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Sample records for interglacial conditions polar

  1. Climatic bisection of the last interglacial warm period in the Polar North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Henning A.; Kandiano, Evguenia S.; Helmke, Jan; Andersen, Nils; Rosell-Mele, Antoni; Erlenkeuser, Helmut

    2011-07-01

    New multiproxy marine data of the Eemian interglacial (MIS5e) from the Norwegian Sea manifest a cold event with near-glacial surface ocean summer temperatures (3-4 °C). This mid-Eemian cooling divided the otherwise relatively warm interglacial climate and was associated with widespread expansions of winter sea-ice and polar water masses due to changes in atmospheric circulation and ocean stability. While the data also verify a late rather than early last interglacial warm peak, which is in general disharmony with northern hemisphere insolation maximum and the regional climatic progression of the early Holocene, the cold event itself was likely instrumental for delaying the last interglacial climate development in the Polar North when compared with regions farther south. Such a 'climatic decoupling' of the Polar region may bear profound implications for the employment of Eemian conditions to help evaluate the present and future state of the Arctic cryosphere during a warming interglacial.

  2. No evidence of polar warming during penultimate interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-07-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), driven by temperature and salinity gradients, is an important component of the climate system; it transfers an enormous amount of heat via ocean currents and atmospheric circulation to high northern latitudes and hence has bearing on climate in the region. Freshening of the surface ocean could weaken AMOC. But during warm interglacial periods the effect of a fresh surface ocean on AMOC may be muted. In fact, climate models predict that heat transfer from the North Atlantic to the Arctic may increase over the 21st century. A series of interconnected processes in the North Atlantic, known as polar amplification, could cause the Arctic to warm up faster compared to the rest of the world. It could even lead to ice-free conditions in the Arctic.

  3. Stratification-induced variations in nutrient utilization in the Polar North Atlantic during past interglacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibodeau, Benoit; Bauch, Henning A.; Pedersen, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    Vertical water mass structure in the Polar North Atlantic Ocean plays a critical role in planetary climate by influencing the formation rate of North Atlantic deepwater, which in turn affects surface heat transfer in the northern hemisphere, ventilation of the deep sea, and ocean circulation on a global scale. However, the response of upper stratification in the Nordic seas to near-future hydrologic forcing, as surface water warms and freshens due to global temperature rise and Greenland ice demise, remains poorly known. While past major interglacials are viewed as potential analogues of the present, recent findings suggest that very different surface ocean conditions prevailed in the Polar North Atlantic during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e and 11 compared to the Holocene. It is thus crucial to identify the causes of those differences in order to understand their role in climatic and oceanographic variability. To resolve this, we pair here bulk sediment δ15N isotopic signatures with planktonic foraminiferal assemblages and their isotopic composition across major past interglacials. The comparison defines for the first time stratification-induced variations in nitrate utilization up to 25% between and within all of these warm periods that highlight changes in the thickness of the mixed-layer throughout the previous interglacials. That thickness directly controls the depth-level of Atlantic water inflow. The major changes of nitrate utilization recorded here thus suggest that a thicker mixed-layer prevailed during past interglacials, probably related to longer freshwater input associated with the preceding glacial termination. This would have caused the Atlantic water to flow at greater depth during MIS 5e and 11. These results call for caution when using older interglacials as modern or near-future climate analogues and contribute to the improvement of our general comprehension of the impact of freshwater input near a globally important deep-water formation site

  4. Collapse of polar ice sheets during the stage 11 interglacial.

    PubMed

    Raymo, Maureen E; Mitrovica, Jerry X

    2012-03-14

    Contentious observations of Pleistocene shoreline features on the tectonically stable islands of Bermuda and the Bahamas have suggested that sea level about 400,000 years ago was more than 20 metres higher than it is today. Geochronologic and geomorphic evidence indicates that these features formed during interglacial marine isotope stage (MIS) 11, an unusually long interval of warmth during the ice age. Previous work has advanced two divergent hypotheses for these shoreline features: first, significant melting of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, in addition to the collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and the Greenland Ice Sheet; or second, emplacement by a mega-tsunami during MIS 11 (ref. 4, 5). Here we show that the elevations of these features are corrected downwards by ∼10 metres when we account for post-glacial crustal subsidence of these sites over the course of the anomalously long interglacial. On the basis of this correction, we estimate that eustatic sea level rose to ∼6-13 m above the present-day value in the second half of MIS 11. This suggests that both the Greenland Ice Sheet and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapsed during the protracted warm period while changes in the volume of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet were relatively minor, thereby resolving the long-standing controversy over the stability of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet during MIS 11.

  5. Interglacial Durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangili, Clara; McManus, Jerry F.; Raynaud, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    In the context of future global warming induced by human activities, it is essential to assess the role of natural climatic variations. Precise knowledge of the duration of past interglacial periods is fundamental to the understanding of the potential future evolution of the Holocene. Past ice age cycles provide a natural laboratory for exploring the progression and duration of interglacial climate. Palaeorecords from ice, land and oceans extend over the last 800 ka, revealing eight glacial-interglacial cycles, with a range of insolation and greenhouse gas influences. The interglacials display a correspondingly large variety of intensity and duration, thus providing an opportunity for major insights into the mechanisms involved in the behaviour of interglacial climates. A comparison of the duration of these interglacials, however, is often difficult, as the definition of an interglacial depends on the archive that is considered. Therefore, to compare interglacial length and climate conditions from different archives, a consistent definition of interglacial conditions is required, ideally one that is not bound to the method nor to the archive under consideration. Here we present a method to identify interglacials and to calculate their length by mean of a simple statistical approach. We based our method on ~ 400 ka windows of time to determine mean climatic conditions while allowing for the possibility of long term evolution of the climatic baseline. For our study of interglacials of the past 800 ka, we used two windows that largely align with the pre- (800-430 ka ago) and post- (430-0 ka ago) mid-Brunhes event (MBE), although the resulting conclusions are not sensitive to this particular division. We applied this method to the last 800 ka of a few palaeoclimate records: the deuterium ice core (EDC) record as a climatic proxy, the benthic δ18O stack (LR04) as a proxy for sea level/ice volume, ice core (Vostok, EDC) atmospheric CO2 and additional records. Although

  6. Evidence for a Progressive Change of Interglacial Climate Conditions Forced by Different Ocean-Atmosphere Circulation Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, H. A.; Kandiano, E. S.; Helmke, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    Most paleoclimatic interpretations directly hinge on observations drawn from studying present day processes. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the overall glacial-interglacial climate system, still little is known in detail about climate forcing and feedback mechanisms of the interglacial past. In order to better estimate the 'natural range' of climatically important mechanisms, it seems crucial to make detailed comparison of the present interglaciation (Holocene) with previous warm periods of the late Quaternary. As the impact of climate change is usually strongest in more extreme environments, the temperature-sensitive northern high latitudes are a suitable region for such comparative studies. There is ample evidence from terrestrial and marine archives that the major warm periods of the Quaternary differed significantly from each other. For instance, the last interglacial period (Eemian/125 ka) had climatic conditions indicating slightly higher temperatures at mid-northern latitudes than during the Holocene hypsithermal. Comparing Holocene with Eemian records using marine sediment cores from the polar-subpolar North Atlantic suggests two different circulation styles. During most of the Holocene surface water circulation was dominated by a polar-directed transport of relatively warm surface water from the Atlantic which entered the eastern Arctic Ocean through Fram Strait and across the western Eurasian shelf seas. This type of circulation forced oceanographic fronts into a meridional alignment, a situation which still exists today. For Eemian times, however, paleoproxies indicate a much steeper north-to-south temperature gradient than for the Holocene, suggesting a zonal configuration of the main water mass fronts. This situation led to a reduced water mass exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic seas. Reconstructions of surface conditions during stage 11 (Holsteinian/405 ka) indicate, despite overall boundary conditions were

  7. Impacts of polar ice sheets on the East Asian monsoon during the MIS-13 interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Feng; Yin, Qiuzhen; Nikolova, Irina; Guo, Zhengtang; Berger, Andre

    2017-04-01

    Among all the interglacials of the last one million years, Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 13 has the highest δ18O value over the past 800 ka in the deep-sea sediments. This would indicate that MIS-13 is the coolest interglacial if assuming δ18O mainly represents global ice volume. The Antarctic ice core records show also that MIS-13 is the coolest interglacial over Antarctica with almost the lowest greenhouse gases concentrations (GHG). However, many proxy records from the northern hemisphere (NH) indicate that MIS-13 is at least as warm as or even warmer than the recent interglacials, with extremely strong summer monsoon and a possible melting of Greenland ice sheet. In this study, based on proxy reconstructions, different scenarios regarding the size of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets are made, and the response of the East Asian summer monsoon to these scenarios are tested by using the models HadCM3 and LOVECLIM as well as factor separation analysis and under the astronomical and GHG configurations of MIS-13. The results show that the influence of the disappearance of Greenland ice sheet on the surface temperature is quite localized, mainly over the northern high latitudinal regions, however, the influence of the bigger southern Hemisphere (SH) ice sheet on the surface temperature is very global, especially in the southern hemisphere. This ice sheet condition has an impact on the precipitation pattern over tropical-subtropical regions. It causes much more summer precipitation over all the East Asian monsoon region, in consistent with the paleosol record from southern China. The scenario of melted Greenland ice sheet and of larger SH ice sheets provides one of the explanations of the strong monsoon rainfall documented by the proxy data.

  8. An Interglacial Polar Bear and an Early Weichselian Glaciation at Poolepynten, Western Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingolfsson, O.; Alexanderson, H.

    2012-12-01

    Recent discovery of a subfossil polar bear (Ursus maritimus) jawbone in the Poolepynten coastal cliff sequence, western Svalbard (Ingolfsson & Wiig, 2009), and its implications for the natural history of the polar bear (Lindqvist et al. 2010; Miller et al. 2012), motivated an effort to better constrain the environmental history and age envelope of the Poolepynten sediment sequence, particularly the lithostratigraphy of the coastal cliffs with emphasis on re-dating the sequence using the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating technique. We report a revised lithostratigraphy and nine new OSL ages. It is concluded that the Poolepynten sequence holds evidence of four regional glaciation events, recorded in the strata as erosional unconformities and/or glacial deposits followed by shallow-marine deposition signifying transgressions and subsequent glacio-isostatic rebound and regression. Our OSL ages refine previous age determinations (14C and IRSL) and support the interpretation that the subfossil polar bear jawbone is of last interglacial (Eemian) age (Alexanderson et al. in press). References: Alexanderson, H., Ingolfsson, O., Murray, A.S. & Dudek, J. in press. An Interglacial Polar Bear and an Early Weichselian Glaciation at Poolepynten, Western Svalbard. Boreas 00, 000-000. Ingolfsson, O. & Wiig, O. 2009. Late Pleistocene fossil find in Svalbard: the oldest remains of a polar bear (Ursus maritimus Phipps, 1744) ever discovered. Polar Research 28, 455-466. Lindqvist, C., Schuster, S. C., Sun, Y., Talbot, S. L., Qi, J., Ratan, A., Tomsho, L. P., Kasson, L., Zeyl, E., Aars, J., Miller, W., Ingólfsson, Ó., Bachmann, L. & Wiig, Ø. 2010. Complete mitochondrial genome of a Pleistocene jawbone unveils the origin of polar bear. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 107, 5053-5057. Miller, W., Schuster, S. C., Welch, A. J., Ratan, A., Bedoya-Reina, O. C., Zhao, F., Kim, H. L., Burhans, R.C., Drautz, D.I., Wittekindt, N.E., Tomsho, L.P., Ibarra-Laclette, E

  9. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    DOE PAGES

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; ...

    2015-05-19

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distances. These cores are a palaeoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol–climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission,more » atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret palaeodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP; hereafter referred to as \\"6 kyr\\"), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"115 kyr\\") and Eemian (126 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"126 kyr\\"). One glacial time interval, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"21 kyr\\"), was simulated as well to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase in mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two-thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one-third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change in dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times

  10. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sein, Dmitry; Zhang, Kai

    2015-05-19

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distances. These cores are a palaeoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol–climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission, atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret palaeodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP; hereafter referred to as \\"6 kyr\\"), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"115 kyr\\") and Eemian (126 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"126 kyr\\"). One glacial time interval, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"21 kyr\\"), was simulated as well to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase in mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two-thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one-third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change in dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times higher

  11. Variations in glacial and interglacial marine conditions over the last two glacial cycles off northern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwemark, Ludvig; Chao, Weng-Si; Gyllencreutz, Richard; Hanebuth, Till J. J.; Chiu, Pin-Yao; Yang, Tien-Nan; Su, Chih-Chieh; Chuang, Chih-Kai; León Dominguez, Dora Carolina; Jakobsson, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Five sediment cores from the Lomonosov Ridge and the Morris Jesup Rise north of Greenland show the history of sea-ice coverage and primary productivity over the last two glacial cycles. Variations in Manganese content, benthic and planktonic foraminifera, bioturbation, and trace fossil diversity are interpreted to reflect differences in sea-ice cover and sediment depositional conditions between the identified interglacials. Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 1 and MIS 2 are represented by thin (<<5 cm) sediment units while the preceding interglacial MIS 5 and glacial MIS 6 are characterized by thick (10-20 cm) deposits. Foraminiferal abundances and bioturbation suggest that MIS 1 was generally characterized by severe sea-ice conditions north of Greenland while MIS 5 appears to have been considerably warmer with more open water, higher primary productivity, and higher sedimentation rates. Strengthened flow of Atlantic water along the northern continental shelf of Greenland rather than development of local polynyas is here suggested as a likely cause for the relatively warmer marine conditions during MIS 5 compared to MIS 1. The cores also suggest distinct differences between the glacial intervals MIS 2 and MIS 6. While MIS 6 is distinguished by a relatively thick sediment unit poor in foraminifera and with low Mn values, MIS 2 is practically missing. We speculate that this could be the effect from a paleocrystic sea-ice cover north of Greenland during MIS 2 that prevented sediment delivery from sea ice and icebergs. In contrast, the thick sequence deposited during MIS 6 indicates a longer glacial period with dynamic intervals characterized by huge drifting icebergs delivering ice rafted debris (IRD). A drastic shift from thinner sedimentary cycles where interglacial sediment parameters indicate more severe sea-ice conditions gave way to larger amplitude cycles with more open water indicators was observed around the boundary between MIS 7/8. This shift is in agreement with a

  12. Glacial/interglacial changes in mineral dust and sea-salt records in polar ice cores: Sources, transport, and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Hubertus; Siggaard-Andersen, Marie-Louise; Ruth, Urs; RöThlisberger, Regine; Wolff, Eric

    2007-03-01

    Sea-salt and mineral dust records as represented by Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations, respectively, in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores show pronounced glacial/interglacial variations. For the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), mineral dust (sea salt) concentrations in Greenland show an increase of a factor of approximately 80 (15) compared to the Holocene and significant shifts by a factor of 15 (5) during Dansgaard-Oeschger events. In Antarctica the dust (sea salt) flux is enhanced by a factor of 15 (3) during the LGM compared to the Holocene, and variations by approximately a factor of 8 (1-2) exist in parallel to Antarctic warm events. Primary glacial dust sources are the Asian deserts for Greenland and Patagonia for Antarctica. Ice core evidence and model results show that both changes in source strength as well as atmospheric transport and lifetime contributed to the observed changes in Greenland ice cores. In Antarctica, changes in ice core fluxes are in large parts related to source variations both for sea salt and dust, where the formation of sea-salt aerosol from sea ice may play a pivotal role. Summarizing our latest estimates on changes in sources, transport, and deposition, these processes are roughly able to explain the glacial increase in sea salt in both polar regions, while they fall short by at least a factor of 4-7 for mineral dust. Future improvements in model resolution and in the formulation of source and transport processes together with new ice core records, e.g., on dust size distributions, will eventually allow convergence of models and observations.

  13. Stable climatic conditions in the Eemian interglacial recorded by stable isotopes from a limnic sediment sequence Parsau (northern Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettger, T.; Junge, F. W.; Stottmeister, L.

    2003-04-01

    An approx. 4m long high-resolution limnic sediment core was drilled near Parsau (south of the town of Jahrstedt) on the bank of the River Ohre in Lower Saxony (northern Germany). The lower part of the sequence consists of calcareous muds while the upper part comprises peats. It corresponds to the Eemian Interglacial period from the beginning of the Corylus (E4a) up to the Pinus (E6b) pollen assemblage zones (PAZ). The sediment sequence was studied by stable isotope analyses of bulk autochthoneous carbonate. According to the δ18O values, the middle part we investigated of the Eemian Interglacial in the Parsau profile indicates a stable climate. From bottom to top, the δ18O values for the first part of the profile (5.0-3.8m deep) are relatively constant with a mean value of -6.70 ±0.11 ppm vs. PDB. Then the 18O level increases continuously without any fluctuations to the top (between 3.8-3.0m) and reaches a maximum between 3.0 and 2.8m (δ18Omean= -5.52± 0.07 ppm vs. PDB) before decreasing in the upper part. Warm climatic conditions began in PAZ E4a. The δ18O data of lake carbonate reflect warm, stable climatic conditions during the Corylus and Carpinus PAZ. The climatic optimum is reached in the course of PAZ E4b to E5. The relatively heavier δ13C values varying between 0.73 and -2.08 ppm vs. PDB reflect the high, continuously increasing eutrophication in the lake. These results confirm that stable climatic conditions prevailed during the middle Eemian and during the climatic optimum of the Eemian as previously found from sediment sequences at opencast mines in Saxony, central Germany.

  14. Belgian speleothems from the Last Interglacial: insights in the onset of glacial conditions in north western Europe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vansteenberge, Stef; Verheyden, Sophie; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, Lawrence R.; Keppens, Eddy; Claeys, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Currently, a dataset combining at least four speleothems from two different cave systems in southern Belgium (Han-sur-Lesse and Remouchamps) is being constructed to improve the understanding of the termination of the Eemian and the millennial to decadal variability of the Early Glacial times in north western Europe. Here, one of those speleothems is presented. The Han-stm-9 (or 'Triptyque') speleothem is a broken, 68 cm long and candle-shaped stalagmite from the Han-sur-Lesse cave system. The stalagmite was collected in summer 2013 within the southern part of the cave network and was dated between ~126 and ~99ka. Most likely, climate optimum conditions during the 130-125ka interval are linked to the growth of this and other speleothems from Belgian caves. This particular speleothem gained interest because of the partial conformity with the continental interglacial period in northern western Europe (130 - 118ka) and its dense calcite composition with visible layering, excluding post-depositional deformation. Furthermore, the stalagmite displays a complex growth history, with large variations in growth rates (ranging from and periods of ceased speleothem formation. Two hiatuses, with a distinct macroscopic expression, occur. The first one starts at 118.4ka and lasts until 113.0ka. A second hiatus is situated between ~108ka and 103.7ka. A trend in growth rate, consisting of slow growth gradually increasing towards very fast speleothem formation before both hiatuses, is observed. These intervals with very high growth rates, for instance around 118ka, enable high-resolution climate reconstructions via stable isotopes (δ18O and δ13C) and trace elements (Mg, Sr, Ba and P), down to centennial and decadal scale. The timing of the first hiatus corresponds with Greenland Stadial 26 and with the generally accepted termination of the Eemian in northern Europe at 119-118ka. Also, preliminary stable isotope studies have indicated a large detoriation of δ13C occurring right

  15. The Last Interglacial Labrador Sea: A Pervasive Millennial Oscillation In Surface Water Conditions Without Labrador Sea Water Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; de Vernal, A.

    A multi-proxy approach was developed to document secular to millenial changes of potential density in surface, mesopelagic, and bottom waters of the Labrador Sea, thus allowing to reconstruct situations when winter convection with intermediate or deep water formation occurred in the basin. This approach relies on dinocyst-transfer functions providing estimates of sea-surface temperature and salinity that are used to calibrate past-relationships between oxygen 18 contents in calcite and potential density gradients. The oxygen isotope compositions of epipelagic (Globigerina bul- loides), deeper-dwelling (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, left coiling), and benthic (Uvigerina peregrina and Cibicides wuellerstorfi) foraminifera, then allow to extrap- olate density gradients between the corresponding water layers. This approach has been tested in surface sediments in reference to modern hydrographic conditions at several sites from the NW North Atlantic, then used to reconstruct past conditions from high resolution studies of cores raised from the southern Greenland Rise (off Cape Farewell). Results indicate that the modern-like regime established during the early Holocene and full developed after 7 ka only. It is marked by weak density gradi- ents between the surface and intermediate water masses, allowing winter convection down to a lower pycnocline between intermediate and deep-water masses, thus the formation of intermediate Labrador Sea Water (LSW). Contrasting with the middle to late Holocene situation, since the last interglacial and throughout the last climatic cycle, a single and dense water mass seems to have occupied the water column below a generally low-density surface water layer, thus preventing deep convection. There- fore, the production of LSW seems to be feature specific to the present interglacial interval that could soon cease to exist, due to global warming, as suggested by recent ocean model experiments and by the fact that it never occurred during the

  16. Correspondence between the ENSO-like state and glacial-interglacial condition during the past 360 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Tiegang; Chang, Fengming; Yu, Zhoufei; Xiong, Zhifang; Wang, Haixia

    2016-10-01

    In the warming world, tropical Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) variation has received considerable attention because of its enormous influence on global climate change, particularly the El Niño-Southern Oscillation process. Here, we provide new high-resolution proxy records of the magnesium/calcium ratio and the oxygen isotope in foraminifera from a core on the Ontong-Java Plateau to reconstruct the SST and hydrological variation in the center of the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) over the last 360 000 years. In comparison with other Mg/Ca-derived SST and δ18O records, the results suggested that in a relatively stable condition, e.g., the last glacial maximum (LGM) and other glacial periods, the tropical Pacific would adopt a La Niña-like state, and the Walker and Hadley cycles would be synchronously enhanced. Conversely, El Niño-like conditions could have occurred in the tropical Pacific during fast-changing periods, e.g., the termination and rapidly cooling stages of interglacial periods. In the light of the sensitivity of the Eastern Pacific Cold Tongue (EPCT) and the inertia of the WPWP, we hypothesize an inter-restricted relationship between the WPWP and EPCT, which could control the zonal gradient variation of SST and affect climate change.

  17. Correspondence between the ENSO-like state and glacial-interglacial condition during the past 360 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Tiegang; Chang, Fengming; Yu, Zhoufei; Xiong, Zhifang; Wang, Haixia

    2017-09-01

    In the warming world, tropical Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) variation has received considerable attention because of its enormous influence on global climate change, particularly the El Niño-Southern Oscillation process. Here, we provide new high-resolution proxy records of the magnesium/calcium ratio and the oxygen isotope in foraminifera from a core on the Ontong-Java Plateau to reconstruct the SST and hydrological variation in the center of the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) over the last 360 000 years. In comparison with other Mg/Ca-derived SST and δ18O records, the results suggested that in a relatively stable condition, e.g., the last glacial maximum (LGM) and other glacial periods, the tropical Pacific would adopt a La Niña-like state, and the Walker and Hadley cycles would be synchronously enhanced. Conversely, El Niño-like conditions could have occurred in the tropical Pacific during fastchanging periods, e.g., the termination and rapidly cooling stages of interglacial periods. In the light of the sensitivity of the Eastern Pacific Cold Tongue (EPCT) and the inertia of the WPWP, we hypothesize an inter-restricted relationship between the WPWP and EPCT, which could control the zonal gradient variation of SST and affect climate change.

  18. Polarity in Conditionals and Conditional-Like Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, I-Ta Chris

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation concerns the distribution of negative polarity items (henceforth, NPIs) in conditionals and conditional-like constructions. NPIs include words such as any and ever and idioms such as "give a damn" and "lift a finger"; these expressions have only a limited distribution. In this dissertation, the distribution of…

  19. Polarity in Conditionals and Conditional-Like Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, I-Ta Chris

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation concerns the distribution of negative polarity items (henceforth, NPIs) in conditionals and conditional-like constructions. NPIs include words such as any and ever and idioms such as "give a damn" and "lift a finger"; these expressions have only a limited distribution. In this dissertation, the distribution of…

  20. Last Interglacial Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukla, George J.; Bender, Michael L.; de Beaulieu, Jacques-Louis; Bond, Gerard; Broecker, Wallace S.; Cleveringa, Piet; Gavin, Joyce E.; Herbert, Timothy D.; Imbrie, John; Jouzel, Jean; Keigwin, Lloyd D.; Knudsen, Karen-Luise; McManus, Jerry F.; Merkt, Josef; Muhs, Daniel R.; Müller, Helmut; Poore, Richard Z.; Porter, Stephen C.; Seret, Guy; Shackleton, Nicholas J.; Turner, Charles; Tzedakis, Polychronis C.; Winograd, Isaac J.

    2002-07-01

    The last interglacial, commonly understood as an interval with climate as warm or warmer than today, is represented by marine isotope stage (MIS) 5e, which is a proxy record of low global ice volume and high sea level. It is arbitrarily dated to begin at approximately 130,000 yr B.P. and end at 116,000 yr B.P. with the onset of the early glacial unit MIS 5d. The age of the stage is determined by correlation to uranium-thorium dates of raised coral reefs. The most detailed proxy record of interglacial climate is found in the Vostok ice core where the temperature reached current levels 132,000 yr ago and continued rising for another two millennia. Approximately 127,000 yr ago the Eemian mixed forests were established in Europe. They developed through a characteristic succession of tree species, probably surviving well into the early glacial stage in southern parts of Europe. After ca. 115,000 yr ago, open vegetation replaced forests in northwestern Europe and the proportion of conifers increased significantly farther south. Air temperature at Vostok dropped sharply. Pulses of cold water affected the northern North Atlantic already in late MIS 5e, but the central North Atlantic remained warm throughout most of MIS 5d. Model results show that the sea surface in the eastern tropical Pacific warmed when the ice grew and sea level dropped. The essentially interglacial conditions in southwestern Europe remained unaffected by ice buildup until late MIS 5d when the forests disappeared abruptly and cold water invaded the central North Atlantic ca. 107,000 yr ago.

  1. Last interglacial climates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kukla, G.J.; Bender, M.L.; de Beaulieu, J. -L.; Bond, G.; Broecker, W.S.; Cleveringa, P.; Gavin, J.E.; Herbert, T.D.; Imbrie, J.; Jouzel, J.; Keigwin, L.D.; Knudsen, K.-L.; McManus, J.F.; Merkt, J.; Muhs, D.R.; Muller, H.; Poore, R.Z.; Porter, S.C.; Seret, G.; Shackleton, N.J.; Turner, C.; Tzedakis, P.C.; Winograd, I.J.

    2002-01-01

    The last interglacial, commonly understood as an interval with climate as warm or warmer than today, is represented by marine isotope stage (MIS) 5e, which is a proxy record of low global ice volume and high sea level. It is arbitrarily dated to begin at approximately 130,000 yr B.P. and end at 116,000 yr B.P. with the onset of the early glacial unit MIS 5d. The age of the stage is determined by correlation to uranium-thorium dates of raised coral reefs. The most detailed proxy record of interglacial climate is found in the Vostok ice core where the temperature reached current levels 132,000 yr ago and continued rising for another two millennia. Approximately 127,000 yr ago the Eemian mixed forests were established in Europe. They developed through a characteristic succession of tree species, probably surviving well into the early glacial stage in southern parts of Europe. After ca. 115,000 yr ago, open vegetation replaced forests in northwestern Europe and the proportion of conifers increased significantly farther south. Air temperature at Vostok dropped sharply. Pulses of cold water affected the northern North Atlantic already in late MIS 5e, but the central North Atlantic remained warm throughout most of MIS 5d. Model results show that the sea surface in the eastern tropical Pacific warmed when the ice grew and sea level dropped. The essentially interglacial conditions in southwestern Europe remained unaffected by ice buildup until late MIS 5d when the forests disappeared abruptly and cold water invaded the central North Atlantic ca. 107,000 yr ago. ?? 2002 University of Washington.

  2. Glacial/interglacial changes in export production in a series of sediment cores spanning the Indian sector Antarctic Polar Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaccard, S.; Thöle, L.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Studer, A.; Michel, E.; Mazaud, A.

    2014-12-01

    Export of organic carbon from surface waters of the Antarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean decreased during the last ice age, coinciding with declining atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, signaling reduced exchange of CO2 between the ocean interior and the atmosphere. In contrast, in the Subantarctic Zone, export production increased into ice ages coinciding with rising dust fluxes, thus suggesting iron fertilization of Subantarctic phytoplankton. Recently developed XRF core-scanning methods permit paleoceanographic reconstructions on time-scales similar to ice core temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements. We have investigated the sedimentary distribution of various proxies allowing reconstructing export production in a series of sedimentary archives retrieved from the Indian Sector of the Southern Ocean spanning the Antarctic Polar Front in the vicinity of Kerguelen Island (Marion Dufresne Expeditions IndienSud-1 & 2). These high-resolution measurements are complemented with reconstruction of 230Th-normalized biogenic particle flux to the seafloor covering the last glacial termination.This contribution will explore the effects of Fe-fertilization on export production in an area remote from major dust sources. Furthermore, quantitative vertical flux determinations will allow comparing carbon export efficiency in the Indian Ocean with previously published records from the South Atlantic.

  3. Low-δD hydration rinds in Yellowstone perlites record rapid syneruptive hydration during glacial and interglacial conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2016-01-01

    Hydration of silicic volcanic glass forms perlite, a dusky, porous form of altered glass characterized by abundant “onion-skin” fractures. The timing and temperature of perlite formation are enigmatic and could plausibly occur during eruption, during post-eruptive cooling, or much later at ambient temperatures. To learn more about the origin of natural perlite, and to fingerprint the hydration waters, we investigated perlitic glass from several synglacial and interglacial rhyolitic lavas and tuffs from the Yellowstone volcanic system. Perlitic cores are surrounded by a series of conchoidal cracks that separate 30- to 100-µm-thick slivers, likely formed in response to hydration-induced stress. H2O and D/H profiles confirm that most D/H exchange happens together with rapid H2O addition but some smoother D/H variations may suggest separate minor exchange by deuterium atom interdiffusion following hydration. The hydrated rinds (2–3 wt% H2O) transition rapidly (within 30 µm, or by 1 wt% H2O per 10 µm) to unhydrated glass cores. This is consistent with quenched “hydration fronts” where H2O diffusion coefficients are strongly dependent on H2O concentrations. The chemical, δ18O, and δD systematics of bulk glass records last equilibrium between ~110 and 60 °C without chemical exchange but with some δ18O exchange. Similarly, the δ18O of water extracted from glass by rapid heating suggests that water was added to the glass during cooling at <200 °C. Our observations support fast hydration at temperatures as low as 60 °C; prolonged exposure to high temperature of 175°–225° during water addition is less likely as the glass would lose alkalies and should alter to clays within days. A compilation of low-temperature hydration diffusion coefficients suggests ~2 orders of magnitude higher rates of diffusion at 60–110 °C temperatures, compared with values expected from extrapolation of high-temperature (>400 °C) experimental data. The thick

  4. Low-δD hydration rinds in Yellowstone perlites record rapid syneruptive hydration during glacial and interglacial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindeman, Ilya N.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2016-11-01

    Hydration of silicic volcanic glass forms perlite, a dusky, porous form of altered glass characterized by abundant "onion-skin" fractures. The timing and temperature of perlite formation are enigmatic and could plausibly occur during eruption, during post-eruptive cooling, or much later at ambient temperatures. To learn more about the origin of natural perlite, and to fingerprint the hydration waters, we investigated perlitic glass from several synglacial and interglacial rhyolitic lavas and tuffs from the Yellowstone volcanic system. Perlitic cores are surrounded by a series of conchoidal cracks that separate 30- to 100-µm-thick slivers, likely formed in response to hydration-induced stress. H2O and D/H profiles confirm that most D/H exchange happens together with rapid H2O addition but some smoother D/H variations may suggest separate minor exchange by deuterium atom interdiffusion following hydration. The hydrated rinds (2-3 wt% H2O) transition rapidly (within 30 µm, or by 1 wt% H2O per 10 µm) to unhydrated glass cores. This is consistent with quenched "hydration fronts" where H2O diffusion coefficients are strongly dependent on H2O concentrations. The chemical, δ18O, and δD systematics of bulk glass records last equilibrium between 110 and 60 °C without chemical exchange but with some δ18O exchange. Similarly, the δ18O of water extracted from glass by rapid heating suggests that water was added to the glass during cooling at <200 °C. Our observations support fast hydration at temperatures as low as 60 °C; prolonged exposure to high temperature of 175°-225° during water addition is less likely as the glass would lose alkalies and should alter to clays within days. A compilation of low-temperature hydration diffusion coefficients suggests 2 orders of magnitude higher rates of diffusion at 60-110 °C temperatures, compared with values expected from extrapolation of high-temperature (>400 °C) experimental data. The thick hydration rinds in perlites

  5. Rapid reductions in North Atlantic Deep Water during the peak of the last interglacial period.

    PubMed

    Galaasen, Eirik Vinje; Ninnemann, Ulysses S; Irvalı, Nil; Kleiven, Helga Kikki F; Rosenthal, Yair; Kissel, Catherine; Hodell, David A

    2014-03-07

    Deep ocean circulation has been considered relatively stable during interglacial periods, yet little is known about its behavior on submillennial time scales. Using a subcentennially resolved epibenthic foraminiferal δ(13)C record, we show that the influence of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) was strong at the onset of the last interglacial period and was then interrupted by several prominent centennial-scale reductions. These NADW transients occurred during periods of increased ice rafting and southward expansions of polar water influence, suggesting that a buoyancy threshold for convective instability was triggered by freshwater and circum-Arctic cryosphere changes. The deep Atlantic chemical changes were similar in magnitude to those associated with glaciations, implying that the canonical view of a relatively stable interglacial circulation may not hold for conditions warmer and fresher than at present.

  6. Lunar Polar Environmental Testing: Regolith Simulant Conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie

    2014-01-01

    As ISRU system development approaches flight fidelity, there is a need to test hardware in relevant environments. Extensive laboratory and field testing have involved relevant soil (lunar regolith simulants), but the current design iterations necessitate relevant pressure and temperature conditions. Including significant quantities of lunar regolith simulant in a thermal vacuum chamber poses unique challenges. These include facility operational challenges (dust tolerant hardware) and difficulty maintaining a pre-prepared soil state during pump down (consolidation state, moisture retention).For ISRU purposes, the regolith at the lunar poles will be of most interest due to the elevated water content. To test at polar conditions, the regolith simulant must be doped with water to an appropriate percentage and then chilled to cryogenic temperatures while exposed to vacuum conditions. A 1m tall, 28cm diameter bin of simulant was developed for testing these simulant preparation and drilling operations. The bin itself was wrapped with liquid nitrogen cooling loops (100K) so that the simulant bed reached an average temperature of 140K at vacuum. Post-test sampling was used to determine desiccation of the bed due to vacuum exposure. Depth dependent moisture data is presented from frozen and thawed soil samples.Following simulant only evacuation tests, drill hardware was incorporated into the vacuum chamber to test auguring techniques in the frozen soil at thermal vacuum conditions. The focus of this testing was to produce cuttings piles for a newly developed spectrometer to evaluate. This instrument, which is part of the RESOLVE program science hardware, detects water signatures from surface regolith. The drill performance, behavior of simulant during drilling, and characteristics of the cuttings piles will be offered.

  7. Semi-open environmental conditions during phases of hominin occupation at the Eemian Interglacial basin site Neumark-Nord 2 and its wider environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Eduard; Bakels, Corrie

    2015-06-01

    Neandertal occupation of Eemian environments in Europe is well attested by several archaeological sites dating to this interglacial period. Does this mean that Neandertals were living in closed forest environments? Due to the potential variability of Eemian environments in space and time, it is necessary to study environmental records that can be correlated with phases of hominin presence, as reflected in the archaeological record. Such a perspective can be obtained from the small basin locality Neumark-Nord 2, as it contains an extensive and detailed environmental record, as well as a large archaeological record consisting of several distinct find levels. Analysis shows that hominin presence is predominantly associated with semi-open environmental conditions. A review of the data from the neighbouring Neumark-Nord 1 basin shows that semi-open environments were also characterizing the wider environment during phases of hominin presence at both basin localities. Large herbivores attracted to the water in these basins may have played an important role in the vegetation openness, probably in conjunction with (local) climatic conditions. The relationship between hominin presence and semi-open environments is explained as Neandertals exploiting the large herbivores aggregating around these freshwater localities, while the more varied vegetation would also have provided them with edible plant foods. Other Eemian sites from freshwater contexts provide evidence for semi-open conditions as well.

  8. A hypothesis linking sub-optimal seawater pCO2 conditions for cnidarian-Symbiodinium symbioses with the exceedence of the interglacial threshold (>260 ppmv)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, S. A.

    2012-05-01

    Most scleractinian corals and many other cnidarians host intracellular photosynthetic dinoflagellate symbionts ("zooxanthellae"). The zooxanthellae contribute to host metabolism and skeletogenesis to such an extent that this symbiosis is well recognised for its contribution in creating the coral reef ecosystem. The stable functioning of cnidarian symbioses is however dependent upon the host's ability to maintain demographic control of its algal partner. In this review, I explain how the modern envelope of seawater conditions found within many coral reef ecosystems (characterised by elevated temperatures, rising pCO2, and enriched nutrient levels) are antagonistic toward the dominant host processes that restrict excessive symbiont proliferation. Moreover, I outline a new hypothesis and initial evidence base, which support the suggestion that the additional "excess" zooxanthellae fraction permitted by seawater pCO2 levels beyond 260 ppmv significantly increases the propensity for symbiosis breakdown ("bleaching") in response to temperature and irradiance extremes. The relevance of this biological threshold is discussed in terms of historical reef extinction events, glacial-interglacial climate cycles and the modern decline of coral reef ecosystems.

  9. A hypothesis linking sub-optimal seawater pCO2 conditions for cnidarian-Symbiodinium symbioses with the exceedence of the interglacial threshold (> 260 ppmv)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, S. A.

    2011-11-01

    Most scleractinian corals and many other cnidarians host intracellular photosynthetic dinoflagellate symbionts ("zooxanthellae"). The zooxanthellae contribute to host metabolism and skeletogenesis to such an extent that this symbiosis is well recognised for its contribution in creating the coral reef ecosystem. The stable functioning of cnidarian symbioses is however dependent upon the host's ability to maintain demographic control of its algal partner. In this review, I explain how the modern envelope of seawater conditions found within many coral reef ecosystems (characterised by elevated temperatures, rising pCO2, and enriched nutrient levels) are antagonistic toward the dominant host processes that restrict excessive symbiont proliferation. Moreover, I outline a new hypothesis and initial evidence base, which support the suggestion that the additional "excess" zooxanthellae fraction permitted by seawater pCO2 levels beyond 260 ppmv significantly increases the propensity for symbiosis breakdown ("bleaching") in response to temperature and irradiance extremes. The relevance of this biological threshold is discussed in terms of historical reef extinction events, glacial-interglacial climate cycles and the modern decline of coral reef ecosystems.

  10. Response of Asian summer monsoon duration to orbital forcing under glacial and interglacial conditions: Implication for precipitation variability in geological records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhengguo

    2016-05-01

    The responses of Asian summer monsoon and associated precipitation to orbital forcing have been intensively explored during the past 30 years, but debate still exists regarding whether or not the Asian monsoon is controlled by northern or southern summer insolation on the precessional timescale. Various modeling studies have been conducted that support the potential roles played by the insolation in both hemispheres. Among these previous studies, however, the main emphasis has been on the Asian monsoon intensity, with the response of monsoon duration having received little consideration. In the present study, the response of the rainy season duration over different monsoon areas to orbital forcing and its contribution to total annual precipitation are evaluated using an atmospheric general circulation model. The results show that the durations of the rainy seasons, especially their withdrawal, in northern East Asia and the India-Bay of Bengal region, are sensitive to precession change under interglacial-like conditions. Compared to those during stronger boreal summer insolation, the Asian monsoon-associated rainy seasons at weaker insolation last longer, although the peak intensity is smaller. This longer duration of rainfall, which results from the change in land-ocean thermal contrast associated with atmospheric diabatic heating, can counterbalance the weakened intensity in certain places and induce an opposite response of total annual precipitation. However, the duration effect of Asian monsoon is limited under glacial-like conditions. Nevertheless, monsoon duration is a factor that can dominate the orbital-scale variability of Asian monsoon, alongside the intensity, and it should therefore receive greater attention when attempting to explain orbital-scale monsoon change.

  11. Stimulus polarity and conditioning in planaria.

    PubMed

    BARNES, C D; KATZUNG, B G

    1963-08-23

    Orientation in the monopolar pulse field used as the unconditioned stimulus was found to influence formation of a conditioned response to light in planarians. Planarians trained while oriented with the head toward the cathode reached maximal response rates rapidly, while those trained while oriented toward the anode showed no evidence of conditioned response formation.

  12. The high Sea Level History of Beringia and its correspondence with Super Interglacials and Warm Pliocene at Lake El'gygytgyn, NE Russia - Links to Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigham-Grette, J.; Roychowdhury, R.; Deconto, R. M.; Melles, M.; Minyuk, P.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal regions of central Beringia contain a well-studied sequence of marine shorelines consisting of barrier beach sequences and broad coastal plans of superposed marine sediment. These sequences include shorelines associated with 2 Pliocene high sea stands, and lower shorelines dated to MIS 31, MIS 11, and MIS 5e. All of these shorelines correspond with super interglacials identified in the Lake El'gygytgyn paleoclimate record (Lake E), NE Arctic Russia. However, not all super interglacials correspond with a recorded high sea level event in the western Arctic. We argue that most of the high sea stands in central and northern Beringia, especially the NW coast of Alaska, likely require at least the partial demise of Greenland, or WAIS, or EAIS, or some combination of the three. How do we evaluate what melted and why? MIS 31 was a remarkably warm interval found in the ANDRILL and other marine records around Antarctica. Half a prerecession cycle after this warmth in Antarctica, we see a super interglacial MIS 31 in Lake E. Because of unconformities in the ANDRILL record, MIS 31 still provides the best match with Lake E, but we postulate that other intervals marked by the deposition of diatomaceous ooze in the ANDRILL record may also correspond to many of our interglacials. The challenge has been to determine orbital phasing relationships between warmth in the south and warmth in the north. Here we explore this relationship starting with the striking observation that most super interglacials correspond with extremely low eccentricity, but lagged by ~53kyrs. We explore how orbital conditions may have preconditioned the polar regions to produce a large response during some interglacials; linking changes in polar ice sheet size to sea level and interglacial extremes recorded at Lake E.

  13. Mars Express MARSIS Radar: A Prediction of the Effect of Overlying Ice on Detecting Polar Basal Lakes and Inter-Glacial Aquifers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Plaut, J. J.; Gurnett, D. A.; Picardi, G.

    2004-01-01

    The penetration of the MARSIS radar signal into the polar ice mass is modeled to determine the capability of the instrument to locate sub-glacial aquifers. As a ground penetrating radar, the orbiting MARSIS transmits a signal greater than 1 W between 1-5 MHz. In this work we will investigate the effect of ice conductive losses on the radar-detection of subsurface aquifers. Based on wave propagation analysis, it is found that for a bulk ice conductivity below 10-5 S/m, conductive losses in the medium are not significant. However, if the bulk ice conductivity is relatively large (greater than 10-5 S/m), the reflected signal from any deep aquifer will be absorbed as it propagates in the lossy ice medium limiting the probing depth.

  14. Interglacials of the last 800,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Past Interglacials Working Group Of Pages

    2016-03-01

    Interglacials, including the present (Holocene) period, are warm, low land ice extent (high sea level), end-members of glacial cycles. Based on a sea level definition, we identify eleven interglacials in the last 800,000 years, a result that is robust to alternative definitions. Data compilations suggest that despite spatial heterogeneity, Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 5e (last interglacial) and 11c (~400 ka ago) were globally strong (warm), while MIS 13a (~500 ka ago) was cool at many locations. A step change in strength of interglacials at 450 ka is apparent only in atmospheric CO2 and in Antarctic and deep ocean temperature. The onset of an interglacial (glacial termination) seems to require a reducing precession parameter (increasing Northern Hemisphere summer insolation), but this condition alone is insufficient. Terminations involve rapid, nonlinear, reactions of ice volume, CO2, and temperature to external astronomical forcing. The precise timing of events may be modulated by millennial-scale climate change that can lead to a contrasting timing of maximum interglacial intensity in each hemisphere. A variety of temporal trends is observed, such that maxima in the main records are observed either early or late in different interglacials. The end of an interglacial (glacial inception) is a slower process involving a global sequence of changes. Interglacials have been typically 10-30 ka long. The combination of minimal reduction in northern summer insolation over the next few orbital cycles, owing to low eccentricity, and high atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations implies that the next glacial inception is many tens of millennia in the future.

  15. Polar and high latitude substorms and solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despirak, I. V.; Lyubchich, A. A.; Kleimenova, N. G.

    2014-09-01

    All substorm disturbances observed in polar latitudes can be divided into two types: polar, which are observable at geomagnetic latitudes higher than 70° in the absence of substorms below 70°, and high latitude substorms, which travel from auroral (<70°) to polar (>70°) geomagnetic latitudes. The aim of this study is to compare conditions in the IMF and solar wind, under which these two types of substorms are observable on the basis of data from meridional chain of magnetometers IMAGE and OMNI database for 1995, 2000, and 2006-2011. In total, 105 polar and 55 high latitude substorms were studied. It is shown that polar substorms are observable at a low velocity of solar wind after propagation of a high-speed recurrent stream during the late recovery phase of a magnetic storm. High latitude substorms, in contrast, are observable with a high velocity of solar wind, increased values of the Bz component of the IMF, the Ey component of the electric field, and solar wind temperature and pressure, when a high-speed recurrent stream passes by the Earth.

  16. The Nuclear Cusp Condition in Spin-Polarized Thomas - Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lung, Chien-An.

    Thomas-Fermi theory, which was introduced in the 1920s, was developed into rigorous mathematics in the 1970s by Lieb, Simon, Benilan, Brezis, and others. Later, Goldstein and Rieder extended rigorous Thomas-Fermi theory to a spin polarized context, to include the nuclear cusp condition, and to the case where a magnetic field is present. But they did not investigate incorporating the nuclear cusp condition into the spin polarized context. The purpose of my thesis is to do precisely that. I proved the existence and uniqueness of the problem of minimizing the energy functional by solving a non-linear elliptic partial differential equation on { bf R}^3 which arose from the Euler -Lagrange equation. A topological argument then related the Lagrange multipliers to the numbers of spin up and spin down electrons.

  17. The equable climate problem during Interglacial warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, B. A.; Mauri, A.; Brewer, S.; Gajewski, K. J.; Kühl, N.; Viau, A. E.; Wu, H.; Kaplan, J. O.

    2011-12-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that warmer climates prior to the Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles were more equable, characterised by 1) a smaller equator-pole temperature gradient, and 2) a smaller temperature difference between winter and summer, especially in the interior of the continents. Future climate is also expected to be more equable, but climate models continue to have difficulty simulating this aspect of pre-Pleistocene climates. The equable nature of more recent interglacial warming has received little attention despite being much more accessible, largely because earlier studies have focussed mainly on summer season temperature changes over high latitudes. Here we use a comprehensive synthesis of published marine and terrestrial proxy-data to reconstruct the pattern of both summer and winter temperature anomalies, and the equator-pole temperature gradient, during the warmer conditions of the Mid-Holocene (6 ka), and the Last Interglacial (125 ka) over the Northern Hemisphere. Comparing these results with climate model simulations we find two major paradoxes that are not reproduced in models; 1) winter warming was greater than summer warming, despite contrary insolation forcing, and 2) this strong winter warming was largely the result of a stronger atmospheric circulation comparable with a high index Northern Annular Mode (NAM), despite a weaker equator-pole temperature gradient at this time. These paradoxes present the same equable climate problem that characterise much earlier and warmer climates, adding to uncertainties in the ability of climate models to simulate the equable nature of future climate warming.

  18. Illumination Conditions of the Lunar Polar Regions Using LOLA Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Torrence, M. H.

    2011-01-01

    We use high-resolution altimetry data obtained by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter instrument onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to characterize present illumination conditions in the polar regions of the Moon. Compared to previous studies, both the spatial and temporal extent of the simulations are increased significantly, as well as the coverage (fill ratio) of the topographic maps used, thanks to the 28 Hz firing rate of the five-beam instrument. We determine the horizon elevation in a number of directions based on 240 m-resolution polar digital elevation models reaching down to 75 latitude. The illumination of both polar regions extending to 80 can be calculated for any geometry from those horizon longitudinal profiles. We validated our modeling with recent Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Wide-Angle Camera images. We assessed the extent of permanently shadowed regions (PSRs, defined as areas that never receive direct solar illumination), and obtained total areas generally larger than previous studies (12,866 and 16,055 km2, in the north and south respectively). We extended our direct illumination model to account for singly-scattered light, and found that every PSR does receive some amount of scattered light during the year. We conducted simulations over long periods (several 18.6-years lunar precession cycles) with a high temporal resolution (6 h), and identified the most illuminated locations in the vicinity of both poles. Because of the importance of those sites for exploration and engineering considerations, we characterized their illumination more precisely over the near future. Every year, a location near the Shackleton crater rim in the south polar region is sunlit continuously for 240 days, and its longest continuous period in total darkness is about 1.5 days. For some locations small height gains ( 10 m) can dramatically improve their average illumination and reduce the night duration, rendering some of those particularly attractive energy-wise as

  19. Illumination conditions of the lunar polar regions using LOLA topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Torrence, M. H.

    2011-02-01

    We use high-resolution altimetry data obtained by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter instrument onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to characterize present illumination conditions in the polar regions of the Moon. Compared to previous studies, both the spatial and temporal extent of the simulations are increased significantly, as well as the coverage (fill ratio) of the topographic maps used, thanks to the 28 Hz firing rate of the five-beam instrument. We determine the horizon elevation in a number of directions based on 240 m-resolution polar digital elevation models reaching down to ˜75° latitude. The illumination of both polar regions extending to ˜80° can be calculated for any geometry from those horizon longitudinal profiles. We validated our modeling with recent Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Wide-Angle Camera images. We assessed the extent of permanently shadowed regions (PSRs, defined as areas that never receive direct solar illumination), and obtained total areas generally larger than previous studies (12,866 and 16,055 km 2, in the north and south respectively). We extended our direct illumination model to account for singly-scattered light, and found that every PSR does receive some amount of scattered light during the year. We conducted simulations over long periods (several 18.6-years lunar precession cycles) with a high temporal resolution (6 h), and identified the most illuminated locations in the vicinity of both poles. Because of the importance of those sites for exploration and engineering considerations, we characterized their illumination more precisely over the near future. Every year, a location near the Shackleton crater rim in the south polar region is sunlit continuously for 240 days, and its longest continuous period in total darkness is about 1.5 days. For some locations small height gains (˜10 m) can dramatically improve their average illumination and reduce the night duration, rendering some of those particularly attractive

  20. Meltwater pulse recorded in Last Interglacial mollusk shells from Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelstern, Ian Z.; Rowe, Mark P.; Lohmann, Kyger C.; Defliese, William F.; Petersen, Sierra V.; Brewer, Aaron W.

    2017-02-01

    The warm climate of Bermuda today is modulated by the nearby presence of the Gulf Stream current. However, iceberg scours in the Florida Strait and the presence of ice-rafted debris in Bermuda Rise sediments indicate that, during the last deglaciation, icebergs discharged from the Laurentide Ice Sheet traveled as far south as subtropical latitudes. We present evidence that an event of similar magnitude affected the subtropics during the Last Interglacial, potentially due to melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Using the clumped isotope paleothermometer, we found temperatures 10°C colder and seawater δ18O values 2‰ lower than modern in Last Interglacial Cittarium pica shells from Grape Bay, Bermuda. In contrast, Last Interglacial shells from Rocky Bay, Bermuda, record temperatures only slightly colder and seawater δ18O values similar to modern, likely representing more typical Last Interglacial conditions in Bermuda outside of a meltwater event. The significantly colder ocean temperatures observed in Grape Bay samples illustrate the extreme sensitivity of Bermudian climate to broad-scale ocean circulation changes. They indicate routine meltwater transport in the North Atlantic to near-equatorial latitudes, which would likely have resulted in disruption of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. These data demonstrate that future melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet, a potential source of the Last Interglacial meltwater event, could have dramatic climate effects outside of the high latitudes.

  1. Probabilistic assessment of sea level during the last interglacial stage.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Robert E; Simons, Frederik J; Mitrovica, Jerry X; Maloof, Adam C; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2009-12-17

    With polar temperatures approximately 3-5 degrees C warmer than today, the last interglacial stage (approximately 125 kyr ago) serves as a partial analogue for 1-2 degrees C global warming scenarios. Geological records from several sites indicate that local sea levels during the last interglacial were higher than today, but because local sea levels differ from global sea level, accurately reconstructing past global sea level requires an integrated analysis of globally distributed data sets. Here we present an extensive compilation of local sea level indicators and a statistical approach for estimating global sea level, local sea levels, ice sheet volumes and their associated uncertainties. We find a 95% probability that global sea level peaked at least 6.6 m higher than today during the last interglacial; it is likely (67% probability) to have exceeded 8.0 m but is unlikely (33% probability) to have exceeded 9.4 m. When global sea level was close to its current level (>or=-10 m), the millennial average rate of global sea level rise is very likely to have exceeded 5.6 m kyr(-1) but is unlikely to have exceeded 9.2 m kyr(-1). Our analysis extends previous last interglacial sea level studies by integrating literature observations within a probabilistic framework that accounts for the physics of sea level change. The results highlight the long-term vulnerability of ice sheets to even relatively low levels of sustained global warming.

  2. Last interglacial beetle fauna from New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Maureen J.

    2003-01-01

    Fossil beetles from two last interglacial lake deposits from southern Wairarapa, central New Zealand are provisionally ascribed to marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS) 5a-e. Both assemblages represent ecological successions from lake margins to forest. The lower sample (MIS 5e) is characterized by species found today in northern New Zealand. These species, including Lorelus crassicornis, 'Dasytes' laticeps, Cryptobius nitidius, 'Stenomalium' sulcithorax, Psilocnaeia nana, and Microbrontes lineatus, represent a southward displacement from modern distributions by up to 700 km. Climate reconstruction indicates that temperatures at the time of deposition were 1.6-2.5°C warmer in the summer (January) and 2.3-3.2°C warmer in the winter (July) than at present. These results match local and regional pollen and phytolith findings of warmer, wetter conditions at the thermal maximum of the last interglaciation. In contrast, the upper sample is characterized by species that have widespread modern-day distributions. This indicates that modern conditions were attained later in MIS5, after the MIS 5e thermal maximum.

  3. Early to Middle Pleistocene Climate Records off Southern Iberia Reveal two Types of Interglacial Climate Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelker, A. H. L.; Rodrigues, T.; Padilha, M.; Jiménez-Espejo, F. J. J.; Salgueiro, E.; Kuhnert, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Gulf of Cadiz off southern Iberia is an ideal place to study the interaction between North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea climate variations with surface waters reflecting subtropical gyre conditions and the intermediate-depth Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) combining Mediterranean Sea and North Atlantic signals. Using centennial-scale records from IODP Site U1387 (36.8°N, 7.7°W; 559 m w.d.) we evaluate interglacial surface-water and MOW conditions during the interval from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 16 to 46 (630-1430 ka). Surface-water changes are deduced from alkenone-derived sea-surface temperature (SST) and G. bulloides stable isotope records and MOW conditions from the benthic foraminifer stable isotope data and the wt% sand. The surface water records clearly allow distinguishing two groups of interglacial climate evolution that can be defined by the shape of the deglaciation and the timing of the interglacial SST maximum. An abrupt glacial/interglacial transition and maximum SST at the beginning of the respective interglacial period are recorded for MIS 17 to MIS 23, whereas MIS 25 to MIS 45 exhibit a more gradual transition and a SST maximum later on during the interglacial period. This change in interglacial climate evolution coincides with the frequently observed, Mid-Pleistocene Transition related shift between MIS 24 and 22. The shift to cooler interglacial SST, however, occurred already earlier, between MIS 31 and MIS 29. MIS 29 and younger experienced interglacial SSTs around 22°C (exception is MIS 23 with 19.5°C), whereas MIS 31 and older show values of 23-23.5°C, even reaching 24.5-25°C during MIS 37 and MIS 41. In contrast, the interglacial MOW shows no major shifts at either MIS 25 or MIS 31. Interglacial MOW conditions are strongly linked to the insolation maxima and the related, African monsoon induced changes in Mediterranean Sea hydrology (e.g., sapropel formation). Thus, the interglacial MOW is a poorly ventilated, sluggish current

  4. Early to Middle Pleistocene Climate Records off Southern Iberia Reveal two Types of Interglacial Climate Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelker, Antje; Rodrigues, Teresa; Padilha, Maria; Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Salgueiro, Emilia; Kuhnert, Henning

    2017-04-01

    The Gulf of Cadiz off southern Iberia is an ideal place to study the interaction between North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea climate variations with surface waters reflecting subtropical gyre conditions and the intermediate-depth Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) combining Mediterranean Sea and North Atlantic signals. Using centennial-scale records from IODP Site U1387 (36.8°N, 7.7°W; 559 m w.d.) we evaluate interglacial surface-water and MOW conditions during the interval from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 16 to 48 (630-1470 ka). Surface-water changes are deduced from alkenone-derived sea-surface temperature (SST) and G. bulloides stable isotope records and MOW conditions from the benthic foraminifer stable isotope data and the wt% sand. The surface water records clearly allow distinguishing two groups of interglacial climate evolution that can be defined by the shape of the deglaciation and the timing of the interglacial SST maximum. An abrupt glacial/interglacial transition and maximum SST at the beginning of the respective interglacial period are recorded for MIS 17 to MIS 27 and for MIS 47, whereas MIS 29 to MIS 45 exhibit a more gradual transition and a SST maximum later on during the interglacial period. The change in interglacial climate evolution roughly coincides with the Mid-Pleistocene Transition, during which the step to a higher, glacial ice-volume occurred in MIS 22. The shift to cooler interglacial SST occurred already earlier, i.e. between MIS 31 and MIS 29. MIS 29 and younger interglacials experienced SSTs around 22°C (exception is MIS 23 with 19.5°C), whereas MIS 31 and older show values of 23-23.5°C, even reaching 24.5-25°C during MIS 37 and MIS 41. All glacial periods experienced millennial-scale oscillations and extreme cold events during glacial periods happened throughout the record. In contrast, the interglacial MOW shows no major shifts at either MIS 25 or MIS 31. Interglacial MOW conditions are strongly linked to the insolation maxima

  5. Modelling the warm interglacials: analogues of MIS1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, N.; Yin, Q. Z.; Karami, M. P.; Berger, A.

    2012-04-01

    Determining interglacial diversity, primarily as a function of duration, intensity and unique climate responses to Earth's orbital variations has become a focal point for researchers trying to better understand our current interglacial. Numerous interglacials have been espoused as Marine Isotopic Stage (MIS) 1 analogues or windows into the future of Holocene climate based on their astronomical characteristics, seasonal insolation patterns or their similarity with predicted anthropogenic warming. However, to date there has been little quantitative study of the climate of these interglacials within a physically robust framework. Here we examine the climate response to peak interglacial forcing during MIS1, 5, 9, 11 and 19 using the Community Climate System Model 3. We determine which interglacial provides the closest analogue to peak MIS1 conditions as well as the mechanisms which dominate the surface climate responses of these interglacials. Considering the differences in astronomical parameters and greenhouse gases we discount MIS5 and 9 as analogues to peak MIS1 conditions due to their significant warmth and stronger precipitation and vegetation responses. Conversely, based on seasonal and hemispheric averages of surface temperature, precipitation and sea-ice cover, MIS11 and 19 are most similar to MIS1, with MIS11 actually exhibiting a higher affinity particularly during boreal summer. This is attributed to a greater similarity in the seasonal and latitudinal distribution of insolation over middle latitude Eurasia and North America, which are the regions most sensitive to insolation change given the absence of ice-sheet dynamics in our model. Global ocean overturning circulation during MIS11 is also closer to MIS1 than circulation during MIS19 is, due predominantly to differences in Weddell Sea bottom water formation. Thus, under the assumption of present-day ice-sheets MIS11 appears to be the better climatic analogue to peak MIS1 conditions. In addition to the

  6. Pleistocene reduction of polar ice caps: Evidence from Cariaco Basin marine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, R.Z.; Dowsett, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Sea level is projected to rise between 13 and 94 cm over the next 100 yr due to continued climate warming. The sea-level projections assume that polar ice sheets will remain stable or even increase on time scales of centuries, but controversial geologic evidence suggests that current polar ice sheets have been eliminated or greatly reduced during previous Pleistocene interglacials indicating that modern polar ice sheets have become unstable within the natural range of interglacial climates. Sea level may have been more than 20 m higher than today during a presumably very warm interglacial about 400 ka during marine isotope stage 11. Because of the implications for future sea level rise, additional study of the conflicting evidence for warmer conditions and higher sea level during marine isotope stage 11 is needed. Here we present microfossil and isotopic data from marine sediments of the Cariaco Basin supporting the interpretation that global sea level was 10-20 m higher than today during marine isotope stage 11. The increased sea level requires reduction in modern polar ice sheets and is consistent with the interpretation that the West Antarctic ice sheet and the Greenland ice sheet were absent or greatly reduced during marine isotope stage 11. Our results show a warm marine isotope stage 11 interglacial climate with sea level as high as or above modern sea level that lasted for 25 to 30 k.y. Variations in Earth's orbit around the sun (Milankovitch cycles) are considered to be a primary external force driving glacial-interglacial cycles. Current and marine isotope stage 11 Milankovitch forcing are very similar, suggesting that the present interglacial (Holocene) that began ca. 10 ka will continue for another 15 to 20 k.y. Therefore any anthropogenic climate warming will accelerate the natural process toward reduction in polar ice sheets. The potential for increased rates of sea level rise related to polar ice sheet decay should be considered as a potential natural

  7. Circular polarization of radio emission from air showers in thunderstorm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, T. N. G.; Scholten, O.; Bonardi, A.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Ebert, U.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Mitra, P.; Mulrey, K.; Nelles, A.; Thoudam, S.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Rutjes, C.; Schellart, P.; ter Veen, S.; Winchen, T.

    2017-03-01

    We present measured radio emission from cosmic-ray-induced air showers under thunderstorm conditions. We observe for these events large differences in intensity, linear polarization and circular polarization from the events measured under fair-weather conditions. This can be explained by the effects of atmospheric electric fields in thunderclouds. Therefore, measuring the intensity and polarization of radio emission from cosmic ray extensive air showers during thunderstorm conditions provides a new tool to probe the atmospheric electric fields present in thunderclouds.

  8. Response of polar cap to solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, K.; Sotirelis, T.

    2014-12-01

    The ionospheric polar cap is an optically dark area encircled by the luminous auroral oval. It is created by solar wind-magnetospheric coupling, and its size is proportional to the open magnetic flux available for nightside reconnection. One of the difficulties in the study of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling is the large spatial domain it involves. Systematic studies of the polar cap dynamics are still rare. This study addresses this issue by utilizing global auroral images, from which the polar cap area can be extracted, acquired with the Ultraviolet Imager on board the Polar satellite. In particular, we quantify the area of polar cap and correlate it with solar wind parameters. Our preliminary results clearly demonstrate, as expected, a clear relationship between the dayside polar cap area and the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field. Other solar wind parameters also affect the polar cap size but with a lesser degree. We will present a detailed analysis and discuss the resulting implications.

  9. Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy under Polar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, J. L.; Hark, R.; Bol'shakov, A.; Plumer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade our research team has evaluated the use of commercial-off-the-shelf laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for chemical analysis of snow and ice samples under polar conditions. One avenue of research explored LIBS suitability as a detector of paleo-climate proxy indicators (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) in ice as it relates to atmospheric circulation. LIBS results revealed detection of peaks for C and N, consistent with the presence of organic material, as well as major ions (Ca, K, Mg, and Na) and trace metals (Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ti). The detection of Ca, K, Mg, and Na confirmed that LIBS has sufficient sensitivity to be used as a tool for characterization of paleo-climate proxy indicators in ice-core samples. Techniques were developed for direct analysis of ice as well as indirect measurements of ice via melting and filtering. Pitfalls and issues of direct ice analysis using several cooling techniques to maintain ice integrity will be discussed. In addition, a new technique, laser ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS) was applied to detection of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in ice as isotopic analysis of ice is the main tool in paleoclimatology and glaciology studies. Our results demonstrated that spectra of hydroxyl isotopologues 16OH, 18OH, and 16OD can be recorded with a compact spectrograph to determine hydrogen and oxygen isotopes simultaneously. Quantitative isotopic calibration for ice analysis can be accomplished using multivariate chemometric regression as previously realized for water vapor. Analysis with LIBS and LAMIS required no special sample preparation and was about ten times faster than analysis using ICP-MS. Combination of the two techniques in one portable instrument for in-field analysis appears possible and would eliminate the logistical and cost issues associated with ice core management.

  10. Insights into the 'super'-interglacial MIS 11 from a Central European flowstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, David; Vollweiler, Nicole; Neumann, Thomas; Kluge, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Given the scenarios of the expected short- and medium-term future Earth climate under anthropogenic influence the climate of past interglacials is of particular interest. In the year 2100 the climate may resemble the conditions of MIS 11, one of the warmest interglacials of the past million years. However, so far information on MIS 11 is sparse, comes mostly from marine or polar ice cores and has little continental contribution. In a cave system from southern Germany relatively large amounts of flowstone material from this interesting time period was discovered which may help to close parts of the knowledge gap. Preliminary results of this flowstone piece confirmed growth during most of MIS 11 (ca. 420-390 ka) with estimated rates of 1-10 μm/a and showed successions of clear and brownish layers that may enable proxy measurements with up to annual resolution. δ18O and δ13C values obtained with coarse resolution (averaging of several 100 years) show variations of less than 0.5 ‰ and are almost identical to Holocene calcite precipitated in the same cave system. The large amount of available flowstone material of this time period and region together with a sufficiently precise chronology (ICPMS U-Th measurements and layer counting) could provide a better understanding of natural variability in future high-resolution and multi-proxy studies. First results will be presented and next steps discussed.

  11. Noble gas paleotemperatures and humidity during the last Glacial - Interglacial transition in Switzerland - first application of the CVCS system to a stalagmite grown under cool climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Nadia; Figura, Simon; Fleitmann, Dominik; Maden, Colin; Wieler, Rainer; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Stalagmites represent excellent multi-proxy paleoclimate archives as they cover long timescales and can be dated with high precision [1]. We determine noble gas temperatures (NGTs) using the CVCS (Combined Vacuum Crushing and Sieving) technique, which enables to preferentially reduce the air content of stalagmite samples, such that temperature information can be deduced from the noble gases dissolved in the stalagmite's water inclusions [2]. The system allows accurate temperature determination from Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe, as shown in a cross-calibration study on a stalagmite from Borneo [3,4]. We have now applied the CVCS technique to samples of stalagmite M2 from Milandre Cave (Swiss Jura Mountains), covering the transitions Bølling-Allerød - Younger Dryas (YD) - Preboreal [5]. So far, we have determined three preliminary NGTs, indicating cave temperatures before the onset of the YD of ~3°C, and dropping to ~1°C at the onset of the YD. These temperatures compare well with theoretical mean annual Milandre cave temperatures inferred from summer temperatures deduced from sediments of Gerzensee [6], located south of Milandre. We also determined in 12 M2 samples water contents, which, for samples grown under hot and rather dry climatic conditions provide information about drip water availability [7]: higher water contents point to irregular, low drip rates and vice versa. In M2, water contents increase strongly at the onset of the YD, suggesting a progressively dryer climate. Towards the end of the YD water contents drop again and are very low at the onset of the Preboreal, indicating a return to more humid conditions. The same conclusion was drawn from a M2 carbon isotope record, reflecting reduced discharge and vegetation density due to dryer conditions during the cold period [8]. Our data emphasize the applicability of the water content as a drip rate proxy also for stalagmites grown under cool climatic conditions. [1] Henderson G.M. (2006) Science, 313, 620-622. [2

  12. Comparative carbon cycle dynamics of the present and last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkin, Victor; Brücher, Tim; Kleinen, Thomas; Zaehle, Sönke; Joos, Fortunat; Roth, Raphael; Spahni, Renato; Schmitt, Jochen; Fischer, Hubertus; Leuenberger, Markus; Stone, Emma J.; Ridgwell, Andy; Chappellaz, Jérôme; Kehrwald, Natalie; Barbante, Carlo; Blunier, Thomas; Dahl Jensen, Dorthe

    2016-04-01

    Changes in temperature and carbon dioxide during glacial cycles recorded in Antarctic ice cores are tightly coupled. However, this relationship does not hold for interglacials. While climate cooled towards the end of both the last (Eemian) and present (Holocene) interglacials, CO2 remained stable during the Eemian while rising in the Holocene. We identify and review twelve biogeochemical mechanisms of terrestrial (vegetation dynamics and CO2 fertilization, land use, wildfire, accumulation of peat, changes in permafrost carbon, subaerial volcanic outgassing) and marine origin (changes in sea surface temperature, carbonate compensation to deglaciation and terrestrial biosphere regrowth, shallow-water carbonate sedimentation, changes in the soft tissue pump, and methane hydrates), which potentially may have contributed to the CO2 dynamics during interglacials but which remain not well quantified. We use three Earth System Models (ESMs) of intermediate complexity to compare effects of selected mechanisms on the interglacial CO2 and δ13CO2 changes, focusing on those with substantial potential impacts: namely carbonate sedimentation in shallow waters, peat growth, and (in the case of the Holocene) human land use. A set of specified carbon cycle forcings could qualitatively explain atmospheric CO2 dynamics from 8 ka BP to the pre-industrial. However, when applied to Eemian boundary conditions from 126 to 115 ka BP, the same set of forcings led to disagreement with the observed direction of CO2 changes after 122 ka BP. This failure to simulate late-Eemian CO2 dynamics could be a result of the imposed forcings such as prescribed CaCO3 accumulation and/or an incorrect response of simulated terrestrial carbon to the surface cooling at the end of the interglacial. These experiments also reveal that key natural processes of interglacial CO2 dynamics - shallow water CaCO3 accumulation, peat and permafrost carbon dynamics - are not well represented in the current ESMs. Global

  13. Fibrinogen adsorption onto 316L stainless steel under polarized conditions.

    PubMed

    Gettens, Robert T T; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2008-04-01

    Adsorption of the plasma protein fibrinogen onto electrically polarized 316L stainless steel was observed and quantified using both in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Significant differences in fibrinogen adsorption were observed across voltages. Ex situ studies showed significantly lower area coverage (theta) and height of adsorbed Fb on cathodically polarized surfaces when compared to anodically polarized surfaces. Conformational differences in the protein may explain the distinctions in Fb surface area coverage (theta) and height between the anodic and cathodic cases. In situ studies showed significantly slower kinetics of Fb adsorption onto surfaces below -100 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) compared to surfaces polarized above -100 mV. Electrochemical current density data showed large charge transfer processes (approximately 1 x 10(-5) to 1 x 10(-4) A/cm(2)) taking place on the 316L SS surfaces at voltages below -100 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl). These relatively large current densities point to flux of ionic species away from the surface as a major source of the reduction in adsorption kinetics rather than just hydrophilic or electrostatic effects.

  14. Polarizing the Nazarov cyclization: efficient catalysis under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Sun, Xiufeng; Frontier, Alison J

    2003-11-26

    Substituted divinyl ketones were studied in the Nazarov cyclization. alpha-Carbomethoxy divinyl ketones underwent efficient Nazarov cyclization with catalytic copper triflate (2 mol %) to give a single cyclopentenone regio- and stereoisomer. The efficiency of the cyclizations correlated with the ability of the substituents to favorably polarize the pi-system of the cationic intermediate.

  15. Dependence of polar hole density on magnetic and solar conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Grebowsky, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Electron densities from the Langmuir probes on the Atmospheric Explorer C and Dynamics Explorer 2 are used for analyzing the behavior of the high-altitude night-side F region polar hole as a function of solar and magnetic activity and of universal time (UT). The polar region of invariant latitude from 70 deg to 80 deg and MLT from 22 to 03 hours is examined. The strongest dependencies are observed in F10.7 and UT; a strong hemispherical difference due to the offset of the magnetic poles from the earth's rotation axis is observed in the UT dependence of the ionization hole. A seasonal variation in the dependence of ion density on solar flux is indicated, and an overall asymmetry in the density level between hemispheres is revealed, with the winter-hole density about a factor of 10 greater in the north than in the south.

  16. High latitude temperature evolution across the Last Interglacial: a model-data comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capron, Emilie; Stone, Emma; Govin, Aline; Loutre, Marie-France; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Mulitza, Stefan; Otto-Bliesner, Betty; Sime, Louise; Waelbroeck, Claire; Wolff, Eric W.

    2014-05-01

    The Last Interglacial (LIG, 129-116 thousand of years, ka) represents an interesting test bed for climate model feedbacks for warmer-than-present high latitudes. However, mainly because synchronising different paleoclimatic archives from different parts of the world is not trivial, a global picture of LIG temperature changes is difficult to obtain. In the framework of the UK iGlass consortium and the European Past4Future project, we have selected 49 polar ice core and sub-polar marine sediment records and developed a strategy to synchronise them onto the recent AICC2012 ice core chronology. This new synthesis enables us to describe the spatial and temporal climatic patterns over polar ice sheets (surface air temperature) and around the ice margins (sea surface temperatures) at a pluri-centennial to millennial-scale. Major features highlighted are (i) non synchronous maximum temperature change between the two hemispheres with the Southern Ocean and Antarctica records showing an early warming compared to North Atlantic records and (ii) Southern hemisphere records exhibiting warm conditions for a longer time period compared to records from the Northern Hemisphere and smaller temperature amplitude changes. Our compiled records are compared with recent snapshot and transient model experiments performed with three state of the art General Circulation Models (HADCM3, CCSM3, FAMOUS) and an Earth Model of Intermediary Complexity (LOVECLIM). Such an exercise enables us to investigate the climate feedbacks which causes the most apparent model-data differences.

  17. Extra-long interglacial in Northern Hemisphere during MISs 15-13 arising from limited extent of Arctic ice sheets in glacial MIS 14.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qingzhen; Wang, Luo; Oldfield, Frank; Guo, Zhengtang

    2015-07-10

    Knowledge of the behavior of Northern Hemisphere (NH) ice sheets over the past million years is crucial for understanding the role of orbitally driven insolation changes on glacial/interglacial cycles. Here, based on the demonstrable link between changes in Chinese loess grain-size and NH ice-sheet extent, we use loess grain-size records to confirm that northern ice-sheets were restricted during marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 14. Thus, an unusually long NH interglacial climate of over 100 kyr persisted during MISs 15-13, much longer than expected from marine oxygen isotope records. Taking a global view of the paleoclimate records, MIS 14 inception seems to be a response to changes in Antarctic ice-sheets rather than to NH cooling. Orbital configuration in the two Polar regions shows that the onset of MIS 14 was forced by austral insolation changes, rather than by boreal summer insolation, as Milankovitch theory proposes. Our analysis of MIS 14 raises the possibility that southern insolation forcing may have played an important role in the inception of several other glacials. We suggest that the extra-long NH interglacial climate during MISs 15-13 provided favorable conditions for the second major dispersal episode of African hominins into Eurasia.

  18. Extra-long interglacial in Northern Hemisphere during MISs 15-13 arising from limited extent of Arctic ice sheets in glacial MIS 14

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Qingzhen; Wang, Luo; Oldfield, Frank; Guo, Zhengtang

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the behavior of Northern Hemisphere (NH) ice sheets over the past million years is crucial for understanding the role of orbitally driven insolation changes on glacial/interglacial cycles. Here, based on the demonstrable link between changes in Chinese loess grain-size and NH ice-sheet extent, we use loess grain-size records to confirm that northern ice-sheets were restricted during marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 14. Thus, an unusually long NH interglacial climate of over 100 kyr persisted during MISs 15−13, much longer than expected from marine oxygen isotope records. Taking a global view of the paleoclimate records, MIS 14 inception seems to be a response to changes in Antarctic ice-sheets rather than to NH cooling. Orbital configuration in the two Polar regions shows that the onset of MIS 14 was forced by austral insolation changes, rather than by boreal summer insolation, as Milankovitch theory proposes. Our analysis of MIS 14 raises the possibility that southern insolation forcing may have played an important role in the inception of several other glacials. We suggest that the extra-long NH interglacial climate during MISs 15−13 provided favorable conditions for the second major dispersal episode of African hominins into Eurasia. PMID:26159304

  19. Extended megadroughts in the southwestern United States during Pleistocene interglacials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fawcett, P.J.; Werne, J.P.; Anderson, R. Scott; Heikoop, J.M.; Brown, E.T.; Berke, M.A.; Smith, S.J.; Goff, F.; Donohoo-Hurley, L.; Cisneros-Dozal, L. M.; Schouten, S.; Damste, J.S.S.; Huang, Y.; Toney, J.; Fessenden, J.; Woldegabriel, G.; Atudorei, V.; Geissman, J.W.; Allen, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for increased drought frequency and severity linked to anthropogenic climate change in the semi-arid regions of the southwestern United States (US) is a serious concern. Multi-year droughts during the instrumental period and decadal-length droughts of the past two millennia were shorter and climatically different from the future permanent, dust-bowl-like-megadrought conditions, lasting decades to a century, that are predicted as a consequence of warming. So far, it has been unclear whether or not such megadroughts occurred in the southwestern US, and, if so, with what regularity and intensity. Here we show that periods of aridity lasting centuries to millennia occurred in the southwestern US during mid-Pleistocene interglacials. Using molecular palaeotemperature proxies to reconstruct the mean annual temperature (MAT) in mid-Pleistocene lacustrine sediment from the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, we found that the driest conditions occurred during the warmest phases of interglacials, when the MAT was comparable to or higher than the modern MAT. A collapse of drought-tolerant C 4 plant communities during these warm, dry intervals indicates a significant reduction in summer precipitation, possibly in response to a poleward migration of the subtropical dry zone. Three MAT cycles-1/42-C in amplitude occurred within Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11 and seem to correspond to the muted precessional cycles within this interglacial. In comparison with MIS 11, MIS 13 experienced higher precessional-cycle amplitudes, larger variations in MAT (4-6??C) and a longer period of extended warmth, suggesting that local insolation variations were important to interglacial climatic variability in the southwestern US. Comparison of the early MIS 11 climate record with the Holocene record shows many similarities and implies that, in the absence of anthropogenic forcing, the region should be entering a cooler and wetter phase. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights

  20. Extended megadroughts in the southwestern United States during Pleistocene interglacials.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Peter J; Werne, Josef P; Anderson, R Scott; Heikoop, Jeffrey M; Brown, Erik T; Berke, Melissa A; Smith, Susan J; Goff, Fraser; Donohoo-Hurley, Linda; Cisneros-Dozal, Luz M; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Huang, Yongsong; Toney, Jaime; Fessenden, Julianna; WoldeGabriel, Giday; Atudorei, Viorel; Geissman, John W; Allen, Craig D

    2011-02-24

    The potential for increased drought frequency and severity linked to anthropogenic climate change in the semi-arid regions of the southwestern United States (US) is a serious concern. Multi-year droughts during the instrumental period and decadal-length droughts of the past two millennia were shorter and climatically different from the future permanent, 'dust-bowl-like' megadrought conditions, lasting decades to a century, that are predicted as a consequence of warming. So far, it has been unclear whether or not such megadroughts occurred in the southwestern US, and, if so, with what regularity and intensity. Here we show that periods of aridity lasting centuries to millennia occurred in the southwestern US during mid-Pleistocene interglacials. Using molecular palaeotemperature proxies to reconstruct the mean annual temperature (MAT) in mid-Pleistocene lacustrine sediment from the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, we found that the driest conditions occurred during the warmest phases of interglacials, when the MAT was comparable to or higher than the modern MAT. A collapse of drought-tolerant C(4) plant communities during these warm, dry intervals indicates a significant reduction in summer precipitation, possibly in response to a poleward migration of the subtropical dry zone. Three MAT cycles ∼2 °C in amplitude occurred within Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11 and seem to correspond to the muted precessional cycles within this interglacial. In comparison with MIS 11, MIS 13 experienced higher precessional-cycle amplitudes, larger variations in MAT (4-6 °C) and a longer period of extended warmth, suggesting that local insolation variations were important to interglacial climatic variability in the southwestern US. Comparison of the early MIS 11 climate record with the Holocene record shows many similarities and implies that, in the absence of anthropogenic forcing, the region should be entering a cooler and wetter phase.

  1. Gravitational vacuum polarization. II. Energy conditions in the Boulware vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, M.

    1996-10-01

    Building on techniques developed in the preceding paper, I investigate the various pointwise and averaged energy conditions for the quantum stress-energy tensor corresponding to a conformally coupled massless scalar field in the Boulware vacuum. I work in the test-field limit, restrict attention to the Schwarzschild geometry, and invoke a mixture of analytical and numerical techniques. In contradistinction to the case of the Hartle-Hawking vacuum, wherein violations of the energy conditions were confined to the region between the event horizon and the unstable photon orbit, I show that in the Boulware vacuum (1) all standard (pointwise and averaged) energy conditions are violated throughout the exterior region, all the way from spatial infinity down to the event horizon, and (2) outside the event horizon the standard pointwise energy conditions are violated in a maximal manner: They are violated at all points and for all null or timelike vectors. (The region inside the event horizon is considerably messier and of dubious physical relevance. Nevertheless, the standard pointwise energy conditions seem to be violated even inside the event horizon.) I argue that this is highly suggestive evidence, pointing to the fact that general self-consistent solutions of semiclassical quantum gravity might {ital not} satisfy the energy conditions and may in fact for certain quantum fields and certain quantum states violate {ital all} the energy conditions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Thin Ice -- Bipolar Super Interglacials and our Possible Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigham-Grette, J.

    2015-12-01

    Evidence of exceptionally warm Arctic interglacials from Lake El'gygytgyn NE Russia, combined with the periodic collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (ANDRILL) suggests the need to reassess climate sensitivity and cryospheric dynamics on many timescales. It may be easier to melt significant portions of large sheets and drive large ecosystem changes in the high latitudes than we thought! Elevated global temperatures of only a few degrees (or less) combined with polar amplification seems to have repeatedly caused large changes in the cryosphere and global sea level, still under investigation given the present knowledge and complexity of glacio-isostatic adjustments. But increasing evidence of a forested Arctic and smaller polar ice sheets in the Pliocene when CO2 was around 400 ppm (like today) and during several more recent super interglacials (under Milankovitch forcing) most likely presages a warming future, partially hidden in recent years by the lagged response of the oceans, atmosphere, and cryosphere to anthropogenic influences. The future will depend on the ability of societies to recognize and respond to the consequences of significant environmental change. The challenge to the science community is to communicate this data-driven reality effectively and without politics.

  3. Unusual Polar Conditions in Solar Cycle 24 and Their Implications for Cycle 25

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Akiyama, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    We report on the prolonged solar-maximum conditions until late 2015 at the north-polar region of the Sun indicated by the occurrence of high-latitude prominence eruptions (PEs) and microwave brightness temperature close to the quiet-Sun level. These two aspects of solar activity indicate that the polarity reversal was completed by mid-2014 in the south and late 2015 in the north. The microwave brightness in the south-polar region has increased to a level exceeding the level of the Cycle 23/24 minimum, but just started to increase in the north. The northsouth asymmetry in the polarity reversal has switched from that in Cycle 23. These observations lead us to the hypothesis that the onset of Cycle 25 in the northern hemisphere is likely to be delayed with respect to that in the southern hemisphere. We find that the unusual condition in the north is a direct consequence of the arrival of poleward surges of opposite polarity from the active region belt. We also find that multiple rush-to-the-pole episodes were indicated by the PE locations that lined up at the boundary between opposite-polarity surges. The high-latitude PEs occurred in the boundary between the incumbent polar flux and the insurgent flux of opposite polarity.

  4. Unusual Polar Conditions in Solar Cycle 24 and Their Implications for Cycle 25

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Akiyama, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    We report on the prolonged solar-maximum conditions until late 2015 at the north-polar region of the Sun indicated by the occurrence of high-latitude prominence eruptions (PEs) and microwave brightness temperature close to the quiet-Sun level. These two aspects of solar activity indicate that the polarity reversal was completed by mid-2014 in the south and late 2015 in the north. The microwave brightness in the south-polar region has increased to a level exceeding the level of the Cycle 23/24 minimum, but just started to increase in the north. The northsouth asymmetry in the polarity reversal has switched from that in Cycle 23. These observations lead us to the hypothesis that the onset of Cycle 25 in the northern hemisphere is likely to be delayed with respect to that in the southern hemisphere. We find that the unusual condition in the north is a direct consequence of the arrival of poleward surges of opposite polarity from the active region belt. We also find that multiple rush-to-the-pole episodes were indicated by the PE locations that lined up at the boundary between opposite-polarity surges. The high-latitude PEs occurred in the boundary between the incumbent polar flux and the insurgent flux of opposite polarity.

  5. Unusual Polar Conditions in Solar Cycle 24 and Their Implications for Cycle 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Akiyama, Sachiko

    2016-05-01

    We report on the prolonged solar-maximum conditions until late 2015 at the north-polar region of the Sun indicated by the occurrence of high-latitude prominence eruptions (PEs) and microwave brightness temperature close to the quiet-Sun level. These two aspects of solar activity indicate that the polarity reversal was completed by mid-2014 in the south and late 2015 in the north. The microwave brightness in the south-polar region has increased to a level exceeding the level of the Cycle 23/24 minimum, but just started to increase in the north. The north-south asymmetry in the polarity reversal has switched from that in Cycle 23. These observations lead us to the hypothesis that the onset of Cycle 25 in the northern hemisphere is likely to be delayed with respect to that in the southern hemisphere. We find that the unusual condition in the north is a direct consequence of the arrival of poleward surges of opposite polarity from the active region belt. We also find that multiple rush-to-the-pole episodes were indicated by the PE locations that lined up at the boundary between opposite-polarity surges. The high-latitude PEs occurred in the boundary between the incumbent polar flux and the insurgent flux of opposite polarity.

  6. Negligible glacial-interglacial variation in continental chemical weathering rates.

    PubMed

    Foster, Gavin L; Vance, Derek

    2006-12-14

    Chemical weathering of the continents is central to the regulation of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, and hence global climate. On million-year timescales silicate weathering leads to the draw-down of carbon dioxide, and on millennial timescales chemical weathering affects the calcium carbonate saturation state of the oceans and hence their uptake of carbon dioxide. However, variations in chemical weathering rates over glacial-interglacial cycles remain uncertain. During glacial periods, cold and dry conditions reduce the rate of chemical weathering, but intense physical weathering and the exposure of carbonates on continental shelves due to low sea levels may increase this rate. Here we present high-resolution records of the lead isotope composition of ferromanganese crusts from the North Atlantic Ocean that cover the past 550,000 years. Combining these records with a simple quantitative model of changes in the lead isotope composition of the deep North Atlantic Ocean in response to chemical weathering, we find that chemical weathering rates were two to three times lower in the glaciated interior of the North Atlantic Region during glacial periods than during the intervening interglacial periods. This decrease roughly balances the increase in chemical weathering caused by the exposure of continental shelves, indicating that chemical weathering rates remained relatively constant on glacial-interglacial timescales. On timescales of more than a million years, however, we suggest that enhanced weathering of silicate glacial sediments during interglacial periods results in a net draw-down of atmospheric carbon dioxide, creating a positive feedback on global climate that, once initiated, promotes cooling and further glaciation.

  7. Gravitational vacuum polarization. IV. Energy conditions in the Unruh vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, M.

    1997-07-01

    Building on a series of earlier papers, I investigate the various pointwise and averaged energy conditions in the Unruh vacuum. I consider the quantum stress-energy tensor corresponding to a conformally coupled massless scalar field, work in the test-field limit, restrict attention to the Schwarzschild geometry, and invoke a mixture of analytical and numerical techniques. I construct a semianalytic model for the stress-energy tensor that globally reproduces all known numerical results to within 0.8{percent}, and satisfies all known analytic features of the stress-energy tensor. I show that in the Unruh vacuum (1) all standard pointwise energy conditions are violated throughout the exterior region, all the way from spatial infinity down to the event horizon, and (2) the averaged null energy condition is violated on all outgoing radial null geodesics. In a pair of appendices I indicate a general strategy for constructing semianalytic models for the stress-energy tensor in the Hartle-Hawking and Boulware states, and show that the Page approximation is in a certain sense the minimal {ital Ansatz} compatible with general properties of the stress energy in the Hartle-Hawking state. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. (Model) Peatlands in late Quaternary interglacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinen, Thomas; Brovkin, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands have accumulated a substantial amount of carbon, roughly 600 PgC, during the Holocene. Prior to the Holocene, there is relatively little direct evidence of peatlands, though coal deposits bear witness to a long history of peat-forming ecosystems going back to the Carboniferous. We therefore need to rely on models to investigate peatlands in times prior to the Holocene. We have developed a dynamical model of wetland extent and peat accumulation, integrated in the coupled climate carbon cycle model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER2-LPJ, in order to mechanistically model interglacial carbon cycle dynamics. This model consists of the climate model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER2 and the dynamic global vegetation model LPJ, which we have extended with modules to determine peatland extent and carbon accumulation. The model compares reasonably well to Holocene peat data. We have used this model to investigate the dynamics of atmospheric CO2 in the Holocene and two other late Quaternary interglacials, namely the Eemian, which is interesting due to its warmth, and Marine Isotope Stage 11 (MIS11), which is the longest interglacial during the last 500ka. We will also present model results of peatland extent and carbon accumulation for these interglacials. We will discuss model shortcomings and knowledge gaps currently preventing an application of the model to full glacial-interglacial cycles.

  9. Middle Pleistocene interglacial deposits at Barling, Essex, England: evidence for a longer chronology for the Thames terrace sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgland, D. R.; Preece, R. C.; Roe, H. M.; Tipping, R. M.; Coope, G. R.; Field, M. H.; Robinson, J. E.; Schreve, D. C.; Crowe, K.

    2001-12-01

    Results are presented from a multidisciplinary study of fossiliferous interglacial deposits on the northern side of the Thames estuary. These fill a channel cut into London Clay bedrock and overlain by the Barling Gravel, a Thames-Medway deposit equivalent to the Lynch Hill and Corbets Tey Gravels of the Middle and Lower Thames, respectively. The channel sediments yielded diverse molluscan and ostracod assemblages, both implying fully interglacial conditions and a slight brackish influence. Pollen analysis has shown that the deposits accumulated during the early part of an interglacial. Plant macrofossils, particularly the abundance of Trapa natans, reinforce the interglacial character of the palaeontological evidence. A beetle fauna, which includes four taxa unknown in Britain at present, has allowed quantification of palaeotemperature using the mutual climatic range method (Tmax 17 to 26 °C; Tmin -11 to 13 °C). A few vertebrate remains have been recovered from the interglacial deposits, but a much larger fauna, as well as Palaeolithic artefacts, is known from the overlying Barling Gravel.The age of the interglacial deposits is inferential. The geological context suggests a late Middle Pleistocene interglacial, part of the post-diversion Thames system and therefore clearly post-Anglian. This conclusion is supported by amino acid ratios from the shells of freshwater molluscs. The correlation of the overlying Barling Gravel with the Lynch Hill/Corbets Tey aggradation of the Thames valley constrains the age of the Barling interglacial to marine oxygen isotope stages 11 or 9. The presence of Corbicula fluminalis and Pisidium clessini confirms a pre-Ipswichian (marine oxygen isotope substage 5e) age and their occurrence in the early part of the interglacial cycle at Barling precludes correlation with marine oxygen isotope stage 11, as these taxa occur only later in that interglacial at sites such as Swanscombe and Clacton. Thus by process of elimination a marine

  10. Similarity of vegetation dynamics during interglacial periods

    PubMed Central

    Cheddadi, Rachid; de Beaulieu, Jacques-Louis; Jouzel, Jean; Andrieu-Ponel, Valérie; Laurent, Jeanne-Marine; Reille, Maurice; Raynaud, Dominique; Bar-Hen, Avner

    2005-01-01

    The Velay sequence (France) provides a unique, continuous, palynological record spanning the last four climatic cycles. A pollen-based reconstruction of temperature and precipitation displays marked climatic cycles. An analysis of the climate and vegetation changes during the interglacial periods reveals comparable features and identical major vegetation successions. Although Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11.3 and the Holocene had similar earth precessional variations, their correspondence in terms of vegetation dynamics is low. MIS 9.5, 7.5, and especially 5.5 display closer correlation to the Holocene than MIS 11.3. Ecological factors, such as the distribution and composition of glacial refugia or postglacial migration patterns, may explain these discrepancies. Comparison of ecosystem dynamics during the past five interglacials suggests that vegetation development in the current interglacial has no analogue from the past 500,000 years. PMID:16162676

  11. Angle of sky light polarization derived from digital images of the sky under various conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Cao, Yu; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Yang, Yi; Ning, Yu

    2017-01-20

    Skylight polarization is used for navigation by some birds and insects. Skylight polarization also has potential for human navigation applications. Its advantages include relative immunity from interference and the absence of error accumulation over time. However, there are presently few examples of practical applications for polarization navigation technology. The main reason is its weak robustness during cloudy weather conditions. In this paper, the real-time measurement of the sky light polarization pattern across the sky has been achieved with a wide field of view camera. The images were processed under a new reference coordinate system to clearly display the symmetrical distribution of angle of polarization with respect to the solar meridian. A new algorithm for the extraction of the image axis of symmetry is proposed, in which the real-time azimuth angle between the camera and the solar meridian is accurately calculated. Our experimental results under different weather conditions show that polarization navigation has high accuracy, is strongly robust, and performs well during fog and haze, clouds, and strong sunlight.

  12. Novel robust skylight compass method based on full-sky polarization imaging under harsh conditions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Zhang, Nan; Li, Dalin; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Binzhen; Wang, Chenguang; Shen, Chong; Ren, Jianbin; Xue, Chenyang; Liu, Jun

    2016-07-11

    A novel method based on Pulse Coupled Neural Network(PCNN) algorithm for the highly accurate and robust compass information calculation from the polarized skylight imaging is proposed,which showed good accuracy and reliability especially under cloudy weather,surrounding shielding and moon light. The degree of polarization (DOP) combined with the angle of polarization (AOP), calculated from the full sky polarization image, were used for the compass information caculation. Due to the high sensitivity to the environments, DOP was used to judge the destruction of polarized information using the PCNN algorithm. Only areas with high accuracy of AOP were kept after the DOP PCNN filtering, thereby greatly increasing the compass accuracy and robustness. From the experimental results, it was shown that the compass accuracy was 0.1805° under clear weather. This method was also proven to be applicable under conditions of shielding by clouds, trees and buildings, with a compass accuracy better than 1°. With weak polarization information sources, such as moonlight, this method was shown experimentally to have an accuracy of 0.878°.

  13. A tale of two polar bear populations: Ice habitat, harvest, and body condition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rode, K.D.; Peacock, E.; Taylor, M.; Stirling, I.; Born, E.W.; Laidre, K.L.; Wiig, O.

    2012-01-01

    One of the primary mechanisms by which sea ice loss is expected to affect polar bears is via reduced body condition and growth resulting from reduced access to prey. To date, negative effects of sea ice loss have been documented for two of 19 recognized populations. Effects of sea ice loss on other polar bear populations that differ in harvest rate, population density, and/or feeding ecology have been assumed, but empirical support, especially quantitative data on population size, demography, and/or body condition spanning two or more decades, have been lacking. We examined trends in body condition metrics of captured bears and relationships with summertime ice concentration between 1977 and 2010 for the Baffin Bay (BB) and Davis Strait (DS) polar bear populations. Polar bears in these regions occupy areas with annual sea ice that has decreased markedly starting in the 1990s. Despite differences in harvest rate, population density, sea ice concentration, and prey base, polar bears in both populations exhibited positive relationships between body condition and summertime sea ice cover during the recent period of sea ice decline. Furthermore, females and cubs exhibited relationships with sea ice that were not apparent during the earlier period (1977-1990s) when sea ice loss did not occur. We suggest that declining body condition in BB may be a result of recent declines in sea ice habitat. In DS, high population density and/or sea ice loss, may be responsible for the declines in body condition. ?? 2011 The Society of Population Ecology and Springer.

  14. Increased Land Use by Chukchi Sea Polar Bears in Relation to Changing Sea Ice Conditions.

    PubMed

    Rode, Karyn D; Wilson, Ryan R; Regehr, Eric V; St Martin, Michelle; Douglas, David C; Olson, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are increasingly using land habitats in some parts of their range, where they have minimal access to their preferred prey, likely in response to loss of their sea ice habitat associated with climatic warming. We used location data from female polar bears fit with satellite radio collars to compare land use patterns in the Chukchi Sea between two periods (1986-1995 and 2008-2013) when substantial summer sea-ice loss occurred. In both time periods, polar bears predominantly occupied sea-ice, although land was used during the summer sea-ice retreat and during the winter for maternal denning. However, the proportion of bears on land for > 7 days between August and October increased between the two periods from 20.0% to 38.9%, and the average duration on land increased by 30 days. The majority of bears that used land in the summer and for denning came to Wrangel and Herald Islands (Russia), highlighting the importance of these northernmost land habitats to Chukchi Sea polar bears. Where bears summered and denned, and how long they spent there, was related to the timing and duration of sea ice retreat. Our results are consistent with other studies supporting increased land use as a common response of polar bears to sea-ice loss. Implications of increased land use for Chukchi Sea polar bears are unclear, because a recent study observed no change in body condition or reproductive indices between the two periods considered here. This result suggests that the ecology of this region may provide a degree of resilience to sea ice loss. However, projections of continued sea ice loss suggest that polar bears in the Chukchi Sea and other parts of the Arctic may increasingly use land habitats in the future, which has the potential to increase nutritional stress and human-polar bear interactions.

  15. Increased Land Use by Chukchi Sea Polar Bears in Relation to Changing Sea Ice Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rode, Karyn D.; Wilson, Ryan R.; Regehr, Eric V.; St. Martin, Michelle; Douglas, David C.; Olson, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are increasingly using land habitats in some parts of their range, where they have minimal access to their preferred prey, likely in response to loss of their sea ice habitat associated with climatic warming. We used location data from female polar bears fit with satellite radio collars to compare land use patterns in the Chukchi Sea between two periods (1986–1995 and 2008–2013) when substantial summer sea-ice loss occurred. In both time periods, polar bears predominantly occupied sea-ice, although land was used during the summer sea-ice retreat and during the winter for maternal denning. However, the proportion of bears on land for > 7 days between August and October increased between the two periods from 20.0% to 38.9%, and the average duration on land increased by 30 days. The majority of bears that used land in the summer and for denning came to Wrangel and Herald Islands (Russia), highlighting the importance of these northernmost land habitats to Chukchi Sea polar bears. Where bears summered and denned, and how long they spent there, was related to the timing and duration of sea ice retreat. Our results are consistent with other studies supporting increased land use as a common response of polar bears to sea-ice loss. Implications of increased land use for Chukchi Sea polar bears are unclear, because a recent study observed no change in body condition or reproductive indices between the two periods considered here. This result suggests that the ecology of this region may provide a degree of resilience to sea ice loss. However, projections of continued sea ice loss suggest that polar bears in the Chukchi Sea and other parts of the Arctic may increasingly use land habitats in the future, which has the potential to increase nutritional stress and human-polar bear interactions. PMID:26580809

  16. Increased land use by Chukchi Sea polar bears in relation to changing sea ice conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rode, Karyn D.; Wilson, Ryan R.; Regehr, Eric V.; St. Martin, Michelle; Douglas, David; Olson, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are increasingly using land habitats in some parts of their range, where they have minimal access to their preferred prey, likely in response to loss of their sea ice habitat associated with climatic warming. We used location data from female polar bears fit with satellite radio collars to compare land use patterns in the Chukchi Sea between two periods (1986–1995 and 2008–2013) when substantial summer sea-ice loss occurred. In both time periods, polar bears predominantly occupied sea-ice, although land was used during the summer sea-ice retreat and during the winter for maternal denning. However, the proportion of bears on land for > 7 days between August and October increased between the two periods from 20.0% to 38.9%, and the average duration on land increased by 30 days. The majority of bears that used land in the summer and for denning came to Wrangel and Herald Islands (Russia), highlighting the importance of these northernmost land habitats to Chukchi Sea polar bears. Where bears summered and denned, and how long they spent there, was related to the timing and duration of sea ice retreat. Our results are consistent with other studies supporting increased land use as a common response of polar bears to sea-ice loss. Implications of increased land use for Chukchi Sea polar bears are unclear, because a recent study observed no change in body condition or reproductive indices between the two periods considered here. This result suggests that the ecology of this region may provide a degree of resilience to sea ice loss. However, projections of continued sea ice loss suggest that polar bears in the Chukchi Sea and other parts of the Arctic may increasingly use land habitats in the future, which has the potential to increase nutritional stress and human-polar bear interactions.

  17. Analytical polarization transfer functions for four coupled spins 12 under isotropic mixing conditions

    PubMed

    Luy; Schedletzky; Glaser

    1999-05-01

    Analytical polarization transfer functions are presented for spin systems consisting of four spins 12 with arbitrary coupling constants under isotropic mixing conditions. In addition, simplified transfer functions were derived for symmetric coupling topologies. Based on these transfer functions optimal durations for the mixing period can be determined for correlations of interest. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  18. Auxin polar transport in arabidopsis under simulated microgravity conditions - relevance to growth and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, K.; Oka, M.; Yamamoto, R.; Masuda, Y.; Hoson, T.; Kamisaka, S.; Ueda, J.

    1999-01-01

    Activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under simulated microgravity conditions was studied in relation to the growth and development. Seeds were germinated and allowed to grow on an agar medium in test tubes on a horizontal clinostat. Horizontal clinostat rotation substantially reduced the growth of inflorescence axes and the productivity of seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (ecotypes Landsberg erecta and Columbia), although it little affected seed germination, development of rosette leaves and flowering. The activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes decreased when Arabidopsis plants were grown on a horizontal clinostat from germination stage, being ca. 60% of 1 g control. On the other hand, the auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis grown in 1 g conditions was not affected when the segments were exposed to various gravistimuli, including 3-dimensional clinorotation, during transport experiments. Pin-formed mutant of Arabidopsis, having a unique structure of the inflorescence axis with no flower and extremely low levels of the activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes and endogenous auxin, did not continue its vegetative growth under clinostat rotation. These facts suggest that the development of the system of auxin polar transport in Arabidopsis is affected by microgravity, resulting in the inhibition of growth and development, especially during reproductive growth.

  19. Pendular trapping conditions for ultracold polar molecules enforced by external electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Petrov, Alexander; Makrides, Constantinos; Tiesinga, Eite; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically investigate trapping conditions for ultracold polar molecules in optical lattices when external magnetic and electric fields are simultaneously applied. Our results are based on an accurate electronic-structure calculation of the polar 23Na40K polar molecule in its absolute ground state combined with a calculation of its rovibrational-hyperfine motion. We find that an electric field strength of 5.26 (15 ) kV/cm and an angle of 54 .7∘ between this field and the polarization of the optical laser lead to a trapping design for 23Na40K molecules where decoherence due to electric field strength and laser-intensity fluctuations, as well as fluctuations in the direction of its polarization, are kept to a minimum. One-standard-deviation systematic and statistical uncertainties are given in parenthesis. Under such conditions, pairs of hyperfine-rotational states of v =0 molecules, used to induce tunable dipole-dipole interactions between them, experience ultrastable, matching trapping forces.

  20. Evidence from the Seychelles of Last Interglacial Sea Level Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyverberg, K.; Dutton, A.; Dechnik, B.; Webster, J.; Zwartz, D.

    2014-12-01

    Several studies indicate that sea level oscillated during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e, but the details of these scenarios, including the number of sea level oscillations, are still debated. We lack a detailed understanding of the sensitivity of the large polar ice sheets to changes in temperature that could result in eustatic sea level oscillations. Because the Seychelles are located far from the margins of the Last Glacial Maximum northern hemisphere ice sheets, they have not been subjected to glacial isostatic adjustment, and have been tectonically stable since the Last Interglacial period; therefore, they provide a robust record of eustatic sea level during MIS 5e. All of the outcrops we examined contain unconformities and/or sharp transitions between facies, though the nature of these boundaries varies between sites. In some outcrops we observed a hardground comprising fine-grained, mollusc-rich sediment layer between distinct generations of in situ coralgal framework. In one outcrop, this succession was observed twice, where two generations of reef growth were each capped by a strongly indurated fine-grained, mollusc-rich sediment layer. At the site with the greatest vertical extent of outcrop, there is a marked difference in the taxonomic composition of the coral community above and below an unconformable surface, but the indurated fine-grained, sediment layer observed elsewhere was absent. Most of the other outcrops we studied contained a common succession of facies from in situ reef units overlain by cemented coral rubble. In two dated outcrops, the age of corals above and below the rubble layer are the same age. The hardgrounds and rubble layers may represent ephemeral exposure of the reef units during two drops in sea level. The inference of multiple meter-scale oscillations during the MIS 5e highstand indicates a more dynamic cryosphere than the present interglacial, although the climatic threshold for more volatile polar ice sheets is not yet clear.

  1. Glacial legacies on interglacial vegetation at the Pliocene-Pleistocene transition in NE Asia

    PubMed Central

    Herzschuh, Ulrike; Birks, H. John B.; Laepple, Thomas; Andreev, Andrei; Melles, Martin; Brigham-Grette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Broad-scale climate control of vegetation is widely assumed. Vegetation-climate lags are generally thought to have lasted no more than a few centuries. Here our palaeoecological study challenges this concept over glacial–interglacial timescales. Through multivariate analyses of pollen assemblages from Lake El'gygytgyn, Russian Far East and other data we show that interglacial vegetation during the Plio-Pleistocene transition mainly reflects conditions of the preceding glacial instead of contemporary interglacial climate. Vegetation–climate disequilibrium may persist for several millennia, related to the combined effects of permafrost persistence, distant glacial refugia and fire. In contrast, no effects from the preceding interglacial on glacial vegetation are detected. We propose that disequilibrium was stronger during the Plio-Pleistocene transition than during the Mid-Pliocene Warm Period when, in addition to climate, herbivory was important. By analogy to the past, we suggest today's widespread larch ecosystem on permafrost is not in climate equilibrium. Vegetation-based reconstructions of interglacial climates used to assess atmospheric CO2–temperature relationships may thus yield misleading simulations of past global climate sensitivity. PMID:27338025

  2. Glacial legacies on interglacial vegetation at the Pliocene-Pleistocene transition in NE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzschuh, Ulrike; Birks, H. John B.; Laepple, Thomas; Andreev, Andrei; Melles, Martin; Brigham-Grette, Julie

    2016-06-01

    Broad-scale climate control of vegetation is widely assumed. Vegetation-climate lags are generally thought to have lasted no more than a few centuries. Here our palaeoecological study challenges this concept over glacial-interglacial timescales. Through multivariate analyses of pollen assemblages from Lake El'gygytgyn, Russian Far East and other data we show that interglacial vegetation during the Plio-Pleistocene transition mainly reflects conditions of the preceding glacial instead of contemporary interglacial climate. Vegetation-climate disequilibrium may persist for several millennia, related to the combined effects of permafrost persistence, distant glacial refugia and fire. In contrast, no effects from the preceding interglacial on glacial vegetation are detected. We propose that disequilibrium was stronger during the Plio-Pleistocene transition than during the Mid-Pliocene Warm Period when, in addition to climate, herbivory was important. By analogy to the past, we suggest today's widespread larch ecosystem on permafrost is not in climate equilibrium. Vegetation-based reconstructions of interglacial climates used to assess atmospheric CO2-temperature relationships may thus yield misleading simulations of past global climate sensitivity.

  3. Stratospheric meteorological conditions in the Arctic polar vortex, 1991 to 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P.; Lait, L. R.; Schoeberl, M.; Nash, E. R.; Kelly, K.; Fahey, D. W.; Nagatani, R.; Toohey, D.; Avallone, L.; Anderson, J.

    1993-01-01

    Stratospheric meteorological conditions during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition II (AASE II) presented excellent observational opportunities from Bangor, Maine, because the polar vortex was located over southeastern Canada for significant periods during the 1991-1992 winter. Temperature analyses showed that nitric acid trihydrates (NAT temperatures below 195 K) should have formed over small regions in early December. The temperatures in the polar vortex warmed beyond NAT temperatures by late January (earlier than normal). Perturbed chemistry was found to be associated with these cold temperatures.

  4. Tropical Atlantic temperature seasonality at the end of the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felis, Thomas; Giry, Cyril; Scholz, Denis; Lohmann, Gerrit; Pfeiffer, Madlene; Pätzold, Jürgen; Kölling, Martin; Scheffers, Sander R.

    2015-04-01

    The end of the last interglacial period, ~118 kyr ago, was characterized by substantial ocean circulation and climate perturbations resulting from instabilities of polar ice sheets. It has been suggested that these perturbations at the end of the last interglacial are crucial for a better understanding of future climate change. The seasonal temperature changes of the tropical ocean, however, which play an important role in seasonal climate extremes such as hurricanes, floods and droughts at the present day, are not well known for this period that led into the last glacial. Here we present a monthly resolved snapshot of reconstructed sea surface temperature in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean for 117.7 ± 0.8 kyr ago, using coral Sr/Ca and δ18O records in a precisely 230Th/U dated shallow-water fossil coral recovered from the southern Caribbean (Bonaire). We find that temperature seasonality was similar to today, which is consistent with the orbital insolation forcing. Our coral records and simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (COSMOS) indicate an orbital control on temperature seasonality in the tropical North Atlantic at the end of the last interglacial, despite the large-scale perturbations of ocean circulation and climate during this period, and suggest that temperature seasonality of the tropical surface ocean is controlled mainly by orbital insolation changes during interglacials.

  5. Modeling the Seasonal South Polar Cap Sublimation Rates at Dust Storm Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonev, B. P.; James, P. B.; Wolff, M. J.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Hansen, G. B.; Benson, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the principal component of the Martian atmosphere and its interaction with the polar caps forms the CO2 seasonal cycle on the planet. A significant fraction of the atmospheric constituent condenses on the surface during the polar winter and sublimes back during spring. The basic aspects of the CO2 cycle have been outlined by Leighton and Murray and a number of follow-up theoretical models ranging from energy balance to general circulation models have been used to study the physical processes involved in the cycle. This paper presents a modeling study on the seasonal south polar cap subliminiation rate under dust storm conditions. Mars Global Surveyor observations are also presented.

  6. Anomalies during the Present and Last interglacial periods - A proxy comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ouahabi, Anuar; Martrat, Belen; Lopez, Jordi F.; Grimalt, Joan O.

    2013-04-01

    The stability of the Earth's climate is strongly linked to the amount and spatial distribution of energy by atmospheric/oceanic processes from low to high latitudes. Past periods of relatively stable climate have been interrupted by sharp events, once a critical point has been passed and positive triggers and feedbacks propel change toward a contrasting mode. Additional mechanisms amplify or sustain climate changes that are already under way. High-resolution proxy archives are useful tools for characterizing these events and modes in the past, both in time and space, in order to assess the likelihood of sudden shifts, in particular within warm climate behaviour. In this respect, the PIG2LIG-4FUTURE database (Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 14, EGU2012-13825) contains alkenone-derived sea surface temperatures (117 marine sediment profiles) and stable oxygen isotope ratios (measured in ice cores and speleothems; 29 and 88 records respectively) with sufficient temporal resolution to understand global abrupt climate processes throughout the present interglacial (PIG) and the last interglacial (LIG), together with their deglaciations (d1 and d2). Records have been selected according to their inclusion of both the PIG and LIG intervals for the same location (no more than 45% of the sites), tight chronological control and calibration revised criteria. Data have been compiled into 200-year bins for regional stacks to help in identifying trends, transitions, boundary conditions, latitudinal temperature gradients, polar amplification and reorganisation of monsoon systems. The LIG relative to PIG anomalies are larger at mid latitudes (up to 6°C around 40N and 40S) than those for the tropics (less than 2°C from 20N to 20S). The amplitude of variation during the PIG is found to be no more than 2°C (few exceptions up to 4°C at northern sub-polar specific locations). Latitudinal distribution of anomalies appears connected to temperature seasonal contrast. The same

  7. Polarizing properties of embedded symmetric trilayer stacks under conditions of frustrated total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Rasheed M A; Perla, Siva R

    2006-03-01

    An all-transparent symmetric trilayer structure, which consists of a high-index center layer coated on both sides by a low-index film and embedded in a high-index prism, can function as an efficient polarizer or polarizing beam splitter under conditions of frustrated total internal reflection over a wide range of incidence angles. For a given set of refractive indices, all possible solutions for the thicknesses of the layers that suppress the reflection of either the p or s polarization at a specified angle, as well as the reflectance of the system for the orthogonal polarization, are determined. A 633 nm design that uses a MgF2-ZnS-MgF2 trilayer embedded in a ZnS prism achieves an extinction ratio (ER) > 40 dB from 50 degrees to 80 degrees in reflection and an ER > 20 dB from 58 degrees to 80 degrees in transmission. IR polarizers that use CaF2-Ge-CaF2 trilayers embedded in a ZnS prism are also considered.

  8. Assessing orbitally-forced interglacial climate variability during the mid-Pliocene Warm Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, Caroline L.; Haywood, Alan M.; Dolan, Aisling M.; Hunter, Stephen J.; Pope, James O.; Pickering, Steven J.

    2014-08-01

    The traditional view of the Pliocene is one of an epoch with higher than present global mean annual temperatures (∼2 to 3 °C) and stable climate conditions. Published data-model comparisons for the mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP: ∼3.3 to 3 million years ago) have identified specific regions of concordance and discord between climate model outputs and marine/terrestrial proxy data. Due to the time averaged nature of global palaeoenvironmental syntheses, it has been hypothesised that climate variability during interglacial events within the mPWP could contribute to site-specific data/model disagreement. The Hadley Centre Coupled Climate Model Version 3 (HadCM3) is used to assess the nature of climate variability around two interglacial events within the mPWP that have different characteristics of orbital forcing (Marine Isotope Stages KM5c and K1). Model results indicate that ±20 kyr on either side of the MIS KM5c, orbital forcing produced a less than 1 °C change in global mean annual temperatures. Regionally, mean annual surface air temperature (SAT) variability can reach 2 to 3 °C. Seasonal variations exceed those predicted for the annual mean and can locally exceed 5 °C. Simulations 20 kyr on either side of MIS K1 show considerably increased variability in relation to KM5c. We demonstrate that orbitally-forced changes in surface air temperature during interglacial events within the mPWP can be substantial, and could therefore contribute to data/model discord. This is especially likely if proxies preserve growing season rather than mean annual temperatures. Model results indicate that peak MIS KM5c and K1 interglacial temperatures were not globally synchronous, highlighting leads and lags in temperature in different regions. This highlights the potential pitfalls in aligning peaks in proxy-derived temperatures across geographically diverse data sites, and indicates that a single climate model simulation for an interglacial event is inadequate to capture

  9. Polar Bear Conservation Status in Relation to Projected Sea-ice Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regehr, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    The status of the world's 19 subpopulations of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) varies as a function of sea-ice conditions, ecology, management, and other factors. Previous methods to project the response of polar bears to loss of Arctic sea ice—the primary threat to the species—include expert opinion surveys, Bayesian Networks providing qualitative stressor assessments, and subpopulations-specific demographic analyses. Here, we evaluated the global conservation status of polar bears using a data-based sensitivity analysis. First, we estimated generation length for subpopulations with available data (n=11). Second, we developed standardized sea-ice metrics representing habitat availability. Third, we projected global population size under alternative assumptions for relationships between sea ice and subpopulation abundance. Estimated generation length (median = 11.4 years; 95%CI = 9.8 to 13.6) and sea-ice change (median = loss of 1.26 ice-covered days per year; 95%CI = 0.70 to 3.37) varied across subpopulations. Assuming a one-to-one proportional relationship between sea ice and abundance, the median percent change in global population size over three polar bear generations was -30% (95%CI = -35% to -25%). Assuming a linear relationship between sea ice and normalized estimates of subpopulation abundance, median percent change was -4% (95% CI = -62% to +50%) or -43% (95% CI = -76% to -20%), depending on how subpopulations were grouped and how inference was extended from relatively well-studied subpopulations (n=7) to those with little or no data. Our findings suggest the potential for large reductions in polar bear numbers over the next three polar bear generations if sea-ice loss due to climate change continues as forecasted.

  10. Tropical Atlantic Temperature Seasonality at the End of the Last Interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felis, T.; Giry, C.; Scholz, D.; Lohmann, G.; Pfeiffer, M.; Pätzold, J.; Kölling, M.; Scheffers, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    The end of the last interglacial period, ~118 kyr ago, was characterized by substantial ocean circulation and climate perturbations resulting from instabilities of polar ice sheets, which are partially comparable to those projected for future climate change. The seasonal temperature changes of the tropical ocean, however, which play an important role in seasonal climate extremes such as hurricanes, floods and droughts at the present day, are not well known for this period that lead into the last glacial. Here we present a monthly resolved snapshot of reconstructed sea surface temperature variability in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean for 117.7 ± 0.8 kyr ago, using fossil coral (Diploria strigosa) Sr/Ca and δ18O records from Bonaire (Caribbean Netherlands). Our 20-year snapshot of reconstructed sea surface temperature variability for the end of the last interglacial is compared with Bonaire monthly coral Sr/Ca and δ18O records for snapshots since the mid-Holocene, comprising a total length of 295 years. We find that temperature seasonality in the southern Caribbean Sea at the end of the last interglacial was relatively stable and similar to today. Our coral records and simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (COSMOS) indicate an orbital control on temperature seasonality in the tropical North Atlantic at the end of the last interglacial, despite the large-scale perturbations of ocean circulation and climate during this period, and suggest that temperature seasonality of the tropical surface ocean was a relatively stable feature of the ocean-atmosphere system at the end of the last interglacial.

  11. Magnetic Field Perturbations from Currents in the Dark Polar Regions During Quiet Geomagnetic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Finlay, C. C.; Hesse, M.; Laundal, K. M.

    2017-02-01

    In the day-side sunlit polar ionosphere the varying and IMF dependent convection creates strong ionospheric currents even during quiet geomagnetic conditions. Observations during such times are often excluded when using satellite data to model the internal geomagnetic main field. Observations from the night-side or local winter during quiet conditions are, however, also influenced by variations in the IMF. In this paper we briefly review the large scale features of the ionospheric currents in the polar regions with emphasis on the current distribution during undisturbed conditions. We examine the distribution of scalar measurements of the magnetic field intensity minus predictions from a geomagnetic field model. These `residuals' fall into two main categories. One category is consistently distributed according to the well-known ionospheric plasma convection and its associated Birkeland currents. The other category represent contributions caused by geomagnetic activity related to the substorm current wedge around local magnetic midnight. A new observation is a strong IMF By control of the residuals in the midnight sector indicating larger ionospheric currents in the substorm current wedge in the northern polar region for By > 0 and correspondingly in the southern hemisphere for By < 0.

  12. Magnetic Field Perturbations from Currents in the Dark Polar Regions During Quiet Geomagnetic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Finlay, C. C.; Hesse, M.; Laundal, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    In the day-side sunlit polar ionosphere the varying and IMF dependent convection creates strong ionospheric currents even during quiet geomagnetic conditions. Observations during such times are often excluded when using satellite data to model the internal geomagnetic main field. Observations from the night-side or local winter during quiet conditions are, however, also influenced by variations in the IMF. In this paper we briefly review the large scale features of the ionospheric currents in the polar regions with emphasis on the current distribution during undisturbed conditions. We examine the distribution of scalar measurements of the magnetic field intensity minus predictions from a geomagnetic field model. These `residuals' fall into two main categories. One category is consistently distributed according to the well-known ionospheric plasma convection and its associated Birkeland currents. The other category represent contributions caused by geomagnetic activity related to the substorm current wedge around local magnetic midnight. A new observation is a strong IMF By control of the residuals in the midnight sector indicating larger ionospheric currents in the substorm current wedge in the northern polar region for By > 0 and correspondingly in the southern hemisphere for By < 0.

  13. Surface thermodynamic homeostasis of salivary conditioning films through polar-apolar layering.

    PubMed

    van der Mei, Henny C; White, Don J; Atema-Smit, Jelly; Geertsema-Doornbusch, Gésinda I; Busscher, Henk J

    2012-02-01

    Salivary conditioning films (SCFs) form on all surfaces exposed to the oral cavity and control diverse oral surface phenomena. Oral chemotherapeutics and dietary components present perturbations to SCFs. Here we determine the surface energetics of SCFs through contact angle measurements with various liquids on SCFs following perturbations with a variety of chemotherapeutics as well as after renewed SCF formation. Sixteen-hour SCFs on polished enamel surfaces were treated with a variety of chemotherapeutics, including toothpastes and mouthrinses. After treatment with chemotherapeutics, a SCF was applied again for 3 h. Contact angles with four different liquids on untreated and treated SCF-coated enamel surfaces were measured and surface free energies were calculated. Perturbations either caused the SCF to become more polar or more apolar, but in all cases, renewed SCF formation compensated these changes. Thus, a polar SCF attracts different salivary proteins or adsorbs proteins in a different conformation to create a more apolar SCF surface after renewed SCF formation and vice versa for apolar SCFs. This polar-apolar layering in SCF formation presents a powerful mechanism in the oral cavity to maintain surface thermodynamic homeostasis--defining oral surface properties within a narrow, biological range and influencing chemotherapeutic strategies. Surface chemical changes brought about by dietary or chemotherapeutic perturbations to SCFs make it more polar or apolar, but new SCFs are rapidly formed compensating for changes in surface energetics.

  14. Open boundary conditions for internal gravity wave modelling using polarization relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsaleix, Patrick; Ulses, Caroline; Pairaud, Ivane; Herrmann, Marine Julie; Floor, Jochem Willem; Estournel, Claude; Auclair, Francis

    This paper proposes an original approach of the open boundary condition problem, within the framework of internal hydrostatic wave theory. These boundary conditions are based on the relations of polarization of internal waves. The method is presented progressively, beginning with a simple case (non-rotating regime, propagation direction normal to the open boundary), ending with a more general situation (rotating regime, multimodal & multi-dimensional propagations and variable background field). In the non-rotating case and as far as we assume that the direction of propagation is locally normal to the open boundary, the so-called PRM (polarization relation method) scheme can be seen as a three-dimensional version of the barotropic Flather boundary conditions. The discrete form of the scheme is detailed. Numerical stability issues proper to leap-frog time stepping are in particular discussed. It is shown that errors on phase speed prescribed in the boundary conditions can notably deteriorate radiation properties. The normal mode approach is introduced to identify coherent structures of propagation and their corresponding phase speed. A simple and robust multi-dimensional propagation scheme can easily be derived from polarization relations. The rotating case is more difficult but it is possible, to some extent, to get around the dependency of phase speed on wave frequency and to keep the non-rotating formulation of the PRM conditions almost unchanged. The PRM scheme being applied to field anomalies, the question of the background reference state is addressed. The latter can be used to introduce incoming waves across the open boundaries or, alternatively, to represent the low-frequency variability of the model itself. The consistency of the pressure and tracer boundary conditions is finally discussed.

  15. Phytoplankton communities of polar regions--Diversity depending on environmental conditions and chemical anthropopressure.

    PubMed

    Kosek, Klaudia; Polkowska, Żaneta; Żyszka, Beata; Lipok, Jacek

    2016-04-15

    The polar regions (Arctic and Antarctic) constitute up to 14% of the biosphere and offer some of the coldest and most arid Earth's environments. Nevertheless several oxygenic phototrophs including some higher plants, mosses, lichens, various algal groups and cyanobacteria, survive that harsh climate and create the base of the trophic relationships in fragile ecosystems of polar environments. Ecosystems in polar regions are characterized by low primary productivity and slow growth rates, therefore they are more vulnerable to disturbance, than those in temperate regions. From this reason, chemical contaminants influencing the growth of photoautotrophic producers might induce serious disorders in the integrity of polar ecosystems. However, for a long time these areas were believed to be free of chemical contamination, and relatively protected from widespread anthropogenic pressure, due their remoteness and extreme climate conditions. Nowadays, there is a growing amount of data that prove that xenobiotics are transported thousands of kilometers by the air and ocean currents and then they are deposed in colder regions and accumulate in many environments, including the habitats of marine and freshwater cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria (blue green algae), as a natural part of phytoplankton assemblages, are globally distributed, but in high polar ecosystems they represent the dominant primary producers. These microorganisms are continuously exposed to various concentration levels of the compounds that are present in their habitats and act as nourishment or the factors influencing the growth and development of cyanobacteria in other way. The most common group of contaminants in Arctic and Antarctic are persistent organic pollutants (POPs), characterized by durability and resistance to degradation. It is important to determine their concentrations in all phytoplankton species cells and in their environment to get to know the possibility of contaminants to transfer to higher

  16. Cross-latitudinal climate teleconnections during the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, H. A.; Kandiano, E.; Fahl, K.

    2014-12-01

    A series of climate interruptions have been noted around the last warm period (MIS5e). Some of these are particularly conspicuous and occurred during both the deglacial as well as the glacial onset. These events are often associated with iceberg/meltwater charges into the subpolar/polar North Atlantic. A new multiproxy analysis using planktic foraminiferal abundances and SSTs, abundances of alkenone compounds and alkenone SSTs, and stable O/C isotope measurements was performed for Site 975 (Balearic Basin; Western Mediterranean). Samples covered the time from late MIS 6 to early MIS 5d with emphasis on the climate progression of the last interglacial period. A number of abrupt climate changes related to alternating influence of northern nutrient rich and southern oligotrophic water masses was revealed. Among the climate fluctuations, North Atlantic events Heinrich 11 as well as cooling events C27 - C23 could all be identified. However, in comparison to the eastern North Atlantic mid-latitude region, at Site 975 events C27 and C26 seem to be significantly more pronounced. This fact, along with evidence of a two-phase climate optimum with the SST maximum reached during its later phase, implies close similarity in climate dynamics between the Western Mediterranean and the polar Nordic Seas. It is therefore proposed that the postglacial marine development in the Nordic Seas - for instance, due to presence of winter sea ice - had a strong impact on the western Mediterranean climate via meridional atmospheric circulation patterns and temperature gradients.

  17. Tropical Atlantic temperature seasonality at the end of the last interglacial.

    PubMed

    Felis, Thomas; Giry, Cyril; Scholz, Denis; Lohmann, Gerrit; Pfeiffer, Madlene; Pätzold, Jürgen; Kölling, Martin; Scheffers, Sander R

    2015-01-22

    The end of the last interglacial period, ~118 kyr ago, was characterized by substantial ocean circulation and climate perturbations resulting from instabilities of polar ice sheets. These perturbations are crucial for a better understanding of future climate change. The seasonal temperature changes of the tropical ocean, however, which play an important role in seasonal climate extremes such as hurricanes, floods and droughts at the present day, are not well known for this period that led into the last glacial. Here we present a monthly resolved snapshot of reconstructed sea surface temperature in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean for 117.7±0.8 kyr ago, using coral Sr/Ca and δ(18)O records. We find that temperature seasonality was similar to today, which is consistent with the orbital insolation forcing. Our coral and climate model results suggest that temperature seasonality of the tropical surface ocean is controlled mainly by orbital insolation changes during interglacials.

  18. Tropical Atlantic temperature seasonality at the end of the last interglacial

    PubMed Central

    Felis, Thomas; Giry, Cyril; Scholz, Denis; Lohmann, Gerrit; Pfeiffer, Madlene; Pätzold, Jürgen; Kölling, Martin; Scheffers, Sander R.

    2015-01-01

    The end of the last interglacial period, ~118 kyr ago, was characterized by substantial ocean circulation and climate perturbations resulting from instabilities of polar ice sheets. These perturbations are crucial for a better understanding of future climate change. The seasonal temperature changes of the tropical ocean, however, which play an important role in seasonal climate extremes such as hurricanes, floods and droughts at the present day, are not well known for this period that led into the last glacial. Here we present a monthly resolved snapshot of reconstructed sea surface temperature in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean for 117.7±0.8 kyr ago, using coral Sr/Ca and δ18O records. We find that temperature seasonality was similar to today, which is consistent with the orbital insolation forcing. Our coral and climate model results suggest that temperature seasonality of the tropical surface ocean is controlled mainly by orbital insolation changes during interglacials. PMID:25609544

  19. Gravitational vacuum polarization. I. Energy conditions in the Hartle-Hawking vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, M.

    1996-10-01

    When a quantum field theory is constructed on a curved background spacetime, the gravitationally induced vacuum polarization typically induces a nonzero vacuum expectation value for the quantum stress-energy tensor. It is well known that this gravitational vacuum polarization often violates the pointwise energy conditions and sometimes violates the averaged energy conditions. In this paper I begin a systematic attack on the question of where and by how much the various energy conditions are violated. To keep the discussion manageable, I work in the test-field limit, and focus on conformally coupled massless scalar fields in Schwarzschild spacetime, using the Hartle-Hawking vacuum. The discussion invokes a mixture of analytical and numerical techniques, and critically compares the qualitative behavior to be expected from the Page approximation with that adduced from the numerical calculations of Anderson, Hiscock, and Samuel. I show that the various pointwise energy conditions are violated in a series of onionlike layers located between the unstable photon orbit and the event horizon, the sequence of violations being DEC, WEC, and (NEC+SEC). Furthermore, the ANEC is violated for {ital some} of the null geodesics trapped in this region. Having established the basic machinery in this paper, the Boulware vacuum will be treated in a companion paper, while studies of the Unruh vacuum should be straightforward, as should extensions to nonconformal couplings, massive scalars, and Reissner-Nordstr{umlt o}m geometries. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Cross-polarization microwave radar return at severe wind conditions: laboratory model and geophysical model function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Abramov, Victor; Ermoshkin, Alexey; Zuikova, Emma; Kazakov, Vassily; Sergeev, Daniil; Kandaurov, Alexandr

    2014-05-01

    Satellite remote sensing is one of the main techniques of monitoring severe weather conditions over the ocean. The principal difficulty of the existing algorithms of retrieving wind based on dependence of microwave backscattering cross-section on wind speed (Geophysical Model Function, GMF) is due to its saturation at winds exceeding 25 - 30 m/s. Recently analysis of dual- and quad-polarization C-band radar return measured from satellite Radarsat-2 suggested that the cross-polarized radar return has much higher sensitivity to the wind speed than co-polarized back scattering [1] and conserved sensitivity to wind speed at hurricane conditions [2]. Since complete collocation of these data was not possible and time difference in flight legs and SAR images acquisition was up to 3 hours, these two sets of data were compared in [2] only statistically. The main purpose of this paper is investigation of the functional dependence of cross-polarized radar cross-section on the wind speed in laboratory experiment. Since cross-polarized radar return is formed due to scattering at small-scale structures of the air-sea interface (short-crested waves, foam, sprays, etc), which are well reproduced in laboratory conditions, then the approach based on laboratory experiment on radar scattering of microwaves at the water surface under hurricane wind looks feasible. The experiments were performed in the Wind-wave flume located on top of the Large Thermostratified Tank of the Institute of Applied Physics, where the airflow was produced in the flume with the straight working part of 10 m and operating cross section 0.40?0.40 sq. m, the axis velocity can be varied from 5 to 25 m/s. Microwave measurements were carried out by a coherent Doppler X-band (3.2 cm) scatterometer with the consequent receive of linear polarizations. Experiments confirmed higher sensitivity to the wind speed of the cross-polarized radar return. Simultaneously parameters of the air flow in the turbulent boundary layer

  1. Hydrogen Transport Conditions and Effects in Cathodically Polarized AF1410 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charca, Samuel M.; Uwakweh, Oswald N. C.; Agarwala, Vinod S.

    2007-10-01

    Hydrogen permeation of AF1410 steel membranes due to cathodic polarization using the Devanathan and Starchurski double cell (DSDC) with 0.1M H2SO4 + 1 g/L Na2HAsO4·7H2O, and 0.1M NaOH media in the input and exit cells, respectively, under Galvanostatic conditions depended on the polarization current density, membrane thickness, and surface roughness. For a 0.35-mm-thick membrane, the steady-state hydrogen permeated using increasing polarization currents from 1.00 to 10.00 mA varied correspondingly from 0.6 × 10-5 (mol H/m2s) to 1.03 × 10-5 mol H/m2s, with accompanying transient rates or permeation rates of 1.07 × 10-4 A/m2s to 4.40 × 10-4 A/m2s. With a constant polarization current density of 20 A/m2, the steady-state permeated hydrogen was in the range of 1.00 × 10-5 (mol H/m2s) to 3.50 × 10-5 (mol H/m2s), for 0.30-mm and 0.09-mm-thick membranes, respectively. The breakthrough times decreased from 2130 to 300 seconds with decreasing membranes thickness from 0.30 to 0.09 mm. The formation of blisters was observed more on the input side surface than on the exit-side surface and occurred for polarization charging current densities greater than 30.0 A/m2. The tendency for blister formation increased with decreasing material’s surface roughness. Cracks accompanying blisters tended to form on both the input and exit-side surfaces only with continued charging following the attainment of steady-state permeation, though they were generally lower on the potentiostated exit side. The average effective permeation coefficient of hydrogen was determined to be 2.89 × 10-12 m2/s for membrane thicknesses ranging from 0.09 to 0.30 mm based on the slope method.

  2. A GCM comparison of Pleistocene super-interglacial periods in relation to Lake El'gygytgyn, NE Arctic Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, A. J.; DeConto, R. M.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Melles, M.

    2015-07-01

    Until now, the lack of time-continuous, terrestrial paleoenvironmental data from the Pleistocene Arctic has made model simulations of past interglacials difficult to assess. Here, we compare climate simulations of four warm interglacials at Marine Isotope Stages (MISs) 1 (9 ka), 5e (127 ka), 11c (409 ka) and 31 (1072 ka) with new proxy climate data recovered from Lake El'gygytgyn, NE Russia. Climate reconstructions of the mean temperature of the warmest month (MTWM) indicate conditions up to 0.4, 2.1, 0.5 and 3.1 °C warmer than today during MIS 1, 5e, 11c and 31, respectively. While the climate model captures much of the observed warming during each interglacial, largely in response to boreal summer (JJA) orbital forcing, the extraordinary warmth of MIS 11c compared to the other interglacials in the Lake El'gygytgyn temperature proxy reconstructions remains difficult to explain. To deconvolve the contribution of multiple influences on interglacial warming at Lake El'gygytgyn, we isolated the influence of vegetation, sea ice and circum-Arctic land ice feedbacks on the modeled climate of the Beringian interior. Simulations accounting for climate-vegetation-land-surface feedbacks during all four interglacials show expanding boreal forest cover with increasing summer insolation intensity. A deglaciated Greenland is shown to have a minimal effect on northeast Asian temperature during the warmth of stages 11c and 31 (Melles et al., 2012). A prescribed enhancement of oceanic heat transport into the Arctic Ocean does have some effect on Lake El'gygytgyn's regional climate, but the exceptional warmth of MIS l1c remains enigmatic compared to the modest orbital and greenhouse gas forcing during that interglacial.

  3. Alternative glacial-interglacial refugia demographic hypotheses tested on Cephalocereus columna-trajani (Cactaceae) in the intertropical Mexican drylands

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo-Romero, Amelia; Aguilar-Martínez, Gustavo F.; Medina-Sánchez, Javier; Rendón-Aguilar, Beatriz; Valverde, Pedro Luis; Zavala-Hurtado, Jose Alejandro; Serrato, Alejandra; Rivas-Arancibia, Sombra; Pérez-Hernández, Marco Aurelio; López-Ortega, Gerardo; Jiménez-Sierra, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    , these results suggest that C. columna-trajani experienced an expansion following the warm conditions of interglacials, in accordance with the GRH. PMID:28426818

  4. Alternative glacial-interglacial refugia demographic hypotheses tested on Cephalocereus columna-trajani (Cactaceae) in the intertropical Mexican drylands.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-Romero, Amelia; Vargas-Mendoza, Carlos Fabián; Aguilar-Martínez, Gustavo F; Medina-Sánchez, Javier; Rendón-Aguilar, Beatriz; Valverde, Pedro Luis; Zavala-Hurtado, Jose Alejandro; Serrato, Alejandra; Rivas-Arancibia, Sombra; Pérez-Hernández, Marco Aurelio; López-Ortega, Gerardo; Jiménez-Sierra, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    , these results suggest that C. columna-trajani experienced an expansion following the warm conditions of interglacials, in accordance with the GRH.

  5. Genesis, evolution, and catastrophic burying of the Ryshkovo paleosol of the Mikulino Interglacial (MIS 5e)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sycheva, S. A.; Sedov, S. N.; Bronnikova, M. A.; Targulian, V. O.; Solleiro-Rebolledo, E.

    2017-09-01

    The results of a hierarchical morphogenetic, physicochemical, and mineralogical study of the Ryshkovo full-profile texture-differentiated paleosol of the Mikulino Interglacial from the section at Aleksandrov quarry in Kursk oblast are discussed. The correlation analysis of the stratigraphy of this section with global geological records made it possible to determine the position of the Ryshkovo paleosol in the chronostratigraphic system of the Late Pleistocene and to attribute it to stage MIS 5e; the duration of pedogenesis for this paleosol was no more than 12-15 ka. The results of the study indicate that the Ryshkovo paleosol is close in its properties to the Holocene soddy-podzolic soils of the East European Plain. No direct evidences in favor of the former interpretation of this paleosol as a lessivated soil genetically close to Luvisols of nemoral broadleaved forest of Central Europe have been found. The difference between the paleosol of the Mikulino Interglacial and the modern soddy-podzolic soils is mainly related to the distribution of clay coatings. In the upper part of the illuvial horizon of Mikulino paleosol, clay coatings are few in number, and typical tongues of podzolized (albic) material are absent in the profile. At the same time, silty coatings (skeletans) are abundant even in the lower part of the illuvial horizon. In general, the Mikulino paleosol is characterized by a smaller diversity of clay pedofeatures. These differences might be related to less contrasting fluctuations of the environmental conditions in the second half of the Mikulino Interglacial, to the periodical renewal of the eluvial part of Mikulino paleosol by erosional and accumulative processes, and to the absence of anthropogenic impacts on the soil during the Mikulino Interglacial. The burying of the Ryshkovo paleosol took place due to the intense development of erosional processes induced by the contrasting climatic events at the end of the interglacial period accompanied by

  6. Modelling Regional Climate and Terrestrial Environmental Change during Interglacial Events of the Late Pliocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, C.; Dolan, A. M.; Haywood, A. M.; Hunter, S. J.; Tindall, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    The mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP; 3.264-3.025 Ma) is a valuable target for environmental reconstruction and modelling. In previous work modelling climate variability around two interglacials in the mPWP we found peak Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) KM5c and K1 interglacial temperatures were not globally synchronous, highlighting regional leads and lags in temperature. We demonstrated that orbitally-forced changes in temperature during interglacial events within the mPWP could be substantial and contribute to data/model discord. Here, we use new climate model simulations to analyze the mPWP vegetation cover and how this varies between four distinct interglacial events during the mPWP (MIS G17, K1, KM3 and KM5c), and we assess climate feedbacks associated with changes in vegetation. Increased spring/summer and reduced autumn/winter insolation in the Northern Hemisphere during MIS G17, K1 and KM3, relative to the modern orbit, leads to increased seasonality in temperature and precipitation. Two of the largest regional responses in climate and vegetation are seen in North America and continental Eurasia, where forests are replaced by more open-type vegetation for interglacials with the most extreme orbital forcing. With the addition of dynamic vegetation, this trend is amplified leading to a loss of forest to a degree not supported by available terrestrial palaeobotanical records. This demonstrates the importance of examining model performance under a range of palaeoclimate conditions even within the same time interval. Further high resolution proxy investigations of regional variability in vegetation throughout the mPWP is necessary to examine the validity of model predicted regional climate and vegetation responses.

  7. High herbivore density associated with vegetation diversity in interglacial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Sandom, Christopher J; Ejrnæs, Rasmus; Hansen, Morten D D; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2014-03-18

    The impact of large herbivores on ecosystems before modern human activities is an open question in ecology and conservation. For Europe, the controversial wood-pasture hypothesis posits that grazing by wild large herbivores supported a dynamic mosaic of vegetation structures at the landscape scale under temperate conditions before agriculture. The contrasting position suggests that European temperate vegetation was primarily closed forest with relatively small open areas, at most impacted locally by large herbivores. Given the role of modern humans in the world-wide decimations of megafauna during the late Quaternary, to resolve this debate it is necessary to understand herbivore-vegetation interactions before these losses. Here, a synthetic analysis of beetle fossils from Great Britain shows that beetles associated with herbivore dung were better represented during the Last Interglacial (132,000-110,000 y B.P., before modern human arrival) than in the early Holocene (10,000-5,000 y B.P.). Furthermore, beetle assemblages indicate closed and partially closed forest in the early Holocene but a greater mixture of semiopen vegetation and forest in the Last Interglacial. Hence, abundant and diverse large herbivores appear to have been associated with high structural diversity of vegetation before the megafauna extinctions at the end of the Pleistocene. After these losses and in the presence of modern humans, large herbivores generally were less abundant, and closed woodland was more prevalent in the early Holocene. Our findings point to the importance of the formerly rich fauna of large herbivores in sustaining structurally diverse vegetation in the temperate forest biome and provide support for recent moves toward rewilding-based conservation management.

  8. High herbivore density associated with vegetation diversity in interglacial ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Sandom, Christopher J.; Ejrnæs, Rasmus; Hansen, Morten D. D.; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2014-01-01

    The impact of large herbivores on ecosystems before modern human activities is an open question in ecology and conservation. For Europe, the controversial wood–pasture hypothesis posits that grazing by wild large herbivores supported a dynamic mosaic of vegetation structures at the landscape scale under temperate conditions before agriculture. The contrasting position suggests that European temperate vegetation was primarily closed forest with relatively small open areas, at most impacted locally by large herbivores. Given the role of modern humans in the world-wide decimations of megafauna during the late Quaternary, to resolve this debate it is necessary to understand herbivore–vegetation interactions before these losses. Here, a synthetic analysis of beetle fossils from Great Britain shows that beetles associated with herbivore dung were better represented during the Last Interglacial (132,000–110,000 y B.P., before modern human arrival) than in the early Holocene (10,000–5,000 y B.P.). Furthermore, beetle assemblages indicate closed and partially closed forest in the early Holocene but a greater mixture of semiopen vegetation and forest in the Last Interglacial. Hence, abundant and diverse large herbivores appear to have been associated with high structural diversity of vegetation before the megafauna extinctions at the end of the Pleistocene. After these losses and in the presence of modern humans, large herbivores generally were less abundant, and closed woodland was more prevalent in the early Holocene. Our findings point to the importance of the formerly rich fauna of large herbivores in sustaining structurally diverse vegetation in the temperate forest biome and provide support for recent moves toward rewilding-based conservation management. PMID:24591633

  9. Paleoproductivity variations off Morocco during Interglacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Silvia; Bard, Edouard; Rostek, Frauke; Figueiredo, Ondina; Silva, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Paleoclimate reconstruction of surface and bottom-water properties (alkenone derived sea surface temperature estimations, δ18O and δ13C from planktonic and benthic foraminifera) for the last 500 ka in the NW African region has been obtained from a sediment record [core MD08-3178, 31°17.09'N, 11°29.20'W, 2184 m water depth]. In addition, paleoproductivity (opal and organic carbon content) and geochemical (XRF) measurements were conducted covering three interglacial periods [Holocene, MIS 5 and MIS 11]. The general trend of the alkenone-derived SST record resembles the oxygen isotopic signal, showing a correlation at these latitudes between SST variations in the glacial-interglacial time scales and Northern Hemisphere ice sheets evolution. Increased nutrient supply from the continent to the ocean realm, due to stronger winds, during glacial periods and colder phases of interglacials is supported by Ti/Ca variation in the sediment record. This trend is also supported by the variation of n-alkane concentration measured in the same core (see poster by Rostek et. al.). Reconstruction of productivity shows climate variability, supporting higher nutrient supply during glacial periods and in particular during Terminations 4 and 2. The various productivity proxies showed a similar pattern of negative correlation with sea surface temperature record (higher productivity coeval with lower SST). The highest nutrient supply, deduced from periods of higher productivity, is also in phase with the benthic δ13C pattern. We therefore suggest that during cold periods, besides increased upwelling due to stronger winds, an increase in the proportion of southern sourced nutrient-rich waters is likely to play a considerable role on productivity at these latitudes, as an important source of nutrients. Taking into account the ocean-atmospheric system affecting the studied region, we propose that both have a major role and contribute in phase for increased productivity during cold

  10. How warm was Greenland during the last interglacial period?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, Amaelle; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Capron, Emilie; Langenbroeck, Petra; Bakker, Pepijn; Stone, Emma; Fischer, Hubertus; Vinther, Bo; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe

    2016-04-01

    The last interglacial period (LIG, ~129-116 thousand years ago) provides the most recent evidence for the response of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to polar warming above pre-industrial level, and a valuable test bed for ice sheet models. Key constraints on past changes in both ice sheet topography and surface temperature are derived from Greenland ice cores. The large warming estimated from the recent NEEM ice core drilled in northwest Greenland (8 ±4°C above pre-industrial) together with the evidence for limited local ice thinning have led to the "NEEM paradox", suggesting more stability of the ice sheet than simulated by ice flow models in response to such large warming. Here, we provide a new assessment of the LIG warming using ice core air isotopic composition (d15N) together with available relationships for Greenland between accumulation rate and temperature. The temperature at the upstream NEEM deposition site is estimated to be between -20°C to -24°C which is consistent with the 8±4°C warming relative to pre-industrial previously determined from water isotopic records measured on the NEEM ice, although we feel the lower end of this range to be more likely. Moreover, we show that under such warm temperature, melting of snow probably led to a significant firn shrinking by 15 m. We show that confirmation of this high temperature range for the LIG in Greenland is difficult to reconcile with climate modeling experiments

  11. Physical Conditions and Variability Processes in AGN Jets through Multi-Frequency Linear and Circular Radio Polarization Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myserlis, Ioannis; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Kraus, Alex; Fuhrmann, Lars; Karamanavis, Vassilis; Zensus, J.

    2016-11-01

    Radio polarimetry is an invaluable tool to investigate the physical conditions and variability processes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets. However, detecting their linear and circular polarization properties is a challenging endeavor due to their low levels and possible depolarization effects. We have developed an end-to-end data analysis methodology to recover the polarization properties of unresolved sources with high accuracy. It has been applied to recover the linear and circular polarization of 87 AGNs measured by the F-GAMMA program from July 2010 to January 2015 with a mean cadence of 1.3 months. Their linear polarization was recovered at four frequencies between 2.64 and 10.45 GHz and the circular polarization at 4.85 and 8.35 GHz. The physical conditions required to reproduce the observed polarization properties and the processes which induce their variability were investigated with a full-Stokes radiative transfer code which emulates the synchrotron emission of modeled jets. The model was used to investigate the conditions needed to reproduce the observed polarization behavior for the blazar 3C 454.3, assuming that the observed variability is attributed to evolving internal shocks propagating downstream.

  12. Two middle Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles from the Valle Grande, Jemez Mountains, northern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fawcett, Peter J.; Heikoop, Jeff; Goff, Fraser; Anderson, R. Scott; Donohoo-Hurley, L.; Geissman, John William; WoldeGabriel, Giday; Allen, Craig D.; Johnson, Catrina M.; Smith, Susan J.; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna

    2006-01-01

    A long-lived middle Pleistocene lake formed in the Valle Grande, a large moat valley of the Valles caldera in northern New Mexico, when a post-caldera eruption (South Mountain rhyolite) dammed the drainage out of the caldera. The deposits of this lake were cored in May 2004 (GLAD5 project, hole VC-3) and 81 m of mostly lacustrine silty mud were recovered. A tentative chronology has been established for VC-3 with a basal tephra Ar-Ar date of 552 +/- 3 ka, a correlation of major climatic changes in the core with other long Pleistocene records (deep sea oxygen isotope records and long Antarctic ice core records), and the recognition of two geomagnetic field polarity events in the core which can be correlated with globally recognized events. This record spans a critical interval of the middle Pleistocene from MIS 14 (552 ka) to MIS 10 (~360 ka), at which time the lacustrine sediments filled the available accommodation space in the caldera moat. Multiple analyses, including core sedimentology and stratigraphy, sediment density and rock magnetic properties, organic carbon content and carbon isotope ratios, C/N ratios, and pollen content reveal two glacial/interglacial cycles in the core (MIS 14 to MIS 10). This record includes glacial terminations V and VI and complete sections spanning interglacials MIS 13 and MIS 11. In the VC-3 record, both of these interglacials are relatively long compared with the intervening glacials (MIS 14 and MIS 12), and interglacial MIS 13 is significantly muted in amplitude compared with MIS 11. These features are similar to several other mid-Pleistocene records. The glacial terminations are quite abrupt in this record with notable changes in sedimentation, organic carbon content, C/N ratios and watershed vegetation type. Termination V is the largest climate change evident in this part of the middle Pleistocene. The glacial inceptions tend to be more gradual, on the order of a few thousand years.

  13. Formation of Polar Ionospheric Tongue of Ionization during Minor Geomagnetic Disturbed Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Wang, W.; Burns, A. G.; Yue, X.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Previous investigations of ionospheric storm-enhanced density (SED) and tongue of ionization (TOI) focused mostly on the behavior of TOI during intense geomagnetic storms. Little attention has been paid to the spatial and temporal variations of TOI during weak to moderate geomagnetic disturbed conditions. we investigate the source and development of TOI during a moderate geomagnetic storm on 14 October 2012.Multi-instrumental observations including GPS total electron content (TEC), Defense Meteorological SatelliteProgram(DMSP) in situ measured total ion concentration and ion drift velocity, SuperDARN measured polar ionconvection patterns, and electron density profiles from the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) have been utilized in the current analysis. GPS TEC maps show salient TOI structures persisting for about 5 h over high latitudes of North America on 14 October 2012 in the later recovery phase of the storm when the magnitudes of IMF By and Bz were less than 5 nT. The PFISR electron density profiles indicate that the extra ionization for TEC enhancements mainly occurred in the topside ionosphere with no obvious changes in the bottom side ionosphere and vertical plasma drifts. Additionally, there were no signatures of penetration electric fields in the equatorial electrojet data and upward ion drifts at high latitudes. At the same time, strong subauroral polarization streams with ion drift speeds exceeding 2.5 km/s carried sunward fluxes and migrated toward lower latitudes for about 5° based on the DMSP cross-track driftmeasurements. Based on those measurements,we postulate that the combined effects of initial build-up of ionization at midlatitudes through daytime production of ionization and equatorward (or less poleward than normal daytime) neutral wind reducing downward diffusion along the inclined filed lines, and an expanded polar ion convection pattern and its associated horizontal plasma transport are important in the formation of the TOI.

  14. Formation of polar ionospheric tongue of ionization during minor geomagnetic disturbed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Nakamura, Takuji; Liu, Libo; Wang, Wenbin; Balan, Nanan; Nishiyama, Takanori; Hairston, Marc R.; Thomas, E. G.

    2015-08-01

    Previous investigations of ionospheric storm-enhanced density (SED) and tongue of ionization (TOI) focused mostly on the behavior of TOI during intense geomagnetic storms. Little attention has been paid to the spatial and temporal variations of TOI during weak to moderate geomagnetic disturbed conditions. In this paper we investigate the source and development of TOI during a moderate geomagnetic storm on 14 October 2012. Multi-instrumental observations including GPS total electron content (TEC), Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) in situ measured total ion concentration and ion drift velocity, SuperDARN measured polar ion convection patterns, and electron density profiles from the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) have been utilized in the current analysis. GPS TEC maps show salient TOI structures persisting for about 5 h over high latitudes of North America on 14 October 2012 in the later recovery phase of the storm when the magnitudes of IMF By and Bz were less than 5 nT. The PFISR electron density profiles indicate that the extra ionization for TEC enhancements mainly occurred in the topside ionosphere with no obvious changes in the bottomside ionosphere and vertical plasma drifts. Additionally, there were no signatures of penetration electric fields in the equatorial electrojet data and upward ion drifts at high latitudes. At the same time, strong subauroral polarization streams with ion drift speeds exceeding 2.5 km/s carried sunward fluxes and migrated toward lower latitudes for about 5° based on the DMSP cross-track drift measurements. Based on those measurements, we postulate that the combined effects of initial build-up of ionization at midlatitudes through daytime production of ionization and equatorward (or less poleward than normal daytime) neutral wind reducing downward diffusion along the inclined filed lines, and an expanded polar ion convection pattern and its associated horizontal plasma transport are important in the

  15. Polar organic chemical integrative samplers for pesticides monitoring: impacts of field exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Lissalde, Sophie; Mazzella, Nicolas; Mazellier, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    This study focuses on how Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS) work in real environmental conditions. A selection of 23 polar pesticides and 8 metabolites were investigated by exposure of triplicates of integrative samplers in two rivers in France for successive 14-day periods. The pesticides and metabolites were trapped not only in Oasis HLB sorbent but also in the polyethersulfone (PES) membrane of the POCIS. The distribution of pesticides depended on the molecular structure. The use of the Performance Reference Compound (PRC) is also discussed here. The impact of some environmental parameters and exposure setup on the transfer of pesticides in POCIS sorbent was studied: river flow rate, biofouling on membranes, sampler holding design and position in the stream. Results show a significant impact of river flow velocity on PRC desorption, especially for values higher than 4 cm·s(-1). Some fouling was observed on the PES membrane which could potentially have an impact on molecule accumulation in the POCIS. Finally, the positioning of the sampler in the river did not have significant effects on pesticide accumulation, when perpendicular exposures were used (sampler positioning in front of the water flow). The POCIS with PRC correction seems to be a suitable tool for estimating time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations, for all the molecules except for one of the nine pesticides analyzed in these two French rivers.

  16. Magnetic Field Fluctuations in the High Ionosphere at Polar Latitudes: Impact of the IMF Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Michelis, P.; Consolini, G.; Tozzi, R.

    2016-12-01

    The characterization of ionospheric turbulence plays an important role for all those communication systems affected by the ionospheric medium. For instance, independently of geomagnetic latitude, ionospheric turbulence represents a considerable issue for all Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Swarm constellation measurements of the Earth's magnetic field allow a precise characterization of ionospheric turbulence. This is possible using a range of indices derived from the analysis of the scaling properties of the geomagnetic field. In particular, by the scaling properties of the 1st order structure function, a scale index can be obtained, with a consequent characterization of the degree of persistence of the fluctuations and of their spectral properties. The knowledge of this index provides a global characterization of the nature and level of ionospheric turbulence on a local scale, which can be displayed along a single satellite orbit or through maps over the region of interest. The present work focuses on the analysis of the scaling properties of the 1st order structure function of magnetic field fluctuations measured by Swarm constellation at polar latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. They are studied according to different interplanetary magnetic field conditions and Earth's seasons to characterize the possible drivers of magnetic field variability. The obtained results are discussed in the framework of Sun-Earth relationship and ionospheric polar convection. This work is supported by the Italian National Program for Antarctic Research (PNRA) Research Project 2013/AC3.08

  17. Validation of adipose lipid content as a body condition index for polar bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKinney, Melissa A.; Atwood, Todd; Dietz, Rune; Sonne, Christian; Iverson, Sara J.; Peacock, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Body condition is a key indicator of individual and population health. Yet, there is little consensus as to the most appropriate condition index (CI), and most of the currently used CIs have not been thoroughly validated and are logistically challenging. Adipose samples from large datasets of capture biopsied, remote biopsied, and harvested polar bears were used to validate adipose lipid content as a CI via tests of accuracy, precision, sensitivity, biopsy depth, and storage conditions and comparisons to established CIs, to measures of health and to demographic and ecological parameters. The lipid content analyses of even very small biopsy samples were highly accurate and precise, but results were influenced by tissue depth at which the sample was taken. Lipid content of capture biopsies and samples from harvested adult females was correlated with established CIs and/or conformed to expected biological variation and ecological changes. However, lipid content of remote biopsies was lower than capture biopsies and harvested samples, possibly due to lipid loss during dart retrieval. Lipid content CI is a biologically relevant, relatively inexpensive and rapidly assessed CI and can be determined routinely for individuals and populations in order to infer large-scale spatial and long-term temporal trends. As it is possible to collect samples during routine harvesting or remotely using biopsy darts, monitoring and assessment of body condition can be accomplished without capture and handling procedures or noninvasively, which are methods that are preferred by local communities. However, further work is needed to apply the method to remote biopsies.

  18. Constraining the Antarctic contribution to interglacial sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naish, T.; Mckay, R. M.; Barrett, P. J.; Levy, R. H.; Golledge, N. R.; Deconto, R. M.; Horgan, H. J.; Dunbar, G. B.

    2015-12-01

    Observations, models and paleoclimate reconstructions suggest that Antarctica's marine-based ice sheets behave in an unstable manner with episodes of rapid retreat in response to warming climate. Understanding the processes involved in this "marine ice sheet instability" is key for improving estimates of Antarctic ice sheet contribution to future sea-level rise. Another motivating factor is that far-field sea-level reconstructions and ice sheet models imply global mean sea level (GMSL) was up to 20m and 10m higher, respectively, compared with present day, during the interglacials of the warm Pliocene (~4-3Ma) and Late Pleistocene (at ~400ka and 125ka). This was when atmospheric CO2 was between 280 and 400ppm and global average surface temperatures were 1- 3°C warmer, suggesting polar ice sheets are highly sensitive to relatively modest increases in climate forcing. Such magnitudes of GMSL rise not only require near complete melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, but a substantial retreat of marine-based sectors of East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Recent geological drilling initiatives on the continental margin of Antarctica from both ship- (e.g. IODP; International Ocean Discovery Program) and ice-based (e.g. ANDRILL/Antarctic Geological Drilling) platforms have provided evidence supporting retreat of marine-based ice. However, without direct access through the ice sheet to archives preserved within sub-glacial sedimentary basins, the volume and extent of ice sheet retreat during past interglacials cannot be directly constrained. Sediment cores have been successfully recovered from beneath ice shelves by the ANDRILL Program and ice streams by the WISSARD (Whillans Ice Stream Sub-glacial Access Research Drilling) Project. Together with the potential of the new RAID (Rapid Access Ice Drill) initiative, these demonstrate the technological feasibility of accessing the subglacial bed and deeper sedimentary archives. In this talk I will outline the

  19. Vegetation and paleoclimate of the last interglacial period, central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Ager, T.A.; Beget, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    The last interglacial period is thought to be the last time global climate was significantly warmer than present. New stratigraphic studies at Eva Creek, near Fairbanks, Alaska indicate a complex last interglacial record wherein periods of loess deposition alternated with periods of soil formation. The Eva Forest Bed appears to have formed about the time of or after deposition of the Old Crow tephra (dated to ??? 160 to ??? 120 ka), and is therefore correlated with the last interglacial period. Pollen, macrofossils, and soils from the Eva Forest Bed indicate that boreal forest was the dominant vegetation and precipitation may have been greater than present around Fairbanks during the peak of the last interglacial period. A new compilation of last interglacial localities indicates that boreal forest was extensive over interior Alaska and Yukon Territory. Boreal forest also extended beyond its present range onto the Seward and Baldwin Peninsulas, and probably migrated to higher elevations, now occupied by tundra, in the interior. Comparison of last interglacial pollen and macrofossil data with atmospheric general circulation model results shows both agreement and disagreement. Model results of warmer-than-present summers are in agreement with fossil data. However, numerous localities with boreal forest records are in conflict with model reconstructions of an extensive cool steppe in interior Alaska and much of Yukon Territory during the last interglacial. ?? 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  20. Glacial-interglacial variability in diatom abundance and valve size: Implications for Southern Ocean paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Abhilash; Mohan, Rahul; Manoj, M. C.; Thamban, Meloth

    2015-10-01

    Antarctic sea ice extent along with Southern Ocean biological productivity varied considerably during glacial-interglacial periods, and both are known to have played a considerable role in regulating atmospheric CO2 variations in the past. Here we present data on diatom absolute abundance (valves/g of sediment) and size over the past ~ 42 ka B.P. and how they link to glacial-interglacial changes in Antarctic sea ice extent, Southern Ocean frontal systems, and aeolian dust flux. Our records of sea ice and permanent open ocean zone diatom abundances suggest a shift in the Antarctic winter sea ice limit and Polar Front respectively up to the modern-day Polar Frontal Zone during marine isotopic stages (MIS) 2 and late MIS 3. In addition to glacial shifts in the Polar Front, diatom assemblages also recorded a plausible northward shifts in Polar Front during few intervals of MIS 1. Glacial periods north of the Polar Front in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean were characterized by higher total diatom abundance, larger Fragilariopsis kerguelensis apical length, and Thalassiosira lentiginosa radius. This is probably a consequence of (1) a northward expansion of the opal belt, a region characterized by high production and export of biogenic silica; (2) an increase in terrigenous input, via erosion of Crozet Islands; and (3) the alleviation of iron deficit by high input of Fe-bearing dust. The larger and highly silicified diatoms such as F. kerguelensis and T. lentiginosa may have mainly contributed in transporting biogenic silica and organic carbon to the seabed for the last 42 ka, in the northern Polar Frontal Zone of the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean.

  1. A Millennial-Scale Reduction in Ventilation of the Deep South Atlantic During the Last Interglacial Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, C. T.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Hasenfratz, A. P.; Jaccard, S.; Hodell, D. A.; Sigman, D. M.; Haug, G. H.; Anderson, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    During the last interglacial period, global temperatures were ~2°C warmer than present and sea level was 6-8 m higher. Southern Ocean sediments from ODP Site 1094 reveal a spike in authigenic uranium 127,000 years ago, within the last interglacial, reflecting decreased oxygenation of deep water by Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). Increased deep storage of respired carbon due to this circulation event may explain an observed decline in atmospheric CO2 at this time. Unlike ice age reductions in AABW, the interglacial stagnation event appears decoupled from open ocean conditions and may have resulted from coastal freshening due to mass loss from the Antarctic ice sheet. AABW reduction coincided with increased North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation, and the subsequent reinvigoration in AABW coincided with reduced NADW formation. Alternation of deep water formation between the Antarctic and the North Atlantic, believed to characterize ice ages, apparently also occurs in warm climates.

  2. Pleistocene glacial/interglacial contrasts in the Labrador Sea prior and after the Mid-Brunhes transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; de Vernal, Anne; Teboulle, Oury; Aubry, Aurélie; Fréchette, Bianca

    2016-04-01

    Isotopic, microfaunal and palynological records from the northern (Eirik Ridge) and southern (Orphan Knoll) Labrador Sea -LS- (Eirik Ridge and Orphan Knoll) are used to document paleoceanographic conditions in the basin during a few interglacials from MIS 31, to MIS 5e, with some specific attention to MIS 13, 11 and 5e. Most features, particularly oxygen isotope records in planktics highlight a major difference between the pre Mid-Brunhes (MB) and post-MB intervals (i.e, before MIS 11 and from MIS 11 to MIS 1), with the exception of MIS 7 showing features resembling those of the pre-MB interglacials. In a similar fashion, glacials from MIS 12 and later differ significantly from earlier ones by their more pronounced 18O-enrichments in planktic foraminifers, thus possibly larger continental ice volume. Another feature of interest concerning glacials is found in the relative abundance of reworked palynomorphs, in the Northern Labrador Sea record, during pre-MB glacials (MIS 12 and earlier) and during a short mid-MIS 7 glacial excursion. These reworked microfossils suggest significant ice streaming over Paleozoic outcrops either along the western Scandinavian Ice Sheet margin and/or in the Fram Strait area. Within interglacials, MIS 13 records large amplitude coolings, the presence of continental ice over NE Canada indicated by sporadic detrital carbonate-rich IRD-pulses. Evidence for the persistence of a relatively large interglacial Greenland Ice Sheet is found for post MIS 11 interglacials only. Finally, density conditions in surface water (calculated using paleo-SSTs and paleo-SSs from dinocysts), suggest that if convection with production of Labrador Sea Water (LSW), as observed since ca 7 ka BP, was unlikely during most interglacials (and notably MIS 5e), but very likely during MIS 11, due to relatively high salinity conditions at surface. A conclusion from this overview of t mid- to late Pleistocene glacial vs interglacial stages is that glacials were pre-conditioning

  3. Growth and development, and auxin polar transport of transgenic Arabidopsis under simulated microgravity conditions on a three-dimensional clinostat.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Toru; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Ueda, Junichi

    2003-12-01

    Growth and development, and auxin polar transport in Arabidopsis thaliana transformed with iaaH gene were studied under simulated microgravity conditions on a three-dimensional (3-D) clinostat. Simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat did not affect the number of rosette leaves but promoted the growth and development (fresh weight of plant and the elongation of flower stalk) of transformants. Final growth of transformants under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat was almost equivalent to that grown on 1 g conditions in the presence of 1 micromoles IAM (indole-3-acetamide). The activities of auxin polar transport in the segments of flower stalk (inflorescence axis) of transformants grown on 1 g conditions were significantly promoted by the addition of IAM. Interestingly, simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-D clinostat also promoted the activities of auxin polar transport of transformants grown on the medium with or without IAM. Based on the results in this study, transgenic plants may not have an efficient homeostatic mechanism for the control of growth and development, and auxin polar transport activity in microgravity conditions in space.

  4. Problem of the length of the current interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dergachev, V. A.; Raspopov, O. M.

    2013-12-01

    The climate during the past hundreds of thousands of years has been characterized by a rather distinct periodicity of about 100000 yr with brief warming periods (interglacials) lasting approximately 10000-12000 yr. Today, mankind is living in an interglacial period that began about 11 ka ago. In light of the discussion about global warming observed in recent decades, which advocates of an anthropogenic impact associate with emission of greenhouse gases due to combustion of fossil fuel, the question arises concerning the duration of the current interglacial. The data available on climate change and solar radiation on a time scale of the last millions of years are critically analyzed in this article and the problem of the length of the current interglacial is discussed.

  5. Validation of adipose lipid content as a body condition index for polar bears

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Melissa A; Atwood, Todd; Dietz, Rune; Sonne, Christian; Iverson, Sara J; Peacock, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Body condition is a key indicator of individual and population health. Yet, there is little consensus as to the most appropriate condition index (CI), and most of the currently used CIs have not been thoroughly validated and are logistically challenging. Adipose samples from large datasets of capture biopsied, remote biopsied, and harvested polar bears were used to validate adipose lipid content as a CI via tests of accuracy, precision, sensitivity, biopsy depth, and storage conditions and comparisons to established CIs, to measures of health and to demographic and ecological parameters. The lipid content analyses of even very small biopsy samples were highly accurate and precise, but results were influenced by tissue depth at which the sample was taken. Lipid content of capture biopsies and samples from harvested adult females was correlated with established CIs and/or conformed to expected biological variation and ecological changes. However, lipid content of remote biopsies was lower than capture biopsies and harvested samples, possibly due to lipid loss during dart retrieval. Lipid content CI is a biologically relevant, relatively inexpensive and rapidly assessed CI and can be determined routinely for individuals and populations in order to infer large-scale spatial and long-term temporal trends. As it is possible to collect samples during routine harvesting or remotely using biopsy darts, monitoring and assessment of body condition can be accomplished without capture and handling procedures or noninvasively, which are methods that are preferred by local communities. However, further work is needed to apply the method to remote biopsies. PMID:24634735

  6. Sub-Auroral Polarization Stream Observations During Storm and Non-Storm Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, S. G.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    A consequence of pressure gradients in the inner magnetosphere and low ionospheric conductivity, sub-auroral polarization streams (SAPS) manifest in the ionosphere as a westward plasma drift (poleward directed electric field) equatorward of the electron precipitation boundary. They can extend over more than 12 hours in MLT with centering on the nightside and maximum velocity in the dusk sector, and occur under all but the quietest geomagnetic conditions. The basic physical mechanism for SAPS appears toinvolve an interplay of field-aligned current, electric field, and conductivity, however, understanding the occurrence and characteristics of SAPS in specific events and the development of a predictive capability require an elaboration of the dynamical aspects of the phenomenon under both storm and non-storm conditions. Ground- and space-based observations, as well as theoretical and modeling capabilities, have improved substantially in recent years and will help answer some of the outstanding questions. Drawing from the recent CEDAR-GEM SAPS Focus Study this talk is an overview of our current state of understanding of the SAPS phenomenon, primarily from an observational perspective, with reference to potential issues and possible studies to resolve them.

  7. Optimization of processing conditions for the fractionation of triticale straw using pressurized low polarity water.

    PubMed

    Pronyk, C; Mazza, G

    2011-01-01

    Pressurized low polarity water (PLPW) fractionation of triticale straw was optimized to maximize hemicellulose and lignin yield, and to produce a cellulose rich fraction for biofuels production. The optimum PLPW conditions for hemicellulose yield was determined to be 165 °C, with a flow rate of 115 mL/min, and a solvent-to-solid ratio of 60 mL/g. Hemicellulose and lignin yield generally increased with increasing temperature and solvent-to-solid ratio. There was a small decrease in hemicellulose yield with an increase in flow rate. Minimum lignin content of the triticale straw residue after extraction was predicted to occur at a processing condition of 206 °C, 160 mL/min, and 67 mL/g. PLPW was successful in removing 73-78% of the hemicellulose, leaving a cellulose rich fraction (65% glucose concentration). Lignin was equally distributed between the solid residues and the extracts and most of the hemicellulose was extracted in oligomer form. Remaining solid residues after fractionation were highly digestible by cellulase enzymes. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The role of mineral dust aerosols in polar amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, F.; Kug, J.; Park, R.; Jin, F.; Lee, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    During today’s global warming, as well as during glacial-interglacial changes, temperature increase is larger in polar areas than the global average, a phenomenon called “polar amplification”. Model studies suggest ice cap melting due to greenhouse gas induced temperature rise, and consequent decrease of albedo and enhanced oceanic and atmospheric heat transport, as the primary cause for this phenomenon in nowadays Arctic. However, the underlying causes for polar amplification on glacial-interglacial timescales are still unclear, especially in the Antarctic where sea ice coverage does not change as drastically as in the North. Recent results have shown that the temperature increase is not limited to the surface and that these changes can not be explained by snow and ice changes alone. Starting with dust flux measurements from ice cores in Greenland and Antarctica, we have estimated tropospheric concentrations using deposition velocities and vertical concentration profiles for Holocene and LGM conditions from the National Center for Atmospheric Research’s Community Climate System Model (CCSM3) and a 3-D global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). The radiative forcing due to mineral dust aerosols was then estimated using the GEOS-Chem model, based on the particle properties found in the ice. Preliminary results point towards positive forcing of dust because of the high albedo of the underlying ice sheets.

  9. Characterization of biomaterials polar interactions in physiological conditions using liquid-liquid contact angle measurements: relation to fibronectin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Velzenberger, Elodie; El Kirat, Karim; Legeay, Gilbert; Nagel, Marie-Danielle; Pezron, Isabelle

    2009-02-01

    Wettability of biomaterials surfaces and protein-coated substrates is generally characterized with the sessile drop technique using polar and apolar liquids. This procedure is often performed in air, which does not reflect the physiological conditions. In this study, liquid/liquid contact angle measurements were carried out to be closer to cell culture conditions. This technique allowed us to evaluate the polar contribution to the work of adhesion between an aqueous medium and four selected biomaterials widely used in tissue culture applications: bacteriological grade polystyrene (PS), tissue culture polystyrene (tPS), poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) film (PolyHEMA), and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose-carboxymethylcellulose bi-layered Petri dish (CEL). The contributions of polar interactions were also estimated on the same biomaterials after fibronectin (Fn) adsorption. The quantity of Fn adsorbed on PS, tPS, PolyHEMA and CEL surfaces was evaluated by using the fluorescein-labeled protein. PolyHEMA and CEL were found to be hydrophilic, tPS was moderately hydrophilic and PS was highly hydrophobic. After Fn adsorption on PS and tPS, a significant increase of the surface polar interaction was observed. On PolyHEMA and CEL, no significant adsorption of Fn was detected and the polar interactions remained unchanged. Finally, an inverse correlation between the polarity of the surfaces and the quantity of adsorbed Fn was established.

  10. Condition for Gaussian Schell-model beam to maintain the state of polarization on the propagation in free space.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinhui; Yao, Yong; Sun, Yunxu; Liu, Chao

    2009-09-28

    In the free space optical communication system with circle polarization shift keying (CPolSK) modulation, the changes of polarization state of light beam have significant influence on the system performance. Keeping the state of polarization (SOP) unchanged on propagation can reduce the bit error rate. Based on the unified theory of coherence and polarization, we derive the sufficient condition for Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam to keep the SOP unchanged. We found that when the three spectral correlation widths (delta(xx), delta(yy) and delta(xy)) equal to each other and sigma(x) = sigma(y), the GSM beam maintains the SOP on propagation. This conclusion can be helpful for the design of the transmitter in the CPolSK system.

  11. Dating of late Pleistocene interglacial and interstadial periods in the United Kingdom from speleothem growth frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, David; Smart, Peter L.; Ford, D. C.; Andrews, J. N.; Atkinson, T. C.; Rowe, P. J.; Christopher, N. S. J.

    1989-01-01

    The growth of speleothems is indicative of interglacial and interstadial conditions in the United Kingdom, since their growth is dependent on two factors. First, the occurrence of significant diffuse groundwater recharge and, second, the biogenic production of carbon dioxide in the soil, both are dependent on temperature and water availability. The growth frequency of speleothems is examined using a cumulative distributed error frequency method applied to 341 uncontaminated uranium-series age determinations. The curves derived are shown to be statistically stable, and the ages of the peaks are interpreted as the best estimates of the ages of interglacial and interstadial periods. Ten such periods are recognized during the interval 220,000 to 20,000 yr B.P., considerably more than are currently recognized in the UK pollen- and coleoptera-based Quaternary stratigraphy. Correlations between the speleothem growth frequency peaks and last interglacial (Ipswichian) sites can be made, but correlations with last glacial (Devensian) interstadial sites are limited because of the paucity of dates. The speleothem growth frequency record provides a well-dated terrestrial chronology for the past 140,000 yr B.P., which directly reflects regional palaeoclimatic conditions in Britain, and should prove very useful in unravelling the complex stratigraphy of the Devensian and Ipswichian stages.

  12. Deglacial Meltwater Pulse Recorded in Last Interglacial Mollusk Shells from Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelstern, I. Z.; Rowe, M. P.; Lohmann, K. C.; Defliese, W.; Petersen, S. V.; Brewer, A. W.

    2016-12-01

    Iceberg scours as far south as the Florida Strait and the presence of ice rafted debris in sediments from the Bermuda Rise indicate that during the last glacial phase icebergs traveled quite far south during episodes of excessive iceberg discharge from the Laurentide Ice Sheet (Heinrich Events). We present evidence that the effects of these events extended southward into the subtropics during the previous deglaciation (Termination-II), potentially aligned with Heinrich Event 11, and that meltwater reached Bermuda. Temperatures 10° C colder and seawater δ18O values 2 ‰ more negative than modern are derived from Last Interglacial Cittarium pica shells from Grape Bay, Bermuda using the clumped isotope paleothermometer. In contrast, Last Interglacial shells from Rocky Bay record temperatures only slightly colder and seawater δ18O values similar to modern, potentially representing more typical Last Interglacial conditions in Bermuda outside of a meltwater event. The cold ocean conditions observed illustrate extreme sensitivity of Bermudian climate to rapid climate and ocean circulation changes. They also provide further evidence for routine meltwater transport in the North Atlantic to near-equatorial latitudes during deglaciation.

  13. Arctic Ocean sea ice cover during the penultimate glacial and the last interglacial.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ruediger; Fahl, Kirsten; Gierz, Paul; Niessen, Frank; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2017-08-29

    Coinciding with global warming, Arctic sea ice has rapidly decreased during the last four decades and climate scenarios suggest that sea ice may completely disappear during summer within the next about 50-100 years. Here we produce Arctic sea ice biomarker proxy records for the penultimate glacial (Marine Isotope Stage 6) and the subsequent last interglacial (Marine Isotope Stage 5e). The latter is a time interval when the high latitudes were significantly warmer than today. We document that even under such warmer climate conditions, sea ice existed in the central Arctic Ocean during summer, whereas sea ice was significantly reduced along the Barents Sea continental margin influenced by Atlantic Water inflow. Our proxy reconstruction of the last interglacial sea ice cover is supported by climate simulations, although some proxy data/model inconsistencies still exist. During late Marine Isotope Stage 6, polynya-type conditions occurred off the major ice sheets along the northern Barents and East Siberian continental margins, contradicting a giant Marine Isotope Stage 6 ice shelf that covered the entire Arctic Ocean.Coinciding with global warming, Arctic sea ice has rapidly decreased during the last four decades. Here, using biomarker records, the authors show that permanent sea ice was still present in the central Arctic Ocean during the last interglacial, when high latitudes were warmer than present.

  14. Late Pleistocene lithostratigraphy and sequences in the southwestern Mesopotamia (Argentina): Evidences of the last interglacial stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernesto, Brunetto; Soledad, Ferrero Brenda; Ignacio, Noriega Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to show the stratigraphic record of the Late Pleistocene corresponding to the distal region of the Paraná River basin. It displays sedimentological, paleontological and geochronological evidences that characterise the last interglacial-glacial cycle. In particular, strong environmental records are shown for the Last Interglacial Stage (LIS). Salto Ander Egg Formation (SAEF) is defined as a new lithostratigraphic unit representative of the Late Pleistocene in southwestern Mesopotamia. This unit is formed of complex fluvial deposits, which contains a heterogeneous collection of sub-environments, of ages ranging from 120 to 60 ky BP. The clast-supported gravel facies containing sparse boulders indicate high flow during a humid climate. The large and middle-scale architectures of fluvial sedimentary bodies evidence the relationship between the sediment accommodation and the sea level oscillations. Three sub-sequences identified in the succession suggest a transgressive trend during the MIS5e, a highstand stage in MIS5c, and a minor transgressive cycle during MIS3. A Brazilian faunal association collected at the bottom of the sequence and sedimentological interpretations display wet and warm climatic conditions, typical of tropical or subtropical environments. Such environmental conditions are characteristic of the maximum of the last interglacial stage (MIS5e) and show a signal stronger than the signal of the current interglacial stage. All these data show a direct correlation between the increases of paleodischarges and the elevation of the sea level. The whole sequence is completed with transitional swampy deposits, accumulated probably during the MIS3/MIS2 transition, and the typical loess of the Tezanos Pinto Formation, mantled during the Last Maximum Glacial.

  15. Increasing nest predation will be insufficient to maintain polar bear body condition in the face of sea ice loss.

    PubMed

    Dey, Cody J; Richardson, Evan; McGeachy, David; Iverson, Samuel A; Gilchrist, Hugh G; Semeniuk, Christina A D

    2017-05-01

    Climate change can influence interspecific interactions by differentially affecting species-specific phenology. In seasonal ice environments, there is evidence that polar bear predation of Arctic bird eggs is increasing because of earlier sea ice breakup, which forces polar bears into nearshore terrestrial environments where Arctic birds are nesting. Because polar bears can consume a large number of nests before becoming satiated, and because they can swim between island colonies, they could have dramatic influences on seabird and sea duck reproductive success. However, it is unclear whether nest foraging can provide an energetic benefit to polar bear populations, especially given the capacity of bird populations to redistribute in response to increasing predation pressure. In this study, we develop a spatially explicit agent-based model of the predator-prey relationship between polar bears and common eiders, a common and culturally important bird species for northern peoples. Our model is composed of two types of agents (polar bear agents and common eider hen agents) whose movements and decision heuristics are based on species-specific bioenergetic and behavioral ecological principles, and are influenced by historical and extrapolated sea ice conditions. Our model reproduces empirical findings that polar bear predation of bird nests is increasing and predicts an accelerating relationship between advancing ice breakup dates and the number of nests depredated. Despite increases in nest predation, our model predicts that polar bear body condition during the ice-free period will continue to decline. Finally, our model predicts that common eider nests will become more dispersed and will move closer to the mainland in response to increasing predation, possibly increasing their exposure to land-based predators and influencing the livelihood of local people that collect eider eggs and down. These results show that predator-prey interactions can have nonlinear responses to

  16. Are boundary conditions in surface productivity at the Southern Polar Front reflected in benthic activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Angelika; Vanreusel, Ann; Bracher, Astrid; Jule Marie Hoppe, Clara; Lins, Lidia; Meyer-Löbbecke, Anna; Altenburg Soppa, Mariana; Würzberg, Laura

    2014-10-01

    In austral summer 2012, during the expedition ANT-XXVIII/3 on board RV Polarstern, two sites were sampled 1600 km apart in the South Polar Front area (52°S) at the boundary of different productivity regimes for meio- and macrobenthos using a multiple-corer and an epibenthic sledge, respectively. Patterns in density and abundance data were compared between different size classes of the benthos and interpreted in relation to surface primary productivity data and sediment oxygen consumption. We tested the hypothesis that long-term satellite-derived surface phytoplankton biomass, in situ real time biomass, and productivity measurements at the surface and throughout the euphotic zone are reflected in abyssal benthos densities, abundances and activity. Specifically, we investigated the effect of boundary conditions for lower and higher surface productivity. Surface and integrated to 100 m depth biomass and primary productivity measurements vary stations, with the lowest values at station 85 (0.083 mg Chl-a m-3 at surface, 9 mg Chl-a m-2 and 161 mg C m-2 d-1- integrated over the first 100 m depth), and the highest values at station 86 (2.231 mg Chl-a m-3 at surface, 180 mg Chl-a m-2 and 2587 mg C m-2 d-1 integrated over first 100 m depth). Total meiofaunal densities varied between 102 and 335 individuals/10 cm². Densities were the highest at station 86-30 (335 individuals) and lowest at station 81-13 (102 individuals). Total macrofaunal densities (individuals/1000 m²) varied between 26 individuals at station 81-17 and 194 individuals at station 86-24. However, three EBS hauls were taken at station 86 with a minimum of 80 and a maximum of 194 individuals. Sediment oxygen consumption did not vary significantly between stations from east to west. Bentho-pelagic coupling of meio- and macrobenthic communities could not be observed in the South Polar Front at the boundary conditions from low to high surface productivity between stations 81 and 86.

  17. How warm was Greenland during the last interglacial period?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, Amaelle; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Capron, Emilie; Langebroek, Petra M.; Bakker, Pepijn; Stone, Emma J.; Merz, Niklaus; Raible, Christoph C.; Fischer, Hubertus; Orsi, Anaïs; Prié, Frédéric; Vinther, Bo; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe

    2016-09-01

    The last interglacial period (LIG, ˜ 129-116 thousand years ago) provides the most recent case study of multimillennial polar warming above the preindustrial level and a response of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to this warming, as well as a test bed for climate and ice sheet models. Past changes in Greenland ice sheet thickness and surface temperature during this period were recently derived from the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core records, northwest Greenland. The NEEM paradox has emerged from an estimated large local warming above the preindustrial level (7.5 ± 1.8 °C at the deposition site 126 kyr ago without correction for any overall ice sheet altitude changes between the LIG and the preindustrial period) based on water isotopes, together with limited local ice thinning, suggesting more resilience of the real Greenland ice sheet than shown in some ice sheet models. Here, we provide an independent assessment of the average LIG Greenland surface warming using ice core air isotopic composition (δ15N) and relationships between accumulation rate and temperature. The LIG surface temperature at the upstream NEEM deposition site without ice sheet altitude correction is estimated to be warmer by +8.5 ± 2.5 °C compared to the preindustrial period. This temperature estimate is consistent with the 7.5 ± 1.8 °C warming initially determined from NEEM water isotopes but at the upper end of the preindustrial period to LIG temperature difference of +5.2 ± 2.3 °C obtained at the NGRIP (North Greenland Ice Core Project) site by the same method. Climate simulations performed with present-day ice sheet topography lead in general to a warming smaller than reconstructed, but sensitivity tests show that larger amplitudes (up to 5 °C) are produced in response to prescribed changes in sea ice extent and ice sheet topography.

  18. Last interglacial temperature seasonality reconstructed from tropical Atlantic corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felis, T.; Brocas, W.; Obert, J. C.; Gierz, P.; Lohmann, G.; Scholz, D.; Kölling, M.; Pfeiffer, M.; Scheffers, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    Reconstructions of last interglacial ( 127-117 ka) climate offer insights into the natural response and variability of the climate system during a period partially analogous to future climate change scenarios. However, the seasonal temperature changes of the tropical ocean are not well known for the last interglacial period. Here we present well preserved fossil corals (Diploria strigosa) recovered from the southern Caribbean island of Bonaire. These corals have been precisely dated by the 230Th/U-method to between 130 and 118 ka ago. Annual banding of the coral skeleton enabled construction of time windows of monthly resolved Sr/Ca temperature proxy records. Our eight coral records of up to 37 years in length cover a total of 105 years within the last interglacial period. From these coral records, sea surface temperature (SST) seasonality in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean is reconstructed. We detect similar to modern SST seasonality of 2.9 °C during the early (130 ka) and the late last interglacial (120 - 118 ka). However, within the mid-last interglacial, a significantly higher than modern SST seasonality of 4.9 °C (at 126 ka) and 4.1 °C (at 124 ka) is observed. These findings are supported by climate model simulations (COSMOS) and are consistent with the evolving amplitude of orbitally induced changes in seasonality of insolation throughout the last interglacial, irrespective of wider climatic instabilities that characterised this period, e.g. at 118 ka ago. The climate model simulations suggest that the SST seasonality changes documented in our last interglacial coral Sr/Ca records are representative of larger regions within the tropical North Atlantic. These simulations also suggest that the reconstructed SST seasonality increase during the mid-last interglacial is caused primarily by summer warming. Furthermore, a 124 ka old coral documents evidence of decadal SST variability in the tropical North Atlantic during the last interglacial, akin to that

  19. Turbulent Alfven boundary layer in the polar ionosphere. 1. Excitation conditions and energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Trakhtengerts, V.Y. ); Feldstein, A.Ya. )

    1991-11-01

    Instability of laminar magnetospheric convection with respect to the strongly anisotropic Alfven waves which are of small scale in the horizontal plane is examined. The waves prove to be trapped in the ionospheric Alfven resonator, bounded from below by the ionospheric E layer and form above by a zone of rapidly increasing Alfven velocity at altitudes of up to {approximately}10{sup 4} km. The finite-amplitude Alfven waves dissipate within a layer of anomalous resistance formed near the upper wall of the resonator. As a result, a high-energy particle source appears in the upper ionosphere. Further evolution results in the transition of laminar convection to turbulent flow conditions and in the formation of a turbulent Alfven boundary layer in the polar ionosphere at altitudes from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4} km. The energy status of the turbulent Alfven boundary layer is calculated. It has been shown that the accelerated-electron energy flux density can reach {approximately}100 ergs cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}.

  20. Application of Polar Cap (PC) indices in analyses and forecasts of geophysical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) indices could be considered to represent the input of power from the solar wind to the Earth's magnetosphere. The indices have been used to analyse interplanetary electric fields, effects of solar wind pressure pulses, cross polar cap voltages and polar cap diameter, ionospheric Joule heating, and other issues of polar cap dynamics. The PC indices have also been used to predict auroral electrojet intensities and global auroral power as well as ring current intensities. For specific space weather purposes the PC indices could be used to forecast substorm development and predict associated power line disturbances in the subauroral regions. The presentation shall outline the general background for applying the PC indices in analyses or forecasts of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions and provide illustrative examples of the use of the Polar Cap indices in specific cases

  1. Ephemeral conditions for life at the South Polar Region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szathmáry, E.; Bérczi, Sz.; Pócs, T.; Horváth, A.; Gánti, T.; Kereszturi, A.; Sik, A.

    2007-08-01

    Several new pieces of information from the last years strengthen the possibility that suitable conditions for possible living organisms may be present ephemerally at the Southern Polar region of Mars. We summarize these results in the lecture, as well as our new model that fits to these results. Among the new information it is proven that the seasonal frost on the polar dunes is layered with water ice at the bottom and carbon-dioxide ice at the top. Some slope structures hint at melting and seepage of the lower water ice layer in springtime/summer. New information was also released on the radiation tolerance of extremophiles, and many possible analogous organisms were analyzed on the Earth. Authors improved their original DDS-MSO hypothesis to a new synthetic model that incorporates the gas geyser and the liquid seepage models. In this synthetic approach the important stages of events are the following: 1. In autumn with decreasing temperature first H2O, then later CO2 freezes onto the surface (above all onto dark dunes) forming a layered structure. 2. In springtime the sunshine causes the outburst of CO2 gas jets (forming the diffuse fans), and the thinning or disappearance of the upper CO2 layer there (forming dark spots). 3. As spring advances the stronger insolation absorbed by the dune surfaces warms up the dune grains at the localities where earlier the gas jets formed a hole in the CO2 ice. In this stage a very thin ephemeral water layer may form on the dune grain surfaces, below the water ice, and between the liquid water and the solid ice roof a layer of water vapor layer may also appear. During this period the liquid layer itself, or the lubricated grains may seep down, or even the front of the phase change may move downwards - forming the slope structures. 4. By the end of spring the surface ice disappears, but among the grains ice or liquid water may still be present in some mm depth for a very brief period of time. 5. In the last phase all the near

  2. Tropically-driven climate shifts in southwestern Europe during MIS 19, a low eccentricity interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Goñi, M. F.; Rodrigues, T.; Hodell, D. A.; Polanco-Martínez, J. M.; Alonso-García, M.; Hernández-Almeida, I.; Desprat, S.; Ferretti, P.

    2016-08-01

    The relative roles of high- versus low-latitude forcing of millennial-scale climate variability are still not well understood. Here we present terrestrial-marine climate profiles from the southwestern Iberian margin, a region particularly affected by precession, that show millennial climate oscillations related to a nonlinear response to the Earth's precession cycle during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 19. MIS 19 has been considered the best analogue to our present interglacial from an astronomical point of view due to the reduced eccentricity centred at 785 ka. In our records, seven millennial-scale forest contractions punctuated MIS 19 superimposed to two orbitally-driven Mediterranean forest expansions. In contrast to our present interglacial, we evidence for the first time low latitude-driven 5000-yr cycles of drying and cooling in the western Mediterranean region, along with warmth in the subtropical gyre related to the fourth harmonic of precession. These cycles indicate repeated intensification of North Atlantic meridional moisture transport that along with decrease in boreal summer insolation triggered ice growth and may have contributed to the glacial inception, at ∼774 ka. The freshwater fluxes during MIS 19ab amplified the cooling events in the North Atlantic promoting further cooling and leading to MIS 18 glaciation. The discrepancy between the dominant cyclicity observed during MIS 1, 2500-yr, and that of MIS 19, 5000-yr, challenges the similar duration of the Holocene and MIS 19c interglacials under natural boundary conditions.

  3. Cyclic 100-ka (glacial-interglacial) migration of subseafloor redox zonation on the Peruvian shelf

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Sergio; Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Prieto-Mollar, Xavier; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Khalili, Arzhang; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of subseafloor microbial life to oceanographic and atmospheric conditions is poorly understood. We examined diagenetic imprints and lipid biomarkers of past subseafloor microbial activity to evaluate its response to glacial-interglacial cycles in a sedimentary section drilled on the Peruvian shelf (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201, Site 1229). Multiple and distinct layers of diagenetic barite and dolomite, i.e., minerals that typically form at the sulfate−methane transition (SMT), occur at much shallower burial depth than the present SMT around 30 meters below seafloor. These shallow layers co-occur with peaks of 13C-depleted archaeol, a molecular fossil of anaerobic methane-oxidizing Archaea. Present-day, non-steady state distributions of dissolved sulfate also suggest that the SMT is highly sensitive to variations in organic carbon flux to the surface shelf sediments that may lead to shoaling of the SMT. Reaction-transport modeling substantiates our hypothesis that shallow SMTs occur in response to cyclic sediment deposition with a high organic carbon flux during interglacials and a low organic carbon flux during glacial stages. Long diffusion distances expectedly dampen the response of deeply buried microbial communities to changes in sediment deposition and other oceanographic drivers over relatively short geological time scales, e.g., glacial-interglacial periods. However, our study demonstrates how dynamically sediment biogeochemistry of the Peru Margin has responded to glacial-interglacial change and how these changes are now preserved in the geological record. Such changes in subsurface biogeochemical zonation need to be taken into account to assess the role of the subseafloor biosphere in global element and redox cycling. PMID:24145422

  4. Cyclic 100-ka (glacial-interglacial) migration of subseafloor redox zonation on the Peruvian shelf.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Sergio; Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Prieto-Mollar, Xavier; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Khalili, Arzhang; Ferdelman, Timothy G; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2013-11-05

    The coupling of subseafloor microbial life to oceanographic and atmospheric conditions is poorly understood. We examined diagenetic imprints and lipid biomarkers of past subseafloor microbial activity to evaluate its response to glacial-interglacial cycles in a sedimentary section drilled on the Peruvian shelf (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201, Site 1229). Multiple and distinct layers of diagenetic barite and dolomite, i.e., minerals that typically form at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT), occur at much shallower burial depth than the present SMT around 30 meters below seafloor. These shallow layers co-occur with peaks of (13)C-depleted archaeol, a molecular fossil of anaerobic methane-oxidizing Archaea. Present-day, non-steady state distributions of dissolved sulfate also suggest that the SMT is highly sensitive to variations in organic carbon flux to the surface shelf sediments that may lead to shoaling of the SMT. Reaction-transport modeling substantiates our hypothesis that shallow SMTs occur in response to cyclic sediment deposition with a high organic carbon flux during interglacials and a low organic carbon flux during glacial stages. Long diffusion distances expectedly dampen the response of deeply buried microbial communities to changes in sediment deposition and other oceanographic drivers over relatively short geological time scales, e.g., glacial-interglacial periods. However, our study demonstrates how dynamically sediment biogeochemistry of the Peru Margin has responded to glacial-interglacial change and how these changes are now preserved in the geological record. Such changes in subsurface biogeochemical zonation need to be taken into account to assess the role of the subseafloor biosphere in global element and redox cycling.

  5. Glacial-Interglacial Climate Changes Recorded by Debris Flow Grain Size, Eastern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, M. K.; Whittaker, A. C.; Roda Boluda, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainties remain about the sensitivity of eroding landscapes to climate changes over a range of frequencies and amplitudes. Numerical models suggest that simple catchment-fan systems should be responsive to glacial-interglacial climate cycles, recording them in both sediment flux and the grain size distribution of their deposits. However these models are largely untested and the propagation of climatic signals through simple sediment routing systems remains contentious. Here, we present detailed sedimentological data from 8 debris flow fans in Owens Valley, eastern California. These fans have an exceptionally well-constrained depositional record spanning the last 120 ka, which we use to examine how sediment export has varied as a function of high-amplitude climate changes. We find a strong and sustained relationship between debris flow grain size and paleoclimate proxies over an entire glacial-interglacial cycle, with significantly coarser-grained deposits correlated with warm and dry conditions. Our data suggest these systems are highly reactive to climate forcing, with a short response timescale of <10 ka and no evidence of signal buffering, which we interpret to be driven by rapid sediment transfer from source to sink. We demonstrate that debris flow grain size follows an exponential relationship with temperature, coarsening at a rate of ~10 % per °C. Using this observation, and a known relationship between temperature and storm intensity, we propose that the climate signal recorded in these fan deposits captures changing storm intensity during the last glacial-interglacial cycle. This study offers a direct test of existing models of catchment-fan systems, confirming that glacial-interglacial climate changes can be clearly expressed in their grain size records. Our results also suggest that these debris flow deposits contain a high-resolution, testable record of past storm intensity, and that storminess is the primary control on their sedimentological

  6. Various environments of interglacials recorded by Pleistocene paleosoils in Hungary (Central Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, György; Kis, Éva

    2015-04-01

    Based on stable isotope analyses of worldwide reference curves from deep sea, ice core and speleothem records, it has long been apparent that duration, intensity and climatic conditions of different interglacial periods were significantly diverse. As a consequence of negligible fresh, detrital material admixture during interglacials, the soil formation intensity and maturity of various kinds of past soils have been holding vital information on the environmental conditions at the time the soils formed. This, in turn, means that several physical and chemical properties of soils allow us to reconstruct past climatic regimes. Loess-paleosol sequences in Hungary (Central Europe) provide insight into the cyclic nature of glacial-interglacial variations of the last 1 million years. The paleosoils have been recognized as the product of warmer and moister interglacials, when the (glacial) loess material was altered by chemical weathering and pedogenic processes. 12 pedogene units from MIS-19 to MIS-5 strata were analysed in the course of this study, with a special attention to MIS-11 and MIS-19 periods, because of these can be regarded as analogues of the Holocene interglacial (due to the similarities in obliquity and eccentricity). Grain size, geochemical and (clay)mineralogical studies were elaborated and were gathered from previously published papers to quantify past weathering intensity and paleoenvironmental conditions by geochemical climofunctions. The Upper and partly, the Middle Pleistocene loess deposits are intercalated by steppe, forest-steppe and brown forest soils, while the older pedogene horizons are different kinds; these are red, Mediterranean-type soils. The MIS-5 pedocomplex consist of three parts at several Hungarian sites, however the pedogene units cannot be correlated unequivocally with the three MIS-5 warmer substages, due to the scarce absolute age data. The MIS-7 and MIS-9 stages are represented by three forest steppe soils. The MIS-11 pedocomplex

  7. The sea-level fingerprints of ice-sheet collapse during interglacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Carling; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Gomez, Natalya; Creveling, Jessica R.; Austermann, Jacqueline; E. Kopp, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Studies of sea level during previous interglacials provide insight into the stability of polar ice sheets in the face of global climate change. Commonly, these studies correct ancient sea-level highstands for the contaminating effect of isostatic adjustment associated with past ice age cycles, and interpret the residuals as being equivalent to the peak eustatic sea level associated with excess melting, relative to present day, of ancient polar ice sheets. However, the collapse of polar ice sheets produces a distinct geometry, or fingerprint, of sea-level change, which must be accounted for to accurately infer peak eustatic sea level from site-specific residual highstands. To explore this issue, we compute fingerprints associated with the collapse of the Greenland Ice Sheet, West Antarctic Ice Sheet, and marine sectors of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet in order to isolate regions that would have been subject to greater-than-eustatic sea-level change for all three cases. These fingerprints are more robust than those associated with modern melting events, when applied to infer eustatic sea level, because: (1) a significant collapse of polar ice sheets reduces the sensitivity of the computed fingerprints to uncertainties in the geometry of the melt regions; and (2) the sea-level signal associated with the collapse will dominate the signal from steric effects. We evaluate these fingerprints at a suite of sites where sea-level records from interglacial marine isotopes stages (MIS) 5e and 11 have been obtained. Using these results, we demonstrate that previously discrepant estimates of peak eustatic sea level during MIS5e based on sea-level markers in Australia and the Seychelles are brought into closer accord.

  8. The last interglaciation in Alaska: Stratigraphy and paleoecology of potential sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, T.D.; Brigham-Grette, J.

    1991-01-01

    At least 20 localities in Alaska contain deposits that may provide information on the last interglaciation (Oxygen-Isotope Substage 5e). These widely dispersed localities include river bluffs, coastal bluffs and terraces, elevated marine shorelines, lake basins, and artificial excavations. Most of the inferred interglacial deposits contain macrofossils or pollen that are older than the range of radiocarbon dating and commonly indicate climate as warm as or warmer than the present. At a few localities, evidence for deep thaw of permafrost also indicates a warm paleoclimate. At eight localities, the Old Crow tephra occurs at or below organic deposits that may represent Substage 5e. The tephra occurs beneath conspicuous organic deposits at Fairbanks, the Yukon Palisades, and Holitna lowland, and directly above a peat bed at Hogatza Mine. At Birch Creek, Halfway House, Ky-11, and Imuruk Lake, the tephra occurs within a paleosol or organic deposit, but other organic horizons that more likely indicate interglacial conditions occur at higher stratigraphic levels. The varied stratigraphic relations of the Old Crow tephra suggest that it may have been deposited close to the boundary between Isotope Substages 6 and 5, which is dated at about 130 ka in the marine record and between 132 and 140 ka on land. These age relations suggests that the tephra may have been deposited about 135 ?? 5 ka, validating the recent fission-track age determination of 140 ?? 10 ka for this deposit. Six coastal localities contain deposits of probable interglacial age, and these commonly are associated with evidence for eustatic sea levels higher than those of the present. Beach and sublittoral sediments of the Pelukian transgression occur up to 12 m asl along the northwest coast of Alaska, and are correlative with barrier island and lagoonal sediments on the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain. Both sets of deposits commonly contain extralimital mollusks and microfauna that indicate marine water slightly

  9. Sea surface temperature variability of the Peru-Chile Current during the previous ten interglacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniupan, M.; Martinez-Mendez, G.; Lamy, F.; Hebbeln, D.; Mohtadi, M.; Pantoja, S.

    2014-12-01

    There are several interglacial periods during the Quaternary that were characterized by climates warmer than present and higher sea level and thus may serve as analogues for future global warming scenarios. These include Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 5e, 9c and 11c. Little is known about past sea surface temperatures (SST) during these warm intervals in the Southern Hemisphere, particularly along the Peru-Chile Current (PCC) which plays a critical role in the Southern Hemisphere surface circulation as it connects the low and high latitudes by transporting sub-polar water masses and thus, a high-latitude climate signal towards the tropics. Here, we present new high-resolution alkenone-derived SST records from marine sediment cores located beneath the PCC. Core GeoB15016 was recovered from off northern Chile (27.5°S; 71.1°W) with the seafloor drill rig MARUM-MeBo. We analyzed the ca. 60 meters composite depth complemented by gravity core GeoB3375-1 (27.5°S; 71.3°W) for the upper part to generate a continuous record that extends back to 970 ka BP. Our record is the first continuous SST reconstruction from the Chilean margin extending back to MIS 25. SST varies between ~8°C and ~20°C over the past ~970 ka. Glacial-interglacial SST amplitudes are in the order of 6°C (see Groeneveld's et al. contribution for Mg/Ca-derived Glacial SST estimations). During MIS 5e, 7e, 9c and 11c, the record reaches SST maxima which are ca. 3ºC warmer than present annual mean SST in the area. Our results suggest a substantial warming of the PCC over past interglacials that may reflect reduced advection of subantarctic surface water from the south and/or enhanced tropical influence from the north.

  10. Paleomonsoonal Precipitation and Hydroclimate Variability from Glacial to Interglacial Climates in the Southwest: The Stoneman Lake, Arizona Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, D.; Fawcett, P. J.; Anderson, R. S.; Sharp, Z. D.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen isotope values from diatom silica have been used to determine past hydrological conditions in a variety of settings including differentiating summer monsoonal paleoprecipitation from winter frontal paleoprecipitation in the American southwest. Lacustrine cores from the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, show a distinct change in silica oxygen isotope values from glacial to interglacial as a switch from a purely winter frontal precipitation during the glacial to a mix of winter frontal and summer monsoonal precipitation during the interglacial. A relatively large (ca. 20‰) and rapid increase in δ18O following the glacial termination implies an abrupt onset of the North American monsoon. We plan to elaborate on this research to see if this is true elsewhere in the southwest. Two lacustrine sediment cores (70 m deep and 30 m deep respectively) were recovered from Stoneman Lake, northern Arizona in October of 2014. With these cores we plan to determine regional hydroclimate variability between the Pleistocene-Holocene glacial transition ca. 14 ka. Oxygen isotope analysis from diatom silica will allow us to determine past sources of precipitation to the basin (Gulf of Mexico vs North Pacific), and paleoprecipitation variability. In conjunction with other proxies, we can determine if the onset of paleomonsoonal precipitation in central Arizona occurs immediately after the glacial termination as in NM, or if there is some component of monsoonal precipitation during the late glacial period. Diatom sampling was performed at approximately every 50 cm. To purify the diatoms, the samples are chemically and physically separated. The step wise fluorination and laser ablation technique are then applied to remove water & hydroxyl groups and to extract O2 & SiF4 respectively.If results from the Stoneman Lake core are similar to that of the Valles Caldera core, we should expect to see a nearly 20‰ increase in δ18Olake water. This would suggest a: 1) collapse of the summer

  11. Speleothem records of western Mediterranean. Hydrological variability along the Last Interglacial Period and marine linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torner, Judit; Cacho, Isabel; Moreno, Ana; Stoll, Heather; Belmonte, Anchel; Sierro, Francisco J.; Frigola, Jaime; Martrat, Belen; Fornós, Joan; Arnau Fernández, Pedro; Hellstrom, John; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to identify and characterize regional hydrological variability in the western Mediterranean region in base to different geochemical parameters (δ18O, δ13C, and Mg/Ca ratios). Speleothems have been recovered from several caves located in southern central Pyrenees one and the others form the Balearic Islands. Their chronologies have been constructed in base on U/Th absolute dating and indicate that the speleothem sequences cover the end of the last interglacial and the glacial inception. One of the most remarkable features of the records is the intense and abrupt shift toward more arid conditions that marks the end of the last interglacial (MIS 5e). Furthermore, our speleothem records also show relatively humid but highly variable hydrological conditions during the interstadial periods from MIS 5c to 5a. These speleothem records have been compared with new generated western Mediterranean marine records from the Balearic Sea (MD99-2343) and Alboran Sea (OPD-977). Marine records include (1) proxies of sea surface temperature and changes in evaporation-precipitation rates based on pair analysis of δ18O and the Mg/Ca ratios in planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides; (2) proxies of deep-water currents associated with the Western Mediterranean Deep Water (WMDW) based on grain size analyses. The results reveal that arid conditions on land were coeval with cold sea surface sub-stages (MIS 5b and 5d), and also with increases in the intensity of the WMDW-related currents. By contrast, humid and hydrological unstable atmosphere conditions were synchronous with sea surface warm sub-stages, and lower WMDW-related currents intensities (MIS 5a, c and e). Consequently, our results highly evidence a strong atmospheric-oceanic coupling, involving parallel changes in both surface but also deep western Mediterranean Sea conditions during the last interglacial period and the glacial inception.

  12. Ice volume and sea level during the last interglacial.

    PubMed

    Dutton, A; Lambeck, K

    2012-07-13

    During the last interglacial period, ~125,000 years ago, sea level was at least several meters higher than at present, with substantial variability observed for peak sea level at geographically diverse sites. Speculation that the West Antarctic ice sheet collapsed during the last interglacial period has drawn particular interest to understanding climate and ice-sheet dynamics during this time interval. We provide an internally consistent database of coral U-Th ages to assess last interglacial sea-level observations in the context of isostatic modeling and stratigraphic evidence. These data indicate that global (eustatic) sea level peaked 5.5 to 9 meters above present sea level, requiring smaller ice sheets in both Greenland and Antarctica relative to today and indicating strong sea-level sensitivity to small changes in radiative forcing.

  13. Climate Controls on European Fluvial Denudation over Glacial-Interglacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Todd A.; Schaller, Mirjam; Mutz, Sebastian G.

    2017-04-01

    Quaternary climate change between glacial-interglacial cycles is commonly thought to induce variations in catchment denudation rates. However, measurements of temporal variations in fluvial denudation are often lacking. Here we present an integration of existing and new cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates from European river terraces with predicted climate change during glacial and interglacial periods derived from a high-resolution (T159, 80x80km) global atmospheric general circulation model (ECHAM5) . Cosmogenic nuclide concentrations were interpreted from river terraces spanning 12 degrees of latitude in unglaciated, tectonically quiescent settings. 25 analyses of cosmogenic nuclide concentrations provide catchment-wide paleodenudation rates from terraces. From 0.5-2.0 Ma these data indicate low, and constant (< 20 mm/kyr) fluvial paleodenudation rates. Modern cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates are generally higher (20-50 mm/kyr). However, previous higher-fidelity studies of terraces formed since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) suggest a factor of 1.5-3 higher denudation rates during the LGM compared to modern. Results from paleoclimate simulations of the LGM, mid-Holocene, and modern times suggest precipitation rates during the last glacial period were 100-500 mm/yr drier than the modern rates across Europe. Mid-Holocene precipitation rates were 100 mm/yr drier (SW Europe) to 200 mm/yr wetter (central Europe) than modern rates. Predicted LGM temperatures indicate periglacial conditions in some areas. Thus, despite moderate changes in predicted precipitation between glacial and interglacial cycles, there is no clear signal of these cycles in cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates between 0.5-2 Ma. In contrast, catchments with higher-fidelity records since the LGM document higher denudation rates during glacial times. We suggest this temporal difference in denudation rates is driven by periglacial, not fluvial, processes. These results have

  14. What caused the glacial to interglacial CO sub 2 change

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.S. . Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory); Peng, Tsung-Hung )

    1991-12-01

    Scenarios put forward to explain the 80 {mu}atm glacial to interglacial change in atmospheric CO{sub 2} content are evaluated. The conclusion is that no single mechanism is adequate. Rather, contributions from temperature, sea ice, biologic pumping, nutrient deepening, and CaCO{sub 3} cycling must be called upon. The observation that the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio for Antarctic foraminifera was 0.9 {plus minus} 0.1% lower during glacial than during interglacial time constitutes a huge fly in the ointment for all scenarios proposed to date.

  15. Role of induced electrical polarization to identify soft ground/fractured rock conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jinho; Lee, Kang-Hyun; Seo, Hyungjoon; Ryu, Jinwoo; Lee, In-Mo

    2017-02-01

    This study attempted to evaluate the role and effectiveness of induced polarization (IP) along with electrical resistivity to identify soft ground/fractured rock. Theoretical studies as well as laboratory-scale experiments were conducted for this purpose. The theoretical study involved deriving the functional relationship between chargeability and influential variables. This was followed by performing a sensitivity analysis using the derived relationship to reveal that the size of narrow pores (r1) exerted the greatest influence on the chargeability followed by the salinity of the pore water (C0). In the laboratory test, a small-scale fractured rock zone was modeled using sandstone as a parent rock. The chargeability and resistivity were measured by changing the size of the joint aperture filled with tap water and/or sea water, the location of the fractured zone, and the thickness of the soil layer in a soil-rock multi-layered ground. The experimental study modeled the jointed zone between competent sandstone layers and indicated that the chargeability was mostly controlled by the size of the narrow pore (r1) of the surface sandstone and not by the porosity of the jointed zone. Hence, it was concluded that the chargeability did not significantly depend on the fractured characteristics of the jointed rock. It could be difficult to clearly distinguish as to whether the low resistivity value is caused by the sea water intrusion or by the increase in porosity of the fractured ground. However, the IP exploration can be effectively utilized to identify sea water intrusion since the chargeability decreased as the salinity of pore water increased. The experimental study on a soil-rock multi-layered ground indicated that the measured chargeability was controlled by the percentage of current flow that passed through the competent rock as well as by the narrow pore size of the rock itself. In conclusion, the ground condition could be easily identified by measuring the IP in

  16. Spectral induced polarization of the three-phase system CO2 - brine - sand under reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Jana H.; Herdegen, Volker; Repke, Jens-Uwe; Spitzer, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    The spectral complex conductivity of a water-bearing sand during interaction with carbon dioxide (CO2) is influenced by multiple, simultaneous processes. These processes include partial saturation due to the replacement of conductive pore water with CO2 and chemical interaction of the reactive CO2 with the bulk fluid and the grain-water interface. We present a laboratory study on the spectral induced polarization (SIP) of water-bearing sands during exposure to and flow-through by CO2. Conductivity spectra were measured successfully at pressures up to 30 MPa and 80°C during active flow and at steady-state conditions concentrating on the frequency range between 0.0014 and 100 Hz. The frequency range between 0.1 and 100 Hz turned out to be most indicative for potential monitoring applications. The presented data show that the impact of CO2 on the electrolytic conductivity may be covered by a model for pore-water conductivity, which depends on salinity, pressure and temperature and has been derived from earlier investigations of the pore-water phase. The new data covering the three-phase system CO2-brine-sand further show that chemical interaction causes a reduction of surface conductivity by almost 20 per cent, which could be related to the low pH-value in the acidic environment due to CO2 dissolution and the dissociation of carbonic acid. The quantification of the total CO2 effect may be used as a correction during monitoring of a sequestration in terms of saturation. We show that this leads to a correct reconstruction of fluid saturation from electrical measurements. In addition, an indicator for changes of the inner surface area, which is related to mineral dissolution or precipitation processes, can be computed from the imaginary part of conductivity. The low frequency range between 0.0014 and 0.1 Hz shows additional characteristics, which deviate from the behaviour at higher frequencies. A Debye decomposition approach is applied to isolate the feature dominating

  17. Spectral induced polarization of the three-phase system CO2 - brine - sand under reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Jana H.; Herdegen, Volker; Repke, Jens-Uwe; Spitzer, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The spectral complex conductivity of a water-bearing sand during interaction with carbon dioxide (CO2) is influenced by multiple, simultaneous processes. These processes include partial saturation due to the replacement of conductive pore water with CO2 and chemical interaction of the reactive CO2 with the bulk fluid and the grain-water interface. We present a laboratory study on the spectral induced polarization of water-bearing sands during exposure to and flow-through by CO2. Conductivity spectra were measured successfully at pressures up to 30 MPa and 80 °C during active flow and at steady-state conditions concentrating on the frequency range between 0.0014 and 100 Hz. The frequency range between 0.1 and 100 Hz turned out to be most indicative for potential monitoring applications. The presented data show that the impact of CO2 on the electrolytic conductivity may be covered by a model for pore-water conductivity, which depends on salinity, pressure and temperature and has been derived from earlier investigations of the pore-water phase. The new data covering the three-phase system CO2-brine-sand further show that chemical interaction causes a reduction of surface conductivity by almost 20 per cent, which could be related to the low pH-value in the acidic environment due to CO2 dissolution and the dissociation of carbonic acid. The quantification of the total CO2 effect may be used as a correction during monitoring of a sequestration in terms of saturation. We show that this leads to a correct reconstruction of fluid saturation from electrical measurements. In addition, an indicator for changes of the inner surface area, which is related to mineral dissolution or precipitation processes, can be computed from the imaginary part of conductivity. The low frequency range between 0.0014 and 0.1 Hz shows additional characteristics, which deviate from the behaviour at higher frequencies. A Debye decomposition approach is applied to isolate the feature dominating the

  18. Last Interglacial climate and sea-level evolution from a coupled ice sheet-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goelzer, Heiko; Huybrechts, Philippe; Loutre, Marie-France; Fichefet, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    As the most recent warm period in Earth's history with a sea-level stand higher than present, the Last Interglacial (LIG, ˜ 130 to 115 kyr BP) is often considered a prime example to study the impact of a warmer climate on the two polar ice sheets remaining today. Here we simulate the Last Interglacial climate, ice sheet, and sea-level evolution with the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM v.1.3, which includes dynamic and fully coupled components representing the atmosphere, the ocean and sea ice, the terrestrial biosphere, and the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. In this setup, sea-level evolution and climate-ice sheet interactions are modelled in a consistent framework.Surface mass balance change governed by changes in surface meltwater runoff is the dominant forcing for the Greenland ice sheet, which shows a peak sea-level contribution of 1.4 m at 123 kyr BP in the reference experiment. Our results indicate that ice sheet-climate feedbacks play an important role to amplify climate and sea-level changes in the Northern Hemisphere. The sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to surface temperature changes considerably increases when interactive albedo changes are considered. Southern Hemisphere polar and sub-polar ocean warming is limited throughout the Last Interglacial, and surface and sub-shelf melting exerts only a minor control on the Antarctic sea-level contribution with a peak of 4.4 m at 125 kyr BP. Retreat of the Antarctic ice sheet at the onset of the LIG is mainly forced by rising sea level and to a lesser extent by reduced ice shelf viscosity as the surface temperature increases. Global sea level shows a peak of 5.3 m at 124.5 kyr BP, which includes a minor contribution of 0.35 m from oceanic thermal expansion. Neither the individual contributions nor the total modelled sea-level stand show fast multi-millennial timescale variations as indicated by some reconstructions.

  19. Migration of the Antarctic Polar Front through the mid-Pleistocene transition: evidence and climatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, A. E. S.; Grigorov, I.; Pearce, R. B.; Naveira Garabato, A. C.

    2010-08-01

    The Antarctic Polar Front is an important biogeochemical divider in the Southern Ocean. Laminated diatom mat deposits record episodes of massive flux of the diatom Thalassiothrix antarctica beneath the Antarctic Polar Front and provide a marker for tracking the migration of the Front through time. Ocean Drilling Program Sites 1091, 1093 and 1094 are the only deep piston cored record hitherto sampled from the sediments of the circumpolar biogenic opal belt. Mapping of diatom mat deposits between these sites indicates a glacial-interglacial front migration of up to 6 degrees of latitude in the early/mid Pleistocene. The mid-Pleistocene transition marks a stepwise minimum 7° northward migration of the locus of the Polar Front sustained for about 450 kyr until an abrupt southward return to a locus similar to its modern position and further south than any mid-Pleistocene locus. This interval from a "900 ka event" that saw major cooling of the oceans and a δ 13C minimum through to the 424 ka Mid-Brunhes Event at Termination V is also seemingly characterised by 1) sustained decreased carbonate in the sub-tropical south Atlantic, 2) reduced strength of Antarctic deep meridional circulation, 3) lower interglacial temperatures and lower interglacial atmospheric CO 2 levels (by some 30 per mil) than those of the last 400 kyr, evidencing less complete deglaciation. This evidence is consistent with a prolonged period lasting 450 kyr of only partial ventilation of the deep ocean during interglacials and suggests that the mechanisms highlighted by recent hypotheses linking mid-latitude atmospheric conditions to the extent of deep ocean ventilation and carbon sequestration over glacial-interglacial cycles are likely in operation during the longer time scale characteristic of the mid-Pleistocene transition. The cooling that initiated the "900 ka event" may have been driven by minima in insolation amplitude related to eccentricity modulation of precession that also affected low

  20. Intra-interglacial climate variability: model simulations of Marine Isotope Stages 1, 5, 11, 13, and 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmayani, Rima; Prange, Matthias; Schulz, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Using the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) including a dynamic global vegetation model, a set of 13 time slice experiments was carried out to study global climate variability between and within the Quaternary interglacials of Marine Isotope Stages (MISs) 1, 5, 11, 13, and 15. The selection of interglacial time slices was based on different aspects of inter- and intra-interglacial variability and associated astronomical forcing. The different effects of obliquity, precession, and greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing on global surface temperature and precipitation fields are illuminated. In most regions seasonal surface temperature anomalies can largely be explained by local insolation anomalies induced by the astronomical forcing. Climate feedbacks, however, may modify the surface temperature response in specific regions, most pronounced in the monsoon domains and the polar oceans. GHG forcing may also play an important role for seasonal temperature anomalies, especially at high latitudes and early Brunhes interglacials (MIS 13 and 15) when GHG concentrations were much lower than during the later interglacials. High- versus low-obliquity climates are generally characterized by strong warming over the Northern Hemisphere extratropics and slight cooling in the tropics during boreal summer. During boreal winter, a moderate cooling over large portions of the Northern Hemisphere continents and a strong warming at high southern latitudes is found. Beside the well-known role of precession, a significant role of obliquity in forcing the West African monsoon is identified. Other regional monsoon systems are less sensitive or not sensitive at all to obliquity variations during interglacials. Moreover, based on two specific time slices (394 and 615 ka), it is explicitly shown that the West African and Indian monsoon systems do not always vary in concert, challenging the concept of a global monsoon system on astronomical timescales. High obliquity can also explain

  1. Optimal forcing perturbations for regional flow patterns conditioning polar low development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, Jørn; Iversen, Trond; Jung, Thomas; Barkmeijer, Jan

    2013-04-01

    olar lows are short lived maritime mesoscale cyclones that develop because of processes unique to the Polar Regions. In the ice-free Nordic and Barents Seas they are associated with violent weather during wintertime and form in cold air outbreaks underneath a cold through. The longer predictability of the large-scales may provide early warnings of the potential for polar lows. We investigate the rare events when the atmosphere is highly sensitive to small external forcings that excite changes in the variability of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Employing a numerical weather prediction model, the period 1957-2002 is sampled for 4-day optimal forcing sensitivity patterns (FSPs). The highly sensitive events are relatively well-defined. A flow pattern resembling the negative-phase NAO is identified as a potential precursor of the most unpredictable transitions in the NAO. The least sensitive events are dominated by a coinciding cyclonic circulation. In the former there is high polar low potential (40-45%) in the northern North Atlantic but it is low south of Iceland. The least sensitive events display high potential along the storm track reaching 80% south of Iceland. The FSPs tend to either strengthen or hamper the transition toward the negative-phase NAO. The strengthened circulation makes the atmosphere favourable in 70% of the events for the formation of polar lows in the Nordic and Barents Seas with high potentials also in the North Sea. From the hampered transition we learn that in the Nordic Seas high- and low-pressure systems can produce similar levels of polar low potential. Temperature and momentum are equally important forcing variables and there are positive feedbacks between them. The forcing is dominantly in-situ and strongest in mid-troposphere. The variability is more localized and larger than the average. Close to the surface the FSPs appear influenced by the Norwegian current.

  2. Future sea ice conditions in Western Hudson Bay and consequences for polar bears in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Castro de la Guardia, Laura; Derocher, Andrew E; Myers, Paul G; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Arjen D; Lunn, Nick J

    2013-09-01

    The primary habitat of polar bears is sea ice, but in Western Hudson Bay (WH), the seasonal ice cycle forces polar bears ashore each summer. Survival of bears on land in WH is correlated with breakup and the ice-free season length, and studies suggest that exceeding thresholds in these variables will lead to large declines in the WH population. To estimate when anthropogenic warming may have progressed sufficiently to threaten the persistence of polar bears in WH, we predict changes in the ice cycle and the sea ice concentration (SIC) in spring (the primary feeding period of polar bears) with a high-resolution sea ice-ocean model and warming forced with 21st century IPCC greenhouse gas (GHG) emission scenarios: B1 (low), A1B (medium), and A2 (high). We define critical years for polar bears based on proposed thresholds in breakup and ice-free season and we assess when ice-cycle conditions cross these thresholds. In the three scenarios, critical years occur more commonly after 2050. From 2001 to 2050, 2 critical years occur under B1 and A2, and 4 under A1B; from 2051 to 2100, 8 critical years occur under B1, 35 under A1B and 41 under A2. Spring SIC in WH is high (>90%) in all three scenarios between 2001 and 2050, but declines rapidly after 2050 in A1B and A2. From 2090 to 2100, the mean spring SIC is 84 (±7)% in B1, 56 (±26)% in A1B and 20 (±13)% in A2. Our predictions suggest that the habitat of polar bears in WH will deteriorate in the 21st century. Ice predictions in A1B and A2 suggest that the polar bear population may struggle to persist after ca. 2050. Predictions under B1 suggest that reducing GHG emissions could allow polar bears to persist in WH throughout the 21st century. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Solar Wind Influence on the Oxygen Content of Ion Outflow in the High Altitude Polar Cap During Solar Minimum Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Heather A.; Comfort, Richard H.; Craven, Paul D.; Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2000-01-01

    We correlate solar wind and IMF properties with the properties of O(+) and H(+) in the polar cap in early 1996 during solar minimum conditions at altitudes between 5.5 and 8.9 Re geocentric using the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) on the POLAR satellite. Throughout the high altitude polar cap, we observe H(+) to be more abundant than O(+). H(+) is a significant fraction of both the ionosphere and the solar wind, and O(+) is not a significant species in the solar wind. O(+) is the major species in the ionosphere so the faction of O(+) present in the magnetosphere is commonly used as a measure of the ionospheric contribution to the magnetosphere. For these reasons, 0+ is of primary interest in this study. We observe O(+) to be most abundant at lower latitudes when the solar wind speed is low (and low Kp), and at higher solar wind speeds (and high Kp) O(+) is observed across most of the polar cap. We also find that O(+) density and parallel flux are well organized by solar wind dynamic pressure; they both increase with solar wind dynamic pressure. H(+) is not as highly correlated with solar wind and IMF parameters, but H(+) density and parallel flux have some negative correlation with IMF By, and some positive correlation with VswBIMF. In this solar minimum data set, H(+) is dominant so that contributions of this plasma to the plasma sheet would have a very low O(+) to H(+) ratio.

  4. Genetic consequences of interglacial isolation in a steppe bird.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J T; Mañosa, S; Morales, M B; Ponjoan, A; García de la Morena, E L; Bota, G; Bretagnolle, V; Dávila, J A

    2011-12-01

    In response to climate changes that have occurred during Pleistocene glacial cycles, taxa associated to steppe vegetation might have followed a pattern of historical evolution in which isolation and fragmentation of populations occurred during the short interglacials and expansion events occurred during the long glacial periods, in contrast to the pattern described for temperate species. Here, we use molecular genetic data to evaluate this idea in a steppe bird with Palaearctic distribution, the little bustard (Tetrax tetrax). Overall, extremely low genetic diversity and differentiation was observed among eight little bustard populations distributed in Spain and France. Mismatch distribution analyses showed that most little bustard populations expanded during cooling periods previous to, and just after, the last interglacial period (127,000-111,000 years before present), when steppe habitats were widespread across Europe. Coalescent-based methods suggested that glacial expansions have resulted in substantial admixture in Western Europe due to the existence of different interglacial refugia. Our results are consistent with a model of evolution and genetic consequences of Pleistocene cycles with low between-population genetic differentiation as a result of short-term isolation periods during interglacials and long-term exchange during glacial periods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Glacial interglacial carbonate preservation records in the Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmke, Jan P.; Bauch, Henning A.

    2002-06-01

    A combination of weight and reflectance measurements as well as scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses on planktic foraminiferal tests from two sites in the Nordic Seas were used to investigate the pelagic carbonate preservation during the last five glacial-interglacial cycles. In general, a pattern showing good preservation during glacial times and enhanced corrosion during interglacial times can be observed. Marine Isotope Stage 11 (MIS 11) reveals the strongest corrosional features with an estimated 45% total loss of the foraminiferal carbonate before shell fragmentation. One reason for the enhanced interglacial corrosion may be a high regional surface productivity during these intervals, which led to increased dissolution rates in the deep sea driven by metabolic carbon dioxide. However, the carbonate preservation changes may also be linked to global changes in the marine carbonate system. Although the reason for the observed dissolution pattern in the Nordic Seas remains speculative, it seems to be in phase with the rhythm of glacial-interglacial carbonate preservation in the Pacific Ocean but out of phase with the rest of the Atlantic. The data further support the hypothesis that much of the glacial decrease in the atmospheric CO 2 may be attributed to the changes in the alkalinity of the oceans.

  6. The last interglacial climate: comparing direct and indirect impacts of insolation changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Rasmus A.; Langen, Peter L.; Vinther, Bo M.

    2017-05-01

    The last interglacial climate was influenced by substantial changes in the annual insolation cycle that led to a warmer climate state with pronounced high northern latitude warming. We analyze the impact of the insolation changes 125,000 years before present using an equilibrium snapshot simulation with the EC-Earth coupled climate model at high spatial resolution. Using additional atmosphere-only simulations, we separate the direct impact from the changed insolation from the secondary contribution from changed sea surface conditions. These simulations are forced with a combination of last interglacial sea surface temperatures and sea ice conditions and pre-industrial insolation, and vice versa. The coupled simulation yields an annual mean global warming of approximately 0.5 °C compared to pre-industrial conditions. While the warming over the continents follows the annual cycle of the insolation anomalies, two regions exhibit persistent responses throughout the year: The tropical region exhibits lower temperatures and stronger monsoonal systems, while the Arctic region shows a warming of more than 2 °C in all seasons. The hybrid simulations reveal that the changed sea surface conditions dominate the response at high northern latitudes, including the North Atlantic region and Europe, while the direct insolation impact is more dominant in the tropics.

  7. Carrier accumulation near electrodes in ferroelectric films due to polarization boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Misirlioglu, I. B. Yildiz, M.

    2014-07-14

    We study the effect of surface polarization on the distribution of free carriers in a wide bandgap semiconductor ferroelectric (FE) film using a thermodynamic approach. We show that free carriers, namely, holes and electrons from ionizable impurities or atomic vacancies can accumulate near the film-electrode interface, if FE polarization profile has a very steep change near the surface that is specified by the extrapolation length. Such an outcome is just the opposite of what happens in a Schottky junction in a partially or fully depleted film. This is also an entirely different effect than what has been often studied in similar structures, where the work function and screening length of the electrode metal determines the electronic character of the interface. Even for low-to-moderate densities of ionizable defects with states within the bandgap close to the band edges, high densities of carriers can localize close to the electrodes in a single domain state FE film when above a critical thickness. For very low densities of such ionizable defects, short extrapolation lengths cause electrical domain formation with minimal carrier accumulation because of the already weak depolarizing fields. This is also true for films below a critical thickness with low-to-moderate densities of ionizable impurities, i.e., electrical domains get stabilized regardless of defect density. The implications of our findings for polarization controlled Schottky to Ohmic-like transition of an interface and experimental results are discussed. It is also found that interfaces of an n-type FE heterostructure can behave like a p-type depending on the barrier heights and impurity density. We conclude that, for low-to-moderate ionizable impurity densities, it is the rate of change of polarization at the interface with position rather than solely its presence that leads to carrier accumulation and that both interfaces can become Ohmic-like with opposite signs of carriers.

  8. Sedimentary Record of the Last two Interglacials in the Terrestrial Canadian Arctic (Pingualuit Crater Lake, Nunavik)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Onge, G.; Guyard, H.; Pienitz, R.; Hausmann, S.; Francus, P.; Salonen, V.; Luoto, T.; Black, J.; Lamothe, M.; Zolitschka, B.; Larocque, I.

    2009-05-01

    The Pingualuit crater lake (Nunavik, Canada) resulted from a meteoritic impact that occurred ca. 1.4 million years ago. Due to its unique morphometry (depth and shape), the lake bottom may have escaped glacial erosion. Based on a punctual seismic profile acquired using a 12 kHz Knudsen echosounder and using both gravity and piston corers, we recovered the uppermost 8.5 m of sediments. High-resolution physical (CAT- Scan, Multi Sensor Core Logger, diffuse spectral reflectance), geochemical (ITRAX core scanner, carbon and nitrogen contents, δ13C of the organic matter) and magnetic (magnetic susceptibility, natural, anhysteretic, isothermal and saturation isothermal remanent magnetizations) analyses were performed. Two main lithofacies were clearly identified by the different measurements and likely represent successive interglacial/glacial cycles. Most of the sediment consists of light grey silts containing several angular rock fragments, that is characterized by very low organic carbon content, relatively high density and magnetic susceptibility values, suggesting a deposition during glacial conditions. Interbedded between this facies are at least two decimetre-thick, organic-rich and finely laminated intervals likely representing ice free periods. The presence of diatoms, chrysophytes and chironomid head capsules in smear and microscope slides from these two intervals supports this hypothesis. In addition, preliminary Infrared Stimulated Luminescence (IRSL) measurements indicate that the upper organic-rich layer has an age coeval with the last interglacial (Oxygen Isotope Stage 5), while the age of the lower organic-rich layer is consistent with an older interglacial, likely the Oxygen Isotope Stage 7. The sedimentary infill thus constitutes a unique long-term terrestrial record of environmental and climatic conditions in the Canadian Arctic. Furthermore, because these sediments escaped glacial erosion, it suggests the presence of a subglacial lake during the last

  9. Vegetation and climate changes in western Amazonia during a previous Interglacial- Glacial transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. L.; Gosling, W. D.; Sherlock, S. C.; Poole, I.; Pennington, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Amazonia is one of the most biodiverse areas of the world and its vegetation plays a crucial role in controlling the global climate through the regulation of the levels of atmospheric CO2. However, Amazonian ecosystems and their role in the climate system are threatened by ongoing the human impact (already estimated loss of 60% of the species in western Amazonia) and predicted climate change (+1.1-6.4oC by 2100). Unfortunately, there is absence of data relating to the ecological baseline function and response to global climate change of western Amazonian ecosystems in the absence of humans. To help anticipate the impact of future climate change predictions an improved understanding of the natural responses of tropical vegetation to known past climate change is required. Here we present the first study that shows the response of pristine tropical ecosystems in western Amazonia biodiversity hotspot to a major global climate change event (a Quaternary Interglacial-Glacial transition). Pleistocene lake/swamp sediments preserved at the Erazo study site (Lat. 00o 33’S, Long. 077o 52’W, 1927m alt.) today within tropical cloud forest vegetation provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of past climate shifts. The sediment are >40,000 years old (radiocarbon infinite) and younger than 1 million years (presence of Alder biomarker) and consist of organic layers interbedded with volcanic ash (tephra). This study presents data from multiple proxies (fossil pollen, wood macrofossils and charcoal) to establish a comprehensive picture of regional and local vegetation change prior to human arrival. Our data show a change of vegetation from palm-dominated forest indicative of warm and wet conditions similar to the present at the base of this record, to a forest dominated by Podocarpus sp. suggesting cold and wet conditions at the top of the record. The transition between these two vegetation communities appears to be progressive with small sharp changes along the

  10. EPICA Dome C record of glacial and interglacial intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Delmotte, V.; Stenni, B.; Pol, K.; Braconnot, P.; Cattani, O.; Falourd, S.; Kageyama, M.; Jouzel, J.; Landais, A.; Minster, B.; Barnola, J. M.; Chappellaz, J.; Krinner, G.; Johnsen, S.; Röthlisberger, R.; Hansen, J.; Mikolajewicz, U.; Otto-Bliesner, B.

    2010-01-01

    Climate models show strong links between Antarctic and global temperature both in future and in glacial climate simulations. Past Antarctic temperatures can be estimated from measurements of water stable isotopes along the EPICA Dome C ice core over the past 800 000 years. Here we focus on the reliability of the relative intensities of glacial and interglacial periods derived from the stable isotope profile. The consistency between stable isotope-derived temperature and other environmental and climatic proxies measured along the EDC ice core is analysed at the orbital scale and compared with estimates of global ice volume. MIS 2, 12 and 16 appear as the strongest glacial maxima, while MIS 5.5 and 11 appear as the warmest interglacial maxima. The links between EDC temperature, global temperature, local and global radiative forcings are analysed. We show: (i) a strong but changing link between EDC temperature and greenhouse gas global radiative forcing in the first and second part of the record; (ii) a large residual signature of obliquity in EDC temperature with a 5 ky lag; (iii) the exceptional character of temperature variations within interglacial periods. Focusing on MIS 5.5, the warmest interglacial of EDC record, we show that orbitally forced coupled climate models only simulate a precession-induced shift of the Antarctic seasonal cycle of temperature. While they do capture annually persistent Greenland warmth, models fail to capture the warming indicated by Antarctic ice core δD. We suggest that the model-data mismatch may result from the lack of feedbacks between ice sheets and climate including both local Antarctic effects due to changes in ice sheet topography and global effects due to meltwater-thermohaline circulation interplays. An MIS 5.5 sensitivity study conducted with interactive Greenland melt indeed induces a slight Antarctic warming. We suggest that interglacial EDC optima are caused by transient heat transport redistribution comparable with

  11. Bipolar seesaw control on last interglacial sea level.

    PubMed

    Marino, G; Rohling, E J; Rodríguez-Sanz, L; Grant, K M; Heslop, D; Roberts, A P; Stanford, J D; Yu, J

    2015-06-11

    Our current understanding of ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere interactions at ice-age terminations relies largely on assessments of the most recent (last) glacial-interglacial transition, Termination I (T-I). But the extent to which T-I is representative of previous terminations remains unclear. Testing the consistency of termination processes requires comparison of time series of critical climate parameters with detailed absolute and relative age control. However, such age control has been lacking for even the penultimate glacial termination (T-II), which culminated in a sea-level highstand during the last interglacial period that was several metres above present. Here we show that Heinrich Stadial 11 (HS11), a prominent North Atlantic cold episode, occurred between 135 ± 1 and 130 ± 2 thousand years ago and was linked with rapid sea-level rise during T-II. Our conclusions are based on new and existing data for T-II and the last interglacial that we collate onto a single, radiometrically constrained chronology. The HS11 cold episode punctuated T-II and coincided directly with a major deglacial meltwater pulse, which predominantly entered the North Atlantic Ocean and accounted for about 70 per cent of the glacial-interglacial sea-level rise. We conclude that, possibly in response to stronger insolation and CO2 forcing earlier in T-II, the relationship between climate and ice-volume changes differed fundamentally from that of T-I. In T-I, the major sea-level rise clearly post-dates Heinrich Stadial 1. We also find that HS11 coincided with sustained Antarctic warming, probably through a bipolar seesaw temperature response, and propose that this heat gain at high southern latitudes promoted Antarctic ice-sheet melting that fuelled the last interglacial sea-level peak.

  12. [Polar lipid pool modification in leaves of hoary plantain (Plantago media L.) plants during their light adaptation under natural conditions].

    PubMed

    Rozentsvet, O A; Golovko, T K; Bogdanova, E S; Tabalenkova, G N; Nesterov, V N; Dymova, O V

    2013-01-01

    Polar glycerolipids and photosynthetic pigments of Plantago media L. plants, growing on limestone outcrops of the Southern Timan, have been studied. Leaves of plants growing on well insolated and heated slopes are characterized by an intensive lipoperoxidation; the accumulation of chlorophylls and carotenoids in these plants is 1.5-2 times less and the content of polar lipids is 15-20% less than in plants growing in dense grass at the bottom of slopes. The accumulation of some classes of glycerolipids in leaves in the daytime provides for stabilization of photosystem complexes and the formation of the pool of zeaxanthin, a protective xanthophyll. Changes in the content and ratio of lipids represent an important part of the adaptive reorganizations of the photosynthetic apparatus caused by excess radiation under natural conditions.

  13. Polarization and Dielectric Study of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Thin Film to Reveal its Nonferroelectric Nature under Solar Cell Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoque, Md Nadim Ferdous; Yang, Mengjin; Li, Zhen; Islam, Nazifah; Pan, Xuan; Zhu, Kai; Fan, Zhaoyang

    2016-07-08

    Researchers have debated whether methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3), with a perovskite crystal structure, is ferroelectric and therefore contributes to the current--voltage hysteresis commonly observed in hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs). We thoroughly investigated temperature-dependent polarization, dielectric, and impedance spectroscopies, and we found no evidence of ferroelectric effect in a MAPbI3 thin film at normal operating conditions. Therefore, the effect does not contribute to the hysteresis in PSCs, whereas the large component of ionic migration observed may play a critical role. Our temperature-based polarization and dielectric studies find that MAPbI3 exhibits different electrical behaviors below and above ca. 45 degrees C, suggesting a phase transition around this temperature. In particular, we report the activation energies of ionic migration for the two phases and temperature-dependent permittivity of MAPbI3. This study contributes to the understanding of the material properties and device performance of hybrid perovskites.

  14. Growth condition dependence of photoluminescence polarization in (100) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Iba, Satoshi; Saito, Hidekazu; Yuasa, Shinji; Watanabe, Ken; Ohno, Yuzo

    2015-08-28

    We conducted systematic measurements on the carrier lifetime (τ{sub c}), spin relaxation time (τ{sub s}), and circular polarization of photoluminescence (P{sub circ}) in (100) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The τ{sub c} values are strongly affected by MBE growth conditions (0.4–9 ns), whereas the τ{sub s} are almost constant at about 0.13 ns. The result suggests that spin detection efficiency [τ{sub s}/(τ{sub c} + τ{sub s})], which is expected to be proportional to a steady-state P{sub circ}, is largely dependent on growth condition. We confirmed that the P{sub circ} has similar dependence on growth condition to those of τ{sub s}/(τ{sub c} + τ{sub s}) values. The study thus indicates that choosing the appropriate growth condition of the QW is indispensable for obtaining a high P{sub circ} from a spin-polarized light-emitting diode (spin-LED)

  15. Troposphere-Stratosphere Dynamic Coupling Under Strong and Weak Polar Vortex Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, Judith; Graf, Hans-F.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between Northern Hemisphere (NH) tropospheric and stratospheric wave-like anomalies of spherical zonal wave number (ZWN) 1 is studied by applying Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA). A lag-correlation technique is used with 10-day lowpass filtered daily time series of 50- and 500-hPa geopotential heights. Generally stratospheric circulation is determined by ultralong tropospheric planetary waves. During winter seasons characterized either by any anomalously strong or weak polar winter vortex different propagation characteristics for waves of ZWN 1 are observed. The non-linear perspective of the results have implications for medium range weather forecast and climate sensitivity experiments.

  16. Interglacial analogues of the Holocene and its natural near future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Qiuzhen; Berger, André

    2015-07-01

    In an attempt to find potential interglacial analogues of our present interglacial and its natural future, five interglacials (MIS-1, 5, 9, 11 and 19) are studied in terms of their astronomical characteristics, greenhouse gases concentration and climate simulated using both snapshot and transient experiments. Transient simulations covering a full range of obliquity, precession and eccentricity allow to develop an OPE index to estimate the climate sensitivity to astronomical forcing. They also show that obliquity and precession have different weight on the annual mean temperature and precipitation of different latitudinal zones, leading to varying phasing of these climate variables between different latitudes. However, the variations in boreal summer temperature of different latitudes (except the Southern Ocean) are in phase and are dominated by precession. All the interglacials are shown to be warmer than the natural climate of the present day and of the next centuries during boreal summer and for the annual mean temperature with varying duration and intensity. Such warming is mainly caused by changes in insolation, unlike the present global warming which mainly results from anthropogenic CO2 increase. The exceptionally long duration of MIS-11 is confirmed by our simulations, and it is demonstrated to be related to the long-lasting low eccentricity and high CO2 concentration and to the anti-phase relationship between obliquity maximum and precession minimum during MIS-11. As far as the variations of annual and seasonal temperatures are concerned, both snapshot and transient simulations show that MIS-19 is the best analogue of the present interglacial. MIS-11 is also a decent analogue when the impact of insolation alone is considered, but it is warmer than MIS-1 when the impact of CO2 is additionally included. Due to the large amplitude in the variations of insolation, MIS-5 and MIS-9 can hardly be considered as an analogue of the natural present-day climate and of

  17. Conditional knockout of polarity complex (atypical) PKCι reveals an anti-inflammatory function mediated by NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Forteza, Radia; Figueroa, Yolanda; Mashukova, Anastasia; Dulam, Vipin; Salas, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    The conserved proteins of the polarity complex made up of atypical PKC (aPKC, isoforms ι and ζ), Par6, and Par3 determine asymmetry in several cell types, from Caenorhabditis elegans oocytes to vertebrate epithelia and neurons. We previously showed that aPKC is down-regulated in intestinal epithelia under inflammatory stimulation. Further, expression of constitutively active PKCι decreases NF-κB activity in an epithelial cell line, the opposite of the effect reported in other cells. Here we tested the hypothesis that aPKC has a dual function in epithelia, inhibiting the NF-κB pathway in addition to having a role in apicobasal polarity. We achieved full aPKC down-regulation in small intestine villi and colon surface epithelium using a conditional epithelium-specific knockout mouse. The results show that aPKC is dispensable for polarity after cell differentiation, except for known targets, including ROCK and ezrin, claudin-4 expression, and barrier permeability. The aPKC defect resulted in increased NF-κB activity, which could be rescued by IKK and ROCK inhibitors. It also increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines. In contrast, expression of anti-inflammatory IL-10 decreased. We conclude that epithelial aPKC acts upstream of multiple mechanisms that participate in the inflammatory response in the intestine, including, but not restricted to, NF-κB. PMID:27226486

  18. Effects of stimuli shape and polarization in evoking deimatic patterns in the European cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, under varying turbidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Cartron, Lelia; Shashar, Nadav; Dickel, Ludovic; Darmaillacq, Anne-Sophie

    2013-06-01

    Cuttlefish possess the complex ability to identify approaching threats and then to selectively express the appropriate defense. We examined the visual cues used by Sepia officinalis cuttlefish during predator detection and the responses they selected. Using computer-generated stimuli, we set out to quantitate the deimatic responses to artificial looming stimuli of different shapes and contrasts. Defensive behavior gradually intensified as geometrical shapes resembled an image of a fish. Therefore, in addition to an object's size or its sudden increase in size, cuttlefish use form recognition to identify a threat. Cuttlefish demonstrated equal performance in predator detection trough clear water when presented with intensity versus polarization contrasts. However, when the water turbidity increased, the cuttlefish still detected looming fish shapes based on polarization contrast even when intensity information alone did not suffice. These results demonstrate the interplay between intensity and polarization information transmission and processing in the spatial domain. As nectobenthic organisms, cuttlefish probably experience low visibility conditions on a regular basis. The ability to see further into turbid water and to better detect an approaching object would be beneficial for their survival.

  19. Can energy fluxes be used to interpret glacial/interglacial precipitation changes in the tropics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, W. H. G.; Valdes, P. J.; Singarayer, J. S.

    2017-06-01

    Recent theoretical advances in the relationship between heat transport and the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) present an elegant framework through which to interpret past changes in tropical precipitation patterns. Using a very large ensemble of climate model simulations, we investigate whether it is possible to use this framework to interpret changes in the position of the ITCZ in response to glacial and interglacial boundary conditions. We find that the centroid of tropical precipitation, which represents the evolution of precipitation in the whole tropics, is best correlated with heat transport changes. We find that the response of the annual mean ITCZ to glacial and interglacial boundary conditions is quite different to the response of the climatological annual cycle of the ITCZ to the seasonal cycle of insolation. We show that the reason for this is that while the Hadley Circulation plays a dominant role in transporting heat over the seasonal cycle, in the annual mean response to forcing, the Hadley Circulation is not dominant. When we look regionally, rather than at the zonal mean, we find that local precipitation is poorly related either to the zonal mean ITCZ or to meridional heat transport. We demonstrate that precipitation is spatially highly variable even when the zonal mean ITCZ is in the same location. This suggests only limited use for heat transport in explaining local precipitation records; thus, there is limited scope for using heat transport changes to explain individual paleoprecipitation records.

  20. Laboratory Growth of Ice Crystals Under Simulated Polar Stratospheric Cloud and High Altitude Cirrus Conditions at Temperatures Below -70 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, M.; Hallett, J.; Peterson, H.; Petersen, D.

    2006-12-01

    A static diffusion chamber has been used to grow ice crystals at temperatures below -70 C under controlled conditions of temperature, pressure, and ice supersaturation. Type 1 polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particle growth was performed with frozen nitric acid solution drops in the presence of nitric acid and water vapor at temperatures between -75 C and -85 C. Type 2 PSC particle growth was performed with predominantly pure water at temperatures below -85 C. Ice crystals were also grown from pure water vapor over the same range of temperatures for comparison, nucleating on frozen sulfuric acid solution drops and on mineral dust particles. Linear, projected area, and volume growth rates are presented.

  1. The ecophysiological response to interglacial warming in the Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkelhammer, M. B.; Insel, N.; Stefanescu, I.; Klein, J.; Anderson, L.

    2016-12-01

    During the Eemian interglacial period (115-130 kya), summer temperatures in the western US are estimated to have been as much as 3-5o warmer than today. The warm summer conditions would have precipitated a number of ecohydrological changes associated with a shift in snow pack dynamics, higher growing season vapor pressure deficits (a consequence of the warming) and potentially a stronger North American Monsoon. These conditions may have lead to an extended growing season and enhanced tree growth by removing temperature limitations and adding monsoon moisture or, alternatively, may have truncated growth by reducing the snow pack reservoir and adding atmospheric water stress. Observing how these competing controls impacted forests is useful for predicting how trees are likely to respond to anticipated 21st century warming. In this study, we present high-resolution stable isotopic measurements (18O/16O and 13C/12C) of cellulose extracted from Eemian-aged tree rings recovered in Ziegler Reservoir, Snowmass, Colorado. The data is compared to isotopic measurements made on modern wood samples taken from trees actively growing adjacent to the fossil site. The seasonal cycle of 13C is indistinguishable between the two time periods and is characterized by progressively higher isotopic ratios through the growing season. The 18O seasonal cycle, however, is clearly distinct between time periods with the modern wood characterized by a steady decline in isotopic ratios whereas the Eemian wood shows a progressive increase. The contrasting isotopic trends between time periods may reflect ecophysiological accommodations to the changed climate, with growth during the Eemian being stomatal-limited and growth during the modern period being limited photosynthetically. This interpretation is consistent with the fact that the modern period has higher CO2 and cooler temperatures whereas the Eemian had warmer temperatures but lower CO2 (270 ppm). Alternatively, the rise in the oxygen

  2. [Increased cortisol levels, frostbite and effects on the muscles and skeleton during extreme polar conditions].

    PubMed

    Steine, Kjetil; Røseth, Arne G; Sandbaek, Gunnar; Murison, Robert; Slagsvold, Carl-Erik; Keller, Anne; Falch, Jan A

    2003-12-23

    We wanted to record physiological changes, injuries and illnesses during a long sledge expedition in North Canada. The expedition consisted of four men aged 41 to 50, and 16 polar dogs. Measurements of cortisol in saliva were performed before, during and after the expedition. Frostbites and other injuries were registered continuously. Body weight and muscle, fat and bone mass were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry scanning, and strength and endurance of shoulders, knees and back were tested. The group encountered extreme frost (-30 to -42 degrees C day temperature), wind, unexpected amounts of pack ice, and poorly motivated dogs. The participants showed increased free cortisol levels during their stay on the ice, probably because of increased mental stress. Three got first degree and two second-degree frostbites, but the affected areas were normal on vascular examination five months later. All members increased their muscle mass, but muscle strength and endurance remained unchanged.

  3. The last interglacial-glacial transition as recorded in sediments from the deep Dead Sea basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, I.; Brauer, A.; Schwab, M. J.; Waldmann, N.; Hadzhiivanova, E.; Frank, U.; Dulski, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Dead Sea and its Pleistocene precursors act as amplifier lakes of climate change affecting the eastern Mediterranean region. The ~460 m long sediment core 5017-1, retrieved from the deepest part of the lake, ideally mirrors the climate variability of the last approximately 200-250 ka. In the current study, we focus on the upper part of the last interglacial Samra Formation (~135-70 ka BP; Waldmann et al., 2009) and the transition into the last glacial Lisan Formation (~70-14ka BP; e.g. Bartov et al., 2002). Overlying the ca 45 m thick main salt layered sequence deposited during the last interglacial, the analyzed ca 30 m thick interval in core 5017-1 is characterized by a lower ~20 m thick interval of predominant alternating aragonite and detrital marl (aad) with occasional intercalations of mass movement deposits, accumulated during temporary humid climatic conditions. The entire sequence is topped by an upper ~10 m thick interval of predominantly layered massive halite, reflecting a dryer climate. Micro-facies analysis on large-scale petrographic thin sections, XRF element scanning, grain size and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been carried out on this interval for detailed and high-resolution characterization of the sediments and interpretation in terms of depositional processes and their value as paleoclimate proxies. The finding of a most likely millennial-scale dry interval just before the beginning of the stratigraphically defined humid Lisan interval falls in agreement with a previously identified depositional hiatus and associated erosional unconformity in the shallower areas outcropping at the margins of the lake (Stein, 2001). However, the deposition of glacial-like aad sediments prior to this pronounced dry period stands in contrast to previous analyses on outcrops (Waldmann et al. 2009). Investigating sediments from the deep Dead Sea basin will hence allow understanding and better deciphering the depositional processes in relation with

  4. New Constraints from the Seychelles on the Timing and Magnitude of Peak Global Mean Sea Level during the Last Interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyverberg, K.; Dechnik, B.; Dutton, A.; Webster, J.; Zwartz, D.; Edwards, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Projecting the rate of future sea-level rise remains a primary challenge associated with continued climate change. However, uncertainties remain in our understanding of the rate of polar ice sheet retreat in warmer-than-present climates. To address this issue, we present a new sea level reconstruction from the tectonically stable granitic Seychelles based on Last Interglacial coral ages and elevations within their sedimentary and stratigraphic context, including estimates of paleo-water depth based on newly defined coralgal assemblages. The reef facies analyzed here has a narrow and shallow paleowater depth range (<2 m) providing increased control on the absolute position of sea level during this time period. Corrected for local glacial isostatic adjustment effects including the fingerprint associated with polar ice sheet mass loss, corals found in primary growth position within in situ coralgal reef framework confirm that global mean sea level (GMSL) was nearly 6 m above present early in the interglacial period. Each coral was dated in triplicate and screened for anomalous U-series geochemistry parameters. The combination of age-elevation data with the sedimentary micro and macro facies and stratigraphic analysis reveals a sea-level rise over 5-6 thousand years that is punctuated by repeated episodes of reef disturbance. These episodes are marked stratigraphically by coral rubble layers or extensive lateral encrustations of Millepora sp. that are infested with coral-dwelling barnacles. These disturbance layers may have been generated through internal reef processes and/or external agents, including coral disease, bleaching, predation, hurricanes, or sub-aerial exposure. In total, these new observations provide improved constraints on the timing, magnitude, and rates of sea-level rise during the Last Interglacial.

  5. Ages of fossil bones from British interglacial sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, B. J.; Collins, D.

    1975-01-01

    THE time gap between the upper limit of radiocarbon dating (???60,000 yr BP) and the lower limit of dates generally obtainable using the K-Ar method (???250,000 yr BP) accounts for the scarcity of dates for the last two interglaciations (the Ipswichian and Hoxnian of Britain; the Eemian and Holsteinian of northern Europe). Accordingly, the ages of such important fossils as the Swanscombe and Steinheim skulls can only be guessed at. For that reason, the adaptation of a method that may date these interglacial periods is highly desirable. We discuss here the application of a uranium-series dating technique pertaining to that span of time. ?? 1975 Nature Publishing Group.

  6. Glacial-interglacial vegetation change in the Zambezi catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, L. M.; Kuhlmann, H.

    2017-01-01

    Changes in the environment are thought to have had strong impact on human evolution. The pollen record of GeoB9311, retrieved offshore of the Zambezi River mouth, indicates glacial-interglacial changes in the vegetation of southern East Africa with enhanced forests in the coastal area during interglacials, more Afromontane forest and ericaceous bushland during glacials and an increase in mopane woodland during the transitional periods. C4 swamps, probably with papyrus, might have spread during the more humid phases of the glacial, while mangroves responded sensitively to changes in sea level. The spread of open ericaceous bushland and Afromontane forest during glacials is found for most of Southern Africa with the exception of the extreme south and southwest regions. In contrast to the western part of the continent, forest and woodland in East Africa did not completely disappear during the glacial. It seems that on a regional scale climatic perturbations of the vegetation are less severe than in West Africa.

  7. A White Nile megalake during the last interglacial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, Timothy T.; Williams, Martin A. J.; Mills, Stephanie C.; Duller, Geoff A. T.; Fifield, L. Keith; Haberlah, David; Tims, Stephen G.; Williams, Frances M.

    2014-05-01

    The eastern Sahara Desert of Africa is one of the most climatically sensitive areas on Earth, varying from lake-studded savannah woodland to hyperarid desert over the course of a glacial-interglacial cycle. In currently semiarid Sudan there is widespread evidence that a very large freshwater lake once filled the White Nile River valley (Barrows et al., 2014). Here we present the first quantitative estimate for the dimensions of the lake and a direct age for the emplacement of its shoreline. Using a profile dating approach with the cosmogenic nuclide 10Be, we estimate an exposure age of 109 ± 8 ka for this megalake, indicating that it probably formed during the last interglacial period. This age is supported by optically stimulated luminescence dating of Blue Nile paleochannels associated with the lake. Using a high-resolution digital elevation model, we estimate that the lake was more than 45,000 km2 in area, making it comparable to the largest freshwater lakes on Earth today. We attribute the lake's existence to seasonal flood pulses as a result of local damming of the White Nile by a more southern position of the Blue Nile and greatly increased precipitation associated with an enhanced monsoon. References Barrows, T.T., Williams, M.A.J., Mills, S.C., Duller, G.A.T., Fifield, L.K., Haberlah, D., Tims, S.G., Williams, F.M., 2014. A White Nile megalake during the last interglacial period. Geology. 10.1130/g35238.1

  8. Evidence for warmer interglacials in East Antarctic ice cores.

    PubMed

    Sime, L C; Wolff, E W; Oliver, K I C; Tindall, J C

    2009-11-19

    Stable isotope ratios of oxygen and hydrogen in the Antarctic ice core record have revolutionized our understanding of Pleistocene climate variations and have allowed reconstructions of Antarctic temperature over the past 800,000 years (800 kyr; refs 1, 2). The relationship between the D/H ratio of mean annual precipitation and mean annual surface air temperature is said to be uniform +/-10% over East Antarctica and constant with time +/-20% (refs 3-5). In the absence of strong independent temperature proxy evidence allowing us to calibrate individual ice cores, prior general circulation model (GCM) studies have supported the assumption of constant uniform conversion for climates cooler than that of the present day. Here we analyse the three available 340 kyr East Antarctic ice core records alongside input from GCM modelling. We show that for warmer interglacial periods the relationship between temperature and the isotopic signature varies among ice core sites, and that therefore the conversions must be nonlinear for at least some sites. Model results indicate that the isotopic composition of East Antarctic ice is less sensitive to temperature changes during warmer climates. We conclude that previous temperature estimates from interglacial climates are likely to be too low. The available evidence is consistent with a peak Antarctic interglacial temperature that was at least 6 K higher than that of the present day -approximately double the widely quoted 3 +/- 1.5 K (refs 5, 6).

  9. Aboveground activity rhythm in Arctic black-capped marmot ( Marmota camtschatica bungei Katschenko 1901) under polar day conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Youri; Ramousse, Raymond; Le Berre, Michel; Vassiliev, Vladimir; Solomonov, Nikita

    2001-04-01

    Daily aboveground activity of wild black-capped marmots of Yakutia ( Marmota camtschatica bungei) was recorded under 'polar day' conditions at 71°56' N and 127°19' E (north of the Polar Circle). From the beginning of May until the end of August, the sun was permanently above or close to the horizon. However under this condition of continuous lighting, the aboveground activity of these arctic hibernating mammals was periodic. Onset and end of activity showed marked changes throughout the seasons. Activity time increased strongly from hibernation emergence until the end of July and then decreased slowly until onset of hibernation. Below daily mean temperatures of 5 °C, activity started when the sun was 35° above the horizon, and ended when it dropped below 28°. When daily mean temperatures were above 5 °C, activity onset was synchronised with a solar altitude around 17-18° and activity ended at 10°. Activity onset was more precise relative to the solar altitude than the end of activity. This may be explained by late feeding bouts, following a midday thermal stress. In absence of rapid natural light-dark (LD) transitions that occur at civil twilight, our results suggest that the activity pattern of black-capped marmots may be synchronised by the light cycle through the solar altitude and ambient temperature.

  10. Accuracy of Ground-based measurements in polar vortex conditions: Comparison to TOMS/OMI observations during 1979-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Kuttippurath, Jayanarayanan; Nair, Prijitha J.; Chakroborty, Arun

    2017-04-01

    We estimate the bias and drifts of ground-based total column ozone (TCO) measurements for 11 stations in Antarctica, with the observations carried out in winter/spring conditions inside the polar vortex during 1979-2013 period. This is the first comparison exercise in the polar vortex conditions. The ground-based measurements (GBM) from Dobson, Brewer, SAOZ and DOAS spectrometers were used for the analysis. In general, the GBMs show good agreement with satellite measurements at all stations for each instrument where correlation is higher than 0.94. Although bias between GBM and satellite measurements are generally station dependent, SAOZ shows relatively large and Dobson shows relatively small bias. There is no specific pattern in drifts and are within ±0.09% at all stations with Dobson showing the least and DOAS exhibiting the highest drift. The relative difference (RD) between Satellite and ground based measurements show dependence on satellite solar zenith angle (SZA) (except Dobson) and temperature (except Dobson and SAOZ) and thus also contributing to the bias in the measurements.

  11. The Last Interglacial to Glacial Transition, Togiak Bay, Southwestern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Darrell S.; Manley, William F.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Hu, Feng Sheng; Preece, Shari J.; Westgate, John A.; Forman, Steve L.

    2001-03-01

    An 18-m-high coastal bluff at Togiak Bay (northwestern Bristol Bay, southwestern Alaska) exposes marine, lacustrine, fluvial, glacial, volcanic, and organic deposits that record the ∼50,000-year-long transition from the peak of the last interglaciation to the early Wisconsin glaciation. The base of the section is dominated by stratified sand and silt extending up to 4.3 m above sea level; marine diatoms are present, and pollen assemblages are characterized by relatively high percentages of Picea, Alnus, and Betula and low percentages of Poaceae and Cyperaceae. The marine sediment was probably deposited during the peak of marine oxygen-isotope stage (OIS) 5e. An infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) age of 151,000±13,000 yr from near the base of the exposure is permissive of this correlation. The marine sand and silt are overlain by 0.8 m of peaty silt with diatoms that record a transition from marine to lacustrine conditions. During this interval, Poaceae and Cyperaceae dominate the pollen assemblages, and Picea and shrubs are nearly absent, suggesting that herb tundra occupied the landscape. This interval probably encompasses OIS 5d on the basis of the herb tundra and an IRSL age of 119,000±10,000 yr from 60 cm below the marine/lacustrine transition. The organic mud is overlain by 3.1 m of stratified sand and organic silt that apparently record shallowing of the lake; reappearance of spruce and shrubs (=OIS 5c?); and subsequent deepening of the lake (=OIS 5b?); followed by aggradation of a floodplain (=OIS 5a?), which was dry at the time basaltic lava buried the site. Thermoluminescence analyses on lava-baked sediment indicate that the eruption occurred 70,000±10,000 yr ago. Sometime thereafter, but prior to 53,600 14C yr B.P. an outlet of the Ahklun Mountains ice cap advanced over the site and deposited ∼7 m of bouldery ice-contact drift. The sedimentary sequence contains at least four tephra beds. Major- and trace-element chemistry provide a basis for

  12. Rocket observations of positive ions during polar mesosphere winter echo conditions at Andenes in January 2005; first analysis and interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brattli, A.; Rapp, M.; Singer, W.; Lattek, R.; Friedrich, M.; Havnes, O.; Blix, T. A.; Svenes, K. R.

    2005-08-01

    On Janurary 18, 2005, two instrumented miniaturised rocket payloads, each with a Positive Ion Probe (PIP) and a Faraday rotation/differential absorption experiment, were launched from Andøya Rocket Range (69°N). The instrumented payloads were launched into conditions with Polar Mesosphere Winter Echoes (PMWE) as part of a salvo of meteorological rockets measuring temperature and wind using falling spheres and chaff. Layers of PMWE were detected in the altitude range 55-77 km by the 53.5 MHz ALWIN radar. Fluctuations in the ion density, as measured in situ by the instrumented payloads, show that there was turbulence inside the PMWE layers, but not above/below and between. Data from the PIPs are analysed and related to the geophysical conditions, as observed with the ALWIN radar and meteorological rockets.

  13. Glacial-interglacial shifts in global and regional precipitation δ18O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasechko, S.; Lechler, A.; Pausata, F. S. R.; Fawcett, P. J.; Gleeson, T.; Cendón, D. I.; Galewsky, J.; LeGrande, A. N.; Risi, C.; Sharp, Z. D.; Welker, J. M.; Werner, M.; Yoshimura, K.

    2015-03-01

    Previous analyses of past climate changes have often been based on site-specific isotope records from speleothems, ice cores, sediments and groundwaters. However, in most studies these dispersed records have not been integrated and synthesized in a comprehensive manner to explore the spatial patterns of precipitation isotope changes from the last ice age to more recent times. Here we synthesize 88 globally-distributed groundwater, cave calcite, and ice core isotope records spanning the last ice age to the late-Holocene. Our data-driven review shows that reconstructed precipitation δ18O changes from the last ice age to the late-Holocene range from -7.1‰ (ice age δ18O < late-Holocene δ18O) to +1.8‰ (ice age δ18O > late-Holocene δ18O) with wide regional variability. The majority (75%) of reconstructions have lower ice age δ18O values than late-Holocene δ18O values. High-magnitude, negative glacial-interglacial precipitation δ18O shifts (ice age δ18O < late-Holocene δ18O by more than 3‰) are common at high latitudes, high altitudes and continental interiors. Conversely, lower-magnitude, positive glacial-interglacial precipitation δ18O shifts (ice age δ18O > late-Holocene δ18O by less than 2‰) are most common along subtropical coasts. Broad, global patterns of glacial-interglacial precipitation δ18O shifts are consistent with stronger-than-modern isotopic distillation of air masses during the last ice age, likely impacted by larger global temperature differences between the tropics and the poles. Further, to complement our synthesis of proxy-record precipitation δ18O, we compiled isotope enabled general circulation model simulations of recent and last glacial maximum climate states. Simulated precipitation δ18O from five general circulation models show better inter-model and model-observation agreement in the sign of δ18O changes from the last ice age to present day in temperate and polar regions than in the tropics. Further model precipitation

  14. Driving Stresses in Mars Polar Ice Caps and Conditions for Ice Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Saba, Jack L.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of the topography of the North polar ice cap by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) show that the ice cap is 2950 +/- 200 meters thick. The volume of the cap is about 1.2 x 10(exp 6) cu km covering an area of 1.04 x 10(exp 6) sq km, which is about 40 percent of the Greenland ice sheet in volume and 62 percent in area. The composition of the Northern cap was previously concluded to be predominately H2O, rather than CO2 ice, based on thermodynamic considerations of the insustainablity of CO2 during summer. Principal questions about the cap are: does the ice move and at what rate, is the cap currently growing or depleting in volume, and how and when was the cap formed? Recent research on terrestrial ice sheets indicates that rates of ice deformation at the low stress values characteristic of ice sheets are significantly higher than the rates given by the classic viscous-plastic flow laws commonly used.

  15. Polar oceans in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A; Tarling, Geraint A

    2017-06-05

    Most of Earth's surface is blue or white, but how much of each would depend on the time of observation. Our planet has been through phases of snowball (all frozen), greenhouse (all liquid seas) and icehouse (frozen and liquid). Even during current icehouse conditions, the extent of ice versus water has changed considerably between ice ages and interglacial periods. Water has been vital for life on Earth and has driven and been influenced by transitions between greenhouse and icehouse. However, neither the possession of water nor having liquid and frozen seas are unique to Earth (Figure 1). Frozen water oceans on the moons Enceladus and Europa (and possibly others) and the liquid and frozen hydrocarbon oceans on Titan probably represent the most likely areas to find extraterrestrial life. We know very little about life in Earth's polar oceans, yet they are the engine of the thermohaline 'conveyor-belt', driving global circulation of heat, oxygen, carbon and nutrients as well as setting sea level through change in ice-mass balance. In regions of polar seas, where surface water is particularly cold and dense, it sinks to generate a tropic-ward flow on the ocean floor of the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Cold water holds more gas, so this sinking water exports O2 and nutrients, thereby supporting life in the deep sea, as well as soaking up CO2 from the atmosphere. Water from mid-depths at lower latitudes flows in to replace the sinking polar surface water. This brings heat. The poles are cold because they receive the least energy from the sun, and this extreme light climate varies on many different time scales. To us, the current warm, interglacial conditions seem normal, yet such phases have represented only ∼10% of Homo sapiens' existence. Variations in Earth's orbit (so called 'Milankovitch cycles') have driven cyclical alternation of glaciations (ice ages) and warmer interglacials. Despite this, Earth's polar regions have been our planet's most

  16. Enhanced Southern Westerly Activity During the Last Glacial Interglacial Transition in SW Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, P. I.; Villa-Martinez, R. P.; Cardenas, M. L.; Moy, C. M.

    2008-12-01

    Much of the ongoing controversy regarding synchrony or bipolar asynchrony has centered on the timing and structure of temperature changes during the Last Glacial Interglacial Transition (LGIT) in the southern mid- latitudes, in particular the Patagonian region (40°-56°S) of South America. South America is the only continuous continental landmass in the Southern Hemisphere that intersects the entire westerly wind belt and lies in the critical climatic interface between mid- to high latitudes. The region between 50°- 55°S is of particular interest considering its proximity to the polar front and the southern margin of the westerly winds, and the possibility of monitoring paleoclimate changes at or near this important oceanic- atmospheric boundary. Present and past climate studies, including modeling simulations, have emphasized that interactions between changes in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the southern westerly winds, sea ice, and the polar front are important drivers for deep ocean circulation changes, variations in atmospheric CO2, and equator-to-pole temperature and pressure gradients. Yet, the behavior of the westerly winds and the adjacent Southern Ocean during the LGIT is still poorly understood despite their fundamental influence on modern hemispheric and global climate. In this study we compare sediment cores from small closed-basin lakes and a bog from the Ultima Esperanza area of SW Patagonia (52°S), an area affected solely by the southern westerlies. Lake sediment cores from three lakes show lacustrine sedimentation over the last 17,000 years. In contrast, the Dumestre bog shows subaerial peat deposition since 15 ka interrupted by a prominent lacustrine phase dated between 14.5-11.5 ka. During this interval palynological records indicate the preponderance of cold-resistant herbs, along with aquatic taxa, followed by a rapid expansion of Nothofagus woodlands/forests, a lake regressive phase in Dumestre, and disappearance of laminated calcite

  17. Sea surface temperature variability of the Peru-Chile Current during the previous four interglacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniupan, M.; Martinez-Mendez, G.; Lamy, F.; Hebbeln, D.; Mohtadi, M.

    2012-12-01

    There are several periods during the Quaternary that were characterized by warmer than present climate and higher sea level that serve as an analogue for future global warming scenarios. These include the Marine isotope Stage (MIS) 5.5, MIS 9.3, and MIS 11.3. Little is known about past sea surface temperatures (SST) during these intervals in the Southern Hemisphere, particularly in the Southeast Pacific. Here, we present a new alkenone-derived SST record from marine sediment core GeoB15016 located beneath the Peru-Chile Current (PCC). The PCC plays a critical role in the Southern Hemisphere surface circulation as it connects the low and high latitudes by transporting sub-polar water masses and thus, a high-latitude climate signal towards the tropics. Core GeoB15016 was recovered with the sea floor drill rig MARUM-MeBo at 956 m water depth off northern Chile (27°29.48'S; 71°07.58'W). We analyzed the uppermost ca 25 meters composite depth that extend back to ~400,000 years ago. Our record is the first Chilean margin record extending back to MIS 11. The stratigraphy is well constrained by correlating benthic oxygen isotope data to the global Lisiecki-Raymo stack. Glacial-interglacial SST amplitudes are in the order of 6°C. During MIS 5, 7, 9 and 11, the record reaches SST maxima of ca. 3°C warmer than present annual mean SST in this area. Our results suggest a substantial warming of the PCC over past interglacials that may reflect reduced advection of subantarctic surface water from the south and/or enhanced tropical influence and/or decreased upwelling intensity.

  18. Where clocks are redundant: weak circadian mechanisms in reindeer living under polar photic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oort, Bob E. H.; Tyler, Nicholas J. C.; Gerkema, Menno P.; Folkow, Lars; Stokkan, Karl-Arne

    2007-03-01

    Biological rhythms are a result of interplay between endogenous clocks and the ambient light-dark (LD) cycle. Biological timing in resident polar organisms presents a conundrum because these experience distinct daily LD cycles for only a few weeks each year. We measured locomotor activity in reindeer, Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus (SR, n = 5 and 6) and R. tarandus tarandus (NR, n = 6), ranging freely at 78 and 70°N, respectively, continuously throughout 1 year using data loggers. NR, but not SR, are gregarious which enabled us to examine the integrated effects of differences in social organisation and the photic environment at two different latitudes on the organisation of activity. In both sub-species, ultradian bouts of activity and inactivity alternated across the 24-h day throughout the year. This pattern was modified by the LD cycle in NR but barely at all in SR. Periodogram analysis revealed significant ultradian rhythmicity in both sub-species; the frequency of daily cycles of activity increased from three per day in winter to nearly five in summer. We conclude that this increase, and a concomitant increase in the level of daily activity, reflected the seasonal increase in the animals’ appetite and the quality of their forage. Secondly, the combination, most evident in SR, of a weak photic response, weak circadian mechanisms and a weak social synchronization reduces the constraints of biological timing in an environment which is effectively non-rhythmic most of the year and permits expression of the basic ultradian pattern of ruminant activity. Third, the weaker 24-h rhythmicity in SR compared to NR indicates a latitudinal decrease in circadian organization and photic responsiveness in Rangifer.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA analysis and numerical chromosome condition in human oocytes and polar bodies.

    PubMed

    Gianaroli, Luca; Luiselli, Donata; Crivello, Anna Maria; Lang, Martin; Ferraretti, Anna Pia; De Fanti, Sara; Magli, M Cristina; Romeo, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) segregation in human oocytes, the level of heteroplasmy in the three products of meioses, polar bodies (PBs) and corresponding oocytes, was assessed by studying the hypervariable region I (HVRI) of the D-loop region. The DNA from 122 PBs and 51 oocytes from 16 patients was amplified by whole genome amplification (WGA). An aliquot of the WGA product was used to assess aneuploidy, and another aliquot to study mtDNA. The HVRI was amplified and sequenced with an efficiency of 75.4 and 63%, respectively, in PBs, and of 100% in oocytes. The comparison with the mtDNA sequences from blood of the individual donors showed full correspondence of polymorphisms with the matching oocytes, whilst in PBs the degree of concordance dropped to 89.6%. Haplogroups were inferred for all 16 patients. Of the 89 diagnosed PBs from the 13 patients belonging to macrohaplogroup R, 23 were euploid and 66 aneuploid. The incidence of total anomalies was significantly lower in haplogroup H (6.5%) when compared with haplogroups J and T (17.6 and 13.4% respectively; P < 0.001). In haplogroup J, hypoaneuploidy occurred more frequently than hyperaneuploidy. In the three patients belonging to haplogroup N*, 81% of PBs were aneuploid with similar rates of chromosome hypoaneuploidy and hyperaneuploidy. The presence of mtDNA base changes confined to PBs could reflect a selection mechanism against severe mtDNA mutations, while permitting a high evolution rate that could result in bioenergetic diversity. The different susceptibility to aneuploidy by some haplogroups strongly supports this hypothesis.

  20. The Preboreal-like Asian monsoon climate in the early last interglacial period recorded from the Dark Cave, Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiuyang; He, Yaoqi; Wang, Xiaoyan; Sun, Xiaoshuang; Hong, Hui; Liu, Juan; Yu, Tsai-Luen; Li, Zhizhong; Shen, Chuan-Chou

    2017-08-01

    Transitions of glacial-interglacial cycles are critical periods for Quaternary climate shifts. Here, we present new, decadal resolution Asian summer monsoon (ASM) record from three stalagmites obtained from the Dark Cave in southwestern China over 130-114 thousand years ago (ka, before CE 1950). Chronology was anchored by 28 230Th dates with typical uncertainties of ±0.3-1.0 kyr, allowing an assessment of timing and transition of climate changes during the onset and end of the last interglacial. An agreement between this new and previous stalagmite δ18O records supports that summer insolation predominates orbital-scale ASM evolution. A 2-3 kyr-long gradually increasing ASM period, analogous to the classical Preboreal episode in the early Holocene, follows the termination of a weak monsoon interval at 129.0 ± 0.8 ka. This finding suggests a strong influence of high-latitude ice-sheet dynamics on Asian monsoonal conditions during the early interglacial period. An abrupt end of the marine isotope stage 5e at 118.8 ± 0.6 ka was probably caused by the internal climate system threshold effects.

  1. Insights into North Atlantic deep water formation during the peak interglacial interval of Marine Isotope Stage 9 (MIS 9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokeddem, Zohra; McManus, Jerry F.

    2017-01-01

    Foraminifera abundance and stable isotope records from ODP Site 984 (61.25°N, 24.04°W, 1648 m) in the North Atlantic are used to reconstruct surface circulation variations and the relative strength of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation over the period spanning the peak warmth of Marine Interglacial Stage (MIS) 9e ( 324-336 ka). This interval includes the preceding deglaciation, Termination 4 (T4), and the subsequent glacial inception of MIS 9d. The records indicate a greatly reduced contribution of NADW during T4, as observed in more recent deglaciations. In contrast with the most recent deglaciation, the lack of a significant NADW signal extended from T4 well into the peak interglacial MIS 9e and persisted nearly until the transition to the subsequent glacial stage MIS 9d. Although NADW formation resumed during MIS 9e, only depths greater than 2000 m appear to have been ventilated. The poorly ventilated intermediate depth of Site 984 (<2000 m) may have resulted on one hand from a general reduction of deep water ventilation by NADW during the study interval or, on the other hand, from different pathways of the spread of newly formed NADW that bypassed the study location. The intermediate depths may have also been invaded by southern-sourced waters as the formation of intermediate depth NADW weakened. The absence of any significant NADW signal at the water depth of Site 984 during the climatic optimum contrasts sharply with subsequent interglacial peaks (MIS 5e and the Holocene). Despite the perturbed intermediate depth circulation, oceanic heat transport northeastward was not interrupted and may have contributed to the relatively mild interglacial conditions of MIS 9e.

  2. Geological "Ground Truth" of Sea-level Highstand Events During Warm Interglaciations (MIS 11 and 5e): Taking the Punch out of Proxy Precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearty, P. J.

    2005-12-01

    High-resolution sea-level records for marine isotope stages (MIS) 11 and 5e from coastal outcrops in Bahamas, Bermuda, Hawaii, and Western Australia provide physical confirmation of extreme ice-melting events during Pleistocene interglacials. Field evidence indicates MIS 11 sea level rose in a series of oscillations to c. +20 m, while that of MIS 5e reached its maximum of +6-10 m. Because these were brief events (100s yrs), their true magnitude is generally muted or obscured in deep-sea oxygen isotope records; generally averaged over thousands of years by the combined effects of sampling, bioturbation, and sedimentation rates. Further unresolvable variables such as temperature and salinity further cloud the isotope proxy record. Thus, the tangible rock record is of greatest importance in understanding the nature of these extreme events. Geomorphology, sedimentary structures, taphonomy of and dating of organisms, and petrology provide ground truth at field sites. Sea-level highstands preserve terraces and benches by erosion and subsequent deposition of sub- and intertidal sediments. Fenestral porosity is a measure of intertidal wetting and drying of sand, while decimetre-scale, high-angle cross beds of poorly-sorted sand and gravel indicate shallow subtidal conditions. In situ coral heads describe similar subtidal conditions. Delicate, sometimes partially articulated skeletons of birds and reptiles in sea caves reveal a protected shoreline. An early generation of isopachous, fibrous cement verifies the presence of marine phreatic water over a sustained period of time. These features, often misinterpreted (McMurtry, 2004, AGU Fall Meeting, OS21E-06), categorically exclude emplacement by tsunami waves. Oceanic isotope records cannot produce an equivalent level of resolution of short, extreme events via (in terms of age, duration, rates of sea-level and ice-volume changes), thus shifting the `burden of proof' to proxy methods to identify such events. In our quest to

  3. Glacial-interglacial changes in H218O, HDO and deuterium excess - results from the fully coupled ECHAM5/MPI-OM Earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, M.; Haese, B.; Xu, X.; Zhang, X.; Butzin, M.; Lohmann, G.

    2016-02-01

    In this study we present the first results of a new isotope-enabled general circulation model set-up. The model consists of the fully coupled ECHAM5/MPI-OM atmosphere-ocean model, enhanced by the JSBACH interactive land surface scheme and an explicit hydrological discharge scheme to close the global water budget. Stable water isotopes H218O and HDO have been incorporated into all relevant model components. Results of two equilibrium simulations under pre-industrial and Last Glacial Maximum conditions are analysed and compared to observational data and paleoclimate records for evaluating the model's performance in simulating spatial and temporal variations in the isotopic composition of the Earth's water cycle. For the pre-industrial climate, many aspects of the simulation results of meteoric waters are in good to very good agreement with both observations and earlier atmosphere-only simulations. The model is capable of adequately simulating the large spread in the isotopic composition of precipitation between low and high latitudes. A comparison to available ocean data also shows a good model-data agreement; however, a strong bias of overly depleted ocean surface waters is detected for the Arctic region. Simulation results under Last Glacial Maximum boundary conditions also fit to the wealth of available isotope records from polar ice cores, speleothems, as well as marine calcite data. Data-model evaluation of the isotopic composition in precipitation reveals a good match of the model results and indicates that the temporal glacial-interglacial isotope-temperature relation was substantially lower than the present spatial gradient for most mid- to high-latitudinal regions. As compared to older atmosphere-only simulations, a remarkable improvement is achieved for the modelling of the deuterium excess signal in Antarctic ice cores. Our simulation results indicate that cool sub-tropical and mid-latitudinal sea surface temperatures are key for this progress. A recently

  4. Effects of Solar Wind Conditions on the Plasma Wake Within a Polar Crater: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    As the solar wind sweeps horizontally past a shadowed lunar crater it simultaneously diffuses toward the surface through an ambipolar process, forming a plasma wake (e.g., Figure 1). Importantly, the resulting electric field structure diverts solar wind protons toward the cold crater floor where they may represent a source of surficial hydrogen. We present a handful of two-dimensional kinetic simulations exploring the range of wake structures and surface particle fluxes possible under various background plasma conditions.

  5. A high-resolution mid-Pleistocene temperature record from Arctic Lake El'gygytgyn: a 50 kyr super interglacial from MIS 33 to MIS 31?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wet, Gregory A.; Castañeda, Isla S.; DeConto, Robert M.; Brigham-Grette, Julie

    2016-02-01

    Previous periods of extreme warmth in Earth's history are of great interest in light of current and predicted anthropogenic warming. Numerous so called ;super interglacial; intervals, with summer temperatures significantly warmer than today, have been identified in the 3.6 million year (Ma) sediment record from Lake El'gygytgyn, northeast Russia. To date, however, a high-resolution paleotemperature reconstruction from any of these super interglacials is lacking. Here we present a paleotemperature reconstruction based on branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) from Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 35 to MIS 29, including super interglacial MIS 31. To investigate this period in detail, samples were analyzed with an unprecedented average sample resolution of 500 yrs from MIS 33 to MIS 30. Our results suggest the entire period currently defined as MIS 33-31 (∼1114-1062 kyr BP) was characterized by generally warm and highly variable conditions at the lake, at times out of phase with Northern Hemisphere summer insolation, and that cold ;glacial; conditions during MIS 32 lasted only a few thousand years. Close similarities are seen with coeval records from high southern latitudes, supporting the suggestion that the interval from MIS 33 to MIS 31 was an exceptionally long interglacial (Teitler et al., 2015). Based on brGDGT temperatures from Lake El'gygytgyn (this study and unpublished results), warming in the western Arctic during MIS 31 was matched only by MIS 11 during the Pleistocene.

  6. Luminescence dating of interglacial coastal depositional systems: Recent developments and future avenues of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamothe, Michel

    2016-08-01

    luminescence-dated coastal feature of all, as the chronology of the sea level markers is crucial to assess global eustatic sea level variations through the course of the last interglacial. Nevertheless, the observed abundance of young (100-120 ka) luminescence ages for presumed MIS5e sediments may underline methodological issues, and/or reflect the higher preservation potential of late regressive sequences. On the other hand, the occurrence of geographically distant reports of MIS5a high stand might reflect a true eustatic origin for this event. Age analysis supports the impression of general reliability of luminescence for the timing of former sea level high stands. There is a clear need to address issues in dose rate variability, in the phenomenology of fading in feldspar, and in the behaviour of luminescence growth with dose, both in laboratory and natural conditions. These could be addressed and properly evaluated by dating different minerals, as multiple or single grains, with consequent variable internal dose rates. More robust practices in the application of luminescence dating techniques could eventually constrain the age uncertainties to no better than 2-3%. Therefore, the strength of luminescence as a dating tool is more in terms of its extended age range and the ubiquity of datable material.

  7. Ice Water Classification Using Statistical Distribution Based Conditional Random Fields in RADARSAT-2 Dual Polarization Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Li, F.; Zhang, S.; Hao, W.; Zhu, T.; Yuan, L.; Xiao, F.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, Statistical Distribution based Conditional Random Fields (STA-CRF) algorithm is exploited for improving marginal ice-water classification. Pixel level ice concentration is presented as the comparison of methods based on CRF. Furthermore, in order to explore the effective statistical distribution model to be integrated into STA-CRF, five statistical distribution models are investigated. The STA-CRF methods are tested on 2 scenes around Prydz Bay and Adélie Depression, where contain a variety of ice types during melt season. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method can resolve sea ice edge well in Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ) and show a robust distinction of ice and water.

  8. Coupled Warming and Drought in the American Southwest During Long mid-Pleistocene Interglacials (MIS 11 and 13)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawcett, P. J.; Werne, J.; Anderson, R.; Heikoop, J.; Brown, E.; Hurley, L.; Smith, S.; Berke, M.; Soltow, H.; Goff, F.; Geissman, J.; Woldegabriel, G.; Fessenden, J.; Cisneros-Dozal, M.; Allen, C. D.

    2008-12-01

    timescales, superimposed on future anthropogenic warming. Intervals of mudcrack facies representing significant drought conditions occur during or just after the warmest phases of the two interglacials. This past coupling between warm temperatures and extended drought in the SW as a natural feature of long interglacials is consistent with recent predictions of extended Dust-Bowl-like conditions in the SW as a response to global warming.

  9. Co-variation of nitrogen isotopes and redox states through glacial-interglacial cycles in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Tracy M.; Wright, James D.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2013-07-01

    In all aquatic environments, nitrogen cycling within the water column is strongly influenced by oxygen. We hypothesize that the nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of organic matter deposited in the sediments is a proxy for the redox state of the water column at the time of deposition. We tested the hypothesis by measuring the bulk sedimentary δ15N values in a drill core from the Black Sea, a basin that alternates between oxic, less saline conditions and anoxic, marine conditions on glacial-interglacial time scales. We reconstructed these changes in Black Sea redox conditions using sedimentary δ15N, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), redox-sensitive metals, and micropaleontological data from a deep-sea core (DSDP Site 380). The sedimentary data reveal that during the transitions between oxic and anoxic conditions, δ15N values increased relative to the preceding and succeeding quasi-steady-state oxic and anoxic periods. The results indicate that the reciprocal transitional states from anoxic to oxic conditions were accompanied by intense denitrification; during the quasi-stable oxic and anoxic states (characterized by glacial fresh water and interglacial marine conditions) nitrification and complete nitrate utilization, respectively, dominate the nitrogen cycle. While other factors may influence the δ15N record, our results support the hypothesis that the variations in nitrogen isotopic composition of organic matter are strongly influenced by changes in redox state in the Black Sea subphotic zone on glacial-interglacial time scales, and can be explained by a relatively simple model describing the effects of oxygen on the microbial processes that drive the nitrogen cycle in marine ecosystems. Our model suggests that the nitrogen isotopic composition of marine sediments, on geological time scales, can be used to reconstruct the redox state of the overlying water column.

  10. Predicting solvation free energies and thermodynamics in polar solvents and mixtures using a solvation-layer interface condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molavi Tabrizi, Amirhossein; Goossens, Spencer; Mehdizadeh Rahimi, Ali; Knepley, Matthew; Bardhan, Jaydeep P.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate that with two small modifications, the popular dielectric continuum model is capable of predicting, with high accuracy, ion solvation thermodynamics (Gibbs free energies, entropies, and heat capacities) in numerous polar solvents. We are also able to predict ion solvation free energies in water-co-solvent mixtures over available concentration series. The first modification to the classical dielectric Poisson model is a perturbation of the macroscopic dielectric-flux interface condition at the solute-solvent interface: we add a nonlinear function of the local electric field, giving what we have called a solvation-layer interface condition (SLIC). The second modification is including the microscopic interface potential (static potential) in our model. We show that the resulting model exhibits high accuracy without the need for fitting solute atom radii in a state-dependent fashion. Compared to experimental results in nine water-co-solvent mixtures, SLIC predicts transfer free energies to within 2.5 kJ/mol. The co-solvents include both protic and aprotic species, as well as biologically relevant denaturants such as urea and dimethylformamide. Furthermore, our results indicate that the interface potential is essential to reproduce entropies and heat capacities. These and previous tests of the SLIC model indicate that it is a promising dielectric continuum model for accurate predictions in a wide range of conditions.

  11. Methane excess production in oxygen-rich polar water and a model of cellular conditions for this paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, E.; Thoms, S.; Beszczynska-Möller, A.; Nöthig, E. M.; Kattner, G.

    2015-09-01

    Summer sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean has undergone a reduction in the last decade exposing the sea surface to unforeseen environmental changes. Melting sea ice increases water stratification and induces nutrient limitation, which is also known to play a crucial role in methane formation in oxygenated surface water. We report on an excess of methane in the marginal ice zone in the western Fram Strait. Our study is based on measurements of oxygen, methane, DMSP, nitrate and phosphate concentrations as well as on phytoplankton composition and light transmission, conducted along the 79°N oceanographic transect, in the western part of the Fram Strait and in Northeast Water Polynya region off Greenland. Between the eastern Fram Strait, where Atlantic water enters from the south and the western Fram Strait, where Polar water enters from the north, different nutrient limitations occurred and consequently different bloom conditions were established. Ongoing sea ice melting enhances the environmental differences between both water masses and initiates regenerated production in the western Fram Strait. We show that in this region methane is in situ produced while DMSP (dimethylsulfoniopropionate) released from sea ice may serve as a precursor for the methane formation. The methane production occured despite high oxygen concentrations in this water masses. As the metabolic activity (respiration) of unicellular organisms explains the presence of anaerobic conditions in the cellular environment we present a theoretical model which explains the maintenance of anaerobic conditions for methane formation inside bacterial cells, despite enhanced oxygen concentrations in the environment.

  12. Pyrite sulfur isotopes reveal glacial-interglacial environmental changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquier, Virgil; Sansjofre, Pierre; Rabineau, Marina; Revillon, Sidonie; Houghton, Jennifer; Fike, David A.

    2017-06-01

    The sulfur biogeochemical cycle plays a key role in regulating Earth’s surface redox through diverse abiotic and biological reactions that have distinctive stable isotopic fractionations. As such, variations in the sulfur isotopic composition (δ34S) of sedimentary sulfate and sulfide phases over Earth history can be used to infer substantive changes to the Earth’s surface environment, including the rise of atmospheric oxygen. Such inferences assume that individual δ34S records reflect temporal changes in the global sulfur cycle; this assumption may be well grounded for sulfate-bearing minerals but is less well established for pyrite-based records. Here, we investigate alternative controls on the sedimentary sulfur isotopic composition of marine pyrite by examining a 300-m drill core of Mediterranean sediments deposited over the past 500,000 y and spanning the last five glacial-interglacial periods. Because this interval is far shorter than the residence time of marine sulfate, any change in the sulfur isotopic record preserved in pyrite (δ34Spyr) necessarily corresponds to local environmental changes. The stratigraphic variations (>76‰) in the isotopic data reported here are among the largest ever observed in pyrite, and are in phase with glacial-interglacial sea level and temperature changes. In this case, the dominant control appears to be glacial-interglacial variations in sedimentation rates. These results suggest that there exist important but previously overlooked depositional controls on sedimentary sulfur isotope records, especially associated with intervals of substantial sea level change. This work provides an important perspective on the origin of variability in such records and suggests meaningful paleoenvironmental information can be derived from pyrite δ34S records.

  13. Orbital forcing of the marine isotope stage 9 interglacial.

    PubMed

    Stirling, C H; Esat, T M; Lambeck, K; McCulloch, M T; Blake, S G; Lee, D C; Halliday, A N

    2001-01-12

    Milankovitch orbital forcing theory has been used to assign time scales to many paleoclimate records. However, the validity of this theory remains uncertain, and independent sea-level chronologies used to test its applicability have been restricted largely to the past approximately 135,000 years. Here, we report U-series ages for coral reefs formed on Henderson Island during sea-level high-stands occurring at approximately 630,000 and approximately 330,000 years ago. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that interglacial climates are forced by Northern Hemisphere summer solar insolation centered at 65 degrees N latitude, as predicted by Milankovitch theory.

  14. Nucleation and growth of crystals under cirrus and polar stratospheric cloud conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, John; Queen, Brian; Teets, Edward; Fahey, James

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory studies examine phase changes of hygroscopic substances which occur as aerosol in stratosphere and troposphere (sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, nitric acid, sulfuric acid), under controlled conditions, in samples volume 1 to 10(exp -4) ml. Crystallization of salts from supersaturated solutions is examined by slowly evaporating a solution drop on a substrate, under controlled relative humidity, until self nucleation occurs; controlled nucleation of ice in a mm capillary U-tube gives a measured ice crystallization velocity at known supercooling. Two states of crystallization occur for regions where hydrates exist. It is inferred that all of the materials readily exist as supersaturated/supercooled solutions; the degree of metastability appears to be slightly enhanced by inclusion of aircraft produced soot. The crystallization velocity is taken as a measure of viscosity. Results suggest an approach to a glass transition at high molality, supersaturation and/or supercooling within the range of atmospheric interest. It is hypothesized that surface reactions occur more readily on solidified particles - either crystalline or glass, whereas volume reactions are more important on droplets with sufficiently low viscosity and volume diffusivity. Implications are examined for optical properties of such particles in the atmosphere. In a separate experiment, crystal growth was examined in a modified thermal vapor diffusion chamber over the range of cirrus temperature (-30 to -70 C) and under controlled supersaturation and air pressure. The crystals grew at a velocity of 1-2 microns/s, thickness 60-70 micron, in the form of thin column crystals. Design criteria are given for a system to investigate particle growth down to -100 C, (PSC temperatures) where nitric acid particles can be grown under similar control and in the form of hydrate crystals.

  15. Last Interglacial (MIS5e) hydrographic shifts linked to meltwater discharges from the East Greenland margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, Anastasia; Bauch, Henning A.; Van Nieuwenhove, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    The East Greenland Current (EGC) plays a key role in transporting polar water from the Arctic to convectional sites of the Iceland and Labrador seas. Ongoing melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) as well as the Arctic sea ice prompts freshening of the EGC and accumulation of low-density water in the subpolar North Atlantic, thus affecting the stabilities of water mass overturning and subsequent northward heat transfer. To assess natural eastern GIS dynamics and possible freshwater-induced regional oceanic reorganizations we analyzed several sediment sequences from the poorly investigated area along the eastern Greenland margin and the western Nordic Seas. Records span the last interglacial (LIG, MIS5e) cycle, including deglacial Termination 2 and the LIG climatic optimum. On a global scale, the latter is believed to have been warmer than present, with a higher sea level, and may, therefore, serve as a promising analogue for future hydrographic changes. Based on various proxy data (stable isotopes, planktic foraminiferal assemblages, ice-rafted debris) our reconstructions support the notion of a "two-step development" of Termination 2 which underwent severe surface freshening in the subpolar North Atlantic. This is shown in extremely light oxygen isotopic values registered all along the eastern Greenland margin during early MIS5e, which are indicative for pronounced eastern/central GIS retreat and a further propagation of the resulting meltwater southward via the EGC. In addition, we find compelling evidence for at least two separate meltwater episodes in proximity of the eastern GIS during early MIS5e. The climatic episode in between is correlated with an early LIG warm peak, which may be linked to enhanced presence of Atlantic water in the central Nordic Seas (Bauch et al., 2012) and further downstream along southern Greenland (Hillaire-Marcel et al., 1994, Irvali et al., 2012). Our data, therefore, reveal a complex and variable dynamic of the EGC during MIS5e

  16. Variability in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation through a glacial-interglacial cycle.

    PubMed

    Tudhope, A W; Chilcott, C P; McCulloch, M T; Cook, E R; Chappell, J; Ellam, R M; Lea, D W; Lough, J M; Shimmield, G B

    2001-02-23

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the most potent source of interannual climate variability. Uncertainty surrounding the impact of greenhouse warming on ENSO strength and frequency has stimulated efforts to develop a better understanding of the sensitivity of ENSO to climate change. Here we use annually banded corals from Papua New Guinea to show that ENSO has existed for the past 130,000 years, operating even during "glacial" times of substantially reduced regional and global temperature and changed solar forcing. However, we also find that during the 20th century ENSO has been strong compared with ENSO of previous cool (glacial) and warm (interglacial) times. The observed pattern of change in amplitude may be due to the combined effects of ENSO dampening during cool glacial conditions and ENSO forcing by precessional orbital variations.

  17. The retention behaviour of polar compounds on zirconia based stationary phases under hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography conditions.

    PubMed

    Kučera, R; Kovaříková, P; Klivický, M; Klimeš, J

    2011-09-28

    The most separations in HILIC mode are performed on silica-based supports. Nevertheless, recently published results have indicated that the metal oxides stationary phases also possess the ability to interact with hydrophilic compounds under HILIC conditions. This paper primarily describes the retention behaviour of model hydrophilic analytes (4-aminobenzene sulfonic acid, 4-aminobenzoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4-diaminobenzoic acid, 3-aminophenol and 3-nitrophenol) on the polybutadine modified zirconia in HILIC. The results were simultaneously compared with a bare zirconia and a silica-based HILIC phase. The mobile phase strength, pH and the column temperature were systematically modified to assess their impact on the retention of model compounds. It was found that the retention of our model hydrophilic analytes on both zirconia phases was mainly governed by adsorption while on the silica-based HILIC phase partitioning was primarily involved. The ability of ligand-exchange interactions of zirconia surface with a carboxylic moiety influenced substantially the response of carboxylic acids on the elevated temperature as well as to the change of the mobile phase pH in contrast to the silica phase. However, no or negligible ligand-exchange interactions were observed for sulfanilic acid. The results of this study clearly demonstrated the ability of modified zirconia phase to retain polar acidic compounds under HILIC conditions, which might substantially enlarge the application area of the zirconia-based stationary phases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Continued Melting of Greenland Ice-Sheet Regulated Northern Hemisphere Climate During the Last Interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govin, A.; Michel, E.; Marti, O.; Braconnot, P.; Jansen, E.; Labeyrie, L.; Landais, A.; Mosquet, E.; Risebrobakken, B.; Swingedouw, D.; Waelbroeck, C.

    2008-12-01

    The evolution of Northern Hemisphere climate during the Last Interglacial (LIG) (129--118 ka) is significant for the study of future climate changes as it may provide information on the climate system responses and feedbacks to radiative forcing (Jansen et al. 2007). We present here a comparison of foraminiferal records from high latitude deep-sea cores with model simulations over the LIG period. We compare high-resolution benthic oxygen and carbon isotope composition records, Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Ice-Rafted Detritus (IRD) records from a Southern Ocean core with three North Atlantic cores at different water--depth, and one Norwegian Sea core. Our strategy is to correlate in details high latitude sea surface records from both hemispheres with corresponding ice isotopic records using atmospheric markers for the interhemispheric correlation (e.g. Blunier et al 1998; Landais et al 2003). We observe persistent iceberg melting at the beginning of the LIG which maintained relatively cold and fresh surface-water conditions in the North Atlantic and the Nordic Seas between 129 and 125 ka. Similarly, benthic δ13C data indicate different LIG deep-water ventilation patterns, with North Atlantic Deep Waters sinking shallower during the 129--125 ka interval than during the later climatic optimum. The establishment of peak interglacial conditions in the high northern latitudes and associated strengthening of North Atlantic thermohaline circulation were delayed in consequence. Simulations with the IPSL--CM4 ocean--atmosphere coupled model (Marti et al. 2005) suggest that our results are consistent with the impact of a continued melting of Greenland ice sheet on Northern Hemisphere climate, in response to a particularly high boreal summer insolation.

  19. Equatorial decline of reef corals during the last Pleistocene interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiessling, Wolfgang; Simpson, Carl; Beck, Brian; Mewis, Heike; Pandolfi, John M.

    2012-12-01

    The Last Interglacial (LIG; ca. 125,000 y ago) resulted from rapid global warming and reached global mean temperatures exceeding those of today. The LIG thus offers the opportunity to study how life may respond to future global warming. Using global occurrence databases and applying sampling-standardization, we compared reef coral diversity and distributions between the LIG and modern. Latitudinal diversity patterns are characterized by a tropical plateau today but were characterized by a pronounced equatorial trough during the LIG. This trough is governed by substantial range shifts away from the equator. Range shifts affected both leading and trailing edges of species range limits and were much more pronounced in the Northern Hemisphere than south of the equator. We argue that interglacial warming was responsible for the loss of equatorial diversity. Hemispheric differences in insolation during the LIG may explain the asymmetrical response. The equatorial retractions are surprisingly strong given that only small temperature changes have been reported in the LIG tropics. Our results suggest that the poleward range expansions of reef corals occurring with intensified global warming today may soon be followed by equatorial range retractions.

  20. Humid glacials, arid interglacials? Results from a multiproxy study of the loess-paleosol sequence Crvenka, Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, R.; Zech, M.; Markovic, S.; Huang, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The loess-paleosol sequences in the Carpathian Basin, southeast Europe, are up to tens of meters thick and provide valuable archives for paleoenvironmental and -climate change over several glacial-interglacial cycles. The Crvenka section spans the full last glacial cycle and is used in this multi-proxy study to reconstruct past climate conditions. Crvenka features the characteristic pattern in terms of grain size and weathering intensity, i.e. finer grain sizes and more intensive weathering in the paleosols compared to the glacial loess units. The analysis of plant-derived long-chain n-alkanes as molecular biomarkers for past vegetation indicates the presence of trees during glacials, which is consistent with other e.g. macrofossil findings and the notion that parts of southeast Europe served as tree-refugia. However, virtually tree-less grass steppes are reconstructed for the Eemian, the last interglacial. More humid conditions during glacials and more arid conditions during interglacials would be in good agreement with lake-level reconstructions from the Dead Sea, but they seem to be at odds with traditional interpretations of pollen and stable isotope records for the Mediterranean region. In order to further contribute to this issue, we performed compound-specific D/H analyses on the most abundant alkanes C29 and C31, which should mainly record past changes in the isotopic composition of precipitation. The absence of a clear signal towards more depleted values during glacials shows that the temperature-effect is not dominant and probably offset by a strong source-effect, namely the enrichment of the Mediterranean sea water during glacials. This very same source effect may generally need to be taken into account when interpreting terrestrial isotope records in the Mediterranean, which implies that more positive values during glacials may not necessarily indicate an amount-effect and more arid conditions.

  1. Glacial/interglacial wetland, biomass burning, and geologic methane emissions constrained by dual stable isotopic CH4 ice core records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Michael; Schmitt, Jochen; Beck, Jonas; Seth, Barbara; Chappellaz, Jérôme; Fischer, Hubertus

    2017-07-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) records reconstructed from polar ice cores represent an integrated view on processes predominantly taking place in the terrestrial biogeosphere. Here, we present dual stable isotopic methane records [δ13CH4 and δD(CH4)] from four Antarctic ice cores, which provide improved constraints on past changes in natural methane sources. Our isotope data show that tropical wetlands and seasonally inundated floodplains are most likely the controlling sources of atmospheric methane variations for the current and two older interglacials and their preceding glacial maxima. The changes in these sources are steered by variations in temperature, precipitation, and the water table as modulated by insolation, (local) sea level, and monsoon intensity. Based on our δD(CH4) constraint, it seems that geologic emissions of methane may play a steady but only minor role in atmospheric CH4 changes and that the glacial budget is not dominated by these sources. Superimposed on the glacial/interglacial variations is a marked difference in both isotope records, with systematically higher values during the last 25,000 y compared with older time periods. This shift cannot be explained by climatic changes. Rather, our isotopic methane budget points to a marked increase in fire activity, possibly caused by biome changes and accumulation of fuel related to the late Pleistocene megafauna extinction, which took place in the course of the last glacial.

  2. Persistent climatic and oceanographic oscillations in the subpolar North Atlantic during the MIS 6 glaciation and MIS 5 interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokeddem, Zohra; McManus, Jerry F.

    2016-06-01

    Rapidly accumulating sediments from the Björn drift deposit south of Iceland are studied for comparison of glacial/interglacial climate changes related to millennial variability of the subpolar surface and deep ocean circulation in the North Atlantic. High-resolution faunal, isotopic, and sedimentary analyses reveal a strong multimillennial climatic variability interpreted as oscillations in heat transport westward south of Iceland during marine isotope stage 6 (MIS 6), possibly related to the strength of the subpolar gyre (SPG). The oscillations persisted from MIS 6 through the following interglacial (MIS 5), although with diminished magnitude, and were respectively characterized by repeated advances of the polar front south of Iceland during MIS 6 and southward migrations of the Arctic front due to cold surface outflow through the East Greenland and East Iceland Currents during MIS 5. Incursions of cold, fresh surface waters, and drifting ice affected the dynamics of the SPG, episodically causing it to weaken and contract to the northwest. During these intervals of diminished SPG, the northward transport of subtropical heat and salt was strengthened and preferentially conveyed to the northeast past Iceland, enhancing deep-water formation in the Nordic Seas. By contrast, when the SPG was strong, more subtropical water and its associated heat were entrained within the relatively warm Irminger Current flowing westward south of Iceland. These oceanographic oscillations were associated with repeated multimillennial cooling and warming episodes during the glacial stage MIS 6, equivalent to the Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles of the last glaciation.

  3. Glacial/interglacial wetland, biomass burning, and geologic methane emissions constrained by dual stable isotopic CH4 ice core records.

    PubMed

    Bock, Michael; Schmitt, Jochen; Beck, Jonas; Seth, Barbara; Chappellaz, Jérôme; Fischer, Hubertus

    2017-07-18

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) records reconstructed from polar ice cores represent an integrated view on processes predominantly taking place in the terrestrial biogeosphere. Here, we present dual stable isotopic methane records [δ(13)CH4 and δD(CH4)] from four Antarctic ice cores, which provide improved constraints on past changes in natural methane sources. Our isotope data show that tropical wetlands and seasonally inundated floodplains are most likely the controlling sources of atmospheric methane variations for the current and two older interglacials and their preceding glacial maxima. The changes in these sources are steered by variations in temperature, precipitation, and the water table as modulated by insolation, (local) sea level, and monsoon intensity. Based on our δD(CH4) constraint, it seems that geologic emissions of methane may play a steady but only minor role in atmospheric CH4 changes and that the glacial budget is not dominated by these sources. Superimposed on the glacial/interglacial variations is a marked difference in both isotope records, with systematically higher values during the last 25,000 y compared with older time periods. This shift cannot be explained by climatic changes. Rather, our isotopic methane budget points to a marked increase in fire activity, possibly caused by biome changes and accumulation of fuel related to the late Pleistocene megafauna extinction, which took place in the course of the last glacial.

  4. A GCM comparison of Plio-Pleistocene interglacial-glacial periods in relation to Lake El'gygytgyn, NE Arctic Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, A. J.; DeConto, R. M.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Melles, M.

    2014-08-01

    Until now, the lack of time-continuous, terrestrial paleoenvironmental data from the Pleistocene Arctic has made model simulations of past interglacials difficult to assess. Here, we compare climate simulations of four warm interglacials at Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 1 (9 ka), 5e (127 ka), 11c (409 ka), and 31 (1072 ka) with new proxy climate data recovered from Lake El'gygytgyn, NE Russia. Climate reconstructions of the Mean Temperature of the Warmest Month (MTWM) indicate conditions 2.1, 0.5 and 3.1 °C warmer than today during MIS 5e, 11c, and 31, respectively. While the climate model captures much of the observed warming during each interglacial, largely in response to boreal summer orbital forcing, the extraordinary warmth of MIS 11c relative to the other interglacials in the proxy records remain difficult to explain. To deconvolve the contribution of multiple influences on interglacial warming at Lake El'gygytgyn, we isolated the influence of vegetation, sea ice, and circum-Arctic land ice feedbacks on the climate of the Beringian interior. Simulations accounting for climate-vegetation-land surface feedbacks during all four interglacials show expanding boreal forest cover with increasing summer insolation intensity. A deglaciated Greenland is shown to have a minimal effect on Northeast Asian temperature during the warmth of stage 11c and 31 (Melles et al., 2012). A prescribed enhancement of oceanic heat transport into the Arctic ocean has some effect on Beringian climate, suggesting intrahemispheric coupling seen in comparisons between Lake El'gygytgyn and Antarctic sediment records might be related to linkages between Antarctic ice volume and ocean circulation. The exceptional warmth of MIS 11c remains enigmatic however, relative to the modest orbital and greenhouse gas forcing during that interglacial. Large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets during Plio-Pleistocene glaciation causes a substantial decrease in Mean Temperature of the Coldest Month (MTCM) and

  5. Debris flow sensitivity to glacial-interglacial climate change - supply vs transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda Boluda, Duna C.; Whittaker, Alexander C.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models suggest that small mountain catchment-alluvial fan systems might be sensitive to climate changes over glacial-interglacial cycles, and record these palaeoclimate signals in the sedimentology of their deposits. However, these models are still largely untested, and the propagation of climate signals through simple sediment routing systems remains contentious. Here, we present detailed sedimentological records from 8 debris flow fan systems in Owens Valley, California, that capture the past ~ 120 ka of deposition. We identify a strong and sustained relationship between deposit grain size and palaeoclimate records over a full glacial-interglacial cycle, with significantly coarser-grained deposits found in warm and dry periods. Our data show that these systems are highly sensitive to climate with a rapid response timescale of < 10ka, which we attribute to rapid transfer from source to sink. This sensitive record might be explained by changes in sediment supply and/or changes in sediment mobilisation, and we evaluate these mechanisms quantitatively. We find little evidence that changes in catchment hypsometry, weathering patterns, past glaciation or sediment production can explain the grain size changes we observe on the fans. However we do find that grain size has increased exponentially with rising temperatures, at a rate that matches the intensification of storms with warming. As these debris flows are triggered by surface runoff during intense storms, we interpret that enhanced runoff rates in warm and stormy conditions are responsible for entraining larger clasts during debris flow initiation. This implies that debris flow fans might record signals of past storm intensity. Our study utilises field sedimentology and focuses on short transport distances (~ 10 km) and climate changes over ~ 1-100 ka timespans, but could additionally have important implications for how eroding landscapes might respond to future warming scenarios. We address the

  6. Response of Phytoplankton Photophysiology to Varying Environmental Conditions in the Sub-Antarctic and Polar Frontal Zone

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Wee; McMinn, Andrew; Griffiths, F. Brian; Westwood, Karen J.; Wright, Simon W.; Clementson, Lesley A.

    2013-01-01

    Climate-driven changes are expected to alter the hydrography of the Sub-Antarctic Zone (SAZ) and Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ) south of Australia, in which distinct regional environments are believed to be responsible for the differences in phytoplankton biomass in these regions. Here, we report how the dynamic influences of light, iron and temperature, which are responsible for the photophysiological differences between phytoplankton in the SAZ and PFZ, contribute to the biomass differences in these regions. High effective photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (/0.4), maximum photosynthesis rate (), light-saturation intensity (), maximum rate of photosynthetic electron transport (1/), and low photoprotective pigment concentrations observed in the SAZ correspond to high chlorophyll and iron concentrations. In contrast, phytoplankton in the PFZ exhibits low / ( 0.2) and high concentrations of photoprotective pigments under low light environment. Strong negative relationships between iron, temperature, and photoprotective pigments demonstrate that cells were producing more photoprotective pigments under low temperature and iron conditions, and are responsible for the low biomass and low productivity measured in the PFZ. As warming and enhanced iron input is expected in this region, this could probably increase phytoplankton photosynthesis in this region. However, complex interactions between the biogeochemical processes (e.g. stratification caused by warming could prevent mixing of nutrients), which control phytoplankton biomass and productivity, remain uncertain. PMID:23977242

  7. Response of phytoplankton photophysiology to varying environmental conditions in the Sub-Antarctic and Polar Frontal Zone.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Wee; McMinn, Andrew; Griffiths, F Brian; Westwood, Karen J; Wright, Simon W; Clementson, Lesley A

    2013-01-01

    Climate-driven changes are expected to alter the hydrography of the Sub-Antarctic Zone (SAZ) and Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ) south of Australia, in which distinct regional environments are believed to be responsible for the differences in phytoplankton biomass in these regions. Here, we report how the dynamic influences of light, iron and temperature, which are responsible for the photophysiological differences between phytoplankton in the SAZ and PFZ, contribute to the biomass differences in these regions. High effective photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (F'(q)/F'(m)0.4), maximum photosynthesis rate (P(B)(max)), light-saturation intensity (E(k)), maximum rate of photosynthetic electron transport (1/[Symbol: see text]PSII), and low photoprotective pigment concentrations observed in the SAZ correspond to high chlorophyll a and iron concentrations. In contrast, phytoplankton in the PFZ exhibits low F'(q)/F'(M) (~ 0.2) and high concentrations of photoprotective pigments under low light environment. Strong negative relationships between iron, temperature, and photoprotective pigments demonstrate that cells were producing more photoprotective pigments under low temperature and iron conditions, and are responsible for the low biomass and low productivity measured in the PFZ. As warming and enhanced iron input is expected in this region, this could probably increase phytoplankton photosynthesis in this region. However, complex interactions between the biogeochemical processes (e.g. stratification caused by warming could prevent mixing of nutrients), which control phytoplankton biomass and productivity, remain uncertain.

  8. The role of mechanical pressure difference in the generation of membrane voltage under conditions of concentration polarization.

    PubMed

    Grzegorczyn, Sławomir; Ślęzak, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical pressure difference across the bacterial cellulose membrane located in a horizontal plane causes asymmetry of voltage measured between electrodes immersed in KCl solutions symmetrically on both sides of the membrane. For all measurements, KCl solution with lower concentration was above the membrane. In configuration of the analyzed membrane system, the concentration boundary layers (CBLs) are created only by molecular diffusion. The voltages measured in the membrane system in concentration polarization conditions were compared with suitable voltages obtained from the model of diffusion through CBLs and ion transport through the membrane. An increase of difference of mechanical pressure across the membrane directed as a difference of osmotic pressure always causes a decrease of voltage between the electrodes in the membrane system. In turn, for mechanical pressure difference across the membrane directed in an opposite direction to the difference of osmotic pressure, a peak in the voltage as a function of mechanical pressure difference is observed. An increase of osmotic pressure difference across the membrane at the initial moment causes an increase of the maximal value of the observed peak and a shift of this peak position in the direction of higher values of the mechanical pressure differences across the membrane.

  9. Comparison of Interglacial fire dynamics in Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücher, Tim; Daniau, Anne-Laure

    2016-04-01

    Responses of fire activity to a change in climate are still uncertain and biases exist by integrating this non-linear process into global modeling of the Earth system. Warming and regional drying can force fire activity in two opposite directions: an increase in fire in fuel supported ecosystems or a fire reduction in fuel-limited ecosystems. Therefore, climate variables alone can not be used to estimate the fire risk because vegetation variability is an important determinant of fire dynamics and responds itself to change in climate. Southern Africa (south of 20°S) paleofire history reconstruction obtained from the analysis of microcharcoal preserved in a deep-sea core located off Namibia reveals changes of fire activity on orbital timescales in the precession band. In particular, increase in fire is observed during glacial periods, and reduction of fire during interglacials such as the Eemian and the Holocene. The Holocene was characterized by even lower level of fire activity than Eemian. Those results suggest the alternance of grass-fueled fires during glacials driven by increase in moisture and the development of limited fueled ecosystems during interglacials characterized by dryness. Those results question the simulated increase in the fire risk probability projected for this region under a warming and drying climate obtained by Pechony and Schindell (2010). To explore the validity of the hypotheses we conducted a data-model comparison for both interglacials from 126.000 to 115.000 BP for the Eemian and from 8.000 to 2.000 BP for the Holocene. Data out of a transient, global modeling study with a Vegetation-Fire model of full complexity (JSBACH) is used, driven by a Climate model of intermediate complexity (CLIMBER). Climate data like precipitation and temperature as well as vegetation data like soil moisture, productivity (NPP) on plant functional type level are used to explain trends in fire activity. The comparison of trends in fire activity during the

  10. Milankovitch forcing of the last interglacial sea level.

    PubMed

    Crowley, T J; Kim, K Y

    1994-09-09

    During the last interglacial, sea level was as high as present, 4000 to 6000 years before peak Northern Hemisphere insolation receipt 126,000 years ago. The sea-level results are shown to be consistent with climate models, which simulate a 3 degrees to 4 degrees C July temperature increase from 140,000 to 130,000 years ago in high latitudes, with all Northern Hemisphere land areas being warmer than present by 130,000 years ago. The early warming occurs because obliquity peaked earlier than precession and because precession values were greater than present before peak precessional forcing occurred. These results indicate that a fuller understanding of the Milankovitch-climate connection requires consideration of fields other than just insolation forcing at 65 degrees N.

  11. A last interglacial fauna from the Eastern Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Kazimierz; Neer, Wim van; Bocheński, Zygmunt; Młynarski, Marian; Rzebik-Kowalska, Barbara; Szyndlar, Zbigniew; Gautier, Achilles; Schild, Romuald; Close, Angela E.; Wendorf, Fred

    1989-11-01

    Recent work on the middle Paleolithic at Bir Tarfawi, in the hyperarid Eastern Sahara (<1 mm of rain per annum), has yielded a rich faunal assemblage, including several thousand remains of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and small mammals. They are derived from the sediments of two consecutive lakes dated by several techniques to about 135,000 yr B.P. Fifty-nine taxa have been identified and indicate that at times during the Last Interglaciation the area received at least 500 mm of rainfall as a result of the northward shift of the monsoon belt, and that, on several occasions, there may have been water connections between Bir Tarfawi and unidentified but permanent bodies of water elsewhere.

  12. Experimental Demonstration of the Formation of Liquid Brines under Martian Polar Conditions in the Michigan Mars Environmental Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Erik; Martinez, German; Elliott, Harvey; Borlina, Caue; Renno, Nilton

    2014-05-01

    Liquid water is one of the necessary ingredients for the development of life as we know it. The behavior of various liquid states of H2O such as liquid brine, undercooled liquid interfacial water, subsurface melt water and ground water [1] needs to be understood in order to address the potential habitability of Mars for microbes and future human exploration. It has been shown thermodynamically that liquid brines can exist under Martian polar conditions [2, 3]. We have developed the Michigan Mars Environmental Chamber (MMEC) to simulate the entire range of Martian surface and shallow subsurface conditions with respect to temperature, pressure, relative humidity, solar radiation and soil wetness at equatorial and polar latitudes. Our experiments in the MMEC show that deliquescence of NaClO4, Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 occurs diurnally under the environmental conditions of the Phoenix landing site when these salts get in contact with water ice. Since Phoenix detected these salts and water ice at the landing site, including frost formation, it is extremely likely that deliquescence occurs at the Phoenix landing site. By layering NaClO4, Mg(ClO4)2 or Ca(ClO4)2 on top of a pure water ice slab at 800 Pa and 190 K and raising the temperature stepwise across the eutectic temperature of the perchlorate salts, we observe distinct changes in the Raman spectra of the samples when deliquescence occurs. When crossing the eutectic temperatures of NaClO4 (236 K), Mg(ClO4)2 (205 K) and Ca(ClO4)2 (199 K) [4, 5], the perchlorate band of the Raman spectrum shows a clear shift from 953 cm-1 to 936 cm-1. Furthermore, the appearance of a broad O-H vibrational stretching spectrum between 3244 cm-1 and 3580 cm-1 is another indicator of deliquescence. This process of deliquescence occurs on the order of seconds when the perchlorate salt is in contact with water ice. On the contrary, when the perchlorate salt is only subjected to water vapor in the Martian atmosphere, deliquescence was not

  13. The Last Interglacial History of the Antarctic Ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Sarah; Siddall, Mark; Milne, Glenn A.; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Wolff, Eric; Hindmarsh, Richard C. A.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we present a summary of the work which was conducted as part of the 'PAST4FUTURE -WP4.1: Sea Level and Ice sheets' project. The overall aim of this study was to understand the response of the Antarctic Ice sheet (AIS) to climate forcing during the Last interglacial (LIG) and its contribution to the observed higher than present sea level during this period. The study involved the application and development of a novel technique which combined East Antarctic stable isotope ice core data with the output from a Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) model [Bradley et al., 2012]. We investigated if the stable isotope ice core data are sensitive to detecting isostatically driven changes in the surface elevation driven by changes in the ice-loading history of the AIS and if so, could we address some key questions relating to the LIG history of the AIS. Although it is believed that the West Antarctic Ice sheet (WAIS) reduced in size during the LIG compared to the Holocene, major uncertainties and unknowns remain unresolved: Did the WAIS collapse? What would the contribution of such a collapse be the higher than present LIG eustatic sea level (ESL)? We will show that a simulated collapse of the WAIS does not generate a significant elevation driven signal at the EAIS LIG ice core sites, and as such, these ice core records cannot be used to assess WAIS stability over this period. However, we will present 'treasure maps' [Bradley et al., 2012] to identify regions of the AIS where results from geological studies and/or new paleoclimate data may be sensitive to detecting a WAIS collapse. These maps can act as a useful tool for the wider science community/field scientists as a guide to highlight sites suitable to constrain the evolution of the WAIS during the LIG. Studies have proposed that the surface temperature across the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) was significantly warmer, 2-5°C during the LIG compared to present [Lang and Wolff, 2011]. These higher

  14. A palaeoclimate investigation of the lacustrine sediments from Chew Bahir in Ethiopia spanning multiple glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Melanie; Dean, Jonathan; Asrat, Asfawossen; Chapot, Melissa; Cohen, Andrew; Deino, Alan; Foerster, Verena; Lamb, Henry; Roberts, Helen; Schäbitz, Frank; Trauth, Martin; Viehberg, Finn

    2017-04-01

    There are few long, continuous, terrestrial Pleistocene records from eastern Africa, therefore it has been difficult to establish the relative influences of different climate forcings on the region's hydroclimate and to understand the climatic conditions at the time of anatomically modern human origin and dispersal out of Africa. To address these gaps in our knowledge, we have cored lake sediments from Chew Bahir in southern Ethiopia, close to the site of the oldest-known anatomically modern human fossils at Omo-Kibish. Several dating techniques are being employed and preliminary results suggest that the record covers the past 500-550ka. Several proxy records are being produced; here we use the oxygen and carbon isotope composition of endogenic calcite to reconstruct changes in hydroclimate. The data suggest significant fluctuations in water balance, with seemingly more evaporative conditions during glacial periods and less evaporative conditions during interglacials. The sawtooth structure of the isotope data through glacial-interglacial cycles suggests a strong linkage between high latitude forcing and Ethiopian hydroclimate fluctuations. We make inferences about the possible correlation between climate and the dispersal of anatomically modern humans out of Africa.

  15. Modes of interglacial sea-level change: evidence from a late Pleistocene highstand in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saher, Margot; Barlow, Natasha; Long, Antony; Gehrels, Roland; Sparkes, Amy; Riley, Rachel; Penkman, Kirsty

    2014-05-01

    Interglacial sea-level extremes provide a useful analogue for future sea-level behaviour. The Holocene has been characterized by an overall stable sea level, but earlier interglacials, especially the Last Interglacial, are reported to have experienced meter-scale fluctuations (e.g. Rohling et al. 2008). Whether interglacial sea-level maxima are reached gradually or in 'steps' has serious societal implications, as the latter mechanism is associated with much higher rates of sea-level rise. Furthermore, the fluctuating Red Sea model of Last Interglacial sea-level change (Rohling et al. 2008) now underpins the high-end sea-level scenario ("High ++") adopted by the UK Climate Impact Programme. To better constrain interglacial sea-level behaviour, the iGlass consortium, funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council, aims to constrain interglacial sea-level fluctuations from a variety of archives, e.g. corals, speleothems, marine isotopes and estuarine sediments. In this paper we investigate estuarine sediments and apply microfossil analyses, used widely to constrain Holocene sea-level changes, to sediments from interglacial deposits recovered from the Nar Valley, Norfolk, United Kingdom. A coring transect, comprised of 8 cores in 6 locations, traces an interglacial transgressive sequence inland. The litho- and biostratigraphy (mainly foraminifera) record the nature of this transgression. Sediments are either MIS 9 or 11 in age and include freshwater peats and marine clays, buried by glacial sands and gravels. Previous palynological work (Ventris, 1996) has indicates the sediments represent the entire interglacial period. The top of the marine clays has been tracked laterally for ~15 km and was found to have (at least) a 18 m vertical range, up to ~18 m above present mean sea level. Foraminiferal assemblages are dominated by the shallow water dweller Ammonia spp, and suggest only one sequence of deepening and shallowing. We further constrain the chronology using

  16. Offset timing of climate oscillations during the last two glacial-interglacial transitions connected with large-scale freshwater perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Amat, Patricia; Zahn, Rainer

    2015-06-01

    Multidecadal to centennial planktic δ18O and Mg/Ca records were generated at Ocean Drilling Program Site 976 (ODP976) in the Alboran Sea. The site is in the flow path of Atlantic inflow waters entering the Mediterranean and captured North Atlantic signals through the surface inflow and the atmosphere. The records reveal similar climatic oscillations during the last two glacial-to-interglacial transitions, albeit with a different temporal pacing. Glacial termination 1 (T1) was marked by Heinrich event 1 (H1), post-H1 Bølling/Allerød warming, and Younger Dryas (YD) cooling. During T2 the H11 δ18O anomaly was twice as high and lasted 30% longer than during H1. The post-H11 warming marked the start of MIS5e while the subsequent YD-style cooling occurred during early MIS5e. The post-H11 temperature increase at ODP976 matched the sudden Asian Monsoon Termination II at 129 ka B.P. Extending the 230Th-dated speleothem timescale to ODP976 suggests glacial conditions in the Northeast Atlantic region were terminated abruptly and interglacial warmth was reached in less than a millennium. The early-MIS5e cooling and freshening at ODP976 coincided with similar changes at North Atlantic sites suggesting this was a basin-wide event. By analogy with T1, we argue that this was a YD-type event that was shifted into the early stages of the last interglacial period. This scenario is consistent with evidence from northern North Atlantic and Nordic Sea sites that the continuing disintegration of the large Saalian Stage (MIS6) ice sheet in Eurasia delayed the advection of warm North Atlantic waters and full-strength convective overturn until later stages of MIS5e.

  17. Impacts of Aerosol, Surface and Meteorological Conditions on Polar Cloud Properties: Use of In-Situ Cloud Probe Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarquhar, Greg; Wu, Wei; Maahn, Maximilian

    2017-04-01

    Over the Southern Oceans, models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) almost universally underestimate sunlight reflected by near surface cloud in the Austral summer compared to Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data. These and other biases in radiative fluxes over the Arctic are believed to be associated with the poorly modeled properties of low-level clouds that are frequently composed of supercooled water. Because changes in cloud macrophysical (heights, coverage) and microphysical (sizes, shapes and phases of particles) can alter the radiative impact of clouds, it is important to understand the processes that control cloud properties. In this presentation, in-situ microphysical observations obtained in prior arctic field campaigns (e.g., the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign ISDAC, the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment M-PACE, and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Carbon Measurements Program-V ACME-V) are discussed. Strategies for comparing data collected in campaigns with different probes and processed with varying algorithms are introduced, along with procedures for using cloud probe data to refine assumptions about cloud properties in model schemes (e.g., size distributions, mass-dimension, and velocity-dimension relations) that affect rates at which mass and number are transferred between hydrometeor categories and hence estimates of latent and radiative heating, which feeds back on dynamics and hence cloud properties. Such observations from past arctic field experiments have enhanced our understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions acting in single-layer mixed phase clouds that are ubiquitous in the Arctic. But, it is still unknown what controls the amount of supercooled water in polar clouds (especially in frequently occurring complex multi-layer clouds), how probability distributions of cloud properties vary with aerosol loading and composition in different surface and meteorological conditions, and how

  18. Changes in southern hemispheric polar amplification over the past 5 million years revealed by climate modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoencamp, Jori; Stap, Lennert; Tuenter, Erik; Lourens, Luc; van de Wal, Roderik

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge on polar amplification is important to relate high latitude climate records to global mean temperature changes. Several studies have pointed out that the strength of polar amplification in the Northern Hemisphere varies considerably due to the presence of large ice sheets and more sea ice during colder climate conditions. As a result, the polar amplification in the Northern Hemisphere decreases for warmer climates. In this study, we address the fact that these changes in the Northern Hemisphere also affect the polar amplification in the Southern Hemisphere. We study the Southern and Northern Hemisphere amplification together over the past 5 million years with the CLIMBER-2 intermediate complexity model. Radiation, land ice extent and height, and greenhouse gases are prescribed as forcing. We find that in contrast to the reduction in polar amplification in the Northern Hemisphere, polar amplification in the Southern Hemisphere increases for warmer climates. The amplification decreases in the Northern Hemisphere from 2.7 during glacial conditions to 1.6 for a pre-industrial climate, which is line with other climate simulations. Over the same CO2 range the southern hemispheric polar amplification increases from 1 to 1.6. This is caused by the fact that the atmospheric transport needed to balance the radiation surplus in the equatorial region needs to be compensated by relatively stronger transport of energy in Southern direction while the transport in Northern direction reduces. This reduction in Northern direction is driven by less (land and sea) ice resulting in a smaller meridional gradient in Northern direction and hence a smaller atmospheric transport. As a consequence, the traditional scaled (with LGM temperature) Dome C record needs to be corrected with a maximum of 0.6 degrees half-way glacial and interglacial conditions, if it is to be interpreted as global mean temperature change indicator. While this changes the amplitude, the phasing of

  19. Oceanography in northwestern Europe during the last interglacial from intrashell δ 18O ranges in Littorina littorea gastropods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Johan; Påsse, Tore

    2008-07-01

    Coastal sea-surface temperature (SST) and sea-surface salinity (SSS), including seasonality, in northwest (NW) Europe during the early phase of the Eemian interglacial ca. 125 ka ago were reconstructed from Littorina littorea (common periwinkle) gastropods. The results were based on intra-annual δ 18O analyses in recent and fossil shells, mainly originating from the sea of Kattegat (Sweden) and the English Channel (United Kingdom), and confined to intertidal settings. The Eemian L. littorea shells indicated annual SSTs in the range 8-18°C for the English Channel and 8-26°C for Kattegat. All specimens from the Eemian sites experienced summer SSTs of ca. 1-3°C above recent conditions. The estimated winter SST in the English Channel during the Eemian was comparable to modern measurements of ca. 8°C. However, the Kattegat region displayed Eemian winter SST approximately 8°C warmer than today, and similar to conditions in the western English Channel. The recent-fossil isotope analogue approach indicated high SSS above 35 practical salinity units (psu) for a channel south of England in full contact with the North Atlantic Ocean during the last interglacial. In addition, the Kattegat shells indicated a SSS of ca. 29 psu, which points out a North Sea affinity for this region during the Eemian.

  20. Project CELIA: Climate and environment of the last interglacial (Isotope Stage 5) in arctic and subarctic North America

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham-Grette, J.

    1992-03-01

    Stage 5e of the marine oxygen isotope record is the last time when world ice volume was lower, sea level was higher, and world climate warmer than during any part of the Holocene. To develop more accurate proxy data for natural climate change during the last interglacial, a multidisciplinary group of scientists working as regional teams has developed Project CELIA to generate and synthesize knowledge for this period from high latitude terrestrial and nearshore marine environments. The authors have cited 13 terrestrial sequences distributed across the Arctic and Subarctic for detailed study based upon well-exposed stratigraphy, abundance of organic remains, and geochronological potential. In addition, information from select marine cores bearing terrestrial pollen and ice cores from Devon and Agassiz Ice Caps will also be incorporated. These data will highlight regional changes in vegetation patterns, tree line position, permafrost distribution, and sea ice conditions from which ocean/atmospheric changes can be inferred. This information will be of value for testing hypotheses generated by GCMs and other simulations of interglacial conditions, refining such models and providing insight to future environments resulting from global warming. CELIA will be carried out over the next 5 years and will be directed by an international board of experts under the auspices of the University of Alberta's Canadian Circumpolar Institute.

  1. Last interglacial plant macrofossils and climates from Ziegler Reservoir, Snowmass Village, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strickland, Laura E.; Baker, Richard G.; Thompson, Robert S.; Miller, Dane M.

    2014-01-01

    Ninety plant macrofossil taxa from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site near Snowmass Village, Colorado, record environmental changes at high elevation (2705 m asl) in the Rocky Mountains during the Last Interglacial Period. Present-day vegetation is aspen forest (Populus tremuloides) intermixed with species of higher (Picea, Abies) and lower (Artemisia, Quercus) elevations. Stratigraphic units 4–13 contain montane forest taxa found near the site today and several species that today generally live at lower elevations within (Abies concolor, Lycopus americanus) and outside Colorado (Najas flexilis). These data suggest near-modern climatic conditions, with slightly warmer summer and winter temperatures. This montane forest period was succeeded by a shorter treeless interval (Unit 14) representing colder and/or drier conditions. In units 15–16, conifer trees reoccur but deciduous and herb taxa are lacking, suggesting a return to warmer conditions, although cooler than during the earlier forest period. Comparison of these inferred paleoclimatic changes with the site's geochronologic framework indicates that the lower interval of sustained warmth correlates with late MIS 6–early 5b (~ 138–94 ka), the cold interval with MIS 5b (~ 94–87 ka), and the uppermost cool assemblages with MIS 5a (~ 87–77 ka).

  2. Last interglacial plant macrofossils and climates from Ziegler Reservoir, Snowmass Village, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Laura E.; Baker, Richard G.; Thompson, Robert S.; Miller, Dane M.

    2014-11-01

    Ninety plant macrofossil taxa from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site near Snowmass Village, Colorado, record environmental changes at high elevation (2705 m asl) in the Rocky Mountains during the Last Interglacial Period. Present-day vegetation is aspen forest (Populus tremuloides) intermixed with species of higher (Picea, Abies) and lower (Artemisia, Quercus) elevations. Stratigraphic units 4-13 contain montane forest taxa found near the site today and several species that today generally live at lower elevations within (Abies concolor, Lycopus americanus) and outside Colorado (Najas flexilis). These data suggest near-modern climatic conditions, with slightly warmer summer and winter temperatures. This montane forest period was succeeded by a shorter treeless interval (Unit 14) representing colder and/or drier conditions. In units 15-16, conifer trees reoccur but deciduous and herb taxa are lacking, suggesting a return to warmer conditions, although cooler than during the earlier forest period. Comparison of these inferred paleoclimatic changes with the site's geochronologic framework indicates that the lower interval of sustained warmth correlates with late MIS 6-early 5b (~ 138-94 ka), the cold interval with MIS 5b (~ 94-87 ka), and the uppermost cool assemblages with MIS 5a (~ 87-77 ka).

  3. New uranium-series ages of the Waimanalo Limestone, Oahu, Hawaii: implications for sea level during the last interglacial period

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Szabo, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Waimanalo Formation (limestone) of Oahu has been correlated with the last interglacial period based on U-series dating of corals by T.-L. Ku and colleagues. The limestone consists of growth-position corals and overlying coral conglomerate. An apparent bimodal distribution of ages for the growth-position corals (mean age = 133 ka) and the overlying coral conglomerate (mean age = 119 ka) has been interpreted to represent two distinct high stands of sea that occurred within the last interglacial period. Both growth-position corals and overlying, conglomerate coral occur in an outcrop east of Kaena Point and consist mainly of Pocillopora and Porites. U-seriesages of growth-position corals that show closed-system conditions are 120 ± 3 ka and 127 ± 4 ka; overlying conglomerate corals have U-seriesages that range from 120 ± 3 ka to 138 ± 4 ka. At Kahe Point, conglomerate corals have ages of 120 ± 3 ka and 134 ± 4 ka. These data show that the growth position corals are not systematically older than the conglomerate corals; thus, there is no evidence for two distinct high stands of sea. Waimanalo deposits at Kahe Point and Mokapu Point (new U-seriesages of 134 ± 4 ka and 127 ± 3 ka) have beach deposits as high as 12.5 m and, at Mokapu Point, growth-position corals as high as 8.5 m. A last-interglacial sea-level stand of +8.5 to +12.5 m conflicts with estimates of +6 m from a number of tectonically stable coastlines and islands in the western Atlantic Ocean. We infer, therefore, that Oahu may be undergoing uplift at a low rate. This uplift may be due to compensatory lithospheric flexure, because the island of Hawaii has been subsiding throughout much of the Quaternary from volcanic loading. Because of this possible uplift, Oahu and islands like it elsewhere in the Pacific cannot be used as reference points for sealevel during the last interglacial period.

  4. Palaeoceanography & Palaeoclimate during the penultimate Glacial-Interglacial transition in the Black Sea - Termination II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegwerth, Antje; Dellwig, Olaf; Kaiser, Jérôme; Bard, Edouard; Ménot, Guillemette; Nowaczyk, Norbert; Plessen, Birgit; Schnetger, Bernhard; Shumilovskikh, Lyudmila; Arz, Helge

    2013-04-01

    The epicontinental Black Sea is very sensitive to environmental changes thus forming an ideal archive of regional climate change and teleconnective responses to the coupled North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere system. Here we focus on the climatic and hydrological evolution of the SE Black Sea during the glacial-interglacial transition of Termination II to the Eemian (~134-122 ka BP) by using different geochemical and sedimentological proxies. Long-term cold conditions during the ending penultimate glacial are provided by TEX86 derived summer sea-surface temperatures (SST) of around 9°C and are thus considerable lower than present values of about 23°C. Coastal ice formation during extreme winters accounted for huge discharge of ice rafted debris (IRD) until 130.5 ka BP. Milder more humid conditions during this period are indicated for instance by elevated Cr/Al values typical for an ultramafic Pontic Mountain source (Piper and Calvert, 2011) thereby suggesting an increased sediment load mainly from the east-Anatolian rivers Kizilirmak and Yesilirmak. The abrupt disappearance of IRD along with increasing δ18O, Mg/Ca, and Sr/Ca of benthic ostracods (Candona spp.) resulted from slightly rising temperatures (SST 11°C) until 128.8 ka BP. Thereafter, SST rapidly increased within less than 500 years to about 25°C revealing a dramatic change from glacial to interglacial conditions. First analyses of U/Ca-ratios of ostracods show sharply increasing values not before ~128.3 ka BP, synchronous to the appearance of larval Mytilus galloprovincialis shells, due to the Mediterranean transgression into the Black Sea. The simultaneous increase of TOC and Mo/Al of the bulk sediment indicates the development of oxygen-deficient bottom waters and Eemian sapropel formation favoured by the establishment of a halocline shortly after the Mediterranean-Black Sea reconnection. About 500 years after the temperature maximum, the continental environment responded to the warming by elevated

  5. A simple rule to determine which insolation cycles lead to interglacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzedakis, Chronis; Crucifix, Michel; Mitsui, Takahito; Wolff, Eric

    2017-04-01

    The pacing of glacial-interglacial cycles of the Quaternary (last 2.6 million years) is attributed to astronomically-driven changes in high-latitude insolation. An enduring puzzle, however, has been how astronomical forcing translates into the observed sequence of interglacials. Here we show that before 1 million years ago, interglacials occurred when caloric summer insolation exceeded a simple threshold, about every 41,000 years. After 1 million years ago, insolation peaks were skipped more frequently and glacials became longer. We also find that the propensity for deglaciation increases with time elapsed since the previous interglacial onset. A statistical model combining these observations correctly predicts every complete deglaciation of the last million years and also indicates what alternative histories might have arisen.

  6. Last interglacial semi-desert expansions in southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrego, D. H.; Sanchez Goni, M.; Lechevrel, S.; Daniau, A.

    2013-05-01

    While our understanding of the effects of orbital-scale variability on the vegetation has grown during the past decades, empirical data from some climatically important periods and regions are still lacking. Scarce data exist for instance for deep-time glacial-interglacial cycles that could provide suitable analogs for current climate change. Recent global-scale syntheses of vegetation responses to rapid events during the last glacial have been useful, however, these global compilations clearly show that some regions, namely the southern tropics and subtropics, remain understudied. We use pollen analysis of marine sediments from core MD96-2098 to produce a paleoenvironmental record from southern Africa spanning MIS 6 to 3. Our interpretations are supported by an analysis of present-day pollen-vegetation-climate relationships for the region. We applied canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) on pollen spectra from terrestrial surface samples to investigate these relationships and to identify pollen taxa that are suitable bioclimatic indicators for the different South African biomes. Semi-desert vegetation dominated southern Africa during the MIS 5 interglacial. Expansion of the semi-desert biome into the Namib desert likely resulted from the reduction of the Benguela upwelling and a relative decrease in aridity. In its eastern boundary, the semi-desert likely expanded at the expense of grasslands as a result of increased subtropical high pressure and reduced summer precipitation. Semi-desert expansion in its southern boundary probably resulted from reduced influence of the southern westerlies and decreased winter precipitation. This atmospheric configuration was probably exacerbated during the three warm substages of MIS 5. During glacial isotopic stages MIS 6, 4 and 3 grasslands gained area over the semi-desert as summer precipitation increased. The area occupied by Fynbos vegetation was particularly large at the

  7. Multiproxy record of the last interglacial (MIS 5e) off central and northern California, U.S.A., from Ocean Drilling Program sites 1018 and 1020

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, Richard Z.; Dowsett, H.J.; Barron, J.A.; Heusser, L.; Ravelo, A.C.; Mix, A.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and climatic conditions during the last interglacial (about 125,000 years ago) along the Central and Northern California coastal region are interpreted from study of marine cores recovered by the Ocean Drilling Program at sites 1018 and 1020. Marine microfossil and pollen assemblages, oxygen isotopes in benthic foraminifers, physical properties, and calcium carbonate contents of cored sediments are proxies indicating strong links between the marine and terrestrial environments during marine isotope stage 5 (MIS 5). At the beginning of the last interglacial (MIS 5e), reduction in global ice volume, increase in surface temperature, and warming of air temperature along the Central and Northern California coast were synchronous within the resolution of our sampling record.

  8. Sea-level oscillations during the last interglacial highstand recorded by Bahamas corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, William G.; Allen Curran, H.; Wilson, Mark A.; White, Brian

    2011-10-01

    Rapid sea-level changes during the last interglacial highstand have been inferred from distinct stratigraphic units, which suggest multiple episodes of reef growth. However, it is difficult to resolve the age differences between fossil reef units, and results from conventional U-Th geochronology instead suggest a prolonged, stable sea-level highstand during the last interglacial. Here we present U-Th ages from last interglacial coral reef sequences in the Bahamas that reflect the timing of sea-level highstands. We use a method that corrects the ages for diagenetic disturbance of the U-Th isotope ratios. Our dated Bahamas stratigraphy confirms that at least one sea-level oscillation interrupted the last interglacial highstand. Further oscillations, as suggested by reconstructions from the Red Sea, would also be consistent with our data. We estimate that the minimum rate of sea-level change across the first oscillation was 2.6m per 1,000 years, slightly lower than previous estimates. In contrast, during the past 6,000 years of the Holocene interglacial, sea level was relatively stable. We therefore suggest that ice sheets during the last interglacial, which was warmer than today and has been proposed as an analogue for future warming, were less stable than during the mid-to-late Holocene.

  9. Identification of last interglacial deposits in eastern Beringia: a cautionary note from the Palisades, interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reyes, Alberto V.; Zazula, Grant D.; Kuzmina, Svetlana; Ager, Thomas A.; Froese, Duane G.

    2011-01-01

    Last interglacial sediments in unglaciated Alaska and Yukon (eastern Beringia) are commonly identified by palaeoecological indicators and stratigraphic position ~2-5m above the regionally prominent Old Crow tephra (124 + or - 10ka). We demonstrate that this approach can yield erroneous age assignments using data from a new exposure at the Palisades, a site in interior Alaska with numerous exposures of last interglacial sediments. Tephrochronology, stratigraphy, plant macrofossils, pollen and fossil insects from a prominent wood-rich organic silt unit are all consistent with a last interglacial age assignment. However, six 14C dates on plant and insect macrofossils from the organic silt range from non-finite to 4.0 14C ka BP, indicating that the organic silt instead represents a Holocene deposit with a mixed-age assemblage of organic material. In contrast, wood samples from presumed last interglacial organic-rich sediments elsewhere at the Palisades, in a similar stratigraphic position with respect to Old Crow tephra, yield non-finite 14C ages. Given that local permafrost thaw since the last interglaciation may facilitate reworking of older sediments into new stratigraphic positions, minimum constraining ages based on 14C dating or other methods should supplement age assignments for last interglacial sediments in eastern Beringia that are based on palaeoecology and stratigraphic association with Old Crow tephra.

  10. Denudation of the continental shelf between Britain and France at the glacial-interglacial timescale.

    PubMed

    Mellett, Claire L; Hodgson, David M; Plater, Andrew J; Mauz, Barbara; Selby, Ian; Lang, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    The erosional morphology preserved at the sea bed in the eastern English Channel dominantly records denudation of the continental shelf by fluvial processes over multiple glacial-interglacial sea-level cycles rather than by catastrophic flooding through the Straits of Dover during the mid-Quaternary. Here, through the integration of multibeam bathymetry and shallow sub-bottom 2D seismic reflection profiles calibrated with vibrocore records, the first stratigraphic model of erosion and deposition on the eastern English Channel continental shelf is presented. Published Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and (14)C ages were used to chronometrically constrain the stratigraphy and allow correlation of the continental shelf record with major climatic/sea-level periods. Five major erosion surfaces overlain by discrete sediment packages have been identified. The continental shelf in the eastern English Channel preserves a record of processes operating from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 to MIS 1. Planar and channelised erosion surfaces were formed by fluvial incision during lowstands or relative sea-level fall. The depth and lateral extent of incision was partly conditioned by underlying geology (rock type and tectonic structure), climatic conditions and changes in water and sediment discharge coupled to ice sheet dynamics and the drainage configuration of major rivers in Northwest Europe. Evidence for major erosion during or prior to MIS 6 is preserved. Fluvial sediments of MIS 2 age were identified within the Northern Palaeovalley, providing insights into the scale of erosion by normal fluvial regimes. Seismic and sedimentary facies indicate that deposition predominantly occurred during transgression when accommodation was created in palaeovalleys to allow discrete sediment bodies to form. Sediment reworking over multiple sea-level cycles (Saalian-Eemian-early Weichselian) by fluvial, coastal and marine processes created a multi-lateral, multi-storey succession of

  11. Denudation of the continental shelf between Britain and France at the glacial-interglacial timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellett, Claire L.; Hodgson, David M.; Plater, Andrew J.; Mauz, Barbara; Selby, Ian; Lang, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    The erosional morphology preserved at the sea bed in the eastern English Channel dominantly records denudation of the continental shelf by fluvial processes over multiple glacial-interglacial sea-level cycles rather than by catastrophic flooding through the Straits of Dover during the mid-Quaternary. Here, through the integration of multibeam bathymetry and shallow sub-bottom 2D seismic reflection profiles calibrated with vibrocore records, the first stratigraphic model of erosion and deposition on the eastern English Channel continental shelf is presented. Published Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and 14C ages were used to chronometrically constrain the stratigraphy and allow correlation of the continental shelf record with major climatic/sea-level periods. Five major erosion surfaces overlain by discrete sediment packages have been identified. The continental shelf in the eastern English Channel preserves a record of processes operating from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 to MIS 1. Planar and channelised erosion surfaces were formed by fluvial incision during lowstands or relative sea-level fall. The depth and lateral extent of incision was partly conditioned by underlying geology (rock type and tectonic structure), climatic conditions and changes in water and sediment discharge coupled to ice sheet dynamics and the drainage configuration of major rivers in Northwest Europe. Evidence for major erosion during or prior to MIS 6 is preserved. Fluvial sediments of MIS 2 age were identified within the Northern Palaeovalley, providing insights into the scale of erosion by normal fluvial regimes. Seismic and sedimentary facies indicate that deposition predominantly occurred during transgression when accommodation was created in palaeovalleys to allow discrete sediment bodies to form. Sediment reworking over multiple sea-level cycles (Saalian-Eemian-early Weichselian) by fluvial, coastal and marine processes created a multi-lateral, multi-storey succession of

  12. Denudation of the continental shelf between Britain and France at the glacial–interglacial timescale

    PubMed Central

    Mellett, Claire L.; Hodgson, David M.; Plater, Andrew J.; Mauz, Barbara; Selby, Ian; Lang, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The erosional morphology preserved at the sea bed in the eastern English Channel dominantly records denudation of the continental shelf by fluvial processes over multiple glacial–interglacial sea-level cycles rather than by catastrophic flooding through the Straits of Dover during the mid-Quaternary. Here, through the integration of multibeam bathymetry and shallow sub-bottom 2D seismic reflection profiles calibrated with vibrocore records, the first stratigraphic model of erosion and deposition on the eastern English Channel continental shelf is presented. Published Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and 14C ages were used to chronometrically constrain the stratigraphy and allow correlation of the continental shelf record with major climatic/sea-level periods. Five major erosion surfaces overlain by discrete sediment packages have been identified. The continental shelf in the eastern English Channel preserves a record of processes operating from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 to MIS 1. Planar and channelised erosion surfaces were formed by fluvial incision during lowstands or relative sea-level fall. The depth and lateral extent of incision was partly conditioned by underlying geology (rock type and tectonic structure), climatic conditions and changes in water and sediment discharge coupled to ice sheet dynamics and the drainage configuration of major rivers in Northwest Europe. Evidence for major erosion during or prior to MIS 6 is preserved. Fluvial sediments of MIS 2 age were identified within the Northern Palaeovalley, providing insights into the scale of erosion by normal fluvial regimes. Seismic and sedimentary facies indicate that deposition predominantly occurred during transgression when accommodation was created in palaeovalleys to allow discrete sediment bodies to form. Sediment reworking over multiple sea-level cycles (Saalian–Eemian–early Weichselian) by fluvial, coastal and marine processes created a multi-lateral, multi-storey succession of

  13. Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise during the Last Interglacial and future centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeConto, Robert; Pollard, David

    2014-05-01

    Substantial retreat of the Antarctic Ice Sheet during past warm periods including the Pliocene and some Pleistocene interglacials has been difficult to reconcile in most ice sheet models. This includes the Last Interglacial (LIG; ~130 to 115 ka), when Antarctica is now thought to have contributed +4 to +7m of equivalent sea-level rise. Here we use a continental ice sheet-shelf model with new physics accounting for structural failure of large tidewater ice cliffs and the influence of surface meltwater on ice-shelf calving. Coupled with high-resolution atmosphere and ocean components, the model is used to simulate the Antarctic Ice Sheet under Pliocene, LIG, and future conditions. The new model simulates an Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise of ~15m during peak mid-Pliocene warmth and ~4.25m during the LIG, in approximate agreement with (albeit uncertain) geological sea-level indicators. When applied to long-term future simulations assuming extended RCP greenhouse gas emission scenarios and using high resolution atmosphere and ocean components, the same model physics show a dramatic retreat of Antarctic marine-based ice over the next 500 years, beginning within a few decades in the Pine Island Bay sector of West Antarctica. In the most extreme RCP scenarios, subsequent retreat of the Siple Coast margin results in the near-total collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) within a few centuries, followed by retreat into the deep subglacial basins underlying the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). Antarctica is shown to contribute up to 9m of sea level rise within the next five centuries. Under such high greenhouse gas conditions, atmospheric warming alone is sufficient to cause substantial ice retreat, without any influence from ocean warming and sub-ice melt. Conversely, in the absence of increasing atmospheric temperatures, very little ocean warming (<0.5 C) is required to trigger substantial WAIS retreat, even if present-day atmospheric temperatures are held

  14. Simulating ice core 10Be on the glacial-interglacial timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsässer, C.; Wagenbach, D.; Levin, I.; Stanzick, A.; Christl, M.; Wallner, A.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Seierstad, I. K.; Wershofen, H.; Dibb, J.

    2014-02-01

    10Be ice core measurements are an important tool for paleoclimate research, e.g. allowing for the reconstruction of past solar activity or variation in the natural 14C production rate. However, especially on multi-millennial timescales, the share of production and climate induced variations of respective 10Be ice core records is still up to debate. Here we present the first quantitative climatological model of the 10Be ice concentration up to the glacial-interglacial timescale. The model approach is composed of (i) a coarse resolution global atmospheric transport model and (ii) a local 10Be air-firn-transfer model. Extensive global-scale observational data of short-lived radionuclides as well as new polar 10Be snow pit measurements are used for model calibration and validation. Being specifically configured for polar 10Be, this tool thus allows for a straight-forward investigation of production and non-production related modulation of this nuclide. We find that the polar 10Be ice concentration does not record a globally mixed cosmogenic production signal. In fact, the geomagnetic modulation of Greenland 10Be is up to 50% lower than in case of the global atmospheric 10Be inventory. Using geomagnetic modulation and revised Greenland snow accumulation rate changes as model input we simulate the observed Greenland Summit (GRIP and GISP2) 10Be ice core records over the last 75 kyr (on the GICC05modelext timescale). We show that our basic model is capable to reproduce the largest portion of the observed 10Be changes. However, model-measurements differences exhibit multi-millennial oscillations with amplitudes up to 87% of the mean observed Holocene 10Be concentration. Focusing on the (12-37) kyr b2k (before the year 2000 AD) period, mean model-measurements differences of 30% cannot be imputed to production changes. However, unconsidered climate-induced changes could likely explain the model shortcomings. In fact, the 10Be ice concentration is very sensitive to snow

  15. Simulating ice core 10Be on the glacial-interglacial timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsässer, C.; Wagenbach, D.; Levin, I.; Stanzick, A.; Christl, M.; Wallner, A.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Seierstad, I. K.; Wershofen, H.; Dibb, J.

    2015-02-01

    10Be ice core measurements are an important tool for paleoclimate research, e.g., allowing for the reconstruction of past solar activity or changes in the geomagnetic dipole field. However, especially on multi-millennial timescales, the share of production and climate-induced variations of respective 10Be ice core records is still up for debate. Here we present the first quantitative climatological model of the 10Be ice concentration up to the glacial-interglacial timescale. The model approach is composed of (i) a coarse resolution global atmospheric transport model and (ii) a local 10Be air-firn transfer model. Extensive global-scale observational data of short-lived radionuclides as well as new polar 10Be snow-pit measurements are used for model calibration and validation. Being specifically configured for 10Be in polar ice, this tool thus allows for a straightforward investigation of production- and non-production-related modulation of this nuclide. We find that the polar 10Be ice concentration does not immediately record the globally mixed cosmogenic production signal. Using geomagnetic modulation and revised Greenland snow accumulation rate changes as model input, we simulate the observed Greenland Summit (GRIP and GISP2) 10Be ice core records over the last 75 kyr (on the GICC05modelext timescale). We show that our basic model is capable of reproducing the largest portion of the observed 10Be changes. However, model-measurement differences exhibit multi-millennial trends (differences up to 87% in case of normalized to the Holocene records) which call for closer investigation. Focusing on the (12-37) b2k (before the year AD 2000) period, mean model-measurement differences of 30% cannot be attributed to production changes. However, unconsidered climate-induced changes could likely explain the model-measurement mismatch. In fact, the 10Be ice concentration is very sensitive to snow accumulation changes. Here the reconstructed Greenland Summit (GRIP) snow

  16. Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) Observations of Polar Winter Conditions in 2009; Comparisons with Years 2002-2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-03

    POLAR WINTER CONDITIONS IN 2009; COMPARISONS WITH YEARS 2002-2008 Peter P. Wintersteiner ARCON Corporation 260 Bear Hill Road Waltham...NUMBER ARCON Corporation 260 Bear Hill Rd. Waltham, MA 02451-1080 AFRL/RVBYM 9. SPONSORING... ARCON Corporation according to the provisions of contract #FA8718-04-C-0031. Much of this work was done during the fifth year in which it was in effect

  17. [Application of the network thermodynamics to interpretation of membrane transport: evaluation of the resistance coefficients of the polymeric membrane in polarization concentration conditions].

    PubMed

    Slyzak, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The Kedem-Katchalsky equations, derived using symmetric transformation of the Peusner's network transformation, to interpretation of transport through Nephrophan membrane of glucose aqueous solutions in concentration polarization conditions were employed. The values of Rij* (i does not equal j = 1, 2) coefficients were calculated. From these calculations it results that, the values of coefficients R11*, R12* = R21* and R22* are nonlinear dependent as well as on concentration of solutions (C) and configuration of membrane system.

  18. Eemian interglacial reconstructed from a Greenland folded ice core.

    PubMed

    2013-01-24

    Efforts to extract a Greenland ice core with a complete record of the Eemian interglacial (130,000 to 115,000 years ago) have until now been unsuccessful. The response of the Greenland ice sheet to the warmer-than-present climate of the Eemian has thus remained unclear. Here we present the new North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling ('NEEM') ice core and show only a modest ice-sheet response to the strong warming in the early Eemian. We reconstructed the Eemian record from folded ice using globally homogeneous parameters known from dated Greenland and Antarctic ice-core records. On the basis of water stable isotopes, NEEM surface temperatures after the onset of the Eemian (126,000 years ago) peaked at 8 ± 4 degrees Celsius above the mean of the past millennium, followed by a gradual cooling that was probably driven by the decreasing summer insolation. Between 128,000 and 122,000 years ago, the thickness of the northwest Greenland ice sheet decreased by 400 ± 250 metres, reaching surface elevations 122,000 years ago of 130 ± 300 metres lower than the present. Extensive surface melt occurred at the NEEM site during the Eemian, a phenomenon witnessed when melt layers formed again at NEEM during the exceptional heat of July 2012. With additional warming, surface melt might become more common in the future.

  19. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard–Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles. PMID:26980084

  20. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D

    2016-03-16

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles.

  1. Astronomical forcing and mathematical theory of glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislov, A. V.

    2009-02-01

    There are three important features of a proxy time series recorded during the Late Pleistocene. They are: 1) 100 000-year cycle as a dominant control of global glacial-interglacials through the late Quaternary, 2) fluctuations with periods of about 40 and 20 thousand years (their contribution to dispersion is no more than 20%), 3) ''Red-noise'' behavior of the time series. Direct influence of the insolation change created by fluctuations of the eccentricity is too weak to cause the observed 100 000-year climate fluctuations. Therefore, other mechanisms of such a rhythm are proposed. On the basis of the equation of the heat budget, the equation describing dynamics of zonally averaged temperature is developed. Various combinations of terms of this equation are discussed. They present a linear response to the Milankovitch periodicity, the Langeven stochastic equation, the equation of delay oscillator, the stochastic equation of spontaneous transitions, and the equation of stochastic resonance. Orbitally-induced changes in the solar energy flux received by the Earth play an important role as a mechanism starting process of climate changes which is supported and intensified by different feedbacks within the climate system. Positive anomalies of solar radiation serve as a mechanism causing reorganization of the climate only in rare cases when inclination of Earth axis of rotation increases and, simultaneously, perihelion takes place during the summer time (for the Northern Hemisphere).

  2. Greenland ice sheet melting during the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langebroek, Petra M.; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.

    2016-04-01

    During the last interglacial period (LIG) peak temperatures over Greenland were several degrees warmer than today. The Greenland ice sheet (GIS) retreated causing a global sea-level rise in the order of several meters. Large uncertainties still exist in the exact amount of melt and on the source location of this melt. Here we examine the GIS response to LIG temperature and precipitation patterns using the SICOPOLIS ice sheet model. The LIG climate was simulated by forcing the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) with the appropriate greenhouse gases and orbital settings. The resulting LIG ice volume evolution strongly depends on the chosen value of uncertain model parameters for the ice sheet (e.g. basal sliding parameter, PDD factors, and atmospheric temperature lapse rate). We reduce the uncertainty by evaluating an ensemble of model results against present-day observations of ice sheet size, elevation and stability, together with paleo information from deep ice cores. We find a maximum GIS reduction equivalent to 0.8 to 2.2m of global sea-level rise. In this model set-up most of the melting occurs in southwestern Greenland.

  3. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditlevsen, Peter; Shao, Zhi-Gang

    2017-04-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H˜0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H˜1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles. Ref: Zhi-Gang Shao and Peter Ditlevsen, Nature Comm. 7, 10951, 2016

  4. South Carolina interglacial sites and stage 5 sea levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollin, John T.; Hearty, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    Amino acid and other studies have been made on the 30-km Pleistocene sections of the Intracoastal Waterway between Myrtle Beach and Little River, South Carolina. Our ratios differentiate the long-established Waccamaw (oldest), Canepatch, and Socastee formations. The ratios from the four laboratories that have worked in this area agree very well, and apparent conflicts with U-series dates may merely reflect an abundance of reworked corals. Our amino acid correlations with U-series coral dates in South Carolina, Bermuda, and the Mediterranean all argue that the classical Canepatch and its Horry Clay date from isotope stage 5e and not, as has been implied, from stage 7, 9, 11, or 13. Excavations and erosion have increased position-fixing problems along the Waterway, and "Canepatch" amino acid ratios and U-series dates (460,000 ± 100,000 yr B.P.) at "ICW5" may be from an older unit. The Canepatch shows the double marine transgression visible in many stage 5e deposits. Pollen shows that the second transgression occurred late in the interglaciation, and stratigraphic studies show that it reached 14 m. It therefore fits very well Antarctic ice-surge models of stage 5 sea level and climate. The Socastee adds to the evidence for one or more sea levels above 0 m late in stage 5.

  5. Resveratrol regulates microglia M1/M2 polarization via PGC-1α in conditions of neuroinflammatory injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Xu, Shaoqing; Qian, Yiwei; Xiao, Qin

    2017-08-01

    Microglia are the primary cells that exert immune function in the central nervous system (CNS), and accumulating evidence suggests that microglia act as key players in the initiation of neurodegenerative diseases. It is now well recognized that microglia have functional plasticity and dual phenotypes, proinflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 phenotypes. Inhibiting the M1 phenotype while stimulating the M2 phenotype has been suggested as a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of neuroinflammation-related diseases. Resveratrol has been demonstrated to exert anti-inflammatory effects by suppressing M1 microglia activation. However, the role of resveratrol in regulating microglia polarization and the molecular mechanisms involved have not been fully clarified. In this study, we tested whether resveratrol could suppress microglia activation by promoting microglia polarization toward the M2 phenotype via PGC-1α by measuring M1 and M2 markers in vitro and in vivo. Our study demonstrated that resveratrol reduced inflammatory damage and promoted microglia polarization to the M2 phenotype in LPS-induced neuroinflammation. In addition, resveratrol ameliorated LPS-induced sickness behavior in mice. The promoting effects of resveratrol on M2 polarization were attenuated by knocking down PGC-1α. PGC-1α not only suppressed LPS-evoked M1 marker expression by inhibition of NF-κB activity but also increased M2 marker expression by coactivation of the STAT6 and STAT3 pathways. We propose that overexpression PGC-1α by resveratrol could be a potential therapeutic approach to suppress neuroinflammation by regulating microglia polarization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Research of beam conditioning technologies using continuous phase plate, Multi-FM smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Jia, Huaiting; Tian, Xiaocheng; Yuan, Haoyu; Zhu, Na; Su, Jingqin; Hu, Dongxia; Zhu, Qihua; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-10-01

    In the research of inertial confinement fusion, laser plasma interaction (LPI) is becoming a key problem that affects ignition. Here, multi-frequency modulation (Multi-FM) smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), continuous phase plate (CPP) and polarization smoothing (PS) were experimentally studied and implemented on the SG-III laser facility. After using these techniques, the far field distribution of SG-Ⅲ laser facility can be adjusted, controlled and repeated accurately. The output spectrums of the cascade phase modulators used for Multi-FM SSD were stable and the FM-to-AM effect can be restrained. Experiments on SG-III laser facility indicate that when the number of color cycles adopts 1, imposing SSD with 3.3 times diffraction limit (TDL) did not lead to pinhole closure in the spatial filters of preamplifier and main amplifiers with 30-TDL pinhole size. The nonuniformity of the focal spots using Multi-FM SSD, CPP and PS drops to 0.18, comparing to 0.26 with CPP+SSD, 0.57 with CPP+PS and 0.84 with only CPP and wedged lens. Polarization smoothing using flat birefringent plate in the convergent beam of final optics assembly (FOA) was studied. The PS plates were manufactured and equipped on SG-III laser facility for LPI research. Combined beam smoothing and polarization manipulation were also studied to solve the LPI problem. Results indicate that through adjusting dispersion directions of SSD beams in a quad, two dimensional SSD can be obtained. Using polarization control plate (PCP), polarization on the near field and far field can be manipulated, providing new method to solve LPI problem in indirect drive laser fusion.

  7. Modern and Interglacial Marine Ostracode Species Diversity Patterns off Eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, W. T. R.; Yasuhara, M.; Cronin, T. M.; Hunt, G.; Gemery, L.

    2016-02-01

    Latitudinal species diversity gradients (LSDGs) are a major feature of various marine groups. However, the detailed shape of LSDG in each marine taxonomic group and the causes of the diversity patterns, notably climatic factors, are still controversial due to limited sampling of many taxa in the world's oceans. We analyzed benthic podocopid ostracode faunal assemblages on the continental shelf regions from Arctic to tropical regions off eastern North America to determine biodiversity patterns and their relationships to oceanographic conditions (temperature, productivity, etc). Our database consists of 200 ostracode species from more than 100 bottom sediment samples. Preliminary results suggest that biodiversity, as measured using simple diversity (S), rarefaction, Shannon and α-Fisher indices, show strong latitudinal diversity gradients in which diversity is 2 to 3 times higher in tropical and subtropical regions that in northern high latitude areas. These modern ostracode diversity patterns will be compared with those from past interglacial periods of global warmth during the Pliocene and Pleistocene to assess the impact of warmer-than- present climate conditions on diversity.

  8. Interglacial genetic diversification of Moussonia deppeana (Gesneriaceae), a hummingbird-pollinated, cloud forest shrub in northern Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Juan Francisco; González, Clementina

    2014-08-01

    Recent empirical work on cloud forest-adapted species supports the role of both old divergences across major geographical areas and more recent divergences attributed to Pleistocene climate changes. The shrub Moussonia deppeana is distributed in northern Mesoamerica, with geographically disjunct populations. Based on sampling throughout the species range and employing plastid and nuclear markers, we (i) test whether the fragmented distribution is correlated with main evolutionary lineages, (ii) reconstruct its phylogeographical history to infer the history of cloud forest in northern Mesoamerica and (iii) evaluate a set of refugia/vicariance scenarios for the region and demographic patterns of the populations whose ranges expanded and tracked cloud forest conditions during the Last Glacial Maximum. We found a deep evolutionary split in M. deppeana about 6-3 Ma, which could be consistent with a Pliocene divergence. Comparison of variation in plastid and nuclear markers revealed several lineages mostly congruent with their isolated geographical distribution and restricted gene flow among groups. Results of species distribution modelling and coalescent simulations fit a model of multiple refugia diverging during interglacial cycles. The demographic history of M. deppeana is not consistent with an expanding-contracting cloud forest archipelago model during the Last Glacial Maximum. Instead, our data suggest that populations persisted across the geographical range throughout the glacial cycles, and experienced isolation and divergence during interglacial periods. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Greenland during the last interglacial: the relative importance of insolation and oceanic changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Rasmus A.; Langen, Peter L.; Vinther, Bo M.

    2016-09-01

    Insolation changes during the Eemian (the last interglacial period, 129 000-116 000 years before present) resulted in warmer than present conditions in the Arctic region. The NEEM ice core record suggests warming of 8 ± 4 K in northwestern Greenland based on stable water isotopes. Here we use general circulation model experiments to investigate the causes of the Eemian warming in Greenland. Simulations of the atmospheric response to combinations of Eemian insolation and preindustrial oceanic conditions and vice versa are used to disentangle the impacts of the insolation change and the related changes in sea surface temperatures and sea ice conditions. The changed oceanic conditions cause warming throughout the year, prolonging the impact of the summertime insolation increase. Consequently, the oceanic conditions cause an annual mean warming of 2 K at the NEEM site, whereas the insolation alone causes an insignificant change. Taking the precipitation changes into account, however, the insolation and oceanic changes cause more comparable increases in the precipitation-weighted temperature, implying that both contributions are important for the ice core record at the NEEM site. The simulated Eemian precipitation-weighted warming of 2.4 K at the NEEM site is low compared to the ice core reconstruction, partially due to missing feedbacks related to ice sheet changes and an extensive sea ice cover. Surface mass balance calculations with an energy balance model further indicate that the combination of temperature and precipitation anomalies leads to potential mass loss in the north and southwestern parts of the ice sheet. The oceanic conditions favor increased accumulation in the southeast, while the insolation appears to be the dominant cause of the expected ice sheet reduction. Consequently, the Eemian is not a suitable analogue for future ice sheet changes.

  10. How warm was the last interglacial? New model-data comparisons.

    PubMed

    Otto-Bliesner, Bette L; Rosenbloom, Nan; Stone, Emma J; McKay, Nicholas P; Lunt, Daniel J; Brady, Esther C; Overpeck, Jonathan T

    2013-10-28

    A Community Climate System Model, Version 3 (CCSM3) simulation for 125 ka during the Last Interglacial (LIG) is compared to two recent proxy reconstructions to evaluate surface temperature changes from modern times. The dominant forcing change from modern, the orbital forcing, modified the incoming solar insolation at the top of the atmosphere, resulting in large positive anomalies in boreal summer. Greenhouse gas concentrations are similar to those of the pre-industrial (PI) Holocene. CCSM3 simulates an enhanced seasonal cycle over the Northern Hemisphere continents with warming most developed during boreal summer. In addition, year-round warming over the North Atlantic is associated with a seasonal memory of sea ice retreat in CCSM3, which extends the effects of positive summer insolation anomalies on the high-latitude oceans to winter months. The simulated Arctic terrestrial annual warming, though, is much less than the observational evidence, suggesting either missing feedbacks in the simulation and/or interpretation of the proxies. Over Antarctica, CCSM3 cannot reproduce the large LIG warming recorded by the Antarctic ice cores, even with simulations designed to consider observed evidence of early LIG warmth in Southern Ocean and Antarctica records and the possible disintegration of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Comparisons with a HadCM3 simulation indicate that sea ice is important for understanding model polar responses. Overall, the models simulate little global annual surface temperature change, while the proxy reconstructions suggest a global annual warming at LIG (as compared to the PI Holocene) of approximately 1(°)C, though with possible spatial sampling biases. The CCSM3 SRES B1 (low scenario) future projections suggest high-latitude warmth similar to that reconstructed for the LIG may be exceeded before the end of this century.

  11. The Last Interglacial in the Levant: Perspective from the ICDP Dead Sea Deep Drill Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, S. L.; Torfstein, A.; Stein, M.; Kushnir, Y.; Enzel, Y.; Haug, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    Sediments recovered by the ICDP Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project provide a new perspective on the climate history of the Levant during the last interglacial period MIS5. They record the extreme impacts of an intense interglacial characterized by stronger insolation, warmer mean global temperatures, and higher sea-levels than the Holocene. Results show both extreme hyper-aridity during MIS5e, including an unprecedented drawdown of Dead Sea water levels, and the impacts of a strong precession-driven African monsoon responsible for a major sapropel event (S5) in the eastern Mediterranean. Hyper-arid conditions at the beginning of MIS5e prior to S5 (~132-128 ka) are evidenced by halite deposition, indicating declining Dead Sea lake levels. Surprisingly, the hyper-arid phase is interrupted during the MIS5e peak (~128-120 ka), coinciding with the S5 sapropel, which is characterized by a thick (23 m) section of silty detritus (without any halite) whose provenance indicates southern-sourced wetness in the watershed. Upon weakening of the S5 monsoon (~120-115 ka), the return of extreme aridity resulted in an unprecedented lake level drawdown, reflected by massive salt deposition, and followed by a sediment hiatus (~115-100 ka) indicating prolonged low lake level. The resumption of section follows classic Levant patterns with more wetness during cooler MIS5b and hyper-aridity during warmer MIS5a. The ICDP core provides the first evidence for a direct linkage between an intense precession-driven African monsoon and wetness at the high subtropical latitude (~30N) of the Dead Sea watershed. Combined with coeval deposition of Negev speleothems and travertines, and calcitification of Red Sea corals, the evidence indicates a wet climatic corridor that could facilitate homo sapiens migration out of Africa during the MIS5e peak. In addition, the MIS 5e hyper-arid intervals may provide an important cautionary analogue for the impact of future warming on regional water resources.

  12. Southern Ocean Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Fields during the Last Interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esper, O.; Gersonde, R.; Lohmann, G.

    2014-12-01

    Diatom assemblages preserved in 18 sediment cores recovered in the eastern Indian, Atlantic and Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean are used for the reconstruction of the variability of summer sea surface temperature (SSST) and sea ice concentration during the Last Interglacial (LIG) or Marine Isotope Stage 5 (MIS 5). The large coverage of the core sites allows for reconstructions on latitudinal and longitudinal transects across the Southern Ocean and thus for the comparison of the environmental signal evolution in different sedimentary basins of the Southern Ocean. Such information is crucial for the understanding of climate signal propagation in the Southern Ocean and on inter-hemispheric scale. The quantitative temperature and sea ice records are derived with newly established diatom-based transfer functions at millennial to centennial resolution. Stratigraphic age assignment relies on a combination of oxygen isotope stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, core-core correlation using physical, geochemical and microfossil abundance pattern together with a tuning of sediment core signals with climate records in Antarctic ice cores. All records display a rapid transition from glacial (MIS 6) to MIS 5 conditions to reach maximum temperatures in the latest MIS 6/MIS 5 transition (Termination II) and the early LIG attributed to MIS 5.5. The amplitude of the SSST change is up to 5°C, with generally smaller values in the Pacific sector. During this period Southern Ocean temperature may exceed modern surface temperatures by up to 3°C and the winter sea ice edge is located south of the modern ice edge. Higher resolution cores display short-term temperature rebounds during the Termination II warming. Such cold rebounds are not discerned in the ice core records. The Southern Ocean warming could be triggered by precessional changes influencing high latitude summer insolation and potentially be accelerated by feedback mechanisms such as the reduction of surface albedo (sea ice

  13. Hydroclimatic changes recorded in Lake Van (eastern Anatolia, Turkey) during the last glacial/interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiecien, O.; Tomonaga, Y.; Stockhecke, M.; Randlett, M.; Bucher, S.; Pickarski, N.; Brennwald, M.; Schubert, C. J.; Kipfer, R.; Anselmetti, F.; Sturm, M.; Haug, G. H.

    2012-12-01

    Lake-level fluctuations of terminal lakes are a sensitive indicator of local/regional moisture balance. Here we reconstruct changes in level of Lake Van, eastern Anatolia, Turkey. We combine several approaches (pore water and sediment geochemistry, lithological analysis, modeling, and mapping of lake terraces) and focus on the last ca. 130 ka of Lake Van's history. For the multi-millennial time scales, we use salinity measured in the pore water to calculate the water volume (and the respective lake level) necessary to dilute or concentrate the dissolved salt content of Lake Van. Our results agree with a previous study on lake terraces in the region of Lake Van (Kuzucuoglu et al., 2010) suggesting that during MIS 5 (130-70 ka BP) the lake level was ca. 100 m higher than today. During the last glacial, the water level dropped significantly, but the lake did not dry out completely (compare Landmann et al., 1996). Pollen data support wet interglacial and dry glacial conditions. In order to resolve centennial-to millennial lake level changes we investigated the terrigenous components of the sediment. The accumulation of terrigenous material in Lake Van is a function of a depocenter distance from a river mouth (fluvial input) and exposition of the shelf (eolian input), both of which are dependent on the lake level. Accordingly, high-resolution XRF Al- and K-data, reflecting terrigenous input, reinforced by lithological analysis provide insight into short-term lake-level fluctuations superimposed on the long-term trend. These data show excellent and detailed correlation with the Greenland ice-core isotope signal. We conclude that in eastern Anatolia, the last interglacial was probably more humid than the recent one. Additionally, during the last glacial, the region experienced not only dry and windy spells in concert with Greenland stadials but also abrupt climate melioration as Greenland warmed into interstadials. Lake Van sediments are thus, to our knowledge, the most

  14. Southern Ocean surface temperature and sea ice fields during the Last Interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esper, Oliver; Gersonde, Rainer

    2013-04-01

    Diatom assemblages preserved in 16 sediment cores recovered in the eastern Indian, Atlantic and Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean are used for the reconstruction of the variability of summer sea surface temperature (SSST) and sea ice concentration during the Last Interglacial (LIG) or Marine Isotope Stage 5 (MIS 5). The large coverage of the core sites allows for reconstructions on latitudinal and longitudinal transects across the Southern Ocean and thus for the comparison of the environmental signal evolution in different sedimentary basins of the Southern Ocean. Such information is crucial for the understanding of climate signal propagation in the Southern Ocean and on inter-hemispheric scale. The quantitative temperature and sea ice records are derived with newly established diatom-based transfer functions at millennial to centennial resolution. Stratigraphic age assignment relies on a combination of oxygen isotope stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, core-core correlation using physical, geochemical and microfossil abundance pattern together with a tuning of sediment core signals with climate records in Antarctic ice cores. All records display a rapid transition from glacial (MIS 6) to MIS 5 conditions to reach maximum temperatures in the latest MIS 6/MIS 5 transition (Termination II) and the early LIG attributed to MIS 5.5. The amplitude of the SSST change is up to 5°C, with generally smaller values in the Pacific sector. During this period Southern Ocean temperature may exceed modern surface temperatures by up to 3°C and the winter sea ice edge is located south of the modern ice edge. Higher resolution cores display short-term temperature rebounds during the Termination II warming. Such cold rebounds are not discerned in the ice core records. The Southern Ocean warming could be triggered by precessional changes influencing high latitude summer insolation and potentially be accelerated by feedback mechanisms such as the reduction of surface albedo (sea ice

  15. Sea ice-associated decline in body condition leads to increased concentrations of lipophilic pollutants in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Svalbard, Norway.

    PubMed

    Tartu, Sabrina; Bourgeon, Sophie; Aars, Jon; Andersen, Magnus; Polder, Anuschka; Thiemann, Gregory W; Welker, Jeffrey M; Routti, Heli

    2017-01-15

    Global climate changes are magnified in the Arctic and are having an especially dramatic effect on the spatial and temporal distribution and the thickness traits of sea ice. Decline of Arctic sea ice may lead to qualitative and/or quantitative changes in diet and reduced body condition (i.e. adipose tissue stores) of ice-associated apex predators such as polar bears (Ursus maritimus). This may further affect their tissue concentrations of lipophilic pollutants. We determined how variations in adipose tissue stores associated to both breeding status and spatial changes in sea ice conditions and diet influence concentrations and biotransformation of lipophilic persistent organic pollutants (POPs). We collected 112 blood and fat samples from female polar bears (Ursus maritimus) of different breeding status (alone, with cubs of the year, or with yearlings) during two seasons (April and September) in 2012 and 2013 at three locations of Svalbard, Norway, with contrasted sea ice conditions. We inferred diet from nitrogen and carbon stable isotope ratios in red blood cells and fatty acid composition in adipose tissue. Relative to diet, body condition, which was negatively related to sea ice extent at both temporal and spatial scales, was the most important predictor for concentrations of POPs in plasma and fat, whereas diet showed a minor influence. Additionally, fatter females were more efficient at biotransforming PCBs than were leaner ones. Breeding status influenced the concentrations of less lipophilic compounds such as β-hexachlorocyclohexane, which were lower in females with yearlings, probably due to excretion into milk and subsequent offloading to young. In conclusion, our results indicate that declining sea ice indirectly leads to increased concentrations of lipophilic pollutants in polar bears mediated through reduced feeding opportunities and declining body condition rather than changes in diet composition.

  16. Comparative analysis of electric field influence on the quantum wells with different boundary conditions.: I. Energy spectrum, quantum information entropy and polarization.

    PubMed

    Olendski, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    Analytical solutions of the Schrödinger equation for the one-dimensional quantum well with all possible permutations of the Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions (BCs) in perpendicular to the interfaces uniform electric field [Formula: see text] are used for the comparative investigation of their interaction and its influence on the properties of the system. Limiting cases of the weak and strong voltages allow an easy mathematical treatment and its clear physical explanation; in particular, for the small [Formula: see text], the perturbation theory derives for all geometries a linear dependence of the polarization on the field with the BC-dependent proportionality coefficient being positive (negative) for the ground (excited) states. Simple two-level approximation elementary explains the negative polarizations as a result of the field-induced destructive interference of the unperturbed modes and shows that in this case the admixture of only the neighboring states plays a dominant role. Different magnitudes of the polarization for different BCs in this regime are explained physically and confirmed numerically. Hellmann-Feynman theorem reveals a fundamental relation between the polarization and the speed of the energy change with the field. It is proved that zero-voltage position entropies [Formula: see text] are BC independent and for all states but the ground Neumann level (which has [Formula: see text]) are equal to [Formula: see text] while the momentum entropies [Formula: see text] depend on the edge requirements and the level. Varying electric field changes position and momentum entropies in the opposite directions such that the entropic uncertainty relation is satisfied. Other physical quantities such as the BC-dependent zero-energy and zero-polarization fields are also studied both numerically and analytically. Applications to different branches of physics, such as ocean fluid dynamics and atmospheric and metallic waveguide electrodynamics, are discussed.

  17. Determining optimum operating conditions of the polarization-maintaining fiber with two far-lying zero dispersion wavelengths for CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Naji, Majid; Murugkar, Sangeeta; Anis, Hanan

    2014-05-05

    Single femtosecond laser-based coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, using a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) pumped in the near-IR to generate a supercontinuum for the Stokes source, is rapidly being adopted as a cost-effective approach. A PCF with two closely-lying zero dispersion wavelengths is a popular choice for the Stokes source, but it is often limited to imaging lipids. A polarization-maintaining PCF with two far-lying zero dispersion wavelengths offers important advantages for polarization CARS microscopy, and for CARS imaging in the fingerprint region. This PCF fiber, though commercially available, has limited use for CARS microscopy in the C-H bond region. The main problem is that the supercontinuum from this fiber is typically noisier than that from a standard PCF with two closely-lying zero dispersion wavelengths. To overcome this, we determined the optimum operating conditions for generating a low-noise supercontinuum out of a PCF with two far-lying zero dispersion wavelengths, in terms of the input parameters of the excitation pulse. We measured the relative intensity noise (RIN) of the Stokes and the corresponding CARS signal as a function of the input laser parameters in this fiber. We showed that the results of CARS imaging using this alternate fiber are comparable to those achieved using the standard fiber, for input laser pulse conditions of low average power, narrow pulse width with slightly positive chirp, and polarization direction parallel to the slow axis of the selected fiber.

  18. Model-Paleodata analysis of an orbitally driven mechanism for the onset of the warmest interglacials like MIS 11, 31, 49 etc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, R.; Deconto, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Global climate during Quaternary and Late Pliocene (present-3.1 Ma) is characterized by alternating glacial and interglacial conditions. Recently, several interglacials have been identified as warmer than others, like 9, 11, 31, 49, 55, 77, 87 and 91, and are termed as "Superinterglacials". Our proposed theory associates these superinterglacials with variations in the behavior of the Northern Hemisphere (NH) ice sheets with respect to the Southern Hemisphere (SH) ice sheets. At lower eccentricities, with the effect of precession being minimal, the NH ice sheets vary in-phase with SH. At higher eccentricities, NH ice sheets vary out-of-phase with SH ice sheets and are forced by precession driven local insolation changes. Model results indicate that during periods of low eccentricity, favorable forcing (high obliquity, high CO2) leads to unusually long interglacial conditions in both NH and SH. Using an ensemble of GCM simulations covering MIS 11, 31 and 49 we show that SH ice-sheets follow boreal summer insolation at lower eccentricities, switching to austral summer insolation at higher eccentricities. This switch provides the necessary orbital forcing for prolonged interglacial climates, much longer than expected from global oxygen isotope records. The prolonged warm conditions in the SH preconditions the poles to produce a large response during the superinterglacials. Recent paleodata studies have shown the existence of such extra-long interglacials in the NH during MIS 15-13 (preceding MIS 11) using grain-size records from Chinese loess (Q Hao, 2015). In this study we work with a collection of paleoclimate records though Pleistocene and correlate with our modeling results. Global records such as benthic δ18O capture the integrated signals of ice volume from both hemispheres, making it difficult to isolate the behaviour of the NH and SH ice sheets. Hence we focus on paleodata records, which capture the NH and SH ice volume signals individually, like the Chinese

  19. Last interglacial temperature seasonality reconstructed from tropical Atlantic corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocas, William M.; Felis, Thomas; Obert, J. Christina; Gierz, Paul; Lohmann, Gerrit; Scholz, Denis; Kölling, Martin; Scheffers, Sander R.

    2016-09-01

    Reconstructions of last interglacial (LIG, MIS 5e, ∼127-117 ka) climate offer insights into the natural response and variability of the climate system during a period partially analogous to future climate change scenarios. We present well preserved fossil corals (Diploria strigosa) recovered from the southern Caribbean island of Bonaire (Caribbean Netherlands). These have been precisely dated by the 230Th/U-method to between 130 and 120 ka ago. Annual banding of the coral skeleton enabled construction of time windows of monthly resolved strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) temperature proxy records. In conjunction with a previously published 118 ka coral record, our eight records of up to 37 years in length, cover a total of 105 years within the LIG period. From these, sea surface temperature (SST) seasonality and variability in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean is reconstructed. We detect similar to modern SST seasonality of ∼2.9 °C during the early (130 ka) and the late LIG (120-118 ka). However, within the mid-LIG, a significantly higher than modern SST seasonality of 4.9 °C (at 126 ka) and 4.1 °C (at 124 ka) is observed. These findings are supported by climate model simulations and are consistent with the evolving amplitude of orbitally induced changes in seasonality of insolation throughout the LIG, irrespective of wider climatic instabilities that characterised this period. The climate model simulations suggest that the SST seasonality changes documented in our LIG coral Sr/Ca records are representative of larger regions within the tropical North Atlantic. These simulations also suggest that the reconstructed SST seasonality increase during the mid-LIG is caused primarily by summer warming. A 124 ka old coral documents, for the first time, evidence of decadal SST variability in the tropical North Atlantic during the LIG, akin to that observed in modern instrumental records.

  20. A probabilistic assessment of sea level variations within the last interglacial stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Robert E.; Simons, Frederik J.; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Maloof, Adam C.; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The last interglacial stage (LIG; ca. 130-115 ka) provides a relatively recent example of a world with both poles characterized by greater-than-Holocene temperatures similar to those expected later in this century under a range of greenhouse gas emission scenarios. Previous analyses inferred that LIG mean global sea level (GSL) peaked 6-9 m higher than today. Here, we extend our earlier work to perform a probabilistic assessment of sea level variability within the LIG highstand. Using the terminology for probability employed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment reports, we find it extremely likely (95 per cent probability) that the palaeo-sea level record allows resolution of at least two intra-LIG sea level peaks and likely (67 per cent probability) that the magnitude of low-to-high swings exceeded 4 m. Moreover, it is likely that there was a period during the LIG in which GSL rose at a 1000-yr average rate exceeding 3 m kyr-1, but unlikely (33 per cent probability) that the rate exceeded 7 m kyr-1 and extremely unlikely (5 per cent probability) that it exceeded 11 m kyr-1. These rate estimates can provide insight into rates of Greenland and/or Antarctic melt under climate conditions partially analogous to those expected in the 21st century.

  1. Impact of oceanic circulation changes on the CO2 concentration during past interglacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouttes, Nathaelle; Swingedouw, Didier; Crosta, Xavier; Fernanda Sanchez Goñi, Maria; Roche, Didier

    2016-04-01

    Interglacials before the Mid-Bruhnes Event (around 430 kyrs BP) were characterized by colder temperature in Antarctica, lower sea level and lower atmospheric CO2 compared to the more recent interglacials. Recent climate simulations have shown that the climate of the interglacials before and after the MBE can only be reproduced when taking into account changes in orbital parameters and atmospheric CO2 concentrations (Yin and Berger, 2010; Yin and Berger, 2012). Indeed, interglacial atmospheric CO2 concentrations were ~250 ppm and ~280 ppm prior and after the MBE, respectively. Yet, the cause for this change in atmospheric CO2 remains mainly unknown. climate simulations suggest that oceanic circulation was different during the interglacials due to the different climate states (Yin, 2013). The changes of oceanic circulation could have modified the carbon cycle: a more sluggish circulation would lead to greater carbon sequestration in the deep ocean and, subsequently, a decrease of atmospheric CO2. However, the impact of oceanic circulation changes on the carbon cycle during the interglacials of the last 800 kyrs has never been tested in coupled carbon-climate models. Here, we evaluate the role of ocean circulation changes on the carbon cycle during interglacials by using the intermediate complexity model iLOVECLIM (Goosse et al., 2010 ; Bouttes et al., 2015). This model includes a carbon cycle module on land and in the ocean and simulates carbon isotopes. The interglacial simulations are forced with orbital parameters, ice sheets and CO2 concentrations from data reconstructions. The model computes carbon fluxes between the reservoirs and an atmospheric CO2 that is distinct from the one used as a forcing. We will present simulations from this climate model for different interglacial periods of the last 800 000 years and use model-data comparison to analyse and evaluate the changes in the carbon cycle, including CO2. References Bouttes, N. et al. (2015), Geosci. Model

  2. A simple rule to determine which insolation cycles lead to interglacials.

    PubMed

    Tzedakis, P C; Crucifix, M; Mitsui, T; Wolff, E W

    2017-02-22

    The pacing of glacial-interglacial cycles during the Quaternary period (the past 2.6 million years) is attributed to astronomically driven changes in high-latitude insolation. However, it has not been clear how astronomical forcing translates into the observed sequence of interglacials. Here we show that before one million years ago interglacials occurred when the energy related to summer insolation exceeded a simple threshold, about every 41,000 years. Over the past one million years, fewer of these insolation peaks resulted in deglaciation (that is, more insolation peaks were 'skipped'), implying that the energy threshold for deglaciation had risen, which led to longer glacials. However, as a glacial lengthens, the energy needed for deglaciation decreases. A statistical model that combines these observations correctly predicts every complete deglaciation of the past million years and shows that the sequence of interglacials that has occurred is one of a small set of possibilities. The model accounts for the dominance of obliquity-paced glacial-interglacial cycles early in the Quaternary and for the change in their frequency about one million years ago. We propose that the appearance of larger ice sheets over the past million years was a consequence of an increase in the deglaciation threshold and in the number of skipped insolation peaks.

  3. Multilocus phylogeography of the European ground squirrel: cryptic interglacial refugia of continental climate in Europe.

    PubMed

    Říčanová, Štěpánka; Koshev, Yordan; Říčan, Oldřich; Ćosić, Nada; Ćirović, Duško; Sedláček, František; Bryja, Josef

    2013-08-01

    The theory of classical and cryptic Pleistocene refugia is based mainly on historical changes in temperature, and the refugia are usually defined within a latitudinal gradient. However, the gradient of oceanic-continental climate (i.e. longitudinal) was also significantly variable during glacial cycles with important biotic consequences. Range-wide phylogeography of the European ground squirrel (EGS) was used to interpret the evolutionary and palaeogeographical history of the species in Europe and to shed light on its glacial-interglacial dynamic. The EGS is a steppe-inhabiting species and the westernmost member of the genus in the Palaearctic region. We have analysed 915 specimens throughout the present natural range by employing mitochondrial DNA sequences (cytochrome b gene) and 12 nuclear microsatellite markers. The reconstructed phylogeography divides the species into two main geographical groups, with deep substructuring within both groups. Bulgaria is the centre of the ancestral area, and it also has the highest genetic diversity within the species. The northernmost group of the EGS survived in the southern part of Pannonia throughout several glacial-interglacial cycles. Animals from this population probably repeatedly colonized areas further to the north and west during the glacial periods, while in the interglacial periods, the EGS distribution contracted back to this Pannonian refugium. The EGS thus represents a species with a glacial expansion/interglacial contraction palaeogeographical dynamics, and the Pannonian and southeastern Balkanian steppes are supported as cryptic refugia of continental climate during Pleistocene interglacials. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Sub-seasonally resolved coral records of northern Red Sea - eastern Mediterranean climate during the Holocene and the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felis, T.; Rimbu, N.; Al-Rousan, S.; Kuhnert, H.; Lohmann, G.; Kölling, M.; Pätzold, J.

    2012-04-01

    The northern Red Sea represents a unique location where ocean currents transport warm tropical waters northward, enabling coral reef growth at unusually high latitudes of up to 29 °N. Moreover, one of the world's northernmost complexes of uplifted Pleistocene reef terraces can be found here at Aqaba (Jordan). We present sub-seasonally resolved reconstructions of surface ocean conditions in the northern Red Sea derived from annually banded Porites corals. The Sr/Ca and δ18O variations in the aragonitic skeletons of our modern and fossil coral colonies provide proxy records of temperature, salinity and hydrologic balance at the sea surface during the last centuries and during time windows (40 to 100 years length) of the Holocene and the last interglacial period. Previous work has shown that seasonality and interannual to decadal climate variability in the northern Red Sea as documented in our coral records is strongly coupled to climate variations in the eastern Mediterranean, Middle East and Europe, reflecting the prominent role of atmospheric teleconnections of the Arctic Oscillation (AO)/North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in controlling regional climate on these timescales. New coral Sr/Ca data, in combination with δ18O, reveal an abrupt regime shift toward fresher surface ocean conditions in northern Red Sea surface waters at the end of the Little Ice Age. Possible mechanisms include a re-organization of the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation. Sr/Ca records from a large number of fossil corals indicate a trend of decreasing temperature seasonality over the last 6000 years toward present-day. Such a trend is expected in the higher latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere from insolation changes on orbital timescales. Coral δ18O and Sr/Ca records suggest an increased seasonality in the hydrologic balance during time intervals around 4400, 4600 and 6000 years ago, which could result from both enhanced winter evaporation or increased summer precipitation

  5. Large-amplitude, circularly polarized, compressive, obliquely propagating electromagnetic proton cyclotron waves throughout the Earth's magnetosheath: low plasma β conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Remya, B.; Reddy, R. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Falkowski, B. J.; Echer, E.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2014-09-20

    During 1999 August 18, both Cassini and WIND were in the Earth's magnetosheath and detected transverse electromagnetic waves instead of the more typical mirror-mode emissions. The Cassini wave amplitudes were as large as ∼14 nT (peak to peak) in a ∼55 nT ambient magnetic field B {sub 0}. A new method of analysis is applied to study these waves. The general wave characteristics found were as follows. They were left-hand polarized and had frequencies in the spacecraft frame (f {sub scf}) below the proton cyclotron frequency (f{sub p} ). Waves that were either right-hand polarized or had f {sub scf} > f{sub p} are shown to be consistent with Doppler-shifted left-hand waves with frequencies in the plasma frame f{sub pf} < f{sub p} . Thus, almost all waves studied are consistent with their being electromagnetic proton cyclotron waves. Most of the waves (∼55%) were found to be propagating along B {sub 0} (θ{sub kB{sub 0}}<30{sup ∘}), as expected from theory. However, a significant fraction of the waves were found to be propagating oblique to B {sub 0}. These waves were also circularly polarized. This feature and the compressive ([B {sub max} – B {sub min}]/B {sub max}, where B {sub max} and B {sub min} are the maximum and minimum field magnitudes) nature (ranging from 0.27 to 1.0) of the waves are noted but not well understood at this time. The proton cyclotron waves were shown to be quasi-coherent, theoretically allowing for rapid pitch-angle transport of resonant protons. Because Cassini traversed the entire subsolar magnetosheath and WIND was in the dusk-side flank of the magnetosheath, it is surmised that the entire region was filled with these waves. In agreement with past theory, it was the exceptionally low plasma β (0.35) that led to the dominance of the proton cyclotron wave generation during this interval. A high-speed solar wind stream ((V{sub sw} ) = 598 km s{sup –1}) was the source of this low-β plasma.

  6. Total synthesis of cephalosporolide E via a tandem radical/polar crossover reaction. The use of the radical cations under nonoxidative conditions in total synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cortezano-Arellano, Omar; Quintero, Leticia; Sartillo-Piscil, Fernando

    2015-03-06

    The present work reports the first example of the use of the chemistry of radical cations under nonoxidative conditions in total synthesis. Using a late-stage tandem radical/polar crossover reaction, a highly stereoselective total synthesis of cephalosporolide E (which is typically obtained admixed with cephalosporolide F) was accomplished. The reaction of a phthalimido derivative with triphenyltin radical in refluxing toluene engenders a contact ion-pair (radical cation) that leads, in the first instance, to the cephalosporolide F, which is transformed into the cephalosporolide E via a stereocontrolled spiroketal isomerization promoted by the diphenylphosphate acid that is formed during the tandem transformation.

  7. U-series evidence for two high Last Interglacial sea levels in southeastern Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedoui, Younes; Reyss, Jean-Louis; Kallel, Nejib; Montacer, Mabrouk; Ismaı̈l, Hedi Ben; Davaud, Eric

    2003-02-01

    Pleistocene raised marine deposits in southeastern Tunisia consist of a siliciclastic unit that culminates at +3 m asl, overlain by a carbonate-rich unit with Strombus bubonius that culminates at +5 m asl. 234U/ 238U ratios on fossil Ostraea shells from both units are compatible with a marine origin from the uranium incorporated into the shells and show narrowly clustered 230Th-ages, respectively, between 147 and 110 ka and 141 and 100 ka. The two units were therefore developed during Marine Isotopic Substage 5e (MISs 5e, Last Interglacial). Their heights are comparable to those of contemporaneous marine deposits found in many tectonically stable areas of the world such as in the Bahamas and in Bermuda and can therefore be used as indicators of eustatic changes during the Last Interglacial. It is argued that on the basis of this evidence, the Last Interglacial was characterised by two eustatic maxima.

  8. Antarctic last interglacial isotope peak in response to sea ice retreat not ice-sheet collapse

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Max D.; Sime, Louise C.; Singarayer, Joy S.; Tindall, Julia C.; Bunch, Pete; Valdes, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that sea-level rise during the last interglacial implies retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). The prevalent hypothesis is that the retreat coincided with the peak Antarctic temperature and stable water isotope values from 128,000 years ago (128 ka); very early in the last interglacial. Here, by analysing climate model simulations of last interglacial WAIS loss featuring water isotopes, we show instead that the isotopic response to WAIS loss is in opposition to the isotopic evidence at 128 ka. Instead, a reduction in winter sea ice area of 65±7% fully explains the 128 ka ice core evidence. Our finding of a marked retreat of the sea ice at 128 ka demonstrates the sensitivity of Antarctic sea ice extent to climate warming. PMID:27526639

  9. Antarctic last interglacial isotope peak in response to sea ice retreat not ice-sheet collapse.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Max D; Sime, Louise C; Singarayer, Joy S; Tindall, Julia C; Bunch, Pete; Valdes, Paul J

    2016-08-16

    Several studies have suggested that sea-level rise during the last interglacial implies retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). The prevalent hypothesis is that the retreat coincided with the peak Antarctic temperature and stable water isotope values from 128,000 years ago (128 ka); very early in the last interglacial. Here, by analysing climate model simulations of last interglacial WAIS loss featuring water isotopes, we show instead that the isotopic response to WAIS loss is in opposition to the isotopic evidence at 128 ka. Instead, a reduction in winter sea ice area of 65±7% fully explains the 128 ka ice core evidence. Our finding of a marked retreat of the sea ice at 128 ka demonstrates the sensitivity of Antarctic sea ice extent to climate warming.

  10. Glacial-interglacial organic carbon record from the Makassar Strait, Indonesia: Implications for regional changes in continental vegetation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Visser, K.; Thunell, R.; Goni, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies convincingly show that climate in the Western Pacific Warm Pool and other equatorial/tropical regions was significantly colder (by ???3-4??C) during glacial periods, prompting a reexamination of the late Pleistocene paleoenvironments of these regions. This study examines changes in continental vegetation during the last two deglaciations (Terminations I and II) using a sediment core (MD9821-62) recovered from the Makassar Strait, Indonesia. Evidence based on the lignin phenol ratios suggests that vegetation on Borneo and other surrounding islands did not significantly change from tropical rainforest during the last two glacial periods relative to subsequent interglacial periods. This supports the hypothesis that the winter monsoon increased in strength during glacial periods, allowing Indonesia to maintain high rainfall despite the cooler conditions. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Thorium-230 ages of corals and duration of the last interglacial sea-level high stand on Aohu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, B. J.; Ludwig, K. R.; Muhs, D.R.; Simmons, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    Thorium-230 ages of emergent marine deposits on Oahu, Hawaii, have a uniform distribution of ages from ~114,000 to ~131,000 years, indicating a duration for the last interglacial sea-level high stand of ~17,000 years, in contrast to a duration of ~8000 years inferred from the orbitally tuned marine oxygen isotope record. Sea level on Oahu rose to ??? 1 to 2 meters higher than present by 131,000 years ago or ~6000 years earlier than inferred from the marine record. Although the latter record suggests a shift back to glacial conditions beginning at ~119,000 years ago, the Oahu coral ages indicate a near present sea level until ~114,000 years ago.

  12. Insect-Based Holocene (and Last Interglacial?) Paleothermometry from the E and NW Greenland Ice Sheet Margins: A Fly's-Eye View of Warmth on Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, Y.; Bigl, M.; Carrio, C.; Corbett, L. B.; Francis, D. R.; Hall, B. L.; Kelly, M. A.; Levy, L.; Lowell, T. V.; Osterberg, E. C.; Richter, N.; Roy, E.; Schellinger, G. C.

    2011-12-01

    Here we present new paleotemperature reconstructions based upon insect (Chironomidae) assemblages and other proxies from lake sediment cores recovered in east Greenland at ~71° N near Scoresby Sund and in northwest Greenland at ~77° N near Thule/Qaanaaq. In east Greenland, Last Chance Lake (informal name) is a small, non-glacial lake situated ~90 km east of the Greenland Ice Sheet margin. The lake preserves a sedimentary record of the entire Holocene (Levy et al. 2013). Chironomids from Last Chance Lake record cold summer temperatures (and establishment of a cold-climate fauna including abundant Oliveridia and Pseudodiamesa) during the late Holocene, preceded by summer temperatures estimated to have been 3 to 6°C warmer during the first half of the Holocene (when summer insolation forcing was greater than today). In northwest Greenland, Delta Sø and Wax Lips Lake (informal name) both preserve Holocene sediments. Here we discuss the late Holocene chironomid record from Delta Sø, whereas from Wax Lips Lake (a small, non-glacial lake situated ~2 km west of the ice sheet margin) we present a longer sedimentary and biostratigraphic record. The deeper portions of cores from Wax Lips Lake yield pre-Holocene and nonfinite radiocarbon ages, suggesting that this lake preserves sediments predating the Last Glacial Maximum. Abundant chironomids in the pre-glacial sediments appear to record interglacial conditions, and we infer that these sediments may date to the Last Interglacial (Eemian). The preservation of in situ Last Interglacial lacustrine sediments so close to the modern ice sheet margin suggests a minimally erosive glacierization style throughout the last glacial period, like that inferred for other Arctic locales such as on Baffin Island (Briner et al. 2007), ~750 km southwest of our study site. Our study sites are situated nearby key ice core sites (including NEEM, Camp Century, Agassiz and Renland) and very close to the ice sheet margin. These chironomid

  13. Insect-Based Holocene (and Last Interglacial?) Paleothermometry from the E and NW Greenland Ice Sheet Margins: A Fly's-Eye View of Warmth on Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, Y.; Bigl, M.; Carrio, C.; Corbett, L. B.; Francis, D. R.; Hall, B. L.; Kelly, M. A.; Levy, L.; Lowell, T. V.; Osterberg, E. C.; Richter, N.; Roy, E.; Schellinger, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Here we present new paleotemperature reconstructions based upon insect (Chironomidae) assemblages and other proxies from lake sediment cores recovered in east Greenland at ~71° N near Scoresby Sund and in northwest Greenland at ~77° N near Thule/Qaanaaq. In east Greenland, Last Chance Lake (informal name) is a small, non-glacial lake situated ~90 km east of the Greenland Ice Sheet margin. The lake preserves a sedimentary record of the entire Holocene (Levy et al. 2013). Chironomids from Last Chance Lake record cold summer temperatures (and establishment of a cold-climate fauna including abundant Oliveridia and Pseudodiamesa) during the late Holocene, preceded by summer temperatures estimated to have been 3 to 6°C warmer during the first half of the Holocene (when summer insolation forcing was greater than today). In northwest Greenland, Delta Sø and Wax Lips Lake (informal name) both preserve Holocene sediments. Here we discuss the late Holocene chironomid record from Delta Sø, whereas from Wax Lips Lake (a small, non-glacial lake situated ~2 km west of the ice sheet margin) we present a longer sedimentary and biostratigraphic record. The deeper portions of cores from Wax Lips Lake yield pre-Holocene and nonfinite radiocarbon ages, suggesting that this lake preserves sediments predating the Last Glacial Maximum. Abundant chironomids in the pre-glacial sediments appear to record interglacial conditions, and we infer that these sediments may date to the Last Interglacial (Eemian). The preservation of in situ Last Interglacial lacustrine sediments so close to the modern ice sheet margin suggests a minimally erosive glacierization style throughout the last glacial period, like that inferred for other Arctic locales such as on Baffin Island (Briner et al. 2007), ~750 km southwest of our study site. Our study sites are situated nearby key ice core sites (including NEEM, Camp Century, Agassiz and Renland) and very close to the ice sheet margin. These chironomid

  14. Corals deep under the stream: how the Gulf Stream is driving the interglacial occurrence of cold-water corals off Cape Lookout, NC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, L.; Mienis, F.; Frank, N.; Thil, F.; Wienberg, C.; Hebbeln, D.

    2012-12-01

    Late Quaternary climate variability has been frequently related to oceanographic forcing. In the North Atlantic, recent glacial-interglacial cycles and abrupt millennial-scale climate changes have been linked to reorganisations of the Meridional Overturning Circulation. Among others, aragonite-forming cold-water corals (CWC) have become important archives to unravel the water-mass history. While being accurately datable by means of mass spectrometric Uranium-series dating and given their intermediate depth distribution and specific ecological requirements, the CWC distribution through time can reveal important insights into the oceanographic conditions that favour coral growth (Frank et al., Geology, 2011). In the northeast Atlantic, climate driven variations in the strength and flow path of the Mediterranean Outflow Water, surface productivity and mid-depth temperature have been suggested to cause a south-north see-saw pattern in the CWC distribution on glacial-interglacial time scales: abundant coral growth occurred north of 50°N during interglacial periods (Marine Isotope Stages MIS1, 5 and 7); and south of 37°N during glacial periods (MIS2, 3, 4 and 6). Stepping forward on the development of basin-scale knowledge on the North Atlantic distribution of framework forming CWC species and its relation to water mass dynamics, we present 19 ages of the CWC Lophelia pertusa sampled from mound structures at 320-500m water depth off Cape Lookout (Blake Plateau) on the North Carolina margin (34°N). Coral (on-mound) and sediment (off-mound) samples were used to accurately reconstruct ages of fossil coral fragments and to determine the sedimentation history via AMS-14C dating of planktonic foraminifera. Our L. pertusa samples revealed interglacial ages from early Eemian and from Mid- to Late-Holocene (last and present interglacials, respectively), thus differing from the predominantly glacial temperate East Atlantic CWC developments. The temporal distribution of CWC off

  15. Permafrost response to last interglacial warming: field evidence from non-glaciated Yukon and Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Alberto V.; Froese, Duane G.; Jensen, Britta J. L.

    2010-11-01

    We present stratigraphic observations from three sites in eastern Beringia - Ch'ijee's Bluff in northern Yukon and nearby exposures on the Old Crow River, the Palisades on the Yukon River in Alaska, and placer mining exposures at Thistle Creek in west-central Yukon - which provide insight into the response of permafrost to regional warming during the last interglaciation. Chronology is based on the presence of Old Crow tephra, an important regional stratigraphic marker that dates to late Marine Isotope Stage 6, supplemented by paleoecology and non-finite 14C ages on wood-rich organic silts. Old Crow tephra overlies several relict ice wedges at the Palisades and Thistle Creek, indicating that permafrost at these sites did not thaw completely during the last interglaciation. Prominent deposits of last interglacial wood-rich organic silt are present at multiple sites in eastern Beringia, and probably represent accumulations of reworked forest vegetation due to thaw slumping or deposition into thermokarst ponds or depressions. Consistent stratigraphic relations between these deposits, Old Crow tephra, and ice wedge pseudomorphs at our three study sites, and at least six other sites in eastern Beringia, suggest that thaw of shallow permafrost was widespread during the last interglaciation. Limited stratigraphic evidence suggests that thaw was probably on the order of meters, rather than 10s of meters. The ubiquity of shallow permafrost degradation during the last interglaciation suggests that current ground warming may foreshadow widespread near-surface thaw under even modest future warming scenarios. However, the persistence of relict pre-last interglacial ice wedges highlights the potential for the regional antiquity of discontinuous permafrost, and provides compelling field evidence for the long-term resilience of deep permafrost during sustained periods of warmer-than-present climate.

  16. Sedimentary and Paleoclimatic Controls on Caddisfly (Insecta: Trichoptera) Assemblages during the Last Interglacial-to-Glacial Transition in Southern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Nancy E.; Eyles, Nicholas

    1995-01-01

    Southern Ontario, Canada, has late Pleistocene deposits that contain evidence for climatic cooling during the last interglacial/glacial transition and much of the succeeding Wisconsin glaciation. Fossils of lacustrine and riverine caddisflies (Insecta: Trichoptera) are abundant and well-preserved in these deposits. We examined 26 samples from the interglacial section exposed in the Don Valley Brickyard and compared their caddisfly assemblages with those recovered from the overlying early Wisconsin Scarborough Formation deposits at nearby Scarborough Bluffs. Fifty-one caddisfly taxa in 16 families were recovered from the Don Valley site. Fossil abundance and species richness appear related to the storm or fair-weather conditions inferred from the sedimentary facies. Caddisfly fossils were most abundant and species richness highest in fair-weather, peaty, rippled sands. Highest proportions of river species as opposed to lake species were recovered from sands (storm and fair-weather). Assemblages from both sites indicate the presence of a large and productive river flowing into ancestral Lake Ontario. However, the river assemblage appeared to be far more sensitive to environmental change than the relatively stable assemblage representing the thermally buffered lake. Warm temperate river species such as Hydropsyche bidens, Hydropsyche mississippiensis, Macrostemum carolina, and Potamyia flava are present in the lower Don samples but absent from the Scarborough Bluffs deposits, while indicators of cooler than present climatic conditions such as Arctopsyche Indogensis and Hagenella canadensis are present in the Scarborough Bluffs sediments but absent from the lower Don samples. For the interval from about 80,000 to 55,000 yr B.P., we infer a climatic cooling from temperature about 2°C warmer than present to about 3°C cooler than present.

  17. The duration of forest stages in southern Europe and interglacial climate variability.

    PubMed

    Tzedakis, P C; Roucoux, K H; de Abreu, L; Shackleton, N J

    2004-12-24

    Foraminiferal oxygen isotope and pollen analyses from a deep-sea sequence off southwest Portugal show that the duration of temperate stages on land over the past 350,000 years varied considerably. The record shows forest contractions during intervals of low ice volume, coeval with declines in atmospheric methane, after which tree populations did not always recover. What emerges is that, although the broad timing of interglacials is consistent with orbital theory, their specific duration may be dictated by millennial variability. This complicates the prediction of the natural duration of interglacials, at least until the origin of this climate variability is understood.

  18. The Last Interglacial represented in the glaciochemical record from Mount Moulton Blue Ice Area, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkikh, E.; Mayewski, P. A.; Handley, M.; Sneed, S. B.; Introne, D.; Kurbatov, A.

    2010-12-01

    The last interglacial is the most recent analog for the present (Holocene) interglacial. Here we present the first high-resolution ice core record of the last interglacial and transition to the subsequent glacial period from Antarctica and the first glaciochemical record for this period from West Antarctica. Rather than using a standard vertical ice core we used samples collected from a horizontal trench in the Mt. Moulton Blue Ice Area (BIA) in West Antarctica. Samples were analyzed for their soluble major ions (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-), trace elements (Na, Ca, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu, V, Mn, As, Al, Fe, Sr, Cs, Ba, Bi, S, Ti, Co, Mg and REEs) and water hydrogen isotopes (δD). A Mt. Moulton BIA timescale was developed invoking a simple linear age model based on 40Ar/39Ar radiometric dates from the 3 englacial tephra layers, yielding an age of 107.2 to 135.6 ka B.P. for the sampled section, thus overlapping onset and termination of the last interglacial. On the basis of this dating temporal sample resolution is about 6-8 years, notably higher than other published ice core records. According to the BIA record, the last interglacial began ~134.3 ka B.P., marked by a major decrease in sea salts and nssSO42-concentrations likely indicating weakening of atmospheric circulation and decrease of sea ice extent. The warmest part of the last interglacial in the BIA record is characterized by maximum δD values (-187‰) that lasted for about 4,500 years between ~129 - 133.5 ka B.P. with temperature reaching its maximum value ~132 ka B.P. At this time increase in seasalt concentration and a low level of nssSO42- indicate minimum sea ice extent and proximity of open water to the Moulton site. The end of the last interglacial occurred sometime between 113 - 123.8 ka B.P. depending on whether defined by change in temperature (δD), atmospheric circulation intensity (dusts and seasalts), or sea ice extent and marine productivity (Na, nssSO42-). Whether the last interglacial lasted ~10,500 or

  19. Interglacial climate in the tropical West Pacific through the late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meckler, A. N.; Clarkson, M.; Adkins, J. F.; Eiler, J.; Cobb, K.

    2010-12-01

    The tropical West Pacific is the warmest region of the oceans and therefore an important source of heat and moisture for higher latitudes. The aim of this study is to better understand the forcings and responses of tropical West Pacific climate on glacial-interglacial timescales and its role during large global climate shifts. We analyzed three stalagmites from different caves in Northern Borneo (4°N, 115°E) for their oxygen isotopic composition. The tropical climate of Borneo results in year-round precipitation, with ENSO being the most important source of inter-annual variability in precipitation today. Available oxygen isotope data for precipitation at our site suggest a negative correlation between amount and δ18O of precipitation, as well as a secondary influence of the trajectory of air masses to Northern Borneo (Cobb et al. 2007). The samples we studied cover the time period from 170 ka to roughly 500 ka (MIS 7 to MIS 13). Although all three speleothems contain growth hiatuses, the data reveal clear glacial-interglacial cycles in δ18O. Maximal amplitudes of δ18O are around 3-4‰, with the most positive values occurring at the beginning of glacial terminations, very similar to the last deglaciation (Partin et al. 2007). Cave temperatures were reconstructed in selected glacial and interglacial intervals by carbonate isotopologue (‘clumped isotope’) measurements. While most speleothems analyzed so far have been out of equilibrium with respect to clumped isotopes, we found that in one of our caves in Borneo modern carbonate appears to have grown at or close to equilibrium. The data from the respective old sample suggest that there was no significant glacial-interglacial change in cave temperature within our errors of ±1°C (1 s.e.). This result implies that temperature change was not an important control for carbonate δ18O. The variability in δ18O is therefore likely due to a combination of changes in source water δ18O and variations in local and

  20. What caused the glacial to interglacial CO{sub 2} change?

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.S.; Peng, Tsung-Hung

    1991-12-01

    Scenarios put forward to explain the 80 {mu}atm glacial to interglacial change in atmospheric CO{sub 2} content are evaluated. The conclusion is that no single mechanism is adequate. Rather, contributions from temperature, sea ice, biologic pumping, nutrient deepening, and CaCO{sub 3} cycling must be called upon. The observation that the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio for Antarctic foraminifera was 0.9 {plus_minus} 0.1% lower during glacial than during interglacial time constitutes a huge fly in the ointment for all scenarios proposed to date.

  1. Celestial polarization patterns sufficient for Viking navigation with the naked eye: detectability of Haidinger's brushes on the sky versus meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Gábor; Takács, Péter; Kretzer, Balázs; Szilasi, Szilvia; Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Barta, András

    2017-02-01

    If a human looks at the clear blue sky from which light with high enough degree of polarization d originates, an 8-shaped bowtie-like figure, the yellow Haidinger's brush can be perceived, the long axis of which points towards the sun. A band of high d arcs across the sky at 90° from the sun. A person can pick two points on that band, observe the yellow brushes and triangulate the position of the sun based on the orientation of the two observed brushes. This method has been suggested to have been used on the open sea by Viking navigators to determine the position of the invisible sun occluded by cloud or fog. Furthermore, Haidinger's brushes can also be used to locate the sun when it is below the horizon or occluded by objects on the horizon. To determine the position of the sun using the celestial polarization pattern, the d of the portion of the sky used must be greater than the viewer's degree of polarization threshold d* for perception of Haidinger's brushes. We studied under which sky conditions the prerequisite d > d* is satisfied. Using full-sky imaging polarimetry, we measured the d-pattern of skylight in the blue (450 nm) spectral range for 1296 different meteorological conditions with different solar elevation angles θ and per cent cloud cover ρ. From the measured d-patterns of a given sky we determined the proportion P of the sky for which d > d*. We obtained that P is the largest at low solar elevations θ ≈ 0° and under totally or nearly clear skies with cloud coverage ρ = 0%, when the sun's position is already easily determined. If the sun is below the horizon (-5° ≤ θ < 0°) during twilight, P = 76.17 ± 4.18% for dmin∗=23 % under clear sky conditions. Consequently, the sky-polarimetric Viking navigation based on Haidinger's brushes is most useful after sunset and prior to sunrise, when the sun is not visible and large sky regions are bright, clear and polarized enough for perception of Haidinger's brushes.

  2. Celestial polarization patterns sufficient for Viking navigation with the naked eye: detectability of Haidinger's brushes on the sky versus meteorological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Takács, Péter; Kretzer, Balázs; Szilasi, Szilvia; Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Barta, András

    2017-01-01

    If a human looks at the clear blue sky from which light with high enough degree of polarization d originates, an 8-shaped bowtie-like figure, the yellow Haidinger's brush can be perceived, the long axis of which points towards the sun. A band of high d arcs across the sky at 90° from the sun. A person can pick two points on that band, observe the yellow brushes and triangulate the position of the sun based on the orientation of the two observed brushes. This method has been suggested to have been used on the open sea by Viking navigators to determine the position of the invisible sun occluded by cloud or fog. Furthermore, Haidinger's brushes can also be used to locate the sun when it is below the horizon or occluded by objects on the horizon. To determine the position of the sun using the celestial polarization pattern, the d of the portion of the sky used must be greater than the viewer's degree of polarization threshold d* for perception of Haidinger's brushes. We studied under which sky conditions the prerequisite d > d* is satisfied. Using full-sky imaging polarimetry, we measured the d-pattern of skylight in the blue (450 nm) spectral range for 1296 different meteorological conditions with different solar elevation angles θ and per cent cloud cover ρ. From the measured d-patterns of a given sky we determined the proportion P of the sky for which d > d*. We obtained that P is the largest at low solar elevations θ ≈ 0° and under totally or nearly clear skies with cloud coverage ρ = 0%, when the sun's position is already easily determined. If the sun is below the horizon (−5° ≤ θ < 0°) during twilight, P = 76.17 ± 4.18% for dmin∗=23% under clear sky conditions. Consequently, the sky-polarimetric Viking navigation based on Haidinger's brushes is most useful after sunset and prior to sunrise, when the sun is not visible and large sky regions are bright, clear and polarized enough for perception of Haidinger

  3. Celestial polarization patterns sufficient for Viking navigation with the naked eye: detectability of Haidinger's brushes on the sky versus meteorological conditions.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Gábor; Takács, Péter; Kretzer, Balázs; Szilasi, Szilvia; Száz, Dénes; Farkas, Alexandra; Barta, András

    2017-02-01

    If a human looks at the clear blue sky from which light with high enough degree of polarization d originates, an 8-shaped bowtie-like figure, the yellow Haidinger's brush can be perceived, the long axis of which points towards the sun. A band of high d arcs across the sky at 90° from the sun. A person can pick two points on that band, observe the yellow brushes and triangulate the position of the sun based on the orientation of the two observed brushes. This method has been suggested to have been used on the open sea by Viking navigators to determine the position of the invisible sun occluded by cloud or fog. Furthermore, Haidinger's brushes can also be used to locate the sun when it is below the horizon or occluded by objects on the horizon. To determine the position of the sun using the celestial polarization pattern, the d of the portion of the sky used must be greater than the viewer's degree of polarization threshold d* for perception of Haidinger's brushes. We studied under which sky conditions the prerequisite d > d* is satisfied. Using full-sky imaging polarimetry, we measured the d-pattern of skylight in the blue (450 nm) spectral range for 1296 different meteorological conditions with different solar elevation angles θ and per cent cloud cover ρ. From the measured d-patterns of a given sky we determined the proportion P of the sky for which d > d*. We obtained that P is the largest at low solar elevations θ ≈ 0° and under totally or nearly clear skies with cloud coverage ρ = 0%, when the sun's position is already easily determined. If the sun is below the horizon (-5° ≤ θ < 0°) during twilight, P = 76.17 ± 4.18% for [Formula: see text] under clear sky conditions. Consequently, the sky-polarimetric Viking navigation based on Haidinger's brushes is most useful after sunset and prior to sunrise, when the sun is not visible and large sky regions are bright, clear and polarized enough for perception of Haidinger

  4. Glacial-interglacial Variations of Molybdenum Isotopes in the Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, C.; Frank, M.; Scholz, F.

    2015-12-01

    Mo isotopes have been widely used as a tool to constrain redox-conditions during major global events such as the oxygenation of the oceans in the Precambrian and Cretaceous Ocean Anoxic Events. In addition, Mo isotopes have considerable, yet underexplored potential to quantitatively track local redox-variation at high resolution on shorter timescales. Here we present data from piston core M77/2-024-5 that was retrieved in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone in the context of Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 754 of the Deutsche Forschungs Gemeinschaft (DFG). The age model for this core is well constrained and the core covers the last 140 ka with a hiatus between 20 and 50 ky BP. The oxygen minimum zone along the Peru continental margin is thought to have been better ventilated and therefore less pronounced during glacial periods compared to interglacials. Concentrations of redox-sensitive trace elements show high-amplitude changes and indicate periods of strongly sulphidic conditions with high Mo fixation rate and oxygenated periods with limited Mo fixation (Scholz et al 2014). Mo isotopes do not show straightforward correlations with elemental redox tracers and are only weakly correlated with Mo/U and total organic carbon (TOC). However, Mo isotopes become significantly heavier around the last glacial maximum (Δ98Mo of 0.4 permil). The observed signatures indicate that the Mo isotope composition is dominated by changes in the operating Mo delivery mechanism, i.e. particulate transport versus molecular diffusion. Our results suggest that Mo isotopes can track local redox variation therefore adding to our understanding of this complex indicator for marine environmental change. Scholz et al., (2014), Nature Geosciences, Vol. 7, Pages 433-437

  5. Vegetation responses to abrupt climatic changes during the Last Interglacial Complex (Marine Isotope Stage 5) at Tenaghi Philippon, NE Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, A. M.; Roucoux, K. H.; Collier, R. E. L.; Müller, U. C.; Pross, J.; Tzedakis, P. C.

    2016-12-01

    The discovery that climate variability during the Last Glacial shifted rapidly between climate states has intensified efforts to understand the distribution, timing and impact of abrupt climate change under a wide range of boundary conditions. In contribution to this, we investigate the nature of abrupt environmental changes in terrestrial settings of the Mediterranean region during the Last Interglacial Complex (Marine Isotope Stage [MIS] 5) and explore the relationships of these changes to high-latitude climate events. We present a new, temporally highly resolved (mean: 170 years) pollen record for the Last Interglacial Complex from Tenaghi Philippon, north-east Greece. The new pollen record, which spans the interval from 130,000 to 65,000 years ago, forms part of an exceptionally long polleniferous sediment archive covering the last 1.35 million years. The pollen data reveal an interglacial followed by alternating forest and steppe phases representing the interstadials and stadials of the Early Glacial. Superimposed on these millennial-scale changes is evidence of persistent sub-millennial-scale variability. We identify ten high-amplitude abrupt events in the pollen record, characterised by rapid contractions of closed forest to open steppe environment and interpreted to indicate major changes in moisture availability and temperature. The contractions in forest cover on millennial timescales appear associated with cooling events in the Mediterranean Sea, North Atlantic and Greenland regions, linked to the Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) cycles of the Early Glacial. On sub-millennial timescales, the pattern of changes in forest cover at Tenaghi Philippon display a structure similar to the pattern of short-lived precursor and rebound-type events detected in the Greenland ice-core record. Our findings indicate that persistent, high-amplitude environmental variability occurred throughout the Early Glacial, on both millennial and submillennial timescales. Furthermore, the

  6. Changes on a glacial-interglacial timescale in the oceanic inventory of phosphorus and its relation to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, F.; Föllmi, K. B.

    2003-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an important nutrient, which, along with other macro- and micronutrients, limits productivity in oceans. On a glacial-interglacial timescale, potential variations in the oceanic inventory of P, which are invoked by changes in the continental weathering regime, may have an impact on global primary production, on CO2 drawdown from the atmosphere, and on climate. It is crucial, therefore, to constrain P inventory changes throughout glacial and interglacial periods. We present new data that illustrate how P is distributed in marine sediments and how its inventory changed during the last 150,000 years. We have applied the SEDEX techinique (Ruttenberg, 1992) on sediments from eight different Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites (Northeastern Atlantic; Peru margin; Oman margin; Japan Sea; Ontong Java plateau; North Atlantic; South China Sea). Authigenic and Fe-bound minerals, and organic material represent the principal sinks of reactive P in oceanic sediments. Regardless of the environmental setting and type of sediment, P phases have been detected at all sites. Moreover, average reactive P concentrations are in the same range of values, between 0.3 and 0.6 mg/g. Only concentrations at the Oman and the Peru margin sites fall outside this interval, showing concentrations characteristic of phosphogenesis. Average concentrations calculated over glacial and interglacial periods do not show any significant difference. Changes in P distribution and concentrations in the sediments, and mass accumulation rates seem closely linked to local climatic and oceanographic conditions, but still reflect global processes (i.e., oceanic circulation and climate). On a global average, P accumulation rates in the sediments increased during the last glacial, suggesting a positive relationship between cold climate, increased physical weathering and P sink in the ocean sediments. Reactive P inventory variations seem paced by the precessional cycle (23 kyr), pointing at the

  7. The Role of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific in Carbon Sequestration and Ventilation over the Last Glacial-Interglacial Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umling, N. E.; Thunell, R.

    2015-12-01

    The last glacial-interglacial transition is punctuated by brief periods of rapid return to glacial-like conditions followed by abrupt warmings. Ice core records reveal episodes of rapid increases in CO2 and synchronous decreases in Δ14C that co-occur with these abrupt warmings (Hughen et al., 2000; Fairbanks et al., 2005). As the largest mobile carbon reservoir, the deep oceans have been implicated as the most likely source of this 14C-deplete CO2. Records of benthic radiocarbon offsets from the atmosphere provide evidence of intermediate depth ventilation of a 14C-deplete reservoir during deglaciation. However, modeling studies focusing on ocean circulation changes alone are unable to replicate the full-observed glacial-interglacial CO2 change. Changes in the biological pump could provide an additional mechanism contributing to the glacial drawdown and deglacial release of CO2. The Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) is currently responsible for ~10% of global ocean primary productivity and is strongly connected to the Southern Ocean (Pennington et al., 2006) making it ideally suited for studying past changes in the biological pump. This study uses a multi-proxy approach to investigate the role of carbonate compensation and export productivity over the last 26,000yrs. Intermediate to deep-water transects of B/Ca, Cd/Ca, and U/Ca for the benthic foraminifera Cibicidoides wuelerstorfi were developed from 7 EEP cores (1620-3200m water-depth) extending from 8.2°N to 2.3°S in the Panama Basin. The fraction of calcite dissolved was estimated for high-resolution core TR163-23 (2,730m; 0.41°N, 92.16°W) using the G. menardii fractionation index (MFI) (Mekik et al., 2002). A record of benthic foraminiferal radiocarbon offsets from the atmosphere was also developed for TR163-23 providing a larger picture of the relative role of both ventilation and the biological pump in changing atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last glacial-interglacial transition.

  8. Interglacial climate dynamics and advanced time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudelsee, Manfred; Bermejo, Miguel; Köhler, Peter; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    Studying the climate dynamics of past interglacials (IGs) helps to better assess the anthropogenically influenced dynamics of the current IG, the Holocene. We select the IG portions from the EPICA Dome C ice core archive, which covers the past 800 ka, to apply methods of statistical time series analysis (Mudelsee 2010). The analysed variables are deuterium/H (indicating temperature) (Jouzel et al. 2007), greenhouse gases (Siegenthaler et al. 2005, Loulergue et al. 2008, L¨ü thi et al. 2008) and a model-co-derived climate radiative forcing (Köhler et al. 2010). We select additionally high-resolution sea-surface-temperature records from the marine sedimentary archive. The first statistical method, persistence time estimation (Mudelsee 2002) lets us infer the 'climate memory' property of IGs. Second, linear regression informs about long-term climate trends during IGs. Third, ramp function regression (Mudelsee 2000) is adapted to look on abrupt climate changes during IGs. We compare the Holocene with previous IGs in terms of these mathematical approaches, interprete results in a climate context, assess uncertainties and the requirements to data from old IGs for yielding results of 'acceptable' accuracy. This work receives financial support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Project ClimSens within the DFG Research Priority Program INTERDYNAMIK) and the European Commission (Marie Curie Initial Training Network LINC, No. 289447, within the 7th Framework Programme). References Jouzel J, Masson-Delmotte V, Cattani O, Dreyfus G, Falourd S, Hoffmann G, Minster B, Nouet J, Barnola JM, Chappellaz J, Fischer H, Gallet JC, Johnsen S, Leuenberger M, Loulergue L, Luethi D, Oerter H, Parrenin F, Raisbeck G, Raynaud D, Schilt A, Schwander J, Selmo E, Souchez R, Spahni R, Stauffer B, Steffensen JP, Stenni B, Stocker TF, Tison JL, Werner M, Wolff EW (2007) Orbital and millennial Antarctic climate variability over the past 800,000 years. Science 317:793. Köhler P, Bintanja R

  9. Modeling of Occurrence and Dynamics of Sub-Auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) During Storm and Non-Storm Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazykin, S. Y.; Huba, J.; Coster, A. J.; Wolf, R.; Erickson, P. J.; Reiff, P. H.; Hairston, M. R.; Shepherd, S. G.; Baker, J. B. H.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Califf, S.

    2016-12-01

    Occurrence and evolution of Sub-Auroral Polarization Stream, or SAPS, structures, defined here as latitudinally narrow channels of enhanced westward convection flows in the evening ionosphere equatorward of the auroral electron precipitation boundary, is the subject of the ongoing CEDAR-GEM focus study. In this paper, we present simulation results of several event intervals selected for the focus study, obtained with the SAMI3-RCM ionosphere-magnetosphere coupled model. We simulate intervals that include quiet-times, storm main phases, and storm recovery phases, as well as non-storm intervals with variations in the high-latitude convection. We compare simulation results with multi-instrument observations. In the ionosphere, these include mid-latitude SuperDARN Doppler flow velocities, DMSP topside ionospheric ExB drifts, Millstone Hill incoherent scatter flow velocities and F-region densities, and ground-based GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) maps. Magnetospheric data used for model comparison are electric field and cold plasma densities from Van Allen Probes and plasma and fields measurements by the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) probes. Through comparing modeling results and data, we address the following questions: (1) Can observed occurrence of SAPS be predicted by the model based on time history of magnetospheric activity? (2) To what extent does non-linear ionospheric feedback affect dynamics of SAPS? (3) How does the preconditioning of the background ionosphere (specifically, night-time main ionospheric trough) affect SAPS dynamics? (4) How does presence of SAPS structures in the global ionospheric convection pattern affect storm-time plasma re-distribution (e.g., storm-enhanced densities (or SEDs), plasmaspheric plumes, traveling ionospheric disturbances (or TIDs))?

  10. Contrasting glacial/interglacial regimes in the western Arctic Ocean as exemplified by a sedimentary record from the Mendeleev Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Polyak, L.; Curry, W.B.; Darby, D.A.; Bischof, J.; Cronin, T. M.

    2004-01-01

    Distinct cyclicity in lithology and microfaunal distribution in sediment cores from the Mendeleev Ridge in the western Arctic Ocean (water depths ca. 1. 5 km) reflects contrasting glacial/interglacial sedimentary patterns. We conclude that during major glaciations extremely thick pack ice or ice shelves covered the western Arctic Ocean and its circulation was restricted in comparison with interglacial, modern-type conditions. Glacier collapse events are marked in sediment cores by increased contents of ice-rafted debris, notably by spikes of detrital carbonates and iron oxide grains from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Composition of foraminiferal calcite ?? 18O and ??13C also shows strong cyclicity indicating changes in freshwater balance and/or ventilation rates of the Arctic Ocean. Light stable isotopic spikes characterize deglacial events such as the last deglaciation at ca. 12 14C kyr BP. The prolonged period with low ??18O and ??13C values and elevated contents of iron oxide grains from the Canadian Archipelago in the lower part of the Mendeleev Ridge record is interpreted to signify the pooling of freshwater in the Amerasia Basin, possibly in relation to an extended glaciation in arctic North America. Unique benthic foraminiferal events provide a means for an independent stratigraphic correlation of sedimentary records from the Mendeleev Ridge and other mid-depth locations throughout the Arctic Ocean such as the Northwind and Lomonosov Ridges. This correlation demonstrates the disparity of existing age models and underscores the need to establish a definitive chronostratigraphy for Arctic Ocean sediments. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Tooth enamel stable isotopes of Holocene and Pleistocene fossil fauna reveal glacial and interglacial paleoenvironments of hominins in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Renée; Joordens, Josephine C. A.; Koutamanis, Dafne S.; Puspaningrum, Mika R.; de Vos, John; van der Lubbe, Jeroen H. J. L.; Reijmer, John J. G.; Hampe, Oliver; Vonhof, Hubert B.

    2016-07-01

    The carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope compositions of fossilized animal tissues have become important proxies of paleodiet and paleoenvironment, but such stable isotope studies have not yet been extensively applied to the fossil assemblages of Sundaland (the biogeographical region comprising most of the Indonesian Archipelago). Here, we use the isotope composition of tooth enamel to investigate the diet and habitat of bovids, cervids, and suids from several Holocene and Pleistocene sites on Java and Sumatra. Our carbon isotope results indicate that individual sites are strongly dominated by either C3-browsers or C4-grazers. Herbivores from the Padang Highlands (Sumatra) and Hoekgrot (Java) cave faunas were mainly C3-browsers, while herbivores from Homo erectus-bearing sites Trinil and Sangiran (Java) utilized an almost exclusive C4 diet. The suids from all sites show a wide range of δ13C values, corroborating their omnivorous diet. For the dataset as a whole, oxygen and carbon isotope values are positively correlated. This suggests that isotopic enrichment of rainwater and vegetation δ18O values coincides with an increase of C4-grasslands. We interpret this pattern to mainly reflect the environmental contrast between glacial (drier, more C4) and interglacial (wetter, more C3) conditions. Intermediate herbivore δ13C values indicating mixed C3/C4 feeding is relatively rare, which we believe to reflect the abruptness of the transition between glacial and interglacial precipitation regimes in Sundaland. For seven Homo erectus bone samples we were not able distinguish between diagenetic overprint and original isotope values, underlining the need to apply this isotopic approach to Homo erectus tooth enamel instead of bone. Importantly, our present results on herbivore and omnivore faunas provide the isotopic framework that will allow interpretation of such Homo erectus enamel isotope data.

  12. A Glacial-Interglacial Record of the North Pacific Biological Pump for the Past 600,000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; McManus, J. F.; Costa, K.; Liu, T.

    2016-02-01

    Because North Pacific deep water solely originates from other sources, namely the Southern and Atlantic Oceans, it is a prime location for global carbon sequestration and storage. Through photosynthesis and gas exchange, the surface ocean sequesters CO2 from the atmosphere, and its biological pump subsequently buries the carbon in the deep ocean. Organisms preferentially utilize the lighter 12C for photosynthesis, leaving behind relatively 13C-enriched surface waters. In contrast, respiration reintroduces 12C and produces 13C-depleted water, especially in the deep ocean, where photosynthesis is absent. This difference in δ13C between surface and deep water is an excellent proxy for characterizing the strength of the biological pump, which our record shows, is relatively strong during glacials and weak during interglacials. We measured δ13C in N. pachyderma, sinistral (planktonic) and Uvigerina spp. (benthic) to reflect surface and deep water conditions, respectively. However, several factors complicate our interpretation of δ13C and biological productivity. During glacials, the entire ocean negatively shifts 0.3 ‰ in δ13C from terrestrial carbon input. Taking the difference in δ13C of benthic and planktonic foraminifera eliminates the struggle of having to characterize the absolute productivity of the surface and deep ocean. But further, the strength of global deep water circulation may affect North Pacific benthic δ13C signature, which may become more depleted with increased aging and respiration. On the other hand, the surface ocean is susceptible to δ13C variations due to air-sea interaction, in which relatively depleted atmospheric carbon mixes into the surface ocean carbon pool. When untangled from global and local complications in δ13C, our record may be able to show glacial-interglacial changes in the strength of the North Pacific biological pump.

  13. Glacial/interglacial changes of Southern Hemisphere wind circulation from the geochemistry of South American dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gili, Stefania; Gaiero, Diego M.; Goldstein, Steven L.; Chemale, Farid; Jweda, Jason; Kaplan, Michael R.; Becchio, Raúl A.; Koester, Edinei

    2017-07-01

    The latitudinal displacement of the southern westerlies and associated climate systems is a key parameter for understanding the variations of Southern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation during the Late Quaternary Period. To increase understanding of past atmospheric circulation and of the paleo-environmental conditions associated with continental dust sources, we dig deeper into dust provenance in paleo-archives of the Southern Hemisphere. We present here a Sr-Nd isotopic and rare earth element study of surface sediments collected along a ∼4000 km latitudinal band from arid and semi-arid terrains in southern South America. Findings from terrains that served as paleo-dust suppliers are compared with modern dust collected from monitoring stations along the same latitudinal band, which affords a test on how actual present-day aeolian compositions compare to those of the past potential source areas. Moreover, the comparison between past and present-day datasets is useful for understanding present-day atmospheric circulation. Armed with a new comprehensive dataset, we revise previous interpretations of the provenance of dust trapped in the Antarctic ice and sediments deposited in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. These comparisons support multiple source regions in southern South America that changed with climates. The findings reveal that, although Patagonia plays an important role in contributing dust to the higher latitudes, central Western Argentina and (to a lesser extent) the southern Puna region also emerge as potentially important dust sources during glacial times. The southern Altiplano appears to be a major contributor during interglacial periods as well. We rely in part on an understanding of modern wind-dust activities to conclude that the possible presence of southern South America source regions - other than Patagonia - in East Antarctic ice is consistent with an overall equatorward displacement during glacial times of both the mid

  14. Lacustrine records of continental climate in northwest Greenland through the Holocene and Last Interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlin, J. M.; Axford, Y.; Osburn, M. R.; Lasher, G. E.; Francis, D. R.; Kelly, M. A.; Osterberg, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    Lake sediment records provide opportunities for high-resolution observations of paleoclimate that help to place modern climate change in geologic context. Here we present a terrestrial record of July air temperature for northwest Greenland (Nunatarssuaq, ~25 km east of the Thule Air Base) through the Holocene and a prior warm period, inferred from subfossil insect remains (Chironomidae) preserved in lacustrine sediments. In addition, we discuss ongoing work in characterizing the sources and isotopic composition of leaf waxes preserved in the same sediments. Multiple parallel sediment cores were collected in the summers of 2012 and 2014 from Wax Lips Lake (informal name), a non-glacial lake situated <2 km from the current margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Radiocarbon ages were obtained on aquatic mosses from intact laminae, and indicate that the record spans the Holocene, beginning at ~10.4 ka, as well as an interval beyond the range of 14C (>44 ka) and thus predates the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Our results demonstrate temperatures warmer than present through the early and mid Holocene followed by cooling in the late Holocene. Material that pre-dates the LGM contains insect assemblages indicating temperatures warmer than the warmest millennia of the Holocene. We interpret this material as most likely dating to the Last Interglacial Period (MIS 5). Along with assemblages of Chironomidae, we find subfossil Chaoboridae in one section of the pre-LGM sediments, suggesting exceptionally warm conditions based upon the distribution of modern-day Chaoborus. We find abundant n-alkanes and n-acids are preserved in the Holocene and pre-LGM sediments, allowing for complementary compound-specific δD analyses and identification of organic matter source in addition to chironomid derived temperature records.

  15. Dead Sea drawdown and monsoonal impacts in the Levant during the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torfstein, Adi; Goldstein, Steven L.; Kushnir, Yochanan; Enzel, Yehouda; Haug, Gerald; Stein, Mordechai

    2015-02-01

    Sediment cores recovered by the Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP) from the deepest basin of the hypersaline, terminal Dead Sea (lake floor at ∼725 m below mean sea level) reveal the detailed climate history of the lake's watershed during the last interglacial period (Marine Isotope Stage 5; MIS5). The results document both a more intense aridity during MIS5 than during the Holocene, and the moderating impacts derived from the intense MIS5e African Monsoon. Early MIS5e (∼133-128 ka) was dominated by hyperarid conditions in the Eastern Mediterranean-Levant, indicated by thick halite deposition triggered by a lake-level drop. Halite deposition was interrupted however, during the MIS5e peak (∼128-122 ka) by sequences of flood deposits, which are coeval with the timing of the intense precession-forced African monsoon that generated Mediterranean sapropel S5. A subsequent weakening of this humidity source triggered extreme aridity in the Dead Sea watershed and resulting in the biggest known lake level drawdown in its history, reflected by the deposition of thick salt layers, and a capping pebble layer corresponding to a hiatus at ∼116-110 ka. The DSDDP core provides the first evidence for a direct association of the African monsoon with mid subtropical latitude climate systems effecting the Dead Sea watershed. Combined with coeval deposition of Arabia and southern Negev speleothems, Arava travertines, and calcification of Red Sea corals, the evidence points to a climatically wet corridor that could have facilitated homo sapiens migration "out of Africa" during the MIS5e peak. The hyperaridity documented during MIS5e may provide an important analogue for future warming of arid regions of the Eastern Mediterranean-Levant.

  16. Modelling stable water isotopes in monsoon precipitation during the previous interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjolte, Jesper; Hoffmann, Georg

    2014-02-01

    Changes in the tropical hydrological cycle have been recorded world wide in speleothem records dating back more than 200,000 years for some areas. Numerous empirical and modelling studies have demonstrated a strong link between the intensity of the northern hemisphere monsoon and the precessional insolation cycle (˜23 ka (thousand years)). Here we present simulations of the climate conditions of the previous interglacial, the Eemian (115-130 ka BP), using a general circulation model. We focus on changes in the tropical hydrological cycle and in the monsoon in particular. The model is equipped with a module for computing the water isotopic composition of all water reservoirs represented by the model. Our analysis of the simulated water isotope signals indicates that this key palaeo-proxy, i.e. the 18O or Deuterium signal in precipitation, is controlled by varying factors in different tropical areas: The main control on 18O for the Indian summer monsoon is the local precipitation amount, in accordance with the traditional interpretation, while the main control of 18O for East Asia is downwind depletion of 18O in vapour along the transport path. Over Africa the model simulates a strong gradient in the 18O anomalies during the Eemian climatic optimum, with depleted values in the east and relatively enriched 18O content in the west. This pattern is the result of a combination of the local "amount effect" and an anomalous zonal moisture transport. The influence of the SSTs anomalies on the placement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is found to be of major importance for the precipitation amount in the coastal regions of tropical South America. For the western part of South America a decrease in precipitation is seen for the Eemian climatic optimum, while an increase is seen for the eastern part. Our results underline the importance of reviewing the mechanisms causing isotopic changes in proxy records and further investigating the causes for past shifts in

  17. The role of CaCO3 compensation in the glacial to interglacial atmospheric CO2 change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Peng, Tsung-Hung

    1987-03-01

    The only viable explanations put forth to date for the glacial to interglacial change in atmospheric CO2 content suggested from measurements of the CO2 content of gas extracted from ice cores involve changes in the ocean's nutrient cycles. Any nutrient change capable of creating the 80 µatm changes in atmosphere CO2 pressure suggested by the ice core results also creates significant change in the deep ocean's CO3= content. Evidence from deep sea sediments suggests that these CO3= changes are compensated on the time scale of a few thousand years by reductions or increases in amount of CaCO3 accumulating in deep sea sediments. This compensation process has two important consequences. First, it significantly increases the magnitude of the CO2 change per unit of nutrient forcing. Second, it causes a delay in the response of the atmospheric CO2 change. While the first of these consequences is a boon to those seeking to explain the CO2 change, the second may prove to be a curse. The ice core CO2 record shows no evidence of a significant lag between the CO2 response and the polar warming. In any case it is important that we improve our knowledge of the magnitude and timing of the CaCO3 preservation events which mark the close of episodes of glaciation and of the dissolution events which mark the onset of these episodes.

  18. Variable sea ice contributions to seawater δ18O on glacial-interglacial timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, C. E.; Weaver, A. J.; Eby, M.; Meissner, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of seawater varies in time, mainly based on the amount of (depleted) ice stored on continents. Oxygen isotope records derived from ocean sediment cores serve as indicators of changes in both seawater temperature and continental ice volume. Seawater δ18O may contain a variable signature of sea ice production, especially at high latitudes. Sea ice growth produces isotopically enriched ice and depleted brine. Over glacial-interglacial cycles, changes in the sites and rates of sea ice production (and by extension sea ice meltwater and brine export) hold the potential to shift local to regional seawater isotopic chemistry. Neglecting variability in sea ice production may therefore superimpose error upon reconstructions employing high latitude δ18O records. We examine the effects of variability in sea ice production between glacial and interglacial climate states on seawater δ18O in the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model. Oxygen isotopes are implemented in all components (ocean, atmosphere, land surface, and sea ice) of the coupled model. The role of glacial-interglacial sea ice variability is investigated in a set of model experiments. Here we isolate the seawater δ18O field due only to sea ice in the model. By contrasting the seawater δ18O fields due to sea ice resulting from the glacial and interglacial climates, we investigate the potential for variable sea ice formation to shift seawater δ18O.

  19. Delayed European Climate Optimum During the Last Interglacial in Northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Richard; Turney, Chris; Lang, Barbara; Brooks, Steve; Rundgren, Mats; Björck, Svante; Hammarlund, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Recent estimates of the Last Interglacial (127-110 kyr) suggest a global average temperature approximately 2˚C above preindustrial levels, providing a potential analogue for future climate change. However, many of the temperature estimates originate from terrestrial sequences with limited temporal resolution, raising questions over the magnitude and relative timing of the warming. Here we report a new quantitative summer temperature reconstruction using non-biting midges (chironomids) from the Danish Last Interglacial site, Hollerup. We find peak average summer temperatures of 17.5˚C, approximately one degree warmer than the AD1961-90 period. In contrast to the timing of the thermal maximum inferred from the pollen record, the chironomid temperature reconstruction suggests that peak warmth took place 3,200 years after the onset of Last Interglacial warming in Europe. Our results indicate a delay in the establishment of full interglacial Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, most probably linked to enhanced melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  20. Causes of atmospheric CO2 variations over the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemppinen, K. M.; Holden, P.; Edwards, N.; Ridgwell, A. J.; Friend, A. D.; Wolff, E.

    2013-12-01

    During glacial-interglacial cycles, atmospheric CO2 increases by about 100 ppmv during brief interglacials. Despite years of research, the causes of this change are still not entirely understood. Here we attempt to explain the change in CO2 using, for the first time, an ensemble of coupled climate-carbon cycle simulations designed to consider the processes that are thought to contribute to variability of atmospheric CO2 on glacial/interglacial timescales. We begin by running the ensemble to equilibrium with Last Glacial Maximum (LGM; 21 kyr BP) forcings. By comparing the simulations with ice core data, we find that a small subset of the ensemble produces plausible atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate. We build emulators of the full model with respect to atmospheric CO2, and perform sensitivity analyses on them to quantify the contributions of atmospheric, sea ice, ocean, and vegetation processes to variability in atmospheric CO2 under glacial forcings. We find that the variability is dominated by a few key parameters. We also use singular vector decomposition to investigate the parameter interactions required for achieving plausible CO2 at the LGM. This work is ongoing, and if plausible states are found, a transient ensemble will be run over the last glacial-interglacial cycle (126 kyr) using the associated parameter sets. This experiment will be the first of its kind as it allows simulated atmospheric CO2 to feedback to the physical climate model in an unconstrained manner.

  1. Detection of a dynamic topography signal in last interglacial sea-level records

    PubMed Central

    Austermann, Jacqueline; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Huybers, Peter; Rovere, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Estimating minimum ice volume during the last interglacial based on local sea-level indicators requires that these indicators are corrected for processes that alter local sea level relative to the global average. Although glacial isostatic adjustment is generally accounted for, global scale dynamic changes in topography driven by convective mantle flow are generally not considered. We use numerical models of mantle flow to quantify vertical deflections caused by dynamic topography and compare predictions at passive margins to a globally distributed set of last interglacial sea-level markers. The deflections predicted as a result of dynamic topography are significantly correlated with marker elevations (>95% probability) and are consistent with construction and preservation attributes across marker types. We conclude that a dynamic topography signal is present in the elevation of last interglacial sea-level records and that the signal must be accounted for in any effort to determine peak global mean sea level during the last interglacial to within an accuracy of several meters. PMID:28695210

  2. Detection of a dynamic topography signal in last interglacial sea-level records.

    PubMed

    Austermann, Jacqueline; Mitrovica, Jerry X; Huybers, Peter; Rovere, Alessio

    2017-07-01

    Estimating minimum ice volume during the last interglacial based on local sea-level indicators requires that these indicators are corrected for processes that alter local sea level relative to the global average. Although glacial isostatic adjustment is generally accounted for, global scale dynamic changes in topography driven by convective mantle flow are generally not considered. We use numerical models of mantle flow to quantify vertical deflections caused by dynamic topography and compare predictions at passive margins to a globally distributed set of last interglacial sea-level markers. The deflections predicted as a result of dynamic topography are significantly correlated with marker elevations (>95% probability) and are consistent with construction and preservation attributes across marker types. We conclude that a dynamic topography signal is present in the elevation of last interglacial sea-level records and that the signal must be accounted for in any effort to determine peak global mean sea level during the last interglacial to within an accuracy of several meters.

  3. Substantial contribution to sea-level rise during the last interglacial from the Greenland ice sheet

    PubMed

    Cuffey; Marshall

    2000-04-06

    During the last interglacial period (the Eemian), global sea level was at least three metres, and probably more than five metres, higher than at present. Complete melting of either the West Antarctic ice sheet or the Greenland ice sheet would today raise sea levels by 6-7 metres. But the high sea levels during the last interglacial period have been proposed to result mainly from disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet, with model studies attributing only 1-2 m of sea-level rise to meltwater from Greenland. This result was considered consistent with ice core evidence, although earlier work had suggested a much reduced Greenland ice sheet during the last interglacial period. Here we reconsider the Eemian evolution of the Greenland ice sheet by combining numerical modelling with insights obtained from recent central Greenland ice-core analyses. Our results suggest that the Greenland ice sheet was considerably smaller and steeper during the Eemian, and plausibly contributed 4-5.5 m to the sea-level highstand during that period. We conclude that the high sea level during the last interglacial period most probably included a large contribution from Greenland meltwater and therefore should not be interpreted as evidence for a significant reduction of the West Antarctic ice sheet.

  4. Temperature trends during the Present and Last Interglacial periods - a multi-model-data comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, P.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Martrat, B.; Charbit, S.; Renssen, H.; Gröger, M.; Krebs-Kanzow, U.; Lohmann, G.; Lunt, D. J.; Pfeiffer, M.; Phipps, S. J.; Prange, M.; Ritz, S. P.; Schulz, M.; Stenni, B.; Stone, E. J.; Varma, V.

    2014-09-01

    Though primarily driven by insolation changes associated with well-known variations in Earth's astronomical parameters, the response of the climate system during interglacials includes a diversity of feedbacks involving the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, vegetation and land ice. A thorough multi-model-data comparison is essential to assess the ability of climate models to resolve interglacial temperature trends and to help in understanding the recorded climatic signal and the underlying climate dynamics. We present the first multi-model-data comparison of transient millennial-scale temperature changes through two intervals of the Present Interglacial (PIG; 8-1.2 ka) and the Last Interglacial (LIG; 123-116.2 ka) periods. We include temperature trends simulated by 9 different climate models, alkenone-based temperature reconstructions from 117 globally distributed locations (about 45% of them within the LIG) and 12 ice-core-based temperature trends from Greenland and Antarctica (50% of them within the LIG). The definitions of these specific interglacial intervals enable a consistent inter-comparison of the two intervals because both are characterised by minor changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations and more importantly by insolation trends that show clear similarities. Our analysis shows that in general the reconstructed PIG and LIG Northern Hemisphere mid-to-high latitude cooling compares well with multi-model, mean-temperature trends for the warmest months and that these cooling trends reflect a linear response to the warmest-month insolation decrease over the interglacial intervals. The most notable exception is the strong LIG cooling trend reconstructed from Greenland ice cores that is not simulated by any of the models. A striking model-data mismatch is found for both the PIG and the LIG over large parts of the mid-to-high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere where the data depicts negative temperature trends that are not in agreement with near zero

  5. Polarized cells, polar actions.

    PubMed

    Maddock, J R; Alley, M R; Shapiro, L

    1993-11-01

    The recognition of polar bacterial organization is just emerging. The examples of polar localization given here are from a variety of bacterial species and concern a disparate array of cellular functions. A number of well-characterized instances of polar localization of bacterial proteins, including the chemoreceptor complex in both C. crescentus and E. coli, the maltose-binding protein in E. coli, the B. japonicum surface attachment proteins, and the actin tail of L. monocytogenes within a mammalian cell, involve proteins or protein complexes that facilitate bacterial interaction with the environment, either the extracellular milieux or that within a plant or mammalian host. The significance of this observation remains unclear. Polarity in bacteria poses many problems, including the necessity for a mechanism for asymmetrically distributing proteins as well as a mechanism by which polar localization is maintained. Large structures, such as a flagellum, are anchored at the pole by means of the basal body that traverses the peptidoglycan wall. But for proteins and small complexes, whether in the periplasm or the membrane, one must invoke a mechanism that prevents the diffusion of these proteins away from the cell pole. Perhaps the periplasmic proteins are retained at the pole by the presence of the periseptal annulus (35). The constraining features for membrane components are not known. For large aggregates, such as the clusters of MCP, CheA, and CheW complexes, perhaps the size of the aggregate alone prevents displacement. In most cases of cellular asymmetry, bacteria are able to discriminate between the new pole and the old pole and to utilize this information for localization specificity. The maturation of new pole to old pole appears to be a common theme as well. Given numerous examples reported thus far, we propose that bacterial polarity displays specific rules and is a more general phenomenon than has been previously recognized.

  6. The Last Interglacial (MIS5e) cycle offshore the Little Bahama Bank: Large-scale ocean dynamics versus sea-level fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, Anastasia; Bauch, Henning; Kandiano, Evgeniya

    2017-04-01

    Along the northwestern part of the Subtropical Gyre existing carbonate platforms can be considered an important link between the tropical and subpolar regions via the Gulf Stream. Here, we used the sediment record from the upper northern slope of Little Bahama Bank (460 m water depth) to decipher the variability of the Gulf Stream strength in the area of its origin during the penultimate deglaciation (T2) and the ensuing interglacial Marine Isotope Substage (MIS) 5e. The stratigraphy is based on the stable oxygen records derived from surface and thermocline planktic foraminifera as well as from bottom dwelling benthic foraminifera. Isotopic data from planktic and benthic foraminifera as well as faunal and XRF-scan data clearly reveal a cooling event that punctuated the climatic amelioration during T2. Although the faunal sea surface temperature reconstructions based on planktic foraminiferal census data indicate relatively stable and warm conditions during MIS5e, high interglacial variability of the "mixed layer" species, dwelling in the upper 50-100 m underscore the existence of short-term climatic perturbations within the last warm period. Of particular note is a marked cold event subsequent to early MIS5e warming - as revealed from a significant decrease in shares of "mixed layer" species along with rapid positive excursions in d18O values of all measured foraminifera groups - and a clear two-fold structure of the last interglacial. Climatic variability during the first phase of the MIS5e goes along with significant variations in chemical composition of sediments (e.g. Sr counts normalized by Ca counts). These changes in sedimentary regime are attributed to the ongoing deglaciation of northern hemisphere ice sheets and associated post-glacial sea level rise. Accordingly, the stable conditions characterized by maximum bank-top flooding appear to have been postponed until the second phase of MIS5e and coincide with a stabilized phase in Sr/Ca ratios.

  7. A new high-resolution pollen sequence at Lake Van, Turkey: insights into penultimate interglacial-glacial climate change on vegetation history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickarski, Nadine; Litt, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    A new detailed pollen and oxygen isotope record of the penultimate interglacial-glacial cycle, corresponding to the marine isotope stage (MIS) 7-6, has been generated from the Ahlat Ridge (AR) sediment core at Lake Van, Turkey. The presented Lake Van pollen record (ca. 250.2-128.8 ka) displays the highest temporal resolution in this region with a mean sampling interval of ˜ 540 years.

    The integration of all available proxies shows three temperate intervals of high effective soil moisture availability. This is evidenced by the predominance of steppe-forested landscapes (oak steppe-forest) similar to the present interglacial vegetation in this sensitive semiarid region between the Black Sea, the Caspian Sea, and the Mediterranean Sea.

    The wettest and warmest stage, as indicated by highest temperate tree percentages, can be broadly correlated with MIS 7c, while the amplitude of the tree population maximum during the oldest penultimate interglacial (MIS 7e) appears to be reduced due to warm but drier climatic conditions. The detailed comparison of the penultimate interglacial complex (MIS 7) to the last interglacial (Eemian, MIS 5e) and the current interglacial (Holocene, MIS 1) provides a vivid illustration of possible differences in the successive climatic cycles. Intervening periods of treeless vegetation can be correlated with MIS 7d and 7a, in which open landscapes favor local erosion and detrital sedimentation. The predominance of steppe elements (e.g., Artemisia, Chenopodiaceae) during MIS 7d indicates very dry and cold climatic conditions. In contrast, the occurrence of higher temperate tree percentages (mainly deciduous Quercus) throughout MIS 7b points to relatively humid and mild conditions, which is in agreement with other pollen sequences in southern Europe.

    Despite the general dominance of dry and cold desert-steppe vegetation during the penultimate glacial (broadly equivalent to MIS 6), this period can be divided into

  8. The Relationship between Climate and Iceland Scotland Overflow Water During Mid-Late Pleistocene Interglacials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuber, S.; Thornalley, D.; Forman, M.; Barker, S.; Oppo, D.

    2016-12-01

    Ocean circulation has been identified as an important climate feedback mechanism in a warming world. An area of particular importance in global ocean circulation is the high latitude North Atlantic and the Nordic Seas. Here, cooling of northward flowing warm surface water produces dense deep water which sinks to the ocean floor and returns southward as part of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Density structures in the Nordic Seas can change as a response to enhanced freshwater input (e.g. from the melting Greenland Ice Sheet or a stronger hydrological cycle) which in turn may perturb the AMOC. It is therefore important that we develop our understanding of the relationship between climate and the return flow of dense water formed in the high latitude North Atlantic, focusing in particular on past warm climates that can act as partial analogues for future global warming scenarios. Previous work investigating the Holocene has revealed long-term trends in the strength of the dense overflow from the Nordic Seas into the North Atlantic via Iceland Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW). These changes have been related to variations in the freshwater budget and the water densities in the Nordic Seas (Thornalley et al., 2013). Across earlier interglacials, ISOW dynamics remain poorly constrained. To gain a more complete understanding of the coupling of climate and ISOW during past warm climates, we reconstructed ISOW flow speeds across an additional five Pleistocene interglacials, using the sortable silt proxy and a newly developed calibration curve. We find that there is large variability in inferred ISOW flow speeds between interglacials, as well as different temporal evolution of flow speed through the various interglacials. Our results suggest that preceded deglacial dynamics may be an important influence on the interglacial ISOW flow structure and highlight the tight coupling between climate and the ISOW.

  9. Stable isotope compositions of speleothems from the last interglacial - Spatial patterns of climate fluctuations in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demény, Attila; Kern, Zoltán; Czuppon, György; Németh, Alexandra; Leél-Őssy, Szabolcs; Siklósy, Zoltán; Lin, Ke; Hu, Hsun-Ming; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Vennemann, Torsten W.; Haszpra, László

    2017-04-01

    Studies on the last interglacial (LIG) can provide information on how our environment behaved in a period of slightly higher global temperatures at about 125 ± 4 ka, even if it is not the best analogue for the Holocene. The available LIG climate proxy records are usually better preserved and can be studied at a higher resolution than those of the preceding interglacials, allowing detailed comparisons. This paper presents complex stable hydrogen, carbon and oxygen isotope records obtained for carbonate (δ13C and δ18Ocarb) and fluid inclusion hosted water (δD and δ18Ow) of a stalagmite from the Baradla Cave system in Central Europe that covers most of the LIG, as proven by U-Th dates. Comparing its C and O isotope data with records reported for other speleothem (cave-hosted carbonate) deposits from Europe revealed the complex behavior of these climate proxies, with a concerted relative increase in 18O of carbonates from 128 to 120 ka and synchronized shifts in the opposite direction after 119 ka. The hydrogen isotope analyses of inclusion-hosted water extracted from the BAR-II stalagmite also correspond to the regional climate proxy records, with meaningful deviations from global temperature trends. Beside following the general paleotemperature pattern from the climate optimum (high δD values up to -64‰ around 120 ka) to the subsequent cooling starting at about 119 ka (low δD values down to -90‰ at about 109 ka), a period between 126.5 and 123 ka with low δD values (down to -81‰) is detected in the BAR-II stalagmite. Although the isotope shifts are muted in the C-O isotope data of carbonate due to competitive fractionation processes, the δ13C data show a positive relationship with the δD pattern, indicating humidity - and possibly temperature - variations. The periods with low δD values fit well to temperature and humidity changes inferred from proxy records from western Europe to the eastern Mediterranean. Spatial distributions of these variables

  10. Interglacial Greenland aerosol deposition: comparison of continuous high resolution chemical ice core records from the Eemian and Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gfeller, Gideon; Bigler, Matthias; Schüpbach, Simon; Mini, Olivia; Leuenberger, Daiana; Fischer, Hubertus

    2014-05-01

    Earth's climate system has been oscillating over the last million years between cold glacials and warm interglacials, leaving the imprints of their climate states in form of isotopes variations and chemical impurities in polar ice caps. In the course of the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) project, the NEEM ice core has been entirely analysed in very high depth resolution with a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system for the concentrations of chemical aerosol tracers in the ice. Only in the brittle ice zone (600-1100 m depth equivalent to the time interval 3000-8000 years before present) most of the ice had to be discarded due to multifractured core material. Based on the unique reconstructed age scale to unfold the stratigraphically disturbed part from about 2200 m depth downwards (NEEM community members, Nature, 2013), we are able to present the first Greenland chemistry record over the entire last interglacial, the so called Eemian period (about 128'000 to 115'000 years ago). As the Eemian is believed to have been 4 to 8 degrees C warmer than the modern climate, it can be used as an analogue for our present warming climate and, thus, contributes to a better understanding of processes causing natural variations. By means of the chemistry records we are able to assess the natural variability of Greenland Eemian climate and gain insight in its biogeochemical state. Here, short-term variability as well as long term trends of soluble chemical impurities in the Eemian are investigated and compared with those in the Holocene. Changes of organic processes in soils and biomass burning for example are assessed through soluble ammonium and nitrate concentrations. In comparison to the Holocene, ammonium concentrations were about 25% higher during the Eemian. Nitrate, on the other hand, shows about 25% lower concentrations. Sodium concentrations, reflecting changes in sea salt aerosol, are about 35% lower during the Eemian than during the Holocene. Calcium

  11. MIS 5e sea level: up to what point can we use literature reviews to answer the most pressing questions on the Last Interglacial ice sheets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovere, A.; Raymo, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    During MIS 5e (between ~128 and 116 kyr BP) greenhouse gas concentrations were comparable to pre-industrial levels, summer insolation was higher by ~10% at high latitudes and polar temperatures in both hemispheres were about 3-5 °C warmer than today. Sea level (SL) at this time has been a subject of numerous studies (and some debate) with ~1000 sites with MIS 5e sea level markers recognized worldwide. Recently, Kopp et al. (Nature, 2009) and Dutton & Lambeck (Science, 2012) analyzed worldwide datasets of sea level markers pertaining to the last interglacial. After accounting for GIA, they reached similar conclusions that eustatic (i.e., globally averaged) sea level (ESL) was between +5 and +9.4 m above modern during MIS 5e. Furthermore, Kopp et al. (Nature, 2009; GJI, 2013) suggest that sea level was not uniform during the LIG, but instead underwent at least two rapid oscillations including a rapid late 5e rise first proposed by Hearty et al. (QSR, 2007) and later by O'Leary et al. (Nat. Geo., 2013). Investigating the temporal and geographic variability of MIS 5e sea level opens new lines of research, in particular the possibility to fingerprint (Hay et al., QSR, 2014) the source of the proposed rapid ice sheet collapse near the end of the Last Interglacial. In this presentation we ask: can we use a database of published sea level estimates for this purpose? To answer this question, we built a relative sea level (RSL) database using RSLcalc 2.0; this is a relational database specifically designed to review relative sea level data points while keeping all the relevant information contained in the original publications. RSlcalc allows to estimate the measurement error (on the actual elevation of the SL feature), the error on the indicative range (the elevation range occupied by a sea level indicator) as well as the reference water level (the relationship between the marker and the former sea level). We show that the majority of published data have an accuracy of few

  12. The Physics of Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  13. Estimating pesticide sampling rates by the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) in the presence of natural organic matter and varying hydrodynamic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Charlestra, Lucner; Amirbahman, Aria; Courtemanch, David L.; Alvarez, David A.; Patterson, Howard

    2012-01-01

    The polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) was calibrated to monitor pesticides in water under controlled laboratory conditions. The effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on the sampling rates (Rs) was evaluated in microcosms containing -1 of total organic carbon (TOC). The effect of hydrodynamics was studied by comparing Rs values measured in stirred (SBE) and quiescent (QBE) batch experiments and a flow-through system (FTS). The level of NOM in the water used in these experiments had no effect on the magnitude of the pesticide sampling rates (p > 0.05). However, flow velocity and turbulence significantly increased the sampling rates of the pesticides in the FTS and SBE compared to the QBE (p < 0.001). The calibration data generated can be used to derive pesticide concentrations in water from POCIS deployed in stagnant and turbulent environmental systems without correction for NOM.

  14. Miscut dependent surface evolution in the process of N-polar GaN(000 1 bar) growth under N-rich condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzyżewski, Filip; Załuska-Kotur, Magdalena A.; Turski, Henryk; Sawicka, Marta; Skierbiszewski, Czesław

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of surface morphology during the growth of N-polar (000 1 bar) GaN under N-rich conditions is studied by kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulations for two substrates miscuts 2° and 4°. The results are compared with experimentally observed surface morphologies of (000 1 bar) GaN layers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The proposed kMC two-component model of GaN(000 1 bar) surface where both types of atoms, nitrogen and gallium, attach to the surface and diffuse independently shows that at relatively high rates of the step flow (miscut angle < 2 °) the low mobility of gallium adatoms causes surface instabilities and leads to experimentally observed roughening while for low rates of the step flow (miscut 4°), smooth surface can be obtained. In the presence of almost immobile nitrogen atoms under N-rich conditions crystal growth is realized by the process of two-dimensional island nucleation and coalescence. Larger crystal miscut, lower growth rate or higher temperature results in similar effect of the surface smoothening. We show that the surface also smoothens for the growth conditions with very high N-excess. In the presence of large number of nitrogen atoms the mobility of gallium atoms changes locally thus providing easier coalescence of separated island.

  15. Polarization measurement through combination polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yunfeng; Li, Linjun; He, Zhelong; Liu, Yanwei; Ma, Cheng; Shi, Guang; Liu, Lu

    2014-02-01

    Polarization measurement approaches only using polarizer and grating is present. The combination polarizers consists of two polarizers: one is γ degree with the X axis; the other is along the Y axis. Binary grating is covered by the combination polarizers, and based on Fraunhofer diffraction, the diffraction intensity formula is deduced. The polarization state of incident light can be gotten by fitting the diffraction pattern with the deduced formula. Compared with the traditional polarization measurement method, this measurement only uses polarizer and grating, therefore, it can be applied to measure a wide wavelength range without replacing device in theory.

  16. Glacial-interglacial changes in equatorial Pacific surface-water structure during the Plio-Pleistocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Kim A.; Bolton, Clara T.; Wilson, Paul A.; Bahr, André; Pross, Jörg; Fiebig, Jens; Kähler, Karsten; Friedrich, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    The late Pliocene/early Pleistocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (iNHG) represents the most recent major tipping point in Earth's climate history. In the equatorial Pacific, the iNHG has been suggested to mark the transition from a warm Pliocene climate state, in which the Pacific warm pool was greatly expanded relative to today giving rise to a surface ocean temperature field akin to modern El Niño conditions, to a climate state with strong upwelling in the east of the basin and stronger zonal temperature gradients. Here we examine this transition by presenting new high-resolution (∼800 yr) planktic foraminiferal Mg/Ca- and δ18O-based sea-surface temperature (SST) and salinity (SSS; based on δ18 O residuals [δ18Oivc-sw]) records from Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) Ocean Drilling Program Site 849 spanning ∼2.75-2.4 Ma. Our study interval contains the first large-amplitude (∼1‰ in benthic δ18O) early Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles (Marine Isotope Stages 100-96) representing the culmination of iNHG. In this study we investigate west-to-east equatorial Pacific SST and SSS gradients. We find that the zonal SST gradient increased by ∼1.5 °C from ∼2.75 to ∼2.4 Ma through EEP cooling. No glacial-interglacial pattern is seen in this gradient. On the other hand, we document obliquity-paced oscillations in the δ18Oivc-sw (SSS) gradient. We hypothesize that these oscillations originated from a response to a glacial southward and interglacial northward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone over the EEP.

  17. Effects of solvents and alcohols on the polar lipid composition of Clostridium butyricum under conditions of controlled lipid chain composition

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, D.L.; Goldfine, H. )

    1991-12-01

    Clostridium butyricum has been grown in media devoid of biotin, to which long-chain fatty acids have been added to promote growth. The authors have shown previously that, under these conditions, exogenous fatty acids are extensively incorporated into the cellular phospholipids. Cells grown with elaidic acid, trans-9-18:1, have normal ratios of the glycerol acetal of plasmenylethanolamine (GaPlaE) to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) plus plasmenylethanolamine (PlaE) compared with cells grown with biotin. When ethanol, cyclohexane, or n-octanol was added to elaidate-containing media, the ratio of GAPlaE to Pe plus PlaE was significantly increased. Addition of dodecane and n-butanol did not affect this ratio. When cells were grown with oleic acid in the absence of biotin, the GAPlaE to PE plus PlaE ratio was increased 5.4-fold compared with elaidate-grown cells. In oleate-supplemented media, the addition of solvents or n-alcohols produced no further increase in this ratio. They conclude that these changes in lipid composition represent cellular responses to perturbation of the equilibria between the lamellar and nonlamellar liquid crystalline phases in the cell membrane.

  18. Contrasting Responses of the Humboldt Current Ecosystem between the Holocene and MIS5e Interglacials Revealed from Multiple Sediment Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatteci, R.; Schneider, R. R.; Blanz, T.; Martinez, P.; Crosta, X.

    2016-12-01

    The Humboldt Current Ecosystem (HCE) off Peru yields about 10% of the global fish catch, producing more fish per unit area than any other region in the world. The high productivity is maintained by the upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich water from the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), driven by strong trade winds. However, the potential impacts of climate change on upwelling dynamics and oceanographic conditions in the near future are uncertain, threatening local and global economies. Here, we unravel the response of the HCE to contrasting climatic conditions during the last two interglacials (i.e. Holocene and MIS5e) providing an independent insight about the relation between climatic factors and upwelling and productivity dynamics. For this purpose, we used multiple cores to reconstruct past changes in OMZ and upwelling intensity, productivity and fish biomass variability. Chronologies for the Holocene were obtained by multiple 14C ages and laminae correlations among cores, while for the MIS5e they were mainly done by correlation of prominent features in several proxies with other published records. We used a multiproxy approach including alkenones to reconstruct sea surface temperatures, δ15N as a proxy for water column denitrification, redox sensitive metals as proxies for sediment redox conditions, and diatom and fish debris assemblages to reconstruct ecological changes. The results show a very different response of the HCE to climate conditions during the last 2 interglacials, likely driven by changes in Tropical Pacific dynamics. During the Holocene we find that 1) the Late Holocene exhibits higher multi-centennial scale variability compared to the Early Holocene, 2) increased upwelling and a weak OMZ during the mid-Holocene, and 3) long term increase in productivity (diatoms and fishes) from the Early to the Late Holocene. During the MIS5e we find an 1) intense OMZ, 2) strong water column stratification, 3) high siliceous biomass, and 4) low fish biomass compared

  19. The relative importance of atmospheric methane sources and sinks during the Last Interglacial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiquet, A.; Friend, A. D.; Archibald, A. T.; Telford, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    A large amount of natural variability of atmospheric methane mixing ratio has been observed during the glacial-interglacial cycles, ranging from ~360 ppbv during the cold glacials to ~700 ppbv during the warm interglacials. The origin of this natural variability of methane has been widely debated, with some suggesting a source driven variability (i.e. wetlands, representing 20 - 40% of global sources) while the oxidising capacity of the atmosphere (sinks) has remained roughly constant over the ice ages. Nevertheless, most previous studies rely on the use of simplified models of methane surface emissions (non-process based) and/or a simplified treatment of atmospheric chemistry, with simple parametrisations of important processes or excluding climatic feedbacks. We address all these issues with state-of-the-art model simulations, both for surface processes and for atmospheric chemistry. The last interglacial period (~125,000 ka BP) is an interesting case study to test the relative importance of methane sources and sinks. Following a change in the orbital configuration, palaeo-record evidences and model reconstructions suggest warmer summers in northern latitudes. This could largely impact the emissions from the large wetlands located in these regions. However, Antarctic ice core records suggest a very similar methane mixing ratio for this period, which could suggest a potential compensation from atmospheric oxidation. In the present study, we use a state-of-the-art global land surface model (Hybrid8) to simulate methane emissions from wetlands during the last interglacial period. The hydrology scheme used in Hybrid8 has been recently updated and validated against multi-instrument retrievals. A process based methane model has also been developed and compared with top-down estimate. On the other hand, we use a sophisticated climate-chemistry model (UM-UKCA) to estimate the potential change of atmospheric oxidising capacity resulting in a change of climate from a pre

  20. Glacial-interglacial variations of microbial communities in permafrost and lake deposits in the Siberian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangelsdorf, Kai; Bischoff, Juliane; Gattinger, Andreas; Wagner, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    The Artic regions are expected to be very sensitive to the currently observed climate change. When permafrost is thawing, the stored carbon becomes available again for microbial degradation, forming a potential source for the generation of carbon dioxide and methane with their positive feedback effect on the climate warming. For the prediction of future climate evolution it is, therefore, important to improve our knowledge about the microbial-driven greenhouse gas dynamics in the Siberian Arctic and their response to glacial-interglacial changes in the past. Sample material was drilled on Kurungnahk Island (Russian-German LENA expedition) located in the southern part of the Lena delta and in lake El'gygytgyn (ICDP-project) in the eastern part of Siberia. The Kurungnahk samples comprise Late Pleistocene to Holocene deposits, whereas the lake El'gygytgyn samples cover Middle to Late Pleistocene sediments. Samples were investigated applying a combined biogeochemical and microbiological approach. The methane profile of the Kurungnahk core reveals highest methane contents in the warm and wet Holocene and Late Pleistocene (LP) deposits and correlates largly to the organic carbon (TOC) contents. Archaeol concentrations, being a biomarker for past methanogenic archaea, are also high during the warm and wet Holocene and LP intervals and low during the cold and dry LP periods. This indicates that part of the methane might be produced and trapped in the past. However, biomarkers for living microorganisms (bacteria and archaea) and microbial activity measurements of methanogens point, especially, for the Holocene to a viable archaeal community, indicating a possible in-situ methane production. Furthermore, warm/wet-cold/dry climate cycles are recorded in the archaeal diversity as revealed by genetic fingerprint analysis. Although the overlying lake water buffers the temperature effect on the lake sediments, which never became permafrost, the bacterial and archaeal biomarker

  1. Solving the riddle of interglacial temperatures over the last 1.5 million years with a future IPICS "Oldest Ice" ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Hubertus

    2014-05-01

    The sequence of the last 8 glacial cycles is characterized by irregular 100,000 year cycles in temperature and sea level. In contrast, the time period between 1.5-1.2 million years ago is characterized by more regular cycles with an obliquity periodicity of 41,000 years. Based on a deconvolution of deep ocean temperature and ice volume contributions to benthic δ18O (Elderfield et al., Science, 2012), it is suggested that glacial sea level became progressively lower over the last 1.5 Myr, while glacial deep ocean temperatures were very similar. At the same time many interglacials prior to the Mid Brunhes event showed significantly cooler deep ocean temperatures than the Holocene, while at the same time interglacial ice volume remained essentially the same. In contrast, interglacial sea surface temperatures in the tropics changed little (Herbert et al., Science,2010) and proxy reconstructions of atmospheric CO2 using δ11B in planktic foraminifera (Hönisch et al., Science, 2009) suggest that prior to 900,000 yr before present interglacial CO2 levels did not differ substantially from those over the last 450,000 years. Accordingly, the conundrum arises how interglacials can differ in deep ocean temperature without any obvious change in ice volume or greenhouse gas forcing and what caused the change in cyclicity of glacial interglacial cycles over the Mid Pleistocene Transition. Probably the most important contribution to solve this riddle is the recovery of a 1.5 Myr old ice core from Antarctica, which among others would provide an unambiguous, high-resolution record of the greenhouse gas history over this time period. Accordingly, the international ice core community, as represented by the International Partnership for Ice Core Science (IPICS), has identified such an 'Oldest Ice' ice core as one of the most important scientific targets for the future (http://www.pages.unibe.ch/ipics/white-papers). However, finding stratigraphically undisturbed ice, which covers this

  2. Warm Greenland during the last interglacial: the role of regional changes in sea ice cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, Niklaus; Born, Andreas; Raible, Christoph C.; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2016-10-01

    The last interglacial, also known as the Eemian, is characterized by warmer than present conditions at high latitudes. This is implied by various Eemian proxy records as well as by climate model simulations, though the models mostly underestimate the warming with respect to proxies. Simulations of Eemian surface air temperatures (SAT) in the Northern Hemisphere extratropics further show large variations between different climate models, and it has been hypothesized that this model spread relates to diverse representations of the Eemian sea ice cover. Here we use versions 3 and 4 of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM3 and CCSM4) to highlight the crucial role of sea ice and sea surface temperatures changes for the Eemian climate, in particular in the North Atlantic sector and in Greenland. A substantial reduction in sea ice cover results in an amplified atmospheric warming and thus a better agreement with Eemian proxy records. Sensitivity experiments with idealized lower boundary conditions reveal that warming over Greenland is mostly due to a sea ice retreat in the Nordic Seas. In contrast, sea ice changes in the Labrador Sea have a limited local impact. Changes in sea ice cover in either region are transferred to the overlying atmosphere through anomalous surface energy fluxes. The large-scale spread of the warming resulting from a Nordic Seas sea ice retreat is mostly explained by anomalous heat advection rather than by radiation or condensation processes. In addition, the sea ice perturbations lead to changes in the hydrological cycle. Our results consequently imply that both temperature and snow accumulation records from Greenland ice cores are sensitive to sea ice changes in the Nordic Seas but insensitive to sea ice changes in the Labrador Sea. Moreover, the simulations suggest that the uncertainty in the Eemian sea ice cover accounts for 1.6 °C of the Eemian warming at the NEEM ice core site. The estimated Eemian warming of 5 °C above present day

  3. Evaluating climate controls on isotopic shifts in high-altitude forests during the Last Interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insel, N.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; Sturm, C.; Karimova, G.

    2016-12-01

    Forests play a significant role in the global carbon cycle, and influence climate through their effect on albedo and latent heat flux. Predicting the response of these ecosystems to climate change is complicated by competing influences between rising CO2, warming, and shifts in hydrology such as timing, rate, and type of precipitation. A key to detection and prediction of future regional and global changes of modern ecosystems lies in understanding the causes and characteristics of historical variations at the ecosystem level. The Last Interglacial (LIG: 130 to 116 ka) is the most recent period in Earth's history when growing season temperature exceeded those of today. In this study, we are using isotope-enabled regional climate model (REMOiso) simulations under LIG (115ka, 125 ka and 135 ka) and modern forcings to evaluate climate controls on boreal forest in the western US. In particular, we investigate (1) changes in moisture sources and moisture transport, (2) changes in the annual and seasonal extent and duration of precipitation, and (3) temperature variations to explore how ecosystem carbon and water fluxes change under coupled temperature and precipitation variability. Eemian wood samples from the Rocky Mountains in Colorado show a progressive increase in the 18O seasonal cycle that may be related to trees utilizing isotopically enriched monsoonal moisture. However, Eemian climate simulations (125ka) incorporate orbital forcings that result in stronger seasonal changes in temperature, precipitation, and snow cover in comparison to today, while annual anomalies are small. The seasonal shift in climate affects the water availability and the length of growing season for Eemian plants. Model results indicate only a very slight increase in monsoonal moisture transport from the south, resulting in slightly wetter conditions in western Colorado, but slightly drier conditions in the eastern part. Preliminary results suggest that changes in the North American

  4. Warm Greenland during the last interglacial: the role of sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, Niklaus; Born, Andreas; Raible, Christoph C.; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2016-04-01

    The last interglacial, the Eemian, is characterized by warmer than present conditions in the high latitudes and is therefore often considered as a possible analogue for the climate in the near future. Simulations of Eemian surface air temperatures (SAT) in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), however, show large variations between different climate models and it has been hypothesized that this model spread relates to diverse representations of the Eemian sea ice cover. Here we use version 3 and 4 of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM3 and CCSM4), to highlight the crucial role of sea ice and sea surface temperatures during the Eemian, in particular for SAT in the North Atlantic sector and in Greenland. A substantial reduction in NH sea ice results in an amplified atmospheric warming and, thus, a better agreement with Eemian proxy records. Sensitivity experiments with idealized lower boundary conditions reveal that warming over Greenland is mostly due to a sea ice retreat in the Nordic Seas. In contrast, sea ice changes in the Labrador Sea have a limited local impact. Changes in sea ice in either region are transferred to the overlying atmosphere through anomalous surface energy fluxes. The large-scale warming simulated for the sea ice retreat in the Nordic Seas further relates to anomalous heat advection. Diabatic processes play a secondary role, yet distinct changes in the hydrological cycle are possible. Our results imply that temperature and accumulation records from Greenland ice cores are sensitive to sea ice changes in the Nordic Seas but insensitive to sea ice changes in the Labrador Sea. Moreover, our simulations suggest that the uncertainty in the Eemian sea ice cover accounts for 1.6°C of the Eemian warming at the NEEM ice core site. The estimated Eemian warming of 5°C above present-day based on the NEEM δ15N record can be reconstructed by the CCSM4 model for the scenario that a sea ice retreat in the Nordic Seas coincided with a reduced Greenland ice

  5. Uranium-series ages of corals, sea level history, and palaeozoogeography, Canary Islands, Spain: an exploratory study for two Quaternary interglacial periods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Meco, Joaquín; Simmons, Kathleen R.

    2014-01-01

    .5 interglacials, decreased insolation may have resulted in southward migration of the ITCZ, strengthened trade winds, and re-establishment of upwelling. Such conditions may have brought about not only local extinction of the Senegalese fauna, but allowed southward migration of the cooler-water Mediterranean fauna to the Canary Islands in the later parts of interglacials, a complex palaeoclimate record that is mirrored in the deep-sea core record.

  6. Glacial- interglacial temperature change based on 13C18O carbonate bond with in fish bone otoliths from Red Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Eiler, J.; Feeney, R.

    2006-12-01

    Determining the past record of temperature and salinity of ocean surface waters is essential for understanding past changes in climate, such as those which occur across glacial-interglacial transitions. As a useful proxy, the clumped isotope of CO2 in carbonate (13C18O16O or ?47) from inorganic precipitation experiment has been shown to reflect surface temperature with high degree of confidence (Ghosh et al., 2006). The last glacial cycle was characterized by climate fluctuations, but the extent of any associated changes in global sea level (or, equivalently, ice volume) remains elusive. High stands of sea level can be reconstructed from dated fossil and isotopic analyses of foraminifera and terapods, and these data are complemented by a compilation of global sea-level estimates based on deep-sea oxygen isotope ratios. Salinity derived from the records of oxygen isotopes ratios, however, contains uncertainties due to lack of information about the sea surface temperature change. Here we used combination of clumped isotopes technique and oxygen isotope measurement from fish otoliths (Myctophiformes; lanternfishes) extracted from two piston cores (Ku et al., 1969) (CH-154 and CH-153) to understand the temperature evolution and salinity variation of Red Sea water (300-800m) during the last 70 k.y. We analyzed well preserved unaltered otoliths from 7 different stratigraphic horizons from sediment core CH-154. Our preliminary observation suggests ~20 degree Celsius differences in sea water temperatures between glacial and interglacial time. We showed that the region has experienced fluctuation in climatic and tectonic processes during glacial interglacial time and the otoliths developed within the fishes captured the information about temperature change and salinity variation. Our results indicate a drop in temperature and restricted exchange of water with the open ocean during glaciations. The Red Sea environment was also highly saline even during the interglacial event

  7. Direct high-performance liquid chromatography enantioseparation of terazosin on an immobilised polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phase under polar organic and reversed-phase conditions.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Rosella; Gallinella, Bruno; La Torre, Francesco; Zanitti, Leo; Turchetto, Luciana; Mosca, Antonina; Cirilli, Roberto

    2009-07-10

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) enantioseparation of terazosin (TER) was accomplished on the immobilised-type Chiralpak IC chiral stationary phase (CSP) under both polar organic and reversed-phase modes. A simple analytical method was validated using a mixture of methanol-water-DEA 95:5:0.1 (v/v/v) as a mobile phase. Under reversed-phase conditions good linearities were obtained over the concentration range 8.76-26.28 microg mL(-1) for both enantiomers. The limits of detection and quantification were 10 and 30 ng mL(-1), respectively. The intra- and inter-day assay precision was less than 1.66% (RSD%). The optimised conditions also allowed to resolve chiral and achiral impurities from the enantiomers of TER. The proposed HPLC method supports pharmacological studies on the biological effects of the both forms of TER and analytical investigations of potential drug formulations based on a single enantiomer. At the semipreparative scale, 5.3 mg of racemic sample were resolved with elution times less than 12 min using a mobile phase consisting of methanol-DEA 100:0.1 (v/v) and both enantiomers were isolated with a purity of > or = 99% enantiomeric excess (ee). The absolute configuration of TER enantiomers was assigned by comparison of the measured specific rotations with those reported in the literature.

  8. P-polarized reflectance spectroscopy: A high sensitive real-time monitoring technique to study surface kinetics under steady state epitaxial deposition conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Nikolaus; Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the results of real-time optical monitoring of epitaxial growth processes by p-polarized reflectance spectroscopy (PRS) using a single wavelength application under pulsed chemical beam epitaxy (PCBE) condition. The high surface sensitivity of PRS allows the monitoring of submonolayer precursors coverage on the surface as shown for GaP homoepitaxy and GaP on Si heteroepitaxy as examples. In the case of heteroepitaxy, the growth rate and optical properties are revealed by PRS using interference oscillations as they occur during growth. Super-imposed on these interference oscillations, the PRS signal exhibits a fine structure caused by the periodic alteration of the surface chemistry by the pulsed supply of chemical precursors. This fine structure is modeled under conditions where the surface chemistry cycles between phosphorus supersaturated and phosphorus depleted surfaces. The mathematical model describes the fine structure using a surface layer that increases during the tertiarybutyl phosphine (TBP) supply and decreases during and after the triethylgallium (TEG) pulse, which increases the growing GaP film thickness. The imaginary part of the dielectric function of the surface layer is revealed from the turning points in the fine structure, where the optical response to the first precursor pulse in the cycle sequence changes sign. The amplitude of the fine structure is determined by the surface layer thickness and the complex dielectric functions for the surface layer with the underlying bulk film. Surface kinetic data can be obtained by analyzing the rise and decay transients of the fine structure.

  9. Midlatitude cooling caused by geomagnetic field minimum during polarity reversal.

    PubMed

    Kitaba, Ikuko; Hyodo, Masayuki; Katoh, Shigehiro; Dettman, David L; Sato, Hiroshi

    2013-01-22

    The climatic effects of cloud formation induced by galactic cosmic rays (CRs) has recently become a topic of much discussion. The CR-cloud connection suggests that variations in geomagnetic field intensity could change climate through modulation of CR flux. This hypothesis, however, is not well-tested using robust geological evidence. Here we present paleoclimate and paleoenvironment records of five interglacial periods that include two geomagnetic polarity reversals. Marine oxygen isotope stages 19 and 31 contain both anomalous cooling intervals during the sea-level highstands and the Matuyama-Brunhes and Lower Jaramillo reversals, respectively. This contrasts strongly with the typical interglacial climate that has the temperature maximum at the sea-level peak. The cooling occurred when the field intensity dropped to <40% of its present value, for which we estimate >40% increase in CR flux. The climate warmed rapidly when field intensity recovered. We suggest that geomagnetic field intensity can influence global climate through the modulation of CR flux.

  10. First fossil evidence of an ``interglacial refugium'' in the Pyrenean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, Juan Manuel; Blain, Hugues-Alexandre; Allué, Ethel; Bañuls, Sandra; Bargalló, Amelia; Martín, Patricia; Morales, Juan Ignacio; Pedro, Mireia; Rodríguez, Anna; Solé, Alex; Oms, F. Xavier

    2010-08-01

    A refugium is generally understood as an area where temperate species survive cold periods, such as the Iberian, Italian, or Balkan Peninsulas in Europe. Strictly speaking, this definition refers to what is known as a glacial refugium. However, there are various types of lesser-known refugia such as the interglacial refugium, which denotes a mountainous region at low latitudes, such as the Pyrenees, where species adapted to the cold survive during interstadial periods. The small-vertebrate association from the sequence of Cova Colomera, which is located on the southern face of the Pyrenees and contains the final cold spell of the Late Pleistocene and the beginnings of the temperate period in which we currently find ourselves (the Holocene), could constitute the first fossil evidence of such an interglacial refugium, thus providing new paleoecological data on the phenomenon.

  11. First fossil evidence of an "interglacial refugium" in the Pyrenean region.

    PubMed

    López-García, Juan Manuel; Blain, Hugues-Alexandre; Allué, Ethel; Bañuls, Sandra; Bargalló, Amelia; Martín, Patricia; Morales, Juan Ignacio; Pedro, Mireia; Rodríguez, Anna; Solé, Alex; Oms, F Xavier

    2010-08-01

    A refugium is generally understood as an area where temperate species survive cold periods, such as the Iberian, Italian, or Balkan Peninsulas in Europe. Strictly speaking, this definition refers to what is known as a glacial refugium. However, there are various types of lesser-known refugia such as the interglacial refugium, which denotes a mountainous region at low latitudes, such as the Pyrenees, where species adapted to the cold survive during interstadial periods. The small-vertebrate association from the sequence of Cova Colomera, which is located on the southern face of the Pyrenees and contains the final cold spell of the Late Pleistocene and the beginnings of the temperate period in which we currently find ourselves (the Holocene), could constitute the first fossil evidence of such an interglacial refugium, thus providing new paleoecological data on the phenomenon.

  12. Glacial to interglacial fluctuations in productivity in the equatorial Pacific as indicated by marine barite

    SciTech Connect

    Paytan, A.; Kastner, M.; Chavez, F.P.

    1996-11-22

    An empirical correlation between marine barite (BaSO{sub 4}) accumulation rate in core-top sediment samples from two equatorial Pacific transects (at 140{degrees}W and 110{degrees}W) and the estimated primary productivity of the overlying water column were used to evaluate glacial to interglacial changes in productivity. Fluctuations in barite accumulation rates down-core indicate that during glacial periods of the past 450,000 years, the productivity in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific was about two times that during intervening interglacial periods. This result is consistent with other evidence that productivity was high in the eastern and central equatorial Pacific during the last glacial. 48 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Direct terrestrial–marine correlation demonstrates surprisingly late onset of the last interglacial in central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Sier, Mark J.; Roebroeks, Wil; Bakels, Corrie C.; Dekkers, Mark J.; Brühl, Enrico; De Loecker, Dimitri; Gaudzinski-Windheuser, Sabine; Hesse, Norbert; Jagich, Adam; Kindler, Lutz; Kuijper, Wim J.; Laurat, Thomas; Mücher, Herman J.; Penkman, Kirsty E.H.; Richter, Daniel; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J.J.

    2011-01-01

    An interdisciplinary study of a small sedimentary basin at Neumark Nord 2 (NN2), Germany, has yielded a high-resolution record of the palaeomagnetic Blake Event, which we are able to place at the early part of the last interglacial pollen sequence documented from the same section. We use this data to calculate the duration of this stratigraphically important event at 3400 ± 350 yr. More importantly, the Neumark Nord 2 data enables precise terrestrial–marine correlation for the Eemian stage in central Europe. This shows a remarkably large time lag of ca. 5000 yr between the MIS 5e ‘peak’ in the marine record and the start of the last interglacial in this region. PMID:26523075

  14. Terrigenous Fe input and biogenic sedimentation in the glacial and interglacial equatorial Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.W.; Leinen, M.; Knowlton, C.W.

    1995-12-01

    This study was performed to determine the relationship of particulate iron from land erosion to the accumulation of biogenic matter in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Sediment cores representing the last six glacial-interglacial cycles and previously published mineralogic records were used as data input. Total iron, terrigenous, and biogenic components were determined for three sediment cores. The study determined that there is no relationship between terrigenous iron input and sedimentary carbon sequestering. This is based on chemical, spectral, and stratigraphic anlyses which showed: (1) no consistent pattern of terrigenous input during glacial or interglacial periods, (2) a close relationshipe between the accumulation of particulate iron and the accumulation of terrigenous matter, (3) no coherent spectral correlations between glacial periodicity and iron input, (4) an inverse correlation of iron input and calcium carbonate, and (5) no spectral or linear relationship between iron accumulation and calcium carbonate, organic carbon, or opal. 55 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Were the MIS 11 and MIS 5e warmer and/or wetter than the Holocene? Test comparison of Interglacial intensities using stable isotope data from Northern France tufa deposits.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabkowski, J.; Limondin-Lozouet, N.; Antoine, P.; Marca-Bell, A.; Andrews, J.

    2012-04-01

    Many recent palaeoclimatic studies have focused on MIS 5 (Eemian) and 11 as they are supposed to be the best analogues for our modern interglacial. As they are characteristic of temperate periods and result of calcite precipitation from meteogene water, tufas are key-deposits for palaeoclimatic reconstructions of these interglacials. Calcite oxygen and carbon stable isotopes (δ18O and δ13C) are known since the 80s to be important palaeoclimatic proxies for the Holocene and we recently have shown their suitability in Pleistocene tufas. At decadal-scale sampling resolution, δ18O of tufa records variations in δ18O of regional rainfall, and in this way reflects source or amount effects (particularly continentality), and temperature depending on locality. δ13C of tufa indicates moisture availability (linked to biomass type/abundance) and rainfall intensity. Using our new results from the tufa of Saint-Germain-le-Vasson (Normandy) dated to the first half of the Holocene, and those from Caours (Somme) and La-Celle-sur-Seine (Seine-et-Marne) respectively assigned to MIS 5e and MIS 11, we investigate similarities or differences between these Pleistocene interglacials and the modern one. Comparison between the sites is relevant as these tufas developed in a similar geological area (the Paris Basin) and are nowadays in the same humid and temperate climatic area. The Caours tufa presents carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions similar to the Saint-Germain sequence. Comparable temperature and humidity conditions are thus recorded during the Eemian and the Holocene. However, δ13C for the MIS 5e optimum are more negative than those for the Atlantic optimum (Holocene), which may indicate wetter conditions. In La Celle, slightly warmer conditions appear to be recorded for MIS 11 compared to the Holocene by higher δ18O values than in Saint-Germain. Moreover, two very humid episodes are observed in the La Celle δ13C profile whereas such wet conditions are not observed during

  16. Sr-isotopic variation in the Quaternary: The record from glacial and interglacial marine terraces

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, K.R.; Muhs, D.R.; Simmons, K.R.; Szabo, B.J.; Moore, J.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors report high-precision Sr isotope of aragonitic fossils from Pleistocene marine terraces, which formed during both glacial and interglacial periods, to (1) constrain the marine Sr-isotope trend for the late Quaternary, and (2) test the long-term marine Sr-isotope trend for reversals related to glacial-interglacial transitions. Analyses of multiple samples of mollusks from each of 15 interglacial terraces on San Nicolas Island, San Clemente Island, and the Palos Verdes Hills (California) define a marine Sr-isotope trend (assigning terrace ages based on an assumption of constant long-term uplift rates calculated from the height of dated 120-Ka terraces) that is generally similar to the trend defined by the data of recent workers for DSDP samples. Data for three U-series dated interglacial terraces on the East Coast of the US plot close to the California trend, as do data for 14 coral samples of 0-750 Ka age (dated by mass-spectrometric {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) from submerged, glacial-stage reefs off Hawaii. As a whole, their data indicate an approximately linear increase of approximately 0.05 % in {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr over the last 800 k.y., confirm the presence of a subtle ({approximately}0.01 %) reversal between approximately 900 and 600 Ka, and resolve a previously unrecognized reversal of approximately 0.02{per thousand} between approximately 1,400 and 1,200 Ka. In addition, the lack of obvious fine structure in samples younger than 800 ka indicates that the amplitude of any short-period oscillations (<100 ky.) in the marine {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr trend for the Late Quaternary is probably less than approximately 0.02{per thousand}.

  17. Evidence for last interglacial chronology and environmental change from Southern Europe.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Achim; Allen, Judy R M; Mingram, Jens; Dulski, Peter; Wulf, Sabine; Huntley, Brian

    2007-01-09

    Establishing phase relationships between earth-system components during periods of rapid global change is vital to understanding the underlying processes. It requires records of each component with independent and accurate chronologies. Until now, no continental record extending from the present to the penultimate glacial had such a chronology to our knowledge. Here, we present such a record from the annually laminated sediments of Lago Grande di Monticchio, southern Italy. Using this record we determine the duration (17.70 +/- 0.20 ka) and age of onset (127.20 +/- 1.60 ka B.P.) of the last interglacial, as reflected by terrestrial ecosystems. This record also reveals that the transitions at the beginning and end of the interglacial spanned only approximately 100 and 150 years, respectively. Comparison with records of other earth-system components reveals complex leads and lags. During the penultimate deglaciation phase relationships are similar to those during the most recent deglaciation, peaks in Antarctic warming and atmospheric methane both leading Northern Hemisphere terrestrial warming. It is notable, however, that there is no evidence at Monticchio of a Younger Dryas-like oscillation during the penultimate deglaciation. Warming into the first major interstadial event after the last interglacial is characterized by markedly different phase relationships to those of the deglaciations, warming at Monticchio coinciding with Antarctic warming and leading the atmospheric methane increase. Diachroneity is seen at the end of the interglacial; several global proxies indicate progressive cooling after approximately 115 ka B.P., whereas the main terrestrial response in the Mediterranean region is abrupt and occurs at 109.50 +/- 1.40 ka B.P.

  18. Cryogenian Interglacial Litho- and C Isotope Chemo-stratigraphy of the Amadeus Basin, Central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdel, C.; Campbell, M.; Phelps, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Cryogenian stratigraphy of the Amadeus Basin in central Australia consists of the Areyonga, Aralka, and Olympic Formations. Both the Areyonga and Olympic Fms. include glacial deposits overlain by cap carbonates, observations that have prompted correlation of these formations with the global Sturtian and Marinoan glaciations, respectively. In this study we focus on the interglacial stratigraphic unit (Aralka Fm.), which is subdivided into the lower Ringwood Mbr. and the upper Limbla Mbr. C isotope values from carbonates within the Limbla Mbr. are particularly large (up to +10 per mil), suggesting that it correlates with the global "Keele Peak" anomaly. The underlying Ringwood Mbr. (the base of which comprises the Sturtian cap carbonate of the Amadeus Basin) varies from thin or non-existent in the northwestern part of the basin to hundreds of meters thick in eastern parts. C isotope values from Ringwood Mbr. carbonates are roughly -5 per mil at its base and rise rapidly up-section. A mid-interglacial negative C isotope excursion to values of approximately -5 per mil in the Ringwood Mbr. may correlate with the Tayshir anomaly of the Mongolian Neoproterozoic succession. Interglacial carbonates of the Aralka Fm. therefore have C isotope compositions that span at least 15 per mil and include both positive and negative isotopic excursions that seem to be globally correlative. Furthermore, detailed field observations from the Ringwood Mbr. suggest that it can be subdivided into three submembers, each of which is marked by stromatolitic intervals. Shallowing-upward parasequences in the Ringwood Mbr., as well as a major change in lithology from siltstones and microbialites of the Ringwood Mbr. to dominantly coarse-grained, cross-stratified sandstones of the Limbla Mbr., suggest that the interglacial strata of the Amadeus Basin were deposited during a period of significant and repeated changes in relative sealevel.

  19. A simple metabolic model of glacial-interglacial energy supply to the upper ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelegrí, J. L.; Olivella, R.; García-Olivares, A.

    2011-03-01

    We use a simple two-state two-box ocean to simulate the CO2 signal during the last four glacial-interglacial transitions in the earth system. The model is inspired by the similarity in spatial organization and temporal transition patterns between the earth and other complex systems, such as mammals. The comparison identifies the earth's metabolic rate with net autotrophic primary production in the upper ocean, sustained through new inorganic carbon and nutrients advected from the deep ocean and organic matter remineralized within the upper ocean. We view the glacial-interglacial transition as a switch of the upper ocean from a basal to an enhanced metabolic state, with energy supply initially relying on the remineralization of the local organic sources and the eventual steady state resulting from the increased advective supply of inorganic deep sources. During the interglacial-glacial transition the opposite occurs, with an initial excess of advective supply and primary production that allows the replenishment of the upper-ocean organic storages. We set the relative change in energy supply from the CO2 signal and use genetic algorithms to explore the sensitivity of the model output to both the basal recirculation rate and the intensity-timing of the maximum recirculation rate. The model is capable of reproducing quite well the long-term oscillations, as shown by correlations with observations typically about 0.8. The dominant time scale for each cycle ranges between about 40 and 45 kyr, close to the 41 kyr average obliquity astronomical period, and the deep-ocean recirculation rate increases between one and two orders of magnitude from glacial to interglacial periods.

  20. Modelled interglacial carbon cycle dynamics during the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinen, Thomas; Brovkin, Victor; Munhoven, Guy

    2016-11-01

    Trends in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during three recent interglacials - the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11 - are investigated using an earth system model of intermediate complexity, which we extended with process-based modules to consider two slow carbon cycle processes - peat accumulation and shallow-water CaCO3 sedimentation (coral reef formation). For all three interglacials, model simulations considering peat accumulation and shallow-water CaCO3 sedimentation substantially improve the agreement between model results and ice core CO2 reconstructions in comparison to a carbon cycle set-up neglecting these processes. This enables us to model the trends in atmospheric CO2, with modelled trends similar to the ice core data, forcing the model only with orbital and sea level changes. During the Holocene, anthropogenic CO2 emissions are required to match the observed rise in atmospheric CO2 after 3 ka BP but are not relevant before this time. Our model experiments show a considerable improvement in the modelled CO2 trends by the inclusion of the slow carbon cycle processes, allowing us to explain the CO2 evolution during the Holocene and two recent interglacials consistently using an identical model set-up.

  1. Ice core evidence for extensive melting of the greenland ice sheet in the last interglacial.

    PubMed

    Koerner, R M

    1989-05-26

    Evidence from ice at the bottom of ice cores from the Canadian Arctic Islands and Camp Century and Dye-3 in Greenland suggests that the Greenland ice sheet melted extensively or completely during the last interglacial period more than 100 ka (thousand years ago), in contrast to earlier interpretations. The presence of dirt particles in the basal ice has previously been thought to indicate that the base of the ice sheets had melted and that the evidence for the time of original growth of these ice masses had been destroyed. However, the particles most likely blew onto the ice when the dimensions of the ice caps and ice sheets were much smaller. Ice texture, gas content, and other evidence also suggest that the basal ice at each drill site is superimposed ice, a type of ice typical of the early growth stages of an ice cap or ice sheet. If the present-day ice masses began their growth during the last interglacial, the ice sheet from the earlier (Illinoian) glacial period must have competely or largely melted during the early part of the same interglacial period. If such melting did occur, the 6-meter higher-than-present sea level during the Sangamon cannot be attributed to disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet, as has been suggested.

  2. A 3-D model for the Antarctic ice sheet: a sensitivity study on the glacial-interglacial contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huybrechts, Philippe

    1990-12-01

    On the longer climatic time scales, changes in the elevation and extent of the Antarctic ice sheet have an important role in modulating global atmospheric and oceanographic processes, and contribute significantly to world-wide sea levels. In this paper, a 3-D time-dependent thermomechanical model for the entire ice sheet is presented, that is subsequently used to examine the effects of glacial-interglacial shifts in environmental boundary conditions on its geometry. The model takes into account a coupled ice shelf, grounding-line dynamics, basal sliding and isostatic bed adjustment and considers the fully coupled velocity and temperature fields. Ice flow is calculated on a fine mesh (40 km horizontal grid size and 10 layers in the vertical) for grounded and floating ice and a stress transition zone in between at the grounding line, where all stress components contribute in the effective stress in the flow law. There is free interaction between ice sheet and ice shelf, so that the entire geometry is internally generated. A simulation of the present ice sheet reveals that the model is able to yield realistic results. A series of sensitivity experiments are then performed, in which lower temperatures, reduced accumulation rates and lower global sea level stands are imposed, either singly or in combination. By comparing results of pairs of experiments, the effects of each of these environmental changes can be determined. In agreement with glacial-geological evidence, we found that the most pronounced changes show up in the West Antarctic ice sheet configuration. They appear to be essentially controlled by variations in eustatic sea level, whereas typical glacial-interglacial changes in temperature and ice deposition rates tend to balance one another. These findings support the hypothesis that the Antarctic ice sheet basically follows glacial episodes in the northern hemisphere by means of sea-level teleconnections. Grounding occurs more readily in the Weddell sea than

  3. The last interglacial climate in EC-Earth - comparing the direct and indirect impacts of the insolation changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anker Pedersen, Rasmus; Langen, Peter Lang; Vinther, Bo

    2016-04-01

    The last interglacial warm climate state was influenced by substantial changes in the annual insolation cycle. The impact of the insolation changes has been investigated using a time-slice simulation with the EC-Earth earth system model. The model climate was forced with the insolation and atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations from 125,000 years before present, and the resulting quasi-equilibrium state has been analyzed and compared to a pre-industrial climate state. The simulations indicate an annual mean global warming of approximately 1 K. The tropical region exhibits lower temperatures and stronger monsoonal systems, while the Arctic region shows a warming of about 3 K throughout the year. Arctic sea ice changes appear to be an important driver of warming, especially in relation to a northward shift of the ice edge in the North Atlantic region. Proxy data from ice and ocean sediment cores indicate substantial warming in parts of the North Atlantic region that could be related to similar sea ice changes. The relative importance of the sea ice and sea surface temperature changes and the direct contribution from the insolation is further investigated using a series of experiments in an atmosphere-only version of the model. Based on the results from the coupled model, we assess the relative contributions using hybrid simulations of the atmospheric response to a combination of last interglacial sea surface temperatures and sea ice conditions and pre-industrial insolation, and vice versa. Special attention is given to the simulated response over the Greenland ice sheet and the potential implications for proxy data from ice cores. Both temperature and precipitation changes could impact the ice core records, and the seasonal and spatial changes over Greenland are analyzed in detail. At the NEEM ice core location, a general warming tendency is accompanied by an increase of summer snowfall that contributes to a further increase of the precipitation

  4. On the glacial and interglacial thermohaline circulation and the associated transports of heat and freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarotta, M.; Falahat, S.; Brodeau, L.; Döös, K.

    2014-11-01

    The thermohaline circulation (THC) and the oceanic heat and freshwater transports are essential for understanding the global climate system. Streamfunctions are widely used in oceanography to represent the THC and estimate the transport of heat and freshwater. In the present study, the regional and global changes of the THC, the transports of heat and freshwater and the timescale of the circulation between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ≈ 21 kyr ago) and the present-day climate are explored using an Ocean General Circulation Model and streamfunctions projected in various coordinate systems. We found that the LGM tropical circulation is about 10% stronger than under modern conditions due to stronger wind stress. Consequently, the maximum tropical transport of heat is about 20% larger during the LGM. In the North Atlantic basin, the large sea-ice extent during the LGM constrains the Gulf Stream to propagate in a more zonal direction, reducing the transport of heat towards high latitudes by almost 50% and reorganising the freshwater transport. The strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation depends strongly on the coordinate system. It varies between 9 and 16 Sv during the LGM, and between 12 to 19 Sv for the present day. Similar to paleo-proxy reconstructions, a large intrusion of saline Antarctic Bottom Water takes place into the Northern Hemisphere basins and squeezes most of the Conveyor Belt circulation into a shallower part of the ocean. These different haline regimes between the glacial and interglacial period are illustrated by the streamfunctions in latitude-salinity coordinates and thermohaline coordinates. From these diagnostics, we found that the LGM Conveyor Belt circulation is driven by an enhanced salinity contrast between the Atlantic and the Pacific basin. The LGM abyssal circulation lifts and makes the Conveyor Belt cell deviate from the abyssal region, resulting in a ventilated upper layer above a deep stagnant layer, and an

  5. Are Physical Properties Able to Differentiate Glacial and Interglacial Coral Identity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lado-Insua, T.; Moran, K.; Anderson, L.; Webster, J. M.; Morgan, S.; Fehr, A.; Lofi, J.; Lukies, V.; Loggia, D.; Iodp Expedition 325 Scientists

    2010-12-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 325 to the Great Barrier Reef provides new information on past sea-level changes and better understanding of mechanisms driving glacial-interglacial cycles. Coral samples recovered during this expedition provide a deeper understanding of coral reef responses to environmental stresses. Inter- and intra-specific differences, growth rates, coral health, symbiotic algae and environmental conditions are all potential causes of differences in the density of coral skeletons and their distribution. Past changes in sea level and temperature can be related not only to isotope ratios but also to the presence of different communities of corals. Density changes in the coral composition can be detected using physical properties such as an increase in the calcium carbonate of a sample. De’ath et al. (2009) reported severe and sudden recent declines in calcification in Porites spp. corals in the Great Barrier Reef in the present that have not been observed over at least the last 400 years, and they attributed the decrease in calcification to changes in sea level, sea surface temperature (SST) and saturation of aragonite in the water column, all of which can limit the capacity of the corals to precipitate calcium carbonate. Variation in Sr/Ca can be related to SST, but different strains of symbiotic algae in the corals’ tissues can also be an important factor affecting skeletal Sr/Ca ratios. Such changes have never been tracked during previous glaciations, but the samples from Expedition 325 give the opportunity to explore their values during and since the last glacial maximum. Physical properties such as gamma ray density, electrical resistivity, and acoustic p-wave velocity can be related to characteristics of the marine sediments that, in turn, are indicative of the depositional environments. We performed a multivariate analysis that relates physical characteristics measured with a multi-sensor core logger (MSCL) and downhole

  6. Debris flow grain size scales with sea surface temperature over glacial-interglacial timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda Boluda, Duna C.; Whittaker, Alexander C.; Araújo, João Paulo C.

    2015-04-01

    Debris flows are common erosional processes responsible for a large volume of sediment transfer across a range of landscapes from arid settings to the tropics. They are also significant natural hazards in populated areas. However, we lack a clear set of debris flow transport laws, meaning that: (i) debris flows remain largely neglected by landscape evolution models; (ii) we do not understand the sensitivity of debris flow systems to past or future climate changes; and (iii) it remains unclear how to interpret debris flow stratigraphy and sedimentology, for example whether their deposits record information about past tectonics or palaeoclimate. Here, we take a grain size approach to characterising debris flow deposits from 35 well-dated alluvial fan surfaces in Owens Valley, California. We show that the average grain sizes of these granitic debris flow sediments precisely scales with sea surface temperature throughout the entire last glacial-interglacial cycle, increasing by ~ 7 % per 1 ° C of climate warming. We compare these data with similar debris flow systems in the Mediterranean (southern Italy) and the tropics (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), and find equivalent signals over a total temperature range of ~ 14 ° C. In each area, debris flows are largely governed by rainfall intensity during triggering storms, which is known to increase exponentially with temperature. Therefore, we suggest that these debris flow systems are transporting predictably coarser-grained sediment in warmer, stormier conditions. This implies that debris flow sedimentology is governed by discharge thresholds and may be a sensitive proxy for past changes in rainfall intensity. Our findings show that debris flows are sensitive to climate changes over short timescales (≤ 104 years) and therefore highlight the importance of integrating hillslope processes into landscape evolution models, as well as providing new observational constraints to guide this. Finally, we comment on what grain size

  7. Initiation age and incision rates of inner gorges: Do they record multiple glacial-interglacial cycles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delunel, Romain; Casagrande, Jan; Schlunegger, Fritz; Akçar, Naki; Kubik, Peter W.

    2015-04-01

    Inner gorges represent some of the most conspicuous landforms in the European Alps. They form narrow and deep active-channel incisions that link hanging tributaries with trunk valleys in glacially-conditioned environments. Despite abundant research carried out on these objects, both their origin and evolution have remained unclear. In particular, the age of initiation, the rate of incision, and the respective contribution of fluvial and subglacial processes in the evolution of inner gorges have still been a matter of scientific debate. Indeed, answering these questions has been complicated by the lack of appropriate quantitative methods and/or suitable sampling strategies for studying inner gorges. Here, we report 10Be concentrations measured in alluvial sediments that have been collected along the main stream of a ~20-km2-catchment in the Swiss foreland (Central European Alps). This catchment hosts a ca. 100-m-deep and 2-km-long inner gorge that has been cut mainly in glacial till. Catchment wide denudation rates inferred from 10Be analyses (n = 15) vary from ~120 to 650 mm/ka and show a general downstream increasing trend. Additional field observations and GIS analyses reveal that the denudation rates within the catchment increase from the headwaters, characterized by relict glacial/periglacial landscapes, to the downstream end of the basin where the inner gorge has been formed. Using a 10Be-based sediment budget approach and the delineation of topographic domains from a 2-m-resolution LIDAR, we provide an estimate of erosion rates within the gorge that are higher than 2.5 m/ka and can reach up to ~ 7 m/ka. Combining these estimated erosion rates with the reconstruction of eroded volumes within the gorge, we obtain a rough initiation age in the early Holocene, in general agreement with previous studies reporting a postglacial origin for the inner gorges. Our results therefore appear contradictory with recent findings arguing for a gradual formation of inner

  8. Fire in Ice: Glacial-Interglacial biomass burning in the NEEM ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zennaro, Piero; Kehrwald, Natalie; Zangrando, Roberta; Gambaro, Andrea; Barbante, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Earth is an intrinsically flammable planet. Fire is a key Earth system process with a crucial role in biogeochemical cycles, affecting carbon cycle mechanisms, land-surface properties, atmospheric chemistry, aerosols and human activities. However, human activities may have also altered biomass burning for thousands of years, thus influencing the climate system. We analyse the specific marker levoglucosan to reconstruct past fire events in ice cores. Levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-D-glucopyranose) is an organic compound that can be only released during the pyrolysis of cellulose at temperatures > 300°C. Levoglucosan is a major fire product in the fine fraction of woody vegetation combustion, can be transported over regional to global distances, and is deposited on the Greenland ice sheet. The NEEM, Greenland ice core (77 27'N, 51 3'W, 2454 masl) documents past fire activity changes from the present back to the penultimate interglacial, the Eemian. Here we present a fire activity reconstruction from both North American and Eurasian sources over the last 120,000 yrs based on levoglucosan signatures in the NEEM ice core. Biomass burning significantly increased over the boreal Northern Hemisphere since the last glacial, resulting in a maximum between 1.5 and 3.5 kyr BP yet decreasing from ~2 kyr BP until the present. Major climate parameters alone cannot explain the observed trend and thus it is not possible to rule out the hypothesis of early anthropogenic influences on fire activity. Over millennial timescales, temperature influences Arctic ice sheet extension and vegetation distribution at Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and may have altered the distance between NEEM and available fuel loads. During the last Glacial, the combination of dry and cold climate conditions, together with low boreal insolation and decreased atmospheric carbon dioxide levels may have also limited the production of available biomass. Diminished boreal forest extension and the southward

  9. Last glacial-interglacial environments in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA and implications for Younger Dryas-age human occupation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briles, Christy E.; Whitlock, Cathy; Meltzer, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The last glacial-interglacial transition (LGIT; 19-9 ka) was characterized by rapid climate changes and significant ecosystem reorganizations worldwide. In western Colorado, one of the coldest locations in the continental US today, mountain environments during the late-glacial period are poorly known. Yet, archaeological evidence from the Mountaineer site (2625 m elev.) indicates that Folsom-age Paleoindians were over-wintering in the Gunnison Basin during the Younger Dryas Chronozone (YDC; 12.9-11.7 ka). To determine the vegetation and fire history during the LGIT, and possible explanations for occupation during a period thought to be harsher than today, a 17-ka-old sediment core from Lily Pond (3208 m elev.) was analyzed for pollen and charcoal and compared with other high-resolution records from the southern Rocky Mountains. Widespread tundra and Picea parkland and low fire activity in the cold wet late-glacial period transitioned to open subalpine forest and increased fire activity in the Bølling-Allerød period as conditions became warmer and drier. During the YDC, greater winter snowpack than today and prolonged wet springs likely expanded subalpine forest to lower elevations than today, providing construction material and fuel for the early inhabitants. In the early to middle Holocene, arid conditions resulted in xerophytic vegetation and frequent fire.

  10. Critical evaluation of climate syntheses to benchmark CMIP6/PMIP4 127 ka Last Interglacial simulations in the high-latitude regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capron, E.; Govin, A.; Feng, R.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.; Wolff, E. W.

    2017-07-01

    The Last Interglacial (LIG, ∼129-116 thousand years ago, ka) represents an excellent case study to investigate the response of sensitive components of the Earth System and mechanisms of high-latitude amplification to a climate warmer than present-day. The Paleoclimate Model Intercomparison Project (Phase 4, hereafter referred as PMIP4) and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (Phase 6, hereafter referred as CMIP6) are coordinating the design of (1) a LIG Tier 1 equilibrium simulation to simulate the climate response at 127 ka, a time interval associated with a strong orbital forcing and greenhouse gas concentrations close to preindustrial levels and (2) associated Tier 2 sensitivity experiments to examine the role of the ocean, vegetation and dust feedbacks in modulating the response to this orbital forcing. Evaluating the capability of the CMIP6/PMIP4 models to reproduce the 127 ka polar and sub-polar climate will require appropriate data-based benchmarks which are currently missing. Based on a recent data synthesis that offers the first spatio-temporal representation of high-latitude (i.e. poleward of 40°N and 40°S) surface temperature evolution during the LIG, we produce a new 126-128 ka time slab, hereafter named 127 ka time slice. This 127 ka time slice represents surface temperature anomalies relative to preindustrial and is associated with quantitative estimates of the uncertainties related to relative dating and surface temperature reconstruction methods. It illustrates warmer-than-preindustrial conditions in the high-latitude regions of both hemispheres. In particular, summer sea surface temperatures (SST) in the North Atlantic region were on average 1.1 °C (with a standard error of the mean of 0.7 °C) warmer relative to preindustrial and 1.8 °C (with a standard error of the mean of 0.8 °C) in the Southern Ocean. In Antarctica, average 127 ka annual surface air temperature was 2.2 °C (with a standard error of the mean of 1.4 °C) warmer

  11. Possible Evidence of Multiple Sea Level Oscillations in the Seychelles During the Last Interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, A. L.; Vyverberg, K.; Webster, J.; Dechnik, B.; Zwartz, D.; Lambeck, K.

    2013-12-01

    In search of a eustatic sea level signal on glacial-interglacial timescales, the Seychelles ranks as one of the best places on the planet to study. Owing to its far-field location with respect to the former margins of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, glacio-hydro-isostatic models predict that relative sea level in the Seychelles should lie within a few meters of the globally averaged eustatic signal during interglacial periods. We have surveyed and dated fossil coral reefs from the last interglacial period to determine the magnitude of peak sea level and to assess sedimentologic evidence of potential sea level oscillations. Numerous outcrops we studied in detail exhibit a stratigraphic sequence comprised of in situ coralgal framework at the base, capped by thick coralline algae crusts, and overlain by coral rubble deposits. We also observed a succession of three stacked coralgal reefs within a single outcrop, separated by hardgrounds that have been bored by molluscs. In general, the succession within each reef unit consists of interlayered corals and crusts of coralline algae-vermetid gastropods-encrusting foraminifera. The lower two reef units are capped by a well-cemented 5 to 10 cm thick carbonate mud layer that is heavily bored by molluscs. These two surfaces may represent exposure surfaces during brief sea level oscillations, where sea level fell and exposed the top of the reef sequence, which was subsequently bored when sea level rose again and reef growth resumed. The elevations of the corals in each reef unit provide minimum elevations of sea level during each of the three pulses of sea level highstands during the last interglacial period. Significantly, since many of these corals are capped by thick coralline algae layers that contain vermetid gastropods and encrusting foraminifera that are indicative of the intertidal zone, there is strong evidence that these corals grew in extremely shallow water, providing a robust indication of sea level position. These

  12. Short-term climate changes in the Holsteinian Interglacial - EGU2012-132

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitychoruk, J.; Bińka, K.; Ruppert, H.; Tudryn, A.

    2012-04-01

    Oxygen and carbon stable isotopes from fossil lake sediments of the Holsteinian age (eastern Poland) give evidence for the abrupt climate shifts in this interglacial that coincide with the changes in vegetation inferred from palaeobotanical data. Especially changes of the stable isotope ratios as well as decrease in the carbonate content in the deposits and increase in silicate redeposited from the area around the lake are synchronous with the short-term climatic deteriorations within the interglacial pollen flora. Two distinct climate shifts are recorded in the Holsteinian. The first one is marked by the very characteristic pine-birch cold phase after the yew (Taxus) domination that is reported from numerous pollen diagrams from Central Europe. This distinct cooling resembles a phenomenon known as 8.2 ka event in the Holocene, when waters of the Agassiz Lake in North America drained into the Atlantic Ocean (Koutsodendris et al. 2010). Enormous volumes of freshwater from melting of the Laurentian ice-sheet caused disturbances in the Gulf Stream and as a result some decrease in regional temperatures. The second distinct cooling of a lower rank took place within the younger part of the climatic optimum of the Holsteinian. It is relatively less known, because most often pollen records lack sufficient temporal resolution needed to identify this event. A well documented cooling in the Holsteinian deposits from Dethlingen, northern Germany (Koutsodendris et al. 2010) and from the Ossówka, eastern Poland (Nitychoruk et al. 2005) are exceptional. In the sequence from Dethlingen, a distinct increase in the percentage of pioneer trees is accompanied by a lower content of temperate taxa. At Ossówka, the shift of climate is noted as the rise of ratio of oxygen and carbon isotopes. According to Nitychoruk (2000) the cold event is coincident with volcanic eruptions evidenced by volcanic ash found in the lake deposits at that time. Literature Koutsodendris, A., Müller, U

  13. Similarities and dissimilarities between the last two deglaciations and interglaciations in the North Atlantic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martrat, Belen; Jimenez-Amat, Patricia; Zahn, Rainer; Grimalt, Joan O.

    2014-09-01

    Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) recorded by alkenones and oxygen isotopes in the Alboran basin are used here to describe, at an unprecedented fine temporal resolution, the present interglaciation (PIG, initiated at 11.7 ka BP), the last interglaciation (LIG, onset approximately at 129 ka) and respective deglaciations. Similarities and dissimilarities in the progression of these periods are reviewed in comparison with ice cores and stalagmites. Cold spells coeval with the Heinrich events (H) described in the North Atlantic include multi-decadal scale oscillations not previously obvious (up to 4 °C in less than eight centuries within the stadials associated with H1 and H11, ca 133 ka and 17 ka respectively). These abrupt oscillations precede the accumulation of organic rich layers deposited when perihelion moves from alignment with NH spring equinox to the summer solstice, a reference for deglaciations. Events observed during the last deglaciation at 17 ka, 14.8 ka and 11.7 ka are reminiscent of events occurred during the penultimate deglaciation at ca 136 ka, 132 ka and 129 ka, respectively. The SST trend during the PIG is no more than 2 °C (from 20 °C to 18 °C; up to -0.2 °C/ka). The trend is steeper during the LIG, i.e. up to a 5 °C change from the early interglaciation to immediately before the glacial inception (from 23 °C to 18 °C; up to -0.4 °C/ka). Events are superimposed upon a long term trend towards colder SSTs, beginning with SST maxima followed by temperate periods until perihelion aligned with the NH autumn equinox (before ca 5.3 ka for the PIG and 121 ka for the LIG). A cold spell of around eight centuries at 2.8 ka during the PIG was possibly mimicked during the LIG at ca 118 ka by a SST fall of around 1 °C in a millennium. These events led interglacial SST to stabilise at around 18 °C. The glacial inception, barely evident at the beginning ca 115 ka (North Atlantic event C25, after perihelion passage in the NH winter solstice), culminated

  14. Patterns of glacial-interglacial vegetation and climate variability in eastern South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Lydie; Caley, Thibaut; Malaizé, Bruno; Giraudeau, Jacques

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation is an integrated part of the earth system and our understanding needs records of its glacial-interglacial variability. Although the data coverage for South Africa is slightly better than for some other parts of Africa, there are only very few records that allow us a glimpse of the vegetation history and development through one or more late Quaternary climate cycles. The existing evidence is fragmentary and in some cases contradictory. Marine sediments can offer here continuous sequences that cover large periods of time and provide a record of a signal that integrates rather large continental regions. Core MD96-2048 has been cored off the Limpopo River mouth at 26°10'S 34°01'E in 660 m water depth. This area is under the double influence of continental discharge and Agulhas current water advection. The sedimentation is slow and continuous. The upper 5 meter (down till 250 ka) have been analysed for pollen and spores at millennial resolution. The terrestrial pollen assemblages indicate that during interglacials the vegetation of eastern South Africa and southern Mozambique largely consisted of evergreen and deciduous forests with an increase of dry deciduous forest and open woodland during interglacial optima. During glacials open mountainous shrubland extended. The pattern strongly suggests a shifting of altitudinal vegetation belts in the mountains primarily depending on temperature, although the decline of forested areas during glacial times might also be the effect of low atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. This pattern in eastern South Africa differs from that suggested for western South Africa, where extension of the winter rain climate seems likely, and corroborates findings of increased C4 vegetation during the Glacial of eastern South Africa. The spread of dry deciduous forest and open woodland suggests a hot and dry climate during interglacial optima. The vegetation and climate of eastern South Africa seems to follow a mid to high

  15. Accumulation of heavy metals in soils and plants of Polar Urals and South Chukotka in contrast geochemical conditions in connection with the search for hyperaccumulator species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeeva-Popova, Natalja Vadimovna; Bech, Jaume; Drozdova, Irina Valeryevna; Roca, Núria

    2017-04-01

    This study highlights the heavy metals (HM) distribution in soils and their uptake by wild plants that grow to the soils formed on the ultramafic and acid rocks of Polar Urals and South Chukotka in Arctic Russia. The contents of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr, and Co have been determined by the atomic absorption spectrometry more than in 100 plant species of 25 families and in 92 soil samples. The data indicate that the levels of Fe, Cr and especially Ni in the soils on the ultramafic rocks exceeded those on acid rocks. It has been found that the mineral composition of plant species varies depending on edaphic conditions. Greater variability was noticed in the uptake of HM by various plant species on the studied soils. Taxon-specific features in the accumulation of heavy metals in plants of these regions have been revealed for the first time. Plants accumulation results showed that species Thlaspi cochleariforme and Alyssum obovatum (Brassicaceae) could act as hyperaccumulators Ni. The excessive concentrations of Cr and Ni in some plants species can be used for mineral prospecting. The excess of Ni is serious environmental problem and health risks in the inhabitants of the study areas.

  16. Modeling of Two-Plasmon-Decay Experiments at Polar-Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Plasma Conditions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, A. A.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Myatt, J. F.; Epstein, R.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shaw, J. G.; Hohenberger, M.; Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Turnbull, D. P.

    2015-11-01

    The two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability can be detrimental for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion because of target preheat by high-energy electrons generated by TPD. The radiation-hydrodynamic code DRACO has been used to design planar target experiments that generate plasma and interaction conditions relevant to ignition polar-direct-drive (PDD) designs. The use of planar targets allows TPD to be decoupled from cross-beam energy transfer, which reduces the laser absorption in current National Ignition Facility (NIF) PDD implosion experiments. The laser-plasma interaction code LPSE has been used to investigate TPD using the predicted plasma profiles and laser irradiation geometry in three dimensions. The energetic electrons generated by LPSE are propagated into the planar target using the Monte Carlo transport code EGSnrc. This enables a direct comparison between the simulated and experimentally observed Mo Kα fluorescence and hard x-ray bremsstrahlung. The plasma profiles have been post-processed for stimulated Raman and Brillouin backscatter gains. Comparisons of these results with recent experiments at the NIF and the implications for ignition-scale PDD experiments will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. Chemotaxis without Conventional Two-Component System, Based on Cell Polarity and Aerobic Conditions in Helicity-Switching Swimming of Spiroplasma eriocheiris

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Zheng, Huajun; Meng, Qingguo; Terahara, Natsuho; Gu, Wei; Wang, Shengyue; Zhao, Guoping; Nakane, Daisuke; Wang, Wen; Miyata, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Spiroplasma eriocheiris is a pathogen that causes mass mortality in Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis. S. eriocheiris causes tremor disease and infects almost all of the artificial breeding crustaceans, resulting in disastrous effects on the aquaculture economy in China. S. eriocheiris is a wall-less helical bacterium, measuring 2.0 to 10.0 μm long, and can swim up to 5 μm per second in a viscous medium without flagella by switching the cell helicity at a kink traveling from the front to the tail. In this study, we showed that S. eriocheiris performs chemotaxis without the conventional two-component system, a system commonly found in bacterial chemotaxis. The chemotaxis of S. eriocheiris was observed more clearly when the cells were cultivated under anaerobic conditions. The cells were polarized as evidenced by a tip structure, swimming in the direction of the tip, and were shown to reverse their swimming direction in response to attractants. Triton X-100 treatment revealed the internal structure, a dumbbell-shaped core in the tip that is connected by a flat ribbon, which traces the shortest line in the helical cell shape from the tip to the other pole. Sixteen proteins were identified as the components of the internal structure by mass spectrometry, including Fibril protein and four types of MreB proteins. PMID:28217108

  18. Depth-resolved simplified characterization of collagen depletion in dermis with polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography applicable to non-laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tougbaev, Vitali; Eom, Tae Joong; Shin, Woojin; Lee, Yeung Lak; Yu, Bong-Ahn; Kee, Chul-Sik; Ko, Do-Kyeong; Lee, Jongmin

    2007-07-01

    A further insight into the prior concept of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography system intended for non-laboratory conditions is brought forward and an experimental proof-of-concept is presented. A phenomenological model is adopted from the theory of light depolarization in crystalline polymers and modified to yield a simplified algorithm for mapping depolarization ratio in dermis. The algorithm could distinguish between dermal layers with depleted collagen content and normal dermis of normal perilesional skin. Dermis is simulated by bireringent lamellae of collagen arranged chaotically in multiple layers parallel to the skin surface. Both the design concept and the model imply the sub-millimeter tumor thickness as a proofed prognostic factor and an important criterion for complementary functional diagnostics of skin cancers at their early phase of vertical growth. Choice of the model is inspired by similarity of structural and optical properties between liquid-crystal collagen fibers in dermis and birefringent crystalline lamellae in polymer materials. The numerical computation based on the model allowing for real characteristics of dermis gives plausible interpreting of depolarization peculiarities caused by collagen depletion. Feasibility is discussed of exploiting fiber optic analogs of achromatic retarders. Fabrication of the fiber retarders is shown to be realistic by making use of the photonics technology possessed by the authors.

  19. Conditions for efficient and stable ion acceleration by moderate circularly polarized laser pulses at intensities of 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Dromey, B.; Kar, S.; Geissler, M.; Gibbon, P.; Schreiber, J.

    2011-04-15

    Conditions for efficient and stable ion radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) from thin foils by circularly polarized laser pulses at moderate intensities are theoretically and numerically investigated. It is found that the unavoidable decompression of the co-moving electron layer in Light-Sail RPA leads to a change of the local electrostatic field from a ''bunching'' to a ''debunching'' profile, ultimately resulting in premature termination of ion acceleration. One way to overcome this instability is the use of a multispecies foil where the high-Z ions act as a sacrificial species to supply excess co-moving electrons for preserving stable acceleration of the lower-Z ion species. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that 100 MeV/u monoenergetic C{sup 6+} ion beams are produced by irradiation of a Cu-C-mixed foil with laser pulses at intensities 5 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}, which can be easily achieved by current day lasers.

  20. The Response of Northern Hemisphere Extratropical Climate and Vegetation to Orbitally Induced Changes in Insolation during the Last Interglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Sandy P.; Kutzbach, John E.; Prentice, I. Colin; Behling, Pat J.; Sykes, Martin T.

    1995-03-01

    The last interglaciation (substage 5e) provides an opportunity to examine the effects of extreme orbital changes on regional climates. We have made two atmospheric general circulation model experiments: P+T+ approximated the northern hemisphere seasonality maximum near the beginning of 5e; P-T- approximated the minimum near the end of 5e. Simulated regional climate changes have been translated into biome changes using a physiologically based model of global vegetation types. Major climatic and vegetational changes were simulated for the northern hemisphere extratropics, due to radiational effects that were both amplified and modified by atmospheric circulation changes and sea-ice feedback. P+T+ showed mid-continental summers up to 8°C warmer than present. Mid-latitude winters were 2-4°C cooler than present but in the Arctic, summer warmth reduced sea-ice extent and thickness, producing winters 2-8°C warmer than present. The tundra and taiga biomes were displaced poleward, while warm-summer steppes expanded in the mid latitudes due to drought. P-T- showed summers up to 5°C cooler than present, especially in mid latitudes. Sea ice and snowpack were thicker and lasted longer; polar desert, tundra, and taiga biomes were displaced equatorward, while cool-summer steppes and semideserts expanded due to the cooling. A slight winter warming in mid latitudes, however, caused warm-temperate evergreen forests and scrub to expand poleward. Such qualitative contrasts in the direction of climate and vegetation change during 5e should be identifiable in the paleorecord.

  1. The Last Interglacial and Holocene in SW Turkey: Evidence from Calcite-Aragonite Speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickens, L.; Rowe, P.; Marca, A.; Noble, S. R.; Millar, I. L.; Chilvers, G.; Dennis, P.; Leze, B.; Özkul, M.; Baykara, O.; Andrews, J.

    2011-12-01

    Speleothems may incorporate several geochemical climatic and environmental proxies, and can be precisely and accurately dated, making them valuable tools for palaeoclimate reconstruction. We analysed a speleothem from Dim Cave, ~130km east of Antalya in the Middle Taurus Mountains, close to the Mediterranean coast of Southwest Turkey. Today, speleothems in the cave are forming of aragonite rather than calcite. DIM-1 is a toppled stalagmite collected 150m from the cave entrance, which grew at the beginning of MIS 5e. After the stalagmite fell, growth resumed in the Holocene on the side of DIM-1 as a small "hump", identified here as DIM-3. Multi-proxy analyses of DIM-1 and DIM-3 enable interpretation of climatic conditions in the Bay of Antalya during early MIS 5e and the Holocene. DIM-1 began forming at ~130 kyr BP, and grew very rapidly. From ~130 kyr BP to ~128 kyr BP, DIM-1 grew as calcite, and δ18O and δ13C show small-scale variability. At 128.6 kyr BP, growth rate increases, both δ18O and δ13C show strong excursions to more negative values, and 87Sr/86Sr becomes less radiogenic. This period is interpreted as the warm, wet interval associated with the Eemian interglacial, which correlates well with similar trends in the Soreq Cave [1] and Antro del Corchia [2] records. At ~128 kyr BP, both δ18O and δ13C show abrupt and pronounced increases (~2% and ~9% respectively), Sr concentration increases, 87Sr/86Sr becomes more radiogenic, and mineralogy switches from calcite to aragonite, before growth ceases and a hiatus occurs. This period is interpreted as an abrupt and brief arid phase lasting a few decades or centuries. A possible analogous arid event exists in a speleothem record from SW France, at 128.2-127.9 kyr BP [3]. After the hiatus, growth continues as calcite, with more negative δ18O and δ13C, signalling the return to wet conditions. DIM-3 is aragonite throughout, and grew from ~8-7 kyr BP at a much slower rate than DIM-1, and with average δ18O and

  2. A very simple criterion for the orbital-scale occurrence of interglacials and glacial inceptions over the last 800 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Takahito; Crucifix, Michel; Wolff, Eric; Tzedakis, Chronis

    2017-04-01

    Past Interglacials Working Group of PAGES (2016) identifies eleven interglacials during the last 800 kyr based on a sea level definition: Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 1, 5e, 7a-7c (as a single interglacial), 7e, 9e, 11c, 13a, 15a, 15e, 17c, and 19c. An important aspect of this definition is the occurrence of more than one interglacial within an MIS. Recently, the authors of this study proposed a simple rule to determine which insolation cycles lead to interglacials (Tzedakis et al. in press). During the last 800 kyr, interglacial onsets occur when a peak of caloric summer half-year insolation at 65oN exceeds a certain threshold which decreases with time. On the other hand, Ganopolski et al. (2016) proposed a criterion to diagnose the glacial inceptions over the last 800 kyr. Based on the experiments with CLIMBER-2, they derived a critical insolation-CO2 relation curve, below which a glacial inception occurs. It is consistent with all the glacial inceptions happened, but incompatible with the lack of glacial inception near the insolation minimum at 209 kyr BP (MIS 7b). While the summer solstice (or mid-June) mean daily insolation at 65oN has about 20 % of variance in obliquity band, the caloric summer half-year insolation at at 65oN has about 50 % of variance in the obliquity band. In this study, we show that the critical insolation-CO2 relation in terms of caloric summer-half year insolation successfully diagnoses all the glacial inceptions over the last 800 kyr and its lack near MIS 7b. This is due to the fact that, near MIS 7b, the effect of precession maximum (boreal summer solstice at aphelion) is counteracted by the effect of average-above obliquity more strongly in the caloric summer insolation than in the summer solstice insolation. Unifying those two theories with the single caloric summer insolation metric, we present a particularly simple criterion for the orbital-scale occurrence of interglacials and glacial inceptions over the last 800 kyr. We also

  3. Extending the record of lacustrine phases beyond the last interglacial for Lake Eyre in central Australia using luminescence dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiao; Cohen, Tim J.; Arnold, Lee J.

    2017-04-01

    peak interglacial conditions, are actually associated with both warm interglacial and cold glacial periods, with all the wettest episodes generally coinciding with the intervening periods between the glacial and interglacial maximums. We assume from these results that orbital forcing is not a first order control for the long-term dynamics of the Lake Eyre basin and the Indo-Australian monsoon. The high lake-level events of Lake Eyre are well correlated with millennial-scale cooling events and stadials of the North Atlantic, and coincide with weakened episodes/events for the East Asia summer monsoon. This may imply an important role for the northern high latitudes in influencing the Indo-Australian monsoon, which may be associated with a southward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) during cooling periods in the North Atlantic.

  4. Superstorms at the end of the Last Interglacial (MIS 5e)? Modeling paleo waves and the transport of giant boulders.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovere, Alessio; Harris, Daniel; Casella, Elisa; Lorscheid, Thomas; Stocchi, Paolo; Nandasena, Napayalage; Sandstrom, Michael; D'Andrea, William; Dyer, Blake; Raymo, Maureen

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of high-resolution field surveys and wave models along the cliffs of the northern part of the Island of Eleuthera, Bahamas. Previous studies have proposed that cliff top mega-boulders were emplaced at the end of the Last Interglacial (MIS 5e, 128-116 ka) by giant swells caused by super-storms that find no counterpart in the Holocene (including historical times). Our results suggest that these boulders could have instead been transported from the cliff face to the top of the cliff by a storm analogous to the 1991 'Perfect Storm', if sea level during MIS 5e sea was more than 4 meters higher than today. We remark that the data-model approach used here is essential to interpreting the geologic evidence of extreme storms during past warm periods, which in turn, is an important tool for predicting the intensity of extreme storm events in future climates. Our results indicate that even without an increase in storm intensity, cliffs and hard coastal barriers might be subject to significant increases wave-generated stresses under conditions of sea levels modestly higher than present.

  5. Evidence of Dust Deposition in a Core from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific on Glacial-Interglacial Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwood, J. C.; Kienast, S. S.; Hill, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric dust is recognized to be an important feedback in marine biogeochemical cycles and global climate. This study examines the record of continental input to the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP), an iron-limited region, over the last 25 kyrs. We measured Thorium-232 (232Th), an isotope greatly enriched in upper continental crust compared to oceanic crust, in core TR163-19P (2.26°N, 90.95°W). We normalized 232Th concentrations to 230Th in order to quantify continental input, and complemented these data with measurements of disaggregated inorganic grain size (DIGS). An end-member mixing analysis of the grain size data was conducted to isolate dust from hemipelagic contributions to the overall inventory of continental material in the core. Our results reveal maximum continental input, dominated by dust, at the last glacial-interglacial transition (~13-16 ka). In addition, we find that overall continental input, based on 232Th fluxes, was higher during the last glacial period than in the Holocene, consistent with earlier findings from the central equatorial Pacific at ~140°W. Dust fluxes derived from grain size distributions, however, exhibit the opposite trend and are elevated in the Holocene compared to the glacial. Our findings emphasize the importance of grain size characterization to complement 232Th fluxes in regions where continental input may have multiple sources. Data will be discussed in the context of other biogeochemical proxies (SST, organic carbon, opal) and regional oceanographic conditions.

  6. The Last Interglacial-Glacial cycle (MIS 5-2) re-examined based on long proxy records from central and northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmens, Karin F.

    2014-02-01

    Current multi-proxy studies on a long sediment sequence preserved at Sokli (N Finland), i.e. in the central area of Fennoscandian glaciations, are drastically changing classic ideas of glaciations, vegetation and climate in northern Europe during the Late Pleistocene. The sediments in the Sokli basin have escaped major glacial erosion due to non-typical bedrock conditions. In this review, the Sokli record is compared in great detail with other long proxy records from central, temperate and northern, boreal Europe. These comprise the classic records of La Grande Pile (E France) and Oerel (N Germany) and more recently obtained records from Horoszki Duże (E Poland) and Lake Yamozero (NW Russia). The focus of the review is on pollen, lithology and macrofossil- and insect-based temperature inferences. The long records are further compared with recent proxy data from nearby terrestrial sites as well as with the rapidly accumulating high-resolution proxy data from the ocean realm. The comparison allows a re-examination of the environmental history and climate evolution of the Last Interglacial-Glacial (LI-G) cycle (MIS 5-2). It shows that environmental and climate conditions during MIS 5 (ca 130-70 ka BP) were distinctly different from those during MIS 4-2 (ca 70-15 ka BP). MIS 5 is characterized by three long forested intervals (broadly corresponding to MIS 5e, 5c, 5a), both in temperate and northern boreal Europe. These mild periods were interrupted by two short, relatively cold and dry intervals (MIS 5d and 5b) with mountain-centered glaciation in Fennoscandia. Millennial scale climate events were superimposed upon these longer lasting climate fluctuations. The time interval encompassing MIS 4-2 shows open vegetation. It is characterized by two glacial maxima (MIS 4 and 2) with sub-continental scale glaciation over northern Europe and dry conditions in strongly continental eastern European settings. High amplitude climate oscillations of millennial duration

  7. Expression of PIN and AUX1 genes encoding putative carrier proteins for auxin polar transport in etiolated pea epicotyls [correction of epicotyles] under simulated microgravity conditions on a three-dimensional clinostat.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Tomoki; Hitotsubashi, Reiko; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Tanimoto, Eiichi; Ueda, Junichi

    2003-10-01

    Etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat showed automorphosis-like growth and development similar to that observed in true microgravity conditions in space. Application of inhibitors of auxin polar transport phenocopied automorphosis-like growth on 1 g conditions, suggesting that automorophosis is closely related to auxin polar transport. Strenuous efforts to know the relationships between automorphosis and auxin polar transport in pea seedlings at molecular bases resulted in successful identification of PsPIN2 and PsAUX1 encoding putative auxin efflux and influx carrier protein, respectively. Significantly high levels in homology were found on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences among PsPIN2, PsPIN1 and AtPINs, and between PsAUX1 and AtAUX1. Expression of PsPIN1 and PsAUX1 genes in etiolated pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were substantially affected, but that of PsPIN2 was not. Roles of these genes in auxin polar transport and automorphosis of etiolated pea seedlings are also described.

  8. Impact of glacial/interglacial sea level change on the ocean nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Ren, Haojia; Sigman, Daniel M; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Anderson, Robert F; Chen, Min-Te; Ravelo, Ana Christina; Straub, Marietta; Wong, George T F; Haug, Gerald H

    2017-08-15

    The continental shelves are the most biologically dynamic regions of the ocean, and they are extensive worldwide, especially in the western North Pacific. Their area has varied dramatically over the glacial/interglacial cycles of the last million years, but the effects of this variation on ocean biological and chemical processes remain poorly understood. Conversion of nitrate to N2 by denitrification in sediments accounts for half or more of the removal of biologically available nitrogen ("fixed N") from the ocean. The emergence of continental shelves during ice ages and their flooding during interglacials have been hypothesized to drive changes in sedimentary denitrification. Denitrification leads to the occurrence of phosphorus-bearing, N-depleted surface waters, which encourages N2 fixation, the dominant N input to the ocean. An 860,000-y record of foraminifera shell-bound N isotopes from the South China Sea indicates that N2 fixation covaried with sea level. The N2 fixation changes are best explained as a response to changes in regional excess phosphorus supply due to sea level-driven variations in shallow sediment denitrification associated with the cyclic drowning and emergence of the continental shelves. This hypothesis is consistent with a glacial ocean that hosted globally lower rates of fixed N input and loss and a longer residence time for oceanic fixed N-a "sluggish" ocean N budget during ice ages. In addition, this work provides a clear sign of sea level-driven glacial/interglacial oscillations in biogeochemical fluxes at and near the ocean margins, with implications for coastal organisms and ecosystems.

  9. The Glacial-Interglacial Monsoon Recorded by Speleothems from Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, A. K.; Gagan, M. K.; Dunbar, G. B.; Krause, C.; Hantoro, W. S.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.; Shen, C. C.; Sun, H.; Cai, B.; Hellstrom, J. C.; Rifai, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Indo-Pacific Warm Pool is a primary source of heat and moisture to the global atmosphere and a key player in tropical and global climate variability. There is mounting evidence that atmospheric convection and oceanic processes in the tropics can modulate global climate on orbital and sub-orbital timescales. Glacial-interglacial cycles represent the largest natural climate changes over the last 800 kyr with each cycle terminated by rapid global warming and sea level rise. Our understanding of the role and response of tropical atmospheric convection during these periods of dramatic warming is limited. We present the first speleothem paleomonsoon record for southwest Sulawesi (5ºS, 119ºE), spanning two glacial-interglacial cycles, including glacial termination IV (~340 kyr BP) and both phases of termination III (~248 and ~220 kyr BP). This unique record is constructed from multiple stalagmites from two separate caves and is based on a multi-proxy approach (δ18O, δ13C, Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca) that provides insight into the mechanisms controlling Australian-Indonesian summer monsoon variability. Speleothem δ18O and trace element data indicate a rapid increase in rainfall at glacial terminations and wet interglacials. Terminations IV, III, and I are each characterized by an abrupt 3‰ decrease in δ18O. Variability in δ18O leading-in to glacial terminations is also similar, and corresponds to October insolation. Prior to deglaciation, there is a distinct shift to higher δ18O that is synchronized with weak monsoon intervals in Chinese speleothem records. The remarkably consistent pattern among terminations implies that the response of tropical convection to changing background climates is well regulated. Furthermore, we find that speleothem δ13C leads δ18O by ~5 kyr during glacial terminations. The early decrease in speleothem δ13C may reflect the response of tropical vegetation to rising atmospheric CO2 and temperature, rather than regional changes in rainfall.

  10. Impact of glacial/interglacial sea level change on the ocean nitrogen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haojia; Sigman, Daniel M.; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Anderson, Robert F.; Chen, Min-Te; Ravelo, Ana Christina; Straub, Marietta; Wong, George T. F.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2017-08-01

    The continental shelves are the most biologically dynamic regions of the ocean, and they are extensive worldwide, especially in the western North Pacific. Their area has varied dramatically over the glacial/interglacial cycles of the last million years, but the effects of this variation on ocean biological and chemical processes remain poorly understood. Conversion of nitrate to N2 by denitrification in sediments accounts for half or more of the removal of biologically available nitrogen (“fixed N”) from the ocean. The emergence of continental shelves during ice ages and their flooding during interglacials have been hypothesized to drive changes in sedimentary denitrification. Denitrification leads to the occurrence of phosphorus-bearing, N-depleted surface waters, which encourages N2 fixation, the dominant N input to the ocean. An 860,000-y record of foraminifera shell-bound N isotopes from the South China Sea indicates that N2 fixation covaried with sea level. The N2 fixation changes are best explained as a response to changes in regional excess phosphorus supply due to sea level-driven variations in shallow sediment denitrification associated with the cyclic drowning and emergence of the continental shelves. This hypothesis is consistent with a glacial ocean that hosted globally lower rates of fixed N input and loss and a longer residence time for oceanic fixed N—a “sluggish” ocean N budget during ice ages. In addition, this work provides a clear sign of sea level-driven glacial/interglacial oscillations in biogeochemical fluxes at and near the ocean margins, with implications for coastal organisms and ecosystems.

  11. Analyzing Glacial-Interglacial Ocean Biogeochemical States in the MPI-Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, M.; Ilyina, T.

    2015-12-01

    There is still little consensus about the mechanisms causing the glacial - interglacial variationsin atmospheric CO2 concentrations of around 100 ppm. Some of those mechanisms aredriven by alterations in ocean biogeochemical cycles. Hence, it is crucial to understand oceanbiogeochemistry dynamics during glacial-interglacial transitions. Within the German nationalclimate modeling initiative PalMod, aiming at simulating a full glacial cycle (135k - today) intransient mode with a state-of-the-art Earth System Model (ESM), we address the oceanbiogeochemistry cycles using a comprehensive modeling approach. In order to set up themodel we start with ocean only simulations, which are based on the 3-D ocean generalcirculation model MPIOM coupled to the ocean biogeochemistry model HAMOCC.Atmospheric forcing data is derived from a fully coupled LGM simulation including theatmosphere general circulation model ECHAM6. This setup provides us a sophisticatedrepresentation of the ocean biogeochemistry during the LGM without using any kind of datarestoring,to be consistent with the biological, chemical and physical dynamics of the model.We analyze alterations in ocean biogeochemistry during the LGM in comparison to a preindustrialcontrol climate. We discuss and quantify the changes in ocean biogeochemicalcycles between these two states, as well as possible implications for carbon transfer due tochanges in ocean dynamics. In the next steps we will use the ocean biogeochemistry model aspart of the fully coupled MPI-ESM. Our results aim at improving the understanding of glacial- interglacial changes in atmospheric CO2, especially in terms of marine carbon sequestrationand release. The presented work contributes to developing comprehensive ESMs, which arecapable of simulating the climate evolution and the variability during the last glacial cycle.

  12. Quantification of the Greenland ice sheet contribution to Last Interglacial sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, E. J.; Lunt, D. J.; Annan, J. D.; Hargreaves, J. C.

    2013-03-01

    During the Last Interglacial period (~ 130-115 thousand years ago) the Arctic climate was warmer than today, and global mean sea level was probably more than 6.6 m higher. However, there are large discrepancies in the estimated contributions to this sea level change from various sources (the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and smaller ice caps). Here, we determine probabilistically the likely contribution of Greenland ice sheet melt to Last Interglacial sea level rise, taking into account ice sheet model parametric uncertainty. We perform an ensemble of 500 Glimmer ice sheet model simulations forced with climatologies from the climate model HadCM3, and constrain the results with palaeodata from Greenland ice cores. Our results suggest a 90% probability that Greenland ice melt contributed at least 0.6 m, but less than 10% probability that it exceeded 3.5 m, a value which is lower than several recent estimates. Many of these previous estimates, however, did not include a full general circulation climate model that can capture atmospheric circulation and precipitation changes in response to changes in insolation forcing and orographic height. Our combined modelling and palaeodata approach suggests that the Greenland ice sheet is less sensitive to orbital forcing than previously thought, and it implicates Antarctic melt as providing a substantial contribution to Last Interglacial sea level rise. Future work should assess additional uncertainty due to inclusion of basal sliding and the direct effect of insolation on surface melt. In addition, the effect of uncertainty arising from climate model structural design should be taken into account by performing a multi-climate-model comparison.

  13. Implications of polar ocean surface stratification changes on a warming climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Henning; Kandiano, Evgenia; Thibodeau, Benoit; Pedersen, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    In the North Polar oceans surface properties have a significant influence on regional climate development. Stratification and salinity in this area are not just strongly coupled, they directly affect North Atlantic deepwater production and, thus, the ventilation of the deep sea and global ocean circulation. Besides a direct feedback on surface heat transfer to the Polar North, the response of upper stratification in a crucial region such as the Nordic Seas to near-future hydrologic forcing as surface water in the polar ocean warms and freshens due to global temperature rise and glacier demise, is still largely unresolved. We paired bulk sediment δ15N isotopic signatures with planktic foraminiferal assemblages across three major interglacials, each of which could be viewed as an analogue of the present. The isotope vs. foraminifer comparison defines stratification-induced variations in nitrate utilization between and within all of these warm periods and signifies changes in the thickness of the mixed-layer throughout the previous interglacials. As the thickness directly controls the depth-level of Atlantic water inflow, the changes recorded here suggest that drastic variations in freshwater water input associated with each preceding glacial terminations caused the Atlantic water to flow at greater depth. Backed up by independent salinity reconstructions using hydrogen isotope composition in alkenones, an active involvement of both glacial ice sheet size and subsequent specific melting history on interglacial climate development is suggested. Although the results also call for caution when using older interglacials as future climate analogues, they do help to better understand the effect of freshwater input on climate-sensitive ocean sites. It is further indicated that any future increase in freshwater flux into the polar oceans would not necessarily stop by itself the poleward advection of Atlantic water.

  14. The Mid-Holocene and Last Interglacial Experiments in PMIP4/CMIP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.; Braconnot, Pascale; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the forcings and feedbacks that produced interglacial warmth and the outcomes from it can help us better project the future climate of our planet. CMIP6 will include two interglacial experiments to explore the responses of the models to the forcing by orbital variations: the Mid-Holocene (MH 6000 years ago [6 ka]) and Last Interglacial (LIG 127,000 years ago [127 ka]). The dominant orbital forcing changes from modern modified the incoming solar insolation at the top of the atmosphere, resulting in large positive anomalies in summer in the Northern Hemisphere. Greenhouse gas concentrations were close to those of the pre-industrial. This pair of simulations will allow an assessment of the scaling and thresholds of the Earth system to the magnitude of the solar insolation changes (larger seasonal anomalies at 127 ka than 6 ka). High latitude feedbacks from sea-ice, water vapor and clouds will be a focus, and the implications for the stability of the Greenland and West Antarctic (WAIS) ice sheets. This output will be used by the ice sheet modeling community, with an intercomparison being coordinated as a joint activity of PMIP4 and ISMIP6 for CMIP6. As well, these experiments will explore the relative changes of the low-latitude hydrological cycle and monsoons. The MH and LIG are the most suitable of the warm interglacials for a CMIP6 assessment because of the wealth of data including: ice cores providing measurements of well-mixed greenhouse gases, aerosols including dust and sea salt, and stable water isotopes as a proxy for temperature, as well as for Greenland, ice sheet elevation and extent; marine records for ocean temperatures and geotracers that can be interpreted in terms of water masses and overturning strength; speleothems that provide indication of monsoon strength; fossil corals and sediments for interannual to multi-decadal variability; and terrestrial records that indicate temperature, vegetation, lake level, and hydroclimate changes. As

  15. Glacial-interglacial variations in coupled thermocline ventilation and sedimentary iron delivery to the Peru upwelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, F.; McManus, J.; Mix, A. C.; Hensen, C.; Schneider, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Primary productivity in the Humboldt Current system off Peru is limited by the supply of bioavailable iron (Fe) from reducing seafloor sediments. Previous studies have demonstrated that bottom water redox conditions exert first-order control on the Fe efflux from continental margin sediments. Fluctuations in thermocline ventilation therefore have the potential to modulate ocean fertility by altering the net efflux of Fe from the seafloor on a variety of timescales. We present a 140 ka record of high-resolution XRD core scanning, reactive Fe, redox sensitive trace metal and nitrogen isotope data for a sediment core from the present-day oxygen minimum zone off Peru. Coarser grain size as well as decreased δ15N values (≥3 ‰) and increased uranium to molybdenum ratios (≤1.6 μg g-1/μg g-1) indicate enhanced thermocline ventilation compared to the present-day (δ15 ≈ 6 ‰, U/Mo ≈ 0.2 μg g-1/μg g-1) during the LGM, MIS4, MIS5b, MIS5d and MIS6. Sediments that were deposited during these intervals are depleted in reactive Fe suggesting that the redox regime prevailing during cooler intervals fostered seafloor Fe release. The relative accumulation rate of uranium and molybdenum indicates that shifts in the Fe mobilization efficiency were related to a transition from sulfate- to Fe-reducing conditions in the sediment pore water. We suggest that lower concentrations of pore water sulfide close to the sediment surface facilitated dissolved Fe loss across the benthic boundary by decreasing Fe fixation as Fe sulfide. Our data suggest that a redox-shift toward more reducing conditions in oxygen minimum zones may not enhance but rather decrease the sedimentary Fe efflux. We will discuss implications of these findings for nitrate utilization and productivity in the ocean at glacial-interglacial transitions and in response to future de-oxygenation.

  16. POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC. In 2002, polarized proton beams were first accelerated to 100 GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. Optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limited conditions are reported.

  17. Polarization Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the polarization characteristics displayed by optical systems can be divided into two categories: geometrical and physical. Geometrical analysis calculates the change in polarization of a wavefront between pupils in an optical instrument. Physical analysis propagates the polarized fields wherever the geometrical analysis is not valid, i.e., near the edges of stops, near images, in anisotropic media, etc. Polarization aberration theory provides a starting point for geometrical design and facilitates subsequent optimization. The polarization aberrations described arise from differences in the transmitted (or reflected) amplitudes and phases at interfaces. The polarization aberration matrix (PAM) is calculated for isotropic rotationally symmetric systems through fourth order and includes the interface phase, amplitude, linear diattenuation, and linear retardance aberrations. The exponential form of Jones matrices used are discussed. The PAM in Jones matrix is introduced. The exact calculation of polarization aberrations through polarization ray tracing is described. The report is divided into three sections: I. Rotationally Symmetric Optical Systems; II. Tilted and Decentered Optical Systems; and Polarization Analysis of LIDARs.

  18. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; ,; Lentfer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  19. Stratigraphic Evidence of a Pre-Wisconsinan Interglaciation in the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Ernest H.; Sirkin, Les; Craft, Jesse L.

    1993-09-01

    Multiple tills separated by interbedded lake sediments were temporarily exposed during open-pit mining at Sanford Hill, near Newcomb, in the central Adirondack Mountains of northeastern New York. Radiocarbon ages of wood fragments from brown clay between two tills at that site indicate an age older than 55,000 yr B.P. A pollen profile in the brown pond clay (Tahawus clay) records a transition from initial domination by pine, spruce, and birch to an oak pollen zone. The upward disappearance of spruce and decrease of pine and birch are accompanied by diversification and increase in hardwood pollen. This assemblage includes several warm-climate hardwood species that are not represented in the postglacial flora of the region, suggesting that the biota existed during an interglacial or interstadial interval that was warmer and/or longer than postglacial time. Accordingly, the Tahawus clay is tentatively assigned to the Sangamon interglaciation, and probably to marine oxygen isotope substage 5e. Truncation of the Tahawus clay by glacial erosion may account for the absence of a Sangamon paleosol.

  20. Coastal deformation between the Versilia and the Garigliano plains (Italy) since the last interglacial stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisi, Marco F.; Antonioli, Fabrizio; Pra, Giuseppe Dai; Leoni, Gabriele; Silenzi, Sergio

    2003-12-01

    The opening of the north-central Tyrrhenian Sea is the result of the Cretaceous-Paleogene alpine collision, which triggered a series of regional uplift, subsidence and transcurrent tectonic mechanisms along the coastal Tyrrhenian sectors of peninsular Italy. These tectonic processes, in conjunction with the effects of glacio- and hydro-isostasy during the Quaternary, produced substantial crustal responses that, in some cases, reached metres in extent. In the study of coastal neotectonics, geomorphological markers of the last interglacial maximum, corresponding to marine isotope stage 5.5, are generally used to quantify the magnitude of the vertical crustal displacements that have occurred since 125 kyr. Through altimetrical, palaeoenvironmental and chronological reinterpretation of the most significant works published since 1913, combined with an additional set of data reported here, a detailed reconstruction of the shoreline displacements evident along 500 km of coast between northern Tuscany and southern Latium is presented. The reconstruction was carried out by quantifying the vertical movement since the last interglacial period and by identifying the tectonic behaviour of different coastal sectors. This has been done by carefully choosing the eustatic marker, among those available at each study site, in order to minimize the margin of error associated with the measurements. Copyright

  1. Increased aridity in southwestern Africa during the warmest periods of the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrego, D. H.; Sánchez Goñi, M. F.; Daniau, A.-L.; Lechevrel, S.; Hanquiez, V.

    2015-10-01

    Terrestrial and marine climatic tracers from marine core MD96-2098 were used to reconstruct glacial-interglacial climate variability in southwestern Africa between 194 and 24 thousand years before present. The pollen record documented three pronounced expansions of Nama-karoo and fine-leaved savanna during the last interglacial (Marine Isotopic Stage 5 - MIS 5). These Nama-karoo and fine-leaved savanna expansions were linked to increased aridity during the three warmest substadials of MIS 5. Enhanced aridity potentially resulted from a combination of reduced Benguela Upwelling, expanded subtropical high-pressure cells, and reduced austral-summer precipitation due to a northward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. Decreased austral-winter precipitation was likely linked to a southern displacement of the westerlies. In contrast, during glacial isotopic stages MIS 6, 4 and 3, fynbos expanded at the expense of Nama-karoo and fine-leaved savanna indicating a relative increase in precipitation probably concentrated during the austral winter months. Our record also suggested that warm-cold or cold-warm transitions between isotopic stages and substages were punctuated by short increases in humidity. Increased aridity during MIS 5e, 5c and 5a warm substages coincided with minima in both precessional index and global ice volume. On the other hand, austral-winter precipitation increases were associated with precession maxima at the time of well-developed Northern Hemisphere ice caps.

  2. Increased aridity in southwestern Africa during the warmest periods of the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrego, Dunia H.; Fernanda Sanchez Goni, Maria; Daniau, Anne-Laure

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial and marine climatic tracers from marine core MD96-2098 were used to reconstruct glacial-interglacial climate variability in southwestern Africa between 194 and 24 thousand years before present. The pollen record documented three pronounced expansions of Nama-karoo and fine-leaved savanna during the last interglacial (Marine Isotopic Stage 5 - MIS 5). These Nama-karoo and fine-leaved savanna expansions were linked to increased aridity during the three warmest substadials of MIS 5. Enhanced aridity potentially resulted from a combination of reduced Benguela Upwelling, expanded subtropical high-pressure cells, and reduced austral-summer precipitation due to a northward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. Decreased austral-winter precipitation was likely linked to a southern displacement of the westerlies. In contrast, during glacial isotopic stages MIS 6, 4 and 3, fynbos expanded at the expense of Nama-karoo and fine-leaved savanna, indicating a relative increase in precipitation probably concentrated during the austral winter months. Our record also suggested that warm-cold or cold-warm transitions between isotopic stages and substages were punctuated by short increases in humidity. Increased aridity during MIS 5e, 5c and 5a warm substages coincided with minima in both precessional index and global ice volume. On the other hand, austral-winter precipitation increases were associated with precession maxima at the time of well-developed Northern Hemisphere ice caps.

  3. Constraining snow accumulation rate in interglacials at EPICA Dome C using nitrate and chloride measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, E. W.; Bigler, M.; de Angelis, M.; Fischer, H.; Hansson, M.; Hutterli, M.; Rothlisberger, R.; Udisti, R.

    2009-04-01

    The EPICA ice core from Dome C extends 3259 m in depth, and encompasses 800 ka of datable and sequential ice. Numerous chemical species have been measured along the length of the cores, and their fluxes related to changes in source strength and transport of material. However, nitrate and chloride both exhibit strong depositional and post-depositional effects, and therefore exhibit profiles that are particularly difficult to interpret in terms of environmental variables. Using shallow parts of the core, it was previously deduced that nitrate shows high concentrations in glacial periods, when it is well-preserved due to the higher levels of dust present in the atmosphere and ice. In interglacials, when dust is low, nitrate concentrations seem to be strongly dependent on the snow accumulation rate, with better preservation at higher accumulation rates. The ratio of chloride to sodium in interglacials also showed an accumulation dependence. Here, we present full 800 ka low-resolution records of reversible species such as nitrate and chloride, and show that the same patterns of post-depositional loss and preservation are shown throughout the record. Because the snow accumulation model used in creating the EDC3 age scale depended only on a poorly constrained accumulation-isotope hypothesis, this finding allows us to explore whether the nitrate and chloride data can be used to confirm the choice of parameters, or even to tune the age scale in particular critical periods.

  4. Early human-plant interactions based on palaeovegetation simulations of Africa over glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowling, S. A.; Cox, P. M.; Jones, C. D.; Maslin, M. A.; Spall, S. A.

    2003-04-01

    A greater understanding of African palaeovegetation environments over the Pleistocene (1.6 Mya) is important for evaluating potential catalysts underlying the anatomical, social and demographic changes observed in early human populations. We used a state-of-the-art fully-coupled earth system model (HADLEY-GCM3) to simulate typical glacial and interglacial environments likely encountered by late-Pleistocene humans. Our simulations indicate that tropical broadleaf forests of central Africa were not severely restricted by expanding grasslands during the last glacial maximum, although the carbon content of stem and density of leaf components were substantially reduced. We interpret a natural eastern migration corridor between southern Africa and the Rift Valley based on simulations of a no-analogue vegetation assemblage characterised by a unique combination of grass and low density forest. We postulate that early human populations in southern Africa were isolated from northern groups during warm interglacials, and that trans-African migration was facilitated during glacial cycles via a more openly forested eastern corridor.

  5. Saharan dust deposition in the Carpathian Basin and its possible effects on interglacial soil formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, György; Cserháti, Csaba; Kovács, János; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    Several hundred tons of windblown dust material are lifted into the atmosphere and are transported every year from Saharan dust source areas towards Europe having an important climatic and other environmental effect also on distant areas. According to the systematic observations of modern Saharan dust events, it can be stated that dust deflated from North African source areas is a significant constituent of the atmosphere of the Carpathian Basin and Saharan dust deposition events are identifiable several times in a year. Dust episodes are connected to distinct meteorological situations, which are also the determining factors of the different kinds of depositional mechanisms. By using the adjusted values of dust deposition simulations of numerical models, the annual Saharan dust flux can be set into the range of 3.2-5.4 g/m2/y. Based on the results of past mass accumulation rates calculated from stratigraphic and sedimentary data of loess-paleosol sequences, the relative contribution of Saharan dust to interglacial paleosol material was quantified. According to these calculations, North African exotic dust material can represent 20-30% of clay and fine silt-sized soil components of interglacial paleosols in the Carpathian Basin. The syngenetic contribution of external aeolian dust material is capable to modify physicochemical properties of soils and hereby the paleoclimatic interpretation of these pedogene stratigraphic units.

  6. Reconstructing Variations of Global Sea-Surface Temperature during the Last Interglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, J. S.; Clark, P. U.; He, F.; Parnell, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The last interglaciation (LIG; ~130-116 ka) was the most recent period in Earth history with higher-than-present global sea level (≥6 m) under similar-to-preindustrial concentrations of atmospheric CO2, suggesting additional feedbacks related to albedo, insolation, and ocean circulation in generating the apparent climatic differences between the LIG and present Holocene. However, our understanding of how much warmer the LIG sea surface was relative to the present interglaciation remains uncertain, with current estimates suggesting from 0°C to 2°C warmer than late-20thcentury average global temperatures. Moreover, the timing, spatial expression, and amplitude of regional and global sea surface temperature variability related to other climate forcing during the LIG are poorly constrained, largely due to uncertainties in age control and proxy temperature reconstructions. An accurate characterization of global and regional temperature change during the LIG can serve as a benchmark for paleoclimate modeling intercomparison projects and help improve understanding of sea-level sensitivity to temperature change. We will present a global compilation (~100 published records) of sea surface temperature (SST) and other climate reconstructions spanning the LIG. Using a Monte Carlo-enabled cross-correlation maximization algorithm to climatostratigraphically align proxy records and then account for both the resulting chronologic and proxy calibration uncertainties with Bayesian statistical inference, our results quantify the spatial timing, amplitude, and uncertainty in estimates of global and regional sea surface temperature change during the LIG and its relation to potential forcings.

  7. Response of the Indian Creek alluvial fan, Nevada, to glacial-interglacial climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda-Boluda, Duna; Whittaker, Alexander; Brooke, Sam

    2017-04-01

    Alluvial fans have been shown to record signals of glacial-interglacial climate changes. Specifically, it has been suggested that their down-system grain size fining patterns may record changes in sediment flux. However, very few field studies have tested this because they require (i) robust fan chronologies, (ii) constraints on basin subsidence and 3D fan geometry, and (iii) a suitable model for inverting grain size fining for sediment flux. Here, we present a case study from the fluvially-dominated Indian Creek fan system in Fish Lake Valley, Nevada, which satisfies these criteria. We measure grain size fining patterns on a surface dating to the mid-glacial period ˜71 kyr ago, and a surface dating to the Holocene, which between them represent an overall warming (˜3 ˚ C) and drying (˜30%) of the regional climate. We use constraints on basin subsidence and a self-similar model of grain size fining to reconstruct sediment fluxes to the alluvial fan during the time periods captured by the two surfaces. Our results indicate a decline in sediment flux of ˜38% between the deposition of the ˜71 kyr and Holocene surfaces, implying significant sensitivity to climatic forcing over time periods of >10 kyr. This could represent a decrease in catchment erosion rates and/or a decrease in sediment export as the climate dried. Our results offer quantitative new constraints on how simple landscapes react to known glacial-interglacial climate shifts.

  8. Intra-interglacial climate variability from Marine Isotope Stage 15 to the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmayani, R.; Prange, M.; Schulz, M.

    2015-07-01

    Using the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) including a dynamic global vegetation model a set of 13 interglacial time slice experiments was carried out to study global climate variability between and within the Quaternary interglaciations of Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 1, 5, 11, 13, and 15. The different effects of obliquity, precession and greenhouse gas forcing on global surface temperature and precipitation fields are illuminated. Several similarities with previous idealized orbital-forcing experiments can be identified. In particular, a significant role of meridional insolation-gradient forcing by obliquity variations in forcing the West African monsoon is found. The sensitivity of the West African monsoon to this obliquity forcing, however, depends on the climatic precession. According to the CCSM3 results, the Indian monsoon is less sensitive to direct obliquity-induced insolation forcing, consistent with the interpretation of proxy records from the Arabian Sea. Moreover, the model results suggest that the two monsoon systems do not always vary in concert, challenging the concept of a global monsoon system at orbital timescales. High obliquity can also explain relatively warm Northern Hemisphere high-latitude summer temperatures despite maximum precession around 495 kyr BP (MIS 13) probably preventing a glacial inception at that time.

  9. Last Interglacial (MIS5e) hydrographic shifts linked to meltwater discharges from the East Greenland margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, Anastasia; Bauch, Henning A.; Van Nieuwenhove, Nicolas

    2017-05-01

    Proximal evidence of the surface ocean response to size reduction of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) during the Last Interglacial (MIS5e) and preceding glacial termination (T2) remains largely elusive. Using a new sediment record from the western Iceland Sea, the behavior of the northeastern GIS and its relation to the subpolar North Atlantic surface hydrography is examined. Extremely light oxygen isotopic (δ18O) values are found off central East Greenland during early MIS5e and point to enhanced meltwater release, potentially from the northeastern sector of the GIS. Data from downstream the cold East Greenland Current (EGC) and its eastward branches suggest a far-reaching effect of this meltwater not only in the Nordic Seas but also in the SE Labrador Sea. In particular, whereas an early MIS5e warming (at ∼128.5-126.5 ka) in the two regions coincided with the relative reduction of meltwater input into the EGC, the subsequent cooling noted at ∼126.5 ka followed a renewed major freshwater event off central East Greenland. Our data further indicate persistent freshwater influence from the East Greenland margin over the entire MIS5e interval and, in addition, also reveal a late MIS5e meltwater event. The latter event occurred just prior to the last glacial inception and emphasizes the importance of Greenland meltwater as forcing factor on Interglacial climates.

  10. Oceanographic dynamics and the end of the last interglacial in the subpolar North Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Mokeddem, Zohra; McManus, Jerry F; Oppo, Delia W

    2014-08-05

    The last interglacial interval was terminated by the inception of a long, progressive glaciation that is attributed to astronomically influenced changes in the seasonal distribution of sunlight over the earth. However, the feedbacks, internal dynamics, and global teleconnections associated with declining northern summer insolation remain incompletely understood. Here we show that a crucial early step in glacial inception involves the weakening of the subpolar gyre (SPG) circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean. Detailed new records of microfossil foraminifera abundance and stable isotope ratios in deep sea sediments from Ocean Drilling Program site 984 south of Iceland reveal repeated, progressive cold water-mass expansions into subpolar latitudes during the last peak interglacial interval, marine isotope substage 5e. These movements are expressed as a sequence of progressively extensive southward advances and subsequent retreats of a hydrographic boundary that may have been analogous to the modern Arctic front, and associated with rapid changes in the strength of the SPG. This persistent millennial-scale oceanographic oscillation accompanied a long-term cooling trend at a time of slowly declining northern summer insolation, providing an early link in the propagation of those insolation changes globally, and resulting in a rapid transition from extensive regional warmth to the dramatic instability of the subsequent ∼ 100 ka.

  11. Oceanographic dynamics and the end of the last interglacial in the subpolar North Atlantic

    PubMed Central

    Mokeddem, Zohra; McManus, Jerry F.; Oppo, Delia W.

    2014-01-01

    The last interglacial interval was terminated by the inception of a long, progressive glaciation that is attributed to astronomically influenced changes in the seasonal distribution of sunlight over the earth. However, the feedbacks, internal dynamics, and global teleconnections associated with declining northern summer insolation remain incompletely understood. Here we show that a crucial early step in glacial inception involves the weakening of the subpolar gyre (SPG) circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean. Detailed new records of microfossil foraminifera abundance and stable isotope ratios in deep sea sediments from Ocean Drilling Program site 984 south of Iceland reveal repeated, progressive cold water-mass expansions into subpolar latitudes during the last peak interglacial interval, marine isotope substage 5e. These movements are expressed as a sequence of progressively extensive southward advances and subsequent retreats of a hydrographic boundary that may have been analogous to the modern Arctic front, and associated with rapid changes in the strength of the SPG. This persistent millennial-scale oceanographic oscillation accompanied a long-term cooling trend at a time of slowly declining northern summer insolation, providing an early link in the propagation of those insolation changes globally, and resulting in a rapid transition from extensive regional warmth to the dramatic instability of the subsequent ∼100 ka. PMID:25049405

  12. Geochemical Identification in Sediment Provenance during Glacial/Interglacial Period: the Southern Drake Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. K.; Jung, J.; Lee, J. I.; Yoo, K. C.; Kim, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Clay mineralogy and crystal size distribution in marine sediment is used for the indication of a sediment provenance and climatic changes. Objective of this study is to trace the sediment provenances in the Southern Drake Passage with clay mineralogy, elemental composition and crystal size distributions (CSDs) of clay mineral. In the present study, X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) measurements showed that smectite, illite and chlorite are dominant phases. The semi-quantitative analysis showed that the relatively proportion of smectite is 50 - 60% in interglacial stage, 30 - 39% in glacial stage. Comparing with REE data, sediments supply was influenced by Weddell sea current and Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Moreover, elemental composition and microscopic analysis of smectites were carried by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The composition of smectite clay minerals were plotted on the tertiary diagram indicating that Smectite in Drake Passage was transported from three provenances: South Shetland island, east and west side of Antarctic peninsula during glacial - interglacial period. The CSDs of smectite also indicate the various source of smectite. The variation in the values of α (mean thickness) and β2 (shape or uniformity of the distribution) of smectite grain size will be discussed in terms of the sediment provenance.

  13. Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2017-02-10

    Macrophage polarization refers to how macrophages have been activated at a given point in space and time. Polarization is not fixed, as macrophages are sufficiently plastic to integrate multiple signals, such as those from microbes, damaged tissues, and the normal tissue environment. Three broad pathways control polarization: epigenetic and cell survival pathways that prolong or shorten macrophage development and viability, the tissue microenvironment, and extrinsic factors, such as microbial products and cytokines released in inflammation. A plethora of advances have provided a framework for rationally purifying, describing, and manipulating macrophage polarization. Here, I assess the current state of knowledge about macrophage polarization and enumerate the major questions about how activated macrophages regulate the physiology of normal and damaged tissues.

  14. Antarctic climate and ice-sheet configuration during the early Pliocene interglacial at 4.23 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golledge, Nicholas R.; Thomas, Zoë A.; Levy, Richard H.; Gasson, Edward G. W.; Naish, Timothy R.; McKay, Robert M.; Kowalewski, Douglas E.; Fogwill, Christopher J.

    2017-07-01

    The geometry of Antarctic ice sheets during warm periods of the geological past is difficult to determine from geological evidence, but is important to know because such reconstructions enable a more complete understanding of how the ice-sheet system responds to changes in climate. Here we investigate how Antarctica evolved under orbital and greenhouse gas conditions representative of an interglacial in the early Pliocene at 4.23 Ma, when Southern Hemisphere insolation reached a maximum. Using offline-coupled climate and ice-sheet models, together with a new synthesis of high-latitude palaeoenvironmental proxy data to define a likely climate envelope, we simulate a range of ice-sheet geometries and calculate their likely contribution to sea level. In addition, we use these simulations to investigate the processes by which the West and East Antarctic ice sheets respond to environmental forcings and the timescales over which these behaviours manifest. We conclude that the Antarctic ice sheet contributed 8.6 ± 2.8 m to global sea level at this time, under an atmospheric CO2 concentration identical to present (400 ppm). Warmer-than-present ocean temperatures led to the collapse of West Antarctica over centuries, whereas higher air temperatures initiated surface melting in parts of East Antarctica that over one to two millennia led to lowering of the ice-sheet surface, flotation of grounded margins in some areas, and retreat of the ice sheet into the Wilkes Subglacial Basin. The results show that regional variations in climate, ice-sheet geometry, and topography produce long-term sea-level contributions that are non-linear with respect to the applied forcings, and which under certain conditions exhibit threshold behaviour associated with behavioural tipping points.

  15. The last interglacial period on the Pacific Coast of North America: Timing and paleoclimate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Simmons, K.R.; Kennedy, G.L.; Rockwell, T.K.

    2002-01-01

    New, high-precision U-series ages of solitary corals (Balanophyllia elegans) coupled with molluscan faunal data from marine terraces on the Pacific Coast of North America yield information about the timing and warmth of the last interglacial sea-level highstand. Balanophyllia elegans takes up U in isotopic equilibrium with seawater during growth and shortly after death. Corals from the second terrace on San Clemente Island (offshore southern California), the third terrace on Punta Banda (on the Pacific Coast of northern Baja California), and the Discovery Point Formation on Isla de Guadalupe (in the Pacific Ocean offshore Baja California) date to the peak of the last interglacial period and have U-series ages ranging from ca. 123 to 114 ka. The first terrace on Punta Banda has corals with ages ranging from ca. 83 to 80 ka, which corresponds to a sea-level highstand formed in the late last interglacial period. U-series analyses of corals from the Cayucos terrace (central California) and the Nestor terrace at Point Loma (southern California) show that these fossils have evidence of open-system history, similar to what has been reported by other workers for the same localities. Nevertheless, a model of continuous, secondary U and Th uptake shows that two ages of corals are likely present at these localities, representing the ca. 105 and ca. 120 ka sea-level highstands reported elsewhere. U-series ages of last interglacial corals from the Pacific Coast overlap with, but are on average younger than the ages of corals from Barbados, the Bahamas, and Hawaii. This age difference is explained by the nature of the geomorphic response to sea-level change: fringing or barrier reefs on low-latitude coastlines have an accretionary growth style that keeps pace with rising sea level, whether on a tectonically rising or stable coastline. In contrast, midlatitude, high-energy coastlines are sites of platform cutting during the early part of a sea-level high stand and terrace

  16. Global sea-level fluctuations during the Last Interglaciation (MIS 5e)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearty, Paul J.; Hollin, John T.; Neumann, A. Conrad; O'Leary, Michael J.; McCulloch, Malcolm

    2007-09-01

    The geomorphology and morphostratigraphy of numerous worldwide sites reveal the relative movements of sea level during the peak of the Last Interglaciation (Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e, assumed average duration between 130±2 and 119±2 ka). Because sea level was higher than present, deposits are emergent, exposed, and widespread on many stable coastlines. Correlation with MIS 5e is facilitated by similar morphostratigraphic relationships, a low degree of diagenesis, uranium-thorium (U/Th) ages, and a global set of amino-acid racemization (AAR) data. This study integrates information from a large number of sites from tectonically stable areas including Bermuda, Bahamas, and Western Australia, and some that have experienced minor uplift (˜2.5 m/100 ka), including selected sites from the Mediterranean and Hawaii. Significant fluctuations during the highstand are evident at many MIS 5e sites, revealed from morphological, stratigraphic, and sedimentological evidence. Rounded and flat-topped curves derived only from reef tracts are incomplete and not representative of the entire interglacial story. Despite predictions of much different sea-level histories in Bermuda, the Bahamas, and Western Australia due to glacio- and hydro-isostatic effects, the rocks from these sites reveal a nearly identical record during the Last Interglaciation. The Last Interglacial highstand is characterized by several defined sea-level intervals (SLIs) that include: (SLI#1) post-glacial (MIS 6/5e Termination II) rise to above present before 130 ka; (SLI#2) stability at +2 to +3 m for the initial several thousand years (˜130 to ˜125 ka) during which fringing reefs were established and terrace morphology was imprinted along the coastlines; (SLI#3) a brief fall to near or below present around 125 ka; (SLI#4) a secondary rise to and through ˜+3-4 m (˜124 to ˜122 ka); followed by (SLI#5) a brief period of instability (˜120 ka) characterized by a rapid rise to between +6 to +9 m during

  17. Impact of paleoceanographic changes at glacial/interglacial transitions on benthic foraminiferal faunas of the eastern North Atlantic (IODP Expedition 339, Site U1385)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunert, Patrick; Hodell, David; Alvarez Zarikian, Carlos; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Stow, Dorrik A. V.

    2014-05-01

    Communities of deep-sea foraminifera are sensitive recorders of environmental conditions. Consequently, the actualistic interpretation of fossil foraminiferal assemblages has become a valuable tool for the reconstruction of paleoceanographic conditions at the sea-floor. For the present study, a quantitative data-set of benthic foraminifera >125μm from the eastern North Atlantic has been analysed to understand paleoceanographic changes (AMOC, ventilation, productivity) associated with glacial/interglacial transitions in more detail. The data-set consists of a series of samples from IODP Site U1385 spanning Terminations I, II and IV and several short-term (millennial-scale) climatic events including the Younger Dryas (YD), Heinrich (H) 1, and H 11. On the family and generic levels, a characteristic succession of foraminiferal assemblages can be recognized at all studied glacial/interglacial transitions: a glacial fauna with abundant occurrences of cassidulinids (Cassidulina, Globocassidulina); a fauna characterized by high abundances of buliminds (Bulimina, Globobulimina) and/or bolivinellids (Bolivinita) that is associated with H-events and the beginning of each termination; a fauna with high abundances of miliolids (mainly Pyrgo) and cibicidids at the end of the termination; an interglacial fauna composed of buliminds (Bulimina), gavellinellids (Gyroidinoides), and pseudoparrellids (Epistominella). For the glacial and interglacial endmembers, this succession indicates a moderately oxygenated environment at the seafloor with mesotrophic conditions due to moderate export productivity. For the early phase of the terminations as well as the short-term events, the dominance of infaunal taxa and high abundances of deep infaunal taxa indicate an environment with high export productivity that is mainly controlled by oxygen. Conversely, the absence of these taxa and the presence of miliolids suggests well-ventilated environments and decreasing export productivity during

  18. Polar Bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  19. Polar Glaciology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robin, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Two fields of research on polar ice sheets are likely to be of dominant interest during the 1990s. These are: the role of polar ice sheets in the hydrological cycle ocean-atmosphere-ice sheets-oceans, especially in relation to climate change; and the study and interpretation of material in deep ice cores to provide improved knowledge of past climates and of the varying levels of atmospheric constituents such as CO2, NOx, SO2, aerosols, etc., over the past 200,000 years. Both topics require a better knowledge of ice dynamics. Many of the studies that should be undertaken in polar regions by Earth Observing System require similar instruments and techniques to those used elsewhere over oceans and inland surfaces. However to study polar regions two special requirements need to be met: Earth Observing System satellite(s) need to be in a sufficiently high inclination orbit to cover most of the polar regions. Instruments must also be adapted, often by relatively limited changes, to give satisfactory data over polar ice. The observational requirements for polar ice sheets in the 1990s are summarized.

  20. The Last Transition From Extreme Glacial to Extreme Interglacial Climate in NW Patagonia: Regional and Global Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, P. I.

    2004-12-01

    The study of interhemispheric climate linkages during and since the last ice age has benefited from the recent development of high-resolution ice core and marine records from the mid- and high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Few paleoclimate records from terrestrial environments in these regions, however, have the temporal continuity, time resolution, and adequate chronologic control to allow a detailed examination of the timing, rates, direction, and phasing of climate change at millennial timescales. Stratigraphic, palynologic, and charcoal records from small, high-sediment accumulating lakes in the Chilean Lake District (41ºS) afford useful data for examining the interval between the LGM to the early Holocene (25-8 ka, ka=cal kyr BP). Millennial-scale changes in glacier extent and vegetation patterns within this interval match key events both in the Northern Hemisphere and Antarctic records, in particular the EPICA Dome C data, highlighting the role of an atmosphere-based conduit for the global propagation of abrupt climate changes. The onset of the last termination in NW Patagonia is marked by glacial collapse and the expansion of rainforest trees at 17.7 ka. An apparent antiphase relationship among the polar hemispheres between 17.7-14.7 ka, might reflect the hemispheric-scale effects of a quasi-total shut down of Atlantic Meridional Overturning circulation driven by Heinrich event 1. Extreme glacial and interglacial modes in the position/strength of the westerlies at multi-millennial timescales in the southern westerlies accompany important shifts in the abundance and composition of rainforest communities during the last termination and the early Holocene. At millennial timescales, this interval is characterised by successive warming pulses interrupted by a generalized reversal in trend with cooling events starting at 14.7 and 13.4 ka. Fires between 12.9-11.5 ka, i.e. Younger Dryas Chron (YDC), led to the expansion of opportunistic rainforest species

  1. Near-field sea-level variability in northwest Europe and ice sheet stability during the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, A. J.; Barlow, N. L. M.; Busschers, F. S.; Cohen, K. M.; Gehrels, W. R.; Wake, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    Global sea level during the Last Interglacial (LIG, Marine Isotope Sub-stage 5e) peaked between c. 5.5 and 9 m above present, implying significant melt from Greenland and Antarctica. Relative sea level (RSL) observations from several far- and intermediate-field sites suggest abrupt flu