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Sample records for intermedia fusobacterium nucleatum

  1. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bharath, Nagaraj; Sowmya, Nagur Karibasappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. Results: MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Conclusion: Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease. PMID:26097349

  2. Myocardial infection due to Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Storm, Jeremy C; Ford, Bradley A; Streit, Judy A

    2013-12-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is an anaerobic gram-negative bacillus, which inhabits the oropharynx, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. Infections classically affect the head and neck. We report a patient with a myocardial mass due to F. nucleatum, initially thought to be a neoplasm, and discuss anaerobic cardiac infections.

  3. Fusobacterium nucleatum: a commensal-turned pathogen.

    PubMed

    Han, Yiping W

    2015-02-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is an anaerobic oral commensal and a periodontal pathogen associated with a wide spectrum of human diseases. This article reviews its implication in adverse pregnancy outcomes (chorioamnionitis, preterm birth, stillbirth, neonatal sepsis, preeclampsia), GI disorders (colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, appendicitis), cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, respiratory tract infections, Lemierre's syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. The virulence mechanisms involved in the diseases are discussed, with emphasis on its colonization, systemic dissemination, and induction of host inflammatory and tumorigenic responses. The FadA adhesin/invasin conserved in F. nucleatum is a key virulence factor and a potential diagnostic marker for F. nucleatum-associated diseases.

  4. Peptidoglycan precursor from Fusobacterium nucleatum contains lanthionine

    SciTech Connect

    Fredriksen, A.; Vasstrand, E.N.; Jensen, H.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum was grown in the presence of ({sup 14}C)UDP. By means of sequential precipitation and chromatographic separation of the cytoplasmic content, a peptidoglycan ({sup 14}C)UDP pentapeptide containing lanthionine was isolated. This finding indicates that lanthionine is synthesized and incorporated as such during the assembly of the peptidoglycan.

  5. Endothelial Cell Response to Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Reila Tainá; Nguyen, Daniel; Stephens, Danielle; Pamuk, Ferda; Fernandes, Daniel; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2016-07-01

    Vascular response is an essential aspect of an effective immune response to periodontal disease pathogens, as new blood vessel formation contributes to wound healing and inflammation. Gaining a greater understanding of the factors that affect vascular response may then contribute to future breakthroughs in dental medicine. In this study, we have characterized the endothelial cell response to the common bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum, an important bridging species that facilitates the activity of late colonizers of the dental biofilm. Endothelial cells were infected with Fusobacterium nucleatum (strain 25586) for periods of 4, 12, 24, or 48 h. Cell proliferation and tube formation were analyzed, and expression of adhesion molecules (CD31 and CD34) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1 and 2 was measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Data indicate that F. nucleatum impaired endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation. The findings suggest that the modified endothelial cell response acts as a mechanism promoting the pathogenic progression of periodontal diseases and may potentially suggest the involvement of periodontopathogens in systemic diseases associated with periodontal inflammation.

  6. Myopericarditis associated with Fusobacterium nucleatum-caused liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Alexis; Knoll, Bettina

    2015-03-01

    A wide clinical spectrum of bacteremic disease caused by Fusobacterium has been presented in this journal. We wish to extend this spectrum by presenting a case of myopericarditis resulting from a liver abscess caused by F. nucleatum. While F. nucleatum plays an important role in periodontal disease, and has been isolated from skin ulcers, liver abscesses, urinary tract infections, and endocarditis, a single case of F. nucleatum-induced pericarditis is documented in the literature.

  7. Fusobacterium nucleatum: an emerging bug in colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Arif; Miskeen, Abid Y; Bhat, Ashaqullah; Fazili, Khalid M; Ganai, Bashir A

    2015-09-01

    The human intestinal microbiota is a plethora of diverse microbial species, wherein certain bacteria considered as driver bacteria with procarcinogenic features contribute directly toward colonic epithelium cell damage to initiate colorectal carcinogenesis. However, some bacteria, in particular Fusobacterium nucleatum, which is otherwise a normal resident of the oral microflora and a relatively poor colonizer of the healthy gut, have also been considered to play a role in the development of colorectal cancer. Many studies have reported that F. nucleatum is associated with colorectal adenomas and advanced-stage colorectal cancer, but its precise role in the early stages of colorectal tumorigenesis is poorly understood. Here, we review some of the important features of F. nucleatum, its association with inflammatory bowel disease, modulation of the tumor-immune microenvironment, and E-cadherin/β-catenin signaling.

  8. Cellular Components Mediating Coadherence of Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Wu, T; Cen, L; Kaplan, C; Zhou, X; Lux, R; Shi, W; He, X

    2015-10-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen found as part of the normal oral flora. It can be coisolated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, from oral disease sites, such as those involved in refractory periodontitis and pulp necrosis. The physical coadherence between these 2 clinically important microbes has been well documented and suggested to play a role in facilitating their oral colonization and colocalization and contributing to polymicrobial pathogenesis. Previous studies indicated that the physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum was mediated by the carbohydrate components on the surface of C. albicans and the protein components on the Fusobaterium cell surface. However, the identities of the components involved still remain elusive. This study was aimed at identifying the genetic determinants involved in coaggregation between the 2 species. By screening a C. albicans SN152 mutant library and a panel of F. nucleatum 23726 outer membrane protein mutants, we identified FLO9, which encodes a putative adhesin-like cell wall mannoprotein of C. albicans and radD, an arginine-inhibitable adhesin-encoding gene in F. nucleatum that is involved in interspecies coadherence. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrated that the strong coaggregation between wild-type F. nucleatum 23726 and C. albicans SN152 in an in vitro assay could be greatly inhibited by arginine and mannose. Our study also suggested a complex multifaceted mechanism underlying physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum and for the first time revealed the identity of major genetic components involved in mediating the coaggregation. These observations provide useful knowledge for developing new targeted treatments for disrupting interactions between these 2 clinically relevant pathogens.

  9. Cellular Components Mediating Coadherence of Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T.; Cen, L.; Kaplan, C.; Zhou, X.; Lux, R.; Shi, W.; He, X.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen found as part of the normal oral flora. It can be coisolated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, from oral disease sites, such as those involved in refractory periodontitis and pulp necrosis. The physical coadherence between these 2 clinically important microbes has been well documented and suggested to play a role in facilitating their oral colonization and colocalization and contributing to polymicrobial pathogenesis. Previous studies indicated that the physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum was mediated by the carbohydrate components on the surface of C. albicans and the protein components on the Fusobaterium cell surface. However, the identities of the components involved still remain elusive. This study was aimed at identifying the genetic determinants involved in coaggregation between the 2 species. By screening a C. albicans SN152 mutant library and a panel of F. nucleatum 23726 outer membrane protein mutants, we identified FLO9, which encodes a putative adhesin-like cell wall mannoprotein of C. albicans and radD, an arginine-inhibitable adhesin-encoding gene in F. nucleatum that is involved in interspecies coadherence. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrated that the strong coaggregation between wild-type F. nucleatum 23726 and C. albicans SN152 in an in vitro assay could be greatly inhibited by arginine and mannose. Our study also suggested a complex multifaceted mechanism underlying physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum and for the first time revealed the identity of major genetic components involved in mediating the coaggregation. These observations provide useful knowledge for developing new targeted treatments for disrupting interactions between these 2 clinically relevant pathogens. PMID:26152186

  10. Taxonomy, biology, and periodontal aspects of Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed Central

    Bolstad, A I; Jensen, H B; Bakken, V

    1996-01-01

    The pathogenic potential of Fusobacterium nucleatum and its significance in the development of periodontal diseases, as well as in infections in other organs, have gained new interest for several reasons. First, this bacterium has the potential to be pathogenic because of its number and frequency in periodontal lesions, its production of tissue irritants, its synergism with other bacteria in mixed infections, and its ability to form aggregates with other suspected pathogens in periodontal disease and thus act as a bridge between early and late colonizers on the tooth surface. Second, of the microbial species that are statistically associated with periodontal disease, F. nucleatum is the most common in clinical infections of other body sites. Third, during the past few years, new techniques have made it possible to obtain more information about F. nucleatum on the genetic level, thereby also gaining better knowledge of the structure and functions of the outer membrane proteins (OMPs). OMPs are of great interest with respect to coaggregation, cell nutrition, and antibiotic susceptibility. This review covers what is known to date about F. nucleatum in general, such as taxonomy and biology, with special emphasis on its pathogenic potential. Its possible relationship to other periodontal bacteria in the development of periodontal diseases and the possible roles played by OMPs are considered. PMID:8665477

  11. Anti-biofilm Activities from Resveratrol against Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiyan; Huang, Zhengwei; Zhou, Wei; Tang, Zisheng; Ma, Rui; Liang, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a Gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium that plays an important role in dental plaque biofilm formation. In this study, we evaluate the effect of resveratrol, a phytoalexin compound, on F. nucleatum biofilm formation. The effects of different concentrations of resveratrol on biofilms formed on 96-well microtiter plates at different time points were determined by the MTT assay. The structures and thicknesses of the biofilm were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and gene expression was investigated by real-time PCR. The results showed that resveratrol at sub-MIC levels can significantly decrease biofilm formation, whereas it does not affect the bacterial growth rate. It was observed by CLSM images that the biofilm was visually decreased with increasing concentrations of resveratrol. Gene expression was down regulated in the biofilm in the presence of resveratrol. Our results revealed that resveratrol can effectively inhibit biofilm formation. PMID:27458454

  12. [Spondylodiscitis due to Fusobacterium nucleatum: new diagnostic method].

    PubMed

    Mediavilla-Santos, L; Fernández-Mariño, J R; Sánchez-Somolinos, M; Vicente-Herrera, E; Díaz-Mauriffo-Garrido-Lestache, J; Marín-Martín, M

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium spp. are Gram negative anaerobe bacteria. Vertebral osteomyelitis caused by these bacteria is very unusual; in fact, we could only find 11 cases in the literature. We report the case of a male, 46 year-old patient who had had lumbar pain for several weeks that irradiated to the right leg, and did not respond to NSAID treatment. The work-up included MRI, biopsy with draining of the collection and a universal PCR followed by 16S rDNA sequencing. The latter was used to make the microbiologic diagnosis, which identified Fusobacterium nucleatum as the causative agent. Final treatment consisted of clindamycin. In conclusion, spondylodiscitis due to Fusobacterium spp. is a rare and difficult to diagnose entity, due both to its clinical characteristics and to the difficulty in making the right microbiologic diagnosis. Vertebral biopsy and molecular microbiologic techniques such as Universal PCR rDNa, are essential to identifying the organism, making the diagnosis and prescribing appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  13. Endobronchial lesion due to pulmonary Fusobacterium nucleatum infection in a child.

    PubMed

    Gedik, Ahmet H; Cakir, Erkan; Soysal, Omer; Umutoğlu, Tarık

    2014-03-01

    Clinically significant infections due to the members of the genus Fusobacterium are rare. The clinical manifestations of pulmonary Fusobacterium nucleatum infections range from simple aspiration pneumonia to severe diseases as necrotizing pneumonia, lung abscess, and empyema. Endobronchial lesions and obstructions are rarely seen in children and are often a misdiagnosed result in delay of definitive treatment. Here, we report a case of endobronchial lesion due to pulmonary F. nucleatum infection in an entirely healthy child before illness. This is the first case reported in the literature of endobronchial lesion due to pulmonary F. nucleatum infection.

  14. Fusobacterium nucleatum subspecies identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shuping; Tian, Baoyu; Wang, Xiaowei; Pincus, David H; Welker, Martin; Gilhuley, Kathleen; Lu, Xuedong; Han, Yiping W; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2015-04-01

    We explored the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for identification of Fusobacterium nucleatum subspecies. MALDI-TOF MS spectra of five F. nucleatum subspecies (animalis, fusiforme, nucleatum, polymorphum, and vincentii) were analyzed and divided into four distinct clusters, including subsp. animalis, nucleatum, polymorphum, and fusiforme/vincentii. MALDI-TOF MS with the modified SARAMIS database further correctly identified 28 of 34 F. nucleatum clinical isolates to the subspecies level.

  15. Berberine may rescue Fusobacterium nucleatum-induced colorectal tumorigenesis by modulating the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui-Jun; Sun, Tian-Tian; Chen, Hui-Min; Chen, Hao-Yan; An, Hui-Fang; Weng, Yu-Rong; Yu, Jun; Li, Min; Qin, Wen-Xin; Ma, Xiong; Shen, Nan; Hong, Jie; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence links colorectal cancer (CRC) with the intestinal microbiota. However, the disturbance of intestinal microbiota and the role of Fusobacterium nucleatum during the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence have not yet been evaluated. Methods 454 FLX pyrosequencing was used to evaluate the disturbance of intestinal microbiota during the adenoma-carcinoma sequence pathway of CRC. Intestinal microbiota and mucosa tumor-immune cytokines were detected in mice after introducing 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), F. nucleatum or Berberine (BBR), using pyrosequencing and Bio-Plex Pro™ cytokine assays, respectively. Protein expressions were detected by western blotting. Results The levels of opportunistic pathogens, such as Fusobacterium, Streptococcus and Enterococcus spp. gradually increased during the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence in human fecal and mucosal samples. F. nucleatum treatment significantly altered lumen microbial structures, with increased Tenericutes and Verrucomicrobia (opportunistic pathogens) (P < 0.05 = in wild-type C57BL/6 and mice with DMH treatment). BBR intervention reversed the F. nucleatum-mediated increase in opportunistic pathogens, and the secretion of IL-21/22/31, CD40L and the expression of p-STAT3, p-STAT5 and p-ERK1/2 in mice, compared with mice fed with F. nucleatum alone. Conclusions F. nucleatum colonization in the intestine may prompt colorectal tumorigenesis. BBR could rescue F. nucleatum-induced colorectal tumorigenesis by modulating the tumor microenvironment and blocking the activation of tumorigenesis-related pathways. PMID:26397137

  16. Association of Fusobacterium nucleatum with clinical and molecular features in colorectal serrated pathway.

    PubMed

    Ito, Miki; Kanno, Shinichi; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Mitsuhashi, Kei; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Takahashi, Taiga; Tachibana, Mami; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Yoshii, Shinji; Takenouchi, Toshinao; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Okita, Kenji; Hirata, Koichi; Maruyama, Reo; Suzuki, Hiromu; Imai, Kohzoh; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-09-15

    Human gut microbiota is being increasingly recognized as a player in colorectal cancers (CRCs). Evidence suggests that Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) may contribute to disease progression and is associated with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and microsatellite instability (MSI) in CRCs; however, to date, there are no reports about the relationship between F. nucleatum and molecular features in the early stage of colorectal tumorigenesis. Therefore, we investigated the presence of F. nucleatum in premalignant colorectal lesions. In total, 465 premalignant lesions (343 serrated lesions and 122 non-serrated adenomas) and 511 CRCs were studied. We determined the presence of F. nucleatum and analyzed its association with molecular features including CIMP, MSI and microRNA-31 status. F. nucleatum was detected in 24% of hyperplastic polyps, 35% of sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), 30% of traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs) and 33% of non-serrated adenomas. F. nucleatum was more frequently detected in CIMP-high premalignant lesions than in CIMP-low/zero lesions (p = 0.0023). In SSAs, F. nucleatum positivity increased gradually from sigmoid colon to cecum (p = 0.042). F. nucleatum positivity was significantly higher in CRCs (56%) than in premalignant lesions of any histological type (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, F. nucleatum was identified in premalignant colorectal lesions regardless of histopathology but was more frequently associated with CIMP-high lesions. Moreover, F. nucleatum positivity increased according to histological grade, suggesting that it may contribute to the progression of colorectal neoplasia. Our data also indicate that F. nucleatum positivity in SSAs may support the "colorectal continuum" concept.

  17. Association of Fusobacterium nucleatum infection with colorectal cancer in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Yuan; Ge, Quan-Xing; Cao, Jie; Zhou, Yong-Jian; Du, Yan-Lei; Shen, Bo; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne; Nie, Yu-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) abundance in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues and its association with CRC invasiveness in Chinese patients. METHODS: The resected cancer and adjacent normal tissues (10 cm beyond cancer margins) from 101 consecutive patients with CRC were collected. Fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) was applied to detect F. nucleatum in CRC and normal tissues. The difference of F. nucleatum abundance between cancer and normal tissues and the relationship of F. nucleatum abundance with clinical variables were evaluated. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was performed on 22 CRC tissues with the highest F. nucleatum abundance by FQ-PCR testing to confirm FQ-PCR results. RESULTS: The median abundance of F. nucleatum in CRC tissues [0.242 (0.178-0.276)] was significantly higher than that in normal controls [0.050 (0.023-0.067)] (P < 0.001). F. nucleatum was over-represented in 88/101 (87.1%) CRC samples. The abundance of F. nucleatum determined by 2-ΔCT was significantly greater in tumor samples [0.242 (0.178, 0.276)] than in normal controls [0.050 (0.023, 0.067)] (P < 0.001). The frequency of patients with lymph node metastases was higher in the over-abundance group [52/88 (59.1%)] than in the under-abundance group [0/13 (0%)] (P < 0.005). No significant association of F. nucleatum with other clinico-pathological variables was observed (P > 0.05). FISH analysis also found more F. nucleatum in CRC than in normal tissues (median number 6, 25th 3, 75th 10 vs 2, 25th 1, 75th 5) (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: F. nucleatum was enriched in CRC tissues and associated with CRC development and metastasis. PMID:27004000

  18. Coinfection of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinomyces israelii in mastoiditis diagnosed by next-generation DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Abbott, April N; SenGupta, Dhruba J; Cummings, Lisa A; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Stephens, Karen; Cookson, Brad T; Hoffman, Noah G

    2014-05-01

    Some bacterial infections involve potentially complex mixtures of species that can now be distinguished using next-generation DNA sequencing. We present a case of mastoiditis where Gram stain, culture, and molecular diagnosis were nondiagnostic or discrepant. Next-generation sequencing implicated coinfection of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinomyces israelii, resolving these diagnostic discrepancies.

  19. Demonstration of lanthionine as a natural constituent of the peptidoglycan of Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed Central

    Vasstrand, E N; Hofstad, T; Endresen, C; Jensen, H B

    1979-01-01

    Peptidoglycan was purified from the oral bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum strain Fev 1, using boiling sodium dodecyl sulfate and pronase. The composition of this peptidoglycan was found to be similar to that of other gram-negative bacteria, except that it lacked diaminopimelic acid. Lanthionine, the monosulfur analog of diaminopimelic acid, was identified as the diaminodicarboxylic acid of this peptidoglycan. It is assumed that lanthionine replaced diaminopimelic acid. Thus, the peptidoglycan of F. nucleatum Fev 1 is one of the few known sources of naturally occurring lanthionine. Images PMID:500186

  20. Morphological and physiological changes induced by contact-dependent interaction between Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Bor, Batbileg; Cen, Lujia; Agnello, Melissa; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are well-studied oral commensal microbes with pathogenic potential that are involved in various oral polymicrobial infectious diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 coaggregates with C. albicans SN152, a process mainly mediated by fusobacterial membrane protein RadD and Candida cell wall protein Flo9. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential biological impact of this inter-kingdom interaction. We found that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 inhibits growth and hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans SN152 in a contact-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis is mediated via RadD and Flo9 protein pair. Using a murine macrophage cell line, we showed that the F. nucleatum-induced inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis promotes C. albicans survival and negatively impacts the macrophage-killing capability of C. albicans. Furthermore, the yeast form of C. albicans repressed F. nucleatum-induced MCP-1 and TNFα production in macrophages. Our study suggests that the interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum leads to a mutual attenuation of virulence, which may function to promote a long-term commensal lifestyle within the oral cavity. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of inter-kingdom interaction and may impact clinical treatment strategies. PMID:27295972

  1. Case series of patients with Fusobacterium nucleatum bacteremia with emphasis on the presence of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Erlangga; Wybo, Ingrid; Piérard, Denis

    2016-06-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is anaerobic oral microbiota that might be associated with cancer. We reported 22 consecutive cases of patients (mean age of 63.8 years (range 34-89), 59.1% male) with F. nucleatum bacteremia that were admitted to a university hospital over a 10-year period. In 17 (77.2%) of these patients, F. nucleatum was the sole possible pathogen. Seven of the 22 patients (31.8%) had active cancer: esophagus carcinoma (n = 3), hematologic malignancies (n = 1), gastrointestinal stromal tumor (n = 1), melanoma (n = 1), and breast cancer (n = 1). In six out of seven patients (85.7%), the F. nucleatum was found within six months of the diagnosis of cancer. Four of seven (57.1%), patients with cancer were on chemotherapy. Three of 22 patients (13.4%) died within 1 month of F. nucleatum bacteremia due to cancer. In conclusion, F. nucleatum bacteremia occurs rarely and when it is found, it is often in patients with cancer, especially those with a recent diagnosis.

  2. Morphological and physiological changes induced by contact-dependent interaction between Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Batbileg; Cen, Lujia; Agnello, Melissa; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are well-studied oral commensal microbes with pathogenic potential that are involved in various oral polymicrobial infectious diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 coaggregates with C. albicans SN152, a process mainly mediated by fusobacterial membrane protein RadD and Candida cell wall protein Flo9. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential biological impact of this inter-kingdom interaction. We found that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 inhibits growth and hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans SN152 in a contact-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis is mediated via RadD and Flo9 protein pair. Using a murine macrophage cell line, we showed that the F. nucleatum-induced inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis promotes C. albicans survival and negatively impacts the macrophage-killing capability of C. albicans. Furthermore, the yeast form of C. albicans repressed F. nucleatum-induced MCP-1 and TNFα production in macrophages. Our study suggests that the interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum leads to a mutual attenuation of virulence, which may function to promote a long-term commensal lifestyle within the oral cavity. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of inter-kingdom interaction and may impact clinical treatment strategies. PMID:27295972

  3. Diverse Toll-like receptors mediate cytokine production by Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Ra; Kim, Dong-Jae; Han, Seung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Jung; Lee, Jun-Young; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2014-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) orchestrate a repertoire of immune responses in macrophages against various pathogens. Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are two important periodontal pathogens. In the present study, we investigated TLR signaling regulating cytokine production of macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans. TLR2 and TLR4 are redundant in the production of cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) in F. nucleatum- and A. actinomycetemcomitans-infected macrophages. The production of cytokines by macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans infection was impaired in MyD88-deficient macrophages. Moreover, cytokine concentrations were lower in MyD88-deficient macrophages than in TLR2/TLR4 (TLR2/4) double-deficient cells. An endosomal TLR inhibitor, chloroquine, reduced cytokine production in TLR2/4-deficient macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, and DNA from F. nucleatum or A. actinomycetemcomitans induced IL-6 production in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), which was abolished by chloroquine. Western blot analysis revealed that TLR2/4 and MyD88 were required for optimal activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in macrophages in response to F. nucleatum and A. actinomycetemcomitans, with different kinetics. An inhibitor assay showed that NF-κB and all MAPKs (p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK], and Jun N-terminal protein kinase [JNK]) mediate F. nucleatum-induced production of cytokines in macrophages, whereas NF-κB and p38, but not ERK and JNK, are involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans-mediated cytokine production. These findings suggest that multiple TLRs may participate in the cytokine production of macrophages against periodontal bacteria.

  4. Binding of the Fap2 protein of Fusobacterium nucleatum to human inhibitory receptor TIGIT protects tumors from immune cell attack.

    PubMed

    Gur, Chamutal; Ibrahim, Yara; Isaacson, Batya; Yamin, Rachel; Abed, Jawad; Gamliel, Moriya; Enk, Jonatan; Bar-On, Yotam; Stanietsky-Kaynan, Noah; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Shussman, Noam; Almogy, Gideon; Cuapio, Angelica; Hofer, Erhard; Mevorach, Dror; Tabib, Adi; Ortenberg, Rona; Markel, Gal; Miklić, Karmela; Jonjic, Stipan; Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S; Bachrach, Gilad; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2015-02-17

    Bacteria, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum, are present in the tumor microenvironment. However, the immunological consequences of intra-tumoral bacteria remain unclear. Here, we have shown that natural killer (NK) cell killing of various tumors is inhibited in the presence of various F. nucleatum strains. Our data support that this F. nucleatum-mediated inhibition is mediated by human, but not by mouse TIGIT, an inhibitory receptor present on all human NK cells and on various T cells. Using a library of F. nucleatum mutants, we found that the Fap2 protein of F. nucleatum directly interacted with TIGIT, leading to the inhibition of NK cell cytotoxicity. We have further demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes expressed TIGIT and that T cell activities were also inhibited by F. nucleatum via Fap2. Our results identify a bacterium-dependent, tumor-immune evasion mechanism in which tumors exploit the Fap2 protein of F. nucleatum to inhibit immune cell activity via TIGIT.

  5. Association of Fusobacterium nucleatum with immunity and molecular alterations in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Adachi, Yasushi; Ito, Miki; Mitsuhashi, Kei; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kanno, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Itaru; Ishigami, Keisuke; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Maruyama, Reo; Imai, Kohzoh; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-14

    The human intestinal microbiome plays a major role in human health and diseases, including colorectal cancer. Colorectal carcinogenesis represents a heterogeneous process with a differing set of somatic molecular alterations, influenced by diet, environmental and microbial exposures, and host immunity. Fusobacterium species are part of the human oral and intestinal microbiota. Metagenomic analyses have shown an enrichment of Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) in colorectal carcinoma tissue. Using 511 colorectal carcinomas from Japanese patients, we assessed the presence of F. nucleatum. Our results showed that the frequency of F. nucleatum positivity in the Japanese colorectal cancer was 8.6% (44/511), which was lower than that in United States cohort studies (13%). Similar to the United States studies, F. nucleatum positivity in Japanese colorectal cancers was significantly associated with microsatellite instability (MSI)-high status. Regarding the immune response in colorectal cancer, high levels of infiltrating T-cell subsets (i.e., CD3+, CD8+, CD45RO+, and FOXP3+ cells) have been associated with better patient prognosis. There is also evidence to indicate that molecular features of colorectal cancer, especially MSI, influence T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Concerning the association between the gut microbiome and immunity, F. nucleatum has been shown to expand myeloid-derived immune cells, which inhibit T-cell proliferation and induce T-cell apoptosis in colorectal cancer. This finding indicates that F. nucleatum possesses immunosuppressive activities by inhibiting human T-cell responses. Certain microRNAs are induced during the macrophage inflammatory response and have the ability to regulate host-cell responses to pathogens. MicroRNA-21 increases the levels of IL-10 and prostaglandin E2, which suppress antitumor T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity through the inhibition of the antigen-presenting capacities of dendritic cells and T-cell proliferation in

  6. Proteomics of Fusobacterium nucleatum within a model developing oral microbial community.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Erik L; Wang, Tiansong; Beck, David A C; Dickinson, Brittany C; Wright, Christopher J; J Lamont, Richard; Hackett, Murray

    2014-10-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a common oral organism that can provide adhesive and metabolic support to developing periodontal bacterial communities. It is within the context of these communities that disease occurs. We have previously reported whole cell proteomics analyses of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus gordonii in early-stage communities with each other and with F. nucleatum, modeled using 18 h pellets. Here, we report the adaptation of F. nucleatum to the same experimental conditions as measured by differential protein expression. About 1210 F. nucleatum proteins were detected in single species F. nucleatum control samples, 1192 in communities with P. gingivalis, 1224 with S. gordonii, and 1135 with all three species. Quantitative comparisons among the proteomes revealed important changes in all mixed samples with distinct responses to P. gingivalis or S. gordonii alone and in combination. The results were inspected manually and an ontology analysis conducted using DAVID (Database for annotation, visualization, and integrated discovery). Extensive changes were detected in energy metabolism. All multispecies comparisons showed reductions in amino acid fermentation and a shift toward butanoate as a metabolic byproduct, although the two organism model community with S. gordonii showed increases in alanine, threonine, methionine, and cysteine pathways, and in the three species samples there were increases in lysine and methionine. The communities with P. gingivalis or all three organisms showed reduced glycolysis proteins, but F. nucleatum paired with S. gordonii displayed increased glycolysis/gluconeogenesis proteins. The S. gordonii containing two organism model also showed increases in the ethanolamine pathway while the three species sample showed decreases relative to the F. nucleatum single organism control. All of the nascent model communities displayed reduced translation, lipopolysaccharide, and cell wall biosynthesis, DNA replication and DNA

  7. Application of rpoB and Zinc Protease Gene for Use in Molecular Discrimination of Fusobacterium nucleatum Subspecies▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwa-Sook; Lee, Dae-Sil; Chang, Young-Hyo; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sukhoon; Kim, Joongsu; Seong, Jin-Hyo; Song, Soo Keun; Shin, Hwan Seon; Son, Jae-Beum; Jung, Min Young; Park, Soon-Nang; Yoo, So Young; Cho, Ki Woon; Kim, Dong-Kie; Moon, Seonghoon; Kim, Dooil; Choi, Yongseok; Kim, Byung-Ock; Jang, Hyun-Seon; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Chan; Choe, Son-Jin; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2010-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is classified into five subspecies that inhabit the human oral cavity (F. nucleatum subsp. nucleatum, F. nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, F. nucleatum subsp. fusiforme, F. nucleatum subsp. vincentii, and F. nucleatum subsp. animalis) based on several phenotypic characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization patterns. However, the methods for detecting or discriminating the clinical isolates of F. nucleatum at the subspecies levels are laborious, expensive, and time-consuming. Therefore, in this study, the nucleotide sequences of the RNA polymerase β-subunit gene (rpoB) and zinc protease gene were analyzed to discriminate the subspecies of F. nucleatum. The partial sequences of rpoB (approximately 2,419 bp), the zinc protease gene (878 bp), and 16S rRNA genes (approximately 1,500 bp) of the type strains of five subspecies, 28 clinical isolates of F. nucleatum, and 10 strains of F. periodonticum (as a control group) were determined and analyzed. The phylogenetic data showed that the rpoB and zinc protease gene sequences clearly delineated the subspecies of F. nucleatum and provided higher resolution than the 16S rRNA gene sequences in this respect. According to the phylogenetic analysis of rpoB and the zinc protease gene, F. nucleatum subsp. vincentii and F. nucleatum subsp. fusiforme might be classified into a single subspecies. Five clinical isolates could be delineated as a new subspecies of F. nucleatum. The results suggest that rpoB and the zinc protease gene are efficient targets for the discrimination and taxonomic analysis of the subspecies of F. nucleatum. PMID:19955278

  8. Identification and characterization of fusolisin, the Fusobacterium nucleatum autotransporter serine protease.

    PubMed

    Doron, Lior; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Ibrahim, Yara; Eini, Amir; Naor, Ronit; Rosen, Graciela; Bachrach, Gilad

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is an oral anaerobe associated with periodontal disease, adverse pregnancy outcomes and colorectal carcinoma. A serine endopeptidase of 61-65 kDa capable of damaging host tissue and of inactivating immune effectors was detected previously in F. nucleatum. Here we describe the identification of this serine protease, named fusolisin, in three oral F. nucleatum sub-species. Gel zymogram revealed fusobacterial proteolytic activity with molecular masses ranging from 55-101 kDa. All of the detected proteases were inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor PMSF. analysis revealed that all of the detected proteases are encoded by genes encoding an open reading frame (ORF) with a calculated mass of approximately 115 kDa. Bioinformatics analysis of the identified ORFs demonstrated that they consist of three domains characteristic of autotransporters of the type Va secretion system. Our results suggest that the F. nucleatum fusolisins are derived from a precursor of approximately 115 kDa. After crossing the cytoplasmic membrane and cleavage of the leader sequence, the C-terminal autotransporter domain of the remaining 96-113 kDa protein is embedded in the outer membrane and delivers the N-terminal S8 serine protease passenger domain to the outer cell surface. In most strains the N-terminal catalytic 55-65 kDa domain self cleaves and liberates itself from the autotransporter domain after its transfer across the outer cell membrane. In F. nucleatum ATCC 25586 this autocatalytic activity is less efficient resulting in a full length membrane-anchored serine protease. The mature serine protease was found to cleave after Thr, Gly, Ala and Leu residues at the P1 position. Growth of F. nucleatum in complex medium was inhibited when serine protease inhibitors were used. Additional experiments are needed to determine whether fusolisin might be used as a target for controlling fusobacterial infections. PMID:25357190

  9. Human complement activation by lipopolysaccharides from bacteroides oralis, fusobacterium nucleatum, and veillonella parvula.

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, H; Dahlén, G; Nilsson, L A

    1979-01-01

    The properties of different lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preparations to induce C3 conversion in human serum was studied by means of crossed immunoelectrophoresis. C3 conversion by the alternative pathway was evaluated after calcium depletion, and lipid A-dependent activation was measured by means of inhibition with polymyxin B sulfate. LPS from Bacteroides oralis converted Co mainly via the alternative pathway, whereas LPS from Fusobacterium nucleatum and Veillonella parvula const pronounced lipid A-dependent conversion. The results are discussed in relation to the chemical composition of the LPS preparations. Images PMID:121108

  10. Phototoxic effect of visible light on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Feuerstein, Osnat; Persman, Nir; Weiss, Ervin I

    2004-01-01

    The antibacterial effect of visible light irradiation combined with photosensitizers has been reported. The objective of this was to test the effect of visible light irradiation without photosensitizers on the viability of oral microorganisms. Strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus faecalis in suspension or grown on agar were exposed to visible light at wavelengths of 400-500 nm. These wavelengths are used to photopolymerize composite resins widely used for dental restoration. Three photocuring light sources, quartz-tungsten-halogen lamp, light-emitting diode and plasma-arc, at power densities between 260 and 1300 mW/cm2 were used for up to 3 min. Bacterial samples were also exposed to a near-infrared diode laser (wavelength, 830 nm), using identical irradiation parameters for comparison. The results show that blue light sources exert a phototoxic effect on P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. The minimal inhibitory dose for P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum was 16-62 J/cm2, a value significantly lower than that for S. mutans and S. faecalis (159-212 J/cm2). Near-infrared diode laser irradiation did not affect any of the bacteria tested. Our results suggest that visible light sources without exogenous photosensitizers have a phototoxic effect mainly on Gram-negative periodontal pathogens. PMID:15623322

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray data of the FadA adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianantham, Stanley; Xu, Minghua; Wu, Nan; Han, Yiping W.; Shoham, Menachem

    2006-12-01

    The FadA adhesin from F. nucleatum, which is involved in bacterial attachment and invasion of human oral epithelial cells, has been crystallized in space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, and X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å resolution. Fusobacterium nucleatum is a Gram-negative anaerobe prevalent in the oral cavity that is associated with periodontal disease, preterm birth and infections in other parts of the human body. The bacteria attach to and invade epithelial and endothelial cells in the gum tissue and elsewhere via a 13.7 kDa adhesin protein FadA (Fusobacterium adhesin A). FadA exists in two forms: the intact form (pre-FadA), consisting of 129 amino acids, and the mature form (mFadA), which lacks an 18-residue signal sequence. Both forms have been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. mFadA has been crystallized. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 59.3, c = 125.7 Å and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals exhibit an unusually high solvent content of 74%. Synchrotron X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å. The crystals are suitable for X-ray structure determination. The crystal structure of FadA may provide a basis for the development of therapeutic agents to combat periodontal disease and other infections associated with F. nucleatum.

  12. Identification of occult Fusobacterium nucleatum central nervous system infection by use of PCR-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nagalingam, Sudha; Lisgaris, Michelle; Rodriguez, Benigno; Jacobs, Michael R; Lederman, Michael; Salata, Robert A; Hujer, Andrea M; Muehlenbachs, Atis; DeLeon-Carnes, Marlene; Farrell, John J; Sampath, Rangarajan; Bonomo, Robert A

    2014-09-01

    Anaerobic bacteria are often difficult to detect, especially after the initiation of antibiotics. We describe the application of PCR-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) using a sample of cerebrospinal fluid to identify an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, in a patient with "culture-negative" meningitis and cerebral abscesses.

  13. [Cerebellar abscess due to infection with the anaerobic bacteria fusobacterium nucleatum: a case report].

    PubMed

    Shimogawa, Takafumi; Sayama, Tetsuro; Haga, Sei; Akiyama, Tomoaki; Morioka, Takato

    2015-02-01

    We report a rare case of cerebellar abscess produced by anaerobic bacteria. A 76-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a history of fever, vomiting, and dizziness lasting 14 days. Computed tomography(CT)scan and magnetic resonance images showed the presence of a multiloculated cerebellar abscess with a right subdural abscess. The patient underwent aspiration of the abscess through a suboccipital craniotomy. Fusobacterium nucleatum, which is an anaerobic bacteria naturally present in the human oral cavity, was detected in cultures of the aspirated abscess. The patient was administered antibiotic treatment combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy(HBO). The symptoms were briefly relieved but the cerebellar abscess recurred, which required a second aspiration. The combined treatment with antibiotics and HBO was maintained after the second operation. After 6 weeks of treatment, the cerebellar abscess was completely controlled. We conclude that antibiotic treatment combined with HBO is useful for treatment of cerebellar abscesses caused by infection with anaerobic bacteria.

  14. Rapid detection of nusG and fadA in Fusobacterium nucleatum by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Simo; Yang, Zhan; Zou, Dayang; Dong, Derong; Liu, Anheng; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-08-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is associated with various human diseases such as periodontal disease and colorectal cancer (CRC); thus, F. nucleatum detection might serve as a novel diagnostic tool. Here, we describe the development of a sensitive and rapid molecular method for detecting two F. nucleatum genes: the highly conserved nusG and fadA, which encode a critical host colonization factor. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) primer sets for the rapid detection of nusG and fadA were designed and optimized. The nusG primers yielded consistent negative results for 20 non-F. nucleatum bacterial strains, confirming the high specificity of the primers. LAMP reaction primer sensitivity was determined, and its detection rate in comparison to conventional PCR was assessed using 57 clinical stool samples. The LAMP detection limit for nusG and fadA was 22.5 and 0.225 pg µl-1, respectively, indicating that the sensitivity of this method was 10-fold higher than that of conventional PCR. These results suggest that the LAMP technique is able to effectively identify F. nucleatum via nusG as well as detect its virulence factor. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to report the application of LAMP for the detection of nusG and fadA in F. nucleatum. The LAMP method constitutes a sensitive and specific visual assay for the rapid detection of the pathogen F. nucleatum.

  15. High occurrence of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Clostridium difficile in the intestinal microbiota of colorectal carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Fukugaiti, Márcia H; Ignacio, Aline; Fernandes, Miriam R; Ribeiro Júnior, Ulysses; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario J

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is considered the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Several microorganisms have been associated with carcinogenesis, including Enterococcus spp., Helicobacter pylori, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, pathogenic E. coli strains and oral Fusobacterium. Here we qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated the presence of oral and intestinal microorganisms in the fecal microbiota of colorectal cancer patients and healthy controls. Seventeen patients (between 49 and 70 years-old) visiting the Cancer Institute of the Sao Paulo State were selected, 7 of whom were diagnosed with colorectal carcinoma. Bacterial detection was performed by qRT-PCR. Although all of the tested bacteria were detected in the majority of the fecal samples, quantitative differences between the Cancer Group and healthy controls were detected only for F. nucleatum and C. difficile. The three tested oral microorganisms were frequently observed, suggesting a need for furthers studies into a potential role for these bacteria during colorectal carcinoma pathogenesis. Despite the small number of patients included in this study, we were able to detect significantly more F. nucleatum and C. difficile in the Cancer Group patients compared to healthy controls, suggesting a possible role of these bacteria in colon carcinogenesis. This finding should be considered when screening for colorectal cancer.

  16. High occurrence of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Clostridium difficile in the intestinal microbiota of colorectal carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Fukugaiti, Márcia H.; Ignacio, Aline; Fernandes, Miriam R.; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos, Mario J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal carcinoma is considered the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Several microorganisms have been associated with carcinogenesis, including Enterococcus spp., Helicobacter pylori, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, pathogenic E. coli strains and oral Fusobacterium. Here we qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated the presence of oral and intestinal microorganisms in the fecal microbiota of colorectal cancer patients and healthy controls. Seventeen patients (between 49 and 70 years-old) visiting the Cancer Institute of the Sao Paulo State were selected, 7 of whom were diagnosed with colorectal carcinoma. Bacterial detection was performed by qRT-PCR. Although all of the tested bacteria were detected in the majority of the fecal samples, quantitative differences between the Cancer Group and healthy controls were detected only for F. nucleatum and C. difficile. The three tested oral microorganisms were frequently observed, suggesting a need for furthers studies into a potential role for these bacteria during colorectal carcinoma pathogenesis. Despite the small number of patients included in this study, we were able to detect significantly more F. nucleatum and C. difficile in the Cancer Group patients compared to healthy controls, suggesting a possible role of these bacteria in colon carcinogenesis. This finding should be considered when screening for colorectal cancer. PMID:26691472

  17. Registered report: Fusobacterium nucleatum infection is prevalent in human colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Repass, John; Maherali, Nimet; Owen, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from 'Fusobacterium nucleatum infection is prevalent in human colorectal carcinoma' by Castellarin and colleagues published in Genome Research in 2012 (Castellarin et al., 2012). The experiment to be replicated is reported in Figure 2. Here, Castellarin and colleagues performed a metagenomic analysis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) to identify potential associations between inflammatory microorganisms and gastrointestinal cancers. They conducted quantitative real-time PCR on genomic DNA isolated from tumor and matched normal biopsies from a patient cohort and found that the overall abundance of Fusobacterium was 415 times greater in CRC versus adjacent normal tissue. These results confirmed earlier studies and provide evidence for a link between tissue-associated bacteria and tumorigenesis. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published in eLife.

  18. Identification of an L-methionine γ-lyase involved in the production of hydrogen sulfide from L-cysteine in Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 25586.

    PubMed

    Suwabe, Kyosuke; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2011-10-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum produces an abundance of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in the oral cavity that is mediated by several enzymes. The identification and characterization of three distinct enzymes (Fn0625, Fn1055 and Fn1220) in F. nucleatum that catalyse the production of H(2)S from l-cysteine have been reported. In the current study, a novel enzyme involved in the production of H(2)S in F. nucleatum ATCC 25586, whose molecular mass had been estimated to be approximately 130 kDa, was identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF MS. The enzyme, Fn1419, has previously been characterized as an l-methionine γ-lyase. SDS-PAGE and gel-filtration chromatography indicated that Fn1419 has a molecular mass of 43 kDa and forms tetramers in solution. Unlike other enzymes associated with H(2)S production in F. nucleatum, the quaternary structure of Fn1419 was not completely disrupted by exposure to SDS. The purified recombinant enzyme exhibited a K(m) of 0.32±0.02 mM and a k(cat) of 0.69±0.01 s(-1). Based on current and published data, the enzymic activity for H(2)S production from l-cysteine in F. nucleatum is ranked as follows: Fn1220>Fn1055>Fn1419>Fn0625. Based on kinetic values and relative mRNA levels of the respective genes, as determined by real-time quantitative PCR, the amount of H(2)S produced by Fn1419 was estimated to be 1.9 % of the total H(2)S produced from l-cysteine in F. nucleatum ATCC 25586. In comparison, Fn1220 appeared to contribute significantly to H(2)S production (87.6 %).

  19. NOX1/2 activation in human gingival fibroblasts by Fusobacterium nucleatum facilitates attachment of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sun Hee; Song, Ji-Eun; Kim, Suhee; Cho, Sung-Hyun; Lim, Yun Kyong; Kook, Joong-Ki; Kook, Min-Suk; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal diseases are infectious polymicrobial inflammatory diseases that lead to destruction of the periodontal ligament, gingiva, and alveolar bone. Sequential colonization of a broad range of bacteria, including Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis, is an important phenomenon in this disease model. F. nucleatum is a facultative anaerobic species thought to be a key mediator of dental plaque maturation due to its extensive coaggregation with other oral bacteria, while P. gingivalis is an obligate anaerobic species that induces gingival inflammation by secreting various virulence factors. The formation of a bacterial complex by these two species is central to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during bacterial infections and are involved in intracellular signaling. However, the impact of oral bacteria-induced ROS on the ecology of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis has yet to be clarified. In the present study, we investigated ROS production induced in primary human oral cells by F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis and its effect on the formation of their bacterial complexes and further host cell apoptosis. We found that in primary human gingival fibroblasts (GFs), two NADPH oxidase isoforms, NOX1 and NOX2, were activated in response to F. nucleatum infection but not P. gingivalis infection. Accordingly, increased NADPH oxidase activity and production of superoxide anion were observed in GFs after F. nucleatum infection, but not after P. gingivalis infection. Interestingly, in NOX1, NOX2, or NOX1/NOX2 knockdown cells, the number of P. gingivalis decreased when the cells were coinfected with F. nucleatum. A similar pattern of host cell apoptosis was observed. This implies that F. nucleatum contributes to attachment of P. gingivalis by triggering activation of NADPH oxidase in host cells, which may provide an environment more favorable to strict anaerobic bacteria and have a subsequent effect on apoptosis of

  20. Evaluation of antibody level against Fusobacterium nucleatum in the serological diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Fang; Li, Lin-Fang; Guo, Song-He; Zeng, Qiu-Yao; Ning, Fen; Liu, Wan-Li; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum, Fn) is associated with the colorectal cancer (CRC). Fn-infection could induce significant levels of serum Fn-specific antibodies in human and mice. The objective of this study was to identify Fn-infection that elicit a humoral response in patients with CRC and evaluate the diagnostic performance of serum anti-Fn antibodies. In this work, we showed the mean absorbance value of anti-Fn-IgA and -IgG in the CRC group were significantly higher than those in the benign colon disease group and healthy control group (P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of ELISA for the detection of anti-Fn-IgA were 36.43% and 92.71% based on the optimal cut-off. The combination of anti-Fn-IgA and carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) was better for diagnosing CRC (Sen: 53.10%, Spe: 96.41%; AUC = 0.848). Furthermore, combining anti-Fn-IgA with CEA and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) (Sen: 40.00%, Spe: 94.22%; AUC = 0.743) had the better ability to classify CRC patients with stages I-II. These results suggested that Fn-infection elicited high level of serum anti-Fn antibodies in CRC patients, and serum anti-Fn-IgA level may be a potential diagnosing biomarker for CRC. Serum anti-Fn-IgA in combination with CEA and CA19-9 increases the sensitivity of detecting early CRC. PMID:27678333

  1. Fusobacterium nucleatum Alters Atherosclerosis Risk Factors and Enhances Inflammatory Markers with an Atheroprotective Immune Response in ApoEnull Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes. F.; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Donghang; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Gangula, Pandu R.; Lucas, Alexandra R.; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-01-01

    The American Heart Association supports an association between periodontal disease (PD) and atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) but does not as of yet support a causal relationship. Recently, we have shown that major periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola are causally associated with acceleration of aortic atherosclerosis in ApoEnull hyperlipidemic mice. The aim of this study was to determine if oral infection with another significant periodontal pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum can accelerate aortic inflammation and atherosclerosis in the aortic artery of ApoEnull mice. ApoEnull mice (n = 23) were orally infected with F. nucleatum ATCC 49256 and euthanized at 12 and 24 weeks. Periodontal disease assessments including F. nucleatum oral colonization, gingival inflammation, immune response, intrabony defects, and alveolar bone resorption were evaluated. Systemic organs were evaluated for infection, aortic sections were examined for atherosclerosis, and inflammatory markers were measured. Chronic oral infection established F. nucleatum colonization in the oral cavity, induced significant humoral IgG (P=0.0001) and IgM (P=0.001) antibody response (12 and 24 weeks), and resulted in significant (P=0.0001) alveolar bone resorption and intrabony defects. F. nucleatum genomic DNA was detected in systemic organs (heart, aorta, liver, kidney, lung) indicating bacteremia. Aortic atherosclerotic plaque area was measured and showed a local inflammatory infiltrate revealed the presence of F4/80+ macrophages and CD3+ T cells. Vascular inflammation was detected by enhanced systemic cytokines (CD30L, IL-4, IL-12), oxidized LDL and serum amyloid A, as well as altered serum lipid profile (cholesterol, triglycerides, chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, HDL), in infected mice and altered aortic gene expression in infected mice. Despite evidence for systemic infection in several organs and modulation of known atherosclerosis risk factors, aortic atherosclerotic

  2. Increased proliferation and decreased membrane permeability as defense mechanisms of Fusobacterium nucleatum against human neutrophilic peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Mutlu; Könönen, Eija; Söderling, Eva; Isik, Gülden; Firatli, Erhan; Uitto, Veli-Jukka; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2014-12-01

    Human neutrophilic peptides (HNPs) constitute a class of host defense molecules, which contribute to the non-oxidative killing of bacteria and other microorganisms. Since the adaptability is crucial to bacterial survival in changing environments, it is of interest to know how Fusobacterium nucleatum, the major bridge organism connecting early and late colonizers in dental biofilms, defends itself against HNPs. This study aimed to examine the planktonic growth, membrane permeability, and biofilm formation characteristics as defense mechanisms of F. nucleatum against HNP-1. In all experiments, the type strain of F. nucleatum (ssp. nucleatum ATCC 25586) and two clinical strains (ssp. nucleatum AHN 9508 and ssp. polymorphum AHN 9910) were used. Planktonic growth (measured in colony forming units), capsular polysaccharide production (visualized by Ziehl-Neelsen stain), membrane permeability (demonstrated as N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine uptake), biofilm formation, and established biofilm development (measured as total mass and polysaccharide levels) were analyzed in the presence of 0 μg/ml (control), 1 μg/ml, 5 μg/ml, and 10 μg/ml of HNP-1. Planktonic growth of the strains AHN 9508 and ATCC 25586 were significantly (p<0.05) increased in the presence of HNP-1, while their membrane permeability decreased (p<0.005) in the planktonic form. HNP-1 decreased the biofilm formation of the strains ATCC 25586 and AHN 9910, whereas it increased the growth of the strain AHN 9508 in established biofilms. Capsule formation and polysaccharide production were not observed in any strain. We conclude that the inhibition of the membrane permeability and the increase in planktonic and established biofilm growth could act as bacterial defense mechanisms against neutrophilic defensins. In addition, this strain-dependent survival ability against HNP-1 may explain the variation in the virulence of different F. nucleatum strains.

  3. Fap2 Mediates Fusobacterium nucleatum Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Enrichment by Binding to Tumor-Expressed Gal-GalNAc.

    PubMed

    Abed, Jawad; Emgård, Johanna E M; Zamir, Gideon; Faroja, Mouhammad; Almogy, Gideon; Grenov, Amalie; Sol, Asaf; Naor, Ronit; Pikarsky, Eli; Atlan, Karine A; Mellul, Anna; Chaushu, Stella; Manson, Abigail L; Earl, Ashlee M; Ou, Nora; Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S; Bachrach, Gilad

    2016-08-10

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is associated with colorectal cancer and promotes colonic tumor formation in preclinical models. However, fusobacteria are core members of the human oral microbiome and less prevalent in the healthy gut, raising questions about how fusobacteria localize to CRC. We identify a host polysaccharide and fusobacterial lectin that explicates fusobacteria abundance in CRC. Gal-GalNAc, which is overexpressed in CRC, is recognized by fusobacterial Fap2, which functions as a Gal-GalNAc lectin. F. nucleatum binding to clinical adenocarcinomas correlates with Gal-GalNAc expression and is reduced upon O-glycanase treatment. Clinical fusobacteria strains naturally lacking Fap2 or inactivated Fap2 mutants show reduced binding to Gal-GalNAc-expressing CRC cells and established CRCs in mice. Additionally, intravenously injected F. nucleatum localizes to mouse tumor tissues in a Fap2-dependent manner, suggesting that fusobacteria use a hematogenous route to reach colon adenocarcinomas. Thus, targeting F. nucleatum Fap2 or host epithelial Gal-GalNAc may reduce fusobacteria potentiation of CRC. PMID:27512904

  4. Fap2 Mediates Fusobacterium nucleatum Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Enrichment by Binding to Tumor-Expressed Gal-GalNAc.

    PubMed

    Abed, Jawad; Emgård, Johanna E M; Zamir, Gideon; Faroja, Mouhammad; Almogy, Gideon; Grenov, Amalie; Sol, Asaf; Naor, Ronit; Pikarsky, Eli; Atlan, Karine A; Mellul, Anna; Chaushu, Stella; Manson, Abigail L; Earl, Ashlee M; Ou, Nora; Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S; Bachrach, Gilad

    2016-08-10

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is associated with colorectal cancer and promotes colonic tumor formation in preclinical models. However, fusobacteria are core members of the human oral microbiome and less prevalent in the healthy gut, raising questions about how fusobacteria localize to CRC. We identify a host polysaccharide and fusobacterial lectin that explicates fusobacteria abundance in CRC. Gal-GalNAc, which is overexpressed in CRC, is recognized by fusobacterial Fap2, which functions as a Gal-GalNAc lectin. F. nucleatum binding to clinical adenocarcinomas correlates with Gal-GalNAc expression and is reduced upon O-glycanase treatment. Clinical fusobacteria strains naturally lacking Fap2 or inactivated Fap2 mutants show reduced binding to Gal-GalNAc-expressing CRC cells and established CRCs in mice. Additionally, intravenously injected F. nucleatum localizes to mouse tumor tissues in a Fap2-dependent manner, suggesting that fusobacteria use a hematogenous route to reach colon adenocarcinomas. Thus, targeting F. nucleatum Fap2 or host epithelial Gal-GalNAc may reduce fusobacteria potentiation of CRC.

  5. Fap2 of Fusobacterium nucleatum is a galactose-inhibitable adhesin involved in coaggregation, cell adhesion, and preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Coppenhagen-Glazer, S; Sol, A; Abed, J; Naor, R; Zhang, X; Han, Y W; Bachrach, G

    2015-03-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a common oral anaerobe involved in periodontitis that is known to translocate and cause intrauterine infections. In the oral environment, F. nucleatum adheres to a large diversity of species, facilitating their colonization and creating biological bridges that stabilize the multispecies dental biofilm. Many of these interactions (called coadherences or coaggregations) are galactose sensitive. Galactose-sensitive interactions are also involved in the binding of F. nucleatum to host cells. Hemagglutination of some F. nucleatum strains is also galactose sensitive, suggesting that a single galactose-sensitive adhesin might mediate the interaction of fusobacteria with many partners and targets. In order to identify the fusobacterial galactose-sensitive adhesin, a system for transposon mutagenesis in fusobacteria was created. The mutant library was screened for hemagglutination deficiency, and three clones were isolated. All three clones were found to harbor the transposon in the gene coding for the Fap2 outer membrane autotransporter. The three fap2 mutants failed to show galactose-inhibitable coaggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis and were defective in cell binding. A fap2 mutant also showed a 2-log reduction in murine placental colonization compared to that of the wild type. Our results suggest that Fap2 is a galactose-sensitive hemagglutinin and adhesin that is likely to play a role in the virulence of fusobacteria.

  6. Fap2 of Fusobacterium nucleatum Is a Galactose-Inhibitable Adhesin Involved in Coaggregation, Cell Adhesion, and Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Coppenhagen-Glazer, S.; Sol, A.; Abed, J.; Naor, R.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is a common oral anaerobe involved in periodontitis that is known to translocate and cause intrauterine infections. In the oral environment, F. nucleatum adheres to a large diversity of species, facilitating their colonization and creating biological bridges that stabilize the multispecies dental biofilm. Many of these interactions (called coadherences or coaggregations) are galactose sensitive. Galactose-sensitive interactions are also involved in the binding of F. nucleatum to host cells. Hemagglutination of some F. nucleatum strains is also galactose sensitive, suggesting that a single galactose-sensitive adhesin might mediate the interaction of fusobacteria with many partners and targets. In order to identify the fusobacterial galactose-sensitive adhesin, a system for transposon mutagenesis in fusobacteria was created. The mutant library was screened for hemagglutination deficiency, and three clones were isolated. All three clones were found to harbor the transposon in the gene coding for the Fap2 outer membrane autotransporter. The three fap2 mutants failed to show galactose-inhibitable coaggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis and were defective in cell binding. A fap2 mutant also showed a 2-log reduction in murine placental colonization compared to that of the wild type. Our results suggest that Fap2 is a galactose-sensitive hemagglutinin and adhesin that is likely to play a role in the virulence of fusobacteria. PMID:25561710

  7. Fusobacterium nucleatum associates with stages of colorectal neoplasia development, colorectal cancer and disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, L; Schmid, J; Ebert, M; Soucek, P; Kunicka, T; Liska, V; Bruha, J; Neary, P; Dezeeuw, N; Tommasino, M; Jenab, M; Prehn, J H M; Hughes, D J

    2014-08-01

    Commensal bacteria in the colon may play a role in colorectal cancer (CRC) development. Recent studies from North America showed that Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) infection is over-represented in disease tissue versus matched normal tissue in CRC patients. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of DNA extracted from colorectal tissue biopsies and surgical resections of three European cohorts totalling 122 CRC patients, we found an over-abundance of Fn in cancerous compared to matched normal tissue (p < 0.0001). To determine whether Fn infection is an early event in CRC development, we assayed Fn in colorectal adenoma (CRA) tissue from 52 Irish patients. While for all CRAs the Fn level was not statistically significantly higher in disease versus normal tissue (p = 0.06), it was significantly higher for high-grade dysplasia (p = 0.015). As a secondary objective, we determined that CRC patients with low Fn levels had a significantly longer overall survival time than patients with moderate and high levels of the bacterium (p = 0.008). The investigation of Fn as a potential non-invasive biomarker for CRC screening showed that, while Fn was more abundant in stool samples from CRC patients compared to adenomas or controls, the levels in stool did not correlate with cancer or adenoma tissue levels from the same individuals. This is the first study examining Fn in the colonic tissue and stool of European CRC and CRA patients, and suggests Fn as a novel risk factor for disease progression from adenoma to cancer, possibly affecting patient survival outcomes. Our results highlight the potential of Fn detection as a diagnostic and prognostic determinant in CRC patients.

  8. Detection of fusobacterium nucleatum and fadA adhesin gene in patients with orthodontic gingivitis and non-orthodontic periodontal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jianning; Guo, Yang; Zhang, Yujie; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of F. nucleatum and its virulence factor FadA adhesion gene (fadA) in 169 subgingival biofilm samples from 55 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 49 cases of gingivitis patients without orthodontic treatment, 35 cases of periodontitis patients and 30 cases of periodontally healthy people via PCR. The correlations between the F. nucleatum/fadA and gingivitis index(GI)was also analyzed. The detection rate of F. nucleatum/fadA in periodontitis group and non-orthodontic gingivitis group was higher than the other two groups (p<0.01) while it was higher in orthodontic gingivitis group than in health people (p<0.05). An obviously positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of F. nucleatum/fadA and GI. F. nucleatum carrying fadA may be more closely related to the development of gingivitis and periodontal disease compared with orthodontic gingivitis.

  9. Detection of fusobacterium nucleatum and fadA adhesin gene in patients with orthodontic gingivitis and non-orthodontic periodontal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jianning; Guo, Yang; Zhang, Yujie; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of F. nucleatum and its virulence factor FadA adhesion gene (fadA) in 169 subgingival biofilm samples from 55 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 49 cases of gingivitis patients without orthodontic treatment, 35 cases of periodontitis patients and 30 cases of periodontally healthy people via PCR. The correlations between the F. nucleatum/fadA and gingivitis index(GI)was also analyzed. The detection rate of F. nucleatum/fadA in periodontitis group and non-orthodontic gingivitis group was higher than the other two groups (p<0.01) while it was higher in orthodontic gingivitis group than in health people (p<0.05). An obviously positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of F. nucleatum/fadA and GI. F. nucleatum carrying fadA may be more closely related to the development of gingivitis and periodontal disease compared with orthodontic gingivitis. PMID:24416378

  10. Antibacterial and antigelatinolytic effects of Satureja hortensis L. essential oil on epithelial cells exposed to Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Keskin, Mutlu; Könönen, Eija; Uitto, Veli-Jukka; Söderling, Eva; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Gürsoy, Ulvi K

    2015-04-01

    The present report examined the effects of essential oils (EOs) from Satureja hortensis L. and Salvia fruticosa M. on the viability and outer membrane permeability of the periodontopathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum, a key bacteria in oral biofilms, as well as the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) activities in epithelial cells exposed to such bacteria. Membrane permeability was tested by measuring the N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine uptake and bacterial viability by using the commercially available Live/Dead BacLight kit. In addition, gelatin zymography was performed to analyze the inhibition of F. nucleatum-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in HaCaT cells. We showed that 5, 10, and 25 μL/mL of Sat. hortensis L. EO decreased the ratio of live/dead bacteria and increased the outer membrane permeability in a range of time from 0 to 5 min. Treatments with 10 and 25 μL/mL of Sal. fruticosa M. also increased the membrane permeability and 5, 10, and 25 μL/mL of both EOs inhibited MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in keratinocytes induced after exposure of 24 h to F. nucleatum. We conclude that antibacterial and antigelatinolytic activities of Sat. hortensis L. EO have potential for the treatment of periodontal inflammation. PMID:24404975

  11. Antibacterial and antigelatinolytic effects of Satureja hortensis L. essential oil on epithelial cells exposed to Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Keskin, Mutlu; Könönen, Eija; Uitto, Veli-Jukka; Söderling, Eva; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Gürsoy, Ulvi K

    2015-04-01

    The present report examined the effects of essential oils (EOs) from Satureja hortensis L. and Salvia fruticosa M. on the viability and outer membrane permeability of the periodontopathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum, a key bacteria in oral biofilms, as well as the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) activities in epithelial cells exposed to such bacteria. Membrane permeability was tested by measuring the N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine uptake and bacterial viability by using the commercially available Live/Dead BacLight kit. In addition, gelatin zymography was performed to analyze the inhibition of F. nucleatum-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in HaCaT cells. We showed that 5, 10, and 25 μL/mL of Sat. hortensis L. EO decreased the ratio of live/dead bacteria and increased the outer membrane permeability in a range of time from 0 to 5 min. Treatments with 10 and 25 μL/mL of Sal. fruticosa M. also increased the membrane permeability and 5, 10, and 25 μL/mL of both EOs inhibited MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in keratinocytes induced after exposure of 24 h to F. nucleatum. We conclude that antibacterial and antigelatinolytic activities of Sat. hortensis L. EO have potential for the treatment of periodontal inflammation.

  12. Osteomyelitis of a long bone due to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinomyces meyeri in an immunocompetent adult: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusobacterium species are uncommon causes of osteomyelitis. These organisms are normal flora of the oral cavity. Therefore, they mostly cause osteomyelitis of the head and neck. Hematogenous osteomyelitis at distant sites other than the head and neck has rarely been reported in pediatric or immunocompromised patients. Here, we report the first case of osteomyelitis of a long bone combined with a muscle abscess due to Fusobacterium nucleatum in an otherwise healthy adult. Case presentation A 59-year-old Korean man was admitted for pain and swelling of the right lower leg, which had been persistent for two weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging showed osteomyelitis of the right fibula with a surrounding muscle abscess of the right lower leg. Incision and drainage was performed, and repetitive tissue cultures grew F. nucleatum. In this patient, it was presumed that recurrent periodontitis caused hematogenous seeding of F. nucleatum to a distant site leading to osteomyelitis with a muscle abscess. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous ampicillin-sulbactam for three weeks and oral amoxicillin-clavulanate for eight weeks. He also underwent repeated surgical drainage. He has no evidence of recurrence after seven months of follow-up. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware that F. nucleatum could be the etiologic agent of hematogenous osteomyelitis of a long bone in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:22817336

  13. Tea polyphenols inhibit the activation of NF-κB and the secretion of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases by macrophages stimulated with Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Lagha, Amel Ben; Grenier, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum has been associated with both periodontal disease and inflammatory bowel disease. This Gram-negative bacterium possesses a high inflammatory potential that may contribute to the disease process. We hypothesized that green and black tea polyphenols attenuate the inflammatory response of monocytes/macrophages mediated by F. nucleatum. We first showed that the tea extracts, EGCG and theaflavins reduce the NF-κB activation induced by F. nucleatum in monocytes. Since NF-κB is a key regulator of genes coding for inflammatory mediators, we tested the effects of tea polyphenols on secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and CXCL8 by macrophages. A pre-treatment of macrophages with the tea extracts, EGCG, or theaflavins prior to a stimulation with F. nucleatum significantly inhibited the secretion of all four cytokines and reduced the secretion of MMP-3 and MMP-9, two tissue destructive enzymes. TREM-1 expressed by macrophages is a cell-surface receptor involved in the propagation of the inflammatory response to bacterial challenges. Interestingly, tea polyphenols inhibited the secretion/shedding of soluble TREM-1 induced by a stimulation of macrophages with F. nucleatum. The anti-inflammatory properties of tea polyphenols identified in the present study suggested that they may be promising agents for the prevention and/or treatment of periodontal disease and inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27694921

  14. Crystal Structure of FadA Adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum Reveals a Novel Oligomerization Motif, the Leucine Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Nithianantham, Stanley; Xu, Minghua; Yamada, Mitsunori; Ikegami, Akihiko; Shoham, Menachem; Han, Yiping W.

    2009-04-07

    Many bacterial appendages have filamentous structures, often composed of repeating monomers assembled in a head-to-tail manner. The mechanisms of such linkages vary. We report here a novel protein oligomerization motif identified in the FadA adhesin from the Gram-negative bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the secreted form of FadA (mFadA) reveals two antiparallel {alpha}-helices connected by an intervening 8-residue hairpin loop. Leucine-leucine contacts play a prominent dual intra- and intermolecular role in the structure and function of FadA. First, they comprise the main association between the two helical arms of the monomer; second, they mediate the head-to-tail association of monomers to form the elongated polymers. This leucine-mediated filamentous assembly of FadA molecules constitutes a novel structural motif termed the 'leucine chain.' The essential role of these residues in FadA is corroborated by mutagenesis of selected leucine residues, which leads to the abrogation of oligomerization, filament formation, and binding to host cells.

  15. Fusobacterium nucleatum promotes colorectal carcinogenesis by modulating E-cadherin/β-catenin signaling via its FadA adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wendy; Hao, Yujun; Cai, Guifang; Han, Yiping W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) has been associated with colorectal cancer (CRC), but causality and underlying mechanisms remain to be established. We demonstrate that Fn adheres to, invades and induces oncogenic and inflammatory responses to stimulate growth of CRC cells through its unique FadA adhesin. FadA binds to E-cadherin, activates β-catenin signaling, and differentially regulates the inflammatory and oncogenic responses. The FadA-binding site on E-cadherin is mapped to an 11 amino acid region. A synthetic peptide derived from this region of E-cadherin abolishes FadA-induced CRC cell growth, and oncogenic and inflammatory responses. FadA levels in the colon tissue from patients with adenomas and adenocarcinomas is >10–100 times higher compared to normal individuals. The increased FadA expression in CRC correlates with increased expression of oncogenic and inflammatory genes. This study unveils a mechanism by which Fn can drive CRC and identifies FadA as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:23954158

  16. Fusobacterium nucleatum Alters Atherosclerosis Risk Factors and Enhances Inflammatory Markers with an Atheroprotective Immune Response in ApoE(null) Mice.

    PubMed

    Velsko, Irina M; Chukkapalli, Sasanka S; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Donghang; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Gangula, Pandu R; Lucas, Alexandra R; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-01-01

    The American Heart Association supports an association between periodontal disease (PD) and atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) but does not as of yet support a causal relationship. Recently, we have shown that major periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola are causally associated with acceleration of aortic atherosclerosis in ApoEnull hyperlipidemic mice. The aim of this study was to determine if oral infection with another significant periodontal pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum can accelerate aortic inflammation and atherosclerosis in the aortic artery of ApoEnull mice. ApoEnull mice (n = 23) were orally infected with F. nucleatum ATCC 49256 and euthanized at 12 and 24 weeks. Periodontal disease assessments including F. nucleatum oral colonization, gingival inflammation, immune response, intrabony defects, and alveolar bone resorption were evaluated. Systemic organs were evaluated for infection, aortic sections were examined for atherosclerosis, and inflammatory markers were measured. Chronic oral infection established F. nucleatum colonization in the oral cavity, induced significant humoral IgG (P=0.0001) and IgM (P=0.001) antibody response (12 and 24 weeks), and resulted in significant (P=0.0001) alveolar bone resorption and intrabony defects. F. nucleatum genomic DNA was detected in systemic organs (heart, aorta, liver, kidney, lung) indicating bacteremia. Aortic atherosclerotic plaque area was measured and showed a local inflammatory infiltrate revealed the presence of F4/80+ macrophages and CD3+ T cells. Vascular inflammation was detected by enhanced systemic cytokines (CD30L, IL-4, IL-12), oxidized LDL and serum amyloid A, as well as altered serum lipid profile (cholesterol, triglycerides, chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, HDL), in infected mice and altered aortic gene expression in infected mice. Despite evidence for systemic infection in several organs and modulation of known atherosclerosis risk factors, aortic atherosclerotic

  17. Synergic phototoxic effect of visible light or Gallium-Arsenide laser in the presence of different photo-sensitizers on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Habibollah; Mousavi, Seyed Amir; Forouzanfar, Ali; Zakeri, Mahdi; Shafaee, Hooman; Shahnaseri, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background: According to the development of resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria following treatment with antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, alternative approaches such as lethal photosensitization are being used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of visible light and laser beam radiation in conjugation with three different photosensitizers on the survival of two main periodontopathogenic bacteria including Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in different exposure periods. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro prospective study, strains of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. were exposed to visible light at wavelengths of 440 nm and diode laser light, Gallium-Arsenide, at wavelength of 830 nm in the presence of a photosensitizer (erythrosine, curcuma, or hydrogen peroxide). They were exposed 1-5 min to each light. Each experiment was repeated 3 times for each strain of bacteria. Data were analyzed by two-ways ANOVA and least significant difference post-hoc tests. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. After 4 days the colonies were counted. Results: Viability of P. gingivalis was reduced 10% and 20% subsequent to exposure to visible light and diode laser, respectively. The values were 65% and 75% for F. nucleatum in a period of 5-min, respectively. Exposure to visible light or laser beam in conjugation with the photosensitizers suspension caused significant reduction in the number of P. gingivalis in duration of 5-min, suggesting a synergic phototoxic effect. However, the survival rate of F. nucleatum following the exposure to laser with hydrogen peroxide, erythrosine and rhizome of Curcuma longa (curcumin) after 5-min was 10%, 20% and 90% respectively. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the synergic phototoxic effect of visible light in combination with each of the photosensitizers on P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. However, the synergic phototoxic effect of laser exposure and hydrogen peroxide and curcumin as

  18. Invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon cancer through the serrated neoplasia pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiahui; Chen, Yongyu; Fu, Xiangsheng; Zhou, Xian; Peng, Yan; Shi, Lei; Chen, Ting; Wu, Yaxin

    2016-09-15

    The prevalence of invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) within the serrated neoplasia pathway of the proximal colon has seldom been investigated. We examined the invasive Fn and bacterial biofilms in 35 proximal hyperplastic polyps (HPs), 33 sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), 48 proximal colorectal cancers (CRCs) and 10 matched metastatic lymph nodes using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Samples of normal mucosa, traditional adenomas (TAs), distal HPs, distal CRCs and matched lymph nodes with or without metastases were used as controls. The prevalence of invasive Fn within proximal HPs (65.7%) and SSAs (78.8%) were significantly higher than that of proximal TAs (28.9%) and distal TAs (24.4%; p < 0.05). Invasive Fn was detected in markedly more proximal CRCs (89.6%) than in distal CRCs (42.2%; p < 0.05). Moreover, invasive Fn was detected in a significantly higher proportion of matched metastatic lymph nodes (100%) than that within nonmetastatic lymph nodes (40.0%; p < 0.001). Bacterial biofilms were found on 52.1% of proximal CRCs, 55.6% of distal CRCs and 48.5% of SSAs. Biofilms were positive for Fn in 47.9% of proximal CRCs, 48.9% of distal CRCs and 27.3% of SSAs. However, the presence of Fn in biofilms was not related to invasive Fn within colorectal tissues (p = 0.415). Invasive Fn may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon developing via the serrated neoplasia pathway, but might have a less important role in the TA-carcinoma sequence. Bacterial biofilms may not contribute to the invasion of Fn into tumor tissues. PMID:27130618

  19. Invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon cancer through the serrated neoplasia pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiahui; Chen, Yongyu; Fu, Xiangsheng; Zhou, Xian; Peng, Yan; Shi, Lei; Chen, Ting; Wu, Yaxin

    2016-09-15

    The prevalence of invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) within the serrated neoplasia pathway of the proximal colon has seldom been investigated. We examined the invasive Fn and bacterial biofilms in 35 proximal hyperplastic polyps (HPs), 33 sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), 48 proximal colorectal cancers (CRCs) and 10 matched metastatic lymph nodes using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Samples of normal mucosa, traditional adenomas (TAs), distal HPs, distal CRCs and matched lymph nodes with or without metastases were used as controls. The prevalence of invasive Fn within proximal HPs (65.7%) and SSAs (78.8%) were significantly higher than that of proximal TAs (28.9%) and distal TAs (24.4%; p < 0.05). Invasive Fn was detected in markedly more proximal CRCs (89.6%) than in distal CRCs (42.2%; p < 0.05). Moreover, invasive Fn was detected in a significantly higher proportion of matched metastatic lymph nodes (100%) than that within nonmetastatic lymph nodes (40.0%; p < 0.001). Bacterial biofilms were found on 52.1% of proximal CRCs, 55.6% of distal CRCs and 48.5% of SSAs. Biofilms were positive for Fn in 47.9% of proximal CRCs, 48.9% of distal CRCs and 27.3% of SSAs. However, the presence of Fn in biofilms was not related to invasive Fn within colorectal tissues (p = 0.415). Invasive Fn may play a role in the carcinogenesis of proximal colon developing via the serrated neoplasia pathway, but might have a less important role in the TA-carcinoma sequence. Bacterial biofilms may not contribute to the invasion of Fn into tumor tissues.

  20. Wild Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) Polyphenols Target Fusobacterium nucleatum and the Host Inflammatory Response: Potential Innovative Molecules for Treating Periodontal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ben Lagha, Amel; Dudonné, Stéphanie; Desjardins, Yves; Grenier, Daniel

    2015-08-12

    Blueberries contain significant amounts of flavonoids to which a number of beneficial health effects in humans have been associated. The present study investigated the effect of a polyphenol-rich lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) extract on the two main etiologic components of periodontitis, a multifactorial disorder affecting the supporting structures of the teeth. Phenolic acids, flavonoids (flavonols, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols), and procyanidins made up 16.6, 12.9, and 2.7% of the blueberry extract, respectively. The blueberry extract showed antibacterial activity (MIC = 1 mg/mL) against the periodontopathogenic bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum. This property may result from the ability of blueberry polyphenols to chelate iron. Moreover, the blueberry extract at 62.5 μg/mL inhibited F. nucleatum biofilm formation by 87.5 ± 2.3%. Subsequently, the ability of the blueberry extract to inhibit the NF-κB signaling pathway in U937-3xκB cells was investigated. The blueberry extract dose-dependently inhibited the activation of NF-κB induced by F. nucleatum. In addition, a pretreatment of macrophages with the blueberry extract (62.5 μg/mL) inhibited the secretion of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 by 87.3 ± 1.3, 80.7 ± 5.6, and 28.2 ± 9.3%, respectively, following a stimulation with F. nucleatum. Similarly, the secretion of MMP-8 and MMP-9 was also dose-dependently inhibited. This dual antibacterial and anti-inflammatory action of lowbush blueberry polyphenols suggests that they may be promising candidates for novel therapeutic agents. PMID:26207764

  1. Wild Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) Polyphenols Target Fusobacterium nucleatum and the Host Inflammatory Response: Potential Innovative Molecules for Treating Periodontal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ben Lagha, Amel; Dudonné, Stéphanie; Desjardins, Yves; Grenier, Daniel

    2015-08-12

    Blueberries contain significant amounts of flavonoids to which a number of beneficial health effects in humans have been associated. The present study investigated the effect of a polyphenol-rich lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) extract on the two main etiologic components of periodontitis, a multifactorial disorder affecting the supporting structures of the teeth. Phenolic acids, flavonoids (flavonols, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols), and procyanidins made up 16.6, 12.9, and 2.7% of the blueberry extract, respectively. The blueberry extract showed antibacterial activity (MIC = 1 mg/mL) against the periodontopathogenic bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum. This property may result from the ability of blueberry polyphenols to chelate iron. Moreover, the blueberry extract at 62.5 μg/mL inhibited F. nucleatum biofilm formation by 87.5 ± 2.3%. Subsequently, the ability of the blueberry extract to inhibit the NF-κB signaling pathway in U937-3xκB cells was investigated. The blueberry extract dose-dependently inhibited the activation of NF-κB induced by F. nucleatum. In addition, a pretreatment of macrophages with the blueberry extract (62.5 μg/mL) inhibited the secretion of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 by 87.3 ± 1.3, 80.7 ± 5.6, and 28.2 ± 9.3%, respectively, following a stimulation with F. nucleatum. Similarly, the secretion of MMP-8 and MMP-9 was also dose-dependently inhibited. This dual antibacterial and anti-inflammatory action of lowbush blueberry polyphenols suggests that they may be promising candidates for novel therapeutic agents.

  2. Periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum promote tumor progression in an oral-specific chemical carcinogenesis model.

    PubMed

    Binder Gallimidi, Adi; Fischman, Stuart; Revach, Brurya; Bulvik, Raanan; Maliutina, Alina; Rubinstein, Ariel M; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Elkin, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a lethal disease whose incidence is increasing. Epidemiologic studies demonstrate an association between periodontitis and oral cancer, and periodontal pathogens are implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and gastrointestinal malignancies. Nevertheless, a causal role for periodontal pathogens in OSCC has not been shown, partly due to the lack of an appropriate animal model. Here, utilizing a newly-established murine model of periodontitis-associated oral tumorigenesis, we report that chronic bacterial infection promotes OSCC, and that augmented signaling along the IL-6-STAT3 axis underlies this effect. Our results indicate that periodontal pathogens P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum stimulate tumorigenesis via direct interaction with oral epithelial cells through Toll-like receptors. Furthermore, oral pathogens stimulate human OSCC proliferation and induce expression of key molecules implicated in tumorigenesis. To the best of our knowledge, these findings represent the first demonstration of a mechanistic role for oral bacteria in chemically induced OSCC tumorigenesis. These results are highly relevant for the design of effective prevention and treatment strategies for OSCC.

  3. One-step purification and porin transport activity of the major outer membrane proteins P2 from Haemophilus influenzae, FomA from Fusobacterium nucleatum and PorB from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Kattner, Christof; Pfennig, Sabrina; Massari, Paola; Tanabe, Mikio

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial porins are major outer membrane proteins that function as essential solute transporters between the bacteria and the extracellular environment. Structural features of porins are also recognized by eukaryotic cell receptors involved in innate and adaptive immunity. To better investigate the function of porins, proper refolding is necessary following purification from inclusion bodies [1, 2]. Using a single-step size exclusion chromatographic method, we have purified three major porins from pathogenic bacteria, the OmpP2 (P2) from Haemophilus influenzae, FomA from Fusobacterium nucleatum and PorB from Neisseria meningitidis, at high yield and report their unique solute transport activity with size exclusion limit. Furthermore, we have optimized their purification method and achieved improvement of their thermostability for facilitating functional and structural analyses.

  4. Fusobacterium and Enterobacteriaceae: important players for CRC?

    PubMed

    Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Jobin, Christian

    2014-12-01

    The gut microbiota plays an essential role in regulating intestinal homeostasis through its capacity to modulate various biological activities ranging from barrier, immunity and metabolic function. Not surprisingly, microbial dysbiosis is associated with numerous intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and colorectal cancer (CRC). In this piece, we will review recent evidence that gut microbial dysbiosis can influence intestinal disease, including colitis and CRC. We will discuss the biological events implicated in the development of microbial dysbiosis and the emergence of CRC-associated microorganisms, focusing on Escherichia coli and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Finally, the mechanisms by which E. coli and F. nucleatum exert potentially carcinogenic effects on the host will be reviewed.

  5. Identification of a 43-kDa outer membrane protein of Fusobacterium necrophorum that exhibits similarity with pore-forming proteins of other Fusobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongbo; Zhang, Hong; Lv, Siwen; Wang, Hongbin; Guo, Donghua

    2013-08-01

    A pair of primers was designed in an attempt to amplify outer membrane protein (OMP) gene of Fusobacterium necrophorum based on nucleotide sequence of the OMP of Fusobacterium nucleatum. Further analysis was performed to characterize its molecular properties and phylogeny in the genus Fusobacterium. We identified a predicated 43kDa outer membrane protein (43K OMP) in F. necrophorum, which showed the same properties as other pore-forming proteins of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria according to analysis of signal peptide, AT-rich, membrane-spanning region and conserved motifs. The predicated 43K OMP exhibited 70.22%, 62.04%, 56.75%, 58.72%, 51.59%, 31.49% and 50.26% amino acid identity with the OMPs of F. nucleatum, Fusobacterium varium, Fusobacterium ucerans, Fusobacterium periodonticum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, Fusobacterium gonidiaformans and F. necrophorum (hypothetical protein), respectively. 11 common conserved domains and 10 common variable domains were found among the 45 aligned OMPs of Fusobacterium species. Distributions of the conserved and variable domains were highly associated with predicted membrane-spanning regions, cell surface exposed regions and B-cell epitope regions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the predicated 43K OMP of F. necrophorum was closely related with the OMPs from F. nucleatum and F. periodonticum. These data will increase understanding of pathogenesis and genetic evolution of F. necrophorum.

  6. Fusobacterium spondylodiscitis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Allen T; Christensen, Diana

    2014-04-01

    Fusobacteria are obligate anaerobic bacilli residing in the oral cavity, female genital tract, and intestine. These pathogens are typical components of head, neck, and abdominal abscesses due to contiguous spread from adjacent mucosal surfaces. They are unusual etiologies, however, of bone and joint infections, particularly outside the cranial region. We report an unusual case of hematogenous lumbar spondylodiscitis caused by Fusobacterium nucleatum of suspected odontogenic origin.

  7. Occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Porphyromonas spp. and Fusobacterium spp. in dogs with and without periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Senhorinho, Gerusa N A; Nakano, Viviane; Liu, Chengxu; Song, Yuli; Finegold, Sydney M; Avila-Campos, Mario J

    2012-08-01

    The occurrence of Porphyromonas gulae, Porphyromonas macacae, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Fusobacterium canifelinum in subgingival plaque from dogs with and without periodontitis as well as their antimicrobial susceptibility were evaluated. From 50 dogs with periodontitis were identified 38 P. gulae, 8 P. macacae, 26 F. nucleatum and 15 F. canifelinum, and from 50 dogs without periodontitis were identified 15 P. gulae, 12 F. nucleatum and 11 F. canifelinum. All strains were susceptible to most of the antibiotics tested, however, different resistance rates to clarithromycin, erythromycin and metronidazole among strains were observed. The role of P. gulae, P. macacae, F. nucleatum and F. canifelinum in periodontal disease of household pets needs to be defined to a better prevention and treatment of the canine periodontitis.

  8. Fusobacterium hwasookii sp. nov., Isolated from a Human Periodontitis Lesion.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eugene; Park, Soon-Nang; Lim, Yun Kyong; Shin, Yeseul; Paek, Jayoung; Hwang, Cheol Ho; Chang, Young-Hyo; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we classified the five strains (ChDC F128(T), ChDC F145, ChDC F174, ChDC F206, and ChDC F300) as a novel species of genus Fusobacterium by DNA-DNA hybridization and multi-locus phylogenetic analysis (MLPA), based on a single sequence (24,715 bp) of 22 concatenated housekeeping genes, with morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics. DNA-DNA hybridization data showed that the values of genomic relatedness between ChDC F128(T) and each of the other novel strains were ranged from 79.0 to 82.6 %, while those of genomic relatedness between ChDC F128(T) and type strain of each of subspecies of F. nucleatum or Fusobacterium periodonticum were ranged from 40.9 to 54.4 %. MLPA revealed that the 5 strains were clustered as one group and clearly discriminated with F. nucleatum and F. periodonticum with 100 % bootstrap value. The DNA G+C content of the five novel strains were ranged from 26.9 to 27.0 mol%. The cellular fatty acid analysis of clinical isolates and type strains revealed C14:0, C16:0, and cis-9 C16:1 as the major fatty acids. The cell wall peptidoglycan of the 5 strains was comprised of meso-lanthionine. These results show that the 5 strains are novel species and belong to the genus Fusobacterium. Strain ChDC F128(T) (=KCOM 1249(T) = KCTC 5108(T) = JCM 30218(T)) is suggested to be the type strain of a novel species of genus Fusobacterium, for which the name Fusobacterium hwasookii sp. nov. is proposed.

  9. Fusobacterium hwasookii sp. nov., Isolated from a Human Periodontitis Lesion.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eugene; Park, Soon-Nang; Lim, Yun Kyong; Shin, Yeseul; Paek, Jayoung; Hwang, Cheol Ho; Chang, Young-Hyo; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we classified the five strains (ChDC F128(T), ChDC F145, ChDC F174, ChDC F206, and ChDC F300) as a novel species of genus Fusobacterium by DNA-DNA hybridization and multi-locus phylogenetic analysis (MLPA), based on a single sequence (24,715 bp) of 22 concatenated housekeeping genes, with morphological and chemotaxonomic characteristics. DNA-DNA hybridization data showed that the values of genomic relatedness between ChDC F128(T) and each of the other novel strains were ranged from 79.0 to 82.6 %, while those of genomic relatedness between ChDC F128(T) and type strain of each of subspecies of F. nucleatum or Fusobacterium periodonticum were ranged from 40.9 to 54.4 %. MLPA revealed that the 5 strains were clustered as one group and clearly discriminated with F. nucleatum and F. periodonticum with 100 % bootstrap value. The DNA G+C content of the five novel strains were ranged from 26.9 to 27.0 mol%. The cellular fatty acid analysis of clinical isolates and type strains revealed C14:0, C16:0, and cis-9 C16:1 as the major fatty acids. The cell wall peptidoglycan of the 5 strains was comprised of meso-lanthionine. These results show that the 5 strains are novel species and belong to the genus Fusobacterium. Strain ChDC F128(T) (=KCOM 1249(T) = KCTC 5108(T) = JCM 30218(T)) is suggested to be the type strain of a novel species of genus Fusobacterium, for which the name Fusobacterium hwasookii sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:25257648

  10. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  11. A case of liver abscess with systemic infection caused by Fusobacterium.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Naoki; Okai, Ken; Takahashi, Atsushi; Abe, Kazumichi; Kanno, Yukiko; Hayashi, Manabu; Imaizumi, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2016-05-01

    A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. Blood testing showed elevated levels of C-reactive protein and white blood cells. Computed tomography revealed multilocular masses of the right hepatic lobe, reticulonodular shadowing on both lungs, left kidney masses, and aortic arch aneurysm. Fusobacterium nucleatum was isolated from the hepatic abscess after percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Because of severe dental caries, he was diagnosed with liver abscess caused by dental infection with F. nucleatum. Administration of cefmetazole and meropenem was not effective; however, he showed remarkable improvement after treatment with metronidazole and continuous drainage.

  12. A case of liver abscess with systemic infection caused by Fusobacterium.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Naoki; Okai, Ken; Takahashi, Atsushi; Abe, Kazumichi; Kanno, Yukiko; Hayashi, Manabu; Imaizumi, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2016-05-01

    A 43-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. Blood testing showed elevated levels of C-reactive protein and white blood cells. Computed tomography revealed multilocular masses of the right hepatic lobe, reticulonodular shadowing on both lungs, left kidney masses, and aortic arch aneurysm. Fusobacterium nucleatum was isolated from the hepatic abscess after percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Because of severe dental caries, he was diagnosed with liver abscess caused by dental infection with F. nucleatum. Administration of cefmetazole and meropenem was not effective; however, he showed remarkable improvement after treatment with metronidazole and continuous drainage. PMID:27151479

  13. Fusobacterium infections in children

    PubMed Central

    Arane, Karen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Question A 2-year-old patient in my practice with acute otitis media that has progressed to mastoiditis with a high fever returns with positive culture results for Fusobacterium. What should I do next? Answer Fusobacterium is a genus of anaerobic bacteria. Although Fusobacterium infections are rare, they can become severe if not treated promptly. Appropriate treatment is combination antibiotic therapy consisting of a β-lactam (penicillin, cephalosporin) and an anaerobic antimicrobial agent (metronidazole, clindamycin). At times surgical involvement is required for mastoiditis such as drainage of abscesses or insertion of a ventilation tube. Delayed treatment of an infection caused by Fusobacterium can lead to serious complications, including Lemierre syndrome. Children should be seen in a hospital for close monitoring. PMID:27737977

  14. Halitosis vaccines targeting FomA, a biofilm-bridging protein of fusobacteria nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Liu, P-F; Huang, I-F; Shu, C-W; Huang, C-M

    2013-09-01

    Halitosis (bad breath) is estimated to influence more than half of the world's population with varying degree of intensity. More than 85% of halitosis originates from oral bacterial infections. Foul-smelling breath mainly results from bacterial production of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) such as hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan. To date, major treatments for elimination of oral malodor include periodontal therapy combined with antibiotics or antimicrobial agents, and mechanical approaches including tooth and tongue cleaning. These treatments may transiently reduce VSCs but carry risks of generating toxicity, increasing resistant strains and misbalancing the resident human flora. Therefore, there is a need to develop alternative therapeutic modalities for halitosis. Plaque biofilms are the principal source for generating VSCs which are originally metabolized from amino acids during co-aggregation of oral bacteria. Blocking the bacterial coaggregation, therefore, may prevent various biofilm-associated oral diseases such as periodontitis and halitosis. Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum), a Gram-negative anaerobe oral bacterium, is a main bacterial strain related to halitosis. Aggregation of F. nucleatum with other bacteria to form plaque biofilms in oral cavity causes bad breath. FomA, the major outer membrane protein of F. nucleatum, recruits other oral pathogenic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) in the periodontal pockets. A halitosis vaccine targeting F. bacterium FomA significantly abrogates the enhancement of bacterial co-aggregation, biofilms, production of VSCs, and gum inflammation mediated by an inter-species interaction of F. nucleatum with P. gingivalis, which suggests FomA of F. nucleatum to be a potential target for development of vaccines or drugs against bacterial biofilm formation and its associated pathogenicities. PMID:23865430

  15. Halitosis vaccines targeting FomA, a biofilm-bridging protein of fusobacteria nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Liu, P-F; Huang, I-F; Shu, C-W; Huang, C-M

    2013-09-01

    Halitosis (bad breath) is estimated to influence more than half of the world's population with varying degree of intensity. More than 85% of halitosis originates from oral bacterial infections. Foul-smelling breath mainly results from bacterial production of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) such as hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan. To date, major treatments for elimination of oral malodor include periodontal therapy combined with antibiotics or antimicrobial agents, and mechanical approaches including tooth and tongue cleaning. These treatments may transiently reduce VSCs but carry risks of generating toxicity, increasing resistant strains and misbalancing the resident human flora. Therefore, there is a need to develop alternative therapeutic modalities for halitosis. Plaque biofilms are the principal source for generating VSCs which are originally metabolized from amino acids during co-aggregation of oral bacteria. Blocking the bacterial coaggregation, therefore, may prevent various biofilm-associated oral diseases such as periodontitis and halitosis. Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum), a Gram-negative anaerobe oral bacterium, is a main bacterial strain related to halitosis. Aggregation of F. nucleatum with other bacteria to form plaque biofilms in oral cavity causes bad breath. FomA, the major outer membrane protein of F. nucleatum, recruits other oral pathogenic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) in the periodontal pockets. A halitosis vaccine targeting F. bacterium FomA significantly abrogates the enhancement of bacterial co-aggregation, biofilms, production of VSCs, and gum inflammation mediated by an inter-species interaction of F. nucleatum with P. gingivalis, which suggests FomA of F. nucleatum to be a potential target for development of vaccines or drugs against bacterial biofilm formation and its associated pathogenicities.

  16. Scaling and root planning, and locally delivered minocycline reduces the load of Prevotella intermedia in an interdependent pattern, correlating with symptomatic improvements of chronic periodontitis: a short-term randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shuli; Wang, Ying; Sun, Wei; Chen, Hui; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the respective or combinatory efficacy of locally delivered 2% minocycline (MO), and scaling and root planning (SRP) by assessing both clinical parameters and the loads of four main periodontal pathogens in treating chronic periodontitis (CP). Methods Seventy adults with CP were randomly assigned to the three treatment groups: 1) SRP alone; 2) MO alone; and 3) combinatory use of SRP and MO (SRP + MO). Before and 7 days after the treatments, we evaluated both clinical parameters (pocket depth [PD] and sulcus bleeding index [SBI]) and the gene load of four main periodontal pathogens (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], and Prevotella intermedia [Pi]). Results The bacterial prevalence per patient was: Aa, 31.25%; Fn, 100%; Pg, 95.31%; and Pi, 98.44%. Seven days after treatment, the three treatments significantly reduced both PD and SBI, but not detection frequencies of the four pathogens. For PD, the reduction efficacy of SRP + MO was significantly higher than that of either MO or SRP. Only Pg responded significantly to SRP. Pg and Fn were significantly reduced in the presence of MO. Only SRP + MO showed a significant reduction effect on the gene load of Pi. The reduction of PD significantly correlated with the gene load of Pi (r=0.26; P=0.042) but not of the other bacteria. Conclusion SRP and MO reduced the load of Pi in an interdependent pattern, which correlated with symptomatic improvements of CP. PMID:26676022

  17. Fusobacterium and Escherichia: models of colorectal cancer driven by microbiota and the utility of microbiota in colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Leung, Andrea; Tsoi, Ho; Yu, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Intestinal microbiota has emerging roles in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Intestinal dysbiosis, with altered levels of specific bacteria, is consistently seen in CRC. The heart of the debate lies in whether these bacteria are a cause or consequence of CRC. Two bacteria in particular, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Escherichia coli, have consistently been associated with CRC. This review will examine evidence supporting oncogenic roles of F. nucleatum and E. coli. The proposed mechanisms of tumor formation follow two models: bacterial induced chronic inflammation leads to cell proliferation and tumor formation and virulence factors directly induce tumor formation. This review will further examine the potential for microbiota as biomarkers in CRC, with a focus on F. nucleatum.

  18. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere’s disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere’s, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses’ have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:25834342

  19. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-03-28

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere's disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere's, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses' have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:25834342

  20. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-03-28

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere's disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere's, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses' have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy.

  1. Clinical Fusobacterium mortiferum Isolates Cluster with Undifferentiated Clostridium rectum Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Phylogenetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo

    2016-05-01

    The most commonly encountered clinical Fusobacterium species are F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum; other Fusobacteria, such as F. mortiferum and F. varium, have occasionally been isolated from human specimens. Clostridium rectum is a gram-positive species characterized as a straight bacillus with oval sub-terminal spores. The close 16S rRNA gene sequence relationship of C. rectum with the genus Fusobacterium is unexpected given their very different phenotypic characteristics. Between 2014 and 2015, a total of 19 Fusobacterium isolates were recovered from the colonic tissue of 10 patients at a university hospital. All isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The phylogenetic relationship among these isolates was estimated using the neighbor-joining method and the Molecular Evolutionary Genetic Analysis (MEGA) version 6. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the F. mortiferum isolates clustered into two groups - F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) and F. mortiferum ATCC 25557 (group II) - even though they are of the same species. Furthermore, the F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) showed a close phylogenetic relationship with C. rectum, even though C. rectum is classified as a gram-positive spore-producing bacillus. C. rectum is clearly unrelated to the genus Clostridium as it shows highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with species from the genus Fusobacterium Therefore, additional methods such as Gram staining and other biochemical methods should be performed for Fusobacterium identification. PMID:27312552

  2. Clinical Fusobacterium mortiferum Isolates Cluster with Undifferentiated Clostridium rectum Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Phylogenetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo

    2016-05-01

    The most commonly encountered clinical Fusobacterium species are F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum; other Fusobacteria, such as F. mortiferum and F. varium, have occasionally been isolated from human specimens. Clostridium rectum is a gram-positive species characterized as a straight bacillus with oval sub-terminal spores. The close 16S rRNA gene sequence relationship of C. rectum with the genus Fusobacterium is unexpected given their very different phenotypic characteristics. Between 2014 and 2015, a total of 19 Fusobacterium isolates were recovered from the colonic tissue of 10 patients at a university hospital. All isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The phylogenetic relationship among these isolates was estimated using the neighbor-joining method and the Molecular Evolutionary Genetic Analysis (MEGA) version 6. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the F. mortiferum isolates clustered into two groups - F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) and F. mortiferum ATCC 25557 (group II) - even though they are of the same species. Furthermore, the F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) showed a close phylogenetic relationship with C. rectum, even though C. rectum is classified as a gram-positive spore-producing bacillus. C. rectum is clearly unrelated to the genus Clostridium as it shows highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with species from the genus Fusobacterium Therefore, additional methods such as Gram staining and other biochemical methods should be performed for Fusobacterium identification.

  3. Subacute osteomyelitis of the femur due to Fusobacterium nucleatum in a 7-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Budd, Emily; Johnson, David S; Thomas, Eva; Sadarangani, Manish

    2015-03-01

    Subacute hematogenous osteomyelitis is an insidious infection, which commonly has a delayed diagnosis. We describe the case of a 7-year-old boy with subacute osteomyelitis, which was initially considered to be a bone tumor. Infection should be considered in all cases of bone pain, especially in children, even in the absence of typical systemic features of inflammation.

  4. Fusobacterium is associated with colorectal adenomas.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Amber N; Araújo-Pérez, Félix; Azcárate-Peril, Andrea; Yeh, Jen Jen; Sandler, Robert S; Keku, Temitope O

    2013-01-01

    The human gut microbiota is increasingly recognized as a player in colorectal cancer (CRC). While particular imbalances in the gut microbiota have been linked to colorectal adenomas and cancer, no specific bacterium has been identified as a risk factor. Recent studies have reported a high abundance of Fusobacterium in CRC subjects compared to normal subjects, but this observation has not been reported for adenomas, CRC precursors. We assessed the abundance of Fusobacterium species in the normal rectal mucosa of subjects with (n = 48) and without adenomas (n = 67). We also confirmed previous reports on Fusobacterium and CRC in 10 CRC tumor tissues and 9 matching normal tissues by pyrosequencing. We extracted DNA from rectal mucosal biopsies and measured bacterial levels by quantitative PCR of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Local cytokine gene expression was also determined in mucosal biopsies from adenoma cases and controls by quantitative PCR. The mean log abundance of Fusobacterium or cytokine gene expression between cases and controls was compared by t-test. Logistic regression was used to compare tertiles of Fusobacterium abundance. Adenoma subjects had a significantly higher abundance of Fusobacterium species compared to controls (p = 0.01). Compared to the lowest tertile, subjects with high abundance of Fusobacterium were significantly more likely to have adenomas (OR 3.66, 95% CI 1.37-9.74, p-trend 0.005). Cases but not controls had a significant positive correlation between local cytokine gene expression and Fusobacterium abundance. Among cases, the correlation for local TNF-α and Fusobacterium was r = 0.33, p = 0.06 while it was 0.44, p = 0.01 for Fusobacterium and IL-10. These results support a link between the abundance of Fusobacterium in colonic mucosa and adenomas and suggest a possible role for mucosal inflammation in this process.

  5. [Current management of thalassemia intermedia].

    PubMed

    Thuret, I

    2014-11-01

    Thalassemia intermedia is a clinical entity where anemia is mild or moderate, requiring no or occasional transfusion. Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia encompasses 3 main clinical forms: beta-thalassemia intermedia, hemoglobin E/beta-thalassemia and alpha-thalassemia intermedia (HbH disease). Clinical severity of thalassemia intermedia increases with age, with more severe anemia and more frequent complications such as extramedullary hematopoiesis and iron overload mainly related to increased intestinal absorption. Numerous adverse events including pulmonary hypertension and hypercoagulability have been associated with splenectomy, often performed in thalassemia intermedia patients. The potential preventive benefit of transfusion and chelation therapies on the occurrence of numerous complications supports the strategy of an earlier therapeutic intervention. Increasing knowledge about pathophysiological mechanisms involved in thalassemia erythropoiesis and related iron overload is currently translating in novel therapeutic approaches.

  6. The double massa intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Baydin, Serhat; Gungor, Abuzer; Baran, Oguz; Tanriover, Necmettin; Rhoton, Albert L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To describe the rare finding of a double massa intermedia (MI). Typically, the MI (interthalamic adhesion) is a single bridge of gray matter connecting the medial surfaces of the thalami. Methods: Twelve formalin- and alcohol-fixed human third ventricles were examined from superior to inferior by fiber dissection technique under ×6 to ×40 magnifications and with the endoscope. Results: In all hemispheres, the anterior and posterior commissure were defined. The MI, which bridges the medial surfaces of the thalami, was defined in all hemispheres. In one hemisphere, there was a second bridge between the thalami, located posteroinferior to the common MI. Endoscopic view confirmed that there was a second MI in this specimen. The MI usually traverses the third ventricle posterior to the foramen of Monro and connects the paired thalami. The MI is an important landmark during endoscopic and microscopic surgeries of the third ventricle. Although a double MI is very rare, surgeons should be aware of the possibility in their surgical planning. Conclusion: The surgeon should be aware of the possibility of a double MI to avoid confusion during third ventricle surgery. PMID:27127695

  7. Human infections with Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Brazier, Jon S

    2006-08-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacillus that can be a primary pathogen causing either localised abscesses and throat infections or systemic life-threatening disease. Systemic infections due to F. necrophorum are referred to as either Lemierre's disease/syndrome, post-anginal sepsis or necrobacillosis, but in the context of this mini-review, all are included under the umbrella term of 'invasive F. necrophorum disease' (IFND). Although IFND has been well documented for over a century, it is quite a rare condition and modern-day clinicians of various medical disciplines are frequently unaware of this organism and the severity of symptoms that it can cause. IFND classically occurs in previously healthy young people although the factors that trigger the invasive process are not fully understood. There are countless descriptive case histories and small series of cases of IFND disease in the literature and although commonly referred to as a 'forgotten' disease, in truth, it is probably best described as a repeatedly 'discovered' disease, as it may not always be included in medical curricula, and neither is it mentioned in some major medical textbooks. There is some evidence that IFND may be on the increase, particularly in the UK. The potential reasons for this are considered in this review along with an historical overview, and updates on disease incidence, patient demography, pathogenesis and laboratory diagnosis. PMID:16962962

  8. Fusobacterium and Enterobacteriaceae: Important players for CRC?

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Jobin, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays an essential role in regulating intestinal homeostasis through its capacity to modulate various biological activities ranging from barrier, immunity and metabolic function. Not surprisingly, microbial dysbiosis is associated with numerous intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and colorectal cancer (CRC). In this piece, we will review recent evidence that gut microbial dysbiosis can influence intestinal disease, including colitis and CRC. We will discuss the biological events implicated in the development of microbial dysbiosis and the emergence of CRC-associated microorganisms, focusing on E.coli and F. nucleatum. Finally, the mechanisms by which E.coli and F. nucleatum exert potentially carcinogenic effects on the host will be reviewed. PMID:24972311

  9. Fusobacterium necrophorum presenting as isolated lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Sonti, Rajiv; Fleury, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum causes Lemierre's syndrome - a dramatic and distinct condition beginning with pharyngitis before proceeding to internal jugular vein septic thrombophlebitis and respiratory tract infection in otherwise healthy individuals. It is rare, but by far the most common pathway to parenchymal lung disease with this organism. Here we describe we a 34 year old healthy lady who was nontoxic without any antecedent illness who presented with lung nodules due to fusobacterium necrophorum as the sole manifestation of disease. Leading diagnostic consideration prior to culture data was pulmonary vasculitis. Identifying her disease process was a somewhat chance occurrence, and it began to resolve prior to antibiotic therapy. Though it would be difficult to recommend keen awareness of this organism given its rarity, it is important to consider that its scope may be broader than traditionally considered. PMID:26236610

  10. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility of Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium species isolated from patients of the N. N. Blokhin Cancer Research Center, Moscow, Russia.

    PubMed

    Shilnikova, Irina I; Dmitrieva, Natalia V

    2015-02-01

    In total 122 non-duplicate Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium spp isolated from cancer patients between 2004 and 2014 were involved in this study. Most of the strains belonged to the B. fragilis group (55%), followed by Prevotella strains (34.4%) and Fusobacterium spp (10.6%). The species identification was carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and they were identified on species level with a log (score) >2.0. The most common isolates were B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus and B. vulgatus. Among Prevotella species, the most frequently isolated species were P. buccae, P. buccalis, P. oris, P. denticola and P. nigrescens, and most of the Fusobacterium spp. were F. nucleatum. Susceptibilities of the strains were determined by the E-test methodology. The percentage of the susceptibility of B. fragilis group isolates were: metronidazole (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 97%; imipenem (MIC ≤2 μg/ml), 95.5%; amoxicillin/clavulanate (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 95.5% and clindamycin (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 77.6%. Three B. fragilis isolates proved to be multidrug-resistant (parallel resistance to imipenem, amoxicillin/clavulanate and metronidazole or clindamycin was observed). All Prevotella strains tested were susceptible to imipenem and amoxicillin/clavulanate, whereas 78.6% of the pigmented Prevotella species and 46.4% of the non-pigmented species were resistant to penicillin (MIC >0.5 μg/ml). The susceptibility to metronidazole and clindamycin were 93% and 88%, respectively. All Fusobacterium strains were sensitive to all tested antibiotics, including penicillin.

  11. Unusual neurological presentation of Fusobacterium necrophorum disease.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nasrean; Morris, Trefor; Dhillon, Rishi; Gibbon, Frances

    2016-01-12

    A 2-year-old girl presented to hospital, with reduced consciousness and fever. She had a 4-week history of fever treated with two courses of amoxicillin for tonsillitis diagnosed in primary care. Neuroimaging revealed multiple cerebral abscesses and subdural empyema. Pus aspirated from the intracranial collections grew Fusobacterium necrophorum and meropenem was started. Following neurosurgery, the patient continued to be agitated with fluctuating fever. She underwent close monitoring with regular neuroimaging. To control the progression of intracranial infection, she underwent three separate neurosurgical procedures following which she made a good recovery. This case demonstrates how an organism rarely associated with childhood illnesses presented atypically and progressed into a complex potentially fatal intracranial infection requiring a high degree of neurosurgical intervention. Awareness of this organism is important. The combination of source control together with appropriate antibiotic use was crucial in controlling the infection.

  12. Fusobacterium in colonic flora and molecular features of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Suzuki, Hiromu; Maruyama, Reo; Chung, Woonbok; Garriga, Judith; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Yamano, Hiro-o; Sugai, Tamotsu; An, Byonggu; Shureiqi, Imad; Toyota, Minoru; Kondo, Yutaka; Estécio, Marcos R H; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2014-03-01

    Fusobacterium species are part of the gut microbiome in humans. Recent studies have identified overrepresentation of Fusobacterium in colorectal cancer tissues, but it is not yet clear whether this is pathogenic or simply an epiphenomenon. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between Fusobacterium status and molecular features in colorectal cancers through quantitative real-time PCR in 149 colorectal cancer tissues, 89 adjacent normal appearing mucosae and 72 colonic mucosae from cancer-free individuals. Results were correlated with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) status, microsatellite instability (MSI), and mutations in BRAF, KRAS, TP53, CHD7, and CHD8. Whole-exome capture sequencing data were also available in 11 cases. Fusobacterium was detectable in 111 of 149 (74%) colorectal cancer tissues and heavily enriched in 9% (14/149) of the cases. As expected, Fusobacterium was also detected in normal appearing mucosae from both cancer and cancer-free individuals, but the amount of bacteria was much lower compared with colorectal cancer tissues (a mean of 250-fold lower for Pan-fusobacterium). We found the Fusobacterium-high colorectal cancer group (FB-high) to be associated with CIMP positivity (P = 0.001), TP53 wild-type (P = 0.015), hMLH1 methylation positivity (P = 0.0028), MSI (P = 0.018), and CHD7/8 mutation positivity (P = 0.002). Among the 11 cases where whole-exome sequencing data were available, two that were FB-high cases also had the highest number of somatic mutations (a mean of 736 per case in FB-high vs. 225 per case in all others). Taken together, our findings show that Fusobacterium enrichment is associated with specific molecular subsets of colorectal cancers, offering support for a pathogenic role in colorectal cancer for this gut microbiome component.

  13. Identification of an outer membrane protein of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. necrophorum that binds with high affinity to bovine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Menon, Sailesh; Nagaraja, T G; Narayanan, Sanjeev

    2015-03-23

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative anaerobe, is the primary etiologic agent of liver abscesses in cattle. There are two subspecies; subsp. necrophorum and subsp. funduliforme, which differ in morphological, biochemical, molecular characteristics, and virulence. The subsp. necrophorum, which is more virulent, occurs more frequently in liver abscesses than the subsp. funduliforme. Bacterial adhesion to the host cell surface is critical to the pathogenesis of several bacterial infections, and in F. necrophorum, outer membrane proteins (OMP) have been shown to mediate adhesion to bovine endothelial cells. The objective of this study was to identify potential adhesins that are involved in adhesion of F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum to the host cells. An OMP of 42.4 kDa, which binds with high affinity to the bovine endothelial cells and is recognized by the sera from cattle with liver abscesses, was identified. N-terminal sequencing of the protein showed 96% homology to the FomA protein of F. nucleatum. The PCR analysis showed that this fomA gene was present in several strains of subsp. necrophorum, subsp. funduliforme of bovine and subsp. funduliforme of human origin. The purified native and recombinantly expressed protein when preincubated with the endothelial cells, prevented the attachment of subsp. necrophorum significantly. In addition, the polyclonal antibody produced against the protein prevented the binding of subsp. necrophorum to bovine endothelial cells.

  14. Glutamate racemization and catabolism in Fusobacterium varium.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Mohammad; Resmer, Kelly L; White, Robert L

    2011-07-01

    The pathways of glutamate catabolism in the anaerobic bacterium Fusobacterium varium, grown on complex, undefined medium and chemically defined, minimal medium, were investigated using specifically labelled (13)C-glutamate. The metabolic end-products acetate and butyrate were isolated from culture fluids and derivatized for analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. On complex medium, labels from L-[1-(13)C]glutamate and L-[4-(13)C]glutamate were incorporated into C1 of acetate and equally into C1/C3 of butyrate, while label derived from L-[5-(13)C]glutamate was not incorporated. The isotopic incorporation results and the detection of glutamate mutase and 3-methylaspartate ammonia lyase in cell extracts are most consistent with the methylaspartate pathway, the best known route of glutamate catabolism in Clostridium species. When F. varium was grown on defined medium, label from L-[4-(13)C]glutamate was incorporated mainly into C4 of butyrate, demonstrating a major role for the hydroxyglutarate pathway. Upon addition of coenzyme B(12) or cobalt ion to the defined medium in replicate experiments, isotope was located equally at C1/C3 of butyrate in accord with the methylaspartate pathway. Racemization of D-glutamate and subsequent degradation of L-glutamate via the methylaspartate pathway are supported by incorporation of label into C2 of acetate and equally into C2/C4 of butyrate from D-[3-(13)C]glutamate and the detection of a cofactor-independent glutamate racemase in cell extracts. Together the results demonstrate a major role for the methylaspartate pathway of glutamate catabolism in F. varium and substantial participation of the hydroxyglutarate pathway when coenzyme B(12) is not available.

  15. Association of Fusobacterium species in pancreatic cancer tissues with molecular features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Kei; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Matsunaga, Yasutaka; Ito, Miki; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kanno, Shinichi; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Naito, Takafumi; Adachi, Yasushi; Tachibana, Mami; Tanuma, Tokuma; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Shinohara, Toshiya; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Imamura, Masafumi; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Maruyama, Reo; Suzuki, Hiromu; Imai, Kohzoh; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-03-30

    Recently, bacterial infection causing periodontal disease has attracted considerable attention as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fusobacterium species is an oral bacterial group of the human microbiome. Some evidence suggests that Fusobacterium species promote colorectal cancer development; however, no previous studies have reported the association between Fusobacterium species and pancreatic cancer. Therefore, we examined whether Fusobacterium species exist in pancreatic cancer tissue. Using a database of 283 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we tested cancer tissue specimens for Fusobacterium species. We also tested the specimens for KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations and measured microRNA-21 and microRNA-31. In addition, we assessed epigenetic alterations, including CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Our data showed an 8.8% detection rate of Fusobacterium species in pancreatic cancers; however, tumor Fusobacterium status was not associated with any clinical and molecular features. In contrast, in multivariate Cox regression analysis, compared with the Fusobacterium species-negative group, we observed significantly higher cancer-specific mortality rates in the positive group (p = 0.023). In conclusion, Fusobacterium species were detected in pancreatic cancer tissue. Tumor Fusobacterium species status is independently associated with a worse prognosis of pancreatic cancer, suggesting that Fusobacterium species may be a prognostic biomarker of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Les infections à Fusobacterium chez l’enfant

    PubMed Central

    Arane, Karen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2016-01-01

    Résumé Question Une otite moyenne aiguë chez un patient de 2 ans qui fréquente ma clinique a dégénéré en mastoïdite avec forte fièvre et les résultats de culture se sont révélés positifs pour le Fusobacterium. Que dois-je faire ensuite? Réponse Le Fusobacterium est un genre de bactéries anaérobies. Quoique les infections à Fusobacterium soient rares, elles peuvent devenir graves si elles ne sont pas traitées rapidement. Le traitement approprié est une antibiothérapie combinée associant une β-lactamine (pénicilline, céphalosporine) et un agent contre les microbes anaérobies (métronidazole, clindamycine). Il faut parfois une intervention chirurgicale pour la mastoïdite, comme le drainage d’abcès ou l’insertion d’un tube de ventilation. Le traitement tardif d’une infection causée par le Fusobacterium peut entraîner de sérieuses complications, dont le syndrome de Lemierre. Il faudrait une surveillance étroite de l’enfant en milieu hospitalier. PMID:27737993

  17. Legal and institutional aspects of regulating intermedia pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Entman, R.M.

    1980-05-01

    Intermedia pollution is defined here as the creation of new environmental impacts by controlling existing ones. DOE asked four questions: (1) do the major environmental laws address intermedia pollution; (2) does the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have rules, regulations, and procedures through which it considers intermedia questions; (3) do the legislative histories of the laws indicate whether Congress intended for the EPA to consider intermedia issues; and (4) in what ways do the existing laws and regulatory procedures exacerbate intermedia pollution. The answer to the first three questions is yes; much of this report is devoted to amplifying and qualifying that response, the rest to answering the fourth question. The report frames these issues by asking how we can control the adverse environmental i.e., intermedia, impacts of EPA itself. A case study of the intermedia implications of recently issued air-pollution standards for coal-fired power plants illustrates the themes concretely. An analysis of policy alternatives for improving intermedia pollution control concludes the study. The major problems impending good intermedia policy decisions are: conflicts among and failures fully to implement environmental laws; political pressures; tendencies of EPA to minimize the adverse environmental consequences of its own actions; uncertainties caused by the rudimentary scientific understanding of intermedia pollution; and limitations on EPA's organizational ability to handle whatever complex intermedia information it does obtain. The final chapter assesses three policy responses to these problems: do nothing new; issue an incremental prod; and a new law and EPA suffice. Evaluation of these alternatives depends on how deficient current practices are thought to be.

  18. Microbiological and serological investigations of oral lesions in Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Clerehugh, V; Drucker, D B; Seymour, G J; Bird, P S

    1996-01-01

    Microbiological and serological (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) investigations were carried out, including karyotyping, on two Asian children with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome. In case 1, a girl aged four years, the most prevalent putative periodontopathogens were Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia (deciduous dentition) and Bacteroides gracilis, E corrodens and F nucleatum (permanent dentition). In case 2, a boy aged nine years, they were F nucleatum, P intermedia and P loeschii and E corrodens. Serum from case 2 showed a raised specific IgG antibody response to Actinomyces actino-mycetemcomitans serotype b. Thus, a wider range of species than hitherto reported may be associated with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome, including A actino-mycetemcomitans and F nucleatum. PMID:8675741

  19. Fusobacterium necrophorum in North American Bighorn Sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Narayanan, Sanjeevkumar; Batra, Sai Arun; Jegarubee, Bavananthasivam; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum has been detected in pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis ) lungs, in addition to the aerobic respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica , Bibersteinia trehalosi , Pasteurella multocida , and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae . Similar to M. haemolytica , F. necrophorum produces a leukotoxin. Leukotoxin-induced lysis and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages are responsible for acute inflammation and lung tissue damage characteristic of M. haemolytica -caused pneumonia. As one approach in elucidating the role of F. necrophorum in BHS pneumonia, we determined the frequency of the presence of F. necrophorum in archived pneumonic BHS lung tissues, and susceptibility of BHS leukocytes to F. necrophorum leukotoxin. A species-specific PCR assay detected F. necrophorum in 37% of pneumonic BHS lung tissues (total tested n=70). Sequences of PCR amplicons were similar to the less virulent F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Fusobacterium necrophorum leukotoxin exhibited cytotoxicity to BHS PMNs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As with the M. haemolytica leukotoxin, F. necrophorum leukotoxin was more toxic to BHS PMNs than domestic sheep PMNs. It is likely that F. necrophorum enters the lungs after M. haemolytica and other aerobic respiratory pathogens enter the lungs and initiate tissue damage, thereby creating a microenvironment that is conducive for anaerobic bacterial growth. In summary, Fusobacterium leukotoxin is highly toxic for BHS leukocytes; however, based on the PCR findings, it is unlikely to play a direct role in the development of BHS pneumonia.

  20. Characterization of Fusobacterium necrophorum isolated from llama and alpaca.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Anderson, David; Amachawadi, Raghavendra G; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G; Narayanan, Sanjeev K

    2013-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium, is an opportunistic animal and human pathogen that causes a variety of infections termed necrobacillosis. There are 2 subspecies of F. necrophorum (subsp. necrophorum and subsp. funduliforme) that differ morphologically and biochemically and in virulence. Leukotoxin, a secreted protein, is considered to be the major virulence factor. In camelids, F. necrophorum causes a variety of infections, generally involving the lips, tongue, pharynx, interdigital spaces, foot pad, larynx, mandible, or maxillary bones. The objective of the current study was to characterize the presumptive Fusobacterium isolates from a variety of necrotic infections in llama (Lama glama) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos) and determine whether the strains possess leukotoxin activities. A total of 7 isolates from alpaca and 2 isolates from llama were characterized. Based on growth characteristics in broth culture, and biochemical and polymerase chain reaction analyses, all 9 isolates belonged to subsp. necrophorum and possessed the putative hemagglutinin gene. Western blot analysis with antileukotoxin antibodies raised in rabbit showed the presence of leukotoxin protein in the culture supernatant of all isolates. Furthermore, flow cytometry of the culture supernatants demonstrated cytotoxicity to bovine and alpaca polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The extent of cytotoxicity to either alpaca or bovine PMNs differed among camelid strains. The cytotoxicity of many of the camelid strains was higher (P < 0.05) toward alpaca PMNs compared to bovine PMNs. Fusobacterium necrophorum isolates from llama and alpaca are similar to bovine isolates, and leukotoxin may be a major virulence factor.

  1. Fusobacterium necrophorum in North American Bighorn Sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Narayanan, Sanjeevkumar; Batra, Sai Arun; Jegarubee, Bavananthasivam; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum has been detected in pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis ) lungs, in addition to the aerobic respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica , Bibersteinia trehalosi , Pasteurella multocida , and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae . Similar to M. haemolytica , F. necrophorum produces a leukotoxin. Leukotoxin-induced lysis and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages are responsible for acute inflammation and lung tissue damage characteristic of M. haemolytica -caused pneumonia. As one approach in elucidating the role of F. necrophorum in BHS pneumonia, we determined the frequency of the presence of F. necrophorum in archived pneumonic BHS lung tissues, and susceptibility of BHS leukocytes to F. necrophorum leukotoxin. A species-specific PCR assay detected F. necrophorum in 37% of pneumonic BHS lung tissues (total tested n=70). Sequences of PCR amplicons were similar to the less virulent F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Fusobacterium necrophorum leukotoxin exhibited cytotoxicity to BHS PMNs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As with the M. haemolytica leukotoxin, F. necrophorum leukotoxin was more toxic to BHS PMNs than domestic sheep PMNs. It is likely that F. necrophorum enters the lungs after M. haemolytica and other aerobic respiratory pathogens enter the lungs and initiate tissue damage, thereby creating a microenvironment that is conducive for anaerobic bacterial growth. In summary, Fusobacterium leukotoxin is highly toxic for BHS leukocytes; however, based on the PCR findings, it is unlikely to play a direct role in the development of BHS pneumonia. PMID:27224212

  2. Anaerobic Spondylodiscitis due to Fusobacterium Species: A Case Report Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Latta, Tiffany N.; Mandapat, Aimee L.; Myers, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Spondylodiscitis caused by Fusobacterium species is rare. Most cases of spontaneous spondylodiscitis are caused by Staphylococcus aureus and most postoperative cases are caused by Staphylococcus aureus or coagulase-negative staphylococci. Escherichia coli is the most common Gram-negative organism causing spondylodiscitis. Fusobacterium species are unusual causes for anaerobic spondylodiscitis. We report the case of a patient with spontaneous L2-L3 spondylodiscitis, vertebral osteomyelitis, and epidural abscess caused by Fusobacterium species and review the literature for patients with Fusobacterium spondylodiscitis. PMID:26000181

  3. A molecular survey of a captive wallaby population for periodontopathogens and the co-incidence of Fusobacterium necrophorum subspecies necrophorum with periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Antiabong, John F; Boardman, Wayne; Smith, Ian; Brown, Melissa H; Ball, Andrew S; Goodman, Amanda E

    2013-05-01

    Periodontal diseases (PD) are diseases of polymicrobial aetiology and constitute major health problems in captive macropods. Increasing knowledge of the causal pathogens is therefore crucial for effective management and prevention of these diseases. PCR survey and sequence analyses of potential periodontopathogens in captive wallaby populations revealed a co-incidence of the diseases with the detection of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. necrophorum (Fnn) and its encoded leukotoxin (lktA) gene. Sequence analyses showed that the outer membrane protein of Fnn in the GenBank database shared significant homology (99%) with the Fnn encoded haemagglutinin-related-protein gene fragment identified in this study. In addition, this report suggests the existence of a variant of Fnn with no detectable lktA gene and thus warrants further studies. In contrast to reports associating Porphyromonas gingivalis and F. nucleatum with PD, this study revealed that PD in macropods are associated with Porphyromonas gulae and Fnn and raises the question: is there a possible host pathogen co-evolution in the pathogenesis of PD in animals and humans? These findings contribute to the understanding of the aetiology of periodontal disease in macropods as well as opening up a new direction of research into the microbial interactions involved in the pathogenesis of PD in macropods.

  4. Antibacterial and antibiofilm effects of iron chelators against Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Hoi; Kim, Cheul; Lee, Hee-Su; Kim, Sung-Woon; Lee, Jin-Yong

    2013-09-01

    Prevotella intermedia, a major periodontopathogen, has been shown to be resistant to many antibiotics. In the present study, we examined the effect of the FDA-approved iron chelators deferoxamine (DFO) and deferasirox (DFRA) against planktonic and biofilm cells of P. intermedia in order to evaluate the possibility of using these iron chelators as alternative control agents against P. intermedia. DFRA showed strong antimicrobial activity (MIC and MBC values of 0.16 mg ml(-1)) against planktonic P. intermedia. At subMICs, DFRA partially inhibited the bacterial growth and considerably prolonged the bacterial doubling time. DFO was unable to completely inhibit the bacterial growth in the concentration range tested and was not bactericidal. Crystal violet binding assay for the assessment of biofilm formation by P. intermedia showed that DFRA significantly decreased the biofilm-forming activity as well as the biofilm formation, while DFO was less effective. DFRA was chosen for further study. In the ATP-bioluminescent assay, which reflects viable cell counts, subMICs of DFRA significantly decreased the bioactivity of biofilms in a concentration-dependent manner. Under the scanning electron microscope, P. intermedia cells in DFRA-treated biofilm were significantly elongated compared to those in untreated biofilm. Further experiments are necessary to show that iron chelators may be used as a therapeutic agent for periodontal disease. PMID:23329319

  5. Fusobacterium necrophorum infections: virulence factors, pathogenic mechanism and control measures.

    PubMed

    Tan, Z L; Nagaraja, T G; Chengappa, M M

    1996-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative, non-spore-forming anaerobe, is a normal inhabitant of the alimentary tract of animals and humans. Two types of F. necrophorum, subspecies necrophorum (biotype A) and funduliforme (biotype B), have been recognized, which differ morphologically, biochemically, and biologically. The organism is an opportunistic pathogen that causes numerous necrotic conditions (necrobacillosis) such as bovine hepatic abscesses, ruminant foot abscesses and human oral infections. The pathogenic mechanism of F. necrophorum is complex and not well defined. Several toxins, such as leukotoxin, endotoxin, haemolysin, haemagglutinin and adhesin, have been implicated as virulence factors. Among these, leukotoxin and endotoxin are believed to be more important than other toxins in overcoming the host's defence mechanisms to establish the infection. F. necrophorum is encountered frequently in mixed infections and, therefore, synergisms between F. necrophorum and other pathogens may play an important role in infection. Several investigators have attempted to induce protective immunity against F. necrophorum using bacterins, toxoids, and other cytoplasmic components. Generally, none of the immunogens has afforded satisfactory protection against Fusobacterium infections. Because of the unavailability of suitable immunoprophylaxis, the control of F. necrophorum infection has depended mainly on the use of antimicrobial compounds.

  6. [Lysogeny among "Yersinia frederiksenii", "Y. kristensenii" and "Y. intermedia"].

    PubMed

    Calvo, C; Brault, J

    1983-01-01

    We described the lysogeny among new species of Yersinia: Y. frederiksenii (47 strains), Y. kristensenii (57 strains) and Y. intermedia (133 strains). We found that 6.3% of the strains of Y. frederiksenii, 3.5% of Y. kristensenii and 2.2% of Y. intermedia were lysogenic for bacteriophages active on Y. enterocolitica (mainly the phenotypes incriminated in human pathology) and less frequently lysogenic for some strains of Y. frederiksenii, Y. kristensenii and Y. intermedia. One bacteriophage, isolated from the strain Y. frederiksenii 7291, should allow to discriminate between Y. enterocolitica phagovar IXa (susceptible) and IXb (resistant), and between the strains of Y. enterocolitica belonging to phagovar Xz and serovar 5 either biovar 1 (sometimes susceptible) or biovar 3 (always resistant).

  7. Severe thalassaemia intermedia with multiple fractures: role of transfusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saqib Qayyum; Iqbal, Mudassar; Wahla, Madiha Saeed; Tarrar, Aimel Munir

    2011-11-01

    Thalassaemia intermedia includes thalassaemias with clinical severity intermediate between asymptomatic thalassaemia minor and transfusion dependent thalassaemia major. By definition patients of thalassaemia intermedia maintain a haemoglobin level of 7-10 g/dl and do not, or only occasionally, require blood transfusion. An eight-year-old girl who was a known case of thalassaemia intermedia and had been occasionally transfused presented with fever, pain and swelling over the wrists, ankles and above the right knee joint. Radiographs showed medullary widening, cortical thinning and; multiple, recent and old, partially healed fractures of metadiaphseal regions of long bones. Her fractures have been immobilized by means of back slabs. In view of her recurrent fractures and growth retardation we advised a regular transfusion-chelation regimen to our patient to suppress her ineffective dyserythropoiesis. The treatment is expected to prevent further bone fragility and fractures, as well as improve her life quality. PMID:22125999

  8. The prevalence of Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A in animal faeces.

    PubMed

    Smith, G R; Thornton, E A

    1993-04-01

    Only a small proportion of animals tested were found to be excreting Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A, the causative organism of necrobacillosis, in the faeces (3 of 69 wallabies, 1 of 66 deer, 2 of 81 cattle). The two positive cattle belonged to a single group of calves on a farm with a history of necrobacillosis and the litter underfoot also readily yielded biovar A organisms. All attempts to demonstrate biovar A in litter on other farms and in soil from an area populated by wallabies and deer failed. Ruminal contents from young beef cattle proved a fertile source of F. necrophorum biovar A, 15 of 18 animals giving a positive result. It is suggested that disturbance of the gastrointestinal microflora leads to intestinal multiplication and faecal excretion of the organism, which may then give rise to necrobacillosis of the body surface.

  9. Evaluation of holy basil mouthwash as an adjunctive plaque control agent in a four day plaque regrowth model

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Anirudh B.; Vij, Chhavi; Trivedi, Dhiraj; Setty, Swati B.; Thakur, Srinath L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Various antibacterial and antiplaque agents are used in chemical plaque control but none are without their shortcomings. Chlorhexidine considered a gold standard, also has an array of side effects. To overcome these, numerous herbal extracts have been tried and tested and one among them is holy basil. The present study evaluated the antibacterial efficacy of holy basil in vitro against some periodontopathogens and its antiplaque effect in vivo. Study Design: Thirty periodontally healthy volunteers were randomly divided into three groups and refrained from all mechanical oral hygiene measures for 4 days and used one of the randomly assigned mouthwash (1- chlorhexidine; 2- holy basil; and 3- sterile water [placebo]) twice daily. The Plaque Index (PI) was assessed at days 0 and 5. Aqueous extract of holy basil was tested against Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F.nucleatum). Results: Holy basil extract showed inhibition of both the tested periodontopathogens (P.intermedia and F.nucleatum) at various concentrations. In all groups, the PI increased from baseline to day 5. There was a statistically significant difference (p < .05) between the chlorhexidine and placebo rinse and the holy basil and placebo rinse, but no statistically significant difference was found between the chlorhexidine and holy basil rinse with respect to PI. Conclusions: These results indicate that the holy basil mouthwash has an antiplaque effect and is efficacious against P. intermedia and F. nucleatum strains in vitro. Hence holy basil mouthwash may have potential as an antiplaque mouthwash with prophylactic benefits. Key words:Antibacterial agent, basil, Fusobacterium nucleatum, mouthwashes, Prevotella intermedia. PMID:25674314

  10. β-Thalassemia Intermedia: A Bird’s-Eye View

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Anthony; Tyan, Paul; Radwan, Amr; Mallat, Naji; Taher, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Beta-thalassemia is due to a defect in the synthesis of the beta-globin chains, leading to alpha/beta imbalance, ineffective erythropoiesis, and chronic anemia. The spectrum of thalassemias is wide, with one end comprising thalassemia minor, which consists of a mild hypochromic microcytic anemia with no obvious clinical manifestations, while on the other end is thalassemia major, characterized by patients who present in their first years of life with profound anemia and regular transfusion requirements for survival. Along the spectrum lies thalassemia intermedia, a term developed to describe patients with manifestations that are neither mild enough nor severe enough to be classified in the spectrum’s extremes. Over the past decade, our understanding of β-thalassemia intermedia has increased tremendously with regards to molecular information as well as pathophysiology. It is now clear that β-thalassemia intermedia has a clinical presentation as well as complications associated with the disease that are different from those of β-thalassemia major. This review is designed to tackle issues related to β-thalassemia intermedia from the basic definition of the disease to paramedical issues, namely the quality of life in these patients. Genetics and pathophysiology are revisited, as well as the complications specific to this disease. These complications include effects on several organ systems, including the cardiovascular, hepatic, endocrine, renal, brain, and skeletal systems. Extramedullary hematopoiesis is also discussed in this article. Risk factors are highlighted and cutoffs are identified to minimize morbidities in β-thalassemia intermedia. Several treatment modalities are considered by shining a light on the pros and cons of each modality, as well as the role of special pharmacological agents in the progress of the disease and its morbidities. Finally, health-related quality of life is discussed in these patients with a direct comparison to the more severe

  11. Fusobacterium necrophorum- detection and identification on a selective agar.

    PubMed

    Bank, Steffen; Nielsen, Hanne Merete; Mathiasen, Boris Hoyer; Leth, Dorte Christiansen; Kristensen, Lena Hagelskjaer; Prag, Jørgen

    2010-12-01

    Within the last decade, Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. funduliforme has been considered a clinically important pathogen causing pharyngitis especially in adolescents and young adults. F. necrophorum pharyngitis can progress into Lemierre's syndrome, which is a severe and life-threatening infection. However, throat swabs are not cultured anaerobically in the routine and even if cultured anaerobically, it can be difficult to identify F. necrophorum from the normal flora of the throat. F. necrophorum is therefore often overlooked as the cause of pharyngitis. In our laboratory, a F. necrophorum selective agar has been developed containing vancomycin and nalidixin, which inhibit the growth of most Gram-positive and many Gram-negative bacteria, respectively. β-haemolysis of horse blood can be detected, which further facilitates the detection and identification of F. necrophorum. The F. necrophorum selective agar was evaluated against a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay and shown to have a significantly higher sensitivity for detecting F. necrophorum than the anaerobic agar commonly used in Denmark. Furthermore, the F. necrophorum selective agar does not require experienced laboratory technicians, require fewer subcultures, is probably less expensive and is faster to perform than other culture methods.

  12. Fusobacterium necrophorum otitis and mastoiditis in infants and young toddlers.

    PubMed

    Stergiopoulou, T; Walsh, T J

    2016-05-01

    There is an increased recovery of Fusobacterium necrophorum from cases of otitis media and mastoiditis in the pediatric population. These infections may be highly severe, causing local osteomyelitis, bacteremia, and Lemierre's syndrome. The severity and difficulties in providing optimal treatment for these infections may be especially difficult in this age group due to immunological immaturity and delayed presentation. In this review of literature, we present and analyze the clinical presentation, management, and outcome of otic infections caused by F. necrophorum in infants and young toddlers less than 2 years old. Search in Pubmed was conducted for reported cases in the English literature for the time period of the last 50 years. Twelve well-described cases were retrieved with F. necrophorum otitis and mastoiditis and complications reported in all cases. Treatment included both intravenously with antimicrobial agents (beta lactams plus metronidazole) and mastoidectomy. Lemierre's syndrome and Lemierre's syndrome variants developed in 60 % of the patients. Dissemination of the infection as distal osteomyelitis and septic shock were also reported. The outcome was favorable in all the cases. Otitis and mastoiditis infections in children less then 2 years old are invasive infections, and severe complications can occur. PMID:26951264

  13. A sensitive method for isolating Fusobacterium necrophorum from faeces.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G. R.; Barton, S. A.; Wallace, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    The isolation of Fusobacterium necrophorum present in small numbers in heavily contaminated material such as faeces or soil is hampered by the lack of an efficient selective medium and by the high minimum infective dose of the organism. A sensitive method for the detection and isolation of faecal strains of F. necrophorum type A was based on the subcutaneous injection of faeces, suspended (5% w/v) in broth culture of Actinomyces (Corynebacterium) pyogenes or Staphylococcus aureus to increase fusobacterial infectivity, into mice pretreated with clostridial antitoxins. When necrobacillosis developed F. necrophorum was identified microscopically in tissue from the advancing edge of the lesion and isolated on a partly selective medium. The enhancement of fusobacterial infectivity produced by A. pyogenes and by S. aureus was high, but the latter was slightly the more efficient, enabling as few as 80 F. necrophorum organisms/g of faeces to be detected. Use of the method showed that 3 of 16 wallabies had F. necrophorum in their faeces at the time of examination. Numerous epidemiological applications are suggested. PMID:2019300

  14. Coccinia intermedia – a new Cucurbitaceae species from West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Norbert; Renner, Susanne S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear and plastid sequences from two individuals of a suspected new species of Coccinia from West Africa were added to an available molecular phylogeny for the remaining 27 species of the genus. Phylogenetic analyses of these data indicate the new species' monophyletic status and closest relatives. Based on four fertile collections, we here describe and illustrate Coccinia intermedia Holstein. We also provide a key to the Coccinia species of West Africa and map their distributions. PMID:22287923

  15. Silent cerebral infarct in child patients with beta thalassaemia intermedia.

    PubMed

    Leblebisatan, Göksel; Bay, Ali; Sirikci, Akif; Kilincaslan, Huseyin; Sonmezisik, Serdar; Leblebisatan, Serife; Baspinar, Osman; Dogan, Mustafa; Yis, Uluc

    2012-10-01

    There are numerous reports that patients with thalassemia are faced with hypercoagulability leading to vascular disorders. One of these complications is known as a silent infarct, defined as a small infarct detected by cerebral imaging but without any neurological symptoms. Since it has a progressive nature, it is of vital importance because it may lead to symptomatic cerebrovascular accidents in the future. Twenty-two children with thalassemia intermedia were enrolled into the study and MRI scans were performed. All demographic data and clinical features of the patients were obtained during the follow-up period. In addition to the patients, 13 healthy controls were included to compare serum anticoagulant levels with those of the thalassemia intermedia patients. Four of the patients were found to have silent cerebral infarcts (SCIs). The lesions involved varying amounts of the deep cerebral white matter and sub-cortical areas. One patient showed 'net line' filling defects within the ambient cistern on MRI images corresponding to moyamoya vessels. Three patients had undergone splenectomy, and three were transfused irregularly and had less than six transfusions per year. More importantly, protein C levels were lower and platelet levels were significantly higher in the patient group compared with controls. We were not able to find any association between SCI and transfusion number or splenectomy. However, of the total patients four thalassemia intermedia patients had SCI in early childhood and this is an unusual finding. In order to verify the findings, further studies must be conducted involving larger numbers of patients.

  16. Thalamic Massa Intermedia Duplication in a Dysmorphic 14 month-old Toddler

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T

    2015-01-01

    The massa intermedia is an inconstant parenchymal band connecting the medial thalami. It may be thickened in various disease processes such as Chiari II malformation or absent in other disease states. However, the massa intermedia may also be absent in up to 30% of normal human brains. To the best of my knowledge, detailed imaging findings of massa intermedia duplication have only been described in a single case report. An additional case of thalamic massa intermedia duplication discovered on a routine brain MR performed for dysmorphic facial features is reported herein. PMID:26622932

  17. Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Effects of Artemisinin Extracts from Artemisia annua L.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wan-Su; Choi, Woo Jin; Lee, Sunwoo; Kim, Woo Joong; Lee, Dong Chae; Sohn, Uy Dong; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties of artemisinin derived from water, methanol, ethanol, or acetone extracts of Artemisia annua L. were evaluated. All 4 artemisinin-containing extracts had anti-inflammatory effects. Of these, the acetone extract had the greatest inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β , IL-6, and IL-10) production. Antioxidant activity evaluations revealed that the ethanol extract had the highest free radical scavenging activity, (91.0±3.2%), similar to α-tocopherol (99.9%). The extracts had antimicrobial activity against the periodontopathic microorganisms Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. animalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, and Prevotella intermedia. This study shows that Artemisia annua L. extracts contain anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial substances and should be considered for use in pharmaceutical products for the treatment of dental diseases. PMID:25605993

  18. Fusobacterium invasive infections in children: a retrospective study in two French tertiary care centres.

    PubMed

    Bailhache, M; Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Lehours, P; Sarlangue, J; Pillet, P; Bingen, E; Faye, A

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe the clinical and biological characteristics and evolution of invasive Fusobacterium infections in children admitted to two French paediatric tertiary care centres. Children who were admitted from 1998 to 2009 to two tertiary care centres for invasive Fusobacterium infection were included in a retrospective study. Thirty-one children with a median age of 5.7 years (interquartile range, IQR [2.3; 9.3]) were included. Nine children had an underlying condition, most commonly sickle cell disease (n = 3) or immunodeficiency (n = 3). Two children had skin effraction prior to the infection. The major sites of infection were the head and neck (n = 14) and abdomen (n = 10). Three children suffered from atypical Lemierre's syndrome. More than half of the children had a bacterial co-infection (58 %). Six children were hospitalised in an intensive care unit, and 67 % of them had a chronic underlying disease. None of the children died. Six children with negative cultures had Fusobacterium identified through 16S RNA-PCR. Fusobacterium is responsible for severe infection in children. Microbiological diagnosis might be improved by the wider use of molecular detection.

  19. Characterization of Fusobacterium isolates from the respiratory tract of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jason W; Kumar, Amit; Narayanan, Sanjeev; Myers, Suzanne; Brown, Kayla; Nagaraja, T G; Jayarao, Bhushan M

    2014-03-01

    A total of 23 clinical isolates of Fusobacterium spp. were recovered at necropsy over a 2-year period from the respiratory tract of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Isolates were identified as Fusobacterium varium (18/23), Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. funduliforme (3/23), and Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. necrophorum (2/23). Using polymerase chain reaction-based detection of virulence genes, all F. necrophorum isolates were positive for the promoter region of the leukotoxin operon and the hemagglutinin-related protein gene, while all F. varium isolates were negative. The presence of the leukotoxin gene in F. necrophorum isolates and the absence of this gene in F. varium isolates were confirmed by Southern hybridization using 2 separate probes. Toxicity to bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes was observed with all F. necrophorum isolates, but was not observed in any F. varium isolates. Susceptibility to antimicrobials was markedly different for F. varium as compared to F. necrophorum. In summary, no evidence of leukotoxin production was detected in any of the 23 F. varium isolates used in the current study. The data suggests that F. varium, the most common species isolated, may be a significant pathogen in deer with a different virulence mechanism than F. necrophorum.

  20. Beta-thalassemia intermedia associated with moyamoya syndrome.

    PubMed

    Göksel, Basak Karakurum; Ozdogu, Hakan; Yildirim, Tulin; Oğuzkurt, Levent; Asma, Suheyl

    2010-07-01

    Moyamoya syndrome (MMS) is a progressive disorder. We report a 19-year-old boy with beta-thalassemia who presented with a left hemiparesis. Brain MRI showed old middle cerebral artery and left frontal subcortical white matter infarcts. Brain magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography revealed occlusion of the bilateral internal carotid arteries with a rich network of basal collateral vessels. To our knowledge this is the third report of beta-thalassemia intermedia and MMS, and the first report of a patient in Turkey. It emphasizes the potential for cerebral infarct due to anemia, protein S and thrombocytosis.

  1. Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in β-thalassaemia intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Hoi; Li, Allen; Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old man known to have β-thalassaemia intermedia since childhood presented with bilateral lower limb weakness after spinal anaesthesia for an elective minor operation of his left leg. MRI and CT scans were performed to rule out acute epidural haematoma; coincidental imaging features of marrow hyperplasia and spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis were found. This article will present and discuss the imaging features, differential diagnosis, management and literature review of the rare occurrence of extramedullary haematopoiesis in the spinal epidural space. PMID:24390965

  2. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY ABSORPTION-EDGE COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY IMAGING OF THALLIUM COMPARTMENTALIZATION IN IBERIS INTERMEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thallium (TI) is an extremely toxic metal which, due to its similarities to K, is readily taken up by plants. Thallium is efficiently hyperaccumulated in Iberis intermedia as TI(I). Distribution and compartmentalization of TI in I. intermedia is highes...

  3. β -thalassemia intermedia in Northern Iraq: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Al-Allawi, Nasir A S; Jalal, Sana D; Mohammad, Ameen M; Omer, Sharaza Q; Markous, Raji S D

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the molecular basis of β -thalassemia intermedia in Northern Iraq and evaluate its management practices, a total of 74 patients from 51 families were enrolled. The patients were clinically and hematologically reevaluated, and had their β-thalassemia mutations characterized, as well as the number of α-globin genes and Xmn I (G)γ-158 (C>T) polymorphism studied. Out of 14 β-thalassemia mutations identified, the four most common were IVS-I-6 (T>C) [33.3%], IVS-II-I (G>A) [21.1%], codon 82/83(-G)[10.1%], and codon 8 (-AA) [8.1%]. The most common contributing factors to the less severe phenotype of thalassemia intermedia were found to be the inheritance of mild β-thalassemia alleles and the Xmn I polymorphism, while concomitant α-thalassemia had a limited role. Several complications were documented including: pulmonary hypertension in 20.4%, diabetes mellitus in 1.4%, hypothyroidism in 2.9%, and heart failure in 2.7%, while no documented cases of venous thrombosis were found. Compared to their counterparts in several Mediterranean countries, it appears that our patients were much less frequently transfused and had a lower proportion of patients who were splenectomized, on iron chelation, or hydroxycarbamide therapy. Such practices require further scrutiny to ensure that a better level of care is provided and that growth retardation, skeletal changes, and other complications are prevented or reduced.

  4. Mycelial pellet formation by edible ascomycete filamentous fungi, Neurospora intermedia.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ramkumar B; Lennartsson, Patrik R; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2016-12-01

    Pellet formation of filamentous fungi in submerged culture is an imperative topic of fermentation research. In this study, we report for the first time the growth of filamentous ascomycete fungus, Neurospora intermedia in its mycelial pellet form. In submerged culture, the growth morphology of the fungus was successfully manipulated into growing as pellets by modifying various cultivation conditions. Factors such as pH (2.0-10.0), agitation rate (100-150 rpm), carbon source (glucose, arabinose, sucrose, and galactose), the presence of additive agents (glycerol and calcium chloride) and trace metals were investigated for their effect on the pellet formation. Of the various factors screened, uniform pellets were formed only at pH range 3.0-4.0, signifying it as the most influential factor for N. intermedia pellet formation. The average pellet size ranged from 2.38 ± 0.12 to 2.86 ± 0.38 mm. The pellet formation remained unaffected by the inoculum type used and its size showed an inverse correlation with the agitation rate of the culture. Efficient glucose utilization was observed with fungal pellets, as opposed to the freely suspended mycelium, proving its viability for fast-fermentation processes. Scale up of the pelletization process was also carried out in bench-scale airlift and bubble column reactors (4.5 L).

  5. Gravi-photomorphogenesis of the moss Pottia intermedia protonemata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkiv, O. T.; Kyjak, N. Y.; Khorkavtsiv, Y. D.; Kit, N. A.

    The protonemata development proceeds in the process of gradual differentiation of growing apical cells and intercalar cells the shortened lateral branches of the latters being transformed into three-dimensional gametophore buds (Demkiv et al., 1991). Normal course of plant development needs favourable external conditions. Sometimes, however, external environment agents can accelerate the development of organism. So, apical protonema cells of darkgrown gravitropic P. intermedia differentiate gametophore-buds in light of low intensity (Ripetskyj, 1999). We investigate the influence of gravistimulation on bud formation in haploid and diploid P. intermedia protonema. Diploid protonema was found to react on light weaker than haploid one. Under the influence of light the darkgrown apical cells and lateral branches of haploid protonema were directly transformed into buds, while in diploid protonema at first the formation of bundles of rhizoid type filaments takes place on the tips of caulonema and buds appeared in center of such bundles. The participation of gravity in gametophore bud formation was assessed by clinorotating protonema in darkness. Being illuminated such protonema also developed buds quickly the latters being formed along all stolon. It can be suggested that at 1g the growth zone of apical cells actively attract inductors of bud formation. During clinorotation the inductors probably are transferred much more slower than under stationary state and that is why the buds arised not only at the tips of stolons but along all their length. It is known that gametophore bud formation can be stimulated by exogenous phytohormones. As M. Bopp (1980) has shown, that kinetin selectively promotes bud formation on moss protonema. Our observations have shown 0,5 -- 50 μ M of kinetin stimulate the bud formation on diploid aposporic protonema much more effectively that on haploid one. It can be concluded that the amount of endogenous cytokinins in haploid protonemal cells is

  6. Control of postharvest Botrytis fruit rot of strawberry by volatile organic compounds of Candida intermedia.

    PubMed

    Huang, R; Li, G Q; Zhang, J; Yang, L; Che, H J; Jiang, D H; Huang, H C

    2011-07-01

    A study was conducted to identify volatile organic compounds or volatiles produced by Candida intermedia strain C410 using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and to determine efficacy of the volatiles of C. intermedia in suppression of conidial germination and mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea and control of Botrytis fruit rot of strawberry. Results showed that, among 49 volatiles (esters, alcohols, alkenes, alkanes, alkynes, organic acids, ketones, and aldehydes) identified from C. intermedia cultures on yeast extract peptone dextrose agar, two compounds, 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene and 3-methyl-1-butanol, were the most abundant. Synthetic chemicals of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene; 3-methyl-1-butanol; 2-nonanone; pentanoic acid, 4-methyl-, ethyl ester; 3-methyl-1-butanol, acetate; acetic acid, pentyl ester; and hexanoic acid, ethyl ester were highly inhibitory to conidial germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea. Inhibition of conidial germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea by volatiles of C. intermedia was also observed. Meanwhile, results showed that incidence and severity of Botrytis fruit rot of strawberry was significantly (P < 0.01) reduced by exposure of the strawberry fruit to the volatiles from C. intermedia cultures or C. intermedia-infested strawberry fruit. These results suggest that the volatiles of C. intermedia C410 are promising biofumigants for control of Botrytis fruit rot of strawberry.

  7. Control of postharvest Botrytis fruit rot of strawberry by volatile organic compounds of Candida intermedia.

    PubMed

    Huang, R; Li, G Q; Zhang, J; Yang, L; Che, H J; Jiang, D H; Huang, H C

    2011-07-01

    A study was conducted to identify volatile organic compounds or volatiles produced by Candida intermedia strain C410 using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and to determine efficacy of the volatiles of C. intermedia in suppression of conidial germination and mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea and control of Botrytis fruit rot of strawberry. Results showed that, among 49 volatiles (esters, alcohols, alkenes, alkanes, alkynes, organic acids, ketones, and aldehydes) identified from C. intermedia cultures on yeast extract peptone dextrose agar, two compounds, 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene and 3-methyl-1-butanol, were the most abundant. Synthetic chemicals of 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene; 3-methyl-1-butanol; 2-nonanone; pentanoic acid, 4-methyl-, ethyl ester; 3-methyl-1-butanol, acetate; acetic acid, pentyl ester; and hexanoic acid, ethyl ester were highly inhibitory to conidial germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea. Inhibition of conidial germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea by volatiles of C. intermedia was also observed. Meanwhile, results showed that incidence and severity of Botrytis fruit rot of strawberry was significantly (P < 0.01) reduced by exposure of the strawberry fruit to the volatiles from C. intermedia cultures or C. intermedia-infested strawberry fruit. These results suggest that the volatiles of C. intermedia C410 are promising biofumigants for control of Botrytis fruit rot of strawberry. PMID:21323467

  8. A thalassaemia intermedia case with concomitant left atrial thrombus.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Cem; Basaran, Ozcan; Topal, Yasar; Akin, Fatih

    2014-06-20

    Although marked improvements have been observed in the life expectancy of patients with thalassaemia by regular blood transfusion and strict iron chelation therapies in recent years, these patients still have to deal with several complications, mainly cardiovascular. One of the life-threatening complications is the chronic hypercoagulable state and thromboembolic events which develop due to haemostatic alterations in patients with thalassaemia, although they are more frequently seen in those with thalassaemia intermedia. Many thromboembolic complications, mainly deep venous thrombosis and cerebral thrombosis, have been reported in thalassaemia. However, intracardiac thrombosis is rarely seen. In this manuscript, we presented a case that underwent splenectomy 6 years ago but not regularly attended the control visits and presented to our clinic with gradually increasing exercise dyspnoea for 2 months.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Brachyspira intermedia isolates from European layers.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Marc; Boyen, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; Garmyn, An; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Martel, An

    2011-09-01

    A broth microdilution method was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of 20 Brachyspira intermedia isolates obtained from different layer flocks in Belgium and The Netherlands between 2008 and 2010. The antimicrobial agents used were tylosin, tilmicosin, tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, and lincomycin. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution patterns of tylosin, tilmicosin, lincomycin, and doxycycline were bimodal, demonstrating acquired resistance against doxycycline in three strains, against the macrolides in two strains, and against lincomycin in one strain. The MICs of tiamulin and valnemulin showed a monomodal distribution, but with tailing toward the higher MIC values, possibly suggesting low-level acquired resistance in six isolates. Sequencing revealed a G1058C mutation in the 16S rRNA gene in all doxycycline-resistant strains. The strain resistant to tylosin, tilmicosin, and lincomycin had an A2058T mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. PMID:21663534

  10. Nuevos sistemas de frecuencia intermedia para el IAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olalde, J. C.; Perilli, D.; Larrarte, J. J.

    Se presenta el diagrama en bloques de los nuevos sistemas de Frecuencia Intermedia para los dos radiómetros instalados en el IAR. Entre las características más importantes del sistema podemos mencionar la posibilidad de conectar cualquiera de las dos antenas a los ``backend" disponibles: analizador espectral de alta resolución (META II) de 0,05 Hz, autocorrelador de 1008 canales y contínuo. Se incorporan al sistema nuevos sintetizadores de frecuencia implementados con PLL y la moderna técnica de síntesis digital directa. Por último, el conjunto del sistema es susceptible de ser configurado por las computadoras de adquisición de datos, supervisadas por otra, que entrega el estado de funcionamiento actual y evita la selección de configuraciones incorrectas por parte del usuario.

  11. Fusobacterium necrophorum in a pediatric retropharyngeal abscess: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jeffrey; Kleinberger, Andrew J; Sikora, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    We present the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed a deep space neck infection following cervical trauma. He was initially managed conservatively with broad-spectrum antibiotics, but when he failed to improve clinically, he required surgical drainage. Wound cultures grew Fusobacterium necrophorum, an uncommon pathogen that can cause pediatric deep neck space infections, especially when it is not associated with Lemierre syndrome. The prognosis for this infection is favorable when it is identified early. Treatment with culture-directed antibiotics and surgical drainage as indicated is appropriate. When treating a pediatric deep neck space infection empirically, physicians should avoid treatment with a macrolide antibiotic, since Fusobacterium spp may be involved and they are often resistant to this class of drugs.

  12. First case of Fusobacterium necrophorum endocarditis to have presented after the 2nd decade of life.

    PubMed

    Moore, Curtiss; Addison, Daniel; Wilson, James M; Zeluff, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, an obligate, anaerobic, filamentous, gram-negative rod, is thought to be a normal inhabitant of the mucous membranes in human beings. Fusobacterium species have been implicated in cases of Lemierre syndrome and other pathologic conditions. Their reported association with infective endocarditis is extremely rare. We describe the case of a previously healthy 34-year-old man who emergently presented with flu-like symptoms and dyspnea on exertion. He had recently undergone a dental procedure. Empiric antibiotic therapy was initiated. Blood cultures were positive for metronidazole-resistant F. necrophorum. A transesophageal echocardiogram revealed 2 mobile vegetations on the mitral valve. Despite the antibiotic therapy, the patient's respiratory status worsened and, after 3 weeks, he died. On the basis of the organism's pathophysiology and the patient's recent dental procedure, the oral cavity was the likely source of the bacteremia. Our patient's case underscores the importance of recognizing Fusobacterium bacteremia as a possible cause of endocarditis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of monomicrobial F. necrophorum endocarditis to have presented in a patient after the 2nd decade of life. In addition, it is apparently only the 4th report of F. necrophorum mitral valve endocarditis with case results derived from modern culture techniques.

  13. Nested culture method improves detection of Fusobacterium from stool in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Toyokazu; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Shibuya, Tomoyoshi; Tsukinaga, Shintaro; Mitobe, Jimi; Takakura, Kazuki; Takahara, Akitaka; Odahara, Shunichi; Matsudaira, Hiroshi; Nagatsuma, Keisuke; Kitahara, Takuya; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Koido, Shigeo; Tajiri, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium varium is an elusive pathogenic factor in ulcerative colitis (UC); conventional methods of fecal culture rarely recover F. varium. We have developed a nested culture method to recover Fusobacterium and we used it to investigate whether F. varium could be isolated from UC patients. We enrolled 50 consecutive patients in this study; 26 received combination antibiotic therapy that included amoxicillin, tetracycline, and metronidazole (ATM) for 2 weeks and were thus assigned to the ATM group, and the remaining 24 were assigned to the non-ATM group and did not receive any antibiotics. Stool samples were added to 10 ml of GAM broth that contained neomycin and crystal violet. The samples were vortexed and incubated under anaerobic conditions. The preincubated broth was streaked onto a Fusobacterium-selective agar plate and then incubated under anaerobic conditions. The species of the colonies isolated were identified using the Vitek Automated system and PCR analysis. We recoverd F. varium from 7 of the 24 non-ATM patients (29.2%) and none from the ATM patients (0%) (P = 0.0035). All of the F. varium isolates were susceptible to ATM. This study suggests that the recovery of F. varium is related to UC, which aligns with results from previous studies that used mucosal culture, immunostaining, real-time PCR, and serological studies.

  14. First case of Fusobacterium necrophorum endocarditis to have presented after the 2nd decade of life.

    PubMed

    Moore, Curtiss; Addison, Daniel; Wilson, James M; Zeluff, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, an obligate, anaerobic, filamentous, gram-negative rod, is thought to be a normal inhabitant of the mucous membranes in human beings. Fusobacterium species have been implicated in cases of Lemierre syndrome and other pathologic conditions. Their reported association with infective endocarditis is extremely rare. We describe the case of a previously healthy 34-year-old man who emergently presented with flu-like symptoms and dyspnea on exertion. He had recently undergone a dental procedure. Empiric antibiotic therapy was initiated. Blood cultures were positive for metronidazole-resistant F. necrophorum. A transesophageal echocardiogram revealed 2 mobile vegetations on the mitral valve. Despite the antibiotic therapy, the patient's respiratory status worsened and, after 3 weeks, he died. On the basis of the organism's pathophysiology and the patient's recent dental procedure, the oral cavity was the likely source of the bacteremia. Our patient's case underscores the importance of recognizing Fusobacterium bacteremia as a possible cause of endocarditis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of monomicrobial F. necrophorum endocarditis to have presented in a patient after the 2nd decade of life. In addition, it is apparently only the 4th report of F. necrophorum mitral valve endocarditis with case results derived from modern culture techniques. PMID:24082377

  15. Gravitropism in caulonemata of the moss Pottia intermedia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, C. I.; Kern, V. D.; Ripetskyj, R. T.; Demkiv, O. T.; Sack, F. D.

    1998-01-01

    The gravitropism of caulonemata of Pottia intermedia is described and compared with that of other mosses. Spore germination produces primary protonemata including caulonemata which give rise to buds that form the leafy moss plant, the gametophore. Primary caulonemata are negatively gravitropic but their growth and the number of filaments are limited in the dark. Axenic culture of gametophores results in the production of secondary caulonemata that usually arise near the leaf base. Secondary protonemata that form in the light are agravitropic. Secondary caulonemata that form when gametophores are placed in the dark for several days show strong negative gravitropism and grow well in the dark. When upright caulonemata are reorientated to the horizontal or are inverted, upward bending can be detected after 1 h and caulonemata reach the vertical within 1-2 d. Clear amyloplast sedimentation occurs 10-15 minutes after horizontal placement and before the start of upward curvature. This sedimentation takes place in a sub-apical zone. Amyloplast sedimentation also takes place along the length of upright and inverted Pottia protonemata. These results support the hypothesis that amyloplast sedimentation functions in gravitropic sensing since sedimentation occurs before gravitropism in Pottia and since the location and presence of a unique sedimentation zone is conserved in all four mosses known to gravitropic protonomata.

  16. Stereospecificity of (+)-pinoresinol and (+)-lariciresinol reductases from Forsythia intermedia.

    PubMed

    Chu, A; Dinkova, A; Davin, L B; Bedgar, D L; Lewis, N G

    1993-12-25

    Pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase catalyzes the first known example of a highly unusual benzylic ether reduction in plants; its mechanism of hydride transfer is described. The enzyme was found in Forsythia intermedia and catalyzes the presumed regulatory branch-points in the pathway leading to benzylaryltetrahydrofuran, dibenzylbutane, dibenzylbutyrolactone, and aryltetrahydronaphthalene lignans. Using [7,7'-2H2]-pinoresinol and [7,7'-2H3]lariciresinol as substrates, the hydride transfers of the highly unusual reductase were demonstrated to be completely stereospecific (> 99%). The incoming hydrides were found to take up the pro-R position at C-7' (and/or C-7) in lariciresinol and secoisolariciresinol, thereby eliminating the possibility of random hydride delivery to a planar quinone methide intermediate. As might be expected, the mode of hydride abstraction from NADPH was also stereospecific: using [4R-3H] and [4S-3H]NADPH, it was found that only the 4 pro-R hydrogen was abstracted for enzymatic hydride transfer.

  17. Characterization of Atypical Isolates of Yersinia intermedia and Definition of Two New Biotypes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Liliane; Leclercq, Alexandre; Savin, Cyril; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    The species Yersinia intermedia is a member of the genus Yersinia which belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family. This species is divided into eight biotypes, according to Brenner's biotyping scheme. This scheme relies on five tests (utilization of Simmons citrate and acid production from d-melibiose, d-raffinose, α-methyl-d-glucoside [αMG], and l-rhamnose). The collection of the French Yersinia Reference Laboratory (Institut Pasteur, Paris, France) contained 44 strains that were originally identified as Y. intermedia but whose characteristics did not fit into the biotyping scheme. These 44 strains were separated into two biochemical groups: variant 1 (positive for acid production from l-rhamnose and αMG and positive for Simmons citrate utlization) and variant 2 (positive for acid production from l-rhamnose and αMG). These atypical strains could correspond to new biotypes of Y. intermedia, to Y. frederiksenii strains having the atypical property of fermenting αMG, or to new Yersinia species. These strains did not exhibit growth or phenotypic properties different from those of Y. intermedia and Y. frederiksenii and did not harbor any of the virulence traits usually found in pathogenic species. DNA-DNA hybridizations performed between one strain each of variants 1 and 2 and the Y. intermedia and Y. frederiksenii type strains demonstrated that these variants do belong to the Y. intermedia species. We thus propose that Brenner's biotyping scheme be updated by adding two new biotypes: 9 (for variant 1) and 10 (for variant 2) to the species Y. intermedia. PMID:19494062

  18. In Vitro Effects of Polyphosphate against Prevotella intermedia in Planktonic Phase and Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eun-Young; Kim, Minjung; Noh, Mi Hee

    2015-01-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) has gained a wide interest in the food industry due to its potential as a decontaminating agent. In this study, we examined the effect of sodium tripolyphosphate (polyP3; Na5P3O10) against planktonic and biofilm cells of Prevotella intermedia, a major oral pathogen. The MIC of polyP3 against P. intermedia ATCC 49046 determined by agar dilution method was 0.075%, while 0.05% polyP3 was bactericidal against P. intermedia in time-kill analysis performed using liquid medium. A crystal violet binding assay for the assessment of biofilm formation by P. intermedia showed that sub-MICs of polyP3 significantly decreased biofilm formation. Under the scanning electron microscope, decreased numbers of P. intermedia cells forming the biofilms were observed when the bacterial cells were incubated with 0.025% or higher concentrations of polyP3. Assessment of biofilm viability with LIVE/DEAD staining and viable cell count methods showed that 0.05% or higher concentrations of polyP3 significantly decreased the viability of the preformed biofilms in a concentration-dependent manner. The zone sizes of alpha-hemolysis formed on horse blood agar produced by P. intermedia were decreased in the presence of polyP3. The expression of the genes encoding hemolysins and the genes of the hemin uptake (hmu) locus was downregulated by polyP3. Collectively, our results show that polyP is an effective antimicrobial agent against P. intermedia in biofilms as well as planktonic phase, interfering with the process of hemin acquisition by the bacterium. PMID:26596937

  19. Fournier's gangrene caused by Actinomyces funkei, Fusobacterium gonidiaformans and Clostridium hathewayi.

    PubMed

    Tena, Daniel; Losa, Cristina; Medina-Pascual, María José; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio

    2014-06-01

    We report the first case of Fournier's gangrene caused by three unusual anaerobic organisms: Actinomyces funkei, Fusobacterium gonidiaformans and Clostridium hathewayi. The infection occurred in a 73-year-old man without typical risk factors for the development of Fournier's gangrene. Clinical outcome was good after prolonged antibiotic treatment and extensive debridement of the perineum. The case suggests that A. funkei, F. gonidiaformans and C. hathewayi should be considered as potential pathogens of Fournier's gangrene. Human infections caused by these organisms are very rare but can be underestimated because correct identification is very difficult, especially in polymicrobial infections such as Fournier's gangrene.

  20. Fusobacterium necrophorum tonsillitis: an important cause of tonsillitis in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Jensen, A; Hansen, T M; Bank, S; Kristensen, L H; Prag, J

    2015-03-01

    The role of Fusobacterium necrophorum in tonsillitis in adolescents and young adults was retrospectively investigated by culture examination. We compared the prevalence of F. necrophorum in 212 subjects with confirmed clinical tonsillitis and in 176 subjects with confirmed no clinical tonsillitis. The prevalence of F. necrophorum was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in subjects with clinical tonsillitis (27%) compared to subjects with no clinical tonsillitis (6%). These results clearly demonstrate the role of F. necrophorum in tonsillitis. By diagnosing and treating F. necrophorum tonsillitis with, for example, penicillin, metronidazole, or both, we might prevent some cases of Lemierre syndrome.

  1. Gradenigo's syndrome: is fusobacterium different? Two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Heshin-Bekenstein, Merav; Megged, Orli; Peleg, Uri; Shahroor-Karni, Sarit; Bass, Roman; Benifla, Moni; Bar-Meir, Maskit

    2014-01-01

    Gradenigo's syndrome is a rare but life threatening complication of acute otitis media (AOM), which includes a classic triad of otitis media, deep facial pain and ipsilateral abducens nerve paralysis. The incidence of Fusobacterium necrophorum infections has increased in recent years. We describe two cases of Gradenigo's syndrome caused by F. necrophorum. Additional four cases were identified in a review of the literature. Gradenigo's syndrome as well as other neurologic complications should be considered in cases of complicated acute otitis media. F. necrophorum should be empirically treated while awaiting culture results.

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Brachyspira intermedia and Brachyspira pilosicoli isolates from Australian chickens.

    PubMed

    Hampson, D J; Stephens, C P; Oxberry, S L

    2006-02-01

    Susceptibilities of predominantly Australian isolates of the pathogenic intestinal spirochaetes Brachyspira intermedia (n = 25) and Brachyspira pilosicoli (n = 17) from chickens were tested in agar dilution against four concentrations each of the antimicrobials tiamulin, lincomycin, tylosin, metronidazole, tetracycline and ampicillin. Based on available minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoint values for Brachyspira hyodysenteriae or other Gram-negative enteric veterinary pathogens, isolates of both species generally were susceptible to tiamulin, lincomycin, metronidazole and tetracycline. Although not classed as resistant, four isolates of B. intermedia had an elevated MIC range for tiamulin (1 to 4 mg/l), 11 isolates of B. intermedia and five of B. pilosicoli had an elevated MIC range for lincomycin (10 to 50 mg/l), one isolate of B. pilosicoli had an elevated MIC range for tetracycline (10 to 20 mg/l), and one isolate of B. intermedia and five of B. pilosicoli had an elevated MIC range for ampicillin (10 to 50 mg/l). A clear lack of susceptibility to tylosin (MIC > 4 mg/l) was seen in 11 isolates each of B. intermedia and B. pilosicoli, and to ampicillin (MIC > 32 mg/l) in two isolates of B. pilosicoli. These data suggest that some resistance to common antimicrobials exists among intestinal spirochetes obtained from laying hens and supports the need of MIC data for clinical isolates before any treatment is considered. PMID:16448937

  3. Endocrine and Bone Complications in β-Thalassemia Intermedia: Current Understanding and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Noureldine, MohammadHassan A.; Abbas, Hussein A.

    2015-01-01

    Thalassemia intermedia (TI), also known as nontransfusion dependent thalassemia (NTDT), is a type of thalassemia where affected patients do not require lifelong regular transfusions for survival but may require occasional or even frequent transfusions in certain clinical settings and for defined periods of time. NTDT encompasses three distinct clinical forms: β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI), Hb E/β-thalassemia, and α-thalassemia intermedia (Hb H disease). Over the past decade, our understanding of the molecular features, pathophysiology, and complications of NTDT particularly β-TI has increased tremendously but data on optimal treatment of disease and its various complications are still lacking. In this paper, we shall review a group of commonly encountered complications in β-TI, mainly endocrine and bone complications. PMID:25834825

  4. Molecular Characterization of β-Thalassemia Intermedia in Southeast Iran.

    PubMed

    Miri-Moghaddam, Ebrahim; Bahrami, Sara; Naderi, Majid; Bazi, Ali; Karimipoor, Morteza

    2016-06-01

    Inheritance of mild mutations within the β-globin gene and coinheritance of α-thalassemia (α-thal) are known as two important genetic modifiers in β-thalassemia (β-thal) intermedia (β-TI). We aimed to evaluate the spectrum of β- and α-thal mutations in β-TI patients in Southeast Iran. Common β- and α-globin gene mutations were detected by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) and multiplex gap-PCR, respectively. There were 26 male (57.8%) and 19 female (42.2%) patients. HBB: c.92 + 5T > C [IVS-I-5 (G > C)] and HBB: c.-138C + 1G > A [IVS-II-I (G > A)] represented the prevalent alleles with respective frequencies of 60.0 and 10.0%. Other β-globin mutations included HBB: c.-138C > T [-88 (C > T)], HBB: c.27_28insG [frameshift codons (FSC) 8/9 (+G)], HBB: c.46delT [codon 15 (-T)], HBB: c.93-22_95del (IVS-I, 25 del), and the 619 bp deletion (NG_000007.3: g.71609_72227del619). The predominant genotypic combinations were β(0)/β(0) (68.9%), β(0)/β(+ )(8.9%) and β(+)/β(+ )(2.2%). Coinheritance of α-thal was observed in 33.0% of the patients, with the -α(3.7) (rightward) (NG_000006.1: g.34164_37967del3804) as the most common deletion (86.0%). One patient was diagnosed with the -α(4.2) (leftward) (AF221717) and one with the - -(MED) (g.24664_41064del16401) deletions, while no patients carried the -(α)(20.5) (g.15164_37864del22701), α(-5 nt) (HBA2: c.95 + 2_95_6delTGAGG) or codon 19 (-G) (HBA2: c.56delG) mutations. The alleviating molecular mechanism was not explainable by β(+ )or concurrent α-thal in more than half of our β-TI patients. This encourages conducting more studies to identify other contributing factors, especially Hb F-inducing genetic modifiers. PMID:27117567

  5. The detection of Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum from ovine footrot in Kashmir, India.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Shaheen; Wani, Shakil A; Hassan, Mir Nadeem; Nazir, Nazima; Nyrah, Qazi Javed

    2015-10-01

    In a study conducted, a total of 450 swab samples from footrot lesions of naturally infected sheep were collected in all the ten districts of the Kashmir valley and were examined for the presence of Dichelobacter nodosus (D. nodosus) and Fusobacterium necrophorum (F. necrophorum), in order to determine if F. necrophorum was associated with ovine footrot. The detection of F. necrophorum and D. nodosus was carried out by polymerase chain reaction targeting the leukotoxin (lktA) and 16S rRNA genes, respectively. In this study, only less than 50% of positive samples contained both the bacteria, so it is not possible to conclude with certainty that both bacteria are together required for the disease manifestation.

  6. Issues in Designing a Hypermedia Document System: The Intermedia Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yankelovich, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Intermedia, a hypermedia system developed at Brown University's Institute for Research (Rhode Island) in Information and Scholarship, is first described, and then used as a case study to explore a number of key issues that software designers must consider in the development of hypermedia document systems. A hypermedia document system is defined as…

  7. Ectoparasites of the critically endangered insular cavy, Cavia intermedia (Rodentia: Caviidae), southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Regolin, André Luis; Furnari, Nina; de Castro Jacinavicius, Fernando; Linardi, Pedro Marcos; de Carvalho-Pinto, Carlos José

    2015-01-01

    Cavia intermedia is a rodent species critically endangered and is found only on a 10 hectare island off the southern Brazilian coast. To identify the ectoparasites of C. intermedia, 27 specimens (14 males and 13 females), representing approximately 65% of the estimated total population, were captured and examined. A total of 1336 chewing lice of two species were collected: Gliricola lindolphoi (Amblycera: Gyropidae) and Trimenopon hispidum (Amblycera: Trimenoponidae). In addition, chiggers Arisocerus hertigi (Acari: Trombiculidae) and Eutrombicula sp. (Acari: Trombiculidae) were collected from the ears of all captured animals. This low species richness compared to those for other Cavia species is expected for island mammals. Although the results presented here are not conclusive about the relationship between C. intermedia and ectoparasites, this low species richness found might be reflected in a low level of investment by the hosts in the basal immune defense, since investments in white blood cell production by mammals are influenced by the diversity of parasites in the environment. Additionally, considering that it might result in host vulnerability to other parasites that might be introduced through exotic or migratory host species, the monitoring of C. intermedia, including parasitological and immunological assessments, is recommended as a key component of conservation efforts. PMID:25830106

  8. Composition, Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Activities of Satureja intermedia C.A.Mey Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Sharifi-Rad, Mehdi; Hoseini-Alfatemi, Seyedeh Mahsan; Iriti, Marcello; Sharifi-Rad, Majid; Sharifi-Rad, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the essential oil (EO) constituents from the aerial parts of Satureja intermedia C.A.Mey were detected by GC and GC/MS. The antimicrobial activity of EO on oral pathogens and its cytotoxicity to human cancer cells were determined by the microbroth dilution method and the crystal violet staining method, respectively. Thirty-nine compounds were identified and the main EO constituents were γ-terpinene (37.1%), thymol (30.2%), p-cymene (16.2%), limonene (3.9%), α-terpinene (3.3%), myrcene (2.5%), germacrene B (1.4%), elemicine (1.1%) and carvacrol (0.5%). The S. intermedia EO showed a concentration-dependent decrease in viability of Hep-G2 (hepatocellular carcinoma) and MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma) human cancer cell lines (p < 0.05). Antimicrobial screening of S. intermedia EO demonstrated slight antibacterial and antifungal activities against Streptococcus mutants, S. salivarius, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and C. glabrata. Further preclinical studies are needed to assess the efficacy and safety of S. intermedia EO as a new promising anticancer agent. PMID:26247936

  9. Formation of Lignans(-)-Secoisolariciresinol and (-)-Matairesinol with Forsythia intermedia Cell-Free Extracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umezawa, Toshiaki; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    1991-01-01

    In vivo labeling experiments of Forsythia intermedia plant tissue with [8-(C-14)]- and [9,9-(2)H2,OC(2)H3]coniferyl alcohols revealed that the lignans, (-)-secoisolariciresinol and (-)-matairesinol, were derived from two coniferyl alcohol molecules; no evidence for the formation of the corresponding (+)-enantiomers was found. Administration of (+/-)-[Ar-(H-3)] secoisolariciresinols to excised shoots of F.intermedia resulted in a significant conversion into (-)-matairesinol; again, the (+)-antipode was not detected. Experiments using cell-free extracts of F.intermedia confirmed and extended these findings. In the presence of NAD(P)H and H2O2, the cell-free extracts catalyzed the formation of (-)- secoisolariciresinol, with either [8-(C-14)]- or [9,9-(2)H2,OC(2)H3]coniferyl alcohols as substrates. The (+)- enantiomer was not formed. Finally, when either (-)-[Ar-(H-3)] or (+/-)-[Ar-(H-2)]secoisolariciresinols were used as substrates, in the presence of NAD(P), only (-)- and not (+)-matairesinol formation occurred. The other antipode, (+)-secoisolariciresinol, did not serve as a substrate for the formation of either (+)- or (-)-matairesinol. Thus, in F.intermedia, the formation of the lignan, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, occurs under strict stereochemical control, in a reaction or reactions requiring NAD(P)H and H2O2 as cofactors. This stereoselectivity is retained in the subsequent conversion into (-)-matairesinol, since (+)-secoisolariciresinol is not a substrate. These are the first two enzymes to be discovered in lignan formation.

  10. Dilated Cardiomyopathy in a Rio Grande Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) in Southern Utah, USA, 2013.

    PubMed

    Frame, David D; Kelly, E Jane; Van Wettere, Arnaud

    2015-07-01

    A male Rio Grande Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) living in semidomestication was submitted for necropsy. Emaciation, a greatly enlarged heart, and chronic passive congestion of the liver were present. Dilated cardiomyopathy occurs in domestic turkey flocks but has not been reported in Wild Turkeys.

  11. Composition, Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Activities of Satureja intermedia C.A.Mey Essential Oil

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Sharifi-Rad, Mehdi; Hoseini-Alfatemi, Seyedeh Mahsan; Iriti, Marcello; Sharifi-Rad, Majid; Sharifi-Rad, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the essential oil (EO) constituents from the aerial parts of Satureja intermedia C.A.Mey were detected by GC and GC/MS. The antimicrobial activity of EO on oral pathogens and its cytotoxicity to human cancer cells were determined by the microbroth dilution method and the crystal violet staining method, respectively. Thirty-nine compounds were identified and the main EO constituents were γ-terpinene (37.1%), thymol (30.2%), p-cymene (16.2%), limonene (3.9%), α-terpinene (3.3%), myrcene (2.5%), germacrene B (1.4%), elemicine (1.1%) and carvacrol (0.5%). The S. intermedia EO showed a concentration-dependent decrease in viability of Hep-G2 (hepatocellular carcinoma) and MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma) human cancer cell lines (p < 0.05). Antimicrobial screening of S. intermedia EO demonstrated slight antibacterial and antifungal activities against Streptococcus mutants, S. salivarius, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and C. glabrata. Further preclinical studies are needed to assess the efficacy and safety of S. intermedia EO as a new promising anticancer agent. PMID:26247936

  12. Comparison of the virulence of exopolysaccharide-producing Prevotella intermedia to exopolysaccharide non-producing periodontopathic organisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence in the literature suggests that exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by bacterial cells are essential for the expression of virulence in these organisms. Secreted EPSs form the framework in which microbial biofilms are built. Methods This study evaluates the role of EPS in Prevotella intermedia for the expression of virulence. This evaluation was accomplished by comparing EPS-producing P. intermedia strains 17 and OD1-16 with non-producing P. intermedia ATCC 25611 and Porphyromonas gingivalis strains ATCC 33277, 381 and W83 for their ability to induce abscess formation in mice and evade phagocytosis. Results EPS-producing P. intermedia strains 17 and OD1-16 induced highly noticeable abscess lesions in mice at 107 colony-forming units (CFU). In comparison, P. intermedia ATCC 25611 and P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, 381 and W83, which all lacked the ability to produce viscous materials, required 100-fold more bacteria (109 CFU) in order to induce detectable abscess lesions in mice. Regarding antiphagocytic activity, P. intermedia strains 17 and OD1-16 were rarely internalized by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, but other strains were readily engulfed and detected in the phagosomes of these phagocytes. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the production of EPS by P. intermedia strains 17 and OD1-16 could contribute to the pathogenicity of this organism by conferring their ability to evade the host's innate defence response. PMID:21864411

  13. Development of Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the nucleotide sequences of a DNA probe Pig27.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Hwang, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Young-Seok; Park, Jae-Yoon; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the P. intermedia-specific DNA probe. The P. intermedia-specific DNA probe was screened by inverted dot blot hybridization and confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. The nucleotide sequences of the species-specific DNA probes were determined using a chain termination method. Southern blot analysis showed that the DNA probe, Pig27, detected only the genomic DNA of P. intermedia strains. PCR showed that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, had species-specificity for P. intermedia. The detection limits of the PCR primer sets were 0.4pg of the purified genomic DNA of P. intermedia ATCC 49046. These results suggest that the PCR primers, Pin-F1/Pin-R1, could be useful in the detection of P. intermedia as well as in the development of a PCR kit in epidemiological studies related to periodontal diseases. PMID:21192988

  14. A Rare Cause of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: Fusobacterium Infection—A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Male, Heather J.

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare syndrome characterized by excessive activation of the immune system. Bacterial infections are very rare precipitants of this disease. A 19-year-old gentleman presented with headache, fatigue, and malaise. He was found to be hypotensive, tachycardic, and febrile. Broad spectrum antibiotics were initiated, and a lumbar puncture ruled out meningitis. Patient progressively developed shock that required use of vasopressors, as well as renal and respiratory failure. Blood cultures grew Fusobacterium necrophorum. Given continued fevers despite appropriate antimicrobials, a bone marrow biopsy was performed revealing increased histiocytes with hemophagocytosis. Dexamethasone was added with dramatic clinical improvement. Our case highlights Fusobacterium as a rare precipitant of HLH and proves that a high index of clinical suspicion is crucial for early diagnosis of HLH, allowing for prompt initiation of HLH-specific immunosuppressive therapy that can be life-saving. PMID:27563473

  15. A Rare Cause of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: Fusobacterium Infection-A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Mohyuddin, Ghulam Rehman; Male, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare syndrome characterized by excessive activation of the immune system. Bacterial infections are very rare precipitants of this disease. A 19-year-old gentleman presented with headache, fatigue, and malaise. He was found to be hypotensive, tachycardic, and febrile. Broad spectrum antibiotics were initiated, and a lumbar puncture ruled out meningitis. Patient progressively developed shock that required use of vasopressors, as well as renal and respiratory failure. Blood cultures grew Fusobacterium necrophorum. Given continued fevers despite appropriate antimicrobials, a bone marrow biopsy was performed revealing increased histiocytes with hemophagocytosis. Dexamethasone was added with dramatic clinical improvement. Our case highlights Fusobacterium as a rare precipitant of HLH and proves that a high index of clinical suspicion is crucial for early diagnosis of HLH, allowing for prompt initiation of HLH-specific immunosuppressive therapy that can be life-saving. PMID:27563473

  16. Production of bacteriocin-like substances by Yersinia frederiksenii, Y. kristensenii, and Y. intermedia strains.

    PubMed

    Calvo, C; Brault, J; Ramos-Cormenzana, A; Mollaret, H H

    1986-01-01

    The production of bacteriocin-like substances by strains of Yersinia frederiksenii, Y. kristensenii and Y. intermedia in broth culture was established. These substances showed a selective activity against Y. enterocolitica, Y. frederiksenii, Y. kristensenii and Y. intermedia strains. Electron micrographs revealed the presence of phage tails in culture media. The production of these substances was detected in cultures grown at 25 degrees C but not in those grown at 37 degrees C, while these bacteriocin-like substances were active at 25 and 37 degrees C. Y. enterocolitica serogroups 0:3 and 0:9 were more susceptible to these bacterin-like substances than strains of Yersinia isolated from environmental sources.

  17. Perianesthetic development of diaphragmatic hernia in a horse with equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID)

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Molly K.; Lee, Wesley L.; Eggleston, Randy B.

    2015-01-01

    A 21-year-old Thoroughbred gelding with a history of equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) presented with priapism of 2 days’ duration. The horse received a caudal morphine epidural and then underwent corpus cavernosum lavage and phallectomy under general anesthesia. The patient’s recovery featured multiple unsuccessful attempts to stand and his respiratory distress persisted for several hours until he acutely developed severe colic and was euthanized. Necropsy findings revealed a pituitary adenoma of the pars intermedia, bilateral adrenal cortical hyperplasia, and diaphragmatic herniation. This report suggests that horses with PPID may present a greater risk for diaphragmatic hernia under general anesthesia or during procedures placing stress on the diaphragm, including anesthetic recovery. PMID:25565714

  18. The effects of stress hormones on growth of selected periodontitis related bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jentsch, H F R; März, Diana; Krüger, Monika

    2013-12-01

    The focus of this study was to examine in vitro the effects of stress hormones (catecholamines: epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine and hydrocortisone: cortisol) on the growth of four anaerobic species of periodontitis-related bacteria (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Tannerella forsythia) and one facultative anaerobic species (Eikenella corrodens). Bacterial growth was determined by two different methods: fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and the viable count by culture method. To simulate stress, each single strain was grown in a special growth medium with three different concentrations of each hormone, using an anaerobic chamber at 37 °C. Growth of F. nucleatum increased in the presence of all stress hormones. Growth of P. gingivalis was not significantly influenced by any hormone. Growth of P. intermedia and E. corrodens was inhibited by almost all stress hormones tested. Both methods of analysis revealed that the highest concentrations of norepinephrine and cortisol increased the growth of T. forsythia. Different hormones have a different effect on the growth of periodontitis-related bacteria in vitro. It appears that bacterial viability is more strongly influenced than is bacterial metabolic activity. The growth of F. nucleatum particularly and partially of T. forsythia is increased by several stress hormones and may have an additional negative impact on periodontal disease.

  19. Thalassemia major and intermedia in jammu and kashmir, India: a regional transfusion centre experience.

    PubMed

    Vasudev, Rahul; Sawhney, Vijay

    2014-12-01

    Data on status of thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies from the extreme northern part of India is scarce. We investigated socio-demographic characteristics and management issues related to β-thalassemia in Jammu and Kashmir, India. Data from 96 thalassemia major and intermedia patients visiting the department of transfusion medicine for their transfusion needs was collected. Parameters recorded included age group, age at diagnosis, gender, religion, districts of the state they belonged to, family history of thalassemia, blood group, type of thalassemia (major/intermedia), total number of transfusions received and chelation therapy status. Thalassemia major patients comprised 92 (95.8 %) and intermedia 4 (4.2 %) of the cohort. Most cases were diagnosed in infancy or early childhood. The districts of Jammu and Rajouri together contributed 53 % of the cases. Most patients were Hindu (76/96, 79.2 %). A positive family history was most often obtained from Muslim patients (8/18, 44.4 %). Only 50 % cases were on iron chelation therapy. There is a need to come up with a national/local policy to manage disease in endemic areas and a policy formulated to help families and patients. Data such as ours may help in health management planning for thalassemic patients in this region.

  20. Brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia) venom triggers endothelial cells death by anoikis.

    PubMed

    Nowatzki, Jenifer; Sene, Reginaldo Vieira; Paludo, Katia Sabrina; Rizzo, Luiz Eduardo; Souza-Fonseca-Guimarães, Fernando; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Franco, Célia Regina C; Trindade, Edvaldo S

    2012-09-01

    Brown spider (Loxosceles sp.) venom affects the endothelium of vessels and triggers disruptive activity in the subendothelial matrix. The vascular disorders observed after venom exposure include leukocyte and platelet activation, disseminated intravascular coagulation, an increase in vessel permeability and hemorrhage into the dermis. In this study, we report additional evidence regarding the mechanism of endothelial cell cytotoxicity induced by Loxosceles intermedia venom. Exposure to venom led to endothelial cell detachment in a time-dependent manner. Loss of cell anchorage and cell-cell adhesion following venom exposure was accompanied by changes in the distribution of the α₅β₁ integrin and VE-cadherin. An ultrastructural analysis of cells treated with venom revealed morphological alterations characteristic of apoptosis. Moreover, after venom exposure, the ratio between Bax and Bcl-2 proteins was disturbed in favor of Bax. In addition, late apoptosis was only observed in cells detached by the action of venom. Accordingly, there was no increase in apoptosis when cells were exposed to L. intermedia venom in suspension, suggesting that the loss of cell anchorage provides the signal to initiate apoptosis. Thus, L. intermedia venom likely triggers endothelial cell death indirectly through an apoptotic mechanism known as anoikis.

  1. Septic internal jugular vein thrombosis caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum and mediated by a broken needle.

    PubMed

    Galyfos, George; Palogos, Konstantinos; Kavouras, Nikolaos

    2014-12-01

    The injection of drugs into the neck is unusual and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein can be a rare clinical presentation with a high risk for severe complications. We report a case of a 31-year-old male intravenous drug user presenting with fever, shortness of breath and right neck oedema. Laboratory studies revealed elevated inflammation parameters. X-ray imaging revealed a broken syringe needle inside the soft tissues of the neck. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the thorax and brain were unremarkable, while cervical CT showed a fully thrombosed, right internal jugular vein. Intravenous antibiotics were initiated, and modified after identification of an anaerobic Gram-negative oropharynx-derived pathogen (Fusobacterium necrophorum). The patient was discharged after resolution of symptoms under treatment. Septic internal jugular vein thrombosis should always be included in the differential diagnosis of local neck inflammation and systemic sepsis in intravenous drug users. Prompt and aggressive antibiotic treatment is vital, whereas the role of anticoagulation therapy is not definitely known.

  2. Human Infection with Fusobacterium necrophorum (Necrobacillosis), with a Focus on Lemierre's Syndrome†

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Terry

    2007-01-01

    Summary: Human infection with Fusobacterium necrophorum usually involves F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme rather than F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum, which is a common pathogen in animals. Lemierre's syndrome, or postanginal sepsis, is the most common life-threatening manifestation. Tonsillitis is followed by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and then a septicemia with septic emboli in lungs and other sites. Recent evidence suggests that F. necrophorum can be limited to the throat and cause persistent or recurrent tonsillitis. F. necrophorum is unique among non-spore-forming anaerobes, first for its virulence and association with Lemierre's syndrome as a monomicrobial infection and second because it seems probable that it is an exogenously acquired infection. The source of infection is unclear; suggestions include acquisition from animals or human-to-human transmission. Approximately 10% of published cases are associated with infectious mononucleosis, which may facilitate invasion. Recent work suggests that underlying thrombophilia may predispose to internal jugular vein thrombophlebitis. Lemierre's syndrome was relatively common in the preantibiotic era but seemed to virtually disappear with widespread use of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infection. In the last 15 years there has been a rise in incidence, possibly related to restriction in antibiotic use for sore throat. PMID:17934077

  3. Fusobacterium prausnitzii and related species represent a dominant group within the human fecal flora.

    PubMed

    Suau, A; Rochet, V; Sghir, A; Gramet, G; Brewaeys, S; Sutren, M; Rigottier-Gois, L; Doré, J

    2001-04-01

    The human gut microflora plays a key role in nutrition and health. It has been extensively studied by conventional culture techniques. However these methods are difficult, time consuming and their results not always consistent. Furthermore microscopic counts indicate that only 20 to 40% of the total flora can be cultivated. Among the predominant species of the human gut, Fusobacterium prausnitzii was reported either as one of the most frequent and numerous species or was seldom retrieved. We designed and validated a specific rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probe, called S-*-Fprau-0645-a-A-23, to accurately detect and quantify F. prausnitzii and relatives within the human fecal microflora. The target group accounted for 5.3 +/- 3% of total bacterial 16S rRNA using dot blot hybridization (10 human fecal samples) and 16.5 +/- 7% of cells stained with Dapi using in situ hybridization (10 other human fecal samples). A specific morphology seemed to be typical and dominant: two cells forming an asymmetrical double droplet. This work showed that F. prausnitzii and phylogenetically related species represent a dominant group within the human fecal flora.

  4. Adhesion of Fusobacterium necrophorum to bovine endothelial cells is mediated by outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Gart, Elena; Nagaraja, T G; Narayanan, Sanjeev

    2013-03-23

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative anaerobe, is frequently associated with suppurative and necrotic infections of animals and humans. The organism is a major bovine pathogen, and in cattle, the common fusobacterial infections are hepatic abscesses, foot rot, and necrotic laryngitis. The species comprises two subspecies: F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum and F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Bacterial adhesion to the host cell surface is a critical initial step in the pathogenesis, and outer membrane proteins (OMP) play an important role in adhesion and establishment of certain Gram-negative bacterial infections. The means by which F. necrophorum attaches to epithelial or endothelial cells has not been determined. We evaluated whether OMP of F. necrophorum, isolated from a liver abscess, mediated adhesion to bovine endothelial cells (adrenal gland capillary endothelial cell line). The extent of binding of subsp. necrophorum to the endothelial cells was higher than that of F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Trypsin treatment of bacterial cells decreased their binding to endothelial cells indicating the protein nature of adhesins. Preincubation of endothelial cells with OMP extracted from F. necrophorum decreased the binding of bacterial cells. In addition, binding of each subspecies to endothelial cells was inhibited by polyclonal antibodies raised against respective OMP and the antibody-mediated inhibition was subspecies specific. The western blot analysis of OMP bound to endothelial cells with anti-OMP antibodies showed four OMP of 17, 24, 40 and 74 kDa. We conclude that OMP of F. necrophorum play a role in adhesion of bacterial cells to the endothelial cells.

  5. Clinical and biochemical characteristics of patients with Fusobacterium necrophorum-positive acute tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Kjærulff, Ann Marlene Gram; Thomsen, Marianne Kragh; Ovesen, Therese; Klug, Tejs Ehlers

    2015-06-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum (FN) is the predominant pathogen in peritonsillar abscesses, which is a relatively frequent complication of acute tonsillitis. The study aimed to explore if FN is a significant pathogen in acute tonsillitis, examine the prevalence of FN in acute tonsillitis patients, and describe the clinical and biochemical characteristics of FN-positive patients. A 6-month prospective study was conducted in a Danish general practice with eight physicians. One hundred acute tonsillitis patients and 100 healthy controls aged 15-40 years were included in the study. The prevalence of FN was (non-significantly) higher among acute tonsillitis patients (16 %) compared to healthy individuals (9 %) (P = 0.199). This trend was border significant for patients aged 15-29 years (24 vs 9 %) (P = 0.050). Significantly, more FN-positive patients were men (75 %) compared to patients growing other bacteria (17 %) or mixed oral flora (27 %) (P < 0.001). Centor scores, individual clinical symptoms, and infection markers were similar between patient growing FN and mixed oral flora. FN is possibly a significant and prevalent pathogen in acute tonsillitis among teenagers and young adults. Patients with FN-positive acute tonsillitis do not seem to be more clinically or biochemically affected than patients without growth of bacterial pathogens.

  6. Outer membrane proteins of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. necrophorum and subsp. funduliforme.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Peterson, Greg; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G; Narayanan, Sanjeev

    2014-08-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, classified into subsp. necrophorum (Fnn) and subsp. funduliforme (Fnf), is frequently associated with necrotic infections of animals and humans. The outer membrane proteins (OMP) of many Gram negative bacteria play an important role in bacterial adhesion and establishment of infection. The OMP profile of F. necrophorum has not been well characterized. We analyzed OMP of bovine strains of Fnn and Fnf and human strains of F. necrophorum. Electrophoretic separations of extracted OMP of Fnn and Fnf strains of cattle showed a total of 19 and 20 protein bands, respectively. The most prominent protein band was 40 kDa in Fnn and 37.5 kDa in Fnf. The four human clinical strains examined had more heterogeneous banding patterns and had different profiles than those of bovine Fnf strains. A total of 11 protein bands in Fnn and 13 protein bands in Fnf were recognized by sera from cattle with liver abscesses. The intensities of many of the bands in Fnn were higher than that of Fnf. We conclude that the two subspecies of F. necrophorum differ in their OMP profiles and the difference may account for differences in their virulence and involvement in the pathogenesis of necrotic infections.

  7. Characterization of the human immunoglobulin G Fc-binding activity in Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, S; Grenier, D

    1995-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria possess cell surface receptors which can bind immunoglobulins via the Fc portion. The aim of this study was to characterize the human immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc-binding activity of Prevotella intermedia, a suspected etiologic agent of adult chronic periodontitis. The Fc-binding activity of P. intermedia on whole cells and on extracellular vesicles was demonstrated. Incubation of P. intermedia cells in the presence of Zwittergent 3-14 allowed complete solubilization of the Fc receptor from the cell surface. This cell envelope extract was thus used to characterize the Fc-binding activity. A microtiter plate assay using alkaline phosphatase-labeled Fc fragments showed that preincubation of the cell envelope extract with human IgG, human IgG Fc fragments, or human serum completely inhibited the Fc-binding activity. Partial inhibition was obtained with human IgG F(ab')2 fragments, whereas no inhibition occurred following preincubation with human IgA, carbohydrates, and selected proteins. Preincubation of the cell envelope extract with IgG from a variety of animals demonstrated that rabbit, mouse, rat, goat, and sheep IgG did not inhibit Fc-binding activity, whereas cow, pig, and dog IgG partially inhibited Fc-binding activity. A strong inhibition comparable to that obtained with human IgG was noted with monkey IgG. The Fc receptor of P. intermedia is thus different from the six types previously reported in other nonoral bacteria. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting (immunoblotting) analysis of the cell envelope extract revealed a major band with a molecular mass of approximately 65 kDa which reacted with peroxidase-labeled human IgG Fe fragments. Transmission electron microscopy showed a uniform distribution of the Fc receptor on the bacterial surface, as revealed by gold labeling. The Fc-binding activity demonstrated in this study may act as an additional virulence factor for P. intermedia by reducing IgG reactions with the

  8. Growth requirements and fermentation products of Fusobacterium prausnitzii, and a proposal to reclassify it as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii gen. nov., comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Sylvia H; Hold, Georgina L; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Stewart, Colin S; Flint, Harry J

    2002-11-01

    Two newly isolated strains of obligately anaerobic bacteria from human faeces are shown here to be related to Fusobacterium prausnitzii, which is regarded as one of the most abundant colonizers of the human colon. These strains, along with Fusobacterium prausnitzii ATCC 27768(T) and 27766, are non-motile and produce butyrate, formate and lactate, but not hydrogen as fermentation products. A new finding is that all four strains produce D-lactate, but not L-lactate. The strains have a requirement for acetate in the growth medium and this may account for the previously reported requirement for rumen fluid. The DNA G+C content of the four strains is 47-57 mol%. Together with phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA sequencing, this establishes that Fusobacterium prausnitzii strains are only distantly related to Fusobacterium sensu stricto and are more closely related to members of Clostridium cluster IV (the Clostridium leptum group). It is proposed that a new genus, Faecalibacterium gen. nov. be created; this genus should include Faecalibacterium prausnitzii gen. nov., comb. nov. ATCC 27768(T) (= NCIMB 13872(T)) (formerly Fusobacterium prausnitzii) as the type species together with ATCC 27766 and the newly isolated strains A2-165 and L2-6.

  9. In vitro degradation of lysine by ruminal fluid-based fermentations and by Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Elwakeel, E A; Amachawadi, R G; Nour, A M; Nasser, M E A; Nagaraja, T G; Titgemeyer, E C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to characterize some factors affecting lysine degradation by mixed ruminal bacteria and by ruminal Fusobacterium necrophorum. Mixed ruminal bacteria degraded lysine, and addition of pure cultures of F. necrophorum did not increase lysine degradation. Addition of acetic or propionic acid strikingly reduced NH(3) production from lysine by mixed ruminal bacteria at pH 6, but not at pH 7. Although typical ruminal environments with acidic pH and normal concentrations of volatile fatty acids might inhibit lysine degradation by F. necrophorum, ruminal fluid contained enough bacteria with a lysine-degrading capacity to ferment 50 mM lysine in vitro. Of 7 strains of ruminal F. necrophorum tested, all grew on both lactate and lysine as the primary energy source. Both subspecies of ruminal F. necrophorum (necrophorum and funduliforme) used lysine as a primary C and energy source. Lysine and glutamic acid were effectively fermented by F. necrophorum, but alanine and tryptophan were not, and histidine and methionine were fermented only to a minor extent. The end products of lactate fermentation by F. necrophorum were propionate and acetate, and those of lysine degradation were butyrate and acetate. Fermentation of glutamic acid by F. necrophorum yielded acetate and butyrate in a ratio near to 2:1. The minimum inhibitory concentration of tylosin for F. necrophorum was not dependent on whether bacteria were grown with lactate or lysine, but F. necrophorum was more susceptible to monensin when grown on lysine than on lactate. Although F. necrophorum is generally resistant to monensin, the ionophore may reduce lysine degradation by F. necrophorum in the rumen. The essential oil components limonene, at 20 or 100 μg/mL, and thymol, at 100 μg/mL, inhibited F. necrophorum growth, whereas eugenol, guaiacol, and vanillin had no effect. Our findings may lead to ways to minimize ruminal lysine degradation and thus increase its availability to the animal

  10. Factor H binding as a complement evasion mechanism for an anaerobic pathogen, Fusobacterium necrophorum.

    PubMed

    Friberg, Nathalie; Carlson, Petteri; Kentala, Erna; Mattila, Petri S; Kuusela, Pentti; Meri, Seppo; Jarva, Hanna

    2008-12-15

    Fusobacterium necrophorum subspecies funduliforme is an obligate anaerobic Gram-negative rod causing invasive infections such as the life-threatening Lemierre's syndrome (sore throat, septicemia, jugular vein thrombosis, and disseminated infection). The aim of our study was to understand if and how F. necrophorum avoids C activation. We studied 12 F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme strains isolated from patients with sepsis. All strains were resistant to serum killing after a 1-h incubation in 20% serum. The bacteria bound, at different levels, the C inhibitor factor H (fH). Binding was ionic and specific in nature and occurred via sites on both the N terminus and the C terminus of fH. Bound fH remained functionally active as a cofactor for factor I in the cleavage of C3b. Interestingly, patients with the most severe symptoms carried strains with the strongest ability to bind fH. An increased C3b deposition and membrane attack complex formation on the surface of a weakly fH-binding strain was observed and its survival in serum at 3.5 h was impaired. This strain had not caused a typical Lemierre's syndrome. These data, and the fact that fH-binding correlated with the severity of disease, suggest that the binding of fH contributes to virulence and survival of F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme in the human host. Our data show, for the first time, that an anaerobic bacterium is able to bind the C inhibitor fH to evade C attack. PMID:19050282

  11. Invasive Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and Lemièrre's syndrome: the role of thrombophilia and EBV.

    PubMed

    Holm, K; Svensson, P J; Rasmussen, M

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe the clinical spectrum of invasive Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and Lemièrre's syndrome, to examine the role of underlying thrombophilia and concomitant mononucleosis in Lemièrre's syndrome, and to describe thromboembolic complications. Patients with invasive F. necrophorum infections were identified either prospectively or retrospectively through the regional database of clinical microbiology from 2000 to 2015. Patient records were reviewed and blood samples from patients with Lemièrre's syndrome were collected for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology and screening for thrombophilia. Of the 65 patients included, 33 had Lemièrre's syndrome. Of the remaining 32 patients, other infections of the respiratory tract and abdominal or urogenital infections were most common. Patients with Lemièrre's syndrome or other tonsillar infections were younger than patients from the other groups. For Lemièrre's syndrome, the 26 patients with severe sepsis on admittance had longer duration of symptoms. Three of five patients who developed distant manifestations had more than 14 days of symptoms. Jugular vein thrombosis was verified in 14 patients, two of whom developed serious complications. Three of 26 patients tested had factor V Leiden mutation, corresponding to the background prevalence. One of 22 patients tested had a concomitant EBV infection. This study confirms earlier studies of the clinical spectrum caused by F. necrophorum. For Lemièrre's syndrome, the study adds to the knowledge on thromboembolic outcome, demonstrating that jugular vein thrombosis may cause severe complications. The time to treatment seems to be important for the risk of severe disease. In this study, concomitant EBV infection or underlying thrombophilia was uncommon. PMID:26272176

  12. The aetiology of pharyngotonsillitis in adolescents and adults - Fusobacterium necrophorum is commonly found.

    PubMed

    Hedin, K; Bieber, L; Lindh, M; Sundqvist, M

    2015-03-01

    Sore throat is common in primary healthcare. Aetiological studies have focused on the presence of a limited number of pathogens. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of a wide range of bacteria and viruses, including Fusobacterium necrophorum, in patients with pharyngotonsillitis and in asymptomatic controls. A prospective case control study was performed in primary healthcare in Kronoberg County, Sweden. Patients (n=220) aged 15 to 45 years with a suspected acute pharyngotonsillitis, and controls (n=128), were included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed for β-hemolytic streptococci, F. necrophorum, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and 13 respiratory viruses. Serum samples were analysed for antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus. The patient history and symptoms, including Centor score, were analysed in relation to pathogens. In 155/220 (70.5%) of the patients, as compared to 26/128 (20.3%) of the controls (p <0.001), at least one microorganism was found. Group A streptococci, F. necrophorum, and influenza B virus were the three most common findings, and all significantly more common in patients than in controls (p <0.001, p 0.001, and p 0.002, respectively). Patients with F. necrophorum only (n=14) displayed a lower Centor score than patients with Group A streptococcus only (n=46), but a higher score than patients with influenza B, other viruses, or no potential pathogen (Kruskal-Wallis p <0.001). A pathogen was detected in 70% of the patients, displaying a wide range of pathogens contributing to the aetiology of pharyngotonsillitis. This study supports F. necrophorum as one of the pathogens to be considered in the aetiology of pharyngotonsillitis.

  13. Invasive Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and Lemièrre's syndrome: the role of thrombophilia and EBV.

    PubMed

    Holm, K; Svensson, P J; Rasmussen, M

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to describe the clinical spectrum of invasive Fusobacterium necrophorum infections and Lemièrre's syndrome, to examine the role of underlying thrombophilia and concomitant mononucleosis in Lemièrre's syndrome, and to describe thromboembolic complications. Patients with invasive F. necrophorum infections were identified either prospectively or retrospectively through the regional database of clinical microbiology from 2000 to 2015. Patient records were reviewed and blood samples from patients with Lemièrre's syndrome were collected for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serology and screening for thrombophilia. Of the 65 patients included, 33 had Lemièrre's syndrome. Of the remaining 32 patients, other infections of the respiratory tract and abdominal or urogenital infections were most common. Patients with Lemièrre's syndrome or other tonsillar infections were younger than patients from the other groups. For Lemièrre's syndrome, the 26 patients with severe sepsis on admittance had longer duration of symptoms. Three of five patients who developed distant manifestations had more than 14 days of symptoms. Jugular vein thrombosis was verified in 14 patients, two of whom developed serious complications. Three of 26 patients tested had factor V Leiden mutation, corresponding to the background prevalence. One of 22 patients tested had a concomitant EBV infection. This study confirms earlier studies of the clinical spectrum caused by F. necrophorum. For Lemièrre's syndrome, the study adds to the knowledge on thromboembolic outcome, demonstrating that jugular vein thrombosis may cause severe complications. The time to treatment seems to be important for the risk of severe disease. In this study, concomitant EBV infection or underlying thrombophilia was uncommon.

  14. Bacteriocin production by Fusobacterium isolates recovered from the oral cavity of human subjects with and without periodontal disease and of marmosets.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A A; Farias, L M; Nicoli, J R; Costa, J E; Carvalho, M A

    1998-09-01

    Bacteriocin production has been studied in very few anaerobic bacteria, and no report is available for Fusobacterium species. In the present study a total of 167 Fusobacterium isolates were tested for bacteriocin production: 70 isolates were obtained from the oral cavity of patients with periodontal disease, 47 were recovered from healthy oral sites of human subjects and 50 from the oral cavity of Callithrix penicillata. Autoantagonism and isoantagonism were observed when the bacteriocin-producing isolates were tested against themselves. Heteroantagonism was detected by testing the Fusobacterium isolates against 14 reference strains and 2 strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from our laboratory collection. The auto-, iso- and heteroantagonism phenomena observed in this comparative study suggest a possible ecological role for this (these) antagonistic substance(s) in the oral environment.

  15. Expression Profiles of TGF-β and TLR Pathways in Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia Challenged Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Kubra; Ekinci, Fatma Yesim; Korachi, May

    2015-01-01

    Background: The presence of certain oral pathogens at implant sites can hinder the osseointegration process. However, it is unclear how and by what microorganisms it happens. Objectives: This study investigated whether the presence of oral pathogens of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia individually, play a role in the failure of bone formation by determining the expression profiles of Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGF-β/Bone Morphogenic Protein (BMP) and Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) pathways in challenged osteoblasts. Materials and Methods: Cell viability of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia challenged osteoblasts were determined by WST assay. Changes in osteoblast morphology and inhibition of mineralization were observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Von Kossa staining, respectively. Expression of TGF-β and TLR pathway genes on challenged cells were identified by RT profiler array. Both P. gingivalis and P. intermedia challenges resulted in reduced viability and mineralization of osteoblasts. Results: Viability was reduced to 56.8% (P. gingivalis) and 52.75% (P. intermedia) at 1000 multiplicity. Amongst 48 genes examined, expressions of BMPER, SMAD1, IL8 and NFRKB were found to be highly upregulated by both bacterial challenges (Fold Change > 4). Conclusions: P. gingivalis and P. intermedia could play a role in implant failure by changing the expression profiles of genes related to bone formation and resorption. PMID:26034550

  16. Quantitative Profiling of Colorectal Cancer-Associated Bacteria Reveals Associations between Fusobacterium spp., Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) and Clinicopathological Features of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, Katie S.; Dakshinamurthy, Amirtha; Goldberg, Paul; Blackburn, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli) in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a) the presence and b) the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples) and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples) were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively) and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples) levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV) colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5). We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05), age (FDR = 0.03) or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01). Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  17. Bad news itself or just the messenger? The high mortality of Fusobacterium spp. infections is related to disseminated malignancy and other comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Johannesen, Katrine; Dessau, Ram; Heltberg, Ole; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Background Fusobacterium species are pleomorphic, obligate anaerobic gram-negative bacilli. They are difficult to culture and grow slowly. If antibiotic treatment is initiated prior to blood cultures, the bacteria might evade detection. This is a comprehensive report on mortality in non-bacteraemia fusobacterial infection. Methods Data were collected retrospectively in adults having a positive culture with Fusobacterium spp. admitted during 2000–2012 at the medical department. Data on culture specimens, number of cultures, admission and culture dates, patient age, gender, clinical disease, Charlson's index of co-morbidity, CRP level and survival were obtained. For comparison, we traced 60 consecutive, similarly obtained cultures from 2009 to 2010 containing Staphylococcus aureus. Results Within a 12-year period, we identified 28 patients with a positive culture of Fusobacterium spp. in a medical ward serving a population of 220,000. Only a minority (39%) had a positive blood culture, and 54% had focus in respiratory tract or pleura. Overall 6-month mortality was 32%, and unrelated to subspecies, treatment or anatomic location but significantly related to age >60 years, admission for severe, acute illness, and comorbidity, especially metastatic malignancy. Comparison between infection with Fusobacterium spp. and S. aureus showed that Fusobacterium spp. infections were predominantly community acquired, while S. aureus were both community and hospital acquired. Overall mortality for both bacterial infections increased significantly with age and current malignant disease. S. aureus–infected patients carried a significantly higher mortality. Conclusion Our data support that Fusobacterium spp. infection is a marker for significant, chronic disease rather than carrying a poor prognosis per se. PMID:27171316

  18. Quantitative profiling of colorectal cancer-associated bacteria reveals associations between fusobacterium spp., enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Katie S; Dakshinamurthy, Amirtha; Goldberg, Paul; Blackburn, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli) in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a) the presence and b) the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples) and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples) were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively) and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples) levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV) colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5). We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05), age (FDR = 0.03) or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01). Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  19. Quantitative profiling of colorectal cancer-associated bacteria reveals associations between fusobacterium spp., enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Katie S; Dakshinamurthy, Amirtha; Goldberg, Paul; Blackburn, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli) in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a) the presence and b) the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples) and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples) were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively) and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples) levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV) colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5). We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05), age (FDR = 0.03) or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01). Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  20. Repeated exposure to Lutzomyia intermedia sand fly saliva induces local expression of interferon-inducible genes both at the site of injection in mice and in human blood.

    PubMed

    Weinkopff, Tiffany; de Oliveira, Camila I; de Carvalho, Augusto M; Hauyon-La Torre, Yazmin; Muniz, Aline C; Miranda, Jose Carlos; Barral, Aldina; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    During a blood meal, Lutzomyia intermedia sand flies transmit Leishmania braziliensis, a parasite causing tegumentary leishmaniasis. In experimental leishmaniasis, pre-exposure to saliva of most blood-feeding sand flies results in parasite establishment in absence of any skin damages in mice challenged with dermotropic Leishmania species together with saliva. In contrast, pre-immunization with Lu. intermedia salivary gland sonicate (SGS) results in enhanced skin inflammatory exacerbation upon co-inoculation of Lu. intermedia SGS and L. braziliensis. These data highlight potential unique features of both L. braziliensis and Lu. intermedia. In this study, we investigated the genes modulated by Lu. intermedia SGS immunization to understand their potential impact on the subsequent cutaneous immune response following inoculation of both SGS and L. braziliensis. The cellular recruitment and global gene expression profile was analyzed in mice repeatedly inoculated or not with Lu. intermedia. Microarray gene analysis revealed the upregulation of a distinct set of IFN-inducible genes, an immune signature not seen to the same extent in control animals. Of note this INF-inducible gene set was not induced in SGS pre-immunized mice subsequently co-inoculated with SGS and L. braziliensis. These data suggest the parasite prevented the upregulation of this Lu. intermedia saliva-related immune signature. The presence of these IFN-inducible genes was further analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) sampled from uninfected human individuals living in a L. braziliensis-endemic region of Brazil thus regularly exposed to Lu. intermedia bites. PBMCs were cultured in presence or absence of Lu. intermedia SGS. Using qRT-PCR we established that the IFN-inducible genes induced in the skin of SGS pre-immunized mice, were also upregulated by SGS in PBMCs from human individuals regularly exposed to Lu. intermedia bites, but not in PBMCs of control subjects. These data demonstrate

  1. Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I.; Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

  2. Functional Transcriptomics of Wild-Caught Lutzomyia intermedia Salivary Glands: Identification of a Protective Salivary Protein against Leishmania braziliensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Marcia W.; Miranda, José Carlos; Clarêncio, Jorge; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Cláudia; Barral, Aldina; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; de Oliveira, Camila I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Leishmania parasites are transmitted in the presence of sand fly saliva. Together with the parasite, the sand fly injects salivary components that change the environment at the feeding site. Mice immunized with Phlebotomus papatasi salivary gland (SG) homogenate are protected against Leishmania major infection, while immunity to Lutzomyia intermedia SG homogenate exacerbated experimental Leishmania braziliensis infection. In humans, antibodies to Lu. intermedia saliva are associated with risk of acquiring L. braziliensis infection. Despite these important findings, there is no information regarding the repertoire of Lu. intermedia salivary proteins. Methods and Findings A cDNA library from the Salivary Glands (SGs) of wild-caught Lu. intermedia was constructed, sequenced, and complemented by a proteomic approach based on 1D SDS PAGE and mass/mass spectrometry to validate the transcripts present in this cDNA library. We identified the most abundant transcripts and proteins reported in other sand fly species as well as novel proteins such as neurotoxin-like proteins, peptides with ML domain, and three small peptides found so far only in this sand fly species. DNA plasmids coding for ten selected transcripts were constructed and used to immunize BALB/c mice to study their immunogenicity. Plasmid Linb-11—coding for a 4.5-kDa protein—induced a cellular immune response and conferred protection against L. braziliensis infection. This protection correlated with a decreased parasite load and an increased frequency of IFN-γ-producing cells. Conclusions We identified the most abundant and novel proteins present in the SGs of Lu. intermedia, a vector of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Americas. We also show for the first time that immunity to a single salivary protein from Lu. intermedia can protect against cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. braziliensis. PMID:23717705

  3. Lutzomyia longipalpis Saliva or Salivary Protein LJM19 Protects against Leishmania braziliensis and the Saliva of Its Vector, Lutzomyia intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Natalia M.; Silva, Robson A.; Costa, Dirceu J.; Pitombo, Maiana A.; Fukutani, Kiyoshi F.; Miranda, José C.; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Barral, Aldina; de Oliveira, Camila I.; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Background Leishmania transmission occurs in the presence of insect saliva. Immunity to Phlebotomus papatasi or Lutzomyia longipalpis saliva or salivary components confers protection against an infection by Leishmania in the presence of the homologous saliva. However, immunization with Lutzomyia intermedia saliva did not protect mice against Leishmania braziliensis plus Lu. intermedia saliva. In the present study, we have studied whether the immunization with Lu. longipalpis saliva or a DNA plasmid coding for LJM19 salivary protein would be protective against L. braziliensis infection in the presence of Lu. intermedia saliva, the natural vector for L. braziliensis. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunization with Lu. longipalpis saliva or with LJM19 DNA plasmid induced a Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity (DTH) response against Lu. longipalpis as well as against a Lu. intermedia saliva challenge. Immunized and unimmunized control hamsters were then intradermally infected in the ears with L. braziliensis in the presence of Lu. longipalpis or Lu. intermedia saliva. Animals immunized with Lu. longipalpis saliva exhibited smaller lesion sizes as well as reduced disease burdens both at lesion site and in the draining lymph nodes. These alterations were associated with a significant decrease in the expression levels of IL-10 and TGF-β. Animals immunized with LJM19 DNA plasmid presented similar findings in protection and immune response and additionally increased IFN-γ expression. Conclusions/Significance Immunization with Lu. longipalpis saliva or with a DNA plasmid coding LJM19 salivary protein induced protection in hamsters challenged with L. braziliensis plus Lu. intermedia saliva. These findings point out an important role of immune response against saliva components, suggesting the possibility to develop a vaccine using a single component of Lu. longipalpis saliva to generate protection against different species of Leishmania, even those transmitted by a different

  4. Evaluation of the antimicrobial effect of lactoferrin on Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, O; Andrés, M T; Heath, J; Fierro, J F; Douglas, C W

    1998-05-01

    The antimicrobial effect of lactoferrin (apoLf) on the oral, black-pigmented anaerobes Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and P. nitrescens has been studied. ApoLf did not kill any of these species but it did inhibit the growth of P. gingivalis, while iron-saturated Lf (FeLf) had no effect. The other two species were unaffected by apoLf. This growth inhibitory effect of apoLf could not be explained on the basis of chelation of inorganic iron, since growth of P. gingivalis occurred in the presence of ethylenediamine di-o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid provided haemin was added. Both apoLf and FeLf reduced haemin uptake by all three species and caused the release of cell-bound haemin in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, haemin reduced the binding of both apoLf and FeLf to P. intermedia and P. nigrescens but stimulated the binding of Lf by P. gingivalis. These data suggest that Lf forms complexes with haemin in solution and competes for the binding of haemin to certain cell receptors, possibly lipopolysaccharides, but this is not sufficient to inhibit growth of the bacteria. P. gingivalis appears to bind Lf-haemin complexes, as well as haemin alone, which may facilitate access of the Lf to the outer and cytoplasmic membranes of P. gingivalis, so disrupting function.

  5. Differentially regulated proteins in Prevotella intermedia after oxidative stress analyzed by 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Santos, Simone G; Diniz, Cláudio G; Silva, Vânia L; Lima, Francisca L; Andrade, Hélida M; Chapeaurouge, Donat A; Perales, Jonas; Serufo, José Carlos; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora R; Farias, Luiz M

    2012-02-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a rod-shaped, Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium found in human indigenous microbiota that plays an important role in opportunistic infections. The successful colonization depends on the ability of anaerobes to respond to oxidative stress (OS) in oxygenated tissues as well as to resist oxidative events from the host immune system until anaerobic conditions are present at the infection site. As knowledge of the mechanisms of protection against OS in Prevotella is limited, studies are needed to clarify aspects of molecular biology, physiology and ecology of this bacterium. The aim of this study was to access the proteins differentially regulated in P. intermedia after exposure to molecular oxygen by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) associated with the approach of MALDI-TOF/TOF Tandem Mass Spectrometry. The identity of the protein was evaluated by database search for homologous genomic sequences of P. intermedia strain 17 (TIGR). Twenty five out of 72 proteins found were identified as up-regulated (17) or down-regulated (9). These proteins were related to a variety of metabolic process, some of which could be associated to antioxidant and redox regulatory roles. Our data indicate that OS may stimulate an adaptive response in P. intermedia whose effect on its biology may be evidenced by the increase in aerotolerance and changes in protein abundance in the oxygen adapted cells. PMID:22193554

  6. Desarrollo curricular, conciencia ambiental y tecnologia para estudiantes de intermedia: Una investigacion en accion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Ramos, Teresita

    Se llevó a cabo una investigación en acción con los propósitos de 1) documentar las relaciones de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación en las clases de ciencias de escuela intermedia como elemento de apoyo cuando se aborda el tema ambiental y sus conceptos pertinentes, a partir de las observaciones de la investigadora, así como las entrevistas y diarios reflexivos de los estudiantes de una escuela intermedia en la zona metropolitana, y luego 2) diseñar una unidad instruccional sobre el tema ambiental que integre actividades tecnologías para el curso de ciencias de la escuela intermedia según el modelo PROCIC y las observaciones que hayan iniciado los estudiantes participantes. Finalmente, se plantearon las implicaciones educativas para el currículo del Programa de Ciencias al instrumentar este modelo de unidad mediante PROCIC, e integrado la tecnología y el tema ambiental. Los hallazgos se analizaron y se categorizaron de acuerdo con las preguntas de investigación. El hallazgo principal de la investigación aborda las cuatro relaciones centrales en las que se articula la utilización de las tecnologías y sus aplicaciones en la clase de ciencias. Estas cuatro relaciones que recogen la posición de los estudiantes son: 1) Perspectiva de los estudiantes hacia la tecnología. 2) Participación de los estudiantes en los aspectos docentes. 3) Aprendizaje estudiantil sobre el ambiente, y 4) Conciencia ambiental en relación con la vida diaria. Estas relaciones ponen de manifiesto,cómo se plantea en las implicaciones, la necesidad de más investigación en acción en la sala de clases, la importancia—como tema transversal—de la conciencia ambiental mediante la tecnología al construir conocimientos significativos dentro y fuera de la escuela, asó como, valorar la investigación y la dialogicidad en la sala de clases como actividades que obligan al reexamen de la práctica didáctica en su formas curriculares de objetivos, recursos

  7. Different Water Use Strategies of Juvenile and Adult Caragana intermedia Plantations in the Gonghe Basin, Tibet Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhiqing; Zhu, Yajuan; Liu, Liying

    2012-01-01

    Background In a semi-arid ecosystem, water is one of the most important factors that affect vegetation dynamics, such as shrub plantation. A water use strategy, including the main water source that a plant species utilizes and water use efficiency (WUE), plays an important role in plant survival and growth. The water use strategy of a shrub is one of the key factors in the evaluation of stability and sustainability of a plantation. Methodology/Principal Findings Caragana intermedia is a dominant shrub of sand-binding plantations on sand dunes in the Gonghe Basin in northeastern Tibet Plateau. Understanding the water use strategy of a shrub plantation can be used to evaluate its sustainability and long-term stability. We hypothesized that C. intermedia uses mainly deep soil water and its WUE increases with plantation age. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen were used to determine the main water source and leaf carbon isotope discrimination was used to estimate long-term WUE. The root system was investigated to determine the depth of the main distribution. The results showed that a 5-year-old C. intermedia plantation used soil water mainly at a depth of 0–30 cm, which was coincident with the distribution of its fine roots. However, 9- or 25-year-old C. intermedia plantations used mainly 0–50 cm soil depth water and the fine root system was distributed primarily at soil depths of 0–50 cm and 0–60 cm, respectively. These sources of soil water are recharged directly by rainfall. Moreover, the long-term WUE of adult plantations was greater than that of juvenile plantations. Conclusions The C. intermedia plantation can change its water use strategy over time as an adaptation to a semi-arid environment, including increasing the depth of soil water used for root growth, and increasing long-term WUE. PMID:23029303

  8. Intraspecies Variability Affects Heterotypic Biofilms of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia: Evidences of Strain-Dependence Biofilm Modulation by Physical Contact and by Released Soluble Factors.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Graziela Murta; Colombo, Andrea Vieira; Rodrigues, Paulo Henrique; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzetti

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that strain and virulence diversity exist within the population structure of Porphyromonas gingivalis. In the present study we investigate intra- and inter-species variability in biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and partners Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. All strains tested showed similar hydrophobicity, except for P. gingivalis W83 which has roughly half of the hydrophobicity of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. An intraspecies variability in coaggregation of P. gingivalis with P. intermedia was also found. The association P. gingivalis W83/P. intermedia 17 produced the thickest biofilm and strain 17 was prevalent. In a two-compartment system P. gingivalis W83 stimulates an increase in biomass of strain 17 and the latter did not stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis W83. In addition, P. gingivalis W83 also stimulates the growth of P. intermedia ATCC25611 although strain W83 was prevalent in the association with P. intermedia ATCC25611. P. gingivalis ATCC33277 was prevalent in both associations with P. intermedia and both strains of P. intermedia stimulate the growth of P. gingivalis ATCC33277. FISH images also showed variability in biofilm structure. Thus, the outcome of the association P. gingivalis/P. intermedia seems to be strain-dependent, and both soluble factors and physical contact are relevant. The association P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens ATCC33563 produced larger biomass than each monotypic biofilm, and P. gingivalis was favored in consortia, while no differences were found in the two-compartment system. Therefore, in consortia P. gingivalis-P. nigrescens physical contact seems to favor P. gingivalis growth. The intraspecies variability found in our study suggests strain-dependence in ability of microorganisms to recognize molecules in other bacteria which may further elucidate the dysbiosis event during periodontitis development giving additional explanation for periodontal bacteria, such as P. gingivalis and P

  9. Primary lumbar epidural abscess without spondylodiscitis caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum diagnosed by 16S rRNA PCR.

    PubMed

    Sanmillán, Jose Luis; Pelegrín, Iván; Rodríguez, David; Ardanuy, Carmen; Cabellos, Carmen

    2013-10-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old woman who presented a primary spinal epidural abscess caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. This is the second report in the medical literature to associate this organism with a primary spinal epidural abscess without spondylodiscitis. After treatment with emergency laminectomy followed by 8 weeks of antibiotic treatment the patient was cured. Oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 h) was the definitive choice of treatment. F. necrophorum spinal epidural abscess is rare, although samples for anaerobic culture should be collected in order to improve detection of anaerobic spinal infections. PCR amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA permits early diagnosis in anaerobic infections.

  10. Thalassaemia intermedia in a family with beta 0-thalassaemia and Hb Hasharon.

    PubMed Central

    Zago, M A; Costa, F F; Bottura, C

    1982-01-01

    A Brazilian family of Italian descent is described in which the beta-thalassaemia gene is interacting with an alpha chain variant Hb Hasharon (alpha 47 Asp leads to His). One patient who was affected by homozygous beta 0-thalassaemia and heterozygous alpha Hasharon displayed the clinical picture of thalassaemia intermedia. Her haemolysate contained 8.6% Hb F Hasharon (alpha 2 Hasharon gamma 2) and 1.1% Hb A2, the remaining haemoglobin being Hb F. Hb A was not detected. Globin chain synthesis in reticulocytes showed non-alpha/total alpha ratios of 0.29, 0.39, and 0.73 respectively for the patient, the mother, and the father, who is heterozygous for both the beta 0-thalassemia and Hb Hasharon genes. The possible contribution of Hb Hasharon heterozygosity to the less severe expression of homozygous beta 0-thalassaemia is discussed. Images PMID:7154040

  11. Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (equine Cushing’s disease) in a Thoroughbred stallion: a single report

    PubMed Central

    HATAZOE, Takashi; KAWAGUCHI, Hiroaki; HOBO, Seiji; MISUMI, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) generally occurs in older horses showing hirsutism, delayed molting, weight loss, polydipsia, polyuria, laminitis, and reproductive disorders (in broodmares), but there have been no reports on stallions. This report presents a case of a 21-year-old Thoroughbred stallion that developed hirsutism and experienced delayed molting. There were no abnormal findings for semen quality or the stallion’s sexual desire. The horse was diagnosed with PPID based on dexamethasone suppression test and plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone. It was then medicated with pergolide mesylate. Since the horse died due to humerus fracture, an autopsy was conducted, and pituitary adenoma was confirmed. No pathological findings were defined in the testicles; therefore, reproductive activity might not have been impaired. PMID:26858577

  12. Characterization of two new plasmid DNAs found in mitochondria of wild-type Neurospora intermedia strains.

    PubMed Central

    Stohl, L L; Collins, R A; Cole, M D; Lambowitz, A M

    1982-01-01

    Mitochondria from two Neurospora intermedia strains (P4O5-Labelle and Fiji N6-6) were found to contain plasmid DNAs in addition to the standard mitochondrial DNA species. The plasmid DNAs consist of monomeric circles (4.1-4.3 kbp and 5.2-5.3 kbp for Labelle and Fiji, respectively) and oligomers in which monomers are organized as head-to-tail repeats. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments showed that the plasmids have no substantial sequence homology to mtDNA, to each other, or to a previously characterized mitochondrial plasmid from N. crassa strain Mauriceville-lc (Collins et al. Cell 24, 443-452, 1981). The intramitochondrial location of the plasmids was established by cell fractionation and nuclease protection experiments. In sexual crosses, the plasmids showed strict maternal inheritance, the same as Neurospora mitochondrial DNA. The plasmids may represent a novel class of mitochondrial genetic elements. Images PMID:6280144

  13. Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (equine Cushing's disease) in a Thoroughbred stallion: a single report.

    PubMed

    Hatazoe, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Hobo, Seiji; Misumi, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) generally occurs in older horses showing hirsutism, delayed molting, weight loss, polydipsia, polyuria, laminitis, and reproductive disorders (in broodmares), but there have been no reports on stallions. This report presents a case of a 21-year-old Thoroughbred stallion that developed hirsutism and experienced delayed molting. There were no abnormal findings for semen quality or the stallion's sexual desire. The horse was diagnosed with PPID based on dexamethasone suppression test and plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone. It was then medicated with pergolide mesylate. Since the horse died due to humerus fracture, an autopsy was conducted, and pituitary adenoma was confirmed. No pathological findings were defined in the testicles; therefore, reproductive activity might not have been impaired. PMID:26858577

  14. Cyclic exchanges and level of coupling between environmental media: intermedia feedback in multimedia fate models.

    PubMed

    Margni, M; Pennington, D W; Bennett, D H; Jolliet, O

    2004-10-15

    The importance of cyclic transport of chemicals between media in the environment can be expressed in terms of the Feedback correction factor--a multiplier that accounts for the fraction of an emission that returns to the medium of release after transfer to other media. This factor is calculated analytically by explicitly solving the appropriate system of mass balance equations or using matrix techniques. It generalizes the concept of stickiness, the ratio between the net and the overall deposition rate constants, to multipathway feedback, while providing a clearer view of the level of coupling between media and analyzing the importance of coupling. This paper first shows the usefulness of the total removal rate coefficient in each media (sum of degradation rate and all intermedia transfer rates) as a baseline to determine the chemical mass in different media, the characteristic travel distance and to understand the cyclic behavior, rather than starting from the degradation lifetimes or the overall persistence in the environment. Starting from this baseline, the importance of feedback is limited for most organic chemicals. The predicted media concentrations are influenced by less than 10% due to the cyclic nature of the intermedia transport for more than 90% of the 317 tested chemicals in a 4-compartment, steady-state, closed-system multimedia model. The Feedback correction factor is always less than a factor of 5 with the greatest values when transfer fractions are important in both directions for adjacent media. This corresponds to a restricted range in the K(AW) and K(OA) space with long chemical lifetimes in both adjacent media. This analysis of the importance of the Feedback correction factor, in conjunction with resultant criteria for when cyclic exchanges between media are likely to be significant, facilitates a more transparent understanding of how substance masses are distributed in the modeled system. It is one of the important criteria to determine to

  15. Complications of β-thalassemia intermedia in Iran during 1996-2010 (single-center study).

    PubMed

    Rafsanjani, Khadijeh Arjmandi; Mafi, Negar; Tafreshi, R Isa

    2011-09-01

    Patients with thalassemia intermedia (TI) experience many complications, of which the incidence varies greatly among cases. Considering the high prevalence of thalassemia in Iran, the study was carried out to determine the frequency of TI complications in Iranian patients and to find possible risk factors for each of them. Using the sampling method of "census," the authors included 153 patients who were seen in their tertiary hematology clinic with the diagnosis of TI during 1996-2010; an analytical cross-sectional study was performed and the data was analyzed by SPSS software using univariate and regression analyses. Mean age of the patients at the time of the study was 17.4 years and 36.5% were receiving transfusions (regularly or occasionally). Mean hemoglobin was 9.2 g/dL and mean serum ferritin was 858 ng/mL. Splenectomy was performed in 46.9% and it was correlated with age and the age at diagnosis in regression analysis. Cholelithiasis was found in 25.5% and was correlated with age and history of splenectomy. Pulmonary hypertension, detected in 23.5%, was correlated with thrombocytosis and mitral valve regurgitation in univariate analysis. Endocrine disease (hypogonadism, hypothyroidism, and adrenal insufficiency) was detected in 8% of the patients. In univariate analysis, endocrine disease was correlated with age of the patients. Regarding bone density of the spine, 53% of cases had osteoporosis. Thrombocytosis was present in 42% of patients and was correlated with their age. Since the severity of thalassemia intermedia vary greatly among patients, a careful evaluation of clinical, laboratory, and genetic aspects is necessary to differentiate TI in a patient at presentation. Moreover, TI patients should be carefully followed up for early detection and management of newly developed complications. The authors also suggest confirmatory controlled studies with larger sample sizes to assist in developing guidelines for surveillance and treatment of TI. PMID

  16. Protection against the toxic effects of Loxosceles intermedia spider venom elicited by mimotope peptides.

    PubMed

    de Moura, J; Felicori, L; Moreau, V; Guimarães, G; Dias-Lopes, C; Molina, L; Alvarenga, L M; Fernandes, P; Frézard, F; Ribeiro, R R; Fleury, C; Nguyen, C; Molina, F; Granier, C; Chávez-Olórtegui, C

    2011-10-19

    The venom of Loxosceles intermedia (Li) spiders is responsible for cutaneous lesions and other clinical manifestations. We previously reported that the monoclonal antibody LimAb7 can neutralize the dermonecrotic activity of crude Li venom. In this study, we observed that this antibody recognizes several proteins from the venom dermonecrotic fraction (DNF), including LiD1. Identifying the epitope of such a neutralizing antibody could help designing immunogens for producing therapeutic sera or vaccination approaches. To this aim, two sets of 25- and 15-mer overlapping peptides that cover the complete amino acid sequence of LiD1 were synthesized using the SPOT technique. None of them was recognized by LimAb7, suggesting that the epitope is discontinuous. Then, the screening of four peptide phage-display libraries yielded four possible epitope mimics that, however, did not show any obvious similarity with the LiD1 sequence. These mimotopes, together with a 3D model of LiD1, were used to predict with the MIMOP bioinformatic tool the putative epitope region (residues C197, Y224, W225, T226, D228, K229, R230, T232 and Y248 of LiD1) recognized by LimAb7. This analysis and the results of alanine-scanning experiments highlighted a few residues (such as W225 and D228) that are found in the active site of different SMases D and that may be important for LiD1 enzymatic activity. Finally, the only mimotope NCNKNDHLFACW that interacts with LimAb7 by SPOT and its analog NSNKNDHLFASW were used as immunogens in rabbits. The resulting antibodies could neutralize some of the biological effects induced by crude Li venom, demonstrating a mimotope-induced protection against L. intermedia venom.

  17. Salivary Periodontopathic Bacteria in Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lopes Devito, Karina; Ribeiro, Luiz Cláudio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess and compare salivary periodontopathic bacteria between groups of Down syndrome and non-Down syndrome children and adolescents. Materials and Methods This study included a sample of 30 Down syndrome children and adolescents (G-DS) and 30 age- and sex-matched non-Down syndrome subjects (G-ND). Clinical examination determined the gingival bleeding index (GBI) and plaque index. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were collected from all participants. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique identified the presence and density of eight periodontopathic bacteria in saliva. The statistical analysis included chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results In the G-DS group, bleeding on probing was more frequent (p = 0.037) and higher densities of Campylobacter rectus (p = 0.013), Porphyromonas gingivalis (p = 0.025), Treponema denticola (p = 0.026), Fusobacterium nucleatum (p = 0.013), Prevotella intermedia (p = 0.001) and Prevotella nigrescens (p = 0.008) were observed. Besides, in the G-DS, the densities of bacteria from the orange complex were significantly higher in the age group 3–7 years for F. nucleatum (p = 0.029), P. intermedia (p = 0.001) and P. nigrescens (p = 0.006). C. rectus was higher in the age group 8–12 years (p = 0.045). Conclusion The results showed that children and adolescents with Down syndrome have higher susceptibility to periodontal disease and number of periodontopathic bacteria. PMID:27727287

  18. Production of monoclonal antibodies capable of neutralizing dermonecrotic activity of Loxosceles intermedia spider venom and their use in a specific immunometric assay.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Larissa M; Martins, Maria S; Moura, Juliana F; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Oliveira, Júlio C; Mangili, Oldemir C; Granier, Claude; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos

    2003-12-01

    We have produced 13 mAbs for Loxosceles intermedia crude venom. Twelve were reactive against proteins of 32-35 kDa and one of these Li mAb(7) showed high neutralizing potency for the dermonecrotic activity of L. intermedia venom. This Li mAb(7) showed no cross-reactivity, with Loxosceles laeta (Brazil), L. laeta (Perú) and Loxosceles gaucho venoms. The mAbs were produced by immunization with the crude venom and screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using L. intermedia whole venom or dermonecrotic fraction (DNF) as antigens coated onto microtitre plates. A sensitive two-site immunometric assay was designed and shown to be useful for identifying and quantifying DNF from L. intermedia in biological samples. The Li mAb(7) coated onto microtitre plates and hyperimmune horse anti-L. intermedia IgGs prepared by immunoaffinity chromatography and conjugated to horseradish peroxidase were used to set up a sandwich-type ELISA. Measurable absorbance signals were obtained with 0.2 ng of L. intermedia crude venom per assay.

  19. [Effects of cutting and reseeding on the ground-dwelling arthropod community in Caragana intermedia forest in desert steppe].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren-Tao; Chai, Yong-Qing; Yang, Xin-Guo; Song, Nai-Ping; Wang, Xin-Yun; Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Taking a 25-year-old Caragana intermedia forest in desert steppe as test object, an investigation was conducted on the ground-dwelling arthropod community in cutting and no-cutting stands with and without reseeding, aimed to understand the effects of cutting, reseeding and their interaction on the individual number and group richness of ground-dwelling arthropod in C. intermedia forest. There were significantly lower number and richness of ground-dwelling arthropod in the open spaces than under the shrubs in the no-cutting and no-reseeding stands. Cutting, reseeding and both of them could significantly increase the number and richness of ground-dwelling arthropod in the open spaces, but not under the shrubs, compared with no cutting or reseeding. Consequently, there were no significant differences in the distribution of ground-dwelling arthropod in the open spaces and under the shrubs in the cutting, reseeding, or cutting and reseeding stands. Further, there was a similar buffer effect between cutting and reseeding on the ground-dwelling arthropod. No significant differences were observed in the ground-dwelling arthropod distribution, between cutting stand and reseeding stand, between cutting stand and cutting and reseeding stand, and between reseeding stand and cutting and reseeding stand. It was suggested that cutting, reseeding, or both of them could significantly improve the ground-dwelling arthropod diversity especially in the open spaces, being beneficial for the restoration of degraded grassland ecosystem and the rational management on artificial C. intermedia forest in desert steppe.

  20. Fatty acid methyl ester from Neurospora intermedia N-1 isolated from Indonesian red peanut cake (oncom merah).

    PubMed

    Priatni, S; Hartati, S; Dewi, P; Kardono, L B S; Singgih, M; Gusdinar, T

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) from Neurospora intermedia N-1 that isolated from Indonesian red peanut cake (oncom). FAME profiles have been used as biochemical characters to study many different groups of organisms, such as bacteria and yeasts. FAME from N. intermedia N-1 was obtained by some stages of extraction the orange spores and fractination using a chromatotron. The pure compound (1) was characterized by 500 mHz NMR (1H and 13C), FTIR and LC-MS. Summarized data's of 1H and 13C NMR spectra of compound 1 contained 19 Carbon, 34 Hydrogen and 2 Oxygen (C19H34O2). The position of the double bonds at carbon number 8 and 12 were indicated in the HMBC spectrum (2D-NMR). LC-MS spectrum indicates molecular weight of the compound 1 as 294 which is visible by the presence of protonated molecular ion [M+H] at m/z 295. Methyl esters of long chain fatty acids was presented by a 3 band pattern of IR spectrum with bands near 1249, 1199 and 1172 cm(-1). We suggested that the structure of the pure compound 1 is methyl octadeca-8,12-dienoate. The presence methyl octadeca-8,12-dienoate in N. intermedia is the first report.

  1. A new autocatalytic activation mechanism for cysteine proteases revealed by Prevotella intermedia interpain A

    PubMed Central

    Mallorquí-Fernández, Noemí; Manandhar, Surya P.; Mallorquí-Fernández, Goretti; Usón, Isabel; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Kantyka, Tomasz; Solà, Maria; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Enghild, Jan J.; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F.Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a major periodontopathogen contributing to human gingivitis and periodontitis. Such pathogens release proteases as virulence factors that cause deterrence of host defences and tissue destruction. A new cysteine protease from the cysteine-histidine-dyad class, interpain A, was studied in its zymogenic and its self-processed mature form. The latter consists of a bivalved moiety made up by two subdomains. In the structure of a catalytic cysteine-to-alanine zymogen variant, the right subdomain interacts with an unusual prodomain, thus contributing to latency. Unlike the catalytic cysteine residue, already in its competent conformation in the zymogen, the catalytic histidine is swung out from its active conformation and trapped in a cage shaped by a backing helix, a zymogenic hairpin and a latency flap in the zymogen. Dramatic rearrangement of up to 20Å of these elements triggered by a tryptophan switch occurs during activation and accounts for a new activation mechanism for proteolytic enzymes. These findings can be extrapolated to related potentially pathogenic cysteine proteases such as Streprococcus pyogenes SpeB and Porphyromonas gingivalis periodontain. PMID:17993455

  2. Old fronds serve as a vernal carbon source in the wintergreen fern Dryopteris intermedia (Aspleniaceae).

    PubMed

    Tessier, Jack T; Bornn, Matthew P

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining green leaves beyond the growing season has been hypothesized to benefit plants by supplying either a nutrient or a carbon source. Understanding such ecophysiological aspects of plants will help us to appreciate how a species functions in its environment and predict how it might be affected by future changes in that environment. The wintergreen fern species Dryopteris intermedia does not retranslocate nitrogen and phosphorus from old fronds in spring, but photosynthesis does take place in the old fronds during this season. To determine if carbon fixed in the old fronds is translocated to other parts of the plant, we labeled old fronds with (13)C via photosynthetic uptake and examined old fronds, new fronds, fine roots, and rhizomes for (13)C content 1 day and 1 month after labeling the old fronds. Vernally fixed carbon was translocated to the new fronds but not significantly to the below ground tissues. Old fronds in this species, therefore, serve as a carbon source for vernal growth of new fronds. This is the first study in which a fern was labeled with (13)C to track vernally fixed carbon from old fronds to the rest of the plant in a wintergreen species. Future research should examine the precise timing of this carbon movement and examine other species for a similar or contrasting strategy.

  3. Characterization of Brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia) hemolymph: cellular and biochemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Bednaski, A V; Trevisan-Silva, D; Matsubara, F H; Boia-Ferreira, M; Olivério, M M; Gremski, L H; Cavalheiro, R P; De Paula, D M B; Paredes-Gamero, E J; Takahashi, H K; Toledo, M S; Nader, H B; Veiga, S S; Chaim, O M; Senff-Ribeiro, A

    2015-05-01

    This is the first study on the hemolymph from a spider of the Loxosceles genus. These animals are responsible for a great number of envenomation cases worldwide. Several studies on Loxosceles venoms have been published, and the knowledge about the venom and its toxins is considerable, not only regarding the biological and biochemical characterization, but also regarding structural, genetic and phylogenetic approaches. However, the literature on Loxosceles hemolymph is nonexistent. The main goal of the present study was to characterize biochemically the hemolymph content, and especially, to identify its different hemocytes. Moreover, many papers have already shown molecules whose source is the hemolymph and their very interesting activities and biomedical applications, for example, antifungal and antibacterial activities. A 2D-SDS-PAGE of brown spider hemolymph showed approximately 111 spots for pH 3-10 and 150 spots for pH 4-7. A lectin-blotting assay showed that hemolymph carbohydrate residues were similar to those found in venom. Several types of TAG and DAG phospholipids were found in the hemolymph and characterized by HPTLC and mass spectrometry. Four different hemocytes were characterized in Loxosceles intermedia hemolymph: prohemocyte, plasmatocyte, granulocyte and adipohemocyte. This paper opens new possibilities on toxinology, studying an unknown biological material, and it characterizes a source of molecules with putative biotechnological applications.

  4. Treatment with pergolide or cyproheptadine of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (equine Cushing's disease).

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Mark T; LaMonte, Bernadette H; Morresey, Peter; Smith, Gary; Beech, Jill

    2002-01-01

    Medical records of 27 horses (including 13 ponies) treated with pergolide or cyproheptadine for pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction were reviewed to determine the effect of treatment on plasma ACTH, insulin, and glucose concentrations and clinical signs. Prior to treatment, the most common clinical signs were laminitis, hirsutism, and abnormal body fat distribution. The median pergolide dose was 3.0 microg/kg p.o. q24h (range, 1.7-5.5 microg/kg). All horses treated with cyproheptadine were given 0.25 mg/kg p.o. q24h. After pergolide treatment, ACTH concentrations (n = 20; median = 30.4 pg/ml; range, 4.2-173) were significantly lower (P < .01) than those in horses treated with cyproheptadine (n = 7; median = 141.0 pg/ml: range, 10-1,230). Among horses treated with pergolide, there was a correlation between ACTH concentration after treatment and the duration of treatment (P < .001) and pergolide dose (P = .04). Significantly (P = .02) more owners of horses treated with pergolide (85%, 17/20) reported an improvement in clinical signs compared to owners of horses treated with cyproheptadine (28%, 2/7).

  5. [Septic shock Fusobacterium necrophorum from origin gynecological at complicated an acute respiratory distress syndrome: a variant of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Huynh-Moynot, Sophie; Commandeur, Diane; Danguy des Déserts, Marc; Drouillard, Isabelle; Leguen, Patrick; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient of 47 years old who presents in a state of septic shock with acute insufficient respiratory complicated with syndrome of acute respiratory distress, together with a list of abdominal pain and polyarthralgia too. In her case of medical history, it is retained that she has had a intra-uterine device since 6 years without medical follow up. The initial thoraco-abdomino-pelvic scan shows a left ovarian vein thrombosis, as well as the opaqueness alveolus diffused interstitiel bilaterally and an aspect of ileitis. The IUD is taken off because of sudden occuring of purulent leucorrhoea. This results in a clinical and paraclinical improvement, whereas aminopenicillin was administered to the patient since 1 week. The microbiological blood test allows to put in evidence Fusobacterium necrophorum found in a blood culture and is sensitive to the amoxicilline-acide clavulanique and metronidazole. Isolation of this bacteria, classically found in Lemierre's syndrome, allowed to explain the multilfocalization of the symtoms and the list of pain. The whole concerns about a variant of Lemierre's syndrom: a state of septic shock secondary then caused by the anaerobic Gram negative bacilli, which is a commensal bacteria of the female genital tractus, complicated of septic emboli typical.

  6. Early Predictors of Renal Dysfunction in Egyptian Patients with β-Thalassemia Major and Intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Tantawy, Azza A.G.; El Bablawy, Nagham; Adly, Amira A.M.; Ebeid, Fatma S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Better survival of thalassemia patients allowed previously unrecognized renal complications to emerge. Objectives Assess prevalence and early predictors of renal dysfunction in young β-thalassemia major (β-TM) and intermedia (β-TI) patients. Subjects 66 β-TM (group I), 26 β-TI (group II) Egyptian patients and 40 healthy controls. Methods Clinical assessment and laboratory data including kidney and liver function tests, such as serum ferritin, serum bicarbonate, plasma osmolality and urinary total proteins, microalbuminuria (MAU), N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), retinol binding protein (RBP), α-1 microglobulin, bicarbonate, osmolality, creatinine clearance (CrCl), % fractional excretion of bicarbonate (% FE-HCO3). Results The prevalent renal abnormality was proteinuria (71%), followed by increased urinary level of RBP (69.4%), NAG (58.1%), α-1 microglobulin (54.8%) and microalbuminuria (29%) and also decreased urinary osmolality (58.1%). CrCl was a better assessment of renal function and significantly lowered in thalassemia patients. Tubular dysfunctions were more significant in splenectomized β-TM patients who showed more elevation of NAG and α-1 microglobulin and lower urinary osmolality. NAG, RBP and α-1 microglobulin were negatively correlated with CrCl and positively correlated with serum ferritin and urinary total protein. Z-score analysis for identifying patients with renal dysfunction proved superiority of urine total protein and RBP. Comparative statistics of different frequencies revealed significant difference between the urinary total protein and both MAU and % FE-HCO3. Conclusion Asymptomatic renal dysfunctions are prevalent in young β-TM and β-TI patients that necessitate regular screening. Urinary total protein and RBP may be cost-effective for early detection. PMID:25237470

  7. 4-sulfomuconolactone hydrolases from Hydrogenophaga intermedia S1 and Agrobacterium radiobacter S2.

    PubMed

    Halak, Sad; Basta, Tamara; Bürger, Sibylle; Contzen, Matthias; Wray, Victor; Pieper, Dietmar Helmut; Stolz, Andreas

    2007-10-01

    The 4-carboxymethylen-4-sulfo-but-2-en-olide (4-sulfomuconolactone) hydrolases from Hydrogenophaga intermedia strain S1 and Agrobacterium radiobacter strain S2 are part of a modified protocatechuate pathway responsible for the degradation of 4-sulfocatechol. In both strains, the hydrolase-encoding genes occur downstream of those encoding the enzymes that catalyze the lactonization of 3-sulfomuconate. The deduced amino acid sequences of the 4-sulfomuconolactone hydrolases demonstrated the highest degree of sequence identity to 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate hydrolases, which take part in the meta cleavage pathway of protocatechuate. The 4-sulfomuconolactone hydrolases did not convert 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate, and the 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate hydrolase from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 did not convert 4-sulfomuconolactone. Nevertheless, the presence of highly conserved histidine residues in the 4-sulfomuconolactone and the 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate hydrolases and some further sequence similarities suggested that both enzymes belong to the metallo-dependent hydrolases (the "amidohydrolase superfamily"). The 4-sulfomuconolactone hydrolases were heterologously expressed as His-tagged enzyme variants. Gel filtration experiments suggested that the enzymes are present as monomers in solution, with molecular weights of approximately 33,000 to 35,000. 4-Sulfomuconolactone was converted by sulfomuconolactone hydrolases to stoichiometric amounts of maleylacetate and sulfite. The 4-sulfomuconolactone hydrolases from both strains showed pH optima at pH 7 to 7.5 and rather similar catalytic constant (k(cat)/K(M))values. The suggested 4-sulfocatechol pathway from 4-sulfocatechol to maleylacetate was confirmed by in situ nuclear magnetic resonance analysis using the recombinantly expressed enzymes.

  8. Expression of reelin in adult mammalian blood, liver, pituitary pars intermedia, and adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Smalheiser, N R; Costa, E; Guidotti, A; Impagnatiello, F; Auta, J; Lacor, P; Kriho, V; Pappas, G D

    2000-02-01

    Reelin regulates telencephalic and cerebellar lamination during mammalian development and is expressed in several structures of the adult brain; however, only traces of reelin were believed to be in peripheral tissues. Because reelin structurally resembles extracellular matrix proteins, and because many of these proteins are expressed in blood, we hypothesized that reelin also might be detectable in the circulation. Reelin (420 kDa) and two reelin-like immunoreactive bands (310 and 160 kDa) are expressed in serum and platelet-poor plasma of rats, mice, and humans, but these three bands were not detectable in serum of homozygous reeler (rl/rl) mice. Reelin plasma levels in heterozygous (rl/+) mice were half of those in wild-type littermates. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry using antireelin mAbs indicated that reelin-like immunoreactivity was expressed in a subset of chromaffin cells within the rat adrenal medulla and in a subset of cells coexpressing alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone within the pituitary pars intermedia. However, surgical removal of adrenal or pituitary failed to decrease the amount of reelin (420-kDa band) expressed in serum. Adult liver expressed one-third of the reelin mRNA concentration expressed in adult mouse cerebral cortex. Full-length reelin protein was detectable in liver extracts in situ; acutely isolated liver cells also secreted full-length reelin in vitro. Liver appears to be a prime candidate to produce and maintain the circulating reelin pool. It now becomes relevant to ask whether circulating reelin has a physiologic role on one or more peripheral target tissues.

  9. Expression of reelin in adult mammalian blood, liver, pituitary pars intermedia, and adrenal chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, Neil R.; Costa, Erminio; Guidotti, Alessandro; Impagnatiello, Francesco; Auta, James; Lacor, Pascale; Kriho, Virginia; Pappas, George D.

    2000-01-01

    Reelin regulates telencephalic and cerebellar lamination during mammalian development and is expressed in several structures of the adult brain; however, only traces of reelin were believed to be in peripheral tissues. Because reelin structurally resembles extracellular matrix proteins, and because many of these proteins are expressed in blood, we hypothesized that reelin also might be detectable in the circulation. Reelin (420 kDa) and two reelin-like immunoreactive bands (310 and 160 kDa) are expressed in serum and platelet-poor plasma of rats, mice, and humans, but these three bands were not detectable in serum of homozygous reeler (rl/rl) mice. Reelin plasma levels in heterozygous (rl/+) mice were half of those in wild-type littermates. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry using antireelin mAbs indicated that reelin-like immunoreactivity was expressed in a subset of chromaffin cells within the rat adrenal medulla and in a subset of cells coexpressing α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone within the pituitary pars intermedia. However, surgical removal of adrenal or pituitary failed to decrease the amount of reelin (420-kDa band) expressed in serum. Adult liver expressed one-third of the reelin mRNA concentration expressed in adult mouse cerebral cortex. Full-length reelin protein was detectable in liver extracts in situ; acutely isolated liver cells also secreted full-length reelin in vitro. Liver appears to be a prime candidate to produce and maintain the circulating reelin pool. It now becomes relevant to ask whether circulating reelin has a physiologic role on one or more peripheral target tissues. PMID:10655522

  10. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Malm, Sven; Jusko, Monika; Eick, Sigrun; Potempa, Jan; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2012-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI) is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and Factor H (FH). Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125)I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  11. Biogeographical aspects of the occurrence of Nyssomyia neivai and Nyssomyia intermedia (Diptera: Psychodidae) in a sympatric area of the Brazilian savannah.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Lara; Carvalho, Gustavo Mayr de Lima; Sanguinette, Cristiani de Castilho; Carvalho, Deborah Aparecida Alves de; Andrade Filho, José Dilermando

    2012-11-01

    Nyssomyia intermedia and Nyssomyia neivai constitute a species complex associated with Leishmania transmission. The aim of this study was to analyse the ecological profiles of the Ny. intermedia and Ny. neivai populations in a sympatric area in the Brazilian savannah along the banks of the Velhas River. Captures were performed from July 2003-June 2005 in two distinct environments: a gallery forest with various degrees of anthropogenic modification and animal shelters. A total of 20,508 Ny. neivai (86%) and Ny. intermedia (14%) sandflies were collected. The difference between the proportions of the sandflies that were collected (Ny. neivai/Ny. intermedia) per bank was significant. The right bank presented a greater number of sandflies (65%) and more preserved vegetation. The abundance of Ny. neivai was higher than that of Ny. intermedia on both banks. The results demonstrate that anthropic activities can affect the sandfly populations in this area, thereby leading to a reduction in species abundance. Nevertheless, the environments with higher levels of antropogenic modification displayed sandfly population numbers that favour the Leishmania transmission cycle.

  12. The serum neutralizing antibody response in cattle to Fusobacterium necrophorum leukotoxoid and possible protection against experimentally induced hepatic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Saginala, S; Nagaraja, T G; Tan, Z L; Lechtenberg, K F; Chengappa, M M; Hine, P M

    1996-01-01

    The serum antileukotoxin antibody response and protection against subsequent experimental challenge with Fusobacterium necrophorum were investigated in 30 steers vaccinated with crude F. necrophorum leukotoxoid. Culture supernatant of F. necrophorum, strain 25, containing leukotoxoid was concentrated. The steers were assigned randomly to six groups (n = 5): PBS control with Stimulon adjuvant; vaccinated with concentrated supernatant diluted to provide 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, or 20.0 ml with the water-soluble Stimulon adjuvant; and 5.0 ml with the Ribi oil-emulsion adjuvant. The steers were injected subcutaneously on days 0 and 21. Blood samples were collected at weekly intervals to monitor serum antileukotoxin antibody titres. On day 42, all the steers were challenged intraportally with F. necrophorum culture. Three weeks later (day 63), the steers were killed and necropsied for examination of their livers and assessment of protection. Steers vaccinated with crude leukotoxoid tended to have higher antileukotoxin titres than the controls, but the difference was not significant. Also, the antibody titre did not appear to be dose-dependent. In the control group, 3 out of 5 steers developed liver abscesses. The incidence of liver abscesses in steers vaccinated with Stimulon adjuvant was not dose related; however, only 8 of the 25 vaccinated steers developed abscesses. None of the steers vaccinated with the 5.0 ml dose with Ribi had any abscesses. Evidence for a relationship between antileukotoxin antibody and protection was shown by the lower titre in those steers that developed abscesses compared to those that did not. It was concluded that antileukotoxin antibody titres probably provided some degree of protection against experimentally induced liver abscesses, but further dose-titration studies using Ribi or possibly another more effective adjuvant will be needed to confirm this.

  13. Characterisation of Dichelobacter nodosus and detection of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Treponema spp. in sheep with different clinical manifestations of footrot.

    PubMed

    Frosth, Sara; König, Ulrika; Nyman, Ann-Kristin; Pringle, Märit; Aspán, Anna

    2015-08-31

    The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of Dichelobacter nodosus, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Treponema spp. in sheep with different clinical manifestations of footrot compared to healthy sheep both at flock and individual level. The second aim was to characterise D. nodosus with respect to virulence, presence of intA gene and the serogroups. Swab samples (n=1000) from footrot-affected (n=10) and healthy flocks (n=10) were analysed for the presence of D. nodosus, F. necrophorum and Treponema spp. by real-time PCR and culturing (D. nodosus only). Dichelobacter nodosus isolates (n=78) and positive swabs (n=474) were analysed by real-time PCR for the aprV2/B2 and the intA genes and by PCR for the fimA gene (isolates only). D. nodosus was more commonly found in flocks affected with footrot than in clinically healthy flocks. A significant association was found between feet with severe footrot lesions and the aprV2 gene and between feet with moderate or no lesions and the aprB2 gene, respectively. F. necrophorum was more commonly found in flocks with footrot lesions than in flocks without lesions. No significant association was found between sheep flocks affected with footrot and findings of Treponema spp. or the intA gene. Benign D. nodosus of six different serogroups was detected in twelve flocks and virulent D. nodosus of serogroup G in one. In conclusion, D. nodosus and F. necrophorum were more commonly found in feet with footrot than in healthy feet. The majority of D. nodosus detected was benign, while virulent D. nodosus was only detected in a single flock.

  14. Characteristics of β-lactamases and their genes (blaA and blaB) in Yersinia intermedia and Y. frederiksenii

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Shilpi; Mallik, Sarita; Sharma, Sachin; Virdi, Jugsharan S

    2007-01-01

    Background The presence of β-lactamases in Y. enterocolitica has been reported to vary with serovars, biovars and geographical origin of the isolates. An understanding of the β-lactamases in other related species is important for an overall perception of antibiotic resistance in yersiniae. The objective of this work was to study the characteristics of β-lactamases and their genes in strains of Y. intermedia and Y. frederiksenii, isolated from clinical and non-clinical sources in India. Results The enzymes, Bla-A (a constitutive class A penicillinase) and Bla-B (an inducible class C cephalosporinase) were found to be present in all the clinical and non-clinical strains of Y. intermedia and Y. frederiksenii by double disc diffusion method. The results showed differential expression of Bla-A as indicated by presence/absence of synergy whereas expression of Bla-B was quite consistent. The presence of these enzymes was also reflected in the high minimum inhibitory concentrations, MIC50 (126–1024 mg/L) and MIC90 (256–1024 mg/L) of β-lactam antibiotics against these species. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) revealed heterogeneity in both blaA and blaB genes of Y. intermedia and Y. frederiksenii. The blaA gene of Y. intermedia shared significant sequence identity (87–96%) with blaA of Y. enterocolitica biovars 1A, 1B and 4. The sequence identity of blaA of Y. frederiksenii with these biovars was 77–79%. The sequence identity of blaB gene of Y. intermedia and Y. frederiksenii was more (85%) with that of Y. enterocolitica biovars 1A, 1B and 2 compared to other species viz., Y. bercovieri, Y. aldovae and Y. ruckeri. Isoelectric focusing data further revealed that both Y. intermedia and Y. frederiksenii produced Bla-A (pI 8.7) and "Bla-B like" (pI 5.5–7.1) enzymes. Conclusion Both Y. intermedia and Y. frederiksenii showed presence of blaA and blaB genes and unequivocal expression of the two β-lactamases. Limited heterogeneity was detected in bla

  15. Evolución de estrellas enanas blancas de Helio de masa baja e intermedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althaus, L. G.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    Numerosas observaciones realizadas particularmente en los últimos dos años parecen confirmar que las enanas blancas (EB) de helio de masa baja e intermedia son el resultado de la evolución de sistemas binarios cercanos. Con el objeto de realizar una adecuada interpretación de estos objetos son necesarios modelos de EBs de helio lo más detallado posibles. En este estudio presentamos cálculos detallados de la evolución de EBs de helio con masas entre M=0.1Msolar y M=0.5Msolar a intervalos de 0.05Msolar . Para ello, hemos tenido en cuenta los efectos de temperatura finita mediante un código de evolución estelar lo más actualizado posible. En particular, el transporte de energía es descripto en el marco del nuevo modelo para la convección turbulenta desarrollado por Canuto - Mazzitelli. Además hemos considerado la nueva ecuación de estado para plasmas de helio de Saumon et al. y nuevas opacidades radiativas OPAL. Las pérdidas por neutrinos fueron asimismo tenidas en cuenta. Excepto para las EBs más masivas, nuestros modelos iniciales están ubicados en las cercanías de la correspondiente línea de Hayashi para configuraciones de helio. Nuestros resultados muestran que existe una región prohibida en el diagrama observacional HR donde ninguna EB de helio puede encontrarse. Dicha región es para log{(L/Lsolar )}>= -0.25 and log{Teff} >= 4.45. Hemos encontrado también que los tracks evolutivos en el diagrama HR en el dominio de alta luminosidad (pre - EB) son fuertemente afectados por la eficiencia convectiva y que las pérdidas por neutrinos son importantes en los modelos más masivos. Finalmente hemos analizado la estructura de la zona convectiva externa encontrando que la teoría de Canuto - Mazzitelli conduce a un perfil convectivo muy diferente del dado por cualquier versión de la popular teoría de la mixing length. Si bién este comportamiento es decisivo en el contexto de las inestabilides pulsacionales, los radios y gravedades superficiales de

  16. A Preliminary Study of the Effects of pH upon Fluorescence in Suspensions of Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Hope, Christopher K; Billingsley, Karen; de Josselin de Jong, Elbert; Higham, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    The quantification of fluorescence in dental plaque is currently being developed as a diagnostic tool to help inform and improve oral health. The oral anaerobe Prevotella intermedia exhibits red fluorescence due to the accumulation of porphyrins. pH affects the fluorescence of abiotic preparations of porphyrins caused by changes in speciation between monomers, higher aggregates and dimers, but this phenomenon has not been demonstrated in bacteria. Fluorescence spectra were obtained from suspensions of P. intermedia that were adjusted to pHs commensurate with the range found within dental plaque. Two fluorescent motifs were identified; 410 nm excitation / 634 nm emission (peak A) and 398 nm excitation / 622 nm emission (peak B). A transition in the fluorescence spectra was observed from peak A to peak B with increasing pH which was also evident as culture age increased from 24 hours to 96 hours. In addition to these 'blue-shifts', the intensity of peak A increased with pH whilst decreasing with culture age from 24 to 96 hours. A bacterium's relationship with the local physiochemical environment at the time of image capture may therefore affect the quantification of dental plaque fluorescence. PMID:27441707

  17. A Preliminary Study of the Effects of pH upon Fluorescence in Suspensions of Prevotella intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Christopher K.; Billingsley, Karen; de Josselin de Jong, Elbert; Higham, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    The quantification of fluorescence in dental plaque is currently being developed as a diagnostic tool to help inform and improve oral health. The oral anaerobe Prevotella intermedia exhibits red fluorescence due to the accumulation of porphyrins. pH affects the fluorescence of abiotic preparations of porphyrins caused by changes in speciation between monomers, higher aggregates and dimers, but this phenomenon has not been demonstrated in bacteria. Fluorescence spectra were obtained from suspensions of P. intermedia that were adjusted to pHs commensurate with the range found within dental plaque. Two fluorescent motifs were identified; 410 nm excitation / 634 nm emission (peak A) and 398 nm excitation / 622 nm emission (peak B). A transition in the fluorescence spectra was observed from peak A to peak B with increasing pH which was also evident as culture age increased from 24 hours to 96 hours. In addition to these ‘blue-shifts’, the intensity of peak A increased with pH whilst decreasing with culture age from 24 to 96 hours. A bacterium’s relationship with the local physiochemical environment at the time of image capture may therefore affect the quantification of dental plaque fluorescence. PMID:27441707

  18. Simultaneous quantitative analysis of nine triterpenoid saponins for the quality control of Stauntonia obovatifoliola Hayata subsp. intermedia stems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuran; Qiu, Feng; Pan, Xueqiang; Li, Jing; Wang, Manyuan; Gong, Muxin

    2014-12-01

    Stauntonia obovatifoliola Hayata subsp. intermedia is used in China to treat rheumatic arthralgia, hernia pain, and traumatic pain. An accurate and reliable method based on high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection has been developed and validated for the quantitative determination of nine triterpenoid saponins in this herb. By using a Kromasil 100-5 C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm), nine analytes were separated by gradient elution over a running time of 45.0 min. All standard calibration curves demonstrated satisfactory linearity (R(2) ≥ 0.9995) within a relatively wide range. The precision was evaluated by intra- and interday tests, which revealed relative standard deviation values within the ranges of 0.20-2.83 and 0.51-2.79%, respectively. The recoveries for the nine target compounds were between 84.6 and 103% with relative standard deviation values less than 2.67%. The samples were also analyzed on a linear trap quadrupole Orbitrap Velos Pro mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source in negative mode to confirm the quantification results. In conclusion, the present high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection method could serve as an accurate and reliable method for the quality evaluation of Stauntonia obovatifoliola Hayata subsp. intermedia stems. PMID:25315436

  19. Thalassemia Intermedia Caused by 16p13.3 Sectional Duplication in a β-Thalassemia Heterozygous Child.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Jiang, Hua; Wu, Man-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Ling; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Thalassemia intermedia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by a significant genetic and clinical heterogeneity. A wide spectrum of different genotypes-homozygous, heterozygous, and compound heterozygous-have been found to be responsible for it. The authors describe a Chinese child of β-thalassemia heterozygote with the mutation IVS2-654 (C→T) (HBB:c.316-197C→T) presenting with severe thalassemia intermedia. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses of the α gene cluster revealed an approximate 146-kb duplication at 16p13.3 including the complete α gene cluster. The duplicated allele and the normal allele in trans result in a total of 6 active α genes. The severe clinical phenotype seemed to be related to the considerable excess of the α-globin and the β-globin deficit caused by the presence of the β-thalassemia. The α gene duplication should be considered in patients heterozygous for β-thalassemia who show a more severe phenotype than β-thalassemia trait.

  20. Differential Midgut Attachment of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in the Sand Flies Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) whitmani and Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rodrigo P.; Margonari, Carina; Secundino, Nágila C.; Macêdo, Maria E.; da Costa, Simone M.; Rangel, Elizabeth F.; Pimenta, Paulo F.; Turco, Salvatore J.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between Leishmania and sand flies has been demonstrated in many Old and New World species. Besides the morphological differentiation from procyclic to infective metacyclic promastigotes, the parasite undergoes biochemical transformations in its major surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG). An upregulation of β-glucose residues was previously shown in the LPG repeat units from procyclic to metacyclic phase in Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, which has not been reported in any Leishmania species. LPG has been implicated as an adhesion molecule that mediates the interaction with the midgut epithelium of the sand fly in the Subgenus Leishmania. These adaptations were explored for the first time in a species from the Subgenus Viannia, L. (V.) braziliensis with its natural vectors Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) intermedia and Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) whitmani. Using two in vitro binding techniques, phosphoglycans (PGs) derived from procyclic and metacyclic parasites were able to bind to the insect midgut and inhibit L. braziliensis attachment. Interestingly, L. braziliensis procyclic parasite attachment was ∼11-fold greater in the midgut of L. whitmani than in L. intermedia. The epidemiological relevance of L. whitmani as a vector of American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ACL) in Brazil is discussed. PMID:20011070

  1. REHABILITATION AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER EXTENSIVE SURGICAL DEBRIDEMENT OF A KNEE INFECTED BY FUSOBACTERIUM NECROPHORUM: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Matthew S.; Kegelmeyer, Deborah K.; Kloos, Anne D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Joint infection is a rare but serious complication after knee injury that should be part of a physical therapist's differential diagnosis. This case report presents the care of a 17 year‐old female athlete with septic arthritis from a Fusobacterium infection after sustaining a right lateral meniscus tear. Joint pathology combined with the aggressive infectious agent led to arthrofibrosis of her knee joint and resultant activity limitations and participation restrictions. The purpose of this case report is to highlight a rare and unique pathology, the serious effects that a joint infection can have on musculoskeletal function, and the challenges encountered during the rehabilitation process. Case Description: The subject was a 17 year‐old volleyball player who injured her right knee while playing volleyball. Within 7 days, the subject developed a severe joint infection that spread into surrounding gluteal, quadriceps, and gastrocnemius musculature. The infection was surgically debrided eight times during a 10‐week inpatient hospital stay. A manipulation under anesthesia was performed to restore range of motion in her knee joint. Outpatient physical therapy was initiated 4 days later in order to restore musculoskeletal function. Outcome: Over eight months of physical therapy services were utilized to address the impairments and activity limitations caused by her joint dysfunction. She met her physical therapy goals and made significant improvements on the Knee Outcome Survey and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Success in physical therapy and completion of additional strength training exercise allowed this subject to return to competitive softball at the club level during her freshman year of college. Discussion: Though rare after musculoskeletal injury, joint infection can lead to soft tissue damage, partial or complete degradation of articular cartilage, and arthrofibrosis causing significant disability. Physical therapists must

  2. 6-phospho-alpha-D-glucosidase from Fusobacterium mortiferum: cloning, expression, and assignment to family 4 of the glycosylhydrolases.

    PubMed Central

    Bouma, C L; Reizer, J; Reizer, A; Robrish, S A; Thompson, J

    1997-01-01

    The Fusobacterium mortiferum malH gene, encoding 6-phospho-alpha-glucosidase (maltose 6-phosphate hydrolase; EC 3.2.1.122), has been isolated, characterized, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The relative molecular weight of the polypeptide encoded by malH (441 residues; Mr of 49,718) was in agreement with the estimated value (approximately 49,000) obtained by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for the enzyme purified from F. mortiferum. The N-terminal sequence of the MalH protein obtained by Edman degradation corresponded to the first 32 amino acids deduced from the malH sequence. The enzyme produced by the strain carrying the cloned malH gene cleaved [U-14C]maltose 6-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate (Glc6P) and glucose. The substrate analogs p-nitrophenyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside 6-phosphate (pNP alphaGlc6P) and 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside 6-phosphate (4MU alphaGlc6P) were hydrolyzed to yield Glc6P and the yellow p-nitrophenolate and fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl aglycons, respectively. The 6-phospho-alpha-glucosidase expressed in E. coli (like the enzyme purified from F. mortiferum) required Fe2+, Mn2+, Co2+, or Ni2+ for activity and was inhibited in air. Synthesis of maltose 6-phosphate hydrolase from the cloned malH gene in E. coli was modulated by addition of various sugars to the growth medium. Computer-based analyses of MalH and its homologs revealed that the phospho-alpha-glucosidase from F. mortiferum belongs to the seven-member family 4 of the glycosylhydrolase superfamily. The cloned 2.2-kb Sau3AI DNA fragment from F. mortiferum contained a second partial open reading frame of 83 residues (designated malB) that was located immediately upstream of malH. The high degree of sequence identity of MalB with IIB(Glc)-like proteins of the phosphoenol pyruvate dependent:sugar phosphotransferase system suggests participation of MalB in translocation of maltose and related alpha-glucosides in F. mortiferum. PMID:9209025

  3. [Variations of ground vegetation and soil properties during the growth process of artificial sand-fixing Caragana intermedia plantations in desert steppe].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren-Tao; Chai, Yong-Qing; Xu, Kun; Zhu, Fan

    2012-11-01

    To study the variation characteristics of ground vegetation and soil properties during the growth process of Caragana intermedia plantations in desert steppe is of scientific significance in revealing the ecological effect of the plantations on the restoration of desertified grassland ecosystem. In this paper, an investigation was conducted on the ground vegetation and soil properties in 6-, 15-, 24-, and 36-yr artificial sand-fixing C. intermedia plantations in desert steppe of Ningxia, Northwest China, with the variation characteristics of the ground vegetation and soil properties during the growth process of the C. intermedia plantations analyzed. With the growth and development of the plantations, the shrub crown width, height, sprout number, and basal diameter all increased significantly, the contents of soil coarse sand and fine sand had significant decrease while those of very fine sand and clay silt were in adverse, the soil organic carbon, total N, and total P contents increased linearly, and the soil pH decreased significantly. During the growth process of the plantations, the species number and individual number of ground vegetation increased significantly, and the vegetation coverage and height presented the order of 24- > 15- > 6- > 36-yr plantation. The soil texture, bulk density, nutrient contents, and pH value were the main factors affecting the species and individual number as well as the coverage of ground vegetation in C. intermedia plantations. It was suggested that in desert steppe, the growth process of artificial sand-fixing C. intermedia plantation benefited the improvement of soil conditions and the recovery of ground vegetation, and promoted the restoration of degraded grassland ecosystem in desert steppe.

  4. Protective antibodies against a sphingomyelinase D from Loxosceles intermedia spider venom elicited in mice with different genetic background.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Camila Franco Batista; Vilela, Andrea; Coura, Luis Augusto M; Rodrigues, Fernandes Tenório Gomes; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Chávez-Olortegui, Carlos; Maioli, Tatiani U; Felicori, Liza F

    2016-07-19

    In the present investigation we used a recombinant LiD1 toxin, named rLiD1his, from Loxosceles intermedia brown spider to elicit specific antibodies in mice carrying different Human Leukocyte Antigens class II (HLAII) {DRB1.0401 (DR4), DQB1.0601 (DQ6) and DQB1.0302 (DQ8)} as well as in BALB/C and C57BL/6 control mice. All mice strains produced high antibody titers against rLiD1his but DR4 mice antibodies (the lower responder mice) were not able to recognize L. intermedia crude venom. The anti-rLiD1his sera, except from DR4 mice, were able to neutralize dermonecrotic, hemorrhagic and edematogenic effects of rLiD1his in naïve rabbits. Overlapping peptides from the amino acid sequence of LiD1 toxin were prepared by SPOT method and differences in LiD1 epitope recognition were observed using different mice anti-rLiD1his sera. The region (160)DKVGHDFSGNDDISDVGK(177) was recognized by transgenic DQ8 and DQ6 mice sera. Other epitopes were recognized by at least two different animals' sera including (10)MGHMVNAIGQIDEFVNLG(27), (37)FDDNANPEYTYHGIP(51), (70)GLRSATTPGNSKYQEKLV(87) and (259)AAYKKKFRVATYDDN(273). Among these epitopes, the epitopes 37-51 and 160-177 have already been shown in previously studies as good candidates to be used alone or combined with other peptides to induce protective immune response against Loxosceles venoms. The results presented here highlight the importance of HLAII in antibody response and recognition of specific B-cell epitopes of rLiD1his spider toxin according to HLAII type and impact in the epitopic vaccine development against this spider. PMID:27265457

  5. Protective antibodies against a sphingomyelinase D from Loxosceles intermedia spider venom elicited in mice with different genetic background.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Camila Franco Batista; Vilela, Andrea; Coura, Luis Augusto M; Rodrigues, Fernandes Tenório Gomes; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Chávez-Olortegui, Carlos; Maioli, Tatiani U; Felicori, Liza F

    2016-07-19

    In the present investigation we used a recombinant LiD1 toxin, named rLiD1his, from Loxosceles intermedia brown spider to elicit specific antibodies in mice carrying different Human Leukocyte Antigens class II (HLAII) {DRB1.0401 (DR4), DQB1.0601 (DQ6) and DQB1.0302 (DQ8)} as well as in BALB/C and C57BL/6 control mice. All mice strains produced high antibody titers against rLiD1his but DR4 mice antibodies (the lower responder mice) were not able to recognize L. intermedia crude venom. The anti-rLiD1his sera, except from DR4 mice, were able to neutralize dermonecrotic, hemorrhagic and edematogenic effects of rLiD1his in naïve rabbits. Overlapping peptides from the amino acid sequence of LiD1 toxin were prepared by SPOT method and differences in LiD1 epitope recognition were observed using different mice anti-rLiD1his sera. The region (160)DKVGHDFSGNDDISDVGK(177) was recognized by transgenic DQ8 and DQ6 mice sera. Other epitopes were recognized by at least two different animals' sera including (10)MGHMVNAIGQIDEFVNLG(27), (37)FDDNANPEYTYHGIP(51), (70)GLRSATTPGNSKYQEKLV(87) and (259)AAYKKKFRVATYDDN(273). Among these epitopes, the epitopes 37-51 and 160-177 have already been shown in previously studies as good candidates to be used alone or combined with other peptides to induce protective immune response against Loxosceles venoms. The results presented here highlight the importance of HLAII in antibody response and recognition of specific B-cell epitopes of rLiD1his spider toxin according to HLAII type and impact in the epitopic vaccine development against this spider.

  6. Ethanol and Protein from Ethanol Plant By-Products Using Edible Fungi Neurospora intermedia and Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Bátori, Veronika; Ferreira, Jorge A.; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.; Lennartsson, Patrik R.

    2015-01-01

    Feasible biorefineries for production of second-generation ethanol are difficult to establish due to the process complexity. An alternative is to partially include the process in the first-generation plants. Whole stillage, a by-product from dry-mill ethanol processes from grains, is mostly composed of undegraded bran and lignocelluloses can be used as a potential substrate for production of ethanol and feed proteins. Ethanol production and the proteins from the stillage were investigated using the edible fungi Neurospora intermedia and Aspergillus oryzae, respectively. N. intermedia produced 4.7 g/L ethanol from the stillage and increased to 8.7 g/L by adding 1 FPU of cellulase/g suspended solids. Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced 0.4 and 5.1 g/L ethanol, respectively. Under a two-stage cultivation with both fungi, up to 7.6 g/L of ethanol and 5.8 g/L of biomass containing 42% (w/w) crude protein were obtained. Both fungi degraded complex substrates including arabinan, glucan, mannan, and xylan where reductions of 91, 73, 38, and 89% (w/v) were achieved, respectively. The inclusion of the current process can lead to the production of 44,000 m3 of ethanol (22% improvement), around 12,000 tons of protein-rich biomass for animal feed, and energy savings considering a typical facility producing 200,000 m3 ethanol/year. PMID:26682213

  7. Ethanol and Protein from Ethanol Plant By-Products Using Edible Fungi Neurospora intermedia and Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Bátori, Veronika; Ferreira, Jorge A; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J; Lennartsson, Patrik R

    2015-01-01

    Feasible biorefineries for production of second-generation ethanol are difficult to establish due to the process complexity. An alternative is to partially include the process in the first-generation plants. Whole stillage, a by-product from dry-mill ethanol processes from grains, is mostly composed of undegraded bran and lignocelluloses can be used as a potential substrate for production of ethanol and feed proteins. Ethanol production and the proteins from the stillage were investigated using the edible fungi Neurospora intermedia and Aspergillus oryzae, respectively. N. intermedia produced 4.7 g/L ethanol from the stillage and increased to 8.7 g/L by adding 1 FPU of cellulase/g suspended solids. Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced 0.4 and 5.1 g/L ethanol, respectively. Under a two-stage cultivation with both fungi, up to 7.6 g/L of ethanol and 5.8 g/L of biomass containing 42% (w/w) crude protein were obtained. Both fungi degraded complex substrates including arabinan, glucan, mannan, and xylan where reductions of 91, 73, 38, and 89% (w/v) were achieved, respectively. The inclusion of the current process can lead to the production of 44,000 m(3) of ethanol (22% improvement), around 12,000 tons of protein-rich biomass for animal feed, and energy savings considering a typical facility producing 200,000 m(3) ethanol/year.

  8. Possible lethal enhancement of toxins from putative periodontopathogens by nicotine: implications for periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, N M; Gomes, B P; Drucker, D B; Blinkhorn, A S

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To test the hypothesis that lethal synergy in the chick embryo model may occur between nicotine and bacterial products (cell-free extracellular toxins and cell lysates) of five putative periodontopathogens. METHODS: The lethality of cell-free extracellular toxins and cell lysates of five periodontal species was assessed with or without nicotine in the chick embryo assay system. Ten putative periodontopathogens (five species) were studied: Prevotella intermedia (n = 5), Porphyromonas gingivalis (n = 1), Porphyromonas asaccharolytica (n = 1), Fusobacterium nucleatum (n = 2), and Fusobacterium necrophorum (n = 1). RESULTS: Simultaneous testing of cell-free extracellular toxins from isolates W50, PS2, PS3, PS4, and PS5 and nicotine resulted in a percentage kill significantly greater than expected (Fisher's Exact test). Simultaneous testing of cell lysates from isolates W50, PS2, and PS5 and nicotine resulted in a percentage kill significantly greater than expected (Fisher's Exact test). CONCLUSIONS: Lethal synergy in the chick embryo model may occur between nicotine and toxins from putative periodontopathogens (both cell-free extracellular toxins and cell lysates). This may be an important mechanism by which smoking increases the severity of periodontal disease. PMID:9155677

  9. [Noma/Cancrum oris: a neglected disease].

    PubMed

    García-Moro, Maria; García-Merino, Enrique; Martín-Del-Rey, Angel; García-Sánchez, Enrique; García-Sánchez, José Elías

    2015-10-01

    Noma is an aggressive orofacial gangrenous pathology that damages hard and soft tissues of the mouth and the face. Throughout the centuries it has been present around the globe, but nowadays it has practically disappeared from developed countries and mainly affects children from the most disadvantaged places, especially in Africa. Noma disease is a multifactorial process; malnutrition, debilitating diseases (bacterial or viral systemic diseases, HIV-associated immunosuppression, etc.) and intraoral infections are some of the factors implied. The characteristic tissue necrosis is produced by a polymicrobial infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella melaninogenica, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides fragilis, Bacillus cereus, Trueperella pyogenes, spyrochetes, etc, are some of the species that have been isolated from the affected areas. Without treatment, noma is lethal in a short period of time, and the patients that survive show severe sequelae that hinder their life and interpersonal relationships. The aim of this paper is to unify the existing information and to promote wider knowledge and awareness among the population.

  10. The effect of blue light on periodontal biofilm growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carla R; Song, Xiaoqing; Polymeri, Angeliki; Goodson, J Max; Wang, Xiaoshan; Soukos, Nikolaos S

    2015-11-01

    We have previously shown that blue light eliminates the black-pigmented oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Prevotella melaninogenica. In the present study, the in vitro photosensitivity of the above black-pigmented microorganisms and four Fusobacteria species (Fusobacterium nucleatum ss. nucleatum, F. nucleatum ss. vincentii, F. nucleatum ss. polymorphum, Fusobacterium periodonticum) was investigated in pure cultures and human dental plaque suspensions. We also tested the hypothesis that phototargeting the above eight key periodontopathogens in plaque-derived biofilms in vitro would control growth within the dental biofilm environment. Cultures of the eight bacteria were exposed to blue light at 455 nm with power density of 80 mW/cm2 and energy fluence of 4.8 J/cm2. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of bacteria was performed to demonstrate the presence and amounts of porphyrin molecules within microorganisms. Suspensions of human dental plaque bacteria were also exposed once to blue light at 455 nm with power density of 50 mW/cm2 and energy fluence of 12 J/cm2. Microbial biofilms developed from the same plaque were exposed to 455 nm blue light at 50 mW/cm2 once daily for 4 min (12 J/cm2) over a period of 3 days (4 exposures) in order to investigate the cumulative action of phototherapy on the eight photosensitive pathogens as well as on biofilm growth. Bacterial growth was evaluated using the colony-forming unit (CFU) assay. The selective phototargeting of pathogens was studied using whole genomic probes in the checkerboard DNA-DNA format. In cultures, all eight species showed significant growth reduction (p < 0.05). HPLC demonstrated various porphyrin patterns and amounts of porphyrins in bacteria. Following phototherapy, the mean survival fractions were reduced by 28.5 and 48.2% in plaque suspensions and biofilms, respectively, (p < 0.05). DNA probe analysis showed significant

  11. Characterization of Yersinia enterocolitica, Y. intermedia, Y. aldovae, Y. frederiksenii, Y. kristensenii and Y. pseudotuberculosis by electrophoretic polymorphism of acid phosphatase, esterases, and glutamate and malate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Goullet, P; Picard, B

    1988-02-01

    Acid phosphatase, esterases, and glutamate and malate dehydrogenases of 192 strains of Yersinia enterocolitica, Y. intermedia, Y. aldovae, Y. frederiksenii, Y. kristensenii and Y. pseudotuberculosis were analysed by horizontal polyacrylamide agarose gel electrophoresis and by isoelectrofocusing in thin-layer polyacrylamide gels. The six species were clearly separated from each other by their distinct enzyme electrophoretic polymorphism. For Y. enterocolitica, the strains of biotype 5 were differentiated from the other biotypes by the mobility of glutamate dehydrogenase. For Y. frederiksenii, six zymotypes were delineated by pI and by the mobility of the enzymes. Variation in number or mobility of esterases within each species could represent a marker for epidemiological and ecological analyses. A linear relationship was obtained between the mean genetic diversity coefficient of enzymes and the mean percentage DNA-DNA relatedness of Y. intermedia, Y. aldovae, Y. enterocolitica and Y. frederiksenii.

  12. Spatial Heterogeneity of Soil Nutrients after the Establishment of Caragana intermedia Plantation on Sand Dunes in Alpine Sandy Land of the Tibet Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingxue; Jia, Zhiqing; Zhu, Yajuan; Wang, Yongsheng; Li, Hong; Yang, Defu; Zhao, Xuebin

    2015-01-01

    The Gonghe Basin region of the Tibet Plateau is severely affected by desertification. Compared with other desertified land, the main features of this region is windy, cold and short growing season, resulting in relatively difficult for vegetation restoration. In this harsh environment, identification the spatial distribution of soil nutrients and analysis its impact factors after vegetation establishment will be helpful for understanding the ecological relationship between soil and environment. Therefore, in this study, the 12-year-old C. intermedia plantation on sand dunes was selected as the experimental site. Soil samples were collected under and between shrubs on the windward slopes, dune tops and leeward slopes with different soil depth. Then analyzed soil organic matter (SOM), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total potassium (TK), available nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP) and available potassium (AK). The results showed that the spatial heterogeneity of soil nutrients was existed in C. intermedia plantation on sand dunes. (1) Depth was the most important impact factor, soil nutrients were decreased with greater soil depth. One of the possible reasons is that windblown fine materials and litters were accumulated on surface soil, when they were decomposed, more nutrients were aggregated on surface soil. (2) Topography also affected the distribution of soil nutrients, more soil nutrients distributed on windward slopes. The herbaceous coverage were higher and C. intermedia ground diameter were larger on windward slopes, both of them probably related to the high soil nutrients level for windward slopes. (3) Soil “fertile islands” were formed, and the “fertile islands” were more marked on lower soil nutrients level topography positions, while it decreased towards higher soil nutrients level topography positions. The enrichment ratio (E) for TN and AN were higher than other nutrients, most likely because C. intermedia is a leguminous

  13. Interaction of Prevotella intermedia strain 17 leucine-rich repeat domain protein AdpF with eukaryotic cells promotes bacterial internalization.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Dipanwita; Kang, Dae-Joong; Anaya-Bergman, Cecilia; Wyant, Tiana; Ghosh, Arnab K; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Lewis, Janina P

    2014-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia is an oral bacterium implicated in a variety of oral diseases. Although internalization of this bacterium by nonphagocytic host cells is well established, the molecular players mediating the process are not well known. Here, the properties of a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain protein, designated AdpF, are described. This protein contains a leucine-rich region composed of 663 amino acid residues, and molecular modeling shows that it folds into a classical curved solenoid structure. The cell surface localization of recombinant AdpF (rAdpF) was confirmed by electron and confocal microscopy analyses. The recombinant form of this protein bound fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the protein was internalized by host cells, with the majority of the process accomplished within 30 min. The internalization of rAdpF was inhibited by nystatin, cytochalasin, latrunculin, nocodazole, and wortmannin, indicating that microtubules, microfilaments, and signal transduction are required for the invasion. It is noteworthy that preincubation of eukaryotic cells with AdpF increased P. intermedia 17 internalization by 5- and 10-fold for HeLa and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines, respectively. The addition of the rAdpF protein was also very effective in inducing bacterial internalization into the oral epithelial cell line HN4, as well as into primary cells, including human oral keratinocytes (HOKs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Finally, cells exposed to P. intermedia 17 internalized the bacteria more readily upon reinfection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that rAdpF plays a role in the internalization of P. intermedia 17 by a variety of host cells.

  14. Spatial Heterogeneity of Soil Nutrients after the Establishment of Caragana intermedia Plantation on Sand Dunes in Alpine Sandy Land of the Tibet Plateau.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingxue; Jia, Zhiqing; Zhu, Yajuan; Wang, Yongsheng; Li, Hong; Yang, Defu; Zhao, Xuebin

    2015-01-01

    The Gonghe Basin region of the Tibet Plateau is severely affected by desertification. Compared with other desertified land, the main features of this region is windy, cold and short growing season, resulting in relatively difficult for vegetation restoration. In this harsh environment, identification the spatial distribution of soil nutrients and analysis its impact factors after vegetation establishment will be helpful for understanding the ecological relationship between soil and environment. Therefore, in this study, the 12-year-old C. intermedia plantation on sand dunes was selected as the experimental site. Soil samples were collected under and between shrubs on the windward slopes, dune tops and leeward slopes with different soil depth. Then analyzed soil organic matter (SOM), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total potassium (TK), available nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP) and available potassium (AK). The results showed that the spatial heterogeneity of soil nutrients was existed in C. intermedia plantation on sand dunes. (1) Depth was the most important impact factor, soil nutrients were decreased with greater soil depth. One of the possible reasons is that windblown fine materials and litters were accumulated on surface soil, when they were decomposed, more nutrients were aggregated on surface soil. (2) Topography also affected the distribution of soil nutrients, more soil nutrients distributed on windward slopes. The herbaceous coverage were higher and C. intermedia ground diameter were larger on windward slopes, both of them probably related to the high soil nutrients level for windward slopes. (3) Soil "fertile islands" were formed, and the "fertile islands" were more marked on lower soil nutrients level topography positions, while it decreased towards higher soil nutrients level topography positions. The enrichment ratio (E) for TN and AN were higher than other nutrients, most likely because C. intermedia is a leguminous shrub.

  15. Analytical performance of an immunologic-based periodontal bacterial test for simultaneous detection and differentiation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Snyder, B; Ryerson, C C; Corona, H; Grogan, E A; Reynolds, H S; Contestable, P B; Boyer, B P; Mayer, J; Mangan, T; Norkus, N; Zambon, J J; Genco, R J

    1996-05-01

    The analytical performance of a membrane-based immunoassay for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia (including Prevotella nigrescens) was investigated. Positive reactions were observed for 71 of 71 reference strains and recent oral isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and P. intermedia. No cross-reactivity was observed with 39 other common oral and environmental species. The specificity of the test was unaffected by the presence of potential oral interferents including whole blood, white blood cells, mucin, saliva, toothpastes, and oral rinses. A proficiency test by dental professionals using a standardized set of unknown simulated samples yielded a sensitivity of 97% (116/120) and a 100% specificity (240/ 240). An additional group including dental professionals and high school students was shown to be 99% proficient (1385/1397) in distinguishing proper from improper test function when processing control samples with normal test devices and devices with simulated error conditions. Comparisons to a culture standard for 104 subgingival plaque samples collected from 26 adult periodontitis patients yielded > 98% specificity for each of the test bacteria. In addition, the detection threshold for the test was determined to be equivalent to 10(4) cultivable test bacteria when compared to the culture standard. The data indicate that this membrane immunoassay is a valid and easy-to-use method for the detection of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and P. intermedia in subgingival plaque, at levels above the detection threshold of the test.

  16. Postnatal development of the interstitial cells (palisade cells) of the pars intermedia in the cat pituitary gland. An immunocytochemical and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Marín, J F; Boya, J

    1991-01-01

    The postnatal development of the interstitial agranulated cells (so-called palisade cells) of the pars intermedia in the cat was investigated immunocytochemically and at the ultrastructural level. Since the first postnatal days, a strong vimentin immunoreactivity and a weaker S-100 protein immunoreactivity were detected in the marginal cells lining the pituitary cleft and in the interstitial bipolar cells located within the pars intermedia. No glial fibrillary acidic protein cells have been found in the pars intermedia of any of the animals studied. This immunocytochemical pattern was maintained throughout the postnatal development. Ultrastructurally these cells showed a vast number of cytoplasmic filaments and well-developed junctional complexes. Secretory granules were never seen. In older animals they lined microcavities and microchannels where they project microvilli and present pinocytotic vesicles on their apical surface. No transitional forms between these cells and granulated secretory cells were found. There is a large number of axons and synaptic endings in contact with the granulated secretory cells. From our findings we guess that palisade cells are not a glial derivative, but they may share a common origin with secretory granulated cells.

  17. New bacteriophage typing system for Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia kristensenii, Yersinia frederiksenii, and Yersinia intermedia: correlation with serotyping, biotyping, and antibiotic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Baker, P M; Farmer, J J

    1982-03-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is listed as a single species in Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, but has recently been split into "true" Y. enterocolitica, Y. kristensenii, Y. intermedia, and Y. frederiksenii. From 48 bacteriophages isolated from raw sewage, 24 were chosen as being the most useful for differentiating strains within the four Yersinia species. The composite set of 24 phages typed 92% of 236 Y. enterocolitica strains, 100% of 16 Y. kristensenii strains, 97% of 29 Y. frederiksenii strains, and 90% of 20 Y. intermedia strains. The most common phage type in any of the groups contained 22% of the strains tested, but most of the phage types contained greater than 5% of the strains. The new typing schema was tested in three outbreaks of Y. enterocolitica, and the results agreed well with serotyping and epidemiological findings. In the same outbreaks, biotyping (API 20E profiles; Analytab Products, Plainview, N.Y.) and antibiograms were less reliable markers and probably should be used only in conjunction with serotyping or phage typing or both. Caution should be used in identifying cultures of Y. frederiksenii and Y. intermedia with the API 20E system, since the tests at 37 degrees C for L-rhamnose and melibiose fermentation are often delayed past 24 h, which is the cut-off point for the final reading in the API system. There were distinct differences in the susceptibilities of Y. enterocolitica and Y. kristensenii to ampicillin, carbenicillin, and cephalothin, which adds further support for classifying the latter as a separate species.

  18. [Clinical and microbiological study of adult periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Nogueira Moreira, A; Fernández Canigia, L; Furman, C; Chiappe, V; Marcantoni, M; Bianchini, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a microbiological evaluation of sites with and without clinical evidence of moderate and severe periodontitis and their correlation with clinical parameters. A total of 52 disease sites and 10 healthy sites were selected according to clinical criteria. The following clinical indexes were measured for all the sites: plaque index, gingival index, blood on probing, depth on probing and insertion level. Samples of subgingival plaque were collected for culture and for differential counts of microbial morphotypes. In disease sites the most frequently isolated were: Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens (65%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (23%), Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (23%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (10%) and Peptostreptococcus sp. (31%). The aerobic gram-positive microflora was predominant in healthy sites. Significant differences were observed in microbial morphotypes between healthy and disease sites: cocci 18.71% and 78.90%, motile rods 46.12% and 16.70%, total spirochetes 26.48% and 2.80%, respectively. The presence of motile rods, spirochetes and P. intermedia/nigrescens were the parameters with most sensitivity to suspect periodontal disease. There were significant differences in the subgingival microflora between healthy and disease sites in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis. PMID:11594003

  19. [Clinical and microbiological study of adult periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Nogueira Moreira, A; Fernández Canigia, L; Furman, C; Chiappe, V; Marcantoni, M; Bianchini, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a microbiological evaluation of sites with and without clinical evidence of moderate and severe periodontitis and their correlation with clinical parameters. A total of 52 disease sites and 10 healthy sites were selected according to clinical criteria. The following clinical indexes were measured for all the sites: plaque index, gingival index, blood on probing, depth on probing and insertion level. Samples of subgingival plaque were collected for culture and for differential counts of microbial morphotypes. In disease sites the most frequently isolated were: Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens (65%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (23%), Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (23%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (10%) and Peptostreptococcus sp. (31%). The aerobic gram-positive microflora was predominant in healthy sites. Significant differences were observed in microbial morphotypes between healthy and disease sites: cocci 18.71% and 78.90%, motile rods 46.12% and 16.70%, total spirochetes 26.48% and 2.80%, respectively. The presence of motile rods, spirochetes and P. intermedia/nigrescens were the parameters with most sensitivity to suspect periodontal disease. There were significant differences in the subgingival microflora between healthy and disease sites in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis.

  20. Detection and enumeration of periodontopathogenic bacteria in subgingival biofilm of pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernanda Campos; Cesar, Dionéia Evangelista; Assis, Amanda Vervloet Dutra Agostinho; Diniz, Cláudio Galuppo; Ribeiro, Rosangela Almeida

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique to test the hypothesis of qualitative and quantitative differences of 8 periodontopathogens between pregnant and non-pregnant women. This cross-sectional study included 20 pregnant women in their second trimester of pregnancy and 20 non-pregnant women. Probing depth, bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level, and presence of calculus were recorded. Subgingival plaque samples were collected and the FISH technique identified the presence and numbers of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, Campylobacter rectus, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. The Mann-Whitney U-test was applied to compare the data between the two groups. The mean age, ethnicity, marital status, education, and economic level in both groups were similar. The clinical parameters showed no significant differences between pregnant and non-pregnant women. The numbers of subgingival periodontopathogens were not found to be significantly different between groups, despite the higher mean counts of P. intermedia in pregnant women. Colonization patterns of the different bacteria most commonly associated with periodontal disease were not different in the subgingival plaque of pregnant and non-pregnant women.

  1. An Extraordinary Accumulation of (-)-Pinoresinol in Cell-Free Extracts of Forsythia intermedia: Evidence for Enantiospecific Reduction of (+)-Pinoresinol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katayama, Takeshi; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    1992-01-01

    Stereoselective and enantiospecific transformation mechanisms in lignan biogenesis are only now yielding to scientific inquiry: it has been shown that soluble cell-free preparations from Forsythia intermedia catalysis the formation of the enantiomerically pure lignan, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, when incubated with coniferyl alcohol in the presence of NAD(P)H and H2O2. Surprisingly, (-)-pinoresinol also accumulates in this soluble cell-free assay mixture in greater than 96% enantiomeric excess, even though it is not the naturally occurring antipode present in Forsythia sp. But these soluble cell-free preparations do not engender stereoselective coupling; instead, racemic pinoresinols are first formed, catalysed by an H2O2-dependent peroxidase reaction. An enantiospecific NAD(P)H reductase then converts (+)- pinoresinol, and not the (-)-antipode, into (-)-secoisolariciresinol. Stereoselective syntheis of(+)-pinoresinol from E-coniferyl alcohol is, however, catalysed by an insoluble enzyme preparation in F. suspensa, obtained following removal of readily soluble and ionically bound enzymes; no exogenously supplied cofactors were required other than oxygen, although the reaction was stimulated by NAD-malate addition. Thus, the overall biochemical pathway to enantiomerically pure (-)-secoisolariciresinol has been delineated.

  2. Brain positron emission tomography in splenectomized adults with β-thalassemia intermedia: uncovering yet another covert abnormality.

    PubMed

    Musallam, Khaled M; Nasreddine, Wassim; Beydoun, Ahmad; Hourani, Roula; Hankir, Ahmed; Koussa, Suzanne; Haidar, Mohamad; Taher, Ali T

    2012-02-01

    Covert brain infarction is an emerging concern in patients with β-thalassemia intermedia (TI). We have recently observed a high prevalence (60%) of silent brain infarction on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 30 splenectomized adults with TI. In this work, we further evaluate cerebral involvement in the same 30 patients using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scanning. The median age was 32 years (range, 18-54 years) with a male to female ratio of 13:17. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had evidence of decreased neuronal function on PET-CT. Involvement was mostly left sided, multiple, and most commonly in the temporal and parietal lobes. Elevated liver iron concentration, beyond 15 mg Fe/g dry weight, characterized patients with decreased neuronal function. The concordance rate between brain MRI and PET-CT for the detection of brain abnormality was only 36.7% (Kappa 0.056, P = 0.757), highlighting that both modalities reveal different types of brain pathology. Decreased neuronal function is a common finding in patients with TI and is associated with iron overload. Moreover, the addition of PET-CT to MRI identifies a greater proportion of TI patients with silent neuroimaging abnormalities.

  3. An extraordinary accumulation of (-)-pinoresinol in cell-free extracts of Forsythia intermedia: evidence for enantiospecific reduction of (+)-pinoresinol.

    PubMed

    Katayama, T; Davin, L B; Lewis, N G

    1992-11-01

    Stereoselective and enantiospecific transformation mechanisms in lignan biogenesis are only now yielding to scientific inquiry: it has been shown that soluble cell-free preparations from Forsythia intermedia catalyse the formation of the enantiomerically pure lignan, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, when incubated with coniferyl alcohol in the presence of NAD(P)H and H2O2. Surprisingly, (-)-pinoresinol also accumulates in this soluble cell-free assay mixture in > 96% enantiomeric excess, even though it is not the naturally occurring antipode present in Forsythia sp. But these soluble cell-free preparations do not engender stereoselective coupling; instead, racemic pinoresinols are first formed, catalysed by an H2O2-dependent peroxidase reaction. An enantiospecific NAD(P)H reductase then converts (+)-pinoresinol, and not the (-)-antipode, into (-)-secoisolariciresinol. Stereoselective synthesis [correction of syntheis] of (+)-pinoresinol from E-coniferyl alcohol is, however, catalysed by an insoluble enzyme preparation in F. suspensa, obtained following removal of readily soluble and ionically bound enzymes; no exogenously supplied cofactors were required other than oxygen, although the reaction was stimulated by NAD-malate addition. Thus, the overall biochemical pathway to enantiomerically pure (-)-secoisolariciresinol has been delineated.

  4. A protein-repellent and antibacterial nanocomposite for Class-V restorations to inhibit periodontitis-related pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Xie, Xianju; Imazato, Satoshi; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a bioactive dental composite and investigate the effects of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) in Class V composite on mechanical properties, water sorption, protein adsorption, and inhibition of four species of periodontitis-related biofilms for the first time. The resin consisted of ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA) and pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM). DMAHDM, MPC and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) were incorporated into the resin. Four species (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Fusobacterium nucleatum) were tested for biofilm colony-forming units (CFU), live/dead, metabolic activity, and polysaccharide production. The results showed that adding DMAHDM and MPC to the composite did not compromise the mechanical properties (p>0.1), with acceptable water sorption values. Composite with 3% MPC reduced protein adsorption to 1/9 that of a commercial composite (p<0.05). For all four species, the composite with 3% DMAHDM+3% MPC had much greater reduction in biofilms than using DMAHDM or MPC alone (p<0.05). Biofilm CFU was reduced by about 4 orders of magnitude via 3% DMAHDM+3% MPC, compared to control. The inhibition efficacy for the four species was: P. gingivalis>P intermedia=A. actinomycetemcomitans>F. nucleatum. In conclusion, a novel bioactive composite with 3% DMAHDM and 3% MPC achieved the greatest reduction in biofilm growth, metabolic activity and polysaccharide of four periodontal pathogens. The new composite is promising for Class V restorations especially with subgingival margins to inhibit periodontal pathogens, combat periodontitis and protect the periodontium.

  5. A protein-repellent and antibacterial nanocomposite for Class-V restorations to inhibit periodontitis-related pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Xie, Xianju; Imazato, Satoshi; Weir, Michael D; Reynolds, Mark A; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a bioactive dental composite and investigate the effects of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) in Class V composite on mechanical properties, water sorption, protein adsorption, and inhibition of four species of periodontitis-related biofilms for the first time. The resin consisted of ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (EBPADMA) and pyromellitic glycerol dimethacrylate (PMGDM). DMAHDM, MPC and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) were incorporated into the resin. Four species (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Fusobacterium nucleatum) were tested for biofilm colony-forming units (CFU), live/dead, metabolic activity, and polysaccharide production. The results showed that adding DMAHDM and MPC to the composite did not compromise the mechanical properties (p>0.1), with acceptable water sorption values. Composite with 3% MPC reduced protein adsorption to 1/9 that of a commercial composite (p<0.05). For all four species, the composite with 3% DMAHDM+3% MPC had much greater reduction in biofilms than using DMAHDM or MPC alone (p<0.05). Biofilm CFU was reduced by about 4 orders of magnitude via 3% DMAHDM+3% MPC, compared to control. The inhibition efficacy for the four species was: P. gingivalis>P intermedia=A. actinomycetemcomitans>F. nucleatum. In conclusion, a novel bioactive composite with 3% DMAHDM and 3% MPC achieved the greatest reduction in biofilm growth, metabolic activity and polysaccharide of four periodontal pathogens. The new composite is promising for Class V restorations especially with subgingival margins to inhibit periodontal pathogens, combat periodontitis and protect the periodontium. PMID:27287170

  6. A cost-effectiveness analysis of identifying Fusobacterium necrophorum in throat swabs followed by antibiotic treatment to reduce the incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and peritonsillar abscesses.

    PubMed

    Bank, S; Christensen, K; Kristensen, L H; Prag, J

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to estimate the cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) saved by identifying Fusobacterium necrophorum in throat swabs followed by proper antibiotic treatment, to reduce the incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and peritonsillar abscesses (PTA) originating from a pharyngitis. The second purpose was to estimate the population size required to indicate that antibiotic treatment has an effect. Data from publications and our laboratory were collected. Monte Carlo simulation and one-way sensitivity analysis were used to analyse cost-effectiveness. The cost-effectiveness analysis shows that examining throat swabs from 15- to 24-year-olds for F. necrophorum followed by antibiotic treatment will probably be less costly than most other life-saving medical interventions, with a median cost of US$8,795 per QALY saved. To indicate a reduced incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and PTA in Denmark, the intervention probably has to be followed for up to 5 years. Identifying F. necrophorum in throat swabs from 15- to 24-year-olds followed by proper antibiotic treatment only requires a reduction of 20-25 % in the incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and PTA to be cost-effective. This study warrants further examination of the effect of antibiotic treatment on the outcome of F. necrophorum acute and recurrent pharyngitis, as well as the effect on Lemierre's syndrome and PTA.

  7. Circumpolar diversity and geographic differentiation of mtDNA in the critically endangered Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia).

    PubMed

    Sremba, Angela L; Hancock-Hanser, Brittany; Branch, Trevor A; LeDuc, Rick L; Baker, C Scott

    2012-01-01

    The Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia) was hunted to near extinction between 1904 and 1972, declining from an estimated initial abundance of more than 250,000 to fewer than 400. Here, we describe mtDNA control region diversity and geographic differentiation in the surviving population of the Antarctic blue whale, using 218 biopsy samples collected under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) during research cruises from 1990-2009. Microsatellite genotypes and mtDNA sequences identified 166 individuals among the 218 samples and documented movement of a small number of individuals, including a female that traveled at least 6,650 km or 131° longitude over four years. mtDNA sequences from the 166 individuals were aligned with published sequences from 17 additional individuals, resolving 52 unique haplotypes from a consensus length of 410 bp. From this minimum census, a rarefaction analysis predicted that only 72 haplotypes (95% CL, 64, 86) have survived in the contemporary population of Antarctic blue whales. However, haplotype diversity was relatively high (0.968±0.004), perhaps as a result of the longevity of blue whales and the relatively recent timing of the bottleneck. Despite the potential for circumpolar dispersal, we found significant differentiation in mtDNA diversity (F(ST) = 0.032, p<0.005) and microsatellite alleles (F(ST) = 0.005, p<0.05) among the six Antarctic Areas historically used by the IWC for management of blue whales. PMID:22412889

  8. Identification, cloning, expression and functional characterization of an astacin-like metalloprotease toxin from Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Rafael B; Wille, Ana C M; Chaim, Olga M; Appel, Marcia H; Silva, Dilza T; Franco, Célia R C; Toma, Leny; Mangili, Oldemir C; Gremski, Waldemiro; Dietrich, Carl P; Nader, Helena B; Veiga, Silvio S

    2007-09-01

    Injuries caused by brown spiders (Loxosceles genus) are associated with dermonecrotic lesions with gravitational spreading and systemic manifestations. The venom has a complex composition containing many different toxins, of which metalloproteases have been described in many different species of this genus. These toxins may degrade extracellular matrix constituents acting as a spreading factor. By using a cDNA library from an Loxosceles intermedia venom gland, we cloned and expressed a 900 bp cDNA, which encoded a signal peptide and a propeptide, which corresponded to a 30 kDa metalloprotease, now named LALP (Loxosceles astacin-like protease). Recombinant LALP was refolded and used to produce a polyclonal antiserum, which showed cross-reactivity with a 29 kDa native venom protein. CD analysis provided evidence that the recombinant LALP toxin was folded correctly, was still in a native conformation and had not aggregated. LALP addition to endothelial cell cultures resulted in de-adhesion of the cells, and also in the degradation of fibronectin and fibrinogen (this could be inhibited by the presence of the bivalent chelator 1,10-phenanthroline) and of gelatin in vitro. Sequence comparison (nucleotide and deduced amino acid), phylogenetic analysis and analysis of the functional recombinant toxin revealed that LALP is related in both structure and function to the astacin family of metalloproteases. This suggests that an astacin-like toxin is present in a animal venom secretion and indicates that recombinant LALP will be a useful tool for future structural and functional studies on venom and the astacin family.

  9. Circumpolar diversity and geographic differentiation of mtDNA in the critically endangered Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia).

    PubMed

    Sremba, Angela L; Hancock-Hanser, Brittany; Branch, Trevor A; LeDuc, Rick L; Baker, C Scott

    2012-01-01

    The Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia) was hunted to near extinction between 1904 and 1972, declining from an estimated initial abundance of more than 250,000 to fewer than 400. Here, we describe mtDNA control region diversity and geographic differentiation in the surviving population of the Antarctic blue whale, using 218 biopsy samples collected under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) during research cruises from 1990-2009. Microsatellite genotypes and mtDNA sequences identified 166 individuals among the 218 samples and documented movement of a small number of individuals, including a female that traveled at least 6,650 km or 131° longitude over four years. mtDNA sequences from the 166 individuals were aligned with published sequences from 17 additional individuals, resolving 52 unique haplotypes from a consensus length of 410 bp. From this minimum census, a rarefaction analysis predicted that only 72 haplotypes (95% CL, 64, 86) have survived in the contemporary population of Antarctic blue whales. However, haplotype diversity was relatively high (0.968±0.004), perhaps as a result of the longevity of blue whales and the relatively recent timing of the bottleneck. Despite the potential for circumpolar dispersal, we found significant differentiation in mtDNA diversity (F(ST) = 0.032, p<0.005) and microsatellite alleles (F(ST) = 0.005, p<0.05) among the six Antarctic Areas historically used by the IWC for management of blue whales.

  10. The complete genome sequencing of Prevotella intermedia strain OMA14 and a subsequent fine-scale, intra-species genomic comparison reveal an unusual amplification of conjugative and mobile transposons and identify a novel Prevotella-lineage-specific repeat

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Mariko; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Itoh, Takehiko; Shoji, Mikio; Okamoto, Masaaki; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Nakayama, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a pathogenic bacterium involved in periodontal diseases. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a clinical strain, OMA14, of this bacterium along with the results of comparative genome analysis with strain 17 of the same species whose genome has also been sequenced, but not fully analysed yet. The genomes of both strains consist of two circular chromosomes: the larger chromosomes are similar in size and exhibit a high overall linearity of gene organizations, whereas the smaller chromosomes show a significant size variation and have undergone remarkable genome rearrangements. Unique features of the Pre. intermedia genomes are the presence of a remarkable number of essential genes on the second chromosomes and the abundance of conjugative and mobilizable transposons (CTns and MTns). The CTns/MTns are particularly abundant in the second chromosomes, involved in its extensive genome rearrangement, and have introduced a number of strain-specific genes into each strain. We also found a novel 188-bp repeat sequence that has been highly amplified in Pre. intermedia and are specifically distributed among the Pre. intermedia-related species. These findings expand our understanding of the genetic features of Pre. intermedia and the roles of CTns and MTns in the evolution of bacteria. PMID:26645327

  11. The complete genome sequencing of Prevotella intermedia strain OMA14 and a subsequent fine-scale, intra-species genomic comparison reveal an unusual amplification of conjugative and mobile transposons and identify a novel Prevotella-lineage-specific repeat.

    PubMed

    Naito, Mariko; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Itoh, Takehiko; Shoji, Mikio; Okamoto, Masaaki; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Nakayama, Koji

    2016-02-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a pathogenic bacterium involved in periodontal diseases. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a clinical strain, OMA14, of this bacterium along with the results of comparative genome analysis with strain 17 of the same species whose genome has also been sequenced, but not fully analysed yet. The genomes of both strains consist of two circular chromosomes: the larger chromosomes are similar in size and exhibit a high overall linearity of gene organizations, whereas the smaller chromosomes show a significant size variation and have undergone remarkable genome rearrangements. Unique features of the Pre. intermedia genomes are the presence of a remarkable number of essential genes on the second chromosomes and the abundance of conjugative and mobilizable transposons (CTns and MTns). The CTns/MTns are particularly abundant in the second chromosomes, involved in its extensive genome rearrangement, and have introduced a number of strain-specific genes into each strain. We also found a novel 188-bp repeat sequence that has been highly amplified in Pre. intermedia and are specifically distributed among the Pre. intermedia-related species. These findings expand our understanding of the genetic features of Pre. intermedia and the roles of CTns and MTns in the evolution of bacteria.

  12. Expression and immunological cross-reactivity of LALP3, a novel astacin-like metalloprotease from brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia) venom.

    PubMed

    Morgon, Adriano M; Belisario-Ferrari, Matheus R; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Meissner, Gabriel O; Vuitika, Larissa; Marin, Brenda; Tashima, Alexandre K; Gremski, Luiza H; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Veiga, Silvio S; Chaim, Olga M

    2016-01-01

    Loxosceles spiders' venom comprises a complex mixture of biologically active toxins, mostly consisting of low molecular mass components (2-40 kDa). Amongst, isoforms of astacin-like metalloproteases were identified through transcriptome and proteome analyses. Only LALP1 (Loxosceles Astacin-Like protease 1) has been characterized. Herein, we characterized LALP3 as a novel recombinant astacin-like metalloprotease isoform from Loxosceles intermedia venom. LALP3 cDNA was cloned in pET-SUMO vector, and its soluble heterologous expression was performed using a SUMO tag added to LALP3 to achieve solubility in Escherichia coli SHuffle T7 Express LysY cells, which express the disulfide bond isomerase DsbC. Protein purification was conducted by Ni-NTA Agarose resin and assayed for purity by SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. Immunoblotting analyses were performed with specific antibodies recognizing LALP1 and whole venom. Western blotting showed linear epitopes from recombinant LALP3 that cross-reacted with LALP1, and dot blotting revealed conformational epitopes with native venom astacins. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the recombinant expressed protein is an astacin-like metalloprotease from L. intermedia venom. Furthermore, molecular modeling of LALP3 revealed that this isoform contains the zinc binding and Met-turn motifs, forming the active site, as has been observed in astacins. These data confirmed that LALP3, which was successfully obtained by heterologous expression using a prokaryote system, is a new astacin-like metalloprotease isoform present in L. intermedia venom. PMID:27343628

  13. Detection and genetic characterization of β-lactamases in Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens isolated from oral cavity infections and peritonsillar abscesses.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Canigia, Liliana; Cejas, Daniela; Gutkind, Gabriel; Radice, Marcela

    2015-06-01

    A prospective analysis on β-lactam resistance mechanisms and β-lactamase prevalence was conducted on Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens recovered from patients with chronic periodontitis and peritonsillar abscesses. Both phenotypic and genotypic methods were performed to characterize the β-lactamases, their coding genes and their genetic contexts. Overall, β-lactamase production was observed in 64% (16/25) P. intermedia and 23.8% (5/21) P. nigrescens (p < 0.01). Besides higher β-lactamase production rates were observed in P. intermedia (8/16) than in P. nigrescens (2/16) recovered from chronic periodontitis, almost all isolates from peritonsillar abscesses were producers (8/9 and 3/3, respectively). cfxA, but not cepA and cblA, was detected in those isolates, which were previously categorized as β-lactamase producers. CfxA producing isolates displayed higher β-lactam MICs than non-producers in both species. The most frequent allele was cfxA2, followed by cfxA3 and a new allelic variant named cfxA6. The analysis of the downstream flanking region in the three cfxA variants revealed the association with mobA of Tn4555, suggesting their localization in a mobilizable element. β-lactam resistance and cfxA carriage prevalence seems to be not only related to the bacterial species but also to the infection site.

  14. Expression and immunological cross-reactivity of LALP3, a novel astacin-like metalloprotease from brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia) venom.

    PubMed

    Morgon, Adriano M; Belisario-Ferrari, Matheus R; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Meissner, Gabriel O; Vuitika, Larissa; Marin, Brenda; Tashima, Alexandre K; Gremski, Luiza H; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Veiga, Silvio S; Chaim, Olga M

    2016-01-01

    Loxosceles spiders' venom comprises a complex mixture of biologically active toxins, mostly consisting of low molecular mass components (2-40 kDa). Amongst, isoforms of astacin-like metalloproteases were identified through transcriptome and proteome analyses. Only LALP1 (Loxosceles Astacin-Like protease 1) has been characterized. Herein, we characterized LALP3 as a novel recombinant astacin-like metalloprotease isoform from Loxosceles intermedia venom. LALP3 cDNA was cloned in pET-SUMO vector, and its soluble heterologous expression was performed using a SUMO tag added to LALP3 to achieve solubility in Escherichia coli SHuffle T7 Express LysY cells, which express the disulfide bond isomerase DsbC. Protein purification was conducted by Ni-NTA Agarose resin and assayed for purity by SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. Immunoblotting analyses were performed with specific antibodies recognizing LALP1 and whole venom. Western blotting showed linear epitopes from recombinant LALP3 that cross-reacted with LALP1, and dot blotting revealed conformational epitopes with native venom astacins. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the recombinant expressed protein is an astacin-like metalloprotease from L. intermedia venom. Furthermore, molecular modeling of LALP3 revealed that this isoform contains the zinc binding and Met-turn motifs, forming the active site, as has been observed in astacins. These data confirmed that LALP3, which was successfully obtained by heterologous expression using a prokaryote system, is a new astacin-like metalloprotease isoform present in L. intermedia venom.

  15. New bacteriophage typing system for Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia kristensenii, Yersinia frederiksenii, and Yersinia intermedia: correlation with serotyping, biotyping, and antibiotic susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, P M; Farmer, J J

    1982-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is listed as a single species in Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, but has recently been split into "true" Y. enterocolitica, Y. kristensenii, Y. intermedia, and Y. frederiksenii. From 48 bacteriophages isolated from raw sewage, 24 were chosen as being the most useful for differentiating strains within the four Yersinia species. The composite set of 24 phages typed 92% of 236 Y. enterocolitica strains, 100% of 16 Y. kristensenii strains, 97% of 29 Y. frederiksenii strains, and 90% of 20 Y. intermedia strains. The most common phage type in any of the groups contained 22% of the strains tested, but most of the phage types contained greater than 5% of the strains. The new typing schema was tested in three outbreaks of Y. enterocolitica, and the results agreed well with serotyping and epidemiological findings. In the same outbreaks, biotyping (API 20E profiles; Analytab Products, Plainview, N.Y.) and antibiograms were less reliable markers and probably should be used only in conjunction with serotyping or phage typing or both. Caution should be used in identifying cultures of Y. frederiksenii and Y. intermedia with the API 20E system, since the tests at 37 degrees C for L-rhamnose and melibiose fermentation are often delayed past 24 h, which is the cut-off point for the final reading in the API system. There were distinct differences in the susceptibilities of Y. enterocolitica and Y. kristensenii to ampicillin, carbenicillin, and cephalothin, which adds further support for classifying the latter as a separate species. Images PMID:7076822

  16. Anti-loxoscelic horse serum produced against a recombinant dermonecrotic protein of Brazilian Loxosceles intermedia spider neutralize lethal effects of Loxosceles laeta venom from Peru.

    PubMed

    Duarte, C G; Bonilla, C; Guimarães, G; Machado de Avila, R A; Mendes, T M; Silva, W; Tintaya, B; Yarleque, A; Chávez-Olórtegui, C

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an anti-loxoscelic serum was produced by immunizing horses with a recombinant dermonecrotic protein from Loxosceles intermedia (rLiD1). Anti-rLiD1 antibodies were able to recognize different species of Loxosceles venoms by Western Blot and ELISA. The efficacy of anti-rLiD1 serum against the toxic effects of Loxosceles laeta (Peru) venom was tested, showing that anti-rLiD1 serum can neutralize those effects. This study confirms that recombinant proteins can be good candidates to replace crude venoms for antivenom production.

  17. Hb Filottrano [codon 120 (-A)]: a novel frameshift mutation in exon 3 of the β-globin gene causing dominantly inherited β-thalassemia intermedia.

    PubMed

    Amato, Antonio; Cappabianca, Maria Pia; Perri, Maria; Zaghis, Ivo; Mastropietro, Fabrizio; Ponzini, Donatella; Di Biagio, Paola; Piscitelli, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    We report a novel frameshift mutation in exon 3 of the β-globin gene, that, in the heterozygous state, leads to a β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI) phenotype (marked anemia, splenomegaly, hyperbilirubinemia, jaundice, unbalanced synthesis of α/non-α chains in a 34-year-old Italian woman. This frameshift mutation, due to the deletion of the first nucleotide (-A) at codon 120, results in a β-globin chain that is elongated to 156 amino acid residues. These highly unstable abnormal chains precipitate in the erythroblasts as inclusion bodies, thus causing inefficient erythropoiesis and ultimately resulting in the observed dominant clinical phenotype.

  18. Subcutaneous Immunization with Inactivated Bacterial Components and Purified Protein of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes Prevents Puerperal Metritis in Holstein Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Vinícius Silva; Bicalho, Marcela Luccas de Souza; Meira Junior, Enoch Brandão de Souza; Rossi, Rodolfo; Ribeiro, Bruno Leonardo; Lima, Svetlana; Santos, Thiago; Kussler, Arieli; Foditsch, Carla; Ganda, Erika Korzune; Oikonomou, Georgios; Cheong, Soon Hon; Gilbert, Robert Owen; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the efficacy of five vaccine formulations containing different combinations of proteins (FimH; leukotoxin, LKT; and pyolysin, PLO) and/or inactivated whole cells (Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum, and Trueperella pyogenes) in preventing postpartum uterine diseases. Inactivated whole cells were produced using two genetically distinct strains of each bacterial species (E. coli, F. necrophorum, and T. pyogenes). FimH and PLO subunits were produced using recombinant protein expression, and LKT was recovered from culturing a wild F. necrophorum strain. Three subcutaneous vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 1 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; Vaccine 2 was composed of proteins only; and Vaccine 3 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells only. Two intravaginal vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 4 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; and Vaccine 5 was composed of PLO and LKT. To evaluate vaccine efficacy, a randomized clinical trial was conducted at a commercial dairy farm; 371 spring heifers were allocated randomly into one of six different treatments groups: control, Vaccine 1, Vaccine 2, Vaccine 3, Vaccine 4 and Vaccine 5. Late pregnant heifers assigned to one of the vaccine groups were each vaccinated twice: at 230 and 260 days of pregnancy. When vaccines were evaluated grouped as subcutaneous and intravaginal, the subcutaneous ones were found to significantly reduce the incidence of puerperal metritis. Additionally, subcutaneous vaccination significantly reduced rectal temperature at 6±1 days in milk. Reproduction was improved for cows that received subcutaneous vaccines. In general, vaccination induced a significant increase in serum IgG titers against all antigens, with subcutaneous vaccination again being more effective. In conclusion, subcutaneous vaccination with inactivated bacterial components and/or protein subunits of E. coli, F. necrophorum and T. pyogenes

  19. High-level association of bovine digital dermatitis Treponema spp. with contagious ovine digital dermatitis lesions and presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Dichelobacter nodosus.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, L E; Clegg, S R; Angell, J W; Newbrook, K; Blowey, R W; Carter, S D; Bell, J; Duncan, J S; Grove-White, D H; Murray, R D; Evans, N J

    2015-05-01

    Contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD) is an important foot disease in sheep, with significant animal welfare and economic implications. It is thought that CODD emerged from bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) via treponemal bacteria. With wildlife species such as elk now suffering a CODD-like disease, it is imperative to clarify these disease etiologies. A large investigation into treponemal association with CODD is warranted. CODD lesions (n = 58) and healthy sheep foot tissues (n = 56) were analyzed by PCR for the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups and two other lameness-associated bacteria, Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum. Spirochete culture was also attempted on CODD lesions. "Treponema medium/Treponema vincentii-like," "Treponema phagedenis-like," and Treponema pedis spirochetes were identified in 39/58 (67%), 49/58 (85%), and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions, respectively. One or more BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups were detected in 100% of CODD lesions. Healthy foot tissues did not amplify BDD-associated Treponema phylogroup DNA. D. nodosus and F. necrophorum were present in 34/58 (59%) and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions and 22/56 (39%) and 5/56 (9%) of healthy foot tissues, respectively. Thirty-two spirochetes were isolated from CODD lesions, with representatives clustering with, and indistinguishable from, each of the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups based on 16S rRNA gene comparisons. This study for the first time demonstrates a high-level association for BDD treponeme phylogroups in CODD and their absence from healthy tissues, supporting the hypothesis that BDD treponemes play a primary causative role in CODD and confirming that the specific PCR assays are an effective differential diagnostic tool for CODD.

  20. The effects of iron limitation and cell density on prokaryotic metabolism and gene expression: Excerpts from Fusobacterium necrophorum strain 774 (sheep isolate).

    PubMed

    Antiabong, John F; Ball, Andrew S; Brown, Melissa H

    2015-05-25

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a Gram-negative obligate anaerobe associated with several diseases in humans and animals. Despite its increasing clinical significance, there is little or no data on the relationship between its metabolism and virulence. Previous studies have shown that bacteria grown under iron-limitation express immunogenic antigens similar to those generated in vivo. Thus, this paper describes the relationship between F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum (Fnn) metabolism and the expression of the encoded putative virulence factors under iron-restricted conditions. At the midlog phase, iron limitation reduced Fnn growth but the cell density was dependent on the size of the inoculum. Preferential utilization of glucose-1-phosphate, d-mannitol and l-phenylalanine; production of 2-hydroxycaproic acid and termination of dimethyl sulphide production were major Fnn response-factors to iron limitation. Ultimately, iron restriction resulted in an increased ability of Fnn to metabolize diverse carbon sources and in the expression of stress-specific virulence factors. Iron starvation in low Fnn cell density was associated with the up-regulation of haemagglutinin (HA) and leukotoxin (lktA) genes (2.49 and 3.72 fold change respectively). However, Fnn encoded Haemolysin (Hly), yebN homologue (febN) and tonB homologue, were down-regulated (0.15, 0.79 and 0.33, fold changes respectively). Interestingly, cell density appeared to play a regulatory role in the final bacteria cell biomass, induction of a metabolic gene expression and the expression pattern virulence factors in Fnn suggesting the role of a cell density-associated regulatory factor. This report suggest that future studies on differential expression of bacterial genes under altered environmental condition(s) should consider testing the effect of cell concentrations as this is often neglected in such studies. In conclusion, iron restriction induces preferential utilization of carbon sources and altered

  1. High-Level Association of Bovine Digital Dermatitis Treponema spp. with Contagious Ovine Digital Dermatitis Lesions and Presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Dichelobacter nodosus

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, S. R.; Angell, J. W.; Newbrook, K.; Blowey, R. W.; Carter, S. D.; Bell, J.; Duncan, J. S.; Grove-White, D. H.; Murray, R. D.; Evans, N. J.

    2015-01-01

    Contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD) is an important foot disease in sheep, with significant animal welfare and economic implications. It is thought that CODD emerged from bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) via treponemal bacteria. With wildlife species such as elk now suffering a CODD-like disease, it is imperative to clarify these disease etiologies. A large investigation into treponemal association with CODD is warranted. CODD lesions (n = 58) and healthy sheep foot tissues (n = 56) were analyzed by PCR for the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups and two other lameness-associated bacteria, Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum. Spirochete culture was also attempted on CODD lesions. “Treponema medium/Treponema vincentii-like,” “Treponema phagedenis-like,” and Treponema pedis spirochetes were identified in 39/58 (67%), 49/58 (85%), and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions, respectively. One or more BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups were detected in 100% of CODD lesions. Healthy foot tissues did not amplify BDD-associated Treponema phylogroup DNA. D. nodosus and F. necrophorum were present in 34/58 (59%) and 41/58 (71%) of CODD lesions and 22/56 (39%) and 5/56 (9%) of healthy foot tissues, respectively. Thirty-two spirochetes were isolated from CODD lesions, with representatives clustering with, and indistinguishable from, each of the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups based on 16S rRNA gene comparisons. This study for the first time demonstrates a high-level association for BDD treponeme phylogroups in CODD and their absence from healthy tissues, supporting the hypothesis that BDD treponemes play a primary causative role in CODD and confirming that the specific PCR assays are an effective differential diagnostic tool for CODD. PMID:25740778

  2. Interleukin 10–Dominant Immune Response and Increased Risk of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis After Natural Exposure to Lutzomyia intermedia Sand Flies

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Augusto M.; Cristal, Juqueline R.; Muniz, Aline C.; Carvalho, Lucas P.; Gomes, Regis; Miranda, José C.; Barral, Aldina; Carvalho, Edgar M.; de Oliveira, Camila I.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Leishmaniasis is caused by parasites transmitted to the vertebrate host by infected sand flies. During transmission, the vertebrate host is also inoculated with sand fly saliva, which exerts powerful immunomodulatory effects on the host's immune response. Methods. We conducted a prospective cohort analysis to characterize the human immune response to Lutzomyia intermedia saliva in 264 individuals, from an area for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) caused by Leishmania braziliensis. Results. Antibodies were found in 150 individuals (56.8%); immunoglobulin G1 and G4 were the predominant subclasses. Recall responses to salivary gland sonicate showed elevated production of interleukin 10 (IL-10), interleukin 13, interferon γ, CXCL9, and CCL2 compared with controls. CD4+CD25+ T cells, including Foxp3+ cells, were the main source of IL-10. L. braziliensis replication was increased (P < .05) in macrophages cocultured with saliva-stimulated lymphocytes from exposed individuals and addition of anti–IL-10 reverted this effect. Positive correlation between antibody response to saliva and cellular response to Leishmania was not found. Importantly, individuals seropositive to saliva are 2.1 times more likely to develop CL (relative risk, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–4.2; P < .05). Conclusions. Exposure to L. intermedia sand flies skews the human immune response, facilitating L. braziliensis survival in vitro, and increases the risk of developing CL. PMID:25596303

  3. Molecular cloning, heterologous expression and functional characterization of a novel translationally-controlled tumor protein (TCTP) family member from Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom.

    PubMed

    Sade, Youssef B; Bóia-Ferreira, Marianna; Gremski, Luiza H; da Silveira, Rafael B; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Chaim, Olga M; Veiga, Silvio S

    2012-01-01

    Envenoming with brown spiders (Loxosceles genus) is common throughout the world. Cutaneous symptoms following spider bite accidents include dermonecrosis, erythema, itching and pain. In some cases, accidents can cause hypersensibility or even allergic reactions. These responses could be associated with histaminergic events, such as an increase in vascular permeability and vasodilatation. A protein that may be related to the effects of spider venom was identified from a previously obtained cDNA library of the L. intermedia venom gland. The amino acid sequence of this protein is homologous to proteins from the TCTP (translationally-controlled tumor protein) family, which are extracellular histamine-releasing factors (HRF) that are associated with the allergic reactions to parasites. Herein, we described the cloning, heterologous expression, purification and functional characterization of a novel member of the TCTP family from the Loxosceles intermedia venom gland. This recombinant protein, named LiRecTCTP, causes edema, enhances vascular permeability and is likely related to the inflammatory activity of the venom. Moreover, LiRecTCTP presents an immunological relationship with mammalian TCTPs.

  4. Pattern of inflammatory response to Loxosceles intermedia venom in distinct mouse strains: a key element to understand skin lesions and dermonecrosis by poisoning.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, M F; Oliveira, F L; Monteiro-Machado, M; Cardoso, P F; Guilarducci-Ferraz, V V C; Melo, P A; Souza, C M V; Calil-Elias, S

    2015-03-01

    Envenomation caused by spiders Loxosceles induce intense dermonecrosis at the bite site and systemic disease. In this work we described the hyaluronidase and collagenase activities in vitro of the Loxosceles intermedia venom, but no phospholipase A2 activity. In vivo, we evaluated the effect of L. intermedia venom used different strain of mice, C57BL/6, BALB/c and Swiss. All mice developed paw edema after venom injection, persistent for 24 h in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Histopathological analysis of the skin after venom injection revealed vascular congestion in Swiss mice and an inflammatory reaction in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. The mobilization of inflammatory cells from bone marrow, spleen and blood was investigated. Typical innate immune response with mobilization of myeloid cells and cytotoxic CD8 T lymphocytes was observed in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, typical acquired/humoral immune response was observed in BALB/c mice, with preferential involvement of conventional B lymphocytes and CD4 T helper cells. The skin inflammation associated to mobilization of inflammatory cells indicated that mice models are strongly recommended to investigate specific cell types involved with immune response to the envenomation and mechanisms to inhibit skin lesions.

  5. Molecular cloning, heterologous expression and functional characterization of a novel translationally-controlled tumor protein (TCTP) family member from Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom.

    PubMed

    Sade, Youssef B; Bóia-Ferreira, Marianna; Gremski, Luiza H; da Silveira, Rafael B; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Chaim, Olga M; Veiga, Silvio S

    2012-01-01

    Envenoming with brown spiders (Loxosceles genus) is common throughout the world. Cutaneous symptoms following spider bite accidents include dermonecrosis, erythema, itching and pain. In some cases, accidents can cause hypersensibility or even allergic reactions. These responses could be associated with histaminergic events, such as an increase in vascular permeability and vasodilatation. A protein that may be related to the effects of spider venom was identified from a previously obtained cDNA library of the L. intermedia venom gland. The amino acid sequence of this protein is homologous to proteins from the TCTP (translationally-controlled tumor protein) family, which are extracellular histamine-releasing factors (HRF) that are associated with the allergic reactions to parasites. Herein, we described the cloning, heterologous expression, purification and functional characterization of a novel member of the TCTP family from the Loxosceles intermedia venom gland. This recombinant protein, named LiRecTCTP, causes edema, enhances vascular permeability and is likely related to the inflammatory activity of the venom. Moreover, LiRecTCTP presents an immunological relationship with mammalian TCTPs. PMID:22051631

  6. Speciation history and widespread introgression in the European short-call tree frogs (Hyla arborea sensu lato, H. intermedia and H. sarda).

    PubMed

    Gvoždík, Václav; Canestrelli, Daniele; García-París, Mario; Moravec, Jiří; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Recuero, Ernesto; Teixeira, José; Kotlík, Petr

    2015-02-01

    European tree frogs (Hyla) characterized by short temporal parameters of the advertisement call form six genetically differentiated but morphologically cryptic taxa, H. arborea sensu stricto, H. orientalis and H. molleri from across Europe to western Asia (together referred to as H. arborea sensu lato), two putative taxa within H. intermedia (Northern and Southern) from the Italian Peninsula and Sicily, and H. sarda from Sardinia and Corsica. Here, we assess species limits and phylogenetic relationships within these 'short-call tree frogs' based on mitochondrial DNA and nuclear protein-coding markers. The mitochondrial and nuclear genes show partly incongruent phylogeographic patterns, which point to a complex history of gene flow across taxa, particularly in the Balkans. To test the species limits in the short-call tree frogs and to infer the species tree, we used coalescent-based approaches. The monophyly of H. arborea sensu lato is supported by the mtDNA as well as by the all-gene species tree. The Northern and Southern lineages of H. intermedia have been connected by nuclear gene flow (despite their deep mtDNA divergence) and should be treated as conspecific. On the contrary, the parapatric taxa within H. arborea sensu lato should be considered distinct species (H. arborea, H. orientalis, H. molleri) based on the coalescent analysis, although signs of hybridization were detected between them (H. arborea×H. orientalis; H. arborea×H. molleri). A mitochondrial capture upon secondary contact appears to explain the close mtDNA relationship between the geographically remote Iberian H. molleri and H. orientalis from around the Black Sea. Introgressive hybridization occurred also between the Balkan H. arborea and northern Italian H. intermedia, and between the Minor Asiatic H. orientalis and Arabian H. felix arabica (the latter belonging to a different acoustic group/clade). Our results shed light on the species limits in the European short-call tree frogs and show

  7. A longitudinal study of the role of Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum load in initiation and severity of footrot in sheep.

    PubMed

    Witcomb, Luci A; Green, Laura E; Kaler, Jasmeet; Ul-Hassan, Atiya; Calvo-Bado, Leo A; Medley, Graham F; Grogono-Thomas, Rose; Wellington, Elizabeth M H

    2014-07-01

    Footrot is an infectious bacterial disease of sheep that causes lameness. The causal agent is Dichelobacter nodosus. There is debate regarding the role of Fusobacterium necrophorum in disease initiation. This research used an observational longitudinal study of footrot, together with quantitative PCR (qPCR) of bacterial load of D. nodosus and F. necrophorum, to elucidate the roles of each species in the development of disease. All feet of 18 a priori selected sheep were monitored for five weeks assessing disease severity (healthy, interdigital dermatitis (ID) and severe footrot (SFR)) and bacterial load. A multinomial model was used to analyse these data. Key unadjusted results were that D. nodosus was detected more frequently on feet with ID, whereas F. necrophorum was detected more frequently on feet with SFR. In the multinomial model, ID was associated with increasing log10 load of D. nodosus the week of observation (OR=1.28 (95% CI=1.08-1.53)) and the week prior to development of ID (OR=1.20 (95% CI=1.01-1.42). There was no association between log10 load(2) of F. necrophorum and presence of ID (OR=0.99 (95% CI=0.96-1.02))). SFR was associated with increasing log10 load of D. nodosus the week before disease onset (OR=1.42 (95% CI=1.02-1.96)) but not once SFR had occurred. SFR was positively associated with log10 load(2) of F. necrophorum once disease was present (OR=1.06 (95% CI=1.01-1.11)). In summary, there was an increased risk of increasing D. nodosus load the week prior to development of ID and SFR and during an episode of ID. In contrast, F. necrophorum load was not associated with ID before or during an episode, and was only associated with SFR once present. These results contribute to our understanding of the epidemiology of footrot and highlight that D. nodosus load plays the primary role in disease initiation and progression, with F. necrophorum load playing a secondary role. Further studies in more flocks and climates would be useful to confirm these

  8. A novel ICK peptide from the Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom gland: cloning, heterologous expression and immunological cross-reactivity approaches.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Fernando Hitomi; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Meissner, Gabriel Otto; Constantino Lopes, Eduardo Soares; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2013-09-01

    The venom of a Loxosceles spider is composed of a complex mixture of biologically active components, consisting predominantly of low molecular mass molecules (3-45 kDa). Transcriptome analysis of the Loxosceles intermedia venom gland revealed ESTs with similarity to the previously described LiTx peptides. Sequences similar to the LiTx3 isoform were the most abundant, representing approximately 13.9% of all ESTs and 32% of the toxin-encoding messengers. These peptides are grouped in the ICK (Inhibitor Cystine Knot) family, which contains single chain molecules with low molecular mass (3-10 kDa). Due to their high number of cysteine residues, ICK peptides form intramolecular disulfide bridges. The aims of this study were to clone and express a novel ICK peptide isoform, as well as produce specific hyperimmune serum for immunoassays. The corresponding cDNA was amplified by PCR using specific primers containing restriction sites for the XhoI and BamHI enzymes; this PCR product was then ligated in the pET-14b vector and transformed into E. coli AD494 (DE3) cells. The peptide was expressed by IPTG induction for 4 h at 30 °C and purified by affinity chromatography with Ni-NTA resin. Hyperimmune serum to the recombinant peptide was produced in rabbits and was able to specifically recognize both the purified recombinant peptide and the native form present in the venom. Furthermore, the recombinant peptide was recognized by antisera raised against L. intermedia, L. gaucho and L. laeta whole venoms. The recombinant peptide obtained will enable future studies to characterize its biological activity, as well as investigations regarding possible biotechnological applications.

  9. Molecular cloning and in silico characterization of knottin peptide, U2-SCRTX-Lit2, from brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia) venom glands.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Gabriel Otto; de Resende Lara, Pedro Túlio; Scott, Luis Paulo Barbour; Braz, Antônio Sérgio Kimus; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Matsubara, Fernando Hitomi; Soares, Eduardo Mendonça; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Chaim, Olga Meiri

    2016-09-01

    Inhibitor cystine knots (ICKs) are a family of structural peptides with a large number of cysteine residues that form intramolecular disulfide bonds, resulting in a knot. These peptides are involved in a variety of biological functions including predation and defense, and are found in various species, such as spiders, scorpions, sea anemones, and plants. The Loxosceles intermedia venom gland transcriptome identified five groups of ICK peptides that represent more than 50 % of toxin-coding transcripts. Here, we describe the molecular cloning of U2-Sicaritoxin-Lit2 (U2-SCRTX-Lit2), bioinformatic characterization, structure prediction, and molecular dynamic analysis. The sequence of U2-SCRTX-Lit2 obtained from the transcriptome is similar to that of μ-Hexatoxin-Mg2, a peptide that inhibits the insect Nav channel. Bioinformatic analysis of sequences classified as ICK family members also showed a conservation of cysteine residues among ICKs from different spiders, with the three dimensional molecular model of U2-SCRTX-Lit2 similar in structure to the hexatoxin from μ-hexatoxin-Mg2a. Molecular docking experiments showed the interaction of U2-SCRTX-Lit2 to its predictable target-the Spodoptera litura voltage-gated sodium channel (SlNaVSC). After 200 ns of molecular dynamic simulation, the final structure of the complex showed stability in agreement with the experimental data. The above analysis corroborates the existence of a peptide toxin with insecticidal activity from a novel ICK family in L. intermedia venom and demonstrates that this peptide targets Nav channels.

  10. Molecular cloning and in silico characterization of knottin peptide, U2-SCRTX-Lit2, from brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia) venom glands.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Gabriel Otto; de Resende Lara, Pedro Túlio; Scott, Luis Paulo Barbour; Braz, Antônio Sérgio Kimus; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Matsubara, Fernando Hitomi; Soares, Eduardo Mendonça; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Chaim, Olga Meiri

    2016-09-01

    Inhibitor cystine knots (ICKs) are a family of structural peptides with a large number of cysteine residues that form intramolecular disulfide bonds, resulting in a knot. These peptides are involved in a variety of biological functions including predation and defense, and are found in various species, such as spiders, scorpions, sea anemones, and plants. The Loxosceles intermedia venom gland transcriptome identified five groups of ICK peptides that represent more than 50 % of toxin-coding transcripts. Here, we describe the molecular cloning of U2-Sicaritoxin-Lit2 (U2-SCRTX-Lit2), bioinformatic characterization, structure prediction, and molecular dynamic analysis. The sequence of U2-SCRTX-Lit2 obtained from the transcriptome is similar to that of μ-Hexatoxin-Mg2, a peptide that inhibits the insect Nav channel. Bioinformatic analysis of sequences classified as ICK family members also showed a conservation of cysteine residues among ICKs from different spiders, with the three dimensional molecular model of U2-SCRTX-Lit2 similar in structure to the hexatoxin from μ-hexatoxin-Mg2a. Molecular docking experiments showed the interaction of U2-SCRTX-Lit2 to its predictable target-the Spodoptera litura voltage-gated sodium channel (SlNaVSC). After 200 ns of molecular dynamic simulation, the final structure of the complex showed stability in agreement with the experimental data. The above analysis corroborates the existence of a peptide toxin with insecticidal activity from a novel ICK family in L. intermedia venom and demonstrates that this peptide targets Nav channels. PMID:27488102

  11. Effects of immunization with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia on progression of ligature-induced periodontitis in the nonhuman primate Macaca fascicularis.

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, J L; Brunsvold, M; Steffensen, B; Wood, R; Holt, S C

    1991-01-01

    The nonhuman primate (Nhp) has proven to be a useful model of human periodontitis. This study describes the immunological characteristics of this model and the ability of active immunization to interfere with ecological changes in the microbiota and its associated disease symptoms. Nhps were parenterally immunized with whole-cell antigens of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia. The immunization elicited an approximate 2-log increase in serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and IgA isotype antibody that was highly specific for these immunogens. Postimmunization and postligation, there was minimal change in the levels of specific antibody. P. gingivalis immunization significantly inhibited the emergence of this species during disease progression. In contrast, induction of anti-P. intermedia antibody had a minimal effect on this species within the subgingival plaque. Plaque indices showed few changes that could be attributed to active immunization. Both bleeding on probing and loss of attachment were higher in ligated sites of immunized animals than in the placebo-treated group. A significant increase in bone density loss was observed in the ligated teeth from immunized versus control animals. These findings indicate that active immunization of Nhps can elicit a substantial systemic immune response; however, while this response may effect the emergence of an individual microorganism, it appears that other ecological considerations are critical in disease progression. It is also possible that the induction of a broad-based immune response to multiple bacterial antigens can result in increased disease, potentially associated with hypersensitivity reactions to the bacteria in the subgingival plaque. PMID:1894349

  12. Odontogenic bacteria in periodontal disease and resistance patterns to common antibiotics used as treatment and prophylaxis in odontology in Spain.

    PubMed

    Maestre, J R; Bascones, A; Sánchez, P; Matesanz, P; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Giménez, M J; Pérez-Balcabao, I; Granizo, J J; Prieto, J

    2007-03-01

    Resistance in streptococci or Gram-negative bacteria is associated with antibiotic consumption. Scarce information exists on the antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial isolates from patients with periodontitis in countries with high antibiotic consumption, as this is an area in which microbiological testing is not performed in daily practice. The present study was undertaken to explore the susceptibility of bacterial isolates in periodontitis to antibiotics prescribed in odontology in Spain as treatment for local infections or prophylaxis for distant focal infections. Periodontal samples were prospectively collected in 48 patients classified by pocket depth of <4 mm and >or=4 mm. Species were identified by culture, selecting the five most frequent morphotypes per sample, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Susceptibility was determined by E-test. A total of 261 isolates were identified: 72.9% patients had Streptococcus oralis; 70.8% Streptococcus mitis; 60.4% Prevotella buccae; 39.6% Prevotella denticola; 37.5% Fusobacterium nucleatum; 35.4% Prevotella intermedia; 25% Capnocytophaga spp.; 23% Veillonella spp.; 22.9% Prevotella melaninogenica and Streptococcus sanguis; and <20% other species. Streptococcus viridans resistance rates were 0% for amoxicillin, approximately 10% for clindamycin, 9-22% for tetracycline, and for azithromycin ranged from 18.2% for S. sanguis to 47.7% for S. mitis. Prevotella isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, with amoxicillin resistance ranging from 17.1% in P. buccae to 26.3% in P. denticola. Metronidazole resistance was <6% in all Prevotella species, while clindamycin resistance ranged from 0 to 21.1%. beta-Lactamase production was positive in 54.1% Prevotella spp., 38.9% F. nucleatum, 30% Capnocytophaga spp., and 10% Veillonella spp. In this study, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was the most active antibiotic against all species tested, followed by metronidazole in the case of anaerobes.

  13. Effects of long-term exposure to two fungicides, pyrimethanil and tebuconazole, on survival and life history traits of Italian tree frog (Hyla intermedia).

    PubMed

    Bernabò, Ilaria; Guardia, Antonello; Macirella, Rachele; Sesti, Settimio; Crescente, Antonio; Brunelli, Elvira

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few years, the hazards associated with the extensive use of fungicides have become an issue of great concern but, at present, the effects of these substances on amphibians remain poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of two commonly used fungicides, tebuconazole and pyrimethanil, on Italian Tree Frog (Hyla intermedia), a species frequently found in agricultural areas. Tadpoles were exposed to fungicides from developmental Gosner stage 25 (GS 25) to completion of metamorphosis (GS 46) and the whole exposure period lasted 78 days. For both tested fungicides we used two concentrations (5 and 50μg/L) that are comparable to those detected in surface waters, near agricultural fields. A variety of sublethal effects-on growth, development, behavior, and physiology-may be used for evaluating alterations induced by pollutants in amphibians. We estimated whether pyrimethanil and tebuconazole exposure impacted on H. intermedia life history traits. For this purpose, survival, growth, development, initiation of metamorphosis, success and size at metamorphosis, time to metamorphosis, and frequency of morphological abnormalities were evaluated. We showed, for all considered endpoints, that the exposure to tebuconazole exerts more harmful effects on H. intermedia than does exposure to pyrimethanil. Before the onset of metamorphic climax we showed, for both fungicides, that the low concentrations (5μg/L) induced significantly greater effects than the higher ones (50μg/L) on survival and deformity incidence. During the metamorphic climax, a complete reversal of this nonlinear trend takes place, and the percentage of animals initiating metamorphosis was reduced in fungicide-exposed groups in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, a strong correlation emerged between fungicide exposure and the incidence of morphological abnormalities such as tail malformations, scoliosis, edema, mouth and limb deformities. Exposure to tested

  14. Effects of long-term exposure to two fungicides, pyrimethanil and tebuconazole, on survival and life history traits of Italian tree frog (Hyla intermedia).

    PubMed

    Bernabò, Ilaria; Guardia, Antonello; Macirella, Rachele; Sesti, Settimio; Crescente, Antonio; Brunelli, Elvira

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few years, the hazards associated with the extensive use of fungicides have become an issue of great concern but, at present, the effects of these substances on amphibians remain poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of two commonly used fungicides, tebuconazole and pyrimethanil, on Italian Tree Frog (Hyla intermedia), a species frequently found in agricultural areas. Tadpoles were exposed to fungicides from developmental Gosner stage 25 (GS 25) to completion of metamorphosis (GS 46) and the whole exposure period lasted 78 days. For both tested fungicides we used two concentrations (5 and 50μg/L) that are comparable to those detected in surface waters, near agricultural fields. A variety of sublethal effects-on growth, development, behavior, and physiology-may be used for evaluating alterations induced by pollutants in amphibians. We estimated whether pyrimethanil and tebuconazole exposure impacted on H. intermedia life history traits. For this purpose, survival, growth, development, initiation of metamorphosis, success and size at metamorphosis, time to metamorphosis, and frequency of morphological abnormalities were evaluated. We showed, for all considered endpoints, that the exposure to tebuconazole exerts more harmful effects on H. intermedia than does exposure to pyrimethanil. Before the onset of metamorphic climax we showed, for both fungicides, that the low concentrations (5μg/L) induced significantly greater effects than the higher ones (50μg/L) on survival and deformity incidence. During the metamorphic climax, a complete reversal of this nonlinear trend takes place, and the percentage of animals initiating metamorphosis was reduced in fungicide-exposed groups in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, a strong correlation emerged between fungicide exposure and the incidence of morphological abnormalities such as tail malformations, scoliosis, edema, mouth and limb deformities. Exposure to tested

  15. Axenic culture of a candidate division TM7 bacterium from the human oral cavity and biofilm interactions with other oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Soro, Valeria; Dutton, Lindsay C; Sprague, Susan V; Nobbs, Angela H; Ireland, Anthony J; Sandy, Jonathan R; Jepson, Mark A; Micaroni, Massimo; Splatt, Peter R; Dymock, David; Jenkinson, Howard F

    2014-10-01

    The diversity of bacterial species in the human oral cavity is well recognized, but a high proportion of them are presently uncultivable. Candidate division TM7 bacteria are almost always detected in metagenomic studies but have not yet been cultivated. In this paper, we identified candidate division TM7 bacterial phylotypes in mature plaque samples from around orthodontic bonds in subjects undergoing orthodontic treatment. Successive rounds of enrichment in laboratory media led to the isolation of a pure culture of one of these candidate division TM7 phylotypes. The bacteria formed filaments of 20 to 200 μm in length within agar plate colonies and in monospecies biofilms on salivary pellicle and exhibited some unusual morphological characteristics by transmission electron microscopy, including a trilaminated cell surface layer and dense cytoplasmic deposits. Proteomic analyses of cell wall protein extracts identified abundant polypeptides predicted from the TM7 partial genomic sequence. Pleiomorphic phenotypes were observed when the candidate division TM7 bacterium was grown in dual-species biofilms with representatives of six different oral bacterial genera. The TM7 bacterium formed long filaments in dual-species biofilm communities with Actinomyces oris or Fusobacterium nucleatum. However, the TM7 isolate grew as short rods or cocci in dual-species biofilms with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Parvimonas micra, or Streptococcus gordonii, forming notably robust biofilms with the latter two species. The ability to cultivate TM7 axenically should majorly advance understanding of the physiology, genetics, and virulence properties of this novel candidate division oral bacterium.

  16. The predominant bacteria isolated from radicular cysts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To detect predominant bacteria associated with radicular cysts and discuss in light of the literature. Material and methods Clinical materials were obtained from 35 radicular cysts by aspiration. Cultures were made from clinical materials by modern laboratory techniques, they underwent microbiologic analysis. Results The following are microorganisms isolated from cultures: Streptococcus milleri Group (SMG) (23.8%) [Streptococcus constellatus (19.1%) and Streptococcus anginosus (4.7%)], Streptococcus sanguis (14.3%), Streptococcus mitis (4.7%), Streptococcus cremoris (4.7%), Peptostreptococcus pevotii (4.7%), Prevotella buccae (4.7%), Prevotella intermedia (4.7%), Actinomyces meyeri (4.7%), Actinomyces viscosus (4.7%), Propionibacterium propionicum (4.7%), Bacteroides capillosus (4.7%), Staphylococcus hominis (4.7%), Rothia denticariosa (4.7%), Gemella haemolysans (4.7%), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (4.7%). Conclusions Results of this study demonstrated that radicular cysts show a great variety of anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacterial flora. It was observed that all isolated microorganisms were the types commonly found in oral flora. Although no specific microorganism was found, Streptococcus spp. bacteria (47.5%) – especially SMG (23.8%) – were predominantly found in the microorganisms isolated. Furthermore, radicular cysts might be polymicrobial originated. Although radicular cyst is an inflammatory cyst, some radicular cyst fluids might be sterile. PMID:24011184

  17. Novel Therapeutic Approach for the Treatment of Periodontitis by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Madhu; Pentyala, Kishore Babu; Urolagin, Sarvesh Basavaraj; K B, Menaka; Bhoi, Shreedevi

    2014-01-01

    Aims and objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological efficacy of locally delivered 1% curcumin gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 25 patients, belonging to both sex, aged between 21-45 years. All patients diagnosed as chronic periodontitis with periodontal pockets of depth >5mm bilaterally were randomly selected. A split mouth design was followed and the patients received a complete prophylaxis including scaling and root planing. Examination of plaque index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were measured for each patient. The test group received 1% curcumin gel along with scaling and root planing whereas the control group received scaling and root planing alone followed by microbiological samples taken at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months interval. Results: The 1% curcumin gel appeared to provide significant improvements in clinical parameters. Microbiological counts of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and capnocytophaga showed significant reduction in periopathogens at the test sites after six months when compared with that of control sites. Conclusion: Locally delivered 1% curcumin gel was more effective in inhibiting the growth of oral bacteria when used as an adjunct to SRP in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. PMID:25654035

  18. Faropenem, a new oral penem: antibacterial activity against selected anaerobic and fastidious periodontal isolates.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, I; Blandino, G; Caccamo, F; Musumeci, R; Nicoletti, G; Speciale, A

    2003-03-01

    The in vitro activity of faropenem, an oral penem, was compared with those of penicillin, co-amoxiclav, cefoxitin, clindamycin, erythromycin and metronidazole against 106 isolates of anaerobic pathogens involved in systemic infections. The organisms tested comprised Porphyromonas gingivalis (29), Prevotella spp. (eight), Prevotella melaninogenica (seven), Prevotella intermedia (five), Actinomyces spp. (25), Fusobacterium nucleatum (14), Peptostreptococcus spp. (11), Bacteroides ureolyticus (five) and Bacteroides forsythus (two). The antimicrobial properties of faropenem were investigated by studying MICs, MBCs, time-kill kinetics and post-antibiotic effect (PAE). Faropenem was highly active against all the anaerobes tested (MIC(90) < or = 0.5 mg/L) and was bactericidal against both beta-lactamase-positive and -negative anaerobes, with a maximum bactericidal effect at 10 x MIC at between 12 and 24 h. In addition, faropenem had an in vitro PAE on all the tested isolates and this was not influenced by beta-lactamase production. Faropenem may be useful for treating infections caused by periodontal bacteria or oral flora. PMID:12615878

  19. Demonstration of human immunoglobulin G Fc-binding activity in oral bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, D; Michaud, J

    1994-01-01

    Nonimmune binding of immunoglobulins via the Fc fragment may reduce opsonization and phagocytosis of bacteria and is thus considered a virulence factor. The aim of this study was to investigate a wide range of oral bacterial strains for the presence of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc-binding activity. A total of 132 strains representing 40 different gram-positive and gram negative bacterial species were tested for IgG Fc-binding activity by using a fast and simple dot blot procedure with horseradish peroxidase-conjugated Fc fragments from human IgG. Neither the human nor animal biotype of Porphyromonas gingivalis possessed IgG Fc-binding activity. The strongest positive reaction of gram-negative species with the IgG Fc fragments were obtained with strains of Prevotella intermedia and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Among the gram-positive bacteria tested, Peptostreptococcus micros, Lactobacillus spp., and several species of streptococci possessed IgG Fc-binding activity. In the present investigation, the ability of several oral bacterial species to bind IgG Fc fragments was demonstrated. This factor represents a potential virulence determinant as it may help pathogenic oral bacteria escape host defense mechanisms. PMID:7496956

  20. Rapid quantification of periodontitis-related bacteria using a novel modification of Invader PLUS technologies.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Kenichi; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Kawamura, Katsumi; Shimizu, Hajime; Egashira, Toru; Minabe, Masato; Yoshino, Toshiaki; Oguchi, Hirokazu

    2010-01-01

    The Invader PLUS technology is a sensitive, rapid method for the detection and quantification of nucleic acid. While the original technology is based on the amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the target sequence followed by its detection using the Invader technology, the current modification allows simultaneous PCR amplification and Invader reaction. The PCR primers and the Invader probes are designed to operate at the same temperature. This allows simpler design and faster results. This technology has been applied for the quantification of six periodontitis-related bacteria (Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Toreponema denticola, Tannerella forsythensis and Fusobacterium nucleatum). Direct comparison of this modified Invader PLUS with real-time PCR demonstrated similar linear range. Furthermore, testing of 64 volunteers showed a good correlation between both technologies with correlation factors r2 spanning between 0.827 and 0.987. We demonstrated here that the proposed improvement of the Invader PLUS allows the detection and quantification of DNA sequences using a simple design and protocol that can be implemented in clinical testing. PMID:18718748

  1. Longitudinal study on clinical and microbial analysis of periodontal status in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernanda Campos; Cesar, Dionéia Evangelista; Apolônio, Ana Carolina Morais; Ribeiro, Luiz Claudio; Ribeiro, Rosangela Almeida

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to provide a longitudinal overview of the subgingival bacterial microbiome using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, in women in the second trimester of pregnancy (between 14 and 24 weeks), and 48 h and 8 weeks postpartum. Of 31 women evaluated during pregnancy, 24 returned for the 48-h and 18 for their 8-week exams postpartum. Probing depth (PD), bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level, and presence of calculus were recorded. Subgingival plaque samples were collected, and FISH was used to identify the numbers of eight periodontal pathogens. Friedman test was used to compare differences between follow-up examinations, followed by a multiple comparison test for a post hoc pairwise comparison. Clinically, a significantly greater number of teeth with PD = 4-5 mm were found during pregnancy than on postpartum examinations. Microbial analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in cell count over the study period for Prevotella nigrescens. P. intermedia, Campylobacter rectus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis also decrease, although not significantly, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans increased. No significant changes were found for Fusobacterium nucleatum, Treponema denticola, or Tannerella forsythia. Our data demonstrate a change in the subgingival microbiota during pregnancy, at least for P. nigrescens. PMID:27556678

  2. Identification of an antibacterial protein by functional screening of a human oral metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Arivaradarajan, Preeti; Warburton, Philip J; Paramasamy, Gunasekaran; Nair, Sean P; Allan, Elaine; Mullany, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Screening of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library containing metagenomic DNA from human plaque and saliva allowed the isolation of four clones producing antimicrobial activity. Three of these were pigmented and encoded homologues of glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR), an enzyme involved in the C5 pathway leading to tetrapyrole synthesis, and one clone had antibacterial activity with no pigmentation. The latter contained a BAC with an insert of 15.6 kb. Initial attempts to localize the gene(s) responsible for antimicrobial activity by subcloning into pUC-based vectors failed. A new plasmid for toxic gene expression (pTGEX) was designed enabling localization of the antibacterial activity to a 4.7-kb HindIII fragment. Transposon mutagenesis localized the gene to an open reading frame of 483 bp designated antibacterial protein1 (abp1). Abp1 was 94% identical to a hypothetical protein of Neisseria subflava (accession number WP_004519448.1). An Escherichia coli clone expressing Abp1 exhibited antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis BS78H, Staphylococcus epidermidis NCTC 11964 and B4268, and S. aureus NCTC 12493,ATCC 35696 and NCTC 11561. However, no antibacterial activity was observed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027, N. subflava ATCC A1078, E. coli K12 JM109 and BL21(DE3) Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586 and NCTC 11326, Prevotella intermedia ATCC 25611, Veillonella parvula ATCC 10790 or Lactobacillus casei NCTC 6375. PMID:26347298

  3. [Usefulness and limit of Gram staining smear examination].

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kuniaki; Mino, Hirotoshi; Yoshida, Shunsuke

    2010-05-01

    Gram staining is one of the most simple and inexpensive methods for the rapid diagnosis of bacterial and fungal infections. It yields results much faster than culture, and provides important data for the patient's treatment and prognosis. However, a difference exists in the quality and quantity of information yielded by Gram staining smears based on the experience and knowledge of those conducting the tests. Therefore, a risk of misdiagnosis based on the information obtained from Gram staining smears is also present. The Gram staining conditions and morphology of bacteria sometimes change due to antimicrobial therapy. Species of Gram-negative rods sometimes become filamentous and pleomorphic. Gram-positive bacteria may become gram variable (change in staining condition) after antimicrobial therapy. Even bacteria that are easy to mis-identify exist, because the morphology of bacteria may be similar. Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive diplococcus, forming Gram-positive clustered cocci in specimens from blood culture bottles, resembling Streptococcus pneumoniae. Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative diplococcus in sputum, resembling Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis. Pasteurella multocida is a small-sized, Gram-negative short rod in the sputum, resembling Haemophilus influenzae. Prevotella intermedia is a small-sized, Gram-negative short rod in sputum, resembling Haemophilus influenzae. Capnocytophaga sp. is a Gram-negative fusiform (thin needle shape) rod present in clinical specimens, resembling Fusobacterium nucleatum.

  4. In Vitro Evaluation of Planktonic Growth on Experimental Cement-Retained Titanium Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Nur; Cakan, Umut; Aksu, Burak; Akgul, Oncu; Ulger, Nurver

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of selected cements, or their combination with titanium, on the growth of two periodontopathic bacteria: Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). Material/Methods This study was comprised of several experimental groups: 1) Dental luting cements (glass ionomer cement, methacrylate-based resin cement, zinc-oxide eugenol cement, eugenol-free zinc oxide cement; 2) titanium discs; and 3) titanium combination cement discs. The disks were submerged in bacterial suspensions of either Fn or Pi. Planktonic bacterial growth within the test media was measured by determining the optical density of the cultures (OD600). Mean and standard deviations were calculated for planktonic growth from three separate experiments. Results Intergroup comparison of all experimental groups revealed increased growth of Pi associated with cement-titanium specimens in comparison with cement specimens. Regarding the comparison of all groups for Fn, there was an increased amount of bacterial growth in cement-titanium specimens although the increase was not statistically significant. Conclusions The combination of cement with titanium may exacerbate the bacterial growth capacity of Pi and Fn in contrast to their sole effect. PMID:27058704

  5. Putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in pregnant women: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haixia; Zhu, Ce; Li, Fei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Danying; Feng, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about herpesvirus and putative periodontopathic bacteria in maternal chronic periodontitis. The present case-control study aimed to explore the potential relationship between putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in maternal chronic periodontitis.Saliva samples were collected from 36 pregnant women with chronic periodontitis (cases) and 36 pregnant women with healthy periodontal status (controls). Six putative periodontopathic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], Aggregatibacer actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Prevotella intermedia [Pi], Tannerella forsythia [Tf], and Treponema denticola [Td]) and three herpesviruses (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV], human cytomegalovirus [HCMV], and herpes simplex virus [HSV]) were detected. Socio-demographic data and oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels were also collected. The results showed no significant differences in socio-demographic background, oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The detection rates of included periodontopathic microorganisms were not significantly different between the two groups (all P > 0.05), but the coinfection rate of EBV and Pg was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.028). EBV and Pg coinfection may promote the development of chronic periodontitis among pregnant women. PMID:27301874

  6. Similarity of the oral microbiota of pre-school children with that of their caregivers in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Tanner, A C R; Milgrom, P M; Kent, R; Mokeem, S A; Page, R C; Liao, S I A; Riedy, C A; Bruss, J B

    2002-12-01

    This study evaluated the similarity between the oral microbiota of young children and that of their adult caregivers. Oral samples from children (174 dentate and 18 pre-dentate) aged 6-36 months and their caregivers in Saipan were assayed using a DNA probe assay. Many species including Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Actinomyces species, Campylobacter rectus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were detected in dentate and pre-dentate children, whereas Bacteroides forsythus was detected only in dentate children. A higher percentage of children were positive for the detection of an individual species if the caregiver was also positive. There were significant relative risks of species detection between dentate children and their caregivers. By logistic regression, there were significant positive associations between species detection in caregiver and in child, but not between species detection and child age or maternal education level. In conclusion, dental pathogens were detected in young, including pre-dentate, children. The microbial profiles of children were strongly associated with the microbiota of their caregivers.

  7. [Lemierre's syndrome as differential diagnosis of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Reinholdt Jensen, Jacob; Weinreich, Ulla Møller

    2012-05-28

    Lemierre's syndrome is a disseminated infection which is usually caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. An oropharyngeal infection progresses to a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and later metastatic infections throughout the body occur. We present a clinical case in which a patient, initially presenting with symptoms characteristic of pulmonary cancer, turned out to have a rare variant of Lemierre's syndrome caused by Fusobacterium nucleatum.

  8. Fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by yeasts. [Candida wickerhamii; C. guiliermondii; C. molischiana; Debaryomyces polymorphus; Pichia guilliermondii; Clavispora lusitaniae; Kluyveromyces lactis; Brettanomyces claussenii; Rhodotorula minuta; Dekkera intermedia

    SciTech Connect

    Freer, S.N. )

    1991-03-01

    The fermentation and aerobic metabolism of cellodextrins by 14 yeast species or strains was monitored. When grown aerobically, Candida wickerhamii, C. guilliermondii, and C. molischiana metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization 3 to 6. C. wicherhamii and C. molischiana also fermented these substrates, while C. guilliermondii fermented only cellodextrins of degree of polymerization {<=} 3. Debaryomyces polymorphus, Pichia guilliermondii, Clavispora lusitaniae, and one of two strains of Kluyveromyces lactis metabolized glucose, cellobiose, and cellotriose when grown aerobically. These yeasts also fermented these substrates, except for K. lactis, which fermented only glucose and cellobiose. The remaining species/strains tested, K. lactis, Brettanomyces claussenii, Brettanomyces anomalus, Kluyveromyces dobzhanskii, Rhodotorula minuta, and Dekkera intermedia, both fermented and aerobically metabolized glucose and cellobiose. Crude enzyme preparations from all 14 yeast species or strains were tested for ability to hydrolyze cellotriose and cellotretose. Most of the yeasts produced an enzyme(s) capable of hydrolyzing cellotriose. However, with two exceptions, R. minuta and P. guilliermondii, only the yeasts that metabolized cellodextrins of degree of polymerization >3 produced an enzyme(s) that hydrolyzed cellotretose.

  9. Generation and characterization of a recombinant chimeric protein (rCpLi) consisting of B-cell epitopes of a dermonecrotic protein from Loxosceles intermedia spider venom.

    PubMed

    Mendes, T M; Oliveira, D; Figueiredo, L F M; Machado-de-Avila, R A; Duarte, C G; Dias-Lopes, C; Guimarães, G; Felicori, L; Minozzo, J C; Chávez-Olortegui, C

    2013-06-01

    A chimeric protein was constructed expressing three epitopes of LiD1, a dermonecrotic toxin from the venom of Loxosceles intermedia spider. This species is responsible for a large number of accidents involving spiders in Brazil. We demonstrated that the chimeric protein (rCpLi) generated is atoxic and that antibodies previously developed in rabbits against synthetic epitopes reactive with rCpLi in ELISA and immunoblot assays. The antibody response in rabbits against the rCpLi was evaluated by ELISA and we have detected an antibody response in all immunized animals. Overlapping peptides covering the amino acid sequence of the rCpLi were synthesized on a cellulose membrane, and their recognition by rabbit anti-rCpLi serum assessed. Three different antigenic regions were identified. The percentage of inhibition of the dermonecrotic, hemorrhagic and edematogenic activities caused by the recombinant protein LiD1r in naïve rabbits was assessed by pre-incubation with anti-rCpLi antibodies. Anti-rCpLi induced good dermonecrotic and hemorrhagic protection. The levels of protection were similar to the antiboides anti-LiD1r. In summary, we have developed a polyepitope recombinant chimeric protein capable of inducing multiple responses of neutralizing antibodies in a rabbit model. This engineered protein may be a promising candidate for therapeutic serum development or vaccination.

  10. Natural antimicrobial susceptibilities and biochemical profiles of Yersinia enterocolitica-like strains: Y. frederiksenii, Y. intermedia, Y. kristensenii and Y. rohdei.

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo; Wiedemann, Bernd

    2003-09-22

    The natural susceptibility of 131 Yersinia strains of Y. frederiksenii (n=38), Y. intermedia (n=48), Y. kristensenii (n=26) and Y. rohdei (n=19) to 70 antibiotics was tested. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined with a microdilution procedure in IsoSensitest broth (all strains) and cation-adjusted Mueller Hinton broth (some strains). All species were naturally sensitive or sensitive and of intermediate susceptibility to tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, acylureidopenicillins, numerous cephalosporins, carbapenems, aztreonam, quinolones, chloramphenicol, folate-pathway inhibitors, nitrofurantoin, and fosfomycin. Uniform natural resistance was found with penicillin G, oxacillin, several macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramins, glycopeptides, rifampicin and fusidic acid. Species-specific differences in susceptibility affecting clinical assessment criteria were seen with aminopenicillins (in the presence and absence of beta-lactamase inhibitors), ticarcillin and some cephalosporins. Major medium-dependent susceptibilities were found with fosfomycin. beta-Lactam MIC susceptibility patterns suggested that most strains of the species tested produce both class A and class C (AmpC) beta-lactamases that are characteristic for the species. The present study describes a database concerning the natural susceptibility of some Y. enterocolitica-like species to a wide range of antibiotics, which can be applied to validate forthcoming antibiotic susceptibility tests of these strains and might contribute to their identification. An evaluation of 30 biochemical tests that secured phenotypic identification to the Yersinia species level is presented.

  11. Shoot-tip cryopreservation by droplet vitrification of Byrsonima intermedia A. Juss.: a woody tropical and medicinal plant species from Brazilian cerrado.

    PubMed

    Silva, L C; Paiva, R; Swennen, R; Andre, E; Panis, B

    2013-01-01

    Cryopreservation of plant species is poorly investigated in Brazil. The aim of this study was to cryopreserve Byrsonima intermedia shoot apical meristems through droplet vitrification. A culture medium for shoot-tips growth was established using the Woody Plant Medium supplemented with 2.22 uM 6-benzylaminopurine. Excised shoot-tips were subjected to pre-culture and/or post-culture treatments on Murashige and Skoog medium with 0.3 M sucrose for 24 h prior dehydration on PVS2 at 0°C for 15, 30 or 45 minutes prior to plunging in liquid nitrogen. The effect of 15 days of shoot pre-growth on a high osmotic medium (0.3 M sucrose or 0.21 M sorbitol + 0.09 M sucrose) prior to meristem excision and cryopreservation was also investigated. Pre-culturing shoot-tips on 0.3 M sucrose for 24 h prior to cryopreservation increased the regrowth level after thawing to 90%. Shoot-tips excised from shoots pre-grown on MS + 0.21 M sorbitol + 0.09 M sucrose for 15 days presented a satisfactory regrowth level (67%).

  12. Differential accumulation of volatile terpene and terpene synthase mRNAs during lavender (Lavandula angustifolia and L. x intermedia) inflorescence development.

    PubMed

    Guitton, Yann; Nicolè, Florence; Moja, Sandrine; Valot, Nadine; Legrand, Sylvain; Jullien, Frédéric; Legendre, Laurent

    2010-02-01

    Despite the commercial importance of Lavandula angustifolia Mill. and L. x intermedia Emeric ex Loisel floral essential oils (EOs), no information is currently available on potential changes in individual volatile organic compound (VOC) content during inflorescence development. Calyces were found to be the main sites of VOC accumulation. The 20 most abundant VOCs could be separated into three sub-groups according to their patterns of change in concentration The three groups of VOCs sequentially dominated the global scent bouquet of inflorescences, the transition between the first and second groups occurring around the opening of the first flower of the inflorescence and the one between the second and third groups at the start of seed set. Changes in calyx VOC accumulation were linked to the developmental stage of individual flowers. Leaves accumulated a smaller number of VOCs which were a subset of those seen in preflowering inflorescences. Their nature and content remained constant during the growing season. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assessments of the expression of two terpene synthase (TPS) genes, LaLIMS and LaLINS, revealed similar trends between their patterns of expression and those of their VOC products. Molecular and chemical analyses suggest that changes in TPS expression occur during lavender inflorescence development and lead to changes in EO composition. Both molecular data and terpene analysis support the findings that changes in biosynthesis of terpene occurred during inflorescence development.

  13. Environmental Niche Modelling of Phlebotomine Sand Flies and Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Identifies Lutzomyia intermedia as the Main Vector Species in Southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Meneguzzi, Viviane Coutinho; dos Santos, Claudiney Biral; Leite, Gustavo Rocha; Fux, Blima; Falqueto, Aloísio

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is caused by a protozoan of the genus Leishmania and is transmitted by sand flies. The state of Espírito Santo (ES), an endemic area in southeast Brazil, has shown a considerably high prevalence in recent decades. Environmental niche modelling (ENM) is a useful tool for predicting potential disease risk. In this study, ENM was applied to sand fly species and CL cases in ES to identify the principal vector and risk areas of the disease. Sand flies were collected in 466 rural localities between 1997 and 2013 using active and passive capture. Insects were identified to the species level, and the localities were georeferenced. Twenty-one bioclimatic variables were selected from WorldClim. Maxent was used to construct models projecting the potential distribution for five Lutzomyia species and CL cases. ENMTools was used to overlap the species and the CL case models. The Kruskal–Wallis test was performed, adopting a 5% significance level. Approximately 250,000 specimens were captured, belonging to 43 species. The area under the curve (AUC) was considered acceptable for all models. The slope was considered relevant to the construction of the models for all the species identified. The overlay test identified Lutzomyia intermedia as the main vector of CL in southeast Brazil. ENM tools enable an analysis of the association among environmental variables, vector distributions and CL cases, which can be used to support epidemiologic and entomological vigilance actions to control the expansion of CL in vulnerable areas. PMID:27783641

  14. Inhibition of tumour promotion in mouse skin by extracts of rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) and honeybush (Cyclopia intermedia), unique South African herbal teas.

    PubMed

    Marnewick, Jeanine; Joubert, Elizabeth; Joseph, Shamiel; Swanevelder, Sonja; Swart, Pieter; Gelderblom, Wentzel

    2005-06-28

    The modulating effect of ethanol/acetone (E/A) soluble fractions, prepared from methanolic extracts of processed and unprocessed rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) and honeybush (Cyclopia intermedia) as well as green (Camellia sinensis) teas was established in a two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis assay. Topical application of the tea fractions prior to the tumour promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), on ICR mouse skin initiated with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) suppressed skin tumorigenesis significantly (P<0.001) with the green tea E/A fraction exhibiting a 100% inhibition, unprocessed honeybush 90%, processed honeybush 84.2%, processed rooibos 75% and unprocessed rooibos 60%. The green tea fraction, with the highest flavanol/proanthocyanidin content, also exhibited the highest protective activity (99%) against hepatic microsomal lipid peroxidation, and completely inhibited skin tumour formation. Differences in the flavanol/proanthocyanidin and flavonol/flavone composition and/or non polyphenolic constituents are likely to be important determinants in the inhibition of tumour promotion by the herbal tea E/A fractions in mouse skin.

  15. Detection of periodontopathogenic bacteria in pregnant women by traditional anaerobic culture method and by a commercial molecular genetic method.

    PubMed

    Urbán, Edit; Terhes, Gabriella; Radnai, Márta; Gorzó, István; Nagy, Elisabeth

    2010-06-01

    To culture facultative and strict anaerobic bacteria is a well-established method for analyzing subgingival plaque samples. Micro-IDent and micro-IDent Plus (HAIN Lifescience GmbH, Nehren, Germany) tests are two commercially available rapid PCR-based methods for the identification and quantification of putative periodontopathogen bacteria. In this study, we compared these commercial PCR-based hybridization methods with conventional anaerobic culture technique. A total of 36 subgingival plaque samples were collected from periodontal pockets of pregnant women with chronic localized periodontitis. Aliquots of these samples were evaluated with species-specific probes provided by micro-IDent and micro-IDent Plus tests simultaneously, and from the same samples anaerobic and capnophylic bacteria were cultured on selective media. The overall agreement between both methods was excellent for Eubacterium nodatum, Tannerella forsythia and Porphyromonas gingivalis (97-92%), fair for Capnocytophaga sp, Eikenella corrodens, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and Prevotella intermedia (91-89%) and poor for Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra (Micromonas micros), and Campylobacter rectus (86-78%). Discrepancies in the results may be explained by inability of culture method to distinguish between closely related taxa (e.i P. intermedia/Prevotella. nigrescens), and problems of keeping periodontopathogen bacteria viable, which is required for successful detection by standard culture method. Nucleic acid-based methods may replace cultivation method as frequently used methods in microbiological diagnosis of progressive periodontitis, thus micro-IDent and micro-IDent Plus tests can be recommended where culture of periodontopathogenic bacteria is not performed in routine microbiology laboratories to analyze subgingival plaque samples.

  16. Prelude to Oral Microbes and Chronic Diseases: Past, Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Kalina R; Yilmaz, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Associations between oral and systemic health are ancient. Oral opportunistic bacteria, particularly, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, have recently been deviated from their traditional roles and arguably ascended to central players based on their participations in complex co-dependent mechanisms of diverse systemic chronic diseases risk and pathogenesis, including cancers, rheumatoid-arthritis, and diabetes. PMID:25813714

  17. [Botryomycosis caused by fusobacteria].

    PubMed

    Gudat, W; Böckers, M; Bräuninger, W

    1992-07-01

    In the Anglo-American literature botrymycosis is described as a chronic cutaneous granulomatous reaction to bacterial infection, containing granules resembling the sulphur granules seen in actinomycosis. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects are discussed with reference to a recently observed patient. Fusobacterium nucleatum was isolated as the bacterial cause of the pathologic disorder.

  18. Liquid based microbiological transport systems: conformity assessment of two commercial devices.

    PubMed

    Avolio, Manuela; Camporese, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    We compared two types of liquid-based microbiology devices for microorganism viability according to standardized quantitative elution method CLSI M40-A2. The eSwab® met CLSI acceptance criteria of viability maintenance for all microorganisms tested. The Σ-Transwab® failed to meet CLSI acceptance criteria for Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Prevotella melaninogenica, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Haemophilus influenzae.

  19. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population.

    PubMed

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7-3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2-23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4-9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5-3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td and Pi

  20. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Treponema denticola / Prevotella intermedia Co-Infection Are Associated with Severe Periodontitis in a Thai Population

    PubMed Central

    Torrungruang, Kitti; Jitpakdeebordin, Supawadee; Charatkulangkun, Orawan; Gleebbua, Yingampa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infection of tooth-supporting tissues. This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the associations between five target species and severe periodontitis in a Thai population. Using the CDC/AAP case definition, individuals diagnosed with no/mild and severe periodontitis were included. Quantitative analyses of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Tannerella forsythia (Tf), Treponema denticola (Td), and Prevotella intermedia (Pi) in subgingival plaque were performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The association between target species and severe periodontitis was examined using logistic regression analysis. The study subjects comprised 479 individuals with no/mild periodontitis and 883 with severe periodontitis. Bacterial prevalence and quantity were higher in subjects with severe periodontitis than in those with no/mild disease. In the fully adjusted model, all species except Tf showed a dose-dependent relationship with periodontitis. The mere presence of Pg, even in low amount, was significantly associated with severe periodontitis, while the amount of Aa, Td, and Pi had to reach the critical thresholds to be significantly associated with disease. Compared to individuals with low levels of both Td and Pi, high colonization by either Td or Pi alone significantly increased the odds of having severe periodontitis by 2.5 (95%CI 1.7–3.5) folds. The odds ratio was further increased to 14.8 (95%CI 9.2–23.8) in individuals who were highly colonized by both species. Moreover, the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa were independently associated with severe periodontitis with odds ratios of 5.6 (95%CI 3.4–9.1) and 2.2 (95%CI 1.5–3.3), respectively. Our findings suggest that the presence of Pg and high colonization by Aa, Td, and Pi play an important role in severe periodontitis in this study population. We also demonstrate for the first time that individuals co-infected with Td

  1. Lavandin (Lavandula × intermedia Emeric ex Loiseleur) essential oil from Spain: determination of aromatic profile by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, antioxidant and lipoxygenase inhibitory bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Alejandro; Martinez-Gutierrez, Ramiro; Tomas, Virginia; Tudela, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Lavandin (Lavandula × intermedia Emeric ex Loiseleur) essential oils (EOs), from Abrial, Super and Grosso cultivars, cultivated and extracted in the South East of Spain, were analysed by using GC/MS to determine their composition, in both relative (peak area) and absolute (using standard curves) concentrations. Linalool (34-47%), linalyl acetate (17-34%), camphor (4-9%) and eucalyptol (3-7%) were determined as the main molecules. This characterisation was completed with the enantioselective gas chromatography, where ( - )-linalool, (+)-camphor and ( - )-linalyl acetate were determined as the main components. Antioxidant activity was evaluated positively by several methods: activity against free radicals, chelating and reducing power, probably due to linalool and linalyl acetate. Mild inhibitory activity on lipoxygenase was observed supporting potential anti-inflammatory activity, mainly due to linalool and camphor. These properties support the potential use of L. × intermedia essential oils as natural cosmetic and natural pharmaceutical ingredient to fight several skin diseases. PMID:26106980

  2. A randomized Phase I/II Trial of HQK-1001, an oral fetal globin gene inducer, in β–thalassaemia intermedia and HbE/β–thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Fucharoen, Suthat; Inati, Adlette; Siritanaratku, Noppadol; Thein, Swee Lay; Wargin, William C.; Koussa, Suzanne; Taher, Ali; Chaneim, Nattawara; Boosalis, Michael; Berenson, Ronald; Perrine, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    β–thalassemia intermedia syndromes (BTI) cause hemolytic anemia, ineffective erythropoiesis, and widespread complications. Higher fetal globin expression within genotypes reduces globin imbalance and ameliorates anemia. Sodium 2,2 dimethylbutyrate (HQK-1001), an orally bioavailable short-chain fatty acid derivative, induces γ-globin expression experimentally and is well-tolerated in normal subjects. Accordingly, a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled, Phase I/II trial was performed in 21 adult BTI patients (14 with HbE/β0 thalassemia and 7 with β+/β0 thalassemia intermedia, to determine effective doses for fetal globin induction, safety, and tolerability. HQK-1001 or placebo were administered once daily for 8 weeks at four dose levels (10, 20, 30, or 40 mg/kg/day), and subjects were monitored for laboratory and clinical events. Pharmacokinetic profiles demonstrated a t1/2 of 10–12 hours. Adverse events with HQK-1001 treatment were not significantly different from placebo treatment. Median HbF increased with the 20 mg/kg treatment doses above baseline levels by 6.6% and 0.44 g/dL (p <0.01) in 8/9 subjects; total hemoglobin (Hgb) increased by a mean of 1.1 gm/dL in 4/9 subjects. These findings identify a safe oral therapeutic which induces fetal globin in BTI. Further investigation of HQK-1001 with longer dosing to definitively evaluate its hematologic potential appears warranted. PMID:23530969

  3. Localization of amylin-like immunoreactivity in melanocyte-stimulating hormone-containing cells of the pars intermedia but not those of the pars distalis in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques were employed to investigate the distribution of amylin-like immunoreactivity in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Amylin-immunoreactive cells were observed in the pars intermedia, and these cells were found to be immunoreactive for α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (αMSH) as well. In contrast, αMSH-immunoreactive cells in the pars distalis were immuno-negaitive for amylin. These light microscopic findings were confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Amylin-immunoreactive signals were located on the haloes of presumable secretory granules in association with αMSH-immunoreactive signals in the amylin-positive cells. However, in the pars distalis, the αMSH-positive cells did not contain amylin-immunoreactive secretory granules. Western blot analysis of axolotl pituitary extracts revealed the labeling of a protein band at approximately 10.5-kDa by the anti-rat amylin serum, which was not labeled by the anti-αMSH antibody. These findings indicate that amylin secreted from MSH-producing cells in the pars intermedia may modulate MSH secretion in an autocrine fashion and may participate in MSH functions such as fatty homeostasis together with MSH.

  4. Localization of amylin-like immunoreactivity in melanocyte-stimulating hormone-containing cells of the pars intermedia but not those of the pars distalis in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques were employed to investigate the distribution of amylin-like immunoreactivity in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Amylin-immunoreactive cells were observed in the pars intermedia, and these cells were found to be immunoreactive for α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (αMSH) as well. In contrast, αMSH-immunoreactive cells in the pars distalis were immuno-negaitive for amylin. These light microscopic findings were confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Amylin-immunoreactive signals were located on the haloes of presumable secretory granules in association with αMSH-immunoreactive signals in the amylin-positive cells. However, in the pars distalis, the αMSH-positive cells did not contain amylin-immunoreactive secretory granules. Western blot analysis of axolotl pituitary extracts revealed the labeling of a protein band at approximately 10.5-kDa by the anti-rat amylin serum, which was not labeled by the anti-αMSH antibody. These findings indicate that amylin secreted from MSH-producing cells in the pars intermedia may modulate MSH secretion in an autocrine fashion and may participate in MSH functions such as fatty homeostasis together with MSH. PMID:26797189

  5. Purification from Fusobacterium mortiferum ATCC 25557 of a 6-phosphoryl-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl:6-phosphoglucohydrolase that hydrolyzes maltose 6-phosphate and related phospho-alpha-D-glucosides.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J; Gentry-Weeks, C R; Nguyen, N Y; Folk, J E; Robrish, S A

    1995-01-01

    6-Phosphoryl-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl:6-phosphoglucohydrolase (6-phospho-alpha-glucosidase) has been purified from Fusobacterium mortiferum ATCC 25557. p-Nitrophenyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside 6-phosphate (pNP alpha Glc6P) served as the chromogenic substrate for detection and assay of enzyme activity. The O2-sensitive, metal-dependent phospho-alpha-glucosidase was stabilized during purification by inclusion of dithiothreitol and Mn2+ ion in chromatography buffers. Various 6-phosphoryl-O-alpha-linked glucosides, including maltose 6-phosphate, pNP alpha Glc6P, trehalose 6-phosphate, and sucrose 6-phosphate, were hydrolyzed by the enzyme to yield D-glucose 6-phosphate and aglycone moieties in a 1:1 molar ratio. 6-Phospho-alpha-glucosidase (M(r) of approximately 49,000; pI of approximately 4.9) is activated by Fe2+, Mn2+, Co2+, and Ni2+, and the maximum rate of pNP alpha Glc6P hydrolysis occurs at 40 degrees C within the pH range 7.0 to 7.5. The sequence of the first 32 amino acids of 6-phospho-alpha-glucosidase exhibits 67% identity (90% similarity) to that deduced for the N terminus of a putative phospho-beta-glucosidase (designated ORF f212) encoded by glvG in Escherichia coli. Western blots involving highly specific polyclonal antibody against 6-phospho-alpha-glucosidase and spectrophotometric analyses with pNP alpha Glc6P revealed only low levels of the enzyme in glucose-, mannose-, or fructose-grown cells of F. mortiferum. Synthesis of 6-phospho-alpha-glucosidase increased dramatically during growth of the organism on alpha-glucosides, such as maltose, alpha-methylglucoside, trehalose, turanose, and palatinose. PMID:7730284

  6. Targeted profiling of oral bacteria in human saliva and in vitro biofilms with quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Price, R R; Viscount, H B; Stanley, M C; Leung, K-P

    2007-01-01

    An in vitro plaque model based on the use of human salivary bacteria and tooth-like surfaces was previously developed for studying the formation of oral biofilm and its use for pre-clinical testing of candidate antimicrobial or antiplaque agents. In this study, a quantitative Taqman PCR assay (QPCR) was developed to compare the bacterial compositions of in vitro biofilms to parent saliva samples, and to determine the relative contributions of different species in the formation of the oral biofilm. In addition, the growth inhibition of saliva-derived plaque was evaluated by chlorhexidine. With this assay, which consisted of primer/probe sets targeting either 16S rDNA sequences present in public databases or cloned ribosomal intergenic spacer region (ISR) sequences, 15 oral bacteria derived from saliva as well as those that were responsible for biofilm formation in an in vitro plaque model were rapidly identified and quantified. Among the target organisms were Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Micromonas micros, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Tannerella forsythensis, and Veillonella parvula. Primer and probe sets developed were both sensitive and specific. The relative profiles of a number of bacteria in 45-h-old biofilms were determined and, when compared to saliva samples, it was found that most of the bacteria identified in saliva also populated the in vitro plaque, including some anaerobes. Brief exposure of biofilms to chlorhexidine resulted in significant losses in viability. This new broad spectrum QPCR assay in combination with the in vitro plaque model will be of significant value in the quantitative study of the microbial composition of human saliva, saliva-derived plaque, and pre-clinical evaluation of potential antimicrobial and antiplaque molecules.

  7. Microbial diversity of the supra- and subgingival biofilm of healthy individuals after brushing with chlorhexidine- or silver-coated toothbrush bristles.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Cássio; Paulo, Diana Ferreira; Pita, Murillo Sucena; Pedrazzi, Vinícius; de Albuquerque Junior, Rubens Ferreira

    2015-02-01

    Nanoparticulate silver has recently been reported as an effective antimicrobial agent. The aim of this clinical study was to investigate the potential changes on the oral microbiota of healthy individuals after controlled brushing with chlorhexidine- or silver-coated toothbrush bristles. Twenty-four healthy participants were enrolled in this investigation and randomly submitted to 3 interventions. All the participants received, in a crossover format, the following toothbrushing interventions: (i) chlorhexidine-coated bristles, (ii) silver-coated bristles, and (iii) conventional toothbrush (Control). All the interventions had a duration of 30 days. The DNA checkerboard hybridization method was used to identify and quantify up to 43 microbial species colonizing the supra- and subgingival biofilm. The supragingival samples presented higher genome counts than the subgingival samples (p < 0.0001). The total genome counts from the Control group showed the highest values, followed by the silver and chlorhexidine groups (p < 0.0001). After 4 weeks of brushing, the silver-coated and chlorhexidine-coated bristles were capable of reducing or maintaining lower levels of the bacterial counts of the putative periodontal pathogens Tanerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Other major periodontal pathogens, such as Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella nigrescens, and Parvimonas micra, were also detected at lower levels. The toothbrush bristles impregnated with silver nanoparticles reduced the total and individual genome count in the supra- and subgingival biofilm after 4 weeks of brushing. Chlorhexidine was not effective in reducing the total genome counts in both supra- or subgingival biofilm after 4 weeks of brushing. Chlorhexidine reduced the individual genome counts in the supragingival biofilm for most of the target species, including putative periodontal pathogens.

  8. High-Level Antimicrobial Efficacy of Representative Mediterranean Natural Plant Extracts against Oral Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Cecere, Manuel; Skaltsounis, Alexios Leandros; Argyropoulou, Aikaterini; Hellwig, Elmar; Aligiannis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    Nature is an unexplored reservoir of novel phytopharmaceuticals. Since biofilm-related oral diseases often correlate with antibiotic resistance, plant-derived antimicrobial agents could enhance existing treatment options. Therefore, the rationale of the present report was to examine the antimicrobial impact of Mediterranean natural extracts on oral microorganisms. Five different extracts from Olea europaea, mastic gum, and Inula viscosa were tested against ten bacteria and one Candida albicans strain. The extraction protocols were conducted according to established experimental procedures. Two antimicrobial assays—the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) assay—were applied. The screened extracts were found to be active against each of the tested microorganisms. O. europaea presented MIC and MBC ranges of 0.07–10.00 mg mL−1 and 0.60–10.00 mg mL−1, respectively. The mean MBC values for mastic gum and I. viscosa were 0.07–10.00 mg mL−1 and 0.15–10.00 mg mL−1, respectively. Extracts were less effective against C. albicans and exerted bactericidal effects at a concentration range of 0.07–5.00 mg mL−1 on strict anaerobic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Parvimonas micra). Ethyl acetate I. viscosa extract and total mastic extract showed considerable antimicrobial activity against oral microorganisms and could therefore be considered as alternative natural anti-infectious agents. PMID:25054150

  9. Axenic Culture of a Candidate Division TM7 Bacterium from the Human Oral Cavity and Biofilm Interactions with Other Oral Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Soro, Valeria; Dutton, Lindsay C.; Sprague, Susan V.; Nobbs, Angela H.; Ireland, Anthony J.; Sandy, Jonathan R.; Jepson, Mark A.; Micaroni, Massimo; Splatt, Peter R.; Dymock, David

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of bacterial species in the human oral cavity is well recognized, but a high proportion of them are presently uncultivable. Candidate division TM7 bacteria are almost always detected in metagenomic studies but have not yet been cultivated. In this paper, we identified candidate division TM7 bacterial phylotypes in mature plaque samples from around orthodontic bonds in subjects undergoing orthodontic treatment. Successive rounds of enrichment in laboratory media led to the isolation of a pure culture of one of these candidate division TM7 phylotypes. The bacteria formed filaments of 20 to 200 μm in length within agar plate colonies and in monospecies biofilms on salivary pellicle and exhibited some unusual morphological characteristics by transmission electron microscopy, including a trilaminated cell surface layer and dense cytoplasmic deposits. Proteomic analyses of cell wall protein extracts identified abundant polypeptides predicted from the TM7 partial genomic sequence. Pleiomorphic phenotypes were observed when the candidate division TM7 bacterium was grown in dual-species biofilms with representatives of six different oral bacterial genera. The TM7 bacterium formed long filaments in dual-species biofilm communities with Actinomyces oris or Fusobacterium nucleatum. However, the TM7 isolate grew as short rods or cocci in dual-species biofilms with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Parvimonas micra, or Streptococcus gordonii, forming notably robust biofilms with the latter two species. The ability to cultivate TM7 axenically should majorly advance understanding of the physiology, genetics, and virulence properties of this novel candidate division oral bacterium. PMID:25107981

  10. Influence of topography and hydrophilicity on initial oral biofilm formation on microstructured titanium surfaces in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Almaguer-Flores, A.; Olivares-Navarrete, R.; Wieland, M.; Ximénez-Fyvie, L. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Boyan, B. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of the microtopography and hydrophilicity of titanium (Ti) substrates on initial oral biofilm formation. Materials and methods Nine bacterial species belonging to the normal oral microbiota, including: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Actinomyces israelii, Campylobacter rectus, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Streptococcus sanguinis were tested on Ti surfaces: pretreatment (PT [Ra<0.2 μm]), acid-etched (A [Ra<0.8 μm]), A modified to be hydrophilic (modA), sand-blasted/acid-etched (SLA [Ra = 4 μm]), and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA). Disks were incubated for 24 h in anaerobic conditions using a normal culture medium (CM) or human saliva (HS). The total counts of bacteria and the proportion of each bacterial species were analysed by checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization. Results: Higher counts of bacteria were observed on all surfaces incubated with CM compared with the samples incubated with HS. PT, SLA, and modSLA exhibited higher numbers of attached bacteria in CM, whereas SLA and modSLA had a significant increase in bacterial adhesion in HS. The proportion of the species in the initial biofilms was also influenced by the surface properties and the media used: SLA and modSLA increased the proportion of species like A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. sanguinis in both media, while the adhesion of A. israelii and P. gingivalis on the same surfaces was affected in the presence of saliva. Conclusions The initial biofilm formation and composition were affected by the microtopography and hydrophilicity of the surface and by the media used. PMID:21492236

  11. High-Fat Diet Induces Periodontitis in Mice through Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) Receptor Signaling: Protective Action of Estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Blasco-Baque, Vincent; Serino, Matteo; Vergnes, Jean-Noël; Riant, Elodie; Loubieres, Pascale; Arnal, Jean-François; Gourdy, Pierre; Sixou, Michel; Burcelin, Rémy; Kemoun, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background A fat-enriched diet favors the development of gram negative bacteria in the intestine which is linked to the occurrence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Interestingly, some pathogenic gram negative bacteria are commonly associated with the development of periodontitis which, like T2D, is characterized by a chronic low-grade inflammation. Moreover, estrogens have been shown to regulate glucose homeostasis via an LPS receptor dependent immune-modulation. In this study, we evaluated whether diet-induced metabolic disease would favor the development of periodontitis in mice. In addition, the regulatory role of estrogens in this process was assessed. Methods Four-week-old C57BL6/J WT and CD14 (part of the TLR-4 machinery for LPS-recognition) knock-out female mice were ovariectomised and subcutaneously implanted with pellets releasing either placebo or 17β-estradiol (E2). Mice were then fed with either a normal chow or a high-fat diet for four weeks. The development of diabetes was monitored by an intraperitoneal glucose-tolerance test and plasma insulin concentration while periodontitis was assessed by identification of pathogens, quantification of periodontal soft tissue inflammation and alveolar bone loss. Results The fat-enriched diet increased the prevalence of periodontal pathogenic microbiota like Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia, gingival inflammation and alveolar bone loss. E2 treatment prevented this effect and CD14 knock-out mice resisted high-fat diet-induced periodontal defects. Conclusions/Significance Our data show that mice fed with a diabetogenic diet developed defects and microflora of tooth supporting-tissues typically associated with periodontitis. Moreover, our results suggest a causal link between the activation of the LPS pathway on innate immunity by periodontal microbiota and HFD-induced periodontitis, a pathophysiological mechanism that could be targeted by estrogens. PMID:23133617

  12. B-Cell Deficiency Predisposes Mice to Disseminating Anaerobic Infections: Protection by Passive Antibody Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Linda; Sasakj, Hajime; Stashenko, Philip

    2000-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a high proportion of RAG-2 SCID knockout mice, which lack T and B cells, develop orofacial abscesses and disseminated infections following pulpal infection, whereas immunocompetent control mice do not. In the present study, we sought to identify the components of the adaptive immune response which contribute to protection against disseminating anaerobic infections and sepsis. For this purpose, various genetically engineered immunodeficient mice were employed, including RAG-2 SCID, Igh-6 (B-cell deficient), Tcrb Tcrd (T-cell deficient) and Hc0 (C5 deficient). For abscess induction, the mandibular first molars were subjected to pulp exposure on day 0. Teeth were infected with a mixture of four anaerobic pathogens, including Prevotella intermedia, Streptococcus intermedius, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Peptostreptococcus micros, and teeth were sealed to prevent communication with the oral cavity. The findings demonstrate that both RAG-2 SCID and B-cell-deficient mice, but not T-cell- or C5-deficient mice, have increased susceptibility to the development of disseminating anaerobic infections. Abscess-susceptible RAG-2 SCID and B-cell-deficient mice also showed a significant loss of body weight, splenomegaly, and absent antibacterial antibody production. Furthermore, dissemination was significantly reduced, from 74 to 25%, in susceptible RAG-2 mice by passively transferred antibody, predominantly immunoglobulin G2b (IgG2b) and IgM, against the infecting bacterial innoculum. Fractionated IgG-enriched preparations were more efficient in transferring protection than IgM preparations. We conclude that an antibody-mediated mechanism(s), most likely bacterial opsonization, is of importance in localizing anaerobic root canal infections and in preventing their systemic spread. PMID:10992465

  13. Association of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and pathogenic oral bacteria in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Sahli, Michelle W; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Ram, Pavani K; LaMonte, Michael J.; Hovey, Kathleen M.; Genco, Robert J.; Andrews, Christopher A.; Millen, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous findings of an association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations and periodontal disease, may be partially explained by vitamin D’s antimicrobial properties. To our knowledge, no study has investigated the association between 25(OH)D and pathogenic oral bacteria, a putative cause of periodontal disease. Methods We examined the association between plasma 25(OH)D concentrations and pathogenic oral bacteria among postmenopausal women in the Buffalo Osteoporosis and Periodontal Disease Study (1997–2000), an ancillary study of the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study. Subgingival plaque samples were assessed using immunofluorescence for the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia and Campylobacter rectus. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for prevalent bacteria by quintile (Q) of 25(OH)D concentrations adjusting for age and body mass index. Results Of the 855 participants, 288 (34%) had deficient/inadequate (<50 nmol/L) 25(OH)D concentrations and 497 (58%) had at least one species of pathogenic bacteria. No significant association was found between 25(OH)D and presence of any of these bacteria (adjusted OR for high (Q5) compared to low (Q1) 25(OH)D=0.96; 95% CI: 0.61–1.50, p for trend=0.50). Inverse, although not statistically significant, associations were found between 25(OH)D and more than one species of pathogenic bacteria (adjusted OR for adequate compared to deficient/inadequate 25(OH)D=0.85; 95% CI: 0.60–1.19). Conclusions No association was observed between pathogenic oral bacteria and 25(OH)D concentrations in postmenopausal women. This may be due to the species of bacteria assessed, small effect size or a true absence of an association. PMID:24261910

  14. Modulation of membrane phospholipids, the cytosolic calcium influx and cell proliferation following treatment of B16-F10 cells with recombinant phospholipase-D from Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom.

    PubMed

    Wille, Ana Carolina Martins; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Magnoni, Mariana Gabriel; Boia-Ferreira, Marianna; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Gremski, Waldemiro; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2013-06-01

    The mechanism through which brown spiders (Loxosceles genus) cause dermonecrosis, dysregulated inflammatory responses, hemolysis and platelet aggregation, which are effects reported following spider bites, is currently attributed to the presence of phospholipase-D in the venom. In the present investigation, through two-dimensional immunoblotting, we observed immunological cross-reactivity for at least 25 spots in crude Loxosceles intermedia venom, indicating high expression levels for different isoforms of phospholipase-D. Using a recombinant phospholipase-D from the venom gland of L. intermedia (LiRecDT1) in phospholipid-degrading kinetic experiments, we determined that this phospholipase-D mainly hydrolyzes synthetic sphingomyelin in a time-dependent manner, generating ceramide 1-phosphate plus choline, as well as lysophosphatidylcholine, generating lysophosphatidic acid plus choline, but exhibits little activity against phosphatidylcholine. Through immunofluorescence assays with antibodies against LiRecDT1 and using a recombinant GFP-LiRecDT1 fusion protein, we observed direct binding of LiRecDT1 to the membrane of B16-F10 cells. We determined that LiRecDT1 hydrolyzes phospholipids in detergent extracts and from ghosts of B16-F10 cells, generating choline, indicating that the enzyme can access and modulate and has activity against membrane phospholipids. Additionally, using Fluo-4, a calcium-sensitive fluorophore, it was shown that treatment of cells with phospholipase-D induced an increase in the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, but without altering viability or causing damage to cells. Finally, based on the known endogenous activity of phospholipase-D as an inducer of cell proliferation and the fact that LiRecDT1 binds to the cell surface, hydrolyzing phospholipids to generate bioactive lipids, we employed LiRecDT1 as an exogenous source of phospholipase-D in B16-F10 cells. Treatment of the cells was effective in increasing their proliferation in a

  15. Characterization of the genes encoding the 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate-lactonizing enzymes from the 4-sulfocatechol degradative pathways of Hydrogenophaga intermedia S1 and Agrobacterium radiobacter S2.

    PubMed

    Halak, Sad; Basta, Tamara; Bürger, Sibylle; Contzen, Matthias; Stolz, Andreas

    2006-11-01

    Hydrogenophaga intermedia strain S1 and Agrobacterium radiobacter strain S2 form a mixed bacterial culture which degrades sulfanilate (4-aminobenzenesulfonate) by a novel variation of the beta-ketoadipate pathway via 4-sulfocatechol and 3-sulfomuconate. It was previously proposed that the further metabolism of 3-sulfomuconate is catalysed by modified 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate-lactonizing enzymes (CMLEs) and that these 'type 2' enzymes were different from the conventional CMLEs ('type 1') from the protocatechuate pathway in their ability to convert 3-sulfomuconate in addition to 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. In the present study the genes for two CMLEs (pcaB2S1 and pcaB2S2) were cloned from H. intermedia S1 and A. radiobacter S2, respectively. In both strains, these genes were located close to the previously identified genes encoding the 4-sulfocatechol-converting enzymes. The gene products of pcaB2S1 and pcaB2S2 were therefore tentatively identified as type 2 enzymes involved in the metabolism of 3-sulfomuconate. The genes were functionally expressed and the gene products were shown to convert 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate and 3-sulfomuconate. 4-Carboxymethylene-4-sulfo-but-2-en-olide (4-sulfomuconolactone) was identified by HPLC-MS as the product, which was enzymically formed from 3-sulfomuconate. His-tagged variants of both CMLEs were purified and compared with the CMLE from the protocatechuate pathway of Pseudomonas putida PRS2000 for the conversion of 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate and 3-sulfomuconate. The CMLEs from the 4-sulfocatechol pathway converted 3-sulfomuconate with considerably higher activities than 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. Also the CMLE from P. putida converted 3-sulfomuconate, but this enzyme demonstrated a clear preference for 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate as substrate. Thus it was demonstrated that in the 4-sulfocatechol pathway, distinct CMLEs are formed, which are specifically adapted for the preferred conversion of sulfonated substrates.

  16. The glucose/xylose facilitator Gxf1 from Candida intermedia expressed in a xylose-fermenting industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases xylose uptake in SSCF of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, César; Olofsson, Kim; Ferreira, Carla; Runquist, David; Fonseca, Luís L; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Lidén, Gunnar

    2011-05-01

    Ethanolic fermentation of lignocellulose raw materials requires industrial xylose-fermenting strains capable of complete and efficient D-xylose consumption. A central question in xylose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for xylose fermentation is to improve the xylose uptake. In the current study, the glucose/xylose facilitator Gxf1 from Candida intermedia, was expressed in three different xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strains of industrial origin. The in vivo effect on aerobic xylose growth and the initial xylose uptake rate were assessed. The expression of Gxf1 resulted in enhanced aerobic xylose growth only for the TMB3400 based strain. It displayed more than a 2-fold higher affinity for D-xylose than the parental strain and approximately 2-fold higher initial specific growth rate at 4 g/L D-xylose. Enhanced xylose consumption was furthermore observed when the GXF1-strain was assessed in simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) of pretreated wheat straw. However, the ethanol yield remained unchanged due to increased by-product formation. Metabolic flux analysis suggested that the expression of the Gxf1 transporter had shifted the control of xylose catabolism from transport to the NAD(+) dependent oxidation of xylitol to xylulose. PMID:22113025

  17. Structural analysis of lipopolysaccharides from Eikenella corrodens by use of murine monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, T; Takazoe, I; Okuda, K

    1989-01-01

    The structure of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) of Eikenella corrodens was analyzed with prepared murine monoclonal antibodies. A common core epitope was found in three of seven LPS preparations from E. corrodens strains and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586. Four E. corrodens LPSs were found to possess an O-side-chain epitope which cross-reacted with LPSs from Fusobacterium necrophorum ATCC 25286 and Capnocytophaga ochracea M-12. Lipid A of E. corrodens LPS shared an epitope common among LPSs from various gram-negative rods. Images PMID:2643582

  18. Photodynamic therapy as adjunct to non-surgical periodontal treatment in patients on periodontal maintenance: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Chondros, Panos; Nikolidakis, Dimitris; Christodoulides, Nicos; Rössler, Ralf; Gutknecht, Norbert; Sculean, Anton

    2009-09-01

    Recent preclinical and clinical data have suggested the potential benefit of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of periodontitis. However, currently, there are very limited data from controlled clinical trials evaluating the effect of PDT in the treatment of periodontitis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological effects of the adjunctive use of PDT in non-surgical periodontal treatment in patients receiving supportive periodontal therapy. Twenty-four patients receiving regularly supportive periodontal therapy were randomly treated with either subgingival scaling and root planing followed by a single episode of PDT (test) or subgingival scaling and root planing alone (control). The following parameters were evaluated at baseline and at 3 months and 6 months after therapy: full mouth plaque score (FMPS), full mouth bleeding score (FMBS), bleeding on probing (BOP) at experimental sites, probing pocket depth (PPD), gingival recession (REC), and clinical attachment level (CAL). Primary outcome variables were changes in PPD and CAL. Microbiological evaluation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A.a.), Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.), Prevotella intermedia (P.i.), Tannerella forsythensis (T.f.), Treponema denticola (T.d.), Peptostreptococcus micros (P.m.), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F.n.), Campylobacter rectus (C.r.), Eubacterium nodatum (E.n.), Eikenella corrodens (E.c.), and Capnocytophaga species (C.s.) was also performed at baseline and at 3 months and 6 months after therapy, using a commercially available polymerase chain reaction test. No differences in any of the investigated parameters were observed at baseline between the two groups. At 3 months and 6 months after treatment, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of PPD, CAL and FMPS. At 3 months and 6 months, a statistically significantly higher improvement of BOP was found in the test group. At 3 months after therapy

  19. D-Galactose as an autoinducer 2 inhibitor to control the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Eun-Ju; Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Lee, Julian; Choi, Bong-Kyu

    2016-09-01

    Autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is a quorum sensing molecule to which bacteria respond to regulate various phenotypes, including virulence and biofilm formation. AI-2 plays an important role in the formation of a subgingival biofilm composed mostly of Gram-negative anaerobes, by which periodontitis is initiated. The aim of this study was to evaluate D-galactose as an inhibitor of AI-2 activity and thus of the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens. In a search for an AI-2 receptor of Fusobacterium nucleatum, D-galactose binding protein (Gbp, Gene ID FN1165) showed high sequence similarity with the ribose binding protein (RbsB), a known AI-2 receptor of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. D-Galactose was evaluated for its inhibitory effect on the AI-2 activity of Vibrio harveyi BB152 and F. nucleatum, the major coaggregation bridge organism, which connects early colonizing commensals and late pathogenic colonizers in dental biofilms. The inhibitory effect of D-galactose on the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens was assessed by crystal violet staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy in the absence or presence of AI-2 and secreted molecules of F. nucleatum. D-Galactose significantly inhibited the AI-2 activity of V. harveyi and F. nucleatum. In addition, D-galactose markedly inhibited the biofilm formation of F. nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia induced by the AI-2 of F. nucleatum without affecting bacterial growth. Our results demonstrate that the Gbp may function as an AI-2 receptor and that galactose may be used for prevention of the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens by targeting AI-2 activity. PMID:27572513

  20. Strain-specific colonization patterns and serum modulation of multi-species oral biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Biyikoğlu, Basak; Ricker, Austin; Diaz, Patricia I

    2012-08-01

    Periodontitis results from an ecological shift in the composition of subgingival biofilms. Subgingival community maturation is modulated by inter-organismal interactions and the relationship of communities with the host. In an effort to better understand this process, we evaluated biofilm formation, with oral commensal species, by three strains of the subgingivally prevalent microorganism Fusobacterium nucleatum and four strains of the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. We also tested the effect of serum, which resembles gingival exudates, on subgingival biofilms. Biofilms were allowed to develop in flow cells using salivary medium. We found that although not all strains of F. nucleatum were able to grow in mono-species biofilms, forming a community with health-associated partners Actinomyces oris and Veillonella parvula promoted biofilm growth of all F. nucleatum strains. Strains of P. gingivalis also showed variable ability to form mono-species biofilms. P. gingivalis W50 and W83 did not form biofilms, while ATCC 33277 and 381 formed biofilm structures, but only strain ATCC 33277 grew over time. Unlike the enhanced growth of F. nucleatum with the two health-associated species, no strain of P. gingivalis grew in three-species communities with A. oris and V. parvula. However, addition of F. nucleatum facilitated growth of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 with health-associated partners. Importantly, serum negatively affected the adhesion of F. nucleatum, while it favored biofilm growth by P. gingivalis. This work highlights strain specificity in subgingival biofilm formation. Environmental factors such as serum alter the colonization patterns of oral microorganisms and could impact subgingival biofilms by selectively promoting pathogenic species.

  1. Inactivating effects of the lactoperoxidase system on bacterial lyases involved in oral malodour production.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Manabu; Shin, Kouichirou; Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki; Hironaka, Shouji

    2015-10-01

    The main components of oral malodour have been identified as volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), including hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and methyl mercaptan (CH(3)SH). The lactoperoxidase (LPO) system (consisting of LPO, glucose oxidase, glucose and thiocyanate) was previously shown to exhibit antimicrobial activities against some oral bacteria in vitro and suppressive effects on VSCs in mouth air in a clinical trial. Here, we examined the in vitro effects of the LPO system on the activities of the bacterial lyases involved in the production of VSCs by oral anaerobes. The exposure of crude bacterial extracts of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis or purified methionine γ-lyase to the LPO system resulted in the inactivation of their lyase activities through l-cysteine and l-methionine, which was linked to the production of H(2)S and CH(3)SH, respectively. The exposure of living F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis cells to the LPO system resulted in the suppression of cell numbers and lyase activities. The inactivation of the crude bacterial extracts of F. nucleatum and purified methionine γ-lyase by the LPO system was partly recovered by the addition of DTT. Therefore, the LPO system may inactivate bacterial lyases including methionine γ-lyase by reacting with the free cysteine residues of lyases. These results suggested that the LPO system suppresses the production of VSCs not only through its antimicrobial effects, but also by its inactivating effects on the bacterial lyases of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis.

  2. Synergistic growth effect among bacteria recovered from root canal infections

    PubMed Central

    Moreira Júnior, Gil; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino; Bambirra, Bernardo Henrique Silva; Bambirra, Felipe Henrique Silva; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Farias, Luiz Macedo; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; Moreira, Elizabeth Spangler

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the ecological relationships between bacterial species that colonize infected root canals. Root canal bacteria recovered from one patient with pulp canal necrosis were evaluated in vitro for synergistic and antagonistic activities determined by mono and co-culture growth kinetics and the production of bacteriocin-like substances using the double layer diffusion method. Peptostreptococcus prevotii triggered a significant increase of Fusobacterium nucleatum growth, while the former bacteria did not affect the growth of P. prevotii. The bacterial species did not produce antagonism activity against itself or against any of the other two species. Despite many studies have demonstrated the capability of root canal microorganisms to produce antagonistic substances, these in vitro experimental tests show the synergistic effect of P. prevotii on the growth of F. nucleatum. PMID:24031714

  3. Metabolic and Community Synergy of Oral Bacteria in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Nielson T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The oral periodontopathic bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum has been repeatedly associated with colorectal tumors. Molecular analysis has identified specific virulence factors that promote tumorigenesis in the colon. However, other oral community members, such as members of the Porphyromonas spp., are also found with F. nucleatum on colonic tumors, and thus, narrow studies of individual pathogens do not take community-wide virulence properties into account. A broader view of oral bacterial physiology and pathogenesis identifies two factors that could promote colonization and persistence of oral bacterial communities in the colon. The polymicrobial nature of oral biofilms and the asaccharolytic metabolism of many of these species make them well suited to life in the microenvironment of colonic lesions. Consideration of these two factors offers a novel perspective on the role of oral microbiota in the initiation, development, and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:27303740

  4. Antimicrobial efficacy of denture adhesives on some oral malodor-related microbes.

    PubMed

    Polyzois, Gregory; Stefaniotis, Theodoros; Papaparaskevas, Joseph; Donta, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the antimicrobial efficacy of three denture adhesives toward Streptococcus oralis, mutans, Prevotella oralis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Adhesives used were Corega Ultra(®), Fixodent Pro Original(®) and Biotene(®) Denture Grip. For Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus mutans, four tubes of Trypticase Soy Broth 10 mL and 1 g denture of adhesive were used. In addition four tubes of Trypticase Soy Broth 10 mL without any denture adhesive was employed as control. For Prevotella oralis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, four tubes of thioglycolate 10 mL and 1 g denture adhesive were used for each one, while four tubes of thioglycolate 10 mL without adhesive served as control. All samples were incubated for 48 h at 37°C. After 48 h, the number of colonies was counted and the mean was extracted as cfu/mL. The results were evaluated with ANOVA on ranked data and Tukey's post hoc test at α = 0.05. Streptococcus oralis, mutans, Prevotella oralis and Fusobacterium nucleatum showed decreased number of colonies for each denture adhesive compared to the control. Under the conditions of this in vitro study, all the tested denture adhesives showed antimicrobial efficacy. However, in contrast to the hypothesis, there were differences among them. Corega Ultra(®) and Biotene(®) Denture Grip were more effective for all the tested oral malodor-related microbes than Fixodent Pro Original(®).

  5. Intestinal dysbiosis: novel mechanisms by which gut microbes trigger and prevent disease.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Mark A

    2014-08-01

    New research has identified specific intestinal colonizing microbes that can have significant influence on health and disease. Evidence is reviewed supporting an association between Fusobacterium nucleatum and colon cancer and for a protective role of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in inflammatory bowel disease, of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 in acute intestinal inflammation, of Bifidobacterium infantis in neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, and of Akkermansia muciniphila in obesity and diabetes. These novel bacteria are clinically relevant and present opportunities for more focused diagnosis of colon cancer and prevention of common diseases. PMID:24857830

  6. Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to analyze multispecies oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Karygianni, Lamprini; Hellwig, Elmar; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) constitutes a favorable microbiological method for the analysis of spatial distribution of highly variable phenotypes found in multispecies oral biofilms. The combined use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) produces high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of individual bacteria in their natural environment. Here, we describe the application of M-FISH on early (Streptococcus spp., Actinomyces naeslundii) and late colonizers (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Veillonella spp.) of in situ-formed oral biofilms, the acquisition of CLSM images, as well as the qualitative and quantitative analysis of these digitally obtained and processed images.

  7. Disinfection of dental impressions and occlusal records by ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Larsen, T; Fiehn, N E; Peutzfeldt, A; Owall, B

    2000-06-01

    As chemical disinfection of dental impressions may cause adverse effects on materials and the dental personnel this study examined disinfection by ultraviolet radiation. Alginate, addition silicone rubber and red wax contaminated by Streptococcus salivarius, Fusobacterium nucleatum and five other bacteria in different suspension media were radiated for up to 18 min, and the number of colony forming units was compared to non-radiated controls. The effect of ultraviolet radiation differed among bacterial species and depended on the organic content in the suspension. Generally, the bacterial reduction after ultraviolet radiation was below 4 log steps and thus insufficient for disinfection of dental impressions. PMID:11307403

  8. Disinfection of dental impressions and occlusal records by ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Larsen, T; Fiehn, N E; Peutzfeldt, A; Owall, B

    2000-06-01

    As chemical disinfection of dental impressions may cause adverse effects on materials and the dental personnel this study examined disinfection by ultraviolet radiation. Alginate, addition silicone rubber and red wax contaminated by Streptococcus salivarius, Fusobacterium nucleatum and five other bacteria in different suspension media were radiated for up to 18 min, and the number of colony forming units was compared to non-radiated controls. The effect of ultraviolet radiation differed among bacterial species and depended on the organic content in the suspension. Generally, the bacterial reduction after ultraviolet radiation was below 4 log steps and thus insufficient for disinfection of dental impressions.

  9. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    E Butler; J Wang; Y Xiong; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for how the glycine riboswitch cooperatively regulates gene expression.

  10. Intestinal dysbiosis: novel mechanisms by which gut microbes trigger and prevent disease.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Mark A

    2014-08-01

    New research has identified specific intestinal colonizing microbes that can have significant influence on health and disease. Evidence is reviewed supporting an association between Fusobacterium nucleatum and colon cancer and for a protective role of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in inflammatory bowel disease, of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 in acute intestinal inflammation, of Bifidobacterium infantis in neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, and of Akkermansia muciniphila in obesity and diabetes. These novel bacteria are clinically relevant and present opportunities for more focused diagnosis of colon cancer and prevention of common diseases.

  11. Assessing the efficacy of vesicle fusion with planar membrane arrays using a mitochondrial porin as reporter

    SciTech Connect

    Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila; Hansen, Jesper S.; Stibius, Karin B.; Groth, Jesper S.; Helix-Nielsen, Claus

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} We have established a vesicle fusion efficacy assay based on the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA). {yields} Maximal fusion obtained was almost 150,000 porin insertions during 20 min. {yields} Incorporation can be either first order or exponential kinetics which has implications for establishing protein delivery to biomimetic membranes. -- Abstract: Reconstitution of functionally active membrane protein into artificially made lipid bilayers is a challenge that must be overcome to create a membrane-based biomimetic sensor and separation device. In this study we address the efficacy of proteoliposome fusion with planar membrane arrays. We establish a protein incorporation efficacy assay using the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA) as reporter. We use electrical conductance measurements and fluorescence microscopy to characterize proteoliposome fusion with an array of planar membranes. We show that protein reconstitution in biomimetic membrane arrays may be quantified using the developed FomA assay. Specifically, we show that FomA vesicles are inherently fusigenic. Optimal FomA incorporation is obtained with a proteoliposome lipid-to-protein molar ratio (LPR) = 50 more than 10{sup 5} FomA proteins could be incorporated in a bilayer array with a total membrane area of 2 mm{sup 2} within 20 min. This novel assay for quantifying protein delivery into lipid bilayers may be a useful tool in developing biomimetic membrane applications.

  12. [Intramedullary Abscess of the Cervical Spinal Cord Caused by Advanced Periodontitis:Case Report].

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Atsushi; Ishigaki, Daiya; Isu, Toyohiko; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2016-08-01

    We describe the case of a 60-year-old man with an intramedullary abscess of the cervical spinal cord caused by advanced periodontitis. He suddenly developed severe neck pain and rapidly progressive palsy of the left upper arm. T2-weighted sagittal magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)revealed a hyperintense area extending from C1 to C6. Gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI showed a ring-enhanced lesion at the C3-4 level that was hyperintense on diffusion-weighted MRI. The patient underwent drainage of the abscess through laminectomy. Cultures of the abscess contents revealed Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus micros. Antibiotics administered to the patient to treat the infection with these anaerobic bacteria improved the neurological deficit eight weeks after surgery. The patient was also diagnosed with advanced periodontitis due to Fusobacterium nucleatum that might have caused the intramedullary abscess of the cervical spinal cord. PMID:27506846

  13. IN-VIVO SYNCHROTRON ANALYSIS OF THALLIUM IN IBERIS INTERMEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thallium (TI) is a metal of great toxicological concern and its prevalence in the natural environment has steadily increased as a result of manufacturing and combustion practices. Due to its low natural abundance and the increasing demand, TI is the fourth most expensive metal, t...

  14. IN VIVO SYNCHROTRON ANALYSIS OF THALLIUM IN IBERIS INTERMEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thallium is a metal of great toxicological concern and its prevalence in the natural environment has steadily increased as a result of manufacturing and combustion practices. Due to its low natural abundance and the increasing demand, TI is the fourth most expensive metal, thus, ...

  15. The Kampo medicine Rokumigan possesses antibiofilm, anti-inflammatory, and wound healing properties.

    PubMed

    Liao, James; Azelmat, Jabrane; Zhao, Lei; Yoshioka, Masami; Hinode, Daisuke; Grenier, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal diseases, which are inflammatory diseases of bacterial origin affecting the tooth-supporting tissues, are characterized by inflammation and destruction of gingival connective tissue and alveolar bone, and may lead to tooth loss. The aim of the study was to investigate Rokumigan, a Kampo Japanese traditional medicine made of six different plants, for its capacity to prevent biofilm formation by Fusobacterium nucleatum, to inhibit interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion by mucosal cells, and to promote wound healing in a fibroblast model. Using a microplate colorimetric assay, Rokumigan prevented biofilm formation by F. nucleatum, while it had no effect on bacterial growth. Rokumigan inhibited IL-6 secretion in both epithelial cells and fibroblasts stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. However, it caused no significant inhibition of IL-8 secretion by both cell types. Rokumigan significantly increased proliferation and migration of gingival fibroblasts in a wound healing assay. In conclusion, the Kampo formulation Rokumigan, through suppression of biofilm formation by F. nucleatum, inhibition of IL-6 secretion by gingival epithelial cells and fibroblasts, and promotion of wound healing in a fibroblast model, may have potential application for periodontal diseases.

  16. Massive Parallel Sequencing Provides New Perspectives on Bacterial Brain Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmsen, Marianne Thulin; Skrede, Steinar; Meisal, Roger; Jakovljev, Aleksandra; Gaustad, Peter; Hermansen, Nils Olav; Vik-Mo, Einar; Solheim, Ole; Ambur, Ole Herman; Sæbø, Øystein; Høstmælingen, Christina Teisner; Helland, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development within the field of massive parallel sequencing (MPS) is about to bring this technology within reach for diagnostic microbiology laboratories. We wanted to explore its potential for improving diagnosis and understanding of polymicrobial infections, using bacterial brain abscesses as an example. We conducted a prospective nationwide study on bacterial brain abscesses. Fifty-two surgical samples were included over a 2-year period. The samples were categorized as either spontaneous intracerebral, spontaneous subdural, or postoperative. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified directly from the specimens and sequenced using Ion Torrent technology, with an average of 500,000 reads per sample. The results were compared to those from culture- and Sanger sequencing-based diagnostics. Compared to culture, MPS allowed for triple the number of bacterial identifications. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Streptococcus intermedius or combinations of them were found in all spontaneous polymicrobial abscesses. F. nucleatum was systematically detected in samples with anaerobic flora. The increased detection rate for Actinomyces spp. and facultative Gram-negative rods further revealed several species associations. We suggest that A. aphrophilus, F. nucleatum, and S. intermedius are key pathogens for the establishment of spontaneous polymicrobial brain abscesses. In addition, F. nucleatum seems to be important for the development of anaerobic flora. MPS can accurately describe polymicrobial specimens when a sufficient number of reads is used to compensate for unequal species concentrations and principles are defined to discard contaminant bacterial DNA in the subsequent data analysis. This will contribute to our understanding of how different types of polymicrobial infections develop. PMID:24671797

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Protamine against Oral Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Sang Moo; Lee, Si Young

    2015-01-01

    Protamine is an arginine-rich polycationic protein extracted from sperm cells of vertebrates including fishes such as salmon. The purpose of this study was to investigate the suppressive effects of protamine on the growth of oral pathogens for possible usage in dental materials. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined by the microdilution method. Twelve strains of oral viridans streptococci, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Candida albicans were suppressed by protamine. MIC and MBC values were between 0.009 ~ 20 mg/mL and 0.019 ~ 80 mg/mL, respectively. The bactericidal activities of protamine against susceptible bacterial species were dependent on the concentration of protamine and incubation time. Based on the results of this study, protamine would be a useful compound for the development of antimicrobial agents against oral pathogens in dental materials.

  18. Antibacterial activity of commercially available plant-derived essential oils against oral pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bardají, D K R; Reis, E B; Medeiros, T C T; Lucarini, R; Crotti, A E M; Martins, C H G

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the antibacterial activity of 15 commercially available plant-derived essential oils (EOs) against a panel of oral pathogens. The broth microdilution method afforded the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the assayed EOs. The EO obtained from Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Lauraceae) (CZ-EO) displayed moderate activity against Fusobacterium nucleatum (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL), Actinomyces naeslundii (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL), Prevotella nigrescens (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL) and Streptococcus mutans (MIC = 200 μg/mL; MBC = 400 μg/mL). (Z)-isosafrole (85.3%) was the main chemical component of this oil. We did not detect cinnamaldehyde, previously described as the major constituent of CZ-EO, in specimens collected in other countries.

  19. Oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies microbial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Peyyala, R; Kirakodu, S S; Novak, K F; Ebersole, J L

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the use of a novel model of multispecies biofilms to stimulate profiles of cytokines/chemokines from oral epithelial cells that contribute to local inflammation in the periodontium. Streptococcus gordonii (Sg)/S. oralis (So)/S. sanguinis (Ss) and Sg/Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn)/Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) biofilms elicited significantly elevated levels of IL-1α and showed synergistic stimulatory activity compared with an additive effect of the 3 individual bacteria. Only the Sg/Actinomyces naeslundii (An)/Fn multispecies biofilms elicited IL-6 levels above those of control. IL-8 was a primary response to the Sg/An/Fn biofilms, albeit the level was not enhanced compared with a predicted composite level from the monospecies challenges. These results represent some of the first data documenting alterations in profiles of oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies biofilms.

  20. Clinical appearance of orofacial infections of odontogenic origin in relation to microbiological findings.

    PubMed Central

    Heimdahl, A; von Konow, L; Satoh, T; Nord, C E

    1985-01-01

    Fifty-eight patients with acute orofacial infections of odontogenic origin were classified into two groups with respect to the severity of infection. A total of 174 anaerobic and 22 aerobic bacterial strains were isolated. Anaerobic gram-negative rods were isolated more frequently from the patients with severe infections than from the patients with infections judged as mild (P less than 0.05). The occurrence of Fusobacterium nucleatum especially appeared to be associated with the severity of the infections (P less than 0.05). Penicillin resistance among the anaerobes was rarely found, while resistance to erythromycin was a common finding. All aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were susceptible to clindamycin, and all obligate anaerobic bacteria were susceptible to nitroimidazoles. PMID:4031041

  1. Gut Microbiota, Inflammation, and Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cancer is largely considered to be a disease of genetic and environmental factors, increasing evidence has demonstrated a role for the microbiota (the microorganisms associated with the human body) in shaping inflammatory environments and promoting tumor growth and spread. Herein, we discuss both human data from meta'omics analyses and data from mechanistic studies in cell culture and animal models that support specific bacterial agents as potentiators of tumorigenesis-including Fusobacterium nucleatum, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, and colibactin-producing Escherichia coli. Further, we consider how microbes can be used in diagnosing colorectal cancer and manipulating the tumor environment to encourage better patient outcomes in response to immunotherapy treatments. PMID:27607555

  2. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, C; Falholt, P; Gram, L

    1997-01-01

    Model biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were made on steel and polypropylene substrata. Plaque-resembling biofilms of Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces viscosus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were made on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite. The activity of enzymes against bacterial cells in biofilm was measured by fluorescence microscopy and an indirect conductance test in which evolution of carbon dioxide was measured. Glucose oxidase combined with lactoperoxidase was bactericidal against biofilm bacteria but did not remove the biofilm from the substrata. A complex mixture of polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes was able to remove bacterial biofilm from steel and polypropylene substrata but did not have a significant bactericidal activity. Combining oxidoreductases with polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes resulted in bactericidal activity as well as removal of the biofilm. PMID:9293025

  3. Aspartame as a source of essential phenylalanine for the growth of oral anaerobes.

    PubMed

    Wyss, C

    1993-04-15

    Phenylalanine and aspartic acid requirements were determined for 13 species of oral bacteria using the chemically defined medium OMIZ-W1. None of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides forsythus, Eikenella corrodens, Selenomonas sputigena, Treponema pectinovorum, T. socranskii, or Wolinella recta required either of these amino acid constituents of aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methylester). Phenylalanine was essential for the growth of Capnocytophaga gingivalis, Eubacterium timidum, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. vincentii, while aspartic acid was not required. With the exception of E. timidum, all phenylalanine-dependent strains could grow when the free amino acid was replaced by aspartame at concentrations at least 10-fold lower than those used for aspartame as an artificial sweetener.

  4. Antibacterial Activity of Myristica fragrans against Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Zaleha; Shuhairi, Nadia Najwa; Md Fazly Shah Yap, Nordiyana; Harry Sibungkil, Carrie-Anne; Latip, Jalifah

    2012-01-01

    Myristica fragrans Houtt is mostly cultivated for spices in Penang Island, Malaysia. The ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of flesh, mace and seed of Myristica fragrans was evaluated the bactericidal potential against three Gram-positive cariogenic bacteria (Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175, Streptococcus mitis ATCC 6249, and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419) and three Gram-negative periodontopathic bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29522, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277, and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586). Antibacterial activities of the extracts was determined by twofold serial microdilution, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 1.25 to 640 mg/mL and 0.075 to 40 mg/mL. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was obtained by subculturing method. Among all extracts tested, ethyl acetate extract of flesh has the highest significant inhibitory effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with mean MIC value ranging from 0.625 to 1.25 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL; P = 0.017) and highest bactericidal effects at mean MBC value ranging from 0.625 mg/mL to 20 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL. While for seed and mace of Myristica fragrans, their ethanol extracts exhibited good antibacterial activity against both groups of test pathogens compared to its ethyl acetate extracts. All of the extracts of Myristica fragrans did not show any antibacterial activities against Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586. Thus, our study showed the potential effect of ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts from flesh, seed and mace of Myristica fragrans to be new natural agent that can be incorporated in oral care products.

  5. Anaerobic Co-Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Anaerobic Pathogens - A New In Vitro Model System

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel, Katja; Biedermann, Anne; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Lang, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Background Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent by nature and are originally isolated from bone marrow. In light of a future application of hMSCs in the oral cavity, a body compartment with varying oxygen partial pressures and an omnipresence of different bacterial species i.e. periodontitis pathogens, we performed this study to gain information about the behavior of hMSC in an anaerobic system and the response in interaction with oral bacterial pathogens. Methodology/Principal Findings We established a model system with oral pathogenic bacterial species and eukaryotic cells cultured in anaerobic conditions. The facultative anaerobe bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were studied. Their effects on hMSCs and primary as well as permanent gingival epithelial cells (Ca9-22, HGPEC) were comparatively analyzed. We show that hMSCs cope with anoxic conditions, since 40% vital cells remain after 72 h of anaerobic culture. The Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells are significantly more sensitive to lack of oxygen. All bacterial species reveal a comparatively low adherence to and internalization into hMSCs (0.2% and 0.01% of the initial inoculum, respectively). In comparison, the Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells present better targets for bacterial adherence and internalization. The production of the pro-inflammatory chemokine IL-8 is higher in both gingival epithelial cell lines compared to hMSCs and Fusobacterium nucleatum induce a time-dependent cytokine secretion in both cell lines. Porphyromonas gingivalis is less effective in stimulating secretion of IL-8 in the co-cultivation experiments. Conclusions/significance HMSCs are suitable for use in anoxic regions of the oral cavity. The interaction with local pathogenic bacteria does not result in massive pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. The test system established in this study allowed further investigation of parameters prior to set up of oral hMSC in vivo

  6. Interleukin-8 and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Regulation in Oral Epithelial Cells by Selected Periodontal Bacteria: Multiple Effects of Porphyromonas gingivalis via Antagonistic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, George T.-J.; Kim, Daniel; Lee, Jonathan K.-H.; Kuramitsu, Howard K.; Haake, Susan Kinder

    2001-01-01

    Interaction of bacteria with mucosal surfaces can modulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules produced by epithelial cells. Previously, we showed that expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) by gingival epithelial cells increases following interaction with several putative periodontal pathogens. In contrast, expression of IL-8 and ICAM-1 is reduced after Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 challenge. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms that govern the regulation of these two molecules in bacterially infected gingival epithelial cells. Experimental approaches included bacterial stimulation of gingival epithelial cells by either a brief challenge (1.5 to 2 h) or a continuous coculture throughout the incubation period. The kinetics of IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression following brief challenge were such that (i) secretion of IL-8 by gingival epithelial cells reached its peak 2 h following Fusobacterium nucleatum infection whereas it rapidly decreased within 2 h after P. gingivalis infection and remained decreased up to 30 h and (ii) IL-8 and ICAM-1 mRNA levels were up-regulated rapidly 2 to 4 h postinfection and then decreased to basal levels 8 to 20 h after infection with either Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, F. nucleatum, or P. gingivalis. Attenuation of IL-8 secretion was facilitated by adherent P. gingivalis strains. The IL-8 secreted from epithelial cells after F. nucleatum stimulation could be down-regulated by subsequent infection with P. gingivalis or its culture supernatant. Although these results suggested that IL-8 attenuation at the protein level might be associated with P. gingivalis proteases, the Arg- and Lys-gingipain proteases did not appear to be solely responsible for IL-8 attenuation. In addition, while P. gingivalis up-regulated IL-8 mRNA expression, this effect was overridden when the bacteria were continuously cocultured with the epithelial cells. The IL-8

  7. Alteration of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Extracts of Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum).

    PubMed

    Muzila, Mbaki; Rumpunen, Kimmo; Wright, Helen; Roberts, Helen; Grant, Melissa; Nybom, Hilde; Sehic, Jasna; Ekholm, Anders; Widén, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Harpagophytum, Devil's Claw, is a genus of tuberiferous xerophytic plants native to southern Africa. Some of the taxa are appreciated for their medicinal effects and have been traditionally used to relieve symptoms of inflammation. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate the antioxidant capacity and the content of total phenols, verbascoside, isoverbascoside, and selected iridoids, as well as to investigate the capacity of various Harpagophytum taxa in suppressing respiratory burst in terms of reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils challenged with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), opsonised Staphylococcus aureus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Harpagophytum plants were classified into different taxa according to morphology, and DNA analysis was used to confirm the classification. A putative new variety of H. procumbens showed the highest degree of antioxidative capacity. Using PMA, three Harpagophytum taxa showed anti-inflammatory effects with regard to the PBS control. A putative hybrid between H. procumbens and H. zeyheri in contrast showed proinflammatory effect on the response of neutrophils to F. nucleatum in comparison with treatment with vehicle control. Harpagophytum taxa were biochemically very variable and the response in suppressing respiratory burst differed. Further studies with larger number of subjects are needed to corroborate anti-inflammatory effects of different taxa of Harpagophytum.

  8. MPC-polymer reduces adherence and biofilm formation by oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hirota, K; Yumoto, H; Miyamoto, K; Yamamoto, N; Murakami, K; Hoshino, Y; Matsuo, T; Miyake, Y

    2011-07-01

    Oral biofilms such as dental plaque cause dental caries and periodontitis, as well as aspiration pneumonia and infectious endocarditis by translocation. Hence, the suppression of oral biofilm formation is an issue of considerable importance. Mechanical removal, disinfectants, inhibition of polysaccharide formation, and artificial sugar have been used for the reduction of oral biofilm. From the viewpoint of the inhibition of bacterial adherence, we investigated whether aqueous biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-polymer can reduce streptococcal colonization and biofilm formation. We examined the effects of MPC-polymer on streptococcal adherence to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and oral epithelial cells, and the adherence of Fusobacterium nucleatum to streptococcal biofilm. MPC-polymer application markedly inhibited both the adherence and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and streptococcal adherence to oral epithelial cells, and reduced the adherence of F. nucleatum to streptococcal biofilms. A small-scale clinical trial revealed that mouthrinsing with MPC-polymer inhibited the increase of oral bacterial numbers, especially of S. mutans. These findings suggest that MPC-polymer is a potent inhibitor of bacterial adherence and biofilm development, and may be useful to prevent dental-plaque-related diseases. (UMIN Clinical Trial Registry UMIN000003471).

  9. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  10. Relationship of Clinical and Microbiological Variables in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Sakalauskiene, Jurgina; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Ivanauskiene, Egle; Šaferis, Viktoras

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to analyze how metabolic control of type 1 diabetes is related to clinical and microbiological periodontal parameters. Material/Methods The study involved 56 subjects aged from 19 to 50 years divided into 2 groups: healthy subjects (the H group), and diabetic (type 1 diabetes) patients with chronic untreated generalized periodontitis (the DM group). The glycosylated hemoglobin value (HbA1c) was determined using the UniCel DxC 800 SYNCHRON System (Beckman Coulter, USA), and the concentration in blood was measured by the turbidimetric immunoinhibition method. A molecular genetic assay (Micro-IDent plus, Germany) was used to detect periodontopathogenic bacteria in plaque samples. Periodontitis was confirmed by clinical and radiological examination. Results Fusobacterium nucleatum, Capnocytophaga species, and Eikenella corrodens were the most frequently found bacteria in dental plaque samples (77.8%, 66.7%, and 33.4%, respectively), whereas Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans was identified 40.7% less frequently in the DM group than in the H group. The strongest relationship was observed between the presence of 2 periodontal pathogens – F. nucleatum and Capnocytophaga spp. – and poorer metabolic control in type 1 diabetes patients (HbA1c) and all clinical parameters of periodontal pathology. Conclusions Periodontal disease was more evident in type 1 diabetic patients, and the prevalence of periodontitis was greatly increased in subjects with poorer metabolic control. PMID:25294115

  11. Mobile Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Han, Y.W.; Wang, X.

    2013-01-01

    The link between oral infections and adverse systemic conditions has attracted much attention in the research community. Several mechanisms have been proposed, including spread of the oral infection due to transient bacteremia resulting in bacterial colonization in extra-oral sites, systemic injury by free toxins of oral pathogens, and systemic inflammation caused by soluble antigens of oral pathogens. Mounting evidence supports a major role of the systemic spread of oral commensals and pathogens to distant body sites causing extra-oral infections and inflammation. We review here the most recent findings on systemic infections and inflammation complicated by oral bacteria, including cardiovascular disease, adverse pregnancy outcomes, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer, respiratory tract infections, and organ inflammations and abscesses. The recently identified virulence mechanisms of oral species Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Streptococcus mutans, and Campylobacter rectus are also reviewed. A pattern emerges indicating that only select subtype(s) of a given species, e.g., F. nucleatum subspecies animalis and polymorphum and S. mutans non-c serotypes, are prone to extra-oral translocation. These findings advocate the importance of identification and quantification of potential pathogens at the subtype levels for accurate prediction of disease potential. PMID:23625375

  12. Immunoglobulin G response to subgingival gram-negative bacteria in human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Y; Okuda, K; Takazoe, I

    1984-01-01

    Serum and gingival crevicular fluid from normal healthy adults and patients with periodontitis were screened for immunoglobulin G antibodies to antigens from Bacteroides gingivalis 381, Bacteroides intermedius 24, Bacteroides loescheii ATCC 15930, Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586, Eikenella corrodens 1073, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29522, and Capnocytophaga sp. strain M-12. Immunoglobulin G antibody titers to the antigens were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The antibody levels to B. gingivalis in serum and gingival crevicular fluid were significantly higher in the samples from patients with periodontitis than in samples from healthy individuals. Although there were individual differences within patient groups, a positive correlation (P less than 0.01) was found between the serum immunoglobulin G levels to B. gingivalis and the development of periodontitis. The antibodies to F. nucleatum (P less than 0.05), E. corrodens (P less than 0.05), and A. actinomycetemcomitans were slightly higher in patients with periodontitis than in normal subjects. There were no remarkable differences between the two groups in titers to B. intermedius, B. loescheii, and Capnocytophaga sp. PMID:6735473

  13. Alteration of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Extracts of Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum).

    PubMed

    Muzila, Mbaki; Rumpunen, Kimmo; Wright, Helen; Roberts, Helen; Grant, Melissa; Nybom, Hilde; Sehic, Jasna; Ekholm, Anders; Widén, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Harpagophytum, Devil's Claw, is a genus of tuberiferous xerophytic plants native to southern Africa. Some of the taxa are appreciated for their medicinal effects and have been traditionally used to relieve symptoms of inflammation. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate the antioxidant capacity and the content of total phenols, verbascoside, isoverbascoside, and selected iridoids, as well as to investigate the capacity of various Harpagophytum taxa in suppressing respiratory burst in terms of reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils challenged with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), opsonised Staphylococcus aureus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Harpagophytum plants were classified into different taxa according to morphology, and DNA analysis was used to confirm the classification. A putative new variety of H. procumbens showed the highest degree of antioxidative capacity. Using PMA, three Harpagophytum taxa showed anti-inflammatory effects with regard to the PBS control. A putative hybrid between H. procumbens and H. zeyheri in contrast showed proinflammatory effect on the response of neutrophils to F. nucleatum in comparison with treatment with vehicle control. Harpagophytum taxa were biochemically very variable and the response in suppressing respiratory burst differed. Further studies with larger number of subjects are needed to corroborate anti-inflammatory effects of different taxa of Harpagophytum. PMID:27429708

  14. Experimental alveolitis in rats: microbiological, acute phase response and histometric characterization of delayed alveolar healing

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES, Moacyr Tadeu Vicente; CARDOSO, Camila Lopes; de CARVALHO, Paulo Sérgio Perri; CESTARI, Tânia Mary; FERES, Magda; GARLET, Gustavo Pompermaier; FERREIRA JÚNIOR, Osny

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alveolitis is not well known and therefore experimental situations that mimic some features of this disease should be developed. Objective In this study, the evolution of the experimentally induced infection in rat sockets is characterized, which leads to clinical signs of suppurative alveolitis with remarkable wound healing disturbs. Material and methods Non-infected (Group I) and experimentally infected sockets in Rattus novergicus (Group II) were histometrically evaluated regarding the kinetics of alveolar healing. In addition, the characterization of the present bacteria in inoculation material and the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) were performed. The detected species were Capnocytophaga ochracea, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss nucleatum, Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus anginosus, Treponema socranskii and Streptococcus sanguis. Results All experimentally infected rats developed suppurative alveolitis, showing higher levels of CRP in comparison to those non-infected ones. Furthermore, infected rats presented a significant delayed wound healing as measured by the histometric analysis (higher persistent polymorphonuclear infiltrate and lower density of newly formed bone). Conclusion These findings indicate that rat sockets with experimentally induced infection produced higher levels of serum CRP, showing the potential of disseminated infection and a disturb in the alveolar repair process in an interesting experimental model for alveolitis studies. PMID:21625744

  15. Effects of surface reaction-type pre-reacted glass ionomer on oral biofilm formation of Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Kisaki; Oguchi, Riyo; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Konishi, Kiyoshi; Karibe, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, a bacterium involved in the initial colonization of tooth surfaces, contributes to dental biofilm formation and is an important cause of infective endocarditis. This study aimed to investigate the influence of surface reaction-type pre-reacted glass ionomer (S-PRG) filler on oral bacterial growth and aggregation of S. gordonii. The effect of various concentrations of S-PRG eluate on the growth and the biofilm formation of S. gordonii and other oral microorganisms (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus oralis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Candida albicans) was assessed. In addition, the effect of S-PRG eluate on coaggregation of S. gordonii with both S. oralis and Fusobacterium nucleatum was assessed. The effect of S-PRG eluate treatment on autoaggregation of S. gordonii was also evaluated. Our results indicate that S-PRG eluate treatment reduced both for the growth and for biofilm of all organisms in a dose-dependent manner. Coaggregation of S. gordonii with both S. oralis and F. nucleatum was inhibited by S-PRG eluate, whereas autoaggregation of S. gordonii increased at certain concentrations of S-PRG eluate. These results indicate that the S-PRG filler possesses antimicrobial activity that is mediated by inhibiting growth and biofilm of oral microorganisms, and by suppressing coaggregation of S. gordonii. In addition, these findings indicate that coaggregation of S. gordonii with other bacteria is inhibited by increased autoaggregation of S. gordonii. PMID:26319990

  16. Intracanal Antibiotic Medication for Sustained Root Surface Disinfection–A Laboratory Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zaruba, Markus Tobias Winfried; Filli, Tilla; Rechenberg, Dan-Krister; Thurnheer, Thomas; Attin, Thomas; Schmidlin, Patrick Roger

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the release of an antibiotic mixture of ciprofloxacin, cerfuroxim and metronidazole (TreVitaMix, TVM) through human dentine and to assess the growth inhibition of Fusobacterium nucleatum. Material and Methods: Twenty-four extracted human incisors were scaled and endodontically treated. Root canals were either filled with antibiotic tri-mixture (TVM) or with the carrier material alone (propylene glycol, PG) and were coronally and apically sealed with a flowable composite. Transradicular medicament release was spectrophotometrically measured at 277 nm in simulated body fluid for up to 21 days. In a second part, an agar diffusion assay (F. nucleatum) with representative TVM concentrations as determined in the first part was performed to study the growth inhibition. Samples were anaerobical incubated for 48 h and inhibition zones were measured. Results: TVM was spectrophotometrically detectable in the immersion solution and released in decreasing concentrations up to 21 days (222.5 ± 65.2 mg/ml at day 1 and 35.1 ± 15.6 mg/ml at day 21). In addition, inhibition zones were shown in the agar diffusion assay at representative TVM concentrations. The carrier material showed no antibacterial effect. Conlusion: TVM showed the potential to penetrate through dentine and to inhibit bacterial growth. Therefore, it might have the potential to disinfect the outer root surface in perio-endo lesions, but further research is needed to confirm these observations. PMID:26966464

  17. Subgingival Plaque in Periodontal Health Antagonizes at Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Inhibits E-Selectin Expression on Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gümüş, Pinar; Nizam, Nejat; Buduneli, Nurcan

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the subgingival microbial community to induce an inappropriate inflammatory response ultimately results in the destruction of bone and gingival tissue. In this study, subgingival plaque samples from both healthy and diseased sites in the same individual were obtained from adults with chronic periodontitis and screened for their ability to either activate Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) or TLR4 and to antagonize TLR4-specific activation by agonist, Fusobacterium nucleatum LPS. Subgingival plaque from diseased sites strongly activated TLR4, whereas matched plaque samples obtained from healthy sites were significantly more variable, with some samples displaying strong TLR4 antagonism, while others were strong TLR4 agonists when combined with F. nucleatum LPS. Similar results were observed when TLR4 dependent E-selectin expression by endothelial cells was determined. These results are the first to demonstrate TLR4 antagonism from human plaque samples and demonstrate that healthy but not diseased sites display a wide variation in TLR4 agonist and antagonist behavior. The results have identified a novel characteristic of clinically healthy sites and warrant further study on the contribution of TLR4 antagonism in the progression of a healthy periodontal site to a diseased one. PMID:26483407

  18. Bacteriological analysis of necrotic pulp and fistulae in primary teeth

    PubMed Central

    FABRIS, Antônio Scalco; NAKANO, Viviane; AVILA-CAMPOS, Mario Júlio

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Primary teeth work as guides for the eruption of permanent dentition, contribute for the development of the jaws, chewing process, preparing food for digestion, and nutrient assimilation. Treatment of pulp necrosis in primary teeth is complex due to anatomical and physiological characteristics and high number of bacterial species present in endodontic infections. The bacterial presence alone or in association in necrotic pulp and fistula samples from primary teeth of boys and girls was evaluated. Material and Methods Necrotic pulp (103) and fistula (7) samples from deciduous teeth with deep caries of 110 children were evaluated. Bacterial morphotypes and species from all clinical samples were determined. Results A predominance of gram-positive cocci (81.8%) and gram-negative coccobacilli (49.1%) was observed. In 88 out of 103 pulp samples, a high prevalence of Enterococcus spp. (50%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (49%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (25%) and Prevotella nigrescens (11.4%) was observed. Porphyromonas gingivalis was detected in three out of seven fistula samples, Enterococcus spp. in two out of seven samples, and F. nucleatum, P. nigrescens and D. pneumosintes in one out of seven samples. Conclusions Our results show that Enterococcus spp. and P. gingivalis were prevalent in necrotic pulp from deciduous teeth in boys from 2 to 5 years old, and that care of the oral cavity of children up to five years of age is important. PMID:24676582

  19. The antibiofilm activity of lingonberry flavonoids against oral pathogens is a case connected to residual complexity.

    PubMed

    Riihinen, Kaisu R; Ou, Zhen M; Gödecke, Tanja; Lankin, David C; Pauli, Guido F; Wu, Christine D

    2014-09-01

    The antimicrobial activity of lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.) was evaluated against two oral pathogens, Streptococcus mutans and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Long-bed gel permeation chromatography (GPC; Sephadex LH-20) yielded purified flavonoids, with the most efficient minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against planktonic cells in the anthocyanin and procyanidin primary fractions against F. nucleatum (63-125 μg/ml) and in the procyanidin rich fraction against S. mutans (16-31 μg/ml). The purified flavonol glycosides and procyanidins inhibited biofilm formation of S. mutans (MICs 16-31 μg/ml), while the corresponding reference compounds showed no activity. Secondary GPC purification yielded flavonol glycosides devoid of antibiofilm activity in the 50% MeOH fraction, while elution with 70% acetone recovered a brownish material with activity against S. mutans biofilm (MIC 8 μg/ml). Even after HPLC-PDA, NMR, and MALDI-TOF analyses, the structural identity of this material remained unknown, while its color and analytical characteristics appear to be consistent with flavonoid oxidation products. PMID:24879903

  20. Alteration of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Extracts of Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum)

    PubMed Central

    Muzila, Mbaki; Wright, Helen; Roberts, Helen; Grant, Melissa; Nybom, Hilde; Sehic, Jasna; Ekholm, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Harpagophytum, Devil's Claw, is a genus of tuberiferous xerophytic plants native to southern Africa. Some of the taxa are appreciated for their medicinal effects and have been traditionally used to relieve symptoms of inflammation. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate the antioxidant capacity and the content of total phenols, verbascoside, isoverbascoside, and selected iridoids, as well as to investigate the capacity of various Harpagophytum taxa in suppressing respiratory burst in terms of reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils challenged with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), opsonised Staphylococcus aureus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Harpagophytum plants were classified into different taxa according to morphology, and DNA analysis was used to confirm the classification. A putative new variety of H. procumbens showed the highest degree of antioxidative capacity. Using PMA, three Harpagophytum taxa showed anti-inflammatory effects with regard to the PBS control. A putative hybrid between H. procumbens and H. zeyheri in contrast showed proinflammatory effect on the response of neutrophils to F. nucleatum in comparison with treatment with vehicle control. Harpagophytum taxa were biochemically very variable and the response in suppressing respiratory burst differed. Further studies with larger number of subjects are needed to corroborate anti-inflammatory effects of different taxa of Harpagophytum. PMID:27429708

  1. Antigen activation of THP-1 human monocytic cells after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide from oral microorganisms and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Baqui, A A; Meiller, T F; Kelley, J I; Turng, B F; Falkler, W A

    1999-05-01

    A human THP-1 monocyte cell line culture system has been utilized to evaluate the morphological changes in THP-1 cells and to measure expression of activation antigens (CD-11b, CD-11c, CD-14, CD-35, CD-68, CD-71 and HLA-DR) as evidence of maturation of THP-1 cells in response to stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the oral microorganisms, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. THP-1 cells were stimulated with LPS (1 microgram/ml) of P. gingivalis or F. nucleatum for different time periods (1, 2, 4 and 7 d). Detection of different activation antigens on THP-1 cells was performed by indirect immunohistochemical staining followed by light microscopy. Confirmational studies were performed in parallel using indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy for detection of the corresponding activation antigens. Expression of different activation antigens by resting THP-1 cells revealed HLA-DR to be on 3% of the cells; CD-11b, 9%; CD-11c, 8%; CD-14, 22%; CD-35, 9% and CD-68, 7%. The CD-71 activation antigen was not expressed in untreated THP-1 cells. LPS stimulation increased expression of all activation antigens. A significant (p < 0.05) increase in expression of CD-11b, CD-11c, CD-14, CD-35, CD-68 and CD-71 was observed when GM-CSF (50 IU/ml) was supplemented during the treatment of THP-1 cells with LPS of F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis. Activation and differentiation of THP-1 cells by LPS from oral microorganisms in the presence of GM-CSF supports a role for human macrophages in acute and chronic periodontal diseases and may explain the clinically observable periodontal exacerbations in some patients after GM-CSF therapy.

  2. Hierarchical micro/nanostructured titanium with balanced actions to bacterial and mammalian cells for dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Shichong; Wang, Manle; Gu, Yingxin; Luo, Huiwen; Meng, Fanhao; Liu, Xuanyong; Lai, Hongchang

    2015-01-01

    A versatile strategy to endow dental implants with long-term antibacterial ability without compromising the cytocompatibility is highly desirable to combat implant-related infection. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been utilized as a highly effective and broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for surface modification of biomedical devices. However, the high mobility and subsequent hazardous effects of the particles on mammalian cells may limit its practical applications. Thus, Ag NPs were immobilized on the surface of sand-blasted, large grit, and acid-etched (SLA) titanium by manipulating the atomic-scale heating effect of silver plasma immersion ion implantation. The silver plasma immersion ion implantation-treated SLA surface gave rise to both good antibacterial activity and excellent compatibility with mammalian cells. The antibacterial activity rendered by the immobilized Ag NPs was assessed using Fusobacterium nucleatum and Staphylococcus aureus, commonly suspected pathogens for peri-implant disease. The immobilized Ag NPs offered a good defense against multiple cycles of bacteria attack in both F. nucleatum and S. aureus, and the mechanism was independent of silver release. F. nucleatum showed a higher susceptibility to Ag NPs than S. aureus, which might be explained by the presence of different wall structures. Moreover, the immobilized Ag NPs had no apparent toxic influence on the viability, proliferation, and differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. These results demonstrated that good bactericidal activity could be obtained with very small quantities of immobilized Ag NPs, which were not detrimental to the mammalian cells involved in the osseointegration process, and promising for titanium-based dental implants with commercial SLA surfaces. PMID:26604743

  3. Pyrosequencing Analysis of Subgingival Microbiota in Distinct Periodontal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, O-J; Yi, H; Jeon, J H; Kang, S-S; Koo, K-T; Kum, K-Y; Chun, J; Yun, C-H; Han, S H

    2015-07-01

    Subgingival microorganisms are potentially associated with periodontal diseases. However, changes in the subgingival microbiota during the progress of periodontal diseases are poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed bacterial communities in the subgingival paper point samples from 32 Korean individuals with no sign of disease, gingivitis, or periodontitis using 454 FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. A total of 256,113 reads representing 26 phyla, 433 genera, and 1,016 species were detected. Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Synergistetes, and Spirochaetes were the abundant phyla in periodontitis subjects, whereas Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were identified as the dominant phyla in the gingivitis and healthy subjects, respectively. Although high levels of Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, Fretibacterium, Rothia, Filifactor, and Treponema genera were observed in the periodontitis subjects, Streptococcus, Capnocytophaga, Leptotrichia, and Haemophilus genera were found at high frequency in the gingivitis subjects. Species including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Fretibacterium fastidiosum were significantly increased in periodontitis subjects. On the other hand, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, and Leptotrichia hongkongensis were preferentially observed in the gingivitis subjects. Intriguingly, the halophile Halomonas hamiltonii was revealed as a predominant species in the healthy subjects. Based on Fast UniFrac analysis, distinctive bacterial clusters were classified for the healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis state. The current findings might be useful for understanding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal diseases.

  4. Pyrosequencing Analysis of Subgingival Microbiota in Distinct Periodontal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, O-J; Yi, H; Jeon, J H; Kang, S-S; Koo, K-T; Kum, K-Y; Chun, J; Yun, C-H; Han, S H

    2015-07-01

    Subgingival microorganisms are potentially associated with periodontal diseases. However, changes in the subgingival microbiota during the progress of periodontal diseases are poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed bacterial communities in the subgingival paper point samples from 32 Korean individuals with no sign of disease, gingivitis, or periodontitis using 454 FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. A total of 256,113 reads representing 26 phyla, 433 genera, and 1,016 species were detected. Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Synergistetes, and Spirochaetes were the abundant phyla in periodontitis subjects, whereas Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were identified as the dominant phyla in the gingivitis and healthy subjects, respectively. Although high levels of Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, Fretibacterium, Rothia, Filifactor, and Treponema genera were observed in the periodontitis subjects, Streptococcus, Capnocytophaga, Leptotrichia, and Haemophilus genera were found at high frequency in the gingivitis subjects. Species including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Fretibacterium fastidiosum were significantly increased in periodontitis subjects. On the other hand, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, and Leptotrichia hongkongensis were preferentially observed in the gingivitis subjects. Intriguingly, the halophile Halomonas hamiltonii was revealed as a predominant species in the healthy subjects. Based on Fast UniFrac analysis, distinctive bacterial clusters were classified for the healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis state. The current findings might be useful for understanding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal diseases. PMID:25904141

  5. Oral Gram-negative anaerobic bacilli as a reservoir of β-lactam resistance genes facilitating infections with multiresistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dupin, Clarisse; Tamanai-Shacoori, Zohreh; Ehrmann, Elodie; Dupont, Anais; Barloy-Hubler, Frédérique; Bousarghin, Latifa; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Many β-lactamases have been described in various Gram-negative bacilli (Capnocytophaga, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, etc.) of the oral cavity, belonging to class A of the Ambler classification (CepA, CblA, CfxA, CSP-1 and TEM), class B (CfiA) or class D in Fusobacterium nucleatum (FUS-1). The minimum inhibitory concentrations of β-lactams are variable and this variation is often related to the presence of plasmids or other mobile genetic elements (MGEs) that modulate the expression of resistance genes. DNA persistence and bacterial promiscuity in oral biofilms also contribute to genetic transformation and conjugation in this particular microcosm. Overexpression of efflux pumps is facilitated because the encoding genes are located on MGEs, in some multidrug-resistant clinical isolates, similar to conjugative transposons harbouring genes encoding β-lactamases. All these facts lead us to consider the oral cavity as an important reservoir of β-lactam resistance genes and a privileged place for genetic exchange, especially in commensal strictly anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli.

  6. In vitro activities of faropenem against 579 strains of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Hannah M; Molitoris, Denise; St John, Shahera; Vu, Ann; Read, Erik K; Finegold, Sydney M

    2002-11-01

    The activity of faropenem, a new oral penem, was tested against 579 strains of anaerobic bacteria by using the NCCLS-approved reference method. Drugs tested included amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefoxitin, clindamycin, faropenem, imipenem, and metronidazole. Of the 176 strains of Bacteroides fragilis group isolates tested, two isolates had faropenem MICs of 64 micro g/ml and imipenem MICs of >32 micro g/ml. Faropenem had an MIC of 16 micro g/ml for an additional isolate of B. fragilis; this strain was sensitive to imipenem (MIC of 1 micro g/ml). Both faropenem and imipenem had MICs of < or=4 micro g/ml for all isolates of Bacteroides capillosus (10 isolates), Bacteroides splanchnicus (13 isolates), Bacteroides ureolyticus (11 isolates), Bilophila wadsworthia (11 isolates), Porphyromonas species (42 isolates), Prevotella species (78 isolates), Campylobacter species (25 isolates), Sutterella wadsworthensis (11 isolates), Fusobacterium nucleatum (19 isolates), Fusobacterium mortiferum/varium (20 isolates), and other Fusobacterium species (9 isolates). Faropenem and imipenem had MICs of 16 to 32 micro g/ml for two strains of Clostridium difficile; the MICs for all other strains of Clostridium tested (69 isolates) were < or =4 micro g/ml. Faropenem had MICs of 8 and 16 micro g/ml, respectively, for two strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (MICs of imipenem were 2 micro g/ml). MICs were < or =4 micro g/ml for all other strains of gram-positive anaerobic cocci (53 isolates) and non-spore-forming gram-positive rods (28 isolates). Other results were as expected and reported in previous studies. No metronidazole resistance was seen in gram-negative anaerobes other than S. wadsworthensis (18% resistant); 63% of gram-positive non-spore-forming rods were resistant. Some degree of clindamycin resistance was seen in most of the groups tested. PMID:12384389

  7. In Vitro Activities of Faropenem against 579 Strains of Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, Hannah M.; Molitoris, Denise; St. John, Shahera; Vu, Ann; Read, Erik K.; Finegold, Sydney M.

    2002-01-01

    The activity of faropenem, a new oral penem, was tested against 579 strains of anaerobic bacteria by using the NCCLS-approved reference method. Drugs tested included amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefoxitin, clindamycin, faropenem, imipenem, and metronidazole. Of the 176 strains of Bacteroides fragilis group isolates tested, two isolates had faropenem MICs of 64 μg/ml and imipenem MICs of >32 μg/ml. Faropenem had an MIC of 16 μg/ml for an additional isolate of B. fragilis; this strain was sensitive to imipenem (MIC of 1 μg/ml). Both faropenem and imipenem had MICs of ≤4 μg/ml for all isolates of Bacteroides capillosus (10 isolates), Bacteroides splanchnicus (13 isolates), Bacteroides ureolyticus (11 isolates), Bilophila wadsworthia (11 isolates), Porphyromonas species (42 isolates), Prevotella species (78 isolates), Campylobacter species (25 isolates), Sutterella wadsworthensis (11 isolates), Fusobacterium nucleatum (19 isolates), Fusobacterium mortiferum/varium (20 isolates), and other Fusobacterium species (9 isolates). Faropenem and imipenem had MICs of 16 to 32 μg/ml for two strains of Clostridium difficile; the MICs for all other strains of Clostridium tested (69 isolates) were ≤4 μg/ml. Faropenem had MICs of 8 and 16 μg/ml, respectively, for two strains of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (MICs of imipenem were 2 μg/ml). MICs were ≤4 μg/ml for all other strains of gram-positive anaerobic cocci (53 isolates) and non-spore-forming gram-positive rods (28 isolates). Other results were as expected and reported in previous studies. No metronidazole resistance was seen in gram-negative anaerobes other than S. wadsworthensis (18% resistant); 63% of gram-positive non-spore-forming rods were resistant. Some degree of clindamycin resistance was seen in most of the groups tested. PMID:12384389

  8. Curvularin and Dehydrocurvularin as Phytotoxic Constituents from Curvularia intermedia Infecting Pandanus amaryllifolius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbes are good sources of biologically active compounds that can be used as pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. As part of our continuous efforts in search for biopesticides from natural sources, a fungus was isolated from leaves of Pandanus amaryllifolius that showed severe necrosis. This fungus ...

  9. THE BIOSYNTHESIS, INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT, AND PACKAGING OF MELANOCYTE-STIMULATING PEPTIDES IN THE AMPHIBIAN PARS INTERMEDIA

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments in which glycine-3H has been introduced into excised neurointermediate lobes of Xenopus laevis incubated in a modified Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate medium have shown that ∼ 50% of the incorporated radioactivity is present in small peptides which have an electrophoretic mobility characteristic of the melanocyte-stimulating (MSH) peptides shown to be elaborated within the tissue. Based on these results and the demonstration that a discrete ∼ 7 min pulse of the label can be introduced into the tissue, electron microscope radioautography has been employed to follow the subcellular events concerned with the synthesis, intracellular transport, and packaging of the labeled secretory product. Together, these studies indicate that the newly synthesized material arises in peptide form, rather than as part of a larger prohormone molecule, on the ribosomes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum within the parenchymal cells of the intermediate portion of the lobe. A proportion is then incorporated into and remains for an extended period within the intracisternal granules which are a feature of the rough endoplasmic reticulum within these cells in vitro Most (∼ 60%) of the labeled secretory product, however, is transferred to the Golgi complex within 30 min and, within a further 10 min, becomes packaged into small (∼ 200 mµ) electron-opaque secretory granules. It is probable that under the conditions employed these granules represent the final intracellular location of secretory product before it is released PMID:5028257

  10. Antioxidant activity and phenolic composition of Lavandin (Lavandula x intermedia Emeric ex Loiseleur) waste.

    PubMed

    Torras-Claveria, Laura; Jauregui, Olga; Bastida, Jaume; Codina, Carles; Viladomat, Francesc

    2007-10-17

    The phenolic content of lavandin waste obtained after the distillation of essential oils for the perfume industry was investigated to find an alternative use for this material. The antioxidant activity of different fractions as well as their total phenolic content were evaluated by different methods. Twenty-three phenolic compounds were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to ionspray mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), including phenolic acids, hydroxycinnamoylquinic acid derivatives, glucosides of hydroxycinnamic acids, and flavonoids, none of which have previously been reported in lavandin waste. Some structure-activity relationships were proposed by relating the type of scavenging activity of different fractions with the identified phenolic compounds. Contents of representative phenolic acids of Lamiaceae (chlorogenic and rosmarinic) were evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and compared with those of other plant species.

  11. Contabilidad Elemental e Intermedia. Prontuario. Documento de Trabajo (Elementary and Intermediate Accounting. Handbook. Working Document).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puerto Rico State Dept. of Education, Hato Rey. Area for Vocational and Technical Education.

    This handbook for elementary and intermediate accounting is intended for teaching the basics of recording and calculating business transactions to students preparing to be accounting clerks. The guide begins with a description of the 2-semester course, a list of competencies to be developed, and the terminal objectives. The course outline for…

  12. Science and Science Fiction: Methods for Evaluating Interdisciplinary and Intermedia Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lear, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Supplementing classroom instruction with online materials and learning activities is becoming less avant-garde and more of an expectation for faculty members in higher education. The use of Blackboard, WebCT, or proprietary software, like Georgia Institute of Technology's Sakai installation (T-Square), has become a requirement, rather than an…

  13. BITING IN THE SALAMANDER SIREN INTERMEDIA: COURTSHIP COMPONENT OR AGONISTIC BEHAVIOR? (R825795)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. IN VIVO SYNCHROTRON STUDY OF THALLIUM SPECIATION AND COMPARTMENTATION IN IBERIS INTERMEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thallium (TI) is a metal of great toxicological concern and its prevalence in the natural environment has steadily increased as a result of manufacturing and combustion practices. Due to its low natural abundance and increasing demand, TI is the fourth most expensive metal, thus,...

  15. The Egg The Cart The Horse The Chicken: Cyberwriting, Sound, Intermedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hazel; Dean, Roger T.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the way new technologies are shifting page-based notions of literature. Argues hyperlinking and animation allow for new kinds of textual structure and linguistic mobility. Suggests the merging of words, sound, and visual image within the domain of the computer can create new types of meaning through semiotic juxtaposition and exchange.…

  16. Secuencias evolutivas e isocronas para estrellas de baja masa e intermedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panei, J.; Baume, G.

    2016-08-01

    We present theoretical evolutionary sequences for low- and intermediate-mass stars. The masses calculated range from 1.7 to 10 M. The initial chemical composition is . In addition, we have taken into account a nuclear network with 17 isotopes and 34 nuclear reactions. With respect to the mix, we considered overshooting with a parameter . The evolutionary calculations were initialized from the region of instability of Hayashi, in order to calculate isochrones of pre-sequence, too.

  17. [Noma in a 4 year-old girl: a case report from Chad].

    PubMed

    Cocquempot, K; Javaudin, O; Lerasle, P; Aigle, L

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a 4-year-old girl in Chad with noma, also called cancrum oris. This acute gangrenous stomatitis has a combined morbidity-mortality rate that can reach 70%. It occurs worldwide but is most common in sub-Saharan Africa in children aged 2 to 16 years. Its pathogenesis is uncertain, but several bacteria including Fusobacterium necrophorum, Prevotella intermedia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa may be responsible for the development of noma, which develops over the oral lesions these bacteria cause. Poverty is its most important risk factor. Due to its rapid course and high lethality, it requires emergency treatment with antibiotics, daily dressing of the lesion, and nutritional rehabilitation. Surgical removal of the remaining necrotic tissue can be followed by reconstructive procedures. Physical and speech therapy should be initiated to prevent functional complications. PMID:24736219

  18. [Noma in a 4 year-old girl: a case report from Chad].

    PubMed

    Cocquempot, K; Javaudin, O; Lerasle, P; Aigle, L

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a 4-year-old girl in Chad with noma, also called cancrum oris. This acute gangrenous stomatitis has a combined morbidity-mortality rate that can reach 70%. It occurs worldwide but is most common in sub-Saharan Africa in children aged 2 to 16 years. Its pathogenesis is uncertain, but several bacteria including Fusobacterium necrophorum, Prevotella intermedia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa may be responsible for the development of noma, which develops over the oral lesions these bacteria cause. Poverty is its most important risk factor. Due to its rapid course and high lethality, it requires emergency treatment with antibiotics, daily dressing of the lesion, and nutritional rehabilitation. Surgical removal of the remaining necrotic tissue can be followed by reconstructive procedures. Physical and speech therapy should be initiated to prevent functional complications.

  19. Early Cytokine Response to Infection with Pathogenic vs Non-Pathogenic Organisms in a Mouse Model of Endodontic Infection.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Aritsune; Stephens, Danielle; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Rittling, Susan R

    2015-01-01

    Using the subcutaneous chamber model of infection, we showed previously that a mixture of four endodontic pathogens (EP: P. intermedia, F. nucleatum, S. intermedius and P. micra) are able to persist without clearance for up to seven days, while a non-pathogenic oral species, S. mitis, was substantially cleared in this time. Here we have compared the cytokine response inside the chambers against these microorganisms. A majority of cytokines tested (17/24) showed different patterns of expression. Several cytokines had a peak of expression at 2 h after infection in response to the EP, while none showed this pattern in S. mitis infections. Chemokines were uniformly present at similar or higher levels in response to S. mitis, with redundant expression of CXCR2 ligands, while several growth/survival factors were present at higher levels in EP infections. Protease activity expressed by EP may be responsible for the lower levels of some chemokines. T-cell associated cytokines were in general expressed at extremely low levels, and did not differ between the two infections. The inflammatory markers IL-6, IL-1α and IL1-β were expressed at similar levels in both infections at early times, while TNFα was preferentially present in S. mitis infections. In EP infected chambers, reciprocal changes in levels of IL-6 and IL-1α were observed at later times suggesting a switch in the inflammatory response. Analysis of the cytokine response to infection with the individual species from the EP mix suggests that P. intermedia drives this inflammatory switch. Together these results show a surprising level of divergence of the host response to pathogenic and non-pathogenic organisms associated with oral infections, and supports a dominant effect of P. intermedia in polymicrobial endodontic infections. PMID:26171605

  20. In vitro growth-inhibitory effect of ethanol GRAS plant and supercritical CO₂ hop extracts on planktonic cultures of oral pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Pilna, J; Vlkova, E; Krofta, K; Nesvadba, V; Rada, V; Kokoska, L

    2015-09-01

    Conventional chemical antiseptics used for treatment of oral infections often produce side-effects, which restrict their long-term use. Plants are considered as perspective sources of novel natural antiseptics. However, little is still known about their inhibitory properties against oral pathogens. The objective of this study was to test in vitro antimicrobial activities of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) species against planktonic cultures of cariogenic, periodontal and candidal microorganisms and identify active compounds of the most active extracts. Growth-inhibitory effects of ethanol extracts from 109 GRAS plant species, six Humulus lupulus cultivars and two hop supercritical CO2 extracts were evaluated using broth microdilution method. The chemical analysis was done through high-performance liquid chromatography. Best results were obtained for supercritical CO2 and ethanol extracts of H. lupulus with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ≥8 μg/mL and ≥16 μg/mL, respectively. The chemical analysis of supercritical CO2H. lupulus extracts revealed that α- and β-acids were their main constituents. Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens showed antibacterial effect against Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus salivarius (MIC=64-128 μg/mL). These strains were further inhibited by Zanthoxylum clava-herculis (MIC=64-128 μg/mL) and Myristica fragrans (both MIC≥128 μg/mL). The latter also exhibited antimicrobial activity against Fusobacterium nucleatum (MIC=64 μg/mL). Punica granatum possessed inhibitory effects against Candida albicans (MIC=128 μg/mL) and F. nucleatum (MIC=64 μg/mL). The results indicate that supercritical CO2H. lupulus extracts together with ethanol extracts of C. annuum, C. frutescens, M. fragrans, P. granatum and Z. clava-herculis are promising materials for further investigation on new antiseptic agents of oral care products.

  1. Oral microbiota species in acute apical endodontic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    George, Noelle; Flamiatos, Erin; Kawasaki, Kellie; Kim, Namgu; Carriere, Charles; Phan, Brian; Joseph, Raphael; Strauss, Shay; Kohli, Richie; Choi, Dongseok; Craig Baumgartner, J.; Sedgley, Christine; Maier, Tom; Machida, Curtis A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Acute apical abscesses are serious endodontic diseases resulting from pulpal infection with opportunistic oral microorganisms. The objective of this study was to identify and compare the oral microbiota in patients (N=18) exhibiting acute apical abscesses, originating from the demographic region in Portland, Oregon. The study hypothesis is that abscesses obtained from this demographic region may contain unique microorganisms not identified in specimens from other regions. Design Endodontic abscesses were sampled from patients at the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) School of Dentistry. DNA from abscess specimens was subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification using 16S rRNA gene-specific primers and Cy3-dCTP labeling. Labeled DNA was then applied to microbial microarrays (280 species) generated by the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray Laboratory (Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA). Results The most prevalent microorganisms, found across multiple abscess specimens, include Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Megasphaera species clone CS025, Prevotella multisaccharivorax, Atopobium rimae, and Porphyromonas endodontalis. The most abundant microorganisms, found in highest numbers within individual abscesses, include F. nucleatum, P. micra, Streptococcus Cluster III, Solobacterium moorei, Streptococcus constellatus, and Porphyromonas endodontalis. Strong bacterial associations were identified between Prevotella multisaccharivorax, Acidaminococcaceae species clone DM071, Megasphaera species clone CS025, Actinomyces species clone EP053, and Streptococcus cristatus (all with Spearman coefficients >0.9). Conclusions Cultivable and uncultivable bacterial species have been identified in endodontic abscesses obtained from the Portland, Oregon demographic region, and taxa identifications correlated well with other published studies, with the exception of Treponema and Streptococcus cristae, which were not commonly

  2. Oral microbial biofilm stimulation of epithelial cell responses.

    PubMed

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S; Novak, Karen F; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2012-04-01

    Oral bacterial biofilms trigger chronic inflammatory responses in the host that can result in the tissue destructive events of periodontitis. However, the characteristics of the capacity of specific host cell types to respond to these biofilms remain ill-defined. This report describes the use of a novel model of bacterial biofilms to stimulate oral epithelial cells and profile select cytokines and chemokines that contribute to the local inflammatory environment in the periodontium. Monoinfection biofilms were developed with Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses. Biofilms, as well as planktonic cultures of these same bacterial species, were incubated under anaerobic conditions with a human oral epithelial cell line, OKF4, for up to 24h. Gro-1α, IL1α, IL-6, IL-8, TGFα, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, and IP-10 were shown to be produced in response to a range of the planktonic or biofilm forms of these species. P. gingivalis biofilms significantly inhibited the production of all of these cytokines and chemokines, except MIP-1α. Generally, the biofilms of all species inhibited Gro-1α, TGFα, and Fractalkine production, while F. nucleatum biofilms stimulated significant increases in IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and IP-10. A. naeslundii biofilms induced elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IP-10. The oral streptococcal species in biofilms or planktonic forms were poor stimulants for any of these mediators from the epithelial cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that oral bacteria in biofilms elicit a substantially different profile of responses compared to planktonic bacteria of the same species. Moreover, certain oral species are highly stimulatory when in biofilms and interact with host cell receptors to trigger pathways of responses that appear quite divergent from individual bacteria.

  3. In vitro evaluation of a multispecies oral biofilm on different implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Violant, Deborah; Galofré, Marta; Nart, José; Teles, Ricardo Patricio

    2014-06-01

    Biofilm accumulation on implant surfaces is one of the most important factors for early and late implant failure. Because of the related clinical implications, the aim of this in vitro study was to compare the bacterial cell attachment of a four-species oral biofilm on titanium discs of purity grade 2 and 4, with machined surfaces and etched-thermochemically modified with Avantblast®. The in vitro biofilm model was composed of early (Actinomyces naeslundii, Streptococcus gordonii), secondary (Veillonella parvula), and intermediate (Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp. polymorphum) colonizers of tooth surfaces. A total of 36 discs were divided into four groups: Tigr2-c (titanium grade 2, machined surface), Tigr2-t (titanium grade 2, modified surface with Avantblast®), Tigr4-c (titanium grade 4, machined surface), Tigr4-t (titanium grade 4, modified surface with Avantblast®). The experiment was repeated three times. Biofilm viability was tested with 1% 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride solution and bacterial cell quantification by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Descriptive analysis was performed to evaluate biofilm composition and differences between groups were checked with the Mann-Whitney test (p < 0.05). After one week, multispecies biofilms showed a similar pattern of bacterial composition on all analyzed implant surfaces. The most prevalent bacterium was V. parvula (∼50% of the total biomass), followed by S. gordonii (∼30%), F. nucleatum ssp. polymorphum (∼10%) and A. naeslundii (<5%). Total bacterial biomass was significantly higher in both grade-4-titanium surfaces (p < 0.05). The results demonstrated that not only implant surface treatment, but also titanium purity, influence early bacterial colonization.

  4. Selected dietary (poly)phenols inhibit periodontal pathogen growth and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Muhammad; Millhouse, Emma; Culshaw, Shauna; Edwards, Christine A; Ramage, Gordon; Combet, Emilie

    2015-03-01

    Periodontitis (PD) is a chronic infectious disease mediated by bacteria in the oral cavity. (Poly)phenols (PPs), ubiquitous in plant foods, possess antimicrobial activities and may be useful in the prevention and management of periodontitis. The objective of this study was to test the antibacterial effects of selected PPs on periodontal pathogens, on both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Selected PPs (n = 48) were screened against Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). The antibacterial potential of each compound was evaluated in terms of planktonic minimum inhibitory concentration (PMIC) and planktonic minimum bactericidal concentration (PMBC) using standardized broth microdilution assays. The most active PPs were further tested for their effect on mono-species and multi-species biofilms using a colorimetric resazurin-based viability assay and scanning electron microscopy. Of the 48 PPs tested, 43 showed effective inhibition of planktonic growth of one or more test strains, of which curcumin was the most potent (PMIC range = 7.8-62.5 μg mL(-1)), followed by pyrogallol (PMIC range = 2.4-2500 μg mL(-1)), pyrocatechol (MIC range = 4.9-312.5 μg mL(-1)) and quercetin (PMIC range = 31.2-500 μg mL(-1)). At this concentration, adhesion of curcumin and quercetin to the substrate also inhibited adhesion of S. mitis, and biofilm formation and maturation. While both curcumin and quercetin were able to alter architecture of mature multi-species biofilms, only curcumin-treated biofilms displayed a significantly reduced metabolic activity. Overall, PPs possess antibacterial activities against periodontopathic bacteria in both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Further cellular and in vivo studies are necessary to confirm their beneficial activities and potential use in the prevention and or treatment of periodontal

  5. Selected dietary (poly)phenols inhibit periodontal pathogen growth and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Muhammad; Millhouse, Emma; Culshaw, Shauna; Edwards, Christine A; Ramage, Gordon; Combet, Emilie

    2015-03-01

    Periodontitis (PD) is a chronic infectious disease mediated by bacteria in the oral cavity. (Poly)phenols (PPs), ubiquitous in plant foods, possess antimicrobial activities and may be useful in the prevention and management of periodontitis. The objective of this study was to test the antibacterial effects of selected PPs on periodontal pathogens, on both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Selected PPs (n = 48) were screened against Streptococcus mitis (S. mitis), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). The antibacterial potential of each compound was evaluated in terms of planktonic minimum inhibitory concentration (PMIC) and planktonic minimum bactericidal concentration (PMBC) using standardized broth microdilution assays. The most active PPs were further tested for their effect on mono-species and multi-species biofilms using a colorimetric resazurin-based viability assay and scanning electron microscopy. Of the 48 PPs tested, 43 showed effective inhibition of planktonic growth of one or more test strains, of which curcumin was the most potent (PMIC range = 7.8-62.5 μg mL(-1)), followed by pyrogallol (PMIC range = 2.4-2500 μg mL(-1)), pyrocatechol (MIC range = 4.9-312.5 μg mL(-1)) and quercetin (PMIC range = 31.2-500 μg mL(-1)). At this concentration, adhesion of curcumin and quercetin to the substrate also inhibited adhesion of S. mitis, and biofilm formation and maturation. While both curcumin and quercetin were able to alter architecture of mature multi-species biofilms, only curcumin-treated biofilms displayed a significantly reduced metabolic activity. Overall, PPs possess antibacterial activities against periodontopathic bacteria in both planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. Further cellular and in vivo studies are necessary to confirm their beneficial activities and potential use in the prevention and or treatment of periodontal

  6. In vitro growth-inhibitory effect of ethanol GRAS plant and supercritical CO₂ hop extracts on planktonic cultures of oral pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Pilna, J; Vlkova, E; Krofta, K; Nesvadba, V; Rada, V; Kokoska, L

    2015-09-01

    Conventional chemical antiseptics used for treatment of oral infections often produce side-effects, which restrict their long-term use. Plants are considered as perspective sources of novel natural antiseptics. However, little is still known about their inhibitory properties against oral pathogens. The objective of this study was to test in vitro antimicrobial activities of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) species against planktonic cultures of cariogenic, periodontal and candidal microorganisms and identify active compounds of the most active extracts. Growth-inhibitory effects of ethanol extracts from 109 GRAS plant species, six Humulus lupulus cultivars and two hop supercritical CO2 extracts were evaluated using broth microdilution method. The chemical analysis was done through high-performance liquid chromatography. Best results were obtained for supercritical CO2 and ethanol extracts of H. lupulus with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ≥8 μg/mL and ≥16 μg/mL, respectively. The chemical analysis of supercritical CO2H. lupulus extracts revealed that α- and β-acids were their main constituents. Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens showed antibacterial effect against Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus salivarius (MIC=64-128 μg/mL). These strains were further inhibited by Zanthoxylum clava-herculis (MIC=64-128 μg/mL) and Myristica fragrans (both MIC≥128 μg/mL). The latter also exhibited antimicrobial activity against Fusobacterium nucleatum (MIC=64 μg/mL). Punica granatum possessed inhibitory effects against Candida albicans (MIC=128 μg/mL) and F. nucleatum (MIC=64 μg/mL). The results indicate that supercritical CO2H. lupulus extracts together with ethanol extracts of C. annuum, C. frutescens, M. fragrans, P. granatum and Z. clava-herculis are promising materials for further investigation on new antiseptic agents of oral care products. PMID:26232134

  7. Phototoxic effect of blue light on the planktonic and biofilm state of anaerobic periodontal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Hwa; Lee, Jae-Kwan; Um, Heung-Sik; Lee, Si-Young; Lee, Min-Ku

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the phototoxic effects of blue light exposure on periodontal pathogens in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. Methods Strains of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, in planktonic or biofilm states, were exposed to visible light at wavelengths of 400.520 nm. A quartz-tungsten-halogen lamp at a power density of 500 mW/cm2 was used for the light source. Each sample was exposed to 15, 30, 60, 90, or 120 seconds of each bacterial strain in the planktonic or biofilm state. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) was used to observe the distribution of live/dead bacterial cells in biofilms. After light exposure, the bacterial killing rates were calculated from colony forming unit (CFU) counts. Results CLSM images that were obtained from biofilms showed a mixture of dead and live bacterial cells extending to a depth of 30-45 µm. Obvious differences in the live-to-dead bacterial cell ratio were found in P. gingivalis biofilm according to light exposure time. In the planktonic state, almost all bacteria were killed with 60 seconds of light exposure to F. nucleatum (99.1%) and with 15 seconds to P. gingivalis (100%). In the biofilm state, however, only the CFU of P. gingivalis demonstrated a decreasing tendency with increasing light exposure time, and there was a lower efficacy of phototoxicity to P. gingivalis as biofilm than in the planktonic state. Conclusions Blue light exposure using a dental halogen curing unit is effective in reducing periodontal pathogens in the planktonic state. It is recommended that an adjunctive exogenous photosensitizer be used and that pathogens be exposed to visible light for clinical antimicrobial periodontal therapy. PMID:23678390

  8. High In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Pac-525 against Porphyromonas gingivalis Biofilms Cultured on Titanium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ji-yin; Wang, Xue-jin; Wang, Li-na; Ying, Xiao-xia; Ren, Xiang; Liu, Hui-ying; Xu, Li; Ma, Guo-wu

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the potential of short antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as alternative antibacterial agents during the treatment of peri-implantitis, the cytotoxic activity of three short AMPs, that is, Pac-525, KSL-W, and KSL, was determined using the MTT assay. The antimicrobial activity of these AMPs, ranging in concentration from 0.0039 mg/mL to 0.5 mg/mL, against the predominant planktonic pathogens, including Streptococcus sanguis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, involved in peri-implantitis was investigated. Furthermore, 2-day-old P. gingivalis biofilms cultured on titanium surfaces were treated with Pac-525 and subsequently observed and analysed using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The average cell proliferation curve indicated that there was no cytotoxicity due to the three short AMPs. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values of Pac-525 were 0.0625 mg/mL and 0.125 mg/mL, respectively, for P. gingivalis and 0.0078 mg/mL and 0.0156 mg/mL, respectively, for F. nucleatum. Using CLSM, we confirmed that compared to 0.1% chlorhexidine, 0.5 mg/mL of Pac-525 caused a significant decrease in biofilm thickness and a decline in the percentage of live bacteria. These data indicate that Pac-525 has unique properties that might make it suitable for the inhibition the growth of pathogenic bacteria around dental implants. PMID:25710035

  9. Copaifera reticulata oleoresin: Chemical characterization and antibacterial properties against oral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bardají, Danae Kala Rodríguez; da Silva, Jonas Joaquim Mangabeira; Bianchi, Thamires Chiquini; de Souza Eugênio, Daniele; de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Leandro, Luís Fernando; Rogez, Hervé Louis Ghislain; Venezianni, Rodrigo Cassio Sola; Ambrosio, Sergio Ricardo; Tavares, Denise Crispim; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; Martins, Carlos Henrique G

    2016-08-01

    Oral infections such as periodontitis and tooth decay are the most common diseases of humankind. Oleoresins from different copaifera species display antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities. Copaifera reticulata is the commonest tree of this genus and grows abundantly in several Brazilian states, such as Pará, Amazonas, and Ceará. The present study has evaluated the chemical composition and antimicrobial potential of the Copaifera reticulata oleoresin (CRO) against the causative agents of tooth decay and periodontitis and has assessed the CRO cytotoxic potential. Cutting edge analytical techniques (GC-MS and LC-MS) aided the chemical characterization of CRO. Antimicrobial assays included determination of the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC), determination of the Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC), determination of the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Biofilm (MICB50), Time Kill Assay, and Checkerboard Dilution. Conduction of XTT assays on human lung fibroblasts (GM07492-A cells) helped to examine the CRO cytotoxic potential. Chromatographic analyses revealed that the major constituents of CRO were β-bisabolene, trans-α-bergamotene, β-selinene, α-selinene, and the terpene acids ent-agathic-15-methyl ester, ent-copalic acid, and ent-polyalthic acid. MIC and MBC results ranged from 6.25 to 200 μg/mL against the tested bacteria. The time-kill assay conducted with CRO at concentrations between 50 and 100 μg/mL showed bactericidal activity against Fusobacterium nucleatum (ATCC 25586) and Streptococcus mitis (ATCC 49456) after 4 h, Prevotella nigrescens (ATCC 33563) after 6 h, Porphyromonas gingivalis (ATCC 33277) and Lactobacillus casei (clinical isolate) after 12 h, and Streptococcus salivarius (ATCC 25975) and Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 25175) after 18 h. The fractional inhibitory concentration indexes (FICIs) revealed antagonistic interaction for Lactobacillus casei (clinical isolate), indifferent effect for Porphyromonas gingivalis

  10. Microbial Signature Profiles of Periodontally Healthy and Diseased Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Talita Gomes Baêta; Heller, Débora; da Silva-Boghossian, Carina Maciel; Cotton, Sean L.; Paster, Bruce J.; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine microbial profiles that discriminate periodontal health from different forms of periodontal diseases. Methods Subgingival biofilm was obtained from patients with periodontal health (27), gingivitis (11), chronic periodontitis (35) and aggressive periodontitis (24), and analyzed for the presence of >250 species/phylotypes using HOMIM. Microbial differences among groups were examined by Mann-Whitney. Regression analyses were performed to determine microbial risk indicators of disease. Results Putative and potential new periodontal pathogens were more prevalent in subjects with periodontal diseases than periodontal health. Detection of Porphyromonas endodontalis/Porphyromonas spp. (OR 9.5 [1.2–73.1]) and Tannerella forsythia (OR 38.2 [3.2–450.6]), and absence of Neisseria polysaccharea (OR 0.004 [0–0.15]) and Prevotella denticola (OR 0.014 [0–0.49], p<0.05) were risk indicators of periodontal disease. Presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (OR 29.4 [3.4–176.5]), Cardiobacterium hominis (OR 14.9 [2.3–98.7]), Peptostreptococcaceae sp. (OR 35.9 [2.7–483.9]), P. alactolyticus (OR 31.3 [2.1–477.2]), and absence of Fretibacterium spp. (OR 0.024 [0.002–0.357]), Fusobacterium naviforme/Fusobacterium nucleatum ss vincentii (OR 0.015 [0.001–0.223]), Granulicatella adiacens/Granulicatella elegans (OR 0.013 [0.001–0.233], p<0.05) were associated with aggressive periodontitis. Conclusion There were specific microbial signatures of the subgingival biofilm that were able to distinguish between microbiomes of periodontal health and diseases. Such profiles may be used to establish risk of disease. PMID:25139407

  11. In vitro efficacy of cefovecin against anaerobic bacteria isolated from subgingival plaque of dogs and cats with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Khazandi, Manouchehr; Bird, Philip S; Owens, Jane; Wilson, Gary; Meyer, James N; Trott, Darren J

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal disease is a common disease of dogs and cats often requiring antimicrobial treatment as an adjunct to mechanical debridement. However, correct compliance with oral antimicrobial therapy in companion animals is often difficult. Cefovecin is a recently introduced veterinary cephalosporin that has demonstrated prolonged concentrations in extracellular fluid, allowing for dosing intervals of up to 14 days. Subgingival samples were collected from the oral cavity of 29 dogs and eight cats exhibiting grade 2 or grade 3 periodontal disease. Samples were cultivated on Wilkin Chalgrens agar and incubated in an anaerobic chamber for seven days. Selected anaerobic bacteria were isolated and identified to species level using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for cefovecin and six additional antimicrobials using the agar dilution methodology recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The 65 clinical isolates were identified as Porphyromonas gulae (n = 45), Porphyromonas crevioricanis (n = 12), Porphyromonas macacae (n = 1), Porphyromonas cangingivalis (n = 1) Fusobacterium nucleatum (n = 2), Fusobacterium russii (n = 1) and Solobacterium moorei (n = 3). This is the first report of S. moorei being isolated from companion animals with periodontal disease. All isolates were highly susceptible to cefovecin, with a MIC90 of ≤0.125 μg/ml. Conversely, different resistance rates to ampicillin, amoxicillin and erythromycin between isolates were detected. Cefovecin is thus shown to be effective in vitro against anaerobic bacteria isolated from dogs and cats with periodontal disease. PMID:24930431

  12. Quantitative Molecular Detection of 19 Major Pathogens in the Interdental Biofilm of Periodontally Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Carrouel, Florence; Viennot, Stéphane; Santamaria, Julie; Veber, Philippe; Bourgeois, Denis

    2016-01-01

    In oral health, the interdental spaces are a real ecological niche for which the body has few or no alternative defenses and where the traditional daily methods for control by disrupting biofilm are not adequate. The interdental spaces are the source of many hypotheses regarding their potential associations with and/or causes of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, degenerative disease, and depression. This PCR study is the first to describe the interdental microbiota in healthy adults aged 18–35 years-old with reference to the Socransky complexes. The complexes tended to reflect microbial succession events in developing dental biofilms. Early colonizers included members of the yellow, green, and purple complexes. The orange complex bacteria generally appear after the early colonizers and include many putative periodontal pathogens, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum. The red complex (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola) was considered the climax community and is on the list of putative periodontal pathogens. The 19 major periodontal pathogens tested were expressed at various levels. F. nucleatum was the most abundant species, and the least abundant were Actinomyces viscosus, P. gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The genome counts for Eikenella corrodens, Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter rectus, T. denticola, and Tannerella forsythensis increased significantly with subject age. The study highlights the observation that bacteria from the yellow complex (Streptococcus spp., S. mitis), the green complex (E. corrodens, Campylobacter gracilis, Capnocytophaga ochracea, Capnocytophaga sputigena, A. actinomycetemcomitans), the purple complex (Veillonella parvula, Actinomyces odontolyticus) and the blue complex (A. viscosus) are correlated. Concerning the orange complex, F. nucleatum is the most abundant species in interdental biofilm. The red complex, which is recognized as the most important

  13. Quantitative Molecular Detection of 19 Major Pathogens in the Interdental Biofilm of Periodontally Healthy Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Carrouel, Florence; Viennot, Stéphane; Santamaria, Julie; Veber, Philippe; Bourgeois, Denis

    2016-01-01

    In oral health, the interdental spaces are a real ecological niche for which the body has few or no alternative defenses and where the traditional daily methods for control by disrupting biofilm are not adequate. The interdental spaces are the source of many hypotheses regarding their potential associations with and/or causes of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, degenerative disease, and depression. This PCR study is the first to describe the interdental microbiota in healthy adults aged 18-35 years-old with reference to the Socransky complexes. The complexes tended to reflect microbial succession events in developing dental biofilms. Early colonizers included members of the yellow, green, and purple complexes. The orange complex bacteria generally appear after the early colonizers and include many putative periodontal pathogens, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum. The red complex (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola) was considered the climax community and is on the list of putative periodontal pathogens. The 19 major periodontal pathogens tested were expressed at various levels. F. nucleatum was the most abundant species, and the least abundant were Actinomyces viscosus, P. gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The genome counts for Eikenella corrodens, Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter rectus, T. denticola, and Tannerella forsythensis increased significantly with subject age. The study highlights the observation that bacteria from the yellow complex (Streptococcus spp., S. mitis), the green complex (E. corrodens, Campylobacter gracilis, Capnocytophaga ochracea, Capnocytophaga sputigena, A. actinomycetemcomitans), the purple complex (Veillonella parvula, Actinomyces odontolyticus) and the blue complex (A. viscosus) are correlated. Concerning the orange complex, F. nucleatum is the most abundant species in interdental biofilm. The red complex, which is recognized as the most important

  14. 21 CFR 558.500 - Ractopamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... liver abscesses caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum and Arcanobacterium (Actinomyces) pyogenes. As in... Fusobacterium necrophorum and Arcanobacterium (Actinomyces) pyogenes. As in paragraph (e)(2)(vi) of this section... caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum and Arcanobacterium (Actinomyces) pyogenes; and for suppression...

  15. Profile of bacteria colonizing the exposed bone of patients with anti-osteoclastic drug-related osteonecrosis of the jaws.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Zaher; do Nascimento, Cássio; El-Hakim, Michel; Henderson, Janet E; de Albuquerque, Rubens F

    2016-09-01

    Microbial etiology for anti-osteoclastic drug-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (ARONJ) was suggested. This study investigates any link between bacteria colonizing ARONJ sites and other oral cavity sites. Microbiota samples of 10 ARONJ patients were collected from the exposed bone, adjacent teeth, contralateral teeth, and tongue. DNA checkerboard hybridization was used for microbiota analysis with 43 genomic DNA probes prepared from human oral bacterial (38) and candida (5) species, using Socransky's bacterial complexes as a guide. The frequency and the mean proportion of each bacterial species were used. Eikenella corrodens, Streptococcus constellatus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were dominant in the ARONJ sites and detected in most teeth samples. Staphylococcus aureus was also dominant in the ARONJ sites and tongue. Significant correlations were found between the mean proportions of bacterial species colonizing adjacent teeth, contralateral teeth, and tongue (p < 0.001, R(2) > 0.69). No significant correlation (p > 0.05, R(2) < 0.025) was found between bacteria colonizing ARONJ sites and other evaluated sites. Within the study limitations, it was concluded that the primary sources of microorganisms colonizing ARONJ sites could be other sites such as teeth and tongue. The microbial profile of the necrotic bone is predominantly colonized with bacteria from Socransky's green and orange complexes, as well as with species associated with bone infections. PMID:27419922

  16. Comparative cytotoxicity of periodontal bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.H.; Hammond, B.F.

    1988-11-01

    The direct cytotoxicity of sonic extracts (SE) from nine periodontal bacteria for human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was compared. Equivalent dosages (in terms of protein concentration) of SE were used to challenge HGF cultures. The cytotoxic potential of each SE was assessed by its ability to (1) inhibit HGF proliferation, as measured by direct cell counts; (2) inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in HGF cultures; or (3) cause morphological alterations of the cells in challenged cultures. The highest concentration (500 micrograms SE protein/ml) of any of the SEs used to challenge the cells was found to be markedly inhibitory to the HGFs by all three of the criteria of cytotoxicity. At the lowest dosage tested (50 micrograms SE protein/ml); only SE from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum caused a significant effect (greater than 90% inhibition or overt morphological abnormalities) in the HGFs as determined by any of the criteria employed. SE from Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, or Wolinella recta also inhibited cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation at this dosage; however, the degree of inhibition (5-50%) was consistently, clearly less than that of the first group of three organisms named above. The SE of the three other organisms tested (Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis) had little or no effect (0-10% inhibition) at this concentration. The data suggest that the outcome of the interaction between bacterial components and normal resident cells of the periodontium is, at least in part, a function of the bacterial species.

  17. Effect of Aging on Periodontal Inflammation, Microbial Colonization, and Disease Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Dong, G; Xiao, W; Xiao, E; Miao, F; Syverson, A; Missaghian, N; Vafa, R; Cabrera-Ortega, A A; Rossa, C; Graves, D T

    2016-04-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease induced by a biofilm that forms on the tooth surface. Increased periodontal disease is associated with aging. We investigated the effect of aging on challenge by oral pathogens, examining the host response, colonization, and osteoclast numbers in aged versus young mice. We also compared the results with mice with lineage-specific deletion of the transcription factor FOXO1, which reduces dendritic cell (DC) function. Periodontitis was induced by oral inoculation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in young (4 to 5 mo) and aged (14 to 15 mo) mice. Aged mice as well as mice with reduced DC function had decreased numbers of DCs in lymph nodes, indicative of a diminished host response. In vitro studies suggest that reduced DC numbers in lymph nodes of aged mice may involve the effect of advanced glycation end products on DC migration. Surprisingly, aged mice but not mice with genetically altered DC function had greater production of antibody to P. gingivalis, greater IL-12 expression, and more plasma cells in lymph nodes following oral inoculation as compared with young mice. The greater adaptive immune response in aged versus young mice was linked to enhanced levels of P. gingivalis and reduced bacterial diversity. Thus, reduced bacterial diversity in aged mice may contribute to increased P. gingivalis colonization following inoculation and increased periodontal disease susceptibility, reflected by higher TNF levels and osteoclast numbers in the periodontium of aged versus young mice. PMID:26762510

  18. Proteomic analysis of endodontic infections by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, R.; Madayiputhiya, N.; Fouad, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Endodontic infections are very prevalent and have a polymicrobial etiology characterized by complex interrelationships between endodontic microorganisms and the host defenses. Proteomic analysis of endodontic infections can provide global insights into the invasion, pathogenicity mechanisms, and multifactorial interactions existing between root canal bacteria and the host in the initiation and progression of apical periodontitis. The purpose of this study was to apply proteomic techniques such as liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) for the identification of proteins of bacterial origin present in endodontic infections. Methods Endodontic specimens were aseptically obtained from seven patients with root canal infections. Protein mixtures were subjected to tryptic in-solution digestion and analysed by reverse-phase nano-LC–MS/MS followed by a database search. Results Proteins, mainly of cell wall or membrane origin, from endodontic bacteria especially Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Treponema denticola were identified from all the samples tested. Identified proteins included adhesins, autolysins, proteases, virulence factors, and antibiotic-resistance proteins. Conclusions LC–MS/MS offers a sensitive analytical platform to study the disease processes in the root canal environment. The array of proteins expressed in endodontic infections reflects the complex microbial presence and highlights the bacterial species involved in the inflammatory process. PMID:19572900

  19. Total Antioxidant Capacity and Total Oxidant Status in Saliva of Periodontitis Patients in Relation to Bacterial Load

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Taowen; Andrukhov, Oleh; Haririan, Hady; Müller-Kern, Michael; Liu, Shutai; Liu, Zhonghao; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    The detection of salivary biomarkers has a potential application in early diagnosis and monitoring of periodontal inflammation. However, searching sensitive salivary biomarkers for periodontitis is still ongoing. Oxidative stress is supposed to play an important role in periodontitis progression and tissue destruction. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) in saliva of periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls and their relationship with periodontopathic bacteria and periodontal disease severity. Unstimulated saliva was collected from 45 patients with generalized severe periodontitis and 37 healthy individuals and the TAC/TOS were measured. In addition, salivary levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva were measured. Salivary TAC was lower in periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation of salivary TAC with clinical attachment loss was observed in periodontitis patients. No significant difference in the salivary TOS was observed between periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Bacterial load was enhanced in periodontitis patients and exhibited correlation with periodontal disease severity but not with salivary TAC/TOS. Our data suggest that changes in antioxidant capacity in periodontitis patients are not associated with increased bacterial load and are probably due to a dysregulated immune response. PMID:26779448

  20. Detection of five potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease: A comparison of PCR and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, Gerhard; Tsigaras, Sandra; Rinke, Sven; Kottmann, Tanja; Haak, Rainer; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microbial analysis methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in terms of detection of five selected potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease. Therefore 45 samples of healthy, mucositis and peri-implantitis (n = 15 each) were assessed according to presence of the following bacteria using PCR (DNA-strip technology) and RT-PCR (fluorescent dye SYBR green-system): Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Treponema denticola (Td), Tanerella forsythia (Tf), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). There were no significant correlations between the bacterial and disease patterns, so the benefit of using microbiological tests for the diagnosis of peri-implant diseases is questionable. Correlations between the methods were highest for Tf (Kendall's Tau: 0.65, Spearman: 0.78), Fn (0.49, 0.61) and Td (0.49, 0.59). For Aa (0.38, 0.42) and Pg (0.04, 0.04), lower correlation values were detected. Accordingly, conventional semi-quantitative PCR seems to be sufficient for analyzing potentially periodontal pathogenic bacterial species.

  1. Oral biofilm architecture on natural teeth.

    PubMed

    Zijnge, Vincent; van Leeuwen, M Barbara M; Degener, John E; Abbas, Frank; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmür, Rudolf; Harmsen, Hermie J M

    2010-02-24

    Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and accessibility. Despite descriptions of initial plaque formation on the tooth surface, studies on mature plaque and plaque structure below the gum are limited to landmark studies from the 1970s, without appreciating the breadth of microbial diversity in the plaque. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization to localize in vivo the most abundant species from different phyla and species associated with periodontitis on seven embedded teeth obtained from four different subjects. The data showed convincingly the dominance of Actinomyces sp., Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Spirochaetes, and Synergistetes in subgingival plaque. The latter proved to be new with a possibly important role in host-pathogen interaction due to its localization in close proximity to immune cells. The present study identified for the first time in vivo that Lactobacillus sp. are the central cells of bacterial aggregates in subgingival plaque, and that Streptococcus sp. and the yeast Candida albicans form corncob structures in supragingival plaque. Finally, periodontal pathogens colonize already formed biofilms and form microcolonies therein. These in vivo observations on oral biofilms provide a clear vision on biofilm architecture and the spatial distribution of predominant species.

  2. Sodium ion pumps and hydrogen production in glutamate fermenting anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Boiangiu, Clara D; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Brügel, Daniela; Herrmann, Gloria; Kim, Jihoe; Forzi, Lucia; Hedderich, Reiner; Vgenopoulou, Irini; Pierik, Antonio J; Steuber, Julia; Buckel, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria ferment glutamate via two different pathways to ammonia, carbon dioxide, acetate, butyrate and molecular hydrogen. The coenzyme B12-dependent pathway in Clostridium tetanomorphum via 3-methylaspartate involves pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a novel enzyme, a membrane-bound NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. The flavin- and iron-sulfur-containing enzyme probably uses the energy difference between reduced ferredoxin and NADH to generate an electrochemical Na+ gradient, which drives transport processes. The other pathway via 2-hydroxyglutarate in Acidaminococcus fermentans and Fusobacterium nucleatum involves glutaconyl-CoA decarboxylase, which uses the free energy of decarboxylation to generate also an electrochemical Na+ gradient. In the latter two organisms, similar membrane-bound NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductases have been characterized. We propose that in the hydroxyglutarate pathway these oxidoreductases work in the reverse direction, whereby the reduction of ferredoxin by NADH is driven by the Na+ gradient. The reduced ferredoxin is required for hydrogen production and the activation of radical enzymes. Further examples show that reduced ferredoxin is an agent, whose reducing energy is about 1 ATP 'richer' than that of NADH.

  3. Anaerobic infections in the head and neck region.

    PubMed

    Tabaqchali, S

    1988-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria form the predominant flora of the oral cavity, outnumbering facultative organisms by 10-1,000: 1. The type of anaerobic bacteria and their concentration depend on the anatomical site and the degree of anaerobiosis in the different sites in the mouth. Three groups of anaerobic bacteria inhabit the oral cavity; the strict anaerobes, the moderate anaerobes, and the microaerophilic group of organisms. The majority of anaerobic bacterial infections occurring in the region of the mouth, head and neck are caused by the commensal flora. These infections include dental and periodontal disease where the predominant organisms are Bacteroides species, Veillonella, Bifidobacteria, Peptococcus, Peptostreptococcus and Propionibacterium species. More recently, Bacteroides endontalis has been isolated from a periapical abscess of endodontal origin and B. gingivalis, B. intermedius, Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans and Wollinella species in chronic periodontal disease. Treponema species and other strict anaerobes are seen in smears of severe periodontal disease and acute necrotising gingivitis, but have not yet been isolated in pure culture. Until such time, their role in disease remains uncertain. Fusobacterium nucleatum is specially associated with severe orofacial infections which may extend into the mediastinum. Other anaerobic infections include chronic otitis media, chronic sinusitis and mastoiditis, and brain abscess. Treatment of these conditions should include the use of beta-lactamase resistant antimicrobials, such as clindamycin or one of the nitroimidazoles with penicillin.

  4. Total Antioxidant Capacity and Total Oxidant Status in Saliva of Periodontitis Patients in Relation to Bacterial Load.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Taowen; Andrukhov, Oleh; Haririan, Hady; Müller-Kern, Michael; Liu, Shutai; Liu, Zhonghao; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    The detection of salivary biomarkers has a potential application in early diagnosis and monitoring of periodontal inflammation. However, searching sensitive salivary biomarkers for periodontitis is still ongoing. Oxidative stress is supposed to play an important role in periodontitis progression and tissue destruction. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) in saliva of periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls and their relationship with periodontopathic bacteria and periodontal disease severity. Unstimulated saliva was collected from 45 patients with generalized severe periodontitis and 37 healthy individuals and the TAC/TOS were measured. In addition, salivary levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva were measured. Salivary TAC was lower in periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation of salivary TAC with clinical attachment loss was observed in periodontitis patients. No significant difference in the salivary TOS was observed between periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Bacterial load was enhanced in periodontitis patients and exhibited correlation with periodontal disease severity but not with salivary TAC/TOS. Our data suggest that changes in antioxidant capacity in periodontitis patients are not associated with increased bacterial load and are probably due to a dysregulated immune response.

  5. Randomized in vivo evaluation of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy on deciduous carious dentin.

    PubMed

    Steiner-Oliveira, Carolina; Longo, Priscila Larcher; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa; Ramalho, Karen Müller; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this randomized in vivo study was to compare antimicrobial chemotherapies in primary carious dentin. Thirty-two participants ages 5 to 7 years underwent partial caries removal from deep carious dentin lesions in primary molars and were subsequently divided into three groups: control [chlorhexidine and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC)], LEDTB [photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) with light-emitting diode associated with toluidine blue solution and RMGIC], and LMB [PACT with laser associated with methylene blue solution and RMGIC]. The participants were submitted to initial clinical and radiographic examinations. Demographic features and biofilm, gingival, and DMFT/DMFS indexes were evaluated, in addition to clinical and radiographic followups at 6 and 12 months after treatments. Carious dentin was collected before and after each treatment, and the number of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus casei, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Atopobium rimae, and total bacteria was established by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. No signs of pain or restoration failure were observed. All therapies were effective in reducing the number of microorganisms, except for S. sobrinus. No statistical differences were observed among the protocols used. All therapies may be considered as effective modern approaches to minimal intervention for the management of deep primary caries treatment. PMID:26502235

  6. Randomized in vivo evaluation of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy on deciduous carious dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner-Oliveira, Carolina; Longo, Priscila Larcher; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa; Ramalho, Karen Müller; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this randomized in vivo study was to compare antimicrobial chemotherapies in primary carious dentin. Thirty-two participants ages 5 to 7 years underwent partial caries removal from deep carious dentin lesions in primary molars and were subsequently divided into three groups: control [chlorhexidine and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC)], LEDTB [photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) with light-emitting diode associated with toluidine blue solution and RMGIC], and LMB [PACT with laser associated with methylene blue solution and RMGIC]. The participants were submitted to initial clinical and radiographic examinations. Demographic features and biofilm, gingival, and DMFT/DMFS indexes were evaluated, in addition to clinical and radiographic followups at 6 and 12 months after treatments. Carious dentin was collected before and after each treatment, and the number of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus casei, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Atopobium rimae, and total bacteria was established by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. No signs of pain or restoration failure were observed. All therapies were effective in reducing the number of microorganisms, except for S. sobrinus. No statistical differences were observed among the protocols used. All therapies may be considered as effective modern approaches to minimal intervention for the management of deep primary caries treatment.

  7. Genotypic diversity of anaerobic isolates from bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Simmon, Keith E; Mirrett, Stanley; Reller, L Barth; Petti, Cathy A

    2008-05-01

    Accurate species determination for anaerobes from blood culture bottles has become increasingly important with the reemergence of anaerobic bacteremia and prevalence of multiple-drug-resistant microorganisms. Our knowledge of the taxonomical diversity of anaerobes that cause bloodstream infections is extremely limited, because identification historically has relied on conventional methods. Over a 5-year period, we profiled anaerobic bacteremia at a large tertiary care hospital with 16S rRNA gene sequencing to gain a better understanding of the taxonomical diversity of the bacteria. Of 316 isolates, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis identified 316 (100%) to the genus or taxonomical group level and 289 (91%) to the species level. Conventional methods identified 279 (88%) to the genus level and 208 (66%) to the species level; 75 (24%) were misidentified at the species level, and 33 (10%) results were inconclusive. High intragenus variability was observed for Bacteroides and Clostridium species, and high intraspecies variability was observed for Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Sequence-based identification has potential benefits in comparison to conventional methods, because it more accurately characterizes anaerobes within taxonomically related clusters and thereby may enable better correlation with specific clinical syndromes and antibiotic resistance patterns.

  8. Comparison of the detection of periodontal pathogens in bacteraemia after tooth brushing by culture and molecular techniques

    PubMed Central

    Figuero, Elena; González, Itziar; O´Connor, Ana; Diz, Pedro; Álvarez, Maximiliano; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence and amounts of periodontal pathogens detected in bacteraemia samples after tooth brushing-induced by means of four diagnostic technique, three based on culture and one in a molecular-based technique, have been compared in this study. Material and Methods Blood samples were collected from thirty-six subjects with different periodontal status (17 were healthy, 10 with gingivitis and 9 with periodontitis) at baseline and 2 minutes after tooth brushing. Each sample was analyzed by three culture-based methods [direct anaerobic culturing (DAC), hemo-culture (BACTEC), and lysis-centrifugation (LC)] and one molecular-based technique [quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)]. With culture any bacterial isolate was detected and quantified, while with qPCR only Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were detected and quantified. Descriptive analyses, ANOVA and Chi-squared tests, were performed. Results Neither BACTEC nor qPCR detected any type of bacteria in the blood samples. Only LC (2.7%) and DAC (8.3%) detected bacteraemia, although not in the same patients. Fusobacterium nucleatum was the most frequently detected bacterial species. Conclusions The disparity in the results when the same samples were analyzed with four different microbiological detection methods highlights the need for a proper validation of the methodology to detect periodontal pathogens in bacteraemia samples, mainly when the presence of periodontal pathogens in blood samples after tooth brushing was very seldom. Key words:Bacteraemia, periodontitis, culture, PCR, tooth brushing. PMID:26946197

  9. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    PubMed Central

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states. PMID:25004958

  10. Effects of a Chlorhexidine Gluconate-Containing Mouthwash on the Vitality and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of In Vitro Oral Bacterial Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    McBain, Andrew J.; Bartolo, Robert G.; Catrenich, Carl E.; Charbonneau, Duane; Ledder, Ruth G.; Gilbert, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Oral bacterial microcosms, established using saliva inocula from three individuals, were maintained under a feast-famine regime within constant-depth film fermenters. Steady-state communities were exposed four times daily, postfeeding, to a chlorhexidine (CHX) gluconate-containing mouthwash (CHXM) diluted to 0.06% (wt/vol) antimicrobial content. The microcosms were characterized by heterotrophic plate counts and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). CHXM caused significant decreases in both total anaerobe and total aerobe/facultative anaerobe counts (P < 0.05), together with lesser decreases in gram-negative anaerobes. The degree of streptococcal and actinomycete inhibition varied considerably among individuals. DGGE showed that CHXM exposure caused considerable decreases in microbial diversity, including marked reductions in Prevotella sp. and Selenomonas infelix. Pure-culture studies of 10 oral bacteria (eight genera) showed that Actinomyces naeslundii, Veillonella dispar, Prevotella nigrescens, and the streptococci were highly susceptible to CHX, while Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Neisseria subflava were the least susceptible. Determination of the MICs of triclosan, CHX, erythromycin, penicillin V, vancomycin, and metronidazole for microcosm isolates, before and after 5 days of CHXM exposure, showed that CHXM exposure altered the distribution of isolates toward those that were less susceptible to CHX (P < 0.05). Changes in susceptibility distributions for the other test agents were not statistically significant. In conclusion, population changes in plaque microcosms following repeated exposure to CHXM represented an inhibition of the most susceptible flora with a clonal expansion of less susceptible species. PMID:12902270

  11. The effect of sodium hypochlorite on Enterococcus faecalis when grown on dentine as a single- and multi-species biofilm.

    PubMed

    Yap, Benlee; Zilm, Peter S; Briggs, Nancy; Rogers, Anthony H; Cathro, Peter C

    2014-12-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is often involved in the aetiology of apical periodontitis after endodontic treatment. This project aimed to establish, on dentine in vitro, a multi-species biofilm containing E. faecalis, and to determine if the organism had an increased resistance to sodium hypochlorite compared with an axenic biofilm. Biofilms were established on dentine discs in flow cells with either E. faecalis alone (axenic) or together with Fusobacterium nucleatum and Streptococcus sanguinis. Following treatment with either 0.9% sodium hypochlorite or saline, the viability of E. faecalis was determined by serial plating and qualitative analysis was performed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Viable counts indicated that 0.9% NaOCl is highly effective against E. faecalis grown alone and as part of a multi-species biofilm (P = 0.0005 and P = 0.001, respectively). No significant difference in its survival in the two biofilm types was found (P = 0.8276).

  12. Evaluation of bacterial recovery and viability from three different swab transport systems.

    PubMed

    Tan, Thean Yen; Ng, Lily Siew Yong; Sim, Diana Miao Fang; Cheng, Yvonne; Min, Melissa Ong Hui

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluated three types of swab transport systems for organism recovery. Swabs with transport media were further assessed for organism viability over 24  hours over a range of different storage temperatures. Test organisms consisted of aerobes, fastidious aerobes and anaerobes. Swabs were tested according to the standardised quantitative elution method published by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI; M-40A). There were substantial differences in primary organism recovery, with recovery rates from different swabs ranging from <0.1% to 78% for Streptococcus pyogenes. Similar differences were noted for other test organisms. In general, the flocked swab (ESwab) demonstrated highest rates of recovery for aerobic organisms, while higher rates of recovery of Fusobacterium nucleatum were demonstrated from a standard swab (Transwab). When considering organism viability, no single swab fulfilled all the criteria stipulated by the M-40A standard for all organism/temperature combinations. Organism viability was marginally better for the gel-based swab transport systems as compared to the liquid-media based ESwab. Significant differences between swab transport systems were demonstrated, including differences for primary organism recovery and viability. The ESwab showed the best recovery of organisms, while gel-based media demonstrated marginally better bacterial viability for most tested retention times and temperatures.

  13. Differential Matrix Metalloprotease (MMP) Expression Profiles Found in Aged Gingiva

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suhee; Ahn, Sun Hee; Lee, Jin-Sil; Song, Ji-Eun; Cho, Sung-Hyun; Jung, Seunggon; Kim, Seon-Kyu; Kim, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kwang-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    The periodontium undergoes age-related cellular and clinical changes, but the involved genes are not yet known. Here, we investigated age-related genetic changes in gingiva at the transcriptomic level. Genes that were differentially expressed between young and old human gingiva were identified by RNA sequencing and verified by real-time PCR. A total of 1939 mRNA transcripts showed significantly differential expression between young and old gingival tissues. Matrix metalloprotease (MMP) regulation was the top pathway involved in gingival aging. MMP3, MMP9, MMP12, and MMP13 were upregulated in old gingival tissues, concomitantly with interleukin-1 beta (IL1B) expression. In vitro experiments using human gingival fibroblasts (hGFs) showed that MMP12 was upregulated in old hGFs compared to young hGFs. Moreover, the MMP3, MMP9 and IL1B levels were more highly stimulated by infection with the oral bacterium, Fusobacterium nucleatum, in old hGFs compared to young hGFs. Collectively, these findings suggest that, in gingiva, the upregulation of MMP12 may be a molecular hallmark of natural aging, while the upregulations of MMP3, MMM9, and IL1B may indicate externally (e.g., infection)-induced aging. These findings contribute to our understanding of the molecular targets involved in gingival aging. PMID:27391467

  14. Evaluation of the efficacy of a new oral gel containing carvacrol and thymol for home oral care in the management of chronic periodontitis using PCR analysis: a microbiological pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, D; Pazzi, D; Iapichino, A; Gaudio, R M; Di Muzio, M; Lo Russo, L; Pezzetti, F

    2016-01-01

    The use of chemical devices for domestic oral hygiene in periodontal patients has led to new treatment strategies aiming primarily at a control of infection. Over the last few years, carvacrol and thymol (CT) have been subjected to many scientific and medical studies. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of CT on the red complex bacteria using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for microbiological analysis. Five patients with a diagnosis of chronic periodontitis in the age group >25 years, were selected. None of these patients had received any surgical or non-surgical periodontal therapy and demonstrated radiographic evidence of moderate bone loss. After scaling and root planning, patients received a CT gel to be used at home. Four non-adjacent sites in separate quadrants were selected in each patient for monitoring, based on criteria that the sites localize chronic periodontitis. Microbial analysis (MA) was analyzed at baseline and at day 15. SPSS program was used for statistical purposes and a paired samples correlation was performed at the end of the observation period. Although an absolute reduction was observed among the studied bacteria (i.e. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Campylobacter rectus and Total bacteria loading) none reach a statistical significant value. The present study demonstrated that CT gel has a small impact on oral biofilm. Additional studies are needed to detect the efficacy of CT gel. PMID:27469559

  15. Bacterial load of periodontal pathogens among italian patients with chronic periodontitis: a comparative study of three different areas.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, D; Martinelli, M; Mucchi, D; Palmieri, A; Lo Muzio, L; Carinci, F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the mean bacterial load of some periodontal pathogenic bacteria in Italian patients affected by chronic periodontitis. The sample consisted of 1,762 patients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic periodontitis based on the criteria of the American Academy of Periodontology sampled in the period 2013-2015; 1,323 patients were from Northern Italy, 317 from Central Italy and 122 from Southern Italy. Samples for microbiological analysis were collected from the four sites of the greatest probing depth in each patient and then processed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Periodontal pathogens have the following percentage respect to total bacteria load: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans 0.1%, Campylobacter rectus 2%, Fusobacterium nucleatum 8%, Porphyromonas gingivalis 6%, Treponema denticola 2% and Tannerella forsythia 1.5%. There are significant differences in bacterial load among the different geographical areas both for the total bacterial and for the single species. The results of our study in this Italian population showed that a different geographic distribution exists among periodontal pathogens. We hypothesize that these differences in bacterial load could be related to genetic and environmental factors. Additional studies are necessary to confirm these data and to get more insight on additional factors, which may play a role in periodontal pathogens in different geographic areas. PMID:27469562

  16. Ascorbate and α-tocopherol differentially modulate reactive oxygen species generation by neutrophils in response to FcγR and TLR agonists.

    PubMed

    Chapple, Iain Lc; Matthews, John B; Wright, Helen J; Scott, Ann E; Griffiths, Helen R; Grant, Melissa M

    2013-01-01

    Periodontitis, a ubiquitous chronic inflammatory disease, is associated with reduced antioxidant defences and neutrophil hyperactivity in terms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Its phenotype is thus characterized by oxidative stress. We have determined the effect of antioxidant micronutrients ascorbate and α-tocopherol on neutrophil ROS generation. Peripheral neutrophils from periodontally-healthy individuals (n = 20) were challenged with phorbol myristate acetate, IgG-opsonised Staphylococcus aureus, Fusobacterium nucleatum or PBS in the presence and absence of micronutrients (50 µM). Total and extracellular ROS were measured by luminol and isoluminol chemiluminescence respectively. Total and extracellular unstimulated, baseline ROS generation was unaffected by α-tocopherol, but inhibited by ascorbate and a combination of both micronutrients. Fcγ-receptor (Fcγ-R)-stimulated total or extracellular ROS generation was not affected by the presence of individual micronutrients. However, the combination significantly reduced extracellular FcγR-stimulated ROS release. Neither micronutrient inhibited TLR-stimulated total ROS, but the combination caused inhibition. Ascorbate and the micronutrient combination, but not α-tocopherol, inhibited extracellular ROS release by TLR-stimulated cells. Such micronutrient effects in vivo could be beneficial in reducing collateral tissue damage in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis, while retaining immune-mediated neutrophil function. PMID:22914919

  17. In vitro antimicrobial activity of propolis samples from different geographical origins against certain oral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Koru, Ozgur; Toksoy, Fulya; Acikel, Cengiz Han; Tunca, Yasar Meric; Baysallar, Mehmet; Uskudar Guclu, Aylin; Akca, Eralp; Ozkok Tuylu, Asli; Sorkun, Kadriye; Tanyuksel, Mehmet; Salih, Bekir

    2007-01-01

    Propolis is an agent having antimicrobial properties, however, its composition can vary depending on the area where it is collected. In the present study, the antimicrobial activity of five propolis samples, collected from four different regions in Turkey and from Brazil, against nine anaerobic strains was evaluated. Ethanol extracts of propolis (EEP) were prepared from propolis samples and we determined minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of EEP on the growth of test microorganisms by using agar dilution method. All strains were susceptible and MIC values ranged from 4 to 512 microg/ml for propolis activity. Propolis from Kazan-Ankara showed most effective MIC values to the studied microorganisms. MBC values of Kazan-Ankara EEP samples were ranged from 8 to 512 microg/ml. Death was observed within 4 h of incubation for Peptostreptococcus anaerobius and micros and Lactobacillus acidophilus and Actinomyces naeslundii, while 8 h for Prevotella oralis and Prevotella melaninogenica and Porphyromonas gingivalis, 12 h for Fusobacterium nucleatum, 16 h for Veillonella parvula. It was shown that propolis samples were more effective against Gram positive anaerobic bacteria than Gram negative ones. The organic chemical compositions of EEPs were determined by high-resolution gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The main compounds of EEPs were flavonoids such as pinobanksin, quercetin, naringenin, galangine, chrysin and aromatic acids such as cafeic acid. Because of increased antimicrobial resistance, propolis may be kept in mind in the treatment of oral cavity diseases.

  18. Coenzyme Recognition and Gene Regulation by a Flavin Mononucleotide Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Serganov, A.; Huang, L; Patel, D

    2009-01-01

    The biosynthesis of several protein cofactors is subject to feedback regulation by riboswitches. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-specific riboswitches also known as RFN elements, direct expression of bacterial genes involved in the biosynthesis and transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and related compounds. Here we present the crystal structures of the Fusobacterium nucleatum riboswitch bound to FMN, riboflavin and antibiotic roseoflavin. The FMN riboswitch structure, centred on an FMN-bound six-stem junction, does not fold by collinear stacking of adjacent helices, typical for folding of large RNAs. Rather, it adopts a butterfly-like scaffold, stapled together by opposingly directed but nearly identically folded peripheral domains. FMN is positioned asymmetrically within the junctional site and is specifically bound to RNA through interactions with the isoalloxazine ring chromophore and direct and Mg{sup 2+}-mediated contacts with the phosphate moiety. Our structural data, complemented by binding and footprinting experiments, imply a largely pre-folded tertiary RNA architecture and FMN recognition mediated by conformational transitions within the junctional binding pocket. The inherent plasticity of the FMN-binding pocket and the availability of large openings make the riboswitch an attractive target for structure-based design of FMN-like antimicrobial compounds. Our studies also explain the effects of spontaneous and antibiotic-induced deregulatory mutations and provided molecular insights into FMN-based control of gene expression in normal and riboflavin-overproducing bacterial strains.

  19. Preventive Effects of Houttuynia cordata Extract for Oral Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sekita, Yasuko; Murakami, Keiji; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Amoh, Takashi; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Ogata, Shohei; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyake, Yoichiro; Kashiwada, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (HC) (Saururaceae) has been used internally and externally as a traditional medicine and as an herbal tea for healthcare in Japan. Our recent survey showed that HC poultice (HCP) prepared from smothering fresh leaves of HC had been frequently used for the treatment of purulent skin diseases with high effectiveness. Our experimental study also demonstrated that ethanol extract of HCP (eHCP) has antibacterial, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory effects against S. aureus which caused purulent skin diseases. In this study, we focused on novel effects of HCP against oral infectious diseases, such as periodontal disease and dental caries. We determined the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of water solution of HCP ethanol extract (wHCP) against important oral pathogens and investigated its cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects on human oral epithelial cells. wHCP had moderate antimicrobial effects against some oral microorganisms and profound antibiofilm effects against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans. In addition, wHCP had no cytotoxic effects and could inhibit interleukin-8 and CCL20 productions by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human oral keratinocytes. Our findings suggested that wHCP may be clinically useful for preventing oral infectious diseases as a mouthwash for oral care. PMID:27413739

  20. Emerging role of bacteria in oral carcinogenesis: a review with special reference to perio-pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Perera, Manosha; Al-Hebshi, Nezar Noor; Speicher, David J; Perera, Irosha; Johnson, Newell W

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer, primarily oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), continues to be a major global health problem with high incidence and low survival rates. While the major risk factors for this malignancy, mostly lifestyle related, have been identified, around 15% of oral cancer cases remain unexplained. In light of evidence implicating bacteria in the aetiology of some cancer types, several epidemiological studies have been conducted in the last decade, employing methodologies ranging from traditional culture techniques to 16S rRNA metagenomics, to assess the possible role of bacteria in OSCC. While these studies have demonstrated differences in microbial composition between cancerous and healthy tissues, they have failed to agree on specific bacteria or patterns of oral microbial dysbiosis to implicate in OSCC. On the contrary, some oral taxa, particularly Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, show strong oral carcinogenic potential in vitro and in animal studies. Bacteria are thought to contribute to oral carcinogenesis via inhibition of apoptosis, activation of cell proliferation, promotion of cellular invasion, induction of chronic inflammation, and production of carcinogens. This narrative review provides a critical analysis of and an update on the association between bacteria and oral carcinogenesis and the possible mechanisms underlying it. PMID:27677454

  1. Antibacterial activity of medicinal plant extracts against periodontopathic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Iauk, L; Lo Bue, A M; Milazzo, I; Rapisarda, A; Blandino, G

    2003-06-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the antibacterial activity of Althaea officinalis L. roots, Arnica montana L. flowers, Calendula officinalis L. flowers, Hamamelis virginiana L. leaves, Illicium verum Hook. fruits and Melissa officinalis L. leaves, against anaerobic and facultative aerobic periodontal bacteria: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Capnocytophaga gingivalis, Veilonella parvula, Eikenella corrodens, Peptostreptococcus micros and Actinomyces odontolyticus. The methanol extracts of H. virginiana and A. montana and, to a lesser extent, A. officinalis were shown to possess an inhibiting activity (MIC < or = 2048 mg/L) against many of the species tested. In comparison, M. officinalis and C. officinalis extracts had a lower inhibiting activity (MIC > or = 2048 mg/L) against all the tested species with the exception of Prevotella sp. Illicium verum methanol extract was not very active though it had a particular good activity against E. corrodens. The results suggest the use of the alcohol extracts of H. virginiana, A. montana and A. officinalis for topical medications in periodontal prophylactics.

  2. Variations in the Oral Anaerobic Microbial Flora in Relation to Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraju, Anuradha; Durga S., Vijaya; Vanitha, B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Pregnancy gingivitis is a major oral infection. Periodontium acts as a reservoir of inflammatory mediators and sub gingival biofilms of bacteria. Aim: To evaluate the anaerobic oral microbial flora in pregnant women before delivery and after delivery by comparing them with control group. Material and Methods: The study group included fifteen cases of pregnant women before and after delivery and healthy non-pregnant women of same age as control group. Sub gingival plaque samples were collected with the help of dentists. The samples were inoculated immediately into Thioglycollate broth (MV010), transported to the laboratory, inoculated on to selective media for anaerobes (Hi-media laboratories) incubated anaerobically (Gas pack). Results: Prevotella, Tanerella forsythia, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, Veillonella, Peptostreptococcus were isolated. Discussion: The anaerobic bacteria in pregnant women were Prevotella, Tanerella forsythia and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Viellonella and Peptostreptococcus were seen in control group and after delivery. Research suggests that periodontal pathogens may travel the blood stream from the oral cavity to the placenta. Conclusion: Pregnancy has significant effect on periodontal tissue. There is a significant alteration of bacterial flora during and after pregnancy. Oral health has to become a part of antenatal care /check up. PMID:23285437

  3. Proteomic profiling of host-biofilm interactions in an oral infection model resembling the periodontal pocket

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Kai; Belibasakis, Georgios N.; Selevsek, Nathalie; Grossmann, Jonas; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal infections cause inflammatory destruction of the tooth supporting tissues. We recently developed a dynamic, in vitro periodontal organotypic tissue model in a perfusion bioreactor system, in co-culture with an 11-species subgingival biofilm, which may recapitulate early events during the establishment of periodontal infections. This study aimed to characterize the global proteome regulations in this host-biofilm interaction model. Semi-quantitative shotgun proteomics were applied for protein identification and quantification in the co-culture supernatants (human and bacterial) and the biofilm lysates (bacterial). A total of 896 and 3363 proteins were identified as secreted in the supernatant and expressed in the biofilm lysate, respectively. Enriched gene ontology analysis revealed that the regulated secreted human tissue proteins were related to processes of cytoskeletal rearrangement, stress responses, apoptosis, and antigen presentation, all of which are commensurate with deregulated host responses. Most secreted bacterial biofilm proteins derived from their cytoplasmic domain. In the presence of the tissue, the levels of Fusobacterium nucleatum, Actinomyces oris and Campylobacter rectus proteins were significantly regulated. The functions of the up-regulated intracellular (biofilm lysate) proteins were associated with cytokinesis. In conclusion, the proteomic overview of regulated pathways in this host-biofilm interaction model provides insights to the early events of periodontal pathogenesis. PMID:26525412

  4. 16S rRNA based microarray analysis of ten periodontal bacteria in patients with different forms of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Topcuoglu, Nursen; Kulekci, Guven

    2015-10-01

    DNA microarray analysis is a computer based technology, that a reverse capture, which targets 10 periodontal bacteria (ParoCheck) is available for rapid semi-quantitative determination. The aim of this three-year retrospective study was to display the microarray analysis results for the subgingival biofilm samples taken from patient cases diagnosed with different forms of periodontitis. A total of 84 patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP,n:29), generalized chronic periodontitis (GCP, n:25), peri-implantitis (PI,n:14), localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP,n:8) and refractory chronic periodontitis (RP,n:8) were consecutively selected from the archives of the Oral Microbiological Diagnostic Laboratory. The subgingival biofilm samples were analyzed by the microarray-based identification of 10 selected species. All the tested species were detected in the samples. The red complex bacteria were the most prevalent with very high levels in all groups. Fusobacterium nucleatum was detected in all samples at high levels. The green and blue complex bacteria were less prevalent compared with red and orange complex, except Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitas was detected in all LAP group. Positive correlations were found within all the red complex bacteria and between red and orange complex bacteria especially in GCP and GAP groups. Parocheck enables to monitoring of periodontal pathogens in all forms of periodontal disease and can be alternative to other guiding and reliable microbiologic tests.

  5. Susceptibility of oral bacteria to phenoxyethanol and phenoxyethanol/chlorhexidine combinations.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M; Bansal, G; Stanley, A; Newman, H N

    1990-08-01

    A total of 57 bacterial strains (26 different species) which may be isolated from subgingival plaque were tested for their in vitro susceptibility to phenoxycthanol, a commonly-used antiseptic and preservative. Ninety-five percent of the strains, including those associated with chronic inflammatory periodontal disease, were susceptible to concentrations of phenoxyethanol used topically (2% w/v). Phenoxyethanol at a concentration of 1% (w/v) was also found that to have a rapid bactericidal effect achieving a 99.9% kill in 5 minutes or less for species such as Bacterodides gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eikenella corrodens, and Wolinella recta. Addition of chlorhexidine to phenoxyethanol resulted in a mixture with increased antibacterial activity. For most bacterial strains, the presence of chlorhexidine resulted in at least a four-fold decrease in the concentration of pheoxyethanol required for inhibition of growth. These results imply that phenoxyethanol may be useful in the treatment of chronic inflammatory periodontal disease either by itself or in combination with chlorhexidine.

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Chemokine CXCL10 for Dermal and Oral Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Holdren, Grant O; Rosenthal, David J; Yang, Jianyi; Bates, Amber M; Fischer, Carol L; Zhang, Yang; Brogden, Nicole K; Brogden, Kim A

    2014-10-23

    CXCL10 (IP-10) is a small 10 kDa chemokine with antimicrobial activity. It is induced by IFN-γ, chemoattracts mononuclear cells, and promotes adhesion of T cells. Recently, we detected CXCL10 on the surface of the skin and in the oral cavity. In the current study, we used broth microdilution and radial diffusion assays to show that CXCL10 inhibits the growth of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Corynebacterium jeikeium, Corynebacterium striatum, and Candida albicans HMV4C, but not Corynebacterium bovis, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus sanguinis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Poryphromonas gingivalis, or C. albicans ATCC 64124. The reason for the selective antimicrobial activity is not yet known. However, antimicrobial activity of CXCL10 may be related to its composition and structure, as a cationic 98 amino acid residue molecule with 10 lysine residues, 7 arginine residues, a total net charge of +11, and a theoretical pI of 9.93. Modeling studies revealed that CXCL10 contains an α-helix at the N-terminal, three anti-parallel β-strands in the middle, and an α-helix at the C-terminal. Thus, CXCL10, when produced on the surface of the skin or in the oral cavity, likely has antimicrobial activity and may enhance innate antimicrobial and cellular responses to the presence of select commensal or opportunistic microorganisms.

  7. Bifidobacteria inhibit the growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis but not of Streptococcus mutans in an in vitro biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Jäsberg, Heli; Söderling, Eva; Endo, Akihito; Beighton, David; Haukioja, Anna

    2016-06-01

    There is growing interest in the use of probiotic bifidobacteria for enhancement of the therapy, and in the prevention, of oral microbial diseases. However, the results of clinical studies assessing the effects of bifidobacteria on the oral microbiota are controversial, and the mechanisms of actions of probiotics in the oral cavity remain largely unknown. In addition, very little is known about the role of commensal bifidobacteria in oral health. Our aim was to study the integration of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12 and of oral Bifidobacterium dentium and Bifidobacterium longum isolates in supragingival and subgingival biofilm models and their effects on other bacteria in biofilms in vitro using two different in vitro biofilms and agar-overlay assays. All bifidobacteria integrated well into the subgingival biofilms composed of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Fusobacterium nucleatum and decreased significantly only the number of P. gingivalis in the biofilms. The integration of bifidobacteria into the supragingival biofilms containing Streptococcus mutans and A. naeslundii was less efficient, and bifidobacteria did not affect the number of S. mutans in biofilms. Therefore, our results suggest that bifidobacteria may have a positive effect on subgingival biofilm and thereby potential in enhancing gingival health; however, their effect on supragingival biofilm may be limited. PMID:27061393

  8. The gut microbial community in metabolic syndrome patients is modified by diet.

    PubMed

    Haro, Carmen; Garcia-Carpintero, Sonia; Alcala-Diaz, Juan F; Gomez-Delgado, Francisco; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Rangel Zuñiga, Oriol A; Quintana-Navarro, Gracia M; Landa, Blanca B; Clemente, Jose C; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Camargo, Antonio; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota changes may be involved in the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS), which is a multicomponent disorder frequently associated with obesity. The aim of this study was to test the effect of consuming two healthy diets: a Mediterranean diet and a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet, for 2years in the gut microbiota of MetS patients and those in the control group. We analyzed the differences in the bacterial community structure between the groups after 2years of dietary intervention (Mediterranean or low-fat diet) through quantitative polymerase chain reaction using primers, targeting specific bacterial taxa. We observed, at basal time, that the abundance of Bacteroides, Eubacterium and Lactobacillus genera is lower in the control group than in MetS patients, while Bacteroides fragilis group, Parabacteroides distasonis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Ruminococcus flavefaciens subgroup and Eubacterium rectale are depleted in MetS patients (all P values <.05). Additionally, we found that long-term consumption of Mediterranean diet partially restores the population of P. distasonis, B. thetaiotaomicron, F. prausnitzii, B. adolescentis and B. longum in MetS patients (all P values <.05). Our results suggest that the Mediterranean diet could be a useful tool to restore potentially beneficial members of the gut microbiota, although the stability of these changes over time still remains to be assessed.

  9. Preventive Effects of Houttuynia cordata Extract for Oral Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sekita, Yasuko; Murakami, Keiji; Amoh, Takashi; Ogata, Shohei; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyake, Yoichiro; Kashiwada, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (HC) (Saururaceae) has been used internally and externally as a traditional medicine and as an herbal tea for healthcare in Japan. Our recent survey showed that HC poultice (HCP) prepared from smothering fresh leaves of HC had been frequently used for the treatment of purulent skin diseases with high effectiveness. Our experimental study also demonstrated that ethanol extract of HCP (eHCP) has antibacterial, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory effects against S. aureus which caused purulent skin diseases. In this study, we focused on novel effects of HCP against oral infectious diseases, such as periodontal disease and dental caries. We determined the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of water solution of HCP ethanol extract (wHCP) against important oral pathogens and investigated its cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects on human oral epithelial cells. wHCP had moderate antimicrobial effects against some oral microorganisms and profound antibiofilm effects against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans. In addition, wHCP had no cytotoxic effects and could inhibit interleukin-8 and CCL20 productions by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human oral keratinocytes. Our findings suggested that wHCP may be clinically useful for preventing oral infectious diseases as a mouthwash for oral care. PMID:27413739

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of food-isolated strains of Yersinia enterocolitica, Y. intermedia, Y. frederiksenii, and Y. kristensenii.

    PubMed

    Ahmedy, A; Vidon, D J; Delmas, C L; Lett, M C

    1985-08-01

    The in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Yersinia enterocolitica and newly related species isolated from foods was examined. Only 4 of 375 isolates displayed resistance to non-ss-lactam antibiotics. MICs of ampicillin and carbenicillin determined by agar dilution with respect to 125 isolates showed the high susceptibility of Y. kristensenii and biovar 3 of Y. enterocolitica to carbenicillin (MIC for 90% of the strains, less than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml).

  11. Cúmulos jóvenes inmersos en campos de edad intermedia en la barra de la Nube Mayor de Magallanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Geisler, D.; Bica, E.; Clariá, J. J.

    We present Washington system photometry for 11 star clusters immersed in the northwest part of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) bar. The fields are heavily populated by the intermediate-age component of the LMC bar. We succeeded in disentangling cluster colour-magnitude diagrams from those of the fields and in deriving reddening and ages for five clusters - SL 218, BRHT4b, NGC 1839, NGC 1838 and NGC 1863 - with the aid of recent Washington System theoretical isochrones. The resulting cluster ages range between 50 and 125 Myr. Despite their proximity, NGC 1836 and BRHT4b have very different ages. Thus the possibility for these two objects being a binary cluster is very unlikely, although a capture cannot be ruled out a priori. Our results suggest that for each intermediate-age cluster remaining in the LMC bar region, a number of robust young blue star clusters occurs in the same region (Piatti et al. 2003, MNRAS, 343, 851).

  12. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BRANCHIATE MOLE SALAMANDERS (AMBYSTOMA TALPOIDEUM) AND LESSER SIRENS (SIREN INTERMEDIA): ASYMMETRICAL COMPETITION AND INTRAGUILD PREDATION. (R825795)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  13. (+)-Pinoresinol/(+)-lariciresinol reductase from Forsythia intermedia. Protein purification, cDNA cloning, heterologous expression and comparison to isoflavone reductase.

    PubMed

    Dinkova-Kostova, A T; Gang, D R; Davin, L B; Bedgar, D L; Chu, A; Lewis, N G

    1996-11-15

    Lignans are a widely distributed class of natural products, whose functions and distribution suggest that they are one of the earliest forms of defense to have evolved in vascular plants; some, such as podophyllotoxin and enterodiol, have important roles in cancer chemotherapy and prevention, respectively. Entry into lignan enzymology has been gained by the approximately 3000-fold purification of two isoforms of (+)-pinoresinol/(+)-lariciresinol reductase, a pivotal branchpoint enzyme in lignan biosynthesis. Both have comparable ( approximately 34.9 kDa) molecular mass and kinetic (Vmax/Km) properties and catalyze sequential, NADPH-dependent, stereospecific, hydride transfers where the incoming hydride takes up the pro-R position. The gene encoding (+)-pinoresinol/(+)-lariciresinol reductase has been cloned and the recombinant protein heterologously expressed as a functional beta-galactosidase fusion protein. Its amino acid sequence reveals a strong homology to isoflavone reductase, a key branchpoint enzyme in isoflavonoid metabolism and primarily found in the Fabaceae (angiosperms). This is of great evolutionary significance since both lignans and isoflavonoids have comparable plant defense properties, as well as similar roles as phytoestrogens. Given that lignans are widespread from primitive plants onwards, whereas the isoflavone reductase-derived isoflavonoids are mainly restricted to the Fabaceae, it is tempting to speculate that this branch of the isoflavonoid pathway arose via evolutionary divergence from that giving the lignans.

  14. A Cook, A Cardinal, His Priests, and the Press: Deviance as a Trigger for Intermedia Agenda Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    Uses content analysis to examine the changes in trends in the aftermath of deviant acts by individual members of the clergy, given that such acts are "triggering events" for further negative stories. Finds strong media agenda-setting effects of the negative triggering events on subsequent coverage of the clergy in general. (SR)

  15. CAirTOX, An inter-media transfer model for assessing indirect exposures to hazardous air contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    Risk assessment is a quantitative evaluation of information on potential health hazards of environmental contaminants and the extent of human exposure to these contaminants. As applied to toxic chemical emissions to air, risk assessment involves four interrelated steps. These are (1) determination of source concentrations or emission characteristics, (2) exposure assessment, (3) toxicity assessment, and (4) risk characterization. These steps can be carried out with assistance from analytical models in order to estimate the potential risk associated with existing and future releases. CAirTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in making these types of calculations. CAirTOX follows an approach that has been incorporated into the CalTOX model, which was developed for the California Department of Toxic Substances Control, With CAirTOX, we can address how contaminants released to an air basin can lead to contamination of soil, food, surface water, and sediments. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure assessments. The capacity to explicitly address uncertainty has been incorporated into the model in two ways. First, the spreadsheet form of the model makes it compatible with Monte-Carlo add-on programs that are available for uncertainty analysis. Second, all model inputs are specified in terms of an arithmetic mean and coefficient of variation so that uncertainty analyses can be carried out.

  16. Microbial Flora in Chronic Periodontitis: Study at a Tertiary Health Care Center from North Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Benachinmardi, Kirtilaxmi K; Nagamoti, Jyoti; Kothiwale, Shaila; Metgud, Sharada C

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Periodontitis is a major public health problem in India with a prevalence of 60–80%. If untreated it acts as a risk factor for systemic diseases. Data on anaerobic periodontal microflora in the Indian population is very scarce. Hence, this study was undertaken to know the nature of oral microbiota in chronic periodontitis in this region of India and also the semiquantitative study in pre- and post-treatment group and to determine antibiotic susceptibility pattern for aerobic isolates. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on 60 cases. Material was collected from the subgingival pockets in patients with chronic periodontitis attending the Periodontology, Outpatient Department. Clinical samples were transported to the laboratory in fluid thioglycollate medium. Initially Gram's stain and Fontana stains were done. Aerobic, anaerobic, and microaerophilic culture were put up. Antibiotic sensitivity test was done for aerobic isolates. Results: Sixty samples yielded 121 isolates of which 78.34% were polymicrobial, 11.66% were monomicrobial and oral commensals were grown in 10% cases. Out of 121 isolates 91.74% were anaerobic, 7.43% were aerobic and 0.83% were microaerophilic. Fusobacterium species was the most common isolate among anaerobes. Using “paired t-test” “P” value was significant indicating significant reduction in colony count after phase-I periodontal therapy. Conclusion: This study has shown that anaerobic bacteria are important cause of chronic periodontitis, along with aerobes and microaerophilic organisms. Fusobacterium spp, Bacteroides fragilis, Porphyromonas spp and Prevotella intermedia are the most common anaerobic pathogens. Bacterial culture methods are still economical and gold standard. PMID:25949060

  17. Surface structures (peritrichous fibrils and tufts of fibrils) found on Streptococcus sanguis strains may be related to their ability to coaggregate with other oral genera.

    PubMed Central

    Handley, P S; Carter, P L; Wyatt, J E; Hesketh, L M

    1985-01-01

    We screened 36 strains of Streptococcus sanguis biotype I and 8 strains of S. sanguis biotype II for the presence of surface structures and for their ability to coaggregate with Actinomyces viscosus, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Negative staining under an electron microscope revealed detectable surface structures on all S. sanguis strains. The majority of strains (38 of 44) carried peritrichous fibrils, which have an irregular profile and no distinct width. They usually appeared as a fringe with a constant width around the cell. Strains selected for measurement had a fringe with an average length of 72.4 +/- 8.5 nm on biotype I strains and 51.6 +/- 3.3 nm on biotype II strains. Some fibrillar biotype I strains carried an additional, longer (158.7 +/- 33.1 nm) type of fibril projecting through the shorter fibrils. Fibrillar density was characteristic for each strain, ranging from very dense on all cells in a population to very sparse on a few cells in a population. A small group of six strains carried tufts of fibrils in a lateral or polar position on the cell. Either one or two lengths of fibril were present in the tuft depending on the strain. One strain carried both peritrichous fibrils and fimbriae. Fimbriae are flexible structures with a constant width (4.5 to 5.0 nm) all along their length but very variable lengths (less than or equal to 0.7 micron) on each cell. S. sanguis I and II both included strains with peritrichous fibrils and tufts of fibrils, but the mixed morphotype strain was confined to biotype II. Fibrils were present on cells at all stages throughout the growth cycle for the strains tested. Freshly isolated fibrillar strains coaggregated consistently well with A. viscosus and A. naeslundii, although some fibrillar reference strains lacked the ability. In addition, all tufted strains could not coaggregate, but the strains with the mixed morphotype coaggregated well. Coaggregation with F. nucleatum was very strong for the

  18. Characterization of the adherence properties of Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, A H; McBride, B C

    1980-01-01

    The adherence and aggregation properties of 46 human oral Streptococcus salivarius isolates were examined. A total of 41% of the isolates aggregated with whole human saliva, 50% aggregated with human erythrocytes, and 85% adhered to human buccal epithelial cells. Strains that aggregated with saliva and erythrocytes usually reacted with Streptococcus group K typing serum whereas the non-hemagglutinating strains did not. K+ strains also adhered more strongly to human buccal epithelial cells than K- strains. All isolates coaggregated with Fusobacterium nucleatum LF and Bacteroides asaccharolyticus 2D, 91% coaggregated with Veillonella alcalescens V1, and 50% coaggregated with Veillonella parvula V4. S. salivarius HB aggregated with saliva from 15 different human donors and aggregated with human erythrocytes irrespective of the blood group. This strain only weakly aggregated with rat saliva or rat erythrocytes. We isolated mutants which concomitantly lost the ability to agglutinate erythrocytes, aggregate with saliva, and bind to buccal epithelial cells, but retained their interbacterial aggregation properties. A second class of mutants lost the ability to coaggregate with Veillonella, but these mutants retained all of the other aggregation properties. Treatment of S. salivarius HB cells with pronase or subtilisin destroyed their ability to aggregate with saliva and erythrocytes and to bind to buccal epithelial cells. The unique characteristics of the aggregation and adherence reactions were suggested by differences in the rate of loss of activity during protease treatment and in the response to chemical modification. The presence of saliva did not affect hemagglutination and adherence to buccal epithelial cells. Binding of the salivary aggregating factor to the bacteria could be distinguished from aggregation on the basis that the latter required divalent cations. The factor involved in coaggregation with F. nucleatum LF was physicochemically different from the other

  19. Robust species taxonomy assignment algorithm for 16S rRNA NGS reads: application to oral carcinoma samples

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hebshi, Nezar Noor; Nasher, Akram Thabet; Idris, Ali Mohamed; Chen, Tsute

    2015-01-01

    Background Usefulness of next-generation sequencing (NGS) in assessing bacteria associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been undermined by inability to classify reads to the species level. Objective The purpose of this study was to develop a robust algorithm for species-level classification of NGS reads from oral samples and to pilot test it for profiling bacteria within OSCC tissues. Methods Bacterial 16S V1-V3 libraries were prepared from three OSCC DNA samples and sequenced using 454's FLX chemistry. High-quality, well-aligned, and non-chimeric reads ≥350 bp were classified using a novel, multi-stage algorithm that involves matching reads to reference sequences in revised versions of the Human Oral Microbiome Database (HOMD), HOMD extended (HOMDEXT), and Greengene Gold (GGG) at alignment coverage and percentage identity ≥98%, followed by assignment to species level based on top hit reference sequences. Priority was given to hits in HOMD, then HOMDEXT and finally GGG. Unmatched reads were subject to operational taxonomic unit analysis. Results Nearly, 92.8% of the reads were matched to updated-HOMD 13.2, 1.83% to trusted-HOMDEXT, and 1.36% to modified-GGG. Of all matched reads, 99.6% were classified to species level. A total of 228 species-level taxa were identified, representing 11 phyla; the most abundant were Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Thirty-five species-level taxa were detected in all samples. On average, Prevotella oris, Neisseria flava, Neisseria flavescens/subflava, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss polymorphum, Aggregatibacter segnis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium periodontium were the most abundant. Bacteroides fragilis, a species rarely isolated from the oral cavity, was detected in two samples. Conclusion This multi-stage algorithm maximizes the fraction of reads classified to the species level while ensuring reliable classification by giving priority to the human, oral reference

  20. Microarray Analysis of Microbiota of Gingival Lesions in Noma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huyghe, Antoine; François, Patrice; Mombelli, Andrea; Tangomo, Manuela; Girard, Myriam; Baratti-Mayer, Denise; Bolivar, Ignacio; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Noma (cancrum oris) is a gangrenous disease of unknown etiology affecting the maxillo-facial region of young children in extremely limited resource countries. In an attempt to better understand the microbiological events occurring during this disease, we used phylogenetic and low-density microarrays targeting the 16S rRNA gene to characterize the gingival flora of acute noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis (ANG) lesions, and compared them to healthy control subjects of the same geographical and social background. Our observations raise doubts about Fusobacterium necrophorum, a previously suspected causative agent of noma, as this species was not associated with noma lesions. Various oral pathogens were more abundant in noma lesions, notably Atopobium spp., Prevotella intermedia, Peptostreptococcus spp., Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus anginosus. On the other hand, pathogens associated with periodontal diseases such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga spp., Porphyromonas spp. and Fusobacteriales were more abundant in healthy controls. Importantly, the overall loss of bacterial diversity observed in noma samples as well as its homology to that of ANG microbiota supports the hypothesis that ANG might be the immediate step preceding noma. PMID:24086784

  1. Detection and measurement of oral malodor in chronic periodontitis patients and its correlation with levels of select oral anaerobes in subgingival plaque

    PubMed Central

    Grover, H. S.; Blaggana, Anshu; Jain, Yashika; Saini, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral malodor is generally ascribable to oral microbial putrefaction generating malodorous volatile sulfur compounds. The aim of the present study is to correlate organoleptic recordings with a small handheld portable volatile sulfide monitor and periodontal clinical parameters and correlate the levels of halitosis causing bacteria in plaque between baseline, 1-week, and 1-month. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 systemically healthy subjects with self-reported halitosis were subjected to organoleptic examination and FitScan®. Subgingival plaque samples for anaerobic culturing were harvested followed by an assessment of plaque index (PI), gingival bleeding index (GBI), and pocket probing depth. Data derived were subjected to statistical analysis using Wilcoxon signed rank test and Spearman's rank test (P < 0.05). Results: No correlation was seen between organoleptic measurements and portable volatile sulfide monitor at any time interval. There was a statistically significant (P < 0.05) correlation between the scores of PI, gingival index, GBI, and myeloproliferative disease with organoleptic readings at all-time intervals. Anaerobic culture has shown to identify Fusobacterium species, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia. However, no correlation could be established in between total microbial load with organoleptic and FitScan® reading at any time interval (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Significant correlation could be established between organoleptic readings and periodontal parameters. PMID:26604572

  2. Systemic antimicrobial treatment and guided tissue regeneration. Clinical and microbiological effects in furcation defects.

    PubMed

    Mombelli, A; Zappa, U; Brägger, U; Lang, N P

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the microbiota associated with furcation-involved teeth before and after treatment by the guided tissue regeneration procedure (GTR) with non-resorbable ePTFE membranes, and to evaluate the benefit of additional systemic antimicrobial therapy (ornidazole). Each of 10 patients contributed 1 pair of bilateral mandibular molars with comparable furcation defects. 5 defects were treated with a membrane and the active drug, 5 were treated without a membrane but with the active drug, 5 were treated with a membrane and a placebo, and 5 were treated with neither a membrane nor the active drug. Considerable differences were found in the healing response of furcation defects treated with or without the antimicrobial agent. More horizontal attachment gain and increase in bone density was obtained in patients receiving the active drug than in patients receiving the placebo. With 1 exception, all sites with increasing horizontal probing depth were found in patients of the placebo group. Treatment with membrane plus ornidazole resulted in 0.7 mm mean recession and -1.2 mm mean decrease in horizontal probing depth. Sites treated with membranes generally tended to be positive for 15 target micro-organisms more often than sites treated without a membrane. This was particularly evident for Fusobacterium, Prevotella intermedia and Actinomyces odontolyticus. Whereas GTR-treated sites were often already positive upon removal of the membrane, re-emergence of target organisms seemed to be more delayed in the conventionally-treated sites.

  3. Microarray analysis of microbiota of gingival lesions in noma patients.

    PubMed

    Huyghe, Antoine; François, Patrice; Mombelli, Andrea; Tangomo, Manuela; Girard, Myriam; Baratti-Mayer, Denise; Bolivar, Ignacio; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Noma (cancrum oris) is a gangrenous disease of unknown etiology affecting the maxillo-facial region of young children in extremely limited resource countries. In an attempt to better understand the microbiological events occurring during this disease, we used phylogenetic and low-density microarrays targeting the 16S rRNA gene to characterize the gingival flora of acute noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis (ANG) lesions, and compared them to healthy control subjects of the same geographical and social background. Our observations raise doubts about Fusobacterium necrophorum, a previously suspected causative agent of noma, as this species was not associated with noma lesions. Various oral pathogens were more abundant in noma lesions, notably Atopobium spp., Prevotella intermedia, Peptostreptococcus spp., Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus anginosus. On the other hand, pathogens associated with periodontal diseases such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga spp., Porphyromonas spp. and Fusobacteriales were more abundant in healthy controls. Importantly, the overall loss of bacterial diversity observed in noma samples as well as its homology to that of ANG microbiota supports the hypothesis that ANG might be the immediate step preceding noma.

  4. Bacterial community development in experimental gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Kistler, James O; Booth, Veronica; Bradshaw, David J; Wade, William G

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities. This study used 454-pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of 16S rRNA genes (approximately 500 bp), and bacterial culture, to characterize the composition of plaque during the transition from periodontal health to gingivitis. A total of 20 healthy volunteers abstained from oral hygiene for two weeks, allowing plaque to accumulate and gingivitis to develop. Plaque samples were analyzed at baseline, and after one and two weeks. In addition, plaque samples from 20 chronic periodontitis patients were analyzed for cross-sectional comparison to the experimental gingivitis cohort. All of the healthy volunteers developed gingivitis after two weeks. Pyrosequencing yielded a final total of 344,267 sequences after filtering, with a mean length of 354 bases, that were clustered into an average of 299 species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) per sample. Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) plots revealed significant shifts in the bacterial community structure of plaque as gingivitis was induced, and community diversity increased significantly after two weeks. Changes in the relative abundance of OTUs during the transition from health to gingivitis were correlated to bleeding on probing (BoP) scores and resulted in the identification of new health- and gingivitis-associated taxa. Comparison of the healthy volunteers to the periodontitis patients also confirmed the association of a number of putative periodontal pathogens with chronic periodontitis. Taxa associated with gingivitis included Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, Lachnospiraceae [G-2] sp. HOT100, Lautropia sp. HOTA94, and Prevotella oulorum, whilst Rothia dentocariosa was associated with periodontal health. Further study of these taxa is warranted and may lead to new therapeutic approaches

  5. Effects of short-chain fatty acids on Actinomyces naeslundii biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, S; Kawarai, T; Narisawa, N; Tuna, E B; Sato, N; Tsugane, T; Saeki, Y; Ochiai, K; Senpuku, H

    2013-10-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii is an early colonizer and has important roles in the development of the oral biofilm. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) are secreted extracellularly as a product of metabolism by gram-negative anaerobes, e.g. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum; and the SCFA may affect biofilm development with interaction between A. naeslundii and gram-negative bacteria. Our aim was to investigate the effects of SCFA on biofilm formation by A. naeslundii and to determine the mechanism. We used the biofilm formation assay in 96-well microtiter plates in tryptic soy broth without dextrose and with 0.25% sucrose using safranin stain of the biofilm monitoring 492 nm absorbance. To determine the mechanism by SCFA, the production of chaperones and stress-response proteins (GrpE and GroEL) in biofilm formation was examined using Western blot fluorescence activity with GrpE and GroEL antibodies. Adding butyric acid (6.25 mm) 0, 6 and 10 h after beginning culture significantly increased biofilm formation by A. naeslundii, and upregulation was observed at 16 h. Upregulation was also observed using appropriate concentrations of other SCFA. In the upregulated biofilm, production of GrpE and GroEL was higher where membrane-damaged or dead cells were also observed. The upregulated biofilm was significantly reduced by addition of anti-GroEL antibody. The data suggest biofilm formation by A. naeslundii was upregulated dependent on the production of stress proteins, and addition of SCFA increased membrane-damaged or dead cells. Production of GroEL may physically play an important role in biofilm development.

  6. Development of In Vitro Denture Biofilm Models for Halitosis Related Bacteria and their Application in Testing the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tingxi; He, Xuesong; Lu, Hongyang; Bradshaw, David J; Axe, Alyson; Loewy, Zvi; Liu, Honghu; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Objective : Since dentures can serve as a reservoir for halitosis-causing oral bacteria, halitosis development is a concern for denture wearers. In this study, we surveyed the prevalence of four selected halitosis-related species (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Tannerella forsythia, Veillonella atypica and Klebsiella pneumoniae) in clinical denture plaque samples, and developed denture biofilm models for these species in vitro to facilitate assessment of antimicrobial treatment efficacy. Design : Denture plaque from ten healthy and ten denture stomatitis patients was screened for the presence of aforementioned four species by PCR. Biofilm formation by these halitosis-associated species on the surfaces of denture base resin (DBR) discs was evaluated by crystal violet staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The efficacy of denture cleanser treatment on these mono-species biofilms was evaluated by colony counting. Results : 80% of the subjects in the denture stomatitis group and 60% in the healthy group contained at least one of the targeted halitosis-related species in their denture plaque. All halitosis species tested were able to form biofilms on DBR disc surfaces to varying degrees. These in vitro mono-species resin biofilm models were used to evaluate the efficacy of denture cleansers, which exhibited differential efficacies. When forming biofilms on resin surfaces, the halitosis-related species displayed enhanced resistance to denture cleansers compared with their planktonic counterparts. Conclusion : The four selected halitosis-related bacterial species examined in this study are present on the majority of dentures. The mono-species biofilm models established on DBR discs for these species are an efficient screening tool for dental product evaluation. PMID:25926895

  7. Association of a novel high molecular weight, serine-rich protein (SrpA) with fibril-mediated adhesion of the oral biofilm bacterium Streptococcus cristatus

    PubMed Central

    Handley, P. S.; Correia, F. F.; Russell, K.; Rosan, B.; DiRienzo, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The surface of the oral plaque bacterium Streptococcus cristatus is decorated with a lateral tuft of fibrils. The fibrillar tuft functions in the adhesion of S. cristatus to heterologous bacterial species in the plaque biofilm. The tuft typically consists of a densely packed fringe of shorter fibrils 238 ± 19 nm long with longer, less abundant fibrils 403 ± 66 nm long projecting through the fringe of short fibrils. The two types of fibrils in the tufts of S. cristatus have been refractory to biochemical separation, complicating their characterization. A hexadecane partition assay was used to enrich for subpopulations of S. cristatus CR311 (type strain NCTC 12479) having distinct fibrillar morphotypes. Negative staining in the TEM revealed that cells of a hydrophobic subpopulation of S. cristatus (CR311var1) carried only the long fibrils (395 ± 32 nm). A hydrophilic subpopulation of S. cristatus (CR311var3) consisted of mixed morphotypes having no fibrils or remnant short fibrils (223 ± 49 nm). No long fibrils were observed on any cells in the CR311var3 subpopulation. The CR311var3 morphotype, unlike the wild-type strain and CR311var1, was not able to form corncobs with either Corynebacterium matruchotii or Fusobacterium nucleatum. Variant CR311var3 did not express the novel gene srpA, which encodes a high molecular weight (321,882 Da) serine-rich protein, SrpA. The SrpA protein contains two extensive repeat motifs of 17 and 71 amino acids and a gram-positive cell wall anchor consensus sequence (LPNTG). The unusual properties of SrpA most closely resemble those of Fap1, the fimbrial-associated adhesin protein of Streptococcus parasanguis. The association of long fibrils, high surface hydrophobicity, ability to form corncob formations, and expression of the srpA gene suggest that SrpA is a long fibril protein in S. cristatus. PMID:15836513

  8. Microscope-based imaging platform for large-scale analysis of oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Karygianni, L; Follo, M; Hellwig, E; Burghardt, D; Wolkewitz, M; Anderson, A; Al-Ahmad, A

    2012-12-01

    A microscopic method for noninvasively monitoring oral biofilms at the macroscale was developed to describe the spatial distribution of biofilms of different bacterial composition on bovine enamel surfaces (BES). For this purpose, oral biofilm was grown in situ on BES that were fixed at approximal sites of individual upper jaw acrylic devices worn by a volunteer for 3 or 5 days. Eubacteria, Streptococcus spp., and Fusobacterium nucleatum were stained using specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. The resulting fluorescence signals were subsequently tested by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and monitored by an automated wide-field microscope-based imaging platform (Scan∧R). Automated image processing and data analysis were conducted by microscope-associated software and followed by statistical evaluation of the results. The full segmentation of biofilm images revealed a random distribution of bacteria across the entire area of the enamel surfaces examined. Significant differences in the composition of the microflora were recorded across individual as well as between different enamel surfaces varying from sparsely colonized (47.26%) after 3 days to almost full surface coverage (84.45%) after 5 days. The enamel plates that were positioned at the back or in the middle of the oral cavity were found to be more suitable for the examination of biofilms up to 3 days old. In conclusion, automated microscopy combined with the use of FISH can enable the efficient visualization and meaningful quantification of bacterial composition over the entire sample surface. Due to the possibility of automation, Scan∧R overcomes the technical limitations of conventional CLSM.

  9. Oral polymorphonuclear neutrophil characteristics in relation to oral health: a cross-sectional, observational clinical study.

    PubMed

    Rijkschroeff, Patrick; Jansen, Ineke D C; van der Weijden, Fridus A; Keijser, Bart J F; Loos, Bruno G; Nicu, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) have a major role in the innate immune system. However, little is known about PMN contribution in relation to oral health. The objective of this study was to investigate the numbers and functional characteristics of oral PMNs (oPMNs) compared with circulatory PMNs (cPMNs). Oral rinse and venous blood samples were obtained from 268 systemically and orally healthy volunteers in a cross-sectional observational study. PMN counts, cell cycle analysis and cellular activation state were investigated. Also, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was analyzed, with and without bacterial stimulation (Fusobacterium nucleatum). In males, 1.2 × 10(6)±1.0 × 10(6) oPMNs were collected, and showed a tendency to correlate with the levels of gingival bleeding (r=0.215, P=0.008). Comparable oPMNs counts were found among females (1.0 × 10(6)±0.7 × 10(6)). More late-stage apoptotic/necrotic cells were found among the oPMNs (53.1%) compared with the cPMNs (8.5%; P<0.001). Without additional stimulation, oPMNs were more activated than cPMNs, as indicated by higher expression of CD11b, CD63 and CD66b, and higher constitutive ROS levels (P<0.001). Notably, in response to bacterial stimulation, oPMNs released comparable ROS levels as cPMNs (P=0.042). In conclusion, this study provides data on viable oPMNs showing high levels of activation in orally and systemically healthy individuals, free of apparent caries lesions and periodontal disease. These data suggests that although the oPMNs are in a more mature stage of their life cycle compared with the cPMNs, oPMNs are still responsive to stimulation, which indicates their functional potential and possible contribution to a healthy oral ecosystem. PMID:27515277

  10. Compressed mints and chewing gum containing magnolia bark extract are effective against bacteria responsible for oral malodor.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael; Urnezis, Philip; Tian, Minmin

    2007-11-14

    Flavors and natural botanic extracts are often used in chewing gum and compressed mints for breath freshening and relief of oral malodor. The oral malodor is a result of bacterial putrification of proteinaceous materials from food or saliva. In this study, magnolia bark extract (MBE) and its two main components, magnolol and honokiol, were evaluated by the minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) test. The inhibitory effect of MBE mint was further evaluated by a kill-time assay study. In addition, an in vivo study was performed on nine healthy volunteers postlunch. Saliva samples were taken before and after subjects consumed mints and gum, with and without MBE. Listerine mouthwash was included as a positive control. The testing results indicated that MBE and its two main constituents demonstrated a strong germ-kill effect against bacteria responsible for halitosis and also Streptococcus mutans, bacteria involved in dental caries formation. The MIC of magnolol, honokiol, and MBE on Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and S. mutans ranged from 8 to 31 microg/mL. Kill-time assay results indicated that mints containing 0.2% MBE reduced more than 99.9% of three oral bacteria within 5 min of treatment. The in vivo study demonstrated that MBE containing mints reduced total salivary bacteria by 61.6% at 30 min and 33.8% at 60 min postconsumption. In comparison, the flavorless mint reduced total salivary bacteria by 3.6% at 30 min and increased total bacteria by 47.9% at 60 min. The MBE containing chewing gum reduced total salivary bacteria by 43.0% at 40 min, while placebo gum reduced total salivary bacteria by 18.0%. In conclusion, MBE demonstrated a significant antibacterial activity against organisms responsible for oral malodor and can be incorporated in compressed mints and chewing gum for improved breath-freshening benefits. PMID:17949053

  11. Individual growth detection of bacterial species in an in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Tabenski, L; Maisch, T; Santarelli, F; Hiller, K-A; Schmalz, G

    2014-11-01

    Most in vitro studies on the antibacterial effects of antiseptics have used planktonic bacteria in monocultures. However, this study design does not reflect the in vivo situation in oral cavities harboring different bacterial species that live in symbiotic relationships in biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a simple in vitro polymicrobial model consisting of only three bacterial strains of different phases of oral biofilm formation to simulate in vivo oral conditions. Therefore, we studied the biofilm formation of Actinomyces naeslundii (An), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), and Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) on 96-well tissue culture plates under static anaerobic conditions using artificial saliva according to the method established by Pratten et al. that was supplemented with 1 g l(-1) sucrose. Growth was separately determined for each bacterial strain after incubation periods of up to 72 h by means of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and live/dead staining. Presence of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) was visualized by Concanavalin A staining. Increasing incubation times of up to 72 h showed adhesion and propagation of the bacterial strains with artificial saliva formulation. An and Ef had significantly higher growth rates than Fn. Live/dead staining showed a median of 49.9 % (range 46.0-53.0 %) of living bacteria after 72 h of incubation, and 3D fluorescence microscopy showed a three-dimensional structure containing EPS. An in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model was established to better simulate oral conditions and had the advantage of providing the well-controlled experimental conditions of in vitro testing.

  12. Microbial profile on metallic and ceramic bracket materials.

    PubMed

    Anhoury, Patrick; Nathanson, Dan; Hughes, Christopher V; Socransky, Sigmund; Feres, Magda; Chou, Laisheng Lee

    2002-08-01

    The placement of orthodontic appliances creates a favorable environment for the accumulation of a microbiota and food residues, which, in time, may cause caries or exacerbate any pre-existing periodontal disease. The purpose of the present study was to compare the total bacterial counts present on metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets in order to clarify which bracket type has a higher plaque retaining capacity and to determine the levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp on both types of brackets. Thirty-two metallic brackets and 24 ceramic brackets were collected from orthodontic patients at the day of debonding. Two brackets were collected from each patient; one from a maxillary central incisor and another from a maxillary second premolar. Sixteen patients who used metallic brackets and 12 patients who used ceramic brackets were sampled. Bacterial populations were studied using "checkerboard" DNA-DNA hybridization, which uses DNA probes to identify species in complex microbial samples. The significance of differences between groups was determined using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results showed no significant differences between metallic and ceramic brackets with respect to the caries-inducing S mutans and L acidophilus spp counts. Mean counts of 8 of 35 additional species differed significantly between metallic and ceramic brackets with no obvious pattern favoring one bracket type over the other. This study showed higher mean counts of Treponema denticola, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss vincentii, Streptococcus anginosus, and Eubacterium nodatum on metallic brackets while higher counts of Eikenella corrodens, Campylobacter showae, and Selenomonas noxia were found on ceramic brackets.

  13. Periowave demonstrates bactericidal activity against periopathogens and leads to improved clinical outcomes in the treatment of adult periodontitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, Cale N.; Andersen, Roger; Loebel, Nicolas G.

    2009-02-01

    Periodontitis affects half of the U.S. population over 50, and is the leading cause of tooth loss after 35. It is believed to be caused by growth of complex bacterial biofilms on the tooth surface below the gumline. Photodynamic therapy, a technology used commonly in antitumor applications, has more recently been shown to exhibit antimicrobial efficacy. We have demonstrated eradication of the periopathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in vitro using PeriowaveTM; a commercial photodisinfection system. In addition, several clinical studies have now demonstrated the efficacy of this treatment. A pilot study in the U.S. showed that 68% of patients treated with PeriowaveTM adjunctively to scaling and root planing (SRP) showed clinical attachment level increase of >1 mm, as opposed to 30% with SRP alone. In a subsequent larger study, a second PeriowaveTM treatment 6 weeks after initial treatment led to pocket depth improvements of >1.5 mm in 89% of patients. Finally, in the most recent multicenter, randomized, examiner-blinded study conducted on 121 subjects in Canada, PeriowaveTM treatment produced highly significant gains in attachment level (0.88 mm vs. 0.57 mm; p=0.003) and pocket depth (0.87 mm vs. 0.63 mm; p=0.01) as compared to SRP alone. In summary, PeriowaveTM demonstrated strong bactericidal activity against known periopathogens, and treatment of periodontitis using this system produced significantly better clinical outcomes than SRP alone. This, along with the absence of any adverse events in patients treated to date demonstrates that PDT is a safe and effective treatment for adult chronic periodontitis.

  14. [A case of corticosteroid-responsive Lemierre syndrome with clivus osteomyelitis and a mass in the cavernous sinus-suprasellar region].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shotaro; Ito, Satoru; Tagashira, Shugo; Yasui, Kenichi; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre syndrome is a clinical syndrome that presents with internal jugular thrombophlebitis, septicemia and systemic abscess formations. In general, the condition is preceded by oropharyngeal infections. We report a case of a 73-year-old man with Lemierre syndrome, clivus osteomyelitis and a steroid-responsive mass in the cavernous sinus-suprasellar region. He complained of fever, occipital pain, diplopia and right ptosis. Administration of oral steroids ameliorated the ophthalmic symptoms for a period before he was admitted to our hospital. After admission, the severity of his headache advanced, and his ophthalmic symptoms progressed bilaterally. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed contrast enhancement of the clivus and revealed a mass lesion contrast-enhancement effect in the cavernous sinus-suprasellar region. Fusobacterium nucleatum was detected by blood culture, and computed tomography revealed multiple bacterial emboli in both lung fields and thrombosis of the left internal jugular vein; thus, he was diagnosed with Lemierre syndrome. After venous administration of antibiotics, his fever and headache markedly improved, but the ophthalmic symptoms did not. We prescribed an oral steroid because the cavernous sinus-suprasellar lesion was probably an inflammatory granuloma caused by a para-infectious mechanism rather than by infection. After the series of treatments, his ophthalmic symptoms improved, and the cavernous sinus-suprasellar region mass lesion decreased. He was eventually discharged in a fully ambulatory state and had no ophthalmic difficulties. We thought that the osteomyelitis of clivus was caused by Lemierre syndrome and its inflammatory processes formed the granuloma in the cavernous sinus-suprasellar region. This was a case of Lemierre syndrome with a rare combination of clivus osteomyelitis and a steroid-responsive tumour in the cavernous sinus-suprasellar region that was successfully treated. PMID:26028195

  15. Shifts in Campylobacter species abundance may reflect general microbial community shifts in periodontitis progression

    PubMed Central

    Henne, Karsten; Fuchs, Felix; Kruth, Sebastian; Horz, Hans-Peter; Conrads, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral Campylobacter species have been found to be associated with periodontitis progression. While the etiological significance of Campylobacter rectus is quite established, the association of C. gracilis, C. concisus, and C. curvus with health or disease remains contradictory. Objectives This study hypothesizes that the proportion of species within the Campylobacter genus rather than the absolute abundance of a single species is a suitable indicator for periodontitis progression. Design Subgingival plaque from 90 periodontitis patients and gingival sulcus fluid of 32 healthy individuals were subjected to a newly developed nested PCR approach, in which all Campylobacter spp. were amplified simultaneously. The resulting mixture of 16S-rRNA-gene-amplicons were separated by single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) gel electrophoresis, followed by sequencing and identification of excised bands and relative quantification of band intensities. In all samples, the abundance of selected periodontitis marker species was determined based on DNA hybridization on a microarray. Results The highly prevalent Campylobacter community was composed of varying proportions of C. rectus, C. gracilis, C. concisus, and C. curvus. Cluster analysis based on SSCP-banding pattern resulted in distinct groups which in turn coincided with significant differences in abundance of established periodontitis marker species (Tannerella forsythia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum) and progression. Conclusions The shift in the Campylobacter community composition seems to display the general microbial community shift during clinical progression in a simplified manner. The focus on members of the Campylobacter in this study suggests that this genus can be an indicator of ecological changes in the subgingival oral microflora. PMID:25412608

  16. Characterization of Bacteroides forsythus isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, T; Kurihara, H; Dahlen, G

    1997-01-01

    Fifteen Bacteroides forsythus strains freshly isolated from patients with periodontitis were used together with three collection strains and one type strain for characterization of growth on various media; determination of enzymatic profiles, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, 16S rRNA ribotypes, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) outer membrane protein profiles, and pathogenicity; and gas chromatography analysis by using a wound chamber model in rabbits. All strains were stimulated by N-acetylmuramic acid, while one strain needed a further supplement such as yeast extract for optimal growth. All strains showed trypsin-like activity. While 10 different ribotypes were found, the SDS-PAGE profiles revealed similar patterns for all strains. All strains were sensitive to penicillin G (MICs, <0.5 microg/ml), ampicillin (MICs, <1.0 microg/ml), amoxicillin (MICs, <0.38 microg/ml), metronidazole (MICs, <0.005 microg/ml), tetracycline (MICs, <0.19 microg/ml), doxycycline (MICs, 0.05 microg/ml), erythromycin (MICs, <0.4 microg/ml), and clindamycin (MICs, <0.016 microg/ml), while they were less sensitive to ciprofloxacin (MICs, <4 microg/ml). B. forsythus did not cause abscess formation by monoinoculation. B. forsythus coinoculated with Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 caused abscess formation in 75% of rabbits, while it caused abscess formation in 100% of rabbits when it was coinoculated with Porphyromonas gingivalis FDC 381. In the case of the latter combination, four of six rabbits died of sepsis after 6 to 7 days, and P. gingivalis and B. forsythus were recovered from the heart blood at a proportion of 10:1. B. forsythus strains were highly virulent and invasive in combination with P. gingivalis. PMID:9163447

  17. Short- and medium-chain fatty acids exhibit antimicrobial activity for oral microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chifu B.; Altimova, Yelena; Myers, Taylor M.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the antibacterial activity of short-, medium-, and long-chain fatty acids against various oral microorganisms. Methods The short-chain fatty acids [formic acid (C1), acetic acid (C2), propionic acid (C3), butyric acid (C4), isobutyric acid (C4), isovaleric acid (C5), hexanoic acid (C6)], medium-chain fatty acids [octanoic acid (C8), capric acid (C10), lauric acid (12)], and long-chain fatty acids [myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16)], were investigated for antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, S. gordonii, S. sanguis, Candida albicans, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Results The data demonstrated that the fatty acids exhibited patterns of inhibition against oral bacteria with some specificity that appeared related more to the bacterial species that the general structural characteristics of the microorganism. As a group the fatty acids were much less effective against C. albicans than the oral bacteria, with effectiveness limited to hexanoic, octanoic, and lauric acids. Formic acid, capric, and lauric acids were broadly inhibitory for the bacteria. Interestingly, fatty acids that are produced at metabolic end-products by a number of these bacteria, were specifically inactive against the producing species, while substantially inhibiting the growth of other oral microorganisms. Conclusions The results indicate that the antimicrobial activity of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs), long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) could influence the microbial ecology in the oral cavity via at least 2 potential pathways. First, the agents delivered exogenously as therapeutic adjuncts could be packaged to enhance a microbial-regulatory environment in the subgingival sulcus. Second, it would be the intrinsic nature of these fatty acid inhibitors in contributing to the characteristics of the microbial biofilms, their evolution, and emergence of

  18. Early colonization of the oral cavity in 6- and 12-month-old infants by cariogenic and periodontal pathogens: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Merglova, Vlasta; Polenik, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    The colonization of the oral cavity by cariogenic and periodontal pathogens occurs earlier than previously thought. This study aimed to identify the presence and quantity of representative cariogenic and periodontal pathogens in the oral cavities of 6- and 12-month olds and to evaluate the influence of C-section delivery on early Streptococcus mutans (Sm) colonization of the oral cavity. The research cohort was composed of 59 infants (35 infants were delivered vaginally and 24 via C-section) and their mothers. At 6 months of age, the infants were examined, and unstimulated saliva samples were collected. Variables concerning mothers were DMF index and salivary levels of Sm. Repeated saliva samples were taken 6 months later. The representative cariogenic and periodontal microorganisms were identified, and their quantities were measured using a polymerase chain reaction-based method. The relationships between the presence of detected microbes, the mode of delivery, and maternal variables were evaluated using paired t tests, chi-squared test, and ANOVAs. High rates of cariogenic bacteria, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), were found in both infant cohorts. An analysis of the differences between delivery methods revealed that the group of 6-month-old vaginally delivered infants had a significantly higher amount of Sm. We conclude that the cariogenic bacteria, Aa and Fn, are present in edentulous infants. This presence increases in the months following the eruption of the deciduous teeth. Results did not confirm the influence of C-section delivery on the early Sm colonization of the oral cavity. PMID:26914065

  19. Broad-Range PCR Coupled with Electrospray Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Detection of Bacteremia and Fungemia in Patients with Neutropenic Fever.

    PubMed

    Desmet, S; Maertens, J; Bueselinck, K; Lagrou, K

    2016-10-01

    Infection is an important complication in patients with hematologic malignancies or solid tumors undergoing intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy. In only 20 to 30% of the febrile neutropenic episodes, an infectious agent is detected by conventional cultures. In this prospective study, the performance of broad-range PCR coupled with electrospray ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) technology was compared to conventional blood cultures (BC) in a consecutive series of samples from high-risk hematology patients. In 74 patients, BC and a whole-blood sample for PCR/ESI-MS (Iridica BAC BSI; Abbott, Carlsbad, CA, USA) were collected at the start of each febrile neutropenic episode and, in case of persistent fever, also at day 5. During 100 different febrile episodes, 105 blood samples were collected and analyzed by PCR/ESI-MS. There was evidence of a bloodstream infection (BSI) in 36/105 cases (34%), based on 14 cases with both PCR/ESI-MS and BC positivity, 17 cases with BC positivity only, and 5 cases with PCR/ESI-MS positivity only. The sensitivity of PCR/ESI-MS was 45%, specificity was 93%, and the negative predictive value was 80% compared to blood culture. PCR/ESI-MS detected definite pathogens (Fusobacterium nucleatum and Streptococcus pneumoniae) missed by BC, whereas it missed both Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms detected by BC. PCR/ESI-MS testing detected additional microorganisms but showed a low sensitivity (45%) compared to BC in neutropenic patients. Our results indicate a lower concordance between BC and PCR/ESI-MS in the neutropenic population than what has been previously reported in other patient groups with normal white blood cell distribution, and a lower sensitivity than other PCR-based methods.

  20. Antibacterial activity of sphingoid bases and fatty acids against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Carol L; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2012-03-01

    There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity--the sphingoid bases D-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid--against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P < 0.0001) for each bacterial species except Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D-sphingosine (MBC range, 0.3 to 19.6 μg/ml), dihydrosphingosine (MBC range, 0.6 to 39.1 μg/ml), and phytosphingosine (MBC range, 3.3 to 62.5 μg/ml) were active against all bacteria except S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection.

  1. IspH–RPS1 and IspH–UbiA: “Rosetta Stone” Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Guodong; O’Dowd, Bing; Li, Jikun; Wang, Ke; Oldfield, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The protein IspH, (E)-1-hydroxy-2-methyl-but-2-enyl 4-diphosphate (HMPPP) reductase, is an essential 4Fe-4S cluster-containing protein in the methylerythritol phosphate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis. Using a sequence similarity network we found that there are >400 IspH proteins that are about twice as large as most of the IspHs studied to date since their IspH domains are fused to either the ribosomal protein S1 (RPS1), or to a UbiA (4-hydroxybenzoate octaprenyltransferase)-like protein. Many of the IspH-RPS1 proteins are present in anaerobes found in the human gut and some, such as Clostridium botulinum, C. tetani and Fusobacterium nucleatum, are pathogens. The IspH-UbiAs are all found in sulfate-reducing anaerobes. The IspH domains in IspH-RPS1 are fused to 4 and in a few cases 6 tandem repeats in RPS1 that, in most organisms, bind to mRNA or form part of the bacterial ribosome. Mutants in which the four RPS1 domains were sequentially eliminated had similar IspH activity as wild-type protein, indicating they are not essential for IspH catalysis. Overall, the results are of interest since they represent the first isolation of a catalytically active IspH-RPS1, as well as the identification of IspH-UbiA hybrids, two "Rosetta stone" proteins that are likely to be functionally related—IspH producing the isoprenoids required for a UbiA-like prenyl transferase; the IspH-RPS1 hybrids, perhaps, being involved in the stringent response or as Fe/O2 sensors. PMID:26865948

  2. A Five-Species Transcriptome Array for Oral Mixed-Biofilm Studies

    PubMed Central

    Podbielski, Andreas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Background Oral polymicrobial interactions and biofilm formation are associated with initiation and progression of caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Transcriptome studies of such interactions, allowing a first mechanistic insight, are hampered by current single-species array designs. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we used 385 K NimbleGene™ technology for design and evaluation of an array covering the full genomes of 5 important physiological-, cariogenic-, and periodontitis-associated microorganisms (Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mutans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas gingivalis). Array hybridization was done with cDNA from cultures grown for 24 h anaerobically. Single species experiments identified cross-species hybridizing array probes. These probes could be neglected in a mixed-species experimental setting without the need to exclude the whole genes from the analysis. Between 69% and almost 99% of the genomes were actively transcribed under the mono-species planktonic, monolayer, and biofilm conditions. The influence of Streptococcus mitis (not represented on the array) on S. mutans gene transcription was determined as a test for a dual-species mixed biofilm setup. Phenotypically, under the influence of S. mitis an increase in S. mutans biofilm mass and a decrease in media pH-value were noticed, thereby confirming previously published data. Employing a stringent cut-off (2-fold, p<0.05), 19 S. mutans transcripts were identified with increased abundance, and 11 with decreased abundance compared to a S. mutans mono-species biofilm. Several of these genes have previously been found differentially regulated under general and acid stress, thereby confirming the value of this array. Conclusions/Significance This new array allows transcriptome studies on multi-species oral biofilm interactions. It may become an important asset in future oral biofilm and inhibitor/therapy studies. PMID

  3. Bacterial community development in experimental gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Kistler, James O; Booth, Veronica; Bradshaw, David J; Wade, William G

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities. This study used 454-pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of 16S rRNA genes (approximately 500 bp), and bacterial culture, to characterize the composition of plaque during the transition from periodontal health to gingivitis. A total of 20 healthy volunteers abstained from oral hygiene for two weeks, allowing plaque to accumulate and gingivitis to develop. Plaque samples were analyzed at baseline, and after one and two weeks. In addition, plaque samples from 20 chronic periodontitis patients were analyzed for cross-sectional comparison to the experimental gingivitis cohort. All of the healthy volunteers developed gingivitis after two weeks. Pyrosequencing yielded a final total of 344,267 sequences after filtering, with a mean length of 354 bases, that were clustered into an average of 299 species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) per sample. Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) plots revealed significant shifts in the bacterial community structure of plaque as gingivitis was induced, and community diversity increased significantly after two weeks. Changes in the relative abundance of OTUs during the transition from health to gingivitis were correlated to bleeding on probing (BoP) scores and resulted in the identification of new health- and gingivitis-associated taxa. Comparison of the healthy volunteers to the periodontitis patients also confirmed the association of a number of putative periodontal pathogens with chronic periodontitis. Taxa associated with gingivitis included Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, Lachnospiraceae [G-2] sp. HOT100, Lautropia sp. HOTA94, and Prevotella oulorum, whilst Rothia dentocariosa was associated with periodontal health. Further study of these taxa is warranted and may lead to new therapeutic approaches

  4. Extensive Identification of Bacterial Riboflavin Transporters and Their Distribution across Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Enrique; Bonomi, Hernán Ruy; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; García-Angulo, Víctor Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Riboflavin, the precursor for the cofactors flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide, is an essential metabolite in all organisms. While the functions for de novo riboflavin biosynthesis and riboflavin import may coexist in bacteria, the extent of this co-occurrence is undetermined. The RibM, RibN, RfuABCD and the energy-coupling factor-RibU bacterial riboflavin transporters have been experimentally characterized. In addition, ImpX, RfnT and RibXY are proposed as riboflavin transporters based on positional clustering with riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (RBP) genes or conservation of the FMN riboswitch regulatory element. Here, we searched for the FMN riboswitch in bacterial genomes to identify genes encoding riboflavin transporters and assessed their distribution among bacteria. Two new putative riboflavin transporters were identified: RibZ in Clostridium and RibV in Mesoplasma florum. Trans-complementation of an Escherichia coli riboflavin auxotroph strain confirmed the riboflavin transport activity of RibZ from Clostridium difficile, RibXY from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, ImpX from Fusobacterium nucleatum and RfnT from Ochrobactrum anthropi. The analysis of the genomic distribution of all known bacterial riboflavin transporters revealed that most occur in species possessing the RBP and that some bacteria may even encode functional riboflavin transporters from two different families. Our results indicate that some species possess ancestral riboflavin transporters, while others possess transporters that appear to have evolved recently. Moreover, our data suggest that unidentified riboflavin transporters also exist. The present study doubles the number of experimentally characterized riboflavin transporters and suggests a specific, non-accessory role for these proteins in riboflavin-prototrophic bacteria. PMID:25938806

  5. Multi-centre evaluation of mass spectrometric identification of anaerobic bacteria using the VITEK® MS system.

    PubMed

    Garner, O; Mochon, A; Branda, J; Burnham, C-A; Bythrow, M; Ferraro, M; Ginocchio, C; Jennemann, R; Manji, R; Procop, G W; Richter, S; Rychert, J; Sercia, L; Westblade, L; Lewinski, M

    2014-04-01

    Accurate and timely identification of anaerobic bacteria is critical to successful treatment. Classic phenotypic methods for identification require long turnaround times and can exhibit poor species level identification. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an identification method that can provide rapid identification of anaerobes. We present a multi-centre study assessing the clinical performance of the VITEK(®) MS in the identification of anaerobic bacteria. Five different test sites analysed a collection of 651 unique anaerobic isolates comprising 11 different genera. Multiple species were included for several of the genera. Briefly, anaerobic isolates were applied directly to a well of a target plate. Matrix solution (α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) was added and allowed to dry. Mass spectra results were generated with the VITEK(®) MS, and the comparative spectral analysis and organism identification were determined using the VITEK(®) MS database 2.0. Results were confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Of the 651 isolates analysed, 91.2% (594/651) exhibited the correct species identification. An additional eight isolates were correctly identified to genus level, raising the rate of identification to 92.5%. Genus-level identification consisted of Actinomyces, Bacteroides and Prevotella species. Fusobacterium nucleatum, Actinomyces neuii and Bacteroides uniformis were notable for an increased percentage of no-identification results compared with the other anaerobes tested. VITEK(®) MS identification of clinically relevant anaerobes is highly accurate and represents a dramatic improvement over other phenotypic methods in accuracy and turnaround time.

  6. Antibacterial Activity of Sphingoid Bases and Fatty Acids against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Carol L.; Drake, David R.; Dawson, Deborah V.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Brogden, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity—the sphingoid bases d-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid—against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P < 0.0001) for each bacterial species except Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. d-Sphingosine (MBC range, 0.3 to 19.6 μg/ml), dihydrosphingosine (MBC range, 0.6 to 39.1 μg/ml), and phytosphingosine (MBC range, 3.3 to 62.5 μg/ml) were active against all bacteria except S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection. PMID:22155833

  7. Polymicrobial Oral Infection with Four Periodontal Bacteria Orchestrates a Distinct Inflammatory Response and Atherosclerosis in ApoEnull Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chukkapalli, Sasanka S.; Velsko, Irina M.; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F.; Zheng, Donghang; Lucas, Alexandra R.; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) develops from a synergy of complex subgingival oral microbiome, and is linked to systemic inflammatory atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD). To investigate how a polybacterial microbiome infection influences atherosclerotic plaque progression, we infected the oral cavity of ApoEnull mice with a polybacterial consortium of 4 well-characterized periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerealla forsythia and Fusobacterium nucleatum, that have been identified in human atherosclerotic plaque by DNA screening. We assessed periodontal disease characteristics, hematogenous dissemination of bacteria, peripheral T cell response, serum inflammatory cytokines, atherosclerosis risk factors, atherosclerotic plaque development, and alteration of aortic gene expression. Polybacterial infections have established gingival colonization in ApoEnull hyperlipidemic mice and displayed invasive characteristics with hematogenous dissemination into cardiovascular tissues such as the heart and aorta. Polybacterial infection induced significantly higher levels of serum risk factors oxidized LDL (p < 0.05), nitric oxide (p < 0.01), altered lipid profiles (cholesterol, triglycerides, Chylomicrons, VLDL) (p < 0.05) as well as accelerated aortic plaque formation in ApoEnull mice (p < 0.05). Periodontal microbiome infection is associated with significant decreases in Apoa1, Apob, Birc3, Fga, FgB genes that are associated with atherosclerosis. Periodontal infection for 12 weeks had modified levels of inflammatory molecules, with decreased Fas ligand, IL-13, SDF-1 and increased chemokine RANTES. In contrast, 24 weeks of infection induced new changes in other inflammatory molecules with reduced KC, MCSF, enhancing GM-CSF, IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-13, IL-4, IL-13, lymphotactin, RANTES, and also an increase in select inflammatory molecules. This study demonstrates unique differences in the host immune response to a polybacterial periodontal infection

  8. Effects of Increasing Doses of UV-B on Main Phenolic Acids Content, Antioxidant Activity and Estimated Biomass in Lavandin (Lavandula x intermedia).

    PubMed

    Usano-Alemany, Jaime; Panjai, Lachinee

    2015-07-01

    Lavandin is a well-known aromatic plant cultivated mainly for its valuable essential oil. Nonetheless, little attention has been paid so far to the quantification of other natural products such as polyphenols. Accordingly, we examined the effect of increasing doses of UV-B radiation on the main phenolic content, antioxidant activity and estimated biomass of one year old lavandin pots compared with pots grown outdoors. Significantly higher total phenolic content and concentration of main polyphenols have been found in outdoor plants. Rosmarinic acid has been described as the major phenolic compound in methanolic extracts (max. 25.9 ± 9.7 mg/g(-1) DW). Furthermore, we found that increasing doses of UV-B promote the plant growth of this species as well as the accumulation of phenolic compounds although with less antioxidant capacity in scavenging DPPH radicals. On the other hand, our results showed a remarkable variability among individual plants regarding the content of major phenolic acids. The application of UV-B doses during plant growth could be a method to promote biomass in this species along with the promotion of higher content of valuable secondary metabolites. PMID:26411027

  9. Arrecifes de Coral: Una Coleccion de Actividades en Espanol para Estudiantes de Escuela Intermedia (Coral Reefs: A Spanish Compilation of Activities for Middle School Students).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Sharon H.; Newton, R. Amanda; Ortiz, Alida

    This activity book for middle school students on coral reefs is divided into 10 sections. Section 1 is the introduction. Section 2 describes what coral reefs are while section 3 describes how coral reefs reproduce and grow. Section 4 describes where coral reefs are found, and section 5 describes life on a coral reef. Section 6 describes the…

  10. Two novel dermonecrotic toxins LiRecDT4 and LiRecDT5 from brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia) venom: from cloning to functional characterization.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Rafael Bertoni; Pigozzo, Romine Bachmann; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Appel, Marcia Helena; Silva, Dilza Trevisan; Dreyfuss, Juliana Luporini; Toma, Leny; Dietrich, Carl Peter; Nader, Helena B; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Gremski, Waldemiro

    2007-03-01

    Loxoscelism (the condition produced by the bite of brown spiders) has been reported worldwide, but especially in warmer regions. Clinical manifestations include skin necrosis with gravitational spreading while systemic loxoscelism may include renal failure, hemolysis and thrombocytopenia. The venom contains several toxins, of which the best biochemically and biologically studied is the dermonecrotic toxin, a phospholipase-D. Purified toxin induces cutaneous and systemic loxoscelism, especially necrotic lesions, hematological disturbances and renal failure. Herein, we describe cloning, heterologous expression and purification of two novel dermonecrotic toxins: LiRecDT4 and LiRecDT5. The recombinant proteins stably expressed in Escherichia coli cells were purified from culture supernatants in a single step using Ni(2+)-chelating chromatography producing soluble proteins of 34 kDa (LiRecDT4) and 37 kDa (LiRecDT5). Circular dichroism analysis evidenced correctly folding for toxins but differences in secondary structures. Both proteins were recognized by whole venom serum antibodies and by a specific antibody to dermonecrotic toxin. Also, recombinant toxins with phospholipase activity induced experimental skin lesions and caused a massive inflammatory response in rabbit skin dermis. Nevertheless, toxins displayed different effects upon platelet aggregation, increase in vascular permeability and not caused death in mice. These characteristics in combination with functional studies illustrates that a family of dermonecrotic toxins exists, and includes two novel members that are useful for future structural and functional studies. They will also be useful in biotechnological ends, for example, as inflammatory and platelet aggregating studies, as antigens for serum therapy source and for lipids biochemical research.

  11. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Disease-Related Autoantibodies in Individuals at Increased Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mikuls, Ted R.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Deane, Kevin D.; Payne, Jeffrey B.; O'Dell, James R.; Yu, Fang; Sayles, Harlan; Weisman, Michael H.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Buckner, Jane H.; Keating, Richard M.; Derber, Lezlie A.; Robinson, William H.; Holers, V. Michael; Norris, Jill M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationship of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) with the presence of autoantibodies in individuals at risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Participants included: 1) a cohort enriched with HLA-DR4 and 2) those at risk for RA by virtue of having a first-degree relative with RA. None satisfied 1987 ACR RA classification criteria. Autoantibodies measured included anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) and rheumatoid factor (RF; nephelometry, IgA, IgM, IgG). Individuals were considered autoantibody positive (n = 113) with ≥ 1 positive autoantibody with individuals further categorized as `high-risk' (n = 38; positive ACPA or ≥ 2 RF assays). Autoantibody negative individuals served as comparators (n = 171). Antibody to Pg, P. intermedia (Pi), and F. nucleatum (Fn) were measured. Associations of bacterial antibodies with group status were examined using logistic regression. Results Anti-Pg concentrations were higher in high-risk (p = 0.011) and autoantibody positive group (p = 0.010) than in the autoantibody negative group. There were no group differences in anti-Pi or anti-Fn concentrations. After multivariable adjustment, anti-Pg concentrations (but not anti-Pi or anti-Fn) were significantly associated with autoantibody positive and high-risk status (p < 0.05). Conclusion Immunity to Pg, but not Pi or Fn, is significantly associated with the presence of RA-related autoantibodies in individuals at risk for RA. These results support the hypothesis that infection with Pg may play a central role in the early loss of tolerance to self-antigens in RA pathogenesis. PMID:22736291

  12. Subgingival temperature: relation to gingival crevicular fluid enzymes, cytokines, and subgingival plaque micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Wolff, L F; Koller, N J; Smith, Q T; Mathur, A; Aeppli, D

    1997-12-01

    There have been no reports on the relationship of subgingival temperature to specific gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) components. Therefore, the purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine whether there was any relationship between subgingival temperature and GCF levels of neutrophil elastase (NE), myeloperoxidase (MPO), beta-glucuronidase (BG), interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1), and interferon alpha (IFN). Furthermore, another objective was to confirm an association of subgingival temperature with clinical parameters and specific subgingival plaque m