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Sample records for interlaboratory fatigue test

  1. Results of an interlaboratory fatigue test program conducted on alloy 800H at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental approach adopted for low cycle fatigue tests of alloy 800H involved the use of electrohydraulic test systems, hour glass geometry specimens, diametral extensometers, and axial strain computers. Attempts to identify possible problem areas were complicated by the lack of reliable data for the heat of Alloy 800H under investigation. The method adopted was to generate definitive test data in an Interlaboratory Fatigue Test Program. The laboratories participating in the program were Argonne National Laboratory, Battelle Columbus, Mar-Test, and NASA Lewis. Fatigue tests were conducted on both solid and turbular specimens at temperatures of 20, 593, and 760 C and strain ranges of 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5 percent. The subject test method can, under certain circumstances, produce fatigue data which are serious in error. This approach subsequently was abandoned at General Atomic Company in favor of parallel gage length specimens and axial extensiometers.

  2. FETAX interlaboratory validation study: Phase 2 testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bantle, J.A. . Dept. of Zoology); Burton, D.T. ); Dawson, D.A. . Dept. of Biology and Toxicology)

    1994-10-01

    The Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX) is a 96-h whole embryo developmental toxicity screening assay that can be used in ecotoxicology and in detecting mammalian developmental toxicants when an in vitro metabolic activation system is employed. A standardized American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) guide for the conduct of FETAX has been published along with a companion atlas that helps in embryo staging and identifying malformations. As part of the ASTM process, an interlaboratory validation study was undertaken to evaluate the repeatability and reliability of FETAX. Six different laboratories participated in the study. Each laboratory utilized one technician with the exception of one laboratory, which utilized two independent technicians. In Phase 1, FETAX proved to be more repeatable and reliable than many other bioassays. However, some excessive variation was observed in a few laboratories. Some of this variation may have been due to an initial lack of experience with the assay by some technicians. Phase 2, which is reported here, showed far less intralaboratory and interlaboratory variability than did Phase 1. Nonteratogens such as saccharin and sodium cyclamate showed the most consistent results, whereas more variability was observed for the teratogens caffeine and 5-fluorouracil. Interlaboratory coefficient of variation values for all FETAX end points ranged from 7.3 to 54.7%. The minimum concentration to inhibit growth proved to be the most variable end point for three of the four test chemicals, whereas the LC50 and EC50 (malformation) proved to be less variable.

  3. Tigriopus fulvus: The interlaboratory comparison of the acute toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Faraponova, Olga; Giacco, Elisabetta; Biandolino, Francesca; Prato, Ermelinda; Del Prete, Francesco; Valenti, Alessandra; Sarcina, Stefania; Pasteris, Andrea; Montecavalli, Adele; Comin, Stefano; Cesca, Claudia; Francese, Marco; Cigar, Monica; Piazza, Veronica; Falleni, Fabrizio; Lacchetti, Ines

    2016-02-01

    The paper reports the results of an interlaboratory comparison involving 11 laboratories, with the objectives of apply and validate a new standardized ecotoxicological method on marine crustacean Tigriopus fulvus. Copper was chosen as reference toxicant as indicated in the official method. The results of two independent tests performed by all the participants, demonstrated that the new method is simple, fast and easy to learn. This is confirmed even by the values of z-score index calculated for each laboratory and the relative coefficient of variation (CV) which are 6.32% after 24h, 6.56 after 48h and 35.3% after 96h, mentioned in the ISO standards for the precision of interlaboratory assays. Therefore its use could be recommended in environmental studies and monitoring. PMID:26584461

  4. Results of the first provisional technical secretariat interlaboratory comparison test

    SciTech Connect

    Stuff, J.R.; Hoffland, L.

    1995-06-01

    The principal task of this laboratory in the first Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) Interlaboratory Comparison Test was to verify and test the extraction and preparation procedures outlined in the Recommended Operating Procedures for Sampling and Analysis in the Verification of Chemical Disarmament in addition to our laboratory extraction methods and our laboratory analysis methods. Sample preparation began on 16 May 1994 and analysis was completed on 12 June 1994. The analytical methods used included NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 31}P) GC/AED, GC/MS (EI and methane CI), GC/IRD, HPLC/IC, HPLC/TSP/MS, MS/MS(Electrospray), and CZE.

  5. Multiaxial fatigue low cycle fatigue testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamrik, S. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Multiaxial testing methods are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of each type test is discussed. Significant multiaxial data available in the literature is analyzed. The yield theories are compared for multiaxial fatigue analysis.

  6. Hydraulic Fatigue-Testing Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodo, James D.; Moore, Dennis R.; Morris, Thomas F.; Tiller, Newton G.

    1987-01-01

    Fatigue-testing machine applies fluctuating tension to number of specimens at same time. When sample breaks, machine continues to test remaining specimens. Series of tensile tests needed to determine fatigue properties of materials performed more rapidly than in conventional fatigue-testing machine.

  7. An interlaboratory comparison of sediment elutriate preparation and toxicity test methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elutriate bioassays are among numerous methods that exist for assessing the potential toxicity of sediments in aquatic systems. In this study, interlaboratory results were compared from 96-hour Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas static-renewal acute toxicity tests conduct...

  8. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  9. Interlaboratory Evaluation of Hyalella Azteca and Chironomus Tentans Short-term and Long-term Sediment Toxicity Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the results of interlaboratory toxicity tests on sediment toxicity methods for use in routine testing and this data has been presented in an EPA report and this is a summary of that data.

  10. Intra- and interlaboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with glochidia and juveniles of freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, N.; Augspurger, T.; Barnhart, M.C.; Bidwell, Joseph R.; Cope, W.G.; Dwyer, F.J.; Geis, S.; Greer, I.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kane, C.M.; May, T.W.; Neves, R.J.; Newton, T.J.; Roberts, A.D.; Whites, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated the performance and variability in acute toxicity tests with glochidia and newly transformed juvenile mussels using the standard methods outlined in American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Multiple 48-h toxicity tests with glochidia and 96-h tests with juvenile mussels were conducted within a single laboratory and among five laboratories. All tests met the test acceptability requirements (e.g., ???90% control survival). Intralaboratory tests were conducted over two consecutive mussel-spawning seasons with mucket (Actinonaias ligamentina) or fatmucket (Lampsilis siliquoidea) using copper, ammonia, or chlorine as a toxicant. For the glochidia of both species, the variability of intralaboratory median effective concentrations (EC50s) for the three toxicants, expressed as the coefficient of variation (CV), ranged from 14 to 27% in 24-h exposures and from 13 to 36% in 48-h exposures. The intralaboratory CV of copper EC50s for juvenile fatmucket was 24% in 48-h exposures and 13% in 96-h exposures. Interlaboratory tests were conducted with fatmucket glochidia and juveniles by five laboratories using copper as a toxicant. The interlaboratory CV of copper EC50s for glochidia was 13% in 24-h exposures and 24% in 48-h exposures, and the interlaboratory CV for juveniles was 22% in 48-h exposures and 42% in 96-h exposures. The high completion success and the overall low variability in test results indicate that the test methods have acceptable precision and can be performed routinely. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  11. [Interlaboratory test: Isolation of Mycobacterium bovis from granulomatous lesions in bovine].

    PubMed

    Garbaccio, Sergio; Barandiaran, Soledad; Fernandez, Analía; Macias, Analía; Magnano, Gabriel; Martinez Vivot, Marcela; Peyrú, Maite; Cataldi, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis. The diagnostic laboratory confirmation is made through bacterial isolation. The aim of interlaboratory tests is to assess the performance of each participant in comparison with other of similar capacities. The test objective was to determine the efficiency of isolation of M. bovis. Four laboratories were part of the test and processed 25 blind tissue samples from granulomatous lesions and with previous M. bovis isolation. The laboratory that had the highest proportion of isolates was A (68%), followed by C (60%) and then B and D (both with 52%). The greatest concordance was observed between B-D and B-C laboratories (68%). The differences could be due to specific factors in each laboratory procedures. This type of interlaboratory tests highlights errors in the bacteriology and identifies critical points in the process to detect M. bovis accurately. PMID:27237425

  12. [Interlaboratory test: Isolation of Mycobacterium bovis from granulomatous lesions in bovine].

    PubMed

    Garbaccio, Sergio; Barandiaran, Soledad; Fernandez, Analía; Macias, Analía; Magnano, Gabriel; Martinez Vivot, Marcela; Peyrú, Maite; Cataldi, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis. The diagnostic laboratory confirmation is made through bacterial isolation. The aim of interlaboratory tests is to assess the performance of each participant in comparison with other of similar capacities. The test objective was to determine the efficiency of isolation of M. bovis. Four laboratories were part of the test and processed 25 blind tissue samples from granulomatous lesions and with previous M. bovis isolation. The laboratory that had the highest proportion of isolates was A (68%), followed by C (60%) and then B and D (both with 52%). The greatest concordance was observed between B-D and B-C laboratories (68%). The differences could be due to specific factors in each laboratory procedures. This type of interlaboratory tests highlights errors in the bacteriology and identifies critical points in the process to detect M. bovis accurately.

  13. Determination of phosphine in plant materials: method optimization and validation in interlaboratory comparison tests.

    PubMed

    Amrein, Thomas M; Ringier, Lara; Amstein, Nathalie; Clerc, Laurence; Bernauer, Sabine; Baumgartner, Thomas; Roux, Bernard; Stebler, Thomas; Niederer, Markus

    2014-03-01

    The optimization and validation of a method for the determination of phosphine in plant materials are described. The method is based on headspace sampling over the sample heated in 5% sulfuric acid. Critical factors such as sample amount, equilibration conditions, method of quantitation, and matrix effects are discussed, and validation data are presented. Grinding of coarse samples does not lead to lower results and is a prerequisite for standard addition experiments, which present the most reliable approach for quantitation because of notable matrix effects. Two interlaboratory comparisons showed that results varied considerably and that an uncertainty of measurement of about 50% has to be assessed. Flame photometric and mass spectrometric detection gave similar results. The proposed method is well reproducible within one laboratory, and results from the authors' laboratories using different injection and detection techniques are very close to each other. The considerable variation in the interlaboratory comparison shows that this analysis is still challenging in practice and further proficiency testing is needed. PMID:24564743

  14. [Interlaboratory Study on Zinc Test for Food-Contact Rubber Products].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Hiroshi; Mutsuga, Motoh; Abe, Yutaka; Itou, Sadahiro; Ohsaka, Ikue; Ohno, Haruka; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Yuichiro; Ozaki, Asako; Kakihara, Yoshiteru; Kobayashi, Hisashi; Shirono, Katsuhiro; Sekido, Haruko; Sonobe, Hironori; Takasaka, Noriko; Tajima, Yoshiyasu; Tanaka, Aoi; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Nakanishi, Toru; Nomura, Chie; Haneishi, Nahoko; Hikida, Akinori; Miura, Toshihiko; Yamaguchi, Miku; Watanabe, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Using six kinds of zinc solution in water and 4% acetic acid as samples, an interlaboratory study was performed to evaluate a zinc (Zn) test method for food-contact rubber products, based on the Japanese Food Sanitation Law. Eighteen laboratories participated, and quantified Zn in six test solutions as blind duplicates using flame atomic absorption spectrometry, induced coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry or induced coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Statistical analysis revealed that the trueness, repeatability (RSDr) and reproducibility (RSDr) were 97-103%, 0.7-4.9% and 1.7-8.9% by all measuring methods. The values of the performance parameter fulfilled the target value (trueness: 80-110%, RSDr: 10%, RSDr: 25%). The performance of these methods is sufficient for testing the adherence of samples to the specifications. PMID:26156169

  15. Creep-Fatigue Interaction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue fives in metals are nominally time independent below 0.5 T(sub Melt). At higher temperatures, fatigue lives are altered due to time-dependent, thermally activated creep. Conversely, creep rates are altered by super. imposed fatigue loading. Creep and fatigue generally interact synergistically to reduce material lifetime. Their interaction, therefore, is of importance to structural durability of high-temperature structures such as nuclear reactors, reusable rocket engines, gas turbine engines, terrestrial steam turbines, pressure vessel and piping components, casting dies, molds for plastics, and pollution control devices. Safety and lifecycle costs force designers to quantify these interactions. Analytical and experimental approaches to creep-fatigue began in the era following World War II. In this article experimental and life prediction approaches are reviewed for assessing creep-fatigue interactions of metallic materials. Mechanistic models are also discussed briefly.

  16. Fatigue tests on the ITER PF jacket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jinggang; Weiss, Klaus-Peter; Wu, Yu; Wu, Zhixiong; Li, Laifeng; Liu, Sheng

    2012-10-01

    This paper focuses on fatigue tests on the ITER Poloidal Field (PF) jacket made of 316L stainless steel material. During manufacture, the conductor will be compacted and spooled after cable insertion. Therefore, sample jackets were prepared under compaction, bending and straightening in order to simulate the status of PF conductor during manufacturing and winding. The fatigue properties of materials were measured at T < 7 K, including S-N and fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR). The testing results show that the present Chinese PF jacket has good fatigue properties, which conclude that the results are accordant with the requirements of ITER.

  17. Fatigue, Creep-Fatigue, and Thermomechanical Fatigue Life Testing of Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Lerch, Bradley A.; McGaw, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    The fatigue crack initiation resistance of an alloy is determined by conducting a series of tests over a range of values of stress amplitude or strain range. The observed number of cycles to failure is plotted against the stress amplitude or strain range to obtain a fatigue curve. The fatigue properties quoted for an alloy are typically the constants used in the equation(s) that describe the fatigue curve. Fatigue lives of interest may be as low as 10(exp 2) or higher than 10(exp 9) cycles. Because of the enormous scatter associated with fatigue, dozens of tests may be needed to confidently establish a fatigue curve, and the cost may run into several thousands of dollars. To further establish the effects on fatigue life of the test temperature, environment, alloy condition, mean stress effects, creep-fatigue effects, thermomechanical cycling, etc. requires an extraordinarily large and usually very costly test matrix. The total effort required to establish the fatigue resistance of an alloy should not be taken lightly. Fatigue crack initiation tests are conducted on relatively small and presumed to be initially crack-free, samples of an alloy that are intended to be representative of the alloy's metallurgical and physical condition. Generally, samples are smooth and have uniformly polished surfaces within the test section. Some may have intentionally machined notches of well-controlled geometry, but the surface at the root of the notch is usually not polished. The purpose of polishing is to attain a reproducible surface finish. This is to eliminate surface finish as an uncontrolled variable. Representative test specimen geometries will be discussed later. Test specimens are cyclically loaded until macroscopically observable cracks initiate and eventually grow to failure. Normally, the fatigue failure life of a specimen is defined as the number of cycles to separation of the specimen into two pieces. Alternative definitions are becoming more common, particularly for

  18. Interlaboratory comparison of the horizontal pipe insulation test apparatus up to 350{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, T.E.; Graves, R.S.; McElroy, D.L.; Smith, D.R.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this interlaboratory comparison was to provide information for the precision and bias section in the ASTM Standard Test Method C 335, {open_quotes}Steady-State Heat Transfer Properties of Horizontal Pipe Insulation.{close_quotes} (The text describes the ASTM C 335 test method, the specimens tested and the test protocol). The apparent thermal conductivity of two rigid calcium silicate pipe insulation specimens was measured by eight laboratories. Each laboratory measured both specimens at four different temperatures. The test mean temperatures ranged from 35 to 390{degrees}C. The two standard deviation value for the data ranged from 4.5 to 7.7% and the average value was 6.3%. The statement recommended for the precision and bias statement for Section 13.1.4 of ASTM C 335 is: {open_quotes}Tests performed at seven different laboratories using guarded-end horizontal pipe test apparatus and at one laboratory using an unguarded cylindrical screen test apparatus on two specimens of calcium silicate insulation in the range of mean temperatures from 35 to 390{degree}C did not vary by more than 6.3% (two standard deviations) of the average.{close_quotes}

  19. An Approach to Evaluate Precision and Inter-Laboratory Variability of Flammability Test Methods for Aerospace Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David; Beeson, Harold D.

    2005-01-01

    Materials selection for spacecraft is based on conventional flammability or ignition sensitivity acceptance tests. Current procedures for determining the inter-laboratory repeatability and reproducibility of aerospace materials flammability tests are not considering the dependence of data variability on test conditions and consequently attempts to characterize the precision of these methods were not successful. The inter-laboratory data variability is determined with tests conducted under arbitrary conditions, which consequently may not provide sufficient information to enable adequate determination of a method's precision. For evaluating the precision of NASA's flammability test methods, the protocol recommended includes selecting critical parameters and determining the 50% failure point by considering the specific failure criteria of each method using the critical parameter as a variable. Upon performing inter-laboratory round robin testing using this approach, the laboratories' performance could be evaluated by comparing the repeatability of the 50% failure point and/or the repeatability of critical conditions where the probabilities of passing and failing are unity, i.e., the transition zone repeatability. When a sufficient amount of data has been acquired with this method, an adequate estimation of precision of aerospace materials flammability test methods will be possible.

  20. Interlaboratory trial on TSE rapid tests for the control of the Italian scrapie surveillance network.

    PubMed

    Nappi, R; Ingravalle, F; Di Vietro, D; Ru, G; Bozzetta, E

    2009-10-20

    Scrapie, a neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats and one of several transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) has been subject to mandatory active surveillance in EU through rapid testing since 2002. Regulation EC/999/2001 on TSE surveillance requires that each Member State's National Reference Laboratory for TSE periodically verifies diagnostic standards and methods by comparative testing. In 2007 the Italian Reference Centre carried out the first ring trial for classical scrapie on a set of 21 negative and 9 positive homogenated brainstems, the latter consisting of three replicates of an ARQ/ARQ scrapie positive sample diluted 1:10, 1:20 and 1:50. The purpose of the study was to verify the interlaboratory agreement in term of Cohen's kappa (k) of the rapid systems currently used by the 25 national rapid test laboratories (RTLs) [laboratories: Biorad TeSeE (17 laboratories), Enfer TSE version 2.0 (4 laboratories), Idexx Herd chek BSE-scrapie antigen kit (3 laboratories) and Prionics check LIA SR (1 laboratory)]. Our results show that the agreement among the laboratories using the same rapid test varied between 0.84 and 1, while the estimated overall agreement among the 25 laboratories was very good (k-combined=0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.85-0.89). Nevertheless, as regards differences in analytical sensitivity among the rapid tests in use, under-recognition of pre-clinical scrapie cases by lower performing systems must be expected.

  1. [Interlaboratory study on migration test of antimony and germanium for food-contact polyethylene terephthalate].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Ryo; Mutsuga, Motoh; Abe, Takashi; Abe, Yutaka; Ohsaka, Ikue; Ohno, Haruka; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Yuichiro; Ozaki, Asako; Kakihara, Yoshiteru; Kawasaki, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Hisashi; Shibata, Hiroshi; Shirono, Katsuhiro; Sekido, Haruko; Sonobe, Hironori; Takasaka, Noriko; Tajima, Yoshiyasu; Tanaka, Aoi; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Nomura, Chie; Haneishi, Nahoko; Hikida, Akinori; Miura, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    An interlaboratory study was performed to evaluate a migration test method of antimony (Sb) and germanium (Ge), based on the Japanese Food Sanitation Law for food- contact polyethylene terephthalate. Eighteen laboratories participated, and quantified Sb and Ge in three test solutions as blind duplicates using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) or induced coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Statistical analysis revealed that the trueness, repeatability and reproducibility were 98-107%, 1.7-7.5% and 2.0-18.8% by using GF-AAS and ICP-OES. The performance of these methods is sufficient for testing the specifications. The performance parameters of ICP-MS were 99-106%, 0.7-2.2% and 2.2-10.5%, respectively. ICP-MS is available as an alternative measuring method. However, in some laboratories, the quantitative values of Sb were higher than the addition levels. We found that Sb in working solutions is absorbed on glass vessels. Careful control of concentration in working solutions is required for Sb analysis.

  2. [Interlaboratory study on migration test of antimony and germanium for food-contact polyethylene terephthalate].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Ryo; Mutsuga, Motoh; Abe, Takashi; Abe, Yutaka; Ohsaka, Ikue; Ohno, Haruka; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Yuichiro; Ozaki, Asako; Kakihara, Yoshiteru; Kawasaki, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Hisashi; Shibata, Hiroshi; Shirono, Katsuhiro; Sekido, Haruko; Sonobe, Hironori; Takasaka, Noriko; Tajima, Yoshiyasu; Tanaka, Aoi; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Nomura, Chie; Haneishi, Nahoko; Hikida, Akinori; Miura, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    An interlaboratory study was performed to evaluate a migration test method of antimony (Sb) and germanium (Ge), based on the Japanese Food Sanitation Law for food- contact polyethylene terephthalate. Eighteen laboratories participated, and quantified Sb and Ge in three test solutions as blind duplicates using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) or induced coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Statistical analysis revealed that the trueness, repeatability and reproducibility were 98-107%, 1.7-7.5% and 2.0-18.8% by using GF-AAS and ICP-OES. The performance of these methods is sufficient for testing the specifications. The performance parameters of ICP-MS were 99-106%, 0.7-2.2% and 2.2-10.5%, respectively. ICP-MS is available as an alternative measuring method. However, in some laboratories, the quantitative values of Sb were higher than the addition levels. We found that Sb in working solutions is absorbed on glass vessels. Careful control of concentration in working solutions is required for Sb analysis. PMID:25925077

  3. Degradation in PV Encapsulation Transmittance: An Interlaboratory Study Toward a Climate-Specific Test

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Hacke, Peter L.; Kempe, Michael D.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Annigoni, Eleonora; Sculati-Meillaud, Fanny; Ballion, Amal; Kohl, Michael; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Bruckman, Laura S.; French, Roger H.; Burns, David; Phillips, Nancy H.; Feng; Jiangtao; Elliott, Lamont; Scott, Kurt P.; Fowler, Sean; Gu, Xiaohong; Honeker, Christian C.; Khonkar, Hussam; Perret-Aebi, Laure-Emmanuelle; Shioda, Tsy

    2015-06-14

    Reduced optical transmittance of encapsulation resulting from ultraviolet (UV) degradation has frequently been identified as a cause of decreased PV module performance through the life of installations in the field. The present module safety and qualification standards, however, apply short UV doses only capable of examining design robustness or 'infant mortality' failures. Essential information that might be used to screen encapsulation through product lifetime remains unknown. For example, the relative efficacy of xenon-arc and UVA-340 fluorescent sources or the typical range of activation energy for degradation is not quantified. We have conducted an interlaboratory experiment to provide the understanding that will be used towards developing a climate- and configuration-specific (UV) weathering test. Five representative, known formulations of EVA were studied in addition to one TPU material. Replicate laminated silica/polymer/silica specimens are being examined at 14 institutions using a variety of indoor chambers (including Xe, UVA-340, and metal-halide light sources) or field aging. The solar-weighted transmittance, yellowness index, and the UV cut-off wavelength, determined from the measured hemispherical transmittance, are examined to provide understanding and guidance for the UV light source (lamp type) and temperature used in accelerated UV aging tests. Index Terms -- reliability, durability, thermal activation.

  4. Degradation in PV Encapsulation Transmittance: An Interlaboratory Study Towards a Climate-Specific Test

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Annigoni, Eleonora; Ballion, Amal; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Bruckman, Laura S.; Burns, David M.; Chen, Xinxin; Elliott, L.; Feng, J.; French, Roger H.; Fowler, S.; Gu, X.; Hacke, Peter L.; Honeker, C. C.; Kempe, Michael D.; Khonkar, H.; Kohl, M.; Perret-Aebi, Laure-Emmanuelle; Phillips, N. H.; Scott, K. P.; Sculati-Meillaud, F.; Shioda, T.; Suga, S.; Watanabe, S.; Wohlgemuth, John H.

    2015-06-14

    Reduced optical transmittance of encapsulants resulting from ultraviolet (UV) degradation has frequently been identified as a cause of decreased PV module performance through the life of service in the field. The present module safety and qualification standards, however, apply short UV doses only capable of examining design robustness or 'infant mortality' failures. Essential information that might be used to screen encapsulation through product lifetime remains unknown. For example, the relative efficacy of xenon-arc and UVA-340 fluorescent sources or the typical range of activation energy for degradation is not quantified. We have conducted an interlaboratory experiment to provide the understanding that will be used towards developing a climate- and configuration-specific (UV) weathering test. Five representative, known formulations of EVA were studied in addition to one TPU material. Replicate laminated silica/polymer/silica specimens are being examined at 14 institutions using a variety of indoor chambers (including Xenon, UVA-340, and metal-halide light sources) or field aging. The solar-weighted transmittance, yellowness index, and the UV cut-off wavelength, determined from the measured hemispherical transmittance, are examined to provide understanding and guidance for the UV light source (lamp type) and temperature used in accelerated UV aging tests.

  5. Degradation in PV Encapsulation Transmittance: An Interlaboratory Study Towards a Climate-Specific Test: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Annigoni, Eleonora; Ballion, Amal; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Bruckman, Laura S.; Burns, David M.; Chen, Xinxin; Elliott, Lamont; Feng, Jiangtao; French, Roger H.; Fowler, Sean; Gu, Xiaohong; Hacke, Peter L.; Honeker, Christian C.; Kempe, Michael D.; Khonkar, Hussam; Kohl, Michael; Perret-Aebi, Laure-Emmanuelle; Phillips, Nancy H.; Scott, Kurt P.; Sculati-Meillaud, Fanny; Shioda, Tsuyos

    2015-08-12

    Reduced optical transmittance of encapsulants resulting from ultraviolet (UV) degradation has frequently been identified as a cause of decreased PV module performance through the life of service in the field. The present module safety and qualification standards, however, apply short UV doses only capable of examining design robustness or 'infant mortality' failures. Essential information that might be used to screen encapsulation through product lifetime remains unknown. For example, the relative efficacy of xenon-arc and UVA-340 fluorescent sources or the typical range of activation energy for degradation is not quantified. We have conducted an interlaboratory experiment to provide the understanding that will be used towards developing a climate- and configuration-specific (UV) weathering test. Five representative, known formulations of EVA were studied in addition to one TPU material. Replicate laminated silica/polymer/silica specimens are being examined at 14 institutions using a variety of indoor chambers (including Xenon, UVA-340, and metal-halide light sources) or field aging. The solar-weighted transmittance, yellowness index, and the UV cut-off wavelength, determined from the measured hemispherical transmittance, are examined to provide understanding and guidance for the UV light source (lamp type) and temperature used in accelerated UV aging tests.

  6. Computer controlled thermal fatigue test system

    SciTech Connect

    Schmale, D.T.; Jones, W.B.

    1986-01-01

    A servo-controlled hydraulic mechanical test system has been configured to conduct computer-controlled thermal fatigue tests. The system uses induction heating, a digital temperature controller, infrared pyrometry, forced air cooling, and quartz rod extensometry. In addition, a digital computer controls the tests and allows precise data analysis and interpretation.

  7. Fatigue tests on big structure assemblies of concorde aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, V. P.; Perrais, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Fatigue tests on structural assemblies of the Concorde supersonic transport aircraft are reported. Two main sections of the aircraft were subjected to pressure, mechanical load, and thermal static tests. The types of fatigue tests conducted and the results obtained are discussed. It was concluded that on a supersonic aircraft whose structural weight is a significant part of the weight analysis, many fatigue and static strength development tests should be made and fatigue and thermal tests of the structures are absolutely necessary.

  8. Fatigue crack growth automated testing method

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, P.W.; VanDenAvyle, J.A.; Laing, J.

    1989-06-01

    A computer controlled servo-hydraulic mechanical test system has been configured to conduct automated fatigue crack growth testing. This provides two major benefits: it allows continuous cycling of specimens without operator attention over evenings and weekends; and complex load histories, including random loading and spectrum loading, can be applied to the specimens to simulate cyclic loading of engineering structures. The software is written in MTS Multi-User Basic to control test machine output and acquire data at predetermined intervals. Compact tension specimens are cycled according to ASTM specification E647-86. Fatigue crack growth is measured via specimen compliance during the test using a compliance/crack length calibration determined earlier by visual crack length measurements. This setup was used to measure crack growth rates in 6063 aluminum alloy for a variety of cyclic loadings, including spectrum loads. Data collected compared well with tests run manually. 13 figs.

  9. Within-Subject Interlaboratory Variability of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Tests

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, William C.; Hamilton, Lanette R.; Goodwin, Donald J.; Barrera, Carlos; West, Kevin B.; Racster, Laura; Daniels, Laura J.; Chuke, Stella O.; Campbell, Brandon H.; Bohanon, Jamaria; Jaffar, Atheer T.; Drane, Wanzer; Maserang, David; Mazurek, Gerald H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) is a viable alternative to the tuberculin skin test (TST) for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. However, within-subject variability may limit test utility. To assess variability, we compared results from the same subjects when QFT-GIT enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were performed in different laboratories. Methods Subjects were recruited at two sites and blood was tested in three labs. Two labs used the same type of automated ELISA workstation, 8-point calibration curves, and electronic data transfer. The third lab used a different automated ELISA workstation, 4-point calibration curves, and manual data entry. Variability was assessed by interpretation agreement and comparison of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) measurements. Data for subjects with discordant interpretations or discrepancies in TB Response >0.05 IU/mL were verified or corrected, and variability was reassessed using a reconciled dataset. Results Ninety-seven subjects had results from three labs. Eleven (11.3%) had discordant interpretations and 72 (74.2%) had discrepancies >0.05 IU/mL using unreconciled results. After correction of manual data entry errors for 9 subjects, and exclusion of 6 subjects due to methodological errors, 7 (7.7%) subjects were discordant. Of these, 6 (85.7%) had all TB Responses within 0.25 IU/mL of the manufacturer's recommended cutoff. Non-uniform error of measurement was observed, with greater variation in higher IFN-γ measurements. Within-subject standard deviation for TB Response was as high as 0.16 IU/mL, and limits of agreement ranged from −0.46 to 0.43 IU/mL for subjects with mean TB Response within 0.25 IU/mL of the cutoff. Conclusion Greater interlaboratory variability was associated with manual data entry and higher IFN-γ measurements. Manual data entry should be avoided. Because variability in measuring TB Response may affect interpretation, especially near the cutoff, consideration

  10. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and interlaboratory testing, life stage, and species.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Sandy; Lilavois, Crystal R; Lee, Larisa; Augspurger, Tom; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Chris G; Bauer, Candice; Hammer, Edward; Barron, Mace G

    2016-03-01

    The authors developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and interlaboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the 2 life stages; and the variation in sensitivity among commonly tested mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea, Utterbackia imbecillis, and Villosa iris), commonly tested cladocerans (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia), and fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Pimephales promelas, and Lepomis macrochirus). The results of these analyses indicate that intralaboratory variability for median effect concentrations (EC50) averaged about 2-fold for both life stages, whereas interlaboratory variability averaged 3.6-fold for juvenile mussels and 6.3-fold for glochidia. The EC50s for juveniles and glochidia were within a factor of 2 of each other for 50% of paired records across chemicals, with juveniles more sensitive than glochidia by more than 2-fold for 33% of the comparisons made between life stages. There was a high concurrence of sensitivity of commonly tested L. siliquoidea, U. imbecillis, and V. iris to that of other mussels. However, this concurrence decreased as the taxonomic distance of the commonly tested cladocerans and fish to mussels increased. The compiled mussel database and determination of data variability will advance risk assessments by including more robust species sensitivity distributions, interspecies correlation estimates, and availability of taxon-specific empirically derived application factors for risk assessment. PMID:26369904

  11. Grip for fatigue testing pure aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, P.; Yuan, G. S.; Hartwig, K. T.

    A simple method of clamping pure aluminium for fatigue tests at cryogenic temperatures is described. Easily machined cylindrical specimens are aligned and held firmly by collet grips that counteract sample shrinkage during cooldown. Specimens are quickly mounted and removed after testing without distortion or thermal treatment 99.999% aluminium, aluminium alloys and copper were gripped successfully through tens of thousands of fully reversed tension-compression cycles at 295, 77 and 4.2 K.

  12. Testing for bias between the Kjeldahl and Dumas methods for the determination of nitrogen in meat mixtures, by using data from a designed interlaboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael; Owen, Linda; Wilkinson, Kate; Wood, Roger; Damant, Andrew

    2004-12-01

    Bias between the Dumas and the Kjeldahl methods for the determination of protein nitrogen in food was studied by conducting an interlaboratory study involving 40 laboratories and 20 different test materials. Biases were found to be small and statistically significant only for the chicken test materials, where a bias of 0.020±0.004% m/m was detected.

  13. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and inter-laboratory testing, life stage, and species - SETAC Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and inter-laboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the two life stages; and the variation in sensitiv...

  14. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and inter-laboratory testing, life stage, and species

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and interlaboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the 2 life stages; and the variation in se...

  15. Characterization of Solder Joint Reliability Using Cyclic Mechanical Fatigue Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Choong-Un; Bang, Woong-Ho; Xu, Huili; Lee, Tae-Kyu

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the mechanics of two mechanical fatigue methods, cyclic bending fatigue and shear fatigue, in inducing failure in solder joints in package assemblies, and it presents the characteristics of fatigue failures resulting from these methods using example cases of Sn-Pb eutectic and Sn-rich Pb-free solder alloys. Numerical simulation suggests that both testing configurations induce fatigue failure by the crack-opening mode. In the case of bending fatigue, the strain induced by the bending displacement is found to be sensitive to chip geometry, and it induces fatigue cracks mainly at the solder matrix adjacent to the printed circuit board interface. In case of shear fatigue, the failure location is firmly fixed at the solder neck, created by solder mask, where an abrupt change in the solder geometry occurs. Both methods conclude that the Coffin-Manson model is the most appropriate model for the isothermal mechanical fatigue of solder alloys. An analysis of fatigue characteristics using the frame of the Coffin-Manson model produces several insightful results, such as the reason why Pb-free alloys show higher fatigue resistance than Sn-Pb alloys even if they are generally more brittle. Our analysis suggests that it is related to higher work hardening. All these results indicate that mechanical fatigue can be an extremely useful method for fast screening of defective package structures and also in gaining a better understanding of fatigue failure mechanism and prediction of reliability in solder joints.

  16. Current activities in standardization of high-temperature, low-cycle-fatigue testing techniques in the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Ellis, J. Rodney; Swindeman, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard E606-80 is the most often used recommended testing practice for low-cycle-fatigue (LCF) testing in the United States. The standard was first adopted in 1977 for LCF testing at room temperature and was modified in 1980 to include high-temperature testing practices. Current activity within ASTM is aimed at extending the E606-80 recommended practices to LCF under thermomechanical conditions, LCF in high-pressure hydrogen, and LCF in metal-matrix composite materials. Interlaboratory testing programs conducted to generate a technical base for modifying E606-80 for the aforementioned LCF test types are discussed.

  17. Interlaboratory study of the Charm ROSA Safe Level Aflatoxin M1 Quantitative lateral flow test for raw bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Salter, Robert; Douglas, David; Tess, Mark; Markovsky, Bob; Saul, Steven J

    2006-01-01

    An interlaboratory study of 21 public health, state agriculture, and industry laboratories in the United States tested raw commingled bovine milk containing aflatoxin M1 using the Charm Rapid One Step Assay (ROSA) Safe Level Aflatoxin M1 Quantitative lateral flow method. Blind coded sample pairs were fortified with 0, 300, 350, 400, 450, 500, and 550 parts per trillion (ppt) aflatoxin M1. A ROSA reader quantitatively interpreted test strips with ppt readings. Readings < or = 400 ppt were interpreted as negative, and readings >400 ppt were interpreted as positive. Initial positive samples were subsequently assayed 2 additional times. If both retest results were >400 ppt, the sample was called positive/ actionable relative to U.S. and Codex levels, 500 ppt. The concentration of 400 ppt was chosen for the positive/negative interpretation to provide 90% sensitivity with 95% confidence at the 500 ppt legislative level. The combined false negative rate was <5% (4 of 83) for samples at 500 and 550 ppt. The false violatives at 0, 300, 350, 400, and 450 ppt (n = 42 at each level) were 0, 0, 21, 14, and 93%, respectively. The 90% positive concentration with 95% confidence was 503 ppt by probit analysis. The average intralaboratory repeatability was 11% and average interlaboratory reproducibility was 13% for the fortified sample pairs. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the study samples by 5 laboratories showed 38% false negatives with the 500 and 550 ppt samples, and a 0% false-violative rate with samples less than the 500 ppt action level.

  18. Precision of the EPA Seven-Day Fathead Minnow Larval Survival and Growth Test: Intra- and interlaboratory study: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeGraeve, G.M.; Cooney, J.D.; Pollock, T.L.; Reichenbach, N.G.; Dean, J.H.; Marcus, M.D.; McIntyre, D.O.

    1989-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has recently developed a ''Seven-Day Fathead Minnow Larval Survival and Growth Test'' for measuring the toxicity of effluents. This study evaluated the intra- and interlaboratory variability of this seven-day test using two reference toxicants (sodium pentachlorophenate and potassium dichromate), two treated refinery effluents, and one untreated internal utility waste stream. Ten different laboratories, representing academia, private industry, contractors, State EPA and US EPA participated in the study. The reference toxicants were tested twice during two separate test periods and each industrial effluent was treated once during a single period. Weight NOEC values were generally similar to those for survival, but had substantially greater variability than survival NOEC values. Increasing the number of replicate test chambers from two to three increased the test sensitivity and decreased the variability in NOEC values. Overall this chronic test procedure was moderately easy to carry-out for experienced laboratories and appears to be a precise method for estimating toxicity. The laboratories were able to successfully complete 126 of 140 tests. Nine of the 14 unsuccessful completed tests were invalid because survival of larvae in control exposures was below the US EPA's survival criterion of 80% for chronic bioassays. 26 refs., 13 figs., 40 tabs.

  19. Rolling element fatigue testing of gear materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    Rolling element fatigue lives of eleven alloys were evaluated. The eleven alloys studied were three nitriding alloys (Super Nitralloy, Nitralloy 135, and Nitralloy N), four case carburizing alloys (AISI 9310, CBS 600, CBS 1000M and Vasco X-2), and four throughhardening alloys (Vasco Matrix II,AISI W-1, AISI S-2 and AISI O-2). Several different heat treatments and/or melting processes were studied on the three carburizing alloy steels. Metallurgical analyses were made before and after the RC rig tests. Test data were statistically analyzed using the Weibull distribution function. B-10 lives were compared versus VIM-VAR AISI M-50 and carburized VAR AISI 9310, as reference alloys.

  20. Multi-axial fatigue testing machine

    SciTech Connect

    Sallberg, D.W.; Lawson, T.J.; Cardon, M.H.

    1989-02-07

    A testing machine is described for multi-axis fatigue testing of a component having inner and outer elements subject to linear and rotational forces about different axes comprising a base, first, second and third hydraulic actuators secured to the base, hydraulic pressure means and control means coupled to the actuators for controlled operation of the actuators, gimbal means comprising first and second gimbals mounted on the base and interconnected for rotation about mutually perpendicular axes, the first gimbal having means for attachment to one of the elements, means for substantially independently coupling the first and second actuators to the first and second gimbals respectively so that each actuator effects rocking movement of one gimbal without inputting torque about the axis of the other gimbal, and means for attaching the third actuator to the other of the elements, whereby the three actuators independently and controllably apply loads to the component about three axes of motion.

  1. Eddy Current Method for Fatigue Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Todhunter, Ronald G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor using a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks and material loss in high conductivity material. A ferrous shield isolates a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil. Use of the magnetic shield produces a null voltage output across the receiving coil in presence of an unflawed sample. Redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws. eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. Maximum sensor output is obtained when positioned symmetrically above the crack. By obtaining position of maximum sensor output, it is possible to track the fault and locate the area surrounding its tip. Accuracy of tip location is enhanced by two unique features of the sensor; a very high signal-to-noise ratio of the probe's output resulting in an extremely smooth signal peak across the fault, and a rapidly decaying sensor output outside a small area surrounding the crack tip enabling the search region to be clearly defined. Under low frequency operation, material thinning due to corrosion causes incomplete shielding of the pick-up coil. Low frequency output voltage of the probe is therefore a direct indicator of thickness of the test sample. Fatigue testing a conductive material is accomplished by applying load to the material, applying current to the sensor, scanning the material with the sensor, monitoring the sensor output signal, adjusting material load based on the sensor output signal of the sensor, and adjusting position of the sensor based on its output signal.

  2. Fatigue test of RC beams strengthened with prestressed CFLs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinyan; Huang, Peiyan; Liu, Guangwan; Xie, Jianhe

    2008-11-01

    Applying prestress to fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) can be used more efficiently since a greater portion energy of its tensile capacity is engaged. Based on carbon fiber laminate (CFL), fatigue tests are made to find out the fatigue behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with prestressed CFL. The interfacial debonding is a main failure mode for RC beams strengthened with prestressed CFLs under the cyclic loading. Furthermore, it has been found that the stress value of CFLs decide whether the additional prestressing has a negative or positive effect on the fatigue behavior of the strengthened beam, and the excessive prestressing would reduce the fatigue life of the strengthened beam.

  3. Inter-laboratory study of human in vitro toxicogenomics-based tests as alternative methods for evaluating chemical carcinogenicity: a bioinformatics perspective.

    PubMed

    Herwig, R; Gmuender, H; Corvi, R; Bloch, K M; Brandenburg, A; Castell, J; Ceelen, L; Chesne, C; Doktorova, T Y; Jennen, D; Jennings, P; Limonciel, A; Lock, E A; McMorrow, T; Phrakonkham, P; Radford, R; Slattery, C; Stierum, R; Vilardell, M; Wittenberger, T; Yildirimman, R; Ryan, M; Rogiers, V; Kleinjans, J

    2016-09-01

    The assessment of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals with alternative, human-based in vitro systems has become a major goal of toxicogenomics. The central read-out of these assays is the transcriptome, and while many studies exist that explored the gene expression responses of such systems, reports on robustness and reproducibility, when testing them independently in different laboratories, are still uncommon. Furthermore, there is limited knowledge about variability induced by the data analysis protocols. We have conducted an inter-laboratory study for testing chemical carcinogenicity evaluating two human in vitro assays: hepatoma-derived cells and hTERT-immortalized renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, representing liver and kidney as major target organs. Cellular systems were initially challenged with thirty compounds, genome-wide gene expression was measured with microarrays, and hazard classifiers were built from this training set. Subsequently, each system was independently established in three different laboratories, and gene expression measurements were conducted using anonymized compounds. Data analysis was performed independently by two separate groups applying different protocols for the assessment of inter-laboratory reproducibility and for the prediction of carcinogenic hazard. As a result, both workflows came to very similar conclusions with respect to (1) identification of experimental outliers, (2) overall assessment of robustness and inter-laboratory reproducibility and (3) re-classification of the unknown compounds to the respective toxicity classes. In summary, the developed bioinformatics workflows deliver accurate measures for inter-laboratory comparison studies, and the study can be used as guidance for validation of future carcinogenicity assays in order to implement testing of human in vitro alternatives to animal testing.

  4. Rolling element fatigue testing of gear materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    Rolling element fatigue lives of nine alloys were evaluated in Rolling Contact (RC) rigs. Test conditions included a Hertzian stress at 4,826 MPa (700 ksi), a rolling speed of 6.23 m/sec (245 in/sec.). Tests were run with a Type I oil (MIL-L-7808G) at room temperature. B-10 lives (10% failure rate) of alloys were compared versus reference alloys, VIM-VAR AISI M-50 and VAR AISI 9310. Six case carburizing alloys (AISI 9310, CBS600, CBS1000M, EX00014, Vasco X-2 and EX00053) and three through-hardening alloys (AISI M-50, VascoMax 350 and Vasco Matrix 2 evaluated, showed RCF performance inferior or equivalent to that of AISI 9310 and AISI M-50. It was also found that the effects of vacuum melting processes, different tempering temperatures, freezing cycle during heat treating, shot peening, gold plating and chrome plating employed in the present investigation did not significantly affect RCF life.

  5. An interlaboratory study to test instrument performance of hydrogen dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, T.B.

    2001-01-01

    An interlaboratory comparison of forty isotope-ratio mass spectrometers of different ages from several vendors has been performed to test 2H/1H performance with hydrogen gases of three different isotopic compositions. The isotope-ratio results (unsufficiently corrected for H3+ contribution to the m/z = 3 collector, uncorrected for valve leakage in the change-over valves, etc.) expressed relative to one of these three gases covered a wide range of values: -630??? to -790??? for the second gas and -368??? to -462??? for the third gas. After normalizing the isotopic abundances of these test gases (linearly adjusting the ?? values so that the gases with the lowest and highest 2H content were identical for all laboratories), the standard deviation of the 40 measurements of the intermediate gas was a remarkably low 0.85???. It is concluded that the use of scaling factors is mandatory for providing accurate internationally comparable isotope-abundance values. Linear scaling for the isotope-ratio scales of gaseous hydrogen mass spectrometers is completely adequate. ?? Springer-Verlag 2001.

  6. Effect of Preloading on Fatigue Strength in Dynamic Fatigue Testing of Ceramic Materials at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1995-01-01

    Previously derived solutions of fatigue strength as a function of preloading were verified by applying preloads to elevated temperature dynamic fatigue tests of 96 wt% alumina at 1000 C and NC 132 silicon nitride at 1100 C. The technique was found very useful in identification and control of the governing failure mechanism when multiple failure mechanisms, such as slow crack growth, creep and oxidation occurred simultaneously at elevated temperatures.

  7. Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help you find out what's causing your fatigue and recommend ways to relieve it. Fatigue itself is not a disease. Medical problems, treatments, and personal habits can add to fatigue. These include Taking certain medicines, such as antidepressants, ...

  8. Hydraulic servo system increases accuracy in fatigue testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, G. V.; Kibler, K. S.

    1967-01-01

    Hydraulic servo system increases accuracy in applying fatigue loading to a specimen under test. An error sensing electronic control loop, coupled to the hydraulic proportional closed loop cyclic force generator, provides an accurately controlled peak force to the specimen.

  9. Low-cycle fatigue testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieurade, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    The good design of highly stressed mechanical components requires accurate knowledge of the service behavior of materials. The main methods for solving the problems of designers are: determination of the mechanical properties of the material after cyclic stabilization; plotting of resistance to plastic deformation curves; effect of temperature on the life on low cycle fatigue; and simulation of notched parts behavior.

  10. Interlaboratory Profiency Testing trial on the Detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxins types SEA to SEE in food in Germany 2013.

    PubMed

    Fetsch, Alexandra; Steege, Katja; Leeser, Daniel; Krause, Gladys

    2016-01-01

    In the autumn 2013, the National Reference Laboratory for coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS) including Staphylococcus (S.) aureus (NRL-Staph) at the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment has organized its first interlaboratory profiency testing (ILPT) trial for the detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE) types SEA to SEE in food. The purpose of the ILPT was to assess the analytical competence of the official laboratories of the Federal German "Länder"authorities. Moreover, it was the intention to gain an overview of the standard methods implemented in the participating laboratories for the purpose of SE detection in food. Five cream cheese samples at three different contamination levels (blank, low, and high) were sent to each participant. In total, 15 laboratories participated to the ILPT: 14 laboratories from 11 Federal German "Länder", and the European Reference Laboratory for CPS including S. aureus (EU-RL for CPS). Data sets from 14 participating laboratories were included in the analysis. Overall, a specificity of 100% (14/14 true negative results), a sensitivity of 55% (31/56 true positive results), and an accuracy of 64% (45/60 true results) was achieved. The majority of participants (9/15) used other analytical methods for the detection of SE in food than the suggested European Screening Method (ESM) v5. To conclude on the ILPT in general it is to state that the majority of participating laboratories failed to correctly identify SE-low-contaminated samples. Further efforts are necessary to improve the analytical capacity and sensitivity as regards the detection of SE in food in Germany. PMID:27529990

  11. Interlaboratory Profiency Testing trial on the Detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxins types SEA to SEE in food in Germany 2013.

    PubMed

    Fetsch, Alexandra; Steege, Katja; Leeser, Daniel; Krause, Gladys

    2016-01-01

    In the autumn 2013, the National Reference Laboratory for coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS) including Staphylococcus (S.) aureus (NRL-Staph) at the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment has organized its first interlaboratory profiency testing (ILPT) trial for the detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE) types SEA to SEE in food. The purpose of the ILPT was to assess the analytical competence of the official laboratories of the Federal German "Länder"authorities. Moreover, it was the intention to gain an overview of the standard methods implemented in the participating laboratories for the purpose of SE detection in food. Five cream cheese samples at three different contamination levels (blank, low, and high) were sent to each participant. In total, 15 laboratories participated to the ILPT: 14 laboratories from 11 Federal German "Länder", and the European Reference Laboratory for CPS including S. aureus (EU-RL for CPS). Data sets from 14 participating laboratories were included in the analysis. Overall, a specificity of 100% (14/14 true negative results), a sensitivity of 55% (31/56 true positive results), and an accuracy of 64% (45/60 true results) was achieved. The majority of participants (9/15) used other analytical methods for the detection of SE in food than the suggested European Screening Method (ESM) v5. To conclude on the ILPT in general it is to state that the majority of participating laboratories failed to correctly identify SE-low-contaminated samples. Further efforts are necessary to improve the analytical capacity and sensitivity as regards the detection of SE in food in Germany.

  12. Using an interlaboratory study to revise methods for conducting 10-d to 42-d water or sediment toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivey, Chris D.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Hammer, Edward J.; Mount, David R.; Hockett, J. Russell; Norberg-King, Teresa J.; Soucek, Dave; Taylor, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to refine US Environmental Protection Agency, ASTM International, and Environment Canada standard methods for conducting 42-d reproduction tests with Hyalella azteca in water or in sediment. Modifications to the H. azteca method include better-defined ionic composition requirements for exposure water (i.e., >15 mg/L of chloride and >0.02 mg/L of bromide) and improved survival, growth, and reproduction with alternate diets provided as increased rations over time in water-only or whole-sediment toxicity tests. A total of 24 laboratories volunteered to participate in the present interlaboratory study evaluating the performance of H. azteca in 42-d studies in control sand or control sediment using the refined methods. Improved growth and reproduction of H. azteca was observed with 2 alternate diets of 1) ramped diatoms (Thalassiosira weissflogii) + ramped Tetramin or 2) yeast–cerophyll–trout chow (YCT) + ramped Tetramin, especially when compared with results from the traditional diet of 1.8 mg YCT/d. Laboratories were able to meet proposed test acceptability criteria and in most cases had lower variation in growth or reproduction compared with previous interlaboratory studies using the traditional YCT diet. Laboratory success in conducting 42-d H. azteca exposures benefited from adherence to several key requirements of the detailed testing, culturing, and handling methods. Results from the present interlaboratory study are being used to help revise standard methods for conducting 10-d to 42-d water or sediment toxicity exposures with H. azteca.

  13. The breaking load method - Results and statistical modification from the ASTM interlaboratory test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, E. L.; Emptage, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    The breaking load test provides quantitative stress corrosion cracking data by determining the residual strength of tension specimens that have been exposed to corrosive environments. Eight laboratories have participated in a cooperative test program under the auspices of ASTM Committee G-1 to evaluate the new test method. All eight laboratories were able to distinguish between three tempers of aluminum alloy 7075. The statistical analysis procedures that were used in the test program do not work well in all situations. An alternative procedure using Box-Cox transformations shows a great deal of promise. An ASTM standard method has been drafted which incorporates the Box-Cox procedure.

  14. Structural fatigue test results for large wind turbine blade sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    In order to provide quantitative information on the operating life capabilities of wind turbine rotor blade concepts for root-end load transfer, a series of cantilever beam fatigue tests was conducted. Fatigue tests were conducted on a laminated wood blade with bonded steel studs, a low cost steel spar (utility pole) with a welded flange, a utility pole with additional root-end thickness provided by a swaged collar, fiberglass spars with both bonded and nonbonded fittings, and, finally, an aluminum blade with a bolted steel fitting (Lockheed Mod-0 blade). Photographs, data, and conclusions for each of these tests are presented. In addition, the aluminum blade test results are compared to field failure information; these results provide evidence that the cantilever beam type of fatigue test is a satisfactory method for obtaining qualitative data on blade life expectancy and for identifying structurally underdesigned areas (hot spots).

  15. Various Fatigue Testing of Polycrystalline Silicon Microcantilever Beam in Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong; Hocheng; Hung, Jeng-Nan; Guu, Yunn-Horng

    2008-06-01

    With the vast potential of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology, the reliability is essential for the successful applications of microdevices. Polycrystalline silicon is one of the most often used structural materials in microdevices. Tension testing for fatigue life of this material has been investigated since past years. This paper presents a micro-actuator-based bending testing system as well as a MTS Tytron250 micro-tensile-force testing machine to study the fatigue of microbeams in bending. The polycrystalline silicon microcantilever beams are fabricated on silicon wafer. The influence of various dimensions and stress on the fatigue endurance is studied when an external force is loaded on the microcantilever beam. The flexural strength of beams are calculated by the ANSYS. Based on the experimental results and ANSYS analysis, it shows that the longer specimen reduces the stresses when the displacement, width and thickness are kept the same. When the width varies, the larger width results in higher stresses. The fatigue life lies between 9.1 ×105-1.53 ×107 cycles in use of the testing machine. For microactuator testing experiment, the fatigue life persists up to million cycles without failure. The obtained results are compared with the references of different testing methods.

  16. Summary report for the interlaboratory round robin on the MCC-1 static leach test method

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, J.W.; Daniel, J.L.

    1982-03-01

    The MCC-1 Static Leach Test Method Round Robbin (RR) was conducted by the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) over a period of 15 months, 1980-82. A total of 25 laboratories provided data in connection with the RR. All together these laboratories tested 769 waste form specimens using the 1980 draft of MCC-1. The specimens tested were approximately one gram wafers cut by the laboratory from samples provided by MCC: NBS borosilicate glass; core dillings of basalt from the Hanford Reservation; and MCC Type 76-68 simulated waste glass. These specimens were tested for 3, 7, 14, 28 days in ovens at 90/sup 0/C using three different leachants. The resulting leachates were analyzed for elemental concentrations, and elemental mass losses were calculated. The specimens were weighed before and after leaching to determine specimen mass loss. This summary report on the round robin has two major parts: Part I provides plots of the data (which are listed in an Appendix) and summary statistics so that the participating laboratories can compare performance with other laboratories. From these plots and summaries, each laboratory also can identify its problem areas. Part II discusses the statistical analysis of the data, and characterizes the precision of the MCC-1 Static Leach Test Method at the time the RR was conducted. The precision characterization indicates that the MCC and waste form community need to institute tighter control of MCC-1 and similar testing practices to reduce the impact of between-laboratory differences on statistical comparisons.

  17. Assessing variability in chemical acute toxicity of unionid mussels: Influence of intra- and inter-laboratory testing, life stage, and species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raimondo, Sandy; Lilavois, Crystal R.; Lee, Larisa; Augspurger, Tom; Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Bauer, Candice R.; Hammer, Edward J.; Barron, Mace G.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a toxicity database for unionid mussels to examine the extent of intra- and inter-laboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles; the extent of differential sensitivity of the two life stages; and the variation in sensitivity among commonly tested mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea, Utterbackia imbecillis, Villosa iris), commonly tested cladocerans (Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia) and fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Pimephales promelas, Lepomis macrochirus). The results of these analyses indicate intra-laboratory variability for median effect concentrations (EC50) averaged about 2 fold for both life stages, while inter-laboratory variability averaged 3.6 fold for juvenile mussels and 6.3 fold for glochidia. The EC50s for juveniles and glochidia were within a factor of 2 of each other for 50% of paired records across chemicals, with juveniles more sensitive than glochidia by more than 2 fold for 33% of the comparisons made between life stages. There was a high concurrence of the sensitivity of commonly tested L. siliquoidea, U. imbecillis, and V. iris to that of other mussels. However, this concurrence decreases as the taxonomic distance of the commonly tested cladocerans and fish to mussels increases. The compiled mussel database and determination of data variability will advance risk assessments by including more robust species sensitivity distributions, interspecies correlation estimates, and availability of taxon-specific empirically derived application factors for risk assessment.

  18. OECD validation study to assess intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility of the zebrafish embryo toxicity test for acute aquatic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Busquet, François; Strecker, Ruben; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Braunbeck, Thomas; Carr, Gregory J; Cenijn, Peter; Fochtman, Przemyslaw; Gourmelon, Anne; Hübler, Nicole; Kleensang, André; Knöbel, Melanie; Kussatz, Carola; Legler, Juliette; Lillicrap, Adam; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Polleichtner, Christian; Rzodeczko, Helena; Salinas, Edward; Schneider, Katharina E; Scholz, Stefan; van den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; van der Ven, Leo T M; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Weigt, Stefan; Witters, Hilda; Halder, Marlies

    2014-08-01

    The OECD validation study of the zebrafish embryo acute toxicity test (ZFET) for acute aquatic toxicity testing evaluated the ZFET reproducibility by testing 20 chemicals at 5 different concentrations in 3 independent runs in at least 3 laboratories. Stock solutions and test concentrations were analytically confirmed for 11 chemicals. Newly fertilised zebrafish eggs (20/concentration and control) were exposed for 96h to chemicals. Four apical endpoints were recorded daily as indicators of acute lethality: coagulation of the embryo, lack of somite formation, non-detachment of the tail bud from the yolk sac and lack of heartbeat. Results (LC50 values for 48/96h exposure) show that the ZFET is a robust method with a good intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility (CV<30%) for most chemicals and laboratories. The reproducibility was lower (CV>30%) for some very toxic or volatile chemicals, and chemicals tested close to their limit of solubility. The ZFET is now available as OECD Test Guideline 236. Considering the high predictive capacity of the ZFET demonstrated by Belanger et al. (2013) in their retrospective analysis of acute fish toxicity and fish embryo acute toxicity data, the ZFET is ready to be considered for acute fish toxicity for regulatory purposes.

  19. Interlaboratory drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by a radiometric procedure and two conventional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqi, S.H.; Hawkins, J.E.; Laszlo, A.

    1985-12-01

    A total of 224 recent isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from 163 patients selected to have multidrug resistance were tested against streptomycin (SM), isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol (EMB) by the rapid radiometric BACTEC method and two conventional proportion methods: the World Health Organization (WHO) method, using Lowenstein-Jensen medium; and the Veterans Administration reference laboratory for mycobacteria (VA) method, using Middlebrook 7H10 agar medium. The results were compared, focusing on the concentrations of the drugs in all three methods. Among the four drugs tested, most of the discrepancies in measured activity were observed with SM and EMB, generally because of differences in the drug concentrations used by the three methods. A 4-micrograms amount of SM in the BACTEC method was found to be slightly less active than 10 micrograms in the VA method and significantly more active than 4 micrograms of dihydrostreptomycin in the WHO method. With EMB, 2.5 micrograms in BACTEC was similar to 5 micrograms in the VA method and 2 micrograms in the WHO method, while 10 micrograms in the BACTEC method was found to be more active than 10 and 2 micrograms in the VA and WHO methods, respectively. To attain close agreement, drug concentrations used in the BACTEC method should be carefully selected when a comparison is to be made with any conventional method employed in a laboratory. Standardization of in vitro susceptibility testing is greatly needed to achieve uniformity among the test methods used to evaluate tuberculosis therapeutics.

  20. Interlaboratory comparison of diagnostic testing methods for bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NVSL, in collaboration with ARS, developed a proficiency panel for bovine viral diarrhea virus testing. Twenty-eight participants used the panel for virus detection by antigen ELISA, virus isolation, or PCR. The panel consisted of 15 or 16 diluted serum and buffy coat samples from known negati...

  1. Fatigue Testing of TBC on Structural Steel by Cyclic Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musalek, Radek; Kovarik, Ondrej; Medricky, Jan; Curry, Nicholas; Bjorklund, Stefan; Nylen, Per

    2015-01-01

    For applications with variable loading, fatigue performance of coated parts is of utmost importance. In this study, fatigue performance of conventional structural steel coated with thermal barrier coating (TBC) was evaluated in cyclic bending mode by "SF-Test" device. Testing was carried out at each stage of the TBC preparation process, i.e., for as-received and grit-blasted substrates, as well as for samples with Ni-based bond-coat and complete TBC: bond-coat with YSZ-based top-coat. Comparison of results obtained for different loading amplitudes supplemented by fractographic analysis enabled identification of dominating failure mechanisms and demonstrated applicability of the high-frequency resonant bending test for evaluation of fatigue resistance alteration at each stage of the TBC deposition process.

  2. Hybrid bearing technology for advanced turbomachinery: Rolling contact fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the basic structure and results to date of a major ARPA funded effort to provide a tribological performance database on ceramic bearing materials and their interaction with standard bearing steels. Program efforts include studies of material physical properties, machining characteristics, and tribological performance. The majority of the testing completed to date focuses on rolling contact fatigue testing of the ceramic materials, including efforts to arrive at optimum approaches to evaluating ceramic/steel hybrid combinations in rolling contact fatigue.

  3. Fatigue Testing of Wing Beam by the Resonance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleakney, William M

    1938-01-01

    Preliminary fatigue tests on two aluminum-alloy wing-beam specimens subjected to reversed axial loading are described. The motion used consists in incorporating one or two reciprocating motors in a resonance system of which the specimen is the spring element. A description is given of the reciprocating motors, and of the method of assembling and adjusting the vibrating system. The results indicate that the method is well adapted to fatigue tests of not only uniform wing beams but also wing beams with asymmetrical local reinforcements.

  4. Fatigue in the military: towards a fatigue detection test based on the saccadic velocity.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Piedra, Carolina; Rieiro, Héctor; Suárez, Juan; Rios-Tejada, Francisco; Catena, Andrés; Di Stasi, Leandro Luigi

    2016-09-01

    Fatigue is a major contributing factor to operational errors. Therefore, the validation of objective and sensitive indices to detect fatigue is critical to prevent accidents and catastrophes. Whereas tests based on saccadic velocity (SV) have become popular, their sensitivity in the military is not yet clear, since most research has been conducted in laboratory settings using not fully validated instruments. Field studies remain scarce, especially in extreme conditions such as real flights. Here, we investigated the effects of real, long flights on SV. We assessed five newly commissioned military helicopter pilots during their aviation training. Pilots flew Sikorsky S-76C helicopters, under instrumental flight rules, for more than 2 h (ca. 150 min). Eye movements were recorded before and after the flight with an eye tracker using a standard guided-saccade task. We also collected subjective ratings of fatigue. SV significantly decreased from the Pre-Flight to the Post-Flight session in all pilots by around 3% (range: 1-4%). Subjective ratings showed the same tendency. We provide conclusive evidence about the high sensitivity of fatigue tests based on SV in real flight conditions, even in small samples. This result might offer military medical departments a valid and useful biomarker of warfighter physiological state. PMID:27531394

  5. Fatigue Testing of Abrasive Water Jet Cut Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Dahl, Michael E.; Williford, Ralph E.

    2009-06-08

    Battelle Memorial Institute as part of its U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Contract No. DE-AC05-76RL01830 to operate the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provides technology assistance to qualifying small businesses in association with a Technology Assistance Program (TAP). Qualifying companies are eligible to receive a set quantity of labor associated with specific technical assistance. Having applied for a TAP agreement to assist with fatigue characterization of Abrasive Water Jet (AWJ) cut titanium specimens, the OMAX Corporation was awarded TAP agreement 09-02. This program was specified to cover dynamic testing and analysis of fatigue specimens cut from titanium alloy Ti-6%Al-4%V via AWJ technologies. In association with the TAP agreement, a best effort agreement was made to characterize fatigue specimens based on test conditions supplied by OMAX.

  6. Flexural fatigue of hollow rolling elements. [fatigue tests on hollow cylindrical bars and bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, E. N.; Parker, R. J.; Dietrich, M. W.

    1976-01-01

    Hollow cylindrical bars were tested in the rolling-contact fatigue tester to determine the effects of material and outside diameter to inside diameter (OD/ID) ratios of 2.0, 1.6, 1.4, and 1.2 on fatigue failure mode and subsequent failure propagation. The range of applied loads with these OD/ID ratios resulted in maximum tangential tensile stresses ranging from 165 to 655 megapascals (24,000 to 95,000 psi) at the bore surface. Flexural failures of the hollow test bars occurred when this bore stress was 490 megapascals (71,000 psi) or greater with AISI 52100 hollow bars and 338 megapascals (49,000 psi) or greater with AISI M-50 hollow bars. Good correlation was obtained in relating the failures of these hollow bars with flexural failures of drilled balls from previously published full scale bearing tests.

  7. X-43A Rudder Spindle Fatigue Life Estimate and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Dawicke, David S.; Johnston, William M.; James, Mark A.; Simonsen, Micah; Mason, Brian H.

    2005-01-01

    Fatigue life analyses were performed using a standard strain-life approach and a linear cumulative damage parameter to assess the effect of a single accidental overload on the fatigue life of the Haynes 230 nickel-base superalloy X-43A rudder spindle. Because of a limited amount of information available about the Haynes 230 material, a series of tests were conducted to replicate the overload and in-service conditions for the spindle and corroborate the analysis. Both the analytical and experimental results suggest that the spindle will survive the anticipated flight loads.

  8. Final report on low-cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue testing of salt-filled alloy 800 specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Kaae, J L

    1982-05-01

    Uniaxial low-cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue tests have been carried out on hollow alloy 800 specimens that were either filled with air or with a molten mixture of sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate and an oxidizer. Low-cycle fatigue tests were carried out at 1200/sup 0/F and 650/sup 0/F by cycling the strain continuously between equal mangitude of tensile and compressive values at a rate of 4 x 10/sup -3/sec/sup -1/ until failure. The creep-fatigue tests were carried out at 1200/sup 0/F. The loading cycle differed from that of low-cycle fatigue testing only in the imposition of a hold at the peak compressive strain in each cycle. Cracks always initiated on the inner surface of the hollow specimen, and therefore, corrosive effects on crack propagation and initiation were controlled by the environment within the specimen cavity. In common with tests carried out earlier on steam-filled alloy 800 specimens, at 1200/sup 0/F in the presence of molten salt the heat of alloy 800 with the lower carbon content had a higher fatigue strength than the heat with the higher carbon content even though different heats were used in the two testing programs. The fatigue strength of the two heats of material in the presence of molten salt at 650/sup 0/F were about the same. Tests with air-filled specimens indicated that the presence of the molten salt degraded the fatigue life at 1200/sup 0/F but did not affect the creep fatigue life, while the presence of steam enhanced both the fatigue life and the creep-fatigue life.

  9. Fatigue testing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Nagy, A.; Popelar, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    A plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating for diesel engines were fatigue tested. Candidate thermal barrier coating materials were fatigue screened and a data base was generated for the selected candidate material. Specimen configurations are given for the bend fatigue tests, along with test setup, specimen preparation, test matrix and procedure, and data analysis.

  10. Rolling-Element Fatigue Testing and Data Analysis - A Tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlcek, Brian L.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2011-01-01

    In order to rank bearing materials, lubricants and other design variables using rolling-element bench type fatigue testing of bearing components and full-scale rolling-element bearing tests, the investigator needs to be cognizant of the variables that affect rolling-element fatigue life and be able to maintain and control them within an acceptable experimental tolerance. Once these variables are controlled, the number of tests and the test conditions must be specified to assure reasonable statistical certainty of the final results. There is a reasonable correlation between the results from elemental test rigs with those results obtained with full-scale bearings. Using the statistical methods of W. Weibull and L. Johnson, the minimum number of tests required can be determined. This paper brings together and discusses the technical aspects of rolling-element fatigue testing and data analysis as well as making recommendations to assure quality and reliable testing of rolling-element specimens and full-scale rolling-element bearings.

  11. Comparing Rotary Bend Wire Fatigue Test Methods at Different Test Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Jason D.; Gutierrez, Erick J.

    2015-12-01

    Given its relatively simple setup and ability to produce results quickly, rotary bend fatigue testing is becoming commonplace in the medical device industry and is the subject of a new standard test method ASTM E2948-14. Although some research has been conducted to determine if results differ for different rotary bend fatigue test setups or test speeds, these parameters have not been extensively studied together. In this work, we investigate the effects of these two parameters on the fatigue life of three commonly used medical device alloys (ASTM F2063 nitinol, ASTM F138 stainless steel, and ASTM F1058 cobalt chromium). Results with three different rotary bend fatigue test setups revealed no difference in fatigue life among those setups. Increasing test speed, however, between 100 and 35,000 RPM led to an increased fatigue life for all three alloys studied (average number of cycles to fracture increased between 2.0 and 5.1 times between slowest and fastest test speed). Supplemental uniaxial tension tests of stainless steel wire at varying strain rates showed a strain rate dependence in the mechanical response which could in part explain the increased fatigue life at faster test speeds. How exactly strain rate dependence might affect the fatigue properties of different alloys at different alternating strain values requires further study. Given the difference in loading rates between benchtop fatigue tests and in vivo deformations, the potential for strain rate dependence should be considered when designing durability tests for medical devices and in extrapolating results of those tests to in vivo performance.

  12. Effects of Total SAT® Test Time on Performance and Fatigue. Research Notes. RN-37

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Phillip L.; Kanfer, Ruth; Wolman, Stacey D.

    2005-01-01

    The current study was designed to examine performance effects and fatigue effects associated with different total SAT testing times. In addition, the researchers examined personality, motivation, and other determinants of individual differences in examinee fatigue before, during, and after testing.

  13. Fatigue Tests with Random Flight Simulation Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schijve, J.

    1972-01-01

    Crack propagation was studied in a full-scale wing structure under different simulated flight conditions. Omission of low-amplitude gust cycles had a small effect on the crack rate. Truncation of the infrequently occurring high-amplitude gust cycles to a lower level had a noticeably accelerating effect on crack growth. The application of fail-safe load (100 percent limit load) effectively stopped subsequent crack growth under resumed flight-simulation loading. In another flight-simulation test series on sheet specimens, the variables studied are the design stress level and the cyclic frequency of the random gust loading. Inflight mean stresses vary from 5.5 to 10.0 kg/sq mm. The effect of the stress level is larger for the 2024 alloy than for the 7075 alloy. Three frequencies were employed: namely, 10 cps, 1 cps, and 0.1 cps. The frequency effect was small. The advantages and limitations of flight-simulation tests are compared with those of alternative test procedures such as constant-amplitude tests, program tests, and random-load tests. Various testing purposes are considered. The variables of flight-simulation tests are listed and their effects are discussed. A proposal is made for performing systematic flight-simulation tests in such a way that the compiled data may be used as a source of reference.

  14. [Results from a German interlaboratory test to establish the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration of bacteria from animals].

    PubMed

    Wallmann, Jürgen; Böttner, Alexander; Hafez, H Mohamed; Kehrenberg, Corinna; Kietzmann, Manfred; Klarmann, Dieter; Klein, Günter; Krabisch, Peter; Kühn, Tilman; Luhofer, Gabriele; Richter, Angelika; Schwarz, Stefan; Sigge, Claudia; Traeder, Wolfgang; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Werckenthin, Christiane; Zschiesche, Eva

    2005-01-01

    In accordance with NCCLS guideline M31-A2, the DVG working group "antimicrobial resistance" developed a standard operating procedure (SOP) for the determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antimicrobial agents by broth microdilution. This SOP was evaluated for its fitness for use in a national interlaboratory test. A total of 32 participating laboratories tested five strains (including two internationally accepted reference strains and three field strains representing in total three different bacterial species) three times at a one week interval each, using uniform microtitre plates. In 31 of the 32 laboratories more than 80% of MIC determinations performed yielded values in the expected range. In total 94.0% of the results were reproducible, with a lesser deviation of 4.0% from the expected values for laboratories performing MIC determination as a matter of routine (46.9%), compared to 7.9% for laboratories without such routine (53.1%). Comparing the consistency of results on the basis of the tested strains, a higher reproducibility of the results was observed for reference strains (96.1%) than for field strains (92.6%). In particular results obtained for the Streptococcus uberis field strain were afflicted with a higher error ratio (98 deviations from the expected values). Among the tested antimicrobial agents, a higher variability of results was recorded only for gentamicin with 16.7% divergent MIC determinations (mean value 6.0%). The high reproducibility of the results confirmed by this interlaboratory study underlines the robustness of the developed SOP as well as broth microdilutions as the method of choice for MIC determina tion.

  15. Fatigue testing of corrugated and Teflon hoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Steve M.; Swanson, Theodore D.; Costello, Frederick A.

    1990-01-01

    Single and two-phase heat transport systems for the thermal control of large space facilities require fluid lines that traverse joints and either rotate or move in some other manner. Flexible hoses are being considered as one means of traversing these joints. To test the resilience of flexible hoses to bending stress, a test assembly was constructed to determine the number of flexing cycles the hoses could withstand before losing their ability to maintain a constant pressure. Corrugated metal hoses and Teflon hoses were tested at different pressures with nitrogen gas. The metal hoses had lives ranging from 30,000 to 100,000 flexing cycles. But, even after 400,000 cycles, the Teflon hoses remained essentially intact, though some leakage in the convoluted Teflon is noted.

  16. Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    Bennett RM. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 274. Thames TA, Karrh ...

  17. Evaluation of composite flattened tubular specimen. [fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liber, T.; Daniel, I. M.

    1978-01-01

    Flattened tubular specimens of graphite/epoxy, S-glass/epoxy, Kevlar-49/epoxy, and graphite/S-glass/epoxy hybrid materials were evaluated under static and cyclic uniaxial tensile loading and compared directly with flat coupon data of the same materials generated under corresponding loading conditions. Additional development for the refinement of the flattened specimen configuration and fabrication was required. Statically tested graphite/epoxy, S-glass/epoxy, and Kevlar 49/epoxy flattened tube specimens exhibit somewhat higher average strengths than their corresponding flat coupons. Flattened tube specimens of the graphite/S-glass/epoxy hybrid and the graphite/epoxy flattened tube specimens failed in parasitic modes with consequential lower strength than the corresponding flat coupons. Fatigue tested flattened tube specimens failed in parasitic modes resulting in lower fatigue strengths than the corresponding flat coupons.

  18. Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L

    2014-01-01

    Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

  19. OPCW Proficiency Test: A Practical Approach Also for Interlaboratory Test on Detection and Identification of Pesticides in Environmental Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Śliwakowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    An overview of general strategy, standard procedures, and critical points, which may be found during carrying out an OPCW Proficiency Test concerning detection and identification of scheduled compounds relevant to Chemical Weapon Convention, has been presented. The observations have been illustrated following the case of the Eight OPCW Designated Laboratories Proficiency Test, which was performed in the OPCW Laboratory in Rijswijk in November and December 2000. Various useful hints, comments, and practical observations concerning the case study have been included as well. The same methodology and procedures may be also applied for detection, identification, and environmental analyses of pesticides and biocides, especially organophosphorus compounds. PMID:24578644

  20. Development and Fatigue Testing of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. Durability of the coating systems remains a critical issue with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Thermal conductivity increase and coating degradation due to sintering and phase changes are known to be detrimental to coating performance. There is a need to characterize the coating thermal fatigue behavior and temperature limit, in order to potentially take full advantage of the current coating capability. In this study, thermal conductivity and cyclic fatigue behaviors of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings were evaluated under high temperature, large thermal gradient and thermal cycling conditions. The coating degradation and failure processes were assessed by real-time monitoring of the coating thermal conductivity under the test conditions. The ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation driving forces and failure modes under the cyclic thermal loads will be discussed in light of the high temperature mechanical fatigue and fracture testing results.

  1. Hot fire fatigue testing results for the compliant combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavli, Albert J.; Kazaroff, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    A hydrogen-oxygen subscale rocket combustion chamber was designed incorporating an advanced design concept to reduce strain and increase life. The design permits unrestrained thermal expansion of a circumferential direction and, thereby, provides structural compliance during the thermal cycling of hot-fire testing. The chamber was built and test fired at a chamber pressure of 4137 kN/sq m (600 psia) and a hydrogen-oxygen mixture ratio of 6.0. Compared with a conventional milled-channel configuration, the new structurally compliant chamber had a 134 or 287 percent increase in fatigue life, depending on the life predicted for the conventional configuration.

  2. Cognitive fatigue influences students’ performance on standardized tests

    PubMed Central

    Sievertsen, Hans Henrik; Gino, Francesca; Piovesan, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Using test data for all children attending Danish public schools between school years 2009/10 and 2012/13, we examine how the time of the test affects performance. Test time is determined by the weekly class schedule and computer availability at the school. We find that, for every hour later in the day, test performance decreases by 0.9% of an SD (95% CI, 0.7–1.0%). However, a 20- to 30-minute break improves average test performance by 1.7% of an SD (95% CI, 1.2–2.2%). These findings have two important policy implications: First, cognitive fatigue should be taken into consideration when deciding on the length of the school day and the frequency and duration of breaks throughout the day. Second, school accountability systems should control for the influence of external factors on test scores. PMID:26884183

  3. Design of a Compact Fatigue Tester for Testing Irradiated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hartsell, Brian; Campbell, Michael; Fitton, Michael; Hurh, Patrick; Ishida, Taku; Nakadaira, Takeshi

    2015-06-01

    A compact fatigue testing machine that can be easily inserted into a hot cell for characterization of irradiated materials is beneficial to help determine relative fatigue performance differences between new and irradiated material. Hot cell use has been carefully considered by limiting the size and weight of the machine, simplifying sample loading and test setup for operation via master-slave manipulator, and utilizing an efficient design to minimize maintenance. Funded from a US-Japan collaborative effort, the machine has been specifically designed to help characterize titanium material specimens. These specimens are flat cantilevered beams for initial studies, possibly utilizing samples irradiated at other sources of beam. The option to test spherically shaped samples cut from the T2K vacuum window is also available. The machine is able to test a sample to $10^7$ cycles in under a week, with options to count cycles and sense material failure. The design of this machine will be presented along with current status.

  4. Detection of fatigue cracks by nondestructive testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. T.; Delacy, T. J.; Stewart, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    The effectiveness was assessed of various NDT methods to detect small tight cracks by randomly introducing fatigue cracks into aluminum sheets. The study included optimizing NDT methods calibrating NDT equipment with fatigue cracked standards, and evaluating a number of cracked specimens by the optimized NDT methods. The evaluations were conducted by highly trained personnel, provided with detailed procedures, in order to minimize the effects of human variability. These personnel performed the NDT on the test specimens without knowledge of the flaw locations and reported on the flaws detected. The performance of these tests was measured by comparing the flaws detected against the flaws present. The principal NDT methods utilized were radiographic, ultrasonic, penetrant, and eddy current. Holographic interferometry, acoustic emission monitoring, and replication methods were also applied on a reduced number of specimens. Generally, the best performance was shown by eddy current, ultrasonic, penetrant and holographic tests. Etching provided no measurable improvement, while proof loading improved flaw detectability. Data are shown that quantify the performances of the NDT methods applied.

  5. Interlaboratory comparison in HercepTest assessment of HER2 protein status in invasive breast carcinoma fixed with various formalin-based fixatives.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Kaoru; Hatanaka, Yutaka; Kamihara, Yuki; Kato, Tomoyuki; Hata, Sakae; Akashi, Shizuka; Kato, Toshihiko; Koyatsu, Junichi; Tani, Yoichi; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2003-12-01

    Although formalin-based fixatives are used in pathologic laboratories, there is no strictly standardized fixation protocol in Japan. To examine interlaboratory variation caused by different conditions of fixation in the assessment of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2 status on pathologic tissues, 274 archival invasive breast carcinomas from 5 different laboratories were evaluated using the HercepTest. In 1 laboratory in which 10% neutral buffered formalin was used, as recommended by the manufacturer, the overexpression rate was 22.4% and fell within the statistical expected range (20%-30%) for HER2 overexpression in breast carcinomas. The overexpression rates in the other 4 laboratories, in which either 20% nonbuffered formalin or 15% neutral buffered formalin was used, were near the expected range for HER2 overexpression. To clarify the influence of prolonged formalin fixation on the HercepTest, we compared 1-day with 7-day fixations using 36 cases fixed with 20% nonbuffered formalin. Of the 36 cases, 7 showed 3+ staining with 1-day fixation and sustained the same scoring results with 7-day fixation, although the staining intensities in these cases were reduced with the prolonged fixation. These results indicated that the immunohistochemical assessment of HER2 status with the HercepTest was comparatively resistant to prolonged fixation conditions and provided stable staining results in positive cases, particularly 3+ patients.

  6. Cyclic fatigue testing of nickel-titanium endodontic instruments.

    PubMed

    Pruett, J P; Clement, D J; Carnes, D L

    1997-02-01

    Cyclic fatigue of nickel-titanium, engine-driven instruments was studied by determining the effect of canal curvature and operating speed on the breakage of Lightspeed instruments. A new method of canal curvature evaluation that addressed both angle and abruptness of curvature was introduced. Canal curvature was simulated by constructing six curved stainless-steel guide tubes with angles of curvature of 30, 45, or 60 degrees, and radii of curvature of 2 or 5 mm. Size #30 and #40 Light-speed instruments were placed through the guide tubes and the heads secured in the collet of a Mangtrol Dynamometer. A simulated operating load of 10 g-cm was applied. Instruments were able to rotate freely in the test apparatus at speeds of 750, 1300, or 2000 rpm until separation occurred. Cycles to failure were determined. Cycles to failure were not affected by rpm. Instruments did not separate at the head, but rather at the point of maximum flexure of the shaft, corresponding to the midpoint of curvature within the guide tube. The instruments with larger diameter shafts, #40, failed after significantly fewer cycles than did #30 instruments under identical test conditions. Multivariable analysis of variance indicated that cycles to failure significantly decreased as the radius of curvature decreased from 5 mm to 2 mm and as the angle of curvature increased greater than 30 degrees (p < 0.05, power = 0.9). Scanning electron microscopic evaluation revealed ductile fracture as the fatigue failure mode. These results indicate that, for nickel-titanium, engine-driven rotary instruments, the radius of curvature, angle of curvature, and instrument size are more important than operating speed for predicting separation. This study supports engineering concepts of cyclic fatigue failure and suggests that standardized fatigue tests of nickel-titanium rotary instruments should include dynamic operation in a flexed state. The results also suggest that the effect of the radius of curvature as an

  7. Conducting High Cycle Fatigue Strength Step Tests on Gamma TiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad; Draper, Sue; Pereira, J. Mike

    2002-01-01

    High cycle fatigue strength testing of gamma TiAl by the step test method is investigated. A design of experiments was implemented to determine if the coaxing effect occurred during testing. Since coaxing was not observed, step testing was deemed a suitable method to define the fatigue strength at 106 cycles.

  8. Mechanical Fatigue Testing of High Burnup Fuel for Transportation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2015-05-01

    This report describes testing designed to determine the ability of high burnup (HBU) (>45 GWd/MTU) spent fuel to maintain its integrity under normal conditions of transportation. An innovative system, Cyclic Integrated Reversible-bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT), has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to test and evaluate the mechanical behavior of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under conditions relevant to storage and transportation. The CIRFT system is composed of a U-frame equipped with load cells for imposing the pure bending loads on the SNF rod test specimen and measuring the in-situ curvature of the fuel rod during bending using a set up with three linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs).

  9. Flexure fatigue testing of 90 deg graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Ann Nancy W.

    1995-01-01

    A great deal of research has been performed characterizing the in-plane fiber-dominated properties, under both static and fatigue loading, of advanced composite materials. To the author's knowledge, no study has been performed to date investigating fatigue characteristics in the transverse direction. This information is important in the design of bonded composite airframe structure where repeated, cyclic out-of-plane bending may occur. Recent tests characterizing skin/stringer debond failures in reinforced composite panels where the dominant loading in the skin is flexure along the edge of the frame indicate failure initiated either in the skin or else the flange, near the flange tip. When failure initiated in the skin, transverse matrix cracks formed in the surface skin ply closest to the flange and either initiated delaminations or created matrix cracks in the next lower ply, which in turn initiated delaminations. When failure initiated in the flanges, transverse cracks formed in the flange angle ply closest to the skin and initiated delamination. In no configuration did failure propagate through the adhesive bond layer. For the examined skin/flange configurations, the maximum transverse tension stress at failure correlates very well with the transverse tension strength of the composites. Transverse tension strength (static) data of graphite epoxy composites have been shown to vary with the volume of material stressed. As the volume of material stressed increased, the strength decreased. A volumetric scaling law based on Weibull statistics can be used to predict the transverse strength measurements. The volume dependence reflects the presence of inherent flaws in the microstructure of the lamina. A similar approach may be taken to determine a volume scale effect on the transverse tension fatigue behavior of graphite/epoxy composites. The objective of this work is to generate transverse tension strength and fatigue S-N characteristics for composite materials using

  10. Flexure fatigue testing of 90 deg graphite/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, A.N.W.

    1995-12-01

    A great deal of research has been performed characterizing the in-plane fiber-dominated properties, under both static and fatigue loading, of advanced composite materials. To the author`s knowledge, no study has been performed to date investigating fatigue characteristics in the transverse direction. This information is important in the design of bonded composite airframe structure where repeated, cyclic out-of-plane bending may occur. Recent tests characterizing skin/stringer debond failures in reinforced composite panels where the dominant loading in the skin is flexure along the edge of the frame indicate failure initiated either in the skin or else the flange, near the flange tip. When failure initiated in the skin, transverse matrix cracks formed in the surface skin ply closest to the flange and either initiated delaminations or created matrix cracks in the next lower ply, which in turn initiated delaminations. When failure initiated in the flanges, transverse cracks formed in the flange angle ply closest to the skin and initiated delamination. In no configuration did failure propagate through the adhesive bond layer. For the examined skin/flange configurations, the maximum transverse tension stress at failure correlates very well with the transverse tension strength of the composites. Transverse tension strength (static) data of graphite epoxy composites have been shown to vary with the volume of material stressed. As the volume of material stressed increased, the strength decreased. A volumetric scaling law based on Weibull statistics can be used to predict the transverse strength measurements. The volume dependence reflects the presence of inherent flaws in the microstructure of the lamina. A similar approach may be taken to determine a volume scale effect on the transverse tension fatigue behavior of graphite/epoxy composites.

  11. Designing of a Testing Machine for Shear-Mode Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaba, A.; Okazaki, S.; Endo, M.; Yanase, K.

    As recognized, flaking-type failure is one of the serious problems for railroad tracks and bearings. In essence, flaking-type failure is closely related to the growth of the shear-mode (Mode-II and Mode-III) fatigue crack. In our research group, it is demonstrated that a shear-mode fatigue crack can be reproduced for cylindrical specimens by applying the cyclic torsion in the presence of the static axial compressive stress. However, a biaxial servo-hydraulic fatigue testing machine is quite expensive to purchase and costly to maintain. The low testing speed (about 10Hz) of the testing machine further aggravates the situation. As a result, study on shear-mode fatigue crack growth is still in the nascent stage. To overcome the difficulties mentioned above, in this research activity, we developed a high-performance and cost-effective testing machine to reproduce the shear-mode fatigue crack growth by improving the available resonance-type torsion fatigue testing machine. The primary advantage of using the resonance-type torsion fatigue testing machine is cost-efficiency. In addition, the testing speed effectively can be improved, in comparison with that of a biaxial servo-hydraulic fatigue testing machine. By utilizing the newly-designed testing machine, we have demonstrated that we can successfully reproduce the shear-mode fatigue crack.

  12. Natural water as the test medium for Ag and CuO nanoparticle hazard evaluation: An interlaboratory case study.

    PubMed

    Heinlaan, Margit; Muna, Marge; Knöbel, Melanie; Kistler, David; Odzak, Niksa; Kühnel, Dana; Müller, Josefine; Gupta, Govind Sharan; Kumar, Ashutosh; Shanker, Rishi; Sigg, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) have realistic potential of reaching natural waterbodies and of exerting toxicity to freshwater organisms. The toxicity may be influenced by the composition of natural waters as crucial NP properties are influenced by water constituents. To tackle this issue, a case study was set up in the framework of EU FP7 NanoValid project, performing an interlaboratory hazard evaluation of NPs in natural freshwater. Ag and CuO NPs were selected as model NPs because of their potentially high toxicity in the freshwater. Daphnia magna (OECD202) and Danio rerio embryo (OECD236) assays were used to evaluate NP toxicity in natural water, sampled from Lake Greifen and Lake Lucerne (Switzerland). Dissolution of the NPs was evaluated by ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation and metal specific sensor bacteria. Ag NP size was stable in natural water while CuO NPs agglomerated and settled rapidly. Ag NP suspensions contained a large fraction of Ag(+) ions and CuO NP suspensions had low concentration of Cu(2+) ions. Ag NPs were very toxic (48 h EC50 1-5.5 μg Ag/L) to D. magna as well as to D. rerio embryos (96 h EC50 8.8-61 μg Ag/L) in both standard media and natural waters with results in good agreement between laboratories. CuO NP toxicity to D. magna differed significantly between the laboratories with 48 h EC50 0.9-11 mg Cu/L in standard media, 5.7-75 mg Cu/L in Lake Greifen and 5.5-26 mg Cu/L in Lake Lucerne. No toxicity of CuO NP to zebrafish embryos was detected up to 100 mg/L independent of the medium used. The results show that Ag and CuO NP toxicity may be higher in natural water than in the standard media due to differences in composition. NP environmental hazard evaluation can and should be carried out in natural water to obtain more realistic estimates on the toxicity.

  13. Natural water as the test medium for Ag and CuO nanoparticle hazard evaluation: An interlaboratory case study.

    PubMed

    Heinlaan, Margit; Muna, Marge; Knöbel, Melanie; Kistler, David; Odzak, Niksa; Kühnel, Dana; Müller, Josefine; Gupta, Govind Sharan; Kumar, Ashutosh; Shanker, Rishi; Sigg, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) have realistic potential of reaching natural waterbodies and of exerting toxicity to freshwater organisms. The toxicity may be influenced by the composition of natural waters as crucial NP properties are influenced by water constituents. To tackle this issue, a case study was set up in the framework of EU FP7 NanoValid project, performing an interlaboratory hazard evaluation of NPs in natural freshwater. Ag and CuO NPs were selected as model NPs because of their potentially high toxicity in the freshwater. Daphnia magna (OECD202) and Danio rerio embryo (OECD236) assays were used to evaluate NP toxicity in natural water, sampled from Lake Greifen and Lake Lucerne (Switzerland). Dissolution of the NPs was evaluated by ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation and metal specific sensor bacteria. Ag NP size was stable in natural water while CuO NPs agglomerated and settled rapidly. Ag NP suspensions contained a large fraction of Ag(+) ions and CuO NP suspensions had low concentration of Cu(2+) ions. Ag NPs were very toxic (48 h EC50 1-5.5 μg Ag/L) to D. magna as well as to D. rerio embryos (96 h EC50 8.8-61 μg Ag/L) in both standard media and natural waters with results in good agreement between laboratories. CuO NP toxicity to D. magna differed significantly between the laboratories with 48 h EC50 0.9-11 mg Cu/L in standard media, 5.7-75 mg Cu/L in Lake Greifen and 5.5-26 mg Cu/L in Lake Lucerne. No toxicity of CuO NP to zebrafish embryos was detected up to 100 mg/L independent of the medium used. The results show that Ag and CuO NP toxicity may be higher in natural water than in the standard media due to differences in composition. NP environmental hazard evaluation can and should be carried out in natural water to obtain more realistic estimates on the toxicity. PMID:27357482

  14. Fatigue testing of laser treated endosseous implants with an internal trilobe connection.

    PubMed

    Berg, Robert W; Kurtz, Kenneth S; Griggs, Jason A; Watanabe, Ikuya; Coelho, Paulo G

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of laser treatment on the fatigue resistance of a 3.5-mm diameter implant with an internal trilobe connection. Twenty two implants were embedded into acrylic resin blocks. Half the specimens were used as control group, and the other half were laser treated circumferentially around the 1.5-mm polished collar with argon shielding. Implants were fatigue tested using a step-stress accelerated lifetime test in a servo-hydraulic test machine. Despite the trend pointing towards higher fatigue resistance of laser treated specimens versus controls, step-stress analysis did not determine significant differences in the fatigue lifetimes. PMID:21528680

  15. Tensile and fatigue qualification testing of ITER-CS conduit alloy JK2LB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P.; McRae, D. M.; Han, K.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-12-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) coils utilize cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) and the conduit alloy is JK2LB. The production grade conduit alloy (and it's welds) must meet strict requirements for strength, toughness, fatigue crack resistance, and fabricability. The conduit alloy must retain good mechanical properties after additional fabrication steps such as welding, coil winding strain and exposure to the Nb3Sn superconductor's reaction heat treatment. Here we present data from cryogenic tensile, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth rate, and axial fatigue tests of JK2LB alloy and conduit butt welds, before and after the exposure to the reaction heat treatment. The tests of specimens removed directly from the conduit provide confirmation of the materials properties and the effect of the cold work and aging. The 4 K fatigue performance is extremely important to the reliability of the CS and is covered both by axial cyclic fatigue tests and the fatigue crack growth rate measurements.

  16. The fracture morphology of nickel-base superalloys tested in fatigue and creep-fatigue at 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Miner, R. V.

    1981-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of compact tension specimens from seven nickel-base superalloys fatigue tested at 650 C were studied by scanning electron microscopy and optical metallography to determine the nature and morphology of the crack surface in the region of stable growth. Crack propagation testing was performed as part of an earlier study at 650 C in air using a 0.33 Hz fatigue cycle and a creep-fatigue cycle incorporating a 900 second dwell at maximum load. In fatigue, alloys with a grain size greater than 20 micrometers, HIP Astroloy, Waspaloy, and MERL 76, exhibited transgranular fracture. MERL 76 also displayed numerous fracture sites which were associated with boundaries of prior powder particles. The two high strength, fine grain alloys, IN 100 and NASA IIB-7, exhibited intergranular fracture. Rene 95 and HIP plus forged Astroloy displayed a mixed failure mode that was transgranular in the coarse grains and intergranular in the fine grains. Under creep-fatigue conditions, fracture was found to be predominantly intergranular in all seven alloys.

  17. Design and fabrication of a bending rotation fatigue test rig for in situ electrochemical analysis during fatigue testing of NiTi shape memory alloy wires.

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, Lakshman; Zglinski, Jenni Kristin; Frotscher, Matthias; Eggeler, Gunther

    2013-03-01

    The current investigation proposes a novel method for simultaneous assessment of the electrochemical and structural fatigue properties of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy (NiTi SMA) wires. The design and layout of an in situ electrochemical cell in a custom-made bending rotation fatigue (BRF) test rig is presented. This newly designed test rig allows performing a wide spectrum of experiments for studying the influence of fatigue on corrosion and vice versa. This can be achieved by performing ex situ and∕or in situ measurements. The versatility of the combined electrochemical∕mechanical test rig is demonstrated by studying the electrochemical behavior of NiTi SMA wires in 0.9% NaCl electrolyte under load. The ex situ measurements allow addressing various issues, for example, the influence of pre-fatigue on the localized corrosion resistance, or the influence of hydrogen on fatigue life. Ex situ experiments showed that a pre-fatigued wire is more susceptible to localized corrosion. The synergetic effect can be concluded from the polarization studies and specifically from an in situ study of the open circuit potential (OCP) transients, which sensitively react to the elementary repassivation events related to the local failure of the oxide layer. It can also be used as an indicator for identifying the onset of the fatigue failure. PMID:23556847

  18. Design and fabrication of a bending rotation fatigue test rig for in situ electrochemical analysis during fatigue testing of NiTi shape memory alloy wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelakantan, Lakshman; Zglinski, Jenni Kristin; Frotscher, Matthias; Eggeler, Gunther

    2013-03-01

    The current investigation proposes a novel method for simultaneous assessment of the electrochemical and structural fatigue properties of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy (NiTi SMA) wires. The design and layout of an in situ electrochemical cell in a custom-made bending rotation fatigue (BRF) test rig is presented. This newly designed test rig allows performing a wide spectrum of experiments for studying the influence of fatigue on corrosion and vice versa. This can be achieved by performing ex situ and/or in situ measurements. The versatility of the combined electrochemical/mechanical test rig is demonstrated by studying the electrochemical behavior of NiTi SMA wires in 0.9% NaCl electrolyte under load. The ex situ measurements allow addressing various issues, for example, the influence of pre-fatigue on the localized corrosion resistance, or the influence of hydrogen on fatigue life. Ex situ experiments showed that a pre-fatigued wire is more susceptible to localized corrosion. The synergetic effect can be concluded from the polarization studies and specifically from an in situ study of the open circuit potential (OCP) transients, which sensitively react to the elementary repassivation events related to the local failure of the oxide layer. It can also be used as an indicator for identifying the onset of the fatigue failure.

  19. Design and fabrication of a bending rotation fatigue test rig for in situ electrochemical analysis during fatigue testing of NiTi shape memory alloy wires

    SciTech Connect

    Neelakantan, Lakshman; Zglinski, Jenni Kristin; Eggeler, Gunther; Frotscher, Matthias

    2013-03-15

    The current investigation proposes a novel method for simultaneous assessment of the electrochemical and structural fatigue properties of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy (NiTi SMA) wires. The design and layout of an in situ electrochemical cell in a custom-made bending rotation fatigue (BRF) test rig is presented. This newly designed test rig allows performing a wide spectrum of experiments for studying the influence of fatigue on corrosion and vice versa. This can be achieved by performing ex situ and/or in situ measurements. The versatility of the combined electrochemical/mechanical test rig is demonstrated by studying the electrochemical behavior of NiTi SMA wires in 0.9% NaCl electrolyte under load. The ex situ measurements allow addressing various issues, for example, the influence of pre-fatigue on the localized corrosion resistance, or the influence of hydrogen on fatigue life. Ex situ experiments showed that a pre-fatigued wire is more susceptible to localized corrosion. The synergetic effect can be concluded from the polarization studies and specifically from an in situ study of the open circuit potential (OCP) transients, which sensitively react to the elementary repassivation events related to the local failure of the oxide layer. It can also be used as an indicator for identifying the onset of the fatigue failure.

  20. 1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V.

    2014-01-29

    One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

  1. Bending fatigue tests on SiC-Al tapes under alternating stress at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a testing method for fatigue tests on SiC-Al tapes containing a small amount of SiC filaments under alternating stress is reported. The fatigue strength curves resulting for this composite are discussed. They permit an estimate of its behavior under continuous stress and in combination with various other matrices, especially metal matrices.

  2. Fatigue Crack Growth Threshold Testing of Metallic Rotorcraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; James, Mark A.; Johnson, William M.; Le, Dy D.

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented for a program to determine the near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior appropriate for metallic rotorcraft alloys. Four alloys, all commonly used in the manufacture of rotorcraft, were selected for study: Aluminum alloy 7050, 4340 steel, AZ91E Magnesium, and Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V (beta-STOA). The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sponsored this research to advance efforts to incorporate damage tolerance design and analysis as requirements for rotorcraft certification. Rotorcraft components are subjected to high cycle fatigue and are typically subjected to higher stresses and more stress cycles per flight hour than fixed-wing aircraft components. Fatigue lives of rotorcraft components are generally spent initiating small fatigue cracks that propagate slowly under near-threshold cracktip loading conditions. For these components, the fatigue life is very sensitive to the near-threshold characteristics of the material.

  3. Transverse Tension Fatigue Life Characterization Through Flexure Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Chawan, Arun D.; Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle

    2001-01-01

    The transverse tension fatigue life of S2/8552 glass-epoxy and IM7/8552 carbon-epoxy was characterized using flexure tests of 90-degree laminates loaded in 3-point and 4-point bending. The influence of specimen polishing and specimen configuration on transverse tension fatigue life was examined using the glass-epoxy laminates. Results showed that 90-degree bend specimens with polished machined edges and polished tension-side surfaces, where bending failures where observed, had lower fatigue lives than unpolished specimens when cyclically loaded at equal stress levels. The influence of specimen thickness and the utility of a Weibull scaling law was examined using the carbon-epoxy laminates. The influence of test frequency on fatigue results was also documented for the 4-point bending configuration. A Weibull scaling law was used to predict the 4-point bending fatigue lives from the 3-point bending curve fit and vice-versa. Scaling was performed based on maximum cyclic stress level as well as fatigue life. The scaling laws based on stress level shifted the curve fit S-N characterizations in the desired direction, however, the magnitude of the shift was not adequate to accurately predict the fatigue lives. Furthermore, the scaling law based on fatigue life shifted the curve fit S-N characterizations in the opposite direction from measured values. Therefore, these scaling laws were not adequate for obtaining accurate predictions of the transverse tension fatigue lives.

  4. Metal Matrix Composites: Fatigue and Fracture Testing. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and results of testing metal matrix composites for fatigue and fracture. Methods include non-destructive testing techniques, and static and cyclic techniques for assessing compression, tensile, bending, and impact characteristics.

  5. An inter-laboratory comparison study of the ANSI/BIFMA standard test method M7.1 for furniture

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five laboratories using five different test chambers participated in the study to quantify within- and between-laboratory variability in the measurement of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from new commercial furniture test items following ANSI/BIFMA M7.1. Test item...

  6. The detection of fatigue cracks by nondestructive testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, W. D.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Frecska, S. A.; Rathke, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    X-radiographic penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current, holographic, and acoustic emission techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy test specimens. One hundred eighteen specimens containing a total of 328 fatigue cracks were evaluated. The cracks ranged in length from 0.500 inch (1.27 cm) to 0.007 inch (0.018 cm) and in depth from 0.178 inch (0.451 cm) and 0.001 inch (0.003 cm). Specimen thicknesses were nominally 0.060 inch (0.152 cm) and 0.210 inch (0.532 cm) and surface finishes were nominally 32 and 125 rms and 64 and 200 rms respectively. Specimens were evaluated in the as-milled surface condition, in the chemically milled surface condition and, after proof loading, in a randomized inspection sequence. Results of the nondestructive test (NDT) evaluations were compared with actual crack size obtained by measurement of the fractured specimens. Inspection data was then analyzed to provide a statistical basis for determinating the threshold crack detection sensitivity (the largest crack size that would be missed) for each of the inspection techniques at a 95% probability and 95% confidence level.

  7. A high temperature fatigue and structures testing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.; Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    As man strives for higher levels of sophistication in air and space transportation, awareness of the need for accurate life and material behavior predictions for advanced propulsion system components is heightened. Such sophistication will require complex operating conditions and advanced materials to meet goals in performance, thrust-to-weight ratio, and fuel efficiency. To accomplish these goals will require that components be designed using a high percentage of the material's ultimate capabilities. This serves only to complicate matters dealing with life and material behavior predictions. An essential component of material behavior model development is the underlying experimentation which must occur to identify phenomena. To support experimentation, the NASA Lewis Research Center's High Temperature Fatigue and Structures Laboratory has been expanded significantly. Several new materials testing systems have been added, as well as an extensive computer system. The intent of this paper is to present an overview of the laboratory, and to discuss specific aspects of the test systems. A limited discussion of computer capabilities will also be presented.

  8. Statistical analysis of an inter-laboratory comparison of small-scale safety and thermal testing of RDX

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Geoffrey W.; Sandstrom, Mary M.; Preston, Daniel N.; Pollard, Colin J.; Warner, Kirstin F.; Sorensen, Daniel N.; Remmers, Daniel L.; Phillips, Jason J.; Shelley, Timothy J.; Reyes, Jose A.; et al

    2014-11-17

    In this study, the Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program has conducted a proficiency test for small-scale safety and thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here are statistical analyses of the results from this test for impact, friction, electrostatic discharge, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of the RDX Class 5 Type II standard. The material was tested as a well-characterized standard several times during the proficiency test to assess differences among participants and the range of results that may arise for well-behaved explosive materials.

  9. Fatigue life on a full scale test rig: Forged versus cast wind turbine rotor shafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, J.; Rauert, T.; Dalhoff, P.; Sander, M.

    2016-09-01

    To reduce uncertainties associated with the fatigue life of the highly safety relevant rotor shaft and also to review today's design practice, the fatigue behaviour will be tested on a full scale test rig. Until now tests on full scale wind turbine parts are not common. Therefore, a general lack of experience on how to perform accelerated life time tests for those components exists. To clarify how to transfer real conditions to the test environment, the arrangements and deviations for the upcoming experimental test are discussed in detail. In order to complete investigations of weight saving potentials, next to getting a better comprehension of the fatigue behaviour by executing a full scale test, a further outcome are suggestions for the usage of cast and forged materials regarding the fatigue and the remaining life of the rotor shaft. It is shown, that it is worthwhile to think about a material exchange for the forged rotor shaft.

  10. New techniques to test fatigue properties of coined sheet specimens. Part 4: Development of experimental techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Anders; Melander, Arne

    1994-09-01

    The present work was directed to the development of laboratory specimens suitable for simulation of fatigue in coinings in sheet materials. This report describes the different steps taken to advance the test procedures towards the requirements formulated for the experiments. Two test geometries with corresponding test procedures were established. The two dimensional geometry loaded axially in the fatigue test benefits from its very simple form which results in ease of manufacture, testing and analysis. The more sophisticated three dimensional geometry developed resembles much of coinings in real automotive components - bending loading, geometry and similar fatigue failure site. However, due to its geometrical complexity it demands more when it comes to fatigue testing and analysis.

  11. Does bisphenol A induce superfeminization in Marisa cornuarietis? Part I: intra- and inter-laboratory variability in test endpoints.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Valery E; Selck, Henriette; Palmqvist, Annemette; Aufderheide, John; Warbritton, Ryan; Pounds, Nadine; Thompson, Roy; van der Hoeven, Nelly; Caspers, Norbert

    2007-03-01

    It has been claimed that bisphenol A (BPA) induces superfeminization in the freshwater gastropod, Marisa cornuarietis. To explore the reproducibility of prior work, here we present results from a three-laboratory study, the objectives of which were to determine the mean and variability in test endpoints (i.e., adult fecundity, egg hatchability, and juvenile growth) under baseline conditions and to identify the sources of variability. A major source of variability for all of the measured endpoints was due to differences within and among individuals. With few exceptions, variability among laboratories and among replicate tanks within laboratories contributed little to the observed variability in endpoints. The results highlight the importance of obtaining basic knowledge of husbandry requirements and baseline information on life-history traits of potential test species prior to designing toxicity test protocols. Understanding of the levels and sources of endpoint variability is essential so that statistically robust and ecologically relevant tests of chemicals can be conducted.

  12. Single-leg hop testing following fatiguing exercise: reliability and biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Augustsson, J; Thomeé, R; Lindén, C; Folkesson, M; Tranberg, R; Karlsson, J

    2006-04-01

    A fatiguing exercise protocol was combined with single-leg hop testing to improve the possibilities of evaluating the effects of training or rehabilitation interventions. In the first test-retest experiment, 11 healthy male subjects performed two trials of single-leg hops under three different test conditions: non-fatigued and following fatiguing exercise, which consisted of unilateral weight machine knee extensions at 80% and 50%, respectively, of 1 repetition maximum (1 RM) strength. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.75 to 0.98 for different hop test conditions, indicating that all tests were reliable. For the second experiment, eight healthy male subjects performed the fatiguing exercise protocol to investigate how fatigue influences lower-extremity joint kinematics and kinetics during single-leg hops. Hip, knee and ankle joint angles, moments and powers, as well as ground-reaction forces were recorded with a six-camera, motion-capture system and a force platform. Recovery of hop performance following the fatiguing exercise was also measured. During the take-off for the single-leg hops, hip and knee flexion angles, generated powers for the knee and ankle joints, and ground-reaction forces decreased for the fatigued hop conditions compared with the non-fatigued condition (P<0.05). Compared with landing during the non-fatigued condition, hip moments and ground-reaction forces were lower for the fatigued hop conditions (P<0.05). The negative joint power was two to three times greater for the knee than for the hip and five to 10 times greater for the knee than for the ankle during landing for all test conditions (P<0.05). Most measured variables had recovered three minutes post-exercise. It is concluded that the fatiguing exercise protocol combined with single-leg hop testing was a reliable method for investigating functional performance under fatigued test conditions. Further, subjects utilized an adapted hop strategy, which employed less hip and

  13. Intra- and interlaboratory performance of antibiotic disk-diffusion-susceptibility testing of bacterial control strains of relevance for monitoring aquaculture environments.

    PubMed

    Huys, Geert; Cnockaert, Margo; Bartie, Kerry; Oanh, Dang Thi Hoang; Phuong, Nguyen Thanh; Somsiri, Temdoung; Chinabut, Supranee; Yussoff, Fatimah Md; Shariff, Mohamed; Giacomini, Mauro; Bertone, Stefania; Swings, Jean; Teale, Alan

    2005-09-23

    In the course of an international research project on hazard analysis of antimicrobial resistance in SE Asian aquaculture environments, 2 European Union and 3 SE Asian laboratories attempted to harmonize a procedure for antimicrobial agent susceptibility testing based on disk diffusion (DD). For this purpose, a selected panel of 10 bacterial control strains of relevance for monitoring warm-water aquaculture environments was sent by the central laboratory to the other participating laboratories. In each laboratory, 10 independently replicated DD determinations of each control strain to 6 antibiotics were performed using Iso-Sensitest Agar (ISA) according to a standard operating procedure (SOP); in total, this study thus yielded 300 data sets for all 5 laboratories. At the end of the study, strain authenticity of subcultures of the control strains used by the respective participating laboratories was verified by the central laboratory. Based on the arithmetic mean of 10 inhibition-zone diameter measurements and standard deviation (SD), intralaboratory SD variations ranged from 0 to 2 mm when 79% of the recorded data sets were considered. In 8% of the data sets, the SD value exceeded 4 mm, which in most cases could be attributed to the fact that the data points for a given strain-disk combination were not normally distributed in one of the laboratories. At the interlaboratory level, 81% of the SD values based on global averaging of 50 data points per strain-disk combination were situated in the 0 to 5 mm range. Comparison with a minimal data set from literature of DD testing performed with Mueller-Hinton (MH) medium indicated that the use of either ISA or MH medium in DD testing has a limited impact on the method's precision among different laboratories. In conclusion, the current study has provided a validated SOP to promote the coordination and harmonization of DD-susceptibility methodologies for aquaculture-associated organisms at an international level. As one of

  14. Test Population Selection from Weibull-Based, Monte Carlo Simulations of Fatigue Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlcek, Brian L.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue life is probabilistic and not deterministic. Experimentally establishing the fatigue life of materials, components, and systems is both time consuming and costly. As a result, conclusions regarding fatigue life are often inferred from a statistically insufficient number of physical tests. A proposed methodology for comparing life results as a function of variability due to Weibull parameters, variability between successive trials, and variability due to size of the experimental population is presented. Using Monte Carlo simulation of randomly selected lives from a large Weibull distribution, the variation in the L10 fatigue life of aluminum alloy AL6061 rotating rod fatigue tests was determined as a function of population size. These results were compared to the L10 fatigue lives of small (10 each) populations from AL2024, AL7075 and AL6061. For aluminum alloy AL6061, a simple algebraic relationship was established for the upper and lower L10 fatigue life limits as a function of the number of specimens failed. For most engineering applications where less than 30 percent variability can be tolerated in the maximum and minimum values, at least 30 to 35 test samples are necessary. The variability of test results based on small sample sizes can be greater than actual differences, if any, that exists between materials and can result in erroneous conclusions. The fatigue life of AL2024 is statistically longer than AL6061 and AL7075. However, there is no statistical difference between the fatigue lives of AL6061 and AL7075 even though AL7075 had a fatigue life 30 percent greater than AL6061.

  15. Test Population Selection from Weibull-Based, Monte Carlo Simulations of Fatigue Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlcek, Brian L.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue life is probabilistic and not deterministic. Experimentally establishing the fatigue life of materials, components, and systems is both time consuming and costly. As a result, conclusions regarding fatigue life are often inferred from a statistically insufficient number of physical tests. A proposed methodology for comparing life results as a function of variability due to Weibull parameters, variability between successive trials, and variability due to size of the experimental population is presented. Using Monte Carlo simulation of randomly selected lives from a large Weibull distribution, the variation in the L10 fatigue life of aluminum alloy AL6061 rotating rod fatigue tests was determined as a function of population size. These results were compared to the L10 fatigue lives of small (10 each) populations from AL2024, AL7075 and AL6061. For aluminum alloy AL6061, a simple algebraic relationship was established for the upper and lower L10 fatigue life limits as a function of the number of specimens failed. For most engineering applications where less than 30 percent variability can be tolerated in the maximum and minimum values, at least 30 to 35 test samples are necessary. The variability of test results based on small sample sizes can be greater than actual differences, if any, that exists between materials and can result in erroneous conclusions. The fatigue life of AL2024 is statistically longer than AL6061 and AL7075. However, there is no statistical difference between the fatigue lives of AL6061 and AL7075 even though AL7075 had a fatigue life 30 percent greater than AL6061.

  16. Stiffness reductions during tensile fatigue testing of graphite/epoxy angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odom, E. M.; Adams, D. F.

    1983-01-01

    The monitoring of modulus decay during fatigue testing as an indicator of damage accumulation and incipient failure has frequently been postulated. The present study was designed to generate tensile fatigue data under carefully controlled test conditions. A computerized data acquisition system was used to permit the measurement of dynamic modulus without interrupting the fatigue cycling. Two different 8-ply laminate configurations, viz, (+ or - 45)2s and (+ or - 67.5)2s, of a T300/5208 graphite/epoxy composite were tested. The (+ or 45)2s laminate did exhibit some modulus decay, although there was no well-defined correlation with applied stress level or number of cycles. The (+ or - 67.5)2s laminate did not exhibit any measurable modulus decay. Secondary effects observed included a slight recovery of the modulus decay after a test interruption, and a significant viscoelastic (creep) response of the (+ or - 45)2s laminate during fatigue testing.

  17. Fatigue acceptance test limit criteria for larger diameter rolled thread fasteners

    SciTech Connect

    Kephart, A.R.

    1999-05-19

    This document describes a fatigue lifetime acceptance test criterion by which studs having rolled threads, larger than 1.0 inches (25 mm) in diameter, can be assured to meet minimum quality attributes associated with a controlled rolling process.

  18. Resistance of three implant-abutment interfaces to fatigue testing

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Cleide Gisele; MAIA, Maria Luiza Cabral; SCHERRER, Susanne S.; CARDOSO, Antonio Carlos; WISKOTT, H. W. Anselm

    2011-01-01

    The design and retentive properties of implant-abutment connectors affect the mechanical resistance of implants. A number of studies have been carried out to compare the efficacy of connecting mechanisms between abutment and fixture. Objectives The aims of this study were: 1) to compare 3 implant-abutment interfaces (external hexagon, internal hexagon and cone-in-cone) regarding the fatigue resistance of the prosthetic screw, 2) to evaluate the corresponding mode of failure, and 3) to compare the results of this study with data obtained in previous studies on Nobel Biocare and Straumann connectors. Materials and Methods In order to duplicate the alternating and multivectorial intraoral loading pattern, the specimens were submitted to the rotating cantilever beam test. The implants, abutments and restoration analogs were spun around their longitudinal axes while a perpendicular force was applied to the external end. The objective was to determine the force level at which 50% of the specimens survived 106 load cycles. The mean force levels at which 50% failed and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals were determined using the staircase procedure. Results The external hexagon interface presented better than the cone-in-cone and internal hexagon interfaces. There was no significant difference between the cone-in-cone and internal hex interfaces. Conclusion Although internal connections present a more favorable design, this study did not show any advantage in terms of strength. The external hexagon connector used in this study yielded similar results to those obtained in a previous study with Nobel Biocare and Straumann systems. However, the internal connections (cone-in-cone and internal hexagon) were mechanically inferior compared to previous results. PMID:21710094

  19. On the use of ultrasonic fatigue testing technique--variable amplitude loadings and crack growth monitoring.

    PubMed

    Müller, T; Sander, M

    2013-12-01

    In the very high cycle fatigue regime high-frequency testing techniques are required. Using the ultrasonic fatigue technique, testing time could be reduced significantly in comparison to conventional servo-hydraulic machines. An ultrasonic fatigue testing system developed by the BOKU Vienna with load frequencies of about 20kHz is used for variable amplitude loading investigations in the VHCF regime. Therefore, the amplitude level during fatigue tests is controlled by a PC using an own developed software. Additionally, an in situ reconstruction of a damage equivalent load spectrum based on a load time history is introduced schematically. To optimize the experimental procedure a temperature-controlled pulse-pause adaption has been developed and implemented into the software. For quantifying the influence of variable amplitude loadings on the fatigue life, e.g. load interaction effects, the crack growth is measured by using the potential drop technique that is adapted to the ultrasonic fatigue testing system. Finally, the results of two-step-block loading tests are presented. PMID:23597637

  20. Isometric knee extensor fatigue following a Wingate test: peripheral and central mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-del-Olmo, M; Rodriguez, F A; Marquez, G; Iglesias, X; Marina, M; Benitez, A; Vallejo, L; Acero, R M

    2013-02-01

    Central and peripheral fatigue have been explored during and after running or cycling exercises. However, the fatigue mechanisms associated with a short maximal cycling exercise (30 s Wingate test) have not been investigated. In this study, 10 volunteer subjects performed several isometric voluntary contractions using the leg muscle extensors before and after two bouts of cycling at 25% of maximal power output and two bouts of Wingate tests. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrical motor nerve stimulation (NM) were applied at rest and during the voluntary contractions. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), twitch amplitude evoked by electrical nerve stimulation, M wave and motor potential evoked by TMS (MEP) were recorded. MVC, VA and twitch amplitude evoked at rest by NM decreased significantly after the first and second Wingate tests, indicating central and peripheral fatigue. MVC and VA, but not the twitch amplitude evoked by NM, recovered before the second Wingate test. These results suggest that the Wingate test results in a decrease in MVC associated with peripheral and central fatigue. While the peripheral fatigue is associated with an intramuscular impairment, the central fatigue seems to be the main reason for the Wingate test-induced impairment of MVC.

  1. Isometric knee extensor fatigue following a Wingate test: peripheral and central mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-del-Olmo, M; Rodriguez, F A; Marquez, G; Iglesias, X; Marina, M; Benitez, A; Vallejo, L; Acero, R M

    2013-02-01

    Central and peripheral fatigue have been explored during and after running or cycling exercises. However, the fatigue mechanisms associated with a short maximal cycling exercise (30 s Wingate test) have not been investigated. In this study, 10 volunteer subjects performed several isometric voluntary contractions using the leg muscle extensors before and after two bouts of cycling at 25% of maximal power output and two bouts of Wingate tests. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electrical motor nerve stimulation (NM) were applied at rest and during the voluntary contractions. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), voluntary activation (VA), twitch amplitude evoked by electrical nerve stimulation, M wave and motor potential evoked by TMS (MEP) were recorded. MVC, VA and twitch amplitude evoked at rest by NM decreased significantly after the first and second Wingate tests, indicating central and peripheral fatigue. MVC and VA, but not the twitch amplitude evoked by NM, recovered before the second Wingate test. These results suggest that the Wingate test results in a decrease in MVC associated with peripheral and central fatigue. While the peripheral fatigue is associated with an intramuscular impairment, the central fatigue seems to be the main reason for the Wingate test-induced impairment of MVC. PMID:21812824

  2. A computer-controlled automated test system for fatigue and fracture testing

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Alexander, D.J.; Swain, R.L.; Hutton, J.T.; Thomas, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    A computer-controlled system consisting of a servohydraulic test machine, an in-house designed test controller, and a desktop computer has been developed for performing automated fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth testing both in the laboratory and in hot cells for remote testing of irradiated specimens. Both unloading compliance and dc-potential drop can be used to monitor crack growth. The test controller includes a dc-current supply programmer, a function generator for driving the servohydraulic test machine to required test outputs, five measurement channels (each consisting of low-pass filter, track/hold amplifier, and 16-bit analog-to-digital converter), and digital logic for various control and data multiplexing functions. The test controller connects to the computer via a 16-bit wide photo-isolated bidirectional bus. The computer, a Hewlett-Packard series 200/300, inputs specimen and test parameters from the operator, configures the test controller, stores test data from the test controller in memory, does preliminary analysis during the test, and records sensor calibrations, specimen and test parameters, and test data on flexible diskette for later recall and analysis with measured initial and final crack length information. During the test, the operator can change test parameters as necessary. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  3. The effects of testing methods on the flexural fatigue life of human cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Griffin, L V; Gibeling, J C; Martin, R B; Gibson, V A; Stover, S M

    1999-01-01

    A flexural model of four-point bending fatigue that has been experimentally validated for human cortical bone under load control was used to determine how load and displacement control testing affects the fatigue behavior of human cortical bone in three-point and symmetric four-point bending. Under load control, it was predicted that three-point bending produced no significant differences in fatigue life when compared to four-point bending. However, three-point bending produced less stiffness loss with increasing cycles than four-point bending. In four-point bending, displacement control was predicted to produce about one and a half orders of magnitude greater fatigue life when compared to load control. This prediction agrees with experimental observations of equine cannon bone tested in load and displacement control (Gibson et al., 1998). Displacement controlled three-point bending was found to produce approximately a 25% greater fatigue life when compared to load control. The prediction of longer fatigue life under displacement control may have clinical relevance for the repair of damaged bone. The model can also be adapted to other geometric configurations, including modeling of whole long bones, and with appropriate fatigue data, other cortical bone types.

  4. Fatigue acceptance test limit criterion for larger diameter rolled thread fasteners

    SciTech Connect

    Kephart, A.R.

    1997-05-01

    This document describes a fatigue lifetime acceptance test criterion by which studs having rolled threads, larger than 1.0 inches in diameter, can be assured to meet minimum quality attributes associated with a controlled rolling process. This criterion is derived from a stress dependent, room temperature air fatigue database for test studs having a 0.625 inch diameter threads of Alloys X-750 HTH and direct aged 625. Anticipated fatigue lives of larger threads are based on thread root elastic stress concentration factors which increase with increasing thread diameters. Over the thread size range of interest, a 30% increase in notch stress is equivalent to a factor of five (5X) reduction in fatigue life. The resulting diameter dependent fatigue acceptance criterion is normalized to the aerospace rolled thread acceptance standards for a 1.0 inch diameter, 0.125 inch pitch, Unified National thread with a controlled Root radius (UNR). Testing was conducted at a stress of 50% of the minimum specified material ultimate strength, 80 Ksi, and at a stress ratio (R) of 0.10. Limited test data for fastener diameters of 1.00 to 2.25 inches are compared to the acceptance criterion. Sensitivity of fatigue life of threads to test nut geometry variables was also shown to be dependent on notch stress conditions. Bearing surface concavity of the compression nuts and thread flank contact mismatch conditions can significantly affect the fastener fatigue life. Without improved controls these conditions could potentially provide misleading acceptance data. Alternate test nut geometry features are described and implemented in the rolled thread stud specification, MIL-DTL-24789(SH), to mitigate the potential effects on fatigue acceptance data.

  5. Characterization of wear debris generated in accelerated rolling-element fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Parker, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    A ferrographic analysis was used to determine the types and quantities of wear debris generated during accelerated rolling contact fatigue tests. The five-ball rolling contact fatigue tester was used. Ball specimens were made of a corrosion resistant, high-temperature bearing steel. The lubricant was a superrefined naphthenic mineral oil. Conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 5.52 10 to the 9th power Pa and a shaft speed of 10,000 rpm. Four types of wear debris were observed: (1) normal rubbing wear particles, (2) fatigue microspall particles, (3) spheres, and (4) friction polymer deposits. The characterization of wear debris as a function of time was of limited use in predicting fatigue failures in these accelerated tests.

  6. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  7. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  8. DOE/MSU composite material fatigue database: Test methods, materials, and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, J.F.; Samborsky, D.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report presents a detailed analysis of the results from fatigue studies of wind turbine blade composite materials carried out at Montana State University (MSU) over the last seven years. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the DOE/MSU composite Materials Fatigue Database. The fatigue testing of composite materials requires the adaptation of standard test methods to the particular composite structure of concern. The stranded fabric E-glass reinforcement used by many blade manufacturers has required the development of several test modifications to obtain valid test data for materials with particular reinforcement details, over the required range of tensile and compressive loadings. Additionally, a novel testing approach to high frequency (100 Hz) testing for high cycle fatigue using minicoupons has been developed and validated. The database for standard coupon tests now includes over 4,100 data points for over 110 materials systems. The report analyzes the database for trends and transitions in static and fatigue behavior with various materials parameters. Parameters explored are reinforcement fabric architecture, fiber content, content of fibers oriented in the load direction, matrix material, and loading parameters (tension, compression, and reversed loading). Significant transitions from good fatigue resistance to poor fatigue resistance are evident in the range of materials currently used in many blades. A preliminary evaluation of knockdowns for selected structural details is also presented. The high frequency database provides a significant set of data for various loading conditions in the longitudinal and transverse directions of unidirectional composites out to 10{sup 8} cycles. The results are expressed in stress and strain based Goodman Diagrams suitable for design. A discussion is provided to guide the user of the database in its application to blade design.

  9. Finding the ideal strategy: Full-scale fatigue testing of wind turbine rotor shafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauert, T.; Herrmann, J.; Dalhoff, P.; Sander, M.

    2016-09-01

    For the purpose of a light weight design of rotor shafts, fatigue testing is necessary. Since full-scale fatigue tests of these large components are time consuming, costly and have not been done before, much effort has to be put into the implementation of a suitable test strategy. The paper presents the boundary conditions that have to be considered to determine the finite life regime of the component S/N-curve. A statistical simulation shows how much the derived S/N-curve is influenced by the specific test procedure.

  10. Comparison of the Capacity of Different Jump and Sprint Field Tests to Detect Neuromuscular Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Gathercole, Rob J; Sporer, Ben C; Stellingwerff, Trent; Sleivert, Gord G

    2015-09-01

    Different jump and sprint tests have been used to assess neuromuscular fatigue, but the test with optimal validity remains to be established. The current investigation examined the suitability of vertical jump (countermovement jump [CMJ], squat jump [SJ], drop jump [DJ]) and 20-m sprint (SPRINT) testing for neuromuscular fatigue detection. On 6 separate occasions, 11 male team-sport athletes performed 6 CMJ, SJ, DJ, and 3 SPRINT trials. Repeatability was determined on the first 3 visits, with subsequent 3 visits (0-, 24-, and 72-hour postexercise) following a fatiguing Yo-Yo running protocol. SPRINT performance was most repeatable (mean coefficient of variation ≤2%), whereas DJ testing (4.8%) was significantly less repeatable than CMJ (3.0%) and SJ (3.5%). Each test displayed large decreases at 0-hour (33 of 49 total variables; mean effect size = 1.82), with fewer and smaller decreases at 24-hour postexercise (13 variables; 0.75), and 72-hour postexercise (19 variables; 0.78). SPRINT displayed the largest decreases at 0-hour (3.65) but was subsequently unchanged, whereas SJ performance recovered by 72-hour postexercise. In contrast, CMJ and DJ performance displayed moderate (12 variables; 1.18) and small (6 variables; 0.53) reductions at 72-hour postexercise, respectively. Consequently, the high repeatability and immediate and prolonged fatigue-induced changes indicated CMJ testing as most suitable for neuromuscular fatigue monitoring. PMID:26308829

  11. Comparison of the Capacity of Different Jump and Sprint Field Tests to Detect Neuromuscular Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Gathercole, Rob J; Sporer, Ben C; Stellingwerff, Trent; Sleivert, Gord G

    2015-09-01

    Different jump and sprint tests have been used to assess neuromuscular fatigue, but the test with optimal validity remains to be established. The current investigation examined the suitability of vertical jump (countermovement jump [CMJ], squat jump [SJ], drop jump [DJ]) and 20-m sprint (SPRINT) testing for neuromuscular fatigue detection. On 6 separate occasions, 11 male team-sport athletes performed 6 CMJ, SJ, DJ, and 3 SPRINT trials. Repeatability was determined on the first 3 visits, with subsequent 3 visits (0-, 24-, and 72-hour postexercise) following a fatiguing Yo-Yo running protocol. SPRINT performance was most repeatable (mean coefficient of variation ≤2%), whereas DJ testing (4.8%) was significantly less repeatable than CMJ (3.0%) and SJ (3.5%). Each test displayed large decreases at 0-hour (33 of 49 total variables; mean effect size = 1.82), with fewer and smaller decreases at 24-hour postexercise (13 variables; 0.75), and 72-hour postexercise (19 variables; 0.78). SPRINT displayed the largest decreases at 0-hour (3.65) but was subsequently unchanged, whereas SJ performance recovered by 72-hour postexercise. In contrast, CMJ and DJ performance displayed moderate (12 variables; 1.18) and small (6 variables; 0.53) reductions at 72-hour postexercise, respectively. Consequently, the high repeatability and immediate and prolonged fatigue-induced changes indicated CMJ testing as most suitable for neuromuscular fatigue monitoring.

  12. Vacuum thermal-mechanical fatigue testing of two iron base high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.

    1974-01-01

    Ultrahigh vacuum elevated temperature low cycle fatigue and thermal fatigue tests of 304 stainless steel and A-286 alloy have shown significant effects of frequency and combined temperature-strain cycling on fatigue life. At constant temperature, the cyclic life of both alloys was lower at lower frequencies. Combined temperature-strain cycling reduced fatigue life with respect to isothermal life at the maximum temperature of the thermal cycle. Life reductions with in-phase thermal cycling (tension at high temperature, compression at low temperature) were attributed to grain boundary cavitation caused by unreversed tensile grain boundary sliding. The proposed mechanism for out-of-phase cavity generation involved accumulation of unreversed compressive grain boundary displacements which could not be geometrically accomodated by intragranular deformation in the low-ductility A-286 alloy.

  13. Full-scale fatigue tests of CX-100 wind turbine blades. Part I: testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinholt, Kevin M.; Taylor, Stuart G.; Park, Gyuhae; Ammerman, Curtt M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper overviews the test setup and experimental methods for structural health monitoring (SHM) of two 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blades that underwent fatigue loading at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The first blade was a pristine blade, which was manufactured to standard specifications for the CX-100 design. The second blade was manufactured for the University of Massachusetts, Lowell with intentional simulated defects within the fabric layup. Each blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, accelerometers, acoustic emission sensors, and foil strain gauges. The blades underwent harmonic excitation at their first natural frequency using the Universal Resonant Excitation (UREX) system at NREL. Blades were initially excited at 25% of their design load, and then with steadily increasing loads until each blade reached failure. Data from the sensors were collected between and during fatigue loading sessions. The data were measured over multi-scale frequency ranges using a variety of acquisition equipment, including off-the-shelf systems and specially designed hardware developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The hardware systems were evaluated for their aptness in data collection for effective application of SHM methods to the blades. The results of this assessment will inform the selection of acquisition hardware and sensor types to be deployed on a CX-100 flight test to be conducted in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) in Bushland, Texas.

  14. Implementation of a Biaxial Resonant Fatigue Test Method on a Large Wind Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect

    Snowberg, D.; Dana, S.; Hughes, S.; Berling, P.

    2014-09-01

    A biaxial resonant test method was utilized to simultaneously fatigue test a wind turbine blade in the flap and edge (lead-lag) direction. Biaxial resonant blade fatigue testing is an accelerated life test method utilizing oscillating masses on the blade; each mass is independently oscillated at the respective flap and edge blade resonant frequency. The flap and edge resonant frequency were not controlled, nor were they constant for this demonstrated test method. This biaxial resonant test method presented surmountable challenges in test setup simulation, control and data processing. Biaxial resonant testing has the potential to complete test projects faster than single-axis testing. The load modulation during a biaxial resonant test may necessitate periodic load application above targets or higher applied test cycles.

  15. The effect of isokinetic testing speed on the reliability of muscle fatigue indicators during a hip abductor-adductor fatigue protocol.

    PubMed

    Gautrey, C N; Watson, T; Mitchell, A

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of fatigue indicators calculated from peak torque and total work during isokinetic speeds of 60, 90, 120 and 180° · s-1 during a hip fatigue protocol. 10 males suffering from a history of unilateral functional ankle instability and 10 male healthy controls performed 5 maximal concentric contractions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Following a 4 min rest period subjects were instructed to perform repeated maximal concentric contractions to fatigue, which was defined as 3 consecutive repetitions below 50% of the maximum peak torque value. Each testing speed was randomised with 24 h between speeds. The subjects were asked to return to the laboratory 7 days later to repeat the 4 speeds, with 24 h between speeds. Muscle fatigue was determined for each testing speed by the fatigue index, the percent decrease in performance and the slope of the regression equation. The most reliable fatigue determination method was the slope of the regression equation, when testing at a speed of 120° · s-1. It is recommended that future investigators examine and plot their data before choosing the slope of the regression equation as their fatigue indicator, as a linear model is required. PMID:23549692

  16. Predicting Fatigue and Psychophysiological Test Performance from Speech for Safety-Critical Environments

    PubMed Central

    Baykaner, Khan Richard; Huckvale, Mark; Whiteley, Iya; Andreeva, Svetlana; Ryumin, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Automatic systems for estimating operator fatigue have application in safety-critical environments. A system which could estimate level of fatigue from speech would have application in domains where operators engage in regular verbal communication as part of their duties. Previous studies on the prediction of fatigue from speech have been limited because of their reliance on subjective ratings and because they lack comparison to other methods for assessing fatigue. In this paper, we present an analysis of voice recordings and psychophysiological test scores collected from seven aerospace personnel during a training task in which they remained awake for 60 h. We show that voice features and test scores are affected by both the total time spent awake and the time position within each subject’s circadian cycle. However, we show that time spent awake and time-of-day information are poor predictors of the test results, while voice features can give good predictions of the psychophysiological test scores and sleep latency. Mean absolute errors of prediction are possible within about 17.5% for sleep latency and 5–12% for test scores. We discuss the implications for the use of voice as a means to monitor the effects of fatigue on cognitive performance in practical applications. PMID:26380259

  17. Stiffness reductions during tensile fatigue testing of graphite/epoxy angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odom, E. M.; Adams, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Tensile fatigue data was generated under carefully controlled test conditions. A computerized data acquisition system was used to permit the measurement of dynamic modulus without interrupting the fatigue cycling. Two different 8-ply laminate configurations, viz, + or - 45 (2s) and + or - 67.5 (2s), of a T300/5208 graphite/epoxy composite were tested. The + or - 45 (2s) laminate did exhibit some modulus decay, although there was no well-defined correlation with applied stress level or number of cycles. The + or - 67.5 (2s) laminate did not exhibit any measurable modulus decay. Secondary effects observed included a small but distinct difference between modulus as measured statically and dynamically, a slight recovery of the modulus decay after a test interruption, and a significant viscoelastic (creep) response of the + or - 45 (2s) laminate during fatigue testing.

  18. Biomechanical fatigue analysis of an advanced new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy plate for bone fracture repair using conventional fatigue tests and thermography.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Zahra S; El Sawi, Ihab; Bougherara, Habiba; Zdero, Radovan

    2014-07-01

    The current study is part of an ongoing research program to develop an advanced new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy (CF/flax/epoxy) hybrid composite with a “sandwich structure” as a substitute for metallic materials for orthopedic long bone fracture plate applications. The purpose of this study was to assess the fatigue properties of this composite, since cyclic loading is one of the main types of loads carried by a femur fracture plate during normal daily activities. Conventional fatigue testing, thermographic analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze the damage progress that occurred during fatigue loading. Fatigue strength obtained using thermography analysis (51% of ultimate tensile strength) was confirmed using the conventional fatigue test (50–55% of ultimate tensile strength). The dynamic modulus (E⁎) was found to stay almost constant at 47 GPa versus the number of cycles, which can be related to the contribution of both flax/epoxy and CF/epoxy laminae to the stiffness of the composite. SEM images showed solid bonding at the CF/epoxy and flax/epoxy laminae, with a crack density of only 0.48% for the plate loaded for 2 million cycles. The current composite plate showed much higher fatigue strength than the main loads experienced by a typical patient during cyclic activities; thus, it may be a potential candidate for bone fracture plate applications. Moreover, the fatigue strength from thermographic analysis was the same as that obtained by the conventional fatigue tests, thus demonstrating its potential use as an alternate tool to rapidly evaluate fatigue strength of composite biomaterials.

  19. Biomechanical fatigue analysis of an advanced new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy plate for bone fracture repair using conventional fatigue tests and thermography.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Zahra S; El Sawi, Ihab; Bougherara, Habiba; Zdero, Radovan

    2014-07-01

    The current study is part of an ongoing research program to develop an advanced new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy (CF/flax/epoxy) hybrid composite with a "sandwich structure" as a substitute for metallic materials for orthopedic long bone fracture plate applications. The purpose of this study was to assess the fatigue properties of this composite, since cyclic loading is one of the main types of loads carried by a femur fracture plate during normal daily activities. Conventional fatigue testing, thermographic analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze the damage progress that occurred during fatigue loading. Fatigue strength obtained using thermography analysis (51% of ultimate tensile strength) was confirmed using the conventional fatigue test (50-55% of ultimate tensile strength). The dynamic modulus (E(⁎)) was found to stay almost constant at 47GPa versus the number of cycles, which can be related to the contribution of both flax/epoxy and CF/epoxy laminae to the stiffness of the composite. SEM images showed solid bonding at the CF/epoxy and flax/epoxy laminae, with a crack density of only 0.48% for the plate loaded for 2 million cycles. The current composite plate showed much higher fatigue strength than the main loads experienced by a typical patient during cyclic activities; thus, it may be a potential candidate for bone fracture plate applications. Moreover, the fatigue strength from thermographic analysis was the same as that obtained by the conventional fatigue tests, thus demonstrating its potential use as an alternate tool to rapidly evaluate fatigue strength of composite biomaterials.

  20. Biomechanical fatigue analysis of an advanced new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy plate for bone fracture repair using conventional fatigue tests and thermography.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Zahra S; El Sawi, Ihab; Bougherara, Habiba; Zdero, Radovan

    2014-07-01

    The current study is part of an ongoing research program to develop an advanced new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy (CF/flax/epoxy) hybrid composite with a “sandwich structure” as a substitute for metallic materials for orthopedic long bone fracture plate applications. The purpose of this study was to assess the fatigue properties of this composite, since cyclic loading is one of the main types of loads carried by a femur fracture plate during normal daily activities. Conventional fatigue testing, thermographic analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze the damage progress that occurred during fatigue loading. Fatigue strength obtained using thermography analysis (51% of ultimate tensile strength) was confirmed using the conventional fatigue test (50–55% of ultimate tensile strength). The dynamic modulus (E⁎) was found to stay almost constant at 47 GPa versus the number of cycles, which can be related to the contribution of both flax/epoxy and CF/epoxy laminae to the stiffness of the composite. SEM images showed solid bonding at the CF/epoxy and flax/epoxy laminae, with a crack density of only 0.48% for the plate loaded for 2 million cycles. The current composite plate showed much higher fatigue strength than the main loads experienced by a typical patient during cyclic activities; thus, it may be a potential candidate for bone fracture plate applications. Moreover, the fatigue strength from thermographic analysis was the same as that obtained by the conventional fatigue tests, thus demonstrating its potential use as an alternate tool to rapidly evaluate fatigue strength of composite biomaterials. PMID:24918250

  1. Aging test and dynamic fatigue test of apatite-wollastonite-containing glass ceramics and dense hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Kitsugi, T; Yamamuro, T; Nakamura, T; Kakutani, Y; Hayashi, T; Ito, S; Kokubo, T; Takagi, M; Shibuya, T

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the changes in mechanical strength of two bioactive ceramics in living tissue. An aging test and dynamic fatigue test were performed using apatite-wollastonite-containing glass ceramics (A X W-GC) and dense hydroxyapatite (HA). Specimens (5 mm X 5 mm X 25 mm, abraded with No. 2000 Al2O3 powder) were implanted into subcutaneous tissue of rats for varying periods of time. The bending strength of aged samples was measured by the three-point loading method. The bending strength of A X W-GC was greater than that of HA (P less than 0.001). There was no reduction in bending strength for both A X W-GC and HA in living tissue. The n value of both A X W-GC and HA did not decrease significantly after implantation as assessed by the results of the dynamic fatigue test according to analysis of covariance. SEM-EPMA showed that Si and Mg contents decreased, Ca content did not change, while P content increased in the surface of A X W-GC. The area where x-ray intensity changed increased moderately after implantation. There were no changes in Ca and P at the interface between HA and soft tissue. In macroscopic and microscopic observations, specimens were found to be encapsulated with a thin layer of connective tissue. Foreign body giant cells, osteoblasts, or osteoclasts were not observed in the soft tissue. There was no bonding between ceramics and soft tissue.

  2. Innovative vibration technique applied to polyurethane foam as a viable substitute for conventional fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Alexander; Just-Agosto, Frederick; Shafiq, Basir; Serrano, David

    2012-12-01

    Lifetime prediction using three-point bending (TPB) can at times be prohibitively time consuming and costly, whereas vibration testing at higher frequency may potentially save time and revenue. A vibration technique that obtains lifetimes that reasonably match those determined under flexural TPB fatigue is developed. The technique designs the specimen with a procedure based on shape optimization and finite element analysis. When the specimen is vibrated in resonance, a stress pattern that mimics the stress pattern observed under conventional TPB fatigue testing is obtained. The proposed approach was verified with polyurethane foam specimens, resulting in an average error of 4.5% when compared with TPB.

  3. Laser Cut Nitinol Tubing Fatigue Coupon: Design, Testing, and Endurance Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forcucci, Stephen J.

    2014-07-01

    Nitinol medical device implants made from a laser cut tubing process (i.e., stents, valve structures, etc.) frequently require a fatigue durability assessment, which necessitates determining the material fatigue properties. Towards the goal of determining the strain-based endurance limit of medical grade superelastic Nitinol tubing, a coupon was designed and evaluated via FEA using Abaqus software, produced via laser cutting, shape setting, and electro-polishing processes, and then fatigue tested to 10 million cycles. FEA was used to determine the strain versus alternating displacement amplitude for the coupon. Error due to dimensional tolerances was determined. The coupons were then fatigue tested in a 37 °C temperature deionized water bath at alternating strain levels ranging from 0.75 to 4.0% at zero mean strain. Sample replication was greater than 90%, and the median alternating strain fatigue limit was determined via two methods. Confidence and reliability with maximum likelihood statistics are used to present a strain-based endurance limit for the material. The results seem to differ from previous published values.

  4. Evaluation of Creep-Fatigue Damage Based on Simplified Model Test Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Tianlei; Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I

    2013-01-01

    Current methods used in the ASME Code, Subsection NH for the evaluation of creep-fatigue damage are based on the separation of elevated temperature cyclic damage into two parts, creep damage and fatigue damage. This presents difficulties in both evaluation of test data and determination of cyclic damage in design. To avoid these difficulties, an alternative approach was identified, called the Simplified Model Test or SMT approach based on the use of creep-fatigue hold time test data from test specimens with elastic follow-up conservatively designed to bound the response of general structural components of interest. A key feature of the methodology is the use of the results of elastic analysis directly in design evaluation similar to current methods in the ASME Code, Subsection NB. Although originally developed for current material included in Subsection NH, recent interest in the application of Alloy 617 for components operating at very high temperatures has caused renewed interest in the SMT approach because it provides an alternative to the proposed restriction on the use of current Subsection NH simplified methods at very high temperatures. A comprehensive review and assessment of five representative simplified methods for creep-fatigue damage evaluation is presented in Asayama [1]. In this review the SMT methodology was identified as the best long term approach but the need for test data precluded its near term implementation. Asayama and Jetter [2] is a summary of the more comprehensive report by Asayama [1] with a summary of the SMT approach presented by Jetter [3].

  5. Fatigue testing of low-cost fiberglass composite wind turbine blade materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, K. E.; Bennett, L. C.

    1981-01-01

    The static and fatigue behavior of transverse filament tape (TFT) fiberglass/epoxy and TFT/polyester composites was established by the testing of specimens cut from panels fabricated by a filament winding process used for the construction of large experimental wind turbine blades.

  6. Evaluation of advanced lubricants for aircraft applications using gear surface fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Shimski, John

    1991-01-01

    Surface pitting fatigue life tests were conducted with five lubricants, using spur gears made from a single lot of consumable-electrode vacuum melted (CVM) AISI 9310 steel. The gears were case carbonized and hardened to a Rockwell c-60 and finish ground. The gear pitch diameter was 8.89 cm. The lot of gears was divided into five groups, each of which was tested with a different lubricant. The test lubricants can be classified as synthetic polyol-esters with various viscosities and additive packages. Test conditions included bulk gear temperature of 350 K, a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa (248 ksi) at the pitch line, and a speed of 10,000 RPM. The lubricant with a viscosity that provided a specific film thickness greater than one and with an additive package produced far greater gear surface fatigue lives than lubricants with a viscosity that provided specific film thickness less than one. A low viscosity lubricant with an additive package produced gear surface fatigue lives equivalent to a similar base stock lubricant with 30 percent higher viscosity, but without an additive package. Lubricants with the same viscosity and similar additive packages gave equivalent gear surface fatigue lives.

  7. Fatigue fracture of the stem-cement interface with a clamped cantilever beam test.

    PubMed

    Heuer, D A; Mann, K A

    2000-12-01

    A clamped cantilever beam test was developed to determine the fatigue crack propagation rate of the CoCr alloy/PMMA cement interface at high crack tip phase angles. A combination of finite element and experimental methods was used to determine the fatigue crack growth rates of two different CoCr alloy/PMMA cement surfaces. A crack tip phase angle of 69 deg was found, indicating that loading at the crack tip was mixed-mode with a large degree of in-plane shear loading. The energy required to propagate a crack at the interface was much greater for the plasma-sprayed CoCr surface when compared to the PMMA-precoated satin finish (p < 0.001). Both interface surfaces could be modeled using a Paris fatigue crack growth law over crack propagation rates of 10(-4) to 10(-9) m/cycle.

  8. Effects on fatigue life of gate valves due to higher torque switch settings during operability testing

    SciTech Connect

    Richins, W.D.; Snow, S.D.; Miller, G.K.; Russell, M.J.; Ware, A.G.

    1995-12-01

    Some motor operated valves now have higher torque switch settings due to regulatory requirements to ensure valve operability with appropriate margins at design basis conditions. Verifying operability with these settings imposes higher stem loads during periodic inservice testing. These higher test loads increase stresses in the various valve internal parts which may in turn increase the fatigue usage factors. This increased fatigue is judged to be a concern primarily in the valve disks, seats, yokes, stems, and stem nuts. Although the motor operators may also have significantly increased loading, they are being evaluated by the manufacturers and are beyond the scope of this study. Two gate valves representative of both relatively weak and strong valves commonly used in commercial nuclear applications were selected for fatigue analyses. Detailed dimensional and test data were available for both valves from previous studies at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Finite element models were developed to estimate maximum stresses in the internal parts of the valves and to identity the critical areas within the valves where fatigue may be a concern. Loads were estimated using industry standard equations for calculating torque switch settings prior and subsequent to the testing requirements of USNRC Generic Letter 89--10. Test data were used to determine both; (1) the overshoot load between torque switch trip and final seating of the disk during valve closing and (2) the stem thrust required to open the valves. The ranges of peak stresses thus determined were then used to estimate the increase in the fatigue usage factors due to the higher stem thrust loads. The usages that would be accumulated by 100 base cycles plus one or eight test cycles per year over 40 and 60 years of operation were calculated.

  9. Development on the Tensile Fatigue Test Apparatus and Strength Evaluation of Thin Metal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushi, Miyuki; Miyata, Hiroshi; Murakami, Akira

    Recently, development of medical devices such as catheter and stent are advanced in the low invasion medical field. Considering the functions of human body are affected severely by the medical devices, the high strength reliability of devices must be secured. In these circumstances, the thin metal film, which has high reliability of strength, is useful structural material for further development of low invasion medical device. As the strength characteristics of a thin film depend on thickness and formation process of itself, there is little strength database concerning a thin metal film. In this study, a tensile fatigue testing apparatus with cyclic loading frequency up to 30Hz and maximum loading 8 N for the thin metal film has been developed, and thin rolled films Ti and SUS304 were evaluated on tensile and load-controlled fatigue strength. The static tensile tests give that both are also over the twice of the bulk material on the tensile strength, and the proof stress is high-strength with over 90% of tensile strength respectively. The fatigue test shows that Ti thin film has long life in comparison with the bulk material, however, the fatigue characteristic itself is similar like that of bulk material.

  10. Design of PF-1 Coil Helium Inlet and Dummy Joint Samples for Fatigue Tests at 77K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasluzov, S. N.; Sukhanova, M. V.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Stepanov, D. B.; Lantsetov, A. A.; Khitruk, A. A.

    A helium inlet and dummy joint between conductors are one of the most important elements of the winding pack of the ITER PF -1 coil double pancakes. A helium inlet is used for letting liquid helium into the PF-1 coil conductor. A full-scale helium inlet sample for fatigue tests and the respective tooling were designed and manufactured. Fatigue tests of the full-scale helium inlet sample were conducted in accordance with ITER requirements testing parameters in order to check the fatigue strength of the structure. Before the fatigue tests thermo-cycling of the helium inlet in the temperature range of 77 to 293 K was conducted. Before and after the fatigue tests the leak tightness of the full-scale helium inlet sample was validated by the vacuum chamber method. A low ohm electrical joint is used to connect two NbTi «CICC» conductors of PF-1 coil into a single electrical loop. To qualify the design and technology of manufacturing of the electrical joint, a full-scale dummy joint sample was developed for fatigue tests at 77 K. The main design feature of the full-scale dummy joint sample for fatigue tests is a symmetrical model of two dummy joint samples with simultaneous loading to compensate the bending moment. Fatigue tests of the full-scale helium inlet sample at 77 K have been successfully conducted in 2013. Fatigue tests of the full-scale dummy joint sample will be conducted in 2014. This paper represents the results of calculating the stress-strain state of the symmetrical model of the full-scale dummy joint sample for fatigue tests with the prescribed loading and strain, the work on designing the symmetrical model of the dummy joint sample for fatigue tests and the test facility for conducting fatigue tests at 77 K. Also the results of the leak tightness tests and thermo-cycling of the full-scale helium inlet and the results of it fatigue tests at 77 K, are presented.

  11. The detection of tightly closed flaws by nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. [fatigue crack formation in aluminum alloy test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, W. D.; Rathke, R. A.; Todd, P. H., Jr.; Mullen, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid penetrant, ultrasonic, eddy current and X-radiographic techniques were optimized and applied to the evaluation of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy test specimens in integrally stiffened panel, and weld panel configurations. Fatigue cracks in integrally stiffened panels, lack-of-fusion in weld panels, and fatigue cracks in weld panels were the flaw types used for evaluation. A 2319 aluminum alloy weld filler rod was used for all welding to produce the test specimens. Forty seven integrally stiffened panels containing a total of 146 fatigue cracks, ninety three lack-of-penetration (LOP) specimens containing a total of 239 LOP flaws, and one-hundred seventeen welded specimens containing a total of 293 fatigue cracks were evaluated. Nondestructive test detection reliability enhancement was evaluated during separate inspection sequences in the specimens in the 'as-machined or as-welded', post etched and post proof loaded conditions. Results of the nondestructive test evaluations were compared to the actual flaw size obtained by measurement of the fracture specimens after completing all inspection sequences. Inspection data were then analyzed to provide a statistical basis for determining the flaw detection reliability.

  12. Loading frequencies up to 20Hz as an alternative to accelerate fatigue strength tests in a Y-TZP ceramic.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Sara; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil Rocha; Freitas, Mariana; Kleverlaan, Cornelis Johannes; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; May, Liliana Gressler

    2016-08-01

    Considering the interest of the research community in the fatigue behavior of all-ceramic restorations and the time consumed in low-frequency cyclic fatigue tests, this study aimed to investigate the influence of the loading frequency on the zirconia fatigue strength. The biaxial flexural fatigue strength of Y-TZP discs was determined by the staircase approach after 500,000 cycles. The investigated frequencies were 2Hz (control-simulation of the chewing activity; n=20), 10Hz (n=20), 20Hz (n=20), and 40Hz (n=21). The fatigue strength data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey׳s test (α=0.05). Pearson coefficient (r) was calculated to assess the existence of a correlation between fatigue strength and loading frequency. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the relative amount of monoclinic phase under each fatigue test condition. The fatigue strength was significantly higher for 40Hz group (630.7±62.1MPa) and did not differ among the groups 2Hz (550.3±89.7MPa), 10Hz (574.0±47MPa) and 20Hz (605.1±30.7MPa). Pearson correlation coefficient indicated a significantly moderate correlation (r=0.57) between fatigue strength and loading frequency. The percentage of monoclinic phase was similar among the groups. Therefore, the use of loading frequencies up to 20Hz seems a good alternative to expedite the cycling strength fatigue tests in polycrystalline ceramics without significantly changing the fatigue behavior showed by zirconia in tests employing the frequency of the masticatory cycle. PMID:26849030

  13. Loading frequencies up to 20Hz as an alternative to accelerate fatigue strength tests in a Y-TZP ceramic.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Sara; Pereira, Gabriel Kalil Rocha; Freitas, Mariana; Kleverlaan, Cornelis Johannes; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; May, Liliana Gressler

    2016-08-01

    Considering the interest of the research community in the fatigue behavior of all-ceramic restorations and the time consumed in low-frequency cyclic fatigue tests, this study aimed to investigate the influence of the loading frequency on the zirconia fatigue strength. The biaxial flexural fatigue strength of Y-TZP discs was determined by the staircase approach after 500,000 cycles. The investigated frequencies were 2Hz (control-simulation of the chewing activity; n=20), 10Hz (n=20), 20Hz (n=20), and 40Hz (n=21). The fatigue strength data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey׳s test (α=0.05). Pearson coefficient (r) was calculated to assess the existence of a correlation between fatigue strength and loading frequency. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the relative amount of monoclinic phase under each fatigue test condition. The fatigue strength was significantly higher for 40Hz group (630.7±62.1MPa) and did not differ among the groups 2Hz (550.3±89.7MPa), 10Hz (574.0±47MPa) and 20Hz (605.1±30.7MPa). Pearson correlation coefficient indicated a significantly moderate correlation (r=0.57) between fatigue strength and loading frequency. The percentage of monoclinic phase was similar among the groups. Therefore, the use of loading frequencies up to 20Hz seems a good alternative to expedite the cycling strength fatigue tests in polycrystalline ceramics without significantly changing the fatigue behavior showed by zirconia in tests employing the frequency of the masticatory cycle.

  14. Vibration fatigue analysis and multi-axial effect in testing of aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aykan, Murat; Çelik, Mehmet

    2009-04-01

    The work reported in this paper compared the fatigue damage accumulated under uni-axial loading (a procedure promoted by the vibration testing standards) to that induced by multi-axial loading. The comparison was performed for a helicopter structural element (the flare dispenser bracket of the self-defensive system's Chaff), which is exposed to the particular combination of wide-band random with sinusoidal vibrations, which is characteristic to the helicopter dynamic environment. The evaluation of the fatigue damage induced by these loads requires the calculation or measurement of the structure's dynamic response in terms of stresses or strains, and the application of the appropriate methodology to this response. In this work, dynamic response was calculated in the frequency domain based on the relations between the power spectral density matrixes of the excitations to that of the responses for a linear system. The transfer matrix that relates the excitation to the responses was evaluated numerically. The power spectral densities of the responses evaluated at different locations on the structure were used in the determination of the responses' statistics (the counting of the loading cycles), which, combined with an appropriate physics of failure model (fatigue model), enabled the evaluation of the accumulated fatigue damage. The uni-axial-induced fatigue was evaluated from vibration tests of the kind promoted by military standards (it is assumed that axis-by-axis loading is cumulatively equal to multi-axial loading), and compared to that evaluated by analysis for the multi-axial loading. Also a numerical comparison of the effects of the two kinds of loading was performed. The results showed that the error of uni-axial testing varied for a wide range of parameters. The work led to the conclusion that simultaneous multi-axis vibration testing can improve significantly the laboratory's vibration simulation realism.

  15. High-strain fiber bragg gratings for structural fatigue testing of military aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Claire; Tejedor, Silvia; Grabovac, Ivan; Kopczyk, James; Nuyens, Travis

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports on an experimental program of work which investigates the reliability, durability, and packaging of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) for application as distributed strain sensors during structural fatigue testing of military platforms. The influence of the FBG fabrication process on sensor reliability is investigated. In addition, methodologies for broad-area packaging and surface-mounting of FBG sensing arrays to defense platforms are developed and tested.

  16. Analysis of wear debris from full-scale bearing fatigue tests using the Ferrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    The Ferrograph was used to determine the types of quantities of wear particles generated during full-scale bearing fatigue tests. Deep-groove ball bearings made from AISI 52100 steel were used. A MIL-L-23699 tetraester lubricant was used in a recirculating lubrication system containing a 49-micron absolute filter. Test conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 2.4 GPa, a shaft speed of 15,000 rpm and a lubricant supply temperature of 74 C (165 F). Four fatigue failures were detected by accelerometers in this test set. In general, the Ferrograph was more sensitive (up to 23 h) in detecting spall initiation than either accelerometers or the normal spectrographic oil analysis (SOAP). Four particle types were observed: normal rubbing wear particles, spheres, nonferrous particles, and severe wear (spall) fragments.

  17. Analysis of wear-debris from full-scale bearing fatigue tests using the ferrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    The ferrograph was used to determine the types and quantities of wear particles generated during full-scale bearing fatigue tests. Deep-groove ball bearings made from AISI 52100 steel were used. A MIL-L-23699 tetraester lubricant was used in a recirculating lubrication system containing a 49 mm absolute filter. Test conditions included a maximum Hertz stress of 2.4 GPa, a shaft speed of 15,000 rpm, and a lubricant supply temperature of 74 C (165 F). Four fatigue failures were detected by accelerometers in this test set. In general, the ferrograph was more sensitive (up to 23 hr) in detecting spall initiation than either accelerometers or the normal spectrographic oil analysis. Four particle types were observed: normal rubbing wear particles, spheres, nonferrous particles, and severe wear (spall) fragments.

  18. Ferrographic analysis of wear debris from full-scale bearing fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Ferrograph was used to determine the types and quantities of wear particles generated during full scale bearing fatigue tests. Deep-groove ball bearings made from steel were used. A tetraester lubricant was used in a recirculating lubricant system containing a 49 micrometers absolute filter. Test conditions include a maximum Hertz stress of 2.4 GPa, a shaft speed of 15,000 rpm, and a lubricant supply temperature of 74 C (165 F). Four fatigue failures were detected by accelerometers in this test set. In general, the Ferrograph was more sensitive (up to 23 hr) in detecting spall initiation than either accelerometers or the normal spectrographic oil analysis. Four particle types were observed: normal rubbing weather particles, spheres, nonferrous particles, and severe wear (spall) fragments.

  19. {sup 129}I interlaboratory comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.L.; Caffee, M.W.; Proctor, L.D.

    1996-05-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for {sup 129}I has been organized and conducted. A total of seven laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In the comparison, a suite of 11 samples were used. This suite of standards contained both synthetic `standard type` materials(i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio of the samples varied from 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -14}. Preliminary results of the comparison are presented.

  20. Construct Validation of a Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Test for Fatigue in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaus, Stephanie; Bode, Christina; Taal, Erik; Vonkeman, Harald E.; Glas, Cees A. W.; van de Laar, Mart A. F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Multidimensional computerized adaptive testing enables precise measurements of patient-reported outcomes at an individual level across different dimensions. This study examined the construct validity of a multidimensional computerized adaptive test (CAT) for fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods The ‘CAT Fatigue RA’ was constructed based on a previously calibrated item bank. It contains 196 items and three dimensions: ‘severity’, ‘impact’ and ‘variability’ of fatigue. The CAT was administered to 166 patients with RA. They also completed a traditional, multidimensional fatigue questionnaire (BRAF-MDQ) and the SF-36 in order to examine the CAT’s construct validity. A priori criterion for construct validity was that 75% of the correlations between the CAT dimensions and the subscales of the other questionnaires were as expected. Furthermore, comprehensive use of the item bank, measurement precision and score distribution were investigated. Results The a priori criterion for construct validity was supported for two of the three CAT dimensions (severity and impact but not for variability). For severity and impact, 87% of the correlations with the subscales of the well-established questionnaires were as expected but for variability, 53% of the hypothesised relations were found. Eighty-nine percent of the items were selected between one and 137 times for CAT administrations. Measurement precision was excellent for the severity and impact dimensions, with more than 90% of the CAT administrations reaching a standard error below 0.32. The variability dimension showed good measurement precision with 90% of the CAT administrations reaching a standard error below 0.44. No floor- or ceiling-effects were found for the three dimensions. Conclusion The CAT Fatigue RA showed good construct validity and excellent measurement precision on the dimensions severity and impact. The dimension variability had less ideal measurement characteristics

  1. Lamb wave ultrasonic evaluation of welded AA2024 specimens at tensile static and fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, M. V.; Byakov, A. V.; Shah, R. T.; Lyubutin, P. S.; Panin, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of Lamb waves ultrasonic testing technique applied for evaluation of different stress-strain and damaged state of aluminum specimens at static and fatigue loading in order to develop a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) approach. The experimental results of tensile testing of AA2024T3 specimens with welded joints are presented. Piezoelectric transducers used as actuators and sensors were adhesively bonded to the specimen's surface using two component epoxy. The set of static and cyclic tensile tests with two frequencies of acoustic testing (50 kHz and 335 kHz) were performed. The recorded signals were processed to calculate the maximum envelope in order to evaluate the changes of the stress-strain state of the specimen and its microstructure during static tension. The registered data are analyzed and discussed in terms of signal attenuation due to the formation of fatigue defects during cyclic loading. Understanding the relations between acoustic signal features and fatigue damages will provide us the ability to determine the damage state of the structure and its residual lifetime in order to design a robust SHM system.

  2. Interlaboratory study of the reproducibility of the single-pass flow-through test method : measuring the dissolution rate of LRM glass at 70 {sup {degree}}C and pH 10.

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

    2006-02-28

    An international interlaboratory study (ILS) was conducted to evaluate the precision with which single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests can be conducted by following a method to be standardized by the American Society for Testing and Materials - International. Tests for the ILS were conducted with the low-activity reference material (LRM) glass developed previously for use as a glass test standard. Tests were conducted at 70 {+-} 2 C using a LiCl/LiOH solution as the leachant to impose an initial pH of about 10 (at 70 C). Participants were provided with LRM glass that had been crushed and sieved to isolate the -100 +200 mesh size fraction, and then washed to remove fines. Participants were asked to conduct a series of tests using different solution flow rate-to-sample mass ratios to generate a range of steady-state Si concentrations. The glass dissolution rate under each test condition was calculated using the steady-state Si concentration and solution flow rate that were measured in the test. The glass surface area was estimated from the mass of glass used in the test and the Si content of LRM glass was known. A linear relationship between the rate and the steady-state Si concentration (at Si concentrations less than 10 mg/L) was used to estimate the forward dissolution rate, which is the rate in the absence of dissolved Si. Participants were asked to sample the effluent solution at least five times after reaction times of between 3 and 14 days to measure the Si concentration and flow rate, and to verify that steady-state was achieved. Results were provided by seven participants and the data sets provided by five participants were sufficient to determine the forward rates independently.

  3. Development of load spectra for Airbus A330/A340 full scale fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, H.-J.; Nielsen, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    For substantiation of the recently certified medium range Airbus A330 and long range A340 the full scale fatigue tests are in progress. The airframe structures of both aircraft types are tested by one set of A340 specimens. The development of the fatigue test spectra for the two major test specimens which are the center fuselage and wing test and the rear fuselage test is described. The applied test load spectra allow a realistic simulation of flight, ground and pressurization loads and the finalization of the tests within the pre-defined test period. The paper contains details about the 1 g and incremental flight and ground loads and the establishment of the flight-by-flight test program, i.e., the definition of flight types, distribution of loads within the flights and randomization of flight types in repeated blocks. Special attention is given to procedures applied for acceleration of the tests, e.g. omission of lower spectrum loads and a general increase of all loads by ten percent.

  4. An engineering method for estimating notch-size effect in fatigue tests on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul; Hardrath, Herbert F

    1952-01-01

    Neuber's proposed method of calculating a practical factor of stress concentration for parts containing notches of arbitrary size depends on the knowledge of a "new material constant" which can be established only indirectly. In this paper, the new constant has been evaluated for a large variety of steels from fatigue tests reported in the literature, attention being confined to stresses near the endurance limit. Reasonably satisfactory results were obtained with the assumption that the constant depends only on the tensile strength of the steel. Even in cases where the notches were cracks of which only the depth was known, reasonably satisfactory agreement was found between calculated and experimental factors. It is also shown that the material constant can be used in an empirical formula to estimate the size effect on unnotched specimens tested in bending fatigue.

  5. Evaluation of Dynamic Mechanical Loading as an Accelerated Test Method for Ribbon Fatigue: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bosco, N.; Silverman, T. J.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.; Inoue, M.; Sakurai, K.; Shinoda, T.; Zenkoh, H.; Hirota, K.; Miyashita, M.; Tadanori, T.; Suzuki, S.

    2015-04-07

    Dynamic Mechanical Loading (DML) of photovoltaic modules is explored as a route to quickly fatigue copper interconnect ribbons. Results indicate that most of the interconnect ribbons may be strained through module mechanical loading to a level that will result in failure in a few hundred to thousands of cycles. Considering the speed at which DML may be applied, this translates into a few hours o testing. To evaluate the equivalence of DML to thermal cycling, parallel tests were conducted with thermal cycling. Preliminary analysis suggests that one +/-1 kPa DML cycle is roughly equivalent to one standard accelerated thermal cycle and approximately 175 of these cycles are equivalent to a 25-year exposure in Golden Colorado for the mechanism of module ribbon fatigue.

  6. Evaluation of Dynamic Mechanical Loading as an Accelerated Test Method for Ribbon Fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Bosco, Nick; Silverman, Timothy J.; Wohlgemuth, John; Kurtz, Sarah; Inoue, Masanao; Sakurai, Keiichiro; Shioda, Tsuyoshi; Zenkoh, Hirofumi; Hirota, Kusato; Miyashita, Masanori; Tadanori, Tanahashi; Suzuki, Soh; Chen, Yifeng; Verlinden, Pierre J.

    2014-12-31

    Dynamic Mechanical Loading (DML) of photovoltaic modules is explored as a route to quickly fatigue copper interconnect ribbons. Results indicate that most of the interconnect ribbons may be strained through module mechanical loading to a level that will result in failure in a few hundred to thousands of cycles. Considering the speed at which DML may be applied, this translates into a few hours of testing. To evaluate the equivalence of DML to thermal cycling, parallel tests were conducted with thermal cycling. Preliminary analysis suggests that one +/-1 kPa DML cycle is roughly equivalent to one standard accelerated thermal cycle and approximately 175 of these cycles are equivalent to a 25-year exposure in Golden Colorado for the mechanism of module ribbon fatigue.

  7. The use of fatigue tests in the manufacture of automotive steel wheels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozyner, P.; Rychlik, A.

    2016-08-01

    Production for the automotive industry must be particularly sensitive to the aspect of safety and reliability of manufactured components. One of such element is the rim, where durability is a feature which significantly affects the safety of transport. Customer complaints regarding this element are particularly painful for the manufacturer because it is almost always associated with the event of accident or near-accident. Authors propose original comprehensive method of quality control at selected stages of rims production: supply of materials, production and pre-shipment inspections. Tests by the proposed method are carried out on the originally designed inertial fatigue machine The machine allows bending fatigue tests in the frequency range of 0 to 50 Hz at controlled increments of vibration amplitude. The method has been positively verified in one of rims factory in Poland. Implementation resulted in an almost complete elimination of complaints resulting from manufacturing and material errors.

  8. Strainrange partitioning life predictions of the long time metal properties council creep-fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    The method of strainrange partitioning is used to predict the cyclic lives of the Metal Properties Council's long time creep-fatigue interspersion tests of several steel alloys. Comparisons are made with predictions based upon the time- and cycle-fraction approach. The method of strainrange partitioning is shown to give consistently more accurate predictions of cyclic life than is given by the time- and cycle-fraction approach.

  9. Strainrange partitioning life predictions of the long time Metal Properties Council creep-fatigue tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    The method of Strainrange Partitioning is used to predict the cyclic lives of the Metal Properties Council's long time creep-fatigue interspersion tests of several steel alloys. Comparisons are made with predictions based upon the Time- and Cycle-Fraction approach. The method of Strainrange Partitioning is shown to give consistently more accurate predictions of cyclic life than is given by the Time- and Cycle-Fraction approach.

  10. Nondestructive determination of fatigue crack damage in composites using vibration tests.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibenedetto, A. T.; Gauchel, J. V.; Thomas, R. L.; Barlow, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The vibration response of glass reinforced epoxy and polyester laminates was investigated. The complex modulus and the damping capacity were measured as fatigue crack damage accumulated. Changes in the Young's modulus as well as the damping capacity correlated with the amount of crack damage. The damping was especially sensitive to debonding of the reinforcement from the resin matrix. Measurement of these vibration response changes shows promise as a means to nondestructively test the structural integrity of filament-reinforced composite structural members.

  11. Fatigue crack growth measurements in TMF testing of titanium alloys using an ACPD technique

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.; Marchand, N.J.; Hongoh, M.

    1995-04-01

    A thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) testing system has been developed which is capable of studying the fatigue behaviors of gas turbine materials under simultaneous changes of temperatures and strains (or stresses). Furthermore, an advanced alternating current potential difference (ACPD) measurement technique has been developed successfully to perform on-line monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and growth in specimens tested under isothermal and TMF conditions. In this paper, the basic principles of the ACPD technique as well as all the relevant experimental procedures for performing ACPD measurements, including probe setup, choice of alternating currents (AC) and frequencies, noise rejection, data acquisition, and signal processing, are described. The linear relationship between ACPD signals and crack lengths, as well as the effects of thermal cycling on the ACPD signal, are presented and discussed. The capabilities of the TMF and ACPD systems are well illustrated by fatigue crack initiation and growth test results under isothermal and TMF conditions. These tests were performed on two titanium forgings, Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) and Ti-6Al-2Sn-6Mo (Ti6246), respectively. Alloy Ti64 was TMF cycled between 150 and 400`C, while Ti6246 was cycled between 200 and 482 C. The resolution for detecting crack initiation at the root of notches was found to be 50 {mu}m with 95% confidence while the resolution for crack growth was 2 {mu}m per mV change of ACPD. An environmental assisted cracking model applied to TMF crack growth is proposed for rationalizing the data.

  12. Dynamic fatigue testing of Zerodur glass-ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.

    1988-01-01

    The inherent brittleness of glass invariably leads to a large variability in strength data and a time dependence in strength. Leading rate plays a large role in strength values. Glass is found to be weaker when supporting loads over long periods of time as compared to glass which undergoes rapid leading. These properties complicate the structural design allowables for the utilization of glass components in an application such as Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The test methodology to obtain parameters which can be used to predict the reliability and life time of Zerodur glass-ceramic which is to be used for the mirrors in the AXAF is described.

  13. Predicting in-service fatigue life of flexible pavements based on accelerated pavement testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Runhua

    Pavement performance prediction in terms of fatigue cracking and surface rutting are essential for any mechanistically-based pavement design method. Traditionally, the estimation of the expected fatigue field performance has been based on the laboratory bending beam test. Full-scale Accelerated Pavement Testing (APT) is an alternative to laboratory testing leading to advances in practice and economic savings for the evaluation of new pavement configurations, stress level related factors, new materials and design improvements. This type of testing closely simulates field conditions; however, it does not capture actual performance because of the limited ability to address long-term phenomena. The same pavement structure may exhibit different response and performance under APT than when in-service. Actual field performance is better captured by experiments such as Federal Highway Administration's Long-Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) studies. Therefore, to fully utilize the benefits of APT, there is a need for a methodology to predict the long-term performance of in-service pavement structures from the results of APT tests that will account for such differences. Three models are generally suggested to account for the difference: shift factors, statistical and mechanistic approaches. A reliability based methodology for fatigue cracking prediction is proposed in this research, through which the three models suggested previously are combined into one general approach that builds on their individual strengths to overcome some of the shortcomings when the models are applied individually. The Bias Correction Factor (BCF) should account for all quantifiable differences between the fatigue life of the pavement site under APT and in-service conditions. In addition to the Bias Correction Factor, a marginal shifty factor, M, should be included to account for the unquantifiable differences when predicting the in-service pavement fatigue life from APT. The Bias Correction Factor

  14. Prediction of Frequency for Simulation of Asphalt Mix Fatigue Tests Using MARS and ANN

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue life of asphalt mixes in laboratory tests is commonly determined by applying a sinusoidal or haversine waveform with specific frequency. The pavement structure and loading conditions affect the shape and the frequency of tensile response pulses at the bottom of asphalt layer. This paper introduces two methods for predicting the loading frequency in laboratory asphalt fatigue tests for better simulation of field conditions. Five thousand (5000) four-layered pavement sections were analyzed and stress and strain response pulses in both longitudinal and transverse directions was determined. After fitting the haversine function to the response pulses by the concept of equal-energy pulse, the effective length of the response pulses were determined. Two methods including Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methods were then employed to predict the effective length (i.e., frequency) of tensile stress and strain pulses in longitudinal and transverse directions based on haversine waveform. It is indicated that, under controlled stress and strain modes, both methods (MARS and ANN) are capable of predicting the frequency of loading in HMA fatigue tests with very good accuracy. The accuracy of ANN method is, however, more than MARS method. It is furthermore shown that the results of the present study can be generalized to sinusoidal waveform by a simple equation. PMID:24688400

  15. Fatigue of Self-Healing Nanofiber-based Composites: Static Test and Subcritical Crack Propagation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Wook; Sett, Soumyadip; Yoon, Sam S; Yarin, Alexander L

    2016-07-20

    Here, we studied the self-healing of composite materials filled with epoxy-containing nanofibers. An initial incision in the middle of a composite sample stretched in a static fatigue test can result in either crack propagation or healing. In this study, crack evolution was observed in real time. A binary epoxy, which acted as a self-healing agent, was encapsulated in two separate types of interwoven nano/microfibers formed by dual-solution blowing, with the core containing either epoxy or hardener and the shell being formed from poly(vinylidene fluoride)/ poly(ethylene oxide) mixture. The core-shell fibers were encased in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) matrix. When the fibers were damaged by a growing crack in this fiber-reinforced composite material because of static stretching in the fatigue test, they broke and released the healing agent into the crack area. The epoxy used in this study was cured and solidified for approximately an hour at room temperature, which then conglutinated and healed the damaged location. The observations were made for at least several hours and in some cases up to several days. It was revealed that the presence of the healing agent (the epoxy) in the fibers successfully prevented the propagation of cracks in stretched samples subjected to the fatigue test. A theoretical analysis of subcritical cracks was performed, and it revealed a jumplike growth of subcritical cracks, which was in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. PMID:27332924

  16. Applications of infrared thermography for nondestructive testing of fatigue cracks in steel bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Izumi, Yui; Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Mizokami, Yoshiaki; Kawabata, Sunao

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, fatigue crack propagations in aged steel bridge which may lead to catastrophic structural failures have become a serious problem. For large-scale steel structures such as orthotropic steel decks in highway bridges, nondestructive inspection of deteriorations and fatigue damages are indispensable for securing their safety and for estimating their remaining strength. As conventional NDT techniques for steel bridges, visual testing, magnetic particle testing and ultrasonic testing have been commonly employed. However, these techniques are time- and labor- consuming techniques, because special equipment is required for inspection, such as scaffolding or a truck mount aerial work platform. In this paper, a new thermography NDT technique, which is based on temperature gap appeared on the surface of structural members due to thermal insulation effect of the crack, is developed for detection of fatigue cracks. The practicability of the developed technique is demonstrated by the field experiments for highway steel bridges in service. Detectable crack size and factors such as measurement time, season or spatial resolution which influence crack detectability are investigated.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF A MOBILE OSCILLATORY FATIGUE OPERATOR FOR WIND TURBINE BLADE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Donohoo, P.E.; Cotrell, J.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory testing of wind turbine blades is required to meet wind turbine design standards, reduce machine cost, and reduce the technical and fi nancial risks of deploying mass-produced wind turbine models. Fatigue testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is currently conducted using Universal Resonance Excitation (UREX) technology. In a UREX test, the blade is mounted to a rigid stand and hydraulic exciters mounted to the blade are used to excite the blade to its resonant frequency. A drawback to UREX technology is that mounting hydraulic systems to the blade is diffi cult and requires a relatively long set-up period. An alternative testing technology called the Mobile Oscillatory Fatigue Operator (MOFO) has been analyzed. The MOFO uses an oscillating blade test-stand rather than a rigid stand, avoiding the need to place hydraulic systems on the blade. The MOFO will be demonstrated by converting an existing test-stand at the NWTC to an oscillating stand that can test blades up to 25 m in length. To obtain the loads necessary to design the MOFO, the system motion is modeled using rigid body and lumped mass dynamics models. Preliminary modeling indicates the existing stand can be converted to a MOFO relatively easily. However, the blade dynamic models suggest that blade bending moment distributions are signifi cantly different for UREX and MOFO testing; more sophisticated models are required to assess the implication of this difference on the accuracy of the test.

  18. Effects of test sample shape and surface production method on the fatigue behaviour of PMMA bone cement.

    PubMed

    Sheafi, E M; Tanner, K E

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus over the optimal criterion to define the fatigue life of bone cement in vitro. Fatigue testing samples have been made into various shapes using different surface preparation techniques with little attention being paid to the importance of these variations on the fatigue results. The present study focuses on the effect of test sample shape and surface production method on the fatigue results. The samples were manufactured with two cross sectional shapes: rectangular according to ISO 527 and circular according to ASTM F2118. Each shape was produced using two methods: direct moulding of the cement dough and machining from oversized rods. Testing was performed using two different bone cements: SmartSet GHV and DePuy CMW1. At least 10 samples of each category were tested, under fully reversed tension-compression fatigue stress at ±20MPa, to allow for Weibull analysis to compare results. The growth of fatigue cracks was observed by means of the changes in the absorbed energy and apparent modulus. It was found that fatigue crack growth can be altered by the sample shape and production method; however it is also dependent on the chemical composition of the cement. The results revealed that moulded samples, particularly those based on the ASTM F2118 standard, can lead to up to 5.5 times greater fatigue lives compared to the machined samples of the same cement. It is thus essential, when comparing the fatigue results of bone cement, to consider the effect of production method along with the shape of the test sample. PMID:24070780

  19. Motor-unit force potentiation in adult cats during a standard fatigue test.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D A; Enoka, R M; Stuart, D G

    1990-02-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to examine the time course of tetanic force during a standard fatigue test and to distinguish between the appearance of potentiation and fatigue among the four motor-unit types of a cat hindlimb muscle. 2. Motor units of the tibialis posterior muscle in the adult cat were assigned to four categories (i.e. types S, FR, FI, FF) based on conventional criteria (Burke, Levine, Tsairis & Zajac, 1973). The mean (+/- S.D.) time course of peak force was constructed for each motor-unit type and, within each type, for those units that potentiated (a greater than 3% increase in peak force compared to the initial value) and those that did not potentiate. 3. The average time courses of force differed between motor-unit types. There was, however, considerable variability within each motor-unit type. For the same relative force output, the forces exerted by slow-twitch units were less variable than those exerted by fast-twitch units. In addition, the variability among slow-twitch units was relatively constant during the fatigue test while variability among fast-twitch units either increased or decreased with time. 4. For a given motor-unit type, the average time course of force did not depend on whether force in each tetanus was expressed as a peak value, an average peak value, or a force-time integral. 5. Some motor units within each type exhibited potentiation. Most of the variability in the time course of the peak force for each motor-unit type could be accounted for by the potentiating units. Motor units that exhibited only force decline (i.e. fatigue), regardless of unit type, had less variable time courses of peak force. Since potentiation was transient in some unit types, it was assumed that at least two opposing processes (i.e. fatigue and potentiation) occurred simultaneously in these units (see also, Krarup, 1981; Rankin, Enoka, Volz & Stuart, 1988; Garner, Hicks & McComas, 1989). 6. It is concluded that the expression of force

  20. Report on FY15 Alloy 617 SMT Creep-Fatigue Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Jetter, Robert I.; Baird, Seth T.; Pu, Chao; Sham, Sam

    2015-06-22

    For the temperature range of 990-950C, Alloy 617 is a candidate IHX structural material for high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) because of its high temperature creep properties. Also, its superior strength over a broad temperature range also offers advantages for certain component applications. In order for the designers to be able to use Alloy 617 for these high temperature components, Alloy 617 has to be approved for use in Section III (the nuclear section) of the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A plan has been developed to propose a Code Case for use of Alloy 617 at elevated temperature in Section III of the ASME Code by September 2015. There has not been a new high temperature material approved for use in Section III for almost 20 years. The Alloy 617 Code Case effort would lead the way to establish a path for Code qualification of new high temperature materials of interest to other advanced SMRs. Creep-fatigue at elevated temperatures is the most damaging structural failure mode. In the past 40 years significant efforts have been devoted to the elevated temperature Code rule development in Section III, Subsection NH* of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, to ascertain conservative structural designs to prevent creep-fatigue failure. The current Subsection NH creep-fatigue procedure was established by the steps of (1) analytically obtaining a detailed stress-strain history, (2) comparing the stress and strain components to cyclic test results deconstructed into stress and strain quantities, and (3) recombining the results to obtain a damage function in the form of the so-called creep-fatigue damage-diagram. The deconstruction and recombination present difficulties in evaluation of test data and determination of cyclic damage in design. The uncertainties in these steps lead to the use of overly conservative design factors in the current creep-fatigue procedure. In addition, and of major significance to the

  1. Fatigue-crack monitoring in-flight using acoustic emission - hardware, technique, and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, P.H.; Skorpik, J.R.; Lemon, D.K.

    1981-07-01

    The three programs described represent a logical evolutionary process toward effective flaw surveillance in aircraft using AE. The Macchi tests showed that an AE system can withstand extended in-flight service and collect meaningful information relative to fatigue crack growth at a single specific location. The MIrage aircraft work seeks to extend the methods demonstrated on the Macchi into a more complex circumstance. We are now attempting to detect and locate crack growth at any of twenty fastener locations in a relatively complex geometry. The DARPA pattern recognition program seeks to develop signal identification capability that would pave the way for general monitoring of aircraft structures using AE to detect fatigue crack growth. It appears that AE technology may be capable of enhancing aircraft safety assurance while reducing inspection requirements with the associated costs.

  2. Interlaboratory Collaborations in the Undergraduate Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megehee, Elise G.; Hyslop, Alison G.; Rosso, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    A novel approach to cross-disciplinary and group learning, known as interlaboratory collaborations, was developed. The method mimics an industrial or research setting, fosters teamwork, and emphasizes the importance of good communication skills in the sciences.

  3. Measuring the uncertainties of discharge measurements: interlaboratory experiments in hydrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Coz, Jérôme; Blanquart, Bertrand; Pobanz, Karine; Dramais, Guillaume; Pierrefeu, Gilles; Hauet, Alexandre; Despax, Aurélien

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying the uncertainty of streamflow data is key for hydrological sciences. The conventional uncertainty analysis based on error propagation techniques is restricted by the absence of traceable discharge standards and by the weight of difficult-to-predict errors related to the operator, procedure and measurement environment. Field interlaboratory experiments recently emerged as an efficient, standardized method to 'measure' the uncertainties of a given streamgauging technique in given measurement conditions. Both uncertainty approaches are compatible and should be developed jointly in the field of hydrometry. In the recent years, several interlaboratory experiments have been reported by different hydrological services. They involved different streamgauging techniques, including acoustic profilers (ADCP), current-meters and handheld radars (SVR). Uncertainty analysis was not always their primary goal: most often, testing the proficiency and homogeneity of instruments, makes and models, procedures and operators was the original motivation. When interlaboratory experiments are processed for uncertainty analysis, once outliers have been discarded all participants are assumed to be equally skilled and to apply the same streamgauging technique in equivalent conditions. A universal requirement is that all participants simultaneously measure the same discharge, which shall be kept constant within negligible variations. To our best knowledge, we were the first to apply the interlaboratory method for computing the uncertainties of streamgauging techniques, according to the authoritative international documents (ISO standards). Several specific issues arise due to the measurements conditions in outdoor canals and rivers. The main limitation is that the best available river discharge references are usually too uncertain to quantify the bias of the streamgauging technique, i.e. the systematic errors that are common to all participants in the experiment. A reference or a

  4. Back and hip extensor muscles fatigue in healthy subjects: task-dependency effect of two variants of the Sorensen test

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, Annick; Descarreaux, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Paraspinal muscle fatigability during various trunk extension tests has been widely investigated by electromyography (EMG), and its task-dependency is established recently. Hip extensor muscle fatigability during the Sorensen test has been reported. The aim of the present experiments was to evaluate the task-dependency of back and hip extensor muscle fatigue during two variants of the Sorensen test. We hypothesized that the rate of muscular fatigue of the hip and back extensor muscles varies according to the test position. Twenty healthy young males with no history of low back pain volunteered to participate in this cross-sectional study. They were asked to perform two body weight-dependent isometric back extension tests (S1 = Sorensen test; S2 = modified Sorensen on a 45° Roman chair). Surface EMG activity of the paraspinal muscles (T10 and L5 levels) and hip extensor muscles (gluteus maximus; biceps femoris) was recorded, and muscular fatigue was assessed through power spectral analysis of the EMG data by calculating the rate of median power frequency change. We observed hip extensor muscle fatigue simultaneously with paraspinal muscle fatigue during both Sorensen variants. However, only L5 level EMG fatigue indices showed a task-dependency effect between S1 and S2. Hip extensor muscles appear to contribute to load sharing of the upper body mass during both Sorensen variants, but to a different extent because L5 level fatigue differs between the Sorensen variants. Our findings suggest that task-dependency has to be considered when EMG variables are compared between two types of lumbar muscle-fatiguing tasks. PMID:18813961

  5. A tension-torsional fatigue testing apparatus for micro-scale components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sichao; Wang, Lei; Chen, Gang; Yu, Dunji; Chen, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical characterization of micro-scale components under complex loading conditions is a great challenge. To meet such a challenge, a microtension-torsional fatigue testing apparatus is developed in this study that specializes in the evaluation of multiaxial fatigue behavior of thin stent wires. The actuation and measurement in two controlled directions are incorporated in the tensile and torsional load frames, respectively, and a thrust air bearing is applied for the coupling of the two frames. The axial deformation of specimens measured by a grating sensor built in the linear motor and by a non-contact displacement detect system is compared and corrected. The accuracy of the torque measurement is proved by torsion tests on thin wires of 316L stainless steel in nominal diameters of 100 μm. Multistep torsion test, multiaxial ratcheting test, and a fully strain controlled multiaxial cyclic test are performed on 100 μm and 200 μm-diameter 316L wires using this apparatus. The capability of the equipment in tension-torsional cyclic tests for micro-scale specimens is demonstrated by the experimental results.

  6. Practical methodological guide for hydrometric inter-laboratory organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, David; Bertrand, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Discharge measurements performed by the French governmental hydrometer team feed a national database. This data is available for general river flows knowkedge, flood forecasting, low water survey, statistical calculations flow, control flow regulatory and many other uses. Regularly checking the measurements quality and better quantifying its accuracy is therefore an absolute need. The practice of inter-laboratory comparison in hydrometry particularly developed during the last decade. Indeed, discharge measurement can not easily be linked to a standard. Therefore, on-site measurement accuracy control is very difficult. Inter-laboratory comparison is thus a practical solution to this issue. However, it needs some regulations in order to ease its practice and legitimize its results. To do so, the French government hydrometrics teams produced a practical methodological guide for hydrometric inter-laboratory organisation in destination of hydrometers community in view of ensure the harmonization of inter-laboratory comparison practices for different materials (ADCP, current meter on wadind rod or gauging van, tracer dilution, surface speed) and flow range (flood, low water). Ensure the results formalization and banking. The realisation of this practice guide is grounded on the experience of the governmental teams & their partners (or fellows), following existing approaches (Doppler group especially). The guide is designated to validate compliance measures and identify outliers : Hardware, methodological, environmental, or human. Inter-laboratory comparison provides the means to verify the compliance of the instruments (devices + methods + operators) and provides methods to determine an experimental uncertainty of the tested measurement method which is valid only for the site and the measurement conditions but does not address the calibration or periodic monitoring of the few materials. After some conceptual definitions, the guide describes the different stages of an

  7. A New High-Speed, High-Cycle, Gear-Tooth Bending Fatigue Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringer, David B.; Dykas, Brian D.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; Zakrajsek, Andrew J.; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    A new high-speed test capability for determining the high cycle bending-fatigue characteristics of gear teeth has been developed. Experiments were performed in the test facility using a standard spur gear test specimens designed for use in NASA Glenn s drive system test facilities. These tests varied in load condition and cycle-rate. The cycle-rate varied from 50 to 1000 Hz. The loads varied from high-stress, low-cycle loads to near infinite life conditions. Over 100 tests were conducted using AISI 9310 steel spur gear specimen. These results were then compared to previous data in the literature for correlation. Additionally, a cycle-rate sensitivity analysis was conducted by grouping the results according to cycle-rate and comparing the data sets. Methods used to study and verify load-path and facility dynamics are also discussed.

  8. Reversible Bending Fatigue Test System for Investigating Vibration Integrity of Spent Nuclear Fuel during Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L; Flanagan, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements under normal and accident conditions as specified by federal regulations. During transportation, SNF experiences unique conditions and challenges to cladding integrity due to the vibrational and impact loading during road or rail shipment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing testing capabilities that can be used to improve the understanding of the impacts on SNF integrity due to vibration loading, especially for high burn-up SNF in normal transportation operation conditions. This information can be used to meet the nuclear industry and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs in the area of safety and security of spent nuclear fuel storage and transport operations. The ORNL developed test system can perform reversible-bending fatigue testing to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The testing apparatus is also designed to meet the challenges of hot-cell operation, including remote installation and detachment of the SNF test specimen, in-situ test specimen deformation measurement, and implementation of a driving system suitable for use in a hot cell. The system contains a U-frame set-up equipped with uniquely designed grip rigs, to protect SNF rod and to ensure valid test results, and use of 3 specially designed LVDTs to obtain the in-situ curvature measurement. A variety of surrogate test rods have been used to develop and calibrate the test system as well as in performing a series of systematic cyclic fatigue tests. The surrogate rods include stainless steel (SS) cladding, SS cladding with cast epoxy, and SS cladding with alumina pellets inserts simulating fuel pellets. Testing to date has shown that the interface bonding between the SS cladding and the alumina pellets has a significant impact on the bending response of the test rods as well as their fatigue strength. The failure behaviors observed from

  9. Reversal bending fatigue test system for investigating vibration integrity of spent nuclear fuel during transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy -An; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L.; Flanagan, Michelle E.

    2014-09-01

    Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements under normal and accident conditions as specified by federal regulations. During transportation, SNF experiences unique conditions and challenges to cladding integrity due to the vibrational and impact loading during road or rail shipment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing testing capabilities that can be used to improve the understanding of the impacts on SNF integrity due to vibration loading, especially for high burn-up SNF in normal transportation operation conditions. This information can be used to meet the nuclear industry and U.S.Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs in the area of safety and security of SNF storage and transportation operations. The ORNL developed test system can perform reversal bending fatigue testing to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The testing apparatus is also designed to meet the challenges of hot cell operation, including remote installation and detachment of the SNF test specimen, in situ test specimen deformation measurement, and implementation of a driving system suitable for use in a hot cell. The system contains a U frame set-up equipped with uniquely designed grip rigs to protect the SNF rod sample and to ensure valid test results, and uses three specially designed linear variable differential transformers to obtain the in situ curvature measurement. A variety of surrogate test rods have been used to develop and calibrate the test system as well as in performing a series of systematic cyclic fatigue tests. The surrogate rods include stainless steel (SS) cladding, SS cladding with cast epoxy and SS cladding with alumina pellet inserts simulating fuel pellets. Testing to date has shown that the interface bonding between the SS cladding and the alumina pellets has a significant impact on the bending response of the test rods as well as their fatigue strength. The

  10. Reversal bending fatigue test system for investigating vibration integrity of spent nuclear fuel during transportation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jy -An; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L.; Flanagan, Michelle E.

    2014-09-01

    Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements under normal and accident conditions as specified by federal regulations. During transportation, SNF experiences unique conditions and challenges to cladding integrity due to the vibrational and impact loading during road or rail shipment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing testing capabilities that can be used to improve the understanding of the impacts on SNF integrity due to vibration loading, especially for high burn-up SNF in normal transportation operation conditions. This information can be used to meet the nuclear industry and U.S.Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs in the areamore » of safety and security of SNF storage and transportation operations. The ORNL developed test system can perform reversal bending fatigue testing to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The testing apparatus is also designed to meet the challenges of hot cell operation, including remote installation and detachment of the SNF test specimen, in situ test specimen deformation measurement, and implementation of a driving system suitable for use in a hot cell. The system contains a U frame set-up equipped with uniquely designed grip rigs to protect the SNF rod sample and to ensure valid test results, and uses three specially designed linear variable differential transformers to obtain the in situ curvature measurement. A variety of surrogate test rods have been used to develop and calibrate the test system as well as in performing a series of systematic cyclic fatigue tests. The surrogate rods include stainless steel (SS) cladding, SS cladding with cast epoxy and SS cladding with alumina pellet inserts simulating fuel pellets. Testing to date has shown that the interface bonding between the SS cladding and the alumina pellets has a significant impact on the bending response of the test rods as well as their fatigue strength

  11. Rolling contact fatigue of surface modified 440C using a 'Ge-Polymet' type disc rod test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Through hardened 440 C martensitic stainless steel test specimens were surface modified and tested for changes in rolling contact fatigue using a disc on rod test rig. The surface modifications consisted of nitrogen, boron, titanium, chromium, tantalum, carbon, or molybdenum ion implantation at various ion fluences and energies. Tests were also performed on specimens reactively sputtered with titanium nitride.

  12. Cognitive and Physical Fatigue Tasks Enhance Pain, Cognitive Fatigue and Physical Fatigue in People with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Dana L; Keffala, Valerie J; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia is a condition characterized by chronic widespread muscle pain and fatigue. The primary objective of this study was to determine if pain, perceived cognitive fatigue, and perceived physical fatigue were enhanced in participants with fibromyalgia compared to healthy controls during a cognitive fatigue task, a physical fatigue task and a dual fatigue task. Methods Twenty four people with fibromyalgia and 33 healthy controls completed pain, fatigue and function measures. A cognitive fatigue task (Controlled Oral Word Association Test) and physical fatigue task (Valpar peg test) were done individually and combined for a dual fatigue task. Resting pain, perceived cognitive fatigue and perceived physical fatigue were assessed during each task using visual analogue scales. Function was assessed with shoulder range of motion and grip. Results People with fibromyalgia had significantly higher increases in pain, cognitive fatigue and physical fatigue when compared to healthy controls after completion of a cognitive fatigue task, a physical fatigue task, or a dual fatigue task (p<0.01). People with fibromyalgia performed equivalently on measures of physical performance and cognitive performance on the physical and cognitive fatigue tasks, respectively. Conclusions These data show that people with fibromyalgia show larger increases in pain, perceived cognitive fatigue and perceived physical fatigue to both cognitive and physical fatigue tasks compared to healthy controls. The increases in pain and fatigue during cognitive and physical fatigue tasks could influence subject participation in daily activities and rehabilitation. PMID:25074583

  13. Fatigue life prediction of liquid rocket engine combustor with subscale test verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, In-Kyung

    Reusable rocket systems such as the Space Shuttle introduced a new era in propulsion system design for economic feasibility. Practical reusable systems require an order of magnitude increase in life. To achieve this improved methods are needed to assess failure mechanisms and to predict life cycles of rocket combustor. A general goal of the research was to demonstrate the use of subscale rocket combustor prototype in a cost-effective test program. Life limiting factors and metal behaviors under repeated loads were surveyed and reviewed. The life prediction theories are presented, with an emphasis on studies that used subscale test hardware for model validation. From this review, low cycle fatigue (LCF) and creep-fatigue interaction (ratcheting) were identified as the main life limiting factors of the combustor. Several life prediction methods such as conventional and advanced viscoplastic models were used to predict life cycle due to low cycle thermal stress, transient effects, and creep rupture damage. Creep-fatigue interaction and cyclic hardening were also investigated. A prediction method based on 2D beam theory was modified using 3D plate deformation theory to provide an extended prediction method. For experimental validation two small scale annular plug nozzle thrusters were designed, built and tested. The test article was composed of a water-cooled liner, plug annular nozzle and 200 psia precombustor that used decomposed hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizer and JP-8 as the fuel. The first combustor was tested cyclically at the Advanced Propellants and Combustion Laboratory at Purdue University. Testing was stopped after 140 cycles due to an unpredicted failure mechanism due to an increasing hot spot in the location where failure was predicted. A second combustor was designed to avoid the previous failure, however, it was over pressurized and deformed beyond repair during cold-flow test. The test results are discussed and compared to the analytical and numerical

  14. Comparison of uncertainty in fatigue tests obtained by the Monte Carlo method in two softwares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, Lisiane; Kapper Fabricio, Daniel Antonio; Reguly, Afonso

    2016-07-01

    The Supplement 1 to the “Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement” indicates the Monte Carlo method for calculating the expanded measurement uncertainty. The objective of this work is to compare the measurement uncertainty values obtained via Monte Carlo method through two commercial softwares (Matlab® and Crystal Ball®) for the parameter ‘adjusted strain’, obtained from fatigue tests. Simulations were carried out using different number of iterations and different levels of confidence. The results showed that there are short differences between the measurement uncertainty values generated by different software.

  15. Appropriate Mechanochemical Conditions for Corrosion-Fatigue Testing of Magnesium Alloys for Temporary Bioimplant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harandi, Shervin Eslami; Singh Raman, R. K.

    2015-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys possess great potential as bioimplants. A temporary implant employed as support for the repair of a fractured bone must possess sufficient strength to maintain their mechanical integrity for the required duration of healing. However, Mg alloys are susceptible to sudden cracking or fracture under the simultaneous action of cyclic loading and the corrosive physiological environment, i.e., corrosion fatigue (CF). Investigations of such fracture should be performed under appropriate mechanochemical conditions that appropriately simulate the actual human body conditions. This article reviews the existing knowledge on CF of Mg alloys in simulated body fluid and describes a relatively more accurate testing procedure developed in the authors' laboratory.

  16. Thermal fatigue tests of a radiative heat shield panel for a hypersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Granville L.; Clark, Ronald K.; Sharpe, Ellsworth L.

    1985-01-01

    A pair of corrugation stiffened, beaded skin Rene 41 heat shield panels were exposed to 20,000 thermal cycles between room temperature and 1450 F to evaluate the thermal fatigue response of Rene 41 metallic heat shields for hypersonic cruise aircraft applications. At the conclusion of the tests, the panels retained substantial structural integrity; however, there were cracks and excessive wear in the vicinity of fastener holes and there was an 80-percent loss in ductility of the skin. Shrinkage of the panel which caused the cracks and wear must be considered in design of panels for Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) applications.

  17. Residual strength and crack propagation tests on C-130 airplane center wings with service-imposed fatigue damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, H. L.; Reeder, F. L.; Dirkin, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen C-130 airplane center wings, each containing service-imposed fatigue damage resulting from 4000 to 13,000 accumulated flight hours, were tested to determine their fatigue crack propagation and static residual strength characteristics. Eight wings were subjected to a two-step constant amplitude fatigue test prior to static testing. Cracks up to 30 inches long were generated in these tests. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 56 to 87 percent of limit load. The remaining six wings containing cracks up to 4 inches long were statically tested as received from field service. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 98 to 117 percent of limit load. Damage-tolerant structural design features such as fastener holes, stringers, doublers around door cutouts, and spanwise panel splices proved to be effective in retarding crack propagation.

  18. A unique elevated-temperature tension-torsion fatigue test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Chan, C. T.

    1987-06-01

    A unique tension-torsion fatigue test set up is described that allows strain-controlled tests at temperatures exceeding 649 C. The machine uses a large die set as a load frame resulting in lower cost and superior parallel positioning of the crossheads. Disposable weld-on grips were found to be cost effective for elevated-temperature testing. A new extensometer using commercially available capacitance probes was developed which can operate at the elevated temperature without cooling. Capacitance ring probes were utilized in an attempt to measure through-thickness strains. The characteristic behavior of the ring probes is discussed. Design modifications needed to make a successful measurement of through-thickness strains at elevated temperatures are presented.

  19. A novel noncontact electromagnetic field-based sensor for the monitoring of resonant fatigue tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Si-Byung; Yun, Gun Jin; Carletta, Joan; Kim, Dong-Han; Binienda, Wieslaw

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, a prototype of an electromagnetic field-based (EFB) vibration sensor that uses a novel sensing technique to monitor the resonant fatigue testing of a conductive and/or ferromagnetic target specimen is presented. The distance from the target to a coil within the sensor affects the impedance of the coil. The electronic circuitry for the sensor consists of a relaxation oscillator, an embedded microprocessor module and a high-speed digital-to-analog converter. The impedance of the coil determines the frequency of oscillation of the relaxation oscillator's output, so that vibration of the target causes changes in the oscillation frequency. A timer in the embedded microprocessor module is used to count the oscillations, producing a digital signal that indicates the coil-to-target distance. The digital signal is instantaneously converted to an analog signal to produce the sensor's output. The key technologies proposed include: (1) a novel timer counting method using the input capture functionality and timer of the embedded microprocessor module and (2) significant simplification of the analog electronic circuitry. The performance of the proposed sensor has been verified using AISI 1095 carbon steel and Al6061-T6 aluminum alloy specimens during resonant fatigue tests. The sensor shows a good linearity between displacement amplitudes and output voltages.

  20. Toward the Standardization of Biochar Analysis: The COST Action TD1107 Interlaboratory Comparison.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Hans Jörg; Bucheli, Thomas D; Dieguez-Alonso, Alba; Fabbri, Daniele; Knicker, Heike; Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Ulbricht, Axel; Becker, Roland; Buscaroli, Alessandro; Buerge, Diane; Cross, Andrew; Dickinson, Dane; Enders, Akio; Esteves, Valdemar I; Evangelou, Michael W H; Fellet, Guido; Friedrich, Kevin; Gasco Guerrero, Gabriel; Glaser, Bruno; Hanke, Ulrich M; Hanley, Kelly; Hilber, Isabel; Kalderis, Dimitrios; Leifeld, Jens; Masek, Ondrej; Mumme, Jan; Carmona, Marina Paneque; Calvelo Pereira, Roberto; Rees, Frederic; Rombolà, Alessandro G; de la Rosa, José Maria; Sakrabani, Ruben; Sohi, Saran; Soja, Gerhard; Valagussa, Massimo; Verheijen, Frank; Zehetner, Franz

    2016-01-20

    Biochar produced by pyrolysis of organic residues is increasingly used for soil amendment and many other applications. However, analytical methods for its physical and chemical characterization are yet far from being specifically adapted, optimized, and standardized. Therefore, COST Action TD1107 conducted an interlaboratory comparison in which 22 laboratories from 12 countries analyzed three different types of biochar for 38 physical-chemical parameters (macro- and microelements, heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pH, electrical conductivity, and specific surface area) with their preferential methods. The data were evaluated in detail using professional interlaboratory testing software. Whereas intralaboratory repeatability was generally good or at least acceptable, interlaboratory reproducibility was mostly not (20% < mean reproducibility standard deviation < 460%). This paper contributes to better comparability of biochar data published already and provides recommendations to improve and harmonize specific methods for biochar analysis in the future. PMID:26693953

  1. Toward the Standardization of Biochar Analysis: The COST Action TD1107 Interlaboratory Comparison.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Hans Jörg; Bucheli, Thomas D; Dieguez-Alonso, Alba; Fabbri, Daniele; Knicker, Heike; Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Ulbricht, Axel; Becker, Roland; Buscaroli, Alessandro; Buerge, Diane; Cross, Andrew; Dickinson, Dane; Enders, Akio; Esteves, Valdemar I; Evangelou, Michael W H; Fellet, Guido; Friedrich, Kevin; Gasco Guerrero, Gabriel; Glaser, Bruno; Hanke, Ulrich M; Hanley, Kelly; Hilber, Isabel; Kalderis, Dimitrios; Leifeld, Jens; Masek, Ondrej; Mumme, Jan; Carmona, Marina Paneque; Calvelo Pereira, Roberto; Rees, Frederic; Rombolà, Alessandro G; de la Rosa, José Maria; Sakrabani, Ruben; Sohi, Saran; Soja, Gerhard; Valagussa, Massimo; Verheijen, Frank; Zehetner, Franz

    2016-01-20

    Biochar produced by pyrolysis of organic residues is increasingly used for soil amendment and many other applications. However, analytical methods for its physical and chemical characterization are yet far from being specifically adapted, optimized, and standardized. Therefore, COST Action TD1107 conducted an interlaboratory comparison in which 22 laboratories from 12 countries analyzed three different types of biochar for 38 physical-chemical parameters (macro- and microelements, heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pH, electrical conductivity, and specific surface area) with their preferential methods. The data were evaluated in detail using professional interlaboratory testing software. Whereas intralaboratory repeatability was generally good or at least acceptable, interlaboratory reproducibility was mostly not (20% < mean reproducibility standard deviation < 460%). This paper contributes to better comparability of biochar data published already and provides recommendations to improve and harmonize specific methods for biochar analysis in the future.

  2. Flat-Cladding Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors for Large Strain Amplitude Fatigue Tests

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Aihen; Chen, Daolun; Li, Cheng; Gu, Xijia

    2010-01-01

    We have successfully developed a flat-cladding fiber Bragg grating sensor for large cyclic strain amplitude tests of up to ±8,000 με. The increased contact area between the flat-cladding fiber and substrate, together with the application of a new bonding process, has significantly increased the bonding strength. In the push-pull fatigue tests of an aluminum alloy, the plastic strain amplitudes measured by three optical fiber sensors differ only by 0.43% at a cyclic strain amplitude of ±7,000 με and 1.9% at a cyclic strain amplitude of ±8,000 με. We also applied the sensor on an extruded magnesium alloy for evaluating the peculiar asymmetric hysteresis loops. The results obtained were in good agreement with those measured from the extensometer, a further validation of the sensor. PMID:22163621

  3. Muscular Activity and Fatigue in Lower-Limb and Trunk Muscles during Different Sit-To-Stand Tests.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Jiménez, Cristina; Bennett, Paul; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I

    2015-01-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) tests measure the ability to get up from a chair, reproducing an important component of daily living activity. As this functional task is essential for human independence, STS performance has been studied in the past decades using several methods, including electromyography. The aim of this study was to measure muscular activity and fatigue during different repetitions and speeds of STS tasks using surface electromyography in lower-limb and trunk muscles. This cross-sectional study recruited 30 healthy young adults. Average muscle activation, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, muscle involvement in motion and fatigue were measured using surface electrodes placed on the medial gastrocnemius (MG), biceps femoris (BF), vastus medialis of the quadriceps (QM), the abdominal rectus (AR), erector spinae (ES), rectus femoris (RF), soleus (SO) and the tibialis anterior (TA). Five-repetition STS, 10-repetition STS and 30-second STS variants were performed. MG, BF, QM, ES and RF muscles showed differences in muscle activation, while QM, AR and ES muscles showed significant differences in MVC percentage. Also, significant differences in fatigue were found in QM muscle between different STS tests. There was no statistically significant fatigue in the BF, MG and SO muscles of the leg although there appeared to be a trend of increasing fatigue. These results could be useful in describing the functional movements of the STS test used in rehabilitation programs, notwithstanding that they were measured in healthy young subjects.

  4. Muscular Activity and Fatigue in Lower-Limb and Trunk Muscles during Different Sit-To-Stand Tests

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Jiménez, Cristina; Bennett, Paul; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I.

    2015-01-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) tests measure the ability to get up from a chair, reproducing an important component of daily living activity. As this functional task is essential for human independence, STS performance has been studied in the past decades using several methods, including electromyography. The aim of this study was to measure muscular activity and fatigue during different repetitions and speeds of STS tasks using surface electromyography in lower-limb and trunk muscles. This cross-sectional study recruited 30 healthy young adults. Average muscle activation, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, muscle involvement in motion and fatigue were measured using surface electrodes placed on the medial gastrocnemius (MG), biceps femoris (BF), vastus medialis of the quadriceps (QM), the abdominal rectus (AR), erector spinae (ES), rectus femoris (RF), soleus (SO) and the tibialis anterior (TA). Five-repetition STS, 10-repetition STS and 30-second STS variants were performed. MG, BF, QM, ES and RF muscles showed differences in muscle activation, while QM, AR and ES muscles showed significant differences in MVC percentage. Also, significant differences in fatigue were found in QM muscle between different STS tests. There was no statistically significant fatigue in the BF, MG and SO muscles of the leg although there appeared to be a trend of increasing fatigue. These results could be useful in describing the functional movements of the STS test used in rehabilitation programs, notwithstanding that they were measured in healthy young subjects. PMID:26506612

  5. Six-Minute Walk Test demonstrates motor fatigue in spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Montes, J.; McDermott, M. P.; Martens, W. B.; Dunaway, S.; Glanzman, A. M.; Riley, S.; Quigley, J.; Montgomery, M. J.; Sproule, D.; Tawil, R.; Chung, W. K.; Darras, B. T.; De Vivo, D. C.; Kaufmann, P.; Finkel, R. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), weakness, decreased endurance, and fatigue limit mobility. Scales have been developed to measure function across the wide spectrum of disease severity. However, these scales typically are observer dependent, and scores are based on sums across Likert-scaled items. The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) is an objective, easily administered, and standardized evaluation of functional exercise capacity that has been proven reliable in other neurologic disorders and in children. Methods: To study the performance of the 6MWT in SMA, 18 ambulatory participants were evaluated in a cross-sectional study. Clinical measures were 6MWT, 10-m walk/run, Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale–Expanded (HFMSE), forced vital capacity, and handheld dynamometry. Associations between the 6MWT total distance and other outcomes were analyzed using Spearman correlation coefficients. A paired t test was used to compare the mean distance walked in the first and sixth minutes. Results: The 6MWT was associated with the HFMSE score (r = 0.83, p < 0.0001), 10-m walk/run (r = −0.87, p < 0.0001), and knee flexor strength (r = 0.62, p = 0.01). Gait velocity decreased during successive minutes in nearly all participants. The average first minute distance (57.5 m) was significantly more than the sixth minute distance (48 m) (p = 0.0003). Conclusion: The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) can be safely performed in ambulatory patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), correlates with established outcome measures, and is sensitive to fatigue-related changes. The 6MWT is a promising candidate outcome measure for clinical trials in ambulatory subjects with SMA. GLOSSARY FVC = forced vital capacity; HFMSE = Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale–Expanded; HHD = handheld dynamometry; 6MWT = Six-Minute Walk Test; SMA = spinal muscular atrophy. PMID:20211907

  6. Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high

  7. Influence of successive bouts of fatiguing exercise on perceptual and physiological markers during an incremental exercise test.

    PubMed

    Coquart, Jeremy B J; Legrand, Renaud; Robin, Sophie; Duhamel, Alain; Matran, Regis; Garcin, Murielle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a succession of fatiguing stages, on ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and estimated time limits (ETL) during an incremental exercise test. Twenty-seven cyclists performed a continuous incremental test and a discontinuous test with randomized workloads. A linear mixed model was used to compare the RPE, ETL, respiratory gas, heart rate, and blood data obtained during the two exercise tests. RPE and ETL were not significantly different between the tests. Ventilation, breathing frequency, heart rate, and blood lactate concentration were significantly higher during the last incremental test workloads. In conclusion, although the incremental exercise test generated higher cardiorespiratory and muscular workloads than observed during the randomized exercise test, most likely due to a greater fatiguing process, these higher workloads did not influence the perceptual response.

  8. Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L.; Dombrowski, D.E.; Guiniatouline, R.N.; Kupriynov, I.B.

    1996-02-01

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ``spike`` of 750{degree}C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m{sup 2}. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S- 65H, S-200F, S-200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP`d spherical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe{sub 12}. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis.

  9. Interlaboratory Performance of a Microarray-Based Gene Expression Test to Determine Tissue of Origin in Poorly Differentiated and Undifferentiated Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dumur, Catherine I.; Lyons-Weiler, Maureen; Sciulli, Christin; Garrett, Carleton T.; Schrijver, Iris; Holley, Tara K.; Rodriguez-Paris, Juan; Pollack, Jonathan R.; Zehnder, James L.; Price, Melissa; Hagenkord, Jill M.; Rigl, C. Ted; Buturovic, Ljubomir J.; Anderson, Glenda G.; Monzon, Federico A.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical workup of metastatic malignancies of unknown origin is often arduous and expensive and is reported to be unsuccessful in 30 to 60% of cases. Accurate classification of uncertain primary cancers may improve with microarray-based gene expression testing. We evaluated the analytical performance characteristics of the Pathwork tissue of origin test, which uses expression signals from 1668 probe sets in a gene expression microarray, to quantify the similarity of tumor specimens to 15 known tissues of origin. Sixty archived tissue specimens from poorly and undifferentiated tumors (metastatic and primary) were analyzed at four laboratories representing a wide range of preanalytical conditions (eg, personnel, reagents, instrumentation, and protocols). Cross-laboratory comparisons showed highly reproducible results between laboratories, with correlation coefficients between 0.95 to 0.97 for measurements of similarity scores, and an average 93.8% overall concordance between laboratories in terms of final tissue calls. Bland-Altman plots (mean coefficients of reproducibility of 32.48 ± 3.97) and κ statistics (κ > 0.86) also indicated a high level of agreement between laboratories. We conclude that the Pathwork tissue of origin test is a robust assay that produces consistent results in diverse laboratory conditions reflecting the preanalytical variations found in the everyday clinical practice of molecular diagnostics laboratories. PMID:18083688

  10. Low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, H. D. (Editor); Kaisand, L. R. (Editor); Halford, G. R. (Editor); Leis, B. N. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on various aspects of low cycle fatigue, including cyclic deformation, crack propagation, high-temperature low cycle fatigue, microstructural defects, multiaxial and variable amplitude loading, and life prediction. Papers are presented on the low cycle fatigue of some aluminum alloys, prediction of crack growth under creep-fatigue loading conditions, high-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior and lifetime prediction of a nickel-base ODS alloy, and an integrated approach to creep-fatigue life prediction. Other topics discussed include thermal fatigue testing of coated monocrystalline superalloys, low cycle fatigue of Al-Mg-Si alloys, and the effect of superimposed stresses at high frequency on low cycle fatigue.

  11. Predicting skin sensitization potential and inter-laboratory reproducibility of a human Cell Line Activation Test (h-CLAT) in the European Cosmetics Association (COLIPA) ring trials.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hitoshi; Ryan, Cindy; Ovigne, Jean-Marc; Schroeder, Klaus R; Ashikaga, Takao

    2010-09-01

    Regulatory policies in Europe prohibited the testing of cosmetic ingredients in animals for a number of toxicological endpoints. Currently no validated non-animal test methods exist for skin sensitization. Evaluation of changes in cell surface marker expression in dendritic cell (DC)-surrogate cell lines represents one non-animal approach. The human Cell Line Activation Test (h-CLAT) examines the level of CD86 and CD54 expression on the surface of THP-1 cells, a human monocytic leukemia cell line, following 24h of chemical exposure. To examine protocol transferability, between-lab reproducibility, and predictive capacity, the h-CLAT has been evaluated by five independent laboratories in several ring trials (RTs) coordinated by the European Cosmetics Association (COLIPA). The results of the first and second RTs demonstrated that the protocol was transferable and basically had good between-lab reproducibility and predictivity, but there were some false negative data. To improve performance, protocol and prediction model were modified. Using the modified prediction model in the first and second RT, accuracy was improved. However, about 15% of the outcomes were not correctly identified, which exposes some of the limitations of the assay. For the chemicals evaluated, the limitation may due to chemical being a weak allergen or having low solubility (ex. alpha-hexylcinnamaldehyde). The third RT evaluated the modified prediction model and satisfactory results were obtained. From the RT data, the feasibility of utilizing cell lines as surrogate DC in development of in vitro skin sensitization methods shows promise. The data also support initiating formal pre-validation of the h-CLAT in order to fully understand the capabilities and limitations of the assay.

  12. Inspection and monitoring of wind turbine blade-embedded wave defects during fatigue testing

    DOE PAGES

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter; Chen, Julie; Sherwood, James; Lundstrom, Troy; LeBlanc, Bruce; Hughes, Scott; Desmond, Michael; Beattie, Alan; Rumsey, Mark; et al

    2014-05-20

    The research we present in this article focuses on a 9-m CX-100 wind turbine blade, designed by a team led by Sandia National Laboratories and manufactured by TPI Composites Inc. The key difference between the 9-m blade and baseline CX-100 blades is that this blade contains fabric wave defects of controlled geometry inserted at specified locations along the blade length. The defect blade was tested at the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory using a schedule of cycles at increasing load level until failure was detected. Our researchers used digital image correlation, shearography, acoustic emission, fiber-opticmore » strain sensing, thermal imaging, and piezoelectric sensing as structural health monitoring techniques. Furthermore, this article provides a comparison of the sensing results of these different structural health monitoring approaches to detect the defects and track the resultant damage from the initial fatigue cycle to final failure.« less

  13. Inspection and monitoring of wind turbine blade-embedded wave defects during fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter; Chen, Julie; Sherwood, James; Lundstrom, Troy; LeBlanc, Bruce; Hughes, Scott; Desmond, Michael; Beattie, Alan; Rumsey, Mark; Klute, Sandra M.; Pedrazzani, Renee; Werlink, Rudy; Newman, John

    2014-05-20

    The research we present in this article focuses on a 9-m CX-100 wind turbine blade, designed by a team led by Sandia National Laboratories and manufactured by TPI Composites Inc. The key difference between the 9-m blade and baseline CX-100 blades is that this blade contains fabric wave defects of controlled geometry inserted at specified locations along the blade length. The defect blade was tested at the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory using a schedule of cycles at increasing load level until failure was detected. Our researchers used digital image correlation, shearography, acoustic emission, fiber-optic strain sensing, thermal imaging, and piezoelectric sensing as structural health monitoring techniques. Furthermore, this article provides a comparison of the sensing results of these different structural health monitoring approaches to detect the defects and track the resultant damage from the initial fatigue cycle to final failure.

  14. Random Vibration Tests for Prediction of Fatigue Life of Diffuser Structure for Gas Dynamic Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, O. F.; Banaszak, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Static and dynamic strain measurements which were taken during test stand operations of the gas dynamic laser (GDL) for the AF Airborne Laser Laboratory indicated that higher than expected vibrational stress levels may possibly limit the fatigue life of the laser structure. Particularly the diffuser sidewall structure exhibited large amplitude random vibrations which were excited by the internal gas flow. The diffuser structure consists of two layers of brazed stainless steel, AISI-347, panels. Cooling ducts were milled into the outer face sheet. These in turn are backed by the inner face sheet. So called T-rail stiffeners silver-brazed to the outer face sheets add the required stiffness and divide the sidewall into smaller rectangular plate sections.

  15. Effect of Test Frequency on Fatigue Crack Growth Rates of Ti-6Al-4V ELI Alloy at Cryogenic Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri, T.; Ono, Y.; Ogata, T.

    2006-03-31

    In order to clarify the effect of test frequency on the fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) of Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy have been investigated at cryogenic temperature. The fatigue crack growth tests were conducted using the test frequencies of 5 and 20 Hz, respectively. At 4 K, the effects of the test frequencies on the fatigue crack growth rates of Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy were not clear or significant. The fatigue crack growth rates in the low propagation rate region at 4 K were smaller than those at 293 K. On the other hand, those in the high propagation rate region at 4 K were bigger than those at 293 K. The former is considered that the crack closure level was higher as compared to that at 293 K and the latter is due to the difference values of the fracture toughness at 4 and 293 K, respectively. The fracture surfaces of compact tension (CT) specimens in the high propagation rate regions at each test temperature revealed the striations, and furthermore accompanied with the flute fracture surface at 4 K. On the other hand, those of CT specimens in the low propagation rate region at 4 K were found facet-like fracture surfaces corresponding with almost the {alpha}-grain size.

  16. Design of Linear Control System for Wind Turbine Blade Fatigue Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toft, Anders; Roe-Poulsen, Bjarke; Christiansen, Rasmus; Knudsen, Torben

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a linear method for wind turbine blade fatigue testing at Siemens Wind Power. The setup consists of a blade, an actuator (motor and load mass) that acts on the blade with a sinusoidal moment, and a distribution of strain gauges to measure the blade flexure. Based on the frequency of the sinusoidal input, the blade will start oscillating with a given gain, hence the objective of the fatigue test is to make the blade oscillate with a controlled amplitude. The system currently in use is based on frequency control, which involves some non-linearities that make the system difficult to control. To make a linear controller, a different approach has been chosen, namely making a controller which is not regulating on the input frequency, but on the input amplitude. A non-linear mechanical model for the blade and the motor has been constructed. This model has been simplified based on the desired output, namely the amplitude of the blade. Furthermore, the model has been linearised to make it suitable for linear analysis and control design methods. The controller is designed based on a simplified and linearised model, and its gain parameter determined using pole placement. The model variants have been simulated in the MATLAB toolbox Simulink, which shows that the controller design based on the simple model performs adequately with the non-linear model. Moreover, the developed controller solves the robustness issue found in the existent solution and also reduces the needed energy for actuation as it always operates at the blade eigenfrequency.

  17. Progress Letter Report on Bending Fatigue Test System Development for Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study (Out-of-cell fatigue testing development - Task 2.4)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Cox, Thomas S; Baldwin, Charles A; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom

    2013-08-01

    Vibration integrity of high burn-up spent nuclear fuel in transportation remains to be a critical component of US nuclear waste management system. The structural evaluation of package for spent fuel transportation eventually will need to see if the content or spent fuel is in a subcritical condition. However, a system for testing and characterizing such spent fuel is still lacking mainly due to the complication involved with dealing radioactive specimens in a hot cell environment. Apparently, the current state-of-the-art in spent fuel research and development is quite far away from the delivery of reliable mechanical property data for the assessment of spent fuels in the transport package evaluation. Under the sponsorship of US NRC, ORNL has taken the challenge in developing a robust testing system for spent fuel in hot cell. An extensive literature survey was carried out and unique requirements of such testing system were identified. The U-frame setup has come to the top among various designs examined for reverse bending fatigue test of spent fuel rod. The U-frame has many features that deserve mentioned here: Easy to install spent fuel rod in test; Less linkages than in conventional bending test setup such as three-point or four-point bending; Target the failure mode relevant to the fracture of spent fuel rod in transportation by focusing on pure bending; The continuous calibrations and modifications resulted in the third generation (3G) U-frame testing setup. Rigid arms are split along the LBB axis at rod sample ends. For each arm, this results in a large arm body and an end piece. Mating halves of bushings were modified into two V-shaped surfaces on which linear roller bearings (LRB) are embedded. The rod specimen is installed into the test fixture through opening and closing slide end-pieces. The 3G apparently has addressed major issues of setup identified in the previous stage and been proven to be eligible to be further pursued in this project. On the other

  18. An unsupervised pattern recognition approach for AE data originating from fatigue tests on polymer-composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, D. D.; Ramasso, E.; Placet, V.; Zhang, S.; Boubakar, L.; Zerhouni, N.

    2015-12-01

    This work investigates acoustic emission generated during tension fatigue tests carried out on a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite specimen. Since massive fatigue data processing, especially noise reduction, remains an important challenge in AE data analysis, a Mahalanobis distance-based noise modeling has been proposed in the present work to tackle this problem. A sequential feature selection based on Davies-Bouldin index has been implemented for fast dimensionality reduction. An unsupervised classifier offline-learned from quasi-static data is then used to classify the data to different AE sources with the possibility to dynamically accommodate with unseen ones. With an efficient proposed noise removal and automatic separation of AE events, this pattern discovery procedure provides an insight into fatigue damage development in composites in the presence of millions of AE events.

  19. Elevated-temperature fracture toughness and fatigue testing of steels for geothermal applications. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.A.; Goodman, E.C.; Guest, R.V.; Hendrickson, R.R.; Leslie, W.C.

    1980-11-01

    Conventional drill bit steels exhibit increased wear and decreased toughness when run at elevated temperatures in geothermal wells. Bits are therefore run at lower speeds and lighter loads, resulting in lower penetration rates for geothermal wells than for conventional rock drilling. Carpenter EX-00053, Timken CBS 600, Timken CBS 1000M and Vasco X-2M, steels with improved hot hardness (improved wear resistance), were tested in conjunction with the steels used for cones (AISI 4820 and 9315) and lugs (AISI 8620 and 9315) in conventional roller cone rock bits. Shortrod fracture toughness measurements were made on each of these steels between room temperature and 400/sup 0/C. Fatigue crack resistance was determined at 300/sup 0/C for high-temperature steels and at room temperature for conventional steels. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of the fractured short-rod specimens were correlated with observed crack behavior from the test records. Test results are discussed, recommendations made for further testing and preliminary steel selections made for improved geothermal bits.

  20. Fatigue Testing of Metallurgically-Bonded EBR-II Superheater Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier

    2006-12-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were performed on 2¼Cr-1Mo steel specimens machined from ex-service Experimental Breeder Reactor – II (EBR-II) superheater duplex tubes. The tubes had been metallurgically bonded with a 100 µm thick Ni interlayer; the specimens incorporated this bond layer. Tests were performed at room temperature in air and at 400°C in air and humid Ar; cracks were grown at varied levels of constant ?K. Crack growth tests at a range of ?K were also performed on specimens machined from the shell of the superheater. In all conditions the presence of the Ni interlayer was found to result in a net retardation of growth as the crack passed through the interlayer. The mechanism of retardation was identified as a disruption of crack planarity and uniformity after passing through the porous interlayer. Full crack arrest was only observed in a single test performed at near-threshold ?K level (12 MPa?m) at 400°C. In this case the crack tip was blunted by oxidation of the base steel at the steel-interlayer interface.

  1. Postural Balance Following Aerobic Fatigue Tests: A Longitudinal Study Among Young Athletes.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Nili; Eliakim, Alon; Zaav, Aviva; Pantanowitz, Michal; Halumi, Monder; Eisenstein, Tamir; Meckel, Yoav; Nemet, Dan

    2016-01-01

    General fatigue can cause aggravation of postural balance, with increased risk for injuries. The present longitudinal study aimed to evaluate the postural balance of young athletes following field aerobic tests throughout 1 year of training. Thirty children from a sports center in Nazareth, participating in a 3 times/week training program (specific to basketball, soccer, or athletic training), were assessed. Postural balance parameters were taken before, immediately after, and 10 min after a 20 m shuttle-run aerobic test, at 3 time points during 1 training year (Start/Y, Mid/Y, and End/Y). Fitness improved at the Mid/Y and End/Y compared to Start/Y. Postural balance significantly deteriorated immediately after the aerobic test and improved significantly in the 10-min testing in all 3 time points, with significant deterioration in the End/Y compared with the Start/Y. In conclusions, postural balance deteriorates immediately after aerobic exercises, and at the end of the year. To better practice drills related to postural balance and possibly to prevent injuries, it is best for young athletes to properly rest immediately following aerobic exercises and to practice postural balance mainly at the beginning and at the middle of the training year.

  2. Impact of Laboratory Practices on Interlaboratory Variability in Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Immunosuppressive Drugs.

    PubMed

    Christians, Uwe; Vinks, Alexander A; Langman, Loralie J; Clarke, William; Wallemacq, Pierre; van Gelder, Teun; Renjen, Varun; Marquet, Pierre; Meyer, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    The immunosuppressants cyclosporine, tacrolimus, sirolimus, everolimus, and probably also mycophenolic acid require therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM)-guided dosing to ensure that blood concentrations are kept within the target range in transplant patients. Reliable, accurate, and precise test methods are therefore essential to effectively monitor levels and to make proper dose adjustments. Data from proficiency testing programs have shown substantial interlaboratory variability. Only few attempts have been made to study the underlying causes. The aim of this study was to systematically document current practices used for immunosuppressant drug TDM in clinical laboratories and identify methodological and practice differences, which may cause the variability observed among laboratories. Data collection was primarily conducted by a structured Web-based survey. Invitations to participate in the survey were distributed to clinical laboratories providing immunosuppressant drug TDM. Surveys were completed by 76 laboratories in 14 countries. The results of our survey suggest that there are 3 main reasons for interlaboratory variability: (1) lack of standardization of laboratory procedures and workflows starting with sample collection and handling, (2) lack of use of appropriate reference materials (eg, isotope-labeled internal standards for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy), and (3) poor compliance with internationally accepted good laboratory practice guidelines (eg, related to quality control, quality assurance, validation, training of personnel). The results of the survey also suggest that interlaboratory variability is a multifactorial problem. Technical-level consensus on laboratory operational procedures, quality systems, and personnel training will be of great importance to improve quality and interlaboratory comparability.

  3. Space Shuttle Partial Stack Rollout Test Analytical Correlation In Support Of Fatigue Load Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelBasso, Steve; Dolenz, Jim; Wilson, Lee

    2005-01-01

    A rollout test with only the Solid Rocket Boosters was conducted in November 2003 to gather structural dynamic response data of the transportation environment from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the Launch Pad. The data was acquired to develop and validate analytical methods used to predict rollout Orbiter fatigue load spectra. Earlier predictions computed by a base drive approach with only 5 input drive degrees-of-freedom raised questions that commissioned the partial stack test. Not only was there a concern because of the input degree-of-freedom omission due to measurement limitations, but there was also a concern with the implementation of the "large mass" itself. Three methods were evaluated with the partial stack test data. The analytical correlations to measured strain derived SRB base loads and acceleration5 showed the earlier 5 degree-of-freedom base drive approach to yield the most conservative results for all quantities monitored except the SRB base moment about the axis in which the input drive was missing. This non-conservative shortcoming led to a recommendation to use either the 6 degree-of-freedom base drive or the 12 degree-of-freedom Craig-Bampton boundary drive methods whose results did not substantially differ.

  4. Neuromuscular characteristics and fatigue in endurance and sprint athletes during a new anaerobic power test.

    PubMed

    Paavolainen, L; Häkkinen, K; Nummela, A; Rusko, H

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate neuromuscular and energy performance characteristics of anaerobic power and capacity and the development of fatigue. Ten endurance and ten sprint athletes performed a new maximal anaerobic running power test (MARP), which consisted of n x 20-s runs on a treadmill with 100-s recovery between the runs. Blood lactate concentration [la-]b was measured after each run to determine submaximal and maximal indices of anaerobic power (P3 mmol.l-1, P5 mmol.l-1, P10 mmol.l-1 and Pmax) which was expressed as the oxygen demand of the runs according to the American College of Sports Medicine equation: the oxygen uptake (ml.kg-1.min-1) = 0.2 x velocity (m.min-1) + 0.9 x slope of treadmill (frac) x velocity (m.min-1) + 3.5. The height of rise of the centre of gravity of the counter movement jumps before (CMJrest) and during (CMJ) the MARP test, as well as the time of force production (tF) and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the leg muscles of CMJ performed after each run were used to describe the neuromuscular performance characteristics. The maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), anaerobic and aerobic thresholds were determined in the VO2max test, which consisted of n x 3-min runs on the treadmill.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Elevated Temperature Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Testing of Steels for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.A.; Goodman, E.C.; Hendrickson, R.R.

    1981-10-01

    Conventional drill bit steels exhibit increased wear and decreased toughness when run at elevated temperatures in geothermal wells. Bits are therefore run at lower speeds and lighter loads, resulting in lower penetration rates for geothermal drilling than for conventional rock drilling. Carpenter EX-00053, Timken CBS 600, Timken CBS 1000M and Vasco X-2M steels with improved hot hardness (improved wear resistance), were tested in conjunction with the steels used for cones (AISI 4829, 3915 and EX55) in conventional roller cones and lugs (AISI 8620, 9315 and EX55) in conventional roller cone rock bits. Short-rod fracture toughness measurements were made on each of these steels between room temperature and 400{degree}C. Fatigue crack resistance was determined at 300{degree}C for high-temperature steels and at room temperature for conventional steels. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of the fractured short-rod specimens were correlated with observed crack behavior from the test records. Materials testing results are discussed and steel selections made for improved geothermal bits. Carpenter EX-00053 and Timken CBS 1000M steels meet all design requirements for use in stabilizers, lugs and cones at temperatures to 400{degree}C. It is recommended that EX-00053 and CBS 1000M be manufactured for geothermal drilling at the Geysers site. [DJE 2005

  6. Interlaboratory study of novel halogenated flame retardants: INTERFLAB.

    PubMed

    Melymuk, Lisa; Goosey, Emma; Riddell, Nicole; Diamond, Miriam L

    2015-09-01

    Flame retardants (FRs) have come under considerable scientific and public scrutiny over the past decade. A lack of reference materials and standardized analytical methods has resulted in questions regarding the variation of measurements from different studies. We evaluated this variation by performing an international interlaboratory study assessing analytical capabilities as well as the accuracy and precision of results for a range of flame retardants (International Flame Retardant Laboratory Study, INTERFLAB). Thirteen international research laboratories participated in a blind interlaboratory comparison of 24 FRs. Results demonstrate good precision within replicates of test mixtures from individual laboratories, but problematic accuracy for several FRs and laboratories. Large ranges in the values reported for decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE), tris(1,3-dichloropropyl)phosphate (TDCIPP), tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA), and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) (>50 % relative standard deviations among measured values) and large deviations from the reference values (>25 % bias in accuracy) suggest potential problems for comparability of results. DBDPE, HBCD, and TBBPA had significantly poorer accuracy and precision, suggesting that current analytical methods are not providing reliable results for these FRs.

  7. Evaluation of the New B-REX Fatigue Testing System for Multi-Megawatt Wind Turbine Blades: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.; Musial, W.; Engberg, S.

    2004-12-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently developed a new hybrid fatigue testing system called the Blade Resonance Excitation (B-REX) test system. The new system uses 65% less energy to test large wind turbine blades in half the time of NREL's dual-axis forced-displacement test method with lower equipment and operating costs. The B-REX is a dual-axis test system that combines resonance excitation with forced hydraulic loading to reduce the total test time required while representing the operating strains on the critical inboard blade stations more accurately than a single-axis test system. The analysis and testing required to fully implement the B-REX was significant. To control unanticipated blade motion and vibrations caused by dynamic coupling between the flap, lead-lag, and torsional directions, we needed to incorporate additional test hardware and control software. We evaluated the B-REX test system under stable operating conditions using a combination of various sensors. We then compared our results with results from the same blade, tested previously using NREL's dual-axis forced-displacement test method. Experimental results indicate that strain levels produced by the B-REX system accurately replicated the forced-displacement method. This paper describes the challenges we encountered while developing the new blade fatigue test system and the experimental results that validate its accuracy.

  8. Simplification of Fatigue Test Requirements for Damage Tolerance of Composite Interstage Launch Vehicle Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Hodge, A. J.; Jackson, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    The issue of fatigue loading of structures composed of composite materials is considered in a requirements document that is currently in place for manned launch vehicles. By taking into account the short life of these parts, coupled with design considerations, it is demonstrated that the necessary coupon level fatigue data collapse to a static case. Data from a literature review of past studies that examined compressive fatigue loading after impact and data generated from this experimental study are presented to support this finding. Damage growth, in the form of infrared thermography, was difficult to detect due to rapid degradation of compressive properties once damage growth initiated. Unrealistically high fatigue amplitudes were needed to fail 5 of 15 specimens before 10,000 cycles were reached. Since a typical vehicle structure, such as the Ares I interstage, only experiences a few cycles near limit load, it is concluded that static compression after impact (CAI) strength data will suffice for most launch vehicle structures.

  9. Creep-fatigue response of structural ceramics: 1, Comparison of flexure, tension, and compression testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G.; Nolan, T.A.; Yeckley, R.

    1990-12-31

    The stress sensitivities of the creep rates of commercially available Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics were measured at elevated temperatures using tension, compression, and flexure specimens. Pronounced differences in creep deformation behavior in compression and tension were observed for both ceramics. These differences were attributed to the generation of a creep-induced damage zone under tensile loading which accelerated the creep rate. The evolution of this damage zone was confirmed by (1) fractographic studies of failed tensile samples and (2) the observed stress-dependence of the creep failure strain. The creep rate-stress data generated fromn the flexure creep testing were found to be in fair agreement with results predicted from a creep deformation model. Differences between experimental and predicted creep behavior were attributed to the failure of the model to account for primary creep. This model was also capable of describing differences in the fatigue-life characteristics of a silicon nitride measured in flexure and tension.

  10. Creep-fatigue response of structural ceramics: 1, Comparison of flexure, tension, and compression testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G.; Nolan, T.A. ); Yeckley, R. )

    1990-01-01

    The stress sensitivities of the creep rates of commercially available Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ceramics were measured at elevated temperatures using tension, compression, and flexure specimens. Pronounced differences in creep deformation behavior in compression and tension were observed for both ceramics. These differences were attributed to the generation of a creep-induced damage zone under tensile loading which accelerated the creep rate. The evolution of this damage zone was confirmed by (1) fractographic studies of failed tensile samples and (2) the observed stress-dependence of the creep failure strain. The creep rate-stress data generated fromn the flexure creep testing were found to be in fair agreement with results predicted from a creep deformation model. Differences between experimental and predicted creep behavior were attributed to the failure of the model to account for primary creep. This model was also capable of describing differences in the fatigue-life characteristics of a silicon nitride measured in flexure and tension.

  11. Interlaboratory study of precision: Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans freshwater sediment toxicity assays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, G.A.; Norberg-King, T. J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Benoit, D.A.; Ankley, G.T.; Winger, P.V.; Kubitz, J.; Lazorchak, J.M.; Smith, M.E.; Greer, E.; Dwyer, F.J.; Call, D.J.; Day, K.E.; Kennedy, P.; Stinson, M.

    1996-01-01

    Standard 10-d whole-sediment toxicity test methods have recently been developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus tentans. An interlaboratory evaluation of method precision was performed using a group of seven to 10 laboratories, representing government, academia, and environmental consulting firms. The test methods followed the EPA protocols for 4-d water-only reference toxicant (KCl) testing (static exposure) and for 10-d whole-sediment testing. Test sediments included control sediment, two copper-containing sediments, and a sediment contaminated primarily with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Reference toxicant tests resulted in H. azteca and C. tentans median lethal concentration (LC50) values with coefficents of variation (CVs) of 15.8 and 19.6%, respectively. Whole sediments which were moderately contaminated provided the best estimates of precision using CVs. Hyalella azteca and C. tentans tests in moderately contaminated sediments exhibited LC50 CVs of 38.9 and 13.5%, respectively. The CV for C. tentans growth was 31.9%. Only 3% (1 of 28) of samples exceeded acceptable interlaboratory precision limits for the H. azteca survival tests. No samples exceeded the intralaboratory precision limit for H. azteca or C. tentans survival tests. However, intralaboratory variability limits for C. tentans growth were exceeded by 80 and 100% of the laboratories for a moderately toxic and control sample, respectively. Interlaboratory variability limits for C. tentans survival were not exceeded by any laboratory. The results showed these test methods to have relatively low variance and acceptable levels of precision in interlaboratory comparisons.

  12. Anti-buckling fatigue test assembly. [for subjecting metal specimen to tensile and compressive loads at constant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenbrenner, F. F.; Imig, L. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An antibuckling fatigue test assembly is described for holding a metal specimen which is subjected to compression and to rapid cyclical heating and cooling while permitting visual observation. In an illustrative embodiment of this invention, the anti-buckling fatigue test apparatus includes first and second guide members between which the metal specimen is disposed and held, a heating assembly comprising a suitable heating source such as a quartz lamp and a reflecting assembly directing the heat onto the specimen, and a cooling assembly for directing a suitable cooling fluid such as air onto the specimen. The guide members each have a passage to permit the heat to be directed onto the specimen. An opening is provided in the reflecting assembly to permit visual inspection of that region of the specimen adjacent to the opening onto which the heat is directed.

  13. Experimental and Finite Element Modeling of Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth for the K-Decreasing Test Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; Newman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The experimental methods to determine near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate data are prescribed in ASTM standard E647. To produce near-threshold data at a constant stress ratio (R), the applied stress-intensity factor (K) is decreased as the crack grows based on a specified K-gradient. Consequently, as the fatigue crack growth rate threshold is approached and the crack tip opening displacement decreases, remote crack wake contact may occur due to the plastically deformed crack wake surfaces and shield the growing crack tip resulting in a reduced crack tip driving force and non-representative crack growth rate data. If such data are used to life a component, the evaluation could yield highly non-conservative predictions. Although this anomalous behavior has been shown to be affected by K-gradient, starting K level, residual stresses, environmental assisted cracking, specimen geometry, and material type, the specifications within the standard to avoid this effect are limited to a maximum fatigue crack growth rate and a suggestion for the K-gradient value. This paper provides parallel experimental and computational simulations for the K-decreasing method for two materials (an aluminum alloy, AA 2024-T3 and a titanium alloy, Ti 6-2-2-2-2) to aid in establishing clear understanding of appropriate testing requirements. These simulations investigate the effect of K-gradient, the maximum value of stress-intensity factor applied, and material type. A material independent term is developed to guide in the selection of appropriate test conditions for most engineering alloys. With the use of such a term, near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate tests can be performed at accelerated rates, near-threshold data can be acquired in days instead of weeks without having to establish testing criteria through trial and error, and these data can be acquired for most engineering materials, even those that are produced in relatively small product forms.

  14. Experimental investigation of fatigue behavior of carbon fiber composites using fully-reversed four-point bending test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Ali

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) have become an increasingly notable material for use in structural engineering applications. Some of their advantages include high strength-to-weight ratio, high stiffness-to-weight ratio, and good moldability. Prediction of the fatigue life of composite laminates has been the subject of various studies due to the cyclic loading experienced in many applications. Both theoretical studies and experimental tests have been performed to estimate the endurance limit and fatigue life of composite plates. One of the main methods to predict fatigue life is the four-point bending test. In most previous works, the tests have been done in one direction (load ratio, R, > 0). In the current work, we have designed and manufactured a special fixture to perform a fully reversed bending test (R = -1). Static four-point bending tests were carried out on three (0°/90°)15 and (± 45°)15 samples to measure the mechanical properties of CFRP. Testing was displacement-controlled at the rate of 10 mm/min until failure. In (0°/90°)15 samples, all failed by cracking/buckling on the compressive side of the sample. While in (± 45°)15 all three tests, no visual fracture or failure of the samples was observed. 3.4 times higher stresses were reached during four-point static bending test of (0° /90°)15 samples compared to (± 45°)15. Same trend was seen in literature for similar tests. Four-point bending fatigue tests were carried out on (0° /90°)15 sample with stress ratio, R = -1 and frequency of 5 Hz. Applied maximum stresses were approximately 45%, 56%, 67%, 72% and 76% of the measured yield stress for (0° /90°)15 samples. There was visible cracking through the thickness of the samples. The expected downward trend in fatigue life with increasing maximum applied stress was observed in S-N curves of samples. There appears to be a threshold for ‘infinite’ life, defined as 1.7 million cycles in the current work, at a maximum stress of about

  15. In vitro bond strength and fatigue stress test evaluation of different adhesive cements used for fixed space maintainer cementation

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Delikan, Ebru; Cetin, Secil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of this research were to (1) compare the shear-peel bond strength (SPBS) of a band of a fixed space maintainer (SM) cemented with five different adhesive cements; and (2) compare the survival time of bands of SM with each cement type after simulating mechanical fatigue stress. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five teeth were used to assess retentive strength and another 50 teeth were used to assess the fatigue survival time. SPBS was determined with a universal testing machine. Fatigue testing was conducted in a ball mill device. Results: The mean survival time of bands cemented with R & D series Nova Glass-LC (6.2 h), Transbond Plus (6.7 h), and R & D series Nova Resin (6.8 h) was significantly longer than for bands cemented with Ketac-Cem (5.4 h) and GC Equia (5.2 h) (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Although traditional glass ionomer cement (GIC) cement presented higher retentive strength than resin-based cements (resin, resin modified GIC, and compomer cement), resin based cements, especially dual cure resin cement (nova resin cement) and compomer (Transbond Plus), can be expected to have lower failure rates for band cementation than GIC (Ketac-Cem) in the light of the results of the ball mill test. PMID:25202209

  16. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior Evaluation of Grainex Mar-M 247 for NASA's High Temperature, High Speed Turbine Seal Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Rimnac, Clare M.; Lewandowski, John J.

    2008-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth behavior of Grainex Mar-M 247 is evaluated for NASA s Turbine Seal Test Facility. The facility is used to test air-to-air seals primarily for use in advanced jet engine applications. Because of extreme seal test conditions of temperature, pressure, and surface speeds, surface cracks may develop over time in the disk bolt holes. An inspection interval is developed to preclude catastrophic disk failure by using experimental fatigue crack growth data. By combining current fatigue crack growth results with previous fatigue strain-life experimental work, an inspection interval is determined for the test disk. The fatigue crack growth life of the NASA disk bolt holes is found to be 367 cycles at a crack depth of 0.501 mm using a factor of 2 on life at maximum operating conditions. Combining this result with previous fatigue strain-life experimental work gives a total fatigue life of 1032 cycles at a crack depth of 0.501 mm. Eddy-current inspections are suggested starting at 665 cycles since eddy current detection thresholds are currently at 0.381 mm. Inspection intervals are recommended every 50 cycles when operated at maximum operating conditions.

  17. Fatigue-test acceleration with flight-by-flight loading and heating to simulate supersonic-transport operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imig, L. A.; Garrett, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Possibilities for reducing fatigue-test time for supersonic-transport materials and structures were studied in tests with simulated flight-by-flight loading. In order to determine whether short-time tests were feasible, the results of accelerated tests (2 sec per flight) were compared with the results of real-time tests (96 min per flight). The effects of design mean stress, the stress range for ground-air-ground cycles, simulated thermal stress, the number of stress cycles in each flight, and salt corrosion were studied. The flight-by-flight stress sequences were applied to notched sheet specimens of Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V and Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloys. A linear cumulative-damage analysis accounted for large changes in stress range of the simulated flights but did not account for the differences between real-time and accelerated tests. The fatigue lives from accelerated tests were generally within a factor of two of the lives from real-time tests; thus, within the scope of the investigation, accelerated testing seems feasible.

  18. Fatigue test of a fiberglass based composite panel. Increasing the lifetime of freight wagon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, M.; Baier, A.; Grabowski, Ł.; Majzner, M.

    2016-08-01

    In the XXI century transportation of goods plays a key role in the economy. Due to a good logistics the economy is able to grow fluently. Although land transportation is carried out mainly through trucks for the last several years there has been noted an increase in the percentage share of rail transport in the freight transport. The main goods transported by railways are mineral fuels, mining and quarrying products. They constitute the greater part of 70% of total transported goods. Transportation of material of such high weight, high hardness and with different shapes involves increased and accelerated wear and tear of the cargo space of the wagon. This process is also magnified by substances used to prevent overheating or goods theft. Usually they are in the form of chemical compounds powder, eg. Calcium. A very large impact on the wear of the freight wagons hull is made because of mechanical damage. Their source comes mostly from loading cargo with impetus and using heavy machines during unloading. A large number of cycles of loading and unloading during the working period causes abrasion of body and as a result after several years a wagon car qualifies for a major maintenance. Possibility of application composite panels in the process of renovating the wagons body could reduce the weight of whole train and prolong the service life between mandatory technical inspection. The Paper "Fatigue test of a fiberglass based composite panel. Increasing the lifetime of freight wagon" presents the research process and the results of the endurance test of the composite panel samples fixed to a metal plate. As a fixing method a stainless steel rivet nut and a stainless steel button head socket screws were chosen. Cyclic and multiple load were applied to test samples using a pneumatic cylinder. Such a methodology simulated the forces resulting from loading and unloading of the wagon and movement of the cargo during transport. In the study a dedicated stand equipped with a

  19. Lessons learned from interlaboratory comparisons of bioassay data interpretation.

    PubMed

    Doerfel, H; Andrasi, A; Bailey, M; Berkovski, V; Castellani, C M; Hurtgen, C; Jourdain, J R; LeGuen, B

    2003-01-01

    When a set of bioassay data is given to two different dosimetrists, it is likely that these data will be interpreted differently, that different methods and dosimetric models will be applied and therefore different numerical values will be obtained. Thus, it is important for laboratories dealing with internal dosimetry to undergo performance testing procedures such as interlaboratory comparisons of bioassay data interpretation. Several intercomparison exercises have already been organised at national and international levels. The largest one so far was the 3rd European Intercomparison Exercise on Internal Dose Assessment, which has been organised in the framework of the EULEP/EURADOS Action Group, 'Derivation of parameter values for application to the new model of the human respiratory tract for occupational exposure'. The most important lesson learned from these intercomparison exercises was the need to develop agreed guidelines for internal dose evaluation procedures to promote harmonisation of assessments between organisations and countries.

  20. Influence of test specimen fabrication method and cross-section configuration on tension-tension fatigue life of PMMA bone cement.

    PubMed

    Sheafi, E M; Tanner, K E

    2015-11-01

    Different cyclic loading modes have been used in in vitro fatigue studies of PMMA bone cement. It is unclear which loading mode is most appropriate from the perspective of the in vivo loading experienced by the cement in a cemented arthroplasty. Also, in different in vitro fatigue studies, different test specimen configurations have been used. The present work considers the influence of test specimen fabrication method (direct moulding vs moulding followed by machining) and cross-section shape (rectangular vs circular) on the tension-tension fatigue performance of two bone cement brands (SmartSet GHV and CMW1), under force control conditions. Two trends were consistent: 1) for each of the cements, for moulded specimens, a longer fatigue life was obtained with circular cross-sectioned specimens and, 2) for either rectangular or circular CMW1 specimens, a longer fatigue life was obtained using machined specimens. A comparison of the present results to those reported in our previous work on fully-reversed tension-compression loading under force control showed that, regardless of the test specimen fabrication method or cross-section configuration used, the fatigue life was considerably shorter under tension-compression than tension-tension loading. This finding highlights the fact that the presence of the compression portion in the loading cycle accelerates fatigue failure.

  1. Indentation hardness: A simple test that correlates with the dissipated-energy predictor for fatigue-life in bovine pericardium membranes for bioprosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Tobaruela, Almudena; Rojo, Francisco Javier; García Paez, José María; Bourges, Jean Yves; Herrero, Eduardo Jorge; Millán, Isabel; Alvarez, Lourdes; Cordon, Ángeles; Guinea, Gustavo V

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the variation of hardness with fatigue in calf pericardium, a biomaterial commonly used in bioprosthetic heart valves, and its relationship with the energy dissipated during the first fatigue cycle that has been shown to be a predictor of fatigue-life (García Páez et al., 2006, 2007; Rojo et al., 2010). Fatigue tests were performed in vitro on 24 pericardium specimens cut in a root-to-apex direction. The specimens were subjected to a maximum stress of 1MPa in blocks of 10, 25, 50, 100, 250, 500, 1000 and 1500 cycles. By means of a modified Shore A hardness test procedure, the hardness of the specimen was measured before and after fatigue tests. Results showed a significant correlation of such hardness with fatigue performance and with the energy dissipated in the first cycle of fatigue, a predictor of pericardium durability. The study showed indentation hardness as a simple and reliable indicator of mechanical performance, one which could be easily implemented in improving tissue selection.

  2. A MODIFIED PMMA CEMENT (SUB-CEMENT) FOR ACCELERATED FATIGUE TESTING OF CEMENTED IMPLANT CONSTRUCTS USING CADAVERIC BONE

    PubMed Central

    Race, Amos; Miller, Mark A.; Mann, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Pre-clinical screening of cemented implant systems could be improved by modeling the longer-term response of the implant/cement/bone construct to cyclic loading. We formulated bone cement with degraded fatigue fracture properties (Sub-cement) such that long-term fatigue could be simulated in short-term cadaver tests. Sub-cement was made by adding a chain-transfer agent to standard polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. This reduced the molecular weight of the inter-bead matrix without changing reaction-rate or handling characteristics. Static mechanical properties were approximately equivalent to normal cement. Over a physiologically reasonable range of stress intensity factor, fatigue crack propagation rates for sub-cement were higher by a factor of 25 ± 19. When tested in a simplified 2 1/2D physical model of a stem-cement-bone system, crack growth from the stem was accelerated by a factor of 100. Sub-cement accelerated both crack initiation and growth rate. Sub-cement is now being evaluated in full stem/cement/femur models. PMID:18774136

  3. A modified PMMA cement (Sub-cement) for accelerated fatigue testing of cemented implant constructs using cadaveric bone.

    PubMed

    Race, Amos; Miller, Mark A; Mann, Kenneth A

    2008-10-20

    Pre-clinical screening of cemented implant systems could be improved by modeling the longer-term response of the implant/cement/bone construct to cyclic loading. We formulated bone cement with degraded fatigue fracture properties (Sub-cement) such that long-term fatigue could be simulated in short-term cadaver tests. Sub-cement was made by adding a chain-transfer agent to standard polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. This reduced the molecular weight of the inter-bead matrix without changing reaction-rate or handling characteristics. Static mechanical properties were approximately equivalent to normal cement. Over a physiologically reasonable range of stress-intensity factor, fatigue crack propagation rates for Sub-cement were higher by a factor of 25+/-19. When tested in a simplified 2 1/2-D physical model of a stem-cement-bone system, crack growth from the stem was accelerated by a factor of 100. Sub-cement accelerated both crack initiation and growth rate. Sub-cement is now being evaluated in full stem/cement/femur models.

  4. Accurate diagnosis of myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome based upon objective test methods for characteristic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Twisk, Frank NM

    2015-01-01

    Although myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are considered to be synonymous, the definitional criteria for ME and CFS define two distinct, partially overlapping, clinical entities. ME, whether defined by the original criteria or by the recently proposed criteria, is not equivalent to CFS, let alone a severe variant of incapacitating chronic fatigue. Distinctive features of ME are: muscle weakness and easy muscle fatigability, cognitive impairment, circulatory deficits, a marked variability of the symptoms in presence and severity, but above all, post-exertional “malaise”: a (delayed) prolonged aggravation of symptoms after a minor exertion. In contrast, CFS is primarily defined by (unexplained) chronic fatigue, which should be accompanied by four out of a list of 8 symptoms, e.g., headaches. Due to the subjective nature of several symptoms of ME and CFS, researchers and clinicians have questioned the physiological origin of these symptoms and qualified ME and CFS as functional somatic syndromes. However, various characteristic symptoms, e.g., post-exertional “malaise” and muscle weakness, can be assessed objectively using well-accepted methods, e.g., cardiopulmonary exercise tests and cognitive tests. The objective measures acquired by these methods should be used to accurately diagnose patients, to evaluate the severity and impact of the illness objectively and to assess the positive and negative effects of proposed therapies impartially. PMID:26140274

  5. Bithermal fatigue - A link between isothermal and thermomechanical fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Mcgaw, Michael A.; Bill, Robert C.; Fanti, Paolo D.

    1988-01-01

    A technique for bithermal fatigue testing is presented in which the tensile and compressive halves of the cycle are conducted isothermally at two significantly different temperatures. With reference to experimental results obtained for a nickel-base superalloy, B1900 + Hf, it is shown that bithermal fatigue testing is a simple alternative to thermomechanical fatigue and can provide a conservative determination of thermomechanical fatigue life for creep damage dominated failure modes. Bithermal fatigue results can be directly related to thermomechanical fatigue results through the use of an appropriate damage rule.

  6. Interlaboratory validation data on real-time polymerase chain reaction detection for unauthorized genetically modified papaya line PRSV-YK.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takumi; Noguchi, Akio; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Kazuto; Futo, Satoshi; Sakata, Kozue; Fukuda, Nozomi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi; Tanaka, Hidenori; Akashi, Ryo; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko

    2016-06-01

    This article is referred to research article entitled "Whole genome sequence analysis of unidentified genetically modified papaya for development of a specific detection method" (Nakamura et al., 2016) [1]. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection method for unauthorized genetically modified (GM) papaya (Carica papaya L.) line PRSV-YK (PRSV-YK detection method) was developed using whole genome sequence data (DDBJ Sequenced Read Archive under accession No. PRJDB3976). Interlaboratory validation datasets for PRSV-YK detection method were provided. Data indicating homogeneity of samples prepared for interlaboratory validation were included. Specificity and sensitivity test data for PRSV-YK detection method were also provided.

  7. Interlaboratory validation data on real-time polymerase chain reaction detection for unauthorized genetically modified papaya line PRSV-YK.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takumi; Noguchi, Akio; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Kazuto; Futo, Satoshi; Sakata, Kozue; Fukuda, Nozomi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi; Tanaka, Hidenori; Akashi, Ryo; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko

    2016-06-01

    This article is referred to research article entitled "Whole genome sequence analysis of unidentified genetically modified papaya for development of a specific detection method" (Nakamura et al., 2016) [1]. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection method for unauthorized genetically modified (GM) papaya (Carica papaya L.) line PRSV-YK (PRSV-YK detection method) was developed using whole genome sequence data (DDBJ Sequenced Read Archive under accession No. PRJDB3976). Interlaboratory validation datasets for PRSV-YK detection method were provided. Data indicating homogeneity of samples prepared for interlaboratory validation were included. Specificity and sensitivity test data for PRSV-YK detection method were also provided. PMID:27408919

  8. Implementation of a Two-Axis Servo-Hydraulic System for Full-Scale Fatigue Testing of Wind Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, S. D.; Musial, W. D.; Stensland, T.

    1999-09-09

    Recently, the blade fatigue testing capabilities at NREL were upgraded from single-axis to two-axis loading. To implement this, several practical challenges were addressed, as hardware complexity increased dramatically with two actuators applying the loads at right angles to each other. A custom bellcrank was designed and implemented to minimize the load angle errors and to prevent actuator side loading. The control system was upgraded to accept load and displacement feedback from two actuators. The inherent long strokes uniquely associated with wind turbine blade-tests required substantial real-time corrections for both the control and data systems. A custom data acquisition and control system was developed using a National Instruments LabVIEW platform that interfaces with proprietary servo-hydraulic software developed by MTS Corporation. Before testing, the program is run under quasi-static (slow speed) conditions and iterates to determine the correct operational control parameters for the controller, taking into consideration geometry, test speed, and phase angle errors between the two actuators. Comparisons are made between single-axis and two-axis test loads using actual test load data and load uncertainties are qualitatively described. To date, two fatigue tests have been completed and another is currently ongoing using NREL's two-axis capability.

  9. The Total Work Measured During a High Intensity Isokinetic Fatigue Test Is Associated With Anaerobic Work Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Bosquet, Laurent; Gouadec, Kenan; Berryman, Nicolas; Duclos, Cyril; Gremeaux, Vincent; Croisier, Jean Louis

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether total work measured during a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test (TWFAT) could be considered as a valid measure of anaerobic work capacity (AWC), such as determined by total work measured during a Wingate Anaerobic Test (TWWAnT). Twenty well-trained cyclists performed 2 randomly ordered sessions involving a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test consisting in 30 reciprocal maximal concentric contractions of knee flexors and extensors at 180°·s-1, and a Wingate Anaerobic Test. We found that TWFAT of knee extensors was largely lower than TWWAnT (4151 ± 691 vs 22313 ± 2901 J, respectively, p < 0.05, Hedge’s g = 4.27). Both measures were highly associated (r = 0.83), and the 95% limits of agreement (LoA) represented 24.5% of TWWAnT. TWFAT of knee flexors (2151 ± 540 J) was largely lower than TWWAnT (p < 0.05, g = 9.52). By contrast, both measures were not associated (r = 0.09), and the 95% LoA represented 31.1% of TWWAnT. Combining TWFAT of knee flexors and knee extensors into a single measure (6302 ± 818 J) did not changed neither improved these observations. We still found a large difference with TWWAnT (p < 0.05, g = 5.26), a moderate association (r = 0.65) and 95% LoA representing 25.5% of TWWAnT. We concluded that TWFAT of knee extensors could be considered as a valid measure of AWC, since both measure were highly associated. However, the mean difference between both measures and their 95% LoA were too large to warrant interchangeability. Key points Total work performed during a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test can be considered as a valid measure of anaerobic work capacity (as determined by total work performance during a 30-s Wingate anaerobic test). The 95% limits of agreement are two large to allow a direct comparison between both measures. In other words, it is not possible to estimate the magnitude of performance improvement during a 30-s Wingate anaerobic test from that observed during a

  10. The Total Work Measured During a High Intensity Isokinetic Fatigue Test Is Associated With Anaerobic Work Capacity.

    PubMed

    Bosquet, Laurent; Gouadec, Kenan; Berryman, Nicolas; Duclos, Cyril; Gremeaux, Vincent; Croisier, Jean Louis

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether total work measured during a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test (TWFAT) could be considered as a valid measure of anaerobic work capacity (AWC), such as determined by total work measured during a Wingate Anaerobic Test (TWWAnT). Twenty well-trained cyclists performed 2 randomly ordered sessions involving a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test consisting in 30 reciprocal maximal concentric contractions of knee flexors and extensors at 180°·s(-1), and a Wingate Anaerobic Test. We found that TWFAT of knee extensors was largely lower than TWWAnT (4151 ± 691 vs 22313 ± 2901 J, respectively, p < 0.05, Hedge's g = 4.27). Both measures were highly associated (r = 0.83), and the 95% limits of agreement (LoA) represented 24.5% of TWWAnT. TWFAT of knee flexors (2151 ± 540 J) was largely lower than TWWAnT (p < 0.05, g = 9.52). By contrast, both measures were not associated (r = 0.09), and the 95% LoA represented 31.1% of TWWAnT. Combining TWFAT of knee flexors and knee extensors into a single measure (6302 ± 818 J) did not changed neither improved these observations. We still found a large difference with TWWAnT (p < 0.05, g = 5.26), a moderate association (r = 0.65) and 95% LoA representing 25.5% of TWWAnT. We concluded that TWFAT of knee extensors could be considered as a valid measure of AWC, since both measure were highly associated. However, the mean difference between both measures and their 95% LoA were too large to warrant interchangeability. Key pointsTotal work performed during a high intensity isokinetic fatigue test can be considered as a valid measure of anaerobic work capacity (as determined by total work performance during a 30-s Wingate anaerobic test).The 95% limits of agreement are two large to allow a direct comparison between both measures. In other words, it is not possible to estimate the magnitude of performance improvement during a 30-s Wingate anaerobic test from that observed during a high

  11. Application of Self Nulling Eddy Current Probe Technique to the Detection of Fatigue Crack Initiation and Control of Test Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Nath, S.; Wincheski, B.; Fulton, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    A major part of fracture mechanics is concerned with studying the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks. This typically requires constant monitoring of crack growth during fatigue cycles and the knowledge of the precise location of the crack tip at any given time. One technique currently available for measuring fatigue crack length is the Potential Drop method. The method, however, may be inaccurate if the direction of crack growth deviates considerably from what was assumed initially or the curvature of the crack becomes significant. Another popular approach is to optically view the crack using a high magnification microscope, but this entails a person constantly monitoring it. The present proposed technique uses an automated scheme, in order to eliminate the need for a person to constantly monitor the experiment. Another technique under development elsewhere is to digitize an optical image of the test specimen surface and then apply a pattern recognition algorithm to locate the crack tip. A previous publication showed that the self nulling eddy current probe successfully tracked a simulated crack in an aluminum sample. This was the impetus to develop an online real time crack monitoring system. An automated system has been developed which includes a two axis scanner mounted on the tensile testing machine, the probe and its instrumentation and a personal computer (PC) to communicate and control all the parameters. The system software controls the testing parameters as well as monitoring the fatigue crack as it propagates. This paper will discuss the experimental setup in detail and demonstrate its capabilities. A three dimensional finite element model is utilized to model the magnetic field distribution due to the probe and how the probe voltage changes as it scans the crack. Experimental data of the probe for different samples under zero load, static load and high cycle fatigue load will be discussed. The final section summarizes the major accomplishments

  12. Interlaboratory comparison of measurements of acid-volatile sulfide and simultaneously extracted nickel in spiked sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brumbaugh, W.G.; Hammerschmidt, C.R.; Zanella, L.; Rogevich, E.; Salata, G.; Bolek, R.

    2011-01-01

    An interlaboratory comparison of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted nickel (SEM-Ni) measurements of sediments was conducted among five independent laboratories. Relative standard deviations for the seven test samples ranged from 5.6 to 71% (mean=25%) for AVS and from 5.5 to 15% (mean=10%) for SEM-Ni. These results are in stark contrast to a recently published study that indicated AVS and SEM analyses were highly variable among laboratories. ?? 2011 SETAC.

  13. Interlaboratory comparison of measurements of acid-volatile sulfide and simultaneously extracted nickel in spiked sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brumbaugh, William G.; Hammerschmidt, Chad R.; Zanella, Luciana; Rogevich, Emily; Salata, Gregory; Bolek, Radoslaw

    2011-01-01

    An interlaboratory comparison of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted nickel (SEM_Ni) measurements of sediments was conducted among five independent laboratories. Relative standard deviations for the seven test samples ranged from 5.6 to 71% (mean?=?25%) for AVS and from 5.5 to 15% (mean?=?10%) for SEM_Ni. These results are in stark contrast to a recently published study that indicated AVS and SEM analyses were highly variable among laboratories.

  14. Effects of general fatigue induced by incremental maximal exercise test on gait stability and variability of healthy young subjects.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Marcus Fraga; de Sá E Souza, Gustavo Souto; Lehnen, Georgia Cristina; Rodrigues, Fábio Barbosa; Andrade, Adriano O

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether general fatigue induced by incremental maximal exercise test (IMET) affects gait stability and variability in healthy subjects. Twenty-two young healthy male subjects walked in a treadmill at preferred walking speed for 4min prior (PreT) the test, which was followed by three series of 4min of walking with 4min of rest among them. Gait variability was assessed using walk ratio (WR), calculated as step length normalized by step frequency, root mean square (RMSratio) of trunk acceleration, standard deviation of medial-lateral trunk acceleration between strides (VARML), coefficient of variation of step frequency (SFCV), length (SLCV) and width (SWCV). Gait stability was assessed using margin of stability (MoS) and local dynamic stability (λs). VARML, SFCV, SLCV and SWCV increased after the test indicating an increase in gait variability. MoS decreased and λs increased after the test, indicating a decrease in gait stability. All variables showed a trend to return to PreT values, but the 20-min post-test interval appears not to be enough for a complete recovery. The results showed that general fatigue induced by IMET alters negatively the gait, and an interval of at least 20min should be considered for injury prevention in tasks with similar demands.

  15. Experimental stress analysis and fatigue tests of five 24-in. NPS ANSI Standard B16. 9 tees. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.E.; Hayes, J.K.; Weed, R.A.

    1985-03-01

    Experimental stress analyses and low-cycle fatigue tests of five 24-in. nominal pipe size American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard B16.9 forged tees are documented in this report. The tees, designated as Oak Ridge National Laboratory tees T10, T11, T12, T13, and T16, were tested under subcontract at Combustion Engineering, Inc. in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Experimental stress analyses were conducted for 12 individual loadings on each tee. Each test model was instrumented with approx. 225, 1/8-in. three-gage, 45/sup 0/ strain rosettes on the inside and outside surfaces; and 6 linear variable differential transformers mounted on special nonflexible holding frames for measuring deflections and rotations of the pipe extensions. Following completion of the strain-gate tests, each tee was fatigue tested to failure with either a fully reversed displacement controlled in-plane bending moment on the branch or a cyclic internal pressure that ranged from a value slightly above zero to about 90% of the nominal yield pressure of the pipe extensions.

  16. Crack propagation monitoring in a full-scale aircraft fatigue test based on guided wave-Gaussian mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Bao, Qiao; Mei, Hanfei; Ren, Yuanqiang

    2016-05-01

    For aerospace application of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology, the problem of reliable damage monitoring under time-varying conditions must be addressed and the SHM technology has to be fully validated on real aircraft structures under realistic load conditions on ground before it can reach the status of flight test. In this paper, the guided wave (GW) based SHM method is applied to a full-scale aircraft fatigue test which is one of the most similar test status to the flight test. To deal with the time-varying problem, a GW-Gaussian mixture model (GW-GMM) is proposed. The probability characteristic of GW features, which is introduced by time-varying conditions is modeled by GW-GMM. The weak cumulative variation trend of the crack propagation, which is mixed in time-varying influence can be tracked by the GW-GMM migration during on-line damage monitoring process. A best match based Kullback-Leibler divergence is proposed to measure the GW-GMM migration degree to reveal the crack propagation. The method is validated in the full-scale aircraft fatigue test. The validation results indicate that the reliable crack propagation monitoring of the left landing gear spar and the right wing panel under realistic load conditions are achieved.

  17. Interlaboratory comparison of chemical analysis of uranium mononitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, E. J.; Davis, W. F.; Halloran, J. T.; Graab, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical methods were established in which the critical variables were controlled, with the result that acceptable interlaboratory agreement was demonstrated for the chemical analysis of uranium mononitride. This was accomplished by using equipment readily available to laboratories performing metallurgical analyses. Agreement among three laboratories was shown to be very good for uranium and nitrogen. Interlaboratory precision of + or - 0.04 percent was achieved for both of these elements. Oxygen was determined to + or - 15 parts per million (ppm) at the 170-ppm level. The carbon determination gave an interlaboratory precision of + or - 46 ppm at the 320-ppm level.

  18. An indentation fatigue strength law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Baoxing; Yonezu, Akio; Chen, Xi

    2010-05-01

    Indentation fatigue, where a cyclic load is applied on the sample via an indenter, emerges as an alternative approach for measuring the fatigue properties of materials. We have carried out indentation fatigue tests on a poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) bulk material, as well as on TiN and NiP films/coatings deposited on SUS304 steel substrates, and demonstrate that a simple power-law relationship can be established between the indentation load amplitude and number of cycles to failure. Such a law is very similar to the conventional fatigue strength law obtained from uniaxial tests. The agreement between the fatigue stress exponents obtained by uniaxial and indentation fatigue tests suggests the potential applicability of the indentation fatigue technique for extracting the fatigue properties of materials.

  19. Wind turbine blade fatigue tests: lessons learned and application to SHM system development

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Stuart G.; Farinholt, Kevin M.; Jeong, Hyomi; Jang, JaeKyung; Park, Gyu Hae; Todd, Michael D.; Farrar, Charles R.; Ammerman, Curtt N.

    2012-06-28

    This paper presents experimental results of several structural health monitoring (SHM) methods applied to a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, accelerometers, acoustic emission sensors, and foil strain gauges. It underwent harmonic excitation at its first natural frequency using a hydraulically actuated resonant excitation system. The blade was initially excited at 25% of its design load, and then with steadily increasing loads until it failed. Various data were collected between and during fatigue loading sessions. The data were measured over multiple frequency ranges using a variety of acquisition equipment, including off-the-shelf systems and specially designed hardware developed by the authors. Modal response, diffuse wave-field transfer functions, and ultrasonic guided wave methods were applied to assess the condition of the wind turbine blade. The piezoelectric sensors themselves were also monitored using a sensor diagnostics procedure. This paper summarizes experimental procedures and results, focusing particularly on fatigue crack detection, and concludes with considerations for implementing such damage identification systems, which will be used as a guideline for future SHM system development for operating wind turbine blades.

  20. An EMG frequency-based test for estimating the neuromuscular fatigue threshold during cycle ergometry.

    PubMed

    Camic, Clayton L; Housh, Terry J; Johnson, Glen O; Hendrix, C Russell; Zuniga, Jorge M; Mielke, Michelle; Schmidt, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this investigation were twofold: (1) to determine if the model used for estimating the physical working capacity at the fatigue threshold (PWC(FT)) from electromyographic (EMG) amplitude data could be applied to the frequency domain of the signal to derive a new fatigue threshold for cycle ergometry called the mean power frequency fatigue threshold (MPF(FT)), and (2) to compare the power outputs associated with the PWC(FT), MPF(FT), ventilatory threshold (VT), and respiratory compensation point (RCP). Sixteen men [mean (SD) age = 23.4 (3.2) years] performed incremental cycle ergometer rides to exhaustion with bipolar surface EMG signals recorded from the vastus lateralis. There were significant (p < 0.05) mean differences for PWC(FT) [mean (SD) = 168 (36) W] versus MPF(FT) [208 (37) W] and VT [152 (33) W] versus RCP [205 (84) W], but no mean differences for PWC(FT) versus VT or MPF(FT) versus RCP. The mean difference between PWC(FT) and MPF(FT) may be due to the effects of specific metabolites that independently influence the time and frequency domains of the EMG signal. These findings indicated that the PWC(FT) model could be applied to the frequency domain of the EMG signal to estimate MPF(FT). Furthermore, the current findings suggested that the PWC(FT) may demarcate the moderate from heavy exercise domains, while the MPF(FT) demarcates heavy from severe exercise intensities.

  1. Three Dimensional Constraint Effects on the Estimated (Delta)CTOD during the Numerical Simulation of Different Fatigue Threshold Testing Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, Banavara R.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Variation in constraint through the thickness of a specimen effects the cyclic crack-tip-opening displacement (DELTA CTOD). DELTA CTOD is a valuable measure of crack growth behavior, indicating closure development, constraint variations and load history effects. Fatigue loading with a continual load reduction was used to simulate the load history associated with fatigue crack growth threshold measurements. The constraint effect on the estimated DELTA CTOD is studied by carrying out three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element simulations. The analysis involves numerical simulation of different standard fatigue threshold test schemes to determine how each test scheme affects DELTA CTOD. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) prescribes standard load reduction procedures for threshold testing using either the constant stress ratio (R) or constant maximum stress intensity (K(sub max)) methods. Different specimen types defined in the standard, namely the compact tension, C(T), and middle cracked tension, M(T), specimens were used in this simulation. The threshold simulations were conducted with different initial K(sub max) values to study its effect on estimated DELTA CTOD. During each simulation, the DELTA CTOD was estimated at every load increment during the load reduction procedure. Previous numerical simulation results indicate that the constant R load reduction method generates a plastic wake resulting in remote crack closure during unloading. Upon reloading, this remote contact location was observed to remain in contact well after the crack tip was fully open. The final region to open is located at the point at which the load reduction was initiated and at the free surface of the specimen. However, simulations carried out using the constant Kmax load reduction procedure did not indicate remote crack closure. Previous analysis results using various starting K(sub max) values and different load reduction rates have indicated DELTA CTOD is

  2. Fatigue damage observed non-destructively in fibre composite coupon test specimens by X-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jespersen, K. M.; Mikkelsen, L. P.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a method for monitoring the 3D fatigue damage progression on a micro-structural level in a glass fibre/polymer coupon test specimen by means of laboratory X-ray Computed Tomography (CT). A modified mount and holder made for the standard test samples to fit into the X-ray CT scanner along with a tension clamp solution is presented. Initially, the same location of the test specimen is inspected by ex-situ X-ray CT during the fatigue loading history, which shows the damage progression on a micro-structural level. The openings of individual uni-directional (UD) fibre fractures are seen to generally increase with the number of cycles, and new regions of UD fibre fractures also appear. There are some UD fibre fractures that are difficult to detect since their opening is small. Therefore, the effect of tension on the crack visibility is examined afterwards using a tension clamp solution. With applied tension some additional cracks become visible and the openings of fibre fractures increases, which shows the importance of applied tension during the scan.

  3. Surface contact fatigue and flexural fatigue of dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    McCabe, J F; Wang, Y; Braem, M

    2000-06-01

    Antagonistic contact on a dental restoration may produce surface and subsurface stresses leading to fatigue wear as well as to bulk stressing, eventually causing catastrophic failure. It was the aim of the present work to study the outcome of two different approaches to fatigue testing of materials involving either surface contact fatigue or flexural fatigue mechanisms. A range of materials was tested, including conventional glass-ionomers, resin-modified glass-ionomers, poly-acid modified composites, and composites. Materials were prepared and tested using both surface contact and flexural fatigue. The results show that conventional glass-ionomers have the least resistance to fatigue under both regimes while composites have the longest fatigue lives and the highest values of flexural fatigue limit. However, the results also support the fact that catastrophic failure should be investigated separately from surface contact fatigue. Within the group of composite products tested, a hybrid composite material had a significantly greater flexural fatigue limit than a microfilled one, but the latter material had a significantly greater surface contact fatigue life, indicating that wear behavior cannot be predicted from bulk fracture characteristics and vice versa. The process of wear occurs by a combination of a number of fundamental processes, and the contribution fatigue makes will vary according to the environment and nature of the material.

  4. A study of elevated temperature testing techniques for the fatigue behavior of PMCS: Application to T650-35/AMB21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Gastelli, Michael G.; Ellis, John R.; Burke, Christopher S.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the mechanical behavior of a T650-35/AMB21 eight-harness satin weave polymer composite system. Emphasis was placed on the development and refinement of techniques used in elevated temperature uniaxial PMC testing. Issues such as specimen design, gripping, strain measurement, and temperature control and measurement were addressed. Quasi-static tensile and fatigue properties (R(sub sigma) = 0.1) were examined at room and elevated temperatures. Stiffness degradation and strain accumulation during fatigue cycling were recorded to monitor damage progression and provide insight for future analytical modeling efforts. Accomplishments included an untabbed dog-bone specimen design which consistently failed in the gage section, accurate temperature control and assessment, and continuous in-situ strain measurement capability during fatigue loading at elevated temperatures. Finally, strain accumulation and stiffness degradation during fatigue cycling appeared to be good indicators of damage progression.

  5. Low-cycle thermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    A state-of-the-art review is presented of the field of thermal fatigue. Following a brief historical review, the concept is developed that thermal fatigue can be viewed as processes of unbalanced deformation and cracking. The unbalances refer to dissimilar mechanisms occurring in opposing halves of thermal fatigue loading and unloading cycles. Extensive data summaries are presented and results are interpreted in terms of the unbalanced processes involved. Both crack initiation and crack propagation results are summarized. Testing techniques are reviewed, and considerable discussion is given to a technique for thermal fatigue simulation, known as the bithermal fatigue test. Attention is given to the use of isothermal life prediction methods for the prediction of thermal fatigue lives. Shortcomings of isothermally-based life prediction methods are pointed out. Several examples of analyses and thermal fatigue life predictions of high technology structural components are presented. Finally, numerous dos and don'ts relative to design against thermal fatigue are presented.

  6. Periodic Overload and Transport Spectrum Fatigue Crack Growth Tests of Ti62222STA and Al2024T3 Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    Variable amplitude loading crack growth tests have been conducted to provide data that can be used to evaluate crack growth prediction codes. Tests with periodic overloads or overloads followed by underloads were conducted on titanium alloy Ti-6Al-2Sn-2Zr-2Mo-2Cr solution treated and aged (Ti62222STA) material at room temperature and at 350 F. Spectrum fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on two materials (Ti62222STA and aluminum alloy 2024-T3) using two transport lower-wing test spectra at two temperatures (room temperature and 350 F (Ti only)). Test lives (growth from an initial crack half-length of 0.15 in. to failure) were recorded in all tests and the crack length against cycles (or flights) data were recorded in many of the tests. The following observations were made regarding the test results: (1) in tests of the Ti62222STA material, the tests at 350 F had longer lives than those at room temperature, (2) in tests to the MiniTwist spectrum, the Al2024T3 material showed much greater crack growth retardations due to the highest stresses in the spectrum than did the Ti62222STA material, and (3) comparisons of material crack growth performances on an "equal weight" basis were spectrum dependent.

  7. Ex-situ tensile fatigue-creep testing: A powerful tool to simulate in-situ mechanical degradation in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi Alavijeh, A.; Venkatesan, S. V.; Khorasany, R. M. H.; Kim, W. H. J.; Kjeang, E.

    2016-04-01

    An ex-situ tensile fatigue and creep based accelerated stress test (TFC-AST) is proposed to evaluate the mechanical stability of catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) used in fuel cells. The fatigue-creep action of the TFC test is analyzed by tensile and hygrothermal expansion measurements on partially degraded specimens supplemented by microstructural characterization using transmission electron microscopy, revealing significant decay in mechanical properties as well as morphological rearrangement due to the combined fatigue and creep loading. Through comparison with in-situ hygrothermally degraded CCMs, the TFC-AST protocol is demonstrated to be an economical alternative to the costly in-situ mechanical accelerated stress tests that can reduce the test duration by more than 99%.

  8. Fitness for duty: A 3 minute version of the Psychomotor Vigilance Test predicts fatigue related declines in luggage screening performance

    PubMed Central

    Basner, Mathias; Rubinstein, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the ability of a 3-min Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT) to predict fatigue related performance decrements on a simulated luggage screening task (SLST). Methods Thirty-six healthy non-professional subjects (mean age 30.8 years, 20 female) participated in a 4 day laboratory protocol including a 34 hour period of total sleep deprivation with PVT and SLST testing every 2 hours. Results Eleven and 20 lapses (355 ms threshold) on the PVT optimally divided SLST performance into high, medium, and low performance bouts with significantly decreasing threat detection performance A′. Assignment to the different SLST performance groups replicated homeostatic and circadian patterns during total sleep deprivation. Conclusions The 3 min PVT was able to predict performance on a simulated luggage screening task. Fitness-for-duty feasibility should now be tested in professional screeners and operational environments. PMID:21912278

  9. Altering Work to Rest Ratios Differentially Influences Fatigue Indices During Repeated Sprint Ability Testing.

    PubMed

    La Monica, Michael B; Fukuda, David H; Beyer, Kyle S; Hoffman, Mattan W; Miramonti, Amelia A; Riffe, Josh J; Baker, Kayla M; Fragala, Maren S; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the influence of recovery time on fatigue indices, performance (total work [TW], peak power [PP], and mean power [MP]), and oxygen consumption during repeated sprint ability (RSA) on a cycle ergometer. Eight recreationally-trained men performed 3 RSA protocols consisting of 10 × 6 s sprints with 12 s, 18 s, and 24 s rest intervals between each sprint. Fatigue indices were determined as percent decrement (%Dec) and rate of decline using either a log transform method or standard slope approach for TW, PP, and MP during respective RSA protocols. The maximal VO2 value in response to given sprint intervals and the minimal VO2 value in response to given rest periods (VO2 work and VO2 rest, respectively) were recorded. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to analyze all variables. Average VO2 work was not different among rest interval trials. Average VO2 rest with 12 s rest was greater than 18 s and 24 s (2.16 ± 0.17 L · min(-1), 1.91 ± 0.18 L · min(-1), 1.72 ± 0.15 L · min(-1), respectively), while 18 s was greater than 24 s. Average TW and MP were greater with 24 s rest than 12 s (4,604.44 ± 915.98 J vs. 4,305.46 ± 727.17 J, respectively), with no differences between RSA protocols for PP. No differences in %Dec were observed. Both methods of calculating rates of decline per sprint for PP and TW were greater during 12 s than 18 s or 24 s. Since changes were only noted between the 12 s and 24 s protocols, a 6 s differential in rest intervals may not be enough to elicit alterations in TW, PP, MP, or %Dec in RSA performance. Rate of decline may be a more sensitive measure of fatigue than %Dec.

  10. Refinements and Tests of an Advanced Controller to Mitigate Fatigue Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.; Fleming, P.

    2010-12-01

    Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems forced by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a complicated 3-D turbulent wind inflow field, with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. Design of control algorithms for wind turbines must account for multiple control objectives. Future large multi-megawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, while maximizing energy capture. Active damping should be added to these dynamic structures to maintain stability for operation in a complex environment. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), we have designed, implemented, and tested advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads. These control designs are based on linear models of the turbine that are generated by specialized modeling software. In this paper, we present field test results of an advanced control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads in Region 3.

  11. Prediction of fatigue life of plain concrete beams from fracture tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsamooj, D.V. )

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model, based on the principles of fracture mechanics, is proposed for the prediction of the flexural fatigue life of plain concrete beams. The model predictions are compared with about 400 experimental data from four separate collections, published earlier, covering materials with wide ranges of compressive strengths, 20 Mpa to 44.8 MPa, stress range ratios (minimum/maximum bending stress) of 0 to 0.75, and flexing frequencies of 1 to 20 Hz. There is good agreement between the model and the regression lines fitted to the experiment data.

  12. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A three year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for non-proportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved undertanding were through several critical non-proportional loading experiments. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C.

  13. Static and fatigue testing of full-scale fuselage panels fabricated using a Therm-X(R) process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinicola, Albert J.; Kassapoglou, Christos; Chou, Jack C.

    1992-01-01

    Large, curved, integrally stiffened composite panels representative of an aircraft fuselage structure were fabricated using a Therm-X process, an alternative concept to conventional two-sided hard tooling and contour vacuum bagging. Panels subsequently were tested under pure shear loading in both static and fatigue regimes to assess the adequacy of the manufacturing process, the effectiveness of damage tolerant design features co-cured with the structure, and the accuracy of finite element and closed-form predictions of postbuckling capability and failure load. Test results indicated the process yielded panels of high quality and increased damage tolerance through suppression of common failure modes such as skin-stiffener separation and frame-stiffener corner failure. Finite element analyses generally produced good predictions of postbuckled shape, and a global-local modelling technique yielded failure load predictions that were within 7% of the experimental mean.

  14. Interlaboratory Comparisons of NbTi Critical Current Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Turrioni, D.; Boutboul, T.; Cheggour, N.; Goodrich, L.F.; Ghosh, A.; Den Ouden, A.; Meinesz, M.

    2009-08-16

    We report on a multi-institute comparison of critical current data measured on a modern NbTi wire for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which has shown a standard deviation below 1% in critical current density spread in more than 1500 measurements. Interlaboratory comparisons on Nb{sub 3}Sn wires have shown ambiguities that could be attributable to strain related differences in critical current density, originating from differences in sample handling, reaction, and mounting techniques, or also to differences in the magnetic field and current calibrations between the institutes. A round robin test of a well characterized NbTi wire provides a baseline variance in critical current results that is presumed to be attributable only to differences in the characterization systems. Systematic differences on the order of 3.5% are found in the comparison. The most likely cause for the observed differences is a small diameter holder that brings the wire into a strain regime in which strain effects can no longer be ignored. A NbTi round robin test, when performed properly, will separate system differences from sample specific differences and provide laboratories with an opportunity to calibrate equipment against a standard measurement.

  15. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    A 3 year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for nonproportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved understanding were through several critical nonproportional loading experiments. The direction of cracking observed on failed specimens was also recorded and used to guide the development of the theory. Cyclic deformation responses were permanently recorded digitally during each test. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C. In contrast to some other metals, loading path in nonproportional loading had little effect on fatigue lives. Strain rate had a small effect on fatigue lives at 649 C. Of the various correlating parameters the modified plastic work and octahedral shear stress were the most successful.

  16. Interlaboratory ring trial to evaluate CFT proficiency of European laboratories for diagnosis of glanders in equids.

    PubMed

    Laroucau, K; Colaneri, C; Jaÿ, M; Corde, Y; Drapeau, A; Durand, B; Zientara, S; Beck, C

    2016-06-18

    To evaluate the routine complement fixation test (CFT) used to detect Burkholderia mallei antibodies in equine sera, an interlaboratory proficiency test was held with 24 European laboratories, including 22 National Reference Laboratories for glanders. The panels sent to participants were composed of sera with or without B mallei antibodies. This study confirmed the reliability of CFT and highlighted its intralaboratory reproducibility. However, the sensitivity of glanders serodiagnosis and laboratory proficiency may be improved by standardising critical reagents, including antigens, and by developing a standard B mallei serum.

  17. Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen in a high-pressure fluid environment

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jy-An; Feng, Zhili; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Liu, Kenneth C

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides fatigue testing of a material specimen while the specimen is disposed in a high pressure fluid environment. A specimen is placed between receivers in an end cap of a vessel and a piston that is moveable within the vessel. Pressurized fluid is provided to compression and tension chambers defined between the piston and the vessel. When the pressure in the compression chamber is greater than the pressure in the tension chamber, the specimen is subjected to a compression force. When the pressure in the tension chamber is greater than the pressure in the compression chamber, the specimen is subjected to a tension force. While the specimen is subjected to either force, it is also surrounded by the pressurized fluid in the tension chamber. In some examples, the specimen is surrounded by hydrogen.

  18. Optical fiber fatigue behavior over very extended periods at low stress levels in the field and in laboratory tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, David J.; Mayhew, Andi J.

    1999-12-01

    The reliability of optical fiber exposed to relatively high static strains (> 2%) has been extensively modelled and investigated by experiment. Fatigue `knees' have been demonstrated predicting the premature fracture of fiber particularly where elevated temperatures and relatively large volumes of water have been used to soak the samples. The cause has been attributed to simultaneous stress- assisted and stress-free corrosion of the fiber surface. In this paper we show that, a t more moderate strains (1 to 2%) and using a limited volume of water, there is evidence of a strength recovery caused either by a healing process or the observance of some form of lower strain threshold. The expected strength reduction of the fiber, from contemporary models is contrasted to that observed. The unusually high strength retention shown by the test fiber in water is shown to have important implications for optical cable design and for the bending of fiber within joint housings.

  19. National Interlaboratory Comparison in Scope of Relative Humidity in the Range from 11 %rh to 95 %rh at 23° C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytekin, S. Oğuz; Kalemci, M.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of interlaboratory comparisons is to verify the competence of accredited or non-accredited laboratories, including verification of the reported measurement uncertainties, whenever possible. An interlaboratory comparison consists of measurement results of a laboratory and a reference laboratory which is competent to run the comparison and provides traceability at the required uncertainty level. In Turkey, the demand for an interlaboratory comparison in the humidity field increased drastically in parallel to an increasing number of accredited laboratories in this field. Therefore, a national interlaboratory comparison in the scope of relative humidity in the range between 11 %rh and 95 %rh at 23° C was initiated by TUBITAK UME in 2011. Two hygrometers were calibrated at TUBITAK UME in the above-mentioned range and characterized in terms of long-term stability, temperature dependence, and hysteresis. One of the hygrometers is used throughout this comparison. The second one was kept aside as a backup device in case of a malfunction of the first device. Organization and evaluation of the interlaboratory comparison in the scope of relative humidity were performed according to the EN ISO/IEC 17043:2010 "Conformity assessment—general requirements for proficiency testing" among thirteen national laboratories. Evaluation of comparison results are performed by normalized error analysis. It was found that among the 95 realized points of comparison, 85 (89 %) had En ≤ 1 and only 10 (11 %) had E >1.

  20. Fatigue and thermal fatigue of Pb-Sn solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Frear, D.; Grivas, D.; McCormack, M.; Tribula, D.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a fundamental investigation of the fatigue and thermal fatigue characteristics, with an emphasis on the microstructural development during fatigue, of Sn-Pb solder joints. Fatigue tests were performed in simple shear on both 60Sn-40Pb and 5Sn-95Pb solder joints. Isothermal fatigue tests show increasing fatigue life of 60Sn-40Pb solder joints with decreasing strain and temperature. In contrast, such behavior was not observed in the isothermal fatigue of 5Sn-95Pb solder joints. Thermal fatigue results on 60Sn-40Pb solder cycled between -55/sup 0/C and 125/sup 0/C show that a coarsened region develops in the center of the joint. Both Pb-rich and Sn-rich phases coarsen, and cracks form within these coarsened regions. The failure mode 60Sn-40Pb solder joints in thermal and isothermal fatigue is similar: cracks form intergranularly through the Sn-rich phase or along Sn/Pb interphase boundaries. Extensive cracking is found throughout the 5Sn-95Pb joint for both thermal and isothermal fatigue. In thermal fatigue the 5Sn-95Pb solder joints failed after fewer cycles than 60Sn-40Pb.

  1. Axial Fatigue Tests at Zero Mean Stress of 24S-T and 75S-T Aluminum-alloy Strips with a Central Circular Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueggeman, W C; Mayer, M JR

    1948-01-01

    Axial fatigue tests at zero mean stress have been made on 0.032- and 0.064-inch 24S-T and 0.032-inch 75S-T sheet-metal specimens 1/4, 1/2, 1, and 2 inches wide without a hole and with central holes giving a range of hole diameter D to specimen width W from 0.01 to 0.95. No systematic difference was noted between the results for the 0.032-inch and the 0.064-inch specimens although the latter seemed the more consistent. In general the fatigue strength based on the minimum section dropped sharply as the ration D/W was increased from zero to about 0.25. The plain specimens showed quite a pronounced decrease in fatigue strength with increasing width. The holed specimens showed only slight and rather inconclusive evidence of this size effect. The fatigue stress-concentration factor was higher for 75S-T than for 24S-T alloy. Evidence was found that a very small hole would not cause any reduction in fatigue strength.

  2. Low-cycle fatigue of TiNi shape memory alloy and formulation of fatigue life

    SciTech Connect

    Tobushi, Hisaaki; Nakahara, Takafumi; Shimeno, Yoshirou; Hashimoto, Takahiro

    2000-04-01

    The low-cycle fatigue of a TiNi shape memory alloy was investigated by the rotating-bending fatigue tests in air, in water and in silicone oil. (1) The influence of corrosion fatigue in water does not appear in the region of low-cycle fatigue. (2) The temperature rise measured through an infrared thermograph during the fatigue test in air is four times as large as that measured through a thermocouple. (3) The fatigue life at an elevated temperature in air coincides with the fatigue life at the same elevated temperature in water. (4) The shape memory processing temperature does not affect the fatigue life. (5) The fatigue equation is proposed to describe the fatigue life depending on strain amplitude, temperature and frequency. The fatigue life is estimated well by the proposed equation.

  3. Surface fatigue life of carburized and hardened M50NiL and AISI 9310 spur gears and rolling-contact test bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Bamberger, Eric N.

    1989-01-01

    Spur gear endurance tests and rolling-element surface tests were conducted to investigate vacuum-induction-melted, vacuum-arc-melted (VIM-VAR) M50NiL steel for use as a gear steel in advanced aircraft applications, to determine its endurance characteristics, and to compare the results with those for standard VAR and VIM-VAR AISI 9310 gear material. Tests were conducted with spur gears and rolling-contact bars manufactured from VIM-VAR M50NiL and VAR and VIM-VAR AISI 9310. The gear pitch diameter was 8.9 cm (3.5 in.). Gear test conditions were an inlet oil temperature of 320 K (116 F), and outlet oil temperature of 350 K (170 F), a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa (248 ksi), and a speed of 10,000 rpm. Bench rolling-element fatigue tests were conducted at ambient temperatures with a bar speed of 12,500 rpm and a maximum Hertz stress of 4.83 GPA (700 ksi). The VIM-VAR M50NiL gears had a surface fatigue life that was 4.5 and 11.5 times that for VIM-VAR and VAR AISI 9310 gears, respectively. The surface fatigue life of the VIM-VAR M50NiL rolling-contact bars was 13.2 and 21.6 times that for the VIM-VAR and VAR AISI 9310, respectively. The VIM-VAR M50NiL material was shown to have good resistance to fracture through a fatigue spall and to have fatigue life far superior to that of both VIM-VAR and VAR AISI 9310 gears and rolling-contact bars.

  4. Toward Improvements in Inter-laboratory Calibration of Argon Isotope Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemming, S. R.; Deino, A. L.; Heizler, M. T.; Hodges, K. V.; McIntosh, W. C.; Renne, P. R.; Swisher, C. C., III; Turrin, B. D.; Van Soest, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    It is important to continue to develop strategies to improve our ability to compare results between laboratories chronometers. The U-Pb community has significantly reduced inter-laboratory biases with the application of a community tracer solution and the distribution of synthetic zircon solutions. Inevitably sample selection and processing and even biases in interpretations will still lead to some disagreements in the assignment of ages. Accordingly natural samples that are shared will be important for achievement of the highest levels of agreement. Analogous improvements in quality and inter-laboratory agreement of analytical aspects of Ar-Ar can be achieved through development of synthetic age standards in gas canisters with multiple pipettes to deliver various controlled amounts of argon to the mass spectrometer. A preliminary proof-of concept comes from the inter-laboratory calibration experiment for the 40Ar/39Ar community. This portable Argon Pipette Intercalibration System (APIS) consists of three 2.7 L canisters each equipped with three pipettes of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 cc volumes. The currently traveling APIS has the three canisters filled with air and 40Ar*/39Ar of 1.73 and canister 2 has a 40Ar*/39Ar of 40.98 (~ Alder Creek and Fish Canyon in the same irradiation). With these pipettes it is possible to combine them to provide 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 (0.1+0.2), 0.4, 0.5 (0.1+0.4), 0.6 (0.2+0.4), and 0.7 (0.1+0.2+0.4) cc. The configuration allows a simple test for inter-laboratory biases and for volume/pressure dependent mass fractionation on the measured ratios for a gas with a single argon isotope composition. Although not yet tested, it is also possible to mix gas from any one of the three canisters in proportions of these increments, allowing even more tightly controlled calibration of measurements. We suggest that ultimately each EARTHTIME lab should be equipped with such a system permanently, with a community plan for a traveling system to periodically repeat the

  5. High strain FBG sensors for structural fatigue testing of military aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, S.; Kopczyk, J.; Nuyens, T.; Davis, C.

    2012-02-01

    This paper reports on a series of tests investigating the performance of Draw Tower Gratings (DTGs) combined with custom-designed broad area packaging and bonding techniques for high-strain sensing applications on Defence platforms. The sensors and packaging were subjected to a series of high-strain static and cyclic loading tests and a summary of these results is presented.

  6. Fatigue of fiberglass beam substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, J.F.; Combs, D.W.; Samborsky, D.D.

    1995-09-01

    Composite material beams representative of wind turbine blade substructure have been designed, fabricated, and tested under constant amplitude flexural fatigue loading. Beam stiffness, strength, and fatigue life are predicted based on detailed finite element analysis and the materials fatigue database developed using standard test coupons and special high frequency minicoupons.Beam results are in good agreement with predictions when premature adhesive and delamination failures are avoided in the load transfer areas. The results show that fiberglass substructures can be designed and fabricated to withstand maximum strain levels on the order of 8,000 microstrain for about 10{sup 6} cycles with proper structural detail design and the use of fatigue resistant laminate constructions. The study also demonstrates that the materials fatigue database and accurate analysis can be used to predict the fatigue life of composite substructures typical of blades.

  7. Particle size distributions by transmission electron microscopy: an interlaboratory comparison case study

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Stephen B; Chan, Christopher; Brown, Scott C; Eschbach, Peter; Han, Li; Ensor, David S; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Bonevich, John; Vladár, András E; Hight Walker, Angela R; Zheng, Jiwen; Starnes, Catherine; Stromberg, Arnold; Ye, Jia; Grulke, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an interlaboratory comparison that evaluated a protocol for measuring and analysing the particle size distribution of discrete, metallic, spheroidal nanoparticles using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The study was focused on automated image capture and automated particle analysis. NIST RM8012 gold nanoparticles (30 nm nominal diameter) were measured for area-equivalent diameter distributions by eight laboratories. Statistical analysis was used to (1) assess the data quality without using size distribution reference models, (2) determine reference model parameters for different size distribution reference models and non-linear regression fitting methods and (3) assess the measurement uncertainty of a size distribution parameter by using its coefficient of variation. The interlaboratory area-equivalent diameter mean, 27.6 nm ± 2.4 nm (computed based on a normal distribution), was quite similar to the area-equivalent diameter, 27.6 nm, assigned to NIST RM8012. The lognormal reference model was the preferred choice for these particle size distributions as, for all laboratories, its parameters had lower relative standard errors (RSEs) than the other size distribution reference models tested (normal, Weibull and Rosin–Rammler–Bennett). The RSEs for the fitted standard deviations were two orders of magnitude higher than those for the fitted means, suggesting that most of the parameter estimate errors were associated with estimating the breadth of the distributions. The coefficients of variation for the interlaboratory statistics also confirmed the lognormal reference model as the preferred choice. From quasi-linear plots, the typical range for good fits between the model and cumulative number-based distributions was 1.9 fitted standard deviations less than the mean to 2.3 fitted standard deviations above the mean. Automated image capture, automated particle analysis and statistical evaluation of the data and fitting coefficients provide a

  8. Interlaboratory validation of the rapid toxicity monitoring assay, DaphniaQuant{trademark}: State of development

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, D.J.; Atherton, R.A.; Stover, E.L.; Blankemeyer, J.T.; Burks, S.L.

    1994-12-31

    Recent regulatory emphasis on aquatic toxicity testing necessitates the development and validation of rapid, cost-effective, alternative bioassays to complement the standard assays used today. Because of this need, DaphniaQuant{trademark}, an assay designed to detect the health of Daphnia sp. at the cellular level was developed. The DaphniaQuant{trademark} assay uses the uptake of a fluorescent dye and corresponding fluorescence measurement as an early indicator of toxicity. Following 30 minutes of exposure to pure chemical compounds or complex environmental mixtures, fluorescence readings are collected, stored in a customized database system in a standard IBM compatible computer, and easily output for graphical display or statistical analysis. Preliminary results with reference toxicants collected during the development of the DaphniaQuant{trademark} system were encouraging and warranted further validation of the assay with conventional acute and subchronic bioassays. Interlaboratory validation studies using both reference toxicants and complex mixtures were performed in three separate laboratories. The current state of DaphniaQuant{trademark} development will be presented including, results from the interlaboratory validation studies, studies with different test species, and novel applications of the DaphniaQuant{trademark} test system in ecological hazard/risk assessment.

  9. Fatigue life of laser cut metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue tests were conducted to determine the actual reduction in fatigue life due to weight removal for balancing by: hand grinding, low power (20 watt) Nd:glass laser, and high power (400 watt) Nd:YAG laser.

  10. Thermal fatigue of beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Deksnis, E.; Ciric, D.; Falter, H.

    1995-09-01

    Thermal fatigue life of S65c beryllium castellated to a geometry 6 x 6 x (8-10)mm deep has been tested for steady heat fluxes of 3 MW/m{sup 2} to 5 MW/m{sup 2} and under pulsed heat fluxes (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}) for which the time averaged heat flux is 5 MW/m{sup 2}. These tests were carried out in the JET neutral beam test facility A test sequence with peak surface temperatures {le} 600{degrees}C produced no visible fatigue cracks. In the second series of tests, with T{sub max} {le} 750{degrees}C evidence for fatigue appeared after a minimum of 1350 stress cycles. These fatigue data are discussed in view of the observed lack of thermal fatigue in JET plasma operations with beryllium PFC. JET experience with S65b and S65c is reviewed; recent operations with {Phi} = 25 MW/m{sup 2} and sustained melting/resolidification are also presented. The need for a failure criterion for finite element analyses of Be PFC lifetimes is discussed.

  11. a Development of Multi Purpose Testing Machine for Friction, Wear and Rolling Contact Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Gab-Su; Pyun, Young-Sik; Kim, Jun-Hyoung; Kim, Hak-Doo; Tominaga, Yasutoshi; Darisuren, Shirmendagwa

    In this paper, the newly developed tribometer was introduced. Ball-on-disk, pin-on-disk, small-sized journal and thrust bearings tests on friction and wear were carried out using a newly developed tribometer which is built up according to the ASTM G99. Those friction and wear test results were compared with the friction results which were approved by Korean (KOLAS) and CSM Instruments. The comparison revealed that friction characteristics and trends of three different tribometers were similar to each other. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of the newly developed tribometer. As a result, the newly developed tribometer is capable of performing friction tests using pin-on-disk, disk-on-disk, journal and thrust bearings configurations.

  12. Sampling and analysis of terpenes in air. An interlaboratory comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Bo; Bomboi-Mingarro, Teresa; Brancaleoni, Enzo; Calogirou, Aggelos; Cecinato, Angelo; Coeur, Cecile; Chatzinestis, Ioannis; Duane, Matthew; Frattoni, Massimiliano; Fugit, Jean-Luc; Hansen, Ute; Jacob, Veronique; Mimikos, Nikolaos; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Owen, Susan; Perez-Pastor, Rosa; Reichmann, Andreas; Seufert, Gunther; Staudt, Michael; Steinbrecher, Rainer

    An interlaboratory comparison on the sampling and analysis of terpenes in air was held within the framework of the BEMA (Biogenic Emissions in the Mediterranean Area) project in May 1995. Samples were drawn and analysed by 10 European laboratories from a dynamic artificial air generator in which five terpenes were present at low ng ℓ -1 levels and ozone varied between 8 and 125 ppbv. Significant improvements over previous inter-comparison exercises in the quality of results were observed. At the ozone mixing ratio of 8 ppbv a good agreement among laboratories was obtained for all test compounds with mean values close to the target concentration. At higher mixing ratios, ozone reduced terpene recoveries and decreased the precision of the measurements due to ozonolysis during sampling. For β-pinene this effect was negligible but for the more reactive compounds significant losses were observed in some laboratories ( cis-β-ocimene = trans-β-ocimene > linalool > d-limonene). The detrimental effect of ozone was significantly lower for the laboratories which removed ozone prior to sampling by scrubbers. Parallel sampling was carried out with a standardised sampler and each individual laboratory's own device. A good agreement between the two sets of results was obtained, clearly showing that the majority of laboratories used efficient sampling systems. Two different standard solutions were analysed by each laboratory. Only in a few cases did interference in the GC separation cause problems for the quantification of the terpenes (nonanal/linalool). However, making up of standards for the calibration of the analytical equipment (GC-MS or GC-FID) was pointed out as a source of error in some laboratories.

  13. Test Length and Cognitive Fatigue: An Empirical Examination of Effects on Performance and Test-Taker Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Phillip L.; Kanfer, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Person and situational determinants of cognitive ability test performance and subjective reactions were examined in the context of tests with different time-on-task requirements. Two hundred thirty-nine first-year university students participated in a within-participant experiment, with completely counterbalanced treatment conditions and test…

  14. Materials Reliability Program: Environmental Fatigue Testing of Type 304L Stainless Steel U-Bends in Simulated PWR Primary Water (MRP-137)

    SciTech Connect

    R.Kilian

    2004-12-01

    Laboratory data generated in the past decade indicate a significant reduction in component fatigue life when reactor water environmental effects are experimentally simulated. However, these laboratory data have not been supported by nuclear power plant component operating experience. In recent comprehensive review of laboratory, component and structural test data performed through the EPRI Materials Reliability Program, flow rate was identified as a critical variable that was generally not considered in laboratory studies but applicable in plant operating environments. Available data for carbon/low-alloy steel piping components suggest that high flow is beneficial regarding the effects of a reactor water environment. Similar information is lacking for stainless steel piping materials. This report documents progress made to date in an extensive testing program underway to evaluate the effects of flow rate on the corrosion fatigue of 304L stainless steel under simulated PWR primary water environmental conditions.

  15. Study on the Temperature Field Loaded by a Shaped Laser Beam on the Top Surface of a Cylinder Head for Thermal Fatigue Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, S.-Z.; Yu, J.; Yu, G.; Tan, Q.-F.; Fan, Z.-W.

    2014-09-01

    In thermal fatigue test, the key point is whether the temperature field on the top surface of cylinder head induced by the heat source can well match it in real service. In order to produce the target temperature field in service which is measured by thermocouples, shaped laser beam generated by diffractive optics element (DOE) is chosen as the heat source to irradiate on the top surface of cylinder head. The DOE is designed based on the Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm and the simulated temperature field is calculated by finite element model (FEM). The results show that the simulated and experimental temperature field can well match the target one which demonstrates that this method is feasible to produce the target temperature field and can be used in thermal fatigue test.

  16. Fatigue loading of tendon

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Screen, Hazel R C

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries, often called tendinopathies, are debilitating and painful conditions, generally considered to develop as a result of tendon overuse. The aetiology of tendinopathy remains poorly understood, and whilst tendon biopsies have provided some information concerning tendon appearance in late-stage disease, there is still little information concerning the mechanical and cellular events associated with disease initiation and progression. Investigating this in situ is challenging, and numerous models have been developed to investigate how overuse may generate tendon fatigue damage and how this may relate to tendinopathy conditions. This article aims to review these models and our current understanding of tendon fatigue damage. We review the strengths and limitations of different methodologies for characterizing tendon fatigue, considering in vitro methods that adopt both viable and non-viable samples, as well as the range of different in vivo approaches. By comparing data across model systems, we review the current understanding of fatigue damage development. Additionally, we compare these findings with data from tendinopathic tissue biopsies to provide some insights into how these models may relate to the aetiology of tendinopathy. Fatigue-induced damage consistently highlights the same microstructural, biological and mechanical changes to the tendon across all model systems and also correlates well with the findings from tendinopathic biopsy tissue. The multiple testing routes support matrix damage as an important contributor to tendinopathic conditions, but cellular responses to fatigue appear complex and often contradictory. PMID:23837793

  17. Evaluation of Ratnaprash for its effect on strength, stamina and fatigue using swim endurance test and biochemical estimation in swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arun; Kumar, Satyendra; Rajput, Rashmi; Srivastava, Ruchi; Rai, Rajiv K.; Sastry, J. L. N.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Traditional medicines have been considered as important resources for postponing fatigue, accelerating elimination of fatigue related metabolites and improving physical ability. Rasāyanās or rejuvenative therapies are mentioned as one of the eight clinical specialties in Ayurveda for attaining longevity, healthy life and regulation of bodily balance. Eventhough more detailed studies are needed to confirm the claims of benefits in the light of evidence based research, Ratnaprash, a herbo-mineral rasāyana formulation, is proposed here to be an antifatigue supplement that is good in promoting strength and stamina. Materials and Methods: In the present study, anti fatigue, strength and stamina enhancing properties of Ratnaprash were examined based on swim endurance capacity and the change in biochemical parameters in Swiss Albino mice. Treatment groups were orally administered Ratnaprash at various test doses (500, 1000, 2000 mg/Kg per day), while the control group received distilled water at similar dose volumes. Effect of therapy was evaluated after 28 days of treatment. Results: At the end of study period, the swimming times to exhaustion were longer in the treated groups than in the control group. Plasma lactate levels of treated groups were lower than those of the control group (P < 0.05) while tissue ATP levels were higher. These effects were dose dependent and the strongest effect was seen in groups treated at 1000 mg/Kg. Conclusion: Ratnaprash enhanced the forced swimming capacity of mice and exhibited elevated anti-fatigue activity, reduced blood lactate levels and increased tissue ATP levels in preclinical models in comparison to vehicle control, exhibiting possible role in increasing strength and stamina and contributing anti-fatigue activity. PMID:26600664

  18. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Test Results for Al-Li 2195 Parent Metal, Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welds and Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Wagner, John A.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2000-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate of aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy 2195 plate and weldments was determined at 200-F, ambient temperature and -320-F. The effects of stress ratio (R), welding process, orientation and thickness were studied. Results are compared with plate data from the Space Shuttle Super Lightweight Tank (SLWT) allowables program. Data from the current series of tests, both plate and weldment, falls within the range of data generated during the SLWT allowables program.

  19. Stability of external and internal implant connections after a fatigue test

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, Paulo Cesar Pinheiro; de Lima, Ana Paula Barbosa; Silva-Concílio, Laís Regiane; Brandt, William Cunha; Neves, Ana Christina Claro

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the torque and detorque values of screw intermediates of external hexagon, internal hexagon, and Morse taper implants in single restorations before and after mechanical cycling. Materials and Methods: The study sample was divided into three groups (n = 10) as follows: group EH – external hexagon implant, group IH – internal hexagon implant, and group MT – Morse taper implant. Universal abutments were screwed on the implants, and metal crowns were cemented onto the abutment. The samples were submitted to a mechanical testing of 1 million cycles, with a frequency of 8 cycles per second under a 400 N load. The application and registration of the screw torque (T0) and detorque (T1) values of the intermediate were performed before and after the test. The results were statistically evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Results: There was no difference between the values of T0 and T1 in the intra-group samples. However, the inter-group difference in T0 between the EH (12.8 N cm) and MT (18.6 N cm) groups and in T1 between the EH (10.4 N cm) and IH (13.8 N cm), EH and MT (19.4 N cm), and MT and IH (P = 0.001) groups were significant. The MT group showed a lower variation of T0 and T1. Conclusion: The internal implants, particularly MT, showed better stability in these cases when used for single restorations. PMID:24926204

  20. Fatigue resistance of duralumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    Where, in the following report, mention is made of fatigue, it always refers to the weakening of the material produced by rapidly changing stresses below the point of elasticity. The alternating stress was obtained by a test bar which was held at one end and subjected to rotation. Most of the tests were conducted on connecting rods.

  1. Determination of Rolling-Element Fatigue Life From Computer Generated Bearing Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlcek, Brian L.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2003-01-01

    Two types of rolling-element bearings representing radial loaded and thrust loaded bearings were used for this study. Three hundred forty (340) virtual bearing sets totaling 31400 bearings were randomly assembled and tested by Monte Carlo (random) number generation. The Monte Carlo results were compared with endurance data from 51 bearing sets comprising 5321 bearings. A simple algebraic relation was established for the upper and lower L(sub 10) life limits as function of number of bearings failed for any bearing geometry. There is a fifty percent (50 percent) probability that the resultant bearing life will be less than that calculated. The maximum and minimum variation between the bearing resultant life and the calculated life correlate with the 90-percent confidence limits for a Weibull slope of 1.5. The calculated lives for bearings using a load-life exponent p of 4 for ball bearings and 5 for roller bearings correlated with the Monte Carlo generated bearing lives and the bearing data. STLE life factors for bearing steel and processing provide a reasonable accounting for differences between bearing life data and calculated life. Variations in Weibull slope from the Monte Carlo testing and bearing data correlated. There was excellent agreement between percent of individual components failed from Monte Carlo simulation and that predicted.

  2. Investigation of thermal fatigue in fiber composite materials. [(thermal cycling tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahmy, A. A.; Cunningham, T. G.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy laminates were thermally cycled to determine the effects of thermal cycles on tensile properties and thermal expansion coefficients of the laminates. Three 12-ply laminate configurations were subjected to up to 5,000 thermal cycles. The cumulative effect of the thermal cycles was determined by destructive inspection (electron micrographs and tensile tests) of samples after progressively larger numbers of cycles. After thermal cycling, the materials' tensile strengths, moduli, and thermal expansion coefficients were significantly lower than for the materials as fabricated. Most of the degradation of properties occurred after only a few cycles. The property degradation was attributed primarily to the progressive development of matrix cracks whose locations depended upon the layup orientation of the laminate.

  3. Pre-crack fatigue life assessment of relevant aircraft materials using fractal analysis of eddy current test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Jürgen; Cikalova, Ulana; Hillmann, Susanne; Meyendorf, Norbert; Hoffmann, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Successful determination of residual fatigue life requires a comprehensive understanding of the fatigue related material deformation mechanism. Neither macroscopic continuum mechanics nor micromechanic observations provide sufficient data to explain subsequent deformation structures occurring during the fatigue life of a metallic structure. Instead mesomechanic deformation on different scaling levels can be studied by applying fractal analysis of various means of nondestructive inspection measurements. The resulting fractal dimension data can be correlated to the actual material damage states, providing an estimation of the remaining residual fatigue life before macroscopic fracture develops. Recent efforts were aimed to apply the fractal concept to aerospace relevant materials AA7075-T6 and Ti-6Al-4V. Proven and newly developed fractal analysis methods were applied to eddy current (EC) measurements of fatigued specimens, with the potential to transition this approach to an aircraft for an in-situ nondestructive inspection. The occurrence of mesomechanic deformation at the material surface of both AA7075-T6 and Ti-6Al-4V specimens could be established via topography images using confocal microscopy (CM). Furthermore, a pulsed eddy current (PEC) approach was developed, combined with a sophisticated new fractal analysis algorithm based on short pulse excitation and evaluation of EC relaxation behavior. This paper presents concept, experimental realization, fractal analysis procedures, and results of this effort.

  4. Bithermal fatigue: A simplified alternative to thermomechanical fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A bithermal fatigue test technique was proposed as a simplified alternative to the thermomechanical fatigue test. Both the thermomechanical cycle and the bithermal technique can be used to study nonisothermal fatigue behavior. The difference between the two cycles is that in a conventional thermomechanical fatigue cycle the temperature is continuously varied concurrently with the applied mechanical strains, but in the bithermal fatigue cycle the specimen is held at zero load during the temperature excursions and all the loads are applied at the two extreme temperatures of the cycle. Experimentally, the bithermal fatigue test technique offers advantages such as ease in synchronizing the temperature and mechanical strain waveforms, in minimizing temperature gradients in the specimen gauge length, and in reducing and interpreting thermal fatigue such as the influence of alternate high and low temperatures on the cyclic stress-strain response characteristics, the effects of thermal state, and the possibility of introducing high- and low-temperature deformation mechanisms within the same cycle. The bithermal technique was used to study nonisothermal fatigue behavior of alloys such as single-crystal PWA 1480, single-crystal Rene N4, cast B1900+Hf, and wrought Haynes 188.

  5. An Experimental Investigation of Transverse Tension Fatigue Characterization of IM6/3501-6 Composite Materials Using a Three-Point Bend Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Ann W.

    1998-01-01

    As composites are introduced into more complex structures with out-of-plane loadings, a better understanding is needed of the out-of-plane, matrix-dominated failure mechanisms. This work investigates the transverse tension fatigue characteristics of IM6/3501 composite materials. To test the 90 degree laminae, a three-point bend test was chosen, potentially minimizing handling and gripping issues associated with tension tests. A finite element analysis was performed of a particular specimen configuration to investigate the influence of specimen size on the stress distribution for a three-point bend test. Static testing of 50 specimens of 9 different sized configurations produced a mean transverse tensile strength of 61.3 Mpa (8.0 ksi). The smallest configuration (10.2 mm wide, Span-to-thickness ratio of 3) consistently exhibited transverse tensile failures. A volume scale effect was difficult to discern due to the large scatter of the data. Static testing of 10 different specimens taken from a second panel produced a mean transverse tensile strength of 82.7 Mpa (12.0 ksi). Weibull parameterization of the data was possible, but due to variability in raw material and/or manufacturing, more replicates are needed for greater confidence. Three-point flex fatigue testing of the smallest configuration was performed on 59 specimens at various levels of the mean static transverse tensile strength using an R ratio of 0.1 and a frequency of 20 Hz. A great deal of scatter was seen in the data. The majority of specimens failed near the center loading roller. To determine whether the scatter in the fatigue data is due to variability in raw material and/or the manufacturing process, additional testing should be performed on panels manufactured from different sources.

  6. 10 CFR 26.211 - Fatigue assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fatigue assessments. 26.211 Section 26.211 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Managing Fatigue § 26.211 Fatigue assessments. (a) Licensees... addition to any other test or determination of fitness that may be required under §§ 26.31(c) and 26.77,...

  7. Characterization of micro-contact resistance between a gold nanocrystalline line and a tungsten electrode probe in interconnect fatigue testing.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xue; Wang, Yusheng; Li, Xide

    2014-10-01

    An electromechanically-coupled micro-contact resistance measurement system is built to mimic the contact process during fatigue testing of nanoscale-thickness interconnects using multiple probe methods. The design combines an optical microscope, high-resolution electronic balance, and micromanipulator-controlled electric probe, and is coupled with electrical measurements to investigate microscale contact physics. Experimental measurements are performed to characterize the contact resistance response of the gold nanocrystalline pad of a 35-nm-thick interconnect under mechanical force applied by a tungsten electrode probe. Location of a stable region for the contact resistance and the critical contact force provides better understanding of micro-contact behavior relative to the effects of the contact force and the nature of the contact surface. Increasing contact temperature leads to reduced contact resistance, softens the pad material, and modifies the contact surface. The stability of both contact resistance and interconnect resistance is studied under increasing contact force. Major fluctuations emerge when the contact force is less than the critical contact force, which shows that temporal contact resistance will affect interconnect resistance measurement accuracy, even when using the four-wire method. This performance is demonstrated experimentally by heating the Au line locally with a laser beam. Finally, the contact resistances are calculated using the LET (Li-Etsion-Talke) model together with combined Holm and Sharvin theory under various contact forces. Good agreement between the results is obtained. This research provides a way to measure change in interconnect line resistance directly under a stable contact resistance regime with a two-wire method that will greatly reduce the experimental costs.

  8. Characterization of micro-contact resistance between a gold nanocrystalline line and a tungsten electrode probe in interconnect fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Xue; Wang, Yusheng; Li, Xide

    2014-10-15

    An electromechanically-coupled micro-contact resistance measurement system is built to mimic the contact process during fatigue testing of nanoscale-thickness interconnects using multiple probe methods. The design combines an optical microscope, high-resolution electronic balance, and micromanipulator-controlled electric probe, and is coupled with electrical measurements to investigate microscale contact physics. Experimental measurements are performed to characterize the contact resistance response of the gold nanocrystalline pad of a 35-nm-thick interconnect under mechanical force applied by a tungsten electrode probe. Location of a stable region for the contact resistance and the critical contact force provides better understanding of micro-contact behavior relative to the effects of the contact force and the nature of the contact surface. Increasing contact temperature leads to reduced contact resistance, softens the pad material, and modifies the contact surface. The stability of both contact resistance and interconnect resistance is studied under increasing contact force. Major fluctuations emerge when the contact force is less than the critical contact force, which shows that temporal contact resistance will affect interconnect resistance measurement accuracy, even when using the four-wire method. This performance is demonstrated experimentally by heating the Au line locally with a laser beam. Finally, the contact resistances are calculated using the LET (Li–Etsion–Talke) model together with combined Holm and Sharvin theory under various contact forces. Good agreement between the results is obtained. This research provides a way to measure change in interconnect line resistance directly under a stable contact resistance regime with a two-wire method that will greatly reduce the experimental costs.

  9. Characterization of micro-contact resistance between a gold nanocrystalline line and a tungsten electrode probe in interconnect fatigue testing.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xue; Wang, Yusheng; Li, Xide

    2014-10-01

    An electromechanically-coupled micro-contact resistance measurement system is built to mimic the contact process during fatigue testing of nanoscale-thickness interconnects using multiple probe methods. The design combines an optical microscope, high-resolution electronic balance, and micromanipulator-controlled electric probe, and is coupled with electrical measurements to investigate microscale contact physics. Experimental measurements are performed to characterize the contact resistance response of the gold nanocrystalline pad of a 35-nm-thick interconnect under mechanical force applied by a tungsten electrode probe. Location of a stable region for the contact resistance and the critical contact force provides better understanding of micro-contact behavior relative to the effects of the contact force and the nature of the contact surface. Increasing contact temperature leads to reduced contact resistance, softens the pad material, and modifies the contact surface. The stability of both contact resistance and interconnect resistance is studied under increasing contact force. Major fluctuations emerge when the contact force is less than the critical contact force, which shows that temporal contact resistance will affect interconnect resistance measurement accuracy, even when using the four-wire method. This performance is demonstrated experimentally by heating the Au line locally with a laser beam. Finally, the contact resistances are calculated using the LET (Li-Etsion-Talke) model together with combined Holm and Sharvin theory under various contact forces. Good agreement between the results is obtained. This research provides a way to measure change in interconnect line resistance directly under a stable contact resistance regime with a two-wire method that will greatly reduce the experimental costs. PMID:25362435

  10. Evaluation of mouse bioassay results in an inter-laboratory comparison for paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jijuan; Zheng, Jiang; Yu, Bing; Wang, Qiuyan; Xu, Junyi; Li, Aifeng

    2011-07-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison of the AOAC mouse bioassay for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxicity in shellfish was carried out among 25 Chinese laboratories to examine the overall performance for PSP testing in China, and to analyze the main factors affecting the performance of this method. The toxic scallop Patinopecten yessoensis collected from coast of Bohai Sea, China, was used as a test sample in the comparison study. The results were reported and evaluated using robust statistical methods. The z scores showed that 80%, 8%, and 12% of laboratories reported satisfactory results, unsatisfactory results, and questionable results, respectively. This evaluation demonstrates that the PSP mouse bioassay is an appropriate method for screening and testing PSP toxicity in shellfish. However, it was found that the experience and skill of technicians, as well as the body weight and health status of mice being used significantly affected the accuracy of the method.

  11. Role and Evaluation of Interlaboratory Comparison Results in Laboratory Accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Bode, P.

    2008-08-14

    Participation in interlaboratory comparisons provides laboratories an opportunity for independent assessment of their analytical performance, both in absolute way and in comparison with those by other techniques. However, such comparisons are hindered by differences in the way laboratories participate, e.g. at best measurement capability or under routine conditions. Neutron activation analysis laboratories, determining total mass fractions, often see themselves classified as 'outliers' since the majority of other participants employ techniques with incomplete digestion methods. These considerations are discussed in relation to the way results from interlaboratory comparisons are evaluated by accreditation bodies following the requirements of Clause 5.9.1 of the ISO/IEC 17025:2005. The discussion and conclusions come largely forth from experiences in the author's own laboratory.

  12. Role and Evaluation of Interlaboratory Comparison Results in Laboratory Accreditation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, P.

    2008-08-01

    Participation in interlaboratory comparisons provides laboratories an opportunity for independent assessment of their analytical performance, both in absolute way and in comparison with those by other techniques. However, such comparisons are hindered by differences in the way laboratories participate, e.g. at best measurement capability or under routine conditions. Neutron activation analysis laboratories, determining total mass fractions, often see themselves classified as `outliers' since the majority of other participants employ techniques with incomplete digestion methods. These considerations are discussed in relation to the way results from interlaboratory comparisons are evaluated by accreditation bodies following the requirements of Clause 5.9.1 of the ISO/IEC 17025:2005. The discussion and conclusions come largely forth from experiences in the author's own laboratory.

  13. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that ... activities. The main symptom of CFS is severe fatigue that lasts for 6 months or more. You ...

  14. Fatigue testing of electron beam-melted Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gaurav V; Duan, Yuanyuan; Neidigh, John; Koike, Mari; Chahine, Gilbert; Kovacevic, Radovan; Okabe, Toru; Griggs, Jason A

    2013-01-01

    Customized one-component dental implants have been fabricated using Electron Beam Melting(®) (EBM(®)), which is a rapid prototyping and manufacturing technique. The goal of our study was to determine the effect of electron beam orientation on the fatigue resistance of EBM Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy. EBM technique was used to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy blocks, which were cut into rectangular beam specimens with dimensions of 25 × 4 × 3 mm, such that electron beam orientation was either parallel (group A) or perpendicular (group B) to the long axis of the specimens. The specimens were subjected to cyclic fatigue (R = 0.1) in four-point flexure under ambient conditions using various stress amplitudes below the yield stress. The fatigue lifetime data were fit to an inverse power law-Weibull model to predict the peak stress corresponding to failure probabilities of 5 and 63% at 2M cycles (σ(max, 5%) and σ(max, 63%)). Groups A and B did not have significantly different Weibull modulus, m (p > 0.05). The specimens with parallel orientation showed significantly higher σ(max, 63%) (p ≤ 0.05), but there was no significant difference in the σ(max, 5%) (p > 0.05). Thus, it can be concluded that the fatigue resistance of the material was greatest when the electron beam orientation was perpendicular to the direction of crack propagation.

  15. Tensile and Fatigue Testing and Material Hardening Model Development for 508 LAS Base Metal and 316 SS Similar Metal Weld under In-air and PWR Primary Loop Water Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2015-09-01

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in September 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In an April 2015 report we presented a baseline mechanistic finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) for systemlevel heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis and fatigue life estimation under reactor thermal-mechanical cycles. In the present report, we provide tensile and fatigue test data for 508 low-alloy steel (LAS) base metal, 508 LAS heat-affected zone metal in 508 LAS–316 stainless steel (SS) dissimilar metal welds, and 316 SS-316 SS similar metal welds. The test was conducted under different conditions such as in air at room temperature, in air at 300 oC, and under PWR primary loop water conditions. Data are provided on materials properties related to time-independent tensile tests and time-dependent cyclic tests, such as elastic modulus, elastic and offset strain yield limit stress, and linear and nonlinear kinematic hardening model parameters. The overall objective of this report is to provide guidance to estimate tensile/fatigue hardening parameters from test data. Also, the material models and parameters reported here can directly be used in commercially available finite element codes for fatigue and ratcheting evaluation of reactor components under in-air and PWR water conditions.

  16. Standardization of reflectance measurements in dispersed organic matter: results of an exercise to improve interlaboratory agreement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Araujo, Carla Viviane; Borrego, Angeles G.; Bouzinos, Antonis; Cardott, Brian; Cook, Alan C.; Eble, Cortland; Flores, Deolinda; Gentzis, Thomas; Gonçalves, Paula Alexandra; Filho, João Graciano Mendonça; Hámor-Vidó, Mária; Jelonek, Iwona; Kommeren, Kees; Knowles, Wayne; Kus, Jolanta; Mastalerz, Maria; Menezes, Taíssa Rêgo; Newman, Jane; Pawlewicz, Mark; Pickel, Walter; Potter, Judith; Ranasinghe, Paddy; Read, Harold; Reyes, Julito; Rodriguez, Genaro De La Rosa; de Souza, Igor Viegas Alves Fernandes; Suarez-Ruiz, Isabel; Sýkorová, Ivana; Valentine, Brett J.

    2015-01-01

    Vitrinite reflectance generally is considered the most robust thermal maturity parameter available for application to hydrocarbon exploration and petroleum system evaluation. However, until 2011 there was no standardized methodology available to provide guidelines for vitrinite reflectance measurements in shale. Efforts to correct this deficiency resulted in publication of ASTM D7708: Standard test method for microscopical determination of the reflectance of vitrinite dispersed in sedimentary rocks. In 2012-2013, an interlaboratory exercise was conducted to establish precision limits for the D7708 measurement technique. Six samples, representing a wide variety of shale, were tested in duplicate by 28 analysts in 22 laboratories from 14 countries. Samples ranged from immature to overmature (0.31-1.53% Ro), from organic-lean to organic-rich (1-22 wt.% total organic carbon), and contained Type I (lacustrine), Type II (marine), and Type III (terrestrial) kerogens. Repeatability limits (maximum difference between valid repetitive results from same operator, same conditions) ranged from 0.03-0.11% absolute reflectance, whereas reproducibility limits (maximum difference between valid results obtained on same test material by different operators, different laboratories) ranged from 0.12-0.54% absolute reflectance. Repeatability and reproducibility limits degraded consistently with increasing maturity and decreasing organic content. However, samples with terrestrial kerogens (Type III) fell off this trend, showing improved levels of reproducibility due to higher vitrinite content and improved ease of identification. Operators did not consistently meet the reporting requirements of the test method, indicating that a common reporting template is required to improve data quality. The most difficult problem encountered was the petrographic distinction of solid bitumens and low-reflecting inert macerals from vitrinite when vitrinite occurred with reflectance ranges overlapping

  17. Fatigue: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Thomas C; Majeroni, Barbara A; Pretorius, Richard; Malik, Khalid

    2008-11-15

    Fatigue, a common presenting symptom in primary care, negatively impacts work performance, family life, and social relationships. The differential diagnosis of fatigue includes lifestyle issues, physical conditions, mental disorders, and treatment side effects. Fatigue can be classified as secondary to other medical conditions, physiologic, or chronic. The history and physical examination should focus on identifying common secondary causes (e.g., medications, anemia, pregnancy) and life-threatening problems, such as cancer. Results of laboratory studies affect management in only 5 percent of patients, and if initial results are normal, repeat testing is generally not indicated. Treatment of all types of fatigue should include a structured plan for regular physical activity that consists of stretching and aerobic exercise, such as walking. Caffeine and modafinil may be useful for episodic situations requiring alertness. Short naps are proven performance enhancers. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, paroxetine, or sertraline, may improve energy in patients with depression. Patients with chronic fatigue may respond to cognitive behavior therapy. Scheduling regular follow-up visits, rather than sporadic urgent appointments, is recommended for effective long-term management. PMID:19035066

  18. Incompatibility and Mental Fatigue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Thomas R.; Hayes, Lauren J.; Applin, Rebecca C.; Weatherly, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    A straightforward prediction from attention restoration theory is that the level of incompatibility in a person's life should be positively correlated with that person's level of mental (or directed attention) fatigue. The authors tested this prediction by developing a new self-report measure of incompatibility in which they attempted to isolate…

  19. Fatigue Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Morris, James M.

    1968-01-01

    Fatigue (or stress) fracture of bone in military recruits has been recognized for many years. Most often it is a metatarsal bone that is involved but the tarsal bones, calcaneus, tibia, fibula, femur, and pelvis are occasionally affected. Reports of such fractures in the ribs, ulna and vertebral bodies may be found in the literature. In recent years, there has been increasing awareness of the occurrence of fatigue fractures in the civilian population. Weekend sportsmen, athletes in an early phase of training, and persons engaged in unaccustomed, repetitive, vigorous activity are potential victims of such a fracture. The signs and symptoms, roentgenographic findings, treatment and etiology of fatigue fractures are dealt with in this presentation. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:5652745

  20. A new quantitative indicator of visual fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goussard, Yves; Martin, Bernard; Stark, Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    Ocular-motor correlates of visual fatigue have remained elusive. Performance of ocular-motor tracking with a wide-band white noise input and the response of the dual-mode, smooth pursuit-saccadic eye movement system as output was used to test visual fatigue. A new visual fatigue indicator, VFI, was defined as the nonlinear remnant after subtracting an identified impulse response contribution to the output. Subjects were required to perform very fatiguing CRT screen reading tasks, and the VFI correlated well with the subjective reports of visual fatigue.

  1. Fatigue of niobium. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Stoloff, N. S.

    1980-01-31

    Tests to determine the effects of frequency, test temperature, and hydrogen content on the fatigue life and crack propagation behavior of polycrystalline niobium are described. Unalloyed niobium is nearly insensitive to test frequency at 25/sup 0/C, while hydrided alloys exhibit a strong frequency effect. Increasing test temperature decreases fatigue life, consistent with decreasing tensile strength. A brief survey of irradiation effects on fatigue of refractory metal alloys suggests that fatigue resistance of irradiated niobium should increase in proportion to effects on strength.

  2. An interlaboratory comparison programme on radio frequency electromagnetic field measurements: the second round of the scheme.

    PubMed

    Nicolopoulou, E P; Ztoupis, I N; Karabetsos, E; Gonos, I F; Stathopulos, I A

    2015-04-01

    The second round of an interlaboratory comparison scheme on radio frequency electromagnetic field measurements has been conducted in order to evaluate the overall performance of laboratories that perform measurements in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations and broadcast antenna facilities. The participants recorded the electric field strength produced by two high frequency signal generators inside an anechoic chamber in three measurement scenarios with the antennas transmitting each time different signals at the FM, VHF, UHF and GSM frequency bands. In each measurement scenario, the participants also used their measurements in order to calculate the relative exposure ratios. The results were evaluated in each test level calculating performance statistics (z-scores and En numbers). Subsequently, possible sources of errors for each participating laboratory were discussed, and the overall evaluation of their performances was determined by using an aggregated performance statistic. A comparison between the two rounds proves the necessity of the scheme. PMID:25205832

  3. Forensic interlaboratory evaluation of the ForFLUID kit for vaginal fluids identification.

    PubMed

    Giampaoli, Saverio; Alessandrini, Federica; Berti, Andrea; Ripani, Luigi; Choi, Ajin; Crab, Roselien; De Vittori, Elisabetta; Egyed, Balazs; Haas, Cordula; Lee, Hwan Young; Korabecná, Marie; Noel, Fabrice; Podini, Daniele; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Valentini, Alessio; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Identification of vaginal fluids is an important step in the process of sexual assaults confirmation. Advances in both microbiology and molecular biology defined technical approaches allowing the discrimination of body fluids. These protocols are based on the identification of specific bacterial communities by microfloraDNA (mfDNA) amplification. A multiplex real time-PCR assay (ForFLUID kit) has been developed for identifying biological fluids and for discrimination among vaginal, oral and fecal samples. In order to test its efficacy and reliability of the assay in the identification of vaginal fluids, an interlaboratory evaluation has been performed on homogeneous vaginal swabs. All the involved laboratories were able to correctly recognize all the vaginal swabs, and no false positives were identified when the assay was applied on non-vaginal samples. The assay represents an useful molecular tool that can be easily adopted by forensic geneticists involved in vaginal fluid identification.

  4. Consistency analysis of multidimensional gonio-spectrophotometric measurements in interlaboratory comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, A.; Campos, J.; Bernad, B.; Pons, A.; Hernanz, M. L.; Martínez-Verdú, F. M.; Höpe, A.

    2016-08-01

    The spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is the key quantity to specify the spectral reflectance of materials for any condition of irradiation and detection, and its characterization is quite important for surfaces with a high dependence on these conditions, such as iridescent coatings. In order to evaluate the calibration and measurement capabilities (CMC) of National Metrology Institutes with the ability to measure the spectral BRDF, a case study interlaboratory comparison is in progress. Spectral BRDF has both spectral and geometric dependence, and this multidimensionality must be treated in the comparison to provide useful information to the participants about their CMCs. A data analysis method for the comparison is presented in this work, which was tested by simulations for different scenarios. The proposed method assesses whether the experimental data from each participant are consistent with those from the others. Finally, one-dimensional and multidimensional degrees of equivalence are defined, which should allow systematic deviations of spectral and geometric nature to be identified.

  5. Determination of nitrogen content in milk by the Kjeldahl method using copper sulfate: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Grappin, R; Horwitz, W

    1988-01-01

    Copper sulfate was substituted for mercury as the catalyst in the International Dairy Federation (IDF) Standard 20A:1986 method for the determination of nitrogen content in milk. The substitution was supported by results obtained in an interlaboratory study by 24 laboratories in 12 countries. Each laboratory analyzed 12 test samples of milk as blind duplicates in a double split level design with high, medium, and low nitrogen concentrations. The method protocol requires the concurrent analyses of an ammonium salt solution and a tryptophan solution as internal quality control standards with a minimum nitrogen recovery between 99 and 100% for the former and at least 98% for the latter. The repeatability and reproducibility relative standard deviations are 0.5 and 1%, respectively, for the range 0.35-0.70 g N/100 g. The performance of the laboratories that did not meet the required quality control specifications was clearly poorer than that of those that did meet the specifications.

  6. Determination of nitrogen content in milk by the Kjeldahl method using copper sulfate: interlaboratory study

    SciTech Connect

    Grappin, R.; Horwitz, W.

    1988-01-01

    Copper sulfate was substituted for mercury as the catalysts in the International Dairy Federation (IDF) Standard 20A:1986 method for the determination of nitrogen content in milk. The substitution was supported by results obtained in an interlaboratory study by 24 laboratories in 12 countries. Each laboratory analyzed 12 test samples of milk as blind duplicates in a double split level design with high, medium, and low nitrogen concentrations. The method protocol requires the concurrent analyses of an ammonium salt solution and a tryptophan solution as internal quality control standards with a minimum nitrogen recovery between 99 and 100% for the former and at least 98% for the latter. The repeatability and reproducibility relative standard deviations are 0.5 and 1%, respectively, for the range 0.35-0.70 N/100 g. The performance of the laboratories that did not meet the required quality control specifications was clearly poorer than that of those that did meet the specifications.

  7. Inter-laboratory comparison of methods to measure androstenone in pork fat.

    PubMed

    Ampuero Kragten, S; Verkuylen, B; Dahlmans, H; Hortos, M; Garcia-Regueiro, J A; Dahl, E; Andresen, O; Feitsma, H; Mathur, P K; Harlizius, B

    2011-08-01

    Today, different analytical methods are used by different laboratories to quantify androstenone in fat tissue. This study shows the comparison of methods used routinely in different laboratories for androstenone quantification: Time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay in Norwegian School of Veterinary Science (NSVS; Norway), gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in Co-operative Central Laboratory (CCL; The Netherlands) and in Institut de Recerca i Tecnologia Agroalimentàries (IRTA; Spain), and high-pressure liquid chromatography in Agroscope Liebefeld-Posieux Research Station (ALP; Switzerland). In a first trial, a set of adipose tissue (AT) samples from 53 entire males was sent to CCL, IRTA and NSVS for determination of androstenone concentration. The average androstenone concentration (s.d.) was 2.47 (2.10) μg/g at NSVS, 1.31 (0.98) μg/g at CCL and 0.62 (0.52) μg/g at IRTA. Despite the large differences in absolute values, inter-laboratory correlations were high, ranging from 0.82 to 0.92. A closer look showed differences in the preparation step. Indeed, different matrices were used for the analysis: pure fat at NSVS, melted fat at CCL and AT at IRTA. A second trial was organised in order to circumvent the differences in sample preparation. Back fat samples from 10 entire males were lyophilised at the ALP labortary in Switzerland and were sent to the other laboratories for androstenone concentration measurement. The average concentration (s.d.) of androstenone in the freeze-dried AT samples was 0.87 (0.52), 1.03 (0.55), 0.84 (0.46) and 0.99 (0.67) μg/g at NSVS, CCL, IRTA and ALP, respectively, and the pairwise correlations between laboratories ranged from 0.92 to 0.97. Thus, this study shows the influence of the different sample preparation protocols, leading to major differences in the results, although still allowing high inter-laboratory correlations. The results further highlight the need for method standardisation and inter-laboratory ring tests for

  8. Interlaboratory Comparison of Quantitative PCR Test Results for Dehalococcoides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) techniques have been widely used to measure Dehalococcoides (Dhc) DNA in the groundwater at field sites for several years. Interpretation of these data may be complicated when different laboratories using alternate methods conduct the analysis. An...

  9. Fatigue properties of acrylic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Fujii, K

    1989-12-01

    Observations were made of fractured surfaces caused by flexural and tensile fatigue tests made in polymethyl methacrylate denture base resins (PMMA). In addition, the changes in dynamic viscoelastic and tensile properties of the materials along with fatigue propagation were investigated. In the tensile and flexural fatigue tests, both the fractured surfaces, which had striations on their surfaces and cracks near the fractured section, closely resembled each other in appearance. On the other hand, all of the tensile properties, such as elastic modulus, toughness and tensile strength, decreased with the increase of the number of stress cycles in the fatigue test. The storage modulus (E') of the material decreased gradually along with fatigue propagation over the whole range of temperatures tested. The loss modulus (E") and mechanical loss tangent (tan delta) increased slightly. The fatigue limit of four commercial denture base resins varied widely from one product to another.

  10. Interlaboratory studies and initiatives developing standards for proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander R; Colangelo, Christopher M; Dufresne, Craig P; Friedman, David B; Lilley, Kathryn S; Mechtler, Karl; Phinney, Brett S; Rose, Kristie L; Rudnick, Paul A; Searle, Brian C; Shaffer, Scott A; Weintraub, Susan T

    2013-03-01

    Proteomics is a rapidly transforming interdisciplinary field of research that embraces a diverse set of analytical approaches to tackle problems in fundamental and applied biology. This viewpoint article highlights the benefits of interlaboratory studies and standardization initiatives to enable investigators to address many of the challenges found in proteomics research. Among these initiatives, we discuss our efforts on a comprehensive performance standard for characterizing PTMs by MS that was recently developed by the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Proteomics Standards Research Group (sPRG).

  11. Dynamic fatigue testing of candidate ceramic materials for turbine engines to determine slow-crack-growth parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, N.R.; Graves, G.A.; Ferber, M.K.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical strength and slow-crack-growth parameter values for two commercially available silicon nitrides, SN-88 and NT164, at three high-temperature conditions. Weibull analysis and dynamic fatigue slow-crack-growth parameters were used to characterize the material strength and resistance to slow crack growth at high temperatures for use in life prediction models. Although both materials are commercially available Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, their high-temperature behavior was found to be significantly different.

  12. Validation of a new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect the triggering proteins and peptides for celiac disease: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Mujico, Jorge R; Dekking, Liesbeth; Kooy-Winkelaar, Yvonne; Verheijen, Ron; van Wichen, Piet; Streppel, Lucia; Sajic, Nermin; Drijfhout, Jan W; Koning, Frits

    2012-01-01

    The performance of Gluten-Tec (EuroProxima, Arnhem, The Netherlands) was tested through an interlaboratory study in accordance with AOAC guidelines. Gluten-Tec is a competitive ELISA that detects an immunostimulatory epitope of a-gliadin in dietary food for celiacs. Fifteen laboratories, representing 14 different countries, announced their interest in taking part in this study. Of the 12 laboratories that sent the results within the established timeframe, two submitted inappropriate standard curves and were excluded from the statistical analysis. Four different food matrixes (rice-based baby food, maize bread, chocolate cake mix, and beer) were selected for preparing the test samples. Two gliadin extraction procedures were used: the conventional 60% ethanol, and a new method based on the reducing reagent dithiothreitol. The 38 samples (19 blind duplicates) tested in this study were prepared by diluting the different extracts in order to cover a wide range of gliadin levels. Both sample extraction and dilution were performed by EuroProxima; the present interlaboratory study was focused only on testing the ELISA part of the Gluten-Tec kit protocol. Repeatability values (within-laboratory variance), expressed as RSD(r) ranged from 6.2 to 25.7%, while reproducibility values (interlaboratory variance), expressed as RSD(R), ranged from 10.6 to 45.9%. Both statistical parameters were in the acceptable range of ELISAs under these conditions, and the method will be presented to the Codex Alimentarius as a preferred method for gluten analysis. PMID:22468361

  13. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  14. An interlaboratory study of potassium determination in rocks and minerals.

    PubMed

    Rice, T D

    1976-05-01

    Seven laboratories took part in this interlaboratory study which was part of an investigation of the flame-speetrometric determination of potassium in rocks and minerals suitable for potassium-argon age-measurement. Three of these laboratories determined potassium in the following five international reference rocks: tonalite T-1, basalt BCR-1, andesite AGV-1, granite G-2, and granodiorite GSP-1. The other five samples (with the number of laboratories analysing them in parentheses) were: a chlorite rock (7), an altered basic igneous rock (5), an altered basaltic andesite (5), a biotite (6) and a potassium feldspar (7). Details of sample preparation and methods of analysis are given; no laboratory used exactly the same method as any of the other six laboratories. Results have been examined by analysis of variance; larger relative between- and within-laboratory variations occurred for the two samples containing less than 0.1% potassium than for seven of the eight other (higher potassium) samples; between-laboratory variations for the basalt BCR-1 and, to a lesser extent, the andesite AGV-1, were high and of similar magnitude to those for the samples containing less than 0.1% potassium. The causes of any poor interlaboratory agreement in the present study are considered.

  15. {sup 129}I Interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Caffee, M W; Roberts, M L

    1999-09-30

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for {sup 129}I was organized and conducted. Nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic ''standard type'' materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios of the samples varied from 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}14}. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the samples. In Phase I, the {sup 129}I AMS measurements for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in {sup 129}I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I {sup 129}I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the {sup 129}I intercomparison, three separate laboratories prepared AgI from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves). Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then re-distributed to the participating {sup 129}I AMS facilities and {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  16. An interlaboratory study of potassium determination in rocks and minerals.

    PubMed

    Rice, T D

    1976-05-01

    Seven laboratories took part in this interlaboratory study which was part of an investigation of the flame-speetrometric determination of potassium in rocks and minerals suitable for potassium-argon age-measurement. Three of these laboratories determined potassium in the following five international reference rocks: tonalite T-1, basalt BCR-1, andesite AGV-1, granite G-2, and granodiorite GSP-1. The other five samples (with the number of laboratories analysing them in parentheses) were: a chlorite rock (7), an altered basic igneous rock (5), an altered basaltic andesite (5), a biotite (6) and a potassium feldspar (7). Details of sample preparation and methods of analysis are given; no laboratory used exactly the same method as any of the other six laboratories. Results have been examined by analysis of variance; larger relative between- and within-laboratory variations occurred for the two samples containing less than 0.1% potassium than for seven of the eight other (higher potassium) samples; between-laboratory variations for the basalt BCR-1 and, to a lesser extent, the andesite AGV-1, were high and of similar magnitude to those for the samples containing less than 0.1% potassium. The causes of any poor interlaboratory agreement in the present study are considered. PMID:18961875

  17. Qualitative PCR method for Roundup Ready soybean: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Takashi; Kasahara, Masaki; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Futo, Satoshi; Sawada, Chihiro; Watai, Masatoshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Furui, Satoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Kitta, Kazumi

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative methods based on PCR have been developed for genetically modified organisms (GMO). Interlaboratory studies were previously conducted for GMO quantitative methods; in this study, an interlaboratory study was conducted for a qualitative method for a GM soybean, Roundup Ready soy (RR soy), with primer pairs designed for the quantitative method of RR soy studied previously. Fourteen laboratories in Japan participated. Each participant extracted DNA from 1.0 g each of the soy samples containing 0, 0.05, and 0.10% of RR soy, and performed PCR with primer pairs for an internal control gene (Le1) and RR soy followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The PCR product amplified in this PCR system for Le1 was detected from all samples. The sensitivity, specificity, and false-negative and false-positive rates of the method were obtained from the results of RR soy detection. False-negative rates at the level of 0.05 and 0.10% of the RR soy samples were 6.0 and 2.3%, respectively, revealing that the LOD of the method was somewhat below 0.10%. The current study demonstrated that the qualitative method would be practical for monitoring the labeling system of GM soy in kernel lots.

  18. 129I interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II results

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.I.; Caffee, M.W.; Proctor, I.D.

    1997-07-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for 129I was organized and conducted. A total of nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, a suite of 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic `standard type` materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic 129I/127I ratios of the samples varied from 10`-8 to 10`-14. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the environmental samples. The 129I AMS measurements obtained at different laboratories for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in 129I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the comparison, AgI was prepared from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves) by three separate laboratories. Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then redistributed to the participating 129I AMS facilities and 129I/127I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  19. Qualitative PCR method for Roundup Ready soybean: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Takashi; Kasahara, Masaki; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Futo, Satoshi; Sawada, Chihiro; Watai, Masatoshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Furui, Satoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Kitta, Kazumi

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative methods based on PCR have been developed for genetically modified organisms (GMO). Interlaboratory studies were previously conducted for GMO quantitative methods; in this study, an interlaboratory study was conducted for a qualitative method for a GM soybean, Roundup Ready soy (RR soy), with primer pairs designed for the quantitative method of RR soy studied previously. Fourteen laboratories in Japan participated. Each participant extracted DNA from 1.0 g each of the soy samples containing 0, 0.05, and 0.10% of RR soy, and performed PCR with primer pairs for an internal control gene (Le1) and RR soy followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The PCR product amplified in this PCR system for Le1 was detected from all samples. The sensitivity, specificity, and false-negative and false-positive rates of the method were obtained from the results of RR soy detection. False-negative rates at the level of 0.05 and 0.10% of the RR soy samples were 6.0 and 2.3%, respectively, revealing that the LOD of the method was somewhat below 0.10%. The current study demonstrated that the qualitative method would be practical for monitoring the labeling system of GM soy in kernel lots. PMID:21391499

  20. Axial Fatigue Tests at Zero Mean Stress of 24S-T Aluminum-alloy Sheet with and Without a Circular Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueggeman, W C; Mayer, M JR; Smith, W H

    1944-01-01

    Axial fatigue tests were made on 189 coupon specimens of 0.032-inch 24S-T aluminum-alloy sheet and a few supplementary specimens of 0.004-inch sheet. The mean load was zero. The specimens were restrained against lateral buckling by lubricated solid guides described in a previous report on this project. About two-thirds of the 0.032-inch specimens were plain coupons nominally free from stress raisers. The remainder contained a 0.1285-inch drilled hole at the center where the reduced section was 0.5 inch wide. S-N diagrams were obtained for cycles to failure between about 1000 and 10 to the 7th power cycles for the plain specimens and 17 and 10 to the 7th power cycles for the drilled specimens. The fatigue stress concentration factor increased from about 1.08 for a stress amplitude causing failure at 0.25 cycles (static) to a maximum of 1.83 at 15,000 cycles and then decreased gradually. The graph for the drilled specimens showed less scatter than that for the plain specimens.

  1. Fatiguing exercise enhances hyperalgesia to muscle inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sluka, Kathleen A; Rasmussen, Lynn A

    2010-02-01

    Since many people with chronic fatigue present with pain and many people with chronic pain present with fatigue, we tested if fatigue would enhance the response to pain in male and female mice. We further tested for the activation of brainstem nuclei by the fatigue task using c-fos as a marker. Fatigue was induced by having mice spontaneously run in running wheel for 2h. Carrageenan (0.03%) was injected into the gastrocnemius muscle either 2h before or 2h after the fatigue task. The mechanical sensitivity of the paw (von Frey filaments), muscle (tweezers), grip force and running wheel activity was assessed before and 24h after injection of carrageenan. Both male and female mice that performed the fatigue task, either before or after intramuscular injection of carrageenan, showed an enhanced mechanical sensitivity of the paw, but not the muscle. Ovariectomized mice showed a similar response to male mice. There was a decrease in running wheel activity after carrageenan injection, but no change in grip force suggesting that mice had no deficit in motor performance induced by the carrageenan. C-fos expression was observed in the nucleus raphe pallidus, obscurus, and magnus after the fatigue task suggesting an increased activity in the raphe nuclei in response to the fatigue task. Therefore, widespread hyperalgesia is enhanced by the fatigue response but not hyperalgesia at the site of insult. We suggest that this effect is sex-dependent and involves mechanisms in the brainstem to result in an enhanced hyperalgesia.

  2. Pilot Fatigue and Circadian Desynchronosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Pilot fatigue and circadian desynchronosis, its significance to air transport safety, and research approaches, were examined. There is a need for better data on sleep, activity, and other pertinent factors from pilots flying a variety of demanding schedules. Simulation studies of flight crew performance should be utilized to determine the degree of fatigue induced by demanding schedules and to delineate more precisely the factors responsible for performance decrements in flight and to test solutions proposed to resolve problems induced by fatigue and desynchronosis. It was concluded that there is a safety problem of uncertain magnitude due to transmeridian flying and a potential problem due to fatigue associated with various factors found in air transport operations.

  3. State-of-the-art in the measurement of volatile organic compounds emitted from building products: results of European interlaboratory comparison.

    PubMed

    De Bortoli, M; Kephalopoulos, S; Kirchner, S; Schauenburg, H; Vissers, H

    1999-06-01

    Eighteen laboratories from 10 European countries participated in a comparison organized as part of the VOCEM project, a 2.5-year research collaboration among 4 research institutes and 4 industrial companies. The scope of the project was to improve the procedure used to measure volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted from building materials and products in small test chambers. The interlaboratory comparison included the GC-MS determination of 5 target compounds from carpet, 8 from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) cushion vinyl and 2 from paint; for the first time, chamber recovery (sinks), homogeneity of solid materials and possible contamination during transport were tested. The results show that the intralaboratory variance (random errors) is much smaller than the interlaboratory variance (systematic errors). Causes of the largest interlaboratory discrepancies were: (i) analytical errors; (ii) losses of the heaviest compounds due to sorption on the chamber walls; and (iii) non homogeneity of the materials. The output of this work concerns both the objective of labelling materials with regard to their VOC emissions and the pre-standard drafted by the European Commitee for Standardization (CEN) for this type of determination.

  4. Three-dimensional measurements of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, S. K.; Grandt, A. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth and retardation experiments conducted in polycarbonate test specimen are described. The transparent test material allows optical interferometry measurements of the fatigue crack opening (and closing) profiles. Crack surface displacements are obtained through the specimen thickness and three dimensional aspects of fatigue crack closure are discussed.

  5. A literature review on fatigue and creep interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    Life-time prediction methods, which are based on a number of empirical and phenomenological relationships, are presented. Three aspects are reviewed: effects of testing parameters on high temperature fatigue, life-time prediction, and high temperature fatigue crack growth.

  6. Experimental and three-dimensional finite element investigation of fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomidi, John A. R.

    Materials often fail at cyclic loads that are lower than their ultimate strength or even their yield strength due to progressive internal material degradation; commonly known as fatigue. Moreover, there is a wide scatter in observed fatigue lives of mechanical components operating under identical loading conditions. The randomness of fatigue failure is considered to be linked to basic microstructural effects such as random microstructure topology and the initiation/growth of cracks along inter/transgranular planes. Several modeling approaches have been previously presented ranging from 2D discrete element to 3D Finite Element methods with explicit representation of microstructure topology and continuum damage mechanics to capture dispersion in rolling contact fatigue life and fatigue spalling. There is, however, a need to compare the modeling approach with experimental fatigue test conditions in order to verify and as required enhance the modeling approach to capture observed fatigue failure. This dissertation presents experimental test results and three-dimensional modeling approach that capture fatigue failure. The three-dimensional modeling approach is enhanced according to the experimental observations to consider inter/trans granular failure, different modes of fatigue initiation and propagation and finally for considering effect of plasticity in fatigue of rolling contacts. The following phenomena have been investigated: (1) Fatigue of microbeams: (a )Results of fatigue life and failure from 3D modeling of intergranular fatigue in microbeams are compared with experimental observations reported in literature (2) Tensile fatigue of thin sheets: (a) A test rig with a new grip and alignment system is developed to address the challenges associated with thin sheet testing and conduct fatigue experiments. (b) The 3D fatigue model is enhanced to capture the dominant transgranular fatigue observed in the experiments. The observed and modeled fatigue life and failure

  7. Interlaboratory study of a method for determining nonvolatile organic carbon in aquifer materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caughey, M.E.; Barcelona, M.J.; Powell, R.M.; Cahill, R.A.; Gron, C.; Lawrenz, D.; Meschi, P.L.

    1995-01-01

    The organic carbon fraction in aquifer materials exerts a major influence on the subsurface mobilities of organic and organic-associated contaminants. The spatial distribution of total organic carbon (TOC) in aquifer materials must be determined before the transport of hydrophobic organic pollutants in aquifers can be modeled accurately. Previous interlaboratory studies showed that it is difficult to measure TOC concentrations 1%. We have tested a new analytical method designed to improve the accuracy and precision of nonvolatile TOC quantitation in geologic materials that also contain carbonate minerals. Four authentic aquifer materials and one NIST standard reference material were selected as test materials for a blind collaborative study. Nonvolatile TOC in these materials ranged from 0.05 to 1.4%, while TIC ranged from 0.46 to 12.6%. Sample replicates were digested with sulfurous acid, dried at 40??C, and then combusted at 950??C using LECO or UIC instruments. For the three test materials that contained >2% TIC, incomplete acidification resulted in a systematic positive bias of TOC values reported by five of the six laboratories that used the test method. Participants did not have enough time to become proficient with the new method before they analyzed the test materials. A seventh laboratory successfully used an alternative method that analyzed separate liquid and solid fractions of the acidified sample residues. ?? 1995 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Interlaboratory Validation of the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) Method 1313 and Method 1316

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document summarizes the results of an interlaboratory study conducted to generate precision estimates for two parallel batch leaching methods which are part of the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF). These methods are: (1) Method 1313: Liquid-Solid Partition...

  9. AN INTERLABORATORY STUDY OF PERFLUORINATED ALKYL COMPOUND LEVELS IN HUMAN PLASMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was designed to investigate intra- and interlaboratory variability in results from six laboratories experienced in the analysis of perfluorinated alkyl compounds in blood matrices and that use stringent procedures to control and assure accuracy and precision. Ea...

  10. Probabilistic fatigue methodology for six nines reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, R. A., Jr.; Bartlett, F. D., Jr.; Elber, Wolf

    1990-01-01

    Fleet readiness and flight safety strongly depend on the degree of reliability that can be designed into rotorcraft flight critical components. The current U.S. Army fatigue life specification for new rotorcraft is the so-called six nines reliability, or a probability of failure of one in a million. The progress of a round robin which was established by the American Helicopter Society (AHS) Subcommittee for Fatigue and Damage Tolerance is reviewed to investigate reliability-based fatigue methodology. The participants in this cooperative effort are in the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command (AVSCOM) and the rotorcraft industry. One phase of the joint activity examined fatigue reliability under uniquely defined conditions for which only one answer was correct. The other phases were set up to learn how the different industry methods in defining fatigue strength affected the mean fatigue life and reliability calculations. Hence, constant amplitude and spectrum fatigue test data were provided so that each participant could perform their standard fatigue life analysis. As a result of this round robin, the probabilistic logic which includes both fatigue strength and spectrum loading variability in developing a consistant reliability analysis was established. In this first study, the reliability analysis was limited to the linear cumulative damage approach. However, it is expected that superior fatigue life prediction methods will ultimately be developed through this open AHS forum. To that end, these preliminary results were useful in identifying some topics for additional study.

  11. Statistical characterization of the fatigue behavior of composite lamina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. N.; Jones, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model was developed to predict statistically the effects of constant and variable amplitude fatigue loadings on the residual strength and fatigue life of composite lamina. The parameters in the model were established from the results of a series of static tensile tests and a fatigue scan and a number of verification tests were performed. Abstracts for two other papers on the effect of load sequence on the statistical fatigue of composites are also presented.

  12. Strain-cycling fatigue behavior of ten structural metals tested in liquid helium (4 K), in liquid nitrogen (78 K), and in ambient air (300 K)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtigall, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Strain-cycling fatigue behavior of 10 different structural alloys and metals was investigated in liquid helium (4 K), in liquid nitrogen (78 K), and in ambient air (300 K). At high cyclic lives, fatigue resistance increased with decreasing temperature for all the materials investigated. At low cyclic lives, fatigue resistance generally decreased with decreasing temperature for the materials investigated. Only for Inconel 718 did fatigue resistance increase with decreasing temperature over the entire life range investigated. Comparison of the experimental fatigue behavior with that predicted by the Manson method of universal slopes showed that the fatigue behavior of these materials can be predicted for cryogenic temperatures by using material tensile properties obtained at those same temperatures.

  13. Interlaboratory comparison of two AOAC liquid chromatographic fluorescence detection methods for paralytic shellfish toxin analysis through characterization of an oyster reference material.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew D; Lewis, Adam M; Rourke, Wade A; Higman, Wendy A

    2014-01-01

    An interlaboratory ring trial was designed and conducted by the Centre for Environment, Fisheries, and Aquaculture Science to investigate a range of issues affecting the analysis of a candidate Pacific oyster paralytic shellfish toxin reference material. A total of 21 laboratories participated in the study and supplied results using one or more of three instrumental methods, specifically precolumn oxidation (Pre-COX) LC with fluorescence detection (FLD; AOAC Official Method 2005.06), postcolumn oxidation (PCOX) LC-FLD (AOAC Official Method 2011.02), and hydrophilic interaction LC/MS/MS. Each participant analyzed nine replicate samples of the oyster tissue in three separate batches of three samples over a period of time longer than 1 week. Results were reported in a standardized format, reporting both individual toxin concentrations and total sample toxicity. Data were assessed to determine the equivalency of the two AOAC LC methods and the LC/MS/MS method as well as an assessment of intrabatch and interbatch repeatability and interlaboratory reproducibility of each method. Differences among the results reported using the three methods were shown to be statistically significant, although visual comparisons showed an overlap between results generated by the majority of tests, the exception being the Pre-COX quantitation of N-hydroxylated toxins in post ion-exchange fractions. Intralaboratory repeatability and interlaboratory reproducibility were acceptable for most of the results, with the exception of results generated from fractions. The results provided good evidence for the acceptable performance of the PCOX method for the quantitation of C toxins. Overall the study showed the usefulness of interlaboratory analysis for the characterization of paralytic shellfish poisoning matrix reference materials, highlighting some issues that may need to be addressed with further method assessment at individual participant laboratories.

  14. Report of multijunction thermal convertor interlaboratory comparison study for measurements at Sandia National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Klemme, Beverly J.

    2009-07-01

    Two Multijunction Thermal Voltage Converters (MJTCs) were provided to the Sandia National Laboratory Primary Standards Laboratory (Sandia PSL) as part of an interlaboratory comparison (ILC). This report summarizes the results of the measurements of the devices (S 127D1 and S 127C2) measured at Sandia PSL from March 4 to March 15, 2009. The SNL/NM portion of an interlaboratory comparison of multijunction thermal convertors was successfully completed with a demonstrated measurement uncertainty of 60ppm (k=2).

  15. Inter-laboratory comparison measurements of radiochemical laboratories in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Meresová, J; Belanová, A; Vrsková, M

    2010-01-01

    The first inter-laboratory comparison organized by the radiochemistry laboratory of Water Research Institute (WRI) in Bratislava was carried out in 1993 and since then is it realized on an annual basis and about 10 radiochemical laboratories from all over Slovakia are participating. The gross alpha and gross beta activities, and the activity concentrations of (222)Rn, tritium, and (226)Ra, and U(nat) concentration in synthetic water samples are compared. The distributed samples are covering the concentration range prevailing in potable and surface waters and are prepared by dilution of certified reference materials. Over the course of the years 1993-2008, we observed the improvement in the quality of results for most of the laboratories. However, the success rate of the gross alpha determination activity is not improving as much as the other parameters.

  16. Interlaboratory comparison of traceable atomic force microscope pitch measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald; Chernoff, Donald A.; Wang, Shihua; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Tan, Siew Leng; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph

    2010-06-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Advanced Surface Microscopy (ASM), and the National Metrology Centre (NMC) of the Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR) in Singapore have completed a three-way interlaboratory comparison of traceable pitch measurements using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The specimen being used for this comparison is provided by ASM and consists of SiO2 lines having a 70 nm pitch patterned on a silicon substrate. NIST has a multifaceted program in atomic force microscope (AFM) dimensional metrology. One component of this effort is a custom in-house metrology AFM, called the calibrated AFM (C-AFM). The NIST C-AFM has displacement metrology for all three axes traceable to the 633 nm wavelength of the iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser - a recommended wavelength for realization of the SI (Système International d'Unités, or International System of Units) meter. NIST used the C-AFM to participate in this comparison. ASM used a commercially available AFM with an open-loop scanner, calibrated by a 144 nm pitch transfer standard. In a prior collaboration with Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German national metrology institute, ASM's transfer standard was calibrated using PTB's traceable optical diffractometry instrument. Thus, ASM's measurements are also traceable to the SI meter. NMC/A*STAR used a large scanning range metrological atomic force microscope (LRM-AFM). The LRM-AFM integrates an AFM scanning head into a nano-stage equipped with three built-in He-Ne laser interferometers so that its measurement related to the motion on all three axes is directly traceable to the SI meter. The measurements for this interlaboratory comparison have been completed and the results are in agreement within their expanded uncertainties and at the level of a few parts in 104.

  17. Color gamut assessment standard: construction, characterization and interlaboratory measurement comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libert, John M.; Kelley, Edward F.; Boynton, Paul A.; Brown, Steven W.; Wall, Christine F.; Campbell, Colin

    2003-07-01

    In earlier papers, NIST proposed a standard illumination source and optical filter targets with which to assess the state-of-the-art of display measurement. The Display Measurement Assessment Transfer Standard (DMATS) was designed to present the display metrologist with a rectangular array of targets such as color filters, polarizers, and grilles, back-lighted by uniform illumination, to be measured using methods and instruments typically used in display performance measurement. A "round robin" interlaboratory measurement exercise using the "standard" artifact suite would enable a first order assessment of display measurement reproducibility, i.e., measurement variability within the electronic display community. The rectangular array design of the DMATS was anticipated to present stray light and color contamination challenges to facilitate identification of error sources deriving from measurement protocols, laboratory environment, and equipment. However, complications in dealing with heating problems threatened to delay the planned laboratory intercomparison. The Gamut Assessment Standard (GAS) was thus designed as an interim solution to enable the NIST scientists and participating measurement laboratories to begin collecting data. The GAS consists of a 150 mm diameter integrating sphere standard illumination source with a stray light elimination tube (SLET) mounted at the exit port. A dual six-position filter wheel is mounted at the SLET exit port. One wheel holds a series of neutral density filters and a second interchangeable wheel holds various color filters. This paper describes the design and construction of the GAS, its initial performance characterization by NIST, and comparison measurements made at NPL. Possible design changes suggested by the results of the preliminary intercomparison are discussed, as are plans for future interlaboratory comparisons and potential use of the GAS as a transfer standard for laboratory self-certification.

  18. Fatigue Strengths of Aircraft Materials: Axial-Load Fatigue Tests on Edge-Notched Sheet Specimens of 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 Aluminum Alloys and of SAE 4130 Steel with Notch Radii of 0.004 and 0.070 inch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grover, H. J.; Hyler, W. S.; Jackson, L. R.

    1959-01-01

    The present report gives results of axial-load fatigue tests on notched specimens of three sheet materials: 2024-T3 and 7075-T6 aluminum alloys and normalized SAE 4130 steel. Two edge-notched specimens were designed and tested, each having a theoretical stress-concentration factor K(sub t) = 4.0. The radii of the notches were 0.004 and 0.070 inch. Tests of these specimens were run at two levels of nominal mean stress: 0 and 20,000 psi. Results of these studies extended information previously reported on tests of specimens with varying notch severity. They afford data on the variation of fatigue-strength reduction with notch radius and on the potential usefulness of Neuber's technical stress-concentration factor K(sub n).

  19. Dynamic fatigue of feldspathic porcelain.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, C W; Lockwood, P E; Ringle, R D; Twiggs, S W

    1993-07-01

    Several studies (Sherrill and O'Brien, 1974; Southan and Jørgensen, 1974; Jones, 1983) have shown that stress corrosion fatigue occurs in dental porcelains. Morena et al. (1986) reported on an assessment of slow crack growth parameters for dental ceramics. The purpose of the study reported here was to evaluate the fatigue parameters of a model experimental porcelain using dynamic fatigue testing. This test procedure makes use of several constant stressing rates to perform strength tests. Dynamic stress testing was first described by Evans (1974) and later defined as a distinct test modality by Ritter (1978). From such data, the fatigue parameters can be calculated. These fatigue parameters, n and sigma f0, are, respectively, the crack growth exponent from the crack velocity expression and a materials constant which is dependent on the test environment and the inert (moisture-free) strength. The model porcelain was made from 60% component 1 and 40% component 3 according to the Weinstein patent (Weinstein, et al., 1962). The biaxial flexure strength of 300 specimens 1 mm thick was tested in 37 degrees C water by testing 50 samples at each of 6 constant stressing rates: 100, 10, 1, 0.1, 0.01, and 0.001 MPa/s. One hundred specimens were tested in a moisture-free environment at 100 MPa/s using a servo-mechanical testing machine. A commercial porcelain (Jelenko Gingival-Lot # 2012, Jelenko Dental Health Products, Armonk, NY, USA) was chosen as a reference material. One hundred twenty specimens were tested using the same procedures as those used for the model porcelain; however, only 20 samples were tested for 5 stressing rate groups and an inert group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. TV fatigue crack monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for monitoring the development and growth of fatigue cracks in a test specimen subjected to a pulsating tensile load. A plurality of television cameras photograph a test specimen which is illuminated at the point of maximum tensile stress. The television cameras have a modified vidicon tube which has an increased persistence time thereby eliminating flicker in the displayed images.

  1. Creep-fatigue of low cobalt superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Testing for the low cycle fatigue and creep fatigue resistance of superalloys containing reduced amounts of cobalt is described. The test matrix employed involves a single high temperature appropriate for each alloy. A single total strain range, again appropriate to each alloy, is used in conducting strain controlled, low cycle, creep fatigue tests. The total strain range is based upon the level of straining that results in about 10,000 cycles to failure in a high frequency (0.5 Hz) continuous strain-cycling fatigue test. No creep is expected to occur in such a test. To bracket the influence of creep on the cyclic strain resistance, strain hold time tests with ore minute hold periods are introduced. One test per composition is conducted with the hold period in tension only, one in compression only, and one in both tension and compression. The test temperatures, alloys, and their cobalt compositions that are under study are given.

  2. Ultrasonic Fatigue Behavior of a Fe-BASED Warm-Compacted Powder Metallurgy Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yu-Heng; Ye, Xuan; Hu, Lei; Luo, Fei; Xiao, Zhi-Yu

    2013-07-01

    Fe-2Cu-2Ni-1Mo-1C powder metallurgy material was fabricated by die-wall lubricated warm compaction and ultrasonic fatigue test was carried out for as-sintered and heat treatment samples. Material fatigue strength reaches 249 MPa under axial fatigue testing. The sintered material consists of acicular martensite, pearlite, bainite and retained austenite. Tempered martensite is the major phases after heat-treatment. Cleavage plane and dimples is mixed fracture for sample after axial fatigue test. Mechanical properties of after heat treatment materials are improved and fatigue strength reaches 382 MPa under 107 cycles in bending ultrasonic fatigue test. The fatigue strength increases significantly in high cycles range.

  3. Fatigue of continuous fiber reinforced metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mirdamadi, M.; Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The complex damage mechanisms that occur in fiber reinforced advanced metallic materials are discussed. As examples, results for several layups of SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites are presented. Fatigue tests were conducted and analyzed for both notched and unnotched specimens at room and elevated temperatures. Test conditions included isothermal, non-isothermal, and simulated mission profile thermomechanical fatigue. Test results indicated that the stress in the 0 degree fibers is the controlling factor for fatigue life for a given test condition. An effective strain approach is presented for predicting crack initiation at notches. Fiber bridging models were applied to crack growth behavior.

  4. In vitro flexural fatigue limits of dental composites.

    PubMed

    Braem, M J; Davidson, C L; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1994-12-01

    The flexural fatigue test equipment developed was used to study the fatigue behavior of dental restorative composites, using a "staircase" approach. Three commercial composites were tested after dry and wet storage conditions. The findings indicate that the method is accurate and reliable, and that changes due to water sorption are clearly reflected: The flexural fatigue limit decreases after water sorption. From the present results it seems that under environmentally controlled conditions, the fatigue behavior is characterized by a well-defined fatigue stress level above which the composites tested fail rapidly, and below which they survive.

  5. A combined NDE-fatigue testing and three-dimensional image processing study of a SiC/SiC composite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Ghosn, Louis J.; Baaklini, George Y.; Rauser, Richard W.; Zima, John D.

    2004-07-01

    Non destructive evaluation (NDE) is a critical technology for improving the quality of a component in a cost-sparing production environment. NDE detects variations in a material or a component without altering or damaging the test piece. Using these techniques to improve the production process requires characterization of the faults and their influence on the component performance. This task depends on the material properties and on the complexity of the component geometry. Hence, the NDE technique is applied to study the structural durability of ceramic matrix composite materials used in gas turbine engine applications. Matrix voids are common anomalies generated during the melt infiltration process. The effects of these matrix porosities are usually associated with a reduction in the initial overall composite stiffness and an increase in the thermal conductivity of the component. Furthermore, since the role of the matrix as well as the coating is to protect the fibers from the harsh engine environments, the current design approach is to limit the design stress level of CMC components to always be below the first matrix cracking stress. In this study, the effect of matrix porosity on the matrix cracking stress is evaluated using a combined fatigue tensile testing, NDE, and 3 D image processing approach. Computed Tomography (CT) is utilized as the NDE technique to characterize the initial matrix porosity"s locations and sizes in various CMC test specimens. The three dimensional volume rendering approach is exercised to construct the 3 D volume of the specimen based on the geometric modeling of the specimen's CT results using image analysis and geometric modeling software. The same scanned specimens are then fatigue tested to various maximum loads and temperatures to depict the matrix cracking locations in relation to the initial damage. The specimen are then re-scanned and checked for further anomalies and obvious changes in the damage state. Finally, rendered

  6. Fatigue Life Methodology for Bonded Composite Skin/Stringer Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    A methodology is presented for determining the fatigue life of bonded composite skin/stringer structures based on delamination fatigue characterization data and geometric nonlinear finite element analyses. Results were compared to fatigue tests on stringer flange/skin specimens to verify the approach.

  7. Preliminary Fatigue Studies on Aluminum Alloy Aircraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1938-01-01

    Preliminary information on the complex subject of the fatigue strength of fabricated structural members for aircraft is presented in the test results obtained on several different types of airship girders subjected to axial tension and compression in a resonance fatigue machine. A description of this machine as well as numerous photographs of the fatigue failures are given. There is also presented an extended bibliography on the subject of fatigue strength.

  8. Thermal Fatigue and Fracture Behavior of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal fatigue and fracture behavior of plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings has been investigated under high heat flux and thermal cyclic conditions. The coating crack propagation is studied under laser heat flux cyclic thermal loading, and is correlated with dynamic fatigue and strength test results. The coating stress response and inelasticity, fatigue and creep interactions, and interface damage mechanisms during dynamic thermal fatigue processes are emphasized.

  9. Inter-laboratory validation study of two immunochemical methods for detection of processed ruminant proteins.

    PubMed

    van Raamsdonk, L W D; Margry, R J C F; van Kaathoven, R G C; Bremer, M G E G

    2015-10-15

    In order to facilitate safe re-introduction of non-ruminant processed animal proteins (PAPs) in aqua feed, two immunoassays have been tested in an interlaboratory study for their capability to detect ruminant PAPs processed under European conditions. The sensitivity of the MELISA-TEK assay was improved by applying a specific extraction kit. Six approved blank pork and poultry samples were adulterated to produce 15 samples spiked at 0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0% with ruminant material, sterilised at either 133 °C or 137 °C. Fourteen participants investigated the 6 blanks and 15 spiked samples, making 21 samples for the final test. For both assays specificity and sensitivity were at 97% or higher. Concordance and accordance were higher than 95% with one exception. The results indicate that both assays provided correct results at 0.5% and higher for the detecting ruminant PAPs (sterilised at 133 °C) in non-ruminant PAPs. Given the 2% upper limit of ruminant PAPs in non-ruminant PAPs for avoiding an increase in BSE incidents, these methods are fit for monitoring non-ruminant PAPs intended for aqua feed. PMID:25952876

  10. Serologic and PCR testing of persons with chronic fatigue syndrome in the United States shows no association with xenotropic or polytropic murine leukemia virus-related viruses.

    PubMed

    Satterfield, Brent C; Garcia, Rebecca A; Jia, Hongwei; Tang, Shaohua; Zheng, Haoqiang; Switzer, William M

    2011-02-22

    In 2009, a newly discovered human retrovirus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related virus (XMRV), was reported by Lombardi et al. in 67% of persons from the US with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) by PCR detection of gag sequences. Although six subsequent studies have been negative for XMRV, CFS was defined more broadly using only the CDC or Oxford criteria and samples from the US were limited in geographic diversity, both potentially reducing the chances of identifying XMRV positive CFS cases. A seventh study recently found polytropic MuLV sequences, but not XMRV, in a high proportion of persons with CFS. Here we tested blood specimens from 45 CFS cases and 42 persons without CFS from over 20 states in the United States for both XMRV and MuLV. The CFS patients all had a minimum of 6 months of post-exertional malaise and a high degree of disability, the same key symptoms described in the Lombardi et al. study. Using highly sensitive and generic DNA and RNA PCR tests, and a new Western blot assay employing purified whole XMRV as antigen, we found no evidence of XMRV or MuLV in all 45 CFS cases and in the 42 persons without CFS. Our findings, together with previous negative reports, do not suggest an association of XMRV or MuLV in the majority of CFS cases.

  11. Mechanical resistance evaluation of a novel anatomical short glass fiber reinforced post in artificial endodontically treated premolar under rotational/lateral fracture fatigue testing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Li

    2016-01-01

    This study develops a novel anatomical short glass fiber reinforced (anatomical SGFR) post and evaluates the mechanical performance in artificial endodontically treated premolars. An anatomical SGFR fiber post with an oval shape and slot/notch designs was manufactured using an injection-molding machine. The three-point bending test and crown/core restorations using the anatomical SGFR and commercial cylindrical fiber posts under fatigue test were executed to understand the mechanical resistances. The results showed that static and dynamic rotational resistance were found significantly higher in the anatomical SGFR fiber post than in the commercial post. The endurance limitations at 1.2×10(6) cycles were 66.81 and 64.77 N for the anatomical SGFR and commercial fiber posts, respectively. The anatomical SGFR fiber post presented acceptable value of flexural strength and modulus, better fit adaption in the root canal resist torque more efficiency but was not a key issue in the lateral fracture resistance in an endodontically treated premolar. PMID:27041013

  12. Mechanical resistance evaluation of a novel anatomical short glass fiber reinforced post in artificial endodontically treated premolar under rotational/lateral fracture fatigue testing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Li

    2016-01-01

    This study develops a novel anatomical short glass fiber reinforced (anatomical SGFR) post and evaluates the mechanical performance in artificial endodontically treated premolars. An anatomical SGFR fiber post with an oval shape and slot/notch designs was manufactured using an injection-molding machine. The three-point bending test and crown/core restorations using the anatomical SGFR and commercial cylindrical fiber posts under fatigue test were executed to understand the mechanical resistances. The results showed that static and dynamic rotational resistance were found significantly higher in the anatomical SGFR fiber post than in the commercial post. The endurance limitations at 1.2×10(6) cycles were 66.81 and 64.77 N for the anatomical SGFR and commercial fiber posts, respectively. The anatomical SGFR fiber post presented acceptable value of flexural strength and modulus, better fit adaption in the root canal resist torque more efficiency but was not a key issue in the lateral fracture resistance in an endodontically treated premolar.

  13. Serologic and PCR testing of persons with chronic fatigue syndrome in the United States shows no association with xenotropic or polytropic murine leukemia virus-related viruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, a newly discovered human retrovirus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related virus (XMRV), was reported by Lombardi et al. in 67% of persons from the US with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) by PCR detection of gag sequences. Although six subsequent studies have been negative for XMRV, CFS was defined more broadly using only the CDC or Oxford criteria and samples from the US were limited in geographic diversity, both potentially reducing the chances of identifying XMRV positive CFS cases. A seventh study recently found polytropic MuLV sequences, but not XMRV, in a high proportion of persons with CFS. Here we tested blood specimens from 45 CFS cases and 42 persons without CFS from over 20 states in the United States for both XMRV and MuLV. The CFS patients all had a minimum of 6 months of post-exertional malaise and a high degree of disability, the same key symptoms described in the Lombardi et al. study. Using highly sensitive and generic DNA and RNA PCR tests, and a new Western blot assay employing purified whole XMRV as antigen, we found no evidence of XMRV or MuLV in all 45 CFS cases and in the 42 persons without CFS. Our findings, together with previous negative reports, do not suggest an association of XMRV or MuLV in the majority of CFS cases. PMID:21342521

  14. Mode 2 fatigue crack growth specimen development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    A Mode II test specimen was developed which has potential application in understanding phemonena associated with mixed mode fatigue failures in high performance aircraft engine bearing races. The attributes of the specimen are: it contains one single ended notch, which simplifiers data gathering and reduction; the fatigue crack grous in-line with the direction of load application; a single axis test machine is sufficient to perform testing; and the Mode I component is vanishingly small.

  15. Bearing fatigue investigation 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Signer, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The operating characteristics of large diameter rolling-element bearings in the ultra high speed regimes expected in advanced turbine engines for high performance aircraft were investigated. A high temperature lubricant, DuPont Krytox 143 AC, was evaluated at bearing speeds to 3 million DN. Compared to the results of earlier, similar tests using a MIL-L-23699 (Type II) lubricant, bearings lubricated with the high density Krytox fluid showed significantly higher power requirements. Additionally, short bearing lives were observed when this fluid was used with AISI M50 bearings in an air atmosphere. The primary mode of failure was corrosion initiated surface distress (fatigue) on the raceways. The potential of a case-carburized bearing to sustain a combination of high-tangential and hertzian stresses without experiencing race fracture was also investigated. Limited full scale bearing tests of a 120 mm bore ball bearing at a speed of 25,000 rpm (3 million DN) indicated that a carburized material could sustain spalling fatigue without subsequent propagation to fracture. Planned life tests of the carburized material had to be aborted, however, because of apparent processing-induced material defects.

  16. Fatigue Life Methodology for Bonded Composite Skin/Stringer Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2001-01-01

    A methodology is presented for determining the fatigue life of composite structures based on fatigue characterization data and geometric nonlinear finite element (FE) analyses. To demonstrate the approach, predicted results were compared to fatigue tests performed on specimens which represented a tapered composite flange bonded onto a composite skin. In a first step, tension tests were performed to evaluate the debonding mechanisms between the flange and the skin. In a second step, a 2D FE model was developed to analyze the tests. To predict matrix cracking onset, the relationship between the tension load and the maximum principal stresses transverse to the fiber direction was determined through FE analysis. Transverse tension fatigue life data were used to -enerate an onset fatigue life P-N curve for matrix cracking. The resulting prediction was in good agreement with data from the fatigue tests. In a third step, a fracture mechanics approach based on FE analysis was used to determine the relationship between the tension load and the critical energy release rate. Mixed mode energy release rate fatigue life data were used to create a fatigue life onset G-N curve for delamination. The resulting prediction was in good agreement with data from the fatigue tests. Further, the prediction curve for cumulative life to failure was generated from the previous onset fatigue life curves. The results showed that the methodology offers a significant potential to Predict cumulative fatigue life of composite structures.

  17. Compact bone fatigue damage: a microscopic examination.

    PubMed

    Carter, D R; Hayes, W C

    1977-01-01

    Flexural fatigue tests of bovine bone specimens produced fracture surfaces that were transverse on the tension side and oblique on the compression side. Similar fracture patterns were produced by bending tests with a single applied loading. Microscopic examination of flexural fatigue specimens prior to complete established that fatigue fracture is caused by the progressive accumulation of diffuse structural damage. The microdamage observed on the tension side consisted primarily of separation (or debonding) at cement lines and interlamellar cement bands. Tensile cracks in interstitial bone were also observed. The major damage modes on the compression side were oblique cracking and longitudinal splitting. The fatigue fracture patterns observed for the bone specimens correspond to the types of fatigue fractures observed clinically. Compact bone fatigue fractures in areas of longitudinal tensile stresses are generally seen as transverse lesions, whereas fatigue fractures in areas of longitudinal compressive stresses are normally oblique fractures. The diffuse nature of the observed fatigue damage is consistent with the hypothesis that microdamage caused by mechanical loading may serve as a stimulus for in vivo bone remodeling.

  18. Corrosion fatigue of high strength fastener materials in seawater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental effects which significantly reduce the fatigue life of metals are discussed. Corrosion fatigue is a major concern in the engineering application of high strength fasteners in marine environments. The corrosion fatigue failure of an AISI 41L4O high strength steel blade to hub attachment bolt at the MOD-OA 200 kW wind turbine generator was investigated. The reduction of fatigue strength of AISI 41L4O in marine environments and to obtain similar corrosion fatigue data for candidate replacement materials was studied. The AISI 4140, PH 13-8Mo stainless steel, alloy 718 and alloy MP-35N were tested in axial fatigue at a frequency of 20 Hz in dry air and natural seawater. The fatigue data are fitted by regression equations to allow determination of fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure.

  19. Corrosion fatigue of high strength fastener materials in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipton, D. G.

    1983-12-01

    Environmental effects which significantly reduce the fatigue life of metals are discussed. Corrosion fatigue is a major concern in the engineering application of high strength fasteners in marine environments. The corrosion fatigue failure of an AISI 41L4O high strength steel blade to hub attachment bolt at the MOD-OA 200 kW wind turbine generator was investigated. The reduction of fatigue strength of AISI 41L4O in marine environments and to obtain similar corrosion fatigue data for candidate replacement materials was studied. The AISI 4140, PH 13-8Mo stainless steel, alloy 718 and alloy MP-35N were tested in axial fatigue at a frequency of 20 Hz in dry air and natural seawater. The fatigue data are fitted by regression equations to allow determination of fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure.

  20. Fatigue of bovine trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tara L; Gibson, Lorna J

    2003-12-01

    Fatigue loading of bone, from the activities of daily living in the elderly, or from prolonged exercise in the young, can lead to increased risk of fracture. Elderly patients with osteoporosis are particularly prone to fragility fractures of the vertebrae, where load is carried primarily by trabecular bone. In this study, specimens of bovine trabecular bone were loaded in compressive fatigue at four different normalized stresses to one of six maximum strains. The resulting change in modulus and residual strain accumulation were measured over the life of the fatigue test. The number of cycles to reach a given maximum compressive strain increased with decreasing normalized stress. Modulus reduction and specimen residual strain increased with increasing maximum compressive strain, but few differences were observed between specimens loaded to the same maximum strain at different normalized stresses.

  1. National Inter-laboratory Comparison of Thermocouples in the Temperature Range from to

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifoviç, N.; Kalemci, M.

    2015-08-01

    One of the main criteria demonstrating the competence of a calibration laboratory is successful participation in inter-laboratory comparisons. Real capability of the laboratory including claimed uncertainties could be demonstrated based on the results of comparisons, evaluated either through -criteria or other acceptable measures. As a number of accredited laboratories with scopes covering calibration services in the field of thermometry have been increasing, the demand for organization of inter-laboratory comparisons with participation of accredited laboratories occurs. Based on this fact, a national inter-laboratory comparison of thermocouple calibrations in the temperature range from to in the field of temperature was launched by TUBITAK UME in 2011. The purpose of the inter-laboratory comparison was to compare the results of the participating laboratories during calibration of the thermocouples in the range from to . Three type S thermocouples were constructed and calibrated by TUBITAK UME which is the pilot laboratory of the comparison. It was recommended that the participants use their standard procedure for the calibration of thermocouples and follow the instructions of comparison protocol during the calibration. The inter-laboratory comparison was carried out among eleven national accredited laboratories. In this paper, the temperature differences obtained by participating laboratories with associated uncertainties of the results and values will be presented. The metrological equivalence of all laboratories was demonstrated, with all values being less than 1.0.

  2. An interlaboratory evaluation of the Syrian hamster embryo cell transformation assay using eighteen coded chemicals.

    PubMed

    Jones, C A; Huberman, E; Callaham, M F; Tu, A; Halloween, W; Pallota, S; Sivak, A; Lubet, R A; Avery, M D; Kouri, R E; Spalding, J; Tennant, R W

    1988-01-01

    Eighteen coded chemicals were evaluated in the Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay in three different laboratories using the same basic experimental protocol with minor modifications. In addition, individual cell and serum sources were selected. Major factors influencing intra-and interlaboratory reproducibility were the source of cells and serum, the toxicity of the chemicals, and the dose-range selected for transformation evaluation. Two or three assays from each laboratory were required to determine the transformation-inducing potential of a chemical because of the low number of transformants scored in any single assay and the difficulty of interpreting morphological variations. Rodent carcinogenicity data were available for 16 of the 18 chemicals tested and the transformation response of 14 of those chemicals was in agreement with the rodent carcinogenicity data (if the positive results are adopted for the four chemicals that produced contradictory results). Four rodent carcinogens, di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, diphenylhydantoin, methapyrilene hydrochloride and o-toluidine hydrochloride, that were negative in the Salmonella/microsome assay, induced morphological transformation in the SHE assay. Although the labour, cost and lack of reproducibility might preclude application of this transformation assay for routine screening, it might, nevertheless, prove valuable for distinguishing between non-mutagenic carcinogens and non-carcinogens.

  3. Gas chromatographic determination of volatile congeners in spirit drinks: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J; Chapman, S; Brereton, P; Bertrand, A; Guillou, C; Wittkowski, R

    1999-01-01

    An interlaboratory study of a gas chromatographic (GC) method for the determination of volatile congeners in spirit drinks was conducted; 31 laboratories from 8 countries took part in the study. The method uses GC with flame ionization detection and incorporates several quality control measures which permit the choice of chromatographic system and conditions to be selected by the user. Spirit drink samples were prepared and sent to participants as 10 blind duplicate or split-level test materials for the determination of 1,1-diethoxyethane (acetal), 2-methylbutan-1-ol (active amyl alcohol), 3-methylbutan-1-ol (isoamyl alcohol), methanol (methyl alcohol), ethyl ethanoate (ethyl acetate), butan-1-ol (n-butanol), butan-2-ol (sec-butanol), 2-methylpropan-1-ol (isobutyl alcohol), propan-1-ol (n-propanol), and ethanal (acetaldehyde). The precision of the method for 9 of the 10 analytes was well within the range predicted by the Horwitz equation. The precision of the most volatile analyte, ethanal, was just above statistically predicted levels. This method is recommended for official regulatory purposes. PMID:10589492

  4. Estimation and uncertainty analysis of dose response in an inter-laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toman, Blaza; Rösslein, Matthias; Elliott, John T.; Petersen, Elijah J.

    2016-02-01

    An inter-laboratory experiment for the evaluation of toxic effects of NH2-polystyrene nanoparticles on living human cancer cells was performed with five participating laboratories. Previously published results from nanocytoxicity assays are often contradictory, mostly due to challenges related to producing a reliable cytotoxicity assay protocol for use with nanomaterials. Specific challenges include reproducibility preparing nanoparticle dispersions, biological variability from testing living cell lines, and the potential for nano-related interference effects. In this experiment, such challenges were addressed by developing a detailed experimental protocol and using a specially designed 96-well plate layout which incorporated a range of control measurements to assess multiple factors such as nanomaterial interference, pipetting accuracy, cell seeding density, and instrument performance. Detailed data analysis of these control measurements showed that good control of the experiments was attained by all participants in most cases. The main measurement objective of the study was the estimation of a dose response relationship between concentration of the nanoparticles and metabolic activity of the living cells, under several experimental conditions. The dose curve estimation was achieved by imbedding a three parameter logistic curve in a three level Bayesian hierarchical model, accounting for uncertainty due to all known experimental conditions as well as between laboratory variability in a top-down manner. Computation was performed using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The fit of the model was evaluated using Bayesian posterior predictive probabilities and found to be satisfactory.

  5. Tritium monitoring in natural waters: Interlaboratory comparison program results for round two

    SciTech Connect

    Kreek, S.A.; Hall, H.L.; Rego, J.H.; Bazan, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    A round-robin interlaboratory comparison program to monitor tritium in natural waters has been established. Currently, five independent laboratories are participating in this round-robin program. Tritium standards are prepared by one of the laboratory participants and analyzed by the other participants in each round of the round-robin. This report encompasses the results of the set of standards prepared by the Radiation Analytical Sciences Section of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the second round of this enriched tritium intercomparison program. Two aqueous tritium standard solutions, A and B, were prepared by sequential dilution of a National Institute of Standards and Technology {sup 3}H standard. The concentrations of the standards solutions, A and B, were 147 {plus_minus}16 pCi/L{sup 3}H and 444{plus_minus}31 pCi/L{sup 3}H, respectively (2{sigma} uncertainty). One blank solution was also prepared. The standards and blank were prepared using water collected from the Nevada Test Site Potable Water Well 4. This well is known to contain only trace amounts of tritium. The participating laboratories measured the {sup 3}H in standards A and B and blanks by liquid scintillation counting after distillation and electrolytic enrichment or directly via {sup 3}He mass spectrometry. The results reported for standards A and B are within the 2{sigma} uncertainties of the known values. These excellent results reflect the quality of the techniques employed.

  6. Inter-Laboratory Uranium Double-Spike Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G. P

    1999-11-11

    In environmental samples, the major analytical limitation on the use of uranium {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U determinations as an indicator of uranium enrichment is mass dependent bias occurring during the measurement. The double-spike technique can be used to correct the data for this effect. The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the variation of mass bias among several laboratories and to determine the extent to which the double-spike could be used to reduce analytical uncertainty. Four laboratories performed replicate analyses on each of three samples. Generally mass bias was determined to be small compared to the random scatter of the measurements, but in at least one case, the bias was > 1%. In 8 of 12 cases, intra-laboratory variance was reduced when the double-spike correction was applied. For all three samples, the inter-laboratory variance was decreased, though the decrease was small. Based on a reasonable assumption about the true isotopic compositions of the samples, the accuracy of 11 of the twelve analyses was improved by applying the double spike correction. When the double spike is used to correct for mass bias, the {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U accuracy is better than 1% even for samples as small as 1 ng. For 50 ng of uranium, 0.1% accuracy was achieved.

  7. Interlaboratory Comparison of Organically Bound Tritium Measurements in Environmental Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Workman, W.J.G.; Kim, S.B.; Kotzer, T.G.

    2005-07-15

    The measurement of organically bound tritium in environmental samples is essential for assessing the impact of tritium releases in terms of doses to the general public and a growing number of laboratories are now required to make them. Interlaboratory comparisons provide one way for laboratories to practice and check their analytical methods and procedures. At AECL's Chalk River Laboratories, two organic matrices with tritium concentrations less than 1.5 kBq/g were developed and distributed to seven laboratories in Canada, Europe and Russia for measurement. Some participants experienced difficulties in analysing the samples, especially with the lower concentrations, where results varied by more than an order of magnitude. Laboratories incorporating procedures such as rinsing to remove tritium from exchangeable sites, using standardized combustion methods and purifying the combustion water obtained more reliable, consistent results. The preparation of the standard reference material must be carefully executed in order to produce a homogeneous sample of uniform size. The tritium measurement community would benefit if standard reference materials in the environmental concentration range were available.

  8. Canadian inter-laboratory organically bound tritium (OBT) analysis exercise.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Olfert, J; Baglan, N; St-Amant, N; Carter, B; Clark, I; Bucur, C

    2015-12-01

    Tritium emissions are one of the main concerns with regard to CANDU reactors and Canadian nuclear facilities. After the Fukushima accident, the Canadian Nuclear Regulatory Commission suggested that models used in risk assessment of Canadian nuclear facilities be firmly based on measured data. Procedures for measurement of tritium as HTO (tritiated water) are well established, but there are no standard methods and certified reference materials for measurement of organically bound tritium (OBT) in environmental samples. This paper describes and discusses an inter-laboratory comparison study in which OBT in three different dried environmental samples (fish, Swiss chard and potato) was measured to evaluate OBT analysis methods currently used by CANDU Owners Group (COG) members. The variations in the measured OBT activity concentrations between all laboratories were less than approximately 20%, with a total uncertainty between 11 and 17%. Based on the results using the dried samples, the current OBT analysis methods for combustion, distillation and counting are generally acceptable. However, a complete consensus OBT analysis methodology with respect to freeze-drying, rinsing, combustion, distillation and counting is required. Also, an exercise using low-level tritium samples (less than 100 Bq/L or 20 Bq/kg-fresh) would be useful in the near future to more fully evaluate the current OBT analysis methods. PMID:26372740

  9. Comparison of bulk sediment and sediment elutriate toxicity testing methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elutriate bioassays are among numerous methods that exist for assessing the potential toxicity of sediments in aquatic systems. In this study, interlaboratory results were compared from 96-hour Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas static-renewal acute toxicity tests conduct...

  10. Electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of lead in urine: results of an interlaboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Slavin, Walter

    1999-05-01

    Results of an interlaboratory study are reported for the determination of lead in urine. Two levels of a lyophilized material containing biologically-bound lead were prepared using pooled urine obtained from lead-poisoned children undergoing the CaNa 2EDTA mobilization test. The materials were circulated to a group of reference laboratories that participate in the `New York State Proficiency Testing Program for Blood Lead'. Results of the initial round-robin gave all-method consensus target values of 145±22 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 17 and 449±43 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 20. The interlaboratory exercise was repeated some 5 years later and consensus target values were re-calculated using the grand mean (excluding outliers) of results reported by laboratories using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The re-calculated target values were 139±10 μg/l (S.D.) and 433±12 μg/l (S.D.). The urine reference materials were also analyzed for lead by several laboratories using other instrumental techniques including isotope dilution (ID), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS), flame atomic absorption with extraction, ICP-atomic emission spectrometry, ID-gas chromatography MS and flow injection-hydride generation AAS, thus providing a rich source of analytical data with which to characterize them. The materials were also used in a long-term validation study of an ETAAS method developed originally for blood lead determinations that has since been used unmodified for the determination of lead in urine also. Recently, urine lead method performance has been tracked in a proficiency testing program specifically for this analysis. In addition, a number of commercial control materials have been analyzed and evaluated.

  11. Could test length or order affect scores on letter number sequencing of the WAIS-III and WMS-III? Ruling out effects of fatigue.

    PubMed

    Tulsky, D S; Zhu, J

    2000-11-01

    The Letter Number Sequencing subtest of the WAIS-III and WMS-III was administered at the end of the standardization edition of the WMS-III. It was not administered as part of the WAIS-III standardization battery. Nevertheless, the subtest was included in the published version of the WAIS-III. This study examines differences between examinees administered the Letter Number Sequencing subtest at three different times during a psychological battery: (1) as part of the published battery, (2) as part of the WMS-III when the WMS-III was administered as the first test in a sequence, and (3) as part of the WMS-III standardization when the WAIS-III was administered immediately preceding the WMS-III. The participants were 372 examinees ( n = 124 in each condition) who were matched on key demographic variables. A repeated measures MANOVA yielded no difference in subtest scores when administered in any of these conditions. The results show no evidence of fatigue or ordering effects on the Letter Number Sequencing subtest.

  12. [Fatigue and depression].

    PubMed

    Hell, Daniel

    2015-04-22

    Fatigue is characterised in an overview of the literature as a specific phenomenon of depression. Its differential diagnosis is discussed. Distinctions and correspondences to burnout are elaborated. Fatigue is not an obligatory symptom of depressive episodes, although it can contribute to depressive developments. The importance of fatigue in depressive episodes and its therapy is shown with the help of a circular model of depression.

  13. Fatigue of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salkind, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    The failure mechanisms in the fatigue of composite materials are analyzed in terms of the requirements for designing fatigue-critical composite structures. Fiber reinforced polymers, fiber reinforced metals, fatigue of composite structures, and composite design considerations are discussed. It is concluded that composite materials offer the engineer the opportunity for tailoring stiffness in different directions for designing dynamic components.

  14. Interconnect fatigue design for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.; Moore, D. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The results of comprehensive investigation of interconnect fatigue that has led to the definition of useful reliability-design and life-prediction algorithms are presented. Experimental data indicate that the classical strain-cycle (fatigue) curve for the interconnect material is a good model of mean interconnect fatigue performance, but it fails to account for the broad statistical scatter, which is critical to reliability prediction. To fill this shortcoming the classical fatigue curve is combined with experimental cumulative interconnect failure rate data to yield statistical fatigue curves (having failure probability as a parameter) which enable (1) the prediction of cumulative interconnect failures during the design life of an array field, and (2) the unambiguous--ie., quantitative--interpretation of data from field-service qualification (accelerated thermal cycling) tests. Optimal interconnect cost-reliability design algorithms are derived based on minimizing the cost of energy over the design life of the array field.

  15. Interlaboratory Study for Nickel Alloy 625 Made by Laser Powder Bed Fusion to Quantify Mechanical Property Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher U.; Jacob, Gregor; Stoudt, Mark; Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Donmez, Alkan

    2016-08-01

    Six different organizations participated in this interlaboratory study to quantify the variability in the tensile properties of Inconel 625 specimens manufactured using laser powder bed fusion-additive manufacturing machines. The tensile specimens were heat treated and tensile tests were conducted until failure. The properties measured were yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elastic modulus, and elongation. Statistical analysis revealed that between-participant variability for yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elastic modulus values were significantly higher (up to four times) than typical within-participant variations. Only between-participant and within-participant variability were both similar for elongation. A scanning electron microscope was used to examine one tensile specimen for fractography. The fracture surface does not have many secondary cracks or other features that would reduce the mechanical properties. In fact, the features largely consist of microvoid coalescence and are entirely consistent with ductile failure.

  16. Interlaboratory Study for Nickel Alloy 625 Made by Laser Powder Bed Fusion to Quantify Mechanical Property Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher U.; Jacob, Gregor; Stoudt, Mark; Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Donmez, Alkan

    2016-06-01

    Six different organizations participated in this interlaboratory study to quantify the variability in the tensile properties of Inconel 625 specimens manufactured using laser powder bed fusion-additive manufacturing machines. The tensile specimens were heat treated and tensile tests were conducted until failure. The properties measured were yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elastic modulus, and elongation. Statistical analysis revealed that between-participant variability for yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elastic modulus values were significantly higher (up to four times) than typical within-participant variations. Only between-participant and within-participant variability were both similar for elongation. A scanning electron microscope was used to examine one tensile specimen for fractography. The fracture surface does not have many secondary cracks or other features that would reduce the mechanical properties. In fact, the features largely consist of microvoid coalescence and are entirely consistent with ductile failure.

  17. Interlaboratory comparison of mineral constituents in a sample from the Herrin (No. 6) coal bed from Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finkelman, Robert B.; Fiene, F.L.; Miller, R.N.; Simon, F.O.

    1984-01-01

    Approximately 20 kg of the Herrin (No. 6) coal was collected from a strip mine in St. Clair County, Ill. A 10-kg portion was ground to -60 mesh, homogenized, and riffled into 128 splits of 70-80 g each. Homogeneity of these splits was confirmed by moisture, ash, and sulfur analyses of six randomly selected splits. Results of these analyses were within the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) guidelines for interlaboratory precision. Splits of the Herrin (No. 6) coal were then transmitted to more than 30 laboratories for analysis. Low-temperature plasma oxidation was used to isolate inorganic matter for quantitative chemical and mineralogical analysis. Despite a wide variation in ashing conditions, only minor variations in ash yields were obtained; these variations were attributed to differences in operating temperature and moisture content. Mineralogical analyses of low-temperature ash (LTA) concentrates prepared by five different laboratories indicated variations within the limits of analytical error. The mean values, in weight percent, for the major minerals are as follows: calcite, 9; quartz, 20; pyrite, 23; kaolinite, 14; and illite+mixed-layer clays, 31. Normative mineralogical calculations and Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) yielded results similar to those obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD). Choosing appropriate mineral standards was found to be critical for the proper use of analytical techniques such as XRD and FTIR. Good interlaboratory agreement was obtained for most major, minor, and trace elements despite differences in analytical procedures and in the type of sample analyzed (coal, high-temperature ash, or LTA). Discrepancies between analyses for zinc, strontium, manganese, and iron may be attributed to sampling inhomogeneity problems. Mossbauer spectroscopy showed that approximately 44 percent of the pyritic sulfur was lost through weathering in the first year after preparation of the interlaboratory sample. Szomolnokite

  18. Fatigue and cardiorespiratory function following abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Christensen, T; Bendix, T; Kehlet, H

    1982-07-01

    Subjective feelings of fatigue were assessed before operation and 10, 20 and 30 days after uncomplicated elective abdominal surgery in 16 otherwise healthy patients, using a constructed fatigue scale model. In addition, all patients had an orthostatic stress test performed at the same times. Six of the patients also underwent a bicycle ergometer test measuring heart rate and oxygen consumption. Subjective feelings of fatigue were increased (P less than 0.01) at all three postoperative observations, and only 5 of 16 patients returned to their preoperative level. The increased subjective feeling of fatigue correlated positively (RS = 0.53, P less than 0.001) with the increased pulse rate seen during orthostatic stress after operation. Heart rate was about 5 per cent higher (n.s.) after operation when bicycling at the same work loads, while oxygen consumption decreased by about 2 per cent (P less than 0.01) at all three postoperative bicycle tests. It is concluded that even electric uncomplicated abdominal surgery is followed by a pronounced feeling of fatigue, which may persist 1 month after surgery in about one-third of patients. The fatigue scale model seems applicable for future studies on the pathogenesis and treatment of the postoperative fatigue syndrome.

  19. Virtual DNA analysis as a platform for interlaboratory data exchange of HLA DNA typing results.

    PubMed

    Helmberg, W; Zahn, R; Keller, E; Weinmair, B; Lanzer, G; Albert, E

    1999-10-01

    In 1998, the German DNA Exchange offered the possibility to report typing data as virtual DNA. Participating labs have been equipped with software based on the principle of Virtual DNA Analysis (VDA). This approach allows the combination of sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO), sequence-specific primer (SSP) and sequence-based typing (SBT) results. The use of all types of test kits has been allowed without any limitations, as long as basic sequence information on SSOs or SSPs was available, at least the sequence and the position of the detected motif on the sample DNA. Typing raw data of the actual SSO-SSP and, if performed, SBT information was collected. Participating labs received 20 DNA samples to type. Fourteen labs returned data on 1,250 single-locus testings. Reported data consisted of 317 SBT data, 452 SSO kits and 1,795 SSP kits with 43,312 single SSO/ SSP reactivities. One hundred and twenty-six different typing kits (unique laboratory-specific kits, commercial kits from 7 companies) have been used. In 30 (2.4%) single-locus testings, at least one single SSO/SSP reactivity has been false-positive or -negative, thus not leading to a valid result on primary evaluation. Eight of these 30 cases were due to the presence of a new DRB1*14 allele in sample no. 2. Thirty-five tests (2.8%) showed wrong allele assignments. This first attempt to collect raw typing data instead of typing interpretation on a larger scale shows the advantages of Virtual DNA Analysis like interlaboratory data exchange without loss of information, transparency of typing interpretation and reinterpretation of typing data with an updated allele database. The VDA format is a useful tool for workshops and bone marrow donor registries. PMID:10551421

  20. Virtual DNA analysis as a platform for interlaboratory data exchange of HLA DNA typing results.

    PubMed

    Helmberg, W; Zahn, R; Keller, E; Weinmair, B; Lanzer, G; Albert, E

    1999-10-01

    In 1998, the German DNA Exchange offered the possibility to report typing data as virtual DNA. Participating labs have been equipped with software based on the principle of Virtual DNA Analysis (VDA). This approach allows the combination of sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO), sequence-specific primer (SSP) and sequence-based typing (SBT) results. The use of all types of test kits has been allowed without any limitations, as long as basic sequence information on SSOs or SSPs was available, at least the sequence and the position of the detected motif on the sample DNA. Typing raw data of the actual SSO-SSP and, if performed, SBT information was collected. Participating labs received 20 DNA samples to type. Fourteen labs returned data on 1,250 single-locus testings. Reported data consisted of 317 SBT data, 452 SSO kits and 1,795 SSP kits with 43,312 single SSO/ SSP reactivities. One hundred and twenty-six different typing kits (unique laboratory-specific kits, commercial kits from 7 companies) have been used. In 30 (2.4%) single-locus testings, at least one single SSO/SSP reactivity has been false-positive or -negative, thus not leading to a valid result on primary evaluation. Eight of these 30 cases were due to the presence of a new DRB1*14 allele in sample no. 2. Thirty-five tests (2.8%) showed wrong allele assignments. This first attempt to collect raw typing data instead of typing interpretation on a larger scale shows the advantages of Virtual DNA Analysis like interlaboratory data exchange without loss of information, transparency of typing interpretation and reinterpretation of typing data with an updated allele database. The VDA format is a useful tool for workshops and bone marrow donor registries.

  1. Physical activity, smoking, and exercise-induced fatigue.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J R; Crow, R S; Jacobs, D R; Mittelmark, M B; Leon, A S

    1984-06-01

    This study determined whether persons with coronary risk factors have increased fatigue during or after exercise. Ratings of perceived exertion were first shown to be a valid measure of fatigue; i.e., ratings of perceived exertion correlated with heart rate both during and after exercise and at each of three exercise tests (all within-subjects r greater than 0.88). Physical inactivity and smoking were associated with increased fatigue. Inactive men and smokers had higher levels of fatigue during both exercise and recovery conditions and at each of three exercise test. The increased fatigue of men who were inactive and smoked was not entirely due to their lower level of fitness. The risk factors of age, Type A behavior pattern, blood pressure, serum cholesterol, serum high-density lipoprotein, and obesity were not associated with increased fatigue. The increased fatigue experienced by inactive persons and smokers may account for their decreased compliance to exercise programs.

  2. Fatigue in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sandıkçı, Sevinç Can; Özbalkan, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is a common and important problem in many diseases including rheumatologic illnesses, and it has a negative impact on health-related quality of life. Fatigue is described as having an impact on multiple aspects of a patient’s life. There is a need for knowledge about causes of and treatments for fatigue to ensure that patient outcomes are improved. There are several effective treatment strategies available for fatigue including pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies. We aim to provide an overview of fatigue in rheumatologic disorders and some recommendations on its optimal management. PMID:27708942

  3. Fatigue and fracture -- 1996: Volume 1. PVP-Volume 323

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, H.S.; Bhandari, S.; Jones, D.; Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.; Yoon, K.K.

    1996-12-01

    Fracture mechanics and fatigue evaluations are an important part of the structural integrity analyses to assure safe operation of pressure vessels and piping components during their service life. The papers presented in this volume illustrate the application of fatigue and fracture mechanics techniques to assess the structural integrity of a wide variety of Pressure Vessels and Piping components. The papers are organized in five sections: (1) fatigue and fracture: piping and components; (2) fatigue and fracture: environmental cracking; (3) leak-before-break analyses; (4) fatigue testing and analyses; and (5) probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses in pressure boundary components. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers in this volume.

  4. Thermally activated processes of fatigue crack growth in steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaki; Fujii, Atsushi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Higashida, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Fatigue crack growth rates in steels at high and low temperatures have been investigated using Paris curves. The fatigue crack growth rates at high temperatures are quite different from those at low temperatures. Arrhenius plots between fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) and test temperatures at constant stress intensity factor range (ΔKI) indicate a difference of the rate-controlling process for fatigue crack growth with temperature. Slip deformation at the crack tip governs fatigue crack growth at high temperatures, while hydrogen diffusion is associated with crack growth at low temperatures.

  5. Fatigue and fibromyalgia syndrome: clinical and neurophysiologic pattern.

    PubMed

    Casale, Roberto; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2011-04-01

    The concept of 'fatigue' is strictly related to parameters of the setting in which fatigue is measured. Therefore, it is mandatory to provide a definition of fatigue and the modalities of its use. This is of pivotal importance with regard to the fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome, where fatigue is the most invalidating symptom and where, paradoxically, no clear and widely accepted definition of fatigue is available in the literature as yet. In the clinical setting, fatigue can be measured by different methods of various complexity. The simplest technique to assess fatigue involves the use of a visual analogue scale (VAS); however, a number of scales with differing levels of complexity are available for use. It is, often, difficult to detach the term 'fatigue' from tiredness and task failure, which correspond to two completely distinguished forms of fatigue: one with central origin (tiredness) and another which is localised within the muscle (peripheral muscle fatigue). The former is related to changes in motor-unit-recruitment strategies, whereas the latter is attributed to changes in membrane properties. To extensively assess fatigue and, partially, to avoid confusion among the types of fatigue described above, a number of laboratory tests have been developed; among these, there are multichannel surface electromyography (EMG) recordings. Using this type of an approach, it is possible the estimation of motor unit location within the muscle, the decomposition of the surface EMG (sEMG) interference signal into constituent trains of motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) and the analysis of single unit properties. PMID:22094199

  6. A report on the interlaboratory quantitation of haemoglobin A2 and haemoglobin F

    PubMed Central

    White, J. M.; Lewis, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    An interlaboratory trial of the quantitation of Hb A2 and Hb F has been carried out on two samples of blood by 90 laboratories in the British Isles. The results have been compared with those obtained by four reference laboratories. Overall, the correlation was very poor and indicated that the methods used have to be standardized before interlaboratory values become meaningful. Moreover, in many laboratories the level of Hb A2 in a patient with proven beta thalassaemia was not reported as being increased. PMID:4766196

  7. Fatigue behavior and recommended design rules for an automotive composite

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Ruggles, M.B.

    1998-11-01

    Fatigue curves (stress vs cycles to failure) were generated under a variety of conditions (temperatures, fluid environments, mean stresses, block loadings) for a candidate automotive structural composite. The results were used to (1) develop observations regarding basic fatigue behavioral characteristics and (2) establish fatigue design rules. The composite was a structural reaction injection-molded polyurethane reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. Tensile fatigue tests on specimens from a single plaque at {minus}40 F, room temperature, and 250 F provided the basic behavioral characteristics. It was found that when stress was normalized by the at-temperature ultimate tensile strength, the fatigue curves at the three temperatures collapsed into a single master curve. An assessment of the individual stress-strain loops throughout each test showed a progressive loss in stiffness and an increase in permanent strain, both of which are indicative of increasing damage. Fatigue tests on specimens from several plaques were used to develop a design fatigue curve, which was established by using a reduction factor of 20 on average cycles to failure. This factor assures that the stiffness loss during the design life is no greater than 10 percent. Fatigue reduction factors were established to account for various fluids. Reversed stress fatigue tests allowed a mean stress rule to be validated, and block loading tests were used to demonstrate the adequacy of Miner`s rule for cumulative fatigue damage.

  8. Evaluating Fatigue in Operational Settings: The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Gregory, Kevin; Miller, Donna; Webbon, Lissa; Oyung, Ray

    1996-01-01

    In response to a 1980 Congressional request, NASA Ames initiated a program to examine fatigue in flight operations. The Program objectives are to examine fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption in flight operations, determine the effects of these factors on flight crew performance, and the development of fatigue countermeasures. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program conducts controlled laboratory experiments, full-mission flight simulations, and field studies. A range of subjective, behavioral, performance, physiological, and environmental measures are used depending on study objectives. The Program has developed substantial expertise in gathering data during actual flight operations and in other work settings. This has required the development of ambulatory and other measures that can be carried throughout the world and used at 41,000 feet in aircraft cockpits. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program has examined fatigue in shorthaul, longhaul, overnight cargo, and helicopter operations. A recent study of planned cockpit rest periods demonstrated the effectiveness of a brief inflight nap to improve pilot performance and alertness. This study involved inflight reaction time/vigilance performance testing and EEG/EOG measures of physiological alertness. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program has applied scientific findings to the development of education and training materials on fatigue countermeasures, input to federal regulatory activities on pilot flight, duty, and rest requirements, and support of National Transportation Safety Board accident investigations. Current activities are examining fatigue in nonaugmented longhaul flights, regional/commuter flight operations, corporate/business aviation, and psychophysiological variables related to performance.

  9. Autonomic nervous alterations associated with daily level of fatigue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a common symptom in both sick and healthy people. We examined autonomic nervous alterations associated with fatigue to clarify the mechanisms underlying fatigue. Methods The study group consisted of 19 healthy participants who performed a 2-back test for 30 min as a fatigue-inducing mental task session. Before and after the session, they completed the advanced trail making test (ATMT) for 30 min for mental fatigue evaluation, subjective scales to measure fatigue sensation, and underwent electrocardiography to allow assessment of autonomic nerve activities. Results After the fatigue-inducing task, the total error counts on the ATMT tended to increase (P = 0.076); the ATMT for total trial counts (P = 0.001), the subjective level of fatigue (P < 0.001), and the % low-frequency power (%LF) (P = 0.035) increased significantly; and the % high-frequency power (%HF) decreased compared with before the fatigue-inducing task although this did not reach the statistical significance (P = 0.170). Although LF measured in absolute units did not change significantly before and after the fatigue-inducing task (P = 0.771), and HF measured in absolute units decreased after the task (P = 0.020). The %LF and LF/HF ratio were positively associated with the daily level of fatigue evaluated using Chalder's fatigue scale. In addition, %HF was negatively associated with the fatigue score. Conclusions Increased sympathetic activity and decreased parasympathetic activity may be characteristic features of both acute and daily levels of fatigue. Our findings provide new perspectives on the mechanisms underlying fatigue. PMID:22032726

  10. Fatigue handbook: Offshore steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Almarnaess, A.

    1985-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Overview of Offshore Steel Structures; Loads on Ocean Structures; Fracture Mechanics As a Tool in Fatigue Analysis; Basic Fatigue Properties of Welded Joints; Significance of Defects; Improving the Fatigue Strength of Welded Joints; Effects of Marine Environment and Cathodic Protection on Fatigue of Structural Steels Fatigue of Tubular Joints; Unstable Fracture; Fatigue Life Calculations; and Fatigue in Building Codes Background and Applications.

  11. Interlaboratory comparison of three microbial source tracking quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays from fecal-source and environmental samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stelzer, Erin A.; Strickler, Kriston M.; Schill, William B.

    2012-01-01

    During summer and early fall 2010, 15 river samples and 6 fecal-source samples were collected in West Virginia. These samples were analyzed by three laboratories for three microbial source tracking (MST) markers: AllBac, a general fecal indicator; BacHum, a human-associated fecal indicator; and BoBac, a ruminant-associated fecal indicator. MST markers were analyzed by means of the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method. The aim was to assess interlaboratory precision when the three laboratories used the same MST marker and shared deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracts of the samples, but different equipment, reagents, and analyst experience levels. The term assay refers to both the markers and the procedure differences listed above. Interlaboratory precision was best for all three MST assays when using the geometric mean absolute relative percent difference (ARPD) and Friedman's statistical test as a measure of interlaboratory precision. Adjustment factors (one for each MST assay) were calculated using results from fecal-source samples analyzed by all three laboratories and applied retrospectively to sample concentrations to account for differences in qPCR results among labs using different standards and procedures. Following the application of adjustment factors to qPCR results, ARPDs were lower; however, statistically significant differences between labs were still observed for the BacHum and BoBac assays. This was a small study and two of the MST assays had 52 percent of samples with concentrations at or below the limit of accurate quantification; hence, more testing could be done to determine if the adjustment factors would work better if the majority of sample concentrations were above the quantification limit.

  12. Fatigue performance of welded aluminum deck structures

    SciTech Connect

    Haagensen, P.J.; Ranes, M.; Kluken, A.O.; Kvale, I.

    1996-12-01

    Aluminum alloys are used increasingly in load carrying structures where low weight and low maintenance costs are at a premium. Helicopter decks, structures for living quarters and personnel transfer bridges between platforms are examples of offshore applications. While these structures are not usually subjected to high fatigue loads, the increasing use of aluminum in high speed ships, and more recently in highway bridge structures, makes the question of fatigue performance more important. In this paper the fatigue properties of small scale weldments in an AA6005 alloy are compared with the results of fatigue tests on full scale sections of welded extrusions in the same material, which were used in an aluminum bridge deck structure. The fatigue performance is also compared with the fatigue clauses in the new British design code BS8118 for aluminium structures and the proposed Eurocode 9. The prospects of using a new joining technique, friction stir welding (FSW), in the production of large scale panels for deck and ship hull structures is discussed. The FSW process is described briefly, and some fatigue test data are presented.

  13. Fatigue of tooth-colored restoratives in aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yoshiko; Takeshige, Fumio; Hayashi, Mikako; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction between mechanical and chemical fatigue in resin composites and dental ceramics, and the effects thereof on fatigue resistance of tooth-colored restoratives. To this end, the fatigue fracture resistance of restoratives under dry and aqueous conditions were analyzed by a dynamic fatigue crack propagation test using beam-shaped specimens with a precrack. Fatigue crack propagation characteristics were expressed by the correlation between fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) and stress intensity factor range (deltaK). In addition, fatigue crack growth threshold (deltaKth) was calculated. Following the fatigue test, a fractographic examination was performed using scanning electron microscopy. Fatigue crack initiation was retarded in resin composites under aqueous condition, but dental ceramics were susceptible to slow crack growth after crack initiation. SEM images of the fatigue facture surfaces reflected inorganic and organic filler particles of different sizes in composites and the bonding at crystal-glass interface in ceramics. It was concluded that water exerted different effects on the fatigue resistance of composites and ceramics.

  14. Developing Fatigue Pre-crack Procedure to Evaluate Fracture Toughness of Pipeline Steels Using Spiral Notch Torsion Test

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Tan, Ting; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2012-10-01

    The spiral notch torsion test (SNTT) has been utilized to investigate the crack growth behavior of X52 steel base and welded materials used for hydrogen infrastructures. The X52 steel materials are received from a welded pipe using friction stir welding techniques. Finite element models were established to study the crack growth behavior of steel SNTT steel samples, which were assumed to be isotropic material. A series SNTT models were set up to cover various crack penetration cases, of which the ratios between crack depth to diameter (a/D ratio) ranging from 0.10 to 0.45. The evolution of compliance and energy release rates in the SNTT method have been investigated with different cases, including different geometries and materials. Indices of characteristic compliance and energy release rates have been proposed. Good agreement has been achieved between predictions from different cases in the same trend. These work shed lights on a successful protocol for SNTT application in wide range of structural materials. The further effort needed for compliance function development is to extend the current developed compliance function to the deep crack penetration arena, in the range of 0.55 to 0.85 to effectively determine fracture toughness for extremely tough materials.

  15. Reliability on Intra-Laboratory and Inter-Laboratory Data of Hair Mineral Analysis Comparing with Blood Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Namkoong, Sun; Hong, Seung Phil; Kim, Myung Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Background Nowadays, although its clinical value remains controversial institutions utilize hair mineral analysis. Arguments about the reliability of hair mineral analysis persist, and there have been evaluations of commercial laboratories performing hair mineral analysis. Objective The objective of this study was to assess the reliability of intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory data at three commercial laboratories conducting hair mineral analysis, compared to serum mineral analysis. Methods Two divided hair samples taken from near the scalp were submitted for analysis at the same time, to all laboratories, from one healthy volunteer. Each laboratory sent a report consisting of quantitative results and their interpretation of health implications. Differences among intra-laboratory and interlaboratory data were analyzed using SPSS version 12.0 (SPSS Inc., USA). Results All the laboratories used identical methods for quantitative analysis, and they generated consistent numerical results according to Friedman analysis of variance. However, the normal reference ranges of each laboratory varied. As such, each laboratory interpreted the patient's health differently. On intra-laboratory data, Wilcoxon analysis suggested they generated relatively coherent data, but laboratory B could not in one element, so its reliability was doubtful. In comparison with the blood test, laboratory C generated identical results, but not laboratory A and B. Conclusion Hair mineral analysis has its limitations, considering the reliability of inter and intra laboratory analysis comparing with blood analysis. As such, clinicians should be cautious when applying hair mineral analysis as an ancillary tool. Each laboratory included in this study requires continuous refinement from now on for inducing standardized normal reference levels. PMID:23467102

  16. 14 CFR 35.37 - Fatigue limits and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.37 Fatigue limits and evaluation. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) Fatigue limits must be established by tests, or analysis based on tests, for propeller: (1) Hubs. (2) Blades. (3) Blade...

  17. 14 CFR 35.37 - Fatigue limits and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.37 Fatigue limits and evaluation. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) Fatigue limits must be established by tests, or analysis based on tests, for propeller: (1) Hubs. (2) Blades. (3) Blade...

  18. 14 CFR 35.37 - Fatigue limits and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.37 Fatigue limits and evaluation. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) Fatigue limits must be established by tests, or analysis based on tests, for propeller: (1) Hubs. (2) Blades. (3) Blade...

  19. 14 CFR 35.37 - Fatigue limits and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.37 Fatigue limits and evaluation. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) Fatigue limits must be established by tests, or analysis based on tests, for propeller: (1) Hubs. (2) Blades. (3) Blade...

  20. 14 CFR 35.37 - Fatigue limits and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.37 Fatigue limits and evaluation. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood propellers of conventional design. (a) Fatigue limits must be established by tests, or analysis based on tests, for propeller: (1) Hubs. (2) Blades. (3) Blade...

  1. Fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy-fractographic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, I.; Muhammad, W.; Ejaz, N.

    2016-08-01

    A two-fold approach was adopted to understand the fatigue crack growth process in an Aluminum alloy; fatigue crack growth test of samples and analysis of fractured surfaces. Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on middle tension M(T) samples prepared from an Aluminum alloy cylinder. The tests were conducted under constant amplitude loading at R ratio 0.1. The stress applied was from 20,30 and 40 per cent of the yield stress of the material. The fatigue crack growth data was recorded. After fatigue testing, the samples were subjected to detailed scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. The resulting fracture surfaces were subjected to qualitative and quantitative fractographic examinations. Quantitative fracture analysis included an estimation of crack growth rate (CGR) in different regions. The effect of the microstructural features on fatigue crack growth was examined. It was observed that in stage II (crack growth region), the failure mode changes from intergranular to transgranular as the stress level increases. In the region of intergranular failure the localized brittle failure was observed and fatigue striations are difficult to reveal. However, in the region of transgranular failure the crack path is independent of the microstructural features. In this region, localized ductile failure mode was observed and well defined fatigue striations were present in the wake of fatigue crack. The effect of interaction of growing fatigue crack with microstructural features was not substantial. The final fracture (stage III) was ductile in all the cases.

  2. Fatigue strength of adhesive bonded section beams under torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tomioka, Noboru; Kakiage, Masashi; Niisawa, Junetsu; Kitagawa, Hideo

    1995-11-01

    Fatigue strength of adhesive bonded box beams was investigated. From results of the fatigue tests, it was seen that the fatigue strength of bonded beams was higher than that of spot welded beams. Fatigue strength of bonded beams was independent of plate thickness and partition. The flexural rigidity of the box beams in the plane of partition can increase without decrease of torsional rigidity and torsional fatigue strength, if the partition is jointed by adhesive bonding instead of spot welding. Since the fatigue strength and rigidity of adhesive bonded joints can be higher than the spot welded joints in the weight saving structures, it is expected that the structural adhesive joints will be employed more in the automobile body structure. For assuring the introduction of this joint more into the automobile body structures, it is necessary that the fatigue tests on the model members of the actual members used in the automobile body structure are conducted, in addition to those of the simple joints such as tension shear and T-type tension, and the property of the fatigue strength on the adhesive bonded members is known. But, the authors now have little data on fatigue tests of the adhesive bonded members. In the present research to be reported, the fatigue tests on adhesive bonded box beams under torsion, which are typical members in automobile body structure, were carried out and the effects of the presence of longitudinal partition and plate thickness on fatigue strength were investigated. Comparing the results of fatigue tests on adhesive bonded box beams with those on spot welded box beams, the property of fatigue strength on these adhesive bonded box beams was cleared.

  3. Pre-trial inter-laboratory analytical validation of the FOCUS4 personalised therapy trial

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Susan D; Adams, Richard; Quirke, Phil; Butler, Rachel; Hemmings, Gemma; Chambers, Phil; Roberts, Helen; James, Michelle D; Wozniak, Sue; Bathia, Riya; Pugh, Cheryl; Maughan, Timothy; Jasani, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Molecular characterisation of tumours is increasing personalisation of cancer therapy, tailored to an individual and their cancer. FOCUS4 is a molecularly stratified clinical trial for patients with advanced colorectal cancer. During an initial 16-week period of standard first-line chemotherapy, tumour tissue will undergo several molecular assays, with the results used for cohort allocation, then randomisation. Laboratories in Leeds and Cardiff will perform the molecular testing. The results of a rigorous pre-trial inter-laboratory analytical validation are presented and discussed. Methods Wales Cancer Bank supplied FFPE tumour blocks from 97 mCRC patients with consent for use in further research. Both laboratories processed each sample according to an agreed definitive FOCUS4 laboratory protocol, reporting results directly to the MRC Trial Management Group for independent cross-referencing. Results Pyrosequencing analysis of mutation status at KRAS codons12/13/61/146, NRAS codons12/13/61, BRAF codon600 and PIK3CA codons542/545/546/1047, generated highly concordant results. Two samples gave discrepant results; in one a PIK3CA mutation was detected only in Leeds, and in the other, a PIK3CA mutation was only detected in Cardiff. pTEN and mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) resulting in 6/97 discordant results for pTEN and 5/388 for MMR, resolved upon joint review. Tumour heterogeneity was likely responsible for pyrosequencing discrepancies. The presence of signet-ring cells, necrosis, mucin, edge-effects and over-counterstaining influenced IHC discrepancies. Conclusions Pre-trial assay analytical validation is essential to ensure appropriate selection of patients for targeted therapies. This is feasible for both mutation testing and immunohistochemical assays and must be built into the workup of such trials. Trial registration number ISRCTN90061564. PMID:26350752

  4. Fatigue reliability based optimal design of planar compliant micropositioning stages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiliang; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-10-01

    Conventional compliant micropositioning stages are usually developed based on static strength and deterministic methods, which may lead to either unsafe or excessive designs. This paper presents a fatigue reliability analysis and optimal design of a three-degree-of-freedom (3 DOF) flexure-based micropositioning stage. Kinematic, modal, static, and fatigue stress modelling of the stage were conducted using the finite element method. The maximum equivalent fatigue stress in the hinges was derived using sequential quadratic programming. The fatigue strength of the hinges was obtained by considering various influencing factors. On this basis, the fatigue reliability of the hinges was analysed using the stress-strength interference method. Fatigue-reliability-based optimal design of the stage was then conducted using the genetic algorithm and MATLAB. To make fatigue life testing easier, a 1 DOF stage was then optimized and manufactured. Experimental results demonstrate the validity of the approach.

  5. Fatigue reliability based optimal design of planar compliant micropositioning stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiliang; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-10-01

    Conventional compliant micropositioning stages are usually developed based on static strength and deterministic methods, which may lead to either unsafe or excessive designs. This paper presents a fatigue reliability analysis and optimal design of a three-degree-of-freedom (3 DOF) flexure-based micropositioning stage. Kinematic, modal, static, and fatigue stress modelling of the stage were conducted using the finite element method. The maximum equivalent fatigue stress in the hinges was derived using sequential quadratic programming. The fatigue strength of the hinges was obtained by considering various influencing factors. On this basis, the fatigue reliability of the hinges was analysed using the stress-strength interference method. Fatigue-reliability-based optimal design of the stage was then conducted using the genetic algorithm and MATLAB. To make fatigue life testing easier, a 1 DOF stage was then optimized and manufactured. Experimental results demonstrate the validity of the approach.

  6. Fatigue reliability based optimal design of planar compliant micropositioning stages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiliang; Zhang, Xianmin

    2015-10-01

    Conventional compliant micropositioning stages are usually developed based on static strength and deterministic methods, which may lead to either unsafe or excessive designs. This paper presents a fatigue reliability analysis and optimal design of a three-degree-of-freedom (3 DOF) flexure-based micropositioning stage. Kinematic, modal, static, and fatigue stress modelling of the stage were conducted using the finite element method. The maximum equivalent fatigue stress in the hinges was derived using sequential quadratic programming. The fatigue strength of the hinges was obtained by considering various influencing factors. On this basis, the fatigue reliability of the hinges was analysed using the stress-strength interference method. Fatigue-reliability-based optimal design of the stage was then conducted using the genetic algorithm and MATLAB. To make fatigue life testing easier, a 1 DOF stage was then optimized and manufactured. Experimental results demonstrate the validity of the approach. PMID:26520994

  7. Low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of Ni-based alloy 230 at 850 C

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Yang, Zhiqing; Sokolov, Mikhail A; ERDMAN III, DONALD L; Mo, Kun; Stubbins, James

    2013-01-01

    Strain-controlled low cycle fatigue (LCF) and creep-fatigue testing of Ni-based alloy 230 were carried out at 850 C. The material creep-fatigue life decreased compared with its low cycle fatigue life at the same total strain range. Longer hold time at peak tensile strain further reduced the material creep-fatigue life. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction, a novel material deformation characterization method was applied, which revealed that in low cycle fatigue testing as the total strain range increased, the deformation was segregated to grain boundaries since the test temperature was higher than the material equicohesive temperature and grain boundaries became weaker regions compared with grains. Creep-fatigue tests enhanced the localized deformation, resulting in material interior intergranular cracking, and accelerated material damage. Precipitation in alloy 230 helped slip dispersion, favorable for fatigue property, but grain boundary cellular precipitates formed after material exposure to the elevated temperature had a deleterious effect on the material low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue property.

  8. Fatigue and fracture research in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Davidson, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Fatigue and fracture research on monolithic and laminated metals is discussed. The research concentrated on three areas: stress analyses of two and three dimensional cracked bodies, fatigue crack growth, and fracture toughness. Analytical methods were developed to predict fatigue crack growth and fracture strengths of cracked specimens. Such specimens represent typical aircraft structural details (such as cracks from holes). These specimens were subjected to simple constant amplitude loading and to more complex flight load histories. Test data from both in house tests and from the literature are used to substantiate the analytical methods. These analyses extended the theory of fracture mechanics to deal with fatigue crack growth and fracture of complex crack configurations that are typical of aircraft materials and structural details.

  9. Fatigue - corrosion of endoprosthesis titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Cornet, A; Muster, D; Jaeger, J H

    1979-01-01

    Commercial total hip prostheses often show certain metallurgical faults (porosities, coarse grains, growth dendrites, carbide networks). In order to investigate more accurately the role played by these different parameters in prostheses failure we performed a large number of systematic corrosion, fatigue and fatigue - corrosion tests on these materials and on commercial total hip prostheses. Ultimate strengthes seem to be reached for cast cobalt alloys, whereas titanium alloys, such as Ta 6 V, present very high fatigue limit under corrosion. Thus, rotative bending fatigue - corrosion tests in biological environment provide values about 50 DaN/mm2. This value, is nevertheless appreciably higher than those obtained with stellites and stainless steel. Titanium alloys, because of their mechanical performances, their weak Young's modulus (11000 DaN/mm2) and their relative lightness (4.5. g/cm3), which are associated with a good biocompatibility, seem very promising for permanent implants realisation.

  10. Fatigue of die cast zinc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, K.K.; Dogan, O.N.; Goodwin, F.E.

    2006-04-01

    The rotating bending fatigue limit of die cast zinc alloy 2, alloy 3, alloy 5, AcuZinc 5, and ZA-8 were determined as a part of an on-going program by ILZRO into the mechanical properties of die cast zinc. The stress-life (S-N) curves of alloys 3, 5, AcuZinc 5, and ZA-8 were determined previously. This presentation reports the results of the S-N curve for Alloy 2 and the calculated fatigue limits for all five alloys. During the previous stress-life testing, the samples were stopped at 10 million cycles and the fatigue limit for alloy 3, alloy 5, and AcuZinc 5 appeared to be higher and the fatigue limit for ZA-8 appeared to be lower than the values reported in the literature. This was further investigated in alloy 5 and ZA-8 by testing continuous cast bulk alloy 5 and ZA-8.

  11. Clinical neurophysiology of fatigue.

    PubMed

    Zwarts, M J; Bleijenberg, G; van Engelen, B G M

    2008-01-01

    Fatigue is a multidimensional concept covering both physiological and psychological aspects. Chronic fatigue is a typical symptom of diseases such as cancer, multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD) and cerebrovascular disorders but is also presented by people in whom no defined somatic disease has been established. If certain criteria are met, chronic fatigue syndrome can be diagnosed. The 4-item Abbreviated Fatigue Questionnaire allows the extent of the experienced fatigue to be assessed with a high degree of reliability and validity. Physiological fatigue has been well defined and originates in both the peripheral and central nervous system. The condition can be assessed by combining force and surface-EMG measurements (including frequency analyses and muscle-fibre conduction estimations), twitch interpolation, magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex and analysis of changes in the readiness potential. Fatigue is a well-known phenomenon in both central and peripheral neurological disorders. Examples of the former conditions are multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and stroke. Although it seems to be a universal symptom of many brain disorders, the unique characteristics of the concomitant fatigue also point to a specific relationship with several of these syndromes. As regards neuromuscular disorders, fatigue has been reported in patients with post-polio syndrome, myasthenia gravis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type-I. More than 60% of all neuromuscular patients suffer from severe fatigue, a prevalence resembling that of patients with MS. Except for several rare myopathies with specific metabolic derangements leading to exercise-induced muscle fatigue, most studies have not identified a prominent peripheral cause for the fatigue in this population. In contrast, the central activation of the diseased neuromuscular system is generally found to be suboptimal. The

  12. Intra- and inter-laboratory validation of an innovative huFcεRIα-RBL-2H3 degranulation assay for in vitro allergenicity assessment of whey hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Knipping, Karen; van Roest, Manon; Kruijssen, Laura; Smits, Mieke; Teunis, Marc; Cox, Linda; de Jong, Niels; Simons, Peter J; Boon, Louis; Teshima, Reiko; Gros, Marjan; Kegler, Diane; Garssen, Johan; Knippels, Léon M J; Pieters, Raymond

    2016-06-01

    Cow's milk-derived whey hydrolysates are milk substitutes for cow's milk allergic infants. Safety assessment of these hydrolysates is crucial. Currently, huFcεRIα-RBL-2H3 cells, sensitized with serum IgE from cow's milk allergic patients, are used to assess in vitro residual allergenicity. However, limited availability and high inter-lot variation of sera impede the standardization of safety testing. Recently, we generated an oligoclonal pool of chimeric human (chu)IgE antibodies against bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG) as an alternative for human serum. These antibodies demonstrated increased sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility. An inter-laboratory ring trial using our new degranulation assay with different whey-based hydrolysates was performed at four independent laboratories to investigate the robustness and reproducibility. RBL-2H3 cells expressing huFcεRIα were sensitized with our oligoclonal pool of anti-BLG chuIgE antibodies. The cells were subsequently incubated with an amino-acid based formula (AAF), two extensively hydrolyzed formulas (eHF) and three partially hydrolyzed formulas (pHF) to assess the degranulation upon challenge. Results demonstrated a very strong inter-laboratory correlation and the intra- and inter-laboratory variations were acceptable. The AAF and both eHFs showed no degranulation, whereas all pHFs demonstrated degranulation. The study showed that this degranulation assay is robust and reproducible within and between laboratories. This new in vitro degranulation assay seems predictive for allergenicity outcome and might therefore be considered as a relevant substitute for animal models. PMID:26921666

  13. Interlaboratory Validation of the Leaching Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) Method 1314 and Method 1315

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of an interlaboratory study conducted to generate precision estimates for two leaching methods under review by the U.S. EPA’s OSWER for inclusion into the EPA’s SW-846: Method 1314: Liquid-Solid Partitioning as a Function of Liquid...

  14. Inter-laboratory validation of standardized method to determine permeability of plastic films

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To support regulations controlling soil fumigation, we are standardizing the laboratory method we developed to measure the permeability of plastic films to fumigant vapors. The method was validated using an inter-laboratory comparison with 7 participants. Each participant evaluated the mass transfer...

  15. ORGANIC CHARACTERIZATION OF AIRBORNE PARTICLES: INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON STUDIES AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF STANDARDS AND REFERENCE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigators characterizing and quantifying the organic compounds in particulate matter (PM) have completed the second interlaboratory comparison study. The first study used a subset of SRM1649a sieved to <63um(API) as an unknown sample, an extract of API, and SRM1649a for u...

  16. Dynamic response and acoustic fatigue of stiffened composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soovere, J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of acoustic fatigue and dynamic response tests performed on L-1011 graphite-epoxy (GrE) aileron and panel components are reported. The aileron featured glass microballoons between the GrE skins. Tests yielded random fatigue data from double and single cantilever coupons and modal data from impedance hammer and loudspeaker impulses. Numerical and sample test data were obtained on combined acoustic and shear loads, acoustic and thermal loads, random fatigue and damping of the integrally stiffened and secondary bonded panels. The fatigue data indicate a fatigue life beyond 10 million cycles. The acoustic data suggested that noise transmission could be enhanced in the integrally stiffened panels, which were more acoustic-fatigue resistant than were the secondary bonded panels.

  17. Interlaboratory studies with the Chinese hamster V79 cell metabolic cooperation assay to detect tumor-promoting agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bohrman, J.S.; Burg, J.R.; Elmore, E.; Gulati, D.K.; Barfknecht, T.R.; Niemeier, R.W.; Dames, B.L.; Toraason, M.; Langenbach, R.

    1988-01-01

    Three laboratories participated in an interlaboratory study to evaluate the usefulness of the Chinese hamster V79 cell metabolic cooperation assay to predict the tumor-promoting activity of selected chemical. Twenty-three chemicals of different chemical structures (phorbol esters, barbiturates, phenols, artificial sweeteners, alkanes, and peroxides) were chosen for testing based on in vivo promotion activities, as reported in the literature. Assay protocols and materials were standardized, and the chemicals were coded to facilitate unbiased evaluation. A chemical was tested only once in each laboratory, with one of the three laboratories testing only 15 out of 23 chemicals. Dunnett's test was used for statistical analysis. Chemicals were scored as positive (at least two concentration levels statistically different than control), equivocal (only one concentration statistically different), or negative. For 15 chemicals tested in all three laboratories, there was complete agreement among the laboratories for nine chemicals. For the 23 chemicals tested in only two laboratories, there was agreement on 16 chemicals. With the exception of the peroxides and alkanes, the metabolic cooperation data were in general agreement with in vivo data. However, an overall evaluation of the V79 cell system for predicting in vivo promotion activity was difficult because of the organ specificity of certain chemicals and/or the limited number of adequately tested nonpromoting chemicals.

  18. Effect Of Solidification Speed On Fatigue Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, M. H.; Schmidt, D. D.; Hamilton, W. D.; Alter, W. S.; Parr, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    Fast solidification increases fatigue life, but failure distribution becomes less predictable. Report describes effects of rate of solidification on nickel-based super-alloy MAR-M246(Hf) used in turbine blades. Based on experiments in which specimens directionally solidified at 5 cm/h and 30 cm/h, then tested for high cycle fatigue. Specimens also inspected by energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis and optical and electron microscopy.

  19. Stereoscopic visual fatigue assessment and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Danli; Wang, Tingting; Gong, Yue

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of stereoscopic visual fatigue is one of the focuses in the user experience research. It is measured in either subjective or objective methods. Objective measures are more preferred for their capability to quantify the degree of human visual fatigue without being affected by individual variation. However, little research has been conducted on the integration of objective indicators, or the sensibility of each objective indicator in reflecting subjective fatigue. The paper proposes a simply effective method to evaluate visual fatigue more objectively. The stereoscopic viewing process is divided into series of sessions, after each of which viewers rate their visual fatigue with subjective scores (SS) according to a five-grading scale, followed by tests of the punctum maximum accommodation (PMA) and visual reaction time (VRT). Throughout the entire viewing process, their eye movements are recorded by an infrared camera. The pupil size (PS) and percentage of eyelid closure over the pupil over time (PERCLOS) are extracted from the videos processed by the algorithm. Based on the method, an experiment with 14 subjects was conducted to assess visual fatigue induced by 3D images on polarized 3D display. The experiment consisted of 10 sessions (5min per session), each containing the same 75 images displayed randomly. The results show that PMA, VRT and PERCLOS are the most efficient indicators of subjective visual fatigue and finally a predictive model is derived from the stepwise multiple regressions.

  20. Continuous fatigue crack monitoring of bridges: Long-Term Electrochemical Fatigue Sensor (LTEFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshier, Monty A.; Nelson, Levi; Brinkerhoff, Ryan; Miceli, Marybeth

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue cracks in steel bridges degrade the load-carrying capacity of these structures. Fatigue damage accumulation caused by the repetitive loading of everyday truck traffic can cause small fatigue cracks initiate. Understanding the growth of these fatigue cracks is critical to the safety and reliability of our transportation infrastructure. However, modeling fatigue in bridges is difficult due to the nature of the loading and variations in connection integrity. When fatigue cracks reach critical lengths failures occur causing partial or full closures, emergency repairs, and even full structural failure. Given the aging US highway and the trend towards asset management and life extension, the need for reliable, cost effective sensors and monitoring technologies to alert bridge owners when fatigue cracks are growing is higher than ever. In this study, an innovative Long-Term Electrochemical Fatigue Sensor (LTEFS) has been developed and introduced to meet the growing NDT marketplace demand for sensors that have the ability to continuously monitor fatigue cracks. The performance of the LTEFS has been studied in the laboratory and in the field. Data was collected using machined specimens with different lengths of naturally initiated fatigue cracks, applied stress levels, applied stress ratios, and for both sinusoidal and real-life bridge spectrum type loading. The laboratory data was evaluated and used to develop an empirically based algorithm used for crack detection. Additionally, beta-tests on a real bridge structure has been completed. These studies have conclusively demonstrated that LTEFS holds great potential for long-term monitoring of fatigue cracks in steel structures

  1. 40Ar/39Ar Interlaboratory Calibration into the Holocene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, M. T.; Jicha, B.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Miggins, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    differences in choosing data subsets leads to variable eruption age estimates between about 7.6±0.2 and 10.5±0.5 ka. Our collaborative efforts continue to show that overall the argon community is making very good progress towards achieving the Earthtime goal of high precision interlaboratory calibration.

  2. Mental fatigue induced by prolonged self-regulation does not exacerbate central fatigue during subsequent whole-body endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Pageaux, Benjamin; Marcora, Samuele M; Rozand, Vianney; Lepers, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that the mental fatigue induced by prolonged self-regulation increases perception of effort and reduces performance during subsequent endurance exercise. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying these negative effects of mental fatigue are unclear. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental fatigue exacerbates central fatigue induced by whole-body endurance exercise. Twelve subjects performed 30 min of either an incongruent Stroop task to induce a condition of mental fatigue or a congruent Stroop task (control condition) in a random and counterbalanced order. Both cognitive tasks (CTs) were followed by a whole-body endurance task (ET) consisting of 6 min of cycling exercise at 80% of peak power output measured during a preliminary incremental test. Neuromuscular function of the knee extensors was assessed before and after CT, and after ET. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was measured during ET. Both CTs did not induce any decrease in maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque (p = 0.194). During ET, mentally fatigued subjects reported higher RPE (mental fatigue 13.9 ± 3.0, control 13.3 ± 3.2, p = 0.044). ET induced a similar decrease in MVC torque (mental fatigue -17 ± 15%, control -15 ± 11%, p = 0.001), maximal voluntary activation level (mental fatigue -6 ± 9%, control -6 ± 7%, p = 0.013) and resting twitch (mental fatigue -30 ± 14%, control -32 ± 10%, p < 0.001) in both conditions. These findings reject our hypothesis and confirm previous findings that mental fatigue does not reduce the capacity of the central nervous system to recruit the working muscles. The negative effect of mental fatigue on perception of effort does not reflect a greater development of either central or peripheral fatigue. Consequently, mentally fatigued subjects are still able to perform maximal exercise, but they are experiencing an altered performance during submaximal exercise due to higher-than-normal perception of effort

  3. Inter-laboratory variation in DNA damage using a standard comet assay protocol.

    PubMed

    Forchhammer, Lykke; Ersson, Clara; Loft, Steffen; Möller, Lennart; Godschalk, Roger W L; van Schooten, Frederik J; Jones, George D D; Higgins, Jennifer A; Cooke, Marcus; Mistry, Vilas; Karbaschi, Mahsa; Collins, Andrew R; Azqueta, Amaya; Phillips, David H; Sozeri, Osman; Routledge, Michael N; Nelson-Smith, Kirsty; Riso, Patrizia; Porrini, Marisa; Matullo, Giuseppe; Allione, Alessandra; Stępnik, Maciej; Steepnik, Maciej; Komorowska, Magdalena; Teixeira, João Paulo; Costa, Solange; Corcuera, Laura-Ana; López de Cerain, Adela; Laffon, Blanca; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Møller, Peter

    2012-11-01

    There are substantial inter-laboratory variations in the levels of DNA damage measured by the comet assay. The aim of this study was to investigate whether adherence to a standard comet assay protocol would reduce inter-laboratory variation in reported values of DNA damage. Fourteen laboratories determined the baseline level of DNA strand breaks (SBs)/alkaline labile sites and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites in coded samples of mononuclear blood cells (MNBCs) from healthy volunteers. There were technical problems in seven laboratories in adopting the standard protocol, which were not related to the level of experience. Therefore, the inter-laboratory variation in DNA damage was only analysed using the results from laboratories that had obtained complete data with the standard comet assay protocol. This analysis showed that the differences between reported levels of DNA SBs/alkaline labile sites in MNBCs were not reduced by applying the standard assay protocol as compared with the laboratory's own protocol. There was large inter-laboratory variation in FPG-sensitive sites by the laboratory-specific protocol and the variation was reduced when the samples were analysed by the standard protocol. The SBs and FPG-sensitive sites were measured in the same experiment, indicating that the large spread in the latter lesions was the main reason for the reduced inter-laboratory variation. However, it remains worrying that half of the participating laboratories obtained poor results using the standard procedure. This study indicates that future comet assay validation trials should take steps to evaluate the implementation of standard procedures in participating laboratories.

  4. Interlaboratory comparison of four in vitro assays for assessing androgenic and antiandrogenic activity of environmental chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Wolfgang; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Térouanne, Béatrice; Ma, Risheng; Wieloch, Carise; Schlumpf, Margret; Sultan, Charles; Soto, Ana M

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated and compared four in vitro assays to detect androgen agonists and antagonists in an international interlaboratory study. Laboratory 1 used a cell proliferation assay (assay 1) with human mammary carcinoma cells stably transfected with human androgen receptor. The other laboratories used reporter gene assays, two based on stably transfected human prostate carcinoma cells (assay 2) or human mammary carcinoma cells (assay 4), and the third based on transient transfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells (assay 3). Four laboratories received four coded compounds and two controls: two steroidal androgens, two antiandrogens, an androgenic control, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and an antiandrogenic control, bicalutamide (ICI 176,334). All laboratories correctly detected the androgenic activity of 4-androsten-3,17-dione and 17alpha-methyltestosterone. For both compounds, the calculated androgenic potencies relative to the positive control (RAPs) remained within one order of magnitude. However, laboratory 3 calculated a 50-fold higher RAP for 4-androsten-3,17-dione. All assays detected and quantified the antiandrogenic effect of vinclozolin [median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values ranging from 1.1 times symbol 10(-7) M to 4.7 times symbol 10(-7) M]. In assays 2 and 3, vinclozolin showed partial androgenic activity at the highest concentrations tested. For vinclozolin, calculated antiandrogenic potencies relative to bicalutamide (RAAPs) differed no more than a factor of 10, and IC50 values matched those of bicalutamide. Similarly, we found antiandrogenic activity for tris-(4-chlorophenyl)methanol. RAAP values were between 0.086 and 0.37. Three assays showed cytotoxicity for this compound at or above 1 times symbol 10(-5) M. In summary, all assays proved sensitive screening tools to detect and quantify androgen receptor-mediated androgenic and antiandrogenic effects of these chemicals accurately, with coefficients of variation between 8 and 90%. PMID

  5. Interlaboratory study of the ion source memory effect in 36Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavetich, Stefan; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier; Buchriegler, Josef; Golser, Robin; Keddadouche, Karim; Martschini, Martin; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg; Steier, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Understanding and minimization of contaminations in the ion source due to cross-contamination and long-term memory effect is one of the key issues for accurate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of volatile elements. The focus of this work is on the investigation of the long-term memory effect for the volatile element chlorine, and the minimization of this effect in the ion source of the Dresden accelerator mass spectrometry facility (DREAMS). For this purpose, one of the two original HVE ion sources at the DREAMS facility was modified, allowing the use of larger sample holders having individual target apertures. Additionally, a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, an interlaboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect of the four Cs sputter ion sources at DREAMS (two sources: original and modified), ASTER (Accélérateur pour les Sciences de la Terre, Environnement, Risques) and VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) had been investigated by measuring samples of natural 35Cl/37Cl-ratio and samples highly-enriched in 35Cl (35Cl/37Cl ∼ 999). Besides investigating and comparing the individual levels of long-term memory, recovery time constants could be calculated. The tests show that all four sources suffer from long-term memory, but the modified DREAMS ion source showed the lowest level of contamination. The recovery times of the four ion sources were widely spread between 61 and 1390 s, where the modified DREAMS ion source with values between 156 and 262 s showed the fastest recovery in 80% of the measurements.

  6. Interlaboratory comparison of PCR-based identification of Candida and Aspergillus DNA in spiked blood samples.

    PubMed

    Reichard, Utz; Buchheidt, Dieter; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Loeffler, Juergen; Lugert, Raimond; Ruhnke, Markus; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Weig, Michael; Groß, Uwe

    2012-09-01

    Despite PCR per se being a powerful and sensitive technique, regarding the detection of fungi in patients' blood, no consensus for a standardised PCR protocol yet exists. To complement other ongoing or accomplished studies which tackle this problem, the German Reference Center for Systemic Mycoses conducted an interlaboratory comparison starting with blood samples spiked with fungal cell elements. Altogether, six laboratories using in-house PCR-protocols from Germany and Austria participated in the trial. Blood samples were spiked with vital cells of Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus. Candida was used in the yeast form, whereas Aspergillus cells were either spiked as conidia or as very young germlings, also known as smoo cells. Spiked blood samples contained between 10 and 10 000 cells ml(-1). Depending on the techniques used for fungal cell disruption and DNA-amplification, detection quality was variable between laboratories, but also differed within single laboratories in different trials particularly for samples spiked with less than 100 cells ml(-1). Altogether, at least regarding the detection of A. fumigatus, two of six laboratories showed constant reliable test results also with low fungal cell number spiked samples. Protocols used by these labs do not differ substantially from others. However, as particularities, one protocol included a conventional phenol chloroform extraction during the DNA preparation process and the other included a real time PCR-protocol based on FRET probes. Other laboratory comparisons on the basis of clinical samples should follow to further evaluate the procedures. The difficulties and problems of such trials in general are discussed.

  7. Development of a Universal Anti-Adalimumab Antibody Standard for Interlaboratory Harmonization

    PubMed Central

    Vande Casteele, Niels; Poppe, Raf; Van de Wouwer, Marlies; Compernolle, Griet; Peeters, Miet; Brouwers, Els; Vermeire, Séverine; Geukens, Nick; Declerck, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic drug monitoring of adalimumab (ADM) has been introduced recently. When no detectable ADM serum concentrations can be found, the formation of antidrug antibodies (ADA) should be investigated. A variety of assays to measure the occurrence of ADA have been developed. Results are expressed as arbitrary units or as a titration value. The aim was to develop a monoclonal antibody (MA) that could serve as a universal calibrator to quantify the amount of ADA in ADM-treated patients. Methods: Hybridoma technology was used to generate a MA toward ADM. The functionality of the MA was tested in a bridging enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) setup and in a cell-based assay. Sera from 25 anti–tumor necrosis factor naive patients with inflammatory bowel disease were used to determine the cutoff values. Sera from 9 ADM-treated patients with inflammatory bowel disease, with undetectable serum concentrations of ADM were used to quantify the ADA response. Results: In this study, MA-ADM6A10, an IgG1 that can be used as a calibrator in both an ELISA to quantify the amount of binding antibodies and in a cell-based assay to quantify the amount of neutralizing antibodies, was generated. Combining the results of both assays showed that the sera with high concentrations of anti-ADM binding antibodies also had the highest neutralizing capacity. Conclusions: The availability of a universal calibrator could facilitate the interlaboratory harmonization of antibody titers in patients who develop anti-adalimumab antibodies. PMID:24906181

  8. Interlaboratory comparison of PCR-based identification of Candida and Aspergillus DNA in spiked blood samples.

    PubMed

    Reichard, Utz; Buchheidt, Dieter; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Loeffler, Juergen; Lugert, Raimond; Ruhnke, Markus; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Weig, Michael; Groß, Uwe

    2012-09-01

    Despite PCR per se being a powerful and sensitive technique, regarding the detection of fungi in patients' blood, no consensus for a standardised PCR protocol yet exists. To complement other ongoing or accomplished studies which tackle this problem, the German Reference Center for Systemic Mycoses conducted an interlaboratory comparison starting with blood samples spiked with fungal cell elements. Altogether, six laboratories using in-house PCR-protocols from Germany and Austria participated in the trial. Blood samples were spiked with vital cells of Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus. Candida was used in the yeast form, whereas Aspergillus cells were either spiked as conidia or as very young germlings, also known as smoo cells. Spiked blood samples contained between 10 and 10 000 cells ml(-1). Depending on the techniques used for fungal cell disruption and DNA-amplification, detection quality was variable between laboratories, but also differed within single laboratories in different trials particularly for samples spiked with less than 100 cells ml(-1). Altogether, at least regarding the detection of A. fumigatus, two of six laboratories showed constant reliable test results also with low fungal cell number spiked samples. Protocols used by these labs do not differ substantially from others. However, as particularities, one protocol included a conventional phenol chloroform extraction during the DNA preparation process and the other included a real time PCR-protocol based on FRET probes. Other laboratory comparisons on the basis of clinical samples should follow to further evaluate the procedures. The difficulties and problems of such trials in general are discussed. PMID:22248125

  9. Low cycle fatigue in turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brun, M.

    1978-01-01

    Behavior of certain components at low-cycle fatigue is a parameter related to the conditions of use of turbines, to the technology of engine production and to the precision of its regulation. The laboratory takes this into account using data from sophisticated tests and rigorous analyses. The production plan includes careful examination of possible causes of premature rupture. This parameter has motivated the metallurgy industry to develop new materials and new technology.

  10. Chronic fatigue syndrome: aetiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Avellaneda Fernández, Alfredo; Pérez Martín, Alvaro; Izquierdo Martínez, Maravillas; Arruti Bustillo, Mar; Barbado Hernández, Francisco Javier; de la Cruz Labrado, Javier; Díaz-Delgado Peñas, Rafael; Gutiérrez Rivas, Eduardo; Palacín Delgado, Cecilia; Rivera Redondo, Javier; Ramón Giménez, José Ramón

    2009-10-23

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is characterised by intense fatigue, with duration of over six months and associated to other related symptoms. The latter include asthenia and easily induced tiredness that is not recovered after a night's sleep. The fatigue becomes so severe that it forces a 50% reduction in daily activities. Given its unknown aetiology, different hypotheses have been considered to explain the origin of the condition (from immunological disorders to the presence of post-traumatic oxidative stress), although there are no conclusive diagnostic tests. Diagnosis is established through the exclusion of other diseases causing fatigue. This syndrome is rare in childhood and adolescence, although the fatigue symptom per se is quite common in paediatric patients. Currently, no curative treatment exists for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. The therapeutic approach to this syndrome requires a combination of different therapeutic modalities. The specific characteristics of the symptomatology of patients with chronic fatigue require a rapid adaptation of the educational, healthcare and social systems to prevent the problems derived from current systems. Such patients require multidisciplinary management due to the multiple and different issues affecting them. This document was realized by one of the Interdisciplinary Work Groups from the Institute for Rare Diseases, and its aim is to point out the main social and care needs for people affected with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. For this, it includes not only the view of representatives for different scientific societies, but also the patient associations view, because they know the true history of their social and sanitary needs. In an interdisciplinary approach, this work also reviews the principal scientific, medical, socio-sanitary and psychological aspects of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

  11. Biomarkers of peripheral muscle fatigue during exercise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biomarkers of peripheral muscle fatigue (BPMFs) are used to offer insights into mechanisms of exhaustion during exercise in order to detect abnormal fatigue or to detect defective metabolic pathways. This review aims at describing recent advances and future perspectives concerning the most important biomarkers of muscle fatigue during exercise. Results BPMFs are classified according to the mechanism of fatigue related to adenosine-triphosphate-metabolism, acidosis, or oxidative-metabolism. Muscle fatigue is also related to an immunological response. impaired calcium handling, disturbances in bioenergetic pathways, and genetic responses. The immunological and genetic response may make the muscle susceptible to fatigue but may not directly cause muscle fatigue. Production of BPMFs is predominantly dependent on the type of exercise. BPMFs need to change as a function of the process being monitored, be stable without appreciable diurnal variations, correlate well with exercise intensity, and be present in detectable amounts in easily accessible biological fluids. The most well-known BPMFs are serum lactate and interleukin-6. The most widely applied clinical application is screening for defective oxidative metabolism in mitochondrial disorders by means of the lactate stress test. The clinical relevance of most other BPMFs, however, is under debate, since they often depend on age, gender, physical fitness, the energy supply during exercise, the type of exercise needed to produce the BPMF, and whether healthy or diseased subjects are investigated. Conclusions Though the role of BPMFs during fatigue is poorly understood, measuring BPMFs under specific, standardised conditions appears to be helpful for assessing biological states or processes during exercise and fatigue. PMID:23136874

  12. Chronic fatigue syndrome: aetiology, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Avellaneda Fernández, Alfredo; Pérez Martín, Álvaro; Izquierdo Martínez, Maravillas; Arruti Bustillo, Mar; Barbado Hernández, Francisco Javier; de la Cruz Labrado, Javier; Díaz-Delgado Peñas, Rafael; Gutiérrez Rivas, Eduardo; Palacín Delgado, Cecilia; Rivera Redondo, Javier; Ramón Giménez, José Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is characterised by intense fatigue, with duration of over six months and associated to other related symptoms. The latter include asthenia and easily induced tiredness that is not recovered after a night's sleep. The fatigue becomes so severe that it forces a 50% reduction in daily activities. Given its unknown aetiology, different hypotheses have been considered to explain the origin of the condition (from immunological disorders to the presence of post-traumatic oxidative stress), although there are no conclusive diagnostic tests. Diagnosis is established through the exclusion of other diseases causing fatigue. This syndrome is rare in childhood and adolescence, although the fatigue symptom per se is quite common in paediatric patients. Currently, no curative treatment exists for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. The therapeutic approach to this syndrome requires a combination of different therapeutic modalities. The specific characteristics of the symptomatology of patients with chronic fatigue require a rapid adaptation of the educational, healthcare and social systems to prevent the problems derived from current systems. Such patients require multidisciplinary management due to the multiple and different issues affecting them. This document was realized by one of the Interdisciplinary Work Groups from the Institute for Rare Diseases, and its aim is to point out the main social and care needs for people affected with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. For this, it includes not only the view of representatives for different scientific societies, but also the patient associations view, because they know the true history of their social and sanitary needs. In an interdisciplinary approach, this work also reviews the principal scientific, medical, socio-sanitary and psychological aspects of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. PMID:19857242

  13. Evidence for sensitized fatigue pathways in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Staud, Roland; Mokthech, Meriem; Price, Donald D; Robinson, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) frequently demonstrate intolerance to physical exertion that is often reported as increased and long-lasting fatigue. Because no specific metabolic alterations have been identified in CFS patients, we hypothesized that sensitized fatigue pathways become activated during exercise corresponding with increased fatigue. After exhausting handgrip exercise, muscle metabolites were trapped in the forearm tissues of 39 CFS patients and 29 normal control (NC) by sudden occlusion for up to 5 minutes. A nonocclusive condition of similar duration was used as control. Repeated fatigue and pain ratings were obtained before and after exercise. Mechanical and heat hyperalgesia were assessed by quantitative sensory testing. All subjects fulfilled the 1994 Fukuda Criteria for CFS. Normal control and CFS subjects exercised for 6.6 (2.4) and 7.0 (2.7) minutes (P > 0.05). Forearm occlusion lasted for 4.7 (1.3) and 4.9 (1.8) minutes in NC and CFS subjects, respectively (P > 0.05). Although fatigue ratings of CFS subjects increased from 4.8 (2.0) to 5.6 (2.1) visual analogue scale (VAS) units during forearm occlusion, they decreased from 5.0 (1.8) to 4.8 (2.0) VAS units during the control condition without occlusion (P = 0.04). A similar time course of fatigue ratings was observed in NC (P > 0.05), although their ratings were significantly lower than those of CFS subjects (P < 0.001). Quantitative sensory testing demonstrated heat and mechanical hyperalgesia in CFS subjects. Our findings provide indirect evidence for significant contributions of peripheral tissues to the increased exercise-related fatigue in CFS patients consistent with sensitization of fatigue pathways. Future interventions that reduce sensitization of fatigue pathways in CFS patients may be of therapeutic benefit.

  14. Reliability improvement of wire bonds subjected to fatigue stresses.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, K. V.; Philofsky, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    The failure of wire bonds due to repeated flexure when semiconductor devices are operated in an on-off mode has been investigated. An accelerated fatigue testing apparatus was constructed and the major fatigue variables, aluminum alloy composition, and bonding mechanism, were tested. The data showed Al-1% Mg wires to exhibit superior fatigue characteristics compared to Al-1% Cu or Al-1% Si and ultrasonic bonding to be better than thermocompression bonding for fatigue resistance. Based on these results highly reliable devices were fabricated using Al-1% Mg wire with ultrasonic bonding which withstood 120,000 power cycles with no failures.

  15. Tensile and fatigue behavior of tungsten/copper composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Kim, Y. S.

    1989-01-01

    Work on W/Cu unidirectional composites was initiated to study the behavior of this ductile-ductile composite system under thermomechanical fatigue and to examine the applicability of fatigue-life prediction methods for thermomechanical fatigue of this metal matrix composite. The first step was to characterize the tensile behavior of four ply, 10 vol. percent W/Cu plates at room and elevated temperatures. Fatigue tests were conducted in load control on 0 degree specimens at 260 C. The maximum cyclic stress was varied but the minimum cyclic stress was kept constant. All tests were performed in vacuum. The strain at failure increased with increasing maximum cyclic stress.

  16. An interlaboratory comparison of nanosilver characterisation and hazard identification: Harmonising techniques for high quality data.

    PubMed

    Jemec, Anita; Kahru, Anne; Potthoff, Annegret; Drobne, Damjana; Heinlaan, Margit; Böhme, Steffi; Geppert, Mark; Novak, Sara; Schirmer, Kristin; Rekulapally, Rohit; Singh, Shashi; Aruoja, Villem; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Juganson, Katre; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Kühnel, Dana

    2016-02-01

    metal ions species in each toxicity test medium at a range of concentrations, and (ii) including soluble metal salt control both in toxicity testing as well as in Ag(+)-species measurements. The present study is among the first nanomaterial interlaboratory comparison studies with the aim to improve the hazard identification testing protocols.

  17. An interlaboratory comparison of nanosilver characterisation and hazard identification: Harmonising techniques for high quality data.

    PubMed

    Jemec, Anita; Kahru, Anne; Potthoff, Annegret; Drobne, Damjana; Heinlaan, Margit; Böhme, Steffi; Geppert, Mark; Novak, Sara; Schirmer, Kristin; Rekulapally, Rohit; Singh, Shashi; Aruoja, Villem; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Juganson, Katre; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Kühnel, Dana

    2016-02-01

    metal ions species in each toxicity test medium at a range of concentrations, and (ii) including soluble metal salt control both in toxicity testing as well as in Ag(+)-species measurements. The present study is among the first nanomaterial interlaboratory comparison studies with the aim to improve the hazard identification testing protocols. PMID:26638016

  18. Detecting Gear Tooth Fatigue Cracks in Advance of Complete Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Lewicki, David G.

    1996-01-01

    Results of using vibration-based methods to detect gear tooth fatigue cracks are presented. An experimental test rig was used to fail a number of spur gear specimens through bending fatigue. The gear tooth fatigue crack in each test was initiated through a small notch in the fillet area of a tooth on the gear. The primary purpose of these tests was to verify analytical predictions of fatigue crack propagation direction and rate as a function of gear rim thickness. The vibration signal from a total of three tests was monitored and recorded for gear fault detection research. The damage consisted of complete rim fracture on the two thin rim gears and single tooth fracture on the standard full rim test gear. Vibration-based fault detection methods were applied to the vibration signal both on-line and after the tests were completed. The objectives of this effort were to identify methods capable of detecting the fatigue crack and to determine how far in advance of total failure positive detection was given. Results show that the fault detection methods failed to respond to the fatigue crack prior to complete rim fracture in the thin rim gear tests. In the standard full rim gear test all of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in advance of tooth fracture; however, only three of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in the early stages of crack propagation.

  19. High temperature fatigue behavior of tungsten copper composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, M. J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Gabb, T. P.

    1990-01-01

    The present study investigates the high-temperature fatigue behavior of a 9-v/o tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite. Load-controlled isothermal fatigue at 260 and 560 C and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) experiments, both in-phase and out-of-phase between 260 and 560 C, were performed. The stress-strain response under all conditions displayed considerable inelasticity. Strain ratchetting was observed during all the fatigue experiments. For the isothermal fatigue and in-phase TMF tests, the ratchetting was always in a tensile direction, continuing until failure. The ratchetting during the out-of-phase TMF test shifted from a tensile to a compressive direction. For all cases, the fatigue lives were found to be controlled by the damage of the copper matrix. On a stress basis, TMF loading substantially reduced lives relative to isothermal cycling.

  20. Interconnect fatigue design for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Mon, G. R.; Moore, D. M.; Ross, Jr., R. G.

    1982-03-01

    Fatigue of solar cell electrical interconnects due to thermal cycling has historically been a major failure mechanism in photovoltaic arrays; the results of a comprehensive investigation of interconnect fatigue that has led to the definition of useful reliability-design and life-prediction algorithms are presented. Experimental data gathered in this study indicate that the classical strain-cycle (fatigue) curve for the interconnect material is a good model of mean interconnect fatigue performance, but it fails to account for the broad statistical scatter, which is critical to reliability prediction. To fill this shortcoming the classical fatigue curve is combined with experimental cumulative interconnect failure rate data to yield statistical fatigue curves (having failure probability as a parameter) which enable: (1) the prediction of cumulative interconnect failures during the design life of an array field; and (2) the unambiguous - i.e., quantitative - interpretation of data from field-service qualification (accelerated thermal cycling) tests. Optimal interconnect cost-reliability design algorithms are derived based on minimizing the cost of energy over the design life of the array field. This procedure yields not only the minimum break-even cost of delivered energy, but also the required degree of interconnect redundancy and an estimate of array power degradation during the design life of the array field. The usefulness of the design algorithms is demonstrated with realistic examples of design optimization, prediction, and service qualification testing.

  1. Aerodynamic Heating and Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, Wilhelmina D.

    1959-01-01

    A review of the physical condition's under which future airplanes will operate has been made and the necessity for considering fatigue in the design has been established. A survey of the literature shows what phases of elevated-temperature fatigue have been investigated. Other studies that would yield data of particular interest to the designer of aircraft structures are indicated.

  2. Investigation of fatigue strength of multilayer advanced fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, H. R.; Kozik, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    The analytical characterization of a multilayer fiber composite plate (without hole) was accomplished for both static and dynamic loading conditions using the finite difference technique. Thornel 300/5208 composites with and without holes were subjected to static and tensile fatigue testing. Five (5) fiber orientations were submitted to test. Tensile fatigue testing also included three (3) loading conditions and two (2) frequencies. The low-cycle test specimens demonstrated a shorter tensile fatigue life than the high-cycle test specimens. Failure surfaces demonstrated effect of testing conditions. Secondary failure mechanisms, such as: delamination, fiber breakage, and edge fiber delamination were present. Longitudinal delamination between plies also occurred in these specimens.

  3. The Effects of Hot Corrosion Pits on the Fatigue Resistance of a Disk Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Hazel, Brian; Mourer, David P.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of hot corrosion pits on low cycle fatigue life and failure modes of the disk superalloy ME3 were investigated. Low cycle fatigue specimens were subjected to hot corrosion exposures producing pits, then tested at low and high temperatures. Fatigue lives and failure initiation points were compared to those of specimens without corrosion pits. Several tests were interrupted to estimate the fraction of fatigue life that fatigue cracks initiated at pits. Corrosion pits significantly reduced fatigue life by 60 to 98 percent. Fatigue cracks initiated at a very small fraction of life for high temperature tests, but initiated at higher fractions in tests at low temperature. Critical pit sizes required to promote fatigue cracking were estimated, based on measurements of pits initiating cracks on fracture surfaces.

  4. The neural mechanisms of re-experiencing mental fatigue sensation: a magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Akira; Karasuyama, Takuma; Kikuchi, Taiki; Tanaka, Masaaki; Yamano, Emi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    There have been several studies which have tried to clarify the neural mechanisms of fatigue sensation; however fatigue sensation has multiple aspects. We hypothesized that past experience related to fatigue sensation is an important factor which contributes to future formation of fatigue sensation through the transfer to memories that are located within specific brain structures. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the neural mechanisms of fatigue sensation related to memory. In the present study, we investigated the neural activity caused by re-experiencing the fatigue sensation that had been experienced during a fatigue-inducing session. Thirteen healthy volunteers participated in fatigue and non-fatigue experiments in a crossover fashion. In the fatigue experiment, they performed a 2-back test session for 40 min to induce fatigue sensation, a rest session for 15 min to recover from fatigue, and a magnetoencephalography (MEG) session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body with fatigue that they had experienced in the 2-back test session. In the non-fatigue experiment, the participants performed a free session for 15 min, a rest session for 15 min, and an MEG session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body without fatigue that they had experienced in the free session. Spatial filtering analyses of oscillatory brain activity showed that the delta band power in the left Brodmann's area (BA) 39, alpha band power in the right pulvinar nucleus and the left BA 40, and beta band power in the left BA 40 were lower when they re-experienced the fatigue sensation than when they re-experienced the fatigue-free sensation, indicating that these brain regions are related to re-experiencing the fatigue sensation. Our findings may help clarify the neural mechanisms underlying fatigue sensation.

  5. Fatigue life prediction under service load considering strengthening effect of loads below fatigue limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lihui; Zheng, Songlin; Feng, Jinzhi

    2014-11-01

    Lightweight design requires an accurate life prediction for structures and components under service loading histories. However, predicted life with the existing methods seems too conservative in some cases, leading to a heavy structure. Because these methods are established on the basis that load cycles would only cause fatigue damage, ignore the strengthening effect of loads. Based on Palmgren-Miner Rule (PMR), this paper introduces a new method for fatigue life prediction under service loadings by taking into account the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit. In this method, the service loadings are classified into three categories: damaging load, strengthening load and none-effect load, and the process for fatigue life prediction is divided into two stages: stage I and stage II, according to the best strengthening number of cycles. During stage I, fatigue damage is calculated considering both the strengthening and damaging effect of load cycles. While during stage II, only the damaging effect is considered. To validate this method, fatigue lives of automobile half shaft and torsion beam rear axle are calculated based on the new method and traditional methods, such as PMR and Modified Miner Rule (MMR), and fatigue tests of the two components are conducted under service loading histories. The tests results show that the percentage errors of the predicted life with the new method to mean life of tests for the two components are -3.78% and -1.76% separately, much lesser than that with PMR and MMR. By considering the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit, the new method can significantly improve the accuracy for fatigue life prediction. Thus lightweight design can be fully realized in the design stage.

  6. Review of sonic fatigue technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarkson, B. L.

    1994-01-01

    From the early-1960s until the mid-1980s, there was very little theoretical development for sonic fatigue prediction. Design nomographs based on simple theoretical models and results of specially designed tests were developed for most common aircraft structures. The use of advanced composites in the 1980s, however, generated an increased interest in development of more sophisticated theoretical models because of the possibilities for a much wider range of structural designs. The purpose of this report is to review sonic fatigue technology and, in particular, to assess recent developments. It also suggests a plan for a coordinated program of theoretical and experimental work to meet the anticipated needs of future aerospace vehicles.

  7. Accelerated fatigue durability of a high performance composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotem, A.

    1982-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of multidirectional graphite-epoxy laminates was analyzed theoretically and experimentally in an effort to establish an accelerated testing methodology. Analysis of the failure mechanism in fatigue of the laminates led to the determination of the failure mode governing fracture. The nonlinear, cyclic-dependent shear modulus was used to calculate the changing stress field in the laminate during the fatigue loading. Fatigue tests were performed at three different temperatures: 25 C, 74 C, and 114 C. The prediction of the S-N curves was made based on the artificial static strength artificial static strength at a reference temperature and the fatigue functions associated with them. The prediction of an S-N curve at other temperatures was performed using shifting factors determined for the specific failure mode. For multidirectional laminates, different S-N curves at different temperatures could be predicted using these shifting factors. Different S-N curves at different temperatures occur only when the fatigue failure mode is matrix dominated. It was found that whenever the fatigue failure mode is fiber dominated, temperature, over the range investigated, had no influence on the fatigue life. These results permit the prediction of long-time, low temperature fatigue behavior from data obtained in short time, high temperature testing, for laminates governed by a matrix failure mode.

  8. Analysis of the interlaboratory and intralaboratory reproducibility of the enhancement of simian adenovirus SA7 transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells by model carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic compounds.

    PubMed

    Schechtman, L M; Hatch, G G; Anderson, T M; Putman, D L; Kouri, R E; Cameron, J W; Nims, R W; Spalding, J W; Tennant, R W; Lubet, R A

    1986-01-01

    The intralaboratory and interlaboratory reproducibility of a DNA virus (SA7) transformation enhancement assay was investigated using nine carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic compounds representing a variety of chemical classes. By the use of standardized procedures designed to limit assay variables, replicate assay data were collected in two independent laboratories and analyzed for concurrence. The carcinogens, 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene, and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine yielded reproducible dose-dependent cytotoxicity and positive transformation effects (defined as statistically significant [p less than or equal to 0.05] enhancement of virus transformation at two or more consecutive dose levels) in all experiments in both laboratories. The carcinogens lead chromate, diethylnitrosamine, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, and 2-acetylaminofluorene demonstrated enhancement of SA7 transformation at two or more dose levels in 40-50% of the assays. The noncarcinogenic structural analogs anthracene and pyrene consistently did not produce positive assay responses when tested at dose levels up to the limits of solubility. Good interlaboratory concurrence was demonstrated for these model compounds in the Syrian hamster embryo cell-SA7 assay. PMID:3089771

  9. Shear fatigue crack growth - A literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies of shear crack growth are reviewed, emphasizing test methods and data analyses. The combined mode I and mode II elastic crack tip stress fields are considered. The development and design of the compact shear specimen are described, and the results of fatigue crack growth tests using compact shear specimens are reviewed. The fatigue crack growth tests are discussed and the results of inclined cracks in tensile panels, center cracks in plates under biaxial loading, cracked beam specimens with combined bending and shear loading, center-cracked panels and double edge-cracked plates under cyclic shear loading are examined and analyzed in detail.

  10. Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth in aircraft engine materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yi

    1993-05-01

    A thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) testing rig was built which is capable of studying the fatigue behaviors of gas turbine engine materials under simultaneous changes of temperatures and strains or stress. An advance alternating current potential drop (ACPD) measurement system was also developed which is capable of performing on-line monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and growth in specimen testing under isothermal and TMF conditions. Fatigue crack initiation and short crack growth data were obtained for titanium alloy specimens designed with notch features associated with bolt holes of compressor discs. TMF data were also obtained for two titanium alloys used in aircraft engine components. Those data explained the material fatigue behavior encountered in full-scale component testing. A complete fractographic analysis was performed on the tested specimens enhancing the understanding of the fatigue crack growth mechanisms and helping to formulate an analytical crack growth model. The ACPD fatigue crack monitoring technique was applied to the low cycle fatigue testing of Pratt & Whitney 1480 monocrystalline nickel alloy. A completely automated, computer controlled test procedure was developed which could obtain crack initiation and growth data with greater speed, precision, and reliability than previous methods.

  11. Piezoelectric Bolt Breakers and Bolt Fatigue Testers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Barengoltz, Jack; Heckman, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    A proposed family of devices for inducing fatigue in bolts in order to break the bolts would incorporate piezoelectric actuators into resonant fixtures as in ultrasonic/ sonic drills/corers and similar devices described in numerous prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. These devices were originally intended primarily for use as safer, more-reliable, more-versatile alternatives to explosive bolts heretofore used to fasten spacecraft structures that must subsequently be separated from each other quickly on command during flight. On Earth, these devices could be used for accelerated fatigue testing of bolts. Fatigue theory suggests that a bolt subjected to both a constant-amplitude dynamic (that is, oscillatory) stress and a static tensile stress below the ultimate strength of the bolt material will fail faster than will a bolt subjected to only the dynamic stress. This suggestion would be applied in a device of the proposed type. The device would be designed so that the device and the bolt to be fatigue-tested or broken would be integral parts of an assembly (see figure). The static tension in the tightened bolt would apply not only the clamping force to hold the joined structures (if any) together but also the compression necessary for proper operation of the piezoelectric actuators as parts of a resonant structural assembly. The constant-amplitude dynamic stress would be applied to the bolt by driving the piezoelectric actuators with a sinusoidal voltage at the resonance frequency of longitudinal vibration of the assembly. The amplitude of the excitation would be made large enough so that the vibration would induce fatigue in the bolt within an acceptably short time. In the spacecraft applications or in similar terrestrial structural-separation applications, devices of the proposed type would offer several advantages over explosive bolts: Unlike explosive bolts, the proposed devices would be reusable, could be tested before final use, and would not be subject to

  12. Fatigue Strength Prediction of Drilling Materials Based on the Maximum Non-metallic Inclusion Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Dezhi; Tian, Gang; Liu, Fei; Shi, Taihe; Zhang, Zhi; Hu, Junying; Liu, Wanying; Ouyang, Zhiying

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the statistics of the size distribution of non-metallic inclusions in five drilling materials were performed. Based on the maximum non-metallic inclusion size, the fatigue strength of the drilling material was predicted. The sizes of non-metallic inclusions in drilling materials were observed to follow the inclusion size distribution rule. Then the maximum inclusion size in the fatigue specimens was deduced. According to the prediction equation of the maximum inclusion size and fatigue strength proposed by Murakami, fatigue strength of drilling materials was obtained. Moreover, fatigue strength was also measured through rotating bending tests. The predicted fatigue strength was significantly lower than the measured one. Therefore, according to the comparison results, the coefficients in the prediction equation were revised. The revised equation allowed the satisfactory prediction results of fatigue strength of drilling materials at the fatigue life of 107 rotations and could be used in the fast prediction of fatigue strength of drilling materials.

  13. Energy-based fatigue model for shape memory alloys including thermomechanical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yahui; Zhu, Jihong; Moumni, Ziad; Van Herpen, Alain; Zhang, Weihong

    2016-03-01

    This paper is aimed at developing a low cycle fatigue criterion for pseudoelastic shape memory alloys to take into account thermomechanical coupling. To this end, fatigue tests are carried out at different loading rates under strain control at room temperature using NiTi wires. Temperature distribution on the specimen is measured using a high speed thermal camera. Specimens are tested to failure and fatigue lifetimes of specimens are measured. Test results show that the fatigue lifetime is greatly influenced by the loading rate: as the strain rate increases, the fatigue lifetime decreases. Furthermore, it is shown that the fatigue cracks initiate when the stored energy inside the material reaches a critical value. An energy-based fatigue criterion is thus proposed as a function of the irreversible hysteresis energy of the stabilized cycle and the loading rate. Fatigue life is calculated using the proposed model. The experimental and computational results compare well.

  14. Fatigue and creep-fatigue deformation of several nickel-base superalloys at 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V.; Gayda, J.; Maier, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to study the bulk deformation characteristics of seven nickel-base superalloys tested in fatigue and creep-fatigue at 650 C. The alloys were Waspalloy, HIP Astroloy, H plus F Astroloy, H plus F Rene 95, IN 100, MERL 76, and NASA IIB-7. The amount of bulk deformation observed in all the alloys was low. In tests with inelastic strain amplitudes less than about 0.003, only some grains exhibited yielding and the majority of those had the 110 line near the tensile axis. Deformation occurred on octahedral systems for all of the alloys except MERL 76 which also showed abundant primary cube slip. Creep-fatigue cycling occasionally produced extended faults between partial dislocations, but otherwise deformation was much the same as for fatigue cycling.

  15. High temperature multiaxial low cycle fatigue of cruciform specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Takamoto . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Sakane, Masao; Ohnami, Masateru . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes high temperature multiaxial low cycle fatigue lives of type SUS304 stainless steel and 1Cr-1Mo-1/4V steel cruciform specimens at 923 K and 823 K in air. Strain controlled multiaxial low cycle fatigue tests were carried out using cruciform specimens at the principal strain ratios between [minus]1 and 1. The principal strain ratio had a significant effect on low cycle fatigue lives. Fatigue lives drastically decreased as the principal strain ratio increased. Multiaxial low cycle fatigue strain parameters were applied to the experimental data and the applicability of the parameter was discussed. The equivalent strain based on crack opening displacement (COD strain) developed in the paper and [Gamma][sup *] -- plane parameter successfully predicted multiaxial low cycle fatigue lives. The crack morphology was also extensively discussed from not only the surface crack direction but also the crack inclination into the specimen.

  16. Corrosion fatigue behavior of carbon steel in drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Chaoyang, F.; Jiashen, Z.

    1998-08-01

    Corrosion fatigue of carbon steel (CS) in drilling fluids was studied using a self-made rotary bending corrosion fatigue testing apparatus under simulated drilling conditions. Mechanisms of the effects of cyclic stress, chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}), sulfide (S{sup 2{minus}}), and pH of drilling fluids on corrosion fatigue of CS as well as the inhibiting action of the imidazoline inhibitor and oxygen (O{sub 2}) scavenger sodium sulfite (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}) on corrosion fatigue were studied. Results showed Cl{sup {minus}} and S{sup 2{minus}} promoted corrosion fatigue crack initiation and growth. Fatigue life was lengthened after reducing subjected stress, increasing the pH of the drilling fluids, or adding the inhibitor and O{sub 2} scavenger.

  17. The effects of mats on back and leg fatigue.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Stuart-Buttle, C; Marras, W S

    1994-02-01

    Prolonged standing is common in many industrial workplaces. It is also quite common for workers to complain of discomfort in the back and legs as a result of prolonged standing. Mats are often provided for the worker to relieve this fatigue. However, there is no quantitative evidence that these mats relieve leg and back fatigue. Five subjects were asked to stand on a concrete surface and two mat surfaces for prolonged periods of time. Spectral electromyographic analyses indicated that mats reduced localized muscle fatigue in the erector spinae muscle only. Furthermore, this fatigue reduction occurred only with the more compressible of the two mats tested. These results imply that localized muscular fatigue in the leg may not be relieved with 'anti-fatigue' mats, and some of these mats only benefit the back. PMID:15676945

  18. The fatigue strength of riveted joints and lugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schijve, J

    1956-01-01

    This report deals with a number of tests on riveted joints and lugs for the primary purpose of comparing the several types of riveted joints and to study the effect of various factors on the fatigue strength of lugs. A check was made to ascertain whether or not an estimate of the fatigue life at a certain loading could be made from the dimensions of the joint and the fatigue data of the unnotched materials. Recommendations are made on the proportioning of joints to obtain better fatigue behavior.

  19. Fatigue life prediction for carbon-epoxy composite design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, B. D.

    A simple design method for the prediction of fatigue life for long fiber carbon-epoxy composites with multi-angular lay-ups is presented. The approach, based in part on the traditional metallic method of fatigue life prediction, can be applied to fully tensile, fully compressive or part-tensile part-compressive loading of either constant or variable amplitude. Predictions produced by the method are compared with extensive data from fatigue tests on XAS/914C material for both relatively fatigue-sensitive and -insensitive lay-ups.

  20. High-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of a Nicalon(tm)/Si-N-C Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Kantzos, Peter T.

    1999-01-01

    Elevated temperature, high-cycle fatigue behavior of a woven SiC/Si-N-C ceramic matrix composite system was investigated at 910 C. High frequency (100 Hz) fatigue tests were conducted in air on specimens machined from the composite system, A power-law type fatigue life relationship adequately characterized the high-cycle fatigue data generated in the study. Post failure fractographic and metallographic studies were performed to document the fatigue crack initiation regions and damage mechanisms in the composite system. Fatigue cracks initiated primarily from the corners of the specimens and propagated along the 90 degree fiber tows.

  1. Ultrasonic Fatigue Endurance of Thin Carbon Fiber Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez Almaraz, Gonzalo M.; Ruiz Vilchez, Julio A.; Dominguez, Aymeric; Meyer, Yann

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic fatigue tests were carried out on thin carbon fiber sheets (0.3 mm of thickness) to determine the fatigue endurance under very high-frequency loading (20 kHz). This material, called the gas diffusion layer (GDL), plays a major role in the overall performances of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The study of its physical-chemical properties is an on-going subject in the literature; nevertheless, no knowledge is available concerning the high-frequency fatigue endurance. A principal difficulty in carrying out ultrasonic fatigue tests on this material was to determine the dimensions of testing specimen to fit the resonance condition. This aspect was solved by modal numerical simulation: The testing specimen has been a combination of a low-strength steel frame (to facilitate the attachment to the ultrasonic machine and to increase the mass of the specimen), and the carbon fiber hourglass-shape profile. Under resonance condition, a stationary elastic wave is generated along the specimen that induces high stress at the neck section and high displacements at the ends. Results show that fatigue life was close to 3 × 108 cycles when the high Von Misses stress at the neck section was 170 MPa, whereas fatigue life attains the 4.5 × 109 cycles when stress decreases to 117 MPa. Crack initiation and propagation were analyzed, and conclusions were drawn concerning the fatigue endurance of these fiber carbon sheets under ultrasonic fatigue testing.

  2. Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth in aircraft engine materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yi

    1993-08-01

    This thesis summarizes the major technical achievements obtained as a part of a collaborative research and development project between Ecole Polytechnique and Pratt & Whitney Canada. These achievements include: (1) a thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) testing rig which is capable of studying the fatigue behaviors of gas turbine materials under simultaneous changes of temperatures and strains or stress; (2) an advanced alternative current potential drop (ACPD) measurement system which is capable of performing on-line monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and growth in specimen testing under isothermal and TMF conditions; (3) fatigue crack initiation and short crack growth data for the titanium specimens designed with notch features associated with bolt holes of compressor discs; (4) thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth data for two titanium alloys being used in PWC engine components, which explained the material fatigue behavior encountered in full-scale component testing; (5) a complete fractographic analysis for the tested specimens which enhanced the understanding of the fatigue crack growth mechanisms and helped to establish an analytical crack growth model; and (6) application of the ACPD fatigue crack monitoring technique to single tooth firtree specimen (STFT) LCF testing of PWA 1480 single crystal alloy. Finally, a comprehensive discussion concerning the results pertaining to this research project is presented.

  3. Results of interlaboratory comparison of fission track ages for 1992 fission track workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, D.S.; Crowley, K.D.; Dokka, R.K.; Galbraith, R.F.; Kowallis, B.J.; Naeser, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    Two apatites and one sphene were made available to the fission track research community for analysis prior to the 1992 Fission Track Workshop held in Philadelphia, U.S.A., 13-17 July. Eighteen laboratories throughout the world received aliquots of apatite and sphene. To date, analyses by 33 different scientists have been representing 15 different laboratories. With respect to the previous two interlaboratory comparisons, there is a noticeable improvement in the accuracy of the age results (Naeser and Cebula, 1978; Naeser et al., 1981; Miller et al., 1985;Miller et al.1990). Ninety-four percent of the analysis used the external detector method (EDM) combined with the zeta technique while the remaining individuals used the population method (POP). Track length measurements (requested for the first time in the interlaboratory comparison studies) were in relatively good agreement. ?? 1993.

  4. Inter-laboratory comparison of the in vivo comet assay including three image analysis systems.

    PubMed

    Plappert-Helbig, Ulla; Guérard, Melanie

    2015-12-01

    To compare the extent of potential inter-laboratory variability and the influence of different comet image analysis systems, in vivo comet experiments were conducted using the genotoxicants ethyl methanesulfonate and methyl methanesulfonate. Tissue samples from the same animals were processed and analyzed-including independent slide evaluation by image analysis-in two laboratories with extensive experience in performing the comet assay. The analysis revealed low inter-laboratory experimental variability. Neither the use of different image analysis systems, nor the staining procedure of DNA (propidium iodide vs. SYBR® Gold), considerably impacted the results or sensitivity of the assay. In addition, relatively high stability of the staining intensity of propidium iodide-stained slides was found in slides that were refrigerated for over 3 months. In conclusion, following a thoroughly defined protocol and standardized routine procedures ensures that the comet assay is robust and generates comparable results between different laboratories.

  5. The measurement of fatigue: a new instrument.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J E; Jandorf, L; Krupp, L B

    1993-10-01

    Fatigue is a frequent medical symptom which has not been routinely measured. We present a 29-item fatigue assessment instrument, describe its psychometric properties, and use it to differentiate normal fatigue from fatigue related medical disorders. Differences in fatigue across a variety of medical disorders, the reproducibility of the fatigue instrument, and its convergent validity with other fatigue measures are also described.

  6. Amino acid racemization dating of fossil bones, I. inter-laboratory comparison of racemization measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bada, J.L.; Hoopes, E.; Darling, D.; Dungworth, G.; Kessels, H.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Blunt, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    Enantiomeric measurements for aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and alanine in twenty-one different fossil bone samples have been carried out by three different laboratories using different analytical methods. These inter-laboratory comparisons demonstrate that D/L aspartic acid measurements are highly reproducible, whereas the enantiomeric measurements for the other amino acids show a wide variation between the three laboratories. At present, aspartic acid measurements are the most suitable for racemization dating of bone because of their superior analytical precision. ?? 1979.

  7. Interlaboratory comparison study of calibration standards for foraminiferal Mg/Ca thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, M.; Caillon, N.; Rebaubier, H.; Bartoli, G.; Bohaty, S.; Cacho, I.; Clarke, L.; Cooper, M.; Daunt, C.; Delaney, M.; Demenocal, P.; Dutton, A.; Eggins, S.; Elderfield, H.; Garbe-Schoenberg, D.; Goddard, E.; Green, D.; Groeneveld, J.; Hastings, D.; Hathorne, E.; Kimoto, K.; Klinkhammer, G.; Labeyrie, L.; Lea, D. W.; Marchitto, T.; MartíNez-Botí, M. A.; Mortyn, P. G.; Ni, Y.; Nuernberg, D.; Paradis, G.; Pena, L.; Quinn, T.; Rosenthal, Y.; Russell, A.; Sagawa, T.; Sosdian, S.; Stott, L.; Tachikawa, K.; Tappa, E.; Thunell, R.; Wilson, P. A.

    2008-08-01

    An interlaboratory study of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in three commercially available carbonate reference materials (BAM RS3, CMSI 1767, and ECRM 752-1) was performed with the participation of 25 laboratories that determine foraminiferal Mg/Ca ratios worldwide. These reference materials containing Mg/Ca in the range of foraminiferal calcite (0.8 mmol/mol to 6 mmol/mol) were circulated with a dissolution protocol for analysis. Participants were asked to make replicate dissolutions of the powdered samples and to analyze them using the instruments and calibration standards routinely used in their laboratories. Statistical analysis was performed in accordance with the International Standardization Organization standard 5725, which is based on the analysis of variance (ANOVA) technique. Repeatability (RSDr%), an indicator of intralaboratory precision, for Mg/Ca determinations in solutions after centrifuging increased with decreasing Mg/Ca, ranging from 0.78% at Mg/Ca = 5.56 mmol/mol to 1.15% at Mg/Ca = 0.79 mmol/mol. Reproducibility (RSDR%), an indicator of the interlaboratory method precision, for Mg/Ca determinations in centrifuged solutions was noticeably worse than repeatability, ranging from 4.5% at Mg/Ca = 5.56 mmol/mol to 8.7% at Mg/Ca = 0.79 mmol/mol. Results of this study show that interlaboratory variability is dominated by inconsistencies among instrument calibrations and highlight the need to improve interlaboratory compatibility. Additionally, the study confirmed the suitability of these solid standards as reference materials for foraminiferal Mg/Ca (and Sr/Ca) determinations, provided that appropriate procedures are adopted to minimize and to monitor possible contamination from silicate mineral phases.

  8. Creep contributes to the fatigue behavior of bovine trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Bowman, S M; Guo, X E; Cheng, D W; Keaveny, T M; Gibson, L J; Hayes, W C; McMahon, T A

    1998-10-01

    Repetitive, low-intensity loading from normal daily activities can generate fatigue damage in trabecular bone, a potential cause of spontaneous fractures of the hip and spine. Finite element models of trabecular bone (Guo et al., 1994) suggest that both creep and slow crack growth contribute to fatigue failure. In an effort to characterize these damage mechanisms experimentally, we conducted fatigue and creep tests on 85 waisted specimens of trabecular bone obtained from 76 bovine proximal tibiae. All applied stresses were normalized by the previously measured specimen modulus. Fatigue tests were conducted at room temperature; creep tests were conducted at 4, 15, 25, 37, 45, and 53 degrees C in a custom-designed apparatus. The fatigue behavior was characterized by decreasing modulus and increasing hysteresis prior to failure. The hysteresis loops progressively displaced along the strain axis, indicating that creep was also involved in the fatigue process. The creep behavior was characterized by the three classical stages of decreasing, constant, and increasing creep rates. Strong and highly significant power-law relationships were found between cycles-to-failure, time-to-failure, steady-state creep rate, and the applied loads. Creep analyses of the fatigue hysteresis loops also generated strong and highly significant power law relationships for time-to-failure and steady-state creep rate. Lastly, the products of creep rate and time-to-failure were constant for both the fatigue and creep tests and were equal to the measured failure strains, suggesting that creep plays a fundamental role in the fatigue behavior of trabecular bone. Additional analysis of the fatigue strain data suggests that creep and slow crack growth are not separate processes that dominate at high and low loads, respectively, but are present throughout all stages of fatigue.

  9. Antifungal susceptibility testing.

    PubMed Central

    Rex, J H; Pfaller, M A; Rinaldi, M G; Polak, A; Galgiani, J N

    1993-01-01

    Unlike antibacterial susceptibility testing, reliable antifungal susceptibility testing is still largely in its infancy. Many methods have been described, but they produce widely discrepant results unless such factors as pH, inoculum size, medium formulation, incubation time, and incubation temperature are carefully controlled. Even when laboratories agree upon a common method, interlaboratory agreement may be poor. As a result of numerous collaborative projects carried out both independently and under the aegis of the Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, the effects of varying these factors have been extensively studied and a standard method which minimizes interlaboratory variability during the testing of Candida spp. and Cryptococcus neoformans has been proposed. This review summarizes this work, reviews the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed susceptibility testing standard, and identifies directions for future work. PMID:8269392

  10. Interlaboratory comparison of real-time PCR protocols for quantification of general fecal indicator bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Orin C; Sivaganesan, Mano; Peed, Lindsay; Kelty, Catherine A; Blackwood, A Denene; Greene, Monica R; Noble, Rachel T; Bushon, Rebecca N; Stelzer, Erin A; Kinzelman, Julie; Anan'eva, Tamara; Sinigalliano, Christopher; Wanless, David; Griffith, John; Cao, Yiping; Weisberg, Steve; Harwood, Valarie J; Staley, Christopher; Oshima, Kevin H; Varma, Manju; Haugland, Richard A

    2012-01-17

    The application of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for the rapid identification of fecal bacteria in environmental waters is being considered for use as a national water quality metric in the United States. The transition from research tool to a standardized protocol requires information on the reproducibility and sources of variation associated with qPCR methodology across laboratories. This study examines interlaboratory variability in the measurement of enterococci and Bacteroidales concentrations from standardized, spiked, and environmental sources of DNA using the Entero1a and GenBac3 qPCR methods, respectively. Comparisons are based on data generated from eight different research facilities. Special attention was placed on the influence of the DNA isolation step and effect of simplex and multiplex amplification approaches on interlaboratory variability. Results suggest that a crude lysate is sufficient for DNA isolation unless environmental samples contain substances that can inhibit qPCR amplification. No appreciable difference was observed between simplex and multiplex amplification approaches. Overall, interlaboratory variability levels remained low (<10% coefficient of variation) regardless of qPCR protocol.

  11. Interlaboratory comparison of real-time pcr protocols for quantification of general fecal indicator bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, O.C.; Sivaganesan, M.; Peed, L.; Kelty, C.A.; Blackwood, A.D.; Greene, M.R.; Noble, R.T.; Bushon, R.N.; Stelzer, E.A.; Kinzelman, J.; Anan'Eva, T.; Sinigalliano, C.; Wanless, D.; Griffith, J.; Cao, Y.; Weisberg, S.; Harwood, V.J.; Staley, C.; Oshima, K.H.; Varma, M.; Haugland, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    The application of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for the rapid identification of fecal bacteria in environmental waters is being considered for use as a national water quality metric in the United States. The transition from research tool to a standardized protocol requires information on the reproducibility and sources of variation associated with qPCR methodology across laboratories. This study examines interlaboratory variability in the measurement of enterococci and Bacteroidales concentrations from standardized, spiked, and environmental sources of DNA using the Entero1a and GenBac3 qPCR methods, respectively. Comparisons are based on data generated from eight different research facilities. Special attention was placed on the influence of the DNA isolation step and effect of simplex and multiplex amplification approaches on interlaboratory variability. Results suggest that a crude lysate is sufficient for DNA isolation unless environmental samples contain substances that can inhibit qPCR amplification. No appreciable difference was observed between simplex and multiplex amplification approaches. Overall, interlaboratory variability levels remained low (<10% coefficient of variation) regardless of qPCR protocol. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. Eddy current pulsed thermography for fatigue evaluation of gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Gui Yun; Yin, Aijun; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Jishan; Shaw, Brian

    2014-02-01

    The pulsed eddy current (PEC) technique generates responses over a wide range of frequencies, containing more spectral coverage than traditional eddy current inspection. Eddy current pulsed thermography (ECPT), a newly developed non-destructive testing (NDT) technique, has advantages such as rapid inspection of a large area within a short time, high spatial resolution, high sensitivity and stand-off measurement distance. This paper investigates ECPT for the evaluation of gear fatigue tests. The paper proposes a statistical method based on single channel blind source separation to extract details of gear fatigue. The discussion of transient thermal distribution and patterns of fatigue contact surfaces as well as the non-contact surfaces have been reported. In addition, the measurement for gears with different cycles of fatigue tests by ECPTand the comparison results between ECPT with magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) have been evaluated. The comparison shows the competitive capability of ECPT in fatigue evaluation.

  13. Depression, Fatigue, and Pre-Sleep Arousal: A Mediation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlson, Cynthia W.; Stevens, Natalie R.; Olson, Christy A.; Hamilton, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    Fatigue is a common and debilitating symptom of clinical depression; however, the causes are not well understood. The present study was designed to test the hypotheses that subjective sleep, objective sleep, and arousal in the pre-sleep state would mediate the relationship between depression status and fatigue. Sleep, pre-sleep arousal, and…

  14. 14 CFR 29.571 - Fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fatigue evaluation of structure. 29.571... § 29.571 Fatigue evaluation of structure. (a) General. An evaluation of the strength of principal... (including tolerance to flaws). The structure must be shown by analysis supported by test evidence and,...

  15. Enhanced Capabilities of the NASA Langley Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Turner, Travis L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents newly enhanced acoustic capabilities of the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus at the NASA Langley Research Center. The facility is a progressive wave tube used for sonic fatigue testing of aerospace structures. Acoustic measurements for each of the six facility configurations are shown and comparisons with projected performance are made.

  16. Tensile and fatigue properties of Inconel 718 at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.; Schmidt, E. H.

    1969-01-01

    Tests to determine the tensile and fatigue properties of Inconel 718 at cryogenic temperatures show that the alloy increases in strength at low temperatures, with very little change in toughness. The effect of surface finish and grain size on the fatigue properties was also determined.

  17. Effect of surface irregularities on bellows fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, E. H.; Sheaffer, E. F.; Turner, J. D.; Zeimer, R. L.

    1968-01-01

    Report presents test data on the bending fatigue life of notched sheet specimens. The influence of a surface irregularity on the fatigue life of a metal bellows is evaluated, with emphasis on accidental defects in ducting bellows which are impossible to avoid short of completely eliminating human contact.

  18. Chronic fatigue syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Bennett RM. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 274. Engleberg NC. Chronic ...

  19. Fatigue and Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Fatigue - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign In In Your Area ... help* daily life for: positive-mom* The National MS Society is Here to Help Need More Information? ...

  20. Brain Tumors and Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... tiredness. You may experience a profound lack of energy that can come on suddenly and bring dramatic ... to manage the severity. Respect the Fatigue The energy you’re accustomed to having has been transferred ...