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Sample records for intermediate phosphorylation reactions

  1. The phosphorylated intermediate in the phosphoglyceromutase reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zwaig, N.; Milstein, C.

    1966-01-01

    1. High-voltage paper-electrophoresis methods have been used for the separation of 32P-labelled phosphoesters. 2. Evidence is presented which indicates that 32P-labelled phosphopeptides, obtained after acid hydrolysis of phosphoglyceromutase incubated with impure 2,3-di[32P]phosphoglycerate, are derived from phosphoglucomutase contamination. 3. The hydrolysis of 2,3-di[32P]phosphoglycerate by phosphoglyceromutase has been studied. After an apparent instantaneous hydrolysis of 1 mole of coenzyme/mole of enzyme the reaction proceeds at a very low rate. 4. This hydrolysis seems to be due to the destruction of an enzyme–coenzyme complex. The proportions of the decomposition products of the complex vary according to further handling (pH of ionophoresis). 5. The inorganic [32P]phosphate produced by the hydrolysis of the complex and the inorganic [32P]phosphate produced by the slow phosphatase activity can be differentiated by the ability of the former to be incorporated into non-radioactive substrate before enzyme denaturation. 6. The effect of enzyme concentration on the stoicheiometry of the slow phosphatase hydrolysis of the diphosphoglycerate is described and this suggests that it may occur via two independent reactions, one of them being the decomposition of the enzyme–coenzyme complex on standing. PMID:5941332

  2. Mycobacterial Ubiquitin-like Protein Ligase PafA Follows a Two-step Reaction Pathway with a Phosphorylated Pup Intermediate*

    PubMed Central

    Guth, Ethan; Thommen, Michael; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2011-01-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the enzyme PafA is responsible for the activation and conjugation of the proteasome-targeting molecule Pup to protein substrates. As the proteasomal pathway has been shown to be vital to the persistence of M. tuberculosis, understanding the reaction mechanism of PafA is critical to the design of antituberculous agents. In this study, we have developed novel techniques to study the activity of PafA and have characterized fundamental features of the reaction mechanism. We show that PafA catalyzes a two-step reaction mechanism proceeding through a γ-glutamyl phosphate-mixed anhydride intermediate that is formed on the C-terminal glutamate of Pup before transfer of Pup to the substrate acceptor lysine. SDS-PAGE analysis of formation of the phosphorylated intermediate revealed that the rate of Pup activation matched the maximal steady-state rate of product formation in the overall reaction and suggested that Pup activation was rate-limiting when all substrates were present at saturating concentrations. Following activation, both ADP and the phosphorylated intermediate remained associated with the enzyme awaiting nucleophilic attack by a lysine residue of the target protein. The PafA reaction mechanism appeared to be noticeably biased toward the stable activation of Pup in the absence of additional substrate and required very low concentrations of ATP and Pup relative to other carboxylate-amine/ammonia ligase family members. The bona fide nucleophilic substrate PanB showed a 3 orders of magnitude stronger affinity than free lysine, promoting Pup conjugation to occur close to the rate limit of activation with physiologically relevant concentrations of substrate. PMID:21081505

  3. Plasma membrane ATPase of red beet forms a phosphorylated intermediate.

    PubMed

    Briskin, D P; Poole, R J

    1983-03-01

    When a plasma membrane-enriched fraction isolated from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) was incubated in the presence of 40 micromolar [gamma-(32)P] ATP, 40 micromolar MgSO(4) at pH 6.5, a rapidly turning over phosphorylated protein was formed. Phosphorylation of the protein was substrate-specific for ATP, sensitive to diethylstilbestrol and vanadate, but insensitive to azide. When the dephosphorylation reaction was specifically studied, KCl was found to increase the turnover of the phosphorylated protein consistent with its stimulatory effect upon plasma membrane ATPase. The protein-bound phosphate was found to be most stable at a pH between 2 and 3 and under cold temperature, suggesting that the protein phosphate bond was an acyl-phosphate. When the phosphorylated protein was analyzed with lithium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis, a labeled polypeptide with a molecular weight of about 100,000 daltons was observed. Phosphorylation of this polypeptide was rapidly turning over and Mg-dependent. It is concluded that the phosphorylation observed represents a reaction intermediate of the red beet plasma membrane ATPase.

  4. Reactions of stabilized Criegee Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, Luc; Harder, Hartwig; Novelli, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl oxides (Criegee intermediates) were proposed as key intermediates in the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes in 1975 by Rudolf Criegee. Despite the importance of ozonolysis in atmospheric chemistry, direct observation of these intermediates remained elusive, with only indirect experimental evidence for their role in the oxidation of hydrocarbons, e.g. through scavenging experiments. Direct experimental observation of stabilized CI has only been achieved since 2008. Since then, a concerted effort using experimental and theoretical means is in motion to characterize the chemistry and kinetics of these reactive intermediates. We present the results of theoretical investigations of the chemistry of Criegee intermediates with a series of coreactants which may be of importance in the atmosphere, in experimental setups, or both. This includes the CI+CI cross-reaction, which proceeds with a rate coefficient near the collision limit and can be important in experimental conditions. The CI + alkene reactions show strong dependence of the rate coefficient depending on the coreactants, but is generally found to be rather slow. The CI + ozone reaction is sufficiently fast to occur both in experiment and the free troposphere, and acts as a sink for CI. The reaction of CI with hydroperoxides, ROOH, is complex, and leads both to the formation of oligomers, as to the formation of reactive etheroxides, with a moderately fast rate coefficient. The importance of these reactions is placed in the context of the reaction conditions in different atmospheric environments ranging from unpolluted to highly polluted.

  5. Intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, C.; Tamain, B.

    The intermediate energy heavy ion induced reactions are extensively studied for several years. In this paper, we try to summarize the present knowledge. The peripheral reactions appear to be intermediate between the fragmentation and the deep inelastic regimes. Many questions remain open concerning the energy relaxation mechanisms and an eventual participant zone creation. In the case of central collisions, it has been shown that very hot nuclei can be built. The fusion limits are discussed and the very hot nuclei properties are considered. In some cases, hot spot formation or compression effects could play a role. Multifragmentation is discussed as a possible decay channel. In all these aspects, a difficult question concerns the validity of the temperature concept and more generally of collective thermodynamical variables. Such collective effects have been investigated in pion production experiments. Les réactions induites par ions lourds d'énergie intermédiaire sont très étudiées depuis quelques années. Dans cet article, nous essayons de résumer l'état actuel des connaissances. Les mécanismes mis en jeu dans les collisions périphériques sont intermédiaires entre les collisions très inélastiques et la fragmentation. La cible joue clairement un rôle déterminant et des effets importants de champ moyen demeurent. De nombreuses questions restent sans réponse comme par exemple les mécanismes de relaxation d'énergie ou l'existence d'une éventuelle zone participante. Dans le cas des collisions centrales, il a pu être montré que des noyaux très chauds sont fabriqués. Les limites au processus de fusion et les propriétés des noyaux très chauds sont discutées. Dans certains cas, des effets de compression ou de points chauds peuvent être envisagés. La multifragmentation est une voie de désexcitation possible. Une importante question concerne la validité du concept de température et plus généralement la notion de variable collective

  6. Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction Snapshots in Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gerlits, Oksana; Tian, Jianhui; Das, Amit; Langan, Paul; Heller, William T.; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. The present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date. PMID:25925954

  7. Phosphorylated intermediate of the ouabain-insensitive, Na(+)-stimulated ATPase in rat kidney cortex and rainbow trout gills.

    PubMed

    Ventrella, V; Elvir, J R; Borgatti, A R; Trigari, G; Proverbio, T; Pagliarani, A; Trombetti, F; Pirini, M; Marín, R; Proverbio, F

    2010-02-01

    Several tissues from different animals, including the rat kidney and the freshwater rainbow trout gills, show an ouabain-insensitive, furosemide-sensitive, Na(+)-stimulated ATPase activity, which has been associated with the active control of the cell volume. This Na-ATPase is Mg(2+) dependent and it is inhibited by vanadate, which can be taken as an indication that this enzyme is a P-type ATPase. The P-type ATPases are known to form a phosphorylated intermediate during their catalytic cycle, where the phosphate binds an aspartyl residue at the enzyme's substrate site. In the current study, we partially characterized the phosphorylated intermediate of the ouabain-insensitive Na-ATPase of rat kidney cortex homogenates and that of gill microsomes from freshwater rainbow trout. While the kidney cortex homogenates, under our assay conditions, show both Na- and Na,K-ATPase activities, the gill microsomes, when assayed at pH 5.2, only show Na-ATPase activity. Both preparations showed a Mg(2+)-dependent, Na(+)-stimulated phosphorylated intermediate, which is enhanced by furosemide. Incubation of the phosphorylated enzyme with 0.6 N hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH) showed that it is acid-stable and sensitive to hydroxylamine, either when phosphorylated in the presence or absence of furosemide. Addition of ADP to the incubation medium drives the reaction cycle of the enzyme backward, diminishing its phosphorylation. Na(+) seems to stimulate both the phosphorylation and the dephosphorylation of the enzyme, at least for the Na-ATPase from gill microsomes. In a E1-E2 reaction cycle of the Na-ATPase, furosemide seems to be blocking the transition step from Na.E1 approximately P to Na.E2-P. 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Biological Phosphoryl-Transfer Reactions: Understanding Mechanism and Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Lassila, Jonathan K.; Zalatan, Jesse G.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoryl-transfer reactions are central to biology. These reactions also have some of the slowest nonenzymatic rates and thus require enormous rate accelerations from biological catalysts. Despite the central importance of phosphoryl transfer and the fascinating catalytic challenges it presents, substantial confusion persists about the properties of these reactions. This confusion exists despite decades of research on the chemical mechanisms underlying these reactions. Here we review phosphoryl-transfer reactions with the goal of providing the reader with the conceptual and experimental background to understand this body of work, to evaluate new results and proposals, and to apply this understanding to enzymes. We describe likely resolutions to some controversies, while emphasizing the limits of our current approaches and understanding. We apply this understanding to enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer and provide illustrative examples of how this mechanistic background can guide and deepen our understanding of enzymes and their mechanisms of action. Finally, we present important future challenges for this field. PMID:21513457

  9. Biological phosphoryl-transfer reactions: understanding mechanism and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Jonathan K; Zalatan, Jesse G; Herschlag, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Phosphoryl-transfer reactions are central to biology. These reactions also have some of the slowest nonenzymatic rates and thus require enormous rate accelerations from biological catalysts. Despite the central importance of phosphoryl transfer and the fascinating catalytic challenges it presents, substantial confusion persists about the properties of these reactions. This confusion exists despite decades of research on the chemical mechanisms underlying these reactions. Here we review phosphoryl-transfer reactions with the goal of providing the reader with the conceptual and experimental background to understand this body of work, to evaluate new results and proposals, and to apply this understanding to enzymes. We describe likely resolutions to some controversies, while emphasizing the limits of our current approaches and understanding. We apply this understanding to enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer and provide illustrative examples of how this mechanistic background can guide and deepen our understanding of enzymes and their mechanisms of action. Finally, we present important future challenges for this field.

  10. Abrasion fission reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowry, Michael

    2016-09-01

    In-flight fission of 0.3-1.0 GeV A uranium beams at GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research and RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory have demonstrated that the yield of fission fragments is naturally attuned to the N, Z and excitation energy of the projectile prefragments formed in peripheral nuclear collisions. Similar measurements at intermediate energies (less than 0.1 GeV A) are scarce despite the potential proximity to the threshold of limiting fragmentation proposed by Benecke et al. and may provide a sensitive probe of prefragment formation. Cross section measurements spanning 20 different isotopic chains from nickel to silver are presented following in-flight fission reactions of an 80 MeV A uranium-238 beam on a diamond active target at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University (East Lansing, USA). Fission products were identified on an event-by-event basis by correlating time-of-flight and energy-loss measurements in the S800 spectrograph with in-flight gamma-decays reconstructed by the Gamma-Ray Energy Tracking Array (GRETINA) in the rest frame of the projectile. Transmission through the S800 has been determined using state-of-the-art simulations developed in the LISE + + code. et al. A full author list is available on request.

  11. Nucleotide affinity for a stable phosphorylated intermediate of nucleoside diphosphate kinase.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Benoit; Norda, Ameli; Karlsson, Anna; Veron, Michel; Deville-Bonne, Dominique

    2002-07-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase is transiently phosphorylated on a histidine of the active site during the catalytic cycle. In the presence of a nucleotide acceptor, the phosphohistidine bond is unstable and the phosphate is transferred to the acceptor in less than 1 msec. We describe the synthesis of an analog of the phosphoenzyme intermediate with an inactive mutant of NDP kinase in which the catalytic histidine is replaced by a cysteine. In two sequential disulfide exchange reactions, a thiophosphate group reacts with the thiol function of the cysteine that had previously reacted with dithionitrobenzoate (DTNB). The thiophosphoenzyme presents a 400,000-fold increased stability in the presence of NDPs compared with the phosphoenzyme. The binding of NDP is studied at the steady state and presteady state. Data were analyzed according to a bimolecular association model. For the first time, the true equilibrium dissociation constants of NDP for the analog of the phosphoenzyme are determined in the absence of phosphotransfer, allowing a better understanding of the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme.

  12. Nucleotide affinity for a stable phosphorylated intermediate of nucleoside diphosphate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Benoit; Norda, Ameli; Karlsson, Anna; Veron, Michel; Deville-Bonne, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase is transiently phosphorylated on a histidine of the active site during the catalytic cycle. In the presence of a nucleotide acceptor, the phosphohistidine bond is unstable and the phosphate is transferred to the acceptor in less than 1 msec. We describe the synthesis of an analog of the phosphoenzyme intermediate with an inactive mutant of NDP kinase in which the catalytic histidine is replaced by a cysteine. In two sequential disulfide exchange reactions, a thiophosphate group reacts with the thiol function of the cysteine that had previously reacted with dithionitrobenzoate (DTNB). The thiophosphoenzyme presents a 400,000-fold increased stability in the presence of NDPs compared with the phosphoenzyme. The binding of NDP is studied at the steady state and presteady state. Data were analyzed according to a bimolecular association model. For the first time, the true equilibrium dissociation constants of NDP for the analog of the phosphoenzyme are determined in the absence of phosphotransfer, allowing a better understanding of the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. PMID:12070317

  13. Cyclic AMP-modulated phosphorylation of intermediate filament proteins in cultured avian myogenic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gard, D L; Lazarides, E

    1982-01-01

    The intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin and the muscle tropomyosins were the major protein phosphate acceptors in 8-day-old myotubes incubated for 4 h in medium containing radiolabeled phosphate. The addition of isoproterenol or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP (BrcAMP) resulted in a two- to threefold increase in incorporation of 32PO4 into both desmin and vimentin, whereas no changes in the incorporation of 32PO4 into tropomyosin or other cellular proteins were observed. The BrcAMP- or hormonally induced increase in 32PO4 incorporation into desmin and vimentin was independent of protein synthesis and was not caused by stimulation of protein phosphate turnover. In addition, BrcAMP did not induce significant changes in the specific activity of the cellular ATP pool. These data suggest that the observed increase in 32PO4 incorporation represented an actual increase in phosphorylation of the intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin. Two-dimensional tryptic analysis of desmin from 8-day-old myotubes revealed five phosphopeptides of which two showed a 7- to 10-fold increase in 32PO4 incorporation in BrcAMP-treated myotubes. Four of the phosphopeptides identified in desmin labeled in vivo were also observed in desmin phosphorylated in vitro by bovine heart cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Although phosphorylation of desmin and vimentin was apparent in myogenic cells at all stages of differentiation, BrcAMP- and isoproterenol-induced increases in phosphorylation of these proteins were restricted to mature myotubes. These data strongly suggest that in vivo phosphorylation of the intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin is catalyzed by the cAMP-dependent protein kinases and that such phosphorylation may be regulated during muscle differentiation. Images PMID:6294504

  14. Kinetics, mechanisms and products of reactions of Criegee intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr-Ewing, Andrew

    The atmospheric ozonolysis of alkenes such as isoprene produces Criegee intermediates which are increasingly recognized as important contributors to oxidation chemistry in the Earth's troposphere. Stabilized Criegee intermediates are conveniently produced in the laboratory by ultraviolet photolysis of diiodoalkanes in the presence of O2, and can be detected by absorption spectroscopy using their strong electronic bands in the near ultraviolet region. We have used these techniques to study a wide range of reactions of Criegee intermediates, including their self-reactions, and reactions with carboxylic acids and various other trace atmospheric constituents. In collaboration with the Sandia National Laboratory group led by Drs C.A. Taatjes and D.L. Osborn, we have used photoionization and mass spectrometry methods, combined with electronic structure calculations, to characterize the products of several of these reactions. Our laboratory studies determine rate coefficients for the Criegee intermediate reactions, many of which prove to be fast. In the case of reactions with carboxylic acids, a correlation between the dipole moments of the reactants and the reaction rate coefficients suggests a dipole-capture controlled reaction and allows us to propose a structure-activity relationship to predict the rates of related processes. The contributions of these various Criegee intermediate reactions to the chemistry of the troposphere have been assessed using the STOCHEM-CRI global atmospheric chemistry model. This work was supported by NERC grant NE/K004905/1.

  15. Ligand Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gladysz, John A.

    1999-07-31

    The longest-running goal of this project has been the synthesis, isolation, and physical chemical characterization of homogeneous transition metal complexes containing ligand types believed to be intermediates in the metal-catalyzed conversion of CO/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and similar raw materials to organic fuels, feedstocks, etc. In the current project period, complexes that contain unusual new types of C{sub x}(carbide) and C{sub x}O{sub y} (carbon oxide) ligands have been emphasized. A new program in homogeneous fluorous phase catalysis has been launched as described in the final report.

  16. Visualizing biological reaction intermediates with DNA curtains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiling; Jiang, Yanzhou; Qi, Zhi

    2017-04-01

    Single-molecule approaches have tremendous potential analyzing dynamic biological reaction with heterogeneity that cannot be effectively accessed via traditional ensemble-level biochemical approaches. The approach of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) curtains developed by Dr Eric Greene and his research team at Columbia University is a high-throughput single-molecule technique that utilizes fluorescent imaging to visualize protein–DNA interactions directly and allows the acquisition of statistically relevant information from hundreds or even thousands of individual reactions. This review aims to summarize the past, present, and future of DNA curtains, with an emphasis on its applications to solve important biological questions.

  17. A computational study of the phosphoryl transfer reaction between ATP and Dha in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Bordes, I; Ruiz-Pernía, J J; Castillo, R; Moliner, V

    2015-10-28

    Phosphoryl transfer reactions are ubiquitous in biology, being involved in processes ranging from energy and signal transduction to the replication genetic material. Dihydroxyacetone phosphate (Dha-P), an intermediate of the synthesis of pyruvate and a very important building block in nature, can be generated by converting free dihydroxyacetone (Dha) through the action of the dihydroxyacetone kinase enzyme. In this paper the reference uncatalyzed reaction in solution has been studied in order to define the foundations of the chemical reaction and to determine the most adequate computational method to describe this electronically complex reaction. In particular, the phosphorylation reaction mechanism between adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Dha in aqueous solution has been studied by means of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations with the QM subset of atoms described with semi-empirical and DFT methods. The results appear to be strongly dependent on the level of calculation, which will have to be taken into account for future studies of the reaction catalyzed by enzymes. In particular, PM3/MM renders lower free energy barriers and a less endergonic process than AM1d/MM and PM6/MM methods. Nevertheless, the concerted pathway was not located with the former combination of potentials.

  18. Reactions of N-phosphorylated thioamides with chloroacetic derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Zabirov, N.G.; Cherkasov, R.A.; Pudovik, A.N.

    1986-11-20

    N-Phosphorylated thioamides of carboxylic acids in reactions with chloroacetic derivatives form only products of S-alkylation on the sulfur of the C=S group. The S-alkylation products do not suffer isomerization into products of N-alkylation or of X-alkylation on the sulfur or oxygen atom of the P=X group. By a study of the reactions of iminobis(diphenyl-phosphine sulfide) with chloroacetic derivatives it was shown that the replacement of the C=S group by P=S leads to the formation of products of S-alkylation on the sulfur atom of the P=S group. A mechanism is proposed for the reactions studied, based on results from a complete IR and NMR spectral analysis.

  19. Reaction Intermediates in Aromatic Fuel Combustion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    distribution is unlimited. 5 ,:-,-,: ;;: , , , ’ : - ..-.. ,., ., ; -.. < ?-’.;.o .’.’.:<. .7/ ABSTRACT 4he oxidation of benzene under fuel-lean conditions has...sensitively on the rate- limiting unimolecular decomposition of benzene & C6H6 4 C6H5 + H The rate constant obtained for the initiation reaction using a...considerable current interest ia the kiuetios and mechanism of benzene oxidatiom because of the iacreasing us* of aromatics as fuel components. Partly’due to

  20. (Ligand intermediates in metal-catalyzed reactions)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report consists of sections on sigma bond complexes of alkenes, a new carbon-hydrogen bond activation reaction of alkene complexes, carbon-hydrogen bond migrations in alkylidene complexes, carbon- hydrogen bond migrations in alkyne complexes, synthesis, structure and reactivity of C{sub x} complexes, synthesis and reactivity of alcohol and ether complexes, new catalysts for the epimerization of secondary alcohols; carbon-hydrogen bond activation in alkoxide complexes, pi/sigma equilibria in metal/O=CXX' complexes, and other hydrocarbon ligands; miscellaneous.(WET)

  1. Phosphorylation site of NtrC, a protein phosphatase whose covalent intermediate activates transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, D A; Gillece-Castro, B L; Burlingame, A L; Koshland, D E

    1992-01-01

    The NtrC transcription factor is a member of a family of homologous prokaryotic regulatory proteins that participate in the transduction of extracellular and nutritional signals. It has been demonstrated that the phosphate group from a histidine residue of the phosphorylated NtrB protein autokinase is transferred to the NtrC protein. Phosphorylation of the NtrC protein is transient and activates its transcriptional enhancement activity. We have investigated the site of phosphorylation of the Salmonella typhimurium NtrC protein and find that it is an aspartate residue (Asp-54) that is found within a sequence conserved in all of the members of the family of regulatory proteins. We propose that this phosphorylation is an NtrC protein histidine phosphatase catalytic intermediate. This conclusion suggests that the NtrC family should be viewed not as kinase substrates but as enzymes that can catalyze the hydrolysis of their activated forms in a concentration-independent fashion. They are similar in this sense to eukaryotic signal-transducing GTPases. Images PMID:1321122

  2. Cluster Productions in Intermediate-Energy Proton-Nucleus Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, Hiroki; Uozumi, Yusuke

    2008-04-17

    We propose a model to describe cluster productions within the framework of the intranuclear cascade (INC) model. In our model, combination of the 'surface coalescence' and the 'knockout' is implemented to describe cluster productions in intermediate-energy nuclear reactions. In the present work, the basic ingredients of our INC model are defined and applied to nucleon and cluster productions for the proton-nucleus reactions. Although our INC model has some difficulties and room for improvement, it gives a good overall agreement with experimental data of not only nucleon productions but also cluster productions at intermediate energies.

  3. Intermediates in the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase reaction.

    PubMed

    Jaworowski, A; Hartman, F C; Rose, I A

    1984-06-10

    At least two intermediates of the D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (EC 4.1.1.39) reaction were liberated in detectable amounts when the functioning enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum was quenched in acid. Using substrate labeled with 32P in C-1, [32P]orthophosphate (Pi) was found when the quenched solution was rapidly processed for extraction of Pi as the acid molybdate complex. Reaction with sodium borohydride under mildly alkaline conditions immediately after acid quenching of the carboxylase reaction decreased the amount of 32Pi that was observed by 68%. The compound whose degradation to Pi was prevented by reaction with sodium borohydride decomposed under both acid and neutral conditions with a half-time of about 5 min at 25 degrees C and was assigned to the beta-keto acid recently demonstrated for the spinach enzyme ( Schloss , J.V., and Lorimer , G.H. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 4691-4694). It was sufficiently stable upon neutralization to react productively with fresh enzyme. As substrate CO2 concentration was decreased below the steady state Km value, the proportion of the 32P that did not react with sodium borohydride increased, indicative of a second unstable intermediate that precedes the carboxylation step. The decomposition of the latter intermediate to Pi, which occurs with a t1/2 less than or equal to 6 ms, was prevented if I2 was present in the acid quench medium. These are properties expected of the 2,3- enediol form of ribulose bisphosphate. Both intermediates reach their maximum levels when product formation is most rapid and disappear when product formation is complete as expected of reaction intermediates.

  4. The role of phosphate in a multistep enzymatic reaction: reactions of the substrate and intermediate in pieces.

    PubMed

    Kholodar, Svetlana A; Allen, C Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M; Murkin, Andrew S

    2015-02-25

    Several mechanistically unrelated enzymes utilize the binding energy of their substrate's nonreacting phosphoryl group to accelerate catalysis. Evidence for the involvement of the phosphodianion in transition state formation has come from reactions of the substrate in pieces, in which reaction of a truncated substrate lacking its phosphorylmethyl group is activated by inorganic phosphite. What has remained unknown until now is how the phosphodianion group influences the reaction energetics at different points along the reaction coordinate. 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) reductoisomerase (DXR), which catalyzes the isomerization of DXP to 2-C-methyl-D-erythrose 4-phosphate (MEsP) and subsequent NADPH-dependent reduction, presents a unique opportunity to address this concern. Previously, we have reported the effect of covalently linked phosphate on the energetics of DXP turnover. Through the use of chemically synthesized MEsP and its phosphate-truncated analogue, 2-C-methyl-D-glyceraldehyde, the current study revealed a loss of 6.1 kcal/mol of kinetic barrier stabilization upon truncation, of which 4.4 kcal/mol was regained in the presence of phosphite dianion. The activating effect of phosphite was accompanied by apparent tightening of its interactions within the active site at the intermediate stage of the reaction, suggesting a role of the phosphodianion in disfavoring intermediate release and in modulation of the on-enzyme isomerization equilibrium. The results of kinetic isotope effect and structural studies indicate rate limitation by physical steps when the covalent linkage is severed. These striking differences in the energetics of the natural reaction and the reactions in pieces provide a deeper insight into the contribution of enzyme-phosphodianion interactions to the reaction coordinate.

  5. Photocatalytic degradation of paracetamol: intermediates and total reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Moctezuma, Edgar; Leyva, Elisa; Aguilar, Claudia A; Luna, Raúl A; Montalvo, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    The advanced oxidation of paracetamol (PAM) promoted by TiO(2)/UV system in aqueous medium was investigated. Monitoring this reaction by HPLC and TOC, it was demonstrated that while oxidation of paracetamol is quite efficient under these conditions, its mineralization is not complete. HPLC indicated the formation of hydroquinone, benzoquinone, p-aminophenol and p-nitrophenol in the reaction mixtures. Further evidence of p-nitrophenol formation was obtained following the reaction by UV-vis spectroscopy. Continuous monitoring by IR spectroscopy demonstrated the breaking of the aromatic amide present in PAM and subsequent formation of several aromatic intermediate compounds such as p-aminophenol and p-nitrophenol. These aromatic compounds were eventually converted into trans-unsaturated carboxylic acids. Based on these experimental results, an alternative deacylation mechanism for the photocatalytic oxidation of paracetamol is proposed. Our studies also demonstrated IR spectroscopy to be a useful technique to investigate oxidative mechanisms of pharmaceutical compounds.

  6. A two-dimensional energy surface of the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by phosphoserine phosphatase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, Suyong; Jung, Jaewoon; Ten-no, Seiichiro; Sugita, Yuji

    2009-10-01

    The phosphoryl transfer reaction from phospho- L-serine (pSer), catalyzed by phosphoserine phosphatase, is investigated using the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The two-dimensional energy surface along the phosphoryl and proton transfer distances reveals early protonation of the leaving group oxygen of pSer, prior to the transition state (TS), which triggers subsequent phosphoryl transfer reaction. Calculated electronic properties of the phosphoryl group at the active site suggest significant metaphosphate-like character of TS, which is consistent with kinetic experiments on related phosphatases. The features are not obtained with a one-dimensional search along the phosphoryl transfer coordinate, due to inadequate description of proton movement.

  7. Characterization of Anionic Cluster Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, Donna Marie

    Recent theoretical and experimental developments in the arena of the gas phase S_{rm N}2 reaction (X^- + RY to RX + Y^-) has rekindled interest in this classic chemical reaction. Consideration of the gas phase S_{rm N} 2 double minima potential surface from a valence bond perspective, advocated by Shaik et. al., predicts the presence of a low lying excited electronic state corresponding to electron transfer. In this work we take advantage of long range ion-molecule induced forces to stabilize the S_{rm N}2 reactants in a complex, X^-cdot RY, allowing us to search for this charge transfer excited state from the well defined location on the potential energy surface. Photoelectron spectroscopy of X^ - cdot RY confirms the identification of the species as essentially charge-localized. Vibrational fine structure observed in the case of I^- cdot CH_3I is found to be consistent with small distortions of the CH_3I neutral upon complexation to form a stable intermediate in the S_{rm N}2 identity reaction. A narrow photofragmentation band lies just below the vertical electron detachment energy and is assigned to the X^- cdot RY to X cdotcdot (RY) ^- charge transfer excited state. More detailed study of the photofragmentation band reveals the photoexcitation mechanism is not direct charge transfer but is mediated by a weakly bound negative ion state. The excited state photochemistry of the X ^- cdot RY reaction intermediates is characterized by the formation of the endothermic halide abstraction product XY^-. Trends in the formation of the dihalide product are strongly dependent of the nature of the R group and these results are consistent with a preferential ion binding site in the complex. Search for the XY^- dihalide product in the bimolecular ground state reaction at supra-thermal collision energies revealed halide abstraction as a competitive product channel to the well known Walden inversion mechanism. All of these results are integrated in the development a picture of

  8. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  9. Atmospheric Chemistry of Criegee Intermediates: Unimolecular Reactions and Reactions with Water.

    PubMed

    Long, Bo; Bao, Junwei Lucas; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-11-02

    Criegee intermediates are produced in the ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the troposphere, and understanding their fate is a prerequisite to modeling climate-controlling atmospheric aerosol formation. Although some experimental and theoretical rate data are available, they are incomplete and partially inconsistent, and they do not cover the tropospheric temperature range. Here, we report quantum chemical rate constants for the reactions of stabilized formaldehyde oxide (CH2OO) and acetaldehyde oxide (syn-CH3CHOO and anti-CH3CHOO) with H2O and for their unimolecular reactions. Our results are obtained by combining post-CCSD(T) electronic structure benchmarks, validated density functional theory potential energy surfaces, and multipath variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling, coupled-torsions anharmonicity, and high-frequency anharmonicity. We consider two different types of reaction mechanisms for the bimolecular reactions, namely, (i) addition-coupled hydrogen transfer and (ii) double hydrogen atom transfer (DHAT). First, we show that the MN15-L exchange-correlation functional has kJ/mol accuracy for the CH2OO + H2O and syn-CH3CHOO + H2O reactions. Then we show that, due to tunneling, the DHAT mechanism is especially important in the syn-CH3CHOO + H2O reaction. We show that the dominant pathways for reactions of Criegee intermediates depend on altitude. The results we obtain eliminate the discrepancy between experiment and theory under those conditions where experimental results are available, and we make predictions for the full range of temperatures and pressures encountered in the troposphere and stratosphere. The present results are an important cog in clarifying the atmospheric fate and oxidation processes of Criegee intermediates, and they also show how theoretical methods can provide reliable rate data for complex atmospheric processes.

  10. Crystal Structures of Intermediates in the Nitroalkane Oxidase Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, A.; Bozinovski, D; Valley, M; Fitzpatrick, P; Orville, A

    2009-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to nitrite and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. Crystal structures to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution or better of enzyme complexes with bound substrates and of a trapped substrate-flavin adduct are described. The D402N enzyme has no detectable activity with neutral nitroalkanes. The structure of the D402N enzyme crystallized in the presence of 1-nitrohexane or 1-nitrooctane shows the presence of the substrate in the binding site. The aliphatic chain of the substrate extends into a tunnel leading to the enzyme surface. The oxygens of the substrate nitro group interact both with amino acid residues and with the 2'-hydroxyl of the FAD. When nitroalkane oxidase oxidizes nitroalkanes in the presence of cyanide, an electrophilic flavin imine intermediate can be trapped (Valley, M. P., Tichy, S. E., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2062-2066). The structure of the enzyme trapped with cyanide during oxidation of 1-nitrohexane shows the presence of the modified flavin. A continuous hydrogen bond network connects the nitrogen of the CN-hexyl-FAD through the FAD 2'-hydroxyl to a chain of water molecules extending to the protein surface. Together, our complementary approaches provide strong evidence that the flavin cofactor is in the appropriate oxidation state and correlates well with the putative intermediate state observed within each of the crystal structures. Consequently, these results provide important structural descriptions of several steps along the nitroalkane oxidase reaction cycle.

  11. Phosphoryl transfer by a concerted reaction mechanism in UMP/CMP-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, M. C.; Helms, V.

    2000-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by UMP/CMP-kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum was investigated by semiempirical AM1 molecular orbital computations of an active site model system derived from crystal structures that contain a transition state analog or a bisubstrate inhibitor. The computational results suggest that the nucleoside monophosphate must be protonated for the forward reaction while it is unprotonated in the presence of aluminium fluoride, a popular transition state analog for phosphoryl transfer reactions. Furthermore, a compactification of the active site model system during the reaction and for the corresponding complex containing AlF3 was observed. For the active site residues that are part of the LID domain, conformational flexibility during the reaction proved to be crucial. On the basis of the calculations, a concerted phosphoryl transfer mechanism is suggested that involves the synchronous shift of a proton from the monophosphate to the transferred PO3-group. The proposed mechanism is thus analogous to the phosphoryl transfer mechanism in cAMP-dependent protein kinase that phosphorylates the hydroxyl groups of serine residues. PMID:11152133

  12. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  13. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miękisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  14. Phosphorylation Reaction in cAPK Protein Kinase - Free Energy Quantum Mechanic/Molecular Mechanics Simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, Marat; Yang, Jie; Adams, Joseph; Taylor, Susan S.; Weare, John H.

    2007-11-29

    Protein kinases catalyze the transfer of the γ-phosphoryl group from ATP, a key regulatory process governing signalling pathways in eukaryotic cells. The structure of the active site in these enzymes is highly conserved implying common catalytic mechanism. In this work we investigate the reaction process in cAPK protein kinase (PKA) using a combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics approach. The novel computational features of our work include reaction pathway determination with nudged elastic band methodology and calculation of free energy profiles of the reaction process taking into account finite temperature fluctuations of the protein environment. We find that the transfer of the γ-phosphoryl group in the protein environment is an exothermic reaction with the reaction barrier of 15 kcal/mol.

  15. The effect of Mg/2+/ and Ca/2+/ on urea-catalyzed phosphorylation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuk, G. J.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by urea is investigated, showing that Mg(2+) improves markedly the yield of products containing pyrophosphate bonds. Yields of up to 25% of uridine diphosphate can be obtained with struvite at temperatures as low as 65 C.

  16. The effect of Mg/2+/ and Ca/2+/ on urea-catalyzed phosphorylation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuk, G. J.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on phosphorylation reactions catalyzed by urea is investigated, showing that Mg(2+) improves markedly the yield of products containing pyrophosphate bonds. Yields of up to 25% of uridine diphosphate can be obtained with struvite at temperatures as low as 65 C.

  17. Structural Insights into Intermediate Steps in the Sir2 Deacetylation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hawse, William F.; Hoff, Kevin G.; Fatkins, David G.; Daines, Alison; Zubkova, Olga V.; Schramm, Vern L.; Zheng, Weiping; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-07-22

    Sirtuin enzymes comprise a unique class of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylases. Although structures of many sirtuin complexes have been determined, structural resolution of intermediate chemical steps are needed to understand the deacetylation mechanism. We report crystal structures of the bacterial sirtuin, Sir2Tm, in complex with an S-alkylamidate intermediate, analogous to the naturally occurring O-alkylamidate intermediate, and a Sir2Tm ternary complex containing a dissociated NAD{sup +} analog and acetylated peptide. The structures and biochemical studies reveal critical roles for the invariant active site histidine in positioning the reaction intermediate, and for a conserved phenylalanine residue in shielding reaction intermediates from base exchange with nicotinamide. The new structural and biochemical studies provide key mechanistic insight into intermediate steps of the Sir2 deacetylation reaction.

  18. 18F-Labelled Intermediates for Radiosynthesis by Modular Build-Up Reactions: Newer Developments

    PubMed Central

    Ermert, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    This brief review gives an overview of newer developments in 18F-chemistry with the focus on small 18F-labelled molecules as intermediates for modular build-up syntheses. The short half-life (<2 h) of the radionuclide requires efficient syntheses of these intermediates considering that multistep syntheses are often time consuming and characterized by a loss of yield in each reaction step. Recent examples of improved synthesis of 18F-labelled intermediates show new possibilities for no-carrier-added ring-fluorinated arenes, novel intermediates for tri[18F]fluoromethylation reactions, and 18F-fluorovinylation methods. PMID:25343144

  19. C Tracer Evidence for Synthesis of Choline and Betaine via Phosphoryl Base Intermediates in Salinized Sugarbeet Leaves.

    PubMed

    Hanson, A D; Rhodes, D

    1983-03-01

    Like other chenopods, sugarbeets (Beta vulgaris L. cv Great Western D-2) accumulate glycine betaine when salinized; this may be an adaptive response to stress. The pathway of betaine synthesis in leaves of salinized (150-200 millimolar NaCl) sugarbeet plants was investigated by supplying [(14)C]formate, phosphoryl[(14)C]monomethylethanolamine ([(14)C][unk] MME) or phosphoryl[(14)C]choline ([(14)C][unk] choline) to leaf discs and following (14)C incorporation into prospective intermediates. The (14)C kinetic data were used to develop a computer model of the betaine pathway.When [(14)C]formate was fed, [unk] MME, phosphoryldimethylethanolamine ([unk] DME) and [unk] choline were the most prominent methylated products at short labeling times, after which (14)C appeared in free choline and in betaine. Phosphatidylcholine labeled more slowly than [unk] choline, choline, and betaine, and behaved as a minor end product. Very little (14)C entered the free methylethanolamines. When [(14)C][unk] MME was supplied, a small amount was hydrolyzed to the free base but the major fate was conversion to [unk] DME, [unk] choline, free choline, and betaine; label also accumulated slowly in phosphatidylcholine. Label from supplied [(14)C][unk] choline entered choline and betaine rapidly, while phosphatidylcholine labeled only slowly and to a small extent.These results are consistent with the pathway [unk] MME -->[unk] DME --> [unk] choline --> choline --> --> betaine, with a minor side branch leading from [unk] choline into phosphatidylcholine. This contrasts markedly (a) with the pathway of stress-induced choline and betaine synthesis in barley, in which phosphatidylcholine apparently acts as an intermediate (Hitz, Rhodes, Hanson 1981, Plant Physiol 68: 814-822); (b) with choline biogenesis in mammalian liver and microorganisms. Computer modeling of the experimental data pointed strongly to regulation at the [unk] choline --> choline step, and also indicated that the rate of [unk

  20. Radiotracer evidence implicating phosphoryl and phosphatidyl bases as intermediates in betaine synthesis by water-stressed barley leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Hitz, W.D.; Rhodes, D.; Hanson, A.

    1981-10-01

    In pulse-chase experiments with barley wilted leaves, label from (/sup 14/C)-ethanolamine continued to accumulate in betaine as it was being lost from phosphatidylcholine. When (/sup 14/C)monomethylethanolamine was supplied to wilted leaves, phosphatidylcholine was initially more heavily labeled than betaine. These results are qualitatively consistent with a precursor-to-product relationship between phosphatidylcholine and betaine. The following experiments, in which tracer amounts of (/sup 14/C)ethanolamine or (/sup 14/C)formate were supplied to wilted barley leaves, implicated phosphoryl and phosphatidyl bases as intermediates in the methylation steps between ethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Label from both (/sup 14/C)ethanolamine and (/sup 14/C)formate entered phosphorylmonomethylethanolamine and phosphorylcholine very rapidly; these phosphoryl bases were the most heavily labeled products at 15 to 30 minutes after label addition and lost label rapidly as the fed /sup 14/C-labeled precursor was depleted. Phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine were also significantly labeled from (/sup 14/C)ethanolamine and (/sup 14/)formate at early times; the corresponding free bases and nucleotide bases were not. Addition of a trapping pool of phosphorylcholine reduced (/sup 14/C)ethanolamine conversion to both phosphatidylcholine and betaine, and resulted in accumulation of labe in the trap. A computer model of the synthesis of betaine via phosphatidylcholine was developed from /sup 14/C kinetic data. The model indicates that about 20% of the total leaf phosphatidylcholine behaves as an intermediate in betaine biosynthesis and that a marked decrease (greater than or equal to2-fold) in the half-life of this metabolically active phosphatidylcholine fraction accompanies wilting.

  1. Regulation of protein phosphorylation of the intermediate-sized filament vimentin in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye

    SciTech Connect

    Coca-Prados, M.

    1985-08-25

    The intermediate-sized filaments of vimentin-type (Mr = 57,000) have been identified biochemically and immunochemically as a major cytoskeleton component in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye. When human or rabbit ciliary processes, or cultured ciliary epithelial-derived cells were incubated in serum-free medium containing (TSP)orthophosphate and any of the following agents: 1) beta-adrenergic agonists (isoproterenol or epinephrine), 2) direct activators of adenylate cyclase (cholera toxin or forskolin), 3) analogs of cyclic AMP (8-Br-cAMP), or 4) prostaglandin E1, the phosphorylation of vimentin was significantly enhanced. The maximal enhancement ranged, in vivo and in vitro, from about 3-fold in human to 5-fold in rabbit, with either 1 mM 8-Br-cAMP or 0.1 microM forskolin. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using a monoclonal antibody, anti-vimentin, allowed the localization of vimentin filaments in cultured ciliary epithelial cells. Treatment of these cells in culture with the catecholamine hormone, isoproterenol (1 microM), resulted in a profound reorganization of vimentin filaments. This may be correlated with the enhanced levels of phosphorylated vimentin observed upon increasing cellular cyclic AMP.

  2. Monitoring reaction intermediates in the FeCl3-catalyzed michael reaction by nuclear inelastic scattering.

    PubMed

    Asthalter, T; Rajagopalan, S; Kauf, Th; Rabe, V; Christoffers, J

    2008-11-20

    We present a study of the metal-centered vibrations in the first step of the Fe(III)-catalyzed Michael reaction. Nuclear inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation was carried out on a shock-frozen solution of FeCl3.6H2O in 2-oxocyclopentane ethylcarboxylate (CPEH), as well as on the solid reference compounds FeCl3.6H2O, [N(CH3)4][FeCl 4], and Fe(acac) 3. In addition to the vibrations of the FeCl4(-) anion at 133 and 383 cm(-1), a multitude of modes associated with the complex Fe(CPE)2(H2O)2 could be identified. Normal-mode analysis on different isomers of the simplified model complex Fe(acac)2(H2O)2 as well as that of the full complex carrying two entire CPE ligands was carried out using density functional calculations. Comparison with experiment suggests that the facial bis(diketonato) isomer probably dominates in the reaction mixture. Thus, we have identified for the first time the isomeric structure of an iron-based intermediate of a homogeneous catalytic reaction using nuclear inelastic scattering.

  3. Criegee Intermediates: What Direct Production and Detection Can Teach Us About Reactions of Carbonyl Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taatjes, Craig A.

    2017-05-01

    The carbonyl oxide intermediates in the ozonolysis of alkenes, often known as Criegee intermediates, are potentially important reactants in Earth's atmosphere. For decades, careful analysis of ozonolysis systems was employed to derive an understanding of the formation and reactions of these species. Recently it has proved possible to synthesize at least some of these intermediates separately from ozonolysis, and hence to measure their reaction kinetics directly. Direct measurements have allowed new or more detailed understanding of each type of gas-phase reaction that carbonyl oxides undergo, often acting as a complement to highly detailed ozonolysis experiments. Moreover, the use of direct characterization methods to validate increasingly accurate theoretical investigations can enhance their impact well beyond the set of specific reactions that have been measured. Reactions that initiate particles or fuel their growth could be a new frontier for direct measurements of Criegee intermediate chemistry.

  4. Radioactive Phosphorylation of Alcohols to Monitor Biocatalytic Diels-Alder Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Nierth, Alexander; Jäschke, Andres

    2011-01-01

    Nature has efficiently adopted phosphorylation for numerous biological key processes, spanning from cell signaling to energy storage and transmission. For the bioorganic chemist the number of possible ways to attach a single phosphate for radioactive labeling is surprisingly small. Here we describe a very simple and fast one-pot synthesis to phosphorylate an alcohol with phosphoric acid using trichloroacetonitrile as activating agent. Using this procedure, we efficiently attached the radioactive phosphorus isotope 32P to an anthracene diene, which is a substrate for the Diels-Alderase ribozyme—an RNA sequence that catalyzes the eponymous reaction. We used the 32P-substrate for the measurement of RNA-catalyzed reaction kinetics of several dye-labeled ribozyme variants for which precise optical activity determination (UV/vis, fluorescence) failed due to interference of the attached dyes. The reaction kinetics were analyzed by thin-layer chromatographic separation of the 32P-labeled reaction components and densitometric analysis of the substrate and product radioactivities, thereby allowing iterative optimization of the dye positions for future single-molecule studies. The phosphorylation strategy with trichloroacetonitrile may be applicable for labeling numerous other compounds that contain alcoholic hydroxyl groups. PMID:21731729

  5. Investigation of Unexpected Reaction Intermediates in the Alkaline Hydrolysis of Methyl 3,5-Dinitrobenzoate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Clesia C.; Silva, Ricardo O.; Navarro, Daniela M. A. F.; Navarro, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    An experimental project aimed at identifying stable reaction intermediates is described. Initially, the studied reaction appears to involve the simple hydrolysis, by aqueous sodium hydroxide, of methyl 3,5-dinitrobenzoate dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide. On mixing the substrates, however, the reaction mixture unexpectedly turns an intense red in…

  6. Investigation of Unexpected Reaction Intermediates in the Alkaline Hydrolysis of Methyl 3,5-Dinitrobenzoate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Clesia C.; Silva, Ricardo O.; Navarro, Daniela M. A. F.; Navarro, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    An experimental project aimed at identifying stable reaction intermediates is described. Initially, the studied reaction appears to involve the simple hydrolysis, by aqueous sodium hydroxide, of methyl 3,5-dinitrobenzoate dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide. On mixing the substrates, however, the reaction mixture unexpectedly turns an intense red in…

  7. Multicomponent macrocyclization reactions (MCMRs) employing highly reactive acyl ketene and nitrile oxide intermediates.

    PubMed

    Knapp, John M; Fettinger, James C; Kurth, Mark J

    2011-09-02

    An efficient synthesis of spiro-fused macrolactams by a multicomponent macrocyclization reaction (MCMR) is reported. The use of highly reactive, transient intermediates in this MCMR permits short reaction times, even at high dilution. The methods employed for this MCMR were first developed as a four-component strategy for the synthesis of β-ketoamide isoxazolines and a new macrocyclization reaction is reported.

  8. Radiotracer Evidence Implicating Phosphoryl and Phosphatidyl Bases as Intermediates in Betaine Synthesis by Water-Stressed Barley Leaves 12

    PubMed Central

    Hitz, William D.; Rhodes, David; Hanson, Andrew D.

    1981-01-01

    In barley, glycine betaine is a metabolic end product accumulated by wilted leaves; betaine accumulation involves acceleration of de novo synthesis from serine, via ethanolamine, N-methylethanolamines, choline, and betaine aldehyde (Hanson, Scott 1980 Plant Physiol 66: 342-348). Because in animals and microorganisms the N-methylation of ethanolamine involves phosphatide intermediates, and because in barley, wilting markedly increases the rate of methylation of ethanolamine to choline, the labeling of phosphatides was followed after supplying [14C]ethanolamine to attached leaf blades of turgid and wilted barley plants. The kinetics of labeling of phosphatidylcholine and betaine showed that phosphatidylcholine became labeled 2.5-fold faster in wilted than in turgid leaves, and that after short incubations, phosphatidylcholine was always more heavily labeled than betaine. In pulse-chase experiments with wilted leaves, label from [14C]ethanolamine continued to accumulate in betaine as it was being lost from phosphatidylcholine. When [14C]monomethylethanolamine was supplied to wilted leaves, phosphatidylcholine was initially more heavily labeled than betaine. These results are qualitatively consistent with a precursor-to-product relationship between phosphatidylcholine and betaine. The following experiments, in which tracer amounts of [14C]ethanolamine or [14C]formate were supplied to wilted barley leaves, implicated phosphoryl and phosphatidyl bases as intermediates in the methylation steps between ethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Label from both [14C]ethanolamine and [14C]formate entered phosphorylmonomethylethanolamine and phosphorylcholine very rapidly; these phosphoryl bases were the most heavily labeled products at 15 to 30 minutes after label addition and lost label rapidly as the fed 14C-labeled precursor was depleted. Phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine were also significantly labeled from [14C]ethanolamine and [14C]formate at early

  9. A study of the reaction of perfluoroalkyl Grignard reagents with phosphoryl chloride and phenylphosphonic dichloride.

    PubMed

    Hosein, Adil I; Caffyn, Andrew J M

    2012-11-21

    Perfluoroalkyl Grignard reagents react with phosphoryl halides at -78 °C to room temperature to selectively produce bis(perfluoroalkyl)phosphonyl halides, which after aqueous work up, give bis(perfluoroalkyl)phosphinic acids in high overall yields. Reaction of perfluoroalkyl Grignards with phenylphosphonic dichloride gives high yields of bis(perfluoroalkyl)phenyl phosphine oxides which are readily hydrolysed to perfluoroalkyl(phenyl)phosphinic acids.

  10. CONSIDERATION OF REACTION INTERMEDIATES IN STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consideration of Reaction Intermediates in Structure- Activity Relationships: A Key to Understanding and Prediction

    A structure-activity relationship (SAR) represents an empirical means for generalizing chemical information relative to biological activity, and is frequent...

  11. Atomic-scale insight into the formation, mobility and reaction of Ullmann coupling intermediates.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Emily A; Murphy, Colin J; Liriano, Melissa L; Sykes, E Charles H

    2014-01-28

    The Ullmann reaction of bromobenzene, the simplest coupling reagent, to form biphenyl on a Cu surface proceeds via a highly mobile organometallic intermediate in which two phenyl groups extract and bind a single surface Cu atom.

  12. Incomplete Combustion of Hydrogen: Trapping a Reaction Intermediate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce; Hoette, Trisha

    2007-01-01

    The combustion of hydrogen in air is quite complex with at least 28 mechanistic steps and twelve reaction species. Most of the species involved are radicals (having unpaired electrons) in nature. Among the various species generated, a few are stable, including hydrogen peroxide. In a normal hydrogen flame, the hydrogen peroxide goes on to further…

  13. Incomplete Combustion of Hydrogen: Trapping a Reaction Intermediate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce; Hoette, Trisha

    2007-01-01

    The combustion of hydrogen in air is quite complex with at least 28 mechanistic steps and twelve reaction species. Most of the species involved are radicals (having unpaired electrons) in nature. Among the various species generated, a few are stable, including hydrogen peroxide. In a normal hydrogen flame, the hydrogen peroxide goes on to further…

  14. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.

  15. Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction Snapshots in Crystals: INSIGHTS INTO THE MECHANISM OF PROTEIN KINASE A CATALYTIC SUBUNIT.

    PubMed

    Gerlits, Oksana; Tian, Jianhui; Das, Amit; Langan, Paul; Heller, William T; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca(2+) ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca(2+) cations with Mg(2+) ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. The present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.

  16. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; ...

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, themore » thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.« less

  17. Investigation of the intermediate-energy deuteron breakup reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Divadeenam, M.; Ward, T.E.; Mustafa, M.G.; Udagawa, T.; Tamura, T.

    1989-01-01

    The Udagawa-Tamura formalism is employed to calculate the proton singles both in the bound and unbound regions. Both the Elastic-Breakup (EB) and the Breakup-Fusion (BF) processes are considered to calculate the doubly-differential cross section for light and intermediate mass nuclei. The calculated spectra for 25 and 56 MeV deuterons reproduce the experimental spectra very well except for the spectra at large angle and at low energies, of the outgoing particle. Contributions due to precompound and evaporation processes are estimated to supplement the spectral results based on the Elastic-Breakup and Breakup-Fusion mechanisms. An extension of the model calculations to higher deuteron energies is being made to test the (EB + BF) model limitations. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Temperature-scan cryocrystallography reveals reaction intermediates in bacteriophytochrome

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaojing; Ren, Zhong; Kuk, Jane; Moffat, Keith

    2012-03-27

    Light is a fundamental signal that regulates important physiological processes such as development and circadian rhythm in living organisms. Phytochromes form a major family of photoreceptors responsible for red light perception in plants, fungi and bacteria. They undergo reversible photoconversion between red-absorbing (Pr) and far-red-absorbing (Pfr) states, thereby ultimately converting a light signal into a distinct biological signal that mediates subsequent cellular responses. Several structures of microbial phytochromes have been determined in their dark-adapted Pr or Pfr states. However, the structural nature of initial photochemical events has not been characterized by crystallography. Here we report the crystal structures of three intermediates in the photoreaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophytochrome (PaBphP). We used cryotrapping crystallography to capture intermediates, and followed structural changes by scanning the temperature at which the photoreaction proceeded. Light-induced conformational changes in PaBphP originate in ring D of the biliverdin (BV) chromophore, and E-to-Z isomerization about the C{sub 15} = C{sub 16} double bond between rings C and D is the initial photochemical event. As the chromophore relaxes, the twist of the C{sub 15} methine bridge about its two dihedral angles is reversed. Structural changes extend further to rings B and A, and to the surrounding protein regions. These data indicate that absorption of a photon by the Pfr state of PaBphP converts a light signal into a structural signal via twisting and untwisting of the methine bridges in the linear tetrapyrrole within the confined protein cavity.

  19. Non-enzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes, uridine diphosphate glucose and cytidine diphosphate choline, and other phosphorylated metabolic intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Dworkin, J.; Oro, J.

    1987-01-01

    Using urea and cyanamide, the two condensing agents considered to have been present on the primitive earth, uridine diphosphate glucose (UDPG), cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline), glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), and glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) were synthesized under simulated prebiotic conditions. The reaction products were separated and identified using paper chromatography, thin layer chromatography, enzymatic analyses, and ion-pair reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The possibility of nonenzymatic synthesis of metabolic intermediates on the primitive earth from simple precursors was thus demonstrated.

  20. Non-enzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes, uridine diphosphate glucose and cytidine diphosphate choline, and other phosphorylated metabolic intermediates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Dworkin, J.; Oro, J.

    1987-01-01

    Using urea and cyanamide, the two condensing agents considered to have been present on the primitive earth, uridine diphosphate glucose (UDPG), cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline), glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), and glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) were synthesized under simulated prebiotic conditions. The reaction products were separated and identified using paper chromatography, thin layer chromatography, enzymatic analyses, and ion-pair reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The possibility of nonenzymatic synthesis of metabolic intermediates on the primitive earth from simple precursors was thus demonstrated.

  1. The elementary reactions of the pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. A study of the inhibition by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, D A; Cooper, R H; Denton, R M; Bridges, B J; Randle, P J

    1976-07-01

    1. A method was devised for preparing pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase free of thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), permitting studies of the binding of [35S]TPP to pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate. The Kd of TPP for pyruvate dehydrogenase was in the range 6.2-8.2 muM, whereas that for pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate was approximately 15 muM; both forms of the complex contained about the same total number of binding sites (500 pmol/unit of enzyme). EDTA completely inhibited binding of TPP; sodium pyrophosphate, adenylyl imidodiphosphate and GTP, which are inhibitors (competitive with TPP) of the overall pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction, did not appreciably affect TPP binding. 2. Initial-velocity patterns of the overall pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction obtained with varying TPP, CoA and NAD+ concentrations at a fixed pyruvate concentration were consistent with a sequential three-site Ping Pong mechanism; in the presence of oxaloacetate and citrate synthase to remove acetyl-CoA (an inhibitor of the overall reaction) the values of Km for NAD+ and CoA were 53+/- 5 muM and 1.9+/-0.2 muM respectively. Initial-velocity patterns observed with varying TPP concentrations at various fixed concentrations of pyruvate were indicative of either a compulsory order of addition of substrates to form a ternary complex (pyruvate-Enz-TPP) or a random-sequence mechanism in which interconversion of ternary intermediates is rate-limiting; values of Km for pyruvate and TPP were 25+/-4 muM and 50+/-10 nM respectively. The Kia-TPP (the dissociation constant for Enz-TPP complex calculated from kinetic plots) was close to the value of Kd-TPP (determined by direct binding studies). 3. Inhibition of the overall pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction by pyrophosphate was mixed non-competitive versus pyruvate and competitive versus TPP; however, pyrophosphate did not alter the calculated value for Kia-TPP, consistent with the lack of effect of pyrophosphate on the Kd for TPP. 4

  2. Cycloaddition reactions of allenes with N-phenylmaleimide. A two-step, diradical-intermediate process

    SciTech Connect

    Pasto, D.J.; Heid, P.F.; Warren, S.E.

    1982-06-30

    The stereoselectivities, chemoselectivities, relative reactivities, and kinetic isotope effects have been determined in the cycloaddition reactions of substituted allenes with N-phenylmaleimide. The comparison of these results with those derived from the studies of the cycloaddition of 1,1-dichloro-2,2-difluoroethene and the radical-chain addition of benzenethiol to allenes strongly indicates that the cycloadditions with N-phenylmaleimide occur via a two-step, diradical-intermediate process. The stereochemical features controlling the formation of the stereoisomeric diradical intermediates and their ring closures are discussed. In addition to the cycloaddition processes, competitive ene reactions occur to produce intermediate dienes, which react further to produce 1:2 adducts or nonreactive alkyne-containing 1:1 adducts. These ene reactions also appear to proceed via diradical intermediates.

  3. Atmospheric chemistry. Direct kinetic measurement of the reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate with water vapor.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wen; Hsieh, Jun-Ting; Chang, Chun-Hung; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2015-02-13

    Carbonyl oxides, or Criegee intermediates, are important transient species formed in the reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons with ozone. Although direct detection of Criegee intermediates has recently been realized, the main atmospheric sink of Criegee intermediates remains unclear. We report ultraviolet absorption spectroscopic measurements of the lifetime of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, at various relative humidity levels up to 85% at 298 kelvin. An extremely fast decay rate of CH2OO was observed at high humidity. The observed quadratic dependence of the decay rate on water concentration implied a predominant reaction with water dimer. On the basis of the water dimer equilibrium constant, the effective rate coefficient of the CH2OO + (H2O)2 reaction was determined to be 6.5 (±0.8) × 10(-12) cubic centimeters per second. This work would help modelers to better constrain the atmospheric concentrations of CH2OO.

  4. Spectroscopic features of cytochrome P450 reaction intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Abhinav; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    Preface Cytochromes P450 constitute a broad class of heme monooxygenase enzymes with more than 11,500 isozymes which have been identified in organisms from all biological kingdoms [1]. These enzymes are responsible for catalyzing dozens chemical oxidative transformations such as hydroxylation, epoxidation, N-demethylation, etc., with very broad range of substrates [2-3]. Historically these enzymes received their name from ‘pigment 450’ due to the unusual position of the Soret band in UV-Vis absorption spectra of the reduced CO-saturated state [4-5]. Despite detailed biochemical characterization of many isozymes, as well as later discoveries of other ‘P450-like heme enzymes’ such as nitric oxide synthase and chloroperoxidase, the phenomenological term ‘cytochrome P450’ is still commonly used as indicating an essential spectroscopic feature of the functionally active protein which is now known to be due to the presence of a thiolate ligand to the heme iron [6]. Heme proteins with an imidazole ligand such as myoglobin and hemoglobin as well as an inactive form of P450 are characterized by Soret maxima at 420 nm [7]. This historical perspective highlights the importance of spectroscopic methods for biochemical studies in general, and especially for heme enzymes, where the presence of the heme iron and porphyrin macrocycle provides rich variety of specific spectroscopic markers available for monitoring chemical transformations and transitions between active intermediates of catalytic cycle. PMID:21167809

  5. Computational insight into the reaction intermediates in the glycosylation reaction assisted by donor heteroatoms.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Fernando; Viso, Antonio; Alcázar, Eva; Molas, Pineda; Bo, Carles; Castillón, Sergio

    2003-02-07

    We studied the geometric and electronic structure of several cations (9 and 18-23) that are usually proposed as intermediates for glycosylation reactions using DFT methods. For ions 9 and 18-23 the geometries obtained corresponded to an open ion (6b type) irrespective of the exocyclic heteroatom (S, Se, I) and the size of the cycle (furanoses as well as pyranoses). We studied how substituents bonded to the exocyclic heteroatom (R in SR and SeR) affect the structure of ions and found that the geometry approached that of episulfonium and episelenonium ions (6a type) when the substituents were electron donors. The tert-butyl group and the 2,4,6-trimethyl- and 2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl and trimethylsilyl groups produced the strongest of these effects. The presence of an electron-withdrawing group (CO-CF(3)) bonded to the hydroxymethyl group produced a similar but weaker effect. We analyzed this behavior in terms of molecular orbital interactions.

  6. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  7. Computational analysis of the mechanism of chemical reactions in terms of reaction phases: hidden intermediates and hidden transition States.

    PubMed

    Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2010-05-18

    (A(n,s) < 0) the curving of the path, and thus the structural changes of the reaction complex. URVA can show the mechanism of a reaction expressed in terms of reaction phases, revealing the sequence of chemical processes in the reaction complex and making it possible to determine those electronic factors that control the mechanism and energetics of the reaction. The magnitude of adiabatic curvature coupling coefficients is related to strength and polarizability of the bonds being broken. Transient points along the reaction path are associated with hidden intermediates and hidden transition states, which can be converted into real intermediates and transition states when the reaction conditions or the substitution pattern of the reaction complex are appropriately changed. Accordingly, URVA represents a theoretical tool with tremendous experimental potential, offering the chemist the ability to assert greater control over reactions.

  8. Genome-wide quantification of 5' phosphorylated mRNA degradation intermediates for analysis of ribosome dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pelechano, Vicent; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    Co-translational mRNA degradation is a widespread process in which 5’-3’ exonucleolytic degradation follows the last translating ribosome, producing an in vivo ribosomal footprint of mRNA molecules’ 5’ positions. To study this process, we developed 5PSeq, a method that profiles the genome-wide abundance of mRNA degradation intermediates with 5'-phosphorylated ends and allows the study of ribosome dynamics. The method targets 5’P mRNA ends by ligating an oligonucleotide to the 5’P RNA ends. rRNA molecules are then depleted, and 5’P mRNAs are subject to reverse transcription followed by Illumina high-throughput sequencing. 5PSeq can identify translational pauses at rare codons that are often masked when using alternative methods. This approach can be applied to previously extracted RNA samples, is straightforward, and does not require polyribosome purification or in vitro RNA footprinting. The protocol we describe can be applied to S. cerevisiae and potentially other eukaryotic organisms. 3 days are required to generate 5PSeq libraries. PMID:26820793

  9. The Incorporation of Added Metal Atoms into Structures of Reaction Intermediates on Catalytic Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ling; Madix, Robert J.

    In this chapter, we review the dynamic nature of catalytic metal surfaces and the effects of metal incorporation into surface reaction intermediates on their reactivity. Scanning tunneling microscopy allows the direct observation of surface reconstruction and dynamic reorganization of surfaces during adsorption, desorption, and surface reaction, and therefore, provides a powerful tool to relate the surface structures of adsorbed layers to reactivity when combined with quantitative temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and other tools. The incorporation of added metal atoms to the structure of adsorbates and reaction intermediates is a general surface phenomenon not restricted to more open, higher free energy single crystal planes, but also occurring on close-packed surfaces of low free energy. Metal atom incorporation into the surface oxide appears to be a guide to the possibility of incorporation of metal atoms into the structure of other intermediates. Added metal atoms can stabilize the structures of reaction intermediates and play an important role in their surface reactions. These observations dictate that the participation of added metal atoms be considered as a paradigm in metal catalyzed reactions, significantly affecting the theoretical treatment of these processes.

  10. Solving the Structure of Reaction Intermediates by Time-Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Hanson, J; Frenkel, A

    2008-01-01

    We present a robust data analysis method of time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments suitable for chemical speciation and structure determination of reaction intermediates. Chemical speciation is done by principal component analysis (PCA) of the time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge structure data. Structural analysis of intermediate phases is done by theoretical modeling of their extended x-ray absorption fine-structure data isolated by PCA. The method is demonstrated using reduction and reoxidation of Cu-doped ceria catalysts where we detected reaction intermediates and measured fine details of the reaction kinetics. This approach can be directly adapted to many time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy experiments where new rapid throughput data collection and analysis methods are needed.

  11. Proteasome activity and its relationship with protein phosphorylation during capacitation and acrosome reaction in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Morales, Patricio; Díaz, Emilce S; Kong, Milene

    2007-01-01

    We have shown that the proteasome is present in mammalian sperm and plays a role during fertilisation. In this work we studied the relationship between protein phosphorylation and proteasomal activity in human sperm. Aliquots of motile sperm were incubated for 0, 5 and 18 h at 37 degrees C, 5% CO2, with different concentration of the kinase inhibitors genistein, H89 or tamoxifen. Control aliquots were treated with the inhibitor solvent. The chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome was assayed using a fluorogenic substrate. Aliquots of spermatozoa capacitated during 18 h were incubated for 30 min with kinase inhibitors and then with 7 microM progesterone (P). The percentage of viable acrosome-reacted sperm was evaluated using FITC-labeled Pisum sativum agglutinin. The results indicate that spermatozoa treated with different concentrations of genistein and tamoxifen did not modify the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome during capacitation. On the other hand, proteasome activity was significantly decreased by incubation with H89. Sperm treatment with genistein, H89 and tamoxifen significantly inhibited the P-induced acrosome reaction. Western blot analysis indicated that the proteasome inhibitor, epoxomicin, reduced serine protein phosphorylation. These results suggest that the enzymatic activity of the proteasome is modulated by protein kinase A, and that both enzymes are involved in the P-induced acrosome reaction.

  12. A Dianionic Phosphorane Intermediate and Transition States in an Associative AN+DN Mechanism for the RibonucleaseA Hydrolysis Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Elsasser, Brigitta M.; Valiev, Marat; Weare, John H.

    2009-02-26

    The ubiquitous presence of phosphoryl transfer as central step in many metabolic, signaling, energy storage, etc. enzymatic reactions requires that the details of the reaction mechanisms (e.g. reaction paths, transition state stabilization and structure, etc.) that leads to their remarkable rates in protein catalytic environments be understood1. It is expected that most of these reactions proceed through a pathway that includes a penta- coordinated phosphorane species. However, the nature of the bonding and the protonation of the structure in this region and the possibility of stable intermediates as the system passes along the reaction path through the transitions state (TS) are currently topics of considerable debate1a,b,c. Typically nucleophilic substitution reactions are classified in terms of extremes of two bonding situations along the reaction path: in a dissociative mechanism the substrate phosphate bridging bond is broken and the bond to the entering nucleophilic group is not yet formed leaving a metastable metaphosphate (PO3-) intermediate (a DN+AN reaction); in an associative mechanism in the extreme case a metastable pentacoordinated phosphorane species with nearly equivalent bonds is present in the TS, whose subsequent dissociation leads to the product state (an AN+DN reaction). Recently we published a computational study of the phosphoryl transfer step of a major class of enzymes, the serine kinases2a,b involved in signal transduction. These calculations2b support a dissociative mechanism (DNAN,) for this family of enzymes with unstable metaphosphate structure in loose transition state with total bond order of 22%.

  13. Transient Clustering of Reaction Intermediates during Wet Etching of Silicon Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Aabdin, Zainul; Xu, Xiu Mei; Sen, Soumyo; Anand, Utkarsh; Král, Petr; Holsteyns, Frank; Mirsaidov, Utkur

    2017-05-10

    Wet chemical etching is a key process in fabricating silicon (Si) nanostructures. Currently, wet etching of Si is proposed to occur through the reaction of surface Si atoms with etchant molecules, forming etch intermediates that dissolve directly into the bulk etchant solution. Here, using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we follow the nanoscale wet etch dynamics of amorphous Si (a-Si) nanopillars in real-time and show that intermediates generated during alkaline wet etching first aggregate as nanoclusters on the Si surface and then detach from the surface before dissolving in the etchant solution. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the molecules of etch intermediates remain weakly bound to the hydroxylated Si surface during the etching and aggregate into nanoclusters via surface diffusion instead of directly diffusing into the etchant solution. We confirmed this model experimentally by suppressing the formation of nanoclusters of etch intermediates on the Si surfaces by shielding the hydroxylated Si sites with large ions. These results suggest that the interaction of etch intermediates with etching surfaces controls the solubility of reaction intermediates and is an important parameter in fabricating densely packed clean 3D nanostructures for future generation microelectronics.

  14. On the nature of the reaction intermediate in the HIV-1 protease: a quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, V.; Raugei, S.; Piana, S.; Carloni, P.

    2008-07-01

    Several mechanistic aspects of Aspartic Proteases' enzymatic reaction are currently highly controversial. There is general consensus that the first step of the reaction involves a nucleophilic attack of a water molecule to the substrate carbonyl carbon with subsequent formation of a metastable intermediate (INT). However, the exact nature of this intermediate is subject of debate. While ab initio and QM/MM calculations predict that INT is a neutral gem-diol specie, empirical valence bond calculations suggest that the protein frame can stabilize a charged oxyanion intermediate. Here the relative stability of the gem diol and oxyanion intermediate is calculated by performing density functional and post-Hartree-Fock calculations. The robustness of the results is assessed by increasing the size of the system and of the basis set and by performing QM/MM calculations that explicitly include protein/solvent electrostatic effects. Our results suggest that the neutral gem-diol intermediate is 20-30 kcal/mol more stable than the charged oxyanion. It is therefore concluded that only the neutral specie is populated during the enzymatic reaction.

  15. Optimizing Catalysts for Solar Fuel Production: Spectroscopic Characterization of the Key Reaction Intermediates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    carbamate free radical anion invoked in the mechanism for photo- electrochemical activation and conversion of CO2 to methanol Our long standing...intermediates by reaction of key species with gas phase (CO2)n‾ clusters, which are readily generated in ionized free jet ion sources. The carbamate anion...this system to undergo chemical reaction is of particular interest in light of recent work suggesting that the formation of a carbamate between Py

  16. Asymmeric Formal [3+3]-Cycloaddition Reactions of Nitrones with Electrophilic Vinylcarbene Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaochen; Xu, Xinfang; Zavalij, Peter Y.; Doyle, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    With metal carbene access to dipolar intermediates, 3,6-dihydro-1,2-oxazines are produced in high yields by dirhodium(II) carboxylate catalyzed reactions between nitrones and a β-TBSO-substituted vinyldiazoacetate. High enantiocontrol occurs with catalysis by N-phthaloyl-(S)-(amino acid)-ligated dirhodium carboxylates for [3+3]-cycloaddition reactions with both acyclic and cyclic nitrones. PMID:21932856

  17. Reaction rates of Criegee intermediates with water vapor and hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. C.; Boering, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Criegee intermediates are byproducts of the reaction of alkenes with ozone. Bimolecular reactions of Criegee intermediates can lead to the production of low-volatility organic compounds and acids in the atmosphere, which in turn play a role in determining the concentration, size, and optical properties of aerosols. Recently, a novel method for producing measurable quantities of stabilized Criegee intermediates in the laboratory paved the way for the development of new experimental techniques to study their chemical properties and predict their importance in the atmosphere. Our lab uses transient UV absorption spectroscopy to measure the formation and decay of Criegee intermediates in a flow cell, using 8-pass absorption of a bright plasma light source combined with sensitive balanced photodiode detection. Here we measured the transient absorption of CH2OO and obtained rate coefficients for its reaction with water dimer from 283 to 324 K. The fast reaction of CH2OO with water dimer is thought to dominate CH2OO removal in the atmosphere, but reaction rates can vary considerably under different conditions of temperature, humidity, and pressure. The rate of the reaction of CH2OO with water dimer was found to exhibit a strong negative temperature dependence. Due to the strong temperature dependence, and shifting competition between water dimer and water monomer (which has a positive temperature dependence), the effective loss rate of CH2OO by reaction with water vapor is highly sensitive to atmospheric conditions. We also present the first measurements of the reaction rate between CH2OO and hydrogen sulfide, which is analogous to the water molecule and may have significance in areas with volcanic activity.

  18. Assembly of a key dienic intermediate for tetrodotoxin via a Machetti-DeSarlo reaction.

    PubMed

    Chau, Jaclyn; Xu, Sanjia; Ciufolini, Marco A

    2013-12-06

    A route to a racemic diene intermediate for the synthesis of tetrodotoxin is described. Key steps of the sequence leading to such a compound include the oxidative amidation of a phenol, a Cu(II)-catalyzed cyclocondensation of a nitroketone with an olefin (Machetti-DeSarlo reaction), and a nucleophilic fragmentation of the resulting isoxazoline. Several unusual reactions encountered in the course of this study are thoroughly discussed.

  19. Direct measurement of Criegee intermediate (CH2OO) reactions with acetone, acetaldehyde, and hexafluoroacetone.

    PubMed

    Taatjes, Craig A; Welz, Oliver; Eskola, Arkke J; Savee, John D; Osborn, David L; Lee, Edmond P F; Dyke, John M; Mok, Daniel W K; Shallcross, Dudley E; Percival, Carl J

    2012-08-14

    Criegee biradicals, i.e., carbonyl oxides, are critical intermediates in ozonolysis and have been implicated in autoignition chemistry and other hydrocarbon oxidation systems, but until recently the direct measurement of their gas-phase kinetics has not been feasible. Indirect determinations of Criegee intermediate kinetics often rely on the introduction of a scavenger molecule into an ozonolysis system and analysis of the effects of the scavenger on yields of products associated with Criegee intermediate reactions. Carbonyl species, in particular hexafluoroacetone (CF(3)COCF(3)), have often been used as scavengers. In this work, the reactions of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH(2)OO (formaldehyde oxide), with three carbonyl species have been measured by laser photolysis/tunable synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. Diiodomethane photolysis produces CH(2)I radicals, which react with O(2) to yield CH(2)OO + I. The formaldehyde oxide is reacted with a large excess of a carbonyl reactant and both the disappearance of CH(2)OO and the formation of reaction products are monitored. The rate coefficient for CH(2)OO + hexafluoroacetone is k(1) = (3.0 ± 0.3) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), supporting the use of hexafluoroacetone as a Criegee-intermediate scavenger. The reactions with acetaldehyde, k(2) = (9.5 ± 0.7) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and with acetone, k(3) = (2.3 ± 0.3) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), are substantially slower. Secondary ozonides and products of ozonide isomerization are observed from the reactions of CH(2)OO with acetone and hexafluoroacetone. Their photoionization spectra are interpreted with the aid of quantum-chemical and Franck-Condon-factor calculations. No secondary ozonide was observable in the reaction of CH(2)OO with acetaldehyde, but acetic acid was identified as a product under the conditions used (4 Torr and 293 K).

  20. Structure of hemiaminal intermediate of the reaction of diethylamine with cyclobutanone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yufit, Dmitry S.; Howard, Judith A. K.

    2010-12-01

    The intermediate of the reaction between cyclobutanone and diethylamine has been crystallized in situ in form of co-crystal with diethylamine and its structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography. The study made possible to have an insight in the mechanism of the reaction and reveals the potential of in situ cryo-crystallization technique as an additional tool for studying the mechanisms of chemical reactions. The related structure of co-crystal of diethylamine with adipic acid, which is a product of cyclohexanone oxidative cleavage, is also reported.

  1. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1991-12-31

    During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  2. Benchmarking of activation reaction distribution in an intermediate energy neutron field.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Morev, Mikhail N; Hirota, Masahiro; Abe, Takuya; Koike, Yuya; Iwai, Satoshi; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-07-01

    Neutron-induced reaction rate depth profiles inside concrete shield irradiated by intermediate energy neutron were calculated using a Monte-Carlo code and compared with an experiment. An irradiation field of intermediate neutron produced in the forward direction from a thick (stopping length) target bombarded by 400 MeV nucleon(-1) carbon ions was arranged at the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba. Ordinary concrete shield of 90 cm thickness was installed 50 cm downstream the iron target. Activation detectors of aluminum, gold and gold covered with cadmium were inserted at various depths. Irradiated samples were extracted after exposure and gamma-ray spectrometry was performed for each sample. Comparison of experimental and calculated shows good agreement for both low- and high-energy neutron-induced reaction except for (27)Al(n,X)(24)Na reaction at the surface.

  3. Mechanistic insight into the hydrazine decomposition on Rh(111): effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhigang; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wen, Zengqiang; Wei, Shuxian; Liu, Yunjie; Fu, Dianling; Zhao, Lianming; Guo, Wenyue

    2013-10-14

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to systematically investigate the effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity for hydrazine (N2H4) decomposition on Rh(111). Reaction mechanisms via intramolecular and NH2-assisted N2H4 decompositions are comparatively analyzed, including adsorption configuration, reaction energy and barrier of elementary step, and reaction network. Our results show that the most favorable N2H4 decomposition pathway starts with the initial N-N bond scission to the NH2 intermediate, followed by stepwise H stripping from adsorbed N2Hx (x = 1-4) species, and finally forms the N2 and NH3 products. Comparatively, the stepwise intramolecular dehydrogenation via N2H4→ N2H3→ N2H2→ N2H → N2, and N2H4→ NH2→ NH → N with or without NH2 promotion effect, are unfavorable due to higher energy barriers encountered. Energy barrier analysis, reaction rate constants, and electronic structures are used to identify the crucial competitive route. The promotion effect of the NH2 intermediate is structurally reflected in the weakening of the N-H bond and strengthening of the N-N bond in N2Hx in the coadsorption system; it results intrinsically from the less structural deformation of the adsorbate, and weakening of the interaction between dehydrogenated fragment and departing H in transition state. Our results highlight the crucial effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity and provide a theoretical approach to analyze the effect.

  4. Controlling the ambiphilic nature of σ-arylpalladium intermediates in intramolecular cyclization reactions.

    PubMed

    Solé, Daniel; Fernández, Israel

    2014-01-21

    The reactivity of main group organometallics, such as organolithium compounds (RLi) and Grignard reagents (RMgX), is quite straightforward. In these species the R group usually exhibits nucleophilic reactivity without any possibility of inducing electrophilic character. In contrast, in organopalladium complexes, researchers can switch the reactivity from electrophilic to nucleophilic relatively simply. Although σ-aryl and σ-vinylpalladium complexes are commonly used as electrophiles in C-C bond-forming reactions, recent research has demonstrated that they can also react with carbon-heteroatom multiple bonds in a nucleophilic manner. Nevertheless, researchers have completely ignored the issue of controlling the ambiphilic nature of such species. This Account describes our efforts toward selectively promoting the same starting materials toward either electrophilic α-arylation or nucleophilic addition reactions to different carbonyl groups. We could tune the properties of the σ-arylpalladium intermediates derived from amino-tethered aryl halides and carbonyl compounds to achieve chemoselective transformations. Therefore, chemists can control the ambiphilic nature of such intermediates and, consequently, the competition between the alternative reaction pathways by the adequate selection of the reaction conditions and additives (base, presence/absence of phenol, bidentate phosphines). The nature of the carbonyl group (aldehydes, ketones, esters, and amides) and the length of the tether connecting it to the aniline moiety also play an important role in the outcome of these processes. Our joint computational and experimental efforts to elucidate the reaction mechanism of these palladium-catalyzed transformations suggest that beyond the formation of the four-membered azapalladacycle, two major factors help to control the dual character of the palladium(II) intermediates derived from 2-haloanilines. First, their high nucleophilicity strongly modifies the interaction of

  5. Isotope effects, dynamic matching, and solvent dynamics in a Wittig reaction. Betaines as bypassed intermediates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Nieves-Quinones, Yexenia; Waas, Jack R; Singleton, Daniel A

    2014-09-24

    The mechanism of the Wittig reaction of anisaldehyde with a stabilized ylide was studied by a combination of (13)C kinetic isotope effects, conventional calculations, and molecular dynamics calculations in a cluster of 53 THF molecules. The isotope effects support a cycloaddition mechanism involving two sequential transition states associated with separate C-C and P-O bond formations. However, the betaine structure in between the two transition states is bypassed as an equilibrated intermediate in most trajectories. The role of the dynamics of solvent equilibration in the nature of mechanistic intermediates is discussed.

  6. Isotope Effects, Dynamic Matching, and Solvent Dynamics in a Wittig Reaction. Betaines as Bypassed Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of the Wittig reaction of anisaldehyde with a stabilized ylide was studied by a combination of 13C kinetic isotope effects, conventional calculations, and molecular dynamics calculations in a cluster of 53 THF molecules. The isotope effects support a cycloaddition mechanism involving two sequential transition states associated with separate C–C and P–O bond formations. However, the betaine structure in between the two transition states is bypassed as an equilibrated intermediate in most trajectories. The role of the dynamics of solvent equilibration in the nature of mechanistic intermediates is discussed. PMID:25208686

  7. Poliovirus-associated protein kinase: Destabilization of the virus capsid and stimulation of the phosphorylation reaction by Zn sup 2+

    SciTech Connect

    Ratka, M.; Lackmann, M.; Ueckermann, C.; Karlins, U.; Koch, G. )

    1989-09-01

    The previously described poliovirus-associated protein kinase activity phosphorylates viral proteins VP0 and VP2 as well as exogenous proteins in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. In this paper, the effect of Zn{sup 2+} on the phosphorylation reaction and the stability of the poliovirus capsid has been studied in detail and compared to that of Mg{sup 2+}. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, phosphorylation of capsid proteins VP2 and VP4 is significantly higher while phosphorylation of VP0 and exogenous phosphate acceptor proteins is not detected. The results indicate the activation of more than one virus-associated protein kinase by Zn{sup 2+}. The ion-dependent behavior of the enzyme activities is observed independently of whether the virus was obtained from HeLa or green monkey kidney cells. The poliovirus capsid is destabilized by Zn{sup 2+}. This alteration of the poliovirus capsid structure is a prerequisite for effective phosphorylation of viral capsid proteins. The increased level of phosphorylation of viral capsid proteins results in further destabilization of the viral capsid. As a result of the conformational changes, poliovirus-associated protein kinase activities dissociate from the virus particle. The authors suggest that the destabilizing effect of phosphorylation on the viral capsid plays a role in uncoating of poliovirus.

  8. The Reaction of Criegee Intermediate CH2OO with Water Dimer: Primary Products and Atmospheric Impact

    DOE PAGES

    Sheps, Leonid; Rotavera, Brandon; Eskola, Arkke J.; ...

    2017-08-04

    The rapid reaction of the smallest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, with water dimers is the dominant removal mechanism for CH2OO in the Earth's atmosphere, but its products are not well understood. This reaction was recently suggested as a significant source of the most abundant tropospheric organic acid, formic acid (HCOOH), which is consistently underpredicted by atmospheric models. Furthermore, using time-resolved measurements of reaction kinetics by UV absorption and product analysis by photoionization mass spectrometry, we show that the primary products of this reaction are formaldehyde and hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), with direct HCOOH yields of less than 10%. Incorporating our results intomore » a global chemistry-transport model further reduces HCOOH levels by 10–90%, relative to previous modeling assumptions, which indicates that the reaction CH2OO + water dimer by itself cannot resolve the discrepancy between the measured and predicted HCOOH levels.« less

  9. Effect of the addition of diammonium citrate to alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) matrix for the detection of phosphorylated peptide in phosphorylation reactions using cell and tissue lysates.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Hun; Toita, Riki; Oishi, Jun; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2007-11-01

    The ionization of phosphorylated peptides is usually suppressed by non-phosphorylated peptides when alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) is used as a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis. In the present study, we examined the effect of diammonium citrate addition to the CHCA matrix on the detection of phosphorylated peptides. Substrates for protein kinase C (PKC) and c-Src were synthesized and phosphorylated by reaction with cell and tissue lysate samples. The addition of diammonium citrate to the CHCA matrix increased the sensitivity for distinguishing phosphorylated peptides from background noise. However, the effect depended on substrate concentration.

  10. Insights into the Mechanism of Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases from Structures of Reaction Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-02-27

    The biosynthetic shikimate pathway consists of seven enzymes that catalyze sequential reactions to generate chorismate, a critical branch point in the synthesis of the aromatic amino acids. The third enzyme in the pathway, dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD), catalyzes the dehydration of 3-dehydroquinate to 3-dehydroshikimate. We present three crystal structures of the type I DHQD from the intestinal pathogens Clostridium difficile and Salmonella enterica. Structures of the enzyme with substrate and covalent pre- and post-dehydration reaction intermediates provide snapshots of successive steps along the type I DHQD-catalyzed reaction coordinate. These structures reveal that the position of the substrate within the active site does not appreciably change upon Schiff base formation. The intermediate state structures reveal a reaction state-dependent behavior of His-143 in which the residue adopts a conformation proximal to the site of catalytic dehydration only when the leaving group is present. We speculate that His-143 is likely to assume differing catalytic roles in each of its observed conformations. One conformation of His-143 positions the residue for the formation/hydrolysis of the covalent Schiff base intermediates, whereas the other conformation positions the residue for a role in the catalytic dehydration event. The fact that the shikimate pathway is absent from humans makes the enzymes of the pathway potential targets for the development of non-toxic antimicrobials. The structures and mechanistic insight presented here may inform the design of type I DHQD enzyme inhibitors.

  11. A kinetic study of the CH2OO Criegee intermediate self-reaction, reaction with SO2 and unimolecular reaction using cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chhantyal-Pun, Rabi; Davey, Anthony; Shallcross, Dudley E; Percival, Carl J; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2015-02-07

    Criegee intermediates are important species formed during the ozonolysis of alkenes. Reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates with various species like SO2 and NO2 may contribute significantly to tropospheric chemistry. In the laboratory, self-reaction can be an important loss pathway for Criegee intermediates and thus needs to be characterized to obtain accurate bimolecular reaction rate coefficients. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy was used to perform kinetic measurements for various reactions of CH2OO at 293 K and under low pressure (7 to 30 Torr) conditions. For the reaction CH2OO + CH2OO (8), a rate coefficient k8 = (7.35 ± 0.63) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was derived from the measured CH2OO decay rates, using an absorption cross section value reported previously. A rate coefficient of k4 = (3.80 ± 0.04) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) was obtained for the CH2OO + SO2 (4) reaction. An upper limit for the unimolecular CH2OO loss rate coefficient of 11.6 ± 8.0 s(-1) was deduced from studies of reaction (4). SO2 catalysed CH2OO isomerization or intersystem crossing is proposed to occur with a rate coefficient of (3.53 ± 0.32) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1).

  12. Determination of isocyanate groups in the organic intermediates by reaction-based headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei-Qi; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2016-10-14

    This work reports on a novel method for the determination of isocyanate groups in the related organic intermediates by a reaction-based headspace gas chromatography. The method is based on measuring the CO2 formed from the reaction between the isocyanate groups in the organic intermediates and water in a closed headspace sample vial at 45°C for 20min. The results showed that the method has a good precision and accuracy, in which the relative standard deviation in the repeatability measurement was 5.26%, and the relative differences between the data obtained by the HS-GC method and the reference back-titration method were within 9.42%. The present method is simple and efficient and is particularly suitable to be used for determining the isocyanate groups in the batch sample analysis.

  13. The Biological Methane-Forming Reaction: Mechanism Confirmed Through Spectroscopic Characterization of a Key Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Shima, Seigo

    2016-10-24

    Find your path: Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR, turquoise) reversibly catalyzes the reduction of methyl-coenzyme M (methyl-S-CoM) with coenzyme B (CoB-SH) to form methane and the heterodisulfide. Recently, spectroscopic methods were used to detect trapped intermediates in a stopped-flow system, and CoM-S-Ni(II) was identified after half a turnover of the MCR reaction (F430 =nickel porphinoid). This finding supports a methyl-radical catalytic mechanism.

  14. Multifragment azimuthal correlation functions: Probes for reaction dynamics in collisions of intermediate energy heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, R.A.; Elmaani, A.; Lauret, J.; Li, T.; Bauer, W.; Craig, D.; Cronqvist, M.; Gualtieri, E.; Hannuschke, S.; Reposeur, T.; Vander Molen, A.; Westfall, G.D.; Wilson, W.K.; Winfield, J.S.; Yee, J.; Yennello, S.; Nadasen, A.; Tickle, R.S.; Norbeck, E. National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 Department of Physics, University of Michigan at Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan 48128 Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1120 Department of Physics, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 )

    1993-03-01

    Multifragment azimuthal correlation functions have been measured as a function of beam energy and impact parameter for the Ar+Sc system ([ital E]/[ital A]=35 to 115 MeV). The observed azimuthal correlation functions---which do not require corrections for dispersion of the reaction plane---exhibit strong asymmetries which are dependent on impact parameter and beam energy. Rotational collective motion and flow seem to dominate the correlation functions at low beam energies. It is proposed that multifragment azimuthal correlation functions can provide a useful probe for intermediate energy heavy ion reaction dynamics.

  15. The reaction of methionine with hydroxyl radical: reactive intermediates and methanethiol production.

    PubMed

    Spasojević, Ivan; Bogdanović Pristov, Jelena; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Spasić, Mihajlo

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms of reaction of methionine with hydroxyl radical are not fully understood. Here, we unequivocally show using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy and GC-FID and GC-MS, the presence of specific carbon-, nitrogen- and sulfur-centered radicals as intermediates of this reaction, as well as the liberation of methanethiol as a gaseous end product. Taking into account the many roles that methionine has in eco- and biosystems, our results may elucidate redox chemistry of this amino acid and processes that methionine is involved in.

  16. Transient Absorption Spectroscopy of C1 and C2 Criegee Intermediates: UV Spectrum and Reaction Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. C.; Chao, W.; Ting, A.; Chang, C. H.; Lin, L. C.; Takahashi, K.; Boering, K. A.; Lin, J. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric production and removal rates of Criegee intermediates produced in alkene ozonolysis must be understood to constrain the importance of these species in VOC oxidation and other processes. To estimate these rates, reliable detection methods and laboratory measurements of the UV absorption spectra and reaction kinetics of Criegee intermediates are needed. Here, transient absorption spectroscopy was used to directly measure the UV spectrum of the C2 Criegee intermediate CH3CHOO in a flow reactor at 295 K. The UV spectrum was scaled to the absolute absorption cross section at 308 nm determined by laser depletion measurements in a molecular beam, resulting in a peak UV cross section of (1.27±0.11) × 10-17 cm2 molecule-1 at 328 nm. This spectrum represents the absorption of the syn and anti conformers of CH3CHOO under near-atmospheric conditions, both of which contribute to CH3CHOO atmospheric removal due to UV photolysis. Transient UV absorption was also used to measure the kinetics of the reaction of the C1 Criegee intermediate CH2OO with water vapor at temperatures from 283 to 324 K. The observed CH2OO decay is quadratic with respect to the H2O concentration, indicating that reaction with water dimer is the primary process affecting CH2OO loss. The rate coefficient for the reaction of CH2OO with water dimer exhibits a strong negative temperature dependence with an Arrhenius activation energy of -8.1±0.6 kcal mol-1. The temperature dependence increases the effective loss rate for CH2OO (relative to 298 K) by a factor of ˜2.5 at 278 K and 70% relative humidity, and decreases the loss rate by a factor of ˜2 at 313 K and 30% humidity, which demonstrates that variations in reaction rate due to temperature differences should be included in estimates of Criegee intermediate removal via reactions with water dimer in the atmosphere.

  17. Cross-hetero-dehydrogenative coupling reaction of phosphites: a catalytic metal-free phosphorylation of amines and alcohols.

    PubMed

    Dhineshkumar, Jayaraman; Prabhu, Kandikere Ramaiah

    2013-12-06

    Phosphorylation of amines, alcohols, and sulfoximines are accomplished using molecular iodine as a catalyst and H2O2 as the sole oxidant under mild reaction conditions. This method provides an easy route for synthesizing a variety of phosphoramidates, phosphorus triesters and sulfoximine-derived phosphoramidates which are of biological importance.

  18. Random sampling of the Green’s Functions for reversible reactions with an intermediate state

    SciTech Connect

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-06-01

    Exact random variate generators were developed to sample Green’s functions used in Brownian Dynamics (BD) algorithms for the simulations of chemical systems. These algorithms, which use less than a kilobyte of memory, provide a useful alternative to the table look-up method that has been used in similar work. The cases that are studied with this approach are (1) diffusion-influenced reactions; (2) reversible diffusion-influenced reactions and (3) reactions with an intermediate state such as enzymatic catalysis. The results are validated by comparison with those obtained by the Independent Reaction Times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of radiation chemistry in the radiation effects on human body and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risk.

  19. Random sampling of the Green's Functions for reversible reactions with an intermediate state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-06-01

    Exact random variate generators were developed to sample Green's functions used in Brownian Dynamics (BD) algorithms for the simulations of chemical systems. These algorithms, which use less than a kilobyte of memory, provide a useful alternative to the table look-up method that has been used in similar work. The cases that are studied with this approach are (1) diffusion-influenced reactions; (2) reversible diffusion-influenced reactions and (3) reactions with an intermediate state such as enzymatic catalysis. The results are validated by comparison with those obtained by the Independent Reaction Times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of radiation chemistry in the radiation effects on human body and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risk.

  20. Phosphorylation of the MAPK pathway has an essential role in the acrosome reaction in miniature pig sperm.

    PubMed

    Kawano, N; Ito, J; Kashiwazaki, N; Yoshida, M

    2010-04-01

    In almost all animal species, sperm acrosome reaction (AR) is a crucial step for fertilization. The step is a Ca(2+)-dependent secretory event that must be completed before fertilization. Many researchers have reported that several chemicals (such as ionomycin, thapsigargin and caffeine) artificially induce this step by increasing [Ca(2+)](i). However, little information has been known on events that occur following Ca(2+) induced initiation of the sperm AR. We show here for the first time that phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is required for the AR in miniature pig sperm. Following caffeine treatment artificially inducing the AR in miniature pig sperm, Raf was phosphorylated and then MAP kinase kinase (MEK) and extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) were also phosphorylated in a time-dependent manner. However, the total ERK1 level did not change during the culture. Pre-treatment of sperm with U0126, a MEK inhibitor, significantly suppressed both the AR and phosphorylation of MEK/ERK1 in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, pre-incubation of the sperm with seminal vesicle (SV) fluid, which is known to contain a decapacitation factor, suppressed both the AR and MEK/ERK1 phosphorylation. These results suggest that phosphorylation of MAPK pathway plays an important role in the AR in miniature pig sperm. Moreover, the SV fluid may have an inhibitory effect on the AR via the suppression of the MAPK pathway.

  1. Unstable Reaction Intermediates and Hysteresis during the Catalytic Cycle of 5-Aminolevulinate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Stojanovski, Bosko M.; Hunter, Gregory A.; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Ferreira, Gloria C.

    2014-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinate (ALA), an essential metabolite in all heme-synthesizing organisms, results from the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymatic condensation of glycine with succinyl-CoA in non-plant eukaryotes and α-proteobacteria. The predicted chemical mechanism of this ALA synthase (ALAS)-catalyzed reaction includes a short-lived glycine quinonoid intermediate and an unstable 2-amino-3-ketoadipate intermediate. Using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to analyze the products from the reaction of murine erythroid ALAS (mALAS2) with O-methylglycine and succinyl-CoA, we directly identified the chemical nature of the inherently unstable 2-amino-3-ketoadipate intermediate, which predicates the glycine quinonoid species as its precursor. With stopped-flow absorption spectroscopy, we detected and confirmed the formation of the quinonoid intermediate upon reacting glycine with ALAS. Significantly, in the absence of the succinyl-CoA substrate, the external aldimine predominates over the glycine quinonoid intermediate. When instead of glycine, l-serine was reacted with ALAS, a lag phase was observed in the progress curve for the l-serine external aldimine formation, indicating a hysteretic behavior in ALAS. Hysteresis was not detected in the T148A-catalyzed l-serine external aldimine formation. These results with T148A, a mALAS2 variant, which, in contrast to wild-type mALAS2, is active with l-serine, suggest that active site Thr-148 modulates ALAS strict amino acid substrate specificity. The rate of ALA release is also controlled by a hysteretic kinetic mechanism (observed as a lag in the ALA external aldimine formation progress curve), consistent with conformational changes governing the dissociation of ALA from ALAS. PMID:24920668

  2. Mixed Anhydride Intermediates in the Reaction of 5(4H)-Oxazolones with Phosphate Esters and Nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziwei; Rigger, Lukas; Rossi, Jean-Christophe; Sutherland, John D; Pascal, Robert

    2016-10-10

    5(4H)-Oxazolones can be formed through the activation of acylated α-amino acids or of peptide C termini. They constitute potentially activated intermediates in the abiotic chemistry of peptides that preceded the origin of life or early stages of biology and are capable of yielding mixed carboxylic-phosphoric anhydrides upon reaction with phosphate esters and nucleotides. Here, we present the results of a study aimed at investigating the chemistry that can be built through this interaction. As a matter of fact, the formation of mixed anhydrides with mononucleotides and nucleic acid models is shown to take place at positions involving a mono-substituted phosphate group at the 3'- or 5'-terminus but not at the internal phosphodiester linkages. In addition to the formation of mixed anhydrides, the subsequent intramolecular acyl or phosphoryl transfers taking place at the 3'-terminus are considered to be particularly relevant to the common prebiotic chemistry of α-amino acids and nucleotides. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  3. Mixed Anhydride Intermediates in the Reaction of 5(4H)‐Oxazolones with Phosphate Esters and Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ziwei; Rigger, Lukas; Rossi, Jean‐Christophe; Sutherland, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract 5(4H)‐Oxazolones can be formed through the activation of acylated α‐amino acids or of peptide C termini. They constitute potentially activated intermediates in the abiotic chemistry of peptides that preceded the origin of life or early stages of biology and are capable of yielding mixed carboxylic‐phosphoric anhydrides upon reaction with phosphate esters and nucleotides. Here, we present the results of a study aimed at investigating the chemistry that can be built through this interaction. As a matter of fact, the formation of mixed anhydrides with mononucleotides and nucleic acid models is shown to take place at positions involving a mono‐substituted phosphate group at the 3’‐ or 5’‐terminus but not at the internal phosphodiester linkages. In addition to the formation of mixed anhydrides, the subsequent intramolecular acyl or phosphoryl transfers taking place at the 3’‐terminus are considered to be particularly relevant to the common prebiotic chemistry of α‐amino acids and nucleotides. PMID:27534830

  4. A Computational Re-examination of the Criegee Intermediate-Sulfur Dioxide Reaction.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Keith T; Guinn, Emily J; Hermes, Matthew R; Fernandez, Jenna A; Mathison, Jon M; Huang, Ke

    2015-10-15

    The atmospheric oxidation of sulfur dioxide by the parent and dimethyl Criegee intermediates (CIs) may be an important source of sulfuric acid aerosol, which has a large impact on radiative forcing and therefore upon climate. A number of computational studies have considered how the CH2OOS(O)O heteroozonide (HOZ) adduct formed in the CI + SO2 reaction converts SO2 to SO3. In this work we use the CBS-QB3 quantum chemical method along with equation-of-motion spin-flip CCSD(dT) and MCG3 theories to reveal new details regarding the formation and decomposition of the endo and exo conformers of the HOZ. Although ∼75% of the parent CI + SO2 reaction is initiated by formation of the exo HOZ, hyperconjugation preferentially stabilizes many of the endo intermediates and transition structures by 1-5 kcal mol(-1). Our quantum chemical calculations, in conjunction with statistical rate theory models, predict a rate coefficient for the parent CI + SO2 reaction of 3.68 × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), in good agreement with recent experimental measurements. RRKM/master equation simulations based on our quantum chemical data predict a prompt carbonyl + SO3 yield of >95% for the reaction of both the parent and dimethyl CI with SO2. The existence of concerted cycloreversion transition structures 10-15 kcal mol(-1) higher in energy than the HOZ accounts for most of the predicted SO3 formation.

  5. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L

    2015-06-23

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1'-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO₂ from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin.

  6. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B.; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO2 from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  7. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Asthalter, T.; Rabe, V.; Laschat, S.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe3(μ 3-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe3(μ 3-O) in pyridine solution, Fe3(μ 3-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe3(μ 3-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe(III)(C5H5N)2(O2CCH3)2]+ and Fe(II)(C5H5N)4(O2CCH3)2, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  8. Mechanism of the mRNA guanylyltransferase reaction: isolation of N epsilon-phospholysine and GMP (5' leads to N epsilon) lysine from the guanylyl-enzyme intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Toyama, R; Mizumoto, K; Nakahara, Y; Tatsuno, T; Kaziro, Y

    1983-01-01

    The mRNA capping reaction catalyzed by rat liver mRNA guanylyltransferase proceeds through an enzyme-GMP intermediate in which GMP is linked to the enzyme by a phosphoamide linkage. The studies described here show that GMP is bound to the epsilon-amino group of lysine of rat liver guanylyltransferase. The enzyme-[32P]GMP intermediate was digested with pronase to a [32P]GMP-peptide which was then converted to [32P]phosphoryl-peptide through periodate oxidation followed by beta-elimination. After alkaline hydrolysis of the [32P]phosphoryl-peptide, the major radioactive product co-electrophoresed with the authentic N epsilon-phospholysine on DEAE-cellulose paper. Neither [32P]Nimid-phosphohistidine nor Nguanido-phosphoarginine was detected in the hydrolysates. Furthermore, formation of N epsilon-guanylyl-lysine linkage on the enzyme was more directly shown by isolation of [32P]GMP(5' leads to N epsilon)lysine when the steps of periodate oxidation and beta-elimination were omitted. The results indicate that the nucleophile in the guanylyltransferase to which the guanylyl residue is linked is the epsilon-amino group of a lysine residue. [32P]Phosphoryl-lysine was also isolated from the vaccinia virus capping enzyme-[32P]GMP intermediate. Guanylyltransferase from HeLa cells, wheat germ, Artemia salina and yeast also formed the enzyme-GMP complex and, from the stability of the complex, the linkage between the enzyme and GMP was suggested to be a phosphoamide. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:6321153

  9. Reactions between Criegee Intermediates and the Inorganic Acids HCl and HNO3 : Kinetics and Atmospheric Implications.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Elizabeth S; Kapnas, Kara M; Murray, Craig

    2016-08-22

    Criegee intermediates (CIs) are a class of reactive radicals that are thought to play a key role in atmospheric chemistry through reactions with trace species that can lead to aerosol particle formation. Recent work has suggested that water vapor is likely to be the dominant sink for some CIs, although reactions with trace species that are sufficiently rapid can be locally competitive. Herein, we use broadband transient absorption spectroscopy to measure rate constants for the reactions of the simplest CI, CH2 OO, with two inorganic acids, HCl and HNO3 , both of which are present in polluted urban atmospheres. Both reactions are fast; at 295 K, the reactions of CH2 OO with HCl and HNO3 have rate constants of 4.6×10(-11)  cm(3)  s(-1) and 5.4×10(-10)  cm(3)  s(-1) , respectively. Complementary quantum-chemical calculations show that these reactions form substituted hydroperoxides with no energy barrier. The results suggest that reactions of CIs with HNO3 in particular are likely to be competitive with those with water vapor in polluted urban areas under conditions of modest relative humidity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Ferritin reactions: direct identification of the site for the diferric peroxide reaction intermediate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2004-06-08

    Ferritins managing iron-oxygen biochemistry in animals, plants, and microorganisms belong to the diiron carboxylate protein family and concentrate iron as ferric oxide approximately 10(14) times above the ferric K(s). Ferritin iron (up to 4,500 atoms), used for iron cofactors and heme, or to trap DNA-damaging oxidants in microorganisms, is concentrated in the protein nanocage cavity (5-8 nm) formed during assembly of polypeptide subunits, 24 in maxiferritins and 12 in miniferritins/DNA protection during starvation proteins. Direct identification of ferritin ferroxidase (F(ox)) sites, complicated by multiple types of iron-ferritin interactions, is now achieved with chimeric proteins where putative F(ox) site residues were introduced singly and cumulatively into an inactive host, an L maxiferritin. A dimagnesium ferritin cocrystal model guided site design and the diferric peroxo F(ox) intermediates (A at 650 nm) monitored activity. Diferric peroxo formation in chimeric and WT proteins had similar K(app) values and Hill coefficients. Catalytic activity required cooperative ferrous substrate binding to two sites A (E, EXXH) and B (E, QXXD). The weaker B sites in ferritin contrast with stronger B sites (E, EXXH) in diiron carboxylate oxygenases, explaining diferric oxo/hydroxo product release in ferritin vs. diiron cofactor retention in oxygenases. Codons for Q/H and D/E differ by single nucleotides, suggesting simple DNA mutations relate site B diiron substrate sites and diiron cofactor sites in proteins. The smaller k(cat) values in chimeras indicate the absence of second-shell residues important for ferritin substrate-product channeling that, when identified, will outline the entire iron path from ferritin pores through the F(ox) site to the mineral cavity.

  11. Investigation of the dp Breakup and dp Elastic Reactions at Intermediate Energies at Nuclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janek, Marian; Ladygin, Vladimir P.; Piyadin, Semen M.; Batyuk, Pavel N.; Gurchin, Yuri V.; Isupov, Alexander Yu.; Karachuk, Julia-Tatiana; Kurilkin, Alexei K.; Kurilkin, Pavel K.; Livanov, Alexei N.; Martinska, Gabriela; Merts, Sergei P.; Reznikov, Sergei G.; Tarjanyiova, Gabriela; Terekhin, Arkadyi A.; Vnukov, Igor E.

    2017-03-01

    The main goal of the deuteron spin structure project is to investigate the spin structure of nucleon-nucleon and three nucleon short-range correlations via the measurements of the polarization observables in the deuteron induced reactions at intermediate energies at Nuclotron (Dubna, Russia). In this framework, dp nonmesonic breakup and dp elastic reactions are investigated using internal target station. The dp breakup data are obtained with the detection of two outgoing protons at the angles of 19°-54° in lab. frame at the deuteron energies of 300-500 MeV. The data of dp elastic scattering for the deuteron energies up to 2000 MeV are obtained in angular range 70°-120° in cm. The further perspectives of the investigations using polarized deuteron beam as well as the studies of the {}^3{He}(d,p){}^4{He} reaction are discussed.

  12. Phosphoryl transfer is not rate-limiting for the ROCK I-catalyzed kinase reaction.

    PubMed

    Futer, Olga; Saadat, Ahmad R; Doran, John D; Raybuck, Scott A; Pazhanisamy, S

    2006-06-27

    Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase, ROCK, is implicated in Rho-mediated cell adhesion and smooth muscle contraction. Animal models suggest that the inhibition of ROCK can ameliorate conditions, such as vasospasm, hypertension, and inflammation. As part of our effort to design novel inhibitors of ROCK, we investigated the kinetic mechanism of ROCK I. Steady-state bisubstrate kinetics, inhibition kinetics, isotope partition analysis, viscosity effects, and presteady-state kinetics were used to explore the kinetic mechanism. Plots of reciprocals of initial rates obtained in the presence of nonhydrolyzable ATP analogues and the small molecule inhibitor of ROCK, Y-27632, against the reciprocals of the peptide concentrations yielded parallel lines (uncompetitive pattern). This pattern is indicative of an ordered binding mechanism, with the peptide adding first. The staurosporine analogue K252a, however, gave a noncompetitive pattern. When a pulse of (33)P-gamma-ATP mixed with ROCK was chased with excess unlabeled ATP and peptide, 0.66 enzyme equivalent of (33)P-phosphate was incorporated into the product in the first turnover. The presence of ATPase activity coupled with the isotope partition data is a clear evidence for the existence of a viable [E-ATP] complex in the kinase reaction and implicates a random binding mechanism. The k(cat)/K(m) parameters were fully sensitive to viscosity (viscosity effects of 1.4 +/- 0.2 and 0.9 +/- 0.3 for ATP and peptide 5, respectively), and therefore, the barriers to dissociation of either substrate are higher than the barrier for the phosphoryl transfer step. As a consequence, not all the binding steps are at fast equilibrium. The observation of a burst in presteady-state kinetics (k(b) = 10.2 +/- 2.1 s(-)(1)) and the viscosity effect on k(cat) of 1.3 +/- 0.2 characterize the phosphoryl transfer step to be fast and the release of product and/or the enzyme isomerization step accompanying it as rate-limiting at V(max) conditions. From

  13. Intermediate Q from soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylates the mechanistic substrate probe norcarane: evidence for a stepwise reaction.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, B J; Austin, R N; Tarr, C; Groves, J T; Lipscomb, J D

    2001-12-05

    Norcarane is a valuable mechanistic probe for enzyme-catalyzed hydrocarbon oxidation reactions because different products or product distributions result from concerted, radical, and cation based reactions. Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b catalyzes the oxidation of norcarane to afford 3-hydroxymethylcyclohexene and 3-cycloheptenol, compounds characteristic of radical and cationic intermediates, respectively, in addition to 2- and 3-norcaranols. Past single turnover transient kinetic studies have identified several optically distinct intermediates from the catalytic cycle of the hydroxylase component of sMMO. Thus, the reaction between norcarane and key reaction intermediates can be directly monitored. The presence of norcarane increases the rate of decay of only one intermediate, the high-valent bis-mu-oxo Fe(IV)(2) cluster-containing species compound Q, showing that it is responsible for the majority of the oxidation chemistry. The observation of products from both radical and cationic intermediates from norcarane oxidation catalyzed by sMMO is consistent with a mechanism in which an initial substrate radical intermediate is formed by hydrogen atom abstraction. This intermediate then undergoes either oxygen rebound, intramolecular rearrangement followed by oxygen rebound, or loss of a second electron to yield a cationic intermediate to which OH(-) is transferred. The estimated lower limit of 20 ps for the lifetime of the putative radical intermediate is in accord with values determined from previous studies of sterically hindered sMMO probes.

  14. Broadband Microwave Study of Reaction Intermediates and Products Through the Pyrolysis of Oxygenated Biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Hernandez-Castillo, Alicia O.; Fritz, Sean; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2017-06-01

    The rapidly growing list of potential plant-derived biofuels creates a challenge for the scientific community to provide a molecular-scale understanding of their combustion. Development of accurate combustion models rests on a foundation of experimental data on the kinetics and product branching ratios of their individual reaction steps. Therefore, new spectroscopic tools are necessary to selectively detect and characterize fuel components and reactive intermediates generated by pyrolysis and combustion. Substituted furans, including furanic ethers, are considered second-generation biofuel candidates. Following the work of the Ellison group, an 8-18 GHz microwave study was carried out on the unimolecular and bimolecular decomposition of the smallest furanic ether, 2-methoxy furan, and it`s pyrolysis intermediate, the 2-furanyloxy radical, formed in a high-temperature pyrolysis source coupled to a supersonic expansion. Details of the experimental setup and analysis of the spectrum of the radical will be discussed.

  15. Criegee intermediate reaction with CO: mechanism, barriers, conformer-dependence, and implications for ozonolysis chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Busch, Daryle H; Subramaniam, Bala; Thompson, Ward H

    2014-03-13

    Density functional theory and transition state theory rate constant calculations have been performed to gain insight into the bimolecular reaction of the Criegee intermediate (CI) with carbon monoxide (CO) that is proposed to be important in both atmospheric and industrial chemistry. A new mechanism is suggested in which the CI acts as an oxidant by transferring an oxygen atom to the CO, resulting in the formation of a carbonyl compound (aldehyde or ketone depending upon the CI) and carbon dioxide. Fourteen different CIs, including ones resulting from biogenic ozonolysis, are considered. Consistent with previous reports for other CI bimolecular reactions, the anti conformers are found to react faster than the syn conformers. However, this can be attributed to steric effects and not hyperconjugation as generally invoked. The oxidation reaction is slow, with barrier heights between 6.3 and 14.7 kcal/mol and estimated reaction rate constants 6-12 orders-of-magnitude smaller than previously reported literature estimates. The reaction is thus expected to be unimportant in the context of tropospheric oxidation chemistry. However, the reaction mechanism suggests that CO could be exploited in ozonolysis to selectively obtain industrially important carbonyl compounds.

  16. Near-threshold absolute photoionization cross-sections of some reaction intermediates in combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Yang, Bin; Cool, Terrill A.; Hansen, Nils; Kasper, Tina

    2008-02-01

    The use of photoionization mass spectrometry for the development of quantitative kinetic models for the complex combustion chemistry of both conventional hydrocarbon fuels and oxygenated biofuels requires near-threshold measurements of absolute photoionization cross-sections for numerous reaction intermediates. Near-threshold absolute cross-sections for molecular and dissociative photoionization for 20 stable reaction intermediates (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, cyclopropane, methylcyclopentane, 1-butene, cis-2-butene, isobutene, 1-pentene, cyclohexene, 3,3-dimethyl-1-butene, 1,3-hexadiene, 1,3-cyclohexadiene, methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, tetrahydrofuran, propanal, 1-butyne, 2-butyne) are presented. Previously measured total photoionization cross-sections for 9 of these molecules are in good agreement with the present results. The measurements are performed with photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) using a monochromated VUV synchrotron light source with an energy resolution of 40 meV (fwhm) comparable to that used for flame-sampling molecular beam PIMS studies of flame chemistry and reaction kinetics.

  17. Direct kinetic measurements of reactions between the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO and alkenes.

    PubMed

    Buras, Zachary J; Elsamra, Rehab M I; Jalan, Amrit; Middaugh, Joshua E; Green, William H

    2014-03-20

    The simplest Criegee Intermediate (CH2OO), a well-known biradical formed in alkene ozonolysis, is known to add across double bonds. Here we report direct experimental rate measurements of the simplest Criegee Intermediate reacting with C2–C4 alkenes obtained using the laser flash photolysis technique probing the recently measured B(1)A′ ← X(1)A′ transition in CH2OO. The measured activation energy (298–494 K) for CH2OO + alkenes is Ea ≈ 3500 ± 1000 J mol(–1) for all alkyl substituted alkenes and Ea = 7000 ± 900 J mol(–1) for ethene. The measured Arrhenius pre-exponential factors (A) vary between (2 ± 1) × 10(–15) and (11 ± 3) × 10(–15) cm(3) molecule(–1) s(–1). Quantum chemical calculations of the corresponding rate coefficients reproduce qualitative reactivity trends but overestimate the absolute rate coefficients. Despite the small Ea's, the CH2OO + alkene rate coefficients are almost 2 orders of magnitude smaller than those of similar reactions between CH2OO and carbonyl compounds. Using the rate constants measured here, we estimate that, under typical atmospheric conditions, reaction with alkenes does not represent a significant sink of CH2OO. In environments rich in C═C double bonds, however, such as ozone-exposed rubber or emission plumes, these reactions can play a significant role.

  18. Use of intermediate partitioning to calculate intrinsic isotope effects for the reaction catalyzed by malic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Grissom, C.B.; Cleland, W.W.

    1985-02-12

    For those enzymes that proceed via a stepwise reaction mechanism with a discrete chemical intermediate and where deuterium and /sup 13/C isotope effects are on separate steps, a new method has been developed to solve for the intrinsic deuterium and /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effects that relies on directly observing the partitioning of the intermediate between the forward and reverse directions. This observed partitioning ratio, along with the values of the primary deuterium, tritium, and /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effects on V/K for the substrate with the label being followed, allows an exact solution for the intrinsic deuterium and /sup 13/C isotope effects, the forward commitment for the deuterium-sensitive step, and the partition ratio for the intermediate in the reaction. This method allows portions of the reaction coordinate diagram to be defined precisely and the relative energy levels of certain activation barriers to be assigned exactly. With chicken liver triphosphopyridine nucleotide (TPN) malic enzyme activated by Mg/sup 2 +/, the partitioning of oxalacetate to pyruvate vs. malate in the presence of TPNH, 0.47, plus previously determined isotope effects gives an intrinsic deuterium isotope effect of 5.7 on hydride transfer and a /sup 13/C isotope effect of 1.044 on decarboxylation. Reverse hydride transfer is 10 times faster than decarboxylation, and the forward commitment for hydride transfer is 3.3. The /sup 13/C isotope effect is not significantly different with reduced acetylpyridine adenine dinucleotide phosphate replacing TPNH (although the pyruvate/malate partitioning ratio for oxalactate is now 9.9), but replacement of Mg/sup 2 +/ by Mn/sup 2 +/ raises the value to 1.065 (partition ratio 0.99).

  19. Regioselective, Transition Metal-Free C-O Coupling Reactions Involving Aryne Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuyang; Lipschutz, Michael I; Tilley, T Don

    2016-04-01

    A new transition-metal-free synthetic method for C-O coupling between various aryl halides and alkoxides is described. This type of transformation is typically accomplished using palladium catalysts containing a specialized phosphine ligand. The reactions reported here can be performed under mild, ambient conditions using certain potassium alkoxides and a range of aryl halides, with iodide and bromide derivatives giving the best results. A likely mechanistic pathway involves the in situ generation of an aryne intermediate, and directing groups on the aryl ring inductively control regioselectivity.

  20. Direct determination of ephedrine intermediate in a biotransformation reaction using infrared spectroscopy and PLS.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Marcello G; Poppi, Ronei J

    2008-05-30

    Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy (FT-MIR) coupled with a homemade attenuated total reflectance (ATR) flow-cell was used for on-line monitoring of a biotransformation reaction. The reaction was also monitored off-line by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) enabling to establish a multivariate model for the infrared data based on partial least squares (PLS) regression. The method developed allowed the simultaneous determination of the substrate, two intermediates and the final product involved in the reduction reaction of 1-phenyl 1,2-propanedione at an initial concentration of 0.5% (v/v). The reaction was accomplished with a whole-cell suspension of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a phosphate buffer of pH 3.0 at 32+/-1 degrees C. The ATR infrared monitoring was performed directly on the suspension cell without any separation process or extraction over 3h, totaling 188 spectra. The data were split into two subsets, with 158 times for calibration and 30 times for validation. The results showed that the proposed method may be used for on-line monitoring of the biotransformation reactions when the initial concentration is very low.

  1. The Allyl Intermediate in Regioselective and Enantioselective Iridium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Allylic Substitution Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Madrahimov, Sherzod T.; Markovic, Dean; Hartwig., John F.

    2010-01-01

    The isolation and structural characterization of metallacyclic allyl (2a) and crotyl (2b) iridium complexes are reported. Complexes 2a and 2b are rare examples of iriduim allyl complexes that undergo nucleophilic attack at terminal position, rather than the central position, of the allyl unit. Structures of 2a and 2b were obtained by X-ray diffraction. Nucleophilic attack was observed at the carbon that is bound to iridium trans to phosphorus through a longer Ir-C bond. However, the effect of the trans phosphine ligand on the Ir-C bond lengths was smaller than the effect of the substituent on the allyl group in 2b. The competence of complexes 2a and 2b to be intermediates in the catalytic asymmetric allylic substitutions was evaluated by studying their reactivity towards stabilized carbon and heteroatom nucleophiles and comparing the rates and selectivities to those of the catalytic reactions. The stereoselectivity and regioselectivity of stoichiometric reactions of 2b were similar to those of reactions catalyzed by the previously reported iridium catalysts, supporting their intermediacy in the catalytic reactions. Based on the structural data, a model is proposed for the origin of stereoselectivity in iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution reactions. PMID:19432473

  2. The allyl intermediate in regioselective and enantioselective iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution reactions.

    PubMed

    Madrahimov, Sherzod T; Markovic, Dean; Hartwig, John F

    2009-06-03

    The isolation and structural characterization of metallacyclic allyl (2a) and crotyl (2b) iridium complexes are reported. Complexes 2a and 2b are rare examples of iriduim allyl complexes that undergo nucleophilic attack at terminal position, rather than the central position, of the allyl unit. Structures of 2a and 2b were obtained by X-ray diffraction. Nucleophilic attack was observed at the carbon that is bound to iridium trans to phosphorus through a longer Ir-C bond. However, the effect of the trans phosphine ligand on the Ir-C bond lengths was smaller than the effect of the substituent on the allyl group in 2b. The competence of complexes 2a and 2b to be intermediates in the catalytic asymmetric allylic substitutions was evaluated by studying their reactivity toward stabilized carbon and heteroatom nucleophiles and comparing the rates and selectivities to those of the catalytic reactions. The stereoselectivity and regioselectivity of stoichiometric reactions of 2b were similar to those of reactions catalyzed by the previously reported iridium catalysts, supporting their intermediacy in the catalytic reactions. On the basis of the structural data, a model is proposed for the origin of stereoselectivity in iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution reactions.

  3. Gold-Catalyzed Reactions via Cyclopropyl Gold Carbene-like Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Dorel, Ruth; Echavarren, Antonio M

    2015-08-07

    Cycloisomerizations of 1,n-enynes catalyzed by gold(I) proceed via electrophilic species with a highly distorted cyclopropyl gold(I) carbene-like structure, which can react with different nucleophiles to form a wide variety of products by attack at the cyclopropane or the carbene carbons. Particularly important are reactions in which the gold(I) carbene reacts with alkenes to form cyclopropanes either intra- or intermolecularly. In the absence of nucleophiles, 1,n-enynes lead to a variety of cycloisomerized products including those resulting from skeletal rearrangements. Reactions proceeding through cyclopropyl gold(I) carbene-like intermediates are ideally suited for the bioinspired synthesis of terpenoid natural products by the selective activation of the alkyne in highly functionalized enynes or polyenynes.

  4. Status of reactive non-heme metal-oxygen intermediates in chemical and enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Ray, Kallol; Pfaff, Florian Felix; Wang, Bin; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-10-08

    Selective functionalization of unactivated C-H bonds, water oxidation, and dioxygen reduction are extremely important reactions in the context of finding energy carriers and conversion processes that are alternatives to the current fossil-based oil for energy. A range of metalloenzymes achieve these challenging tasks in biology by using cheap and abundant transition metals, such as iron, copper, and manganese. High-valent metal-oxo and metal-dioxygen (superoxo, peroxo, and hydroperoxo) cores act as active intermediates in many of these processes. The generation of well-described model compounds can provide vital insights into the mechanisms of such enzymatic reactions. This perspective provides a focused rather than comprehensive review of the recent advances in the chemistry of biomimetic high-valent metal-oxo and metal-dioxygen complexes, which can be related to our understanding of the biological systems.

  5. Gold-Catalyzed Reactions via Cyclopropyl Gold Carbene-like Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cycloisomerizations of 1,n-enynes catalyzed by gold(I) proceed via electrophilic species with a highly distorted cyclopropyl gold(I) carbene-like structure, which can react with different nucleophiles to form a wide variety of products by attack at the cyclopropane or the carbene carbons. Particularly important are reactions in which the gold(I) carbene reacts with alkenes to form cyclopropanes either intra- or intermolecularly. In the absence of nucleophiles, 1,n-enynes lead to a variety of cycloisomerized products including those resulting from skeletal rearrangements. Reactions proceeding through cyclopropyl gold(I) carbene-like intermediates are ideally suited for the bioinspired synthesis of terpenoid natural products by the selective activation of the alkyne in highly functionalized enynes or polyenynes. PMID:26061916

  6. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.

  7. Intermediate resonance excitation in the γp→pππ reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gdh Collaboration; Ahrens, J.; Altieri, S.; Annand, J. R. M.; Anton, G.; Arends, H.-J.; Aulenbacher, K.; Beck, R.; Bradtke, C.; Braghieri, A.; Degrande, N.; D'Hose, N.; Dutz, H.; Goertz, S.; Grabmayr, P.; Hansen, K.; Harmsen, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, T.; Heid, E.; Helbing, K.; Holvoet, H.; van Hoorebeke, L.; Horikawa, N.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, O.; Jennewein, P.; Kageya, T.; Kiel, B.; Klein, F.; Kondratiev, R.; Kossert, K.; Krimmer, J.; Lang, M.; Lannoy, B.; Leukel, R.; Lisin, V.; Matsuda, T.; McGeorge, J. C.; Meier, A.; Menze, D.; Meyer, W.; Michel, T.; Naumann, J.; Panzeri, A.; Pedroni, P.; Pinelli, T.; Preobrajenski, I.; Radtke, E.; Reichert, E.; Reicherz, G.; Rohlof, Ch.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sauer, M.; Schoch, B.; Schumacher, M.; Seitz, B.; Speckner, T.; Takabayashi, N.; Tamas, G.; Thomas, A.; van de Vyver, R.; Wakai, A.; Weihofen, W.; Wissmann, F.; Zapadtka, F.; Zeitler, G.

    2005-09-01

    The helicity dependence of the total cross section for the γ→p→→pππ reaction has been measured for the first time at incident photon energies from 400 to 800 MeV. The measurement, performed at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI accelerator in Mainz, used the large acceptance detector DAPHNE and a longitudinally polarized frozen-spin target. This channel is found to be excited predominantly when the photon and proton have a parallel spin orientation, most likely due to the intermediate production of the D(1520) resonance. However, the contribution of the antiparallel spin configuration, arising from other reaction mechanisms, is also not negligible. This result gives important new information to resolve the existing model discrepancies in the identification of the nucleon resonances contributing to this channel.

  8. Bimetallic oxidative addition involving radical intermediates in nickel-catalyzed alkyl-alkyl Kumada coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Breitenfeld, Jan; Ruiz, Jesus; Wodrich, Matthew D; Hu, Xile

    2013-08-14

    Many nickel-based catalysts have been reported for cross-coupling reactions of nonactivated alkyl halides. The mechanistic understanding of these reactions is still primitive. Here we report a mechanistic study of alkyl-alkyl Kumada coupling catalyzed by a preformed nickel(II) pincer complex ([(N2N)Ni-Cl]). The coupling proceeds through a radical process, involving two nickel centers for the oxidative addition of alkyl halide. The catalysis is second-order in Grignard reagent, first-order in catalyst, and zero-order in alkyl halide. A transient species, [(N2N)Ni-alkyl(2)](alkyl(2)-MgCl), is identified as the key intermediate responsible for the activation of alkyl halide, the formation of which is the turnover-determining step of the catalysis.

  9. Experimental investigation of dp → ppn reaction at intermediate energies at Nuclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janek, M.; Ladygin, V. P.; Piyadin, S. M.; Gurchin, Yu. V.; Isupov, A. Yu.; Karachuk, J.-T.; Khrenov, A. N.; Kurilkin, A. K.; Kurilkin, P. K.; Livanov, A. N.; Martinska, G.; Reznikov, S. G.; Tarjanyiova, G.; Terekhin, A. A.; Vnukov, I. E.

    2016-11-01

    There are still discrepancies between theory and experimental data in the polarisation observables of dp → ppn reaction in the low and intermediate energies, despite of significant process in the development of theoretical models which include three and more nucleon forces and relativistic effects. The data of dp → ppn reaction have been accumulated at 300, 400 and 500 MeV in the Nuclotron (Dubna, Russia) and partially processed for some kinematic configurations including few in which possible relativistic effects can appear. Kinematic simulation in the framework of ROOT and GEANT4 package have been performed before data processing. Part of the preliminary results are obtained in the form of energy deposit correlations of the two arms working in coincidence and few in the form of kinematic S curve.

  10. Imaging single-molecule reaction intermediates stabilized by surface dissipation and entropy.

    PubMed

    Riss, Alexander; Paz, Alejandro Pérez; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; De Oteyza, Dimas G; Bradley, Aaron J; Ugeda, Miguel M; Gorman, Patrick; Jung, Han Sae; Crommie, Michael F; Rubio, Angel; Fischer, Felix R

    2016-07-01

    Chemical transformations at the interface between solid/liquid or solid/gaseous phases of matter lie at the heart of key industrial-scale manufacturing processes. A comprehensive study of the molecular energetics and conformational dynamics that underlie these transformations is often limited to ensemble-averaging analytical techniques. Here we report the detailed investigation of a surface-catalysed cross-coupling and sequential cyclization cascade of 1,2-bis(2-ethynyl phenyl)ethyne on Ag(100). Using non-contact atomic force microscopy, we imaged the single-bond-resolved chemical structure of transient metastable intermediates. Theoretical simulations indicate that the kinetic stabilization of experimentally observable intermediates is determined not only by the potential-energy landscape, but also by selective energy dissipation to the substrate and entropic changes associated with key transformations along the reaction pathway. The microscopic insights gained here pave the way for the rational design and control of complex organic reactions at the surface of heterogeneous catalysts.

  11. Photocatalytic degradation of pesticide methomyl: determination of the reaction pathway and identification of intermediate products.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, M; Qourzal, S; Assabbane, A; Chovelon, J-M; Ferronato, C; Ait-Ichou, Y

    2006-05-01

    The degradation of pesticide methomyl in aqueous solution by UV-irradiation in the presence of TiO2 "Degussa P-25" has been studied. It was found that mineralisation to carbon dioxide, water, sulfate and ammonia took place during the process. The rate of photodecomposition of methomyl was measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), while its mineralization was followed using ion chromatography (IC), and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis. The identification of reaction intermediate products was carried out using coupled techniques HPLC-MS (electrospray ionization in positive mode) and a degradation pathway was proposed. Under our conditions, complete disappearance of 1.23 x 10(-4) mol l(-1) of pure pesticide occurred within 45 min of illumination and 80% TOC removal occurred in less than 4 h. Three main intermediates were identified resulting from (i) the rupture of the ester bond (or the N-O bond), (ii) the hydroxylation of methyl group borne by the nitrogen atom and (iii) the product resulting from the decarboxylation of the oxidized hydroxylated methyl group (photo-Kolbe reaction). In order to be sure that the photocatalytic results were consistent, hydrolysis and photolysis tests were performed. Photocatalysis proved to be an excellent new advanced oxidation technology (AOT) to eliminate methomyl present in water.

  12. Ozonation of benzotriazole and methylindole: Kinetic modeling, identification of intermediates and reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Benitez, F Javier; Acero, Juan L; Real, Francisco J; Roldán, Gloria; Rodríguez, Elena

    2015-01-23

    The ozonation of 1H-benzotriazole (BZ) and 3-methylindole (ML), two emerging contaminants that are frequently present in aquatic environments, was investigated. The experiments were performed with the contaminants (1μM) dissolved in ultrapure water. The kinetic study led to the determination of the apparent rate constants for the ozonation reactions. In the case of 1H-benzotriazole, these rate constants varied from 20.1 ± 0.4M(-1)s(-1) at pH=3 to 2143 ± 23 M(-1)s(-1) at pH=10. Due to its acidic nature (pKa=8.2), the degree of dissociation of this pollutant was determined at every pH of work, and the specific rate constants of the un-dissociated and dissociated species were evaluated, being the values of these rate constants 20.1 ± 2.0 and 2.0 ± 0.3 × 10(3)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. On the contrary, 3-methylindole does not present acidic nature, and therefore, it can be proposed an average value for its rate constant of 4.90 ± 0.7 × 10(5)M(-1)s(-1) in the whole pH range 3-10. Further experiments were performed to identify the main degradation byproducts (10 mg L(-1) of contaminants, 0.023 gh(-1) of ozone). Up to 8 intermediates formed in the ozonation of 3-methylindole were identified by LC-TOFMS, while 6 intermediates were identified in the ozonation of 1H-benzotriazole. By considering these intermediate compounds, the reaction mechanisms were proposed and discussed. Finally, evaluated rate constants allowed to predict and modeling the oxidation of these micropollutants in general aquatic systems.

  13. Multifragmentation in intermediate energy 129Xe-induced heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tso, Kin

    1996-05-01

    The 129Xe-induced reactions on natCu, 89Y, 165Ho, and 197Au at bombarding energies of E/A = 40 & 60 MeV have been studied theoretically and experimentally in order to establish the underlying mechanism of multifragmentation at intermediate energy heavy-Ion collisions. Nuclear disks formed in central heavy-ion collisions, as simulated by means of Boltzmann-like kinetic equations, break up into several fragments due to a new kind of Rayleigh-like surface instability. A sheet of liquid, stable in the limit of non-interacting surfaces, is shown to become unstable due to surface-surface interactions. The onset of this instability is determined analytically. A thin bubble behaves like a sheet and is susceptible to the surface instability through the crispation mode. The Coulomb effects associated with the depletion of charges in the central cavity of nuclear bubbles are investigated. The onset of Coulomb instability is demonstrated for perturbations of the radial mode. Experimental intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity distributions for the 129Xe-induced reactions are shown to be binomial at each transverse energy. From these distributions, independent of the specific target, an elementary binary decay probability p can be extracted that has a thermal dependence. Thus it is inferred that multifragmentation is reducible to a combination of nearly independent emission processes. If sequential decay is assumed, the increase of p with transverse energy implies a contraction of the emission time scale. The sensitivity of p to the lower Z threshold in the definition of intermediate-mass-fragments points to a physical Poisson simulations of the particle multiplicities show that the weak auto-correlation between the fragment multiplicity and the transverse energy does not distort a Poisson distribution into a binomial distribution. The effect of device efficiency on the experimental results has also been studied.

  14. Reaction of a copper(II)-nitrosyl complex with hydrogen peroxide: putative formation of a copper(I)-peroxynitrite intermediate.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Apurba; Kumar, Pankaj; Mondal, Biplab

    2012-05-14

    The reaction of a Cu(II)-nitrosyl complex (1) with hydrogen peroxide at -20 °C in acetonitrile results in the formation of the corresponding Cu(I)-peroxynitrite intermediate. The reduction of the Cu(II) center was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopic studies. Formation of the peroxynitrite intermediate has been confirmed by its characteristic phenol ring nitration reaction as well as isolation of corresponding Cu(I)-nitrate (2). On air oxidation, 2 resulted in the corresponding Cu(II)-nitrate (3). Thus, these results demonstrate a possible decomposition pathway for H(2)O(2) and NO through the formation of a peroxynitrite intermediate in biological systems.

  15. The Pressure Dependency of Stabilized Criegee Intermediate Yields of Selected Ozone-Alkene Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, J. P.; Donahue, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (SCI) play an important role as an oxidizing species in atmospheric reactions. The ozonolysis of alkenes in the atmosphere, i.e. the mechanism by which the SCIs are produced, is a major pathway to the formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. Just how much SCIs contribute to the SOA formation is not well known and fundamental research in the kinetics of SCI formation need to be performed to shed light on this mystery. The alkene ozonolysis is highly exothermic reaction, so a third body is needed for stabilizing the SCI, thus making the SCI yield pressure dependent. We studied the production of SCIs at different pressures by studying their ability to oxidize sulfur dioxide in a pressure controlled flow reactor. We used a mixture of ultra-high purity nitrogen, oxygen, and a selective scavenger for hydroxyl radical (OH) as a carrier gas, and injected a mixture of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide and selected alkene to the center of the flow for ozonolysis to take place. With the OH radical scavenged, the SCI yield of the reaction was measured by measuring the amount of sulfuric acid formed in the reaction between SCI and sulfur dioxide with a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). This work was supported by NASA/ROSES grant NNX12AE54G to CMU and Academy of Finland Center of Excellence project 1118615.

  16. Strong Negative Temperature Dependence of the Simplest Criegee Intermediate CH2OO Reaction with Water Dimer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mica C; Chang, Chun-Hung; Chao, Wen; Lin, Liang-Chun; Takahashi, Kaito; Boering, Kristie A; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2015-07-16

    The kinetics of the reaction of CH2OO with water vapor was measured directly with UV absorption at temperatures from 283 to 324 K. The observed CH2OO decay rate is second order with respect to the H2O concentration, indicating water dimer participates in the reaction. The rate coefficient of the CH2OO reaction with water dimer can be described by an Arrhenius expression k(T) = A exp(-Ea/RT) with an activation energy of -8.1 ± 0.6 kcal mol(-1) and k(298 K) = (7.4 ± 0.6) × 10(-12) cm(3) s(-1). Theoretical calculations yield a large negative temperature dependence consistent with the experimental results. The temperature dependence increases the effective loss rate for CH2OO by a factor of ~2.5 at 278 K and decreases by a factor of ~2 at 313 K relative to 298 K, suggesting that temperature is important for determining the impact of Criegee intermediate reactions with water in the atmosphere.

  17. Reaction of Stabilized Criegee Intermediates from Ozonolysis of Limonene with Water: Ab Initio and DFT Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lei; Lan, Ru; Xu, Yi-Sheng; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Yang, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of the chemical reaction of H2O with three stabilized Criegee intermediates (stabCI-OO, stabCI-CH3-OO and stabCIx-OO) produced via the limonene ozonolysis reaction has been investigated using ab initio and DFT (Density Functional Theory) methods. It has been shown that the formation of the hydrogen-bonded complexes is followed by two different reaction pathways, leading to the formation of either OH radicals via water-catalyzed H migration or of α-hydroxy hydroperoxide. Both pathways were found to be essential sources of atmospheric OH radical and H2O2 making a significant contribution to the formation of secondary aerosols in the Earth’s atmosphere. The activation energies at the CCSD(T)/6-31G(d) + CF level of theory were found to be in the range of 14.70–21.98 kcal mol−1. The formation of α-hydroxy hydroperoxide for the reaction of stabCIx-OO and H2O with the activation energy of 14.70 kcal mol−1 is identified as the most favorable pathway. PMID:23481640

  18. Spectroscopic Characterization of the Reaction Products Between HCl and the Simplest Criegee Intermediate CH_{2}OO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, Carlos; Endo, Yasuki

    2017-06-01

    Carbonyl oxides (R_{1}R_{2}COO), also known as Criegee intermediates (CIs), react quickly with many trace atmospheric gases, including inorganic gases such as HCl, which are present in polluted urban atmospheres. A theoretical investigation of the reaction between the simplest CI, CH_{2}OO, with HCl suggests the formation of chloromethyl hydroperoxide (CMHP) through an insertion mechanism. To gain some insight, we have interrogated the reaction system containing CH_{2}OO and HCl through pure rotational spectroscopy. In our experiment, CH_{2}OO molecules have been generated in the discharged plasma of a CH_{2}I_{2}/O_{2} mixture, which containg a small amount of HCl enough to react with CH_{2}OO. The resulting products (including CH_{2}OO) were characterized by Fourier-transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy. Rotational transitions in the 6-40 GHz frequency range were observed by FTMW spectroscopy together with FTMW-mmW and MW-MW double-resonance techniques. The observed species was identified with the help of quantum chemical calculations as the most stable conformer of CMHP. The non observation of other different reaction products together with the absence of spectral features of the complex between HCl and CH_{2}OO enable us to understand the pathway of the HCl+CH_{2}OO reaction.

  19. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14-3-3 protein Bmh2 is required for regulation of the phosphorylation status of Fin1, a novel intermediate filament protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mayordomo, Isabel; Sanz, Pascual

    2002-01-01

    In order to identify proteins that interact with Bmh2, a yeast member of the 14-3-3 protein family, we performed a two-hybrid screening using LexA-Bmh2 as bait. We identified Fin1, a novel intermediate filament protein, as the protein that showed the highest degree of interaction. We also identified components of the vesicular transport machinery such as Gic2 and Msb3, proteins involved in transcriptional regulation such as Mbf1, Gcr2 and Reg2, and a variety of other different proteins (Ppt1, Lre1, Rps0A and Ylr177w). We studied the interaction between Bmh2 and Fin1 in more detail and found that Bmh2 only interacted with phosphorylated forms of Fin1. In addition, we showed that Glc7, the catalytic subunit of the protein phosphatase 1 complex, was also able to interact with Fin1. PMID:11931638

  20. Chemically Activated Formation of Organic Acids in Reactions of the Criegee Intermediate with Aldehydes and Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.

    2013-08-08

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, .CH2OO.) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between .CH2OO. and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48–51 kcal mol-1 lower in energy, formed via 1,3- cycloaddition of .CH2OO. across the CQO bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O–O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO o CH3CHO o CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10-4 times lower than the initial .CH2OO. concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  1. Chemically activated formation of organic acids in reactions of the Criegee intermediate with aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W; Green, William H

    2013-10-21

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, ˙CH2OO˙) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between ˙CH2OO˙ and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48-51 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy, formed via 1,3-cycloaddition of ˙CH2OO˙ across the C=O bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O-O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO < CH3CHO < CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10(-4) times lower than the initial ˙CH2OO˙ concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  2. Two Lysine Residues in the Bacterial Luciferase Mobile Loop Stabilize Reaction Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Zachary T.; Baldwin, Thomas O.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial luciferase catalyzes the reaction of FMNH2, O2, and a long chain aliphatic aldehyde, yielding FMN, carboxylic acid, and blue-green light. The most conserved contiguous region of the primary sequence corresponds to a crystallographically disordered loop adjacent to the active center (Fisher, A. J., Raushel, F. M., Baldwin, T. O., and Rayment, I. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 6581–6586; Fisher, A. J., Thompson, T. B., Thoden, J. B., Baldwin, T. O., and Rayment, I. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 21956–21968). Deletion of the mobile loop does not alter the chemistry of the reaction but decreases the total quantum yield of bioluminescence by 2 orders of magnitude (Sparks, J. M., and Baldwin, T. O. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 15436–15443). In this study, we attempt to localize the loss of activity observed in the loop deletion mutant to individual residues in the mobile loop. Using alanine mutagenesis, the effects of substitution at 15 of the 29 mobile loop residues were examined. Nine of the point mutants had reduced activity in vivo. Two mutations, K283A and K286A, resulted in a loss in quantum yield comparable with that of the loop deletion mutant. The bioluminescence emission spectrum of both mutants was normal, and both yielded the carboxylic acid chemical product at the same efficiency as the wild-type enzyme. Substitution of Lys283 with alanine resulted in destabilization of intermediate II, whereas mutation of Lys286 had an increase in exposure of reaction intermediates to a dynamic quencher. Based on a model of the enzyme-reduced flavin complex, the two critical lysine residues are adjacent to the quininoidal edge of the isoalloxazine. PMID:19710008

  3. CheY3 of Borrelia burgdorferi is the key response regulator essential for chemotaxis and forms a long-lived phosphorylated intermediate.

    PubMed

    Motaleb, M A; Sultan, Syed Z; Miller, Michael R; Li, Chunhao; Charon, Nyles W

    2011-07-01

    Spirochetes have a unique cell structure: These bacteria have internal periplasmic flagella subterminally attached at each cell end. How spirochetes coordinate the rotation of the periplasmic flagella for chemotaxis is poorly understood. In other bacteria, modulation of flagellar rotation is essential for chemotaxis, and phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the response regulator CheY plays a key role in regulating this rotary motion. The genome of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi contains multiple homologues of chemotaxis genes, including three copies of cheY, referred to as cheY1, cheY2, and cheY3. To investigate the function of these genes, we targeted them separately or in combination by allelic exchange mutagenesis. Whereas wild-type cells ran, paused (flexed), and reversed, cells of all single, double, and triple mutants that contained an inactivated cheY3 gene constantly ran. Capillary tube chemotaxis assays indicated that only those strains with a mutation in cheY3 were deficient in chemotaxis, and cheY3 complementation restored chemotactic ability. In vitro phosphorylation assays indicated that CheY3 was more efficiently phosphorylated by CheA2 than by CheA1, and the CheY3-P intermediate generated was considerably more stable than the CheY-P proteins found in most other bacteria. The results point toward CheY3 being the key response regulator essential for chemotaxis in B. burgdorferi. In addition, the stability of CheY3-P may be critical for coordination of the rotation of the periplasmic flagella.

  4. Snapshot of a Reaction Intermediate: Analysis of Benzoylformate Decarboxylase in Complex with a Benzoylphosphonate Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Chakraborty, Sumit; Baykal, Ahmet T.; Nemeria, Natalia; Yep, Alejandra; Ruby, David I.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Kenyon, George L.; McLeish, Michael J.; Jordan, Frank; Ringe, Dagmar

    2009-04-22

    Benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC) is a thiamin diphosphate- (ThDP-) dependent enzyme acting on aromatic substrates. In addition to its metabolic role in the mandelate pathway, BFDC shows broad substrate specificity coupled with tight stereo control in the carbon-carbon bond-forming reverse reaction, making it a useful biocatalyst for the production of chiral-hydroxy ketones. The reaction of methyl benzoylphosphonate (MBP), an analogue of the natural substrate benzoylformate, with BFDC results in the formation of a stable analogue (C2{alpha}-phosphonomandelyl-ThDP) of the covalent ThDP-substrate adduct C2{alpha}-mandelyl-ThDP. Formation of the stable adduct is confirmed both by formation of a circular dichroism band characteristic of the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomeric form of ThDP (commonly observed when ThDP forms tetrahedral complexes with its substrates) and by high-resolution mass spectrometry of the reaction mixture. In addition, the structure of BFDC with the MBP inhibitor was solved by X-ray crystallography to a spatial resolution of 1.37 {angstrom} (PDB ID 3FSJ). The electron density clearly shows formation of a tetrahedral adduct between the C2 atom of ThDP and the carbonyl carbon atom of the MBP. This adduct resembles the intermediate from the penultimate step of the carboligation reaction between benzaldehyde and acetaldehyde. The combination of real-time kinetic information via stopped-flow circular dichroism with steady-state data from equilibrium circular dichroism measurements and X-ray crystallography reveals details of the first step of the reaction catalyzed by BFDC. The MBP-ThDP adduct on BFDC is compared to the recently solved structure of the same adduct on benzaldehyde lyase, another ThDP-dependent enzyme capable of catalyzing aldehyde condensation with high stereospecificity.

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of lithium sulfur battery reaction intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wujcik, Kevin; Pascal, Tod; Prendergast, David; Balsara, Nitash

    2015-03-01

    Lithium sulfur batteries have a theoretical energy density nearly five times greater than current lithium ion battery standards, but questions still remain regarding the reaction pathways through which soluble lithium polysulfide (Li2Sx, ``x'' ranging from 2 to 8) reaction intermediates are formed. Complicating spectroelectrochemical approaches to elucidate redox pathways is the challenge of obtaining spectral standards for individual Li2Sx species. Lithium polysulfides cannot be isolated as individual component and exist only in solution as a distribution of different Li2Sx molecules formed via disproportionation reactions (e.g. 2Li2S4 goes to Li2S3 + Li2S5). X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the sulfur K-edge has recently been employed as a technique to study Li-S chemistry. We have recently obtained XAS standards for individual Li2Sx species via first principles DFT simulations and the excited electron and core hole approach. Here, experimental sulfur K-edge XAS of Li2Sx species dissolved in poly(ethylene oxide) are compared to spectra obtained from analogous theoretical calculations. The impact that polysulfide solution concentration and the presence of other lithium salts (e.g. LiNO3) have on X-ray spectra of Li2Sx species is explored via experiment and theory.

  6. [Spectroscopic measurement of intermediate free radicals of n-heptane in the combustion reaction].

    PubMed

    Ye, Bin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Chang-hua; Wang, Li-dong; Tang, Hong-chang; Li, Xiang-yuan

    2012-04-01

    Using an intensified spectroscopic detector CCD and a chemical shock tube, transient emission spectra of n-heptane during the reaction process of combustion were measured, with exposure time of 6 micros and a spectral range of 200 - 850 nm Experiments were conducted at an ignition temperature of 1 408 K and pressure of 2.0 atmos, with an initial fuel mole fraction of 1.0% and an equivalence ratio of 1.0. Measured emission bands were determined to be produced by OH, CH and C2 free radicals, which reveals that small OH, CH and C2 radicals are important intermediate products in the combustion process of n-heptane. Time-resolved spectra indicate that radical concentrations of OH, CH and C2 reached their peaks sharply; however, CH and C2 reduced and disappeared rapidly while the duration of OH was much longer in the reaction. This work provides experimental data for understanding the microscopic process and validating the mechanism of n-heptane combustion reaction.

  7. Identifying reaction intermediates and catalytic active sites through in situ characterization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Andrew J.; Lobo, Raul F

    2010-01-01

    This tutorial review centers on recent advances and applications of experimental techniques that help characterize surface species and catalyst structures under in situ conditions. We start by reviewing recent applications of IR spectroscopy of working catalysis, emphasizing newer approaches such as Sum Frequency Generation and Polarization Modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. This is followed by a section on solid-state NMR spectroscopy for the detection of surface species and reaction intermediates. These two techniques provide information mainly about the concentration and identity of the prevalent surface species. The following sections center on methods that provide structural and chemical information about the catalyst surface. The increasingly important role of high-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in catalyst characterization is evident from the new and interesting information obtained on supported catalysts as presented in recent reports. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) is used increasingly under reaction conditions to great advantage, although is inherently limited to systems where the bulk of the species in the sample are surface species. However, the ability of X-rays to penetrate the sample has been used cleverly by a number of groups to understand how changing reaction conditions change the structure and composition of surface atoms on supported catalyst.

  8. Workshop on hadron structure from photo-reactions at intermediate energies: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, A.M.; Sandorfi, A.M.

    1992-10-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The proton compton effect: Recent measurements of the electric and magnetic polorizabilities of the proton; experiments on the electric polarizability of the neutron; chiral symmetry and nucleon polarizabilities; chiral model predictions for electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon, a consumer report; the polarizabilities of bound nucleons; nucleon polarizability in free space and in nuclear matter; mechanisms of photon scattering on nucleons at intermediate energies; pion polarizabilities in chiral perturbation theory; pion polarizabilities and the shielding of {sigma}(700)-meson exchange in {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{pi} processes; pion and kaon polarizabilities in the quark confinement model; radiative pion photoproduction and pion polarizabilities; pion and sigma polarizabilities and radiative transitions; the quadrupole amplitude in the {gamma}{Nu}-{Delta} transition; pion photoproduction and the {gamma}{Nu}-{Delta} amplitudes; effective- lagrangians, Watson`s theorem, and the E2/M1 mixing ratio in the excitation of the delta resonance; new measurements of the p({rvec {gamma}}, {pi}{sup o}) reaction; multipole analyses and photo-decay couplings at intermediate energies; compton scattering off the proton; connections between compton scattering and pion photoproduction in the delta region; single-pion electroproduction and the transverse one-half and scalar helicity transition form factors; relativistic effects, QCD mixing angles, and {Nu} {yields} {Nu}{gamma} and {Delta} {yields} {gamma}{Nu} transition form factors; electroproduction studies of the {Nu} {yields} {Delta} transition at bates and CEBAF.

  9. Carbonate radical ion is the only observable intermediate in the reaction of peroxynitrite with CO(2).

    PubMed

    Goldstein, S; Czapski, G; Lind, J; Merényi, G

    2001-09-01

    The reaction of ONOO(-) with CO(2) at alkaline pH was recently reported to form a transient absorption with a maximum at 640 nm and a half-life of ca. 4 ms at 10 degrees C [Meli et al. (1999) Helv. Chim. Acta 82, 722-725]. This transient absorption was hardly affected by the presence of *NO, and therefore was attributed to the adduct ONOOC(O)O(-). This conclusion contradicts all current experimental results as it suggests that the decomposition of this adduct via homolysis of the O-O bond into CO(3)(*)(-) and *NO(2) is a minor pathway. In the present work the observations of Meli et al. will be shown to be artifacts resulting from light coming from the UV region. When these experiments are carried out in the presence of appropriate cutoff filters, the only observable intermediate formed in the reaction of ONOO(-) with CO(2) at alkaline pH is the carbonate radical ion with a maximum at 600 nm. This transient absorption is not observed in the presence of *NO or ferrocyanide. In the latter case ferricyanide is formed, and its yield was determined to be 66 +/- 2% of the initial concentration of peroxynitrite. The reaction of ONOO(-) with 16 mM CO(2) with and without ferrocyanide was also studied at pH 5.6-7.7 in the presence of 0.1 M phosphate, where both the initial pH and [CO(2)] remain constant. Under these conditions the rate constant of the decay of peroxynitrite was found to be identical to that of the formation of ferricyanide, indicating that ONOOC(O)(-) does not accumulate. These results confirm our earlier observations, i.e., the reaction of peroxynitrite with excess CO(2) takes place via the formation of about 33% CO(3)(*)(-) and *NO(2) radicals in the bulk of the solution.

  10. Reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates from ozonolysis of limonene with sulfur dioxide: ab initio and DFT study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Xu, Yi-sheng; Ding, Ai-zhong

    2010-12-02

    The mechanism of the reaction of the sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) with four stabilized Criegee intermediates (stabCI-CH(3)-OO, stabCI-OO, stabCIx-OO, and stabCH(2)OO) produced via the ozonolysis of limonene have been investigated using ab initio and DFT (density functional theory) methods. It has been shown that the intermediate adduct formed by the initiation of these reactions may be followed by two different reaction pathways such as H migration reaction to form carboxylic acids and rearrangement of oxygen to produce the sulfur trioxide (SO(3)) from the terminal oxygen of the COO group and SO(2). We found that the reaction of stabCI-OO and stabCH(2)OO with SO(2) can occur via both the aforementioned scenarios, whereas that of stabCI-CH(3)-OO and stabCIx-OO with SO(2) is limited to the second pathway only due to the absence of migrating H atoms. It has been shown that at the CCSD(T)/6-31G(d) + CF level of theory the activation energies of six reaction pathways are in the range of 14.18-22.59 kcal mol(-1), with the reaction between stabCIx-OO and SO(2) as the most favorable pathway of 14.18 kcal mol(-1) activation energy and that the reaction of stabCI-OO and stabCH(2)OO with SO(2) occurs mainly via the second reaction path. The thermochemical analysis of the reaction between SO(2) and stabilized Criegee intermediates indicates that the reaction of SO(2) and stabilized Criegee intermediates formed from the exocyclic primary ozonide decomposition is the main pathway of the SO(3) formation. This is likely to explain the large (~100%) difference in the production rate in the favor of the exocyclic compounds observed in recent experiments on the formation of H(2)SO(4) from exocyclic and endocyclic compounds.

  11. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    DOE PAGES

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used inmore » the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.« less

  12. Direct Determination of the Simplest Criegee Intermediate (CH2OO) Self Reaction Rate.

    PubMed

    Buras, Zachary J; Elsamra, Rehab M I; Green, William H

    2014-07-03

    The rate of self-reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, is of importance in many current laboratory experiments where CH2OO concentrations are high, such as flash photolysis and alkene ozonolysis. Using laser flash photolysis while simultaneously probing both CH2OO and I atom by direct absorption, we can accurately determine absolute CH2OO concentrations as well as the UV absorption cross section of CH2OO at our probe wavelength (λ = 375 nm), which is in agreement with a recently published value. Knowing absolute concentrations we can accurately measure kself = 6.0 ± 2.1 × 10(-11)cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 297 K. We are also able to put an upper bound on the rate coefficient for CH2OO + I of 1.0 × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). Both of these rate coefficients are at least a factor of 5 smaller than other recent measurements of the same reactions.

  13. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (∼ 50 MeV to ∼ 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are available now. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results. Our current results indicate this is, in fact, the case.

  14. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  15. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin

    2014-01-01

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding ‘greener’ sources of commodity chemicals and fuels.

  16. Direct kinetic measurements of Criegee intermediate (CH₂OO) formed by reaction of CH₂I with O₂.

    PubMed

    Welz, Oliver; Savee, John D; Osborn, David L; Vasu, Subith S; Percival, Carl J; Shallcross, Dudley E; Taatjes, Craig A

    2012-01-13

    Ozonolysis is a major tropospheric removal mechanism for unsaturated hydrocarbons and proceeds via "Criegee intermediates"--carbonyl oxides--that play a key role in tropospheric oxidation models. However, until recently no gas-phase Criegee intermediate had been observed, and indirect determinations of their reaction kinetics gave derived rate coefficients spanning orders of magnitude. Here, we report direct photoionization mass spectrometric detection of formaldehyde oxide (CH(2)OO) as a product of the reaction of CH(2)I with O(2). This reaction enabled direct laboratory determinations of CH(2)OO kinetics. Upper limits were extracted for reaction rate coefficients with NO and H(2)O. The CH(2)OO reactions with SO(2) and NO(2) proved unexpectedly rapid and imply a substantially greater role of carbonyl oxides in models of tropospheric sulfate and nitrate chemistry than previously assumed.

  17. Mass Spectrometric-Based Selected Reaction Monitoring of Protein Phosphorylation during Symbiotic Signaling in the Model Legume, Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the major cereal crops corn, rice, and wheat, leguminous plants such as soybean and alfalfa can meet their nitrogen requirement via endosymbiotic associations with soil bacteria. The establishment of this symbiosis is a complex process playing out over several weeks and is facilitated by the exchange of chemical signals between these partners from different kingdoms. Several plant components that are involved in this signaling pathway have been identified, but there is still a great deal of uncertainty regarding the early events in symbiotic signaling, i.e., within the first minutes and hours after the rhizobial signals (Nod factors) are perceived at the plant plasma membrane. The presence of several protein kinases in this pathway suggests a mechanism of signal transduction via posttranslational modification of proteins in which phosphate is added to the hydroxyl groups of serine, threonine and tyrosine amino acid side chains. To monitor the phosphorylation dynamics and complement our previous untargeted 'discovery' approach, we report here the results of experiments using a targeted mass spectrometric technique, Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) that enables the quantification of phosphorylation targets with great sensitivity and precision. Using this approach, we confirm a rapid change in the level of phosphorylation in 4 phosphosites of at least 4 plant phosphoproteins that have not been previously characterized. This detailed analysis reveals aspects of the symbiotic signaling mechanism in legumes that, in the long term, will inform efforts to engineer this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in important non-legume crops such as rice, wheat and corn. PMID:27203723

  18. The thermodynamic properties of 2-aminobiphenyl (an intermediate in the carbazole/hydrogen reaction network)

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Knipmeyer, S.E.; Nguyen, A.

    1990-12-01

    Catalytic hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) is a key step in upgrading processes for conversion of heavy petroleum, shale oil, tar sands, and the products of the liquefaction of coal to economically viable products. This research program provides accurate experimental thermochemical and thermophysical properties for key organic nitrogen-containing compounds present in the range of alternative feedstocks, and applies the experimental information to thermodynamic analyses of key HDN reaction networks. This report is the first in a series that will lead to an analysis of a three-ring HDN system; the carbazole/hydrogen reaction network. 2-Aminobiphenyl is the initial intermediate in the HDN pathway for carbazole, which consumes the least hydrogen possible. Measurements leading to the calculation of the ideal-gas thermodynamic properties for 2-aminobiphenyl are reported. Experimental methods included combustion calorimetry, adiabatic heat-capacity calorimetry, comparative ebulliometry, inclined-piston gauge manometry, and differential-scanning calorimetry (d.s.c). Entropies, enthalpies, and Gibbs energies of formation were derived for the ideal gas for selected temperatures between 298.15 K and 820 K. The critical temperature and critical density were determined for 2-aminobiphenyl with the d.s.c., and the critical pressure was derived. The Gibbs energies of formation are used in thermodynamic calculations to compare the feasibility of the initial hydrogenolysis step in the carbazole/H{sub 2} network with that of its hydrocarbon and oxygen-containing analogous; i.e., fluorene/H{sub 2} and dibenzofuran/H{sub 2}. Results of the thermodynamic calculations are compared with those of batch-reaction studies reported in the literature. 57 refs., 8 figs., 18 tabs.

  19. Reactions of spinach nitrite reductase with its substrate, nitrite, and a putative intermediate, hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Sofya; Knaff, David B; Hirasawa, Masakazu; Sétif, Pierre; Mattioli, Tony A

    2004-08-24

    Plant nitrite reductase (NiR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrite (NO(2)(-)) to ammonia, using reduced ferredoxin as the electron donor. NiR contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster and an Fe-siroheme, which is the nitrite binding site. In the enzyme's as-isolated form ([4Fe-4S](2+)/Fe(3+)), resonance Raman spectroscopy indicated that the siroheme is in the high-spin ferric hexacoordinated state with a weak sixth axial ligand. Kinetic and spectroscopic experiments showed that the reaction of NiR with NO(2)(-) results in an unexpectedly EPR-silent complex formed in a single step with a rate constant of 0.45 +/- 0.01 s(-)(1). This binding rate is slow compared to that expected from the NiR turnover rates reported in the literature, suggesting that binding of NO(2)(-) to the as-isolated form of NiR is not the predominant type of substrate binding during enzyme turnover. Resonance Raman spectroscopic characterization of this complex indicated that (i) the siroheme iron is low-spin hexacoordinated ferric, (ii) the ligand coordination is unusually heterogeneous, and (iii) the ligand is not nitric oxide, most likely NO(2)(-). The reaction of oxidized NiR with hydroxylamine (NH(2)OH), a putative intermediate, results in a ferrous siroheme-NO complex that is spectroscopically identical to the one observed during NiR turnover. Resonance Raman and absorption spectroscopy data show that the reaction of oxidized NiR ([4Fe-4S](2+)/Fe(3+)) with hydroxylamine is binding-limited, while the NH(2)OH conversion to nitric oxide is much faster.

  20. O-glycosylation of glycine-serine linkers in recombinant Fc-fusion proteins: attachment of glycosaminoglycans and other intermediates with phosphorylation at the xylose sugar subunit.

    PubMed

    Spahr, Chris; Shi, Stone D-H; Lu, Hsieng S

    2014-01-01

    A xylose-based glycosaminoglycan (GAG) core was recently identified at a Ser residue in the linker sequence of a recombinant Fc fusion protein. The linker sequence, G-S-G-G-G-G, and an upstream acidic residue were serving as a substrate for O-xylosyltransferase, resulting in a major glycan composed of Xyl-Gal-Gal-GlcA and other minor intermediates. In this paper, a portion of an unrelated protein was fused to the C-terminus of an IgG Fc domain using the common (G4S) 4 linker repeat. This linker resulted in a heterogenous population of xylose-based glycans all containing at least a core Xyl. Commonly observed glycan structures include GAG-related di-, tri-, tetra-, and penta-saccharides (e.g., Xyl-Gal, Xyl-Gal-Gal, Xyl-Gal-Gal-GlcA, and Xyl-Gal-Gal-GlcA-HexNAc), as well as Xyl-Gal-Neu5Ac. Following alkaline phosphatase or sialidase treatment combined with CID fragmentation, low-level glycans with a mass addition of 79.9 Da were confirmed to be a result of phosphorylated xylose. A minute quantity of phosphorylated GAG pentasaccharides may also be sulfated (also 79.9 Da), possibly at the HexNAc moiety due to non-reactivity to alkaline phosphatase. The xylose moiety may be randomly incorporated in one of the three G-S-G sequence motifs; and the linker peptide shows evidence for multiple additions of xylose at very low levels.

  1. Oligomer Formation Reactions of Criegee Intermediates in the Ozonolysis of Small Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Y.; Inomata, S.; Hirokawa, J.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) constitutes a substantial fraction of atmospheric fine particulate matters and has an effect on visibility, climate and human health. One of the major oxidizing processes leading to SOA formation is an ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons (UHCs).[1] Despite of its importance, the contribution of the ozonolysis of UHCs to the SOA formation in the troposphere is not sufficiently understood due to a lack of information on reaction pathways to produce low volatile compounds. While many studies have previously been focused on SOA formation from the ozonolysis of large UHCs, SOA formation from the ozonolysis of UHCs with less than six carbon atoms have been rarely investigated because their products are expected to be too volatile to contribute to the SOA formation. Very recently, a few studies have reported the SOA formation from the ozonolysis of such small UHCs but chemical mechanisms are still unclear. [2-4] In order to understand SOA formation from the ozonolysis of the small UHCs, this study investigated gas- and particle-phase products in laboratory experiments with a Teflon bag using a negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS) with chloride ion transfer for chemical ionization. This technique is suitable for analysis of compounds such as carboxylic acids and hydroperoxides expected to be produced in the ozonolysis of UHCs with less fragmentation, high selectivity, and high sensitivity. In the particle-phase analysis, SOAs collected on a PTFE filter were heated, and thermally desorbed compounds were analyzed. In the gas-phase analysis, series of peaks with an interval of a mass-to-charge ratio equal to the molecular weight of a Criegee intermediate formed in their ozonolysis were observed. These peaks were attributed to oligomeric hydroperoxides composed of Criegee intermediates as a chain unit. These oligomeric hydroperoxides were also observed in the particle-phase analysis, indicating that the oligomeric

  2. Weak interaction processes in supernovae: New probes using charge exchange reaction at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frekers, Dieter

    2005-04-01

    Spin-isospin-flip excitations in nuclei at vanishing momentum transfer are generally referred to as Gamov-Teller (GT) transitions. They are being studied because the simplicity of the excitation makes them an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. GT transitions in the β- direction (also referred to as isospin lowering T< transitions) have extensively been studied through (p,n) and (3He,t) charge-exchange reactions [B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 36 (1987) 2195, B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 43 (1991) 50, J. Rapaport et al., Phys. Rev. C 24 (1981) 335, H. Akimune et al., Nucl. Phys. A 569 (1994) 245c, Y. Fujita et al., Phys. Lett. B 365 (1996) 29]. The generally good resolution allows easy extraction of the GT distribution and the total B(GT-) strength in the final nucleus. On the other hand, determination of B(GT+) strength through a charge-exchange reaction in the T> direction were mostly done with secondary neutron beams, and as such, they come with significant experimental difficulties. TRIUMF has pioneered this field in the late 80's and early 90's with a rich and highly successful (n,p) program using a several hundred MeV neutron beam from a 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction [R. Helmer, Can. J. Phys. 65 (1987) 588]. In this paper we present the (d,2He) reaction at intermediate energies as another and potentially even more powerful tool for charge-exchange reactions in the T>, resp. β+ direction. The key issue here will be the high resolution of order 100 keV, which provides new and sometimes unexpected insight into nuclear structure phenomena. This program has been launched at the AGOR Superconducting Cyclotron Facility at the KVI Groningen. By now, it covers a wide field of physics questions ranging from few-body physics, the structure of halo-nuclei, to questions pertaining

  3. Theoretical Study of the Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction from ATP to Dha Catalyzed by DhaK from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bordes, I; Castillo, R; Moliner, V

    2017-09-28

    Protein kinases, representing one of the largest protein families involved in almost all aspects of cell life, have become one of the most important targets for the development of new drugs to be used in, for instance, cancer treatments. In this article an exhaustive theoretical study of the phosphoryl transfer reaction from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to dihydroxyacetone (Dha) catalyzed by DhaK from Escherichia coli (E. coli) is reported. Two different mechanisms, previously proposed for the phosphoryl transfer from ATP to the hydroxyl side chain of specific serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues, have been explored based on the generation of free energy surfaces (FES) computed with hybrid QM/MM potentials. The results suggest that the substrate-assisted phosphoryl and proton-transfer mechanism is kinetically more favorable than the mechanism where an aspartate would be activating the Dha. Although the details of the mechanisms appear to be dramatically dependent on the level of theory employed in the calculations (PM3/MM, B3LYP:PM3/MM, or B3LYP/MM), the transition states (TSs) for the phosphoryl transfer step appear to be described as a concerted step with different degrees of synchronicity in the breaking and forming bonds process in both explored mechanisms. Residues of the active site belonging to different subunits of the protein, such as Gly78B, Thr79A, Ser80A, Arg178B, and one Mg(2+) cation, would be stabilizing the transferred phosphate in the TS. Asp109A would have a structural role by posing the Dha and other residues of the active site in the proper orientation. The information derived from our calculations not only reveals the role of the enzyme and the particular residues of its active site, but it can assist in the rational design of new more specific inhibitors.

  4. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance Studies of the Reactions of Cryogenerated Hydroperoxoferric–Hemoprotein Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The fleeting ferric peroxo and hydroperoxo intermediates of dioxygen activation by hemoproteins can be readily trapped and characterized during cryoradiolytic reduction of ferrous hemoprotein–O2 complexes at 77 K. Previous cryoannealing studies suggested that the relaxation of cryogenerated hydroperoxoferric intermediates of myoglobin (Mb), hemoglobin, and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), either trapped directly at 77 K or generated by cryoannealing of a trapped peroxo-ferric state, proceeds through dissociation of bound H2O2 and formation of the ferric heme without formation of the ferryl porphyrin π-cation radical intermediate, compound I (Cpd I). Herein we have reinvestigated the mechanism of decays of the cryogenerated hydroperoxyferric intermediates of α- and β-chains of human hemoglobin, HRP, and chloroperoxidase (CPO). The latter two proteins are well-known to form spectroscopically detectable quasistable Cpds I. Peroxoferric intermediates are trapped during 77 K cryoreduction of oxy Mb, α-chains, and β-chains of human hemoglobin and CPO. They convert into hydroperoxoferric intermediates during annealing at temperatures above 160 K. The hydroperoxoferric intermediate of HRP is trapped directly at 77 K. All studied hydroperoxoferric intermediates decay with measurable rates at temperatures above 170 K with appreciable solvent kinetic isotope effects. The hydroperoxoferric intermediate of β-chains converts to the S = 3/2 Cpd I, which in turn decays to an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-silent product at temperature above 220 K. For all the other hemoproteins studied, cryoannealing of the hydroperoxo intermediate directly yields an EPR-silent majority product. In each case, a second follow-up 77 K γ-irradiation of the annealed samples yields low-spin EPR signals characteristic of cryoreduced ferrylheme (compound II, Cpd II). This indicates that in general the hydroperoxoferric intermediates relax to Cpd I during cryoanealing at low temperatures, but

  5. Aryl-phenyl scrambling in intermediate organopalladium complexes: a gas-phase study of the Mizoroki-Heck reaction.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Lukas; Schlörer, Nils; Schmalz, Hans-Günther; Schäfer, Mathias

    2014-04-22

    The intramolecular aryl-phenyl scrambling reaction within palladium-DPPP-aryl complex (DPPP=1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) ions was analyzed by state-of-the-art tandem MS, including gas-phase ion/molecule reactions. The Mizoroki-Heck cross-coupling reaction was performed in the gas phase, and the intrinsic reactivity of important intermediates could be examined. Moreover, linear free-energy correlations were applied, and a mechanism for the scrambling reaction proceeding via phosphonium cations was assumed.

  6. Solving the 170-Year-Old Mystery About Red-Violet and Blue Transient Intermediates in the Gmelin Reaction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yin; Toubaei, Abouzar; Kong, Xianqi; Wu, Gang

    2015-11-23

    The Gmelin reaction between nitroprusside and sulfides in aqueous solution is known to produce two transient intermediates with distinct colors: an initial red-violet intermediate that subsequently converts into a blue intermediate. In this work, we use a combination of multinuclear ((17) O, (15) N, (13) C) NMR, UV/Vis, IR spectroscopic techniques and quantum chemical computation to show unequivocally that the red-violet intermediate is [Fe(CN)5 N(O)S](4-) and the blue intermediate is [Fe(CN)5 N(O)SS)](4-) . While the formation of [Fe(CN)5 N(O)S](4-) has long been postulated in the literature, this study provides the most direct proof of its structure. In contrast, [Fe(CN)5 N(O)SS)](4-) represents the first example of any metal coordination complex containing a perthionitro ligand. The new reaction pathways found in this study not only provide clues for the mode of action of nitroprusside for its pharmacological activity, but also have broader implications to the biological role of H2 S, potential reactions between H2 S and nitric oxide donor compounds, and the possible biological function of polysulfides.

  7. Direct evidence for a substantive reaction between the Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, and the water vapour dimer.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Tom R; Blitz, Mark A; Heard, Dwayne E; Seakins, Paul W

    2015-02-21

    The C1 Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, reaction with water vapour has been studied. The removal rate constant shows a quadratic dependence on [H2O], implying reaction with the water dimer, (H2O)2. The rate constant, kCH2OO+(H2O)2 = (4.0 ± 1.2) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), is such that this is the major atmospheric sink for CH2OO.

  8. Furfuryl alcohol polymerization in H-Y confined spaces: reaction mechanism and structure of carbocationic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Bertarione, S; Bonino, F; Cesano, F; Damin, A; Scarano, D; Zecchina, A

    2008-03-06

    The acid-catalyzed polymerization and resinification, in the 300-673 K interval, of furfuryl alcohol adsorbed in the framework of a protonic Y zeolite is studied by means of FTIR, Raman, and UV-vis spectroscopies. The idea is that restricted spaces can impose a constraint to the growth of the oligomeric chains, therefore moderating the formation of conjugated sequences responsible for the color of the products and allowing their observation by means of spectroscopic techniques. The detailed study of the evolution of UV-vis, FTIR, and Raman spectra upon dosed amount, contact time, and temperature has allowed the spectroscopic features of some of the single species, either neutral and positively charged (carbocationic intermediates), to be singled out and assigned to understand the mechanism of initiation. The vibrational assignments have been confirmed by computer simulations on model compounds and compared with the results of the mechanistic description of the reaction mechanism made in the past (Choura, et al. Macromolecules 1996, 29, 3839-3850). The spectroscopic methods have been applied in a large temperature range in order to follow also the formation of more complex products into the pores, associated with longer conjugated sequences, gradually filling the open spaces of the zeolite. For samples contacted with furfuryl alcohol at 673 K, this methodology gives information also on the incipient carbonization process, leading to the formation of a carbonaceous replica phase inside the internal porosity of the zeolite.

  9. An ab initio investigation of possible intermediates in the reaction of the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackels, C. F.; Phillips, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemical techniques have been used to investigate covalently-bonded and hydrogen-bonded species that may be important intermediates in the reaction of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals. Stable structures of both types were identified. Basic sets of polarized double-zeta quality and large scale configuration interaction wave functions have been utilized. Based upon electronic energies, the covalently-bonded HOOOH species is found to be 26.4 kcal/mol more stable than the OH and HO2 radicals. Similarly, the hydrogen-bonded HO-HO2 species is found to have an electronic energy 4.7 kcal/mol below that of the component radicals, after correction is made for the basis set superposition error. The hydrogen-bonded form is found to be planar, to possess one relatively 'normal' hydrogen bond, and to have lowest energy 3A-prime and 1A-prime states that are essentially degenerate. The 1A-double prime and 3A-double prime excited states produced by rotation of the unpaired OH electron into the molecular plane are found to be very slightly bound.

  10. An ab initio investigation of possible intermediates in the reaction of the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackels, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemical techniques are used to investigate covalently-bonded and hydrogen-bonded species that may be important intermediates in the reaction of hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals. Stable structures of both types are identified. Basis sets of polarized double zeta quality and large scale configuration interaction wave functions are utilized. Based on electronic energies, the covalently bonded HOOOH species is 26.4 kcal/mol more stable than the OH and HO2 radicals. Similarly, the hydrogen bonded HO---HO2 species has an electronic energy 4.7 kcal/mol below that of the component radicals, after correction is made for the basis set superposition error. The hydrogen bonded form is planar, possesses one relatively normal hydrogen bond, and has the lowest energy 3A' and 1A' states that are essentially degenerate. The 1A" and 3A" excited states produced by rotation of the unpaired OH electron into the molecular plane are very slightly bound.

  11. Reactions of Criegee Intermediates with Non-Water Greenhouse Gases: Implications for Metal Free Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S

    2017-09-07

    High-level theoretical calculations suggest that a Criegee intermediate preferably interacts with carbon dioxide compared to two other greenhouse gases, nitrous oxide and methane. The results also suggest that the interaction between Criegee intermediates and carbon dioxide involves a cycloaddition reaction, which results in the formation of a cyclic carbonate-type adduct with a barrier of 6.0-14.0 kcal/mol. These results are in contrast to a previous assumption that the reaction occurs barrierlessly. The subsequent decomposition of the cyclic adduct into formic acid and carbon dioxide follows both concerted and stepwise mechanisms. The latter mechanism has been overlooked previously. Under formic acid catalysis, the concerted decomposition of the cyclic carbonate may be favored under tropospheric conditions. Considering that there is a strong nexus between carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere and global warming, the high reactivity of Criegee intermediates could be utilized for designing efficient carbon capture technologies.

  12. Chronic restraint stress induces sperm acrosome reaction and changes in testicular tyrosine phosphorylated proteins in rats

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Supatcharee; Burawat, Jaturon; Sukhorum, Wannisa; Sampannang, Apichakan; Maneenin, Chanwit; Iamsaard, Sitthichai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress is a cause of male infertility. Although sex hormones and sperm quality have been shown to be low in stress, sperm physiology and testicular functional proteins, such as phosphotyrosine proteins, have not been documented. Objective: To investigate the acrosome status and alterations of testicular proteins involved in spermatogenesis and testosterone synthesis in chronic stress in rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, male rats were divided into 2 groups (control and chronic stress (CS), n=7). CS rats were immobilized (4 hr/day) for 42 consecutive days. The blood glucose level (BGL), corticosterone, testosterone, acrosome status, and histopathology were examined. The expressions of testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR), cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (CYP11A1), and phosphorylated proteins were analyzed. Results: Results showed that BGL (71.25±2.22 vs. 95.60±3.36 mg/dl), corticosterone level (24.33±4.23 vs. 36.9±2.01 ng/ml), acrosome reacted sperm (3.25±1.55 vs. 17.71±5.03%), and sperm head abnormality (3.29±0.71 vs. 6.21±1.18%) were significantly higher in CS group in comparison with control. In contrast, seminal vesicle (0.41±0.05 vs. 0.24±0.07 g/100g), testosterone level (3.37±0.79 vs. 0.61±0.29 ng/ml), and sperm concentration (115.33±7.70 vs. 79.13±3.65×106 cells/ml) of CS were significantly lower (p<0.05) than controls. Some atrophic seminiferous tubules and low sperm mass were apparent in CS rats. The expression of CYP11A1 except StAR protein was markedly decreased in CS rats. In contrast, a 55 kDa phosphorylated protein was higher in CS testes. Conclusion: CS decreased the expression of CYP11A, resulting in decreased testosterone, and increased acrosome-reacted sperm, assumed to be the result of an increase of 55 kDa phosphorylated protein. PMID:27525328

  13. Photofragment imaging study of the CH2CCH2OH radical intermediate of the OH +allene reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Arjun S.; Justine Bell, M.; Lau, Kai-Chung; Butler, Laurie J.

    2007-10-01

    These velocity map imaging experiments characterize the photolytic generation of one of the two radical intermediates formed when OH reacts via an addition mechanism with allene. The CH2CCH2OH radical intermediate is generated photolytically from the photodissociation of 2-chloro-2-propen-1-ol at 193nm. Detecting the Cl atoms using [2+1] resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization evidences an isotropic angular distribution for the Cl +CH2CCH2OH photofragments, a spin-orbit branching ratio for Cl(P1/22):Cl(P3/22) of 0.28, and a bimodal recoil kinetic energy distribution. Conservation of momentum and energy allows us to determine from this data the internal energy distribution of the nascent CH2CCH2OH radical cofragment. To assess the possible subsequent decomposition pathways of this highly vibrationally excited radical intermediate, we include electronic structure calculations at the G3//B3LYP level of theory. They predict the isomerization and dissociation transition states en route from the initial CH2CCH2OH radical intermediate to the three most important product channels for the OH +allene reaction expected from this radical intermediate: formaldehyde+C2H3, H +acrolein, and ethene+CHO. We also calculate the intermediates and transition states en route from the other radical adduct, formed by addition of the OH to the center carbon of allene, to the ketene+CH3 product channel. We compare our results to a previous theoretical study of the O +allyl reaction conducted at the CBS-QB3 level of theory, as the two reactions include several common intermediates.

  14. Reaction mechanism of mRNA guanylyltransferase from rat liver: isolation and characterization of a guanylyl-enzyme intermediate.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, K; Kaziro, Y; Lipmann, F

    1982-03-01

    Rat liver RNA guanylyltransferase catalyzes a GTP-PPi exchange reaction in the absence of acceptor RNA [Mizumoto, K. & Lipmann, F. (1979) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 76, 4961-4965] suggesting that the reaction proceeds through the formation of a covalent guanylylated intermediate. We now present more direct evidence for the existence of the enzyme-GMP intermediate: (i) the enzyme-[32P]GMP intermediate was formed on incubation of rat liver guanylyltransferase with [alpha-32P]GTP and migrated as a single radioactive band with Mr 69,000 on NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and (ii) the intermediate isolated on gel filtration can transfer its GMP moiety to ppGpCpC-poly(A2,U2,G) to form the capped RNA molecule or it can react with PPi to regenerate GTP. The formation of the intermediate was dependent on Mg2+ and was strongly inhibited by PPi. The addition of pyrophosphatase markedly increased the amount of the intermediate complex. On blue dextran-Sepharose affinity column chromatography, the activity of guanylyltransferase to form an enzyme-[32P]GMP intermediate comigrated with activities of cap formation and GTP-PPi exchange. A phosphoamide type linkage between GMP and enzyme is suggested by its acidlabile and alkali-stable nature and also by the susceptibility to acidic hydroxylamine. These results indicate that the reaction catalyzed by rat liver guanylyltransferase occurs through the following two partial steps: (i) E + GTP in equilibrium E-pG + PPi; and (ii) E-pG + ppN .....leads to GpppN .....+ E.

  15. Quantum-chemical ab initio investigation of the two-step charge transfer process of hydrogen reaction: approach of reaction pathways via hydrogen intermediate on Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, An. M.; Lorenz, W.

    1994-08-01

    Local reaction events in the course of the electrochemical two-step hydrogen evolution reaction have been investigated by means of quantum-chemical all-electron ab initio calculations on interfacial supermolecular cluster models including a hydrated hydrogen intermediate on Cu(100). Expanding on preceding study to larger hydration clusters, an approach to relevant reaction path characteristics has been pursued for two processes: (i) the transfer of hydrated hydronium ion into a chemisorbed hydrogen intermediate: (ii) the reaction of hydronium ion with the intermediate to molecular hydrogen. Computations were carried out on RHF level, using contracted (12,8,4)/[8,6,2,] and/or 6-31G * or G ** pol-O bases for the metal and adsorbate part, respectively. Destruction of the hydronium configuration in process (i) has been confirmed. Electronic partial charge transfer dut to chemical bond conversions in both steps (i) and (ii) has been displayed along relevant cuts of adiabatic potential surfaces, proving significantly different amounts of charge transfer in both steps, λ 1 > 1, λ 2≡(2-λ 1) < 1. In advance of consideration of macroscopic double layer effects, first insight has been gained into coupled nuclear motions and into the origin of reaction barriers

  16. The use of the magnetic field effect for studying a chemiluminescent chemical reaction in aqueous solution. Reaction rate constants and lifetimes of intermediate molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triebel, Michael M.; Totrov, Maxim M.; Zorinyants, George E.; Frankevich, Eugene L.

    1993-11-01

    The phase shift magnetic field effect technique is applied for investigation of the chemiluminescent (ChL) reaction of luminol oxidation by potassium ferricyanide in aqueous alkali solution. The external modulated magnetic field changed the rate constant of recombination of luminol radicals. Rate constants of intermediate stages of the reaction are obtained: 10 8 M -1 s -1 for diazaquinone reaction with hydrogen peroxide, 2 X 10 6 M -1 s -1 for diazaquinone hydrolysis and 2 X 10 5 s -1 for the decomposition of hydroperoxide, which is a precursor of the light emitter.

  17. Extremely rapid self-reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO and its implications in atmospheric chemistry.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Te; Lin, Hui-Yu; Putikam, Raghunath; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Lin, M C; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2014-06-01

    Criegee intermediates, which are carbonyl oxides produced when ozone reacts with unsaturated hydrocarbons, play an important role in the formation of OH and organic acids in the atmosphere, but they have eluded direct detection until recently. Reactions that involve Criegee intermediates are not understood fully because data based on their direct observation are limited. We used transient infrared absorption spectroscopy to probe directly the decay kinetics of formaldehyde oxide (CH2OO) and found that it reacts with itself extremely rapidly. This fast self-reaction is a result of its zwitterionic character. According to our quantum-chemical calculations, a cyclic dimeric intermediate that has the terminal O atom of one CH2OO bonded to the C atom of the other CH2OO is formed with large exothermicity before further decomposition to 2H2CO + O2((1)Δg). We suggest that the inclusion of this previously overlooked rapid reaction in models may affect the interpretation of previous laboratory experiments that involve Criegee intermediates.

  18. Extremely rapid self-reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO and its implications in atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Te; Lin, Hui-Yu; Putikam, Raghunath; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Lin, M. C.; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2014-06-01

    Criegee intermediates, which are carbonyl oxides produced when ozone reacts with unsaturated hydrocarbons, play an important role in the formation of OH and organic acids in the atmosphere, but they have eluded direct detection until recently. Reactions that involve Criegee intermediates are not understood fully because data based on their direct observation are limited. We used transient infrared absorption spectroscopy to probe directly the decay kinetics of formaldehyde oxide (CH2OO) and found that it reacts with itself extremely rapidly. This fast self-reaction is a result of its zwitterionic character. According to our quantum-chemical calculations, a cyclic dimeric intermediate that has the terminal O atom of one CH2OO bonded to the C atom of the other CH2OO is formed with large exothermicity before further decomposition to 2H2CO + O2(1Δg). We suggest that the inclusion of this previously overlooked rapid reaction in models may affect the interpretation of previous laboratory experiments that involve Criegee intermediates.

  19. The GC-MS Observation of Intermediates in a Stepwise Grignard Addition Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latimer, Devin

    2007-01-01

    Preparation of phenylmagnesium bromide described by Eckert, addition of three equivalents of Grignard reagent to diethyl carbonate to form triphenylmethanol and a series of GC-MS procedures that form intermediates. The analysis is consistent with a gas chromatogram and mass spectrum for each of the expected intermediates and final product of the…

  20. The GC-MS Observation of Intermediates in a Stepwise Grignard Addition Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latimer, Devin

    2007-01-01

    Preparation of phenylmagnesium bromide described by Eckert, addition of three equivalents of Grignard reagent to diethyl carbonate to form triphenylmethanol and a series of GC-MS procedures that form intermediates. The analysis is consistent with a gas chromatogram and mass spectrum for each of the expected intermediates and final product of the…

  1. Intermediate in the O−O Bond Cleavage Reaction of an Extradiol Dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaleva, Elena G.; Lipscomb, John D.

    2009-02-16

    The reactive oxy intermediate of the catalytic cycle of extradiol aromatic ring-cleaving dioxygenases is formed by binding the catecholic substrate and O{sub 2} in adjacent ligand positions of the active site metal [usually Fe(II)]. This intermediate and the following Fe(II)-alkylperoxo intermediate resulting from oxygen attack on the substrate have been previously characterized in a crystal of homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPCD). Here a subsequent intermediate in which the O-O bond is broken to yield a gem diol species is structurally characterized. This new intermediate is stabilized in the crystal by using the alternative substrate, 4-sulfonylcatechol, and the Glu323Leu variant of HPCD, which alters the crystal packing.

  2. Evaluation of various silicon-and boron-containing compounds for the detection of phosphorylation in peptides via gas-phase ion-molecule reactions.

    PubMed

    Piatkivskyi, Andrii; Pyatkivskyy, Yuriy; Ryzhov, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Gas-phase ion-molecule reactions [IMR] of various boron- and silicon-containing neutrals were investigated as a potential route for detecting phosphorylation within peptides in the negative ion mode. Trimethyl borate (TMB), triethyl borate (TEB) and N,O- Bis(trimethylsilyl)acetamide (TMSA), unlike diethylmethoxyborane (DEMB), diisopropoxymethylborane [DiPMB] and chlorotrimethylsi- Lane (TMSCIL], reacted differently if a phosphate moiety was present and thus are suitable to detect phosphorylation. During multistage collision-induced dissociation experiments of the reaction products of IMR with TMB and TEB, the [LSsF - 4H + B]- ion formed a modified y2 fragment allowing the phosphorylation site to be assigned, unlike reaction products of DEMB and DiPMB which lost both the phos- phoric acid and the boron-containing moiety.

  3. Computational characterization of reaction intermediates in the photocycle of the sensory domain of the AppA blue light photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Khrenova, Maria G; Domratcheva, Tatiana; Schlichting, Ilme; Grigorenko, Bella L; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    The AppA protein with the BLUF (blue light using flavin adenine dinucleotide) domain is a blue light photoreceptor that cycle between dark-adapted and light-induced functional states. We characterized possible reaction intermediates in the photocycle of AppA BLUF. Molecular dynamics (MD), quantum chemical and quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations were carried out to describe several stable structures of a molecular system modeling the protein. The coordinates of heavy atoms from the crystal structure (PDB code 2IYG) of the protein in the dark state served as starting point for 10 ns MD simulations. Representative MD frames were used in QM(B3LYP/cc-pVDZ)/MM(AMBER) calculations to locate minimum energy configurations of the model system. Vertical electronic excitation energies were estimated for the molecular clusters comprising the quantum subsystems of the QM/MM optimized structures using the SOS-CIS(D) quantum chemistry method. Computational results support the occurrence of photoreaction intermediates that are characterized by spectral absorption bands between those of the dark and light states. They agree with crystal structures of reaction intermediates (PDB code 2IYI) observed in the AppA BLUF domain. Transformations of the Gln63 side chain stimulated by photo-excitation and performed with the assistance of the chromophore and the Met106 side chain are responsible for these intermediates. © 2010 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2010 The American Society of Photobiology.

  4. Forming a Two-Ring Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon without a Benzene Intermediate: the Reaction of Propargyl with Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, David; Savee, John; Selby, Talitha; Welz, Oliver; Taatjes, Craig

    The reaction of acetylene (HCCH) with a resonance-stabilized free radical is a commonly invoked mechanism for the generation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which are likely precursors of soot particles in combustion. In this work, we examine the sequential addition of acetylene to the propargyl radical (H2CCCH) at temperatures of 800 and 1000 K. Using time-resolved multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with tunable ionizing radiation, we identified the isomeric forms of the C5H5 and C7H7 intermediates in this reaction sequence, and confirmed that the final C9H8 product is the two-ring aromatic compound indene. We identified two different resonance-stabilized C5H5 intermediates, with different temperature dependencies. Furthermore, the C7H7 intermediate is the tropyl radical (c-C7H7) , not the benzyl radical (C6H5CH2) , as is usually assumed in combustion environments. These experimental results are in general agreement with the latest electronic structure / master equation results of da Silva et al. This work shows a pathway for PAH formation that bypasses benzene / benzyl intermediates.

  5. (/sup 14/C)Acrylonitrile: preparation via a stable tosylate intermediate and quantitative reaction with amine residues in collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, L.; Mechanic, G.L.

    1986-03-01

    A simple, convenient synthetic procedure for (/sup 14/C)acrylonitrile is described. Na/sup 14/CN is used as the radioactive starting material. Small (milligram) amounts are converted to 3-(/sup 14/C)Hydroxypropionitrile by a substitution reaction with 2-chloroethanol. 3-(/sup 14/C)Hydroxypropionitrile is then tosylated, and the specific activity of this intermediate product is easily determined using its uv extinction coefficient and scintillation counting. (/sup 14/C)Acrylonitrile is obtained rapidly on distillation by heating the tosylate in the presence of a high boiling tertiary amine base catalyst. The tosylate intermediate can be stored, in contrast to radioactive acrylonitrile, which is unstable. The reaction of acrylonitrile with lysine, hydroxylysine, and histidine residues in human Achilles tendon collagen, as well as chromatographic separation and identification of the carboxyethyl derivatives of these amino acids, is also described.

  6. Active site conformational changes upon reaction intermediate biotinyl-5'-AMP binding in biotin protein ligase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingjun; Akhter, Yusuf; Wilmanns, Matthias; Ehebauer, Matthias T

    2014-07-01

    Protein biotinylation, a rare form of post-translational modification, is found in enzymes required for lipid biosynthesis. In mycobacteria, this process is essential for the formation of their complex and distinct cell wall and has become a focal point of drug discovery approaches. The enzyme responsible for this process, biotin protein ligase, substantially varies in different species in terms of overall structural organization, regulation of function and substrate specificity. To advance the understanding of the molecular mechanism of biotinylation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis we have biochemically and structurally characterized the corresponding enzyme. We report the high-resolution crystal structures of the apo-form and reaction intermediate biotinyl-5'-AMP-bound form of M. tuberculosis biotin protein ligase. Binding of the reaction intermediate leads to clear disorder-to-order transitions. We show that a conserved lysine, Lys138, in the active site is essential for biotinylation. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  7. NO3 radical production from the reaction between the Criegee intermediate CH2OO and NO2.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Bin; McLeod, Matthew W; Jones, Roderic L; Bloss, William J

    2013-10-28

    Formation of the NO3 radical was observed following photolysis of the CH2I2 + O2 system at 248 nm under ambient atmospheric boundary layer conditions (~760 Torr and 297 K) in the presence of NO2. The Criegee intermediate (CI) CH2OO is believed to be responsible for the NO3 production. The potential of such reactions to enhance the rate of NO3 production in the atmosphere is discussed.

  8. Roles of different initial Maillard intermediates and pathways in meat flavor formation for cysteine-xylose-glycine model reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Hou, Li; Xie, Jianchun; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Mengyao; Fan, Mengdie; Xiao, Qunfei; Liang, Jingjing; Chen, Feng

    2017-10-01

    To explore initial Maillard reaction pathways and mechanisms for maximal formation of meaty flavors in heated cysteine-xylose-glycine systems, model reactions with synthesized initial Maillard intermediates, Gly-Amadori, TTCA (2-threityl-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids) and Cys-Amadori, were investigated. Relative relativities were characterized by spectrophotometrically monitoring the development of colorless degradation intermediates and browning reaction products. Aroma compounds formed were determined by solid-phase microextraction combined with GC-MS and GC-olfactometry. Gly-Amadori showed the fastest reaction followed by Cys-Amadori then TTCA. Free glycine accelerated reaction of TTCA, whereas cysteine inhibited that of Gly-Amadori due to association forming relatively stable thiazolidines. Cys-Amadori/Gly had the highest reactivity in development of both meaty flavors and brown products. TTCA/Gly favored yielding meaty flavors, whereas Gly-Amadori/Cys favored generation of brown products. Conclusively, initial formation of TTCA and pathway involving TTCA with glycine were more applicable to efficiently produce processed-meat flavorings in a cysteine-xylose-glycine system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intermediate-energy inverse-kinematics one-proton pickup reactions on neutron-deficient fp-shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaniel, S.; Gade, A.; Tostevin, J. A.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Cook, J. M.; Glasmacher, T.; Grinyer, G. F.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Weisshaar, D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Thick-target-induced nucleon-adding transfer reactions onto energetic rare-isotope beams are an emerging spectroscopic tool. Their sensitivity to single-particle structure complements one-nucleon removal reaction capabilities in the quest to reveal the evolution of nuclear shell structure in very exotic nuclei. Purpose: Our purpose is to add intermediate-energy, carbon-target-induced one-proton pickup reactions to the arsenal of γ-ray-tagged direct reactions applicable in the regime of low beam intensities and to apply these for the first time to fp-shell nuclei. Methods: Inclusive and partial cross sections were measured for the 12C(48Cr,49Mn+γ)X and 12C(50Fe,51Co+γ)X proton pickup reactions at 56.7 and 61.2 MeV/nucleon, respectively, using coincident particle-γ spectroscopy at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The results are compared to reaction theory calculations using fp-shell-model nuclear structure input. For comparison with our previous work, the same reactions were measured on 9Be targets. Results: The measured partial cross sections confirm the specific population pattern predicted by theory, with pickup into high-ℓ orbitals being strongly favored, driven by linear and angular momentum matching. Conclusion: Carbon-target-induced pickup reactions are well suited, in the regime of modest beam intensity, to study the evolution of nuclear structure, with specific sensitivities that are well described by theory.

  10. Glutaredoxin-2 Is Required to Control Oxidative Phosphorylation in Cardiac Muscle by Mediating Deglutathionylation Reactions*

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Ryan J.; Xuan, Jian Ying; McBride, Skye; Maharsy, Wael; Thorn, Stephanie; Holterman, Chet E.; Kennedy, Christopher R. J.; Rippstein, Peter; deKemp, Robert; da Silva, Jean; Nemer, Mona; Lou, Marjorie; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Glutaredoxin-2 (Grx2) modulates the activity of several mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue by catalyzing deglutathionylation reactions. However, it remains uncertain whether Grx2 is required to control mitochondrial ATP output in heart. Here, we report that Grx2 plays a vital role modulating mitochondrial energetics and heart physiology by mediating the deglutathionylation of mitochondrial proteins. Deletion of Grx2 (Grx2−/−) decreased ATP production by complex I-linked substrates to half that in wild type (WT) mitochondria. Decreased respiration was associated with increased complex I glutathionylation diminishing its activity. Tissue glucose uptake was concomitantly increased. Mitochondrial ATP output and complex I activity could be recovered by restoring the redox environment to that favoring the deglutathionylated states of proteins. Grx2−/− hearts also developed left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, and mice became hypertensive. Mitochondrial energetics from Grx2 heterozygotes (Grx2+/−) were also dysfunctional, and hearts were hypertrophic. Intriguingly, Grx2+/− mice were far less hypertensive than Grx2−/− mice. Thus, Grx2 plays a vital role in modulating mitochondrial metabolism in cardiac muscle, and Grx2 deficiency leads to pathology. As mitochondrial ATP production was restored by the addition of reductants, these findings may be relevant to novel redox-related therapies in cardiac disease. PMID:24727547

  11. Reactions of acetone oxide stabilized Criegee intermediate with SO2, NO2, H2O and O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukui, Alexandre; Chen, Hui; Xiao, Shan; Mellouki, Wahid; Daële, Veronique

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles represent a critical component of the atmosphere, impacting global climate, regional air pollution, and human health. The formation of new atmospheric particles and their subsequent growth to larger sizes are the key processes for understanding of the aerosol effects. Sulphuric acid, H2SO4, has been identified to play the major role in formation of new atmospheric particles and in subsequent particle growth. Until recently the reaction of OH with SO2 has been considered as the only important source of H2SO4 in the atmosphere. However, recently it has been suggested that the oxidation of SO2 by Criegee biradicals can be a significant additional atmospheric source of H2SO4 comparable with the reaction of SO2 with OH. Here we present some results about the reactions of the acetone oxide stabilized Criegee intermediate, (CH3)2=OO, produced in the reaction of 2,3-dimethyl-butene (TME) with O3. The formation of the H2SO4 in the reaction of acetone oxide with SO2 was investigated in the specially constructed atmospheric pressure laminar flow reactor. The Criegee intermediate was generated by ozonolysis of TME. The H2SO4, generated by addition of SO2, was directly monitored with Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SAMU, LPC2E). Relative rates of reactions of acetone oxide with SO2, NO2, H2O and ozone were determined from the dependencies of the H2SO4 yield at different concentrations of the reactants. Atmospheric applications of the obtained results are discussed in relation to the importance of this additional H2SO4 formation pathway compared to the reaction of OH with SO2.

  12. Oxidation reactions performed by soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylase intermediates H(peroxo) and Q proceed by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Lippard, Stephen J

    2010-09-14

    Soluble methane monooxygenase is a bacterial enzyme that converts methane to methanol at a carboxylate-bridged diiron center with exquisite control. Because the oxidizing power required for this transformation is demanding, it is not surprising that the enzyme is also capable of hydroxylating and epoxidizing a broad range of hydrocarbon substrates in addition to methane. In this work we took advantage of this promiscuity of the enzyme to gain insight into the mechanisms of action of H(peroxo) and Q, two oxidants that are generated sequentially during the reaction of reduced protein with O(2). Using double-mixing stopped-flow spectroscopy, we investigated the reactions of the two intermediate species with a panel of substrates of varying C-H bond strength. Three classes of substrates were identified according to the rate-determining step in the reaction. We show for the first time that an inverse trend exists between the rate constant of reaction with H(peroxo) and the C-H bond strength of the hydrocarbon examined for those substrates in which C-H bond activation is rate-determining. Deuterium kinetic isotope effects revealed that reactions performed by Q, but probably not H(peroxo), involve extensive quantum mechanical tunneling. This difference sheds light on the observation that H(peroxo) is not a sufficiently potent oxidant to hydroxylate methane, whereas Q can perform this reaction in a facile manner. In addition, the reaction of H(peroxo) with acetonitrile appears to proceed by a distinct mechanism in which a cyanomethide anionic intermediate is generated, bolstering the argument that H(peroxo) is an electrophilic oxidant that operates via two-electron transfer chemistry.

  13. Modeling of catalytically active metal complex species and intermediates in reactions of organic halides electroreduction.

    PubMed

    Lytvynenko, Anton S; Kolotilov, Sergey V; Kiskin, Mikhail A; Eremenko, Igor L; Novotortsev, Vladimir M

    2015-02-28

    The results of quantum chemical modeling of organic and metal-containing intermediates that occur in electrocatalytic dehalogenation reactions of organic chlorides are presented. Modeling of processes that take place in successive steps of the electrochemical reduction of representative C1 and C2 chlorides - CHCl3 and Freon R113 (1,1,2-trifluoro-1,2,2-trichloroethane) - was carried out by density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). It was found that taking solvation into account using an implicit solvent model (conductor-like screening model, COSMO) or considering explicit solvent molecules gave similar results. In addition to modeling of simple non-catalytic dehalogenation, processes with a number of complexes and their reduced forms, some of which were catalytically active, were investigated by DFT. Complexes M(L1)2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, L1H = Schiff base from 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde and the hydrazide of 4-pyridinecarboxylic acid), Ni(L2) (H2L2 is the Schiff base from salicylaldehyde and 1,2-ethylenediamine, known as salen) and Co(L3)2Cl2, representing a fragment of a redox-active coordination polymer [Co(L3)Cl2]n (L3 is the dithioamide of 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid), were considered. Gradual changes in electronic structure in a series of compounds M(L1)2 were observed, and correlations between [M(L1)2](0) spin-up and spin-down LUMO energies and the relative energies of the corresponding high-spin and low-spin reduced forms, as well as the shape of the orbitals, were proposed. These results can be helpful for determination of the nature of redox-processes in similar systems by DFT. No specific covalent interactions between [M(L1)2](-) and the R113 molecule (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Zn) were found, which indicates that M(L1)2 electrocatalysts act rather like electron transfer mediators via outer-shell electron transfer. A relaxed surface scan of the adducts {M(L1)2·R113}(-) (M = Ni or Co) versus the distance between the

  14. Reactivity of TEMPO toward 16- and 17-electron organometallic reaction intermediates: a time-resolved IR study.

    PubMed

    Lomont, Justin P; Nguyen, Son C; Harris, Charles B

    2013-07-31

    The (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl radical (TEMPO) has been employed for an extensive range of chemical applications, ranging from organometallic catalysis to serving as a structural probe in biological systems. As a ligand in an organometallic complex, TEMPO can exhibit several distinct coordination modes. Here we use ultrafast time-resolved infrared spectroscopy to study the reactivity of TEMPO toward coordinatively unsaturated 16- and 17-electron organometallic reaction intermediates. TEMPO coordinates to the metal centers of the 16-electron species CpCo(CO) and Fe(CO)4, and to the 17-electron species CpFe(CO)2 and Mn(CO)5, via an associative mechanism with concomitant oxidation of the metal center. In these adducts, TEMPO thus behaves as an anionic ligand, characterized by a pyramidal geometry about the nitrogen center. Density functional theory calculations are used to facilitate interpretation of the spectra and to further explore the structures of the TEMPO adducts. To our knowledge, this study represents the first direct characterization of the mechanism of the reaction of TEMPO with coordinatively unsaturated organometallic complexes, providing valuable insight into its reactions with commonly encountered reaction intermediates. The similar reactivity of TEMPO toward each of the species studied suggests that these results can be considered representative of TEMPO's reactivity toward all low-valent transition metal complexes.

  15. Rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate in membrane fission under tension: Reaction coordinates, kinetic pathways, and free-energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guojie; Müller, Marcus

    2017-08-01

    Membrane fission is a fundamental process in cells, involved inter alia in endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, and virus infection. Its underlying molecular mechanism, however, is only incompletely understood. Recently, experiments and computer simulation studies have revealed that dynamin-mediated membrane fission is a two-step process that proceeds via a metastable hemi-fission intermediate (or wormlike micelle) formed by dynamin's constriction. Importantly, this hemi-fission intermediate is remarkably metastable, i.e., its subsequent rupture that completes the fission process does not occur spontaneously but requires additional, external effects, e.g., dynamin's (unknown) conformational changes or membrane tension. Using simulations of a coarse-grained, implicit-solvent model of lipid membranes, we investigate the molecular mechanism of rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate, such as its pathway, the concomitant transition states, and barriers, as well as the role of membrane tension. The membrane tension is controlled by the chemical potential of the lipids, and the free-energy landscape as a function of two reaction coordinates is obtained by grand canonical Wang-Landau sampling. Our results show that, in the course of rupturing, the hemi-fission intermediate undergoes a "thinning → local pinching → rupture/fission" pathway, with a bottle-neck-shaped cylindrical micelle as a transition state. Although an increase of membrane tension facilitates the fission process by reducing the corresponding free-energy barrier, for biologically relevant tensions, the free-energy barriers still significantly exceed the thermal energy scale kBT.

  16. Rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate in membrane fission under tension: Reaction coordinates, kinetic pathways, and free-energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojie; Müller, Marcus

    2017-08-14

    Membrane fission is a fundamental process in cells, involved inter alia in endocytosis, intracellular trafficking, and virus infection. Its underlying molecular mechanism, however, is only incompletely understood. Recently, experiments and computer simulation studies have revealed that dynamin-mediated membrane fission is a two-step process that proceeds via a metastable hemi-fission intermediate (or wormlike micelle) formed by dynamin's constriction. Importantly, this hemi-fission intermediate is remarkably metastable, i.e., its subsequent rupture that completes the fission process does not occur spontaneously but requires additional, external effects, e.g., dynamin's (unknown) conformational changes or membrane tension. Using simulations of a coarse-grained, implicit-solvent model of lipid membranes, we investigate the molecular mechanism of rupturing the hemi-fission intermediate, such as its pathway, the concomitant transition states, and barriers, as well as the role of membrane tension. The membrane tension is controlled by the chemical potential of the lipids, and the free-energy landscape as a function of two reaction coordinates is obtained by grand canonical Wang-Landau sampling. Our results show that, in the course of rupturing, the hemi-fission intermediate undergoes a "thinning → local pinching → rupture/fission" pathway, with a bottle-neck-shaped cylindrical micelle as a transition state. Although an increase of membrane tension facilitates the fission process by reducing the corresponding free-energy barrier, for biologically relevant tensions, the free-energy barriers still significantly exceed the thermal energy scale kBT.

  17. Direct Measurements of Unimolecular and Bimolecular Reaction Kinetics of the Criegee Intermediate (CH3)2COO.

    PubMed

    Chhantyal-Pun, Rabi; Welz, Oliver; Savee, John D; Eskola, Arkke J; Lee, Edmond P F; Blacker, Lucy; Hill, Henry R; Ashcroft, Matilda; Khan, M Anwar H; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C; Evans, Louise; Rotavera, Brandon; Huang, Haifeng; Osborn, David L; Mok, Daniel K W; Dyke, John M; Shallcross, Dudley E; Percival, Carl J; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Taatjes, Craig A

    2017-01-12

    The Criegee intermediate acetone oxide, (CH3)2COO, is formed by laser photolysis of 2,2-diiodopropane in the presence of O2 and characterized by synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry and by cavity ring-down ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The rate coefficient of the reaction of the Criegee intermediate with SO2 was measured using photoionization mass spectrometry and pseudo-first-order methods to be (7.3 ± 0.5) × 10(-11) cm(3) s(-1) at 298 K and 4 Torr and (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1) at 298 K and 10 Torr (He buffer). These values are similar to directly measured rate coefficients of anti-CH3CHOO with SO2, and in good agreement with recent UV absorption measurements. The measurement of this reaction at 293 K and slightly higher pressures (between 10 and 100 Torr) in N2 from cavity ring-down decay of the ultraviolet absorption of (CH3)2COO yielded even larger rate coefficients, in the range (1.84 ± 0.12) × 10(-10) to (2.29 ± 0.08) × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1). Photoionization mass spectrometry measurements with deuterated acetone oxide at 4 Torr show an inverse deuterium kinetic isotope effect, kH/kD = (0.53 ± 0.06), for reactions with SO2, which may be consistent with recent suggestions that the formation of an association complex affects the rate coefficient. The reaction of (CD3)2COO with NO2 has a rate coefficient at 298 K and 4 Torr of (2.1 ± 0.5) × 10(-12) cm(3) s(-1) (measured with photoionization mass spectrometry), again similar to rate for the reaction of anti-CH3CHOO with NO2. Cavity ring-down measurements of the acetone oxide removal without added reagents display a combination of first- and second-order decay kinetics, which can be deconvolved to derive values for both the self-reaction of (CH3)2COO and its unimolecular thermal decay. The inferred unimolecular decay rate coefficient at 293 K, (305 ± 70) s(-1), is similar to determinations from ozonolysis. The present measurements confirm the large rate coefficient for reaction of

  18. Detailed mechanism of the CH2I + O2 reaction: Yield and self-reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Wei-Lun; Chang, Chun-Hung; Lee, Yu-Fang; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Lin, Jim-Min, Jr.

    2014-09-01

    The application of a new reaction scheme using CH2I + O2 to generate the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, has stimulated lively research; the Criegee intermediates are extremely important in atmospheric chemistry. The detailed mechanism of CH2I + O2 is hence important in understanding kinetics involving CH2OO. We employed ultraviolet absorption to probe simultaneously CH2I2, CH2OO, CH2I, and IO in the reaction system of CH2I + O2 upon photolysis at 248 nm of a flowing mixture of CH2I2, O2, and N2 (or SF6) in the pressure range 7.6-779 Torr to investigate the reaction kinetics. With a detailed mechanism to model the observed temporal profiles of CH2I, CH2OO, and IO, we found that various channels of the reaction CH2I + O2 and CH2OO + I play important roles; an additional decomposition channel of CH2I + O2 to form products other than CH2OO or ICH2OO becomes important at pressure less than 60 Torr. The pressure dependence of the derived rate coefficients of various channels of reactions of CH2I + O2 and CH2OO + I has been determined. We derived a rate coefficient also for the self-reaction of CH2OO as k = (8 ± 4) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 295 K. The yield of CH2OO from CH2I + O2 was found to have a pressure dependence on N2 and O2 smaller than in previous reports; for air under 1 atm, the yield of ˜30% is about twice of previous estimates.

  19. Detailed mechanism of the CH₂I + O₂ reaction: yield and self-reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH₂OO.

    PubMed

    Ting, Wei-Lun; Chang, Chun-Hung; Lee, Yu-Fang; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2014-09-14

    The application of a new reaction scheme using CH2I + O2 to generate the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO, has stimulated lively research; the Criegee intermediates are extremely important in atmospheric chemistry. The detailed mechanism of CH2I + O2 is hence important in understanding kinetics involving CH2OO. We employed ultraviolet absorption to probe simultaneously CH2I2, CH2OO, CH2I, and IO in the reaction system of CH2I + O2 upon photolysis at 248 nm of a flowing mixture of CH2I2, O2, and N2 (or SF6) in the pressure range 7.6-779 Torr to investigate the reaction kinetics. With a detailed mechanism to model the observed temporal profiles of CH2I, CH2OO, and IO, we found that various channels of the reaction CH2I + O2 and CH2OO + I play important roles; an additional decomposition channel of CH2I + O2 to form products other than CH2OO or ICH2OO becomes important at pressure less than 60 Torr. The pressure dependence of the derived rate coefficients of various channels of reactions of CH2I + O2 and CH2OO + I has been determined. We derived a rate coefficient also for the self-reaction of CH2OO as k = (8 ± 4) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 295 K. The yield of CH2OO from CH2I + O2 was found to have a pressure dependence on N2 and O2 smaller than in previous reports; for air under 1 atm, the yield of ~30% is about twice of previous estimates.

  20. Reaction of a copper(II)-nitrosyl complex with hydrogen peroxide: phenol ring nitration through a putative peroxynitrite intermediate.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Apurba; Deka, Ramesh C; Mondal, Biplab

    2013-10-07

    Copper(II) complex, 1, with the histidine-derived ligand L (L = methyl 2-(2-hydroxybenzylamino)-3-(1H-imidazol-5-yl)propanoate) has been synthesized and characterized. Single-crystal structure determination reveals a diphenolato-bridged dicopper(II) core in 1. Addition of (•)NO to an acetonitrile solution of 1 affords the corresponding mononuclear copper(II)-nitrosyl complex, 2. In the presence of H2O2, 2 results in formation of the corresponding copper(I)-peroxynitrite. Formation of peroxynitrite ((-)OONO) intermediate is evident from its characteristic phenol ring nitration reaction which resembles the tyrosine nitration in biological systems. Further, isolation of nitrate (NO3(-)) as the decomposition product from 2 at room temperature also supports the involvement of (-)OONO intermediate.

  1. NMR Crystallography of a Carbanionic Intermediate in Tryptophan Synthase: Chemical Structure, Tautomerization, and Reaction Specificity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Carbanionic intermediates play a central role in the catalytic transformations of amino acids performed by pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. Here, we make use of NMR crystallography—the synergistic combination of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography, and computational chemistry—to interrogate a carbanionic/quinonoid intermediate analogue in the β-subunit active site of the PLP-requiring enzyme tryptophan synthase. The solid-state NMR chemical shifts of the PLP pyridine ring nitrogen and additional sites, coupled with first-principles computational models, allow a detailed model of protonation states for ionizable groups on the cofactor, substrates, and nearby catalytic residues to be established. Most significantly, we find that a deprotonated pyridine nitrogen on PLP precludes formation of a true quinonoid species and that there is an equilibrium between the phenolic and protonated Schiff base tautomeric forms of this intermediate. Natural bond orbital analysis indicates that the latter builds up negative charge at the substrate Cα and positive charge at C4′ of the cofactor, consistent with its role as the catalytic tautomer. These findings support the hypothesis that the specificity for β-elimination/replacement versus transamination is dictated in part by the protonation states of ionizable groups on PLP and the reacting substrates and underscore the essential role that NMR crystallography can play in characterizing both chemical structure and dynamics within functioning enzyme active sites. PMID:27779384

  2. The reaction of indole with the aminoacrylate intermediate of Salmonella typhimurium tryptophan synthase: observation of a primary kinetic isotope effect with 3-[(2)H]indole.

    PubMed

    Cash, Michael T; Miles, Edith W; Phillips, Robert S

    2004-12-15

    The bacterial tryptophan synthase alpha(2)beta(2) complex catalyzes the final reactions in the biosynthesis of L-tryptophan. Indole is produced at the active site of the alpha-subunit and is transferred through a 25-30 A tunnel to the beta-active site, where it reacts with an aminoacrylate intermediate. Lane and Kirschner proposed a two-step nucleophilic addition-tautomerization mechanism for the reaction of indole with the aminoacrylate intermediate, based on the absence of an observed kinetic isotope effect (KIE) when 3-[(2)H]indole reacts with the aminoacrylate intermediate. We have now observed a KIE of 1.4-2.0 in the reaction of 3-[(2)H]indole with the aminoacrylate intermediate in the presence of monovalent cations, but not when an alpha-subunit ligand, disodium alpha-glycerophosphate (Na(2)GP), is present. Rapid-scanning stopped flow kinetic studies were performed of the reaction of indole and 3-[(2)H]indole with tryptophan synthase preincubated with L-serine, following the decay of the aminoacrylate intermediate at 350 nm, the formation of the quinonoid intermediate at 476 nm, and the formation of the L-Trp external aldimine at 423 nm. The addition of Na(2)GP dramatically slows the rate of reaction of indole with the alpha-aminoacrylate intermediate. A primary KIE is not observed in the reaction of 3-[(2)H]indole with the aminoacrylate complex of tryptophan synthase in the presence of Na(2)GP, suggesting binding of indole with tryptophan synthase is rate limiting under these conditions. The reaction of 2-methylindole does not show a KIE, either in the presence of Na(+) or Na(2)GP. These results support the previously proposed mechanism for the beta-reaction of tryptophan synthase, but suggest that the rate limiting step in quinonoid intermediate formation from indole and the aminoacrylate intermediate is deprotonation.

  3. Identification of reaction intermediates/products from the photocatalytic degradation of trichloroethylene on illuminated titanium dioxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, C.H.; Marinas, B.J.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of this study was to identify reaction intermediates/products from the gas-phase photocatalytic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) on anatase titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) surfaces illuminated with near-ultraviolet light (360 nm wavelength). A Pyrex glass annular photocatalytic reactor fabricated with turbulence promoters was used for this purpose. The inner surface of the outside tube forming the annular reactor was coated with TiO{sub 2} prepared by vapor phase hydrolysis of titanium isopropoxide. Reaction intermediates/products were concentrated by passing the photocatalytic reactor off-gas through a stainless steel tube immersed in liquid nitrogen. Compounds deposited were allowed to revolatilize or were washed with deionized water and analyzed by gas chromatography with a mass spectrum selective detector (GC/MS), or by ion chromatography (IC), respectively. Preliminary results revealed the presence of many halogenated organic compounds, including phosgene, 1,2-dichloroethylene, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, dichloroacetyl chloride, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, pentchloroethane, and hexachloroethane, as well as hydrochloric acid. The abundance of most of these compounds except phosgene and hydrochloric acid was observed to diminish with increasing oxygen concentrations. Possible reaction mechanisms and pathways for the photocatalytic degradation of TCE will be presented.

  4. Measuring Rate Constants for Reactions of the Simplest Criegee Intermediate CH_2OO by Monitoring the OH Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yingdi; Bayes, Kyle D.; Sander, Stanley P.

    2014-06-01

    Criegee radicals are important atmospheric intermediates formed from ozonolysis of alkenes. It potentially contributes to the atmospheric oxidation cycle mainly by generating OH radicals through unimolecular decomposition. In this work, we focus on studying the unimolecular decomposition reaction of the smallest Criegee intermediate (CH2OO), which was generated by reacting CH2I with O2. While generating the CH2OO molecule by reacting CH2I with O2, significant amounts of the OH radical were observed by laser-induced fluorescence. The addition of molecules known to react with CH2OO increased the observed decay rates of the OH signal. Using the OH signals as a proxy for the CH2OO concentration, the rate constant for the reaction of hexafluoroacetone with CH2OO was determined. The rate constant for the reaction of SO2 with CH2OO showed no pressure dependence over the range of 50 to 200 Torr. This work provides the direct experimental evidence for the unimolecular decomposition of CH2OO, and possible mechanisms of CH2OO have been investigated by this multidimensional study.

  5. Photodegradation of Diquat and Paraquat in aqueous solutions by titanium dioxide: evolution of degradation reactions and characterisation of intermediates.

    PubMed

    Florêncio, M Helena; Pires, Elisabete; Castro, Ana L; Nunes, Manuel R; Borges, Carlos; Costa, Fernanda M

    2004-04-01

    The titanium dioxide assisted photodegradation of Diquat and Paraquat herbicides solutions has been the subject of the present investigation, considering its direct application in the treatment of contaminated waters and soils. To have a better understanding of the photodegradation process, different types of TiO2, commercial and 'home prepared' Ti(1-x)FexO2 (x = 0% and 4%), were used as catalysts, using an UV light as radiation source. The degradation reactions were followed by UV spectroscopy and the intermediates and reaction products were characterised by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESIMS) combined with collision-induced dissociation (CID) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The present study shows that, for photocatalytic degradation of Diquat and Paraquat solutions, a basic pH can be determinant, as well as the type of catalyst. The type of catalyst can also strongly influence the degradation pattern of the herbicide. Regarding complete degradation, we were able to show that Diquat is more persistent than Paraquat. During the photocatalytic processes, several intermediate and reaction products are sequentially formed, to which structures are proposed.

  6. Processes forming Gas, Tar, and Coke in Cellulose Gasification from Gas-Phase Reactions of Levoglucosan as Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fukutome, Asuka; Kawamoto, Haruo; Saka, Shiro

    2015-07-08

    The gas-phase pyrolysis of levoglucosan (LG), the major intermediate species during cellulose gasification, was studied experimentally over the temperature range of 400-900 °C. Gaseous LG did not produce any dehydration products, which include coke, furans, and aromatic substances, although these are characteristic products of the pyrolysis of molten LG. Alternatively, at >500 °C, gaseous LG produced only fragmentation products, such as noncondensable gases and condensable C1 -C3 fragments, as intermediates during noncondensable gas formation. Therefore, it was determined that secondary reactions of gaseous LG can result in the clean (tar- and coke-free) gasification of cellulose. Cooling of the remaining LG in the gas phase caused coke formation by the transition of the LG to the molten state. The molecular mechanisms that govern the gas- and molten-phase reactions of LG are discussed in terms of the acid catalyst effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding to promote the molten-phase dehydration reactions.

  7. Interplay Of Mean Field And Individual Nucleon Collisions Effects At Intermediate Energy Heavy Ion Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Subotic, K.; Jordanov, D.; Durasevic, M.; Dragosavac, D.; Grabez, B.

    2007-04-23

    In our study of the reaction 20Ne+27Al at energy of 84 A MeV, the track detectors were used to select the target like fragments arising from processes in which the interacting system becomes disintegrated into a large number of constituent nucleons and one massive fragment. Heavy ion reaction studies at bombarding energies of several tens of MeV/nucleon have provided the evidence that most of reaction cross section, in this energy range, is associated with the production of primary projectile like and target like fragment in the first step of the nuclear reaction. The subsequent evolution of the studied reaction systems, has been usually described either using low energy models based on mean field effects (MFE), or high energy models where reaction proceeds by independent collisions (INC) of individual nucleons in the overlap region between target and projectile. The analysis of our results in terms of different MFE and INC models, prescribing consistent timings, has shown that the reaction mechanism may be defined of interplay of the mean field and individual nucleon collisions effects.

  8. Electrochemically assisted photocatalysis. 2. The role of oxygen and reaction intermediates in the degradation of 4-chlorophenol on immobilized TiO[sub 2] particulate films

    SciTech Connect

    Vinodgopal, K. ); Stafford, U.; Gray, K.A.; Kamat, P.V. )

    1994-07-07

    The electrochemically-assisted photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) using immobilized TiO[sub 2] particulate films has been investigated by analyzing reaction intermediates under a variety of experimental conditions. The degradations were carried out in both nitrogen- and oxygen-saturated solutions to explore the role of reduced oxygen species and molecular oxygen in the formation of reaction intermediates and in the mineralization of 4-CP. The degradation rate can be greatly improved even in a nitrogen-saturated atmosphere by applying an anodic bias to the TiO[sub 2] film electrodes. 4-Chlorocatechol (4-CC) is the predominant intermediate observed in oxygen-saturated solutions, whereas hydroquinone (HQ) is the primary intermediate in nitrogen-saturated solutions. Molecular oxygen plays an important role in the enhancement of the electrochemically assisted photocatalytic decay rate of 4-CP and the subsequent degradation of reaction intermediates, viz., 4-CC and HQ. 37 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Does shoe heel design influence ground reaction forces and knee moments during maximum lunges in elite and intermediate badminton players?

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Ryu, Jiseon

    2017-01-01

    Background Lunge is one frequently executed movement in badminton and involves a unique sagittal footstrike angle of more than 40 degrees at initial ground contact compared with other manoeuvres. This study examined if the shoe heel curvature design of a badminton shoe would influence shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments during lunge. Methods Eleven elite and fifteen intermediate players performed five left-forward maximum lunge trials with Rounded Heel Shoe (RHS), Flattened Heel Shoe (FHS), and Standard Heel Shoes (SHS). Shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments were measured by using synchronized force platform and motion analysis system. A 2 (Group) x 3 (Shoe) ANOVA with repeated measures was performed to determine the effects of different shoes and different playing levels, as well as the interaction of two factors on all variables. Results Shoe effect indicated that players demonstrated lower maximum vertical loading rate in RHS than the other two shoes (P < 0.05). Group effect revealed that elite players exhibited larger footstrike angle, faster approaching speed, lower peak horizontal force and horizontal loading rates but higher vertical loading rates and larger peak knee flexion and extension moments (P < 0.05). Analysis of Interactions of Group x Shoe for maximum and mean vertical loading rates (P < 0.05) indicated that elite players exhibited lower left maximum and mean vertical loading rates in RHS compared to FHS (P < 0.01), while the intermediate group did not show any Shoe effect on vertical loading rates. Conclusions These findings indicate that shoe heel curvature would play some role in altering ground reaction force impact during badminton lunge. The differences in impact loads and knee moments between elite and intermediate players may be useful in optimizing footwear design and training strategy to minimize the potential risks for impact related injuries in badminton. PMID:28334016

  10. Does shoe heel design influence ground reaction forces and knee moments during maximum lunges in elite and intermediate badminton players?

    PubMed

    Lam, Wing-Kai; Ryue, Jaejin; Lee, Ki-Kwang; Park, Sang-Kyoon; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Ryu, Jiseon

    2017-01-01

    Lunge is one frequently executed movement in badminton and involves a unique sagittal footstrike angle of more than 40 degrees at initial ground contact compared with other manoeuvres. This study examined if the shoe heel curvature design of a badminton shoe would influence shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments during lunge. Eleven elite and fifteen intermediate players performed five left-forward maximum lunge trials with Rounded Heel Shoe (RHS), Flattened Heel Shoe (FHS), and Standard Heel Shoes (SHS). Shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments were measured by using synchronized force platform and motion analysis system. A 2 (Group) x 3 (Shoe) ANOVA with repeated measures was performed to determine the effects of different shoes and different playing levels, as well as the interaction of two factors on all variables. Shoe effect indicated that players demonstrated lower maximum vertical loading rate in RHS than the other two shoes (P < 0.05). Group effect revealed that elite players exhibited larger footstrike angle, faster approaching speed, lower peak horizontal force and horizontal loading rates but higher vertical loading rates and larger peak knee flexion and extension moments (P < 0.05). Analysis of Interactions of Group x Shoe for maximum and mean vertical loading rates (P < 0.05) indicated that elite players exhibited lower left maximum and mean vertical loading rates in RHS compared to FHS (P < 0.01), while the intermediate group did not show any Shoe effect on vertical loading rates. These findings indicate that shoe heel curvature would play some role in altering ground reaction force impact during badminton lunge. The differences in impact loads and knee moments between elite and intermediate players may be useful in optimizing footwear design and training strategy to minimize the potential risks for impact related injuries in badminton.

  11. Precursors in the preparation of transition metal nitrides and transition metal carbonitrides and their reaction intermediates

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Leon

    1991-01-01

    A process for making ammonolytic precursors to nitride and carbonitride ceramics. Extreme reaction conditions are not required and the precursor is a powder-like substance that produces ceramics of improved purity and morphology upon pyrolysis.

  12. Process for preparing transition metal nitrides and transition metal carbonitrides and their reaction intermediates

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Leon

    1988-05-24

    A process for making ammonolytic precursors to nitride and carbonitride ceramics. Extreme reaction conditions are not required and the precursor is a powder-like substance that produces ceramics of improved purity and morphology upon pyrolysis.

  13. Energy-loss cross sections for inclusive charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Dubey, Rajendra R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-exchange reactions for scattering to the continuum are considered in a high-energy multiple scattering model. Calculations for (p,n) and (He-3,H-3) reactions are made and compared with experimental results for C-12, O-16, and Al-27 targets. Coherent effects are shown to lead to an important role for inelastic multiple scattering terms when light projectiles are considered.

  14. A Rh(II)-catalyzed multicomponent reaction by trapping an α-amino enol intermediate in a traditional two-component reaction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shunying; Yao, Wenfeng; Liu, Yuan; Wei, Qinghua; Chen, Jianghui; Wu, Xiang; Xia, Fei; Hu, Wenhao

    2017-01-01

    Multicomponent reactions (MCRs) represent an ideal organic synthesis tool for the rapid construction of complex molecules due to their step and atom economy. Compared to two-component reactions, the development of new MCRs has been greatly limited during the 170 years since the first MCR was reported. Theoretically, the trapping of an active intermediate generated from two components by a third component could change the traditional two-component reaction pathway, leading to the discovery of MCRs. We report an example of the trapping of α-imino enols generated in situ from 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles via α-imino metal carbene species by vinylimine ions using C(2)-substituted indoles and paraformaldehyde as precursors in the presence of a rhodium(II) catalyst. The traditional enol-ketone transformation pathway was suspended by the trapping procedure and efficiently switched to an MCR pathway to produce α-amino-β-indole ketones in moderate to good yields. Unexpectedly, the resulting products and the theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculation results indicated that the enolic carbon had a stronger nucleophilicity than the well-known traditional enamic carbon in the trapping process. The reaction mechanism was investigated using control experiments and detailed DFT calculations, and the synthetic application of the products was also illustrated. The developed strategy provides a mild and rapid access to α-amino-β-indole ketones and suggests a rationale for the discovery of MCRs by trapping an active intermediate with a third component in a traditional two-component reaction pathway. PMID:28345053

  15. Inverse Kinematics Studies of Intermediate-Energy Reactions Relevant for SEE and Medical Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Aichelin, J.; Bargholtz, Ch.; Geren, L.; Tegner, P.-E.; Zartova, I.; Blomgren, J.; Olsson, N.; Budzanowski, A.; Czech, B.; Skwirczynska, I.; Chubarov, M.; Lozhkin, O.; Murin, Yu.; Pljuschev, V.; Zubkov, M.; Ekstroem, C.; Kolozhvari, A.; Persson, H.; Westerberg, L.; Jakobsson, B.

    2005-05-24

    The lack of systematic experimental checks on the intermediate-energy nuclear model simulations of heavily ionizing recoils from nucleon-nucleus collisions -- critical inputs for the Single Event Effect analysis of microelectronics and dosimetry calculations including high-LET components in the cancer tumor radiation therapy -- has been a primary motivation for a new experiment planned at the CELSIUS nuclear storage ring of The Svedberg Laboratory, Uppsala, Sweden. Details of the experiment and the first results from a feasibility study are presented here.

  16. Base-Controlled Reactions through an Aldol Intermediate Formed between 2-Oxoaldehydes and Malonate Half Esters.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atul; Khan, Shahnawaz; Ahmed, Qazi Naveed

    2017-09-06

    A practical, atom-economical, base-directed, and highly efficient method for the generation of different selective products through a common aldol intermediate of 2-oxoaldehydes and malonate half esters is successfully developed. The addition of a strong basic environment (potassium tert-butoxide) catalyzed the synthesis of stable decarboxylative aldol products (α-hydroxy ketones), while the Doebner modification procedure resulted in decarboxylative elimination to (E)-α,β-unsaturated esters in good yields. The application of this method in one pot and one pot/two steps with azoles helped to develop regioselective α- and β-azolated products in appreciable yields.

  17. Direct experimental probing and theoretical analysis of the reaction between the simplest Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO and isoprene

    DOE PAGES

    Decker, Z. C. J.; Au, K.; Vereecken, L.; ...

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in the spectroscopy of Criegee intermediates (CI) have enabled direct kinetic studies of these highly reactive chemical species. The impact of CI chemistry is currently being incorporated into atmospheric models, including their reactions with trace organic and inorganic compounds. Isoprene, C5H8, is a doubly-unsaturated hydrocarbon that accounts for the largest share of all biogenic emissions around the globe and is also a building block of larger volatile organic compounds. We report direct measurements of the reaction of the simplest CI (CH2OO) with isoprene, using time-resolved cavity-enhanced UV absorption spectroscopy. We find the reaction to be pressure-independent between 15–100more » Torr, with a rate coefficient that varies from (1.5 ± 0.1) × 10–15 cm3 molecule–1 s–1 at room temperature to (23 ± 2) × 10–15 cm3 molecule–1 s–1 at 540 K. Quantum chemical and transition-state theory calculations of 16 unique channels for CH2OO + isoprene somewhat underpredict the observed T-dependence of the total reaction rate coefficient, but are overall in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Finally, this reaction is broadly similar to those with smaller alkenes, proceeding by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition to one of the two conjugated double bonds of isoprene.« less

  18. Direct experimental probing and theoretical analysis of the reaction between the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO and isoprene

    DOE PAGES

    Decker, Z. C. J.; Au, K.; Vereecken, L.; ...

    2017-03-07

    Recent advances in the spectroscopy of Criegee intermediates (CI) have enabled direct kinetic studies of these highly reactive chemical species. The impact of CI chemistry is currently being incorporated into atmospheric models, including their reactions with trace organic and inorganic compounds. Isoprene, C5H8, is a doubly-unsaturated hydrocarbon that accounts for the largest share of all biogenic emissions around the globe and is also a building block of larger volatile organic compounds. We report direct measurements of the reaction of the simplest CI (CH2OO) with isoprene, using time-resolved cavity-enhanced UV absorption spectroscopy. We find the reaction to be pressure-independent between 15–100more » Torr, with a rate coefficient that varies from (1.5 ± 0.1) × 10–15 cm3 molecule–1 s–1 at room temperature to (23 ± 2) × 10–15 cm3 molecule–1 s–1 at 540 K. Quantum chemical and transition-state theory calculations of 16 unique channels for CH2OO + isoprene somewhat underpredict the observed T-dependence of the total reaction rate coefficient, but are overall in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Finally, this reaction is broadly similar to those with smaller alkenes, proceeding by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition to one of the two conjugated double bonds of isoprene.« less

  19. Direct experimental probing and theoretical analysis of the reaction between the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO and isoprene.

    PubMed

    Decker, Z C J; Au, K; Vereecken, L; Sheps, L

    2017-03-13

    Recent advances in the spectroscopy of Criegee intermediates (CI) have enabled direct kinetic studies of these highly reactive chemical species. The impact of CI chemistry is currently being incorporated into atmospheric models, including their reactions with trace organic and inorganic compounds. Isoprene, C5H8, is a doubly-unsaturated hydrocarbon that accounts for the largest share of all biogenic emissions around the globe and is also a building block of larger volatile organic compounds. We report direct measurements of the reaction of the simplest CI (CH2OO) with isoprene, using time-resolved cavity-enhanced UV absorption spectroscopy. We find the reaction to be pressure-independent between 15-100 Torr, with a rate coefficient that varies from (1.5 ± 0.1) × 10(-15) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at room temperature to (23 ± 2) × 10(-15) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 540 K. Quantum chemical and transition-state theory calculations of 16 unique channels for CH2OO + isoprene somewhat underpredict the observed T-dependence of the total reaction rate coefficient, but are overall in good agreement with the experimental measurements. This reaction is broadly similar to those with smaller alkenes, proceeding by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition to one of the two conjugated double bonds of isoprene.

  20. Direct observation of reaction intermediates for a well defined heterogeneous alkene metathesis catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Frédéric; Berthoud, Romain; Copéret, Christophe; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Singh, Rojendra; Kreickmann, Thorsten; Schrock, Richard R.

    2008-01-01

    Grafting of [W(≡NAr)(=CHtBu)(2,5-Me2NC4H2)2] on a silica partially dehydroxylated at 700°C (SiO2- (700)) generates the corresponding monosiloxy complex [(≡SiO)W(≡NAr)(=CHtBu)(2,5-Me2NC4H2)] as the major species (≈90%) along with [(≡SiO)W(≡NAr)(CH2tBu)(2,5-Me2NC4H2)2], according to mass balance analysis, IR, and NMR studies. This heterogeneous catalyst displays good activity and stability in the metathesis of propene. Very importantly, solid state NMR spectroscopy allows observation of the propagating alkylidene as well as stable metallacyclobutane intermediates. These species have the same reactivity as the initial surface complex [(≡SiO)W(≡NAr)(=CHtBu)(2,5-Me2NC4H2)], which shows that they are the key intermediates of alkene metathesis. PMID:18723685

  1. Photodegradation of 2-chloropyridine in aqueous solution: Reaction pathways and genotoxicity of intermediate products.

    PubMed

    Skoutelis, Charalambos; Antonopoulou, Maria; Konstantinou, Ioannis; Vlastos, Dimitris; Papadaki, Maria

    2017-01-05

    2-Chloropyridine, an important precursor of the chemical industry is also a persistent water pollutant. The genotoxicity of photolytically treated 2-chloropyridine aqueous solution to human lymphocytes initially increases and fluctuates during treatment finally reaching the control values after prolonged treatment. Intermediate products formed were identified; a kinetic scheme for their formation is presented. To identify the source of genotoxicity variations and the potential in vitro effects on human lymphocytes of the partially photo-treated aqueous solution, the genotoxicity of four (the only) commercially available intermediates, i.e., 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde, 6-chloro-2-pyridinecarboxylic acid, 2,3-dichloropyridine and 2-pyridinecarbonitrile was measured; the obtained results were used for the reasoning on the variation of the solution genotoxic (including clastogenic as well as aneugenic) events and cytotoxic activity. It was found that 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde and 6-chloro-2-pyridinecarboxylic acid were highly genotoxic even at the very low concentration measured here. Thus, they likely had a significant contribution to the photolytically treated solution genotoxicity. 2,3-Dichloropyridine was found to be genotoxic but only at concentrations higher than the ones measured in this work. Thus, it was not likely to have contributed to the solution genotoxicity. Finally, at the concentrations measured in this work 2-pyridinecarbonitrile was found to be only cytotoxic.

  2. Understanding and Mitigating the Effects of Stable Dodecahydro- closo -dodecaborate Intermediates on Hydrogen-Storage Reactions

    DOE PAGES

    White, James L.; Newhouse, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Jin Z.; ...

    2016-10-25

    Alkali metal borohydrides can reversibly store hydrogen; however, the materials display poor cyclability, often times linked to occurrence of stable closo-polyborate intermediate species. In an effort to understand the role of such intermediates on the hydrogen storage properties of metal borohydrides, several alkali metal dodecahydro-closo-dodecaborate salts were isolated in anhydrous form and characterized by diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. Mixtures of Li2B12H12, Na2B12H12, and K2B12H12 with the corresponding alkali metal hydrides were subjected to hydrogenation conditions known to favor partial or full reversibility in metal borohydrides. The stoichiometric mixtures of MH and M2B12H12 salts form the corresponding metal borohydrides MBH4 (M=Li,more » Na, K) in almost quantitative yield at 100 MPa H2 and 500 °C. In addition, stoichiometric mixtures of Li2B12H12 and MgH2 were found to form MgB2 at 500 °C and above upon desorption in vacuum. The two destabilization strategies outlined above suggest that metal polyhydro-closo-polyborate species can be converted into the corresponding metal borohydrides or borides, albeit under rather harsh conditions of hydrogen pressure and temperature.« less

  3. Oligomerization reaction of the Criegee intermediate leads to secondary organic aerosol formation in ethylene ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yosuke; Inomata, Satoshi; Hirokawa, Jun

    2013-12-05

    Ethylene ozonolysis was investigated in laboratory experiments using a Teflon bag reactor. A negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometer (NI-CIMS) using SO2Cl(-) and Cl(-) as reagent ions was used for product analysis. In addition to the expected gas-phase products, such as formic acid and hydroperoxymethyl formate, oligomeric hydroperoxides composed of the Criegee intermediate (CH2OO) as a chain unit were observed. Furthermore, we observed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the ethylene ozonolysis, and the particle-phase products were also analyzed by NI-CIMS. The CH2OO oligomers were also observed as particle-phase components, suggesting that the oligomeric hydroperoxides formed in the gas phase partition into the particle phase. By adding methanol as a stabilized Criegee intermediate scavenger, both the gas-phase oligomer formation and SOA formation were strongly suppressed. This indicates that CH2OO plays a critical role in the formation of oligomeric hydroperoxides followed by SOA formation in ethylene ozonolysis. A new formation mechanism for the oligomeric hydroperoxides, which includes sequential addition of CH2OO to hydroperoxides, is proposed.

  4. Synthesis of Y1BaCu3O(x) superconducting powders by intermediate phase reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moure, C.; Fernandez, J. F.; Tartaj, J.; Recio, P.; Duran, P.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for synthesizing Y1Ba2Cu3O(x) by solid state reactions was developed. The method is based on the use of barium compounds, previously synthesized, as intermediate phases for the process. The reaction kinetics of this procedure were established between 860 C and 920 C. The crystal structure and the presence of second phases were studied by means of XRD. The sintering behavior and ceramic parameters were also determined. The orthorhombic type-I structure was obtained on the synthesized bodies after a cooling cycle in an air atmosphere. Superconducting transition took place at 91 K. Sintering densities higher than 95 percent D sub th were attained at temperatures below 940 C.

  5. The knockout reaction of {sup 15}C on a {sup 9}Be target at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, H. Fereidonnejad, R.; Ghambari, M.

    2016-05-15

    In this work, neutron knockout reactions of {sup 15}C on a {sup 9}Be target at energy 103 and 250 MeV/nucleon are studied. Using the Eikonal approximation of the Glauber model, total neutron removal cross sections, the stripping and diffractive cross sections as well as {sup 14}C longitudinal momentum distributions are determined in both {sup 15}C ground state and exited states of the wave function. We compared the results of our calculations with the available experimental data obtained recently. The calculated cross sections of {sup 15}C and {sup 14}C reactions, as well as the momentum distribution are in relatively good agreement with available data.

  6. Vibrational spectrum of the lumi intermediate in the room temperature rhodopsin photo-reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Ujj, L; Jäger, F; Atkinson, G H

    1998-01-01

    The vibrational spectrum (650-1750 cm(-1)) of the lumi-rhodopsin (lumi) intermediate formed in the microsecond time regime of the room-temperature rhodopsin (RhRT) photoreaction is measured for the first time using picosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (PTR/CARS). The vibrational spectrum of lumi is recorded 2.5 micros after the 3-ps, 500-nm excitation of RhRT. Complementary to Fourier transform infrared spectra recorded at Rh sample temperatures low enough to freeze lumi, these PTR/CARS results provide the first detailed view of the vibrational degrees of freedom of room-temperature lumi (lumiRT) through the identification of 21 bands. The exceptionally low intensity (compared to those observed in bathoRT) of the hydrogen out-of-plane (HOOP) bands, the moderate intensity and absolute positions of C-C stretching bands, and the presence of high-intensity C==C stretching bands suggest that lumiRT contains an almost planar (nontwisting), all-trans retinal geometry. Independently, the 944-cm(-1) position of the most intense HOOP band implies that a resonance coupling exists between the out-of-plane retinal vibrations and at least one group among the amino acids comprising the retinal binding pocket. The formation of lumiRT, monitored via PTR/CARS spectra recorded on the nanosecond time scale, can be associated with the decay of the blue-shifted intermediate (BSI(RT)) formed in equilibrium with the bathoRT intermediate. PTR/CARS spectra measured at a 210-ns delay contain distinct vibrational features attributable to BSI(RT), which suggest that the all-trans retinal in both BSI(RT) and lumiRT is strongly coupled to part of the retinal binding pocket. With regard to the energy storage/transduction mechanism in RhRT, these results support the hypothesis that during the formation of lumiRT, the majority of the photon energy absorbed by RhRT transfers to the apoprotein opsin. PMID:9512045

  7. RRKM and master equation kinetic analysis of parallel addition reactions of isomeric radical intermediates in hydrocarbon flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Pierre M.; Rheaume, Michael; Cooksy, Andrew L.

    2017-08-01

    We have calculated the temperature-dependent rate coefficients of the addition reactions of butadien-2-yl (C4H5) and acroylyl (C3H3O) radicals with ethene (C2H4), carbon monoxide (CO), formaldehyde (H2CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and ketene (H2CCO), in order to explore the balance between kinetic and thermodynamic control in these combustion-related reactions. For the C4H5 radical, the 1,3-diene form of the addition products is more stable than the 1,2-diene, but the 1,2-diene form of the radical intermediate is stabilized by an allylic delocalization, which may influence the relative activation energies. For the reactions combining C3H3O with C2H4, CO, and HCN, the opposite is true: the 1,2-enone form of the addition products is more stable than the 1,3-enone, whereas the 1,3-enone is the slightly more stable radical species. Optimized geometries and vibrational modes were computed with the QCISD/aug-cc-pVDZ level and basis, followed by single-point CCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVDZ-F12 energy calculations. Our findings indicate that the kinetics in all cases favor reaction along the 1,3 pathway for both the C4H5 and C3H3O systems. The Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) microcanonical rate coefficients and subsequent solution of the chemical master equation were used to predict the time-evolution of our system under conditions from 500 K to 2000 K and from 10-5 bar to 10 bars. Despite the 1,3 reaction pathway being more favorable for the C4H5 system, our results predict branching ratios of the 1,2 to 1,3 product as high as 0.48 at 1 bar. Similar results hold for the acroylyl system under these combustion conditions, suggesting that under kinetic control the branching of these reactions may be much more significant than the thermodynamics would suggest. This effect may be partly attributed to the low energy difference between 1,2 and 1,3 forms of the radical intermediate. No substantial pressure-dependence is found for the overall forward reaction rates until pressures

  8. RRKM and master equation kinetic analysis of parallel addition reactions of isomeric radical intermediates in hydrocarbon flames.

    PubMed

    Winter, Pierre M; Rheaume, Michael; Cooksy, Andrew L

    2017-08-07

    We have calculated the temperature-dependent rate coefficients of the addition reactions of butadien-2-yl (C4H5) and acroylyl (C3H3O) radicals with ethene (C2H4), carbon monoxide (CO), formaldehyde (H2CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and ketene (H2CCO), in order to explore the balance between kinetic and thermodynamic control in these combustion-related reactions. For the C4H5 radical, the 1,3-diene form of the addition products is more stable than the 1,2-diene, but the 1,2-diene form of the radical intermediate is stabilized by an allylic delocalization, which may influence the relative activation energies. For the reactions combining C3H3O with C2H4, CO, and HCN, the opposite is true: the 1,2-enone form of the addition products is more stable than the 1,3-enone, whereas the 1,3-enone is the slightly more stable radical species. Optimized geometries and vibrational modes were computed with the QCISD/aug-cc-pVDZ level and basis, followed by single-point CCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVDZ-F12 energy calculations. Our findings indicate that the kinetics in all cases favor reaction along the 1,3 pathway for both the C4H5 and C3H3O systems. The Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) microcanonical rate coefficients and subsequent solution of the chemical master equation were used to predict the time-evolution of our system under conditions from 500 K to 2000 K and from 10(-5) bar to 10 bars. Despite the 1,3 reaction pathway being more favorable for the C4H5 system, our results predict branching ratios of the 1,2 to 1,3 product as high as 0.48 at 1 bar. Similar results hold for the acroylyl system under these combustion conditions, suggesting that under kinetic control the branching of these reactions may be much more significant than the thermodynamics would suggest. This effect may be partly attributed to the low energy difference between 1,2 and 1,3 forms of the radical intermediate. No substantial pressure-dependence is found for the overall forward reaction rates until pressures

  9. Photocatalytic decomposition of crotamiton over aqueous TiO(2) suspensions: determination of intermediates and the reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Fukahori, Shuji; Fujiwara, Taku; Ito, Ryusei; Funamizu, Naoyuki

    2012-09-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of crotamiton in aqueous solution using TiO(2) was investigated. To investigate the effect of initial pH, the photodegradation behaviors of three types of pharmaceuticals were compared (crotamiton, clofibric acid, sulfamethoxazole). The degradation rates of crotamiton in the pH range 3-9 were nearly equal, but those of clofibric acid and sulfamethoxazole were affected by pH. At pH>6.5, TiO(2) particles, clofibric acid and sulfamethoxazole had negative charge, therefore, the repulsive force between TiO(2) particles and anionic pharmaceuticals occurred and a low reaction rate at high pH was observed. The effect of UV intensity and TiO(2) concentration on photodegradation efficiency was also investigated. Linear and logarithmical relationships between UV intensity, TiO(2) concentration and the reaction rate constant were confirmed. Furthermore, the structures of photodegradation intermediates formed concomitantly with the disappearance of crotamiton were estimated. Seven intermediates were characterized by LC/MS/MS analyses, and it was assumed that the photocatalytic degradation of crotamiton was initiated by the attack of electrophilic hydroxyl radicals on aromatic rings and alkyl chains.

  10. Infrared matrix isolation and theoretical study of the initial intermediates in the reaction of ozone with cis-2-butene.

    PubMed

    Clay, Mary; Ault, Bruce S

    2010-03-04

    Matrix isolation studies combined with infrared spectroscopy of the twin jet codeposition of ozone and cis-2-butene into argon matrices have led to the first observation of several early intermediates in this ozonolysis reaction. Specifically, evidence is presented for the formation and identification of the long sought-after Criegee intermediate, as well as confirming evidence for earlier reports of the primary and secondary ozonides. These species were observed after initial twin jet deposition, and grew upon annealing to 35 K. Extensive isotopic labeling ((18)O and (16,18)O mixtures) experiments provided important supporting data. Detailed theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,2p) level were carried out as well to augment the experimental work. Merged jet (flow reactor) experiments followed by cryogenic trapping in solid argon led to the formation of "late", stable oxidation products. Photochemical reactions of ozone with cis-2-butene was studied as well, as was the photochemical behavior of the primary and secondary ozonides.

  11. Identification of intermediates and products in the reaction of porphyrin iron(III) alkyl complexes with dioxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Arasasingham, R.D.; Balch, A.L.; Latos-Grazynski, L.

    1987-09-16

    Unlike most PFe/sup III+/ (P is a porphyrin dianion) complexes, complexes of the type PFe/sup III/CH/sub 2/R (R = H or CH/sub 3/) are reactive toward dioxygen with the ubiquitous PFe/sup III/O-Fe/sup III/P as the only reported product. Here the authors report on /sup 1/H NMR studies of this reaction which focus on the detection of intermediates and the fate of the alkyl group. These results should be viewed in the context of extensive previous studies on model systems for dioxygen activation in biological systems (heme oxygenases) involving reaction of dioxygen with PFe/sup II/ and on the interaction of peracids and hydroperoxides with PFe/sup III/. Through these studies a number of reactive intermediates including the peroxobridge complex, PFe/sup III/-O-O-Fe/sup III/P, and the ferryl complexes, PFe/sup IV/ double bond O, (B)P-Fe/sup IV/ double bond O (B is an amine), and (P)Fe/sup IV/ double bond O/sup +/ (P is a porphyrin radical monoanion), have been detected.

  12. Fear load: The psychophysiological over-expression of fear as an intermediate phenotype associated with trauma reactions.

    PubMed

    Norrholm, Seth Davin; Glover, Ebony M; Stevens, Jennifer S; Fani, Negar; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J; Jovanovic, Tanja

    2015-11-01

    Psychophysiological measures of fear expression provide observable intermediate phenotypes of fear-related symptoms. Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) advocate using neurobiological intermediate phenotypes that provide dimensional correlates of psychopathology. Negative Valence Systems in the RDoC matrix include the construct of acute threat, which can be measured on a physiological level using potentiation of the acoustic startle reflex assessed via electromyography recordings of the orbicularis oculi muscle. Impairments in extinction of fear-potentiated startle due to high levels of fear (termed fear load) during the early phases of extinction have been observed in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The goals of the current work were to examine dimensional associations between fear-related symptoms of PTSD and fear load variables to test their validity as an intermediate phenotype. We examined extinction of fear-potentiated startle in a cohort (n=269) of individuals with a broad range of civilian trauma exposure (range 0-13 traumatic events per person, mean=3.5). Based on previously reported findings, we hypothesized that fear load would be significantly associated with intrusion and fear memories of an index traumatic event. The results indicated that early extinction was correlated with intrusive thoughts (p=0.0007) and intense physiological reactions to trauma reminders (p=0.036). Degree of adult or childhood trauma exposure, and depression severity were not associated with fear load. After controlling for age, sex, race, income, level of prior trauma, and level of fear conditioning, fear load during extinction was still significantly predictive of intrusive thoughts (p=0.004). The significance of these findings is that they support dimensional associations with symptom severity rather than diagnostic category and, as such, fear load may emerge as a transdiagnostic intermediate phenotype expressed across fear-related disorders (e.g., specific phobia, social

  13. Fear Load: The Psychophysiological Over-expression of Fear as an Intermediate Phenotype Associated with Trauma Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Norrholm, Seth Davin; Glover, Ebony M.; Stevens, Jennifer S.; Fani, Negar; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R.; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J.; Jovanovic, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Psychophysiological measures of fear expression provide observable intermediate phenotypes of fear-related symptoms. Research Domains Criteria (RDoC) advocate using neurobiological intermediate phenotypes that provide dimensional correlates of psychopathology. Negative Valence Systems in the RDoC matrix include the construct of acute threat, which can be measured on a physiological level using potentiation of the acoustic startle reflex assessed via electromyography recordings of the orbicularis oculi muscle. Impairments in extinction of fearpotentiated startle due to high levels of fear (termed fear load) during the early phases of extinction have been observed in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The goals of the current work were to examine dimensional associations between fear-related symptoms of PTSD and fear load variables to test their validity as an intermediate phenotype. We examined extinction of fear-potentiated startle in a cohort (n = 269) of individuals with a broad range of civilian trauma exposure (range 0–13 traumatic events per person, mean = 3.5). Based on previously reported findings, we hypothesized that fear load would be significantly associated with intrusion and fear memories of an index traumatic event. The results indicated that early extinction was correlated with intrusive thoughts (p = 0.0007) and intense physiological reactions to trauma reminders (p = 0.036). Degree of adult or childhood trauma exposure, and depression severity were not associated with fear load. After controlling for age, sex, race, income, level of prior trauma, and level of fear conditioning, fear load during extinction was still significantly predictive of intrusive thoughts (p = 0.004). The significance of these findings is that they support dimensional associations with symptom severity rather than diagnostic category and, as such, fear load may emerge as a transdiagnostic intermediate phenotype expressed across fear-related disorders (e.g., specific

  14. Ligand intermediates in metal catalyzed reactions. Technical report: third budget year

    SciTech Connect

    Gladysz, J.A.

    1988-04-01

    A progress report is presented in which a new method for the activation of metal-bound methyl groups and the oxidative disproportionation of coordinated ethylene and methane are discussed. Also considered in the report is the divergent kinetic and thermodynamic acidity in organotransition metal hydride complexes and the synthesis, structure, and reactions of chiral rhenium vinylidene complexes.

  15. Identification of a Critical Intermediate in Galvanic Exchange Reactions by Single-Nanoparticle Resolved Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jeremy George; Jain, Prashant

    2014-06-01

    The realization of common materials transformations in nanocrystalline systems is fostering the development of novel nanostructures and allowing a deep look into the atomistic mechanisms involved. Galvanic corrosion is one such transformation. We studied galvanic replacement within individual metal nanoparticles by using plasmonic spectroscopy. This proved to be a powerful approach to studying materials transformations in the absence of ensemble averaging. Individual nanoscale units act as domains that can be interrogated optically in isolation, whereas the averaging of all such domains provides a bulk reaction trajectory. Single-nanoparticle reaction trajectories showed that a Ag nanoparticle exposed to Au3+ makes an abrupt transition into a nanocage structure. The transition is limited by a critical structural event, which we identified by electron microscopy to comprise the formation of a nanosized void, similar to the pitting process commonly observed in the corrosion of metals. Trajectories also revealed a surprisingly strong nonlinearity of the reaction kinetics, which we explain by a model involving the critical coalescence of vacancies into a growing void. The critical void size for galvanic exchange to spontaneously proceed was found to be 20 atomic vacancies. In the future we hope to extend this approach to examine a wide variety of materials transformations and chemical reactions.

  16. High Resolution Reaction Intermediates of rabbit Muscle Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate Aldolase: Substrate Cleavage and Induced Fit

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean,M.; Lafrance-Vanasse, J.; Liotard, B.; Sygusch, J.

    2005-01-01

    Crystal structures were determined to 1.8-Angstrom resolution of the glycolytic enzyme fructose-1, 6-bis(phosphate) aldolase trapped in complex with its substrate and a competitive inhibitor, mannitol-1, 6-bis(phosphate). The enzyme substrate complex corresponded to the postulated Schiff base intermediate and has reaction geometry consistent with incipient C3-C4 bond cleavage catalyzed by Glu-187, which is adjacent to the Schiff base forming Lys-229. Atom arrangement about the cleaved bond in the reaction intermediate mimics a pericyclic transition state occurring in non-enzymatic aldol condensations. Lys-146 hydrogen bonds the substrate C4 hydroxyl and assists substrate cleavage by stabilizing the developing negative charge on the C4 hydroxyl during proton abstraction. Mannitol-1, 6-bis(phosphate) forms a non-covalent complex in the active site whose binding geometry mimics the covalent carbinolamine precursor. Glu-187 hydrogen bonds the C2 hydroxyl of the inhibitor in the enzyme complex substantiating a proton transfer role by Glu-187 in catalyzing the conversion of the carbinolamine intermediate to Schiff base. Modeling of the acyclic substrate configuration into the active site shows Glu-187, in acid form, hydrogen bonding both substrate C2 carbonyl and C4 hydroxyl, thereby aligning the substrate ketose for nucleophilic attack by Lys-229. The multi-functional role by Glu-187 epitomizes a canonical mechanistic feature conserved in Schiff base forming aldolases catalyzing carbohydrate metabolism. Trapping of tagatose-1, 6-bis(phosphate), a diastereoisomer of fructose-1, 6-bis(phosphate), displayed stereospecific discrimination and reduced ketohexose binding specificity. Each ligand induces homologous conformational changes in two adjacent a-helical regions that promote phosphate binding in the active site.

  17. Workshop on hadron structure from photo-reactions at intermediate energies: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, A.M.; Sandorfi, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The proton compton effect: Recent measurements of the electric and magnetic polorizabilities of the proton; experiments on the electric polarizability of the neutron; chiral symmetry and nucleon polarizabilities; chiral model predictions for electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon, a consumer report; the polarizabilities of bound nucleons; nucleon polarizability in free space and in nuclear matter; mechanisms of photon scattering on nucleons at intermediate energies; pion polarizabilities in chiral perturbation theory; pion polarizabilities and the shielding of [sigma](700)-meson exchange in [gamma][gamma][yields][pi][pi] processes; pion and kaon polarizabilities in the quark confinement model; radiative pion photoproduction and pion polarizabilities; pion and sigma polarizabilities and radiative transitions; the quadrupole amplitude in the [gamma][Nu]-[Delta] transition; pion photoproduction and the [gamma][Nu]-[Delta] amplitudes; effective- lagrangians, Watson's theorem, and the E2/M1 mixing ratio in the excitation of the delta resonance; new measurements of the p([rvec [gamma

  18. Flow-injection determination of acetone with diazotized anthranilic acid through a fluorescent reaction intermediate.

    PubMed

    García de María, C; Hueso Domínguez, K B; Martín Garrido, N

    2007-09-26

    Acetone and diazotized anthranilic acid react in alkaline solution, giving a fluorescent intermediate that can be measured at excitation and emission wavelengths of 305 and 395 nm, respectively. Based on this, a fluorimetric flow-injection method is proposed for the determination of acetone in aqueous solution. Under the proposed conditions, acetone can be detected at concentrations higher than 8 x 10(-7)M, with a linear application range from 1 x 10(-6) to 2 x 10(-4)M and an R.S.D. of 2.7% (1.0 x 10(-5)M, n=10). A sampling frequency of 24h(-1) is achieved. Some potentially interfering species are investigated.

  19. Astrophysically Important Reaction Rates For Novae And X-ray Bursts From Proton Breakup At Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Banu, A.; Trache, L.; Carstoiu, F.; Negoita, F.; Rotaru, F.; Orr, N. A.; Achouri, N. L.; Laurent, B.; Bonaccorso, A.; Catford, W. N.; Patterson, N.; Thomas, J. S.; Chartier, M.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Paschalis, S.; Pietras, B.; Freer, M.; Gaudefroy, L.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Horoi, M.

    2010-11-24

    We discuss the use of one-nucleon removal reactions of loosely bound nuclei at intermediate energies as an indirect method in nuclear astrophysics. The breakup reactions are proved to be good spectroscopic tools and can be used to study a large number of loosely bound proton- or neutron-rich nuclei over a wide range of beam energies. As peripheral processes, they can be used to extract asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) from which non-resonant capture reaction rates of astrophysical interest can be calculated parameter free. In this talk, we present results of a proton-breakup experiment carried out at GANIL (France) with a cocktail beam centered around {sup 23}Al at 50 MeV/nucleon. Momentum distributions of the breakup fragments, inclusive and in coincidence with gamma rays detected by EXOGAM Germanium clover array, were measured in the focal plan of SPEG energy-loss spectrometer. We present in particular the investigations of reaction rates for {sup 22}Mg(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Al and {sup 23}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 24}Si important for novae and X-ray bursts, respectively.

  20. Intermediate-scale sodium-concrete reaction tests with basalt and limestone concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Hassberger, J.A.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    Ten tests were performed to investigate the chemical reactions and rate and extent of attack between sodium and basalt and limestone concretes. Test temperatures ranged from 510 to 870/sup 0/C (950 to 1600/sup 0/F) and test times from 2 to 24 hours. Sodium hydroxide was added to some of the tests to assess the impact of a sodium hydroxide-aided reaction on the overall penetration characteristics. Data suggest that the sodium penetration of concrete surfaces is limited. Penetration of basalt concrete in the presence of sodium hydroxide is shown to be less severe than attack by the metallic sodium alone. Presence of sodium hydroxide changes the characteristics of sodium penetration of limestone concrete, but no major differences in bulk penetration were observed as compared to penetration by metallic sodium.

  1. Sensitivity of the blue loops of intermediate-mass stars to nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Halabi, Ghina M.; El Eid, Mounib

    2012-11-20

    We investigate the effects of a modification of the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction rate, as suggested by recent evaluations, on the formation and extension of the blue loops encountered during the evolution of the stars in the mass range 5M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator} to 12M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }. We show that the blue loops of stars in the mass range 5M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator} to 8M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }, that is the range of super ABG stars, are severely affected by a modification of the important {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction rate. We also show that the blue loops can be restored if envelope overshooting is included, which is necessary to explain the observations of the Cepheid stars.

  2. Observation of Organometallic and Radical Intermediates Formed during the Reaction of Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase with Bromoethanesulfonate†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianghui; Telser, Joshua; Hoffman, Brian M.; Gerfen, Gary; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) from methanogenic archaea catalyzes the final step of methane formation, in which methyl-coenzyme M (2-methylthioethane sulfonate, methyl-SCoM) is reduced with coenzyme B (N-7-mercaptoheptanolyl-threonine phosphate, CoBSH) to form methane and the heterodisulfide CoBS-SCoM. The active dimeric form of MCR contains two Ni(I)-F430 prosthetic groups, one in each monomer. This manuscript describes studies of the reaction of the active Ni(I) state of MCR (MCRred1) with BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate) and CoBSH or its analog, CoB6SH (N-6-mercaptohexanolyl-threonine phosphate), by transient kinetic measurements using EPR and UV-visible spectroscopy and by global fits of the data. This reaction is shown to lead to the formation of three intermediates, the first of which is assigned as an alkyl-Ni(III) species that forms as the active Ni(I)-MCRred1 state of the enzyme decays. Subsequently, a radical (MCRBES radical) is formed that was characterized by multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies at X (~ 9 GHz)-, Q (~35 GHz)- and D (~135 GHz)-bands and by electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy. The MCRBES radical is characterized by g-values at 2.00340 and 1.99832 and includes a strongly coupled non-exchangeable proton with a hyperfine coupling constant of 50 MHz. Based on transient kinetic measurements, the formation and decay of the radical coincides with a species that exhibits absorption peaks at 426 nm and 575 nm. Isotopic substitution, multifrequency EPR and ENDOR spectroscopic experiments rule out the possibility that MCRBES is a tyrosyl radical and indicate that if a tyrosyl radical is formed during the reaction, it does not accumulate to detectable levels. The results provide support for a hybrid mechanism of methanogenesis by MCR that includes both alkyl-Ni and radical intermediates. PMID:20597483

  3. Spectral and Kinetic Characterization of Intermediates in the Aromatization Reaction Catalyzed by NikD, an Unusual Amino Acid Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Bruckner, Robert C.; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2009-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nikD, a 2-electron acceptor, catalyzes a remarkable aromatization of piperideine-2-carboxylate (P2C) to picolinate, an essential component of nikkomycin antibiotics. Steady-state kinetic data are indicative of a sequential mechanism where oxygen reacts with a reduced enzyme•dihydropicolinate (DHP) complex. The kinetics observed for complex formation with competitive inhibitors are consistent with a one-step binding mechanism. The anaerobic reaction with P2C involves three steps. The first step yields an enzyme•substrate charge transfer complex likely to contain the electron-rich P2C enamine. Calculated rates of formation and dissociation of the nikD•P2C complex are similar to those observed for the enzyme•1-cyclohexenoate complex. Formation of a reduced enzyme•DHP complex, (EH2•DHP)ini, occurs in a second step that exhibits a hyperbolic dependence on substrate concentration. The limiting rate of nikD reduction is at least 10-fold faster than the turnover rate observed with unlabeled or [4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6-D6]-P2C and exhibits a kinetic isotope effect (KIE = 6.4). The observed KIE on Kd apparent (4.7) indicates that P2C is a sticky substrate. Formation of a final reduced species, (EH2•DHP)fin, occurs in a third step that is independent of P2C concentration and equal to the observed turnover rate. The observed KIE (3.3) indicates that the final step involves cleavage of at least one C-H bond. Tautomerization, followed by isomerization, of the initial DHP intermediate can produce an isomer that could be oxidized to picolinate in a reaction that satisfies known steric constraints of flavoenzyme reactions without the need to reposition a covalently tethered flavin or tightly bound intermediate. PMID:19354202

  4. Tracking the structural and electronic configurations of reaction intermediates of a cobalt proton reduction catalyst in water

    SciTech Connect

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Gimbert-Surinach, Carolina; Guda, Alexander; Picon, Antonio; Lehmann, C. Stefan; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Doumy, Gilles; March, Anne Marie; Soldatov, Alexander; Llobet, Antoni; Southworth, Stephen H.

    2016-08-24

    Time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy (X-TAS) has been used to study the light induced hydrogen evolution reaction catalyzed by a highly stable cobalt complex, [Ru(bpy)3]2+ photosensitizer and an equimolar mixture of sodium ascorbate/ascorbic acid electron donor in pure water. XANES and EXAFS analysis of a binary mixture of the octahedral Co(III) pre-catalyst and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ after illumination, revealed in-situ formation of a square pyramidal Co(II) intermediate, with electron transfer kinetics of 51 ns. On the other hand, X-TAS experiments of the complete photocatalytic system in the presence of the electron donor showed the formation of a square planar Co(I) intermediate species within a few nanoseconds followed by its decay in the microsecond timescales. The Co(I) structural assignment is supported by calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). At longer reaction times, we observe the formation of the initial Co(III) species concomitant to the decay of Co(I), thus closing the catalytic cycle. The experimental X-ray absorption spectra of the molecular species formed along the catalytic cycle are modeled using a combination of molecular orbital DFT calculations (DFT-MO) and Finite Difference Method (FDM). These findings allowed us to unequivocally assign the full mechanistic pathway followed by the catalyst as well as to determine the rate limiting step of the process, which consists in the protonation of the Co(I). This study provides a complete kinetics scheme for the hydrogen evolution reaction by a cobalt catalyst, revealing unique information for the development of better catalysts for the reductive side of hydrogen fuel cells.

  5. Direct measurements of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction kinetics of the Criegee intermediate (CH3)2COO

    DOE PAGES

    Chhantyal-Pun, Rabi; Welz, Oliver; Savee, John D.; ...

    2016-10-18

    Here, the Criegee intermediate acetone oxide, (CH3)2COO, is formed by laser photolysis of 2,2-diiodopropane in the presence of O2 and characterized by synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry and by cavity ring-down ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The rate coefficient of the reaction of the Criegee intermediate with SO2 was measured using photoionization mass spectrometry and pseudo-first-order methods to be (7.3 ± 0.5) × 10–11 cm3 s–1 at 298 K and 4 Torr and (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10–10 cm3 s–1 at 298 K and 10 Torr (He buffer). These values are similar to directly measured rate coefficients of anti-CH3CHOO with SO2, and inmore » good agreement with recent UV absorption measurements. The measurement of this reaction at 293 K and slightly higher pressures (between 10 and 100 Torr) in N2 from cavity ring-down decay of the ultraviolet absorption of (CH3)2COO yielded even larger rate coefficients, in the range (1.84 ± 0.12) × 10–10 to (2.29 ± 0.08) × 10–10 cm3 s–1. Photoionization mass spectrometry measurements with deuterated acetone oxide at 4 Torr show an inverse deuterium kinetic isotope effect, kH/kD = (0.53 ± 0.06), for reactions with SO2, which may be consistent with recent suggestions that the formation of an association complex affects the rate coefficient. The reaction of (CD3)2COO with NO2 has a rate coefficient at 298 K and 4 Torr of (2.1 ± 0.5) × 10–12 cm3 s–1 (measured with photoionization mass spectrometry), again similar to rate for the reaction of anti-CH3CHOO with NO2. Cavity ring-down measurements of the acetone oxide removal without added reagents display a combination of first- and second-order decay kinetics, which can be deconvolved to derive values for both the self-reaction of (CH3)2COO and its unimolecular thermal decay. The inferred unimolecular decay rate coefficient at 293 K, (305 ± 70) s–1, is similar to determinations from ozonolysis. The present measurements confirm the large rate coefficient for

  6. Characterization of the low-temperature intermediates of the reaction of fully reduced soluble cytochrome oxidase with oxygen by electron-paramagnetic-resonance and optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Clore, G M; Andréasson, L E; Karlsson, B; Aasa, R; Malmström, B G

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of fully reduced soluble bovine heart cytochrome oxidase with O2 at 173K was investigated by low-temperature optical and e.p.r. spectroscopy, and the kinetics of the reaction were analysed by non-linear optimization techniques. The only e.p.r. signals seen during the course of the reaction are those attributable to low-spin cytochrome a3+ and CuA2+. Quantitative analysis of e.p.r. signals shows that, at the end point of the reaction at 173K, nearly 100% of CuA is in the cupric state but only about 40% of cytochrome a is in the ferric low-spin state. The optical spectra recorded at this stage of the reaction show incomplete oxidation of haem and the absence of a 655 nm absorption band. The only reaction scheme that accounts for both the e.p.r. and optical data is a four-intermediate mechanism involving a branching pathway. The reaction is initiated when fully reduced cytochrome oxidase reacts with O2 to form intermediate I. This is then converted into either intermediate IIA or intermediate IIB. Of these, intermediate IIB is a stable end product at 173 K, but intermediate IIA is converted into intermediate III, which is the stable state at 173 K in this branch of the mechanism. The kinetic analysis of the e.p.r. data allows the unambiguous assignments of the valence states of cytochrome a and CuA in the intermediates. Intermediate I contains cytochrome a2+ and CuA+, intermediate IIA contains low-spin cytochroma a3+ and CuA+, intermediate IIB contains cytochrome a2+ and CuA2+, and intermediate III contains low-spin cytochrome a3+ and CuA2+. The electronic state of the O2-binding CuBa3 couple during the reoxidation of cytochrome oxidase is discussed in terms of an integrated structure containing CuB, cytochrome a3 and O2. PMID:6246874

  7. Investigation of the O+allyl addition/elimination reaction pathways from the OCH(2)CHCH(2) radical intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin L; Lau, Kai-Chung; Butler, Laurie J; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2008-08-28

    These experiments study the preparation of and product channels resulting from OCH(2)CHCH(2), a key radical intermediate in the O+allyl bimolecular reaction. The data include velocity map imaging and molecular beam scattering results to probe the photolytic generation of the radical intermediate and the subsequent pathways by which the radicals access the energetically allowed product channels of the bimolecular reaction. The photodissociation of epichlorohydrin at 193.3 nm produces chlorine atoms and c-OCH(2)CHCH(2) radicals; these undergo a facile ring opening to the OCH(2)CHCH(2) radical intermediate. State-selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection resolves the velocity distributions of ground and spin-orbit excited state chlorine independently, allowing for a more accurate determination of the internal energy distribution of the nascent radicals. We obtain good agreement detecting the velocity distributions of the Cl atoms with REMPI, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization at 13.8 eV, and electron bombardment ionization; all show a bimodal distribution of recoil kinetic energies. The dominant high recoil kinetic energy feature peaks near 33 kcalmol. To elucidate the product channels resulting from the OCH(2)CHCH(2) radical intermediate, the crossed laser-molecular beam experiment uses VUV photoionization and detects the velocity distribution of the possible products. The data identify the three dominant product channels as C(3)H(4)O (acrolein)+H, C(2)H(4)+HCO (formyl radical), and H(2)CO (formaldehyde)+C(2)H(3). A small signal from C(2)H(2)O (ketene) product is also detected. The measured velocity distributions and relative signal intensities at me=27, 28, and 29 at two photoionization energies show that the most exothermic product channel, C(2)H(5)+CO, does not contribute significantly to the product branching. The higher internal energy onset of the acrolein+H product channel is consistent with the relative barriers en route to

  8. Investigation of the O+allyl addition/elimination reaction pathways from the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin L.; Lau, Kai-Chung; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim-Min, Jr.

    2008-08-01

    These experiments study the preparation of and product channels resulting from OCH2CHCH2, a key radical intermediate in the O+allyl bimolecular reaction. The data include velocity map imaging and molecular beam scattering results to probe the photolytic generation of the radical intermediate and the subsequent pathways by which the radicals access the energetically allowed product channels of the bimolecular reaction. The photodissociation of epichlorohydrin at 193.3 nm produces chlorine atoms and c-OCH2CHCH2 radicals; these undergo a facile ring opening to the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate. State-selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection resolves the velocity distributions of ground and spin-orbit excited state chlorine independently, allowing for a more accurate determination of the internal energy distribution of the nascent radicals. We obtain good agreement detecting the velocity distributions of the Cl atoms with REMPI, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization at 13.8 eV, and electron bombardment ionization; all show a bimodal distribution of recoil kinetic energies. The dominant high recoil kinetic energy feature peaks near 33 kcal/mol. To elucidate the product channels resulting from the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate, the crossed laser-molecular beam experiment uses VUV photoionization and detects the velocity distribution of the possible products. The data identify the three dominant product channels as C3H4O (acrolein)+H, C2H4+HCO (formyl radical), and H2CO (formaldehyde)+C2H3. A small signal from C2H2O (ketene) product is also detected. The measured velocity distributions and relative signal intensities at m/e=27, 28, and 29 at two photoionization energies show that the most exothermic product channel, C2H5+CO, does not contribute significantly to the product branching. The higher internal energy onset of the acrolein+H product channel is consistent with the relative barriers en route to each of these product channels

  9. [NiFe]-hydrogenases: spectroscopic and electrochemical definition of reactions and intermediates.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Fraser A; Albracht, Simon P J

    2005-04-15

    Production and usage of di-hydrogen, H2, in micro-organisms is catalysed by highly active, 'ancient' metalloenzymes known as hydrogenases. Based on the number and identity of metal atoms in their active sites, hydrogenases fall into three main classes, [NiFe]-, [FeFe]- and [Fe]-. All contain the unusual ligand CO (and in most cases CN- as well) making them intriguing examples of 'organometallic' cofactors. These ligands render the active sites superbly 'visible' using infrared spectroscopy, which complements the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in studying mechanisms and identifying intermediates. Hydrogenases are becoming a focus of attention for research into future energy technologies, not only H2 production but also H2 oxidation in fuel cells. Hydrogenases immobilized on electrodes exhibit high electrocatalytic activity, providing not only an important new technique for their investigation, but also a basis for novel fuel cells either using the enzyme itself, or inspired synthetic catalysts. Favourable comparisons have been made with platinum electrocatalysts, an advantage of enzymes being their specificity for H2 and tolerance of CO. A challenge for exploiting hydrogenases is their sensitivity to O2, but some organisms are known to produce enzymes that overcome this problem by subtle alterations of the active site and gas access channels.

  10. Dynamics of Radical Intermediates in Prostaglandin H Synthase-1 Cyclooxygenase Reactions is Modulated by Multiple Factors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Tsai, Ah-Lim

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin H synthase (PGHS) catalyzes the biosynthesis of PGG2 and PGH2, the precursor of all prostanoids, from arachidonic acid (AA). PGHS exhibits two enzymatic activities following a branched-chain radical mechanism: 1) a peroxidase activity (POX) that utilizes hydroperoxide through heme redox cycles to generate the critical Tyr385 tyrosyl radical for coupling both enzyme activities; 2) the cyclooxygenase (COX) activity inserting two oxygen molecules into AA to generate endoperoxide/hydroperoxide PGG2 through a series of radical intermediates. Upon the generation of Tyr385 radical, COX catalysis is initiated, with C13 pro-S hydrogen abstraction from AA by Tyr385 radical to generate arachidonyl substrate radical. Oxygen provides a large driving force for the subsequent fast steps leading to the formation of PGG2, including radical redistributions, ring formations, and rearrangements. On the other hand, if the supply of oxygen is severed, equilibrium between arachidonyl radical and tyrosyl radical(s) biases largely towards the latter. In this study, we demonstrate that such equilibrium is shifted by many factors, including temperature, chemical structures of fatty acid substrates and limited supply of oxygen. We also, for the first time, reveal that this equilibrium is significantly affected by co-substrates of POX. The presence of efficient POX co-substrates, which reduces heme to its ferric state, apparently biases the equilibrium towards arachidonyl radical. Therefore a dynamic interplay exists between the two activities of PGHS.

  11. [Ligand intermediates in metal-catalyzed reactions]. Progress report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This report consists of sections on sigma bond complexes of alkenes, a new carbon-hydrogen bond activation reaction of alkene complexes, carbon-hydrogen bond migrations in alkylidene complexes, carbon- hydrogen bond migrations in alkyne complexes, synthesis, structure and reactivity of C{sub x} complexes, synthesis and reactivity of alcohol and ether complexes, new catalysts for the epimerization of secondary alcohols; carbon-hydrogen bond activation in alkoxide complexes, pi/sigma equilibria in metal/O=CXX` complexes, and other hydrocarbon ligands; miscellaneous.(WET)

  12. R/X exchange reactions in cis-[M(R)2{P(X)(NMeCH2)2}2] (M = Pd, Pt), via a phosphenium intermediate.

    PubMed

    Itazaki, Masumi; Tsuchida, Noriko; Shigesato, Yuka; Takano, Keiko; Nakazawa, Hiroshi

    2016-12-06

    R/X exchange reactions in cis-[M(R)2{P(X)(NMeCH2)2}2] (M = Pd, Pt; R = aryl, alkyl; X = Cl, Br) were achieved for the first time to give cis-[M(X)2{P(R)(NMeCH2)2}2]. DFT calculations suggested that the exchange reaction proceeds via a phosphenium intermediate.

  13. Chlorobenzene degradation by electro-heterogeneous catalysis in aqueous solution: intermediates and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiade; Mei, Yu; Liu, Chenliang; Chen, Jianmeng

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the variables that influence chlorobenzene (CB) degradation in aqueous solution by electro-heterogeneous catalysis. The effects of current density, pH, and electrolyte concentration on CB degradation were determined. The degradation efficiency of CB was almost 100% with an initial CB concentration of 50 mg/L, current density 15 mA/cm2, initial pH 10, electrolyte concentration 0.1 mol/L, and temperature 25 degrees C after 90 min of reaction. Under the same conditions, the degradation efficiency of CB was only 51% by electrochemical (EC) process, which showed that electro-heterogeneous catalysis was more efficient than EC alone. The analysis results of Purge-and-Trap chromatography-mass spectrometry (P&T/GC/MS) and ion chromatography (IC) indicated that in the reaction process, the initial *OH attack could occur at the C-Cl bond of CB, yielding phenol and biphenyl with the release of Cl-. Further oxidation of phenol and biphenyl produced p-Vinylbenzoic acid and hydroquinol. Finally, the compounds were oxidized to butenedioic acid and other small-molecule acids.

  14. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA

    DOE PAGES

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E.; Dai, Nan; ...

    2015-08-31

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solvedmore » NgTet1–5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably due to the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate.« less

  15. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Ivan R; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-12-15

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solved NgTet1-5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably because the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. In medium dispersion relation effects in nuclear inclusive reactions at intermediate and low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, Juan; Sobczyk, Joanna E.

    2017-08-01

    In a well-established many-body framework, successful in modeling a great variety of nuclear processes, we analyze the role of the spectral functions (SFs) accounting for the modifications of the dispersion relation of nucleons embedded in a nuclear medium. We concentrate in processes mostly governed by one-body mechanisms, and study possible approximations to evaluate the particle-hole propagator using SFs. We also investigate how to include together SFs and long-range RPA-correlation corrections in the evaluation of nuclear response functions, discussing the existing interplay between both type of nuclear effects. At low energy transfers (≤ 50 MeV), we compare our predictions for inclusive muon and radiative pion captures in nuclei, and charge-current (CC) neutrino-nucleus cross sections with experimental results. We also present an analysis of intermediate energy quasi-elastic neutrino scattering for various targets and both neutrino and antineutrino CC driven processes. In all cases, we pay special attention to estimate the uncertainties affecting the theoretical predictions. In particular, we show that errors on the σμ /σe ratio are much smaller than 5%, and also much smaller than the size of the SF+RPA nuclear corrections, which produce significant effects, not only in the individual cross sections, but also in their ratio for neutrino energies below 400 MeV. These latter nuclear corrections, beyond Pauli blocking, turn out to be thus essential to achieve a correct theoretical understanding of this ratio of cross sections of interest for appearance neutrino oscillation experiments. We also briefly compare our SF and RPA results to predictions obtained within other representative approaches.

  17. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. [Annual] progress report, August 1, 1989--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  18. Reactivity and reaction intermediates for acetic acid adsorbed on CeO2(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Calaza, Florencia C.; Chen, Tsung -Liang; Mullins, David R.; Xu, Ye; Steven H. Overbury

    2015-05-02

    Adsorption and reaction of acetic acid on a CeO2(1 1 1) surface was studied by a combination of ultra-highvacuum based methods including temperature desorption spectroscopy (TPD), soft X-ray photoelectronspectroscopy (sXPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and reflection absorption IRspectroscopy (RAIRS), together with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. TPD shows that thedesorption products are strongly dependent upon the initial oxidation state of the CeO2 surface, includingselectivity between acetone and acetaldehyde products. The combination of sXPS and NEXAFS demon-strate that acetate forms upon adsorption at low temperature and is stable to above 500 K, above whichpoint ketene, acetone and acetic acid desorb. Furthermore, DFT and RAIRS show that below 500 K, bridge bondedacetate coexists with a moiety formed by adsorption of an acetate at an oxygen vacancy, formed bywater desorption.

  19. Reactivity and reaction intermediates for acetic acid adsorbed on CeO2(111)

    DOE PAGES

    Calaza, Florencia C.; Chen, Tsung -Liang; Mullins, David R.; ...

    2015-05-02

    Adsorption and reaction of acetic acid on a CeO2(1 1 1) surface was studied by a combination of ultra-highvacuum based methods including temperature desorption spectroscopy (TPD), soft X-ray photoelectronspectroscopy (sXPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and reflection absorption IRspectroscopy (RAIRS), together with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. TPD shows that thedesorption products are strongly dependent upon the initial oxidation state of the CeO2 surface, includingselectivity between acetone and acetaldehyde products. The combination of sXPS and NEXAFS demon-strate that acetate forms upon adsorption at low temperature and is stable to above 500 K, above whichpoint ketene, acetone and acetic acidmore » desorb. Furthermore, DFT and RAIRS show that below 500 K, bridge bondedacetate coexists with a moiety formed by adsorption of an acetate at an oxygen vacancy, formed bywater desorption.« less

  20. Dehydrocyclization of n-octane: Role of alkene intermediates in the reaction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Buchang; Davis, B.H.

    1997-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to define whether alkenes, formed during alkane dehydrocyclization, are reconverted to the alkane and to elucidate the role of alkanes in the dehydrocyclization mechanism. In a competitive conversion, an alkene is converted much more rapidly than n-octane (C{sub 8}D{sub 18}). The lack of H/D exchange indicates that the adsorption of the n-octane is essentially irreversible, whereas some H/D exchange in the added alkene suggests that alkene desorption does occur; however, the added alkene does not desorb as the alkane, in conformity with irreversible adsorption of the alkane. The results demonstrate that the addition of a labeled alkene cannot provide data to establish the validity of the sequential dehydrogenation reaction pathway.

  1. Isolation of bis(copper) key intermediates in Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne "click reaction".

    PubMed

    Jin, Liqun; Tolentino, Daniel R; Melaimi, Mohand; Bertrand, Guy

    2015-06-01

    The copper-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of an azide to a terminal alkyne (CuAAC) is one of the most popular chemical transformations, with applications ranging from material to life sciences. However, despite many mechanistic studies, direct observation of key components of the catalytic cycle is still missing. Initially, mononuclear species were thought to be the active catalysts, but later on, dinuclear complexes came to the front. We report the isolation of both a previously postulated π,σ-bis(copper) acetylide and a hitherto never-mentioned bis(metallated) triazole complex. We also demonstrate that although mono- and bis-copper complexes promote the CuAAC reaction, the dinuclear species are involved in the kinetically favored pathway.

  2. Modeling stopped-flow data for nucleic acid duplex formation reactions: the importance of off-path intermediates.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Jacqueline R; Rauzan, Brittany; Stegemann, Rachel; Deckert, Alice

    2013-08-01

    Evidence for unexpected off-path intermediates to DNA duplex formation is presented. These off-path intermediates are shown to involve unimolecular and, in one case, bimolecular structure in one of the single strands of complementary DNA. Three models are developed to account for the observed single-stranded structures that are formed in parallel with duplex formation. These models are applied to the analysis of stopped-flow data for eight different nonself-complementary duplex formation reactions in order to extract the elementary rate constant for formation of the duplex from the complementary random coil single-stranded DNA. The free energy of activation (at 25 °C) for the denaturation of each duplex is calculated from these data and is shown to have a linear correlation to the overall standard free energy for duplex formation (also at 25 °C). Duplexes that contain mismatches obey a parallel linear free-energy (LFE) relationship with a y-intercept that is greater than that of duplexes without mismatches. Slopes near unity for the LFE relationships indicate that all duplexes go through an early, unstructured transition state.

  3. Localisation of the sites of action of cadmium on oxidative phosphorylation in potato tuber mitochondria using top-down elasticity analysis.

    PubMed

    Kesseler, A; Brand, M D

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the significant sites of action of cadmium on oxidative phosphorylation in potato tuber mitocondria. We simplified the system to three convenient subsystems linked via the production or consumption of a common intermediate, namely protonmotive force. The three subsystems were substrate oxidation, which produces protonmotive force, and the proton leak reactions and the phosphorylation reactions, which consume protonmotive force. By measuring the effect of cadmium on the kinetic response of each subsystem to protonmotive force (top-down elasticity analysis), we found that cadmium stimulated proton leak reactions and strongly inhibited substrate oxidation, but had no measurable effect on the phosphorylation reactions. Cadmium therefore decreases the amount of ATP produced/oxygen consumed (the effective P/O ratio) not by inhibiting the phosphorylation reactions directly, but by inhibiting the production of protonmotive force and by diverting proton flux from phosphorylation reactions to the proton leak reactions.

  4. Nonclassical aryl radicals: Intermediates or transition states for the hydrogen shift reactions?

    SciTech Connect

    Cioslowski, J.; Liu, G.; Moncrieff, D.

    1996-06-14

    Electronic properties of aryl radicals obtained by removing single hydrogen atoms from the sterically congested regions of benzo[c]phenanthrene, biphenyl, triphenylene, phenanthrene, and perylene are studied at the UBLYP/6-311G** level of theory. Two structures are considered by each radical, the classical one involving a C-H{hor_ellipsis}C arrangement of atoms and the nonclassical one possessing a three-center C-H-C linkage. The five nonclassical radicals under study are found to be transition states for degenerate 1,4- and 1,5-hydrogen shift reactions that interconvert the classical species. However, the results of the present calculations indicate that the nonclassical structures with the C-H distances in the C-H-C linkages shorter than 1.34 {angstrom} should be energy minima representing potentially observable chemical systems. The predicted energy barrier to the 1,5-hydrogen shift in the 1-benzo[c]phenanthrenyl radical is only 9.3 kcal/mol with the zero-point energies included, making the hydrogen migration in this system facile at relatively low temperatures. Rigorous analysis of the computed electronic wave functions provides a clear-cut picture of bonding in both the classical and nonclassical aryl radicals. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Reactions of Atmospheric Particulate Stabilized Criegee Intermediates Lead to High-Molecular-Weight Aerosol Components.

    PubMed

    Wang, MingYi; Yao, Lei; Zheng, Jun; Wang, XinKe; Chen, JianMin; Yang, Xin; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-07

    Aging of organic aerosol particles is one of the most poorly understood topics in atmospheric aerosol research. Here, we used an aerosol flow tube together with an iodide-adduct high-resolution time-of-flight chemical-ionization mass spectrometer equipped with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO-HRToF-CIMS) to investigate heterogeneous ozonolysis of oleic acid (OL), developing a comprehensive oxidation mechanism with observed products. In addition to the well-known first-generation C9 products including nonanal, nonanoic acid, azelaic acid, and 9-oxononanoic acid, the iodide-adduct chemical ionization permitted unambiguous determination of a large number of high-molecular-weight particulate products up to 670 Da with minimum amounts of fragmentation. These high-molecular-weight products are characterized by a fairly uniform carbon oxidation state but stepwise addition of a carbon backbone moiety, and hence continuous decrease in the volatility. Our results demonstrate that heterogeneous oxidation of organic aerosols has a significant effect on the physiochemical properties of organic aerosols and that reactions of particulate SCIs from ozonolysis of an unsaturated particulate species represent a previously underappreciated mechanism that lead to formation of high-molecular-weight particulate products that are stable under typical atmospheric conditions.

  6. Single turnover kinetics of tryptophan hydroxylase: evidence for a new intermediate in the reaction of the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases.

    PubMed

    Pavon, Jorge Alex; Eser, Bekir; Huynh, Michaela T; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2010-09-07

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TrpH) uses a non-heme mononuclear iron center to catalyze the tetrahydropterin-dependent hydroxylation of tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan. The reactions of the TrpH.Fe(II), TrpH.Fe(II).tryptophan, TrpH.Fe(II).6MePH(4).tryptophan, and TrpH.Fe(II).6MePH(4).phenylalanine complexes with O(2) were monitored by stopped-flow absorbance spectroscopy and rapid quench methods. The second-order rate constant for the oxidation of TrpH.Fe(II) has a value of 104 M(-1) s(-1) irrespective of the presence of tryptophan. Stopped-flow absorbance analyses of the reaction of the TrpH.Fe(II).6MePH(4).tryptophan complex with oxygen are consistent with the initial step being reversible binding of oxygen, followed by the formation with a rate constant of 65 s(-1) of an intermediate I that has maximal absorbance at 420 nm. The rate constant for decay of I, 4.4 s(-1), matches that for formation of the 4a-hydroxypterin product monitored at 248 nm. Chemical-quench analyses show that 5-hydroxytryptophan forms with a rate constant of 1.3 s(-1) and that overall turnover is limited by a subsequent slow step, presumably product release, with a rate constant of 0.2 s(-1). All of the data with tryptophan as substrate can be described by a five-step mechanism. In contrast, with phenylalanine as substrate, the reaction can be described by three steps: a second-order reaction with oxygen to form I, decay of I as tyrosine forms, and slow product release.

  7. A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Trong-Nghia; Putikam, Raghunath; Lin, M. C.

    2015-03-28

    We have discovered a new and highly competitive product channel in the unimolecular decay process for small Criegee intermediates, CH{sub 2}OO and anti/syn-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, occurring by intramolecular insertion reactions via a roaming-like transition state (TS) based on quantum-chemical calculations. Our results show that in the decomposition of CH{sub 2}OO and anti-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, the predominant paths directly produce cis-HC(O)OH and syn-CH{sub 3}C(O)OH acids with >110 kcal/mol exothermicities via loose roaming-like insertion TSs involving the terminal O atom and the neighboring C–H bonds. For syn-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, the major decomposition channel occurs by abstraction of a H atom from the CH{sub 3} group by the terminal O atom producing CH{sub 2}C(H)O–OH. At 298 K, the intramolecular insertion process in CH{sub 2}OO was found to be 600 times faster than the commonly assumed ring-closing reaction.

  8. Protein modification by a Maillard reaction intermediate methylglyoxal. Immunochemical detection of fluorescent 5-methylimidazolone derivatives in vivo.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Khor, O T; Oya, T; Osawa, T; Yasuda, Y; Miyata, T

    1997-06-30

    Methylglyoxal (MG), an endogenous metabolite that increases in diabetes, is a common intermediate in nonenzymatic glycation (Maillard reaction) in vivo. Here we describe the immunochemical approach to the detection of MG adducts in proteins in vitro and in atherosclerotic lesions of human aorta in vivo. The reaction of protein (bovine serum albumin) with MG led to selective loss of arginine and lysine residues, accompanied by the formation of 5-methylimidazolone (N delta-(5-methylimidazolon-2-yl)ornithine) and imidazolysine (1,3-di-lysino-4-methylimidazole) derivatives, respectively. The anti-5-methylimidazolone antibody was prepared by immunizing rabbits with a MG-keyhole limpet hemocyanin conjugate and purifying the serum on an affinity gel prepared by covalent attachment of the 5-methylimidazolone derivative. The antibody cross-reacted with the proteins treated with not only MG but trioses, such as hydroxyacetone, dihydroxyacetone, and glyceraldehyde. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed that atherosclerotic lesions of human aorta contained 5-methylimidazolone derivatives whose distributions were identical to those of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) detected by the anti-AGE antibody.

  9. Reactions of connective tissue to amalgam, intermediate restorative material, mineral trioxide aggregate, and mineral trioxide aggregate mixed with chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Mahmut; Muglali, Mehtap; Bodrumlu, Emre; Guvenc, Tolga

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to histopathologically examine the biocompatibility of the high-copper amalgam, intermediate restorative material (IRM), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and MTA mixed with chlorhexidine (CHX). This study was conducted to observe the rat subcutaneous connective tissue reaction to the implanted tubes filled with amalgam, IRM, MTA, and MTA mixed with CHX. The animals were sacrificed 15, 30, and 60 days after the implantation procedure. The implant sites were excised and prepared for histological evaluation. Sections of 5 to 6 microm thickness were cut by a microtome and stained with hemotoxylin eosin and examined under a light microscope. The inflammatory reactions were categorized as weak (none or few inflammatory cells < or =25 cells), moderate (>25 cells), and severe (a lot of inflammatory cells not to be counted, giant cells, and granulation tissue). Thickness of fibrous capsules measured five different areas by the digital imaging and the mean values were scored. Amalgam, IRM, and MTA mixed with CHX caused a weak inflammatory response on days 15, 30, and 60. MTA provoked an initial severe inflammatory response that subsided at the 30 and 60 day study period. A clear fibrous capsule was observed beginning from the 15 days in all of the groups. Within the limits of this study, amalgam, IRM, MTA, and MTA mixed with CHX materials were surrounded by fibrous connective tissue indicated that they were well tolerated by the tissues, therefore, MTA/CHX seemed to be biocompatible.

  10. A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trong-Nghia; Putikam, Raghunath; Lin, M. C.

    2015-03-01

    We have discovered a new and highly competitive product channel in the unimolecular decay process for small Criegee intermediates, CH2OO and anti/syn-CH3C(H)OO, occurring by intramolecular insertion reactions via a roaming-like transition state (TS) based on quantum-chemical calculations. Our results show that in the decomposition of CH2OO and anti-CH3C(H)OO, the predominant paths directly produce cis-HC(O)OH and syn-CH3C(O)OH acids with >110 kcal/mol exothermicities via loose roaming-like insertion TSs involving the terminal O atom and the neighboring C-H bonds. For syn-CH3C(H)OO, the major decomposition channel occurs by abstraction of a H atom from the CH3 group by the terminal O atom producing CH2C(H)O-OH. At 298 K, the intramolecular insertion process in CH2OO was found to be 600 times faster than the commonly assumed ring-closing reaction.

  11. A biosynthetic thiolase in complex with a reaction intermediate: the crystal structure provides new insights into the catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Modis, Y; Wierenga, R K

    1999-10-15

    Thiolases are ubiquitous and form a large family of dimeric or tetrameric enzymes with a conserved, five-layered alphabetaalphabetaalpha catalytic domain. Thiolases can function either degradatively, in the beta-oxidation pathway of fatty acids, or biosynthetically. Biosynthetic thiolases catalyze the biological Claisen condensation of two molecules of acetyl-CoA to form acetoacetyl-CoA. This is one of the fundamental categories of carbon skeletal assembly patterns in biological systems and is the first step in a wide range of biosynthetic pathways, including those that generate cholesterol, steroid hormones, and various energy-storage molecules. The crystal structure of the tetrameric biosynthetic thiolase from Zoogloea ramigera has been determined at 2.0 A resolution. The structure contains a striking and novel 'cage-like' tetramerization motif, which allows for some hinge motion of the two tight dimers with respect to each other. The protein crystals were flash-frozen after a short soak with the enzyme's substrate, acetoacetyl-CoA. A reaction intermediate was thus trapped: the enzyme tetramer is acetylated at Cys89 and has a CoA molecule bound in each of its active-site pockets. The shape of the substrate-binding pocket reveals the basis for the short-chain substrate specificity of the enzyme. The active-site architecture, and in particular the position of the covalently attached acetyl group, allow a more detailed reaction mechanism to be proposed in which Cys378 is involved in both steps of the reaction. The structure also suggests an important role for the thioester oxygen atom of the acetylated enzyme in catalysis.

  12. Understanding the reaction mechanism and intermediate stabilization in mammalian serine racemase using multiscale quantum-classical simulations.

    PubMed

    Nitoker, Neta; Major, Dan Thomas

    2015-01-20

    Serine racemase (SerR) is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme catalyzing the racemization of l-Ser to d-Ser. In mammals, d-Ser is an endogenous coagonist required for the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), thus making SerR a promising pharmaceutical target. However, mechanistic studies of SerR are scarce, and the details of the enzymatic racemization reaction are not fully understood. In the current study we elucidate the catalytic mechanism in SerR by employing combined multiscale classical/quantum simulations. The free energy profile of a model SerR racemization reaction is first calculated in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. To obtain the free energy profile for the enzymatic reaction, hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with umbrella sampling are performed. The results suggest that in SerR, similarly to the related enzyme alanine racemase, the unprotonated PLP-substrate intermediate is stabilized mostly due to solvation effects contributed by water molecules and active-site residues, as well as long-range electrostatic interactions with the enzyme environment. In addition to a deeper understanding of the racemization mechanism in SerR, based on our simulations we propose specific mutations, which might shift the SerR equilibrium in favor of either l-Ser or d-Ser. Finally, the current studies have produced catalytically competent forms of the rat and human enzymes, which may serve as targets for future docking studies and drug design.

  13. Oxo iron(IV) as an oxidative active intermediate of p-chlorophenol in the Fenton reaction: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Mignon, Pierre; Pera-Titus, Marc; Chermette, Henry

    2012-03-21

    Debate continues over which active species plays the role of oxidative agent during the Fenton reaction-the HO˙ radical or oxo iron [Fe(IV)O](2+). In this context, the present study investigates the oxidation of p-chlorophenol by [Fe(IV)O(H(2)O)(5)](2+) using DFT calculations, within gas-phase and micro-solvated models, in order to explore the possible role of oxo iron as a reactant. The results show that the chlorine atom substitution of p-chlorophenol by oxo iron is a highly stabilising step (ΔH = -83 kcal mol(-1)) with a free energy barrier of 5.8 kcal mol(-1) in the micro-solvated model. This illustrates the high oxidising power of the [Fe(IV)O(H(2)O)(5)](2+) complex. On the other hand, the breaking of the Fe-O bond, leading to the formation of hydroquinone, is observed to be the rate-determining step of the reaction. The rather large free energy barrier corresponding to this bond cleavage amounts to 10.2 and 9.3 kcal mol(-1) in the gas-phase and micro-solvated models, respectively. Elsewhere, the lifetime of the HO˙ radical has previously been shown to be extremely small. These facts, combined with observations of oxo iron under certain experimental conditions, suggest that oxo iron is a highly plausible oxidative species of the reaction. In addition, a trigonal bipyramidal iron complex, coordinated either by hydroxyl groups and/or by water molecules, has been found in all described mechanisms. This structure appears to be a stable intermediate; and to our knowledge, it has not been characterised by previous studies.

  14. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of spectrin from human erythrocyte ghosts under physiological conditions: autocatalysis rather than reaction with separate kinase and phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Imhof, B A; Acha-Orbea, H J; Libermann, T A; Reber, B F; Lanz, J H; Winterhalter, K H; Birchmeier, W

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism of phosphosylation and dephosphorylation of spectrin from human erythrocyte membranes has been examined under closely physiological conditions. The results support the hypothesis that spectrin is an autophosphorylating and dephosphorylating system. (i) Extraction from ghosts of up to 85% of the kinase (casein kinase) suggested to catalyze the reaction [see Fairbanks, G., Avruch, J., Dino, E. J. & Patel, V. P. (1978) J. Supramol. Struct. 9, 97--112] only slightly reduced spectrin component 2 phosphorylation and did not affect ATP-induced changes in the ghosts' shapes. (ii) A spectrin--actin complex isolated from endocytotic inside-out vesicles under hyperteonic conditions contained virtually no casein kinase activity and still exhibited a largely intact phosphorylation machinery. (iii) Photoaffinity labeling experiments indicated that spectrin component 2 fulfills the necessary prerequisite of the hypothesis--i.e., it contains its own ATP-binding site. (iv) Under various conditions, spectrin phosphorylation and dephospohrylation seem to be tightly coupled. The implications of these findings for the understanding of spectrin function and the maintenance of erythrocyte shape are discussed. Images PMID:6932020

  15. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of spectrin from human erythrocyte ghosts under physiological conditions: autocatalysis rather than reaction with separate kinase and phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Imhof, B A; Acha-Orbea, H J; Libermann, T A; Reber, B F; Lanz, J H; Winterhalter, K H; Birchmeier, W

    1980-06-01

    The mechanism of phosphosylation and dephosphorylation of spectrin from human erythrocyte membranes has been examined under closely physiological conditions. The results support the hypothesis that spectrin is an autophosphorylating and dephosphorylating system. (i) Extraction from ghosts of up to 85% of the kinase (casein kinase) suggested to catalyze the reaction [see Fairbanks, G., Avruch, J., Dino, E. J. & Patel, V. P. (1978) J. Supramol. Struct. 9, 97--112] only slightly reduced spectrin component 2 phosphorylation and did not affect ATP-induced changes in the ghosts' shapes. (ii) A spectrin--actin complex isolated from endocytotic inside-out vesicles under hyperteonic conditions contained virtually no casein kinase activity and still exhibited a largely intact phosphorylation machinery. (iii) Photoaffinity labeling experiments indicated that spectrin component 2 fulfills the necessary prerequisite of the hypothesis--i.e., it contains its own ATP-binding site. (iv) Under various conditions, spectrin phosphorylation and dephospohrylation seem to be tightly coupled. The implications of these findings for the understanding of spectrin function and the maintenance of erythrocyte shape are discussed.

  16. Synthesis of Y1Ba2Cu3O(sub x) superconducting powders by intermediate phase reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C.; Fernandez, J. F.; Recio, P.; Duran, P.

    1990-04-01

    One of the more striking problems for the synthesis of the Y1Ba2Cu3Ox compound is the high-temperature decomposition of the BaCO3. This compound is present as raw material or as an intermediate compound in chemical processes such as amorphous citrate, coprecipitation oxalate, sol-gel process, acetate pyrolisis, etc. This fact makes difficult the total formation reaction of the Y1Ba2Cu3Ox phase and leads to the presence of undesirable phases such as the BaCuO2 phase, the 'green phase', Y2BaCuO5 and others. Here, a new procedure to overcome this difficulty is studied. The barium cation is previously combined with yttrium and/or copper to form intermediate compounds which can react between them to give Y1Ba2Cu3Ox. BaY2O4 and BaCu2O3 react according to the equation BaY2O4+3BaCu2O3 yields 2Y1Ba2Cu3Ox. BaY2O4 is a stable compound of the Y2O3-BaO system; BaCu2O3 is an intimate mixture of BaCuO2 and uncombined CuO. The reaction kinetics of these phases have been established between 860 and 920 C. The phase evolution has been determined. The crystal structure of the Y1Ba2Cu3Ox obtained powder was studied. According to the results obtained from the kinetics study the Y1Ba2Cu3Ox the synthesis was performed at temperatures of 910 to 920 C for short treatment times (1 to 2 hours). Pure Y1Ba2Cu3Ox was prepared, which develops orthorombic type I structure despite of the cooling cycle. Superconducting transition took place at 91 K. The sintering behavior and the superconducting properties of sintered samples were studied. Density, microstructure and electrical conductivity were measured. Sintering densities higher than 95 percent D(sub th) were attained at temperatures below 940 C. Relatively fine grained microstructure was observed, and little or no-liquid phase was detected.

  17. Synthesis of Y1Ba2Cu3O(sub x) superconducting powders by intermediate phase reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, C.; Fernandez, J. F.; Recio, P.; Duran, P.

    1990-01-01

    One of the more striking problems for the synthesis of the Y1Ba2Cu3Ox compound is the high-temperature decomposition of the BaCO3. This compound is present as raw material or as an intermediate compound in chemical processes such as amorphous citrate, coprecipitation oxalate, sol-gel process, acetate pyrolisis, etc. This fact makes difficult the total formation reaction of the Y1Ba2Cu3Ox phase and leads to the presence of undesirable phases such as the BaCuO2 phase, the 'green phase', Y2BaCuO5 and others. Here, a new procedure to overcome this difficulty is studied. The barium cation is previously combined with yttrium and/or copper to form intermediate compounds which can react between them to give Y1Ba2Cu3Ox. BaY2O4 and BaCu2O3 react according to the equation BaY2O4+3BaCu2O3 yields 2Y1Ba2Cu3Ox. BaY2O4 is a stable compound of the Y2O3-BaO system; BaCu2O3 is an intimate mixture of BaCuO2 and uncombined CuO. The reaction kinetics of these phases have been established between 860 and 920 C. The phase evolution has been determined. The crystal structure of the Y1Ba2Cu3Ox obtained powder was studied. According to the results obtained from the kinetics study the Y1Ba2Cu3Ox the synthesis was performed at temperatures of 910 to 920 C for short treatment times (1 to 2 hours). Pure Y1Ba2Cu3Ox was prepared, which develops orthorombic type I structure despite of the cooling cycle. Superconducting transition took place at 91 K. The sintering behavior and the superconducting properties of sintered samples were studied. Density, microstructure and electrical conductivity were measured. Sintering densities higher than 95 percent D(sub th) were attained at temperatures below 940 C. Relatively fine grained microstructure was observed, and little or no-liquid phase was detected.

  18. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of spectrin.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, G; Avruch, J; Dino, J E; Patel, V P

    1978-01-01

    The phosphorylation of spectrin polypeptide 2 is thought to be involved in the metabolically dependent regulation of red cell shape and deformability. Spectrin phosphorylation is not affected by cAMP. The reaction in isolated membranes resembles the cAMP-independent, salt-stimulated phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate, casein, by enzyme(s) present both in isolated membranes and cytoplasmic extracts. Spectrin kinase is selectively eluted from membranes by 0.5 M NaCl and co-fractionates with eluted casein kinase. Phosphorylation of band 3 in the membrane is inhibited by salt, but the band 3 kinase is otherwise indistinguishable operationally from spectrin kinase. The membrane-bound casein (spectrin) kinase is not eluted efficiently with spectrin at low ionic strength; about 80% of the activity is apparently bound at sites (perhaps on or near band 3) other than spectrin. Partitioning of casein kinase between cytoplasm and membrane is metabolically dependent; the proportion of casein kinase on the membrane can range from 25% to 75%, but for fresh cells is normally about 40%. Dephosphorylation of phosphorylated spectrin has not been studied intensively. Slow release of 32Pi from [32P] spectrin on the membrane can be demonstrated, but phosphatase activity measured against solubilized [32P] spectrin is concentrated in the cytoplasm. The crude cytoplasmic phosphospectrin phosphatase is inhibited by various anions--notably, ATP and 2,3-DPG at physiological concentrations. Regulation of spectrin phosphorylation in intact cells has not been studied. We speculate that spectrin phosphorylation state may be regulated 1) by metabolic intermediates and other internal chemical signals that modulate kinase and phosphatase activities per se or determine their intracellular localization and 2) by membrane deformation that alters enzyme-spectrin interaction locally. Progress in the isolation and characterization of spectrin kinase and phosphospectrin phosphatase should lead to

  19. Atmospheric isoprene ozonolysis: impacts of stabilized Criegee intermediate reactions with SO2, H2O and dimethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newland, M. J.; Rickard, A. R.; Vereecken, L.; Muñoz, A.; Ródenas, M.; Bloss, W. J.

    2015-03-01

    Isoprene is the dominant global biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emission. Reactions of isoprene with ozone are known to form stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCIs), which have recently been shown to be potentially important oxidants for SO2 and NO2 in the atmosphere; however the significance of this chemistry for SO2 processing (affecting sulfate aerosol) and NO2 processing (affecting NOx levels) depends critically upon the fate of the SCI with respect to reaction with water and decomposition. Here, we have investigated the removal of SO2 in the presence of isoprene and ozone, as a function of humidity, under atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on relative humidity, confirming a significant reaction for isoprene derived SCI with H2O. Under excess SO2 conditions, the total isoprene ozonolysis SCI yield was calculated to be 0.56 (±0.03). The observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with a relative rate constant, k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2), of 5.4 (±0.8) × 10-5 for isoprene derived SCI. The relative rate constant for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) is 8.4 (±5.0) × 1010 cm-3. Uncertainties are ±2σ and represent combined systematic and precision components. These kinetic parameters are based on the simplification that a single SCI species is formed in isoprene ozonolysis, an approximation which describes the results well across the full range of experimental conditions. Our data indicate that isoprene-derived SCIs are unlikely to make a substantial contribution to gas-phase SO2 oxidation in the troposphere. We also present results from an analogous set of experiments, which show a clear dependence of SO2 removal in the isoprene-ozone system as a function of dimethyl sulfide concentration. We propose that this behaviour arises from a rapid reaction between isoprene-derived SCI and DMS; the observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with a relative rate constant, k(SCI + DMS)/k(SCI + SO2), of 4.1 (±2

  20. Atmospheric isoprene ozonolysis: impacts of stabilised Criegee intermediate reactions with SO2, H2O and dimethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newland, M. J.; Rickard, A. R.; Vereecken, L.; Muñoz, A.; Ródenas, M.; Bloss, W. J.

    2015-08-01

    Isoprene is the dominant global biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emission. Reactions of isoprene with ozone are known to form stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCIs), which have recently been shown to be potentially important oxidants for SO2 and NO2 in the atmosphere; however the significance of this chemistry for SO2 processing (affecting sulfate aerosol) and NO2 processing (affecting NOx levels) depends critically upon the fate of the SCIs with respect to reaction with water and decomposition. Here, we have investigated the removal of SO2 in the presence of isoprene and ozone, as a function of humidity, under atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on relative humidity, confirming a significant reaction for isoprene-derived SCIs with H2O. Under excess SO2 conditions, the total isoprene ozonolysis SCI yield was calculated to be 0.56 (±0.03). The observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with a relative rate constant, k(SCI + H2O) / k(SCI + SO2), of 3.1 (±0.5) × 10-5 for isoprene-derived SCIs. The relative rate constant for k(SCI decomposition) / k(SCI+SO2) is 3.0 (±3.2) × 1011 cm-3. Uncertainties are ±2σ and represent combined systematic and precision components. These kinetic parameters are based on the simplification that a single SCI species is formed in isoprene ozonolysis, an approximation which describes the results well across the full range of experimental conditions. Our data indicate that isoprene-derived SCIs are unlikely to make a substantial contribution to gas-phase SO2 oxidation in the troposphere. We also present results from an analogous set of experiments, which show a clear dependence of SO2 removal in the isoprene-ozone system as a function of dimethyl sulfide concentration. We propose that this behaviour arises from a rapid reaction between isoprene-derived SCIs and dimethyl sulfide (DMS); the observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with a relative rate constant, k(SCI + DMS

  1. Light Charged Particles and Intermediate Mass Fragments from the Reactions 486, 550, 640, and 730 Mev KRYPTON-86 + COPPER-63

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boger, John Thomas

    1992-01-01

    A detailed study has been made of the reaction ^{86}Kr + ^ {63}Cu at incident energies of 486, 550, 640, and 730 MeV. Measurements include cross sections, angular distributions, and energy spectra for light charged particles (^{1,2,3}H and ^4He), intermediate mass fragments (IMF) (4 <= Z <= 17), and heavy fragments (Z >= 18). Coincidences between light charged particles and between particles and fragments have also been measured to obtain exclusive cross sections, energy spectra, and angular distributions. Statistical model analysis of the energy spectra for ^1 H and ^4He detected in coincidence with the fragments has allowed estimation of ^1 H and ^4He multiplicities associated with the evaporation residues, fragments, and composite nuclei prior to scission. In particular, the light charged particle multiplicities for the IMF's have allowed for the derivation of their primary masses. This in turn has permitted refined measurements of the kinetic energies of the primary IMF's. The ^{86}Kr bombarding energies were selected so that the excitation energies of the composite nuclei (^{149} Tb*) were matched to those of other entrance channel reactions that produce the same composite nuclei. A close comparison of cross sections, energy spectra, angular distributions, and particle multiplicities for these matched entrance channels has provided the means for a detailed test of the Bohr Independence Hypothesis. Results of this comparison indicate extensive shape and thermal equilibration of the composite nuclei over the excitation energy range of 128 to 231 MeV. This conclusion is reached even for nuclear systems whose decay lifetimes are expected to be similar to their relaxation times. For the 640 MeV ^{86} Kr + ^{63}Cu reaction, cross sections were measured for IMF's of 4 <= Z <= 17 in singles and in coincidence with heavy fragments. Three sources for IMF production have been identified: (1) asymmetric binary fission, (2) sequential binary fission, and (3) simultaneous

  2. Methanol synthesis on ZnO({{000overline{1}}}). II. Structure, energetics, and vibrational signature of reaction intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Janos; Frenzel, Johannes; Meyer, Bernd; Marx, Dominik

    2013-07-01

    A rigorous characterization of a wealth of molecular species adsorbed at oxygen defects on ZnO(000overline{1}) is given. These defects represent the putative active sites in methanol synthesis from CO and H2. The oxidation state of the ZnO catalyst and thus the preferred charge state and the reactivity of the oxygen vacancies depend on the gas phase temperature and pressure conditions. Considering charge states of oxygen vacancies relevant at the reducing conditions of the industrial process, i.e., F++/H2, F0, F0/H2, and F-, as well as the F++ center which is abundant at UHV conditions and therefore important to allow for comparison with surface science experiments, we have investigated the structure, energetics, and vibrational frequencies of an exhaustive catalog of reaction intermediates using electronic structure calculations. After having identified the characteristic adsorption modes of CO, formate, formic acid, hydroxymethylene, formyl, formaldehyde, dioxomethylene, hydroxymethyl, hydroxymethoxide, methoxide, as well as methanol itself, the thermodynamic stability of all species with respect to the charge state of the oxygen vacancy and their electronic stabilization is discussed in detail and summarized in an energy level diagram.

  3. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  4. Photochemical reactions of fac-[Mn(CO)3(phen)imidazole]+: evidence for long-lived radical species intermediates.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Inara; Inglez, Simone D; Lima, Francisco C A; Daniel, Juliana F S; McGarvey, Bruce R; Tedesco, Antônio C; Carlos, Rose M

    2008-12-15

    The electronic absorption spectrum of fac-[Mn(CO)(3)(phen)imH](+), fac-1 in CH(2)Cl(2) is characterized by a strong absorption band at 378 nm (epsilon(max) = 3200 mol(-1) L cm(-1)). On the basis of quantum mechanical calculations, the visible absorption band has been assigned to ligand-to-ligand charge-transfer (LLCT, im-->phen) and metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT, Mn-->phen) charge transfer transition. When fac-1 in CH(2)Cl(2) is irradiated with 350 nm continuous light, the absorption features are gradually shifted to represent those of the meridional complex mer-[Mn(CO)(3)(phen)imH](+), mer-1 (lambda(max) = 556 nm). The net photoreaction under these conditions is a photoisomerization, although, the presence of the long-lived radical species was also detected by (1)H NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. 355 nm continuous photolysis of fac-1 in CH(3)CN solution also gives the long-lived intermediate which is readily trapped by metylviologen (MV(2+)) giving rise to the formation of the one-electron reduced methyl viologen (MV(*+)). The UV-vis spectra monitored during the slow (45 min) thermal back reaction exhibited isosbestic conversion at 426 nm. On the basis of spectroscopic techniques and quantum mechanical calculations, the role of the radicals produced is analyzed.

  5. A QM/MM study of the associative mechanism for the phosphorylation reaction catalyzed by protein kinase A and its D166A mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Gallegos, Ayax; Garcia-Viloca, Mireia; González-Lafont, Àngels; Lluch, José M.

    2014-11-01

    Here we analyze in detail the possible catalytic role of the associative mechanism in the γ-phosphoryl transfer reaction in the catalytic subunit of the mammalian cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) enzyme and its D166A mutant. We have used a complete solvated model of the ATP-Mg2-Kemptide/PKA system and good levels of theory (B3LYP/MM and MP2/MM) to determine several potential energy paths from different MD snapshots, and we present a deep analysis of the interaction distances and energies between ligands, metals and enzyme residues. We have also tested the electrostatic stabilization of the transition state structures localized herein with the charge balance hypothesis. Overall, the results obtained in this work reopen the discussion about the plausibility of the associative reaction pathway and highlight the proposed role of the catalytic triad Asp166-Lys168-Thr201.

  6. REACTIONS OF PEROXYNITRITE WITH URIC ACID: FORMATION OF REACTIVE INTERMEDIATES, ALKYLATED PRODUCTS AND TRIURET, AND IN VIVO PRODUCTION OF TRIURET UNDER CONDITIONS OF OXIDATIVE STRESS

    PubMed Central

    Gersch, Christine; Palii, Sergiu P.; Imaram, Witcha; Kim, Kyung Mee; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Angerhofer, Alexander; Johnson, Richard J.; Henderson, George N.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is associated with hypertension, metabolic syndrome, preeclampsia, cardiovascular disease and renal disease, all conditions associated with oxidative stress. We hypothesized that uric acid, a known antioxidant, might become prooxidative following its reaction with oxidants; and, thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases. Uric acid and 1,3-15N2-uric acid were reacted with peroxynitrite in different buffers and in the presence of alcohols, antioxidants and in human plasma. The reaction products were identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses. The reactions generate reactive intermediates that yielded triuret as their final product. We also found that the antioxidant, ascorbate, could partially prevent this reaction. Whereas triuret was preferentially generated by the reactions in aqueous buffers, when uric acid or 1,3-15N2-uric acid was reacted with peroxynitrite in the presence of alcohols, it yielded alkylated alcohols as the final product. By extension, this reaction can alkylate other biomolecules containing OH groups and others containing labile hydrogens. Triuret was also found to be elevated in the urine of subjects with preeclampsia, a pregnancy-specific hypertensive syndrome that is associated with oxidative stress, whereas very little triuret is produced in normal healthy volunteers. We conclude that under conditions of oxidative stress, uric acid can form reactive intermediates, including potential alkylating species, by reacting with peroxynitrite. These reactive intermediates could possibly explain how uric acid contributes to the pathogenesis of diseases such as the metabolic syndrome and hypertension. PMID:19219741

  7. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding 'greener' sources of commodity chemicals and fuels. High-valent Chromium from Hydroperoxido-Chromium(III). The decomposition of pentaaquahydroperoxido chromium(III) ion (hereafter Cr aqOOH2+) in acidic aqueous solutions is kinetically complex and generates mixtures of products (Craq3+, HCrO 4-, H2O2, and O2). The yield of high-valent chromium products (known carcinogens) increased from a few percent at pH 1 to 70 % at pH 5.5 (near biological pH). Yields of H 2O2 increased with acid concentration. The reproducibility of the kinetic data was poor, but became simplified in the presence of H2O2 or 2,2‧-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) dianion (ABTS2-). Both are capable of scavenging strongly oxidizing intermediates). The observed rate constants (pH 1, [O2] ≤ 0.03 mM) in the presence of these scavengers are independent of [scavenger] and within the error are the same (k,ABTS2- = (4.9 +/- 0.2) x 10-4 s-1 and kH2O2 = (5.3 +/- 0.7) x 10-4 s-1); indicating involvement of the scavengers in post-rate determining steps. In the presence of either scavenger, decomposition of CrOOH2+ obeyed a two-term rate law, k obs / s-1 = (6.7 +/- 0.7) x 10-4 + (7.6 +/- 1.1) x 10-4 [H+]. Effect of [H+] on the kinetics and the product distribution, cleaner kinetics in the presence of scavengers, and independence of kobs on [scavenger] suggest a dual-pathway mechanism for the decay of Craq OOH2+. The H+-catalyzed path

  8. LC/MS/MS structure elucidation of reaction intermediates formed during the TiO2 photocatalysis of microcystin-LR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a cyanotoxin and emerging drinking water contaminant, was treated with TiO(2) photocatalysts immobilized on stainless steel plates as an alternative to nanoparticles in slurry. The reaction intermediates of MC-LR were identified with mass spectrometry (MS)...

  9. LC/MS/MS structure elucidation of reaction intermediates formed during the TiO2 photocatalysis of microcystin-LR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR), a cyanotoxin and emerging drinking water contaminant, was treated with TiO(2) photocatalysts immobilized on stainless steel plates as an alternative to nanoparticles in slurry. The reaction intermediates of MC-LR were identified with mass spectrometry (MS)...

  10. A Computational Study of a Recreated G Protein-GEF Reaction Intermediate Competent for Nucleotide Exchange: Fate of the Mg Ion

    PubMed Central

    Ben Hamida-Rebaï, Mériam; Robert, Charles H.

    2010-01-01

    Small G-proteins of the superfamily Ras function as molecular switches, interacting with different cellular partners according to their activation state. G-protein activation involves the dissociation of bound GDP and its replacement by GTP, in an exchange reaction that is accelerated and regulated in the cell by guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Large conformational changes accompany the exchange reaction, and our understanding of the mechanism is correspondingly incomplete. However, much knowledge has been derived from structural studies of blocked or inactive mutant GEFs, which presumably closely represent intermediates in the exchange reaction and yet which are by design incompetent for carrying out the nucleotide exchange reaction. In this study we have used comparative modelling to recreate an exchange-competent form of a late, pre-GDP-ejection intermediate species in Arf1, a well-characterized small G-protein. We extensively characterized three distinct models of this intermediate using molecular dynamics simulations, allowing us to address ambiguities related to the mutant structural studies. We observed in particular the unfavorable nature of Mg associated forms of the complex and the establishment of closer Arf1-GEF contacts in its absence. The results of this study shed light on GEF-mediated activation of this small G protein and on predicting the fate of the Mg ion at a critical point in the exchange reaction. The structural models themselves furnish additional targets for interfacial inhibitor design, a promising direction for exploring potentially druggable targets with high biological specificity. PMID:20174625

  11. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. Progress report, August 1, 1989--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1991-12-31

    During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  12. Is the mu-oxo-mu-peroxodiiron intermediate of a ribonucleotide reductase biomimetic a possible oxidant of epoxidation reactions?

    PubMed

    de Visser, Sam P

    2008-01-01

    Density functional calculations on a mu-oxo-mu-peroxodiiron complex (1) with a tetrapodal ligand BPP (BPP=N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-3-aminopropionate) are presented that is a biomimetic of the active site region of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). We have studied all low-lying electronic states and show that it has close-lying broken-shell singlet and undecaplet (S=0, 5) ground states with essentially two sextet spin iron atoms. In strongly distorted electronic systems in which the two iron atoms have different spin states, the peroxo group moves considerably out of the plane of the mu-oxodiiron group due to orbital rearrangements. The calculated absorption spectra of (1,11)1 are in good agreement with experimental studies on biomimetics and RNR enzyme systems. Moreover, vibrational shifts in the spectrum due to (18)O(2) substitution of the oxygen atoms in the peroxo group follow similar trends as experimental observations. To identify whether the mu-oxo-mu-1,2-peroxodiiron or the mu-oxo-mu-1,1-peroxodiiron complexes are able to epoxidize substrates, we studied the reactivity patterns versus propene. Generally, the reactions are stepwise via radical intermediates and proceed by two-state reactivity patterns on competing singlet and undecaplet spin state surfaces. However, both the mu-oxo-mu-1,2-peroxodiiron and mu-oxo-mu-1,1-peroxodiiron complex are sluggish oxidants with high epoxidation barriers. The epoxidation barriers for the mu-oxo-mu-1,1-peroxodiiron complex are significantly lower than the ones for the mu-oxo-mu-1,2-peroxodiiron complex but still are too high to be considered for catalytic properties. Thus, theory has ruled out two possible peroxodiiron catalysts as oxidants in RNR enzymes and biomimetics and the quest to find the actual oxidant in the enzyme mechanism continues.

  13. Production of Neutron-Unbound States in Intermediate - Fragments from Nitrogen + Silver Reactions at E/a = 35 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbronn, Lawrence Harvey

    The populations of neutron-unbound states and of bound states in intermediate-mass fragments have been measured at 15^circ, 31 ^circ, and 64^circ from the ^{14}N + Ag reaction at E/A = 35 MeV. The data are identified in terms of the reaction mechanism producing them, which is either a deep-inelastic mechanism or a quasielastic mechanism. In order to test the assumption that the deep -inelastic data are produced from a thermal source, the unbound-state/bound-state population ratios of deep-inelastic fragments are compared to the predictions of a thermal sequential decay model. Most, but not all, of the deep -inelastic population ratios are fitted with model calculations that assume a source temperature between 2.5 and 3.4 MeV. Three or more populations from the same isotope were measured for ^{13}C, ^ {12}B, and ^{10} Be. The deep-inelastic populations from ^{13}C and ^{10 }Be were fitted with a single temperature, while the deep-inelastic populations from ^ {12}B were not fitted. There is enough of the deep-inelastic data that is not fitted with the predictions of a thermal model that the assumption of a thermal source for the production of deep-inelastic fragments may be incorrect, or there may be other effects present which alter the thermal properties of the data. The dependence of the unbound-state/bound-state population ratio on the fragment kinetic energy shows a difference between the quasielastic and deep-inelastic data. For quasielastic fragments whose mass is near the mass of the beam, the ratio decreases towards zero as the fragment velocity approaches the beam velocity. In contrast, the ratio for half-beam mass quasielastic fragments is constant or only slightly decreasing as the kinetic energy increases. The ratio for deep-inelastic fragments is approximately constant as a function of kinetic energy, independent of fragment mass. The amount of feeding from several neutron-unbound channels into bound states is measured and compared to the sequential

  14. Correlation between tyrosine phosphorylation intensity of a 107 kDa protein band and A23187-induced acrosome reaction in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Picherit-Marchenay, C; Bréchard, S; Boucher, D; Grizard, G

    2004-12-01

    This study, performed using semen samples from 10 men, investigated the relationship between sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation and acrosomal status in conditions supporting in vitro capacitation. Percoll-selected spermatozoa (cells from the 95% fraction) were incubated for 3 h at 37 degrees C under an atmosphere of 5% CO2 in air, in a polyvinyl alcohol (1 mg ml(-1)) containing Biggers-Whitten-Whittingham's medium, nonsupplemented or supplemented with either bovine serum albumin (BSA; fatty acid free, 3 mg ml(-1)) or 2-hydroxy-propyl-beta-cyclodextrin (2-OH-p-beta-CD; 0.5, 1, 2 mmol l(-1)). Sperm suspension in each medium was split into two aliquots. The first was used to evaluate the acrosomal status by staining with the fluorescein isothiocyanate Pisum sativum agglutinin after induction of the acrosome reaction (AR) for 45 min with 10 micromol l(-1) of A23187 calcium ionophore. The second aliquot was used for sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting, followed by a densitometric analysis. Compared with the nonsupplemented medium, BSA- or 2-OH-p-beta-CD-supplementation induced an increase in both the percentage of live acrosome-reacted sperm and the tyrosine phosphorylation intensity of the main phosphorylated 107 kDa protein. A correlation between the percentage of live acrosome-reacted sperm and the 107-kDa protein phosphotyrosine intensity was observed. Therefore, the 107 kDa protein-phosphotyrosine level measurement would bring additional information to conventional semen parameters in the assessment of the human sperm functionality.

  15. Conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active complex by the phosphate reaction in heart mitochondria is inhibited by alloxan-diabetes or starvation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, N J; Kerbey, A L; Randle, P J; Sugden, P H

    1978-01-01

    1. The conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active (dephosphorylated) complex by pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase is inhibited in heart mitochondria prepared from alloxan-diabetic or 48h-starved rats, in mitochondria prepared from acetate-perfused rat hearts and in mitochondria prepared from normal rat hearts incubated with respiratory substrates for 6 min (as compared with 1 min). 2. This conclusion is based on experiments with isolated intact mitochondria in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase reaction was inhibited by pyruvate or ATP depletion (by using oligomycin and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone), and in experiments in which the rate of conversion of inactive complex into active complex by the phosphatase was measured in extracts of mitochondria. The inhibition of the phosphatase reaction was seen with constant concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ (activators of the phosphatase). The phosphatase reaction in these mitochondrial extracts was not inhibited when an excess of exogenous pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate was used as substrate. It is concluded that this inhibition is due to some factor(s) associated with the substrate (pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex) and not to inhibition of the phosphatase as such. 3. This conclusion was verified by isolating pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex, free of phosphatase, from hearts of control and diabetic rats an from heart mitochondria incubed for 1min (control) or 6min with respiratory substrates. The rates of re-activation of the inactive complexes were then measured with preparations of ox heart or rat heart phosphatase. The rates were lower (relative to controls) with inactive complex from hearts of diabetic rats or from heart mitochondria incubated for 6min with respiratory substrates. 4. The incorporation of 32Pi into inactive complex took 6min to complete in rat heart mitocondria. The extent of incorporation was consistent with

  16. Conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active complex by the phosphate reaction in heart mitochondria is inhibited by alloxan-diabetes or starvation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hutson, N J; Kerbey, A L; Randle, P J; Sugden, P H

    1978-08-01

    1. The conversion of inactive (phosphorylated) pyruvate dehydrogenase complex into active (dephosphorylated) complex by pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase is inhibited in heart mitochondria prepared from alloxan-diabetic or 48h-starved rats, in mitochondria prepared from acetate-perfused rat hearts and in mitochondria prepared from normal rat hearts incubated with respiratory substrates for 6 min (as compared with 1 min). 2. This conclusion is based on experiments with isolated intact mitochondria in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase reaction was inhibited by pyruvate or ATP depletion (by using oligomycin and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone), and in experiments in which the rate of conversion of inactive complex into active complex by the phosphatase was measured in extracts of mitochondria. The inhibition of the phosphatase reaction was seen with constant concentrations of Ca2+ and Mg2+ (activators of the phosphatase). The phosphatase reaction in these mitochondrial extracts was not inhibited when an excess of exogenous pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate was used as substrate. It is concluded that this inhibition is due to some factor(s) associated with the substrate (pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex) and not to inhibition of the phosphatase as such. 3. This conclusion was verified by isolating pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate complex, free of phosphatase, from hearts of control and diabetic rats an from heart mitochondria incubed for 1min (control) or 6min with respiratory substrates. The rates of re-activation of the inactive complexes were then measured with preparations of ox heart or rat heart phosphatase. The rates were lower (relative to controls) with inactive complex from hearts of diabetic rats or from heart mitochondria incubated for 6min with respiratory substrates. 4. The incorporation of 32Pi into inactive complex took 6min to complete in rat heart mitocondria. The extent of incorporation was consistent with

  17. Spectroscopic investigations of intermediates in the reaction of cytochrome P450(BM3)-F87G with surrogate oxygen atom donors.

    PubMed

    Raner, Gregory M; Thompson, Jonathan I; Haddy, Alice; Tangham, Valary; Bynum, Nicole; Ramachandra Reddy, G; Ballou, David P; Dawson, John H

    2006-12-01

    Rapid mixing of substrate-free ferric cytochrome P450(BM3)-F87G with m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid (mCPBA) resulted in the sequential formation of two high-valent intermediates. The first was spectrally similar to compound I species reported previously for P450(CAM) and CYP 119 using mCPBA as an oxidant, and it featured a low intensity Soret absorption band characterized by shoulder at 370nm. This is the first direct observation of a P450 compound I intermediate in a type II P450 enzyme. The second intermediate, which was much more stable at pH values below 7.0, was characterized by an intense Soret absorption peak at 406nm, similar to that seen with P450(CAM) [T. Spolitak, J.H. Dawson, D.P. Ballou, J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005) 20300-20309]. Double mixing experiments in which NADPH was added to the transient 406nm-absorbing intermediate resulted in rapid regeneration of the resting ferric state, with the flavins of the flavoprotein domain in their reduced state. EPR results were consistent with this stable intermediate species being a cytochrome c peroxidase compound ES-like species containing a protein-based radical, likely localized on a nearby Trp or Tyr residue in the active site. Iodosobenzene, peracetic acid, and sodium m-periodate also generated the intermediate at 406nm, but not the 370nm intermediate, indicating a probable kinetic barrier to accumulating compound I in reactions with these oxidants. The P450 ES intermediate has not been previously reported using iodosobenzene or m-periodate as the oxygen donor.

  18. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Characterization of Peroxidase-Like π-Cation Radical Pinch-Porphyrin-Iron(III) Reaction Intermediate Models of Peroxidase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hernández Anzaldo, Samuel; Arroyo Abad, Uriel; León García, Armando; Ramírez Rosales, Daniel; Zamorano Ulloa, Rafael; Reyes Ortega, Yasmi

    2016-06-27

    The spectroscopic and kinetic characterization of two intermediates from the H₂O₂ oxidation of three dimethyl ester [(proto), (meso), (deuteroporphyrinato) (picdien)]Fe(III) complexes ([FePPPic], [FeMPPic] and [FeDPPic], respectively) pinch-porphyrin peroxidase enzyme models, with s = 5/2 and 3/2 Fe(III) quantum mixed spin (qms) ground states is described herein. The kinetic study by UV/Vis at λmax = 465 nm showed two different types of kinetics during the oxidation process in the guaiacol test for peroxidases (1-3 + guaiacol + H₂O₂ → oxidation guaiacol products). The first intermediate was observed during the first 24 s of the reaction. When the reaction conditions were changed to higher concentration of pinch-porphyrins and hydrogen peroxide only one type of kinetics was observed. Next, the reaction was performed only between pinch-porphyrins-Fe(III) and H₂O₂, resulting in only two types of kinetics that were developed during the first 0-4 s. After this time a self-oxidation process was observed. Our hypotheses state that the formation of the π-cation radicals, reaction intermediates of the pinch-porphyrin-Fe(III) family with the ligand picdien [N,N'-bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-propane-1,3-diamine], occurred with unique kinetics that are different from the overall process and was involved in the oxidation pathway. UV-Vis, ¹H-NMR and ESR spectra confirmed the formation of such intermediates. The results in this paper highlight the link between different spectroscopic techniques that positively depict the kinetic traits of artificial compounds with enzyme-like activity.

  19. Online Quantification of Criegee Intermediates of α-Pinene Ozonolysis by Stabilization with Spin Traps and Proton-Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry Detection.

    PubMed

    Giorio, Chiara; Campbell, Steven J; Bruschi, Maurizio; Tampieri, Francesco; Barbon, Antonio; Toffoletti, Antonio; Tapparo, Andrea; Paijens, Claudia; Wedlake, Andrew J; Grice, Peter; Howe, Duncan J; Kalberer, Markus

    2017-03-07

    Biogenic alkenes, which are among the most abundant volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere, are readily oxidized by ozone. Characterizing the reactivity and kinetics of the first-generation products of these reactions, carbonyl oxides (often named Criegee intermediates), is essential in defining the oxidation pathways of organic compounds in the atmosphere but is highly challenging due to the short lifetime of these zwitterions. Here, we report the development of a novel online method to quantify atmospherically relevant Criegee intermediates (CIs) in the gas phase by stabilization with spin traps and analysis with proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry. Ozonolysis of α-pinene has been chosen as a proof-of-principle model system. To determine unambiguously the structure of the spin trap adducts with α-pinene CIs, the reaction was tested in solution, and reaction products were characterized with high-resolution mass spectrometry, electron paramagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. DFT calculations show that addition of the Criegee intermediate to the DMPO spin trap, leading to the formation of a six-membered ring adduct, occurs through a very favorable pathway and that the product is significantly more stable than the reactants, supporting the experimental characterization. A flow tube set up has been used to generate spin trap adducts with α-pinene CIs in the gas phase. We demonstrate that spin trap adducts with α-pinene CIs also form in the gas phase and that they are stable enough to be detected with online mass spectrometry. This new technique offers for the first time a method to characterize highly reactive and atmospherically relevant radical intermediates in situ.

  20. Histone phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Dorine; Avvakumov, Nikita; Côté, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications are key components of diverse processes that modulate chromatin structure. These marks function as signals during various chromatin-based events, and act as platforms for recruitment, assembly or retention of chromatin-associated factors. The best-known function of histone phosphorylation takes place during cellular response to DNA damage, when phosphorylated histone H2A(X) demarcates large chromatin domains around the site of DNA breakage. However, multiple studies have also shown that histone phosphorylation plays crucial roles in chromatin remodeling linked to other nuclear processes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of histone phosphorylation and describe the many kinases and phosphatases that regulate it. We discuss the key roles played by this histone mark in DNA repair, transcription and chromatin compaction during cell division and apoptosis. Additionally, we describe the intricate crosstalk that occurs between phosphorylation and other histone modifications and allows for sophisticated control over the chromatin remodeling processes. PMID:22948226

  1. Detection of short-lived intermediates in electrochemical reactions using time-resolved surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Chongtie,; Zhang, Wei; Birke, R.L.; Lombardi, J.R. )

    1990-06-14

    p-Nitrobenzoic acid (PNBA) is studied by real-time detection of SERS spectra during time-resolved optical multichannel recording following the application of a double potential step to a Ag electrode. The spectral bands of three stable intermediate products, p-nitrosobenzoate, hydroxylamine, and azoxy compounds are observed. In addition, the transient bands of an unstable intermediate are seen at 996, 1233, and 1580 cm{sup {minus}1} with a lifetime of about 70 ms during the oxidation process of the hydroxylamine compound which itself is generated electrochemically by a 200-ms potential pulse. We suggest these bands represent the p-nitrosobenzoate free-radical anion intermediate formed during the oxidation of the hydroxylamine compound.

  2. Phosphorylation of adenosine in renal brush-border membrane vesicles by an exchange reaction catalysed by adenosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Sayós, J; Solsona, C; Mallol, J; Lluis, C; Franco, R

    1994-01-01

    Uptake of [3H]adenosine in brush-border membrane (BBM) vesicles from either rat or pig kidney leads to an accumulation of intravesicular [3H]AMP. The lack of significant levels of ATP and the presence of AMP in BBM indicated that a phosphotransfer between [3H]adenosine and AMP occurs. The phosphotransfer activity is inhibited by iodotubercidin, which suggests that it is performed by adenosine kinase acting in an ATP-independent manner. The existence of a similar phosphotransferase activity was demonstrated in membrane-free extracts from pig kidney. From the compounds tested it was shown that a variety of mononucleotides could act as phosphate donors. The results suggest that phosphotransfer reactions may be physiologically relevant in kidney. PMID:8110185

  3. Heme-bound nitroxyl, hydroxylamine, and ammonia ligands as intermediates in the reaction cycle of cytochrome c nitrite reductase: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Bykov, Dmytro; Plog, Matthias; Neese, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we consider, in detail, the second half-cycle of the six-electron nitrite reduction mechanism catalyzed by cytochrome c nitrite reductase. In total, three electrons and four protons must be provided to reach the final product, ammonia, starting from the HNO intermediate. According to our results, the first event in this half-cycle is the reduction of the HNO intermediate, which is accomplished by two PCET reactions. Two isomeric radical intermediates, HNOH(•) and H2NO(•), are formed. Both intermediates are readily transformed into hydroxylamine, most likely through intramolecular proton transfer from either Arg114 or His277. An extra proton must enter the active site of the enzyme to initiate heterolytic cleavage of the N-O bond. As a result of N-O bond cleavage, the H2N(+) intermediate is formed. The latter readily picks up an electron, forming H2N(+•), which in turn reacts with Tyr218. Interestingly, evidence for Tyr218 activity was provided by the mutational studies of Lukat (Biochemistry 47:2080, 2008), but this has never been observed in the initial stages of the overall reduction process. According to our results, an intramolecular reaction with Tyr218 in the final step of the nitrite reduction process leads directly to the final product, ammonia. Dissociation of the final product proceeds concomitantly with a change in spin state, which was also observed in the resonance Raman investigations of Martins et al. (J Phys Chem B 114:5563, 2010).

  4. Composition of reaction intermediates for stoichiometric and fuel-rich dimethyl ether flames: flame-sampling mass spectrometry and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Chaos, Marcos; Yang, Bin; Cool, Terrill A; Dryer, Fred L; Kasper, Tina; Hansen, Nils; Osswald, Patrick; Kohse-Höinghaus, Katharina; Westmoreland, Phillip R

    2009-03-07

    Molecular-beam synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry and electron-ionization mass spectrometry are used for measurements of species mole fraction profiles for low-pressure premixed dimethyl ether (DME) flames with equivalence ratios ranging from near-stoichiometric conditions (Phi = 0.93) to fuel-rich flames near the limits of flat-flame stability (Phi = 1.86). The results are compared with predictions of a recently modified kinetic model for DME combustion [Zhao et al., Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 2008, 40, 1-18] that has been extensively tested against laminar flame speed measurements, jet-stirred reactor experiments, pyrolysis and oxidation experiments in flow reactors, species measurements for burner-stabilized flames and ignition delay measurements in shock tubes. The present comprehensive measurements of the composition of reaction intermediates over a broad range of equivalence ratios considerably extends the range of the previous experiments used for validation of this model and allows for an accurate determination of contributions of individual reactions to the formation or destruction of any given flame species. The excellent agreement between measurements and predictions found for all major and most intermediate species over the entire range of equivalence ratios provides a uniquely sensitive test of details of the kinetic model. The dependence on equivalence ratio of the characteristic reaction paths in DME flames is examined within the framework of reaction path analyses.

  5. Interaction of CO with OH on Au(111): HCOO, CO3, and HOCO as Key Intermediates in the Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Senanayake, S.; Stacchiola, D; Liu, P; Mullins, C; Hrbek, J; Rodriguez, J

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the role of formate (HCOO), carbonate (CO{sub 3}), and carboxyl (HOCO) species as possible intermediates in the OH{sub ads} + CO{sub gas} {yields} CO{sub 2,gas} + 0.5H{sub 2,gas} reaction on Au(111) using synchrotron-based core level photoemission, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), and infrared absorption spectroscopy (IR). Adsorbed HCOO, CO{sub 3}, and OH species were prepared by adsorbing formic acid, carbon dioxide, and water on a Au(111) surface precovered with 0.2 ML of atomic oxygen, respectively. HCOOH interacts weakly with Au(111), but on O/Au(111) it dissociates its acidic H to yield adsorbed formate. The results of NEXAFS, IR, and density-functional calculations indicate that the formate adopts a bidentate configuration on Au(111). Since the HCOO groups are stable on Au(111) up to temperatures near 350 K, it is not likely that formate is a key intermediate for the OH{sub ads} + CO{sub gas} {yields} CO{sub 2,gas} + 0.5H{sub 2,gas} reaction at low temperatures. In fact, the formation of this species could lead eventually to surface poisoning. When compared to a formate species, a carbonate species formed by the reaction of CO{sub 2} with O/Au(111) has low stability, decomposing at temperatures between 100 and 125 K, and should not poison the gold surface. Neither HCOO nor CO{sub 3} was detected during the reaction of CO with OH on Au(111) at 90-120 K. The results of photoemission and IR spectroscopy point to HO {leftrightarrow} CO interactions, consistent with the formation of an unstable HOCO intermediate which has a very short lifetime on the gold surface. The possible mechanism for the low-temperature water-gas shift on gold catalysts is discussed in light of these results.

  6. Spectral Identification of Intermediates Generated during the Reaction of Dioxygen with the Wild-Type and EQ(I-286) Mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Cytochrome c Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Szundi, Istvan; Funatogawa, Chie; Cassano, Jennifer; McDonald, William; Ray, Jayashree; Hiser, Carrie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh; Gennis, Robert B.; Einarsdóttir, Ólöf

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Rs) is frequently used to model the more complex mitochondrial enzyme. The O2 reduction in both enzymes is generally described by a unidirectional mechanism involving the sequential formation of the ferrous-oxy complex (compound A), the PR state, the oxyferryl F form, and the oxidized state. In this study we investigated the reaction of dioxygen with the wild-type reduced Rs cytochrome oxidase and the EQ(I-286) mutant using the CO flow-flash technique. Singular value decomposition and multi-exponential fitting of the time-resolved optical absorption difference spectra showed that three apparent lifetimes, 18 μs, 53 μs, and 1.3 ms, are sufficient to fit the kinetics of the O2 reaction of the wild-type enzyme. A comparison of the experimental intermediate spectra with the corresponding intermediate spectra of the bovine enzyme revealed that PR is not present in the reaction mechanism of the wild-type Rs aa3. Transient absorbance changes at 440 and 610 nm support this conclusion. For the EQ(I-286) mutant, in which a key glutamic residue in the D proton pathway is replaced by glutamine, two lifetimes, 16 and 108 μs, were observed. A spectral analysis of the intermediates shows that the O2 reaction in the EQ(I-286) mutant terminates at the PR state, with 70% of heme a becoming oxidized. These results indicate significant differences in the kinetics of O2 reduction between the bovine and wild-type Rs aa3 oxidases, which may arise from differences in the relative rates of internal electron and proton movements in the two enzymes. PMID:23057757

  7. Forward scattering due to slow-down of the intermediate in the H + HD --> D + H2 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harich, Steven A.; Dai, Dongxu; Wang, Chia C.; Yang, Xueming; Chao, Sheng Der; Skodje, Rex T.

    2002-09-01

    Quantum dynamical processes near the energy barrier that separates reactants from products influence the detailed mechanism by which elementary chemical reactions occur. In fact, these processes can change the product scattering behaviour from that expected from simple collision considerations, as seen in the two classical reactions F + H2 --> HF + H and H + H2 --> H2 + H and their isotopic variants. In the case of the F + HD reaction, the role of a quantized trapped Feshbach resonance state had been directly determined, confirming previous conclusions that Feshbach resonances cause state-specific forward scattering of product molecules. Forward scattering has also been observed in the H + D2 --> HD + D reaction and attributed to a time-delayed mechanism. But despite extensive experimental and theoretical investigations, the details of the mechanism remain unclear. Here we present crossed-beam scattering experiments and quantum calculations on the H + HD --> H2 + D reaction. We find that the motion of the system along the reaction coordinate slows down as it approaches the top of the reaction barrier, thereby allowing vibrations perpendicular to the reaction coordinate and forward scattering. The reaction thus proceeds, as previously suggested, through a well-defined `quantized bottleneck state' different from the trapped Feshbach resonance states observed before.

  8. 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) mechanism of action: modulation of L-type calcium channels leading to calcium uptake and intermediate filament phosphorylation in cerebral cortex of young rats.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Leila; Goulart, Paola Bez; Gonçalves, Renata; Pierozan, Paula; Winkelmann-Duarte, Elisa C; Woehl, Viviane Mara; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina; Silva, Fátima Regina Mena Barreto; Zamoner, Ariane

    2012-10-01

    The involvement of calcium-mediated signaling pathways in the mechanism of action of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25D) is currently demonstrated. In this study we found that 1,25D induces nongenomic effects mediated by membrane vitamin D receptor (VDRm) by modulating intermediate filament (IF) phosphorylation and calcium uptake through L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCC) in cerebral cortex of 10 day-old rats. Results showed that the mechanism of action of 1,25D involves intra- and extracellular calcium levels, as well as the modulation of chloride and potassium channels. The effects of L-VDCCs on membrane voltage occur over a broad potential range and could involve depolarizing or hyperpolarizing coupling modes, supporting a cross-talk among Ca(2+) uptake and potassium and chloride channels. Also, the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inactivation by ouabain mimicked the 1,25D action on (45)Ca(2+) uptake. The Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibition observed herein might lead to intracellular Na(+) accumulation with subsequent L-VDCC opening and consequently increased (45)Ca(2+) (calcium, isotope of mass 45) uptake. Moreover, the 1,25D effect is dependent on the activation of the following protein kinases: cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (PKCaMII), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 (p38(MAPK)). The modulation of calcium entry into neural cells by the 1,25D we are highlighting, might take a role in the regulation of a plethora of intracellular processes. Considering that vitamin D deficiency can lead to brain illness, 1,25D may be a possible candidate to be used, at least as an adjuvant, in the pharmacological therapy of neuropathological conditions.

  9. Characterization of the folding and unfolding reactions of single-chain monellin: evidence for multiple intermediates and competing pathways.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ashish K; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2007-10-23

    The mechanisms of folding and unfolding of the small plant protein monellin have been delineated in detail. For this study, a single-chain variant of the natively two-chain monellin, MNEI, was used, in which the C terminus of chain B was connected to the N terminus of chain A by a Gly-Phe linker. Equilibrium guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl)-induced unfolding experiments failed to detect any partially folded intermediate that is stable enough to be populated at equilibrium to a significant extent. Kinetic experiments in which the refolding of GdnHCl-unfolded protein was monitored by measurement of the change in the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the protein indicated the accumulation of three transient partially structured folding intermediates. The fluorescence change occurred in three kinetic phases: very fast, fast, and slow. It appears that the fast and slow changes in fluorescence occur on competing folding pathways originating from one unfolded form and that the very fast change in fluorescence occurs on a third parallel pathway originating from a second unfolded form of the protein. Kinetic experiments in which the refolding of alkali-unfolded protein was monitored by the change in the fluorescence of the hydrophobic dye 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS), consequent to the dye binding to the refolding protein, as well as by the change in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, not only confirmed the presence of the three kinetic intermediates but also indicated the accumulation of one or more early intermediates at a few milliseconds of refolding. These experiments also exposed a very slow kinetic phase of refolding, which was silent to any change in the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the protein. Hence, the spectroscopic studies indicated that refolding of single-chain monellin occurs in five distinct kinetic phases. Double-jump, interrupted-folding experiments, in which the accumulation of folding intermediates and native protein during the

  10. Oxidative and Photosynthetic Phosphorylation Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jui H.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes a molecular mechanism for the coupling of phosphorylation to electron transport in both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Justifies the proposed reaction schemes in terms of thermodynamics and biochemical data. Suggests how areobic respiration could have evolved. (EB)

  11. Oxidative and Photosynthetic Phosphorylation Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jui H.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes a molecular mechanism for the coupling of phosphorylation to electron transport in both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Justifies the proposed reaction schemes in terms of thermodynamics and biochemical data. Suggests how areobic respiration could have evolved. (EB)

  12. Kinetics of the Reaction of beta-Methoxy-alpha-nitrostilbene with Cyanamide in 50 DMSO-50 Water. Failure to Detect the S(N)V Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Claude F.; Leyes, Aquiles E.; Rappoport, Zvi

    1999-04-16

    A kinetic study of the reaction of beta-methoxy-alpha-nitrostilbene (1-OMe) with cyanamide (CNA) over a pH range from 8.5 to 12.4 shows that it is the anion (CNA(-), pK(a) = 11.38) rather than the neutral amine that is the reactive species. Attempts at monitoring the reaction with the neutral CNA at low pH were unsuccessful because of competing hydrolysis. It is shown that the nucleophilic reactivity of CNA is abnormally low, probably because of a resonance effect, and that the reactivity of CNA(-) is high, higher than that of strongly basic oxyanion because of relatively weak solvation. The high reactivity of both 1-OMe and CNA(-) appeared to constitute favorable conditions conducive to the detection of the S(N)V intermediate, as has been the case in the reactions of 1-OMe with thiolate ions, alkoxide ions, and some amines. However, no intermediate was observed. Reasons for this failure are discussed.

  13. Reaction of chromium(VI) with glutathione or with hydrogen peroxide: Identification of reactive intermediates and their role in chromium(VI)-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Aiyar, J.; Berkovits, H.J.; Wetterhahn, K.E. ); Floyd, R.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The types of reactive intermediates generated upon reduction of chromium (VI) by glutathione or hydrogen peroxide and the resulting DNA damage have been determined. In vitro, reaction of chromium (VI) with glutathione led to formation of two chromium (V) complexes and the glutathione thiyl radical. When chromium (VI) was reacted with DNA in the presence of glutathione, chromium-DNA adducts were obtained, with no DNA strand breakage. The level of chromium-DNA adduct formation correlated with chromium (V) formation. Reaction of chromium (VI) with hydrogen peroxide led to formation of hydroxyl radical. No chromium (V) was detectable at 24 C (297 K); however, low levels of the tetraperoxochromium (V) complex were detected at 77 K. Reaction of chromium (VI) with DNA in the presence of hydrogen peroxide produced significant DNA strand breakage and the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine adduct, whose formation correlated with hydroxyl radical production. No significant chromium-DNA adduct formation was detected. Thus, the nature of chromium (VI)-induced DNA damage appears to be dependent on the reactive intermediates, i.e., chromium (V) or hydroxyl radical, produced during the reduction of chromium (VI).

  14. Isolation and in vitro phosphorylation of sensory transduction components controlling anaerobic induction of light harvesting and reaction center gene expression in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Kouadio, J L; Mosley, C S; Bauer, C E

    1995-01-17

    Anaerobic induction of light harvesting and reaction center gene expression involves two transacting factors termed RegA and RegB. Sequence and mutational analysis has indicated that RegA and RegB constitute cognate components of a prokaryotic sensory transduction cascade with RegB comprising a membrane-spanning sensor kinase and RegA a cytosolic response regulator. In this study we have purified RegA, as well as a truncated portion of RegB (RegB') and undertaken an in vitro analysis of autophosphorylation and phosphotransfer activities. Incubation of RegB' with [gamma-32P]ATP and MgCl2 resulted in phosphorylation of RegB' (RegB' approximately P) over a 20-min incubation period. Incubation of RegB' approximately P with RegA resulted in rapid transfer of the phosphate from RegB' to RegA. In analogy to other characterized prokaryotic sensory transduction components, mutational and chemical stability studies also indicate that RegB' is autophosphorylated at a conserved histidine and that RegA accepts the phosphate from RegB at a conserved aspartate.

  15. Characterisation of Criegee intermediates in the gas phase by stabilisation with a spin trap and analysis by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorio, Chiara; Tapparo, Andrea; Barbon, Antonio; Toffoletti, Antonio; Kalberer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can react with o xidants present in the atmosphere to form less volatile compounds which could partition in the condensed phase and contribute to organic aerosol mass. One of the most important and efficient reaction for the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is the ozonolysis of alkenes. This process occurs with a generally accepted mechanism, proposed for the first time by Rudolf Criegee (Criegee, 1975). According to the Criegee mechanism, ozone coordinates to the double bond of alkenes forming a primary ozonide, which promptly decomposes to form biradical intermediates called Criegee intermediates (CIs). CIs further react quickly to form first generation oxidation products. The analysis of Criegee intermediates represent an analytical challenge due to their characteristic high reactivity and low concentrations. Their role in the formation of SOA remains highly uncertain because of uncertainty in the kinetic of their reaction with different atmospheric compounds. Up to date, only a few studies have been able to detect the CIs directly (Welz et al., 2012) or indirectly (Mauldin et al., 2012). The aim of this study is the development of a method for the on-line measurement of CIs by stabilization with a spin trap (5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline N-oxide, DMPO) and detection via proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The novel method is used to study the ozonolysis of α-pinene in a flow tube, one of the most important precursors in the formation of SOA, often used as a proxy in global aerosol models to study the effects of biogenic organic aerosols on climate change. Criegee R., 1975. Angewandte Chemie 14, 745-752. Welz O., et al., 2012. Science 335, 204 207. Mauldin R. L., et al., 2012. Nature 488, 193-196.

  16. Hydrotrioxides rather than cyclic tetraoxides (tetraoxolanes) as the primary reaction intermediates in the low-temperature ozonation of aldehydes. The case of benzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Cerkovnik, Janez; Plesnicar, Bozo; Koller, Joze; Tuttle, Tell

    2009-01-02

    We demonstrate in this work by theory and experiment that benzaldehyde hydrotrioxide (PhC(O)OOOH), the intermediate most likely formed in the low-temperature ozonation of benzaldehyde, is too unstable to be detected by NMR (1H, 13C, and 17O) spectroscopy in various organic solvents at temperatures > or = -80 degrees C and that its previous detection must have been erroneous. Several plausible mechanisms for the formation of this polyoxide were explored by using density functional theory. We found that the formation of the hydrotrioxide involves the facile 1,3-dipolar insertion of ozone into the C-H bond (deltaH(double dagger) = 11.1 kcal/mol) in a strongly exothermic process (deltaH(R) = -57.0 kcal/mol). The hydrotrioxide then quickly decomposes in a second concerted, exothermic reaction involving an intramolecular H transfer to form benzoic acid and singlet oxygen (O2(1delta(g))) (deltaH(double dagger) = 5.6 kcal/mol), deltaH(R) = -14.0 kcal/mol). The equilibrium is thus expected to be shifted toward the products; therefore, this intermediate cannot be observed experimentally. Peroxybenzoic acid, still another major reaction product formed in the ozonation reaction, is formed as a result of the surprising instability of the RC(O)O-OOH bond (deltaH(R) = 23.5 kcal/mol), generating HOO* and benzoyloxyl radicals. Both of these radicals can then initiate the chain autoxidation reaction sequence--the abstraction of a H atom from benzaldehyde to form either a benzoyl radical and HOOH or a benzoyl radical and benzoic acid. Because only very small amounts of HOOH were detected in the decomposition mixtures, the recombination of the benzoyl radical with the HOO* radical (deltaH(R) = -80.7 kcal/mol) appears to be the major source of peroxybenzoic acid. A theoretical investigation of the mechanistic possibility of the involvement of still another intermediate, a cyclic tetraoxide (tetraoxolane) formed as a primary product in the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of ozone to the

  17. Kinetic and product studies of Criegee intermediate reactions with halogenated and non-halogenated carboxylic acids and their implications in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhantyal-Pun, Rabi; Rotavera, Brandon; Eskola, Arkke; Taatjes, Craig; Percival, Carl; Shallcross, Dudley; Orr-Ewing, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Criegee intermediates are important species formed during the ozonolysis of alkenes. Direct measurement and modelling studies have shown that reactions of stabilized Criegee intermediates with species like SO2 and NO2 may have a significant effect in tropospheric chemistry.[1, 2] Reaction rates of Criegee intermediates with simple carboxylic acids like HCOOH and CH3COOH have been shown to be near the collision limit and may be a significant sink for these otherwise stable species in the atmosphere.[3, 4] Results obtained from our time-resolved Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) apparatus[5] for reactions of the Criegee intermediates, CH2OO and (CH3)2COO with various halogenated (CF3COOH, CF3CF2COOH, CClF2COOH and CHCl2COOH) and non-halogenated (HCOOH and CH3COOH) carboxylic acids will be presented, together with Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) based on these observations. Structure characterization of the products from these reactions using the Multiplexed PhotoIonization Mass Spectrometry (MPIMS) apparatus[1,3] as well as implications for Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation, assessed using the global atmospheric model STOCHEM, will also be discussed. Bibliography 1. O. Welz, J. D. Savee, D. L. Osborn, S. S. Vasu, C. J. Percival, D. E. Shallcross and C. A. Taatjes, Science, 2012, 335, 204-207. 2. C. J. Percival, O. Welz, A. J. Eskola, J. D. Savee, D. L. Osborn, D. O. Topping, D. Lowe, S. R. Utembe, A. Bacak, G. McFiggans, M. C. Cooke, P. Xiao, A. T. Archibald, M. E. Jenkin, R. G. Derwent, I. Riipinen, D. W. K. Mok, E. P. F. Lee, J. M. Dyke, C. A. Taatjes and D. E. Shallcross, Faraday Discuss., 2013, 165, 45-73. 3. O. Welz, A. J. Eskola, L. Sheps, B. Rotavera, J. D. Savee, A. M. Scheer, D. L. Osborn, D. Lowe, A. M. Booth, P. Xiao, M. A. H. Khan, C. J. Percival, D. E. Shallcross and C. A. Taatjes, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2014, 53, 4547-4550. 4. M. D. Hurley, M. P. S. Andersen, T. J. Wallington, D. A. Ellis, J. W. Martin and S. A. Mabury, J. Phys. Chem. A

  18. Model for particle production in nuclear reactions at intermediate energies: Application to C-C collisions at 95 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudouet, J.; Durand, D.

    2016-07-01

    A model describing nuclear collisions at intermediate energies is presented and the results are compared with recently measured double differential cross sections in C-C reactions at 95 MeV/nucleon. Results show the key role played by geometrical effects and the memory of the entrance channel, in particular the momentum distributions of the two incoming nuclei. Special attention is paid to the description of processes occurring at midrapidity. To this end, a random particle production mechanism by means of a coalescence process in velocity space is considered in the overlap region of the two interacting nuclei.

  19. Phosphorylation in the Catalytic Cleft Stabilizes and Attracts Domains of a Phosphohexomutase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia; Lee, Yingying; Beamer, Lesa J.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation can modulate the activities of enzymes. The phosphoryl donor in the catalytic cleft of α-D-phosphohexomutases is transiently dephosphorylated while the reaction intermediate completes a 180° reorientation within the cleft. The phosphorylated form of 52 kDa bacterial phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase is less accessible to dye or protease, more stable to chemical denaturation, and widely stabilized against NMR-detected hydrogen exchange across the core of domain 3 to juxtaposed domain 4 (each by ≥1.3 kcal/mol) and parts of domains 1 and 2. However, phosphorylation accelerates hydrogen exchange in specific regions of domains 1 and 2, including a metal-binding residue in the active site. Electrostatic field lines reveal attraction across the catalytic cleft between phosphorylated Ser-108 and domain 4, but repulsion when Ser-108 is dephosphorylated. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulated the dephosphorylated form to be expanded due to enhanced rotational freedom of domain 4. The contacts and fluctuations of the MD trajectories enabled correct simulation of more than 80% of sites that undergo either protection or deprotection from hydrogen exchange due to phosphorylation. Electrostatic attraction in the phosphorylated enzyme accounts for 1) domain 4 drawing closer to domains 1 and 3; 2) decreased accessibility; and 3) increased stability within these domains. The electrostriction due to phosphorylation may help capture substrate, whereas the opening of the cleft upon transient dephosphorylation allows rotation of the intermediate. The long-range effects of phosphorylation on hydrogen exchange parallel reports on protein kinases, suggesting a conceptual link among these multidomain, phosphoryl transfer enzymes. PMID:25606681

  20. Phosphorylation regulates mycobacterial proteasome.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Tripti; Han, Jaeil; Baun, Heather; Nyayapathy, Seeta; Brown, Jacob T; Dial, Rebekah L; Moltalvo, Juan A; Kim, Min-Seon; Yang, Seung Hwan; Ronning, Donald R; Husson, Robert N; Suh, Joowon; Kang, Choong-Min

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a proteasome system that is required for the microbe to resist elimination by the host immune system. Despite the importance of the proteasome in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms by which proteasome activity is controlled remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the α-subunit (PrcA) of the M. tuberculosis proteasome is phosphorylated by the PknB kinase at three threonine residues (T84, T202, and T178) in a sequential manner. Furthermore, the proteasome with phosphorylated PrcA enhances the degradation of Ino1, a known proteasomal substrate, suggesting that PknB regulates the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Previous studies showed that depletion of the proteasome and the proteasome-associated proteins decreases resistance to reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) but increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we show that PknA phosphorylation of unprocessed proteasome β-subunit (pre-PrcB) and α-subunit reduces the assembly of the proteasome complex and thereby enhances the mycobacterial resistance to H2O2 and that H2O2 stress diminishes the formation of the proteasome complex in a PknA-dependent manner. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of the M. tuberculosis proteasome not only modulates proteolytic activity of the proteasome, but also affects the proteasome complex formation contributing to the survival of M. tuberculosis under oxidative stress conditions.

  1. Structure of the triosephosphate isomerase-phosphoglycolohydroxamate complex: an analogue of the intermediate on the reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Davenport, R C; Bash, P A; Seaton, B A; Karplus, M; Petsko, G A; Ringe, D

    1991-06-18

    The glycolytic enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) catalyzes the interconversion of the three-carbon sugars dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAP) at a rate limited by the diffusion of substrate to the enzyme. We have solved the three-dimensional structure of TIM complexed with a reactive intermediate analogue, phosphoglycolohydroxamate (PGH), at 1.9-A resolution and have refined the structure to an R-factor of 18%. Analysis of the refined structure reveals the geometry of the active-site residues and the interactions they make with the inhibitor and, by analogy, the substrates. The structure is consistent with an acid-base mechanism in which the carboxylate of Glu-165 abstracts a proton from carbon while His-95 donates a proton to oxygen to form an enediol (or enediolate) intermediate. The conformation of the bound substrate stereoelectronically favors proton transfer from substrate carbon to the syn orbital of Glu-165. The crystal structure suggests that His-95 is neutral rather than cationic in the ground state and therefore would have to function as an imidazole acid instead of the usual imidazolium. Lys-12 is oriented so as to polarize the substrate oxygens by hydrogen bonding and/or electrostatic interaction, providing stabilization for the charged transition state. Asn-10 may play a similar role.

  2. Probing the neutron-skin thickness by photon production from reactions induced by intermediate-energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Gao-Feng

    2015-07-01

    The photon from neutron-proton bremsstrahlung in p +Pb reactions is examined as a potential probe of the neutron-skin thickness in different centralities and at different proton incident energies. It is shown that the best choice of reaction environment is about 140 MeV for the incident proton and the 95%-100% centrality for the reaction system since the incident proton mainly interacts with neutrons inside the skin of the target and thus leads to different photon production to a maximal extent. Moreover, considering two main uncertainties from both photon production probability and nucleon-nucleon cross section in the reaction, I propose to use the ratio of photon production from two reactions to measure the neutron-skin thickness because of its cancellation effects on these uncertainties simultaneously, but preserved about 13%-15% sensitivities on the varied neutron-skin thickness from 0.1 to 0.3 fm within the current experimental uncertainty range of the neutron-skin size in 208Pb.

  3. Conserved YjgF protein family deaminates reactive enamine/imine intermediates of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme reactions.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Jennifer A; Flynn, Jeffrey M; Downs, Diana M

    2012-01-27

    The YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family of proteins is conserved in all domains of life, suggesting that the role of these proteins arose early and was maintained throughout evolution. Metabolic consequences of lacking this protein in Salmonella enterica and other organisms have been described, but the biochemical function of YjgF remained unknown. This work provides the first description of a conserved biochemical activity for the YjgF protein family. Our data support the conclusion that YjgF proteins have enamine/imine deaminase activity and accelerate the release of ammonia from reactive enamine/imine intermediates of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent threonine dehydratase (IlvA). Results from structure-guided mutagenesis experiments suggest that YjgF lacks a catalytic residue and that it facilitates ammonia release by positioning a critical water molecule in the active site. YjgF is renamed RidA (reactive intermediate/imine deaminase A) to reflect the conserved activity of the protein family described here. This study, combined with previous physiological studies on yjgF mutants, suggests that intermediates of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-mediated reactions may have metabolic consequences in vivo that were previously unappreciated. The conservation of the RidA/YjgF family suggests that reactive enamine/imine metabolites are of concern to all organisms.

  4. Analysis of the reaction products from micro-vial pyrolysis of the mixture glucose/proline and of a tobacco leaf extract:Search for Amadori intermediates.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Kazuhisa; David, Frank; Tienpont, Bart; Sandra, Koen; Ochiai, Nobuo; Tamura, Hirotoshi; Sandra, Pat

    2015-11-27

    Micro-vial pyrolysis (PyroVial) was used to study the production of compounds important for the aroma of heat-treated natural products such as tobacco. Firstly, a mixture of glucose and proline was pyrolyzed as model, as this sugar and amino acid are also abundant in tobacco leaf (Nicotiana tobacum L.). The pyrolysate was analyzed using headspace-GC–MS, liquid injection GC–MS and LC–MS. Next, micro-vial pyrolysis in combination with LC–MS was applied to tobacco leaf extract. Using MS deconvolution, molecular feature extraction and differential analysis it was possible to identify Amadori intermediates of the Maillard reaction in the tobacco leaf extract. The intermediate disappeared as was the case for 1-deoxy-1-prolino-β-d-fructose or the concentration decreased in the pyrolysate compared to the original extract such as for the 1-deoxy-1-[2-(3-pyridyl)-1-pyrrolidinyl]-β-d-fructose isomers indicating that Amadori intermediates are important precursors for aroma compound formation.

  5. Origin of product selectivity in a prenyl transfer reaction from the same intermediate: exploration of multiple FtmPT1-catalyzed prenyl transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Pan, Li-Li; Yang, Yue; Merz, Kenneth M

    2014-09-30

    FtmPT1 is a fungal indole prenyltransferase that catalyzes the reaction of tryptophan derivatives with dimethylallyl pyrophosphate to form various biologically active compounds. Herein, we describe detailed studies of FtmPT1 catalysis involving dimethylallyl pyrophosphate and Brevianamide F following the native pathway (yielding Tryprostatin B) and an alternate pathway observed in the Gly115Thr mutant of FtmPT1 yielding a novel cyclized product. Importantly, these two products arise from the same intermediate state, meaning that a step other than the cleavage of the dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP; C-O) bond is differentiating between the two product reaction channels. From detailed potential of mean force (PMF) and two-dimensional PMF analyses, we conclude that the rate-limiting step is the cleavage of the C-O bond in DMAPP, while the deprotonation/cyclization step determines the final product distribution. Hence, in the case of FtmPT1, the optimization of the necessary catalytic machinery guides the generation of the final product after formation of the intermediate carbocation.

  6. Exploring the aryl esterase catalysis of paraoxonase-1 through solvent kinetic isotope effects and phosphonate-based isosteric analogues of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate.

    PubMed

    Bavec, Aljoša; Knez, Damijan; Makovec, Tomaž; Stojan, Jure; Gobec, Stanislav; Goličnik, Marko

    2014-11-01

    Although a recent study of Debord et al. in Biochimie (2014; 97:72-77) described the thermodynamics of the catalysed hydrolysis of phenyl acetate by human paraoxonase-1, the mechanistic details along the reaction route of this enzyme remain unclear. Therefore, we briefly present the solvent kinetic isotope effects on the phenyl acetate esterase activity of paraoxonase-1 and its inhibition with the phenyl methylphosphonate anion, which is a stable isosteric analogue that mimics the high-energy tetrahedral intermediate on the hydroxide-promoted hydrolysis pathway. The data show normal isotope effects, while proton inventory analysis indicates that two protons contribute to the kinetic isotope effect. Coherently, moderate competitive inhibition with the phenyl methylphosphonate anion reveals that the rate-limiting transition state suboptimally resembles the tetrahedral intermediate. The implications of these findings can be attributed to two possible reaction mechanisms that might occur during the paraoxonase-1-catalysed hydrolysis of phenyl acetate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  7. Superstructure in the Metastable Intermediate-Phase Li2/3 FePO4 Accelerating the Lithium Battery Cathode Reaction.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Shin-ichi; Natsui, Ryuichi; Yamada, Atsuo

    2015-07-27

    LiFePO4 is an important cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. Regardless of the biphasic reaction between the insulating end members, Lix FePO4 , x≈0 and x≈1, optimization of the nanostructured architecture has substantially improved the power density of positive LiFePO4 electrode. The charge transport that occurs in the interphase region across the biphasic boundary is the primary stage of solid-state electrochemical reactions in which the Li concentrations and the valence state of Fe deviate significantly from the equilibrium end members. Complex interactions among Li ions and charges at the Fe sites have made understanding stability and transport properties of the intermediate domains difficult. Long-range ordering at metastable intermediate eutectic composition of Li2/3 FePO4 has now been discovered and its superstructure determined, which reflected predominant polaron crystallization at the Fe sites followed by Li(+) redistribution to optimize the Li-Fe interactions.

  8. Highly Enantioselective Dearomatizing Formal [3+3]-Cycloaddition Reactions of N-Acyliminopyridinium Ylides with Electrophilic Enolcarbene Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xinfang; Zavalij, Peter Y.; Doyle, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    A effective dearomatizing formal [3+3]-cycloaddition reaction triggered by Rh(II)-catalyzed dinitrogen extrusion of enoldiazoacetates followed by vinylogous addition of metal enolcarbenes to N-acyliminopyridinium ylides that produces highly substituted 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridazines in up to 98% ee and in high yield has been developed. PMID:24123489

  9. Fenton-like oxidation of small aromatic acids from biomass burning in atmospheric water and in the absence of light: Identification of intermediates and reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Santos, Patrícia S M; Domingues, M Rosário M; Duarte, Armando C

    2016-07-01

    A previous work showed that the night period is important for the occurrence of Fenton-like oxidation of small aromatic acids from biomass burning in atmospheric waters, which originate new chromophoric compounds apparently more complex than the precursors, although the chemical transformations involved in the process are still unknown. In this work were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) the organic intermediate compounds formed during the Fenton-like oxidation of three aromatic acids from biomass burning (benzoic, 4-hydroxybenzoic and 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acids), the same compounds evaluated in the previous study, in water and in the absence of light, which in turns allows to disclose the chemical reaction pathways involved. The oxidation intermediate compounds found for benzoic acid were 2-hydroxybenzoic, 3-hydroxybenzoic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic, 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acids. The oxidation intermediates for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid were 3,4-hydroxybenzoic acid and hydroquinone, while for 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid were 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzoic and 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acids, and tetrahydroxybenzene. The results suggested that the hydroxylation of the three small aromatic acids is the main step of Fenton-like oxidation in atmospheric waters during the night, and that the occurrence of decarboxylation is also an important step during the oxidation of the 4-dihydroxybenzoic and 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acids. In addition, it is important to highlight that the compounds produced are also small aromatic compounds with potential adverse effects on the environment, besides becoming available for further chemical reactions in atmospheric waters.

  10. Isobaric yield ratios in heavy-ion reactions, and symmetry energy of neutron-rich nuclei at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Wang, Fang; Ma, Yu-Gang; Jin, Chan

    2011-06-01

    The isobaric yield ratios of the fragments produced in the neutron-rich Ca48 and Ni64 projectile fragmentation are analyzed in the framework of a modified Fisher model. The correlations between the isobaric yield ratios (R) and the energy coefficients in the Weiszäcker-Beth semiclassical mass formula (the symmetry-energy term asym, the Coulomb-energy term ac, and the pairing-energy term ap) and the difference between the chemical potentials of the neutron and proton (μn-μp) are investigated. Simple correlations between (μn-μp)/T, ac/T, asym/T, and ap/T (where T is the temperature), and lnR are obtained. It is suggested that (μn-μp)/T, ac/T, asym/T, and ap/T of neutron-rich nuclei can be extracted using isobaric yield ratios for heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies.

  11. Studies on the inhibition of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase by stabilized reaction intermediates and stereodefined azido phosphates.

    PubMed

    Sanllehí, Pol; Abad, José-Luís; Bujons, Jordi; Casas, Josefina; Delgado, Antonio

    2016-11-10

    Two kinds of inhibitors of the PLP-dependent enzyme sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase have been designed and tested on the bacterial (StS1PL) and the human (hS1PL) enzymes. Amino phosphates 1, 12, and 32, mimicking the intermediate aldimines of the catalytic process, were weak inhibitors on both enzyme sources. On the other hand, a series of stereodefined azido phosphates, resulting from the replacement of the amino group of the natural substrates with an azido group, afforded competitive inhibitors in the low micromolar range on both enzyme sources. This similar behavior represents an experimental evidence of the reported structural similarities for both enzymes at their active site level. Interestingly, the anti-isomers of the non-natural enantiomeric series where the most potent inhibitors on hS1PL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Understanding and Mitigating the Effects of Stable Dodecahydro- closo -dodecaborate Intermediates on Hydrogen-Storage Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    White, James L.; Newhouse, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Jin Z.; Udovic, Terrence J.; Stavila, Vitalie

    2016-10-25

    Alkali metal borohydrides can reversibly store hydrogen; however, the materials display poor cyclability, often times linked to occurrence of stable closo-polyborate intermediate species. In an effort to understand the role of such intermediates on the hydrogen storage properties of metal borohydrides, several alkali metal dodecahydro-closo-dodecaborate salts were isolated in anhydrous form and characterized by diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. Mixtures of Li2B12H12, Na2B12H12, and K2B12H12 with the corresponding alkali metal hydrides were subjected to hydrogenation conditions known to favor partial or full reversibility in metal borohydrides. The stoichiometric mixtures of MH and M2B12H12 salts form the corresponding metal borohydrides MBH4 (M=Li, Na, K) in almost quantitative yield at 100 MPa H2 and 500 °C. In addition, stoichiometric mixtures of Li2B12H12 and MgH2 were found to form MgB2 at 500 °C and above upon desorption in vacuum. The two destabilization strategies outlined above suggest that metal polyhydro-closo-polyborate species can be converted into the corresponding metal borohydrides or borides, albeit under rather harsh conditions of hydrogen pressure and temperature.

  13. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation, hyperactivation and progesterone-induced acrosome reaction are enhanced in IVF media: an effect that is not associated with an increase in protein kinase A activation.

    PubMed

    Moseley, F L C; Jha, K N; Björndahl, Lars; Brewis, I A; Publicover, S J; Barratt, C L R; Lefièvre, L

    2005-07-01

    Sperm capacitation is a prerequisite for successful in vitro fertilization (IVF) and therefore a focus of sperm preparation in IVF laboratories. The technology of IVF is, therefore, potentially valuable in advancing our understanding of the molecular processes that occur during sperm capacitation. We have investigated sperm capacitation induced by a commercial IVF medium compared to that occurring in standard capacitating medium (CM) typically used in a nonclinical setting. Percoll-washed spermatozoa were resuspended in Cook Sydney IVF medium, Cook Sydney IVF sperm buffer, Earle's balanced salt medium (capacitating medium) or a modified Earle's balanced salt medium [non-capacitating medium (NCM)] for up to 120 min at 37 degrees C and, if applicable, in the presence of 5% CO2 in air. Sperm protein kinase A (PKA) activity, PKA-dependent serine/threonine phosphorylation, tyrosine phosphorylation, hyperactivation and progesterone-induced acrosome reaction were evaluated. IVF medium was shown to accelerate sperm capacitation (compared with capacitating medium) as determined by tyrosine phosphorylation, sperm hyperactivation and progesterone-induced acrosome reaction. This effect was not associated with enhanced activation of PKA or increased levels of serine/threonine phosphorylation. In contrast, IVF sperm buffer (used for sperm preparation) did not stimulate sperm capacitation when incubated for up to 90 min. We have shown that different capacitating media vary strikingly in their efficacy and that this difference reflects activation of a pathway other than the well-characterized activation of soluble adenylyl cyclase/cAMP/PKA.

  14. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with multiple alloantibody (Anti S, N, K) and a monospecific autoanti-JK(b) in intermediate β-thalassemia patient in Tabriz.

    PubMed

    Dolatkhah, Roya; Esfahani, Ali; Torabi, Seyed Esmaeil; Kermani, Iraj Asvadi; Sanaat, Zohreh; Ziaei, Jamal Eivazei; Nikanfar, Alireza; Chavoshi, Seyed Hadi; Ghoreishi, Zohreh; Kermani, Atabak Asvadi

    2013-07-01

    It appears that delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions may occur several days after the administration of donor red cells is true even though they have been shown to be compatible in cross match tests by the antiglobulin technique. A specific case was observed in our center, which confirms the fact. The patient was a 37-year-old male suffering from intermediate β-thalassemia. He had a history of two previous transfusions, with unknown transfusion reaction. In the last transfusion, laboratory data showed: Hb 7.8 g/dL and Hematocrit (Hct) 24.2%. The patient received two units of cross matched, compatible concentrated red blood cells (RBCs). After eight days a severe reaction was observed with clinical evidence of tachycardia, fatigue, fever, back pain, chest discomfort, jaundice, nausea and anorexia. Accordingly delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction was suspected, and anti-RBC antibodies were tested. Laboratory tests revealed the presence of three alloantibodies: Anti-N, anti-S, anti-K, and a monospecific autoanti-JK(b).

  15. Study of a reaction between 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone and N,N'-diphenyl thiourea involving an EDA adduct as intermediate.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kakali; Mukherjee, Asok K

    2004-06-01

    The reaction between 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone and N,N'-diphenyl thiourea in acetonitrile medium, which yields the product, 2,3-(N,N'-diphenylthioureylene)-naphtho-1,4-quinone has been found to take place in two ways--thermal and photochemical. The thermal (dark) reaction occurs through an electron donor-acceptor (EDA) adduct as intermediate with evolution of HCl and kinetic data fit into the scheme A + B<==>AB(fast)-->product(slow) Formation constant of the EDA adduct and the rate constant of the slow process have been determined at four different temperatures from which the enthalpy of formation of AB has been determined. The photochemical reaction has been studied with 360 nm ordinary light and also with 365 and 370 nm laser beams. Use of laser causes about 10(3)-fold increase in the rate of the reaction but does not affect the quantum yield. The final product has been isolated and characterised by elemental analysis, 1H and 13C NMR, IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

  16. H2SO4 formation from the gas-phase reaction of stabilized Criegee Intermediates with SO2: Influence of water vapour content and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, Torsten; Jokinen, Tuija; Sipilä, Mikko; Mauldin, Roy L.; Herrmann, Hartmut; Stratmann, Frank; Junninen, Heikki; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-06-01

    The importance of gas-phase products from alkene ozonolysis other than OH radicals, most likely stabilized Criegee Intermediates (sCI), for the process of atmospheric SO2 oxidation to H2SO4 has been recently discovered. Subjects of this work are investigations on H2SO4 formation as a function of water vapour content (RH = 2-65%) and temperature (278-343 K) starting from the ozonolysis of trans-2-butene and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene (TME). H2SO4 production other than via the OH radical reaction was attributed to the reaction of SO2 with sCI, i.e. acetaldehyde oxide arising from trans-2-butene ozonolysis and acetone oxide from TME. Measurements have been conducted in an atmospheric pressure flow tube using NO3--CI-APi-TOF mass spectrometry for H2SO4 detection. The sCI yields derived from H2SO4 measurements at 293 K were 0.49 ± 0.22 for acetaldehyde oxide and 0.45 ± 0.20 for acetone oxide. Our findings indicate a H2SO4 yield from sCI + SO2 of unity or close to unity. The deduced rate coefficient ratio for the reaction of sCI with H2O and SO2, k(sCI + H2O)/k(sCI + SO2), was found to be strongly dependent on the structure of the Criegee Intermediate, for acetaldehyde oxide at 293 K: (8.8 ± 0.4)·10-5 (syn- and anti-conformer in total) and for acetone oxide: <4·10-6. H2SO4 formation from sCI was pushed back with rising temperature in both reaction systems most probably due to an enhancement of sCI decomposition. The ratio k(dec)/k(sCI + SO2) increased by a factor of 34 (acetone oxide) increasing the temperature from 278 to 343 K. In the case of acetaldehyde oxide the temperature effect is less pronounced. The relevance of atmospheric H2SO4 formation via sCI + SO2 is discussed in view of its dependence on the structure of the Criegee Intermediate.

  17. Study of the {sup 12}C ({sup 8}B, {sup 7}Be)X knockout reaction at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, H. Ghambari, M.; Fereidonnejad, R.

    2016-01-15

    The breakup reactions of {sup 8}B on a {sup 12}C target at 142, 285, 790, and 936MeV/nucleon have been studied. One-proton-removal cross sections, leading to the production of {sup 7}Be fragments in the ground and first excited states (at 0.429MeV), and the longitudinal momentum distributions of the {sup 7}Be fragments are obtained in the Eikonal approximation of the Glauber Model. The results of the calculations including the contribution of the {sup 7}Be to the ground and first excited states of {sup 8}B are compared with the available experimental data. One-proton-removal cross section for the {sup 12}C({sup 8}B, {sup 7}Be)X knockout reaction at 142, 285, 790, and 936 MeV/nucleon energy has been calculated. {sup 8}B and {sup 7}Be cross sections and momentum distribution are in a good agreement with available data.

  18. Synthesis of Spiro Indole-2-Ones Using Three Component Reaction of N-Alkylisatins and Triphenylphosphonium Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali Varasteh

    2017-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure is achieved for the synthesis of indole-2-one derivatives via three-component reaction of N-alkylisatin, activated acetylenic compounds and alkyl bromide in the presence of triphenylphosphine in water under two conditions; room temperature and microwave irradiation. All chemicals used in this work were prepared from Fluka (Buchs, Switzerland) and were used without further purification. N-alkylisatin were synthesized in the laboratory in the procedure that is reported in the literature. Electrothermal 9100 apparatus is employed for measuring of melting points of products. Elemental analyses for C, H, and N were performed with Heraeus CHN-O-Rapid analyzer. Mass spectra were recorded on a FINNIGAN-MAT 8430 spectrometer operating at an ionization potential of 70 eV. Measurement of IR spectra was performed by Shimadzu IR-460 spectrometer. 1H, and 13C NMR spectra were evaluated with a BRUKER DRX- 500 AVANCE spectrometer at 500.1 and 125.8 MHz, respectively. The results were demonstrated that simple mixing of N-alkylisatin, dialkyl acetylenedicarboxylate and alkyl bromides in the presence of triphenylphosphine by using of microwave condition is the efficient method for preparation of indole derivatives in good yields. In the optimized reaction conditions, water is solvent and temperature of the mixture of reaction is 80 oC. In this study, the reaction of activated acetylenic compounds with N-alkylisatin and alkyl bromide in the presence of triphenylphosphine is investigated which is led to a facile synthesis of some functionalized indoles. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Measuring rate constants for reactions of the simplest Criegee intermediate (CH2OO) by monitoring the OH radical.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingdi; Bayes, Kyle D; Sander, Stanley P

    2014-01-30

    While generating the CH2OO molecule by reacting CH2I with O2, significant amounts of the OH radical were observed by laser-induced fluorescence. At least two different processes formed OH. A fast process was probably initiated by a reaction of vibrationally hot CH2I radicals. The second process appeared to be associated with the decay of the CH2OO molecule. The addition of molecules known to react with CH2OO increased the observed decay rates of the OH signal. Using the OH signals as a proxy for the CH2OO concentration, the rate constant for the reaction of hexafluoroacetone with CH2OO was determined to be (3.33 ± 0.27) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), in good agreement with the value measured by Taatjes et al.1 The rate constant for the reaction of SO2 with CH2OO, (3.53 ± 0.29) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), showed no pressure dependence over the range of 50-200 Torr and was in agreement with the value at 4 Torr reported by Welz et al.

  20. The nature of the intermediates in the reactions of Fe(III)- and Mn(III)-microperoxidase-8 with H(2)O(2): a rapid kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Primus, Jean-Louis; Grunenwald, Sylvie; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Albrecht-Gary, Anne-Marie; Mandon, Dominique; Veeger, Cees

    2002-02-20

    Kinetic studies were performed with microperoxidase-8 (Fe(III)MP-8), the proteolytic breakdown product of horse heart cytochrome c containing an octapeptide linked to an iron protoporphyrin IX. Mn(III) was substituted for Fe(III) in Mn(III)MP-8. The mechanism of formation of the reactive metal-oxo and metal-hydroperoxo intermediates of M(III)MP-8 upon reaction of H(2)O(2) with Fe(III)MP-8 and Mn(III)MP-8 was investigated by rapid-scan stopped-flow spectroscopy and transient EPR. Two steps (k(obs1) and k(obs2)) were observed and analyzed for the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with both catalysts. The plots of k(obs1) as function of [H(2)O(2)] at pH 8.0 and pH 9.1 for Fe(III)MP-8, and at pH 10.2 and pH 10.9 for Mn(III)MP-8, exhibit saturation kinetics, which reveal the accumulation of an intermediate. Double reciprocal plots of 1/k(obs1) as function of 1/[H(2)O(2)] at different pH values reveal a competitive effect of protons in the oxidation of M(III)MP-8. This effect of protons is confirmed by the linear dependence of 1/k(obs1) on [H(+)] showing that k(obs1) increases with the pH. The UV-visible spectra of the intermediates formed at the end of the first step (k(obs1)) exhibit a spectrum characteristic of a high-valent metal-oxo intermediate for both catalysts. Transient EPR of Mn(III)MP-8 incubated with an excess of H(2)O(2), at pH 11.5, shows the detection of a free radical signal at g approximately equal to 2 and of a resonance at g approximately equal to 4 characteristic of a Mn(IV) (S = 3/2) species. On the basis of these results, the following mechanism is proposed: (i) M(III)MP-8-OH(2) is deprotonated to M(III)MP-8-OH in a rapid preequilibrium step, with a pK(a) = 9.2 +/- 0.9 for Fe(III)MP-8 and a pK(a) = 11.2 +/- 0.3 for Mn(III)MP-8; (ii) M(III)MP-8-OH reacts with H(2)O(2) to form Compound 0, M(III)MP8-OOH, with a second-order rate constant k(1) = (1.3 +/- 0.6) x 10(6) M(-1) x s(-1) for Fe(III)MP-8 and k(1) = (1.6 +/- 0.9) x 10(5) M(-1) x s(-1) for Mn

  1. Laboratory detection of the D3h isomer of carbon trioxide (CO3): Potential intermediate in the CO2 + O reaction in atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, C.; Mebel, A.; Kaiser, R.

    Radiation induced degradation of oxygen-bearing molecules like ozone or carbon dioxide can liberate oxygen atoms that are electronically excited 1 D state and or superthermal high kinetic energy and may subsequently react with carbon dioxide in the atmospheres of Venus Mars or the Earth In this reaction the carbon trioxide CO 3 intermediate was found to form and has been subsequently included in many reaction models to explain the heavy isotope enrichment of stratospheric carbon dioxide on Earth and the regeneration of carbon dioxide on Mars both in the upper atmosphere and catalyzed in solid CO 2 surfaces Studies of the O 1 D CO 2 reaction show a nearly statistical rate of isotope exchange suggesting that the CO 3 intermediate may possess a high degree of symmetry From theoretical calculations and matrix isolation studies we know that the lowest energy CO 3 isomer has C 2v symmetry however the D 3h isomer lies only 0 1 kcal mol -1 higher in energy than the C 2v structure with an isomerization barrier of 4 4 kcal mol -1 thus interconversion of these two structures should readily occur To date the C 2v structure has been the only isomer that has been experimentally detected and therefore inclusion of the symmetric D 3h isomer in the isotope exchange models is only theoretical Here we present the first experimental detection of the D 3h isomer of carbon trioxide which was identified by two fundamental vibrational frequencies nu 1 and nu 5 using infrared

  2. Identifying the proton transfer reaction mechanism via a proton-bound dimeric intermediate for esomeprazoles by a kinetic method combined with density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoji; Zhang, Feifei; Zhu, Kundan; Ye, Xuemin; Shen, Lingxiao; Chen, Jiaoyu; Mo, Weimin

    2014-05-15

    Esomeprazole analogs are a class of important proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux diseases. Understanding the fragmentation reaction mechanism of the protonated esomeprazole analogs will facilitate the characterization of their complex metabolic fate in humans. In this paper, the kinetic method and theoretical calculations were applied to evaluate the fragmentation of protonated esomeprazole analogs. All collision-induced dissociation (CID) mass spectrometry experiments were carried out using electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap mass spectrometry in positive ion mode. Also the accurate masses of fragments were measured on by ESI quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) MS in positive ion mode. Theoretical calculations were carried out by the density functional theory (DFT) method with the 6-31G(d) basis set in the Gaussian 03 program. In the fragmentation of the protonated esomeprazole analogs, C-S bond breakage is observed, which gives rise to protonated 2-(sulfinylmethylene)pyridines and protonated benzimidazoles. DFT calculations demonstrate that the nitrogen atom of the pyridine part is the thermodynamically most favorable protonation site, and the C-S bond cleavage is triggered by the transfer of this ionizing proton from the nitrogen atom of the pyridine part to the carbon atom of the benzimidazole part to which the sulfinyl is attached. Moreover, with the kinetic plot, the intensity ratios of two protonated product ions yield a linear relationship with the differences in proton affinities of the corresponding neutral molecules, which provides strong experimental evidence that the reaction proceeds via proton-bound 2-(sulfinylmethylene)pyridine/benzimidazole complex intermediates. The kinetic method combined with theoretical calculations was successfully applied to probe the proton transfer reaction by proton-bound 2-(sulfinylmethylene)pyridine/benzimidazole complexes in the fragmentation of protonated esomeprazole analogs by ESI

  3. Electro-Fenton degradation of the antibiotic sulfanilamide with Pt/carbon-felt and BDD/carbon-felt cells. Kinetics, reaction intermediates, and toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    El-Ghenymy, Abdellatif; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Brillas, Enric; Oturan, Nihal; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of 230 mL of a 0.6-mM sulfanilamide solution in 0.05 M Na₂SO₄ of pH 3.0 has been studied by electro-Fenton process. The electrolytic cell contained either a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon-felt cathode. Under these conditions, organics are oxidized by hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between initially added (and then electrochemically regenerated) Fe(2+) and cathodically generated H₂O₂. From the decay of sulfanilamide concentration determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, an optimum Fe(2+) concentration of 0.20 mM in both cells was found. The drug disappeared more rapidly using BDD than Pt, and, in both cases, it was more quickly removed with raising applied current. Almost total mineralization was achieved using the BDD/carbon-felt cell, whereas the alternative use of Pt anode led to a slightly lower mineralization degree. In both cells, the degradation rate was accelerated at higher current but with the concomitant fall of mineralization current efficiency due to the greater increase in rate of the parasitic reactions of hydroxyl radicals. Reversed-phase liquid chromatography allowed the identification of catechol, resorcinol, hydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, and 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene as aromatic intermediates, whereas ion exclusion chromatography revealed the formation of malic, maleic, fumaric, acetic, oxalic, formic, and oxamic acids. NH₄(+), NO₃(-), and SO₄(2-) ions were released during the electro-Fenton process. A plausible reaction sequence for sulfanilamide mineralization involving all detected intermediates has been proposed. The toxicity of the solution was assessed from the Vibrio fischeri bacteria luminescence inhibition. Although it acquired its maximum value at short electrolysis time, the solution was completely detoxified at the end of the electro-Fenton treatment, regardless of the anode used.

  4. Direct measurements of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction kinetics of the Criegee intermediate (CH3)2COO

    SciTech Connect

    Chhantyal-Pun, Rabi; Welz, Oliver; Savee, John D.; Eskola, Arkke J.; Lee, Edmond P. F.; Blacker, Lucy; Hill, Henry R.; Ashcroft, Matilda; Khan, M. Anwar H.; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C.; Evans, Louise; Rotavera, Brandon; Huang, Haifeng; Osborn, David L.; Mok, Daniel K. W.; Dyke, John M.; Shallcross, Dudley E.; Percival, Carl J.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2016-10-18

    Here, the Criegee intermediate acetone oxide, (CH3)2COO, is formed by laser photolysis of 2,2-diiodopropane in the presence of O2 and characterized by synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry and by cavity ring-down ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The rate coefficient of the reaction of the Criegee intermediate with SO2 was measured using photoionization mass spectrometry and pseudo-first-order methods to be (7.3 ± 0.5) × 10–11 cm3 s–1 at 298 K and 4 Torr and (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10–10 cm3 s–1 at 298 K and 10 Torr (He buffer). These values are similar to directly measured rate coefficients of anti-CH3CHOO with SO2, and in good agreement with recent UV absorption measurements. The measurement of this reaction at 293 K and slightly higher pressures (between 10 and 100 Torr) in N2 from cavity ring-down decay of the ultraviolet absorption of (CH3)2COO yielded even larger rate coefficients, in the range (1.84 ± 0.12) × 10–10 to (2.29 ± 0.08) × 10–10 cm3 s–1. Photoionization mass spectrometry measurements with deuterated acetone oxide at 4 Torr show an inverse deuterium kinetic isotope effect, kH/kD = (0.53 ± 0.06), for reactions with SO2, which may be consistent with recent suggestions that the formation of an association complex affects the rate coefficient. The reaction of (CD3)2COO with NO2 has a rate coefficient at 298 K and 4 Torr of (2.1 ± 0.5) × 10–12 cm3 s–1 (measured with photoionization mass spectrometry), again similar to rate for the reaction of anti-CH3CHOO with NO2. Cavity ring-down measurements of the acetone oxide removal without added reagents display a combination of first- and second-order decay kinetics

  5. Investigation of the O+allyl addition/elimination reaction pathways from the OCH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} radical intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Lau, K.-C.; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, S.-H.; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2008-08-28

    These experiments study the preparation of and product channels resulting from OCH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2}, a key radical intermediate in the O+allyl bimolecular reaction. The data include velocity map imaging and molecular beam scattering results to probe the photolytic generation of the radical intermediate and the subsequent pathways by which the radicals access the energetically allowed product channels of the bimolecular reaction. The photodissociation of epichlorohydrin at 193.3 nm produces chlorine atoms and c-OCH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} radicals; these undergo a facile ring opening to the OCH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} radical intermediate. State-selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection resolves the velocity distributions of ground and spin-orbit excited state chlorine independently, allowing for a more accurate determination of the internal energy distribution of the nascent radicals. We obtain good agreement detecting the velocity distributions of the Cl atoms with REMPI, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization at 13.8 eV, and electron bombardment ionization; all show a bimodal distribution of recoil kinetic energies. The dominant high recoil kinetic energy feature peaks near 33 kcal/mol. To elucidate the product channels resulting from the OCH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} radical intermediate, the crossed laser-molecular beam experiment uses VUV photoionization and detects the velocity distribution of the possible products. The data identify the three dominant product channels as C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O (acrolein)+H, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}+HCO (formyl radical), and H{sub 2}CO (formaldehyde)+C{sub 2}H{sub 3}. A small signal from C{sub 2}H{sub 2}O (ketene) product is also detected. The measured velocity distributions and relative signal intensities at m/e=27, 28, and 29 at two photoionization energies show that the most exothermic product channel, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}+CO, does not contribute significantly to the product branching. The higher internal energy onset of the

  6. Isobaric yield ratios in heavy-ion reactions, and symmetry energy of neutron-rich nuclei at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Chunwang; Wang Fang; Ma Yugang; Jin Chan

    2011-06-15

    The isobaric yield ratios of the fragments produced in the neutron-rich {sup 48}Ca and {sup 64}Ni projectile fragmentation are analyzed in the framework of a modified Fisher model. The correlations between the isobaric yield ratios (R) and the energy coefficients in the Weiszaecker-Beth semiclassical mass formula (the symmetry-energy term a{sub sym}, the Coulomb-energy term a{sub c}, and the pairing-energy term a{sub p}) and the difference between the chemical potentials of the neutron and proton ({mu}{sub n}-{mu}{sub p}) are investigated. Simple correlations between ({mu}{sub n}-{mu}{sub p})/T, a{sub c}/T, a{sub sym}/T, and a{sub p}/T (where T is the temperature), and lnR are obtained. It is suggested that ({mu}{sub n}-{mu}{sub p})/T, a{sub c}/T, a{sub sym}/T, and a{sub p}/T of neutron-rich nuclei can be extracted using isobaric yield ratios for heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies.

  7. Photodegradation of imidacloprid insecticide by Ag-deposited titanate nanotubes: a study of intermediates and their reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Grover, Inderpreet Singh; Singh, Satnam; Pal, Bonamali

    2014-12-31

    The present work demonstrates the influence of Ag-loading (0.2-1.0 wt %) onto sodium titanate nanotubes (TNT) for complete photomineralization of the neurotoxic imidacloprid (IMI) insecticide under UV light illumination. It has been observed that degradation of IMI follows pseudo-first-order kinetics, where 0.5 wt % Ag-loaded TNT exhibited highest apparent rate constant (2.2 × 10(-2) min(-1)) and corresponding least half-life (t1/2) of 31 min for IMI relative to bare P25-TiO2 (3.4 × 10(-3) min(-1), t1/2 = 230 min). The mineralization of IMI intermediates to CO2 during its photooxidation has been described by time course GC-MS and GC analysis and has been correlated with the kinetic analysis. The investigation for the role and quantitative estimation of the fate of heteroatoms (N, O, and Cl) present in IMI revealed an increase in the amount of nitrate, nitrite, and chloride ions with time during its photooxidation. On the basis of these results a mechanistic pathway for photomineralization of IMI is proposed.

  8. Exploiting Acid Phosphatases in the Synthesis of Phosphorylated Monoalcohols and Diols

    PubMed Central

    Tasnádi, Gábor; Lukesch, Michael; Zechner, Michaela; Jud, Wolfgang; Hall, Mélanie; Ditrich, Klaus; Baldenius, Kai; Hartog, Aloysius F.; Wever, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A set of phosphatases was evaluated for their potential to catalyze the regio‐ and stereoselective phosphorylation of alcohols using a high‐energy inorganic phosphate donor, such as di‐, tri‐ and polyphosphate. Parameters such as type and amount of phosphate donor and pH of the reaction were investigated in order to minimize the thermodynamically favored hydrolysis of the phosphate donor and the formed phosphate ester. Diols were monophosphorylated with high selectivities. This biocatalytic phosphorylation method provides selectively activated and/or protected synthetic intermediates for further chemical and/or enzymatic transformations and is applicable to a large scale (6.86 g) in a flow setup with immobilized phosphatase.

  9. Apparent anti-Woodward-Hoffmann addition to a nickel bis(dithiolene) complex: the reaction mechanism involves reduced, dimetallic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Dang, Li; Shibl, Mohamed F; Yang, Xinzheng; Harrison, Daniel J; Alak, Aiman; Lough, Alan J; Fekl, Ulrich; Brothers, Edward N; Hall, Michael B

    2013-04-01

    Nickel dithiolene complexes have been proposed as electrocatalysts for alkene purification. Recent studies of the ligand-based reactions of Ni(tfd)2 (tfd = S2C2(CF3)2) and its anion [Ni(tfd)2](-) with alkenes (ethylene and 1-hexene) showed that in the absence of the anion, the reaction proceeds most rapidly to form the intraligand adduct, which decomposes by releasing a substituted dihydrodithiin. However, the presence of the anion increases the rate of formation of the stable cis-interligand adduct, and decreases the rate of dihydrodithiin formation and decomposition. In spite of both computational and experimental studies, the mechanism, especially the role of the anion, remained somewhat elusive. We are now providing a combined experimental and computational study that addresses the mechanism and explains the role of the anion. A kinetic study (global analysis) for the reaction of 1-hexene is reported, which supports the following mechanism: (1) reversible intraligand addition, (2) oxidation of the intraligand addition product prior to decomposition, and (3) interligand adduct formation catalyzed by Ni(tfd)2(-). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed on the Ni(tfd)2/Ni(tfd)2(-)/ethylene system to shed light on the selectivity of adduct formation in the absence of anion and on the mechanism in which Ni(tfd)2(-) shifts the reaction from intraligand addition to interligand addition. Computational results show that in the neutral system the free energy of activation for intraligand addition is lower than that for interligand addition, in agreement with the experimental results. The computations predict that the anion enhances the rate of the cis-interligand adduct formation by forming a dimetallic complex with the neutral complex. The [(Ni(tfd)2)2](-) dimetallic complex then coordinates ethylene and isomerizes to form a Ni,S-bound ethylene complex, which then rapidly isomerizes to the stable interligand adduct but not to the intraligand adduct

  10. Phosphorylation of C-H bonds of aromatic compounds using metals and metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnikova, Yu H.; Sinyashin, O. G.

    2015-09-01

    Key achievements and current trends in the development of methods for phosphorylation of aromatic C-H bonds catalyzed by metal salts and complexes are considered. The most important and promising approaches of the last decade, including those concerning the synthesis and properties of arylphosphonates, are distinguished. Methods for the introduction of a phosphonate group into non-activated and functionally substituted aromatic compounds and heteroaromatic molecules and phosphorylation-cyclization reactions involving acetylenes, 2-isocyanobiphenyls and alkynoates are analyzed. The possibilities of ligand-directed phosphorylation of compounds with aromatic C-H bonds and presumed mechanisms and intermediates in the C-P bond formation reactions are considered. The potential of this extensively developing research trend in organic and organoelement chemistry is highlighted. The bibliography includes 263 references.

  11. EPR and pulsed ENDOR study of intermediates from reactions of aromatic azides with group 13 metal trichlorides

    PubMed Central

    Bencivenni, Giorgio; Cesari, Riccardo; Nanni, Daniele; El Mkami, Hassane

    2010-01-01

    Summary The reactions of group 13 metal trichlorides with aromatic azides were examined by CW EPR and pulsed ENDOR spectroscopies. Complex EPR spectra were obtained from reactions of aluminium, gallium and indium trichlorides with phenyl azides containing a variety of substituents. Analysis of the spectra showed that 4-methoxy-, 3-methoxy- and 2-methoxyphenyl azides all gave ‘dimer’ radical cations [ArNHC6H4NH2]+• and trimers [ArNHC6H4NHC6H4NH2]+• followed by polymers. 4-Azidobenzonitrile, with its electron-withdrawing substituent, did not react. In general the aromatic azides appeared to react most rapidly with AlCl3 but this reagent tended to generate much polymer. InCl3 was the least reactive group 13 halide. DFT computations of the radical cations provided corroborating evidence and suggested that the unpaired electrons were accommodated in extensive π-delocalised orbitals. A mechanism to account for the reductive conversion of aromatic azides to the corresponding anilines and thence to the dimers and trimers is proposed. PMID:21049080

  12. Reaction of alkynes and azides: not triazoles through copper-acetylides but oxazoles through copper-nitrene intermediates.

    PubMed

    Haldón, Estela; Besora, Maria; Cano, Israel; Cambeiro, Xacobe C; Pericàs, Miquel A; Maseras, Feliu; Nicasio, M Carmen; Pérez, Pedro J

    2014-03-17

    Well-defined copper(I) complexes of composition [Tpm*(,Br) Cu(NCMe)]BF4 (Tpm*(,Br) =tris(3,5-dimethyl-4-bromo-pyrazolyl)methane) or [Tpa(*) Cu]PF6 (Tpa(*) =tris(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazolylmethyl)amine) catalyze the formation of 2,5-disubstituted oxazoles from carbonyl azides and terminal alkynes in a direct manner. This process represents a novel procedure for the synthesis of this valuable heterocycle from readily available starting materials, leading exclusively to the 2,5-isomer, attesting to a completely regioselective transformation. Experimental evidence and computational studies have allowed the proposal of a reaction mechanism based on the initial formation of a copper-acyl nitrene species, in contrast to the well-known mechanism for the copper-catalyzed alkyne and azide cycloaddition reactions (CuAAC) that is triggered by the formation of a copper-acetylide complex. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Structure of Naegleria Tet-like dioxygenase (NgTet1) in complexes with a reaction intermediate 5-hydroxymethylcytosine DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Pais, June E.; Dai, Nan; Corrêa, Jr., Ivan R.; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-08-31

    The family of ten-eleven translocation (Tet) dioxygenases is widely distributed across the eukaryotic tree of life, from mammals to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Like mammalian Tet proteins, the Naegleria Tet-like protein, NgTet1, acts on 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and generates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) in three consecutive, Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxidation reactions. The two intermediates, 5hmC and 5fC, could be considered either as the reaction product of the previous enzymatic cycle or the substrate for the next cycle. Here we present a new crystal structure of NgTet1 in complex with DNA containing a 5hmC. Along with the previously solved NgTet1–5mC structure, the two complexes offer a detailed picture of the active site at individual stages of the reaction cycle. In the crystal, the hydroxymethyl (OH-CH2-) moiety of 5hmC points to the metal center, representing the reaction product of 5mC hydroxylation. The hydroxyl oxygen atom could be rotated away from the metal center, to a hydrophobic pocket formed by Ala212, Val293 and Phe295. Such rotation turns the hydroxyl oxygen atom away from the product conformation, and exposes the target CH2 towards the metal-ligand water molecule, where a dioxygen O2 molecule would occupy to initiate the next round of reaction by abstracting a hydrogen atom from the substrate. The Ala212-to-Val (A212V) mutant profoundly limits the product to 5hmC, probably due to the reduced hydrophobic pocket size restricts the binding of 5hmC as a substrate.

  14. Direct experimental probing and theoretical analysis of the reaction between the simplest Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO and isoprene

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Z. C. J.; Au, K.; Vereecken, L.; Sheps, L.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in the spectroscopy of Criegee intermediates (CI) have enabled direct kinetic studies of these highly reactive chemical species. The impact of CI chemistry is currently being incorporated into atmospheric models, including their reactions with trace organic and inorganic compounds. Isoprene, C5H8, is a doubly-unsaturated hydrocarbon that accounts for the largest share of all biogenic emissions around the globe and is also a building block of larger volatile organic compounds. We report direct measurements of the reaction of the simplest CI (CH2OO) with isoprene, using time-resolved cavity-enhanced UV absorption spectroscopy. We find the reaction to be pressure-independent between 15–100 Torr, with a rate coefficient that varies from (1.5 ± 0.1) × 10–15 cm3 molecule–1 s–1 at room temperature to (23 ± 2) × 10–15 cm3 molecule–1 s–1 at 540 K. Quantum chemical and transition-state theory calculations of 16 unique channels for CH2OO + isoprene somewhat underpredict the observed T-dependence of the total reaction rate coefficient, but are overall in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Finally, this reaction is broadly similar to those with smaller alkenes, proceeding by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition to one of the two conjugated double bonds of isoprene.

  15. Cobalt catalysis in the gas phase: experimental characterization of cobalt(I) complexes as intermediates in regioselective Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Lukas; Kuttner, Julian; Hilt, Gerhard; Schwarzer, Martin C; Frenking, Gernot; Schmalz, Hans-Günther; Schäfer, Mathias

    2013-10-18

    In situ-formed cobalt(I) complexes are proposed to act as efficient catalysts in regioselective Diels-Alder reactions of unactivated substrates such as 1,3-dienes and alkynes. We report the first experimental evidence for the in situ reduction of CoBr2(dppe) [dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane] by Zn/ZnI2 to [Co(I)(dppe)](+) by means of electrospray MS(n) experiments. Additionally, the reactivities of Co(II) and Co(I) dppe complexes toward the Diels-Alder substrates isoprene and phenylacetylene were probed in gas-phase ion/molecule reactions (IMRs). Isoprene and phenylacetylene were introduced into the mass spectrometer via the buffer gas flow of a linear ion trap. The IMR experiments revealed a significantly higher substrate affinity of [Co(I)(dppe)](+) compared with [Co(II)Br(dppe)](+). Furthermore, the central intermediate of the solution-phase cobalt-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction, [Co(I)(dppe)(isoprene)(phenylacetylene)](+), could be generated via IMR and examined in the gas phase. Collision activation of this complex ion delivered evidence for the gas-phase reaction of isoprene with phenylacetylene in the coordination sphere of the cobalt ion. The experimental findings are consistent with the results of quantum-chemical calculations on all of the observed Co(I) dppe complex ions. The results constitute strong analytical evidence for the formation and importance of different cobalt(I) species in regioselective Diels-Alder reactions of unactivated substrates and identify [Co(I)(dppe)](+) as the active Diels-Alder catalyst.

  16. A model for the compositions of non-stoichiometric intermediate phases formed by diffusion reactions, and its application to Nb3Sn superconductors.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Sumption, M D

    2016-01-12

    In this work we explore the compositions of non-stoichiometric intermediate phases formed by diffusion reactions: a mathematical framework is developed and tested against the specific case of Nb3Sn superconductors. In the first part, the governing equations for the bulk diffusion and inter-phase interface reactions during the growth of a compound are derived, numerical solutions to which give both the composition profile and growth rate of the compound layer. The analytic solutions are obtained with certain approximations made. In the second part, we explain an effect that the composition characteristics of compounds can be quite different depending on whether it is the bulk diffusion or grain boundary diffusion that dominates in the compounds, and that "frozen" bulk diffusion leads to unique composition characteristics that the bulk composition of a compound layer remains unchanged after its initial formation instead of varying with the diffusion reaction system; here the model is modified for the case of grain boundary diffusion. Finally, we apply this model to the Nb3Sn superconductors and propose approaches to control their compositions.

  17. Rate coefficients of C(1) and C(2) Criegee intermediate reactions with formic and acetic Acid near the collision limit: direct kinetics measurements and atmospheric implications.

    PubMed

    Welz, Oliver; Eskola, Arkke J; Sheps, Leonid; Rotavera, Brandon; Savee, John D; Scheer, Adam M; Osborn, David L; Lowe, Douglas; Murray Booth, A; Xiao, Ping; Anwar H Khan, M; Percival, Carl J; Shallcross, Dudley E; Taatjes, Craig A

    2014-04-25

    Rate coefficients are directly determined for the reactions of the Criegee intermediates (CI) CH2 OO and CH3 CHOO with the two simplest carboxylic acids, formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid (CH3 COOH), employing two complementary techniques: multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry and cavity-enhanced broadband ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The measured rate coefficients are in excess of 1×10(-10)  cm(3)  s(-1) , several orders of magnitude larger than those suggested from many previous alkene ozonolysis experiments and assumed in atmospheric modeling studies. These results suggest that the reaction with carboxylic acids is a substantially more important loss process for CIs than is presently assumed. Implementing these rate coefficients in global atmospheric models shows that reactions between CI and organic acids make a substantial contribution to removal of these acids in terrestrial equatorial areas and in other regions where high CI concentrations occur such as high northern latitudes, and implies that sources of acids in these areas are larger than previously recognized.

  18. Rate Coefficients of C1 and C2 Criegee Intermediate Reactions with Formic and Acetic Acid Near the Collision Limit: Direct Kinetics Measurements and Atmospheric Implications**

    PubMed Central

    Welz, Oliver; Eskola, Arkke J; Sheps, Leonid; Rotavera, Brandon; Savee, John D; Scheer, Adam M; Osborn, David L; Lowe, Douglas; Murray Booth, A; Xiao, Ping; Anwar H Khan, M; Percival, Carl J; Shallcross, Dudley E; Taatjes, Craig A

    2014-01-01

    Rate coefficients are directly determined for the reactions of the Criegee intermediates (CI) CH2OO and CH3CHOO with the two simplest carboxylic acids, formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH), employing two complementary techniques: multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry and cavity-enhanced broadband ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The measured rate coefficients are in excess of 1×10−10 cm3 s−1, several orders of magnitude larger than those suggested from many previous alkene ozonolysis experiments and assumed in atmospheric modeling studies. These results suggest that the reaction with carboxylic acids is a substantially more important loss process for CIs than is presently assumed. Implementing these rate coefficients in global atmospheric models shows that reactions between CI and organic acids make a substantial contribution to removal of these acids in terrestrial equatorial areas and in other regions where high CI concentrations occur such as high northern latitudes, and implies that sources of acids in these areas are larger than previously recognized. PMID:24668781

  19. A model for the compositions of non-stoichiometric intermediate phases formed by diffusion reactions, and its application to Nb3Sn superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Sumption, M. D.

    2016-01-12

    In this work we explore the compositions of non-stoichiometric intermediate phases formed by diffusion reactions: a mathematical framework is developed and tested against the specific case of Nb3Sn superconductors. In the first part, the governing equations for the bulk diffusion and interphase interface reactions during the growth of a compound are derived, numerical solutions to which give both the composition profile and growth rate of the compound layer. The analytic solutions are obtained with certain approximations made. In the second part, we explain an effect that the composition characteristics of compounds can be quite different depending on whether it is the bulk diffusion or grain boundary diffusion that dominates in the compounds, and that “frozen” bulk diffusion leads to unique composition characteristics that the bulk composition of a compound layer remains unchanged after its initial formation instead of varying with the diffusion reaction system; here the model is modified for the case of grain boundary diffusion. Lastly, we apply this model to the Nb3Sn superconductors and propose approaches to control their compositions.

  20. A model for the compositions of non-stoichiometric intermediate phases formed by diffusion reactions, and its application to Nb3Sn superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, X.; Sumption, M. D.

    2016-01-12

    In this work we explore the compositions of non-stoichiometric intermediate phases formed by diffusion reactions: a mathematical framework is developed and tested against the specific case of Nb3Sn superconductors. In the first part, the governing equations for the bulk diffusion and interphase interface reactions during the growth of a compound are derived, numerical solutions to which give both the composition profile and growth rate of the compound layer. The analytic solutions are obtained with certain approximations made. In the second part, we explain an effect that the composition characteristics of compounds can be quite different depending on whether it ismore » the bulk diffusion or grain boundary diffusion that dominates in the compounds, and that “frozen” bulk diffusion leads to unique composition characteristics that the bulk composition of a compound layer remains unchanged after its initial formation instead of varying with the diffusion reaction system; here the model is modified for the case of grain boundary diffusion. Lastly, we apply this model to the Nb3Sn superconductors and propose approaches to control their compositions.« less

  1. Re-examination of the roles of PEP and Mg2+ in the reaction catalysed by the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from leaves of Zea mays. Effects of the activators glucose 6-phosphate and glycine.

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Méndez, A; Rodríguez-Sotres, R; López-Valentín, D M; Muñoz-Clares, R A

    1998-01-01

    To study the effects of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and Mg2+ on the activity of the non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from Zea mays leaves, steady-state measurements have been carried out with the free forms of PEP (fPEP) and Mg2+ (fMg2+), both in a near-physiological concentration range. At pH 7.3, in the absence of activators, the initial velocity data obtained with both forms of the enzyme are consistent with the exclusive binding of MgPEP to the active site and of fPEP to an activating allosteric site. At pH 8.3, and in the presence of saturating concentrations of glucose 6-phosphate (Glc6P) or Gly, the free species also combined with the active site in the free enzyme, but with dissociation constants at least 35-fold that estimated for MgPEP. The latter dissociation constant was lowered to the same extent by saturating Glc6P and Gly, to approx. one-tenth and one-sixteenth in the non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated enzymes respectively. When Glc6P is present, fPEP binds to the active site in the free enzyme better than fMg2+, whereas the metal ion binds better in the presence of Gly. Saturation of the enzyme with Glc6P abolished the activation by fPEP, consistent with a common binding site, whereas saturation with Gly increased the affinity of the allosteric site for fPEP. Under all the conditions tested, our results suggest that fPEP is not able to combine with the allosteric site in the free enzyme, i.e. it cannot combine until after MgPEP, fPEP or fMg2+ are bound at the active site. The physiological role of Mg2+ in the regulation of the enzyme is only that of a substrate, mainly as part of the MgPEP complex. The kinetic properties of maize leaf PEPC reported here are consistent with the enzyme being well below saturation under the physiological concentrations of fMg2+ and PEP, particularly during the dark period; it is therefore suggested that the basal PEPC activity in vivo is very low, but highly

  2. Chemical potential and symmetry energy for intermediate-mass fragment production in heavy ion reactions near the Fermi energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Lin, W.; Huang, M.; Wada, R.; Wang, J.; Bonasera, A.; Zheng, H.; Chen, Z.; Kowalski, S.; Keutgen, T.; Hagel, K.; Qin, L.; Natowitz, J. B.; Materna, T.; Sahu, P. K.; Barbui, M.; Bottosso, C.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.

    2017-04-01

    Ratios of differential chemical potential values relative to the temperature, (μn-μp)/T , extracted from isotope yields of 13 reaction systems at 40 MeV/nucleon are compared to those of a quantum statistical model to determine the temperature and symmetry energy values of the fragmenting system. The experimental (μn-μp)/T values are extracted based on the modified Fisher model. Using the density value of ρ /ρ0=0.56 from the previous analysis, the temperature and symmetry energy values of T =4.6 ±0.4 MeV and asym=23.6 ±2.1 MeV are extracted in a framework of a quantum statistical model. These values agree well with those of the previous work, in which a self-consistent method was utilized with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics simulations. The extracted temperature and symmetry energies are discussed together with other experimental values published in literature.

  3. Yield ratios and directed flows of light fragments from reactions induced by neutron-rich nuclei at intermediate energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ting-Zhi; Li, Long-Long; Wang, Rui-Feng; Yan, Ting-Feng

    2017-04-01

    The yield ratios of neutron/proton and 3H/3He and the directed flow per nucleon for these projectile-like fragments at large impact parameters are studied for 50Ca + 40Ca and 50Cr + 40Ca for comparison at 50 MeV/u using the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model. It is found that the yield ratios and the directed flows per nucleon are different for reactions induced by the neutron-rich nucleus 50Ca and the stable isobaric nucleus 50Cr, and depend on the hardness of the EOS. The ratios of neutron/proton and 3H/3He and the difference of directed flow per nucleon of neutron-proton are suggested to be possible observables to investigate the isospin effects. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405025)

  4. Stabilization and Characterization of a Heme-Oxy Reaction Intermediate in Inducible Nitric-oxide Synthase*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Tejero, Jesús; Biswas, Ashis; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Page, Richard C.; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Hemann, Craig; Zweier, Jay L.; Misra, Saurav; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric-oxide synthases (NOS) are heme-thiolate enzymes that N-hydroxylate l-arginine (l-Arg) to make NO. NOS contain a unique Trp residue whose side chain stacks with the heme and hydrogen bonds with the heme thiolate. To understand its importance we substituted His for Trp188 in the inducible NOS oxygenase domain (iNOSoxy) and characterized enzyme spectral, thermodynamic, structural, kinetic, and catalytic properties. The W188H mutation had relatively small effects on l-Arg binding and on enzyme heme-CO and heme-NO absorbance spectra, but increased the heme midpoint potential by 88 mV relative to wild-type iNOSoxy, indicating it decreased heme-thiolate electronegativity. The protein crystal structure showed that the His188 imidazole still stacked with the heme and was positioned to hydrogen bond with the heme thiolate. Analysis of a single turnover l-Arg hydroxylation reaction revealed that a new heme species formed during the reaction. Its build up coincided kinetically with the disappearance of the enzyme heme-dioxy species and with the formation of a tetrahydrobiopterin (H4B) radical in the enzyme, whereas its subsequent disappearance coincided with the rate of l-Arg hydroxylation and formation of ferric enzyme. We conclude: (i) W188H iNOSoxy stabilizes a heme-oxy species that forms upon reduction of the heme-dioxy species by H4B. (ii) The W188H mutation hinders either the processing or reactivity of the heme-oxy species and makes these steps become rate-limiting for l-Arg hydroxylation. Thus, the conserved Trp residue in NOS may facilitate formation and/or reactivity of the ultimate hydroxylating species by tuning heme-thiolate electronegativity. PMID:18815130

  5. Formation of gold and gold sulfide nanoparticles and mesoscale intermediate structures in the reactions of aqueous HAuCl4 with sulfide and citrate ions.

    PubMed

    Mikhlin, Yuri; Likhatski, Maxim; Karacharov, Anton; Zaikovski, Vladimir; Krylov, Alexander

    2009-07-14

    The effects of the molar ratio of sodium sulfide to chloroauric acid in the range of 0.5 to 5 and the time factor on the formation of the nanoparticles (NPs) of metallic Au, Au(2)S or their mixtures have been studied applying in situ and ex situ techniques (UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, potentiometry, TEM, SPM, SERS, XPS). The products and intermediates have been compared with those for the reduction of chloroaurate with citrate ions and combinations of citrate and sulfide ions. An increase in the concentration of sulfide ions accelerates the reduction of Au(iii) complexes but hinders the nucleation and growth of Au NPs, resulting in a prolonged period before the appearance of plasmon peaks. The electrochemical potential is not directly associated with the plasmon intensities, although the potential sharply decreases simultaneously with a blue shift of the near-IR peak emerging with the Na(2)S/HAuCl(4) ratios of 0.5 to 1.5. It was concluded that the peak is due to longitudinal plasmon resonance of gold nanoplates. Au(2)S NPs, the nucleation of which is effectively inhibited, and probably some structures and fragments visible in TEM and AFM, including 2-5 nm Au NPs, crystallize in part outside the solutions. The evidence of partially liquid mesoscale structures comprising intermediate gold species as precursors of nanoparticles is presented, and their origin, ex situ transformation and role in the reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  6. A new class of modular P,N-ligand library for asymmetric Pd-catalyzed allylic substitution reactions: a study of the key Pd-pi-allyl intermediates.

    PubMed

    Mazuela, Javier; Paptchikhine, Alexander; Tolstoy, Päivi; Pàmies, Oscar; Diéguez, Montserrat; Andersson, Pher G

    2010-01-11

    A new class of modular P,N-ligand library has been synthesized and screened in the Pd-catalyzed allylic substitution reactions of several substrate types. These series of ligands can be prepared efficiently from easily accessible hydroxyl-oxazole/thiazole derivatives. Their modular nature enables the bridge length, the substituents at the heterocyclic ring and in the alkyl backbone chain, the configuration of the ligand backbone, and the substituents/configurations in the biaryl phosphite moiety to be easily and systematically varied. By carefully selecting the ligand components, therefore, high regio- and enantioselectivities (ee values up to 96 %) and good activities are achieved in a broad range of mono-, di-, and trisubstituted linear hindered and unhindered substrates and cyclic substrates. The NMR spectroscopic and DFT studies on the Pd-pi-allyl intermediates provide a deeper understanding of the effect of ligand parameters on the origin of enantioselectivity.

  7. Detection of alkylperoxo and ferryl, (Fe sup IV = O) sup 2+ , intermediates during the reaction of tert-butyl hydroperoxide with iron porphyrins in toluene solution

    SciTech Connect

    Arasasingham, R.D.; Cornman, C.R.; Balch, A.L. )

    1989-11-27

    PFe{sup II} and PFe{sup III}OH (P is a porphyrin dianion) catalyze the decomposition of tert-butyl hydroperoxide in toluene solution without appreciable attack on the porphyrin ligand. {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic studies at low temperature ({minus}70{degree}C) give evidence for the formation of a high-spin, five-coordinate intermediate, PFe{sup III}OOC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}. Organic products formed from this reaction are tert-butyl alcohol, di-tert-butyl peroxide, benzaldehyde, acetone, and benzyl-tert-butyl peroxide, which arise largely from a radical chain process initiated by the iron porphyrin but continuing without its intervention.

  8. An all-encompassing global convergence result for processive multisite phosphorylation systems.

    PubMed

    Eithun, Mitchell; Shiu, Anne

    2017-09-01

    Phosphorylation, the enzyme-mediated addition of a phosphate group to a molecule, is a ubiquitous chemical mechanism in biology. Multisite phosphorylation, the addition of phosphate groups to multiple sites of a single molecule, may be distributive or processive. Distributive systems, which require an enzyme and substrate to bind several times in order to add multiple phosphate groups, can be bistable. Processive systems, in contrast, require only one binding to add all phosphate groups, and were recently shown to be globally stable. However, this global convergence result was proven only for a specific mechanism of processive phosphorylation/dephosphorylation (namely, all catalytic reactions are reversible). Accordingly, we generalize this result to allow for processive phosphorylation networks in which each reaction may be irreversible, and also to account for possible product inhibition. We accomplish this by first defining an all-encompassing processive network that encapsulates all of these schemes, and then appealing to recent results of Marcondes de Freitas et al. that assert global convergence by way of monotone systems theory and network/graph reductions (corresponding to removing intermediate complexes). Our results form a case study into the question of when global convergence is preserved when reactions and/or intermediate complexes are added to or removed from a network. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Intermediate products of sulfur disproportional reaction and their physical role in effusive to explosive submarine volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Takano, B.; Butterfield, D. A.; Resing, J.; Chadwick, W. W.; Embley, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Recent direct observations of submarine volcanic activity in the Mariana Arc are giving us a chance to examine the role of volcanic gas in submarine volcanic conduits. Unlike subaerial volcanoes, where hydrogeologic conditions have different character from place to place, the overlying water mass above submarine volcanoes gives a uniform hydrographic setting. Currently, the places where we can directly observe submarine volcanic activity are located deeper than 400 m, which raises the boiling point of seawater to over 240 deg C. This situation allows us to examine the interaction of volcanic gases with ambient seawater at a shorter distance from the magma source than at subaerial volcanic settings. Arc volcano settings give us longer and more frequent opportunities to make observations and provide a more diverse range of submarine volcanism than ridge settings. Among the three major components of volcanic gases (i.e., H2O, CO2 and SO2), water follows a two phase boundary below the critical temperature after volatile components leave from the magmatic source. Milky sulfur sol bearing hydrothermal fluid is commonly observed throughout Mariana active sites. Most of the sulfur sol (colloidal elemental sulfur and polysulfides) might be formed by disproportional reaction of sulfur dioxide with seawater when water vapor shrinks to liquid water. The reaction creates not only sulfur sol but also various types of sulfite, which affects the pH of seawater. We detected short-lived sulfite species in the water column above several active Mariana volcanoes such as NW Rota-1, Daikoku and Nikko by on-board HPLC. Because most observations are made on the liquid phase side of H2O boundary, it is very hard to get data to investigate the physical and chemical sulfur sol forming process occurring on the vapor phase side or at the critical state (i.e., near the magma source process). Carbon dioxide behaves as a gas at a wide range of pressures and temperatures and carries heat and

  10. Preparation and characterization of bonded silica hydride intermediate from triethoxysilane and dimethylmethoxysilane using supercritical carbon dioxide and dioxane as reaction medium.

    PubMed

    Ashu-Arrah, Benjamin A; Glennon, Jeremy D; Albert, Klaus

    2012-05-04

    This research examines bonding methodology, surface coverage and silanol conversion efficiencies on the preparation of silica hydride (SiH) intermediate from triethoxysilane (TES) and dimethylmethoxysilane (DMMS) using sc-CO(2) and dioxane as reaction solvent. Under sc-CO(2) reaction conditions (at temperature and pressure of 100 °C, 414 bar, respectively and 3h reaction time), the surface coverages of SiH (evaluated from %C obtained from elemental analysis) prepared with DMMS (3.39 μmol/m(2)) and TES (4.46 μmol/m(2)) increased by 2- and 4-folds respectively, when compared to reaction performed in dioxane (2.66 μmol/m(2), SiH, DMMS and 0.69 μmol/m(2), SiH, TES). The relatively higher surface coverage of SiH from TES over DMMS generated in sc-CO(2) is due to the inherent trialkoxy moiety of the TES that favours siloxane crosslinkage, forming polymeric surface attachments to yield a higher ligand density than the monomeric DMMS ligand. A conversion efficiency of ∼84.4% of SiH prepared from TES in sc-CO(2) estimated from (29)Si CP/MAS NMR analysis is comparable to TES silanization in dioxane or toluene. Moreover, silica hydride (SiH) conversion efficiency of ca. 42.4% achieved for the hydride intermediate prepared from DMMS in sc-CO(2) is more superior to 33.3% efficiency obtained in dioxane. The differences in conversion efficiencies is attributed to the ability of sc-CO(2) being able to access silica pores that are inaccessible in organic solvents. Bonded silica hydride from TES, DMMS prepared in sc-CO(2) were characterized using elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), BET surface area, Fourier transform infrared (FI-IR) and solid state NMR spectroscopy. Silica hydride technology/chemical functionalization of silica in sc-CO(2) avoid extended purification steps (i.e. filtration and washing), generation of waste organic solvent and the need of costly or energy consuming drying processing with improved modification efficiency. Copyright © 2012

  11. Kinetic and spectroscopic characterization of intermediates and component interactions in reactions of methane monooxygenase from methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.E.; Valentine, A.M.; Salifoglou, A.; Lippard, S.J.; Wang, D.; Huynh, B.H.; Edmondson, D.E.

    1995-10-18

    We describe mechanistic studies of the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) enzyme system from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). Interactions among the three sMMO components, the hydroxylase (H), reductase (R), and protein B (B), were investigated by monitoring conversion of nitrobenzene to nitrophenol under both single turnover and catalytic conditions. During catalytic turnover, hydroxylation occurs to afford 3-nitrophenol (43%) and 4-nitrophenol (57%), whereas hydroxylation takes place exclusively (> 95%) to give 4-nitrophenol under single turnover conditions in the absence of reductase. Protein B exerts a strong influence on single turnover reactions of nitrobenzene, with optimal rate constants and yields obtained by using 1.5-2 equiv of protein R per equivalent of hydroxylase. The temperature dependence of these kinetic values was determined. Changes in dioxygen concentration and pH, as well as exchange of solvent accessible protons with D{sub 2}O, did not significantly affect the rate constants for either of these processes, the implications of which for the kinetic mechanism are discussed. From the present and related evidence, structures for H{sub peroxo} and Q are proposed. 54 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Structure of phosphorylated enzyme I, the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system sugar translocation signal protein.

    PubMed

    Teplyakov, Alexey; Lim, Kap; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Kapadia, Geeta; Chen, Celia C H; Schwartz, Jennifer; Howard, Andrew; Reddy, Prasad T; Peterkofsky, Alan; Herzberg, Osnat

    2006-10-31

    Bacterial transport of many sugars, coupled to their phosphorylation, is carried out by the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):sugar phosphotransferase system and involves five phosphoryl group transfer reactions. Sugar translocation initiates with the Mg(2+)-dependent phosphorylation of enzyme I (EI) by PEP. Crystals of Escherichia coli EI were obtained by mixing the protein with Mg(2+) and PEP, followed by oxalate, an EI inhibitor. The crystal structure reveals a dimeric protein where each subunit comprises three domains: a domain that binds the partner PEP:sugar phosphotransferase system protein, HPr; a domain that carries the phosphorylated histidine residue, His-189; and a PEP-binding domain. The PEP-binding site is occupied by Mg(2+) and oxalate, and the phosphorylated His-189 is in-line for phosphotransfer to/from the ligand. Thus, the structure represents an enzyme intermediate just after phosphotransfer from PEP and before a conformational transition that brings His-189 approximately P in proximity to the phosphoryl group acceptor, His-15 of HPr. A model of this conformational transition is proposed whereby swiveling around an alpha-helical linker disengages the His domain from the PEP-binding domain. Assuming that HPr binds to the HPr-binding domain as observed by NMR spectroscopy of an EI fragment, a rotation around two linker segments orients the His domain relative to the HPr-binding domain so that His-189 approximately P and His-15 are appropriately stationed for an in-line phosphotransfer reaction.

  13. Characterization of Metastable Intermediates Formed in the Reaction Between a Mn(II) Complex and Dioxygen, Including a Crystallographic Structure of a Binuclear Mn(III)-Peroxo Species

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, Michael K.; Sun, Xianru; Kwak, Yeonju; Solomon, Edward I.; Rybak-Akimova, Elena; Kovacs, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Transition-metal peroxos have been implicated as key intermediates in a variety of critical biological processes involving O2. Due to their highly reactive nature, very few metal-peroxos have been characterized. The dioxygen chemistry of manganese remains largely unexplored despite the proposed involvement of a binuclear Mn-peroxo, either as a precursor to O2, or derived from O2, in both photosynthetic H2O oxidation and DNA biosynthesis, arguably two of the most fundamental processes of life. Neither of these biological intermediates has been observed. Herein we describe the dioxygen chemistry of coordinatively unsaturated [MnII(SMe2N4(6-MeDPEN))] +(1), and the characterization of intermediates formed en route to a binuclear mono-oxo bridged Mn(III) product {[MnIII(SMe2N4(6-MeDPEN)]2-(μ-O)}2+ (2), the oxo atom of which is derived from 18O2. At low-temperatures, a dioxygen intermediate, [Mn(SMe2N4(6-MeDPEN))(O2)]+ (4), is observed (by stopped-flow) to rapidly and irreversibly form in this reaction (k1(−10 °C)= 3780±180M−1s−1, ΔH1‡ = 26.4±1.7 kJ mol−1, ΔS1‡ = − 75.6±6.8 J mol−1K−1), and then convert more slowly (k2(−10 °C)= 417±3.2 M−1s−1, ΔH2‡ = 47.1±1.4 kJ mol−1, ΔS2‡ = − 15.0±5.7 J mol−1K−1) to a species 3 with isotopically sensitive stretches at νo-o (Δ18O) = 819(47) cm−1, kO–O= 3.02 mdyn/Å, and νMn-O(Δ18O) = 611(25) cm−1 consistent with a peroxo. Intermediate 3 releases approximately 0.5 equiv of H2O2 per Mn ion upon protonation, and the rate of conversion of 4 to 3 is dependent on [Mn(II)] concentration, consistent with the formation of a binuclear Mn-peroxo. This was verified by X-ray crystallography, where the peroxo of {[MnIII(SMe2N4(6-Me-DPEN)]2(trans–μ–1,2–O2)}2+ (3) is shown to be bridging between two Mn(III) ions in an end-on trans-μ-1,2-fashion. This represents the first characterized example of a binuclear Mn(III)-peroxo, and a rare case in which more than one intermediate is observed

  14. Physicochemical Changes and Glycation Reaction in Intermediate-Moisture Protein-Sugar Foods with and without Addition of Resveratrol during Storage.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zhanwu; Gu, Mantun; Hao, Wangjun; Shen, Yixiao; Zhang, Weimin; Zheng, Lili; Ai, Binling; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Xu, Zhimin

    2016-06-22

    An intermediate-moisture food (IMF) model consisting of whey protein isolate and glucose and an IMF model fortified with resveratrol were used to study the effect of resveratrol on physicochemical changes and glycation of protein-sugar-rich foods during storage. The water activity (aw) of the storage was controlled at 0.75 or 0.56. The browning rate or hardness of fortified IMFs was significantly lower than that of IMFs after 45-day storage. The rate of Maillard reaction in the samples stored at aw 0.56 was higher than that of samples stored at aw 0.75. The fortified IMFs had lower levels of AGEs (advanced glycation end products), CML (N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)-l-lysine), and insoluble protein during storage. The inhibition capability of resveratrol against glycation was also confirmed by using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis to monitor glycated proteins and protein aggregation in the samples. The results of this study suggested that resveratrol could be used as an inhibitor to reduce the formation of undesirable AGEs and other Maillard reaction products in foods during storage.

  15. Modeling of S-Nitrosothiol-Thiol Reactions of Biological Significance: HNO Production by S-Thiolation Requires a Proton Shuttle and Stabilization of Polar Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Lena V; Cibich, Daniel; Deye, Gregory; Talipov, Marat R; Timerghazin, Qadir K

    2017-02-07

    Nitroxyl (HNO), a reduced form of the important gasotransmitter nitric oxide, exhibits its own unique biological activity. A possible biological pathway of HNO formation is the S-thiolation reaction between thiols and S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs). Our density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggested that S-thiolation proceeds through a proton transfer from the thiol to the RSNO nitrogen atom, which increases electrophilicity of the RSNO sulfur, followed by nucleophilic attack by thiol, yielding a charge-separated zwitterionic intermediate structure RSS(+) (R)N(H)O(-) (Zi), which decomposes to yield HNO and disulfide RSSR. In the gas phase, the proton transfer and the S-S bond formation are asynchronous, resulting in a high activation barrier (>40 kcal mol(-1) ), making the reaction infeasible. However, the barrier can decrease below the S-N bond dissociation energy in RSNOs (≈30 kcal mol(-1) ) upon transition into an aqueous environment that stabilizes Zi and provides a proton shuttle to synchronize the proton transfer and the S-S bond formation. These mechanistic features suggest that S-thiolation can easily lend itself to enzymatic catalysis and thus can be a possible route of endogenous HNO production.

  16. Measurement of key resonance states for the 30P (p , γ)31S reaction rate, and the production of intermediate-mass elements in nova explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankainen, A.; Woods, P. J.; Schatz, H.; Poxon-Pearson, T.; Doherty, D. T.; Bader, V.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Browne, J.; Estrade, A.; Gade, A.; José, J.; Kontos, A.; Langer, C.; Lotay, G.; Meisel, Z.; Montes, F.; Noji, S.; Nunes, F.; Perdikakis, G.; Pereira, J.; Recchia, F.; Redpath, T.; Stroberg, R.; Scott, M.; Seweryniak, D.; Stevens, J.; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.; Zegers, R.

    2017-06-01

    We report the first experimental constraints on spectroscopic factors and strengths of key resonances in the 30P (p , γ)31S reaction critical for determining the production of intermediate-mass elements up to Ca in nova ejecta. The 30P (d , n)31S reaction was studied in inverse kinematics using the GRETINA γ-ray array to measure the angle-integrated cross-sections of states above the proton threshold. In general, negative-parity states are found to be most strongly produced but the absolute values of spectroscopic factors are typically an order of magnitude lower than predicted by the shell-model calculations employing WBP Hamiltonian for the negative-parity states. The results clearly indicate the dominance of a single 3 /2- resonance state at 196 keV in the region of nova burning T ≈ 0.10- 0.17 GK, well within the region of interest for nova nucleosynthesis. Hydrodynamic simulations of nova explosions have been performed to demonstrate the effect on the composition of nova ejecta.

  17. The formation of free radical intermediates in the reactions of gaseous NO 2 with solid NaCl and NaBr—Atmospheric and toxicological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, J. K. S.; Pitts, J. N.; Beichert, P.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    The reaction of gaseous NO 2 with alkali halides is of significant interest for its potential to occur in polluted marine atmospheres ((Finlayson-Pitts, 1993), Res. Chem. Int.19, 235-249). We report here a new paramagnetic signal in NaBr and NaCl formed upon reaction with gaseous NO 2 and assigned to a radical anion intermediate of the type [X… NO 2] - where X = Br, Cl. This is a new type of V k center (Castner and Känzig, 1957, J. Phys. Chem. Solids3, 178-195; Fowler, 1968; Seidel, 1969, in Magnetic Resonance and Radiofrequency Spectroscopy (edited by Averbuch P.), North Holland, Amsterdam, pp. 141-156), which is remarkably stable. Indeed, with NaCl it can be observed for several days following the reaction after handling the sample in room light and ambient air. This intermediate may be responsible at least in part for synergistic effects observed in the deep lung in rats exposed simultaneously to gaseous NO 2 and NaCl aerosol (Last and Warren, 1987, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.90, 34-42). While the gaseous product ClNO was suggested earlier as the causative agent (Last and Warren, 1987, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.90, 34-42), it is highly reactive with liquid water and will be removed largely in the upper respiratory tract, while small particles are able to penetrate into the deep lung. Given the ubiquitous occurrence (Finlayson-Pitts and Pitts, 1986, Atmospheric Chemistry: Fundamentals and Experimental Techniques, Wiley, New York), of NO 2 and airborne salt particles, which occur not only in marine areas but also significant distances inland (Shaw, 1991, J. geophys. Res.96, 22,369-22,372) as well as in the plumes from oil well burning (Lowenthal et al., 1993, Geophys. Res. Lett.20, 691-693; Stevens et al., 1993, Wat. Sci. Technol.27, 223-233; Sheridan et al., 1992, Geophys. Res. Lett.19, 389-392; Parungo et al., 1992, J. geophys. Res. 97, 15,867-15,882; Cahill et al., 1992, J. geophys. Res.97, 14,513-14,520) this radical anion could provide a vehicle for delivery

  18. Intermediate treatments

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; Wayne D. Shepperd

    1985-01-01

    Intermediate treatments are those applied after a new stand is successfully established and before the final harvest. These include not only intermediate cuttings - primarily thinning - but also fertilization, irrigation, and protection of the stand from damaging agents.

  19. A Novel Tool for Studying Auxin-Metabolism: The Inhibition of Grapevine Indole-3-Acetic Acid-Amido Synthetases by a Reaction Intermediate Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Christine; Dennis, Eric G.; Booker, Grant W.; Polyak, Steven W.; Boss, Paul K.; Davies, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    An important process for the regulation of auxin levels in plants is the inactivation of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) by conjugation to amino acids. The conjugation reaction is catalysed by IAA-amido synthetases belonging to the family of GH3 proteins. Genetic approaches to study the biological significance of these enzymes have been hampered by large gene numbers and a high degree of functional redundancy. To overcome these difficulties a chemical approach based on the reaction mechanism of GH3 proteins was employed to design a small molecule inhibitor of IAA-amido synthetase activity. Adenosine-5′-[2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl]phosphate (AIEP) mimics the adenylated intermediate of the IAA-conjugation reaction and was therefore proposed to compete with the binding of MgATP and IAA in the initial stages of catalysis. Two grapevine IAA-amido synthetases with different catalytic properties were chosen to test the inhibitory effects of AIEP in vitro. GH3-1 has previously been implicated in the grape berry ripening process and is restricted to two amino acid substrates, whereas GH3-6 conjugated IAA to 13 amino acids. AIEP is the most potent inhibitor of GH3 enzymes so far described and was shown to be competitive against MgATP and IAA binding to both enzymes with Ki-values 17-68-fold lower than the respective Km-values. AIEP also exhibited in vivo activity in an ex planta test system using young grape berries. Exposure to 5–20 µM of the inhibitor led to decreased levels of the common conjugate IAA-Asp and reduced the accumulation of the corresponding Asp-conjugate upon treatment with a synthetic auxin. AIEP therefore represents a novel chemical probe with which to study IAA-amido synthetase function. PMID:22649546

  20. C1-symmetric carbohydrate diphosphite ligands for asymmetric Pd-allylic alkylation reactions. Study of the key Pd-allyl intermediates.

    PubMed

    Gual, Aitor; Castillón, Sergio; Pàmies, Oscar; Diéguez, Montserrat; Claver, Carmen

    2011-03-28

    A series of C(1)-symmetrical 1,3-diphosphite ligands with a furanoside backbone have been applied in the Pd-catalysed asymmetric allylic alkylation of mono- and disubstituted linear substrates. These diphosphite ligands were designed by selective modification of the successful diphosphite ligand L1a with the 6-deoxy-1,2-O-isopropylidene-glucofuranose backbone in order to study the effect of the ligand structure on the catalytic performance. The effect of the solvent, the substrate/metal ratio and ligand/metal ratio were also investigated. The results in the Pd-allylic alkylation of rac-1,3-diphenyl-3-acetoxyprop-1-ene showed that the ligand structure and the reaction conditions had a considerable effect on enantioselectivity and on the kinetics of the reaction producing the kinetic resolution of the substrate. The alkylated product 2 was therefore obtained in 95% ee at 53% conversion and the enantiopure substrate 1 was recovered in 99.9% ee. Furthermore, the effect of the ligand structure and solvent were also observed in the Pd-allylic alkylation of monosubstituted 1-phenyl-3-acetoxyprop-1-ene. The use of a pro-chiral nucleophile was also explored in this reaction leading to excellent regioselectivities but moderate enantioselectivities. Finally, in order to determine how the ligand structure affected the chiral pocket of the Pd-π-allyl intermediates, the complexes [Pd(η(3)-C(15)H(13))(L)]PF(6), where L = L1a, L5-L8a, were synthesised and characterised by NMR spectroscopy.

  1. N-->S phosphoryl migration in phosphoryl glutathion.

    PubMed

    Yang, H J; Liu, J; Zhao, Y F

    1993-07-01

    It was found that in the case of N-(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion (reduced form), 2, N-->S phosphoryl migration took place, but not for N,N-bis(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion (oxidized form) or N-diisopropylphosphoryl cysteine. These results were deduced by 31P-NMR tracing experiments. It was shown that phosphoryl migration was catalyzed by an intramolecular carboxyl group, and a mechanism involving a mixed carboxyl-phosphoric anhydride was proposed. A competitive reaction between the amino and thiol group toward diisopropyl phosphite indicated that the phospho-thiol derived from N-(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion (reduced form), 2, did not result from direct phosphorylation of the thiol group. N,S-Bis(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion provides an authentic sample to confirm the migrated phosphoryl thiol product.

  2. The thiolase reaction mechanism: the importance of Asn316 and His348 for stabilizing the enolate intermediate of the Claisen condensation.

    PubMed

    Meriläinen, Gitte; Poikela, Visa; Kursula, Petri; Wierenga, Rik K

    2009-11-24

    The biosynthetic thiolase catalyzes a Claisen condensation reaction between acetyl-CoA and the enzyme acetylated at Cys89. Two oxyanion holes facilitate this catalysis: oxyanion hole I stabilizes the enolate intermediate generated from acetyl-CoA, whereas oxyanion hole II stabilizes the tetrahedral intermediate of the acetylated enzyme. The latter intermediate is formed when the alpha-carbanion of acetyl-CoA enolate reacts with the carbonyl carbon of acetyl-Cys89, after which C-C bond formation is completed. Oxyanion hole II is made of two main chain peptide NH groups, whereas oxyanion hole I is formed by a water molecule (Wat82) and NE2(His348). Wat82 is anchored in the active site by an optimal set of hydrogen bonding interactions, including a hydrogen bond to ND2(Asn316). Here, the importance of Asn316 and His348 for catalysis has been studied; in particular, the properties of the N316D, N316A, N316H, H348A, and H348N variants have been determined. For the N316D variant, no activity could be detected. For each of the remaining variants, the k(cat)/K(m) value for the Claisen condensation catalysis is reduced by a factor of several hundred, whereas the thiolytic degradation catalysis is much less affected. The crystal structures of the variants show that the structural changes in the active site are minimal. Our studies confirm that oxyanion hole I is critically important for the condensation catalysis. Removing either one of the hydrogen bond donors causes the loss of at least 3.4 kcal/mol of transition state stabilization. It appears that in the thiolytic degradation direction, oxyanion hole I is not involved in stabilizing the transition state of its rate limiting step. However, His348 has a dual role in the catalytic cycle, contributing to oxyanion hole I and activating Cys89. The analysis of the hydrogen bonding interactions in the very polar catalytic cavity shows the importance of two conserved water molecules, Wat82 and Wat49, for the formation of oxyanion

  3. Quantification of intermediate-abundance proteins in serum by multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry in a single-quadrupole ion trap.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shanhua; Shaler, Thomas A; Becker, Christopher H

    2006-08-15

    A method is presented to quantify intermediate-abundance proteins in human serum using a single-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer-in contrast, for example, to a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer. Stable-isotope-labeled (tryptic) peptides are spiked into digested protein samples as internal standards, aligned with the traditional isotope dilution approach. As a proof-of-concept experiment, four proteins of intermediate abundance were selected, coagulation factor V, adiponectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and thyroxine binding globulin. Stable-isotope-labeled peptides were synthesized with one tryptic sequence from each of these proteins. The normal human serum concentration ranges of these proteins are from 1 to 30 microg/mL (or 20 to 650 pmol/mL). These labeled peptides and their endogenous counterparts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring, a multiplexed form of the selected reaction monitoring technique. For these experiments, only one chromatographic dimension (on-line reversed-phase capillary column) was used. Improved limits of detection will result with multidimensional chromatographic methods utilizing more material per sample. Standard curves of the spiked calibrants were generated with concentrations ranging from 3 to 700 pmol/mL using both neat solutions and peptides spiked into the complex matrix of digested serum protein solution where ion suppression effects and interferences are common. Endogenous protein concentrations were determined by comparing MS/MS peak areas of the endogenous peptides to the isotopically labeled internal calibrants. The derived concentrations from a normal human serum pool (neglecting loss of material during sample processing) were 9.2, 110, 120, and 246 pmol/mL for coagulation factor V, adiponectin, CRP, and thyroxine binding globulin, respectively. These concentrations generally agree with the reported normal ranges for these proteins. As a measure of analytical reproducibility of this

  4. Antibodies to intermediate filament proteins as molecular markers in clinical tumor pathology. Differentiation of carcinomas by their reaction with different cytokeratin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Krepler, R; Denk, H; Artlieb, U; Fichtinger, E; Davidovits, A

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies to human and bovine epidermal prekeratin and antibodies to mouse liver cytokeratin component D (Mr 49 000) have been applied in indirect immunofluorescence microscopy on sections of human tumors of mammary gland and liver. In non-neoplastic mammary gland all epithelial cells were stained with these antibodies. In pre-invasive and invasive ductal and lobular carcinomas a cell population was observed which was not significantly stained with antibodies to epidermal prekeratin but did strongly react with antibodies to liver cytokeratin D. In the liver, the antibodies to epidermal prekeratin as well as those directed against liver cytokeratin D strongly decorated bile duct epithelia. In contrast, significant staining of the hepatocytes was only achieved with antibodies to liver cytokeratin D. This different staining reaction was maintained in liver tumors of hepatocellular and cholangiocellular origin. Antibodies to vimentin stained mesenchymal cells and tumors of mesenchymal derivation but reacted not significantly with any of the epithelial and carcinoma cells examined. The difference is of practical importance for the discrimination between anaplastic carcinomas and sarcomas of unknown origin. Cytokeratin could also be detected by antibody staining using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) technique in formaldehyde-fixed and paraffin-embedded material of skin, gastrointestinal, respiratory, urinary and genital tract as well as various glands, liver and kidney. Examples of positive reactions were shown in a squamous cell carcinoma, a basalioma and a pleomorphic adenoma of the parotis. It is concluded that the immunohistochemical analysis of intermediate filament proteins has diagnostic potential in clinical pathology and may help to elucidate histogenesis and differentiation of tumors and possibly also prognosis of tumor growth. It is further suggested to use antibodies recognizing different subsets of proteins of the cytokeratin family in order to

  5. Ethene insertion into vanadium hydride intermediates formed via vanadium atom reaction with water or ethene: a matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew G K; Parnis, J Mark

    2008-05-19

    The reaction of V atoms with H2O and various concentrations of C2D4 in argon has been investigated by matrix isolation infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Both C2D6 and CD2H-CD2H are observed as the major products of a set of parallel processes involving hydrogenation of ethene where the formal source of hydrogen is either C2D4 or H2O. Portions of the IR spectrum of CD2H-CD2H isolated in an argon matrix are observed for the first time. For experiments involving low concentrations of C2D4, irradiation of the matrix with light of wavelengths >455 nm results in VH2 formation, with limited observation of ethene hydrogenation. The source of H2 is believed to be due to photoelimination of molecular hydrogen from HO-V-H species, during matrix deposition, with OV as an additional product. Recombination of OV with available H2 in the matrix is proposed as the source of OVH2 under low ethene conditions. No evidence for VD2 formation is observed under our conditions. At higher C2D4 concentrations, VH2 formation is suppressed, while products of ethene hydrogenation are maximized. A second process competing with H2 elimination in which HO-V-H reacts with C2D4 is proposed. Parallel reaction schemes involving V atom insertion into the O-H bonds of water or the photoinduced insertion of V atoms into the C-D bonds of C2D4 are proposed to account for the observed hydrogenation products. In each mechanism, insertion of C2D4 into the V-H or V-D bonds of transient intermediates is followed by photoinduced elimination of the associated ethane isotopomer.

  6. Identification of in vivo processing intermediates and of splice junctions of tRNAs from maize chloroplasts by amplification with the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Delp, G; Igloi, G L; Kössel, H

    1991-01-01

    Total RNA from chloroplasts of maize seedlings was used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mediated amplification of tRNA precursors and of mature tRNAs encoded by the two split tRNA genes of the ribosomal spacer (tRNA(lle)GAU and tRNA(Ala)UGC) and the single intron-containing tRNA(Gly)UCC gene. Sequence analysis of DNAs amplified from the mature tRNAs by combinations of exon specific primers allows unambiguous identification of the respective splice junctions. Primer combinations in which 5'- or 3'-flanking precursor tRNA sequences are included, leads to the amplification of processing intermediates in which 5'-terminal extensions are still present, whereas no PCR products corresponding to 3'-terminal extensions could be detected. From this it is concluded that in chloroplasts the 5'-terminal endonucleolytic cleavage by RNase P occurs as one of the final steps in the tRNA processing pathway of which the endonucleolytic cleavage at the 3' side probably occurs prior to the splicing of the intron sequences. Images PMID:2017358

  7. [Intermediate states formed during discharge separation in the reaction centers of Rhodospirillum rubrum in the presence of a low-redox potential].

    PubMed

    Godik, V I; Samuilov, V D; Borisov, A Iu

    1978-01-01

    The intermediate short-lived states arising in reaction centre preparations (RC) of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum are investigated under the conditions of low redox potential. Excitation by 353 and 530 nm laser pulses produced two states characterized by optical absorption changes in the range of 350--650 nm and lifetimes: 10--30 ns for the first state and 2.5 +/- 0.5 microseconds for the second one. The first state is similar to the state PF, described previously by Parson et al. for RC from Rps. sphaeroides. Carotenoid extraction with isooctane resulted in changing the spectrum with tau = 2.5 microseconds and in the appearance of new absorption changes similar to those for the R state observed before in carotenoidless bacterial strains within microsecond time range. The comparison of the microsecond spectra with difference spectra (continuous light minus dark) of RC from R. rubrum in the range of 350--650 nm made it possible to identify the states with tau = 2.5 microseconds as carotenoid triplet states. The ratio of quantum yields of PR and carotenoid triplet states production was determined as being 1 : 1. The conclusion was made that triplet-triplet energy transfer from state PR to carotenoid is responsible for the production of carotenoid triplet states.

  8. Kinetics of the E. coli replication factor DnaC protein-nucleotide interactions. II. Fluorescence anisotropy and transient, dynamic quenching stopped-flow studies of the reaction intermediates.

    PubMed

    Galletto, Roberto; Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz

    2002-07-16

    The nature of the intermediates in the binding of MANT-ATP and MANT-ADP to the E. coli replicative factor DnaC protein (accompanying paper) has been examined using the fluorescence intensity, anisotropy, and transient dynamic quenching stopped-flow techniques. Using molar fluorescence intensities of individual intermediates of the reaction, we derived the Stern-Volmer equation that provides a direct method to quantitatively address the quenching of the fluorescence of a transient intermediate by an external, neutral quencher. The data indicate that in the first intermediate, (C)(1), the solvent has full access to the MANT group. Thus, the nucleotide-binding site is located on the surface of the protein, fully open to the solvent. Moreover, formation of the first intermediate does not affect the structure of the binding site. On the other hand, in the second intermediate, (C)(2), the entire binding site changes its conformation, resulting in diminished access of the solvent to the bound nucleotide. The time course of the fluorescence anisotropy in the reaction provides direct, unique insight into the mobility of bound nucleotides in each intermediate. The analysis is facilitated by the fact that the anisotropy can be expressed as a function of the relative molar intensities and steady-state anisotropies of the individual intermediates. The major decrease of the nucleotide mobility occurs in the formation of the first intermediate and reflects the fact that the MANT group is immobilized to a similar extent as the ribose region of the bound nucleotides. Transition to the second intermediate and closing of the binding site leads to only a moderate, additional decrease of nucleotide mobility. The temperature effect on the studied interactions indicates that the formation of individual intermediates is accompanied by very different enthalpy and entropy changes predominantly generated from the structural changes of the protein. Analysis of the salt effect indicates that

  9. Thiamine phosphorylated derivatives and bioelectrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schoffeniels, E

    1983-09-01

    Kinetic as well as thermodynamic considerations favour the idea that the change in sodium conductance explaining the action potential, must result from a bimolecular reaction system. The fact that thiamine phosphorylated derivatives are associated with the specific protein forming the sodium channel could well mean that these thiamine derivatives and more specifically thiamine triphosphate are directly involved in the conductance change.

  10. A phosphorylation cascade in the basal ganglia of the mammalian brain: regulation by the D-1 dopamine receptor. A mathematical model of known biochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Kebabian, J W

    1997-01-01

    Stimulation of the dopamine D-1 receptor in the corpus striatum initiates a cascade of biochemical events. These events include: activation of adenylate cyclase, stimulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, protein phosphorylation and inhibition of phosphoprotein phosphotase-1. This article presents and discusses a mathematical model of these biochemical events (and their dependence upon the concentration of cytosolic calcium). According to this model, the activity of calcineurin (which is regulated by the concentration of cytosolic calcium ions) counterbalances the activity of the "D-1 cascade". The combined activity of the "D-1 cascade" and calcineurin can regulate the activity of calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

  11. Chromophoric spin-labeled beta-lactam antibiotics for ENDOR structural characterization of reaction intermediates of class A and class C beta-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Hofer, Jennifer E; Huang, Wanzhi; Palzkill, Timothy; Makinen, Marvin W

    2004-05-01

    The chromophoric spin-label substrate 6-N-[3-(2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxypyrrolin-3-yl)-propen-2-oyl]penicillanic acid (SLPPEN) was synthesized by acylation of 6-aminopenicillanic acid with the acid chloride of 3-(2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxypyrrolinyl)-2-propenoic acid and characterized by physical methods. By application of angle-selected electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR), we have determined the molecular structure of SLPPEN in solution. SLPPEN exhibited UV absorption properties that allowed accurate monitoring of the kinetics of its enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis. The maximum value of the (substrate-product) difference extinction coefficient was 2824 M(-1) cm(-1) at 275 nm compared to 670 M(-1) cm(-1) at 232 nm for SLPEN [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117 (1995) 6739]. For SLPPEN, the steady-state kinetic parameters kcat and kcat/KM, determined under initial velocity conditions, were 637 +/- 36 s(-1) and 13.8 +/- 1.4 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, for hydrolysis catalyzed by TEM-1 beta-lactamase of E. coli, and 0.5 +/- 0.04 s(-1) and 3.9 +/- 0.4 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) for hydrolysis catalyzed by the beta-lactamase of Enterobacter cloacae P99. We have also observed "burst kinetics" for the hydrolysis of SLPPEN with P99 beta-lactamase, indicative of formation of an acylenzyme reaction intermediate. In DMSO:H2O (30:70, v:v) cryosolvent mixtures buffered to pH* 7.0, the half-life of the acylenzyme intermediate formed with the P99 enzyme at -5 degrees C was > or = 3 min, suitable for optical characterization. The observation of burst kinetics in the hydrolysis of SLPPEN catalyzed by P99 beta-lactamase suggests that this chromophoric spin-labeled substrate is differentially sensitive to active site interactions underlying the cephalosporinase and penicillinase reactivity of this class C enzyme.

  12. Chromophoric spin-labeled β-lactam antibiotics for ENDOR structural characterization of reaction intermediates of class A and class C β-lactamases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Hofer, Jennifer E.; Huang, Wanzhi; Palzkill, Timothy; Makinen, Marvin W.

    2004-05-01

    The chromophoric spin-label substrate 6- N-[3-(2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxypyrrolin-3-yl)-propen-2-oyl]penicillanic acid (SLPPEN) was synthesized by acylation of 6-aminopenicillanic acid with the acid chloride of 3-(2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxypyrrolinyl)-2-propenoic acid and characterized by physical methods. By application of angle-selected electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR), we have determined the molecular structure of SLPPEN in solution. SLPPEN exhibited UV absorption properties that allowed accurate monitoring of the kinetics of its enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis. The maximum value of the (substrate-product) difference extinction coefficient was 2824 M -1 cm -1 at 275 nm compared to 670 M -1 cm -1 at 232 nm for SLPEN [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 117 (1995) 6739]. For SLPPEN, the steady-state kinetic parameters kcat and kcat/ KM, determined under initial velocity conditions, were 637±36 s -1 and 13.8±1.4×10 6 M -1 s -1, respectively, for hydrolysis catalyzed by TEM-1 β-lactamase of E. coli, and 0.5±0.04 s -1 and 3.9±0.4×10 4 M -1 s -1 for hydrolysis catalyzed by the β-lactamase of Enterobacter cloacae P99. We have also observed "burst kinetics" for the hydrolysis of SLPPEN with P99 β-lactamase, indicative of formation of an acylenzyme reaction intermediate. In DMSO:H 2O (30:70, v:v) cryosolvent mixtures buffered to pH ∗ 7.0, the half-life of the acylenzyme intermediate formed with the P99 enzyme at -5 °C was ≥3 min, suitable for optical characterization. The observation of burst kinetics in the hydrolysis of SLPPEN catalyzed by P99 β-lactamase suggests that this chromophoric spin-labeled substrate is differentially sensitive to active site interactions underlying the cephalosporinase and penicillinase reactivity of this class C enzyme.

  13. Metabolism-dependent mutagenicity of a compound containing a piperazinyl indazole motif: Role of a novel p450-mediated metabolic reaction involving a putative oxaziridine intermediate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Murray, Joel; Kornberg, Brian; Dethloff, Lloyd; Rock, David; Nikam, Sham; Mutlib, Abdul E

    2006-10-01

    Compound 1a (6-chloro-5-{3-[4-(1H-indazol-3-yl)-piperazin-1-yl]-propyl}-3,3-dimethyl-1,3-dihydro-indol-2-one) was mutagenic to Salmonella typhimurium TA98 in the presence of rat liver S9 subcellular fraction. The metabolism of 1a in rat liver S9 or microsomes demonstrated that it underwent a P450-mediated N-deindazolation (loss of indazole ring) as a predominant metabolic pathway. To investigate a possible link between metabolism and mutagenicity, a structural analogue 1b (6-chloro-5-{3-[4-(1H-indazol-3-yl)-piperidin-1-yl]-propyl}-3,3-dimethyl-1,3-dihydro-indol-2-one), the cleaved product 2a (6-chloro-3,3-dimethyl-5-(3-piperazin-1-yl-propyl)-1,3-dihydro-indol-2-one), and the core motif 3a (3-piperazinyl indazole) were evaluated in the Ames assay. It was found that 1b was not mutagenic to Salmonella typhimurium TA98 in the absence or presence of a metabolic activating system. In contrast to 1a, 1b did not undergo the metabolic cleavage (loss of indazole ring). Marginal mutagenicity of 2a to TA98 was observed with rat liver S9, whereas 3a was shown to be a promutagen. It was further demonstrated that 1a inactivated P450 3A, the principle enzyme catalyzing the N-deindazolation reaction, in an NADPH-, time-, and concentration-dependent manner. The kinetics of inactivation was characterized by a K(I) of 8.1 microM and k(inact) of 0.114 min(-1). The differences in mutagenicity between 1a and 1b suggest that a chemical bond extending from the 3-position of the indazole to a heteroatom (as part of another cyclic ring) is a prerequisite for the toxicity. The metabolic process leading to the elimination of the indazole from the rest of the molecule apparently plays a key role in causing mutagenicity. It is postulated that the N-deindazolation of 1a proceeds via an oxaziridine intermediate, the formation of which is indirectly inferred from the presence of benzoic acid in microsomal incubations. Benzoic acid is thought to be derived from the hydrolysis of 3-indazolone, an

  14. Characterization of photo-intermediates in the photo-reaction pathways of a bacteriorhodopsin Y185F mutant using in situ photo-irradiation solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kyosuke; Shigeta, Arisu; Makino, Yoshiteru; Kawamura, Izuru; Okitsu, Takashi; Wada, Akimori; Tuzi, Satoru; Iwasa, Tatsuo; Naito, Akira

    2015-09-26

    Photo-reaction pathways of a bacteriorhodopsin Y185F mutant were examined using in situ photo-irradiation solid-state NMR spectroscopy. (13)C CP MAS NMR spectra were recorded at -40 °C in the dark (D1), under irradiation with 520 nm light (L1), subsequently in the dark (D2), and again under irradiation with 520 nm light (L2). In the process from D1 to L1, the 13-cis, 15-syn (CS; bR548) state changed to a CS*- (13-cis, 15-syn) intermediate, which was highly stable at -40 °C, and the all-trans (AT; bR568) state transformed to an N-intermediate. Under the D2 conditions, the N-intermediate transformed to an O-intermediate, which was highly stable at -40 °C in the dark. During subsequent irradiation with 520 nm light (L2), the O-intermediate transformed to the N-intermediate through the AT state, whereas the CS*-intermediate did not change. The CS*-intermediate was converted to the AT state (or O-intermediate) after the temperature was increased to -20 °C. Upon subsequent increase of the temperature to 20 °C, the AT state (or O-intermediate) was converted to the CS state until reaching equilibrium. In this experiment, the chemical shift values of [20-(13)C, 14-(13)C]retinal provided the 13C[double bond, length as m-dash]C and 15C[double bond, length as m-dash]N configurations, respectively. From these data, the configurations of the AT and CS states and the CS*-, N-, and O-intermediates were determined to be (13-trans, 15-anti), (13-cis, 15-syn), (13-cis, 15-syn), (13-cis, 15-anti), and (13-trans, 15-anti), respectively. (13)C NMR signals of the CS*- and O-intermediates were observed for the first time for the Y185F bR mutant by in situ photo-irradiation solid-state NMR spectroscopy and the configuration of the CS*-intermediate was revealed to be significantly twisted from that of the CS state although both were assigned as (13-cis, 15-syn) configurations.

  15. Application of rapid-scanning, stopped-flow spectroscopy to the characterization of intermediates formed in the reactions of L- and D-tryptophan and beta-mercaptoethanol with Escherichia coli tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Drewe, W F; Koerber, S C; Dunn, M F

    1989-04-01

    The reactions of the alpha 2 beta 2 complex of Escherichia coli tryptophan synthase with D- and L-Trp and the presteady-state reaction of L-Ser and beta-mercaptoethanol under different premixing conditions have been investigated by rapid-scanning stopped-flow (RSSF) UV-visible spectroscopy. The reaction of alpha 2 beta 2 with L-Ser and beta-mercaptoethanol occurs in 3 detectable relaxations with rates similar to the 3 relaxations seen in the partial reaction with L-Ser and in the reaction with L-Ser and indole. The presteady-state phase of the reaction of beta-mercaptoethanol with the alpha-aminoacrylate intermediate is characterized by 2 relaxations. The RSSF spectra for this reaction show that the spectral changes that take place in these 2 phases are essentially identical. The L-Trp reaction is biphasic, and the spectral changes occurring in each phase of the reaction also are identical. The 2 new spectral bands formed (lambda max congruent to 420 nm and congruent to 476 nm) are assigned as the L-Trp external aldimine (Schiff's base) and L-Trp quinonoid intermediates, respectively. The reaction of D-Trp also is biphasic. Analysis of first and second derivatives of the RSSF spectral changes give evidence for the formation of spectral bands with lambda max of approximately 423 nm, approximately 450 nm, and approximately 478 nm. The positions and shapes of these bands suggest a D-Trp external aldimine structure (423 nm) and a quinonoidal species (450 and 478 nm). However, product studies do not support this latter assignment. The behavior of the D- and L-Trp reactions and the reaction of beta-mercaptoethanol with the alpha-aminoacrylate strongly indicate the pre-existence of 2 slowly equilibrating forms of the internal aldimine and of the alpha-aminoacrylate.

  16. Guanidinium groups act as general-acid catalysts in phosphoryl transfer reactions: a two-proton inventory on a model system.

    PubMed

    Piatek, Anna M; Gray, Mark; Anslyn, Eric V

    2004-08-18

    Cleavage/transesterification of phosphodiesters is catalyzed by various acidic groups in solution and with enzymes. General-acid catalysts can transfer protons to the developing phosphorane intermediate, resulting in a monoprotic-monoanionic intermediate, giving the so-called "triester mechanism". Using a proton inventory on a model compound (1) possessing an intramolecular hydrogen bond between a phosphodiester and a guanidinium group, we find that two protons move in the rate-determining step for cleavage/transesterification. In contrast, HPNP shows a single-proton inventory and is a substrate well accepted to react with the movement of only one proton at the transition state. We therefore propose a mechanism for 1 that involves general-acid catalysis by the guanidinium group. This leads one to conclude that other, more acidic groups, such as ammonium and imidazolium, would also act as general-acid catalysts.

  17. Crystal structure of activated tobacco rubisco complexed with the reaction-intermediate analogue 2-carboxy-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Schreuder, H. A.; Knight, S.; Curmi, P. M.; Andersson, I.; Cascio, D.; Sweet, R. M.; Brändén, C. I.; Eisenberg, D.

    1993-01-01

    The crystal structure of activated tobacco rubisco, complexed with the reaction-intermediate analogue 2-carboxy-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate (CABP) has been determined by molecular replacement, using the structure of activated spinach rubisco (Knight, S., Andersson, I., & Brändén, C.-I., 1990, J. Mol. Biol. 215, 113-160) as a model. The R-factor after refinement is 21.0% for 57,855 reflections between 9.0 and 2.7 A resolution. The local fourfold axis of the rubisco hexadecamer coincides with a crystallographic twofold axis. The result is that the asymmetric unit of the crystals contains half of the L8S8 complex (molecular mass 280 kDa in the asymmetric unit). The activated form of tobacco rubisco is very similar to the activated form of spinach rubisco. The root mean square difference is 0.4 A for 587 equivalent C alpha atoms. Analysis of mutations between tobacco and spinach rubisco revealed that the vast majority of mutations concerned exposed residues. Only 7 buried residues were found to be mutated versus 54 residues at or near the surface of the protein. The crystal structure suggests that the Cys 247-Cys 247 and Cys 449-Cys 459 pairs are linked via disulfide bridges. This pattern of disulfide links differ from the pattern of disulfide links observed in crystals of unactivated tobacco rubisco (Curmi, P.M.G., et al., 1992, J. Biol. Chem. 267, 16980-16989) and is similar to the pattern observed for activated spinach tobacco. PMID:8358296

  18. Crystal structures of the substrate free-enzyme, and reaction intermediate of the HAD superfamily member, haloacid dehalogenase DehIVa from Burkholderia cepacia MBA4.

    PubMed

    Schmidberger, Jason W; Wilce, Jackie A; Tsang, Jimmy S H; Wilce, Matthew C J

    2007-05-04

    DehIVa is a haloacid dehalogenase (EC 3.8.1.2) from the soil and water borne bacterium Burkholderia cepacia MBA4, which belongs to the functionally variable haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily of enzymes. The haloacid dehalogenases catalyse the removal of halides from haloacids resulting in a hydroxlated product. These enzymes are of interest for their potential to degrade recalcitrant halogenated environmental pollutants and their use in the synthesis of industrial chemicals. The haloacid dehalogenases utilise a nucleophilic attack on the substrate by an aspartic acid residue to form an enzyme-substrate ester bond and concomitantly cleaving of the carbon-halide bond and release of a hydroxylated product following ester hydrolysis. We present the crystal structures of both the substrate-free DehIVa refined to 1.93 A resolution and DehIVa covalently bound to l-2-monochloropropanoate trapped as a reaction intermediate, refined to 2.7 A resolution. Electron density consistent with a previously unidentified yet anticipated water molecule in the active site poised to donate its hydroxyl group to the product and its proton to the catalytic Asp11 is evident. It has been unclear how substrate enters the active site of this and related enzymes. The results of normal mode analysis (NMA) are presented and suggest a means whereby the predicted global dynamics of the enzyme allow for entry of the substrate into the active site. In the context of these results, the possible role of Arg42 and Asn178 in a "lock down" mechanism affecting active site access is discussed. In silico substrate docking of enantiomeric substrates has been examined in order to evaluate the enzymes enantioselectivity.

  19. Kinetics of stabilised Criegee intermediates derived from alkene ozonolysis: reactions with SO2, H2O and decomposition under boundary layer conditions.

    PubMed

    Newland, Mike J; Rickard, Andrew R; Alam, Mohammed S; Vereecken, Luc; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Bloss, William J

    2015-02-14

    The removal of SO2 in the presence of alkene-ozone systems has been studied for ethene, cis-but-2-ene, trans-but-2-ene and 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene, as a function of humidity, under atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on relative humidity for all four alkene-ozone systems confirming a significant reaction for stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCI) with H2O. The observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with relative rate constants, k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2), of 3.3 (±1.1) × 10(-5) for CH2OO, 26 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, 33 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene, and 8.7 (±2.5) × 10(-5) for (CH3)2COO derived from 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene. The relative rate constants for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) are -2.3 (±3.5) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH2OO, 13 (±43) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, -14 (±31) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene and 63 (±14) × 10(11) cm(-3) for (CH3)2COO. Uncertainties are ±2σ and represent combined systematic and precision components. These values are derived following the approximation that a single SCI is present for each system; a more comprehensive interpretation, explicitly considering the differing reactivity for syn- and anti-SCI conformers, is also presented. This yields values of 3.5 (±3.1) × 10(-4) for k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2) of anti-CH3CHOO and 1.2 (±1.1) × 10(13) for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) of syn-CH3CHOO. The reaction of the water dimer with CH2OO is also considered, with a derived value for k(CH2OO + (H2O)2)/k(CH2OO + SO2) of 1.4 (±1.8) × 10(-2). The observed SO2 removal rate constants, which technically represent upper limits, are consistent with decomposition being a significant, structure dependent, sink in the atmosphere for syn-SCI.

  20. Boosted Reaction on Two-Step Tuberculin Skin Test among Military Personnel in South Korea, a Setting with an Intermediate Burden of Tuberculosis and Routine Bacille Calmette-Guérin Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyeongman; Ji, Sang-Hoon; Oh, Soo-Yon; Lee, Jin-Beom; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to estimate the rate of boosted reaction in the two-step tuberculin skin test (TST) and to evaluate the associated factors among military personnel of South Korea, which has an intermediate burden of tuberculosis (TB) and a routine bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination policy. Two-step TST was performed on 264 military personnel who did not have a history of close contact to TB. Subjects with a negative reaction to the first test of <10 mm had a second TST applied 1 week later on the other forearm. A positive result (≥10 mm) on the initial TST was observed in 126 (48%) of the subjects. A boosted reaction on the second TST developed in 32 (23%) of the 124 subjects with a negative initial TST. In multiple logistic regression analysis, the size of the initial TST reaction was the only factor associated with a boosted reaction on the second TST. The high rate of boosted reaction among healthy adults in South Korea suggests that two-step TST should be performed to assess the baseline TST reactivity in settings with an intermediate burden of TB and routine BCG vaccination policy, especially among subjects with an initial TST reaction that is ≥5 mm. PMID:18583874

  1. Formation of diphenylphosphanylbutadienyl complexes by insertion of two P-coordinated alkynylphosphanes into a PtbondC6F5 bond: detection of intermediate and reaction products.

    PubMed

    Ara, Irene; Forniés, Juan; García, Ana; Gómez, Julio; Lalinde, Elena; Moreno, M Teresa

    2002-08-16

    The reactions between cis-[M(C(6)F(5))(2)(PPh(2)CtriplebondCR)(2)] (M=Pt, Pd; R=Ph, tBu, Tol 2, 3) or cis-[Pt(C(6)F(5))(2)(PPh(2)CtriplebondCR)(PPh(2)CtriplebondCtBu)] (R=Ph 4, Tol 5) and cis-[Pt(C(6)F(5))(2)(thf)(2)] 1 have been investigated. Whereas [M](PPh(2)CtriplebondCtBu)(2) ([M]=cis-M(C(6)F(5))(2)) is inert towards 1, the analogous reactions starting from [M](PPh(2)CtriplebondCR)(2) or [Pt](PPh(2)CtriplebondCR)(PPh(2)CtriplebondCtBu) (R=Ph, Tol) afford unusual binuclear species [Pt(C(6)F(5))(S)mu-[C(R')dbondC(PPh(2))C(PPh(2))doublebondC(R)(C(6)F(5))]M(C(6)F(5))(2)] (R=R'=Ph, Tol, M=Pt 6 a,c, M=Pd 7 a,c; M=Pt, R'=tBu, R=Ph 8, Tol 9) containing a bis(diphenylphosphanyl)butadienyl bridging ligand formed by an unprecedented sequential insertion reaction of two P-coordinated PPh(2)CtriplebondCR ligands into a PtbondC(6)F(5) bond. Although in solution the presence of coordinated solvent S (S=(thf)(x)(H(2)O)(y)) in 6, 7 is suggested by NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analyses of different crystals of the mixed complex [Pt(C(6)F(5))mu-[C(tBu)doublebondC(PPh(2))C(PPh(2))doublebondC(Tol)(C(6)F(5))]Pt(C(6)F(5))(2)] 9 unequivocally establish that in the solid state the steric crowding of the new diphenylbutadienyl ligand formed stabilizes an unusual coordinatively unsaturated T-shaped 3-coordinated platinum(II) center. Structure determinations of the mononuclear precursors cis-[Pt(C(6)F(5))(2)(PPh(2)CtriplebondCR)(2)] (R=Ph, tBu, Tol) have been carried out to evaluate the factors affecting the insertion processes. The reactions of the platinum complexes 6 towards neutral ligands (L=CO, py, PPh(2)H, CNtBu) in a 1:1 molar ratio afford related diplatinum derivatives 10-13, whereas treatment with CNtBu (1:2 molar ratio) or 2,2'-bipy (1:1 molar ratio) results in the opening of the chelating ring to give cis,cis-[Pt(C(6)F(5))(L)(2)mu-[1-kappaC(1):2-kappaPP'-C(R)doublebondC(PPh(2))C(PPh(2))doublebondC(R)(C(6)F(5))]Pt(C(6)F(5))(2)] (14, 15). The unsaturated or solvento

  2. FT-IR analysis of phosphorylated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshihashi, Sachiko S.; Chihara, Kunihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-09-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which are the most remarkable posttranslational modifications, are considered to be important chemical reactions that control the activation of proteins. We examine the phosphorylation analysis method by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group that observed at about 1070cm-1 (9.4μm) with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FT-IR). This study indicates that it is possible to identify a phosphorylation by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group observed at about 1070 cm-1 with FT-IR method. As long as target peptides have the same amino acid sequence, it is possible to identify the phosphorylated sites (threonine, serine and tyrosine).

  3. Multicomponent reactions of phosphines, diynedioates, and aryl aldehydes generated furans appending reactive phosphorus ylides through cumulated trienoates as key intermediates: a phosphine α-addition-δ-evolvement of an anion pathway.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jie-Cheng; Chuang, Shih-Ching

    2014-11-07

    Multicomponent reactions of phosphines, diynedioates, and aryl aldehydes have been demonstrated, providing trisubstituted furans appending reactive phosphorus ylides, through cumulated trienoates as key intermediates. The proposed trienoate intermediates, 1,5-dipolar species formed via nucleophilic α-attack of phosphines toward diynedioates (α-addition-δ-evolvement of an anion, abbreviated αAδE), undergo addition to aryl aldehydes followed by 5-endo-dig cyclization, proton transfer, and resonance to give trisubstituted furans. Furthermore, the phosphorus ylides are oxidized to α-keto ester furans and utilized as Wittig reagents.

  4. Nucleoside phosphorylation in amide solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoffstall, A. M.; Kokko, B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with phosphorylation in possible prebiotic nonaqueous solvents. To this end, phosphorylation of nucleosides using inorganic phosphates in amide solutions is studied at room and elevated temperatures. Reaction proceeds most readily in formamide and N-methylformamide. Products obtained at elevated temperature are nucleotides, nucleoside 2',3'-cyclic phosphates, and when the phosphate concentration is high, nucleoside diphosphates. At room temperature, adenosine afforded a mixture of nucleotides, but none of the cyclic nucleotide. Conditions leading to the highest relative percentage of cyclic nucleotide involve the use of low concentrations of phosphate and an excess of nucleoside.

  5. Linking chemical electron-proton transfer to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase: broken-symmetry DFT exploration of intermediates along the catalytic reaction pathway of the iron-copper dinuclear complex.

    PubMed

    Noodleman, Louis; Han Du, Wen-Ge; Fee, James A; Götz, Andreas W; Walker, Ross C

    2014-07-07

    After a summary of the problem of coupling electron and proton transfer to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase, we present the results of our earlier and recent density functional theory calculations for the dinuclear Fe-a3-CuB reaction center in this enzyme. A specific catalytic reaction wheel diagram is constructed from the calculations, based on the structures and relative energies of the intermediate states of the reaction cycle. A larger family of tautomers/protonation states is generated compared to our earlier work, and a new lowest-energy pathway is proposed. The entire reaction cycle is calculated for the new smaller model (about 185-190 atoms), and two selected arcs of the wheel are chosen for calculations using a larger model (about 205 atoms). We compare the structural and redox energetics and protonation calculations with available experimental data. The reaction cycle map that we have built is positioned for further improvement and testing against experiment.

  6. Prebiotic phosphorylation of nucleosides in formamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoffstall, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study intended to assess phosphorylation under neither aqueous nor dry thermal conditions. Instead, phosphorylations were attempted in possible nonaqueous prebiotic solvents. Formamide appeared to be the most obvious candidate for phosphorylation studies. Three main classes of phosphorylated products were formed in formamide solution: adenosine monophosphates, cyclic adenosine phosphate, and adenosine diphosphates. Experiments were designed to investigate the extent of phosphorylation of nucleosides in formamide, the relative amounts of nucleoside monophosphate, diphosphates and cyclic phosphate formed and the relative effectiveness of different sources of phosphate as phosphorylating agents in formamide. Reaction variables were temperature, nature of the phosphate or condensed phosphate, nucleoside, concentration of reactants and possible effects of additives. Product identification was based on qualitative and quantitative thin layer chromatography.

  7. EPR and optical spectroscopic properties of the electron carrier intermediate between the reaction center bacteriochlorophylls and the primary acceptor in Chromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Tiede, D M; Prince, R C; Dutton, P L

    1976-12-06

    1. A reaction center-cytochrome c complex has been isolated from Chromatium vinosum which is capable of normal photochemistry and light-activated rapid cytochrome c553 and c555 oxidation, but which has no antenna bacteriochlorophyll. As is found in whole cells, ferrocytochrome c553 is oxidized irreversibly in milliseconds by light at 7 K. 2. Room temperature redox potentiometry in combination with EPR analysis at 7 K, of cytochrome c553 and the reaction center bacteriochlorophyll dimer (BChl)2 absorbing at 883 nm yields identical results to those previously reported using optical analytical techniques at 77 K. It shows directly that two cytochrome c553 hemes are equivalent with respect to the light induced (BChl)2+. At 7 K, only one heme can be rapidly oxidized in the light, commensurate with the electron capacity of the primary acceptor (quinone-iron) being unity. 3. Prior chemical reduction of the quinone-iron followed by illumination at 200K, however, leads to the slow (t1/2 approximately equal to 30 s) oxidation of one cytochrome c553 heme, with what appears to be concommitant reduction of one of the two bacteriophytins (BPh) of the reaction center as shown by bleaching of the 760 nm band, a broad absorbance increase at approx. 650 nm and a bleaching at 543 nm. The 800 nm absorbing bacteriochlorophyll is also involved since there is also bleaching at 595 and 800 nm; at the latter wave-length the remaining unbleached band appears to shift significantly to the blue. No redox changes in the 883 absorbing bacteriochlorophyll dimer are seen during or after illumination under these conditions. The reduced part of the state represents what is considered to be the reduced form of the electron carrier (I) which acts as an intermediate between the bacteriochlorophyll dimer and quinone-iron. The state (oxidized c553/reduced I) relaxes in the dark at 200K in t1/2 approx. 20 min but below 77 K it is trapped on a days time scale. 4. EPR analysis of the state trapped as

  8. Phosphorylation/Dephosphorylation Assays.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The P-type ATPases form an autophosphorylated intermediate with ATP, and its isomeric transition and hydrolysis are obligatory events in the ATP-driven pump and thus for the energy coupling. The analyses of these reactions are therefore crucial for understanding the mechanism of the pump function and diseases caused by its defects. Here we describe the methods to analyze these processes in the transport cycle with a representative member of P-type ATPase family, SERCA1a, sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  9. Comment on "A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states" [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 124312 (2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Lawrence B.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2015-10-01

    We discuss the recent report of a roaming type mechanism for the decomposition of the Criegee intermediate. We show that the predicted barrier height for this new pathway is too low by ˜30 kcal/mol owing to an inconsistent use of spin-restricted and spin-unrestricted calculations. As a result, this new pathway is not expected to compete significantly with the well-known dioxirane pathways for the decomposition of the Criegee intermediate.

  10. Comment on "A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states" [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 124312 (2015)].

    PubMed

    Harding, Lawrence B; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2015-10-28

    We discuss the recent report of a roaming type mechanism for the decomposition of the Criegee intermediate. We show that the predicted barrier height for this new pathway is too low by ∼30 kcal/mol owing to an inconsistent use of spin-restricted and spin-unrestricted calculations. As a result, this new pathway is not expected to compete significantly with the well-known dioxirane pathways for the decomposition of the Criegee intermediate.

  11. Comment on “A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states” [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 124312 (2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, Lawrence B.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2015-10-28

    We discuss the recent report of a roaming type mechanism for the decomposition of the Criegee intermediate. We show that the predicted barrier height for this new pathway is too low by ∼30 kcal/mol owing to an inconsistent use of spin-restricted and spin-unrestricted calculations. As a result, this new pathway is not expected to compete significantly with the well-known dioxirane pathways for the decomposition of the Criegee intermediate.

  12. Glycogen Phosphorylation and Lafora disease

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Covalent phosphorylation of glycogen, first described 35 years ago, was put on firm ground through the work of the Whelan laboratory in the 1990s. But glycogen phosphorylation lay fallow until interest was rekindled in the mid 2000s by the finding that it could be removed by a glycogen-binding phosphatase, laforin, and that mutations in laforin cause a fatal teenage-onset epilepsy, called Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylation is due to phosphomonoesters at C2, C3 and C6 of glucose residues. Phosphate is rare, ranging from 1:500 - 1:5000 phosphates/glucose depending on the glycogen source. The mechanisms of glycogen phosphorylation remain under investigation but one hypothesis to explain C2 and perhaps C3 phosphate is that it results from a rare side reaction of the normal synthetic enzyme glycogen synthase. Lafora disease is likely caused by over-accumulation of abnormal glycogen in insoluble deposits termed Lafora bodies in neurons. The abnormality in the glycogen correlates with elevated phosphorylation (at C2, C3 and C6), reduced branching, insolubility and an enhanced tendency to aggregate and become insoluble. Hyperphosphorylation of glycogen is emerging as an important feature of this deadly childhood disease PMID:26278984

  13. Role of the reaction intermediates in determining PHIP (parahydrogen induced polarization) effect in the hydrogenation of acetylene dicarboxylic acid with the complex [Rh (dppb)]+ (dppb: 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane).

    PubMed

    Reineri, F; Aime, S; Gobetto, R; Nervi, C

    2014-03-07

    This study deals with the parahydrogenation of the symmetric substrate acetylene dicarboxylic acid catalyzed by a Rh(I) complex bearing the chelating diphosphine dppb (1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane). The two magnetically equivalent protons of the product yield a hyperpolarized emission signal in the (1)H-NMR spectrum. Their polarization intensity varies upon changing the reaction solvent from methanol to acetone. A detailed analysis of the hydrogenation pathway is carried out by means of density functional theory calculations to assess the structure of hydrogenation intermediates and their stability in the two solvents. The observed polarization effects have been accounted on the basis of the obtained structures. Insights into the lifetime of a short-lived reaction intermediate are also obtained.

  14. Role of the reaction intermediates in determining PHIP (parahydrogen induced polarization) effect in the hydrogenation of acetylene dicarboxylic acid with the complex [Rh (dppb)]{sup +} (dppb: 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane)

    SciTech Connect

    Reineri, F.; Aime, S.; Gobetto, R.; Nervi, C.

    2014-03-07

    This study deals with the parahydrogenation of the symmetric substrate acetylene dicarboxylic acid catalyzed by a Rh(I) complex bearing the chelating diphosphine dppb (1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane). The two magnetically equivalent protons of the product yield a hyperpolarized emission signal in the {sup 1}H-NMR spectrum. Their polarization intensity varies upon changing the reaction solvent from methanol to acetone. A detailed analysis of the hydrogenation pathway is carried out by means of density functional theory calculations to assess the structure of hydrogenation intermediates and their stability in the two solvents. The observed polarization effects have been accounted on the basis of the obtained structures. Insights into the lifetime of a short-lived reaction intermediate are also obtained.

  15. Arginine Coordination in Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer: Evaluation of the Effect of Arg166 Mutations in Escherichia Coli Alkaline Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, P.J.; Lassila, J.K.; Fenn, T.D.; Zalatan, J.G.; Herschlag, D.

    2009-05-22

    Arginine residues are commonly found in the active sites of enzymes catalyzing phosphoryl transfer reactions. Numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments establish the importance of these residues for efficient catalysis, but their role in catalysis is not clear. To examine the role of arginine residues in the phosphoryl transfer reaction, we have measured the consequences of mutations to arginine 166 in Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase on hydrolysis of ethyl phosphate, on individual reaction steps in the hydrolysis of the covalent enzyme-phosphoryl intermediate, and on thio substitution effects. The results show that the role of the arginine side chain extends beyond its positive charge, as the Arg166Lys mutant is as compromised in activity as Arg166Ser. Through measurement of individual reaction steps, we construct a free energy profile for the hydrolysis of the enzyme-phosphate intermediate. This analysis indicates that the arginine side chain strengthens binding by {approx}3 kcal/mol and provides an additional 1-2 kcal/mol stabilization of the chemical transition state. A 2.1 {angstrom} X-ray diffraction structure of Arg166Ser AP is presented, which shows little difference in enzyme structure compared to the wild-type enzyme but shows a significant reorientation of the bound phosphate. Altogether, these results support a model in which the arginine contributes to catalysis through binding interactions and through additional transition state stabilization that may arise from complementarity of the guanidinum group to the geometry of the trigonal bipyramidal transition state.

  16. Developmentally regulated interconversions between end product-inhibitable and noninhibitable forms of a first pathway-specific enzyme activity can be mimicked in vitro by protein dephosphorylation-phosphorylation reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Frisa, P S; Sonneborn, D R

    1982-01-01

    During the life cycle of Blastocladiella emersonii, dramatic shifts occur in the sensitivity of the first hexosamine biosynthetic pathway-specific enzyme [amidotransferase; 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate ketol-isomerase (amino-transferring), EC 5.3.1.19] to end product inhibition. These shifts are developmentally correlated with changes in the utilization of the end product (uridine-5'-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine) for chitin synthesis [Selitrennikoff, C. P., Dalley, N. E. & Sonneborn, D. R. (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77, 5998-6002]. Alterations in amidotransferase sensitivity to end product inhibition can be mimicked by in vitro protein dephosphorylation-phosphorylation reactions, as follows: (i) Zoospore end product-inhibitable amidotransferase activity can be converted to a noninhibitable form by an endogenous (zoospore) protein phosphatase (phosphoprotein phosphohydrolase EC 3.1.3.16) reaction; this noninhibitable form can be converted back to an inhibitable form either by an endogenous cAMP-independent protein kinase (ATP:protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37) reaction or with an added cAMP-dependent protein kinase. (ii) Noninhibitable amidotransferase activity from growing cells can also be converted to the inhibitable form with added protein kinase. PMID:6959119

  17. Kinetic preference for the 3'-5'-linked dimer in the reaction of guanosine 5'-phosphorylmorpholinamide with deoxyguanosine 5'-phosphoryl-2-methylimidazolide as a function of poly(C) concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.

    1998-01-01

    The formation of the internucleotide bond in diguanylate synthesis was studied in aqueous solution at pH 8 and 0.2 M Mg2+ in the presence and absence of polycytidylate, poly(C). The investigation was simplified by using guanosine 5'-phosphorylmorpholinamide, mor-pG, which can act only as a nucleophile, and deoxyguanosine 5'-phosphoryl-2-methylimidazolide, 2-MeImpdG, which can act only as an electrophile. The time-dependent product distribution was monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In the absence of poly(C) the reaction between mor-pG and 2-MeImpdG yielded small amounts of the dimer mor-pGpdG with a regioselectivity of 2'-5':3'-5' = 3.5. In the presence of poly(C) dimer yields increased and a reversal in regioselectivity occurred; both effects were in proportion to the concentration of the polymer. The results can be quantitatively explained with the proposition that poly(C), acting as the template, catalyzes the reaction between template-bound monomers by about a factor of 4-5 over the reaction in solution and yields dimers with a regioselectivity of 2'-5':3'-5' approximately 0.33. These findings illustrate the intrinsic preference of guanosine monomers to correctly self-assemble on the appropriate template.

  18. Kinetic preference for the 3'-5'-linked dimer in the reaction of guanosine 5'-phosphorylmorpholinamide with deoxyguanosine 5'-phosphoryl-2-methylimidazolide as a function of poly(C) concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.

    1998-01-01

    The formation of the internucleotide bond in diguanylate synthesis was studied in aqueous solution at pH 8 and 0.2 M Mg2+ in the presence and absence of polycytidylate, poly(C). The investigation was simplified by using guanosine 5'-phosphorylmorpholinamide, mor-pG, which can act only as a nucleophile, and deoxyguanosine 5'-phosphoryl-2-methylimidazolide, 2-MeImpdG, which can act only as an electrophile. The time-dependent product distribution was monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS). In the absence of poly(C) the reaction between mor-pG and 2-MeImpdG yielded small amounts of the dimer mor-pGpdG with a regioselectivity of 2'-5':3'-5' = 3.5. In the presence of poly(C) dimer yields increased and a reversal in regioselectivity occurred; both effects were in proportion to the concentration of the polymer. The results can be quantitatively explained with the proposition that poly(C), acting as the template, catalyzes the reaction between template-bound monomers by about a factor of 4-5 over the reaction in solution and yields dimers with a regioselectivity of 2'-5':3'-5' approximately 0.33. These findings illustrate the intrinsic preference of guanosine monomers to correctly self-assemble on the appropriate template.

  19. Mutation of Arg-166 of alkaline phosphatase alters the thio effect but not the transition state for phosphoryl transfer. Implications for the interpretation of thio effects in reactions of phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Holtz, K M; Catrina, I E; Hengge, A C; Kantrowitz, E R

    2000-08-08

    It has been suggested that the mechanism of alkaline phosphatase (AP) is associative, or triester-like, because phosphorothioate monoesters are hydrolyzed by AP approximately 10(2)-fold slower than phosphate monoesters. This "thio effect" is similar to that observed for the nonenzymatic hydrolysis of phosphate triesters, and is the inverse of that observed for the nonenzymatic hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters. The latter reactions proceed by loose, dissociative transition states, in contrast to reactions of triesters, which have tight, associative transition states. Wild-type alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate approximately 70 times faster than p-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate. In contrast, the R166A mutant alkaline phosphatase enzyme, in which the active site arginine at position 166 is replaced with an alanine, hydrolyzes p-nitrophenyl phosphate only about 3 times faster than p-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate. Despite this approximately 23-fold change in the magnitude of the thio effects, the magnitudes of Bronsted beta(lg) for the native AP (-0.77 +/- 0.09) and the R166A mutant (-0.78 +/- 0. 06) are the same. The identical values for the beta(lg) indicate that the transition states are similar for the reactions catalyzed by the wild-type and the R166A mutant enzymes. The fact that a significant change in the thio effect is not accompanied by a change in the beta(lg) indicates that the thio effect is not a reliable reporter for the transition state of the enzymatic phosphoryl transfer reaction. This result has important implications for the interpretation of thio effects in enzymatic reactions.

  20. Simultaneous infrared detection of the ICH2OO radical and Criegee intermediate CH2OO: the pressure dependence of the yield of CH2OO in the reaction CH2I + O2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Li-Wei; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2015-11-19

    The simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO, important in atmospheric reactions, has been recently produced from the reaction of CH2I + O2 and detected with various methods. In this reaction, the yield of CH2OO decreases with increasing pressure because of the stabilization of the adduct ICH2OO, but no definitive spectral identification of ICH2OO has been reported. We recorded the infrared spectrum of ICH2OO using the same reaction under high pressure; the spectrum agrees with that simulated according to theoretical predictions. With direct detection of both CH2OO and ICH2OO, we determined the pressure dependence of the yield of CH2OO. The yield of CH2OO near 1 atm is greater than previously reported values, which might have significant consequences in atmospheric chemistry.

  1. ENDOR/HYSCORE Studies of the Common Intermediate Trapped During Nitrogenase Reduction of N2H2, CH3N2H, and N2H4 Support an Alternating Reaction Pathway for N2 Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Lukoyanov, Dmitriy; Dikanov, Sergei A.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Barney, Brett M.; Samoilova, Rimma I.; Narasimhulu, Kuppala V.; Dean, Dennis R.; Seefeldt, Lance C.; Hoffman, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    Enzymatic N2 reduction proceeds along a reaction pathway comprised of a sequence of intermediate states generated as a dinitrogen bound to the active-site iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) of the nitrogenase MoFe protein undergoes six steps of hydrogenation (e−/H+ delivery). There are two competing proposals for the reaction pathway, and they invoke different intermediates. In the ‘Distal’ (D) pathway, a single N of N2 is hydrogenated in three steps until the first NH3 is liberated, then the remaining nitrido-N is hydrogenated three more times to yield the second NH3. In the ‘Alternating’ (A) pathway, the two N’s instead are hydrogenated alternately, with a hydrazine-bound intermediate formed after four steps of hydrogenation and the first NH3 liberated only during the fifth step. A recent combination of X/Q-band EPR and 15N, 1,2H ENDOR measurements suggested that states trapped during turnover of the α-70Ala/α-195Gln MoFe protein with diazene or hydrazine as substrate correspond to a common intermediate (here denoted I) in which FeMo-co binds a substrate-derived [NxHy] moiety, and measurements reported here show that turnover with methyldiazene generates the same intermediate. In the present report we describe X/Q-band EPR and 14/15N, 1,2H ENDOR/-HYSCORE/ESEEM measurements that characterize the N-atom(s) and proton(s) associated with this moiety. The experiments establish that turnover with N2H2, CH3N2H, and N2H4 in fact generates a common intermediate, I, and show that the N-N bond of substrate has been cleaved in I. Analysis of this finding leads us to conclude that nitrogenase reduces N2H2, CH3N2H, and N2H4 via a common A reaction pathway, and that the same is true for N2 itself, with Fe ion(s) providing the site of reaction. PMID:21744838

  2. Nucleoside phosphorylation by phosphate minerals.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Saladino, Raffaele; Crestini, Claudia; Ciciriello, Fabiana; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2007-06-08

    In the presence of formamide, crystal phosphate minerals may act as phosphate donors to nucleosides, yielding both 5'- and, to a lesser extent, 3'-phosphorylated forms. With the mineral Libethenite the formation of 5'-AMP can be as high as 6% of the adenosine input and last for at least 10(3) h. At high concentrations, soluble non-mineral phosphate donors (KH(2)PO(4) or 5'-CMP) afford 2'- and 2':3'-cyclic AMP in addition to 5'-and 3'-AMP. The phosphate minerals analyzed were Herderite Ca[BePO(4)F], Hureaulite Mn(2+)(5)(PO(3)(OH)(2)(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(4), Libethenite Cu(2+)(2)(PO(4))(OH), Pyromorphite Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)Cl, Turquoise Cu(2+)Al(6)(PO(4))(4)(OH)(8)(H(2)O)(4), Fluorapatite Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)F, Hydroxylapatite Ca(5)(PO(4))(3)OH, Vivianite Fe(2+)(3)(PO(4))(2)(H(2)O)(8), Cornetite Cu(2+)(3)(PO(4))(OH)(3), Pseudomalachite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4), Reichenbachite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4), and Ludjibaite Cu(2+)(5)(PO(4))(2)(OH)(4)). Based on their behavior in the formamide-driven nucleoside phosphorylation reaction, these minerals can be characterized as: 1) inactive, 2) low level phosphorylating agents, or 3) active phosphorylating agents. Instances were detected (Libethenite and Hydroxylapatite) in which phosphorylation occurs on the mineral surface, followed by release of the phosphorylated compounds. Libethenite and Cornetite markedly protect the beta-glycosidic bond. Thus, activated nucleic monomers can form in a liquid non-aqueous environment in conditions compatible with the thermodynamics of polymerization, providing a solution to the standard-state Gibbs free energy change (DeltaG degrees ') problem, the major obstacle for polymerizations in the liquid phase in plausible prebiotic scenarios.

  3. Long-term dynamics of multisite phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Boris Y.; Mattingly, Henry H.; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2016-01-01

    Multisite phosphorylation cycles are ubiquitous in cell regulation systems and are studied at multiple levels of complexity, from molecules to organisms, with the ultimate goal of establishing predictive understanding of the effects of genetic and pharmacological perturbations of protein phosphorylation in vivo. Achieving this goal is essentially impossible without mathematical models, which provide a systematic framework for exploring dynamic interactions of multiple network components. Most of the models studied to date do not discriminate between the distinct partially phosphorylated forms and focus on two limiting reaction regimes, distributive and processive, which differ in the number of enzyme–substrate binding events needed for complete phosphorylation or dephosphorylation. Here we use a minimal model of extracellular signal-related kinase regulation to explore the dynamics of a reaction network that includes all essential phosphorylation forms and arbitrary levels of reaction processivity. In addition to bistability, which has been studied extensively in distributive mechanisms, this network can generate periodic oscillations. Both bistability and oscillations can be realized at high levels of reaction processivity. Our work provides a general framework for systematic analysis of dynamics in multisite phosphorylation systems. PMID:27226482

  4. Measurements of activation reaction rates in transverse shielding concrete exposed to the secondary particle field produced by intermediate energy heavy ions on an iron target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, T.; Morev, M. N.; Iimoto, T.; Kosako, T.

    2012-01-01

    Reaction rate distributions were measured inside a 60-cm thick concrete pile placed at the lateral position of a thick (stopping length) iron target that was bombarded with heavy ions, 400 MeV/u C and 800 MeV/u Si. Foils of aluminum and gold, as well as gold, tungsten and manganese covered with cadmium were inserted at various locations in the concrete pile to serve as activation detectors. Features of reaction rate distribution, such as the shape of the reaction rate profile, contribution of the neutrons from intra-nuclear cascade and that from evaporation to the activation reactions are determined by the analysis of measured reaction rates. The measured reaction rates were compared with those calculated with radiation transport simulation codes, FLUKA and PHITS, to verify their capability to predict induced activity. The simulated reaction rates agree with the experimental results within a factor of three in general. However, systematic discrepancies between simulated reaction rates and measured reaction rates attributed to the neutron source terms are observed.

  5. Prebiotic synthesis of phosphoenol pyruvate by α-phosphorylation-controlled triose glycolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggins, Adam J.; Powner, Matthew W.

    2017-04-01

    Phosphoenol pyruvate is the highest-energy phosphate found in living organisms and is one of the most versatile molecules in metabolism. Consequently, it is an essential intermediate in a wide variety of biochemical pathways, including carbon fixation, the shikimate pathway, substrate-level phosphorylation, gluconeogenesis and glycolysis. Triose glycolysis (generation of ATP from glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate via phosphoenol pyruvate) is among the most central and highly conserved pathways in metabolism. Here, we demonstrate the efficient and robust synthesis of phosphoenol pyruvate from prebiotic nucleotide precursors, glycolaldehyde and glyceraldehyde. Furthermore, phosphoenol pyruvate is derived within an α-phosphorylation controlled reaction network that gives access to glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceric acid 3-phosphate, phosphoserine and pyruvate. Our results demonstrate that the key components of a core metabolic pathway central to energy transduction and amino acid, sugar, nucleotide and lipid biosyntheses can be reconstituted in high yield under mild, prebiotically plausible conditions.

  6. Prebiotic synthesis of phosphoenol pyruvate by α-phosphorylation-controlled triose glycolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggins, Adam J.; Powner, Matthew W.

    2016-10-01

    Phosphoenol pyruvate is the highest-energy phosphate found in living organisms and is one of the most versatile molecules in metabolism. Consequently, it is an essential intermediate in a wide variety of biochemical pathways, including carbon fixation, the shikimate pathway, substrate-level phosphorylation, gluconeogenesis and glycolysis. Triose glycolysis (generation of ATP from glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate via phosphoenol pyruvate) is among the most central and highly conserved pathways in metabolism. Here, we demonstrate the efficient and robust synthesis of phosphoenol pyruvate from prebiotic nucleotide precursors, glycolaldehyde and glyceraldehyde. Furthermore, phosphoenol pyruvate is derived within an α-phosphorylation controlled reaction network that gives access to glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceric acid 3-phosphate, phosphoserine and pyruvate. Our results demonstrate that the key components of a core metabolic pathway central to energy transduction and amino acid, sugar, nucleotide and lipid biosyntheses can be reconstituted in high yield under mild, prebiotically plausible conditions.

  7. The Chemoselective Reduction of Isoxazoline γ-Lactams Through Iminium Aza-Diels-Alder Reactions: A Short-Cut Synthesis of Aminols as Valuable Intermediates towards Nucleoside Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Memeo, Misal Giuseppe; Mella, Mariella; Quadrelli, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Isoxazoline γ-lactams are prepared starting from the regioisomeric cycloadducts of benzonitrile oxide to the N-alkyl 2-azanorbornenes taking advantage of the efficient catalytic oxidation by RuO4. The reduction of the amide groups is easily conducted in the presence of LiAlH4 under mild conditions, which allowed for the chemoselective reduction of the amide moiety followed by ring opening to afford the desired conformationally locked isoxazoline-carbocyclic aminols, as valuable intermediates for nucleoside synthesis. PMID:22629174

  8. Enantioselective Reactions of 2-Sulfonylalkyl Phenols with Allenic Esters: Dynamic Kinetic Resolution and [4+2] Cycloaddition Involving ortho-Quinone Methide Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Wang, Kai; Guo, Wengang; Liu, Xianghui; Liu, Yan; Li, Can

    2017-03-20

    We report herein a dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) involving ortho-quinone methide (o-QM) intermediates. In the presence of Et3 N and the cinchonine-derived nucleophilic catalyst D, the DKR of 2-sulfonylalkyl phenols with allenic esters afforded chiral benzylic sulfones in 57-79 % yield with good to excellent enantioselectivity (85-95 % ee). Furthermore, with 2-(tosylmethyl)sesamols or 2-(tosylmethyl)naphthols, from which stable o-QM substrates can be generated, a formal [4+2] cycloaddition delivered 4-aryl- or alkyl-substituted chromans with excellent enantioselectivity (88-97 % ee).

  9. Linking Chemical Electron–Proton Transfer to Proton Pumping in Cytochrome c Oxidase: Broken-Symmetry DFT Exploration of Intermediates along the Catalytic Reaction Pathway of the Iron–Copper Dinuclear Complex

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    After a summary of the problem of coupling electron and proton transfer to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase, we present the results of our earlier and recent density functional theory calculations for the dinuclear Fe-a3–CuB reaction center in this enzyme. A specific catalytic reaction wheel diagram is constructed from the calculations, based on the structures and relative energies of the intermediate states of the reaction cycle. A larger family of tautomers/protonation states is generated compared to our earlier work, and a new lowest-energy pathway is proposed. The entire reaction cycle is calculated for the new smaller model (about 185–190 atoms), and two selected arcs of the wheel are chosen for calculations using a larger model (about 205 atoms). We compare the structural and redox energetics and protonation calculations with available experimental data. The reaction cycle map that we have built is positioned for further improvement and testing against experiment. PMID:24960612

  10. Neurofilament subunit (NFL) head domain phosphorylation regulates axonal transport of neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Yates, Darran M; Manser, Catherine; De Vos, Kurt J; Shaw, Christopher E; McLoughlin, Declan M; Miller, Christopher C J

    2009-04-01

    Neurofilaments are the intermediate filaments of neurons and are synthesised in neuronal cell bodies and then transported through axons. Neurofilament light chain (NFL) is a principal component of neurofilaments, and phosphorylation of NFL head domain is believed to regulate the assembly of neurofilaments. However, the role that NFL phosphorylation has on transport of neurofilaments is poorly understood. To address this issue, we monitored axonal transport of phosphorylation mutants of NFL. We mutated four known phosphorylation sites in NFL head domain to either preclude phosphorylation, or mimic permanent phosphorylation. Mutation to preclude phosphorylation had no effect on transport but mutation of three sites to mimic permanent phosphorylation inhibited transport. Mutation of all four sites together to mimic permanent phosphorylation proved especially potent at inhibiting transport and also disrupted neurofilament assembly. Our results suggest that NFL head domain phosphorylation is a regulator of neurofilament axonal transport.

  11. Ambiphilic molecules for trapping reactive intermediates: interrupted Nazarov reaction of allenyl vinyl ketones with Me2PCH2AlMe2.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Josée; Courtemanche, Marc-André; Marx, Vanessa M; Jean Burnell, D; Fontaine, Frédéric-Georges

    2012-11-25

    The addition of the ambiphilic molecule Me(2)AlCH(2)PMe(2) (1) to the allenyl vinyl ketone 2 gave a trapped Nazarov reaction product. Under kinetic control, the addition of the phosphine was on the methylated carbon, contrary to expected steric and electronic considerations. Computational data pointed to hydrogen bonding between the phosphine and the methyl group guiding the regiochemistry of this reaction. This product rearranged to provide the expected, regioisomeric Nazarov product. With additional 1 this compound yielded a Michael-addition product via a retro-Nazarov process.

  12. Study of the CH2I + O2 Reaction with a Step-Scan Fourier-Transform Infrared Absorption Spectrometer: Spectra of the Criegee Intermediate CH2OO and DIOXIRANE(?)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2014-06-01

    The Criegee intermediates are carbonyl oxides that play key roles in ozonolysis of unsaturated organic compounds. This mechanism was first proposed by Criegee in 1949, but the first direct observation of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO in the gaseous phase has been reported only recently using photoionization mass spectrometry. Our group has reported the low-resolution IR spectra of CH2OO, produced from the reaction of CH2I + O2, with a second-generation step-scan Fourier-transfom IR absorption spectrometer. The spectral assignments were based on comparison of observed vibrational wavenumbers and rotational contours with theoretical predictions. Here, we report the IR absorption spectra of CH2OO at a resolution of 0.32 wn, showing partially rotationally-resolved structures. The origins of the νb{3}, νb{4}, νb{6}, and νb{8} vibrational modes of CH2OO are determined to be 1434.1, 1285.7, 909.2, and 847.3 wn, respectively. With the analysis of the vibration-rotational spectra, we provide a definitive assignment of these bands to CH2OO. The observed vibrational wavenumbers indicate a zwitterionic contribution to this singlet biradical showing a strengthened C-O bond and a weakened O-O bond. This zwitterionic character results to an extremely rapid self reaction via a cyclic dimer to form 2H2CO + O2 (1Δg). Another group of weak transient IR bands centered at 1231.5, 1213.3, and 899.8 wn are also observed. These bands might be contributed from dioxirane, which was postulated to be another important intermediate that might be isomerized from the Criegee intermediate in the reaction of O3 with 1-alkenes. O. Welz, J. D. Savee, D. L. Osborn, S. S.Vasu, C. J. Percival, D. E. Shallcross, and C. A. Taatjes, Science 335, 204 (2012). Y.-T. Su, Y.-H. Huang, H. A.Witek, and Y.-P. Lee, Science 340, 174 (2013).

  13. A Simple Hydraulic Analog Model of Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Willis, Wayne T; Jackman, Matthew R; Messer, Jeffrey I; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Glancy, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is the primary source of cellular energy transduction in mammals. This energy conversion involves dozens of enzymatic reactions, energetic intermediates, and the dynamic interactions among them. With the goal of providing greater insight into the complex thermodynamics and kinetics ("thermokinetics") of mitochondrial energy transduction, a simple hydraulic analog model of oxidative phosphorylation is presented. In the hydraulic model, water tanks represent the forward and back "pressures" exerted by thermodynamic driving forces: the matrix redox potential (ΔGredox), the electrochemical potential for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane (ΔGH), and the free energy of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) (ΔGATP). Net water flow proceeds from tanks with higher water pressure to tanks with lower pressure through "enzyme pipes" whose diameters represent the conductances (effective activities) of the proteins that catalyze the energy transfer. These enzyme pipes include the reactions of dehydrogenase enzymes, the electron transport chain (ETC), and the combined action of ATP synthase plus the ATP-adenosine 5'-diphosphate exchanger that spans the inner membrane. In addition, reactive oxygen species production is included in the model as a leak that is driven out of the ETC pipe by high pressure (high ΔGredox) and a proton leak dependent on the ΔGH for both its driving force and the conductance of the leak pathway. Model water pressures and flows are shown to simulate thermodynamic forces and metabolic fluxes that have been experimentally observed in mammalian skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise, chronic endurance training, and reduced substrate availability, as well as account for the thermokinetic behavior of mitochondria from fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle and the metabolic capacitance of the creatine kinase reaction.

  14. Theoretical characterization of stable eta1-N2O-, eta2-N2O-, eta1-N2-, and eta2-N2-bound species: intermediates in the addition reactions of nitrogen hydrides with the pentacyanonitrosylferrate(II) ion.

    PubMed

    Olabe, José A; Estiú, Guillermina L

    2003-08-11

    The addition of nitrogen hydrides (hydrazine, hydroxylamine, ammonia, azide) to the pentacyanonitrosylferrate(II) ion has been analyzed by means of density functional calculations, focusing on the identification of stable intermediates along the reaction paths. Initial reversible adduct formation and further decomposition lead to the eta(1)- and eta(2)-linkage isomers of N(2)O and N(2), depending on the nucleophile. The intermediates (adducts and gas-releasing precursors) have been characterized at the B3LYP/6-31G level of theory through the calculation of their structural and spectroscopic properties, modeling the solvent by means of a continuous approach. The eta(2)-N(2)O isomer is formed at an initial stage of adduct decompositions with the hydrazine and azide adducts. Further conversion to the eta(1)-N(2)O isomer is followed by Fe-N(2)O dissociation. Only the eta(1)-N(2)O isomer is predicted for the reaction with hydroxylamine, revealing a kinetically controlled N(2)O formation. eta(1)-N(2) and eta(2)-N(2) isomers are also predicted as stable species.

  15. Carbon-carbon cross-coupling reactions catalyzed by a two-coordinate nickel(II)-bis(amido) complex via observable Ni(I) , Ni(II) , and Ni(III) intermediates.

    PubMed

    Lipschutz, Michael I; Tilley, T Don

    2014-07-07

    Recently, the development of more sustainable catalytic systems based on abundant first-row metals, especially nickel, for cross-coupling reactions has attracted significant interest. One of the key intermediates invoked in these reactions is a Ni(III) -alkyl species, but no such species that is part of a competent catalytic cycle has yet been isolated. Herein, we report a carbon-carbon cross-coupling system based on a two-coordinate Ni(II) -bis(amido) complex in which a Ni(III) -alkyl species can be isolated and fully characterized. This study details compelling experimental evidence of the role played by this Ni(III) -alkyl species as well as those of other key Ni(I) and Ni(II) intermediates. The catalytic cycle described herein is also one of the first examples of a two-coordinate complex that competently catalyzes an organic transformation, potentially leading to a new class of catalysts based on the unique ability of first-row transition metals to accommodate two-coordinate complexes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. [Phosphorylation of tau protein].

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Ishiguro, K

    1990-05-01

    In aged human brain and particularly in Alzheimer's disease brain, paired helical filaments (PHFs) accumulate in the neuronal cell. Recently, it has been found that the highly phosphorylated tau protein, one of the microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), is a component of PHF. The authors attempted to clarify the mechanism underlying the accumulation of PHF from the following two aspects; 1) What is the mechanism of phosphorylation of tau protein? 2) Is the highly phosphorylated tau protein capable of forming PHFs? From rat or bovine microtubule proteins we partially purified and characterized a novel protein kinase that specifically phosphorylated tau and MAP2 among many proteins in the brain extract, and which formed a PHF epitope on the phosphorylated human tau. This enzyme was one of the protein serine/threonine kinases and was independent of known second messengers. The phosphorylation of tau by this enzyme was stimulated by tubulin under the condition of microtubule formation, suggesting that the phosphorylation of tau could occur concomitantly with microtubule formation in the brain. Since this kinase was usually bound to tau but not directly to tubulin, the enzyme was associated with microtubules through tau. From these properties related to tau, this kinase is designated as tau protein kinase. The tau that been phosphorylated with this kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP as a phosphate donor, was digested by endoprotinase Lys-C to produce three labeled fragments, K1, K2 and K3. These three fragments were sequenced and the phosphorylation sites on tau by this kinase were identified. The K2 fragment overlapped with the tau-1 site known to be one of the phosphorylation site in PHF. This result strengthens the possibility that tau protein phosphorylated by tau protein kinase is incorporated into PHF. Tubulin binding sites on tau were located between K1 and K3 fragments, while K2 fragment was located in the neighboring to N-terminus of K1. No phosphorylated sites were

  17. Shedding new light on ZnCl2-mediated addition reactions of Grignard reagents to ketones: structural authentication of key intermediates and diffusion-ordered NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David R; Clegg, William; García-Alvarez, Pablo; McCall, Matthew D; Nuttall, Lorraine; Kennedy, Alan R; Russo, Luca; Hevia, Eva

    2011-04-11

    Building on recent advances in synthesis showing that the addition of inorganic salts to Grignard reagents can greatly enhance their performance in alkylation reactions to ketones, this study explores the reactions of EtMgCl with benzophenone in the presence of stoichiometric or catalytic amounts of ZnCl(2) with the aim of furthering the understanding of the role and constitution of the organometallic species involved in these transformations. Investigations into the metathesis reactions of three molar equivalents of EtMgCl with ZnCl(2) led to the isolation and characterisation (X-ray crystallography and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy) of novel magnesium "zinc-rich" zincate [{(THF)(6)Mg(2)Cl(3)}(+){Zn(2)Et(5)}(-)] (1), whose complicated constitution in THF solutions was assessed by variable-temperature (1)H DOSY NMR studies. Compound 1 reacted with one equivalent of benzophenone to yield magnesium magnesiate [{(THF)(6)Mg(2)Cl(3)}(+){Mg(2)(OC(Et)Ph(2))(2)Cl(3)(THF)}(-)] (3), whose structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. (1)H NMR monitoring of this reaction showed two equivalents of ZnEt(2) formed as a co-product, which together with the "magnesium only constitution" of 3 provides experimental insights into how zinc can be efficiently recycled in these reactions, and therefore used catalytically. The chemoselectivity of this reaction can be rationalised in terms of the synergic effect of magnesium and zinc and contrasts with the results obtained when benzophenone was allowed to react with EtMgCl in the absence of ZnCl(2), where the reduction of the ketone takes place preferentially. The reduction product [{(THF)(5)Mg(3)Cl(4){OC(H)Ph(CF(3))}(2)] (4) obtained from the reaction of EtMgCl with 2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone was established by X-ray crystallography and multinuclear ((1)H, (13)C and (19)F) NMR spectroscopy. Compounds 3 and 4 exhibit new structural motifs in magnesium chemistry having MgCl(2) integrated within their constitution, which highlights

  18. Synthesized TiO2/ZSM-5 composites used for the photocatalytic degradation of azo dye: Intermediates, reaction pathway, mechanism and bio-toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kefu; Hu, Xin-Yan; Chen, Bor-Yann; Hsueh, Chung-Chuan; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jiajie; Lin, Yu-Jung; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a one-step solid dispersion method was used to synthesize titanium dioxide (TiO2)/Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5) composites with substantially reduced time and energy consumption. A degradation efficiency of more than 95% was achieved within 10 min using 50% PTZ (synthesized TiO2/ZSM-5 composites with TiO2 contents of 50 wt% loaded on ZSM-5) at pH 7 and 25 °C. The possible degradation pathway of azo-dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) was investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ion chromatography (IC). The bonds between the N atoms and naphthalene groups are likely attacked first and cleaved by hydroxyl radicals, ultimately resulting in the decolorization and mineralization of the azo dye. A comparative assessment of the characteristics of abiotic and biotic dye decolorization was completed. In addition, the toxicity effects of the degradation intermediates of azo-dye RB5 on cellular respiratory activity were analyzed. The bio-toxicity results showed that the decay rate constants of CO2 production from the azo-dye RB5 samples at different degradation times increased initially and subsequently decreased, indicating that intermediates of higher toxicity could adhere to the catalyst surface and gradually destroyed by further photocatalytic oxidation. Additionally, EDTA (hole scavengers) and t-BuOH (radical scavengers) were used to detect the main active oxidative species in the system. The results showed that the hydroxyl radicals are the main oxidation species in the photocatalytic process.

  19. A Closer Look at the Spectroscopic Properties of Possible Reaction Intermediates in WT and Mutant (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl Diphosphate Reductase (IspH/LytB)†

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weiya; Lees, Nicholas S.; Hall, Dominique; Welideniya, Dhanushi; Hoffman, Brian M.; Duin, Evert C.

    2012-01-01

    (E)-4-Hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (IspH or LytB) catalyzes the terminal step of the MEP/DOXP pathway where it converts (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate (HMBPP) into the two products isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. The reaction involves the reductive elimination of the C4 hydroxyl group, using a total of two electrons. Here we show that the active form of IspH contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster and not the [3Fe-4S] form. Our studies show that the cluster is not only the direct electron source for the reaction but that a reaction intermediate is bound directly to the cluster. This active form, has been trapped in a state, dubbed FeSA, that was detected in EPR spectroscopy when one-electron-reduced IspH was incubated with HMBPP. In addition, three mutants of IspH protein have been prepared and studied, His42, His124 and Glu126 (Aquifex aeolicus numbering), with particular attention to the effects on the cluster properties and possible reaction intermediates. None of the mutants affected the properties of the [4Fe-4S]+ cluster significantly, but different effects were observed when one-electron-reduced forms were incubated with HMBPP. Replacing the His42 led to an increased Km value and much lower catalytic efficiency, confirming the role of this residue in substrate binding. Replacing the His124 also resulted in lower catalytic efficiency. In this case, however, enzyme showed the loss of the [4Fe-4S]+ EPR signal upon addition of HMBPP without the subsequent formation of the FeSA signal. Instead, a radical-type signal was observed in some of the samples indicating that this residue plays a role in the correct positioning of the substrate. The incorrect orientation in the mutant leads to the formation of substrate-based radicals instead of the cluster-bound-intermediate complex FeSA. Replacing the Glu126 also resulted in lower catalytic efficiency, with yet a third type of EPR signal being detected upon incubation with

  20. Synthesis of heterocyclic analogues of epibatidine via 7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-yl radical intermediates. 1. Intermolecular reactions.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sánchez, Elena; Soriano, Elena; Marco-Contelles, José

    2008-09-05

    The synthesis and reactivity of the 7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-yl radical has been extensively investigated in inter- and intramolecular reaction processes for the first time. In this work we will present the preparation of the radical and its successful intermolecular reaction with radical acceptors such as tert-butylisocyanide and acrylonitrile. Computational analyses have been carried out to show and explain the mechanisms and stereochemical outcome of these transformations. Overall and from the chemical point of view, a new and convenient synthetic approach has been developed for the synthesis of exo-2-(cyano)alkyl substituted 7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane derivatives, a series of compounds of wide interest for the synthesis of heterocyclic analogues of epibatidine. As a result, we describe here the synthesis of the tetrazoloepibatidines (8 and 15) and the oxadiazoloepibatidine (10).

  1. Ni/Fe-supported over hydrotalcites precursors as catalysts for clean and selective oxidation of Basic Yellow 11: reaction intermediates determination.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, G; Rodríguez, A; Vallet, A; García, J

    2013-01-01

    In this work, Basic Yellow 11 (BY 11) was employed as model compound to study catalytic wet air oxidation as a pre-treatment step to the conventional biological oxidation. Ni and Fe catalysts supported over hydrotalcite (HT) were prepared by incipient wetness and excess impregnation to obtain catalysts with different metal loadings (from 1 to 10 wt.%). HTs were synthesized by co-precipitation and characterized with XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), BET, thermogravimetric analysis and SEM. Results showed that dye conversion increased with Ni and Fe content up to 7 wt.% and that the most effective catalyst were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation. The influence of metal loading in the catalyst, and the preparation method as well as the reaction conditions was investigated. A mechanism and reaction pathways for BY 11 during catalytic liquid phase oxidation have also been proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of a higher-order organozincate intermediate involved in Negishi cross-coupling reactions by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Howard N; Hadei, Niloufar; Blagojevic, Voislav; Patschinski, Pascal; Achonduh, George T; Avola, Stephanie; Bohme, Diethard K; Organ, Michael G

    2011-07-04

    Negishi cross-coupling reactions were analyzed in solution by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy to identify both the effect of LiBr as an additive as well as the purpose of 3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) as a co-solvent. The results suggest that the main role of DMI is to facilitate a higher order bromozincate formation during the addition of LiBr.

  3. The role of carbonate as a catalyst of Fenton-like reactions in AOP processes: CO3˙(-) as the active intermediate.

    PubMed

    Burg, Ariela; Shamir, Dror; Shusterman, Inna; Kornweitz, Haya; Meyerstein, Dan

    2014-11-07

    Kinetic and DFT results for the carbonate catalysed Co(H2O)6(2+) + H2O2 Fenton-like reaction suggest a mechanism involving the formation of a cyclic transient, cyclic-(CO4)Co(II)(OOH)(H2O)2(-) that decomposes into Co(II)(H2O)(OOH)(OH)2 + CO3˙(-), i.e. no OH˙ radicals are involved. Plausible biological implications are pointed out.

  4. Diallyl Trisulfide Is a Fast H2S Donor, but Diallyl Disulfide Is a Slow One: The Reaction Pathways and Intermediates of Glutathione with Polysulfides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Wu, Haixia; Wong, Ming Wah; Huang, Dejian

    2015-09-04

    Diallyl trisulfide (DATS) reacts rapidly with glutathione (GSH) to release H2S through thiol-disulfide exchange followed by allyl perthiol reduction by GSH. Yet diallyl disulfide (DADS) only releases a minute amount of H2S via a sluggish reaction with GSH through an α-carbon nucleophilic substitution pathway. The results clarify the misunderstanding of DADS as a rapid H2S donor, which is attributed to its DATS impurity.

  5. Detection and identification of intermediates in the reaction of L-serine with Escherichia coli tryptophan synthase via rapid-scanning ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Drewe, W F; Dunn, M F

    1985-07-16

    Rapid-scanning stopped-flow (RSSF) UV-visible spectroscopy has been used to investigate the UV-visible absorption changes (300-550 nm) that occur in the spectrum of enzyme-bound pyridoxal 5'-phosphate during the reaction of L-serine with the alpha 2 beta 2 and beta 2 forms of Escherichia coli tryptophan synthase. In agreement with previous kinetic studies [Lane, A., & Kirschner, K. (1983) Eur. J. Biochem. 129, 561-570], the reaction with alpha 2 beta 2 was found to occur in three detectable relaxations (1/tau 1 greater than 1/tau 2 greater than 1/tau 3). The RSSF data reveal that during tau 1, the internal aldimine, E(PLP), with lambda max = 412 nm (pH 7.8), undergoes rapid conversion to two transient species, one with lambda max congruent to 420 nm and one with lambda max congruent to 460 nm. These species decay in a biphasic process (1/tau 2, 1/tau 3) to a complicated final spectrum with lambda max congruent to 350 nm and with a broad envelope of absorbance extending out to approximately 525 nm. Analysis of the time-resolved spectra establishes that the spectral changes in tau 2 are nearly identical with the spectral changes in tau 3. Kinetic isotope effects due to substitution of 2H for the alpha-1H of serine were found to increase the amount of the 420-nm transient and to decrease the amount of the species with lambda max congruent to 460 nm. These findings identify the serine Schiff base (the external aldimine) as the 420 nm absorbing, highly fluorescent transient; the species with lambda max congruent to 460 nm is the delocalized carbanion (quinoidal) species derived from abstraction of the alpha proton from the external aldimine. The reaction of L-serine with beta 2 consists of two relaxations (1/tau 1 beta greater than 1/tau 2 beta) and yields a quasi-stable species with lambda max = 420 nm, in good agreement with a previous report [Miles, E. W., Hatanaka, M., & Crawford, I. P. (1968) Biochemistry 7, 2742-2753]. Analysis of the RSSF spectra indicates that

  6. The effect of monovalent and divalent cations on the ATP-dependent Ca2+-binding and phosphorylation during the reaction cycle of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-transport ATPase.

    PubMed

    Medda, P; Fassold, E; Hasselbach, W

    1987-06-01

    The coupling of Ca2+ movements and phosphate fluxes as well as the time-dependent occurrence of sequential reaction intermediates in the forward mode of the Ca,Mg-dependent ATPase reaction have been investigated using leaky vesicles (A23187) in the presence of varying Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+ concentrations. The employed ATP concentration of 2 microM does not allow more than one reaction cycle to occur. The respective fractions of ADP-sensitive and ADP-insensitive phosphoenzyme have been determined. The chosen experimental conditions (0-1 degree C, pH 6.0, absence of solubilizers) allow a prolonged time of observation and exclude interfering alterations of coupling and binding parameters, respectively. It is shown that under the experimental conditions K+ interacts with at least four different reaction steps (phosphoenzyme formation, E1P----E2P transition, E2P hydrolysis, and E2----E1 transformation). Mg2+ represents the sole ionic co-factor for the formation of the substrate MgATP if it is present in high concentrations (5 mM). Additional Ca2+ is bound to the substrate as well as to unspecific sites otherwise occupied by Mg2+ if Mg2+ is reduced to 0.1 mM. In this case the E1P----E2P transition rate (including Ca2+ translocation and Ca2+ release from low-affinity sites) is little diminished. If, in the absence of K+, both Mg2+ and Ca2+ are deficient E2P hydrolysis is vastly retarded. We find Ca2+ release to occur time-coincidently with E1P formation and not concomitantly with the comparably slow appearance of E2P; the molar amount of Ca2+ released, however, rather agreed with that of E2P formed. This suggests that under the prevailing conditions of a high proton concentration, phosphoenzyme states containing occluded Ca2+ or Ca2+ bound to low-affinity sites are transitional and not detectable. Preliminary findings on this subject have been published by us and colleagues from this laboratory [Hasselbach, W., Agostini, B., Medda, P., Migala, A. & Waas, W. (1985) in The

  7. Role of a Guanidinium Cation-Phosphodianion Pair in Stabilizing the Vinyl Carbanion Intermediate of Orotidine 5'-Phosphate Decarboxylase-Catalyzed Reactions.†

    PubMed Central

    Goryanova, Bogdana; Goldman, Lawrence M.; Amyes, Tina L.; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The side chain cation of Arg235 provides a 5.6 and 2.6 kcal/mol stabilization of the transition states for orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (OMPDC) catalyzed reactions of OMP and 5-fluoroorotidine 5'-monophosphate (FOMP), respectively, a 7.2 kcal/mol stabilization of the vinyl carbanion-like transition state for enzyme-catalyzed exchange of the C-6 proton of 5-fluorouridine 5'-monophosphate (FUMP), but no stabilization of the transition states for enzyme-catalyzed decarboxylation of truncated substrates 1-(β-d-erythrofuranosyl)orotic acid and 1-(β-d-erythrofuranosyl) 5-fluorouracil. These observations show that the transition state stabilization results from formation of a protein cation-phosphodianion pair, and that there is no detectable stabilization from an interaction between the side chain and the pyrimidine ring of substrate. The 5.6 kcal/mol side chain interaction with the transition state for the decarboxylation reaction is 50% of the total 11.2 kcal/mol transition state stabilization by interactions with the phosphodianion of OMP, while the 7.2 kcal/mol side-chain interaction with the transition state for the deuterium exchange reaction is a larger 78% of the total 9.2 kcal/mol transition state stabilization by interactions with the phosphodianion of FUMP. The effect of the R235A mutation on the enzyme-catalyzed deuterium exchange is expressed predominantly as a change in the turnover number kex while the effect on the enzyme-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP is expressed predominantly as a change in the Michaelis constant Km. These results are rationalized by a mechanism in which the binding of OMP, compared with FUMP, provides a larger driving force for conversion of OMPDC from an inactive open conformation to a productive, active, closed conformation. PMID:24053466

  8. Thermally-generated reactive intermediates: Trapping of the parent ferrocene-based o-quinodimethane and reactions of diradicals generated by hydrogen-atom transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, John Michael

    1993-09-01

    Ferrocenocyclobutene is prepared by flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of the N-amino-2-phenylaziridine hydrazone of 2-methylferrocenealdehyde. In the second section of this dissertation, a series of hydrocarbon rearrangements were observed. FVP of o-allyltoluene at 0.1 Torr (700--900 C) gives 2-methylindan and indene, accompanied by o-propenyltoluene. FVP of 2-methyl-2`-vinylbiphenyl gives 9-methyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, which fits the proposed mechanism. However, FVP of 2-(o-methylbenzyl)styrene gives mainly anthracene and 1-methylanthracene. This cyclization reaction was also successful with o-allylphenol and o-(2-methylallyl)phenol.

  9. Intermediate Nuclear Structure for 2v 2{beta} Decay of {sup 48}Ca Studied by (p, n) and (n, p) Reactions at 300 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, H.; Yako, K.

    2009-08-26

    Angular distributions of the double differential cross sections for the {sup 48}Ca(p,n) and the {sup 48}Ti(n,p) reactions were measured at 300 MeV. A multipole decomposition technique was applied to the spectra to extract the Gamow-Teller (GT) transition strengths. In the (n, p) spectrum beyond 8 MeV excitation energy extra B(GT{sup +}) strengths which are not predicted by the shell model calculation. This extra B(GT{sup +}) strengths significantly contribute to the nuclear matrix element of the 2v2{beta}-decay.

  10. Biocatalytic Asymmetric Phosphorylation Catalyzed by Recombinant Glycerate-2-Kinase.

    PubMed

    Hardt, Norman; Kinfu, Birhanu M; Chow, Jennifer; Schoenenberger, Bernhard; Streit, Wolfgang R; Obkircher, Markus; Wohlgemuth, Roland

    2017-08-04

    The efficient synthesis of pure d-glycerate-2-phosphate is of great interest due to its importance as an enzyme substrate and metabolite. Therefore, we investigated a straightforward one-step biocatalytic phosphorylation of glyceric acid. Glycerate-2-kinase from Thermotoga maritima was expressed in Escherichia coli, allowing easy purification. The selective glycerate-2-kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation was followed by (31) P NMR and showed excellent enantioselectivity towards phosphorylation of the d-enantiomer of glyceric acid. This straightforward phosphorylation reaction and subsequent product isolation enabled the preparation of enantiomerically pure d-glycerate 2-phosphate. This phosphorylation reaction, using recombinant glycerate-2-kinase, yielded d-glycerate 2-phosphate in fewer reaction steps and with higher purity than chemical routes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Extensional flow convecting a reactant undergoing a first order homogeneous reaction and diffusional mass transfer from a sphere at low to intermediate Peclet and Damkohler numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, N. Y.; Reed, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Forced convective diffusion-reaction is considered for viscous axisymmetric extensional convecting velocity in the neighborhood of a sphere. For Peclet numbers in the range 0.1 less than or equal to Pe less than or equal to 500 and for Damkohler numbers increasing with increasing Pe but in the overall range 0.02 less than or equal to Da less than or equal to 10, average and local Sherwood numbers have been computed. By introducing the eigenfunction expansion c(r, Theta) = Sum of c(n)(r)P(n)(cos Theta) into the forced convective diffusion equation for the concentration of a chemical species undergoing a first order homogeneous reaction and by using properties of the Legendre functions Pn(cos Theta), the variable coefficient PDE can be reduced to a system of N + 1 second order ODEs for the radial functions c(sub n)(r), n = 0, 1, 2,..., N. The adaptive grid algorithm of Pereyra and Lentini can be used to solve the corresponding 2(N + 1) first order differential equations as a two-point boundary value problem on 1 less than or equal to r less than or equal to r(sub infinity). Convergence of the expansion for a specific value of N can thus be established and provides 'spectral' behavior as well as the full concentration field c(r, Theta).

  12. Switchable Synthesis of Pyrroles and Pyrazines via Rh(II)-Catalyzed Reaction of 1,2,3-Triazoles with Isoxazoles: Experimental and DFT Evidence for the 1,4-Diazahexatriene Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Rostovskii, Nikolai V; Ruvinskaya, Julia O; Novikov, Mikhail S; Khlebnikov, Alexander F; Smetanin, Ilia A; Agafonova, Anastasiya V

    2017-01-06

    4-Aminopyrrole-3-carboxylates and pyrazine-2-carboxylates were synthesized from 5-alkoxyisoxazoles and 1-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazoles by tuning the Rh(II) catalyst and the reaction conditions. The reaction in chloroform at 100 °C under Rh2(OAc)4 catalysis provides 4-aminopyrrole-3-carboxylates in good yields. The use of Rh2(Piv)4 in refluxing toluene results in the formation of 1,2-dihydropyrazine-2-carboxylates as the main products, which can be converted by a one-pot procedure to pyrazine-2-carboxylates by heating with catalytic amounts of TsOH. According to the NMR and DFT investigations of the reaction mechanism, pyrroles and dihydropyrazines are formed, respectively, via 1,5- and 1,6-cyclization of common (5Z)-1,4-diazahexa-1,3,5-triene intermediates. The influence of the nature of the catalyst on the product distribution is rationalized in terms of the Rh-catalyzed isomerization of a pyrrolin-2-ylium-3-aminide zwitterion, the primary product of 1,4-diazahexatriene 1,5-cyclization.

  13. Reactions of nitrogen oxides with the five-coordinate Fe(III)(porphyrin) nitrito intermediate Fe(Por)(ONO) in sublimed solids.

    PubMed

    Kurtikyan, Tigran S; Hovhannisyan, Astghik A; Hakobyan, Manya E; Patterson, James C; Iretskii, Alexei; Ford, Peter C

    2007-03-28

    Detailed experimental studies are described for reactions of several nitrogen oxides with iron porphyrin models for heme/NxOy systems. It is shown by FTIR and optical spectroscopy and by isotope labeling experiments that reaction of small increments of NO2 with sublimed thin layers of the iron(II) complex Fe(Por) (Por = meso-tetraphenylporphyrinato dianion, TPP, or meso-tetra-p-tolylporphyrinato dianion, TTP) leads to formation of the 5-coordinate nitrito complexes Fe(Por)(eta1-ONO) (1), which are fairly stable but very slowly decompose under vacuum giving mostly the corresponding nitrosyl complexes Fe(Por)(NO). Further reaction of 1 with new NO2 increments leads to formation of the nitrato complex Fe(Por)(eta2-O2NO) (2). The interaction of NO with 1 at low temperature involves ligand addition to give the nitrito-nitrosyl complexes Fe(Por)(eta1-ONO)(NO) (3); however, these isomerize to the nitro-nitrosyl analogs Fe(Por)(eta1-NO2)(NO) (4) upon warming. Experiments with labeled nitrogen oxides argue for an intramolecular isomerization ("flipping") mechanism rather than one involving dissociation and rebinding of NO2. The Fe(III) centers in the 6-coordinate species 3 and 4 are low spin in contrast to 1, which appears to be high-spin, although DFT computations of the porphinato models Fe(P)(nitrite) suggest that the doublet nitro species and the quartet and sextet nitrito complexes are all relatively close in energy. The nitro-nitrosyl complex 4 is stable under an NO atmosphere but decomposes under intense pumping to give a mixture of the ferrous nitrosyl complex Fe(Por)(NO) and the ferric nitrito complex Fe(Por)(eta1-ONO) indicating the competitive dissociation of NO and NO2. Hence, loss of NO from 4 is accompanied with nitro --> nitrito isomerization consistent with 1 being the more stable of the 5-coordinate NO2 complexes of iron porphyrins.

  14. Theoretical vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates and the reaction mechanism of the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis by the protein complex Ras-GAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrenova, Maria G.; Grigorenko, Bella L.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2016-09-01

    The structures and vibrational spectra of the reacting species upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis to guanosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate (Pi) trapped inside the protein complex Ras-GAP were analyzed following the results of QM/MM simulations. The frequencies of the phosphate vibrations referring to the reactants and to Pi were compared to those observed in the experimental FTIR studies. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental vibrational data provides a strong support to the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis by the Ras-GAP enzyme system revealed by the recent QM/MM modeling. Evolution of the vibrational bands associated with the inorganic phosphate Pi during the elementary stages of GTP hydrolysis is predicted.

  15. THE EFFECT OF THE {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O REACTION ON THE BLUE LOOPS IN INTERMEDIATE-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Halabi, Ghina M.; El Eid, Mounib F.; Champagne, Arthur

    2012-12-10

    We present stellar evolutionary sequences of stars in the mass range 5-12 M{sub Sun }, having solar-like initial composition. The stellar models are obtained using updated input physics, including recent rates of thermonuclear reactions. We investigate the effects of a modification of the {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O reaction rate, as suggested by recent evaluations, on the formation and extension of the blue loops encountered during the evolution of the stars in the above mass range. We find that a reduced {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O rate, as described in the text, has a striking impact on the physical conditions of burning and mixing during shell hydrogen burning when the blue loops are formed. In particular, we find that the efficiency of shell hydrogen burning is crucial for the formation of an extended blue loop. We show that a significantly reduced {sup 14}N(p, {gamma}){sup 15}O rate affects severely the extension of the blue loops and the time spent by the star in the blue part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram in the mass range 5-7 M{sub Sun} if the treatment of convection is based on the Schwarzschild criterion only. In this case, envelope overshooting helps to restore well-extended blue loops as supported by the observations of the Cepheid stars. If core overshooting is included during the core hydrogen and core helium burning phases, the loop formation and its properties depend on how this overshooting is treated for a given stellar mass range, as well as on its efficiency.

  16. New mechanistic insight into the oxygen reduction reaction on Ruddlesden-Popper cathodes for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyuan; Guan, Bo; Zhang, Xinxin; Yan, Jianhua; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Xingbo

    2016-03-28

    Ruddlesden-Popper (R-P) phase materials have been investigated widely as cathode candidates for IT-SOFCs. However, widespread application of R-P phase cathodes demands further improvement in electrode activity whose progress is hindered by the limited information in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The ORR mechanism for the R-P phase is therefore investigated in this paper using (LaSr)2NiO(4±δ) as an example. Accurate characterization of the surface oxygen exchange process is realized by developing thin and dense polycrystalline LSNO layers via a versatile spray-modified pressing method we invented before to avoid perceptible bulk diffusion contribution, surface enrichment and geometry complication. The governing factors of the ORR are identified as oxygen adsorption and incorporation based on the findings in reaction orders from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), stoichiometry-related chemical capacitance and intrinsic anisotropic properties. The incorporation rate is proven to drastically depend on the amount of interstitial oxygen (O(i)"). Since the unfilled interstitial sites(V(i)(×)) in the R-P phase serve to accommodate the adsorbed oxygen during incorporation, like vacancies in the perovskite structure (V(O)(••)), more O(i)" would seem to suppress the kinetics of this process. In regards to this, for the first time, a physical model is proposed to reconcile the discrepancy between the experimental results and intuitive reasoning. Based on supporting evidence, this model illustrates a possibility of how O(i)" works to regulate the exchange rate, and how the contradiction between V(O)(••) and O(i)" is harmonized so that the latter in the R-P structure also positively promotes the incorporation rate in the ORR.

  17. Sequential Phosphorylation of Smoothened Transduces Graded Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ying; Ospina, Jason K.; Zhang, Junzheng; Michelson, Andrew P.; Schoen, Adam M.; Zhu, Alan Jian

    2012-01-01

    The correct interpretation of a gradient of the morphogen Hedgehog (Hh) during development requires phosphorylation of the Hh signaling activator Smoothened (Smo); however, the molecular mechanism by which Smo transduces graded Hh signaling is not well understood. We show that regulation of the phosphorylation status of Smo by distinct phosphatases at specific phosphorylated residues creates differential thresholds of Hh signaling. Phosphorylation of Smo was initiated by adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP)–dependent protein kinase (PKA) and further enhanced by casein kinase I (CKI). We found that protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) directly dephosphorylated PKA-phosphorylated Smo to reduce signaling mediated by intermediate concentrations of Hh, whereas PP2A specifically dephosphorylated PKA-primed, CKI-phosphorylated Smo to restrict signaling by high concentrations of Hh. We also established a functional link between sequentially phosphorylated Smo species and graded Hh activity. Thus, we propose a sequential phosphorylation model in which precise interpretation of morphogen concentration can be achieved upon versatile phosphatase-mediated regulation of the phosphorylation status of an essential activator in developmental signaling. PMID:21730325

  18. Negative ion photoelectron spectra of ISO3-, IS2O3-, and IS2O4- intermediates formed in interfacial reactions of ozone and iodide/sulfite aqueous microdroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhengbo; Hou, Gao-Lei; Yang, Zheng; Valiev, Marat; Wang, Xue-Bin

    2016-12-01

    Three short-lived, anionic intermediates, ISO3-, IS2O3-, and IS2O4-, are detected during reactions between ozone and aqueous iodine/sulfur oxide microdroplets. These species may play an important role in ozone-driven inorganic aerosol formation; however their chemical properties remain largely unknown. This is the issue addressed in this work using negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy (NIPES) and ab initio modeling. The NIPE spectra reveal that all of the three anionic species are characterized by high adiabatic detachment energies (ADEs) - 4.62 ± 0.10, 4.52 ± 0.10, and 4.60 ± 0.10 eV for ISO3-, IS2O3-, and IS2O4-, respectively. Vibrational progressions with frequencies assigned to the S-O symmetric stretching modes are discernable in the ground state transition features. Density functional theory calculations show the presence of several low-lying isomers involving different bonding scenarios. Further analysis based on high level CCSD(T) calculations reveal that the lowest energy structures are characterized by the formation of I-S and S-S bonds and can be structurally viewed as SO3 linked with I, IS, and ISO for ISO3-, IS2O3-, and IS2O4-, respectively. The calculated ADEs and vertical detachment energies are in excellent agreement with the experimental results, further supporting the identified minimum energy structures. The obtained intrinsic molecular properties of these anionic intermediates and neutral radicals should be useful to help understand their photochemical reactions in the atmosphere.

  19. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Domains

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Stephen; Brueggmann, Ernst E.; Oyler, George A.; Smith, Leonard A.; Hines, Harry B.; Ahmed, S. Ashraf

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are most potent of all toxins. Their N-terminal light chain domain (Lc) translocates into peripheral cholinergic neurons to exert its endoproteolytic action leading to muscle paralysis. Therapeutic development against these toxins is a major challenge due to their in vitro and in vivo structural differences. Although three-dimensional structures and reaction mechanisms are very similar, the seven serotypes designated A through G vastly vary in their intracellular catalytic stability. To investigate if protein phosphorylation could account for this difference, we employed Src-catalyzed tyrosine phosphorylation of the Lc of six serotypes namely LcA, LcB, LcC1, LcD, LcE, and LcG. Very little phosphorylation was observed with LcD and LcE but LcA, LcB, and LcG were maximally phosphorylated by Src. Phosphorylation of LcA, LcB, and LcG did not affect their secondary and tertiary structures and thermostability significantly. Phosphorylation of Y250 and Y251 made LcA resistant to autocatalysis and drastically reduced its kcat/Km for catalysis. A tyrosine residue present near the essential cysteine at the C-terminal tail of LcA, LcB, and LcG was readily phosphorylated in vitro. Inclusion of a competitive inhibitor protected Y426 of LcA from phosphorylation, shedding light on the role of the C-terminus in the enzyme’s substrate or product binding. PMID:22675300

  20. Stochastic-convective transport with nonlinear reaction and mixing: application to intermediate-scale experiments in aerobic biodegradation in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Ginn, T R; Murphy, E M; Chilakapati, A; Seeboonruang, U

    2001-03-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of benzoate by Pseudomonas cepacia sp. in a saturated heterogeneous porous medium was simulated using the stochastic-convective reaction (SCR) approach. A laboratory flow cell was randomly packed with low permeability silt-size inclusions in a high permeability sand matrix. In the SCR upscaling approach, the characteristics of the flow field are determined by the breakthrough of a conservative tracer. Spatial information on the actual location of the heterogeneities is not used. The mass balance equations governing the nonlinear and multicomponent reactive transport are recast in terms of reactive transports in each of a finite number of discrete streamtubes. The streamtube ensemble members represent transport via a steady constant average velocity per streamtube and a conventional Fickian dispersion term, and their contributions to the observed breakthroughs are determined by flux-averaging the streamtube solute concentrations. The resulting simulations were compared to those from a high-resolution deterministic simulation of the reactive transport, and to alternative ensemble representations involving (i) effective Fickian travel time distribution function, (ii) purely convective streamtube transport, and (iii) streamtube ensemble subset simulations. The results of the SCR simulation compare favorably to that of a sophisticated high-resolution deterministic approach.

  1. Stochastic-convective transport with nonlinear reaction and mixing: application to intermediate-scale experiments in aerobic biodegradation in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginn, T. R.; Murphy, E. M.; Chilakapati, A.; Seeboonruang, U.

    2001-03-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of benzoate by Pseudomonas cepacia sp. in a saturated heterogeneous porous medium was simulated using the stochastic-convective reaction (SCR) approach. A laboratory flow cell was randomly packed with low permeability silt-size inclusions in a high permeability sand matrix. In the SCR upscaling approach, the characteristics of the flow field are determined by the breakthrough of a conservative tracer. Spatial information on the actual location of the heterogeneities is not used. The mass balance equations governing the nonlinear and multicomponent reactive transport are recast in terms of reactive transports in each of a finite number of discrete streamtubes. The streamtube ensemble members represent transport via a steady constant average velocity per streamtube and a conventional Fickian dispersion term, and their contributions to the observed breakthroughs are determined by flux-averaging the streamtube solute concentrations. The resulting simulations were compared to those from a high-resolution deterministic simulation of the reactive transport, and to alternative ensemble representations involving (i) effective Fickian travel time distribution function, (ii) purely convective streamtube transport, and (iii) streamtube ensemble subset simulations. The results of the SCR simulation compare favorably to that of a sophisticated high-resolution deterministic approach.

  2. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometric investigations of [alpha]-dicarbonyl compounds--Probing intermediates formed in the course of the nonenzymatic browning reaction of l-ascorbic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Anke; Trage, Claudia; Schwarz, Helmut; Kroh, Lothar W.

    2007-05-01

    A new method is presented which allows the simultaneous detection of various [alpha]-dicarbonyl compounds generated in the course of the nonenzymatic browning reaction initiated by thermal treatment of l-ascorbic acid, namely: glyoxal, methylglyoxal, diacetyl, 3-deoxy-l-pentosone, and l-threosoneE 3-Deoxy-l-threosone was successfully identified as a new C4-[alpha]-dicarbonyl structure for the first time in the degradation of Vitamin C by application of this non-chromatographic mass spectrometric approach. Moreover, a more detailed elucidation of the mechanistic scenario with respect to the oxidative and nonoxidative pathways is presented by using dehydro-l-ascorbic acid and 2,3-diketo-l-gulonic acid instead of l-ascorbic acid as a starting material. Furthermore, the postulated pathways are corroborated with the aid of 13C-isotopic labeling studies. The investigations were extended to baby food, and the successful detection of [alpha]-dicarbonyl compounds characteristic for Vitamin C degradation proved the matrix tolerance of the introduced method.

  3. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. Final report, August 4, 1986--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1997-12-31

    The techniques of continuous photolysis and pulsed laser flash photolysis, continuous and pulse radiolysis, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, and time-resolved fluorimetry have been used to examine intramolecular electron transfer within the solvent quenching cage, photodynamics of quenching of the excited states of transition-metal photosensitizers, the properties of excites states and one-electron reduced forms, ground- and excited-state interactions with solutes, and photoinduced oxidations of organic solutes in aqueous solution. The following specific areas were examined: (1) the parameters that govern the yields of redox products from excited-state electron-transfer quenching reactions; (2) the mediation of the properties of excited states and one-electron reduced forms by the ligands and the solution medium; (3) the effect of the interactions between the ground state of the complex and the solution components on the behavior of the excited state; (4) the yields of singlet oxygen from excited-state energy-transfer quenching by O{sub 2}; and (5) the oxidations of solutes by singlet oxygen, excited-state electron-transfer quenching, and free radicals. This report contains the abstracts of 50 publications describing the studies.

  4. LiCuS, an intermediate phase in the electrochemical conversion reaction of CuS with Li: A potential environment-friendly battery and solar cell material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beleanu, Andreea; Kiss, Janos; Baenitz, Michael; Majumder, Mayukh; Senyshyn, Anatoliy; Kreiner, Guido; Felser, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    The crystal structure of a ternary sulfide with the approximate composition LiCuS, which is a promising candidate for environment-friendly battery and solar cell materials is reported. The crystal structure was solved by a combination of neutron and X-ray powder diffraction data, and 7Li solid-state NMR analysis. A yellow powder, Li1.1Cu0.9S, was obtained by the reaction of CuS with a slight excess of Li metal. The compound crystallizes in the Na3AgO2 structure type in the space group Ibam. An idealized crystal structure of Li1.1Cu0.9S can be derived from the cubic Li2S structure by moving a part of the Li along the c axis so that these Li atoms become linearly coordinated by S. All the metal sites are occupied by randomly mixed Li and Cu atoms; however, there is a strong preference for linear coordination by Cu. The density functional theory calculations show that Li1.1Cu0.9S is a direct band-gap semiconductor with an energy gap of 1.95 eV in agreement with experimental data.

  5. Chemical vapour deposition: a matrix isolation study of precursor compounds and reaction intermediates in the formation of cadmium telluride and gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almond, Matthew J.; Jenkins, Carolyn E.; Rice, David A.; Yates, Carol A.

    1990-05-01

    Infrared spectra for the matrix-isolated species R 2Te, R 2Cd (R=Me or Et), Me 3N·GaH 3, Me 3N·GaMe 3 and Me 2NH·GaMe 3 are reported for the first time. Evidence is also presented for the formation of the weakly bound adducts Me 2Cd·(TeEt 2) x and Et 2Cd·(TeMe 2) t x ( x = 1 or 2) in a gaseous mixture before trapping in Ar matrices at 14 K. The strength of bonding in Et 2Cd·(TeMe 2) x is similar to that in the adduct Et 2Cd·(SEt 2) x and it has a non-linear CCdC unit. Thermal decomposition (60°C) of gaseous Me 3N·GaH 3 in a glass tube yields Me 3N and a Ga mirror — an observation which suggests that the primary step of the reaction is GaN bond rupture. By contrast, the two gaseous adducts Me 3N·GaMe 3 and Me 2NH·GaMe 3 decompose thermally and photochemically to yield inter alia methane, a result which implies that the GaN bond remains intact in the primary decomposition step.

  6. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase: mechanism of action and role in regulating oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David F; Vinogradov, Sergei A

    2014-12-15

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation has a central role in eukaryotic metabolism, providing the energy (ATP) required for survival. Regulation of this important pathway is, however, still not understood, largely due to limitations in the ability to measure the essential metabolites, including oxygen (pO2, oxygen pressure), ADP, and AMP. In addition, neither the mechanism of oxygen reduction by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase nor how its rate is controlled is understood, although this enzyme determines the rate of oxygen consumption and thereby the rate of ATP synthesis. Cytochrome c oxidase is responsible for reduction of molecular oxygen to water using reducing equivalents donated by cytochrome c and for site 3 energy coupling in oxidative phosphorylation. A mechanism-based model of the cytochrome c oxidase reaction is presented in which transfer of reducing equivalents from the lower- to the higher-potential region of the coupling site occurs against an opposing energy barrier, Q. The steady-state rate equation is fitted to data for the dependence of mitochondrial respiratory rate on cytochrome c reduction, oxygen pressure (pO2), and [ATP]/[ADP][Pi] at pH 6.5 to 8.35 (where Pi is inorganic phosphate). The fit of the rate expression to the experimental data is very good for all experimental conditions. Levels of the intermediates in oxygen reduction in the oxidase reaction site have been calculated. An intermediate in the reaction, tentatively identified as peroxide, bridged between the iron and copper atoms of the reaction site has a central role in coupling mitochondrial respiration to the [ATP]/[ADP][Pi].

  7. Evolutionary constraints of phosphorylation in eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gnad, Florian; Forner, Francesca; Zielinska, Dorota F; Birney, Ewan; Gunawardena, Jeremy; Mann, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    High accuracy mass spectrometry has proven to be a powerful technology for the large scale identification of serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation in the living cell. However, despite many described phosphoproteomes, there has been no comparative study of the extent of phosphorylation and its evolutionary conservation in all domains of life. Here we analyze the results of phosphoproteomics studies performed with the same technology in a diverse set of organisms. For the most ancient organisms, the prokaryotes, only a few hundred proteins have been found to be phosphorylated. Applying the same technology to eukaryotic species resulted in the detection of thousands of phosphorylation events. Evolutionary analysis shows that prokaryotic phosphoproteins are preferentially conserved in all living organisms, whereas-site specific phosphorylation is not. Eukaryotic phosphosites are generally more conserved than their non-phosphorylated counterparts (with similar structural constraints) throughout the eukaryotic domain. Yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans are two exceptions, indicating that the majority of phosphorylation events evolved after the divergence of higher eukaryotes from yeast and reflecting the unusually large number of nematode-specific kinases. Mitochondria present an interesting intermediate link between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic domains. Applying the same technology to this organelle yielded 174 phosphorylation sites mapped to 74 proteins. Thus, the mitochondrial phosphoproteome is similarly sparse as the prokaryotic phosphoproteomes. As expected from the endosymbiotic theory, phosphorylated as well as non-phosphorylated mitochondrial proteins are significantly conserved in prokaryotes. However, mitochondrial phosphorylation sites are not conserved throughout prokaryotes, consistent with the notion that serine/threonine phosphorylation in prokaryotes occurred relatively recently in evolution. Thus, the phosphoproteome reflects major events in the

  8. Radiolytic oxidation of 1,2,4-benzenetriol. An application of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to kinetic studies of reaction intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, L.; Tripathi, G.N.R.; Schuler, R.H.

    1987-03-26

    In acidic solution, 1,2,4-benzenetriol is rapidly oxidized by OH or N/sub 3/ to form a mixture of neutral 2,4- and 3,4-dihydroxyphenoxyl radicals. At higher pH these radicals deprotonate (pK/sub a/(1) = 4.75) to form the 2-hydroxy-p-benzosemiquinone radical anion which exhibits a prominent resonance Raman band at 1625 cm/sup -1/ attributable to the Wilson 8a ring stretching mode. In basic solutions this radical subsequently reacts with OH/sup -/ to form the radical dianion (pK/sub a/(2) = 8.85) in which the 8a band is shifted to an appreciably lower frequency (1587 cm/sup -1/). While the absorption spectra of these latter radicals are very similar and do not allow ready examination of their interconversion by absorption spectrophotometry, the difference between these 8a frequencies is sufficiently great that the Raman method can be used to examine the acid-base equilibrium between the two forms of the radical and to follow the deprotonation kinetics. It is shown that even at high pH the radical monoanion is initially formed on oxidation by N/sub 3/ and that deprotonation subsequently occurs by its reaction with base with a rate constant of (9.6 +/- 1.5) x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ d/sup -1/. These studies illustrate very well the application of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy as a complement to kinetic spectrophotometry in sorting out the details of secondary processes in pulse radiolysis studies.

  9. Terminally Truncated Isopenicillin N Synthase Generates a Dithioester Product: Evidence for a Thioaldehyde Intermediate during Catalysis and a New Mode of Reaction for Non-Heme Iron Oxidases.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Luke A; Brown, Toby J N; Sami, Malkit; Clifton, Ian J; Burzlaff, Nicolai I; Claridge, Timothy D W; Adlington, Robert M; Baldwin, Jack E; Rutledge, Peter J; Schofield, Christopher J

    2017-09-18

    Isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS) catalyses the four-electron oxidation of a tripeptide, l-δ-(α-aminoadipoyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine (ACV), to give isopenicillin N (IPN), the first-formed β-lactam in penicillin and cephalosporin biosynthesis. IPNS catalysis is dependent upon an iron(II) cofactor and oxygen as a co-substrate. In the absence of substrate, the carbonyl oxygen of the side-chain amide of the penultimate residue, Gln330, co-ordinates to the active-site metal iron. Substrate binding ablates the interaction between Gln330 and the metal, triggering rearrangement of seven C-terminal residues, which move to take up a conformation that extends the final α-helix and encloses ACV in the active site. Mutagenesis studies are reported, which probe the role of the C-terminal and other aspects of the substrate binding pocket in IPNS. The hydrophobic nature of amino acid side-chains around the ACV binding pocket is important in catalysis. Deletion of seven C-terminal residues exposes the active site and leads to formation of a new type of thiol oxidation product. The isolated product is shown by LC-MS and NMR analyses to be the ene-thiol tautomer of a dithioester, made up from two molecules of ACV linked between the thiol sulfur of one tripeptide and the oxidised cysteinyl β-carbon of the other. A mechanism for its formation is proposed, supported by an X-ray crystal structure, which shows the substrate ACV bound at the active site, its cysteinyl β-carbon exposed to attack by a second molecule of substrate, adjacent. Formation of this product constitutes a new mode of reaction for IPNS and non-heme iron oxidases in general. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  10. Phosphorylation: Implications in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishakha; Ram, Mahendra; Kumar, Rajesh; Prasad, Raju; Roy, Birendra Kumar; Singh, Kaushal Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Post translational modifications (PTMs) are involved in variety of cellular activities and phosphorylation is one of the most extensively studied PTM, which regulates a number of cellular functions like cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and cell signaling in healthy condition. However, alterations in phosphorylation pathways result in serious outcomes in the form of diseases, especially cancer. Many signalling pathways including Tyrosine kinase, MAP kinase, Cadherin-catenin complex, Cyclin-dependent kinase etc. are major players of the cell cycle and deregulation in their phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cascade has been shown to be manifested in the form of various types of cancers. Tyrosine kinase family encompasses the greatest number of oncoproteins. MAPK cascade has an importance role in cancer growth and progression. Bcl-2 family proteins serve either proapoptotic or antiapoptotic function. Cadherin-catenin complex regulates cell adhesion properties and cyclins are the key regulators of cell cycle. Altered phosphorylations in any of the above pathways are strongly associated with cancer, at the same time they serve as the potential tergets for drug development against cancer. Drugs targeting tyrosine kinase are potent anticancer drugs. Inhibitors of MEK, PI3K and ERK signalling pathways are undergoing clinical trials. Thus, drugs targeting phosphorylation pathways represent a promising area for cancer therapy.

  11. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P. R.

    2016-09-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICBGlc, which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes.

  12. endo/exo stereoselectivity in Diels-Alder reactions of α,β-di