistic devices that guide and extend our thinking by bridging conceptual domains, for example to consider the brain as a digital computer. Trees are widely used as metaphors for broad concepts like evolution, history, society, and even life itself, i.e. 'the tree of life'. Tree-like diagrams of roots and branches are used to demonstrate historical and cultural relationships, for example, between different species or different languages. In this paper, we describe a theatrical character called a tree doctor which is a living metaphor. A human being, namely the author, lectures, acts or dances as a tree and offers lessons to Homo Sapiens about 'holistic' ideas of health. The character teaches us to not only see the value of our relationships to trees, but the importance of seeing forests as well the individual trees. The metaphorical statement that we should not 'miss the forest for the trees' means we should learn to think of health embedded in systems and communities. In medicine, we too often focus on individual molecules, pharmaceuticals, or even patients and miss the bigger picture of public and environmental health. In a time of great ecological system change, the tree doctor points to broad ethical responsibility for each other and future generations of humans and other living creatures. The character embraces arts and particularly music as a powerful way of infusing purpose and improving the qualities of our lives together, especially as we age. The tree doctor knows the value of intergenerational relationships. But it also points to intergenerative innovations across many cultural domains, disciplines and professions. The tree doctor supports primary care and empowers the value of intergenerational relationships, art and music in the recommendations doctors make to patients to improve their health and well-being.

  18. Negative correlation between expression level and evolutionary rate of long intergenic noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Managadze, David; Rogozin, Igor B; Chernikova, Diana; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Koonin, Eugene V

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian genomes contain numerous genes for long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). The functions of the lncRNAs remain largely unknown but their evolution appears to be constrained by purifying selection, albeit relatively weakly. To gain insights into the mode of evolution and the functional range of the lncRNA, they can be compared with much better characterized protein-coding genes. The evolutionary rate of the protein-coding genes shows a universal negative correlation with expression: highly expressed genes are on average more conserved during evolution than the genes with lower expression levels. This correlation was conceptualized in the misfolding-driven protein evolution hypothesis according to which misfolding is the principal cost incurred by protein expression. We sought to determine whether long intergenic ncRNAs (lincRNAs) follow the same evolutionary trend and indeed detected a moderate but statistically significant negative correlation between the evolutionary rate and expression level of human and mouse lincRNA genes. The magnitude of the correlation for the lincRNAs is similar to that for equal-sized sets of protein-coding genes with similar levels of sequence conservation. Additionally, the expression level of the lincRNAs is significantly and positively correlated with the predicted extent of lincRNA molecule folding (base-pairing), however, the contributions of evolutionary rates and folding to the expression level are independent. Thus, the anticorrelation between evolutionary rate and expression level appears to be a general feature of gene evolution that might be caused by similar deleterious effects of protein and RNA misfolding and/or other factors, for example, the number of interacting partners of the gene product.

  19. The music of trees: the intergenerative tie between primary care and public health

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stories help us frame and understand complex ideas and challenges. Metaphors are particularly powerful linguistic devices that guide and extend our thinking by bridging conceptual domains, for example to consider the brain as a digital computer. Trees are widely used as metaphors for broad concepts like evolution, history, society, and even life itself, i.e. ‘the tree of life’. Tree-like diagrams of roots and branches are used to demonstrate historical and cultural relationships, for example, between different species or different languages. In this paper, we describe a theatrical character called a tree doctor which is a living metaphor. A human being, namely the author, lectures, acts or dances as a tree and offers lessons to Homo Sapiens about ‘holistic’ ideas of health. The character teaches us to not only see the value of our relationships to trees, but the importance of seeing forests as well the individual trees. The metaphorical statement that we should not ‘miss the forest for the trees’ means we should learn to think of health embedded in systems and communities. In medicine, we too often focus on individual molecules, pharmaceuticals, or even patients and miss the bigger picture of public and environmental health. In a time of great ecological system change, the tree doctor points to broad ethical responsibility for each other and future generations of humans and other living creatures. The character embraces arts and particularly music as a powerful way of infusing purpose and improving the qualities of our lives together, especially as we age. The tree doctor knows the value of intergenerational relationships. But it also points to intergenerative innovations across many cultural domains, disciplines and professions. The tree doctor supports primary care and empowers the value of intergenerational relationships, art and music in the recommendations doctors make to patients to improve their health and well-being. PMID:28250826

  20. Heat transfer near spacer grids in rod bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Heat transfer data from several sources have been assembled which show the effect of spacer grids on local heat transfer within a rod bundle. Both single phase (air and steam) data and two phase (steam/water) data show heat transfer augmentation in the grid region. Heat transfer improvement immediately beyond the grid ranges from a few percent to over fifty percent in these experiments, depending on flow conditions. The data are examined using several nondimensional parameters which relate the above effects to known quantities. The relative effect of the grid on local heat transfer is altered by both the Reynolds number and blockage ratio. Twenty to thirty hydraulic diameters are required before the local effect of the grid dissipates. Locally, both the single phase and two phase data show the same trends. Comparison of the single and two phase data also shown some differences. Some film boiling data indicate that an altered heat transfer regime may exist near the grid. High rod heat transfer coefficients at the grid locations indicate either a rewet of the rods or at least a change from film boiling to transition boiling near the spacer. The comparison also indicates that the film boiling data is affected on a global as well as local basis. This is due to the effect of the grid on the liquid distribution.

  1. The CRISPR Spacer Space Is Dominated by Sequences from Species-Specific Mobilomes

    PubMed Central

    Shmakov, Sergey A.; Sitnik, Vassilii; Makarova, Kira S.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Severinov, Konstantin V.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and CRISPR-associated protein (CRISPR-Cas) systems store the memory of past encounters with foreign DNA in unique spacers that are inserted between direct repeats in CRISPR arrays. For only a small fraction of the spacers, homologous sequences, called protospacers, are detectable in viral, plasmid, and microbial genomes. The rest of the spacers remain the CRISPR “dark matter.” We performed a comprehensive analysis of the spacers from all CRISPR-cas loci identified in bacterial and archaeal genomes, and we found that, depending on the CRISPR-Cas subtype and the prokaryotic phylum, protospacers were detectable for 1% to about 19% of the spacers (~7% global average). Among the detected protospacers, the majority, typically 80 to 90%, originated from viral genomes, including proviruses, and among the rest, the most common source was genes that are integrated into microbial chromosomes but are involved in plasmid conjugation or replication. Thus, almost all spacers with identifiable protospacers target mobile genetic elements (MGE). The GC content, as well as dinucleotide and tetranucleotide compositions, of microbial genomes, their spacer complements, and the cognate viral genomes showed a nearly perfect correlation and were almost identical. Given the near absence of self-targeting spacers, these findings are most compatible with the possibility that the spacers, including the dark matter, are derived almost completely from the species-specific microbial mobilomes. PMID:28928211

  2. Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajiv; Belz, Jodi; Markovic, Stacey; Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William; Niedre, Mark; Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G.; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy-inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Methods and Materials: Here we have fabricated implantable nanoplatforms or chemoradiation therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow-release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemoradiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix and are physically identical in size to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5 mm × 0.8 mm). The silica nanoparticles, 250 nm in diameter, were conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug, and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology, and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with an anticancer drug, docetaxel. We evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results: The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked by the use of optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue in contrast to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer, which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth in contrast to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions: The imaging with the Cy7.5 spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in a slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, in contrast to the rapid clearance of the drugs when

  3. Cervical interfacet spacers and maintenance of cervical lordosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee A; Straus, David C; Traynelis, Vincent C

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The cervical interfacet spacer (CIS) is a relatively new technology that can increase foraminal height and area by facet distraction. These offer the potential to provide indirect neuroforaminal decompression while simultaneously enhancing fusion potential due to the relatively large osteoconductive surface area and compressive forces exerted on the grafts. These potential benefits, along with the relative ease of implantation during posterior cervical fusion procedures, make the CIS an attractive adjuvant in the management of cervical pathology. One concern with the use of interfacet spacers is the theoretical risk of inducing iatrogenic kyphosis. This work tests the hypothesis that interfacet spacers are associated with loss of cervical lordosis. METHODS Records from patients undergoing posterior cervical fusion at Rush University Medical Center between March 2011 and December 2012 were reviewed. The FacetLift CISs were used in all patients. Preoperative and postoperative radiographic data were reviewed and the Ishihara indices and cervical lordotic angles were measured and recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using STATA software. RESULTS A total of 64 patients were identified in whom 154 cervical levels were implanted with machined allograft interfacet spacers. Of these, 15 patients underwent anterior-posterior fusions, 4 underwent anterior-posterior-anterior fusions, and the remaining 45 patients underwent posterior-only fusions. In the 45 patients with posterior-only fusions, a total of 110 levels were treated with spacers. There were 14 patients (31%) with a single level treated, 16 patients (36%) with two levels treated, 5 patients (11%) with three levels treated, 5 patients (11%) with four levels treated, 1 patient (2%) with five levels treated, and 4 patients (9%) with six levels treated. Complete radiographic data were available in 38 of 45 patients (84%). On average, radiographic follow-up was obtained at 256.9 days (range 48-524 days

  4. Precision markedly attenuates repetitive lift capacity.

    PubMed

    Collier, Brooke R; Holland, Laura; McGhee, Deirdre; Sampson, John A; Bell, Alison; Stapley, Paul J; Groeller, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of precision on time to task failure in a repetitive whole-body manual handling task. Twelve participants were required to repetitively lift a box weighing 65% of their single repetition maximum to shoulder height using either precise or unconstrained box placement. Muscle activity, forces exerted at the ground, 2D body kinematics, box acceleration and psychophysical measures of performance were recorded until task failure was reached. With precision, time to task failure for repetitive lifting was reduced by 72%, whereas the duration taken to complete a single lift and anterior deltoid muscle activation increased by 39% and 25%, respectively. Yet, no significant difference was observed in ratings of perceived exertion or heart rate at task failure. In conclusion, our results suggest that when accuracy is a characteristic of a repetitive manual handling task, physical work capacity will decline markedly. The capacity to lift repetitively to shoulder height was reduced by 72% when increased accuracy was required to place a box upon a shelf. Lifting strategy and muscle activity were also modified, confirming practitioners should take into consideration movement precision when evaluating the demands of repetitive manual handling tasks.

  5. Item repetition in short-term memory: Ranschburg repeated.

    PubMed

    Henson, R N

    1998-09-01

    In serial recall from short-term memory, repeated items are recalled well when close together (repetition facilitation), but not when far apart (repetition inhibition; the Ranschburg effect). These effects were re-examined with a new scoring scheme that addresses the possibility that repetitions are distinct tokens in memory. Repetition facilitation and repetition inhibition proved robust, and were shown to interact with the temporal grouping of items (Experiment 1), which affected the probability of detecting repetition (Experiments 2A and 2B). It is argued that detection of a repetition is necessary for repetition facilitation, attributable to the tagging of immediate repetition, whereas the failure to detect or remember a repetition results in repetition inhibition, attributable to an automatic suppression of previous responses and a bias against guessing repeated items (Experiment 3). The findings are discussed in relation to models of short-term memory and the phenomenon of repetition blindness.

  6. [Correction of lower eyelid retraction with a porous polyethylene (Medpor) lower eyelid spacer--Medpor spacer in lower eyelid retraction].

    PubMed

    de Jong-Hesse, Y; Paridaens, D A

    2006-07-01

    The correction of lower eyelid retraction remains a challenge with established techniques having disadvantages. A recently described alternative is implantation of an ultrathin high density porous polyethylene lower eyelid spacer (Medpor LES). We report our experience on implanting this Medpor LES, especially in patients with lower eyelid retraction due to Graves' orbitopathy. All patients receiving a Medpor LES between March 2003 and November 2004 in the Rotterdam Eye Hospital were included. Indications and preceding procedures as well as the degree of proptosis were noted. Preoperative and postoperative lower eyelid retraction were compared by measuring scleral show inferior to the limbus (LSS). Postoperative complications, recurrent retraction and secondary surgical procedures were recorded. Out of 12 patients (16 eyelids) in whom a Medpor LES was inserted 8 patients suffered from Graves' orbitopathy. Mean follow-up was 7.5 months (range 4 - 11 months). Final cosmetic outcome was good in 8/16 eyelids and improved in 7/16 eyelids. Lower eyelid retraction (LSS) was reduced significantly (1.34 mm +/- 0.214 (mean +/- std. error of mean), p = 0.004). Complications included eyelid contour deformity (4/16 eyelids), remaining irritation of the eye (1/16) and problems in down gaze (4/16) as well as recurrent lower eyelid retraction (2/16) requiring further surgery in 3 of 11 patients. In selected patients, insertion of a Medpor lower eyelid spacer may be a good alternative to correct lower eyelid retraction.

  7. The Dunaliella salina organelle genomes: large sequences, inflated with intronic and intergenic DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David R.; Lee, Robert W.; Cushman, John C.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Tran, Duc; Polle, Juergen E.

    2010-05-07

    Abstract Background: Dunaliella salina Teodoresco, a unicellular, halophilic green alga belonging to the Chlorophyceae, is among the most industrially important microalgae. This is because D. salina can produce massive amounts of β-carotene, which can be collected for commercial purposes, and because of its potential as a feedstock for biofuels production. Although the biochemistry and physiology of D. salina have been studied in great detail, virtually nothing is known about the genomes it carries, especially those within its mitochondrion and plastid. This study presents the complete mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences of D. salina and compares them with those of the model green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. Results: The D. salina organelle genomes are large, circular-mapping molecules with ~60% noncoding DNA, placing them among the most inflated organelle DNAs sampled from the Chlorophyta. In fact, the D. salina plastid genome, at 269 kb, is the largest complete plastid DNA (ptDNA) sequence currently deposited in GenBank, and both the mitochondrial and plastid genomes have unprecedentedly high intron densities for organelle DNA: ~1.5 and ~0.4 introns per gene, respectively. Moreover, what appear to be the relics of genes, introns, and intronic open reading frames are found scattered throughout the intergenic ptDNA regions -- a trait without parallel in other characterized organelle genomes and one that gives insight into the mechanisms and modes of expansion of the D. salina ptDNA. Conclusions: These findings confirm the notion that chlamydomonadalean algae have some of the most extreme organelle genomes of all eukaryotes. They also suggest that the events giving rise to the expanded ptDNA architecture of D. salina and other Chlamydomonadales may have occurred early in the evolution of this lineage. Although interesting from a genome evolution standpoint, the D. salina organelle DNA sequences will aid in the development of a viable

  8. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs in Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiang; Liu, Chang

    2014-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a white-rot fungus best-known for its medicinal activities. We have previously sequenced its genome and annotated the protein coding genes. However, long non-coding RNAs in G. lucidum genome have not been analyzed. In this study, we have identified and characterized long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNA) in G. lucidum systematically. We developed a computational pipeline, which was used to analyze RNA-Seq data derived from G. lucidum samples collected from three developmental stages. A total of 402 lincRNA candidates were identified, with an average length of 609 bp. Analysis of their adjacent protein-coding genes (apcGenes) revealed that 46 apcGenes belong to the pathways of triterpenoid biosynthesis and lignin degradation, or families of cytochrome P450, mating type B genes, and carbohydrate-active enzymes. To determine if lincRNAs and these apcGenes have any interactions, the corresponding pairs of lincRNAs and apcGenes were analyzed in detail. We developed a modified 3′ RACE method to analyze the transcriptional direction of a transcript. Among the 46 lincRNAs, 37 were found unidirectionally transcribed, and 9 were found bidirectionally transcribed. The expression profiles of 16 of these 37 lincRNAs were found to be highly correlated with those of the apcGenes across the three developmental stages. Among them, 11 are positively correlated (r>0.8) and 5 are negatively correlated (r<−0.8). The co-localization and co-expression of lincRNAs and those apcGenes playing important functions is consistent with the notion that lincRNAs might be important regulators for cellular processes. In summary, this represents the very first study to identify and characterize lincRNAs in the genomes of basidiomycetes. The results obtained here have laid the foundation for study of potential lincRNA-mediated expression regulation of genes in G. lucidum. PMID:24932683

  9. Genome-wide interrogation reveals hundreds of long intergenic noncoding RNAs that associate with cardiometabolic traits.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Rachel L; Zhang, Xuan; Nuñez, Sara; Xue, Chenyi; Zhao, Wei; Reed, Eric; Salaheen, Danish; Foulkes, Andrea S; Li, Mingyao; Reilly, Muredach P

    2016-07-15

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) play important roles in disease, but the vast majority of these transcripts remain uncharacterized. We defined a set of 54 944 human lincRNAs by drawing on four publicly available lincRNA datasets, and annotated ∼2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from each of 15 cardiometabolic genome-wide association study datasets into these lincRNAs. We identified hundreds of lincRNAs with at least one trait-associated SNP: 898 SNPs in 343 unique lincRNAs at 5% false discovery rate, and 469 SNPs in 146 unique lincRNAs meeting Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.05. An additional 64 trait-associated lincRNAs were identified using a class-level testing strategy at Bonferroni-corrected P < 0.05. To better understand the genomic context and prioritize trait-associated lincRNAs, we examined the pattern of linkage disequilibrium between SNPs in the lincRNAs and SNPs that met genome-wide-significance in the region (±500 kb of lincRNAs). A subset of the lincRNA-trait association findings was replicated in independent Genome-wide association studies data from the Pakistan Risk of Myocardial Infarction Study study. For trait-associated lincRNAs, we also investigated synteny and conservation relative to mouse, expression patterns in five cardiometabolic-relevant tissues, and allele-specific expression in RNA sequencing data for adipose tissue and leukocytes. Finally, we revealed a functional role in human adipocytes for linc-NFE2L3-1, which is expressed in adipose and is associated with waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI. This comprehensive profile of trait-associated lincRNAs provides novel insights into disease mechanism and serves as a launching point for interrogation of the biology of specific lincRNAs in cardiometabolic disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Integrative Analysis of Normal Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bawa, Pushpinder; Zackaria, Sajna; Verma, Mohit; Gupta, Saurabh; Srivatsan, R; Chaudhary, Bibha; Srinivasan, Subhashini

    2015-01-01

    Recently, large numbers of normal human tissues have been profiled for non-coding RNAs and more than fourteen thousand long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are found expressed in normal human tissues. The functional roles of these normal lincRNAs (nlincRNAs) in the regulation of protein coding genes in normal and disease biology are yet to be established. Here, we have profiled two RNA-seq datasets including cancer and matched non-neoplastic tissues from 12 individuals from diverse demography for both coding genes and nlincRNAs. We find 130 nlincRNAs significantly regulated in cancer, with 127 regulated in the same direction in the two datasets. Interestingly, according to Illumina Body Map, significant numbers of these nlincRNAs display baseline null expression in normal prostate tissues but are specific to other tissues such as thyroid, kidney, liver and testis. A number of the regulated nlincRNAs share loci with coding genes, which are either co-regulated or oppositely regulated in all cancer samples studied here. For example, in all cancer samples i) the nlincRNA, TCONS_00029157, and a neighboring tumor suppressor factor, SIK1, are both down regulated; ii) several thyroid-specific nlincRNAs in the neighborhood of the thyroid-specific gene TPO, are both up-regulated; and iii) the TCONS_00010581, an isoform of HEIH, is down-regulated while the neighboring EZH2 gene is up-regulated in cancer. Several nlincRNAs from a prostate cancer associated chromosomal locus, 8q24, are up-regulated in cancer along with other known prostate cancer associated genes including PCAT-1, PVT1, and PCAT-92. We observe that there is significant bias towards up-regulation of nlincRNAs with as high as 118 out of 127 up-regulated in cancer, even though regulation of coding genes is skewed towards down-regulation. Considering that all reported cancer associated lincRNAs (clincRNAs) are biased towards up-regulation, we conclude that this bias may be functionally relevant. PMID:25933431

  11. The internal transcribed spacer region of belonolaimus (nemata: belonolaimidae).

    PubMed

    Cherry, T; Szalanski, A L; Todd, T C; Powers, T O

    1997-03-01

    Belonolaimus isolates from six U.S. states were compared by restriction endonuclease digestion of amplified first internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1) of the nuclear ribosomal genes. Seven restriction enzymes were selected for evaluation based on restriction sites inferred from the nucleotide sequence of a South Carolina Belonolaimus isolate. Amplified product size from individuals of each isolate was approximately 700 bp. All Midwestern isolates gave distinct restriction digestion patterns. Isolates identified morphologically as Belonolaimus longicaudatus from Florida, South Carolina, and Palm Springs, California, were identical for ITS1 restriction patterns. The correlation between ITS1 restriction patterns and the distribution of B. longicaudatus isolates suggest that the California isolate is a relatively recent introduction into the state.

  12. Effect of carbon spacer length on zwitterionic carboxybetaines.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qing; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2013-02-07

    Zwitterionic carboxybetaines (CBs) are ubiquitous in nature and considered promising materials for biological and chemical applications. A thorough understanding of the effect of carbon spacer length (CSL) on molecular properties is important. In this work, using molecular dynamics simulation and quantum chemical calculation, we investigated the effect of CSL on the molecular properties of CB molecules. The hydration number, structure, and dynamics of carboxylic and trimethyl ammonium groups were investigated and found to present different behaviors in regards to the variation of CSL. The simulation results with partial charges developed from quantum chemical calculations were compared with those with partial charges from the OPLS all atom (OPLSAA) force field. The hydration free energy of CB molecules and CB-Na(+) association was also studied as a function of CSL.

  13. Minor and repetitive head injury.

    PubMed

    Buki, Andras; Kovacs, Noemi; Czeiter, Endre; Schmid, Kara; Berger, Rachel P; Kobeissy, Firas; Italiano, Domenico; Hayes, Ronald L; Tortella, Frank C; Mezosi, Emese; Schwarcz, Attila; Toth, Arnold; Nemes, Orsolya; Mondello, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in the young, active population and expected to be the third leading cause of death in the whole world until 2020. The disease is frequently referred to as the silent epidemic, and many authors highlight the "unmet medical need" associated with TBI.The term traumatically evoked brain injury covers a heterogeneous group ranging from mild/minor/minimal to severe/non-salvageable damages. Severe TBI has long been recognized to be a major socioeconomical health-care issue as saving young lives and sometimes entirely restituting health with a timely intervention can indeed be extremely cost efficient.Recently it has been recognized that mild or minor TBI should be considered similarly important because of the magnitude of the patient population affected. Other reasons behind this recognition are the association of mild head injury with transient cognitive disturbances as well as long-term sequelae primarily linked to repeat (sport-related) injuries.The incidence of TBI in developed countries can be as high as 2-300/100,000 inhabitants; however, if we consider the injury pyramid, it turns out that severe and moderate TBI represents only 25-30 % of all cases, while the overwhelming majority of TBI cases consists of mild head injury. On top of that, or at the base of the pyramid, are the cases that never show up at the ER - the unreported injuries.Special attention is turned to mild TBI as in recent military conflicts it is recognized as "signature injury."This chapter aims to summarize the most important features of mild and repetitive traumatic brain injury providing definitions, stratifications, and triage options while also focusing on contemporary knowledge gathered by imaging and biomarker research.Mild traumatic brain injury is an enigmatic lesion; the classification, significance, and its consequences are all far less defined and explored than in more severe forms of brain injury

  14. Repetitive strain injury: causes, treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, Ann

    Repetitive strain injury (RSI) has become increasingly prevalent with the growth of computer-based and automated occupations. While environmental factors such as work stations and repetitive tasks are primary causes, a number of secondary causes can increase a person's risk of RSI. Various treatments provide relief but the rate of recovery varies widely. Prevention involves adopting a range of measures that will also promote recovery in those with RSI.

  15. Modified Open-door Laminoplasty Using Hydroxyapatite Spacers and Miniplates

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sung-Won; Kim, Bum-Joon; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Lim, Dong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cervical laminoplasty has been widely accepted as one of the major treatments for cervical myelopathy and various modifications and supplementary procedures have been devised to achieve both proper decompression and stability of the cervical spine. We present the retrospectively analyzed results of a modified unilateral open-door laminoplasty using hydroxyapatite (HA) spacers and malleable titanium miniplates. Methods From June 2008 to May 2012, among patients diagnosed with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, the patients who received laminoplasty were reviewed. Clinical outcome was assessed using Frankel grade and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score. The radiologic parameters were obtained from plain films, 3-dimensional computed tomography and magnetic resonance images. Results A total of 125 cervical laminae were operated in 38 patients. 11 patients received 4-level laminoplasty and 27 patients received 3-level laminoplasty. Postoperatively, the mean Frankel grade and JOA score were significantly improved from 3.97 to 4.55 and from 12.76 to 14.63, respectively (p<0.001). Radiologically, cervical curvature was worsened from 19.09 to 15.60 (p=0.025). The percentage of range of motion preservation was 73.32±22.39%. The axial dimension of the operated spinal canal was increased from 1.75 to 2.70 cm2 (p<0.001). Conclusion In the presenting study, unilateral open-door laminoplasty using HA spacers and miniplates appears to be a safe, rapid and easy procedure to obtain an immediate and rigid stabilization of the posterior elements of the cervical spine. This modified laminoplasty method showed effective expansion of the spinal canal and favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:25346767

  16. Optimized spacer layer thickness for plasmonic-induced enhancement of photocurrent in a-Si:H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Z. M.; Nasser, H.; Özkol, E.; Günöven, M.; Abak, K.; Canli, S.; Bek, A.; Turan, R.

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonic interfaces consisting of silver nanoparticles of different sizes (50-100 nm) have been processed by the self-assembled dewetting technique and integrated to hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) using SiN x spacer layers to investigate the dependence of optical trapping enhancement on spacer layer thickness through the enhancements in photocurrent. Samples illuminated from the a-Si:H side exhibit a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) that is red-shifted with the increasing particle size and broadened into the red with the increasing spacer layer thickness. The photocurrent measured in a-Si:H is not only consistent with the red-shift and broadening of the LSPR, but exhibits critical dependence on the spacer layer thickness also. The samples with plasmonic interfaces and a SiN x spacer layer exhibit appreciable enhancement of photocurrent compared with flat a-Si:H reference depending on the size of the Ag nanoparticle. Simulations conducted on one-dimensional square structures exhibit electric fields that are localized near the plasmonic structures but extend appreciably into the higher refractive index a-Si:H. These simulations produce a clear red-shift and broadening of extinction spectra for all spacer layer thicknesses and predict an enhancement in photocurrent in agreement with experimental results. The spectral dependence of photocurrent for six plasmonic interfaces with different Ag nanoparticle sizes and spacer layer thicknesses are correlated with the optical spectra and compared with the simulations to predict an optimal spacer layer thickness.

  17. Ertapenem Articulating Spacer for the Treatment of Polymicrobial Total Knee Arthroplasty Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marinkovic, Jugoslav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are the primary cause of early failure of the total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Polymicrobial TKA infections are often associated with a higher risk of treatment failure. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of ertapenem loaded spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial PJI. Methods. There were 18 patients enrolled; nine patients with polymicrobial PJI treated with ertapenem loaded articulating spacers were compared to the group of 9 patients treated with vancomycin or ceftazidime loaded spacers. Results. Successful reimplantation with revision implants was possible in 66.67%. Ertapenem spacers were used in 6 cases in primary two-stage procedure and in 3 cases in secondary spacer exchange. Successful infection eradication was achieved in all cases; final reimplantation with revision knee arthroplasty implants was possible in 6 cases. Conclusion. Ertapenem can be successfully used as antimicrobial addition to the cement spacers in two-stage revision treatment of polymicrobial PJIs. However, this type of spacer may also be useful in the treatment of infections caused by monomicrobial extended spectrum beta-lactamases producing gram-negative bacilli. Further clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ertapenem spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial and monomicrobial PJIs. PMID:27366173

  18. Investigation of multiphase multicomponent aerosol flow dictating pMDI-spacer interactions.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Saurabh; Peri, S Prasad; Chaudhuri, Bodhisattwa

    2017-08-30

    The use of Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) for the treatment of asthma and other chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases is frequently associated with breath-actuation synchronization problems and poor pulmonary delivery, particularly amongst the pediatric and geriatric population groups. Spacers, or Valved Holding Chambers (VHCs), are frequently used to address these problems. However, the performance of spacers with different pMDIs is also highly variable and needs to be investigated. The purpose of the current study is to develop a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model which can characterize multiphase multicomponent aerosol flow issuing from a commercial suspension-based pMDI into a spacer. The CFD model was initially calibrated against published experimental measurements in order to appropriately model the spray characteristics. This model was subsequently used to examine several combinations of inhaler, spacer and USP Throat geometries under different discharge rates of coflow air. The CFD model predictions compared favorably with experimental measurements. In particular, the predictions show, in accordance with experimental determinations, a decrease of drug retained by the spacers with increasing coflow air. The recirculation observed near the obstructions in axial path of the spray within either spacer is considered to be central for increasing spray retention and drug deposition behavior. Fluid flow patterns within the spacers were correlated with drug deposition behavior through a dimensionless variable, the Recirculation index (RCI). Bigger particles were found to be selectively retained within the spacer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Incentive device improves spacer technique but not clinical outcome in preschool children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Schultz, André; Sly, Peter D; Zhang, Guicheng; Venter, André; Le Souëf, Peter N; Devadason, Sunalene G

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the influence of an incentive device, the Funhaler, on spacer technique and symptom control in young children with asthma and recurrent wheeze. Randomised controlled trial where 132 2-6 year old asthmatic children received regular inhaled fluticasone through Aerochamber Plus, or Funhaler. The setting was a research clinic at Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, Australia. Subjects were followed up for a year. The main outcome measure was asthma symptoms. Proficiency in spacer technique was measured as salbutamol inhaled from spacer onto filter. Quality of life was measured every three months. Groups were compared in terms of spacer technique, symptoms and quality of life. The relationship between spacer technique and clinical outcome was examined. There was no difference between Funhaler and Aerochamber groups in wheeze free days, cough free days, bronchodilator free days or quality of life (P = 0.90, 0.87, 0.74 and 0.11 respectively). Spacer technique was better in the Funhaler group (P = 0.05), particularly in subjects younger than 4 years of age (P = 0.002). Drug dose on filter (as the mean of five 100 mg doses) ranged from zero to 136 mg. Use of Funhaler incentive device does not improve clinical outcome, but improves spacer technique in children younger than 4 years. Variability in drug delivery is large in young children using pressurised metered dose inhalers and spacers. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  20. High-percentage lung delivery in children from detergent-treated spacers.

    PubMed

    Wildhaber, J H; Janssens, H M; Piérart, F; Dore, N D; Devadason, S G; LeSouëf, P N

    2000-05-01

    Pressurized metered-dose inhalers attached to spacers are now the most common form of delivery of anti-asthma medication in children. However, no reliable data are available of how much drug reaches the lungs in children of different ages. This information is crucial, as it determines the efficacy of therapy. In this study, we present information on the amount of drug reaching the lungs in children from a pressurized metered-dose inhaler attached to a detergent-coated spacer. We studied 18 asthmatic children inhaling radiolabeled salbutamol through detergent treated spacers to minimize electrostatic charge on the spacer wall. Lung deposition was much higher than expected when using detergent-coated spacers. Mean (SD) lung deposition, expressed as a percentage of the total actuated dose (five actuations), was 16.4% (5.5) in younger children inhaling through a small volume spacer, and 28.2% (6.7) and 41.8% (3. 8) in older children inhaling with different breathing patterns through a large volume spacer. These findings have major implications for dosage regimens for inhaled anti-asthma medication in children. Lower doses may be sufficient for adequate drugs delivered through spacers treated for static to achieve a desired clinical response. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Results of a programme to improve house staff use of metered dose inhalers and spacers.

    PubMed

    Lee-Wong, M; Mayo, P H

    2003-04-01

    Metered dose inhalers (MDIs) and spacers are used widely in the treatment of asthma. Medical personnel who are responsible for training patients must themselves be proficient with the devices. The proficiency of a group of new medical interns with use of MDI and spacer devices was determined, and improvement in their use of these devices was sought. Fifty six medical interns tested at the start of their first house staff training year. The ability of medical interns to use MDIs and spacers was assessed using a visual scoring system before and after a large group lecture emphasising proper device use and once again after an intensive one-on-one training session with an attending physician. Initially, only 5% used an MDI perfectly. This improved to 13% after a lecture and demonstration, and 73% after an intensive one-on-one session. Almost no new interns could use a collapsible or tube spacer properly initially. This improved to 15% and 29% respectively after a lecture. After one-on-one training, correct technique was increased to 69% for collapsible spacer and 95% for the tube spacer. Analysis of individual steps of MDI use showed that interns had particular difficulty in coordinating actuation with inhalation. The tube spacer appeared easiest to learn. Incoming medical house staff have limited ability to use MDI with and without spacers. A large group lecture is relatively ineffective when compared with a one-on-one training session in training with these devices.

  2. Repetitive sequence environment distinguishes housekeeping genes

    PubMed Central

    Eller, C. Daniel; Regelson, Moira; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stan; Horvath, Steve; Marahrens, York

    2007-01-01

    Housekeeping genes are expressed across a wide variety of tissues. Since repetitive sequences have been reported to influence the expression of individual genes, we employed a novel approach to determine whether housekeeping genes can be distinguished from tissue-specific genes their repetitive sequence context. We show that Alu elements are more highly concentrated around housekeeping genes while various longer (>400-bp) repetitive sequences ("repeats"), including Long Interspersed Nuclear Element 1 (LINE-1) elements, are excluded from these regions. We further show that isochore membership does not distinguish housekeeping genes from tissue-specific genes and that repetitive sequence environment distinguishes housekeeping genes from tissue-specific genes in every isochore. The distinct repetitive sequence environment, in combination with other previously published sequence properties of housekeeping genes, were used to develop a method of predicting housekeeping genes on the basis of DNA sequence alone. Using expression across tissue types as a measure of success, we demonstrate that repetitive sequence environment is by far the most important sequence feature identified to date for distinguishing housekeeping genes. PMID:17141428

  3. Functional Characterization of MC1R-TUBB3 Intergenic Splice Variants of the Human Melanocortin 1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Olivares, Conchi; Castejón-Griñán, Maria; Abrisqueta, Marta; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R) expressed in melanocytes is a major determinant of skin pigmentation. It encodes a Gs protein-coupled receptor activated by α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH). Human MC1R has an inefficient poly(A) site allowing intergenic splicing with its downstream neighbour Tubulin-β-III (TUBB3). Intergenic splicing produces two MC1R isoforms, designated Iso1 and Iso2, bearing the complete seven transmembrane helices from MC1R fused to TUBB3-derived C-terminal extensions, in-frame for Iso1 and out-of-frame for Iso2. It has been reported that exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) might promote an isoform switch from canonical MC1R (MC1R-001) to the MC1R-TUBB3 chimeras, which might lead to novel phenotypes required for tanning. We expressed the Flag epitope-tagged intergenic isoforms in heterologous HEK293T cells and human melanoma cells, for functional characterization. Iso1 was expressed with the expected size. Iso2 yielded a doublet of Mr significantly lower than predicted, and impaired intracellular stability. Although Iso1- and Iso2 bound radiolabelled agonist with the same affinity as MC1R-001, their plasma membrane expression was strongly reduced. Decreased surface expression mostly resulted from aberrant forward trafficking, rather than high rates of endocytosis. Functional coupling of both isoforms to cAMP was lower than wild-type, but ERK activation upon binding of αMSH was unimpaired, suggesting imbalanced signaling from the splice variants. Heterodimerization of differentially labelled MC1R-001 with the splicing isoforms analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation was efficient and caused decreased surface expression of binding sites. Thus, UVR-induced MC1R isoforms might contribute to fine-tune the tanning response by modulating MC1R-001 availability and functional parameters.

  4. The CRISPR Spacer Space Is Dominated by Sequences from Species-Specific Mobilomes.

    PubMed

    Shmakov, Sergey A; Sitnik, Vassilii; Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Severinov, Konstantin V; Koonin, Eugene V

    2017-09-19

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and CRISPR-associated protein (CRISPR-Cas) systems store the memory of past encounters with foreign DNA in unique spacers that are inserted between direct repeats in CRISPR arrays. For only a small fraction of the spacers, homologous sequences, called protospacers, are detectable in viral, plasmid, and microbial genomes. The rest of the spacers remain the CRISPR "dark matter." We performed a comprehensive analysis of the spacers from all CRISPR-cas loci identified in bacterial and archaeal genomes, and we found that, depending on the CRISPR-Cas subtype and the prokaryotic phylum, protospacers were detectable for 1% to about 19% of the spacers (~7% global average). Among the detected protospacers, the majority, typically 80 to 90%, originated from viral genomes, including proviruses, and among the rest, the most common source was genes that are integrated into microbial chromosomes but are involved in plasmid conjugation or replication. Thus, almost all spacers with identifiable protospacers target mobile genetic elements (MGE). The GC content, as well as dinucleotide and tetranucleotide compositions, of microbial genomes, their spacer complements, and the cognate viral genomes showed a nearly perfect correlation and were almost identical. Given the near absence of self-targeting spacers, these findings are most compatible with the possibility that the spacers, including the dark matter, are derived almost completely from the species-specific microbial mobilomes.IMPORTANCE The principal function of CRISPR-Cas systems is thought to be protection of bacteria and archaea against viruses and other parasitic genetic elements. The CRISPR defense function is mediated by sequences from parasitic elements, known as spacers, that are inserted into CRISPR arrays and then transcribed and employed as guides to identify and inactivate the cognate parasitic genomes. However, only a small fraction of the CRISPR spacers match

  5. Factors affecting the efficiency of aerosol therapy with pressurised metered-dose inhalers through plastic spacers.

    PubMed

    Chuffart, A A; Sennhauser, F H; Wildhaber, J H

    2001-01-12

    The main objective of this study was to compare the in vitro delivery of salbutamol from a chlorofluorocarbon(CFC)-propelled pressurised metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) versus a newly developed hydrofluoroalkane(HFA)-propelled pMDI through various spacers. In addition, we aimed to study the effect on bronchodilator response when using an optimal pMDI/spacer combination for aerosol delivery compared to a suboptimal combination. Particle size distribution and output from salbutamol pMDIs containing either CFC propellants (Ventolin) or HFA propellants (Airomir) were measured using a multistage liquid impinger (MSLI) and compared to that through both detergent-coated (non-static) or untreated (static) large volume (Nebuhaler, Volumatic) and small volume (Aerochamber) plastic spacers. Flow-volume curves (FEV1) were obtained from twelve asthmatic children with known significant bronchodilator response (8 males), aged 13-17 years, randomly inhaling salbutamol from a CFC-pMDI through a static spacer (Nebuhaler) and from an HFA-pMDI through a non-static spacer (Nebuhaler). In vitro output of particles in the respirable range (< 6.8 microns) from HFA-pMDIs was significantly higher than that from CFC-pMDIs using various spacers. Removal of electrostatic charge increased output from CFC- and HFA-pMDIs through all spacers by 17-82%. The mean (SD) bronchodilator response after inhalation of salbutamol from a CFC-pMDI through a static spacer was 7.1% (6.3%) compared to 17.5% (7.9%) after inhalation from an HFA-pMDI through a non-static spacer (p = 0.002). Use of a newly developed HFA-propelled pMDI greatly improves drug delivery through spacers compared to a CFC-propelled pMDI. However, electrostatic charge in plastic spacers remains the key determinant limiting delivery of salbutamol from a pMDI through spacers, and can be reduced by soaking the spacer in a household detergent. Using an optimal pMDI/spacer combination leads to a significantly improved bronchodilator response.

  6. Home-made spacers for bronchodilator therapy in children with acute asthma: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Zar, H J; Brown, G; Donson, H; Brathwaite, N; Mann, M D; Weinberg, E G

    1999-09-18

    A metered-dose inhaler (MDI) with spacer is the best way to deliver bronchodilator therapy for treatment of acute asthma. In developing countries, commercially produced spacers are generally unavailable or too costly. We tested the efficacy of home-made spacers (500 mL plastic bottle, polystyrene cup) compared with a conventional spacer for delivery of a beta2 agonist via MDI for children with acute asthma. We studied children aged 5 to 13 years with acute asthma, stratified into those with mild airways obstruction (peak expiratory flow [PEF] 60-79% of predicted value) or moderate to severe airways obstruction (PEF 20-59% of predicted value). A beta2 agonist (fenoterol hydrobromide) was given via MDI and one of four randomly assigned spacers (conventional spacer, sealed 500 mL plastic bottle, unsealed 500 mL bottle, 200 mL polystyrene cup). Clinical score, pulmonary function tests, and oximetry were recorded at baseline and 15 min after treatment. If a second bronchodilator treatment was needed, nebulised fenoterol was given and the assessment repeated 15 min later. Primary outcome measures were changes in clinical score and pulmonary function, and need for and response to nebulisation. 88 children were eligible for study. In 44 children with moderate to severe airways obstruction, a cup gave significantly less bronchodilation (median increase in: forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1] 0%; PEF 12%) compared with the conventional spacer (37%; 59%), sealed bottle (33%; 36%), or unsealed bottle (18%; 21%, p<0.05 for difference between groups). Nebulisation was required by ten of 11 who had used a cup, nine of 11 who had used an unsealed bottle, eight of 11 who had used a sealed bottle, and only four of 11 who had used a conventional spacer. After nebulisation, improvement in FEV1 (15.5%) and PEF (26%) was more marked in children who had used a cup than in those who had used a conventional spacer (5.5% FEV1; 4% PEF), sealed bottle (3%; 0%), or unsealed bottle (7%; 9

  7. Phylogenetic diversity of rhizobia associated with horsegram [Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam.) Verdc.] grown in South India based on glnII, recA and 16S-23S intergenic sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Appunu, Chinnaswamy; Ganesan, Govindan; Kalita, Michał; Kaushik, Raghavan; Saranya, Balamurugan; Prabavathy, Vaiyapuri Ramalingam; Sudha, Nair

    2011-04-01

    Horsegram [Macrotyloma uniflorum (Lam.) Verdc.) is an important grain legume and fodder crop in India. Information on root nodule endosymbionts of this legume in India is limited. In the present study, 69 isolates from naturally occurring root nodules of horsegram collected from two agro-eco-climatic regions of South India was analyzed by generation rate, acid/alkali reaction on YMA medium, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region (IGS), and sequence analyses of IGS and housekeeping genes glnII and recA. Based on the rDNA IGS RFLP by means of three restriction enzymes rhizobia were grouped in five clusters (I-V). By sequence analysis of 16S-23S rDNA IGS identified genotypes of horsegram rhizobia were distributed into five divergent lineages of Bradyrhizobium genus which comprised (I) the IGS type IV rhizobia and valid species B. yuanmingense, (II) the strains of IGS type I and Bradyrhizobium sp. ORS 3257 isolated from Vigna sp., (III) the strains of the IGS type II and Bradyrhizobium sp. CIRADAc12 from Acacia sp., (IV) the IGS type V strains and Bradyrhizobium sp. genospecies IV, and (V) comprising genetically distinct IGS type III strains which probably represent an uncharacterized new genomic species. Nearly, 87% of indigenous horsegram isolates (IGS types I, II, III, and V) could not be related to any other species within the genus Bradyrhizobium. Phylogeny based on housekeeping glnII and recA genes confirmed those results found by the analysis of the IGS sequence. All the isolated rhizobia nodulated Macrotyloma sp. and Vigna spp., and only some of them formed nodules on Arachis hypogeae. The isolates within each IGS type varied in their ability to fix nitrogen. Selection for high symbiotic effective strains could reward horsegram production in poor soils of South India where this legume is largely cultivated.

  8. In vitro release of antibiotics from commercial PMMA beads and articulating hip spacers.

    PubMed

    Moojen, Dirk Jan F; Hentenaar, Bram; Charles Vogely, H; Verbout, Abraham J; Castelein, René M; Dhert, Wouter J A

    2008-12-01

    The efficacy and benefits of high-dose antibiotic cement spacers compared with beads in the treatment of an infected prosthesis have been shown. However, in clinical practice, commercial, low-dose antibiotic bone cement is often used. This study investigated the in vitro antibiotic release of hip spacers made from Refobacin-Palacos-R or Antibiotic-Simplex-P cement compared with Septopal beads. Antibiotic concentrations were measured during 6 weeks. All carriers showed a burst release, but spacers showed little additional release after the first week. Cumulative release was 27.5 +/- 2.3 mg for Palacos, 23.8 +/- 0.2 mg for Simplex, and 188.3 +/- 9.3 mg for Septopal (P < .001). Despite the efficacy of high-dose antibiotic bone cement spacers, we believe one should be cautious toward using low-dose antibiotic bone cement for spacers because this could result in an unsuccessful eradication of infection.

  9. Development of new spacer device geometry: a CFD study (part I).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ricardo F; Teixeira, Senhorinha F C F; Silva, Luís F; Teixeira, José C F; Antunes, Henedina

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is a widespread disease, affecting more than 300 million individuals. The treatment in children is based upon an administration of a pressurised metered-dose inhaler added with a spacer. The efficiency of drug delivery to the patient is strongly affected by the transient airflow pattern inside the spacer device. This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of airflow inside a commercially available spacer device with wide application. This study, carried out in Fluent™, was the basis of an optimisation procedure developed to improve the geometry of the spacer and develop a more efficient product. The results show that an appropriate control of the boundary layer development, by changing the spacer shape, reduces the length of the recirculation zones and improves the flow. It can be concluded that CFD is a powerful technique that can be successfully applied to optimise the geometry of such medical devices.

  10. Cement spacer loaded with antibiotics for infected implants of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kengo; Miyagawa, Naoki; Masaoka, Toshinori; Katori, Youichi; Shishido, Takaaki; Imakiire, Atsuhiro

    2009-01-01

    It is difficult to treat infected implants of the hip joints. Such treatment involves immeasurable physical and psychological suffering of the patients. We used antibiotic-impregnated cement spacers in 17 cases of infection after total hip arthroplasty and bipolar arthroplasty with good clinical results. We thoroughly removed any foreign material and formed an antibiotic-impregnated cement spacer into a similar shape as that of the implants. A cement spacer enables high-concentration antibiotics to act on infected sites. Also, it can prevent leg length discrepancy and atrophy of bones or muscles. Although cement spacers have been reported to have problems regarding shape and strength, we achieved good results with a cement spacer mold in the present study. No recurring infection has been found at a mean follow-up period of 3 years and 2 months.

  11. Hydrophobic spacers enhance the helicity and lectin binding of synthetic, pH-responsive glycopolypeptides.

    PubMed

    Mildner, Robert; Menzel, Henning

    2014-12-08

    The influence of different hydrophobic spacers on the structural and lectin binding properties of well-defined glycopolypeptides decorated with galactose moieties was investigated. All glycopolypeptides were prepared from a poly(α,l-glutamic acid) (PGA) precursor via a polymer-analogous aqueous amide coupling reaction. Thereby, two alkyl spacers of different length (C6 and C11) as well as an aromatic spacer were introduced between the backbone and the galactose moieties, as confirmed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The secondary structure was investigated as a function of the sugar density and the pH by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. It was found that the helicity in acidic medium and thus the typical coil-to-helix transition is strongly enhanced by the hydrophobic spacers. Preliminary lectin binding tests via turbidimetric assay revealed that the spacers also significantly enhance the interaction of the glycopolypeptides with the lectin RCA120.

  12. Low temperature plasma-enhanced ALD enables cost-effective spacer defined double patterning (SDDP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beynet, Julien; Wong, Patrick; Miller, Andy; Locorotondo, Sabrina; Vangoidsenhoven, Diziana; Yoon, Tae-Ho; Demand, Marc; Park, Hyung-Sang; Vandeweyer, Tom; Sprey, Hessel; Yoo, Yong-Min; Maenhoudt, Mireille

    2009-12-01

    The inherent advantages of the Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition (PEALD) technology--excellent conformality and within wafer uniformity, no loading effect--overcome the limitations in this domain of the standard PECVD technique for spacer deposition. The low temperature process capability of PEALD silicon oxide enables direct spacer deposition on photoresist, thus suppressing the need of a patterned template hardmask to design the spacers. By decreasing the number of deposition and patterning steps, this so-called Direct Spacer Defined Double Patterning (DSDDP) integration reduces cost and complexity of the conventional SDDP approach. A successful integration is reported for 32 nm half-pitch polysilicon lines. The performances are promising, especially from the lines, which result from the PEALD spacers: Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) of 1.3 nm and Line Width Roughness (LWR) of 2.0 nm.

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of new spacers for use as dsDNA endcaps

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Pei-Sze; Laing, Brian M.; Balasundarum, Ganesan; Pingle, Maneesh; Friedman, Alan; Bergstrom, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    A series of aliphatic and aromatic spacer molecules designed to cap the ends of DNA duplexes have been synthesized. The spacers were converted into dimethoxytrityl protected phosphoramidites as synthons for oligonucleotides synthesis. The effect of the spacers on the stability of short DNA duplexes was assessed by melting temperature studies. Endcaps containing amide groups were found to be less stabilizing than the hexaethylene glycol spacer. Endcaps containing either a terthiophene or a naphthalene tetracarboxylic acid dimide were found to be significantly more stabilizing. The former showed a preference for stacking above an A•T base pair. Spacers containing only methylene (-CH2-) and amide (-CONH-) groups interact weakly with DNA and consequently may be optimal for applications that require minimal influence on DNA structure but require a way to hold the ends of double-stranded DNA together. PMID:20715857

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of new spacers for use as dsDNA end-caps.

    PubMed

    Ng, Pei-Sze; Laing, Brian M; Balasundarum, Ganesan; Pingle, Maneesh; Friedman, Alan; Bergstrom, Donald E

    2010-08-18

    A series of aliphatic and aromatic spacer molecules designed to cap the ends of DNA duplexes have been synthesized. The spacers were converted into dimethoxytrityl-protected phosphoramidites as synthons for oligonucleotides synthesis. The effect of the spacers on the stability of short DNA duplexes was assessed by melting temperature studies. End-caps containing amide groups were found to be less stabilizing than the hexaethylene glycol spacer. End-caps containing either a terthiophene or a naphthalene tetracarboxylic acid diimide were found to be significantly more stabilizing. The former showed a preference for stacking above an A*T base pair. Spacers containing only methylene (-CH(2)-) and amide (-CONH-) groups interact weakly with DNA and consequently may be optimal for applications that require minimal influence on DNA structure but require a way to hold the ends of double-stranded DNA together.

  15. Postprandial changes of fiber-degrading microbes in the rumen of sheep fed diets varying in type of forage as monitored by real-time PCR and automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis.

    PubMed

    Saro, C; Ranilla, M J; Carro, M D

    2012-12-01

    Four ruminally cannulated sheep were used in a crossover design to assess the postprandial changes of fiber-degrading microbes in the solid phase of the rumen of sheep fed 2 high-forage diets. The diets had forage:concentrate ratio of 70:30 (DM basis) and either alfalfa (Medicago sativa) hay (AL) or grass hay (GR) as forage (FOR). Sheep were fed twice daily, and samples from solid rumen digesta were taken at 0, 4, and 8 h after the morning feeding. Postprandial changes of DNA concentrations of all determined microbial populations were similar for the 2 diets. Samples taken at 4 h after feeding had lesser (P < 0.05) concentrations of total bacterial DNA determined with real-time PCR and bacterial diversity and greater (P < 0.05) protozoal DNA concentrations, relative abundance of fungal, Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, and Ruminococcus albus DNA compared with those taken at 0 and 8 h. No effect (P = 0.41 to 0.76) of FOR was detected either on concentrations of bacterial and protozoal DNA or the relative abundance of the 2 Ruminococcus DNA, but GR diet promoted greater (P < 0.001) relative abundance of F. succinogenes and fungal DNA compared with AL diet. Fibrobacter succinogenes was the most abundant (P < 0.05) of the 3 cellulolytic bacteria for both diets, with no differences (P < 0.05) between the 2 Ruminococcus species. Rumen pH and carboxymethylcellulase, Avicelase, and amylase activities were not affected (P = 0.15 to 0.69) by FOR, but xylanase activity was greater (P = 0.01) for GR diet. The influence of FOR on microbial communities in ruminal solid digesta was more evident in the first hours after feeding than at later times after feeding, which highlights the influence of sampling time when investigating dietary effects on rumen function and microbial populations.

  16. Preliminary analysis and design optimization of the short spacer truss of Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendy, A. S.; Patnaik, S. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Berke, L.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis, dynamic simulation, and design optimization of the short spacer truss of the Space Station Freedom are presented in this report. The short spacer truss will be positioned between the integrated equipment assembly (IEA) and another truss, called the long spacer truss, in the Space Station Freedom. During its launch in the Space Shuttle, the truss will be subjected to considerable in-span distributed inertia loads due to shuttle accelerations. The short spacer truss, therefore, has been modeled as a space frame to account for flexural response. Several parameters have been assumed, since the design specifications are in the process of development; hence the results presented should be considered preliminary. However, the automated analysis and design capabilities that have been developed can readily be used to generate an optimum design of the short spacer truss once the actual specifications have been determined. This report includes static and dynamic analyses of the short spacer truss, which have been obtained with the linear elastic code LE-HOST (in these analyses, LE-HOST data files have been automated to facilitate their future use for different design specifications of the short spacer truss); the dynamic animation of the short spacer truss, which has been carried out by using the results of the dynamic analysis and a post-processing feature of the modeling code PATRAN; and the optimum-weight design of the spacer truss, which was obtained under prescribed stress, displacement, and frequency constraints by using the design code COMETBOARDS. Examination of the analysis and design results revealed that the design could be improved if the configuration of the short spacer truss were modified to a certain extent. A modified configuration, which may simplify fabrication, has been suggested. The performance of this configuration has been evaluated and was found to be satisfactory under both static and dynamic conditions.

  17. Comparative lung bioavailability of fluticasone/salmeterol via a breath-actuated spacer and conventional plastic spacers.

    PubMed

    Nair, Arun; McKinlay, Lorna; Williamson, Peter; Short, Philip; Burns, Patricia; Lipworth, Brian J

    2011-04-01

    This study compares the in vivo relative lung bioavailability of Hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) Seretide delivered via unprimed and unwashed Aerochamber Plus (AP) or Volumatic (VM) spacers, a integrated breath-actuated vortex Synchro-Breathe (SB) device and an Evohaler pMDI (EH) device using adrenal suppression and early fall in serum potassium (K) as surrogates for respirable dose. Seventeen healthy volunteers completed this randomised double-blind, double-dummy crossover study. Single doses of placebo/Seretide 250 (total dose ex valve fluticasone 2000 mcg/salmeterol 200 mcg) were administered via the devices. Overnight urinary cortisol/creatinine (OUCC) and serum K were measured at baseline and after each dose. Significant suppression of OUCC and K occurred from baseline with the SB, AP and VM but not with the EH devices. The geometric mean fold suppression (95% confidence interval, p) was: EH, 1.59 (0.80-3.14, p=0.40); AP, 4.26 (3.01-6.02, p<0.001); VM, 3.11 (1.99-4.78, p<0. 001); SB, 3.29 (2.04-5.24, p<0.001). For K, the arithmetic mean fall (mmol/l) (95% confidence interval; p) was: EH, -0.10 (-0.25-0.05, p=0.18); AP, -0.23 (-0.41 to -0.04, p=0.02); VM, -0.22 (-0.44 to -0.01, p=0.04); SB, -0.28 (-0.42 to -0.13, p=0.001). The breath-actuated SB device was comparable to 'out of the box' small and large volume spacers and produced similar improvements in relative systemic lung bioavailability for fluticasone and salmeterol.

  18. Analysis of TNFAIP3, a feedback inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB and the neighbor intergenic 6q23 region in rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Dieguez-Gonzalez, Rebeca; Calaza, Manuel; Perez-Pampin, Eva; Balsa, Alejandro; Blanco, Francisco J; Cañete, Juan D; Caliz, Rafael; Carreño, Luis; de la Serna, Arturo R; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Benjamin; Ortiz, Ana Maria; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Pablos, Jose L; Narvaez, Javier; Navarro, Federico; Marenco, Jose L; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Genome-wide association studies of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have identified an association of the disease with a 6q23 region devoid of genes. TNFAIP3, an RA candidate gene, flanks this region, and polymorphisms in both the TNFAIP3 gene and the intergenic region are associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. We hypothesized that there is a similar association with RA, including polymorphisms in TNFAIP3 and the intergenic region. Methods To test this hypothesis, we selected tag-single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both loci. They were analyzed in 1,651 patients with RA and 1,619 control individuals of Spanish ancestry. Results Weak evidence of association was found both in the 6q23 intergenic region and in the TNFAIP3 locus. The rs582757 SNP and a common haplotype in the TNFAIP3 locus exhibited association with RA. In the intergenic region, two SNPs were associated, namely rs609438 and rs13207033. The latter was only associated in patients with anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies. Overall, statistical association was best explained by the interdependent contribution of SNPs from the two loci TNFAIP3 and the 6q23 intergenic region. Conclusions Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that several RA genetic factors exist in the 6q23 region, including polymorphisms in the TNFAIP3 gene, like that previously described for systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:19292917

  19. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation....5805 Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system. (a) Identification. A repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system is an external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed...

  20. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation....5805 Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system. (a) Identification. A repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system is an external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed...

  1. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation....5805 Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system. (a) Identification. A repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system is an external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed...

  2. The Prevalence and Phenomenology of Repetitive Behavior in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Joanna; Oliver, Chris; Arron, Kate; Burbidge, Cheryl; Berg, Katy

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence and phenomenology of repetitive behavior in genetic syndromes to detail profiles of behavior. The Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire (RBQ) provides fine-grained identification of repetitive behaviors. The RBQ was employed to examine repetitive behavior in Angelman (N = 104), Cornelia de Lange (N = 101), Cri-du-Chat…

  3. The Prevalence and Phenomenology of Repetitive Behavior in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Joanna; Oliver, Chris; Arron, Kate; Burbidge, Cheryl; Berg, Katy

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence and phenomenology of repetitive behavior in genetic syndromes to detail profiles of behavior. The Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire (RBQ) provides fine-grained identification of repetitive behaviors. The RBQ was employed to examine repetitive behavior in Angelman (N = 104), Cornelia de Lange (N = 101), Cri-du-Chat…

  4. Effects of structural changes in the dsdA-dsdC intergenic region on D-serine deaminase synthesis.

    PubMed

    McFall, E; Nikam, S S; Palchaudhuri, S

    1991-02-01

    Single-base-pair changes well upstream of its transcription initiation site resulted in partially to fully constitutive expression of the D-serine deaminase structural gene, dsdA, independently of the cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP-binding protein complex and of the specific D-serine deaminase activator protein. These promoter mutations appear to define a consensus sequence that is repeated several times. Basal expression of dsdA+ was also strongly enhanced by subcloning on multicopy plasmids, by the DNA gyrase inhibitor novobiocin, and in dsdC(Con) mutants by increasing growth temperature. These results suggest that activation of dsdA+ expression by the dsdC-encoded protein involves distortion of promoter DNA. A dsdA translation start at bp -731 was verified by subcloning of dsdC+. Plasmid-specified activator at a high concentration interfered with chromosomal dsdC(Con) expression, and the interference was enhanced by deletion of most of the intergenic region from the plasmid. Even at a high concentration, however, plasmid-specified activator did not activate expression of chromosomal dsdA+, and in one case it was actually repressive. These results confirm the strong cis tropism of plasmid-specified dsdC-encoded protein and suggest that it is mediated by multiple sites in the dsdA-dsdC intergenic region.

  5. Effects of structural changes in the dsdA-dsdC intergenic region on D-serine deaminase synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    McFall, E; Nikam, S S; Palchaudhuri, S

    1991-01-01

    Single-base-pair changes well upstream of its transcription initiation site resulted in partially to fully constitutive expression of the D-serine deaminase structural gene, dsdA, independently of the cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP-binding protein complex and of the specific D-serine deaminase activator protein. These promoter mutations appear to define a consensus sequence that is repeated several times. Basal expression of dsdA+ was also strongly enhanced by subcloning on multicopy plasmids, by the DNA gyrase inhibitor novobiocin, and in dsdC(Con) mutants by increasing growth temperature. These results suggest that activation of dsdA+ expression by the dsdC-encoded protein involves distortion of promoter DNA. A dsdA translation start at bp -731 was verified by subcloning of dsdC+. Plasmid-specified activator at a high concentration interfered with chromosomal dsdC(Con) expression, and the interference was enhanced by deletion of most of the intergenic region from the plasmid. Even at a high concentration, however, plasmid-specified activator did not activate expression of chromosomal dsdA+, and in one case it was actually repressive. These results confirm the strong cis tropism of plasmid-specified dsdC-encoded protein and suggest that it is mediated by multiple sites in the dsdA-dsdC intergenic region. PMID:1899415

  6. Identification and Functional Prediction of Large Intergenic Noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Fu, Liyuan; Koganti, Prasanthi P; Wang, Lei; Hand, Jacqelyn M; Ma, Hao; Yao, Jianbo

    2016-04-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recognized in recent years as key regulators of diverse cellular processes. Genome-wide large-scale projects have uncovered thousands of lncRNAs in many model organisms. Large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are lncRNAs that are transcribed from intergenic regions of genomes. To date, no lincRNAs in non-model teleost fish have been reported. In this report, we present the first reference catalog of 9674 rainbow trout lincRNAs based on analysis of RNA-Seq data from 15 tissues. Systematic analysis revealed that lincRNAs in rainbow trout share many characteristics with those in other mammalian species. They are shorter and lower in exon number and expression level compared with protein-coding genes. They show tissue-specific expression pattern and are typically co-expressed with their neighboring genes. Co-expression network analysis suggested that many lincRNAs are associated with immune response, muscle differentiation, and neural development. The study provides an opportunity for future experimental and computational studies to uncover the functions of lincRNAs in rainbow trout.

  7. Shewanella knowledgebase: integration of the experimental data and computational predictions suggests a biological role for transcription of intergenic regions

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinets, Tatiana V; Romine, Margaret; Schmoyer, Denise D; Kora, Guruprasad H; Syed, Mustafa H; Leuze, Michael Rex; Serres, Margrethe H.; Park, Byung; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2010-01-01

    Shewanellae are facultative gamma-proteobacteria whose remarkable respiratory versatility has resulted in interest in their utility for bioremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides and for energy generation in microbial fuel cells. Extensive experimental efforts over the last several years and the availability of 21 sequenced Shewanella genomes made it possible to collect and integrate a wealth of information on the genus into one public resource providing new avenues for making biological discoveries and for developing a system level understanding of the cellular processes. The Shewanella knowledgebase was established in 2005 to provide a framework for integrated genome-based studies on Shewanella ecophysiology. The present version of the knowledgebase provides access to a diverse set of experimental and genomic data along with tools for curation of genome annotations and visualization and integration of genomic data with experimental data. As a demonstration of the utility of this resource, we examined a single microarray data set from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 for new insights into regulatory processes. The integrated analysis of the data predicted a new type of bacterial transcriptional regulation involving co-transcription of the intergenic region with the downstream gene and suggested a biological role for co-transcription that likely prevents the binding of a regulator of the upstream gene to the regulator binding site located in the intergenic region. Database URL: http://shewanella-knowledgebase.org:8080/Shewanella/ or http://spruce.ornl.gov:8080/Shewanella/

  8. A Survey of Repetitive Control for Nonlinear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Quan; Cai, Kai-Yuan

    2010-10-01

    In aerospace engineering and industry, control tasks are often of a periodic nature, while repetitive control is especially suitable for tracking and rejection of periodic exogenous signals. Because of limited research effort on nonlinear systems, we give a survey of repetitive control for nonlinear systems in this paper. First, a brief introduction of repetitive control is presented. Then, after giving a brief overview of repetitive control for linear systems, this paper summarizes design methods and existing problems of repetitive control for nonlinear systems in detail. Lastly, relationships between repetitive control and other control schemes are analyzed to recognize repetitive control from different aspects more insightfully.

  9. Sequencing of long stretches of repetitive DNA

    PubMed Central

    De Bustos, Alfredo; Cuadrado, Angeles; Jouve, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA is widespread in eukaryotic genomes, in some cases making up more than 80% of the total. SSRs are a type of repetitive DNA formed by short motifs repeated in tandem arrays. In some species, SSRs may be organized into long stretches, usually associated with the constitutive heterochromatin. Variation in repeats can alter the expression of genes, and changes in the number of repeats have been linked to certain human diseases. Unfortunately, the molecular characterization of these repeats has been hampered by technical limitations related to cloning and sequencing. Indeed, most sequenced genomes contain gaps owing to repetitive DNA-related assembly difficulties. This paper reports an alternative method for sequencing of long stretches of repetitive DNA based on the combined use of 1) a linear vector to stabilize the cloning process, and 2) the use of exonuclease III for obtaining progressive deletions of SSR-rich fragments. This strategy allowed the sequencing of a fragment containing a stretch of 6.2 kb of continuous SSRs. To demonstrate that this procedure can sequence other kinds of repetitive DNA, it was used to examine a 4.5 kb fragment containing a cluster of 15 repeats of the 5S rRNA gene of barley. PMID:27819354

  10. DNA polymerase-catalyzed elongation of repetitive hexanucleotide sequences: application to creation of repetitive DNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Hiroyuki; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the elongation of various hexanucleotide sequences with thermophilic DNA polymerase, under isothermal or thermal cyclic reaction conditions. We prepared 10 types of double repeat hexanucleotide duplexes with various GC compositions containing between 0 and 6 GC nucleotides per repeat and incubated these duplexes with thermophilic Taq DNA polymerase and dNTPs at various temperatures. All of the model repetitive short duplexes were elongated under the isothermal incubation conditions, although there were some differences in the elongation efficiencies derived from the GC composition in the repetitive sequences. It was also found that all of the model repetitive duplexes were extended more effectively by a 3-step thermal cyclic reaction involving denaturation, annealing, and extension. On the basis of this technique, we prepared a glutamate-encoding short repetitive duplex and created long repetitive DNAs under isothermal and thermal cyclic reaction conditions. DNA sequencing analysis of the cloned repetitive DNA revealed that well-ordered long repetitive DNAs of various chain lengths were created by this DNA polymerase-catalyzed ligation method, and these were easily cloned into vectors by the TA-cloning method. This method could be useful for obtaining DNAs encoding arbitrary long repetitive amino acid sequences more effectively than the conventional T4 ligase-catalyzed ligation method.

  11. Efficacy of a home-made spacer with acute exacerbation of bronchial asthma: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Singhal, T; Garg, H; Arora, H S; Lodha, R; Pandey, R M; Kabra, S K

    2001-01-01

    Metered dose inhaler (MDI) with spacer is the preferred method for administration of aerosolized medications in pediatric asthma. The expense of commercial spacers limits their use and indigenous alternatives have therefore been developed. Information on the clinical efficacy of home-made spacers is limited. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy of a valve-less home-made spacer with a commercial spacer in delivering salbutamol via MDI in acute asthma. Asthmatic children aged 5-15 years who presented with an acute exacerbation to the pediatric chest clinic of a tertiary care hospital were enrolled in a single blinded randomized parallel group study. The study patients received 10 puffs of salbutamol (100 microg/puff) via MDI-home-made spacer or MDI-commercial spacer. Pre and post inhalation measurements of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), oxygen saturation (SaO2), respiratory rate (RR), pulse rate (PR) were made and compared. Sixty children were enrolled in the study, 31 were administered salbutamol via the home-made spacer and 29 via the commercial spacer. The median increase in PEFR was similar in both the groups (20.8% vs 22.2%, p=0.4), clinical improvement being satisfactory in all patients. The valve-less home-made spacer is equally efficacious and cheaper than the commercial spacer in administering bronchodilators in acute exacerbations of asthma. Further studies on the efficacy of home-made spacer in delivery of inhaled steroids are needed.

  12. Occult spinous process fractures associated with interspinous process spacers.

    PubMed

    Kim, David H; Tantorski, Mark; Shaw, Jeremy; Martha, Juli; Li, Ling; Shanti, Nael; Rencu, Tal; Parazin, Stephen; Kwon, Brian

    2011-07-15

    Prospective observational study. To provide a more accurate estimate of the rate of acute spinous process fractures associated with IPS surgery. Biomechanical cadaveric studies have suggested adequate spinous process strength to support placement of interspinous process spacers (IPS). Postoperative spinous process fractures have been reported in one%-to 5.8% of patients in previous series based on routine biplanar radiographic evaluation. However, most fractures occur between the base and midportion of the spinous process in an area that is typically difficult to visualize on plain radiographs due to device design. All patients underwent preoperative biplanar plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine to confirm anatomy favorable for IPS placement and rule out fracture or spondylolysis. Postoperatively, all patients underwent repeat CT imaging within six months of surgery, biplanar radiographs at two weeks, six weeks, three months, six months, and one year. All studies were reviewed independently by a neuroradiologist and two orthopedic spine surgeons. Fifty implants (38 L4-5, 12 L3-4) were placed in 38 patients who completed follow-up and were included in final analysis. Three IPS designs were included (34 Medtronic X-STOP titanium, 8 X-STOP PEEK, 8 Lanx Aspen). Postoperative CT revealed 11 nondisplaced spinous process fractures in 11 patients (28.9% of patients, 22% of levels). Five fractures were associated with mild to moderate lumbar back pain and six fractures were asymptomatic. No patient reported a traumatic incident. No fracture was identifiable on plain radiographs. One fracture displaced during follow-up evaluation. Three patients underwent IPS removal and laminectomy. Three fractures healed by CT in one year. Overall, patients with fractures tended toward poorer outcomes by Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ) (28.5% vs. 34.8% improvement in symptom severity, P = 0.496; 21.4% vs. 30.7% improvement in physical function, P = 0

  13. Biofouling of spiral-wound nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes: a feed spacer problem.

    PubMed

    Vrouwenvelder, J S; Graf von der Schulenburg, D A; Kruithof, J C; Johns, M L; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2009-02-01

    Biofouling was studied in full-scale and pilot-scale installations, test-rigs and membrane fouling monitors by conventional methods as well as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Independent of permeate production, the feed spacer channel pressure drop and biomass concentration increased similarly in a nanofiltration pilot installation. In the presence of a feed spacer the absolute feed channel pressure drop increase caused by biomass accumulation was much higher than when a feed spacer was absent: in both spiral-wound nanofiltration and reverse osmosis systems biofouling is dominantly a feed spacer problem. This conclusion is based on (i) in-situ visual observations of the fouling accumulation, (ii) in-situ non-destructive observations of the fouling accumulation and velocity distribution profiles using MRI, and (iii) differences in pressure drop and biomass development in monitors with and without feed spacer. MRI studies showed that even a restricted biofilm accumulation on the feed channel spacer influenced the velocity distribution profile strongly. Biofouling control should be focused on the development of low fouling feed spacers and hydrodynamic conditions to restrict the impact of biomass accumulation on the feed channel pressure drop increase.

  14. [Bench-test evaluation of spacer devices for fluticasone delivery to infants].

    PubMed

    Pourchez, J; Leclerc, L; Sarry, G; Vergnon, J-M; Dubus, J C

    2017-01-01

    Use of a spacer device to optimize the delivery of fluticasone to infants with asthma is an important issue and clinicians require guidance around the choice of device. This in vitro study characterizes the particle size and the fluticasone delivery via 9 spacers. We used an in vitro infant nasal cast with two different inspiratory flow rates (50 and 100mL/s). Fluticasone particle size in the aerosol was evaluated by laser diffractometry and tracheal deposition by spectrophotometric assay. Significant differences in particle size were observed between the 9 spacers (similar D50 but D90 from 5.65±0.65 to 8.80±1.35μm). A 75 % or higher respirable fraction was obtained for only 5 spacers. The 50mL/s flow rate lead to the best drug delivery. At this flow, OptiChamber(®) (62±3 %) and Vortex(®) (91±8.5 %) had a tracheal deposition over 50 % of the initial dose of fluticasone, although the 7 other spacers exhibited a fluticasone deposition less than 25 %. This study shows a wide variation of drug delivery between the 9 spacers studied. We demonstrate that a low inspiratory flow and a spacer showing antistatic properties facilitate drug delivery. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The Annular Two-phase Flow on Rod Bundle: The Effects of Spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Tomoaki; Pham, Son; Kawara, Zensaku; Yokomine, Takehiko

    2013-11-01

    The annular two-phase flow on rod bundle keeps an important role in many heat exchange systems but our knowledge about it, especially the interaction between the liquid film flowing on the rods' surfaces and the spacers is very limited. This study is aimed to the investigation of how the spacer affects the disturbance waves of the flow in a 3 × 3 simulating BWR fuel rod bundle test section. Firstly, the characteristics of the disturbance waves at both upstream and downstream locations of the spacer were obtained by using reflected light arrangement with a high speed camera Phantom V7.1 (Vision Research Inc.) and a Nikon macro lens 105mm f/2.8. The data showed that the parameters such as frequency and circumferential coherence of the disturbance waves are strongly modified when they go through the spacer. Then, the observations at the locations right before and after the spacer were performed by using the back light arrangement with the same high speed camera and a Cassegrain optical system (Seika Cooperation). The obtained images at micro-scale of time and space provided the descriptions of the wavy interface behaviors right before and after the spacer as well as different droplets creation processes caused by the presence of this spacer.

  16. Repetition Priming and Repetition Suppression: A Case for Enhanced Efficiency Through Neural Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Gotts, Stephen J.; Chow, Carson C.; Martin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Stimulus repetition in identification tasks leads to improved behavioral performance ("repetition priming") but attenuated neural responses ("repetition suppression") throughout task-engaged cortical regions. While it's clear that this pervasive brain-behavior relationship reflects some form of improved processing efficiency, the exact form that it takes remains elusive. In this Discussion Paper, we review four different theoretical proposals that have the potential to link repetition suppression and priming, with a particular focus on a proposal that stimulus repetition affects improved efficiency through enhanced neural synchronization. We argue that despite exciting recent work on the role of neural synchronization in cognitive processes such as attention and perception, similar studies in the domain of learning and memory - and priming, in particular - have been lacking. We emphasize the need for new studies with adequate spatiotemporal resolution, formulate several novel predictions, and discuss our ongoing efforts to disentangle the current proposals. PMID:23144664

  17. Strain Identification of Trichophyton rubrum by Specific Amplification of Subrepeat Elements in the Ribosomal DNA Nontranscribed Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Colin J.; Barton, Richard C.; Kelly, Steven L.; Evans, E. Glyn V.

    2000-01-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is the commonest cause of dermatophytosis of skin and nail tissue. Molecular characterization of the T. rubrum ribosomal DNA nontranscribed-spacer region revealed two novel tandemly repetitive subelements (TRSs): TRS-1, containing a 27-bp palindromic sequence, and TRS-2. Specific amplification of TRS-1 produced strain-characteristic banding patterns (PCR types), with 21 TRS-1 PCR types recognized from 101 clinical isolates. Four simple patterns representing 1 to 4 copies of TRS-1 accounted for 75 (75%) of all 101 strains, whereas more complex patterns were observed for 21 (20%) of the 101 isolates. The copy number of TRS-2 was 0 to 3 repeats per cistron, with a majority of isolates having two copies of this element. Eleven isolates were polymorphic for TRS-2, and in combination, 23 separate PCR types were recognized by amplification of both TRS-1 and TRS-2. The PCR patterns from both elements were stable and reproducible. Elements with homology to TRS-1 were present in three phylogenetically related species, Trichophyton violaceum, Trichophyton gourvilii, and Trichophyton soudanense, but these elements were not identified in other dermatophyte taxa. There was no clear correlation of PCR type with specimen (skin or nail tissue), but certain PCR types appeared to show a bias in geographic distribution. This new method of typing T. rubrum will enable important questions about pathogenesis and epidemiology of this fungus to be addressed. PMID:11101591

  18. Employing 454 amplicon pyrosequencing to reveal intragenomic divergence in the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region in fungi.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Daniel L; Carlsen, Tor; Henrik Nilsson, R; Davey, Marie; Schumacher, Trond; Kauserud, Håvard

    2013-06-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been accepted as a DNA barcoding marker for fungi and is widely used in phylogenetic studies; however, intragenomic ITS variability has been observed in a broad range of taxa, including prokaryotes, plants, animals, and fungi, and this variability has the potential to inflate species richness estimates in molecular investigations of environmental samples. In this study 454 amplicon pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region was applied to 99 phylogenetically diverse axenic single-spore cultures of fungi (Dikarya: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) to investigate levels of intragenomic variation. Three species (one Basidiomycota and two Ascomycota), in addition to a positive control species known to contain ITS paralogs, displayed levels of molecular variation indicative of intragenomic variation; taxon inflation due to presumed intragenomic variation was ≈9%. Intragenomic variability in the ITS region appears to be widespread but relatively rare in fungi (≈3-5% of species investigated in this study), suggesting this problem may have minor impacts on species richness estimates relative to PCR and/or pyrosequencing errors. Our results indicate that 454 amplicon pyrosequencing represents a powerful tool for investigating levels of ITS intragenomic variability across taxa, which may be valuable for better understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying concerted evolution of repetitive DNA regions.

  19. Employing 454 amplicon pyrosequencing to reveal intragenomic divergence in the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Daniel L; Carlsen, Tor; Henrik Nilsson, R; Davey, Marie; Schumacher, Trond; Kauserud, Håvard

    2013-01-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been accepted as a DNA barcoding marker for fungi and is widely used in phylogenetic studies; however, intragenomic ITS variability has been observed in a broad range of taxa, including prokaryotes, plants, animals, and fungi, and this variability has the potential to inflate species richness estimates in molecular investigations of environmental samples. In this study 454 amplicon pyrosequencing of the ITS1 region was applied to 99 phylogenetically diverse axenic single-spore cultures of fungi (Dikarya: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) to investigate levels of intragenomic variation. Three species (one Basidiomycota and two Ascomycota), in addition to a positive control species known to contain ITS paralogs, displayed levels of molecular variation indicative of intragenomic variation; taxon inflation due to presumed intragenomic variation was ≈9%. Intragenomic variability in the ITS region appears to be widespread but relatively rare in fungi (≈3–5% of species investigated in this study), suggesting this problem may have minor impacts on species richness estimates relative to PCR and/or pyrosequencing errors. Our results indicate that 454 amplicon pyrosequencing represents a powerful tool for investigating levels of ITS intragenomic variability across taxa, which may be valuable for better understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying concerted evolution of repetitive DNA regions. PMID:23789083

  20. Nonuniform Deposition of Pressurized Metered-Dose Aerosol in Spacer Devices.

    PubMed

    Ogrodnik, Nicholas; Azzi, Victor; Sprigge, Elizabeth; Fiset, Sandra; Matida, Edgar

    2016-12-01

    Pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs) are commonly used to administer medication to patients suffering from chronic lower respiratory tract diseases such as asthma. Inhaling medication directly from a pMDI can prove difficult for some patients and, as a result, add-on devices (or spacers) have been designed to aid in the delivery of medication. Although spacers increase the percentage of medication that reaches the patient, medication will also nonsymmetrically deposit on the walls of the device and will be lost to the device itself. The deposition of medication, salbutamol sulfate, within a large- and a small-volume spacer, has been studied through an experimental and numerical analysis. Experiments were conducted at inspiratory flow rates ranging from 30 to 60 L/min. The amount of deposition of the medication on the walls of the spacer was quantified through an application of spectrophotometry. Computational fluid dynamics was used to quantify the deposition numerically. Simulations were conducted by implementing mean flow and turbulent tracking of particles using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations with a shear stress transport turbulence model. Regions of deposition are of interest, as well as how the method of deposition varied for different inhalation flow rates. The deposition of salbutamol sulfate in the Volumatic(®) and OptiChamber(®) spacers was found to be greater in the lower half as opposed to the upper half of the spacer due to a downward spray angle. With an increased flow rate, these spacers demonstrated a slight increase in medication delivered to the inline filter, which is analogous to that reaching the patient, and an increase in distal deposition. For the numerical analysis, the results indicated that inertial impaction is the most likely method of deposition for the Volumatic spacer, and turbulence is more likely to cause deposition in the OptiChamber spacer.

  1. INCENTIVE DEVICE IMPROVES SPACER TECHNIQUE BUT NOT CLINICAL OUTCOME IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN WITH ASTHMA

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, André; Sly, Peter D; Zhang, Guicheng; Venter, André; le Souëf, Peter N; Devadason, Sunalene G

    2011-01-01

    Background Inhaled corticosteroid use reduces respiratory symptoms in young children with recurrent wheeze. Delivery of steroids with pressurised metered dose inhalers and spacers is influenced by children’s proficiency/technique in using delivery devices. Objectives To investigate the influence of an incentive device, the Funhaler®, on spacer technique and symptom control in young children with asthma and recurrent wheeze. Methods Randomised controlled trial where 132 2–6 year old asthmatic children received regular inhaled fluticasone through Aerochamber Plus®, or Funhaler®. The setting was a research clinic at Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, Australia. Subjects were followed up for a year. The main outcome measure was asthma symptoms. Proficiency in spacer technique was measured as salbutamol inhaled from spacer onto filter. Quality of life was measured three-monthly. Groups were compared in terms of spacer technique, symptoms and quality of life. The relationship between spacer technique and clinical outcome was examined. Results There was no difference between Funhaler and Aerochamber groups in wheeze free days, cough free days, bronchodilator free days or quality of life (p = 0.90, 0.87, 0.74 and 0.11 respectively). Spacer technique was better in the Funhaler group (p = 0.05), particularly in subjects younger than 4 years of age (p = 0.002). Drug dose on filter (as the mean of five 100μg doses) ranged from zero to 136μg. Conclusion Use of Funhaler® incentive device does not improve clinical outcome, but improves spacer technique in children younger than 4 years. Variability in drug delivery is large in young children using pMDI-spacers. PMID:22040259

  2. Repetitive foreign body ingestion: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Sarah; Stagno, Susan J; Daly, Barb

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of persons who frequently present to the healthcare system following repetitive foreign body ingestion has been addressed in the psychiatric literature. However, there has been little exploration of the ethical considerations regarding the treatment of these patients. The complexity of their medical and psychiatric presentation raises fundamental ethical questions regarding the duty to treat, patient autonomy, justice, and futility. Careful ethical analysis is particularly important in this context, since the frustration that medical professionals may feel in response may lead to false assumptions that can negatively impact patient care. A careful exploration of these questions can increase awareness and understanding, which in turn can lead to improved treatment of patients who repetitively ingest foreign bodies. Care for patients who inflict self-harm, particularly by repetitive foreign body ingestion, is not futile. The patients have a right to treatment and are entitled to resources. Efforts should be made to provide a more comprehensive treatment approach to these patients.

  3. Conservative treatment for repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Konijnenberg, H S; de Wilde, N S; Gerritsen, A A; van Tulder, M W; de Vet, H C

    2001-10-01

    Various conservative treatment options for repetitive strain injury are widely used, despite questionable evidence of their effectiveness. This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of these treatment options for relieving symptoms of repetitive strain injury and improving activities of daily living. Searches in Medline and Embase, with additional reference checking resulted in 15 eligible trials for this review. Methodological quality was assessed, and data-extraction was performed. With the use of a "best-evidence synthesis", no strong evidence was found for the effectiveness of any of the treatment options. There is limited evidence that multidisciplinary rehabilitation, ergonomic intervention measures, exercises, and spinal manipulation combined with soft tissue therapy are effective in providing symptom relief or improving activities of daily living. There is conflicting evidence for the effectiveness of behavioral therapy. In conclusion, little is known about the effectiveness of conservative treatment options for repetitive strain injury. To establish strong evidence, more high-quality trials are needed.

  4. Preventing mechanical complications of hip spacer implantation: technical tips and pearls.

    PubMed

    Barreira, Pedro; Leite, Pedro; Neves, Pedro; Soares, Daniel; Sousa, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection is a frequent complication after total hip replacement. Two-stage exchange with the use of a temporary cement spacer is commonplace. Several complications are possible with its use. In addition to infection persistence, mechanical complications such as dislocation or fractures are among the most common. Several risk factors can and should be addressed during first stage or spacer implantation surgery in order to minimize complications. Technical aspects as well as practical tips and pearls to overcome common nuisances such as spacer instability or femoral and acetabular bone loss will be discussed.

  5. Titanium-copper-nitride coated spacers for two-stage revision of infected total hip endoprostheses.

    PubMed

    Ellenrieder, Martin; Haenle, Maximilian; Lenz, Robert; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Within the first two years after total hip arthroplasty implant-associated infection has become the second most common reason for a revision surgery. Two-stage implant exchange is frequently conducted using temporary spacers made of antibiotic-loaded cement in order to prevent a bacterial colonization on the spacer. Avoiding several disadvantages of cement spacers, a conventional hemi-endoprosthesis was equipped with a copper-containing implant coating for inhibition of bacterial biofilms. In the present paper details of this novel treatment concept are presented including a case report.

  6. Optimization of radiation therapy techniques for prostate cancer with prostate-rectum spacers: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mok, Gary; Benz, Eileen; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Miralbell, Raymond; Zilli, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Dose-escalated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer improves disease control but is also associated with worse rectal toxicity. A spacer placed between the prostate and rectum can be used to displace the anterior rectal wall outside of the high-dose radiation regions and potentially minimize radiation-induced rectal toxicity. This systematic review focuses on the published data regarding the different types of commercially available prostate-rectum spacers. Dosimetric results and preliminary clinical data using prostate-rectum spacers in patients with localized prostate cancer treated by curative radiation therapy are compared and discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization of Radiation Therapy Techniques for Prostate Cancer With Prostate-Rectum Spacers: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Gary; Benz, Eileen; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Miralbell, Raymond; Zilli, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Dose-escalated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer improves disease control but is also associated with worse rectal toxicity. A spacer placed between the prostate and rectum can be used to displace the anterior rectal wall outside of the high-dose radiation regions and potentially minimize radiation-induced rectal toxicity. This systematic review focuses on the published data regarding the different types of commercially available prostate-rectum spacers. Dosimetric results and preliminary clinical data using prostate-rectum spacers in patients with localized prostate cancer treated by curative radiation therapy are compared and discussed.

  8. Titanium-copper-nitride coated spacers for two-stage revision of infected total hip endoprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Ellenrieder, Martin; Haenle, Maximilian; Lenz, Robert; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Within the first two years after total hip arthroplasty implant-associated infection has become the second most common reason for a revision surgery. Two-stage implant exchange is frequently conducted using temporary spacers made of antibiotic-loaded cement in order to prevent a bacterial colonization on the spacer. Avoiding several disadvantages of cement spacers, a conventional hemi-endoprosthesis was equipped with a copper-containing implant coating for inhibition of bacterial biofilms. In the present paper details of this novel treatment concept are presented including a case report. PMID:22242097

  9. Experimental Study of Two Phase Flow Behavior Past BWR Spacer Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnayake, Ruwan K.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Ivanov, K.N.; Cimbala, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    Performance of best estimate codes used in the nuclear industry can be significantly improved by reducing the empiricism embedded in their constitutive models. Spacer grids have been found to have an important impact on the maximum allowable Critical Heat Flux within the fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor core. Therefore, incorporation of suitable spacer grids models can improve the critical heat flux prediction capability of best estimate codes. Realistic modeling of entrainment behavior of spacer grids requires understanding the different mechanisms that are involved. Since visual information pertaining to the entrainment behavior of spacer grids cannot possibly be obtained from operating nuclear reactors, experiments have to be designed and conducted for this specific purpose. Most of the spacer grid experiments available in literature have been designed in view of obtaining quantitative data for the purpose of developing or modifying empirical formulations for heat transfer, critical heat flux or pressure drop. Very few experiments have been designed to provide fundamental information which can be used to understand spacer grid effects and phenomena involved in two phase flow. Air-water experiments were conducted to obtain visual information on the two-phase flow behavior both upstream and downstream of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) spacer grids. The test section was designed and constructed using prototypic dimensions such as the channel cross-section, rod diameter and other spacer grid configurations of a typical BWR fuel assembly. The test section models the flow behavior in two adjacent sub channels in the BWR core. A portion of a prototypic BWR spacer grid accounting for two adjacent channels was used with industrial mild steel rods for the purpose of representing the channel internals. Symmetry was preserved in this practice, so that the channel walls could effectively be considered as the channel boundaries. Thin films were established on the rod surfaces

  10. Internal transcribed spacer region evolution in Larix and Pseudotsuga (Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Gernandt, D S; Liston, A

    1999-05-01

    The nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been characterized in the sister genera Larix and Pseudotsuga (Pinaceae). Complete sequences were obtained for seven species of Larix from North America and Eurasia and five species of Pseudotsuga from western North America and eastern Asia. ITS region lengths ranged from 1759 to 1770 bp in Larix and from 1564 to 1571 bp in Pseudotsuga. In both genera, ITS1 is three times as long as the 5.8S plus ITS2 and contains subrepeats as observed in other genera of Pinaceae. Secondary structure models predicted that the subrepeats fold into terminal stem and loop domains. ITS polymorphism detected within individuals of Larix and Pseudotsuga suggests a slow rate of concerted evolution among nrDNA loci. Except for the placement of L. sibirica, phylogenetic analyses of the ITS region agreed with previously reported restriction site analyses of Larix and Pseudotsuga. The data were not consistent with phylogenetic hypotheses for Larix based primarily upon ovulate cone characters, failing to support a derivation of the North American L. laricina from a short-bracted Eurasian lineage. The phylogenetic hypothesis did not conflict with a stepping stone model of evolution for Pseudotsuga, but a basal lineage could not be inferred for either genus.

  11. Analysis of Mammalian rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Annette W.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear rDNA Internal Transcribed Spacers, ITS1 and ITS2, are widely used for eukaryote phylogenetic studies from the ordinal level to the species level, and there is even a database for ITS2 sequences. However, ITS regions have been ignored in mammalian phylogenetic studies, and only a few rodent and ape sequences are represented in GenBank. The reasons for this dearth, and the remedies, are described here. We have recovered these sequences, mostly >1 kb in length, for 36 mammalian species. Sequence alignment and transcript folding comparisons reveal the rRNA transcript secondary structure. Mammalian ITS regions, though quite long, still fold into the recognizable secondary structure of other eukaryotes. The ITS2 in particular bears the four standard helix loops, and loops II and III have the hallmark characters universal to eukaryotes. Both sequence and insertions/deletions of transcript secondary structure helices observed here support the four superorder taxonomy of Placentalia. On the family level, major unique indels, neatly excising entire helices, will be useful when additional species are represented, resulting in significant further understanding of the details of mammalian evolutionary history. Furthermore, the identification of a highly conserved element of ITS1 common to warm-blooded vertebrates may aid in deciphering the complex mechanism of RNA transcript processing. This is the last major group of terrestrial vertebrates for which rRNA ITS secondary structure has been resolved. PMID:24260162

  12. Successful implementation of spacer treatment guideline for acute asthma

    PubMed Central

    Powell, C; Maskell, G; Marks, M; South, M; Robertson, C; LENNEY, W.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To develop and implement an evidence based guideline for the treatment of acute asthma using a metered dose inhaler and spacer combination.
METHODS—Defined strategies were used for the development and implementation of a guideline, assessed by a prospective, descriptive, study using notes review, and patient, nursing, and medical staff telephone contact. The setting was a tertiary referral hospital in Victoria, Australia with 25 000 yearly admissions, and asthma accounting for about 7% of total. The first 200 children and families to use the guideline after its introduction were evaluated.
RESULTS—A total of 191 (95.5%) children were treated according to the guideline. Six (3.0%) children were given nebulisers appropriately based on severity; five (2.5%) were given nebulisers at parental or child choice; and four (2.0 %) who did not have severe asthma, received nebulised treatment inappropriately.
CONCLUSIONS—Successful implementation of a new evidence based guideline can be achieved using specific strategies for promoting the application of research findings in the clinical arena.

 PMID:11159290

  13. Rapid proliferation of repetitive palindromic elements in mtDNA of the endemic Baikalian sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Dennis V

    2010-04-01

    Animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a remarkably compact molecule largely because of the scarcity of noncoding "selfish" DNA. Recently, however, we found that mitochondrial genomes of several phylogenetically diverse species of demosponges contain small repetitive palindromic sequences, interspersed within intergenic regions and fused in protein and ribosomal RNA genes. Here, I report and analyze the proliferation of such elements in the mitochondrial genome of the endemic sponge of Lake Baikal Lubomirskia baicalensis. Because Baikal sponges are closely related to the circumglobally distributed freshwater sponge Ephydatia muelleri with which they shared a common ancestor approximately 3-10 Ma, both the rate of single nucleotide substitutions and the rate of palindromic repeat insertions can be calculated in this system. I found the rate of nucleotide substitutions in mtDNA of freshwater sponges to be extremely low (0.5-1.6 x 10(-9) per site per year), more similar to that in plants than bilaterian animals. By contrast, the per/nucleotide rate of insertions of repetitive elements is at least four times higher. This rapid rate of proliferation combined with the broad phylogenetic distribution of hairpin elements can make them a defining force in the evolution of mitochondrial genomes of demosponges.

  14. Model for repetitive cycles of large earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, W.I.; Knopoff, L.

    1983-04-01

    The theory of the fusion of small cracks into large ones reproduces certain features also observed in the clustering of earthquake sequences. By modifying our earlier model to take into account the stress release associated with the occurrence of large earthquakes, we obtain repetitive periodic cycles of large earthquakes. A preliminary conclusion is that a combination of the stress release or elastic rebound mechanism plus time delays in the fusion process are sufficient to destabilize the crack populations and, ultimately, give rise to repetitive episodes of seismicity.

  15. Apparatus and methods for aligning holes through wheels and spacers and stacking the wheels and spacers to form a turbine rotor

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Robert Randolph; Palmer, Gene David; Wilson, Ian David

    2000-01-01

    A gas turbine rotor stacking fixture includes upstanding bolts for reception in aligned bolt holes in superposed aft disk, wheels and spacers and upstanding alignment rods received in openings of the disk, wheels and spacers during the rotor stacking assembly. The axially registering openings enable insertion of thin-walled tubes circumferentially about the rim of the rotor, with tight tolerances to the openings to provide supply and return steam for cooling buckets. The alignment rods have radial dimensions substantially less than their dimensions in a circumferential direction to allow for radial opening misalignment due to thermal expansion, tolerance stack-up and wheel-to-spacer mismatch due to rabbet mechanical growth. The circumferential dimension of the alignment rods affords tightly toleranced alignment of the openings through which the cooling tubes are installed.

  16. [Interspinous spacers and disc herniation. Geomorphometric and clinical study of 71 cases treated by L4-L5 microdiscectomy associated to spacer placement].

    PubMed

    Aso Escario, José; Aso Vizán, Alberto; Martínez Quiñones, José Vicente; Consolini, Fabian; Martín Gallego, Álvaro; Arregui Calvo, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    A controversial indication of interspinous spacers is their use as a complement to discectomy. At the present time, there is no solid clinical evidence of effectiveness of that association, which might result from variability in spacer positioning, restricting its correct biomechanical actions. In this study our goal was to identify and analyse the variability in the placement of an interspinous spacer, and to investigate its relationship with the clinical results. We performed a retrospective study on X-ray films from 71 patients suffering from disc herniation in L4-L5 who underwent surgery in our hospital, consisting of: microdiscectomy and biomed interspinous spacer implantation. The geomorphometric techniques used to analyse the data were procrustes superimposition and principal components analysis. We compared the clinical results (using the Herron and Turner scale), segmental lordosis and surgical distraction with the geomorphometric parameters. Significant morphological variability was found in the implant position showing cephalo-caudal translation and clockwise-counterclockwise rotations. This variability did not correlate with clinical results. A relationship with anatomical features (lordosis) and additional surgical distraction was identified. A different morphology of implant-segment configuration was identified in cases with recurrence of disc herniation. Geometric morphometrics allowed identifying high variability in the final placement of interspinous spacers. Nevertheless, it seems not to be related to the clinical outcome, depending rather on the degree of lordosis and distraction. Some differences in segment-implant morphology were identified in cases with recurrences. To assess the effectiveness of spacers, larger studies including morphological and clinical variables are required. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamics of Escherichia coli type I-E CRISPR spacers over 42 000 years.

    PubMed

    Savitskaya, Ekaterina; Lopatina, Anna; Medvedeva, Sofia; Kapustin, Mikhail; Shmakov, Sergey; Tikhonov, Alexey; Artamonova, Irena I; Logacheva, Maria; Severinov, Konstantin

    2016-12-20

    CRISPR-Cas are nucleic acid-based prokaryotic immune systems. CRISPR arrays accumulate spacers from foreign DNA and provide resistance to mobile genetic elements containing identical or similar sequences. Thus, the set of spacers present in a given bacterium can be regarded as a record of encounters of its ancestors with genetic invaders. Such records should be specific for different lineages and change with time, as earlier acquired spacers get obsolete and are lost. Here, we studied type I-E CRISPR spacers of Escherichia coli from extinct pachyderm. We find that many spacers recovered from intestines of a 42 000-year-old mammoth match spacers of present-day E. coli. Present-day CRISPR arrays can be reconstructed from palaeo sequences, indicating that the order of spacers has also been preserved. The results suggest that E. coli CRISPR arrays were not subject to intensive change through adaptive acquisition during this time.

  18. Verbal Repetitions and Echolalia in Alzheimer's Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Da Cruz, Fernanda Miranda

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of echolalic repetition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A qualitative analysis of data from spontaneous conversations with MHI, a woman with AD, is presented. The data come from the DALI Corpus, a corpus of spontaneous conversations involving subjects with AD. This study argues that echolalic effects can be…

  19. Large-scale detection of repetitions.

    PubMed

    Smyth, W F

    2014-05-28

    Combinatorics on words began more than a century ago with a demonstration that an infinitely long string with no repetitions could be constructed on an alphabet of only three letters. Computing all the repetitions (such as ∙∙∙TTT ∙∙∙ or ∙∙∙ CGACGA ∙∙∙ ) in a given string x of length n is one of the oldest and most important problems of computational stringology, requiring time in the worst case. About a dozen years ago, it was discovered that repetitions can be computed as a by-product of the Θ(n)-time computation of all the maximal periodicities or runs in x. However, even though the computation is linear, it is also brute force: global data structures, such as the suffix array, the longest common prefix array and the Lempel-Ziv factorization, need to be computed in a preprocessing phase. Furthermore, all of this effort is required despite the fact that the expected number of runs in a string is generally a small fraction of the string length. In this paper, I explore the possibility that repetitions (perhaps also other regularities in strings) can be computed in a manner commensurate with the size of the output.

  20. Large-scale detection of repetitions

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, W. F.

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorics on words began more than a century ago with a demonstration that an infinitely long string with no repetitions could be constructed on an alphabet of only three letters. Computing all the repetitions (such as ⋯TTT⋯ or ⋯CGACGA⋯ ) in a given string x of length n is one of the oldest and most important problems of computational stringology, requiring time in the worst case. About a dozen years ago, it was discovered that repetitions can be computed as a by-product of the Θ(n)-time computation of all the maximal periodicities or runs in x. However, even though the computation is linear, it is also brute force: global data structures, such as the suffix array, the longest common prefix array and the Lempel–Ziv factorization, need to be computed in a preprocessing phase. Furthermore, all of this effort is required despite the fact that the expected number of runs in a string is generally a small fraction of the string length. In this paper, I explore the possibility that repetitions (perhaps also other regularities in strings) can be computed in a manner commensurate with the size of the output. PMID:24751872

  1. Sentence Repetition: What Does the Task Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polišenská, Kamila; Chiat, Shula; Roy, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sentence repetition is gaining increasing attention as a source of information about children's sentence-level abilities in clinical assessment, and as a clinical marker of specific language impairment. However, it is widely debated what the task is testing and therefore how informative it is. Aims: (1) To evaluate the effects of…

  2. Using Repetition to Make Ideas Stick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykins, Alicia N.

    2015-01-01

    In elementary school, the use of repetitive songs to help children remember concepts is commonplace and is usually very effective. Unfortunately for many students, this strategy is generally not used in later grades. A group of mathematics teachers at Westerville South High School in Westerville, Ohio, have taken this approach to a new creative…

  3. Sentence Repetition: What Does the Task Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polišenská, Kamila; Chiat, Shula; Roy, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sentence repetition is gaining increasing attention as a source of information about children's sentence-level abilities in clinical assessment, and as a clinical marker of specific language impairment. However, it is widely debated what the task is testing and therefore how informative it is. Aims: (1) To evaluate the effects of…

  4. The Treatment Effect of Grade Repetitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahjoub, Mohamed-Badrane

    2017-01-01

    This paper estimates the treatment effect of grade repetitions in French junior high schools, using a value-added test score as outcome and quarter of birth as instrument. With linear two-stage least squares, local average treatment effect is estimated at around 1.6 times the standard deviation of the achievement gain. With non-linear…

  5. Verbal Repetitions and Echolalia in Alzheimer's Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Da Cruz, Fernanda Miranda

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of echolalic repetition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A qualitative analysis of data from spontaneous conversations with MHI, a woman with AD, is presented. The data come from the DALI Corpus, a corpus of spontaneous conversations involving subjects with AD. This study argues that echolalic effects can be…

  6. Bystanders' Reactions to Witnessing Repetitive Abuse Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janson, Gregory R.; Carney, JoLynn V.; Hazler, Richard J.; Oh, Insoo

    2009-01-01

    The Impact of Event Scale-Revised (D. S. Weiss & C. R. Marmar, 1997) was used to obtain self-reported trauma levels from 587 young adults recalling childhood or adolescence experiences as witnesses to common forms of repetitive abuse defined as bullying. Mean participant scores were in a range suggesting potential need for clinical assessment…

  7. Social Interaction and Repetitive Motor Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftin, Rachel L.; Odom, Samuel L.; Lantz, Johanna F.

    2008-01-01

    Students with autism have difficulty initiating social interactions and may exhibit repetitive motor behavior (e.g., body rocking, hand flapping). Increasing social interaction by teaching new skills may lead to reductions in problem behavior, such as motor stereotypies. Additionally, self-monitoring strategies can increase the maintenance of…

  8. Repetition Priming and Hyperpriming in Semantic Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, T. B.; Graham, K. S.; Patterson, K.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence from neurologically normal subjects suggests that repetition priming (RP) is independent of semantic processing. Therefore, we may expect patients with a selective deficit to conceptual knowledge to exhibit RP for words regardless of the integrity of their semantic representations. We tested six patients with semantic dementia (SD) on a…

  9. Repetition effects in human ERPs to faces.

    PubMed

    Schweinberger, Stefan R; Neumann, Markus F

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, we review research conducted over the past 25 years addressing the effects of repeating various kinds of information in faces (e.g., pictorial, spatial configural, identity, semantic) on different components in human event-related brain potentials (ERPs). This body of evidence suggests that several ERP components are systematically linked to different functional components of face identity processing. Specifically, we argue (1) that repetition of the category of faces (categorical adaptation) strongly affects the occipitotemporal N170 amplitude, which is systematically suppressed when a face is preceded by another face, irrespective of its identity, whereas (2) the prototypicality of a face's second order spatial configuration has a prominent effect on the subsequent occipitotemporal P200. Longer-latency repetition effects are related to the processing of individual facial identities. These include (3) an ERP correlate of the transient activation of individual representations of repeated faces in the form of an enhanced occipitotemporal N250r as seen in repetition priming experiments, and (4) a correlate of the acquisition of individual face identity representations during learning as seen in a topographically similar long-lasting N250 effect. Finally, (5) the repetition of semantic information in familiar person recognition elicits a central-parietal N400 ERP effect. We hope that this overview will encourage researchers to further exploit the potential of ERPs to provide a continuous time window to neuronal correlates of multiple processes in face perception under comparatively natural viewing conditions.

  10. EFFECTIVENESS OF INCREASED REPETITION IN CLASSROOM LEARNING.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Mechanic Course at Fort Jackson. Achievement was measured with multiple choice test items given in regular course examinations two days and 24 days...instructed by the experimental method made passing scores on the test items at both testing times. It is recommended that repetition of major points be increased in classroom instruction. (Author)

  11. Temporal Processing Capabilities in Repetition Conduction Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidiropoulos, Kyriakos; Ackermann, Hermann; Wannke, Michael; Hertrich, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the temporal resolution capacities of the central-auditory system in a subject (NP) suffering from repetition conduction aphasia. More specifically, the patient was asked to detect brief gaps between two stretches of broadband noise (gap detection task) and to evaluate the duration of two biphasic (WN-3) continuous noise…

  12. The Value of Repetition in Articulation Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, John L.

    1970-01-01

    Exact analysis of an experiment involving children from the ages of 4 to 12 learning three new articulations revealed that most of the articulation learning took place on the second attempt with relatively moderate improvement in subsequent trials, thus placing the value of repetition in articulation learning in question. (FB)

  13. Reducing Repetitive Speech: Effects of Strategy Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dipipi, Caroline M.; Jitendra, Asha K.; Miller, Judith A.

    2001-01-01

    This article describes an intervention with an 18-year-old young woman with mild mental retardation and a seizure disorder, which focused on her repetitive echolalic verbalizations. The intervention included time delay, differential reinforcement of other behaviors, and self-monitoring. Overall, the intervention was successful in facilitating…

  14. Using Repetition to Make Ideas Stick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykins, Alicia N.

    2015-01-01

    In elementary school, the use of repetitive songs to help children remember concepts is commonplace and is usually very effective. Unfortunately for many students, this strategy is generally not used in later grades. A group of mathematics teachers at Westerville South High School in Westerville, Ohio, have taken this approach to a new creative…

  15. FRB repetition and non-Poissonian statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Liam; Pen, Ue-Li; Oppermann, Niels

    2016-05-01

    We discuss some of the claims that have been made regarding the statistics of fast radio bursts (FRBs). In an earlier Letter, we conjectured that flicker noise associated with FRB repetition could show up in non-cataclysmic neutron star emission models, like supergiant pulses. We show how the current limits of repetition would be significantly weakened if their repeat rate really were non-Poissonian and had a pink or red spectrum. Repetition and its statistics have implications for observing strategy, generally favouring shallow wide-field surveys, since in the non-repeating scenario survey depth is unimportant. We also discuss the statistics of the apparent latitudinal dependence of FRBs, and offer a simple method for calculating the significance of this effect. We provide a generalized Bayesian framework for addressing this problem, which allows for direct model comparison. It is shown how the evidence for a steep latitudinal gradient of the FRB rate is less strong than initially suggested and simple explanations like increased scattering and sky temperature in the plane are sufficient to decrease the low-latitude burst rate, given current data. The reported dearth of bursts near the plane is further complicated if FRBs have non-Poissonian repetition, since in that case the event rate inferred from observation depends on observing strategy.

  16. Effect of Repetitive Film Showings on Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Tavish, C. L.

    In a study made in 1949 to determine the increment in learning that could be attributed to repetition, four general science films were shown to each of four groups of college students in such a way that each group saw one of the films once, a second film twice, a third film three times, and a fourth film four times. The experimental population…

  17. EFFECT OF REPETITIVE FILM SHOWINGS ON LEARNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCTAVISH, C.L.; AND OTHERS

    A DETERMINATION OF THE INCREMENT IN LEARNING ATTRIBUTABLE SOLELY TO ONE, TWO, AND THREE REPETITIONS OF A FILM OVER AND ABOVE A SINGLE SHOWING WAS INVESTIGATED. THE SUBJECTS WERE 319 COLLEGE FRESHMEN WHO WERE DIVIDED INTO FOUR GROUPS AND WHO WERE SHOWN FOUR GENERAL SCIENCE FILMS. EACH GROUP SAW ONE OF THE FILMS ONCE, A SECOND FILM TWICE, A THIRD…

  18. Pressure wave charged repetitively pulsed gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarny, Vijay A.

    1982-01-01

    A repetitively pulsed gas laser in which a system of mechanical shutters bracketing the laser cavity manipulate pressure waves resulting from residual energy in the cavity gas following a lasing event so as to draw fresh gas into the cavity and effectively pump spent gas in a dynamic closed loop.

  19. Nonword Repetition and Vocabulary Use in Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Stephanie F.; Moran, Catherine; George, Anjali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: There is general consensus that the ability to repeat nonsense words is related to vocabulary size in young children, but there is considerable debate about the nature of the relationship and the mechanisms that underlie it. Research with adults has proposed a shared neural substrate for nonword repetition (NWR) and language production,…

  20. Temporal Processing Capabilities in Repetition Conduction Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidiropoulos, Kyriakos; Ackermann, Hermann; Wannke, Michael; Hertrich, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the temporal resolution capacities of the central-auditory system in a subject (NP) suffering from repetition conduction aphasia. More specifically, the patient was asked to detect brief gaps between two stretches of broadband noise (gap detection task) and to evaluate the duration of two biphasic (WN-3) continuous noise…

  1. Very strong antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling with iridium spacer layer for perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushiji, Kay; Sugihara, Atsushi; Fukushima, Akio; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yuasa, Shinji

    2017-02-01

    We systematically studied the interlayer exchange coupling (IEC) in a perpendicular synthetic antiferromagnetically coupled structure having an Ir spacer layer for perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs). We found a broader peak in IEC energy density (Jex) versus spacer thickness (tIr) compared with the case of using a Ru spacer. The highest IEC energy density was 2.6 erg/cm2 at a tIr of about 5 nm. The p-MTJ nanopillars had a high magnetoresistance ratio (131%) as well as a high spin-transfer torque (STT) switching efficiency (about 2). An Ir spacer can be used to make a stable reference layer for STT magnetoresistive random access memory.

  2. Manufacturing and Process-based Property Analysis of Textile-Reinforced Thermoplastic Spacer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hufenbach, Werner; Adam, Frank; Füßel, René; Krahl, Michael; Weck, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Novel woven spacer fabrics based on hybrid yarns are suitable for an efficient fabrication of three-dimensional composite structures in high volume production. In this paper, an innovative manufacturing process with short cycle times and high automatisation is introduced for textile-reinforced thermoplastic spacer structures suited for bending load cases. The different process steps hybrid yarn fabrication, weaving technology for three-dimensional textile preforms and consolidation with unique kinematics and hot pressing technology are described in detail. The bending properties of the manufactured spacer structures are evaluated by means of experiments as well as finite element simulations. Numerical parametric studies are performed in order to validate the influence of manufacturing tolerances on the bending stiffness of the spacer structures.

  3. Enhanced charge trapping in bipolar spacer oxides during low-dose-rate irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Reber, R.A. Jr.; Winokur, P.S.; Kosier, S.L.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Nowlin, R.N.; Pease, R.L.; DeLaus, M.

    1994-03-01

    Thermally-stimulated-current and capacitance-voltage measurements reveal enhanced hole trapping in bipolar spacer-oxide capacitors irradiated at 0 V at low dose rates. Possible mechanisms and implications for bipolar low-rate response are discussed.

  4. Method of forming a spacer for field emission flat panel displays

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    Spacers for applications such as field emission flat panel displays and vacuum microelectronics, and which involves the application of aerogel/xerogel technology to the formation of the spacer. In a preferred approach the method uses a mold and mold release agent wherein the gel precursor is a liquid which can be applied to the mold filling holes which expose the substrate (either the baseplate or the faceplate). A release agent is applied to the mold prior to precursor application to ease removal of the mold after formation of the dielectric spacer. The shrinkage of the gel during solvent extraction also improves mold removal. The final spacer material is a good dielectric, such as silica, secured to the substrate.

  5. Annular Flow in Rod-Bundle: Effect of Spacer on Disturbance Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Son H.; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2016-08-01

    A high-speed camera technique is used to study the effect of spacers on the disturbance waves present in annular two-phase flow within a rod-bundle geometry. Images obtained using a backlight configuration to visualize the spacer-wave interactions at the micro-scale resolution (in time and space) are discussed. This paper also presents additional images obtained using a reflected light configuration which provides new observations of the disturbance waves. These images show the separation effect caused by the spacer on the liquid film in which the size of generated liquid droplets can be controlled by the gas superficial velocity. Furthermore, the data confirm that the spacer breaks the circumferential coherent structures of the waves.

  6. Spacer geometry and particle deposition in spiral wound membrane feed channels.

    PubMed

    Radu, A I; van Steen, M S H; Vrouwenvelder, J S; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Picioreanu, C

    2014-11-01

    Deposition of microspheres mimicking bacterial cells was studied experimentally and with a numerical model in feed spacer membrane channels, as used in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems. In-situ microscopic observations in membrane fouling simulators revealed formation of specific particle deposition patterns for different diamond and ladder feed spacer orientations. A three-dimensional numerical model combining fluid flow with a Lagrangian approach for particle trajectory calculations could describe very well the in-situ observations on particle deposition in flow cells. Feed spacer geometry, positioning and cross-flow velocity sensitively influenced the particle transport and deposition patterns. The deposition patterns were not influenced by permeate production. This combined experimental-modeling approach could be used for feed spacer geometry optimization studies for reduced (bio)fouling.

  7. Method of forming a spacer for field emission flat panel displays

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.

    1997-08-19

    Spacers are disclosed for applications such as field emission flat panel displays and vacuum microelectronics, and which involves the application of aerogel/xerogel technology to the formation of the spacer. In a preferred approach the method uses a mold and mold release agent wherein the gel precursor is a liquid which can be applied to the mold filling holes which expose the substrate (either the baseplate or the faceplate). A release agent is applied to the mold prior to precursor application to ease removal of the mold after formation of the dielectric spacer. The shrinkage of the gel during solvent extraction also improves mold removal. The final spacer material is a good dielectric, such as silica, secured to the substrate. 3 figs.

  8. CRISPR Spacer Arrays for Detection of Viral Signatures from Acidic Hot Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, J. C.; Bateson, M. M.; Suciu, D.; Young, M. J.

    2010-04-01

    Viruses are the most abundant life-like entities on the planet Earth. Using CRISPR spacer sequences, we have developed a microarray-based approach to detecting viral signatures in the acidic hot springs of Yellowstone.

  9. Effect of plastic spacer handling on salbutamol lung deposition in asthmatic children

    PubMed Central

    Lipworth, Brian J; Lee, Daniel K C; Anhøj, Jacob; Bisgaard, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Aims To study the effects of electrostatics in a plastic spacer on the lung deposition of salbutamol in asthmatic children. Methods Twenty-five children (5–12 years) with mild asthma were given salbutamol hydrofluoroalkane pressurized metered dose inhaler 400 µg via a 750 ml plastic spacer on separate days. Blood samples were taken for plasma salbutamol at 5, 10, 15 and 20 min after inhalation to measure lung bioavailability as a surrogate for relative lung dose. With immediate inhalation following actuation, a new rinsed spacer (NewRinsed) was compared with a used spacer after repeated daily use (Used), a spacer rinsed after repeated use (UsedRinsed) and a spacer primed with benzalkonium chloride to avoid electrostatics (Primed1). In addition, spacers were evaluated using a 15 s inhalation delay following actuation with primed (PrimedDelay) and rinsed (RinsedDelay) spacers. Data were log transformed and expressed as geometric mean fold difference for the average plasma salbutamol concentration (Cav) over 20 min. Results There were significant differences (P < 0.05) in Cav (as geometric mean fold difference and 95% CI) between Primed1 vs NewRinsed 1.92 fold (95% CI 1.15, 3.20) and between Used vs NewRinsed 1.75 fold (1.11, 2.76). There were no significant differences comparing Primed1, Used or UsedRinsed. There were also significant differences (P < 0.05) between Primed1 vs PrimedDelay 2.34 fold (1.31, 4.19), or vs RinsedDelay 3.59 fold (2.15, 5.99); and for Used vs PrimedDelay 2.14 fold (1.24, 3.69), or vs RinsedDelay 3.28 fold (2.13, 5.04). Conclusions The relative lung dose of salbutamol from a plastic spacer may differ considerably depending on spacer handling suggesting that nonelectrostatic spacers may be the best way forward. PMID:12445036

  10. Marginal discrepancy as affected by selective placement of die-spacer: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Aditya, Priyam; Madhav, V N V; Bhide, S V; Aditya, Amita

    2012-09-01

    An increase in the marginal discrepancy is seen after cementation with a luting agent and provision of cement space with a die-spacer is the most preferred method to avoid it. Recommended thickness of die-spacer is 25-40 μm. Smaller die-spacer thickness was consistently found at the axio-occlusal line angles as compared to the other surfaces which has been postulated to that the spacer paint tends to flow away from the sharp line angles and cusp tips as a result of increased surface tension. The absence of adequate relief spaces in these areas impedes the flow of cement beyond the occlusal portion of the casting, which would result in incomplete seating because of hydraulic pressure. Fifty stone dies were duplicated from a steel die and were divided into five groups of sample size 10, where the die-spacer was selectively placed. Measurements were taken at four points, 90° apart from each other with the help of optical microscope. Later all the castings were cemented using Glass Inomer cement as a luting agent, under a 10 kg static load and measurements were recorded. Statistical analysis showed samples with no spacer had the maximum pre and post cementation gap while the least discrepancy was seen in group with additional layer of die-spacer painted over the axio-occlusal line angle. The results were highly significant which clearly indicated the superiority of this group over others. Within limitations of the study, it can be said that application of additional layer of die-spacer at the axio-occlusal line angle will help in decreasing the post cementation marginal discrepancy in full cast metal crowns.

  11. Rectal dose to prostate cancer patients treated with proton therapy with or without rectal spacer.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heeteak; Polf, Jerimy; Badiyan, Shahed; Biagioli, Matthew; Fernandez, Daniel; Latifi, Kujtim; Wilder, Richard; Mehta, Minesh; Chuong, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a spacer inserted in the prerectal space could reduce modeled rectal dose and toxicity rates for patients with prostate cancer treated in silico with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. A total of 20 patients were included in this study who received photon therapy (12 with rectal spacer (DuraSeal™ gel) and 8 without). Two PBS treatment plans were retrospectively created for each patient using the following beam arrangements: (1) lateral-opposed (LAT) fields and (2) left and right anterior oblique (LAO/RAO) fields. Dose volume histograms (DVH) were generated for the prostate, rectum, bladder, and right and left femoral heads. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity was calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model and compared between patients with and without the rectal spacer. A significantly lower mean rectal DVH was achieved in patients with rectal spacer compared to those without. For LAT plans, the mean rectal V70 with and without rectal spacer was 4.19 and 13.5%, respectively. For LAO/RAO plans, the mean rectal V70 with and without rectal spacer was 5.07 and 13.5%, respectively. No significant differences were found in any rectal dosimetric parameters between the LAT and the LAO/RAO plans generated with the rectal spacers. We found that ≥ 9 mm space resulted in a significant decrease in NTCP modeled for ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity. Rectal spacers can significantly decrease modeled rectal dose and predicted ≥grade 2 rectal toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated in silico with PBS. A minimum of 9 mm separation between the prostate and anterior rectal wall yields the largest benefit.

  12. Spacer-controlled emission of randomly oriented fluorophores enhanced with surface plasmon-polaritons.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Yu; Sun, S

    2017-03-29

    In surface plasmon-polariton enhanced fluorescence, the use of spacers is simply understood to control the distance between the fluorescence dyes and metals to avoid quenching. However, the presence of a spacer layer over the metallic surface not only manipulates the quantum yield, but also affects the surface plasmon-polariton resonance, which in turn modifies the florescence excitation rate as well as the far-field radiation pattern of the emission. This study presents a systematic investigation on the spacer-controlled emission of randomly oriented emitters in the Kretschmann configuration, with the full leverage of the coupled transfer matrix, reciprocity and plane-wave decomposition methods. It demonstrates that the introduction of a spacer between the metal film and fluorescence dyes decreases the excitation rate. Furthermore, the excitation rate decreases more for spacers with a higher refractive index due to the reduction of the effective power that goes into the resonance excitation. Combining the excitation rate with the quantum yield and photon-collection efficiency, the detected fluorescence enhancement from either the medium side or substrate side is determined and optimized for the spacer thickness and material. It was found that the highest enhancement of a randomly oriented fluorophore's emission was generally achieved in detection from the substrate side with a low refractive index spacer (e.g. Teflon and SiO2). In addition, the substrate-side measurements were thought to benefit from highly directional radiation and a more stable enhancement compared to the medium-side measurements. Our results clearly reveal physical insights into the spacer-controlled emission and provide concrete guidance in the design and measurement of fluorescence-based sensing and imaging systems.

  13. A new asthma spacer device to improve compliance in children: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chaney, Gervase; Clements, Barry; Landau, Lou; Bulsara, Max; Watt, Paul

    2004-11-01

    This pilot study was designed to compare the acceptance, ease of use, and effects on compliance between currently used spacer devices and the Funhaler--a new small volume spacer device designed to improve adherence to asthma medication in children. A matched questionnaire-based survey was conducted by two interviews of each caregiver by the same person. A total of 32 children were randomly recruited from seven clinics spanning widely differing socioeconomic and geographical areas of Perth, Western Australia. Preschool children taking regular inhaled asthma medication using an existing low volume spacer device and aged between 1.5 and 6 years, took part in the pilot study. Parents completed two matched questionnaires. The first questionnaire was completed at the beginning of the study and the second after 2 weeks' use of the Funhaler spacer. Data collected related primarily to ease of use of the devices, child and parental compliance, and treatment attitudes. During the study, parents were also called at random on one occasion to ascertain whether they had attempted to medicate their child the previous day. Using the Funhaler incentive spacer device, parents reported significantly more success at medicating their children (22/30 always successful) in comparison to using their existing spacer device (3/30). Parental adherence to prescribed frequency and the delivery technique of children were also improved. The children also showed improved satisfaction and willingness to use the device and parents' attitude towards medicating their children was improved with the Funhaler spacer device. Use of a novel, incentive spacer device (Funhaler) appeared to be associated with increased success and fewer problems in medicating children, improved child and parental adherence, and a more positive attitude towards treatment, suggesting that more extensive long-term efficacy trials with the device are warranted.

  14. Genome-wide CpG island methylation and intergenic demethylation propensities vary among different tumor sites

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Tae; Wiemels, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic landscape of cancer includes both focal hypermethylation and broader hypomethylation in a genome-wide manner. By means of a comprehensive genomic analysis on 6637 tissues of 21 tumor types, we here show that the degrees of overall methylation in CpG island (CGI) and demethylation in intergenic regions, defined as ‘backbone’, largely vary among different tumors. Depending on tumor type, both CGI methylation and backbone demethylation are often associated with clinical, epidemiological and biological features such as age, sex, smoking history, anatomic location, histological type and grade, stage, molecular subtype and biological pathways. We found connections between CGI methylation and hypermutability, microsatellite instability, IDH1 mutation, 19p gain and polycomb features, and backbone demethylation with chromosomal instability, NSD1 and TP53 mutations, 5q and 19p loss and long repressive domains. These broad epigenetic patterns add a new dimension to our understanding of tumor biology and its clinical implications. PMID:26464434

  15. Capturing intergenerativity: the use of student reflective journals to identify learning within an undergraduate course in gerontological nursing.

    PubMed

    Davies, Susan M; Reitmaier, Amy B; Smith, Linda Reveling; Mangan-Danckwart, Deborah

    2013-03-01

    The benefits of intergenerational contact between older and young adults have been demonstrated; yet, nursing programs have underexplored the potential of such relationships for enhancing student learning. This article presents an analysis of student reflective journals as part of an evaluation of an undergraduate gerontological nursing course. The course aims to create positive learning experiences by involving older adults as partners in student learning. Older adults are recruited to receive visits from a designated student to share aspects of their life and experiences. Students write reflective journals based on these visits as a method of evaluating their learning. A framework analysis of 80 journals completed by 59 students identified four major themes representing the impact of these visits on student learning: becoming aware, making connections, seeing the unique person, and valuing intergenerational relationships. The analysis suggests the relevance of the concept of intergenerativity in illuminating shared benefits of the practicum experience.

  16. Conservation of the Exon-Intron Structure of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes in Eutherian Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Chernikova, Diana; Managadze, David; Glazko, Galina V.; Makalowski, Wojciech; Rogozin, Igor B.

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of mammalian long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes is high, yet their functions remain largely unknown. One possible way to study this important question is to use large-scale comparisons of various characteristics of lincRNA with those of protein-coding genes for which a large body of functional information is available. A prominent feature of mammalian protein-coding genes is the high evolutionary conservation of the exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis of putative intron positions in lincRNA genes from various mammalian genomes suggests that some lincRNA introns have been conserved for over 100 million years, thus the primary and/or secondary structure of these molecules is likely to be functionally important. PMID:27429005

  17. Analysis of the spatial and temporal arrangement of transcripts over intergenic regions in the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum to invade, colonise and multiply within diverse host environments, as well as to manifest its virulence within the human host, are activities tightly linked to the temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Yet, despite the wealth of high throughput transcriptomic data available for this organism there is very little information regarding the location of key transcriptional landmarks or their associated cis-acting regulatory elements. Here we provide a systematic exploration of the size and organisation of transcripts within intergenic regions to yield surrogate information regarding transcriptional landmarks, and to also explore the spatial and temporal organisation of transcripts over these poorly characterised genomic regions. Results Utilising the transcript data for a cohort of 105 genes we demonstrate that the untranscribed regions of mRNA are large and apportioned predominantly to the 5′ end of the open reading frame. Given the relatively compact size of the P. falciparum genome, we suggest that whilst transcriptional units are likely to spatially overlap, temporal co-transcription of adjacent transcriptional units is actually limited. Critically, the size of intergenic regions is directly dependent on the orientation of the two transcriptional units arrayed over them, an observation we extend to an analysis of the complete sequences of twelve additional organisms that share moderately compact genomes. Conclusions Our study provides a theoretical framework that extends our current understanding of the transcriptional landscape across the P. falciparum genome. Demonstration of a consensus gene-spacing rule that is shared between P. falciparum and ten other moderately compact genomes of apicomplexan parasites reveals the potential for our findings to have a wider impact across a phylum that contains many organisms important to human and veterinary health. PMID:23601558

  18. Genic and Intergenic SSR Database Generation, SNPs Determination and Pathway Annotations, in Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out aiming to use the bioinformatics tools in order to identify and characterize, simple sequence repeats within the third Version of the date palm genome and develop a new SSR primers database. In addition single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are located within the SSR flanking regions were recognized. Moreover, the pathways for the sequences assigned by SSR primers, the biological functions and gene interaction were determined. A total of 172,075 SSR motifs was identified on date palm genome sequence with a frequency of 450.97 SSRs per Mb. Out of these, 130,014 SSRs (75.6%) were located within the intergenic regions with a frequency of 499 SSRs per Mb. While, only 42,061 SSRs (24.4%) were located within the genic regions with a frequency of 347.5 SSRs per Mb. A total of 111,403 of SSR primer pairs were designed, that represents 291.9 SSR primers per Mb. Out of the 111,403, only 31,380 SSR primers were in the genic regions, while 80,023 primers were in the intergenic regions. A number of 250,507 SNPs were recognized in 84,172 SSR flanking regions, which represents 75.55% of the total SSR flanking regions. Out of 12,274 genes only 463 genes comprising 896 SSR primers were mapped onto 111 pathways using KEGG data base. The most abundant enzymes were identified in the pathway related to the biosynthesis of antibiotics. We tested 1031 SSR primers using both publicly available date palm genome sequences as templates in the in silico PCR reactions. Concerning in vitro validation, 31 SSR primers among those used in the in silico PCR were synthesized and tested for their ability to detect polymorphism among six Egyptian date palm cultivars. All tested primers have successfully amplified products, but only 18 primers detected polymorphic amplicons among the studied date palm cultivars. PMID:27434138

  19. Modulation of Re-initiation of Measles Virus Transcription at Intergenic Regions by PXD to NTAIL Binding Strength

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, Véronique; Erales, Jenny; Bignon, Christophe; Roche, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) and all Paramyxoviridae members rely on a complex polymerase machinery to ensure viral transcription and replication. Their polymerase associates the phosphoprotein (P) and the L protein that is endowed with all necessary enzymatic activities. To be processive, the polymerase uses as template a nucleocapsid made of genomic RNA entirely wrapped into a continuous oligomer of the nucleoprotein (N). The polymerase enters the nucleocapsid at the 3’end of the genome where are located the promoters for transcription and replication. Transcription of the six genes occurs sequentially. This implies ending and re-initiating mRNA synthesis at each intergenic region (IGR). We explored here to which extent the binding of the X domain of P (XD) to the C-terminal region of the N protein (NTAIL) is involved in maintaining the P/L complex anchored to the nucleocapsid template during the sequential transcription. Amino acid substitutions introduced in the XD-binding site on NTAIL resulted in a wide range of binding affinities as determined by combining protein complementation assays in E. coli and human cells and isothermal titration calorimetry. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that XD binding to NTAIL involves a complex network of hydrogen bonds, the disruption of which by two individual amino acid substitutions markedly reduced the binding affinity. Using a newly designed, highly sensitive dual-luciferase reporter minigenome assay, the efficiency of re-initiation through the five measles virus IGRs was found to correlate with NTAIL/XD KD. Correlatively, P transcript accumulation rate and F/N transcript ratios from recombinant viruses expressing N variants were also found to correlate with the NTAIL to XD binding strength. Altogether, our data support a key role for XD binding to NTAIL in maintaining proper anchor of the P/L complex thereby ensuring transcription re-initiation at each intergenic region. PMID:27936158

  20. Diversification of the light-harvesting complex gene family via intra- and intergenic duplications in the coral symbiotic alga Symbiodinium.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Shinichiro; Shoguchi, Eiichi; Satoh, Nori; Minagawa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The light-harvesting complex (LHC) is an essential component in light energy capture and transduction to facilitate downstream photosynthetic reactions in plant and algal chloroplasts. The unicellular dinoflagellate alga Symbiodinium is an endosymbiont of cnidarian animals, including corals and sea anemones, and provides carbohydrates generated through photosynthesis to host animals. Although Symbiodinium possesses a unique LHC gene family, called chlorophyll a-chlorophyll c2-peridinin protein complex (acpPC), its genome-level diversity and evolutionary trajectories have not been investigated. Here, we describe a phylogenetic analysis revealing that many of the LHCs are encoded by highly duplicated genes with multi-subunit polyprotein structures in the nuclear genome of Symbiodinium minutum. This analysis provides an extended list of the LHC gene family in a single organism, including 80 loci encoding polyproteins composed of 145 LHC subunits recovered in the phylogenetic tree. In S. minutum, 5 phylogenetic groups of the Lhcf-type gene family, which is exclusively conserved in algae harboring secondary plastids of red algal origin, were identified. Moreover, 5 groups of the Lhcr-type gene family, of which members are known to be associated with PSI in red algal plastids and secondary plastids of red algal origin, were identified. Notably, members classified within a phylogenetic group of the Lhcf-type (group F1) are highly duplicated, which may explain the presence of an unusually large number of LHC genes in this species. Some gene units were homologous to other units within single loci of the polyprotein genes, whereas intergenic homologies between separate loci were conspicuous in other cases, implying that gene unit 'shuffling' by gene conversion and/or genome rearrangement might have been a driving force for diversification. These results suggest that vigorous intra- and intergenic gene duplication events have resulted in the genomic framework of

  1. Human skin color is influenced by an intergenic DNA polymorphism regulating transcription of the nearby BNC2 pigmentation gene.

    PubMed

    Visser, Mijke; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kayser, Manfred

    2014-11-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found to be statistically significant when associated with human diseases, and other phenotypes are most often located in non-coding regions of the genome. One example is rs10765819 located in the first intron of the BNC2 gene previously associated with (saturation of) human skin color. Here, we demonstrate that a nearby intergenic SNP (rs12350739) in high linkage disequilibrium with rs10756819 is likely the causal DNA variant for the observed BNC2 skin color association. The highly conserved region surrounding rs12350739 functions as an enhancer element regulating BNC2 transcription in human melanocytes, while the activity of this enhancer element depends on the allelic status of rs12350739. When the rs12350739-AA allele is present, the chromatin at the region surrounding rs12350739 is inaccessible and the enhancer element is only slightly active, resulting in low expression of BNC2, corresponding with light skin pigmentation. When the rs12350739-GG allele is present however, the chromatin at the region surrounding rs12350739 is more accessible and the enhancer is active, resulting in a higher expression of BNC2, corresponding with dark skin pigmentation. Overall, we demonstrate the identification of the functional DNA variant that explains the BNC2 skin color association signal, providing another important step towards further understanding human pigmentation genetics beyond statistical association. We thus deliver a clear example of how an intergenic non-coding DNA variant modulates the regulatory potential of the enhancer element it is located within, which in turn results in allele-dependent differential gene expression affecting variation in common human traits. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Investigations on the wear behaviour of the temporary PMMA-based hip Spacer-G.

    PubMed

    Affatato, S; Mattarozzi, A; Taddei, P; Robotti, P; Soffiatti, R; Sudanese, A; Toni, A

    2003-01-01

    Total hip replacement has become one of the most successful orthopaedic procedures. However, complications due to infections may give serious problems and have devastating consequences for the hip implant. The use of a temporary three-dimensional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement spacer may be an alternative to solve infections in hip implants, improving the lives of patients awaiting reimplantation. In order to evaluate their wear behaviour, five PMMA Spacer-G femoral heads were tested against five post-mortem pelves in a hip joint simulator with bovine calf serum as lubricant. The surface of the worn spacers was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis; all the samples revealed a similar morphology, showing areas characterized by different degrees of wear. Particle debris was isolated from the lubricant and PMMA particles and bone fractions were quantified. The amount of debris was found to be higher than where no-temporary prostheses were used. However, this result is acceptable since wear debris is removed by lavage irrigation when the Spacer-G is explanted. On the basis of these data, it is considered that the use of the cement Spacer-G could be a promising approach to the treatment of complicated infections of the hip joint. Therefore, Spacer-G is worthy of further research.

  3. Shape memory alloy smart knee spacer to enhance knee functionality: model design and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Arvind; Rani, A Bhargavi; Callejas, Miguel A; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh; Acharyya, Amit; Biswas, Dwaipayan; Bhandari, Vasundhra; Sharma, Paresh; Naik, Ganesh R

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we introduce Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) for designing the tibial part of Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) by exploiting the shape-memory and pseudo-elasticity property of the SMA (e.g. NiTi). This would eliminate the drawbacks of the state-of-the art PMMA based knee-spacer including fracture, sustainability, dislocation, tilting, translation and subluxation for tackling the Osteoarthritis especially for the aged people of 45-plus or the athletes. In this paper a Computer Aided Design (CAD) model using SolidWorks for the knee-spacer is presented based on the proposed SMA adopting the state-of-the art industry-standard geometry that is used in the PMMA based spacer design. Subsequently Ansys based Finite Element Analysis is carried out to measure and compare the performance between the proposed SMA based model with the state-of-the art PMMA ones. 81% more bending is noticed in the PMMA based spacer compared to the proposed SMA that would eventually cause fracture and tilting or translation of spacer. Permanent shape deformation of approximately 58.75% in PMMA based spacer is observed compared to recoverable 11% deformation in SMA when same load is applied on both separately.

  4. The Effect of Spacer Morphology on the Aerosolization Performance of Metered-Dose Inhalers

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Sepideh; Nokhodchi, Ali; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory drug delivery has been attracted great interest for the past decades, because of the high incidence of pulmonary diseases. However, despite its invaluable benefits, there are some major drawbacks in respiratory drug delivery, mainly due to the relatively high drug deposition in undesirable regions. One way to improve the efficiency of respiratory drug delivery through metered-dose inhalers (MDI) is placing a respiratory spacer between the inhaler exit and the mouth. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of type and shape of spacer on the aerosolization performance of MDIs. Methods: A commercial Beclomethasone Dipropionate (BDP) MDI alone or equipped with two different spacer devices (roller and pear type) widely distributed in the world pharmaceutical market was used. The effect of spacers was evaluated by calculating aerosolization indexes such as fine particle fraction (FPF), mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) using the next generation impactor. Results: Although one of the spacers resulted in superior outcomes than the other one, but it was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The results confirmed that the type and shape of spacer did not substantially influence the aerosolization performance of MDIs. PMID:27478789

  5. [Repetitive strain injuries. Forearm pain caused by tissue responses to repetitive strain].

    PubMed

    Sorgatz, H

    2002-10-01

    According to the National Research Council, painful work-related upper limb disorders are caused by different pathophysiological mechanisms, one of which is repetitive strain injury (RSI). Forearm pain, tenderness, and paresthesias are thought to result from a continual risk of exceeding limits of "cumulative trauma load tolerance" (CTLT, cf. NRC 2001) in soft tissue by thousands of high-frequency, repetitive movements. On the other hand, repetitive painful stimulations also produce neuroplastic changes in the spinal and supraspinal nociceptive systems. Thus, repetitive motor and nociceptive impulses become part of the same motor programs, which are also responsible for high-frequency movements and tissue damage. In this way RSI pain may be felt as a task-related response, even after all injuries are completely healed. Consequences of this neuroplastic CTLT model for RSI prevention and therapy are discussed.

  6. Dual detection of Legionella pneumophila and Legionella species by real-time PCR targeting the 23S-5S rRNA gene spacer region.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Benson, R; Pelish, T; Brown, E; Winchell, J M; Fields, B

    2010-03-01

    Although the majority of cases of Legionnaires' disease (LD) are caused by Legionella pneumophila, an increasing number of other Legionella species have been reported to cause human disease. There are no clinical presentations unique to LD and hence accurate laboratory tests are required for early diagnosis. Therefore, we designed a real-time PCR assay that targets the 23S-5S rRNA intergenic spacer region (23S-5S PCR) and allows for detection of all Legionella species and discrimination of L. pneumophila from other Legionella species. In total, 271 isolates representing 50 Legionella species were tested and the assay was validated using 39 culture-positive and 110 culture-negative patient specimens collected between 1989 and 2006. PCR-positive results were obtained with all 39 culture-positive samples (100% sensitivity). Specimens that tested positive according to 23S-5S PCR, but were culture-negative, were further analysed by DNA sequencing of the amplicon or the macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) gene. In addition to L. pneumophila, Legionella longbeachae, Legionella cincinnatiensis and Legionella micdadei were identified in the specimens. The assay showed a 7-log dynamic range displaying a sensitivity of 7.5 CFU/mL or three genome equivalents per reaction. Sixty-one specimens containing viruses or bacteria other than Legionellae were negative according to 23S-5S PCR, demonstrating its specificity. Use of this assay should contribute to the earlier detection of respiratory disease caused by Legionella species, as well as to increased rates of detection.

  7. The apolipoprotein CIII enhancer regulates both extensive histone modification and intergenic transcription of human apolipoprotein AI/CIII/AIV genes but not apolipoprotein AV.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Jun; Wei, Yu-Sheng; Fu, Xiang-Hui; Hao, De-Long; Xue, Zheng; Gong, Huan; Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2008-10-17

    The apolipoprotein (apo) AI/CIII/AIV/AV cluster genes are expressed at different levels in the liver and intestine. The apoCIII enhancer, a common regulatory element, regulates the tissue-specific expression of apoAI, apoCIII, and apoAIV but not apoAV. To study this regulation at the chromatin level, the histone modifications and intergenic transcription in the human apoAI/CIII/AIV/AV cluster were investigated in HepG2 and Caco-2 cells and in the livers of transgenic mice carrying the human gene cluster constructs with or without the apoCIII enhancer. We found that both the promoters and the intergenic regions of the apoAI/CIII/AIV genes were hyperacetylated and formed an open subdomain that did not include the apoAV gene. Hepatic and intestinal intergenic transcripts were identified to transcribe bidirectionally with strand preferences along the cluster. The deletion of the apoCIII enhancer influenced both histone modification and intergenic transcription in the apoAI/CIII/AIV gene region. These results demonstrate that the apoCIII enhancer contributes to the maintenance of an active chromatin subdomain of the apoAI/CIII/AIV genes, but not apoAV.

  8. A Nonword Repetition Task for Speakers with Misarticulations: The Syllable Repetition Task (SRT)

    PubMed Central

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; Campbell, Thomas F.; Dollaghan, Christine A.; Green, Jordan R.; Moore, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Conceptual and methodological confounds occur when non(sense) repetition tasks are administered to speakers who do not have the target speech sounds in their phonetic inventories or who habitually misarticulate targeted speech sounds. We describe a nonword repetition task, the Syllable Repetiton Task (SRT) that eliminates this confound and report findings from three validity studies. Method Ninety-five preschool children with Speech Delay and 63 with Typical Speech, completed an assessment battery that included the Nonword Repetition Task (NRT: Dollaghan & Campbell, 1998) and the SRT. SRT stimuli include only four of the earliest occurring consonants and one early occurring vowel. Results Study 1 findings indicated that the SRT eliminated the speech confound in nonword testing with speakers who misarticulate. Study 2 findings indicated that the accuracy of the SRT to identify expressive language impairment was comparable to findings for the NRT. Study 3 findings illustrated the SRT’s potential to interrogate speech processing constraints underlying poor nonword repetition accuracy. Results supported both memorial and auditory-perceptual encoding constraints underlying nonword repetition errors in children with speech-language impairment. Conclusion The SRT appears to be a psychometrically stable and substantively informative nonword repetition task for emerging genetic and other research with speakers who misarticulate. PMID:19635944

  9. Nebulisers or spacers for the administration of bronchodilators to those with asthma attending emergency departments?

    PubMed

    Mason, Naomi; Roberts, Nicola; Yard, Nick; Partridge, Martyn R

    2008-07-01

    Systematic reviews and national guidelines conclude that the nebulised route of administration of bronchodilators has no advantage over the use of a spacer in moderately severe exacerbations of asthma. Whether this recommendation is implemented and whether it might affect use of staff time is unknown. To determine the current method of administration of bronchodilators to those with non-life-threatening asthma attending emergency departments (ED) in London, UK and to monitor the implementation of a new policy to administer bronchodilators by spacers in one ED with a special reference to the time taken by nurses to administer the therapy by two different routes. Thirty-five EDs in Greater London were surveyed regarding their current practice. A time and motion study was then undertaken in one department observing nurses administering bronchodilators in the 3 weeks before and 3 weeks after a departmental policy change to favour the use of spacer devices rather than nebulisers. The majority of EDs (94.3%) in Greater London were using the nebulised route of administering bronchodilators to the majority of their adult patients. Spacers were more commonly used for the treatment of children (60.3% of departments using spacers and nebulisers or spacers alone). Over half of the hospitals surveyed (51.4%) were unaware that the British Guidelines on Asthma Management suggested that outcomes were the same and that there were potential advantages in the use of a spacer for both adults and children. Time and motion studies showed that the use of a spacer took no more nursing time than administration of the bronchodilator via a nebuliser; in fact treatment and set-up time were considerably lower for spacers. Spacer administration of bronchodilators to those with asthma attending EDs utilises less treatment time than use of a nebuliser. A survey of EDs in Greater London has shown that despite guideline conclusions there appears to be little evidence of reduction in use of

  10. Predicting the impact of feed spacer modification on biofouling by hydraulic characterization and biofouling studies in membrane fouling simulators.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, A; Lehmann, S; Bucs, Sz S; Fresquet, M; Fel, L; Prest, E I E C; Ogier, J; Schellenberg, C; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kruithof, J C; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2017-03-01

    Feed spacers are an essential part of spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane modules. Geometric modification of feed spacers is a potential option to reduce the impact of biofouling on the performance of membrane systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the biofouling potential of two commercially available reference feed spacers and four modified feed spacers. The spacers were compared on hydraulic characterization and in biofouling studies with membrane fouling simulators (MFSs). The virgin feed spacer was characterized hydraulically by their resistance, measured in terms of feed channel pressure drop, performed by operating MFSs at varying feed water flow rates. Short-term (9 days) biofouling studies were carried out with nutrient dosage to the MFS feed water to accelerate the biofouling rate. Long-term (96 days) biofouling studies were done without nutrient dosage to the MFS feed water. Feed channel pressure drop was monitored and accumulation of active biomass was quantified by adenosine tri phosphate (ATP) determination. The six feed spacers were ranked on pressure drop (hydraulic characterization) and on biofouling impact (biofouling studies). Significantly different trends in hydraulic resistance and biofouling impact for the six feed spacers were observed. The same ranking for biofouling impact on the feed spacers was found for the (i) short-term biofouling study with nutrient dosage and the (ii) long-term biofouling study without nutrient dosage. The ranking for hydraulic resistance for six virgin feed spacers differed significantly from the ranking of the biofouling impact, indicating that hydraulic resistance of clean feed spacers does not predict the hydraulic resistance of biofouled feed spacers. Better geometric design of feed spacers can be a suitable approach to minimize impact of biofouling in spiral wound membrane systems.

  11. Contribution of Rapid Evolution of the luxR-luxI Intergenic Region to the Diverse Bioluminescence Outputs of Vibrio fischeri Strains Isolated from Different Environments▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Jeffrey L.; Wollenberg, Michael S.; Colton, Deanna M.; Mandel, Mark J.; Septer, Alecia N.; Dunn, Anne K.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri serves as a valuable model of bacterial bioluminescence, its regulation, and its functional significance. Light output varies more than 10,000-fold in wild-type isolates from different environments, yet dim and bright strains have similar organization of the light-producing lux genes, with the activator-encoding luxR divergently transcribed from luxICDABEG. By comparing the genomes of bright strain MJ11 and the dimmer ES114, we found that the lux region has diverged more than most shared orthologs, including those flanking lux. Divergence was particularly high in the intergenic sequence between luxR and luxI. Analysis of the intergenic lux region from 18 V. fischeri strains revealed that, with one exception, sequence divergence essentially mirrored strain phylogeny but with relatively high substitution rates. The bases conserved among intergenic luxR-luxI sequences included binding sites for known regulators, such as LuxR and ArcA, and bases of unknown significance, including a striking palindromic repeat. By using this collection of diverse luxR-luxI regions, we found that expression of PluxI-lacZ but not PluxR-lacZ transcriptional reporters correlated with the luminescence output of the strains from which the promoters originated. We also found that exchange of a small stretch of the luxI-luxR intergenic region between two strains largely reversed their relative brightness. Our results show that the luxR-luxI intergenic region contributes significantly to the variable luminescence output among V. fischeri strains isolated from different environments, although other elements of strain backgrounds also contribute. Moreover, the lux system appears to have evolved relatively rapidly, suggesting unknown environment-specific selective pressures. PMID:21317265

  12. [Our experiences with anterior cervical cages and spacer].

    PubMed

    Szabó, József; Lapis, István; Marik, László; Kondacs, András; Rusznyák, Csaba

    2007-11-30

    Between 2001 and 2005 86 patients were treated for cervical disc herniations and spondylosis at our department. Stabilization was performed with different cervical cages or spacer after discectomy and decompression. The aim of the study was to examine the changes of the patients' pain, quality of life and work ability, fusion rate, the intervertebral disc height, changes of under and upper segments and finally curvature of cervical spine. Patients were followed by the authors, clinical examination, lateral and antero-posterior radiographic examinations were performed. They were asked to fill in a questionnaire, concerning their pre- and postoperative pain, quality of life and work ability. The patients' pain was graded using a 10-point analog scale (VAS) and with a simplified, McGill-Melzak analog scale. The quality of life was measured with a 10-graduated analog scale as well. More than 77% of our patients appeared at follow up examination. The fusion rate was 89.3%, operated spaces were held in 61%. In the upper segment of operated space 7%, and in the under-segment 14% were found increasingly degenerated. The curvature of cervical spine of the patients' were 64.51% lordotic, 27.42% straight and 8.07% kyphotic. On average the patients' pain changed on VAS from 8.179 to 5.015; on McGill-Melzak scale from 3.89 to 2.80; quality of life changed from 8.045 to 5.463. By the advantage of using cages, the operative approach has become smaller than before, consequently the operative pain has become less too. In addition operation time and hospital stay were significantly shorter (p < 0.005) than using traditional operation approach. The majority of the patients, pain was decreased, quality of life got better. Despite this fact only 3 patients continue their original work and 5 patients do easier work. The majority of our patients were disabled before the operation, but from that time many of them became disabled, in some cases the grade of disability increased. There can

  13. Verbal repetitions and echolalia in Alzheimer's discourse.

    PubMed

    Da Cruz, Fernanda Miranda

    2010-11-01

    This article reports on an investigation of echolalic repetition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A qualitative analysis of data from spontaneous conversations with MHI, a woman with AD, is presented. The data come from the DALI Corpus, a corpus of spontaneous conversations involving subjects with AD. This study argues that echolalic effects can be explained through an analysis of their formal linguistic aspects, such as intonational-prosodic and enunciative-syntactic features. The analysis shows that the description of echolalic repetitions in these terms can help find parameters for the description of the linguistic and communicative characteristics of AD. This analysis even shows how a previous speech turn serves as a base for the elaboration of the next turn by the participant with AD. It also contributes to the understanding of echolalic productions in AD.

  14. Repetition probability effects depend on prior experiences.

    PubMed

    Grotheer, Mareike; Kovács, Gyula

    2014-05-07

    The magnitude of repetition suppression (RS) in the Fusiform Face Area is influenced by the probability of repetitions of faces (Summerfield et al., 2008), implying that perceptual expectations affect repetition-related processes. Surprisingly, however, macaque single-cell (Kaliukhovich and Vogels, 2011) and human fMRI (Kovács et al., 2013) studies have failed to find repetition probability [P(rep)] modulations of RS with nonface stimuli in the occipitotemporal cortex, suggesting that the effect is face specific. One possible explanation of this category selectivity is that the extensive experience humans have with faces affects the neural mechanisms of RS specifically, creating P(rep) modulatory effects. To address this question, we used fMRI to test the P(rep) effects for another well trained stimulus category, upright letters of the roman alphabet as well as for unfamiliar false fonts. We observed significant RS for both stimulus sets in the Letter Form Area as well as in the caudodorsal part of the lateral occipital complex. Interestingly, the influence of P(rep) on RS was dependent on the stimulus: while we observed P(rep) modulations for the roman letters, no such effects were found for the unfamiliar false fonts in either area. Our findings suggest that P(rep) effects on RS are manifest for nonface stimuli as well, but that they depend on the experience of the subjects with the stimulus category. This shows, for the first time, that prior experience affects the influence of contextual predictive information on RS in the human occipitotemporal cortex.

  15. [Effect of spacer on red and green phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Fang-Hui; Huang, Jin

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated the performances of organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) with different spacer, the structure was fabricated as ITO/MoO3 (40 nm)/NPB(40 nm)/TCTA(10 nm)/CBP:GIr114:R-4B2%(30 nm)/spacer (3 nm)/CBP: GIr114%:R-4B2%(30 nm)/BCP(10 nm)/Alq3 (40 nm)/LiF(1 nm)/Al(100 nm), the spacers were CBP, TCTA, TPBI and BCP separately, GIr1 and R-4B were green and red phosphorescent dye respectively. The results showed that compared to the reference device utilized CBP as the spacer layer, TCTA, TPBI and BCP had higher current efficiency in excess of 59%, 79% and 93%, the maximum current efficiency of 16.91 cd x A(-1) was achieved with BCP as the spacer at voltage of 5 V, TPBI and BCP as the spacer layer obtained the higher current density and lower efficiency roll-off. We attributed to these results to the follow reasons, the first was that carriers and excitons were limited to a narrow recombination region because of TCTA with higher LUMO energy level and triplet energy, which improved the probability of carriers recombination, in addition, more serious quenching at higher current density. The second reason was that TPBI and BCP had the higher HOMO energy level and electron mobility, which broadened excitons recombination zone. In addition, the spacer layer caused the accumulation of electrons or holes and the formation of high space electric field, leading to carrier injection and transport more effectively. In particular, we obtained a better stability of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes since the way for the red and green co-doped with host material.

  16. Effect of Varying Layers of Two Die Spacers on Precementation Space of Full Coverage Restorations.

    PubMed

    Mule, Shivkumar A; Dange, Shankar P; Khalikar, Arun N; Vaidya, Smita P

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of varying layers of two commercially available die spacers on pre-cementation space of full coverage restorations in vitro and in vivo. Seven dies were prepared for each of 15 subjects. On three dies 1, 2, 3 layers of Pico-fit and on other three dies 1, 2, 3 layers of Yeti die spacers applied, wax pattern fabricated, invested and cast. Metal copings seated in vitro on die without die spacer and on prepared tooth of respective subject with fit-checker. Thickness of fit checker was measured using micrometer at mid-axial, mid-occlusal and near finish line locations that provided pre-cementation space. Result of ANOVA tests suggested significant difference among groups with varying layers. There was no significant difference between pre-cementation space achieved with Pico-fit and Yeti die spacers. The r values suggested positive correlation between the respective pair of in vivo and in vitro groups. (1) There was significant difference between pre-cementation space at mid-axial and mid-occlusal sites achieved with 1, 2 and 3 layers of die spacers except between 1 and 2 layers and 1 and 3 layers at mid-occlusal site. (2) Pre-cementation space achieved with Pico-fit and Yeti die spacers did not differ significantly for same location, layers and in vitro and in vivo. (3) Pre-cementation space achieved in vitro was analogous to pre-cementation space achieved in vivo for respective location, layers and die spacer.

  17. A Functional Analysis of the Spacer of V(D)J Recombination Signal Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Cowell, Lindsay G; Ptaszek, Leon M; Kelsoe, Garnett

    2003-01-01

    During lymphocyte development, V(D)J recombination assembles antigen receptor genes from component V, D, and J gene segments. These gene segments are flanked by a recombination signal sequence (RSS), which serves as the binding site for the recombination machinery. The murine Jβ2.6 gene segment is a recombinationally inactive pseudogene, but examination of its RSS reveals no obvious reason for its failure to recombine. Mutagenesis of the Jβ2.6 RSS demonstrates that the sequences of the heptamer, nonamer, and spacer are all important. Strikingly, changes solely in the spacer sequence can result in dramatic differences in the level of recombination. The subsequent analysis of a library of more than 4,000 spacer variants revealed that spacer residues of particular functional importance are correlated with their degree of conservation. Biochemical assays indicate distinct cooperation between the spacer and heptamer/nonamer along each step of the reaction pathway. The results suggest that the spacer serves not only to ensure the appropriate distance between the heptamer and nonamer but also regulates RSS activity by providing additional RAG:RSS interaction surfaces. We conclude that while RSSs are defined by a “digital” requirement for absolutely conserved nucleotides, the quality of RSS function is determined in an “analog” manner by numerous complex interactions between the RAG proteins and the less-well conserved nucleotides in the heptamer, the nonamer, and, importantly, the spacer. Those modulatory effects are accurately predicted by a new computational algorithm for “RSS information content.” The interplay between such binary and multiplicative modes of interactions provides a general model for analyzing protein–DNA interactions in various biological systems. PMID:14551903

  18. Randomised controlled study of clinical efficacy of spacer therapy in asthma with regard to electrostatic charge

    PubMed Central

    Dompeling, E; Oudesluys-Murphy, A; Janssens, H; Hop, W; Brinkman, J; Sukhai, R; de Jongste, J C

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Inhalation therapy using a pressured metered dose inhaler (pMDI) and a spacer is frequently used in the treatment of airway disease in children. Several laboratory studies found a clear negative influence of electrostatic charge (ESC) on plastic spacers on the delivery of aerosol.
AIMS—To investigate whether ESC on plastic spacers could diminish bronchodilating responses to salbutamol.
METHODS—Ninety asthmatic children (aged 4-8 years) were randomised into three groups: metal Nebuchamber, plastic Volumatic, and plastic Aerochamber. The bronchodilating response was measured by the change in peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) after 100 µg and 400µg salbutamol. Within the Volumatic and Aerochamber groups, a crossover comparison was made between electrostatic and non-electrostatic spacers.
RESULTS—We found no significant effect of ESC on the bronchodilating response to salbutamol with any of the doses in the Aerochamber and Volumatic groups. For the plastic spacers, the mean difference of the change in PEF after 100 µg salbutamol between non-electrostatic and electrostatic spacers was only +1.7% (95% CI −1.3% to 4.7%). After 400 µg salbutamol this was +1.9% (95% CI −1.4% to 5.1%). A comparable efficacy was found for the Nebuchamber, the Aerochamber, and Volumatic with respect to the change in PEF after 100 and 400 µg salbutamol.
CONCLUSION—This study showed no negative influence of ESC on plastic spacers with regard to clinical efficacy of a β2 agonist (salbutamol) in children with asthma. The metal Nebuchamber, plastic Aerochamber, and plastic Volumatic were equally effective.

 PMID:11159302

  19. Metered dose inhaler-spacer use education effects on achieve asthma control in children.

    PubMed

    Türkeli, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Özge; Yüksel, Hasan

    2016-06-01

    Improper Metered Dose Inhaler (MDI)-spacer use technique can result in less than optimal delivery of medicine to the lungs and poor asthma outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of standardized education on proper MDI- spacer use and asthma control in children with asthma and to identify the factors associated with these results. This is a cohort study that evaluated the influence of standardized education about MDI-Spacer device use on asthma control in children. Asthmatic children using MDI-Spacer device and their parents were enrolled in this study. Children were followed up for two months after standardized education and the change in asthma control was recorded. Thirty eight children (14 females and 24 males) aged between 2.5 and 13 years were enrolled in the study. Mean age of the children was 7.5 ± 2.8 years. Six patients were lost to follow up and thirty two patients completed the study. Mean inhalation technique score was 4.9 ± 1.3 before education and increased significantly to 7.8 ± 0.4 after education (p< 0.001). Mean Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score decreased significantly with education (0.77 ± 0.9 vs 0.1 ± 0.1 respectively, p< 0.001). Similarly, mean asthma symptom score (ASS) decreased significantly from 4.3 ± 3.6 to 0.2 ± 0.7 with education (p< 0.001). Most common mistake in use of MDI-Spacer device use was detected to be lack of mouth rinsing after use before education in 78.9% of the patients. Providing standardized education about MDI-Spacer device use to children and parents leads to correct MDI-Spacer device use and is associated with improvement in asthma symptom score and asthma control.

  20. Systemic activity of inhaled beclomethasone dipropionate: a double-blind comparison of volume spacers.

    PubMed

    Wolthers, Ole D; Sergio, Francesco

    2012-02-01

    To which extent volume spacers may influence systemic activity of inhaled beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) has not been evaluated. To assess whether the AeroChamber Plus™ spacer is equivalent to the Volumatic™ spacer for administration of inhaled hydroflouroalkane 134a propelled BDP in terms of lower leg growth rate (LLGR). Prepubertal children with mild asthma (n = 26, aged 6-14 years) were included in a 3-time periods of 2 weeks duration randomized double-blind cross-over study with a single-blind placebo run-in and two washout periods. LLGR was measured with the knemometer. Interventions were inhaled BDP hydroflouroalkane 134a pressurized metered dose inhaler 100 μg and 200 μg b.i.d. with the AeroChamber Plus and 200 μg b.i.d. with the Volumatic spacer. Beclomethasone dipropionate 200 μg b.i.d. from the AeroChamber Plus was non-inferior to BDP 200 b.i.d. from the Volumatic spacer as the lower margin of confidence interval of the difference between treatments (-0.18 to 0.13 mm/week) was greater than the prespecified lower limit for non-inferiority (-0.20 mm/week). UFC/creatinine data showed no statistically significant variations. The systemic activity of BDP, via the Volumatic™, and AeroChamber Plus™ spacers is similar. The AeroChamber Plus spacer may be used in children without risk of increasing systemic activity of BDP. © 2011 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2011 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  1. Randomised controlled study of clinical efficacy of spacer therapy in asthma with regard to electrostatic charge.

    PubMed

    Dompeling, E; Oudesluys-Murphy, A M; Janssens, H M; Hop, W; Brinkman, J G; Sukhai, R N; de Jongste, J C

    2001-02-01

    Inhalation therapy using a pressured metered dose inhaler (pMDI) and a spacer is frequently used in the treatment of airway disease in children. Several laboratory studies found a clear negative influence of electrostatic charge (ESC) on plastic spacers on the delivery of aerosol. To investigate whether ESC on plastic spacers could diminish bronchodilating responses to salbutamol. Ninety asthmatic children (aged 4-8 years) were randomised into three groups: metal Nebuchamber, plastic Volumatic, and plastic Aerochamber. The bronchodilating response was measured by the change in peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) after 100 microgram and 400 microgram salbutamol. Within the Volumatic and Aerochamber groups, a crossover comparison was made between electrostatic and non-electrostatic spacers. We found no significant effect of ESC on the bronchodilating response to salbutamol with any of the doses in the Aerochamber and Volumatic groups. For the plastic spacers, the mean difference of the change in PEF after 100 microgram salbutamol between non-electrostatic and electrostatic spacers was only +1.7% (95% CI -1.3% to 4.7%). After 400 microgram salbutamol this was +1.9% (95% CI -1.4% to 5.1%). A comparable efficacy was found for the Nebuchamber, the Aerochamber, and Volumatic with respect to the change in PEF after 100 and 400 microgram salbutamol. This study showed no negative influence of ESC on plastic spacers with regard to clinical efficacy of a beta(2) agonist (salbutamol) in children with asthma. The metal Nebuchamber, plastic Aerochamber, and plastic Volumatic were equally effective.

  2. Repetition Blindness: An Emergent Property of Inter-Item Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alison L.; Still, Mary L.; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Repeating an item in a brief or rapid display usually produces faster or more accurate identification of the item (repetition priming), but sometimes produces the opposite effect (repetition blindness). We present a theory of short-term repetition effects, the "competition hypothesis," which explains these paradoxical outcomes. The central tenet…

  3. Lingual Kinematics during Rapid Syllable Repetition in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Min Ney; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid syllable repetition tasks are commonly used in the assessment of motor speech disorders. However, little is known about the articulatory kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: To investigate and compare lingual kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in dysarthric…

  4. Grade Repetition and Primary School Dropout in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabay, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Research on education in low-income countries rarely focuses on grade repetition. When addressed, repetition is typically presented along with early school dropout as the "wasting" of educational resources. Simplifying grade repetition in this way often fails to recognize significant methodological concerns and also overlooks the unique…

  5. Grade Repetition and Primary School Dropout in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabay, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Research on education in low-income countries rarely focuses on grade repetition. When addressed, repetition is typically presented along with early school dropout as the "wasting" of educational resources. Simplifying grade repetition in this way often fails to recognize significant methodological concerns and also overlooks the unique…

  6. Lingual Kinematics during Rapid Syllable Repetition in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Min Ney; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid syllable repetition tasks are commonly used in the assessment of motor speech disorders. However, little is known about the articulatory kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: To investigate and compare lingual kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in dysarthric…

  7. Naming and Repetition in Aphasia: Steps, Routes, and Frequency Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nozari, Nazbanou; Kittredge, Audrey K.; Dell, Gary S.; Schwartz, Myrna F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the cognitive processes underlying picture naming and auditory word repetition. In the two-step model of lexical access, both the semantic and phonological steps are involved in naming, but the former has no role in repetition. Assuming recognition of the to-be-repeated word, repetition could consist of retrieving the…

  8. Neural Correlates of Restricted, Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dara Manoach CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Massachusetts...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 06September2011–05September2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Neural Correlates of Restricted , Repetitive Behaviors in Autism ...complete, we will test the hypothesis that restrictive , repetitive behaviors (RRBs) are associated with specific reductions in brain

  9. Repetitive Behaviours in Typically Developing 2-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leekam, Susan; Tandos, Jonathan; McConachie, Helen; Meins, Elizabeth; Parkinson, Kathryn; Wright, Charlotte; Turner, Michelle; Arnott, Bronia; Vittorini, Lucia; Le Couteur, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Background: Repetitive behaviours are an essential part of the diagnosis of autism but are also commonly seen in typically developing children. The current study investigated the frequency and factor structure of repetitive behaviours in a large community sample of 2-year-olds. Methods: A new measure, the Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire (RBQ-2)…

  10. Phosphor thermometry at high repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, N.; Brübach, J.; Dreizler, A.

    2013-09-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilizing the luminescence properties of thermographic phosphors. Typically these ceramic materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Photomultipliers and high-speed camera systems are used to transiently detect the subsequently emitted luminescence decay point wise or two-dimensionally resolved. Based on appropriate calibration measurements, the luminescence lifetime is converted to temperature. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. For the first time, the authors realized a high-speed phosphor thermometry system combining a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterized regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating in terms of heating effects has been investigated. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of one sample per crank angle degree at an engine speed of 1000 rpm. This experiment has proven that high-speed phosphor thermometry is a promising diagnostic tool for the resolution of surface temperature transients.

  11. Repetitive element hypermethylation in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Neven, K Y; Piola, M; Angelici, L; Cortini, F; Fenoglio, C; Galimberti, D; Pesatori, A C; Scarpini, E; Bollati, V

    2016-06-18

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disorder of the central nervous system whose cause is currently unknown. Evidence is increasing that DNA methylation alterations could be involved in inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases and could contribute to MS pathogenesis. Repetitive elements Alu, LINE-1 and SAT-α, are widely known as estimators of global DNA methylation. We investigated Alu, LINE-1 and SAT-α methylation levels to evaluate their difference in a case-control setup and their role as a marker of disability. We obtained blood samples from 51 MS patients and 137 healthy volunteers matched by gender, age and smoking. Methylation was assessed using bisulfite-PCR-pyrosequencing. For all participants, medical history, physical and neurological examinations and screening laboratory tests were collected. All repetitive elements were hypermethylated in MS patients compared to healthy controls. A lower Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score was associated with a lower levels of LINE-1 methylation for 'EDSS = 1.0' and '1.5 ≤ EDSS ≤ 2.5' compared to an EDSS higher than 3, while Alu was associated with a higher level of methylation in these groups: 'EDSS = 1.0' and '1.5 ≤ EDSS ≤ 2.5'. MS patients exhibit an hypermethylation in repetitive elements compared to healthy controls. Alu and LINE-1 were associated with degree of EDSS score. Forthcoming studies focusing on epigenetics and the multifactorial pathogenetic mechanism of MS could elucidate these links further.

  12. Abnormal repetitive behaviours: shared phenomenology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Muehlmann, A M; Lewis, M H

    2012-05-01

    Self-injurious behaviour (SIB) is a devastating problem observed in individuals with various neurodevelopmental disorders, including specific genetic syndromes as well as idiopathic intellectual and developmental disability. Although an increased prevalence of SIB has been documented in specific genetic mutations, little is known about the neurobiological basis of SIB. This makes vulnerability assessment and pharmacological treatment incredibly challenging. Here we review evidence that SIB and other repetitive, invariant behaviours, such as stereotypy, compulsions and tics, share many phenotypic similarities, are often co-morbidly expressed and have common inducing conditions. This argues for shared or overlapping pathophysiology. As much more is known about the neurobiology of these related disorders, this should make the neurobiology of SIB a more tractable problem. Stereotypy, compulsions and tics are diagnostic for disorders that have received focused neurobiological investigation (autism, obsessive compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome, respectively). In addition, animal models of these repetitive behaviours have been well characterised. Collectively, these studies have found that cortical basal ganglia circuitry dysfunction mediates repetitive behaviour. Moreover, these studies provide more detailed information and potentially testable hypotheses about specific aspects of the circuitry that may be operative in SIB. We can use available information from clinical and animal models to make more precise hypotheses regarding the particular pathophysiology driving SIB. The results of testing such hypotheses should generate pharmacological strategies that may prove efficacious in reducing SIB. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Modeling repetitive motions using structured light.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Aliaga, Daniel G

    2010-01-01

    Obtaining models of dynamic 3D objects is an important part of content generation for computer graphics. Numerous methods have been extended from static scenarios to model dynamic scenes. If the states or poses of the dynamic object repeat often during a sequence (but not necessarily periodically), we call such a repetitive motion. There are many objects, such as toys, machines, and humans, undergoing repetitive motions. Our key observation is that when a motion-state repeats, we can sample the scene under the same motion state again but using a different set of parameters; thus, providing more information of each motion state. This enables robustly acquiring dense 3D information difficult for objects with repetitive motions using only simple hardware. After the motion sequence, we group temporally disjoint observations of the same motion state together and produce a smooth space-time reconstruction of the scene. Effectively, the dynamic scene modeling problem is converted to a series of static scene reconstructions, which are easier to tackle. The varying sampling parameters can be, for example, structured-light patterns, illumination directions, and viewpoints resulting in different modeling techniques. Based on this observation, we present an image-based motion-state framework and demonstrate our paradigm using either a synchronized or an unsynchronized structured-light acquisition method.

  14. Experimental models of repetitive brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Weber, John T

    2007-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs in a significant portion of trauma patients, especially in specific populations, such as child abuse victims or athletes involved in contact sports (e.g. boxing, football, hockey, and soccer). A continually emerging hypothesis is that repeated mild injuries may cause cumulative damage to the brain, resulting in long-term cognitive dysfunction. The growing attention to this hypothesis is reflected in several recent experimental studies of repeated mild TBI in vivo. These reports generally demonstrate cellular and cognitive dysfunction after repetitive injury using rodent TBI models. In some cases, data suggests that the effects of a second mild TBI may be synergistic, rather than additive. In addition, some studies have found increases in cellular markers associated with Alzheimer's disease after repeated mild injuries, which demonstrates a direct experimental link between repetitive TBI and neurodegenerative disease. To complement the findings from humans and in vivo experimentation, my laboratory group has investigated the effects of repeated trauma in cultured brain cells using a model of stretch-induced mechanical injury in vitro. In these studies, hippocampal cells exhibited cumulative damage when mild stretch injuries were repeated at either 1-h or 24-h intervals. Interestingly, the extent of damage to the cells was dependent on the time between repeated injuries. Also, a very low level of stretch, which produced no cell damage on its own, induced cell damage when it was repeated several times at a short interval (every 2 min). Although direct comparisons to the clinical situation are difficult, these types of repetitive, low-level, mechanical stresses may be similar to the insults received by certain athletes, such as boxers, or hockey and soccer players. This type of in vitro model could provide a reliable system in which to study the mechanisms underlying cellular dysfunction following repeated injuries. As

  15. Holding chambers (spacers) versus nebulisers for beta-agonist treatment of acute asthma.

    PubMed

    Cates, Christopher J; Welsh, Emma J; Rowe, Brian H

    2013-09-13

    In acute asthma inhaled beta(2)-agonists are often administered by nebuliser to relieve bronchospasm, but some have argued that metered-dose inhalers with a holding chamber (spacer) can be equally effective. Nebulisers require a power source and need regular maintenance, and are more expensive in the community setting. To assess the effects of holding chambers (spacers) compared to nebulisers for the delivery of beta(2)-agonists for acute asthma. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Trial Register and reference lists of articles. We contacted the authors of studies to identify additional trials. Date of last search: February 2013. Randomised trials in adults and children (from two years of age) with asthma, where spacer beta(2)-agonist delivery was compared with wet nebulisation. Two review authors independently applied study inclusion criteria (one review author for the first version of the review), extracted the data and assessed risks of bias. Missing data were obtained from the authors or estimated. Results are reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). This review includes a total of 1897 children and 729 adults in 39 trials. Thirty-three trials were conducted in the emergency room and equivalent community settings, and six trials were on inpatients with acute asthma (207 children and 28 adults). The method of delivery of beta(2)-agonist did not show a significant difference in hospital admission rates. In adults, the risk ratio (RR) of admission for spacer versus nebuliser was 0.94 (95% CI 0.61 to 1.43). The risk ratio for children was 0.71 (95% CI 0.47 to 1.08, moderate quality evidence). In children, length of stay in the emergency department was significantly shorter when the spacer was used. The mean duration in the emergency department for children given nebulised treatment was 103 minutes, and for children given treatment via spacers 33 minutes less (95% CI -43 to -24 minutes, moderate quality evidence). Length of stay in the emergency department

  16. The Adult Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 (RBQ-2A): A Self-Report Measure of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Sarah L.; Uljarevic, Mirko; Baker, Emma K.; Richdale, Amanda L.; Jones, Catherine R. G.; Leekam, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    In two studies we developed and tested a new self-report measure of restricted and repetitive behaviours (RRB) suitable for adults. In Study 1, The Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 for adults (RBQ-2A) was completed by a sample of 163 neurotypical adults. Principal components analysis revealed two components: Repetitive Motor Behaviours and…

  17. The Adult Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 (RBQ-2A): A Self-Report Measure of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Sarah L.; Uljarevic, Mirko; Baker, Emma K.; Richdale, Amanda L.; Jones, Catherine R. G.; Leekam, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    In two studies we developed and tested a new self-report measure of restricted and repetitive behaviours (RRB) suitable for adults. In Study 1, The Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 for adults (RBQ-2A) was completed by a sample of 163 neurotypical adults. Principal components analysis revealed two components: Repetitive Motor Behaviours and…

  18. Detection and characterization of spacer integration intermediates in type I-E CRISPR-Cas system.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Zihni; Hermanns, Veronica; Wurm, Reinhild; Wagner, Rolf; Pul, Ümit

    2014-07-01

    The adaptation against foreign nucleic acids by the CRISPR-Cas system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats and CRISPR-associated proteins) depends on the insertion of foreign nucleic acid-derived sequences into the CRISPR array as novel spacers by still unknown mechanism. We identified and characterized in Escherichia coli intermediate states of spacer integration and mapped the integration site at the chromosomal CRISPR array in vivo. The results show that the insertion of new spacers occurs by site-specific nicking at both strands of the leader proximal repeat in a staggered way and is accompanied by joining of the resulting 5'-ends of the repeat strands with the 3'-ends of the incoming spacer. This concerted cleavage-ligation reaction depends on the metal-binding center of Cas1 protein and requires the presence of Cas2. By acquisition assays using plasmid-located CRISPR array with mutated repeat sequences, we demonstrate that the primary sequence of the first repeat is crucial for cleavage of the CRISPR array and the ligation of new spacer DNA.

  19. The CRISPR RNA-guided surveillance complex in Escherichia coli accommodates extended RNA spacers.

    PubMed

    Luo, Michelle L; Jackson, Ryan N; Denny, Steven R; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Maksimchuk, Kenneth R; Lin, Wayne; Bothner, Brian; Wiedenheft, Blake; Beisel, Chase L

    2016-09-06

    Bacteria and archaea acquire resistance to foreign genetic elements by integrating fragments of foreign DNA into CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) loci. In Escherichia coli, CRISPR-derived RNAs (crRNAs) assemble with Cas proteins into a multi-subunit surveillance complex called Cascade (CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense). Cascade recognizes DNA targets via protein-mediated recognition of a protospacer adjacent motif and complementary base pairing between the crRNA spacer and the DNA target. Previously determined structures of Cascade showed that the crRNA is stretched along an oligomeric protein assembly, leading us to ask how crRNA length impacts the assembly and function of this complex. We found that extending the spacer portion of the crRNA resulted in larger Cascade complexes with altered stoichiometry and preserved in vitro binding affinity for target DNA. Longer spacers also preserved the in vivo ability of Cascade to repress target gene expression and to recruit the Cas3 endonuclease for target degradation. Finally, longer spacers exhibited enhanced silencing at particular target locations and were sensitive to mismatches within the extended region. These findings demonstrate the flexibility of the Type I-E CRISPR machinery and suggest that spacer length can be modified to fine-tune Cascade activity.

  20. Treatment of proximal femur infections with antibiotic-loaded cement spacers

    PubMed Central

    Kelm, J.; Bohrer, P.; Schmitt, E.; Anagnostakos, K.

    2009-01-01

    In case of periprosthetic hip infections the implantation of antibiotic-loaded PMMA spacers is accepted for an adequate treatment option. Although their indication for the treatment of destructive, bacterial infections of the proximal femur would make sense, literature data are scarce. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotic-impregnated spacers in the treatment of proximal femur infections. In 10 consecutive patients (5 M/ 5 F, mean age 66 y.) with bacterial proximal femur infections, a femoral head/neck resection was prospectively performed with a subsequent implantation of an antibiotic-loaded spacer. The joint-specific outcome was evaluated by the Merle d´Aubigne and the Mayo hip score, the general outcome by SF-36. The time periods were divided into “infection situation”, “between stages” and meanly 1 year “after prosthesis implantation”. The spacers were meanly implanted over 90 [155-744] days. In all cases an infection eradication could be achieved. After infection eradication, a prosthesis implantation was performed in 8 cases. The general scores showed significant increases at each time period. With regard to the dimension “pain”, both scores demonstrated a significant increase between “infection situation” and “between stages”, but no significance between “between stages” and “after prosthesis implantation”. Spacers could be indicated in the treatment of proximal femur infections. Besides an infection eradication, a pain reduction is also possible. PMID:19841730