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Sample records for intermittent preventive treatment

  1. Intermittent Screening and Treatment versus Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria in Pregnancy: Provider Knowledge and Acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Smith Paintain, Lucy; Antwi, Gifty D.; Jones, Caroline; Amoako, Esther; Adjei, Rose O.; Afrah, Nana A.; Greenwood, Brian; Chandramohan, Daniel; Tagbor, Harry; Webster, Jayne

    2011-01-01

    Malaria in pregnancy (MiP) is associated with increased risks of maternal and foetal complications. The WHO recommends a package of interventions including intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), insecticide-treated nets and effective case management. However, with increasing SP resistance, the effectiveness of SP-IPT has been questioned. Intermittent screening and treatment (IST) has recently been shown in Ghana to be as efficacious as SP-IPT. This study investigates two important requirements for effective delivery of IST and SP-IPT: antenatal care (ANC) provider knowledge, and acceptance of the different strategies. Structured interviews with 134 ANC providers at 67 public health facilities in Ashanti Region, Ghana collected information on knowledge of the risks and preventative and curative interventions against MiP. Composite indicators of knowledge of SP-IPT, and case management of MiP were developed. Log binomial regression of predictors of provider knowledge was explored. Qualitative data were collected through in-depth interviews with fourteen ANC providers with some knowledge of IST to gain an indication of the factors influencing acceptance of the IST approach. 88.1% of providers knew all elements of the SP-IPT policy, compared to 20.1% and 41.8% who knew the treatment policy for malaria in the first or second/third trimesters, respectively. Workshop attendance was a univariate predictor of each knowledge indicator. Qualitative findings suggest preference for prevention over cure, and increased workload may be barriers to IST implementation. However, a change in strategy in the face of SP resistance is likely to be supported; health of pregnant women is a strong motivation for ANC provider practice. If IST was to be introduced as part of routine ANC activities, attention would need to be given to improving the knowledge and practices of ANC staff in relation to appropriate treatment of MiP. Health worker support for

  2. Intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in pregnancy in Africa: What's new, what's needed?

    PubMed Central

    Vallely, Andrew; Vallely, Lisa; Changalucha, John; Greenwood, Brian; Chandramohan, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Falciparum malaria is an important cause of maternal, perinatal and neonatal morbidity in high transmission settings in Sub-Saharan Africa. Intermittent preventive treatment with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP-IPT) has proven efficacious in reducing the burden of pregnancy-associated malaria but increasing levels of parasite resistance mean that the benefits of national SP-IPT programmes may soon be seriously undermined in much of the region. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop alternative drug regimens for IPT in pregnancy. This paper reviews published safety and efficacy data on various antimalarials and proposes several candidate combination regimens for assessment in phase II/III clinical trials. PMID:17306014

  3. User and Provider Acceptability of Intermittent Screening and Treatment and Intermittent Preventive Treatment with Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine to Prevent Malaria in Pregnancy in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jenny; Hoyt, Jenna; Achieng, Florence; Ouma, Peter; L’lanziva, Anne; Kariuki, Simon; Desai, Meghna; Webster, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization recommends intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) alongside long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLIN) and case management for reducing the risks associated with malaria in pregnancy in areas of moderate-to-high transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. Due to increasing Plasmodium falciparum resistance to SP, the search for alternative drugs or strategies to control malaria in pregnancy is a priority. We assessed the acceptability among pregnant women and health providers of intermittent screening and treatment (ISTp) and IPTp with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) as alternative strategies in the context of an un-blinded clinical trial. Methods Qualitative data were collected through ten focus group discussions with women participating in a randomized controlled trial to evaluate ISTp or IPTp with DP (multi-day regimen) versus IPTp with SP (single dose) in western Kenya. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with 26 health providers working in the trial facilities and trial staff. Results Women appreciated the advantages of being tested with a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) at every ANC visit (although a few women disliked finger pricks) and accepted that they would not receive any antimalarial when tested RDT-negative. There were differences in women’s experiences of the efficacy of antimalarials between the trial arms, with more women in the IPTp-SP arm reporting they had experienced malaria episodes. Side effects were experienced among women taking DP and SP. Although women and trial staff reported adherence to the full DP regimen within the trial, health providers were not confident that women would adhere to multi-day regimens in non-trial settings. Health providers recognized the advantages of ISTp in reducing unnecessary exposure to drugs, but lacked confidence in the reliability of RDTs compared to microscopy. Conclusions Our findings indicate that, within a

  4. A Non-Inferiority, Individually Randomized Trial of Intermittent Screening and Treatment versus Intermittent Preventive Treatment in the Control of Malaria in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Tagbor, Harry; Cairns, Matthew; Bojang, Kalifa; Coulibaly, Sheick Oumar; Kayentao, Kassoum; Williams, John; Abubakar, Ismaela; Akor, Francis; Mohammed, Khalifa; Bationo, Richard; Dabira, Edgar; Soulama, Alamissa; Djimdé, Moussa; Guirou, Etienne; Awine, Timothy; Quaye, Stephen; Njie, Fanta; Ordi, Jaume; Doumbo, Ogobara; Hodgson, Abraham; Oduro, Abraham; Meshnick, Steven; Taylor, Steve; Magnussen, Pascal; ter Kuile, Feiko; Woukeu, Arouna; Milligan, Paul; Chandramohan, Daniel; Greenwood, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background The efficacy of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP) in pregnancy is threatened in parts of Africa by the emergence and spread of resistance to SP. Intermittent screening with a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and treatment of positive women (ISTp) is an alternative approach. Methods and Findings An open, individually randomized, non-inferiority trial of IPTp-SP versus ISTp was conducted in 5,354 primi- or secundigravidae in four West African countries with a low prevalence of resistance to SP (The Gambia, Mali, Burkina Faso and Ghana). Women in the IPTp-SP group received SP on two or three occasions whilst women in the ISTp group were screened two or three times with a RDT and treated if positive for malaria with artemether-lumefantrine (AL). ISTp-AL was non-inferior to IPTp-SP in preventing low birth weight (LBW), anemia and placental malaria, the primary trial endpoints. The prevalence of LBW was 15.1% and 15.6% in the IPTp-SP and ISTp-AL groups respectively (OR = 1.03 [95% CI: 0.88, 1.22]). The mean hemoglobin concentration at the last clinic attendance before delivery was 10.97g/dL and 10.94g/dL in the IPTp-SP and ISTp-AL groups respectively (mean difference: -0.03 g/dL [95% CI: -0.13, +0.06]). Active malaria infection of the placenta was found in 24.5% and in 24.2% of women in the IPTp-SP and ISTp-AL groups respectively (OR = 0.95 [95% CI 0.81, 1.12]). More women in the ISTp-AL than in the IPTp-SP group presented with malaria parasitemia between routine antenatal clinics (310 vs 182 episodes, rate difference: 49.4 per 1,000 pregnancies [95% CI 30.5, 68.3], but the number of hospital admissions for malaria was similar in the two groups. Conclusions Despite low levels of resistance to SP in the study areas, ISTp-AL performed as well as IPTp-SP. In the absence of an effective alternative medication to SP for IPTp, ISTp-AL is a potential alternative to IPTp in areas where SP resistance is high. It may also

  5. Effectiveness of Intermittent Preventive Treatment in Pregnancy with Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine against Submicroscopic falciparum Malaria in Central Region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Nwaefuna, Ekene K.; Afoakwah, Richmond; Orish, Verner N.; Egyir-Yawson, Alexander; Boampong, Johnson N.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria infections undetectable by microscopy but detectable by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) (submicroscopic malaria) are common in endemic areas like Ghana. Submicroscopic malaria has been linked with severe pregnancy outcomes as well as contributing to malaria transmission. In this cross-sectional study 872 consenting pregnant women (gestation ≥ 20 weeks) were recruited from 8 hospitals in Central Region, Ghana, between July and December 2009. Malaria infection was detected by microscopy and PCR. Haemoglobin was measured and anaemia was defined as haemoglobin lower than 11 g/dL. Majority of the women, 555 (63.6%), were Intermittent Preventive Treatment in Pregnancy with Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP) users while 234 (36.4%) were nonusers. The prevalence of malaria by microscopy was 20.9% (182/872) and 9.7% (67/688) of microscopy negative women had submicroscopic malaria. IPTp-SP usage significantly (odds ratio = 0.13, 95% confidence interval = 0.07–0.23, p = 0.005) reduced the prevalence of submicroscopic malaria as more nonusers (51/234) than users (16/454) were PCR positive. After controlling for other variables the effect of IPTp-SP remained statistically significant (odds ratio = 0.11, 95% confidence interval = 0.02–0.22, p = 0.006). These results suggest that Intermittent Preventive Treatment with Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine is useful in the reduction of submicroscopic malaria in pregnancy. PMID:26448871

  6. Implementing Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Malaria in Pregnancy: Review of Prospects, Achievements, Challenges and Agenda for Research

    PubMed Central

    Mubyazi, Godfrey Martin; Magnussen, Pascal; Goodman, Catherine; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Kitua, Andrew Yona; Olsen, Øystein Evjen; Byskov, Jens; Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Bloch, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Implementing Intermittent Preventive Treatment for malaria in Pregnancy (IPTp) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) through antenatal care (ANC) clinics is recommended for malaria endemic countries. Vast biomedical literature on malaria prevention focuses more on the epidemiological and cost-effectiveness analyses of the randomised controlled trials carried out in selected geographical settings. Such studies fail to elucidate the economic, psychosocial, managerial, organization and other contextual systemic factors influencing the operational effectiveness, compliance and coverage of the recommended interventions. Objective To review literature on policy advances, achievements, constraints and challenges to malaria IPTp implementation, emphasising on its operational feasibility in the context of health-care financing, provision and uptake, resource constraints and psychosocial factors in Africa. Results The importance of IPTp in preventing unnecessary anaemia, morbidity and mortality in pregnancy and improving childbirth outcomes is highly acknowledged, although the following factors appear to be the main constraints to IPTp service delivery and uptake: cost of accessing ANC; myths and other discriminatory socio-cultural values on pregnancy; target users, perceptions and attitudes towards SP, malaria, and quality of ANC; supply and cost of SP at health facilities; understaffing and demoralised staff; ambiguity and impracticability of user-fee exemption policy guidelines on essential ANC services; implementing IPTp, bednets, HIV and syphilis screening programmes in the same clinic settings; and reports on increasing parasite resistant to SP. However, the noted increase in the coverage of the delivery of IPTp doses in several countries justify that IPTp implementation is possible and better than not. Conclusion IPTp for malaria is implemented in constrained conditions in Africa. This is a challenge for higher coverage of at least two doses and attainment

  7. Underreporting and Missed Opportunities for Uptake of Intermittent Preventative Treatment of Malaria in Pregnancy (IPTp) in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Emily A.; Rao, Namratha; Diarra, Niélé Hawa; Klein, Meredith C.; Diop, Samba I.; Doumbia, Seydou O.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify factors contributing to low uptake of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP) in rural Mali. Methods We conducted secondary data analysis on Mali’s 2012–2013 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) to determine the proportion of women who failed to take IPTp-SP due to ineligibility or non-attendance at antenatal care (ANC). We also identified the proportion who reported taking other or unknown medications to prevent malaria in pregnancy and those who did not know if they took any medication to prevent malaria in pregnancy. We conducted qualitative interviews, focus groups and ANC observations in six rural sites in Mali’s Sikasso and Koulikoro regions to identify reasons for missed opportunities. Results Our secondary data analysis found that reported IPTp-SP coverage estimates are misleading due to their dependence on a variable (“source of IPTp”) that is missing 62% of its data points. Among all women who gave birth in the two years prior to the survey, 56.2% reported taking at least one dose of IPTp-SP. Another 5.2% reported taking chloroquine, 1.9% taking another drug to prevent malaria in pregnancy, 4.4% not knowing what drug they took to prevent malaria, and 1.1% not knowing if they took any drug to prevent malaria. The majority of women who did not receive IPTp-SP were women who also did not attend ANC. Our qualitative data revealed that many health centers neither administer IPTp-SP by directly observed therapy, nor give IPTp-SP at one month intervals through the second and third trimesters, nor provide IPTp-SP free of charge. Women generally reported IPTp-SP as available and tolerable, but frequently could not identify its name or purpose, potentially affecting accuracy of responses in household surveys. Conclusion We estimate IPTp-SP uptake to be significantly higher than stated in Mali’s 2012–13 DHS report. Increasing ANC attendance should be the first priority for

  8. Placental Malaria Is Rare Among Zanzibari Pregnant Women Who Did Not Receive Intermittent Preventive Treatment in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Marya; Said, Khadija; Msellem, Mwinyi I.; Chase, Rachel P.; Hendler, Natalie; Khamis, Asma Ramadhan; Roman, Elaine; Kitojo, Chonge; Schwartz, Alanna C.; Gutman, Julie; McElroy, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Zanzibar has transitioned from malaria control to the pre-elimination phase, and the continued need for intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy (IPTp) has been questioned. We conducted a prospective observational study to estimate placental malaria positivity rate among women who did not receive IPTp with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. A convenience sample of pregnant women was enrolled from six clinics on the day of delivery from August of 2011 to September of 2012. Dried placental blood spot specimens were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); 9 of 1,349 specimens (0.7%; precision estimate = 0.2–1.1%) were PCR-positive for Plasmodium falciparum. Placental infection was detected on both Pemba (N = 3) and Unguja (N = 6). Placental malaria positivity in Zanzibar was low, even in the absence of IPTp. It may be reasonable for the Ministry of Health to consider discontinuing IPTp, intensifying surveillance efforts, and promoting insecticide-treated nets and effective case management of malaria in pregnancy. PMID:24891469

  9. Intermittent Preventive Treatment with Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine in Ugandan Schoolchildren Selects for Plasmodium falciparum Transporter Polymorphisms That Modify Drug Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nankabirwa, Joaniter I; Conrad, Melissa D; Legac, Jennifer; Tukwasibwe, Stephen; Tumwebaze, Patrick; Wandera, Bonnie; Brooker, Simon J; Staedke, Sarah G; Kamya, Moses R; Nsobya, Sam L; Dorsey, Grant; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2016-10-01

    Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) offers prolonged protection against malaria, but its impact on Plasmodium falciparum drug sensitivity is uncertain. In a trial of intermittent preventive treatment in schoolchildren in Tororo, Uganda, in 2011 to 2012, monthly DP for 1 year decreased the incidence of malaria by 96% compared to placebo; DP once per school term offered protection primarily during the first month after therapy. To assess the impact of DP on selection of drug resistance, we compared the prevalence of key polymorphisms in isolates that emerged at different intervals after treatment with DP. Blood obtained monthly and at each episode of fever was assessed for P. falciparum parasitemia by microscopy. Samples from 160 symptomatic and 650 asymptomatic episodes of parasitemia were assessed at 4 loci (N86Y, Y184F, and D1246Y in pfmdr1 and K76T in pfcrt) that modulate sensitivity to aminoquinoline antimalarials, utilizing a ligase detection reaction-fluorescent microsphere assay. For pfmdr1 N86Y and pfcrt K76T, but not the other studied polymorphisms, the prevalences of mutant genotypes were significantly greater in children who had received DP within the past 30 days than in those not treated within 60 days (86Y, 18.0% versus 8.3% [P = 0.03]; 76T, 96.0% versus 86.1% [P = 0.05]), suggesting selective pressure of DP. Full sequencing of pfcrt in a subset of samples did not identify additional polymorphisms selected by DP. In summary, parasites that emerged soon after treatment with DP were more likely than parasites not under drug pressure to harbor pfmdr1 and pfcrt polymorphisms associated with decreased sensitivity to aminoquinoline antimalarials. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under no. NCT01231880.). PMID:27401569

  10. Economic Evaluation of an Alternative Drug to Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine as Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sicuri, Elisa; Fernandes, Silke; Macete, Eusebio; González, Raquel; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Massougbodgi, Achille; Abdulla, Salim; Kuwawenaruwa, August; Katana, Abraham; Desai, Meghna; Cot, Michel; Ramharter, Michael; Kremsner, Peter; Slustker, Laurence; Aponte, John; Hanson, Kara; Menéndez, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Background Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is recommended in HIV-negative women to avert malaria, while this relies on cotrimoxazole prophylaxis (CTXp) in HIV-positive women. Alternative antimalarials are required in areas where parasite resistance to antifolate drugs is high. The cost-effectiveness of IPTp with alternative drugs is needed to inform policy. Methods The cost-effectiveness of 2-dose IPTp-mefloquine (MQ) was compared with IPTp-SP in HIV-negative women (Benin, Gabon, Mozambique and Tanzania). In HIV-positive women the cost-effectiveness of 3-dose IPTp-MQ added to CTXp was compared with CTXp alone (Kenya, Mozambique and Tanzania). The outcomes used were maternal clinical malaria, anaemia at delivery and non-obstetric hospital admissions. The poor tolerability to MQ was included as the value of women’s loss of working days. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated and threshold analysis undertaken. Results For HIV-negative women, the ICER for IPTp-MQ versus IPTp-SP was 136.30 US$ (2012 US$) (95%CI 131.41; 141.18) per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) averted, or 237.78 US$ (95%CI 230.99; 244.57), depending on whether estimates from Gabon were included or not. For HIV-positive women, the ICER per DALY averted for IPTp-MQ added to CTXp, versus CTXp alone was 6.96 US$ (95%CI 4.22; 9.70). In HIV-negative women, moderate shifts of variables such as malaria incidence, drug cost, and IPTp efficacy increased the ICERs above the cost-effectiveness threshold. In HIV-positive women the intervention remained cost-effective for a substantial (up to 21 times) increase in cost per tablet. Conclusions Addition of IPTp with an effective antimalarial to CTXp was very cost-effective in HIV-positive women. IPTp with an efficacious antimalarial was more cost-effective than IPTp-SP in HIV-negative women. However, the poor tolerability of MQ does not favour its use as IPTp. Regardless of HIV

  11. From strategy development to routine implementation: the cost of Intermittent Preventive Treatment in Infants for malaria control

    PubMed Central

    Manzi, Fatuma; Hutton, Guy; Schellenberg, Joanna; Tanner, Marcel; Alonso, Pedro; Mshinda, Hassan; Schellenberg, David

    2008-01-01

    Background Achieving the Millennium Development Goals for health requires a massive scaling-up of interventions in Sub Saharan Africa. Intermittent Preventive Treatment in infants (IPTi) is a promising new tool for malaria control. Although efficacy information is available for many interventions, there is a dearth of data on the resources required for scaling up of health interventions. Method We worked in partnership with the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MoHSW) to develop an IPTi strategy that could be implemented and managed by routine health services. We tracked health system and other costs of (1) developing the strategy and (2) maintaining routine implementation of the strategy in five districts in southern Tanzania. Financial costs were extracted and summarized from a costing template and semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants to record time and resources spent on IPTi activities. Results The estimated financial cost to start-up and run IPTi in the whole of Tanzania in 2005 was US$1,486,284. Start-up costs of US$36,363 were incurred at the national level, mainly on the development of Behaviour Change Communication (BCC) materials, stakeholders' meetings and other consultations. The annual running cost at national level for intervention management and monitoring and drug purchase was estimated at US$459,096. Start-up costs at the district level were US$7,885 per district, mainly expenditure on training. Annual running costs were US$170 per district, mainly for printing of BCC materials. There was no incremental financial expenditure needed to deliver the intervention in health facilities as supplies were delivered alongside routine vaccinations and available health workers performed the activities without working overtime. The economic cost was estimated at 23 US cents per IPTi dose delivered. Conclusion The costs presented here show the order of magnitude of expenditures needed to initiate and to implement IPTi at national

  12. Cost Effectiveness of Seasonal Intermittent Preventive Treatment Using Amodiaquine & Artesunate or Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine in Ghanaian Children

    PubMed Central

    Conteh, Lesong; Patouillard, Edith; Kweku, Margaret; Legood, Rosa; Greenwood, Brian; Chandramohan, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Background Intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in children (IPTc) involves the administration of a full course of an anti-malarial treatment to children under 5 years old at specified time points regardless of whether or not they are known to be infected, in areas where malaria transmission is seasonal. It is important to determine the costs associated with IPTc delivery via community based volunteers and also the potential savings to health care providers and caretakers due to malaria episodes averted as a consequence of IPTc. Methods Two thousand four hundred and fifty-one children aged 3–59 months were randomly allocated to four groups to receive: three days of artesunate plus amodiaquine (AS+AQ) monthly, three days of AS+AQ bimonthly, one dose of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) bi-monthly or placebo. This paper focuses on incremental cost effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of the three IPTc drug regimens as delivered by community based volunteers (CBV) in Hohoe, Ghana compared to current practice, i.e. case management in the absence of IPTc. Financial and economic costs from the publicly funded health system perspective are presented. Treatment costs borne by patients and their caretakers are also estimated to present societal costs. The costs and effects of IPTc during the intervention period were considered with and without a one year follow up. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was undertaken to account for uncertainty. Results Economic costs per child receiving at least the first dose of each course of IPTc show SP bimonthly, at US$8.19, is the cheapest to deliver, followed by AS+AQ bimonthly at US$10.67 and then by AS+AQ monthly at US$14.79. Training, drug delivery and supervision accounted for approximately 20–30% each of total unit costs. During the intervention period AS & AQ monthly was the most cost effective IPTc drug regimen at US$67.77 (61.71–74.75, CI 95%) per malaria case averted based on intervention costs only, US$64.93 (58.92–71

  13. Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria in Pregnancy with Mefloquine in HIV-Negative Women: A Multicentre Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, Salim; Accrombessi, Manfred; Aponte, John J.; Akerey-Diop, Daisy; Basra, Arti; Briand, Valérie; Capan, Meskure; Cot, Michel; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor M.; Kleine, Christian; Kremsner, Peter G.; Macete, Eusebio; Mackanga, Jean-Rodolphe; Massougbodgi, Achille; Mayor, Alfredo; Nhacolo, Arsenio; Pahlavan, Golbahar; Ramharter, Michael; Rupérez, María; Sevene, Esperança; Vala, Anifa; Zoleko-Manego, Rella; Menéndez, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Background Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is recommended by WHO to prevent malaria in African pregnant women. The spread of SP parasite resistance has raised concerns regarding long-term use for IPT. Mefloquine (MQ) is the most promising of available alternatives to SP based on safety profile, long half-life, and high efficacy in Africa. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of MQ for IPTp compared to those of SP in HIV-negative women. Methods and Findings A total of 4,749 pregnant women were enrolled in an open-label randomized clinical trial conducted in Benin, Gabon, Mozambique, and Tanzania comparing two-dose MQ or SP for IPTp and MQ tolerability of two different regimens. The study arms were: (1) SP, (2) single dose MQ (15 mg/kg), and (3) split-dose MQ in the context of long lasting insecticide treated nets. There was no difference on low birth weight prevalence (primary study outcome) between groups (360/2,778 [13.0%]) for MQ group and 177/1,398 (12.7%) for SP group; risk ratio [RR], 1.02 (95% CI 0.86–1.22; p = 0.80 in the ITT analysis). Women receiving MQ had reduced risks of parasitemia (63/1,372 [4.6%] in the SP group and 88/2,737 [3.2%] in the MQ group; RR, 0.70 [95% CI 0.51–0.96]; p = 0.03) and anemia at delivery (609/1,380 [44.1%] in the SP group and 1,110/2743 [40.5%] in the MQ group; RR, 0.92 [95% CI 0.85–0.99]; p = 0.03), and reduced incidence of clinical malaria (96/551.8 malaria episodes person/year [PYAR] in the SP group and 130/1,103.2 episodes PYAR in the MQ group; RR, 0.67 [95% CI 0.52–0.88]; p = 0.004) and all-cause outpatient attendances during pregnancy (850/557.8 outpatients visits PYAR in the SP group and 1,480/1,110.1 visits PYAR in the MQ group; RR, 0.86 [0.78–0.95]; p = 0.003). There were no differences in the prevalence of placental infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes between groups. Tolerability was poorer in the two MQ groups compared to SP

  14. Impact of combined intermittent preventive treatment of malaria and helminths on anaemia, sustained attention, and recall in Northern Ghanaian schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Opoku, Ernest Cudjoe; Olsen, Annette; Browne, Edmund; Hodgson, Abraham; Awoonor-Williams, John K.; Yelifari, Lawrence; Williams, John; Magnussen, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    .5% (from 2.83 to 3.56, p=0.01) respectively, compared to 5.75% in Control Arm 3 (from 2.95 to 3.13, p=0.09). Likewise, mean recall test score improvements after interventions were 16.9% (from 2.07 to 2.49, p=0.01) and 27.9% (from 1.91 to 2.65, p=0.01) in Study Arms 1 and 2, respectively, compared to 18.3% (from 1.92 to 2.35, p=0.01) in Control Arm 3. Conclusion Combined intermittent preventive treatment of malaria and deworming reduced prevalence of anaemia and improved sustained attention and recall in schoolchildren. Best results for sustained attention and recall were seen in Study Arm 2. PMID:27633035

  15. TLR4 elimination prevents synaptic and myelin alterations and long-term cognitive dysfunctions in adolescent mice with intermittent ethanol treatment.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, Jorge; Pascual, María; Pla, Antoni; Maldonado, Concepción; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Guerri, Consuelo

    2015-03-01

    The adolescent brain undergoes important dynamic and plastic cell changes, including overproduction of axons and synapses, followed by rapid pruning along with ongoing axon myelination. These developmental changes make the adolescent brain particularly vulnerable to neurotoxic and behavioral effects of alcohol. Although the mechanisms of these effects are largely unknown, we demonstrated that ethanol by activating innate immune receptors toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), induces neuroinflammation and brain damage in adult mice. The present study aims to evaluate whether intermittent ethanol treatment in adolescence promotes TLR4-dependent pro-inflammatory processes, leading to myelin and synaptic dysfunctions, and long-term cognitive impairments. Using wild-type (WT) and TLR4-deficient (TLR4-KO) adolescent mice treated intermittently with ethanol (3.0g/kg) for 2weeks, we show that binge-like ethanol treatment activates TLR4 signaling pathways (MAPK, NFκB) leading to the up-regulation of cytokines and pro-inflammatory mediators (COX-2, iNOS, HMGB1), impairing synaptic and myelin protein levels and causing ultrastructural alterations. These changes were associated with long-lasting cognitive dysfunctions in young adult mice, as demonstrated with the object recognition, passive avoidance and olfactory behavior tests. Notably, elimination of TLR4 receptors prevented neuroinflammation along with synaptic and myelin derangements, as well as long-term cognitive alterations. These results support the role of the neuroimmune response and TLR4 signaling in the neurotoxic and behavioral effects of ethanol in adolescence.

  16. Impact of combining intermittent preventive treatment with home management of malaria in children less than 10 years in a rural area of Senegal: a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Current malaria control strategies recommend (i) early case detection using rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) and treatment with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT), (ii) pre-referral rectal artesunate, (iii) intermittent preventive treatment and (iv) impregnated bed nets. However, these individual malaria control interventions provide only partial protection in most epidemiological situations. Therefore, there is a need to investigate the potential benefits of integrating several malaria interventions to reduce malaria prevalence and morbidity. Methods A randomized controlled trial was carried out to assess the impact of combining seasonal intermittent preventive treatment in children (IPTc) with home-based management of malaria (HMM) by community health workers (CHWs) in Senegal. Eight CHWs in eight villages covered by the Bonconto health post, (South Eastern part of Senegal) were trained to diagnose malaria using RDT, provide prompt treatment with artemether-lumefantrine for uncomplicated malaria cases and pre-referral rectal artesunate for complicated malaria occurring in children under 10 years. Four CHWs were randomized to also administer monthly IPTc as single dose of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) plus three doses of amodiaquine (AQ) in the malaria transmission season, October and November 2010. Primary end point was incidence of single episode of malaria attacks over 8 weeks of follow up. Secondary end points included prevalence of malaria parasitaemia, and prevalence of anaemia at the end of the transmission season. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. The study protocol was approved by the Senegalese National Ethical Committee (approval 0027/MSP/DS/CNRS, 18/03/2010). Results A total of 1,000 children were enrolled. The incidence of malaria episodes was 7.1/100 child months at risk [95% CI (3.7-13.7)] in communities with IPTc + HMM compared to 35.6/100 child months at risk [95% CI (26.7-47.4)] in communities with only HMM (aOR = 0.20; 95

  17. Scheduled Intermittent Screening with Rapid Diagnostic Tests and Treatment with Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine versus Intermittent Preventive Therapy with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine for Malaria in Pregnancy in Malawi: An Open-Label Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Madanitsa, Mwayiwawo; Kalilani, Linda; Mwapasa, Victor; van Eijk, Anna M.; Khairallah, Carole; Ali, Doreen; Pace, Cheryl; Smedley, James; Thwai, Kyaw-Lay; Levitt, Brandt; Kang’ombe, Arthur; Faragher, Brian; Taylor, Steve M.; Meshnick, Steve; ter Kuile, Feiko O.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Africa, most plasmodium infections during pregnancy remain asymptomatic, yet are associated with maternal anemia and low birthweight. WHO recommends intermittent preventive therapy in pregnancy with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP). However, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) efficacy is threatened by high-level parasite resistance. We conducted a trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of scheduled intermittent screening with malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and treatment of RDT-positive women with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) as an alternative strategy to IPTp-SP. Methods and Findings This was an open-label, two-arm individually randomized superiority trial among HIV-seronegative women at three sites in Malawi with high SP resistance. The intervention consisted of three or four scheduled visits in the second and third trimester, 4 to 6 wk apart. Women in the IPTp-SP arm received SP at each visit. Women in the intermittent screening and treatment in pregnancy with DP (ISTp-DP) arm were screened for malaria at every visit and treated with DP if RDT-positive. The primary outcomes were adverse live birth outcome (composite of small for gestational age, low birthweight [<2,500 g], or preterm birth [<37 wk]) in paucigravidae (first or second pregnancy) and maternal or placental plasmodium infection at delivery in multigravidae (third pregnancy or higher). Analysis was by intention to treat. Between 21 July 2011 and 18 March 2013, 1,873 women were recruited (1,155 paucigravidae and 718 multigravidae). The prevalence of adverse live birth outcome was similar in the ISTp-DP (29.9%) and IPTp-SP (28.8%) arms (risk difference = 1.08% [95% CI −3.25% to 5.41%]; all women: relative risk [RR] = 1.04 [95% CI 0.90–1.20], p = 0.625; paucigravidae: RR = 1.10 [95% CI 0.92–1.31], p = 0.282; multigravidae: RR = 0.92 [95% CI 0.71–1.20], p = 0.543). The prevalence of malaria at delivery was higher in the ISTp-DP arm (48.7% versus 40.8%; risk difference

  18. Perceptions of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) and barriers to adherence in Nasarawa and Cross River States in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malaria during pregnancy is dangerous to both mother and foetus. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) is a strategy where pregnant women in malaria-endemic countries receive full doses of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), whether or not they have malaria. The Nigerian government adopted IPTp as a national strategy in 2005; however, major gaps affecting perception, uptake, adherence, and scale-up remain. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in peri-urban and rural communities in Nasarawa and Cross River States in Nigeria. Study instruments were based on the socio-ecological model and its multiple levels of influences, taking into account individual, community, societal, and environmental contexts of behaviour and social change. Women of reproductive age, their front-line care providers, and (in Nasarawa only) their spouses participated in focus group discussions and in-depth individual interviews. Facility sampling was purposive to include tertiary, secondary and primary health facilities. Results The study found that systems-based challenges (stockouts; lack of provider knowledge of IPTp protocols) coupled with individual women’s beliefs and lack of understanding of IPT contribute to low uptake and adherence. Many pregnant women are reluctant to seek care for an illness they do not have. Those with malaria often prefer to self-medicate through drug shops or herbs, though those who seek clinic-based treatment trust their providers and willingly accept medicine prescribed. Conclusions Failing to deliver complete IPTp to women attending antenatal care is a missed opportunity. While many obstacles are structural, programmes can target women, their communities and the health environment with specific interventions to increase IPTp uptake and adherence. PMID:24059757

  19. Intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine does not modify plasma cytokines and chemokines or intracellular cytokine responses to Plasmodium falciparum in Mozambican Children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cytokines and chemokines are key mediators of anti-malarial immunity. We evaluated whether Intermittent Preventive Treatment in infants with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine (IPTi-SP) had an effect on the acquisition of these cellular immune responses in Mozambican children. Multiple cytokines and chemokines were quantified in plasma by luminex, and antigen-specific cytokine production in whole blood was determined by intracellular cytokine staining and flow cytometry, at ages 5, 9, 12 and 24 months. Results IPTi-SP did not significantly affect the proportion of CD3+ cells producing IFN-γ, IL-4 or IL-10. Overall, plasma cytokine or chemokine concentrations did not differ between treatment groups. Th1 and pro-inflammatory responses were higher than Th2 and anti-inflammatory responses, respectively, and IFN-γ:IL-4 ratios were higher for placebo than for SP recipients. Levels of cytokines and chemokines varied according to age, declining from 5 to 9 months. Plasma concentrations of IL-10, IL-12 and IL-13 were associated with current infection or prior malaria episodes. Higher frequencies of IFN-γ and IL-10 producing CD3+ cells and elevated IL-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and IL-13 in plasma were individually associated with increased malaria incidence, at different time points. When all markers were analyzed together, only higher IL-17 at 12 months was associated with lower incidence of malaria up to 24 months. Conclusions Our work has confirmed that IPTi-SP does not negatively affect the development of cellular immune response during early childhood. This study has also provided new insights as to how these cytokine responses are acquired upon age and exposure to P. falciparum, as well as their associations with malaria susceptibility. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00209795 PMID:22280502

  20. Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria in Pregnancy with Mefloquine in HIV-Infected Women Receiving Cotrimoxazole Prophylaxis: A Multicenter Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, Salim; Aponte, John J.; Bulo, Helder; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor M.; Katana, Abraham; Maculuve, Sonia; Mayor, Alfredo; Nhacolo, Arsenio; Otieno, Kephas; Pahlavan, Golbahar; Rupérez, María; Sevene, Esperança; Slutsker, Laurence; Vala, Anifa; Williamsom, John; Menéndez, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Background Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is recommended for malaria prevention in HIV-negative pregnant women, but it is contraindicated in HIV-infected women taking daily cotrimoxazole prophylaxis (CTXp) because of potential added risk of adverse effects associated with taking two antifolate drugs simultaneously. We studied the safety and efficacy of mefloquine (MQ) in women receiving CTXp and long-lasting insecticide treated nets (LLITNs). Methods and Findings A total of 1,071 HIV-infected women from Kenya, Mozambique, and Tanzania were randomized to receive either three doses of IPTp-MQ (15 mg/kg) or placebo given at least one month apart; all received CTXp and a LLITN. IPTp-MQ was associated with reduced rates of maternal parasitemia (risk ratio [RR], 0.47 [95% CI 0.27–0.82]; p = 0.008), placental malaria (RR, 0.52 [95% CI 0.29–0.90]; p = 0.021), and reduced incidence of non-obstetric hospital admissions (RR, 0.59 [95% CI 0.37–0.95]; p = 0.031) in the intention to treat (ITT) analysis. There were no differences in the prevalence of adverse pregnancy outcomes between groups. Drug tolerability was poorer in the MQ group compared to the control group (29.6% referred dizziness and 23.9% vomiting after the first IPTp-MQ administration). HIV viral load at delivery was higher in the MQ group compared to the control group (p = 0.048) in the ATP analysis. The frequency of perinatal mother to child transmission of HIV was increased in women who received MQ (RR, 1.95 [95% CI 1.14–3.33]; p = 0.015). The main limitation of the latter finding relates to the exploratory nature of this part of the analysis. Conclusions An effective antimalarial added to CTXp and LLITNs in HIV-infected pregnant women can improve malaria prevention, as well as maternal health through reduction in hospital admissions. However, MQ was not well tolerated, limiting its potential for IPTp and indicating the need

  1. Efficacy of malaria prevention during pregnancy in an area of low and unstable transmission: an individually-randomised placebo-controlled trial using intermittent preventive treatment and insecticide-treated nets in the Kabale Highlands, southwestern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Clarke, Siân E; Hutchison, Coll L; Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Magnussen, Pascal

    2011-11-01

    Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) and insecticide-treated nets (ITN) are recommended malaria interventions during pregnancy; however, there is limited information on their efficacy in areas of low malaria transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. An individually-randomised placebo-controlled trial involving 5775 women of all parities examined the effect of IPTp, ITNs alone, or ITNs used in combination with IPTp on maternal anaemia and low birth weight (LBW) in a highland area of southwestern Uganda. The overall prevalence of malaria infection, maternal anaemia and LBW was 15.0%, 14.7% and 6.5%, respectively. Maternal and fetal outcomes were generally remarkably similar across all intervention groups (P>0.05 for all outcomes examined). A marginal difference in maternal haemoglobin was observed in the dual intervention group (12.57g/dl) compared with the IPTp and ITN alone groups (12.40g/dl and 12.44g/dl, respectively; P=0.04), but this was too slight to be of clinical importance. In conclusion, none of the preventive strategies was found to be superior to the others, and no substantial additional benefit to providing both IPTp and ITNs during routine antenatal services was observed. With ITNs offering a number of advantages over IPTp, yet showing comparable efficacy, we discuss why ITNs could be an appropriate preventive strategy for malaria control during pregnancy in areas of low and unstable transmission.

  2. Supply-related drivers of staff motivation for providing intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy in Tanzania: evidence from two rural districts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since its introduction in the national antenatal care (ANC) system in Tanzania in 2001, little evidence is documented regarding the motivation and performance of health workers (HWs) in the provision of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) services in the national ANC clinics and the implications such motivation and performance might have had on HWs and services' compliance with the recommended IPTp delivery guidelines. This paper describes the supply-related drivers of motivation and performance of HWs in administering IPTp doses among other ANC services delivered in public and private health facilities (HFs) in Tanzania, using a case study of Mkuranga and Mufindi districts. Methods Interviews were conducted with 78 HWs participating in the delivery of ANC services in private and public HFs and were supplemented by personal communications with the members of the district council health management team. The research instrument used in the data collection process contained a mixture of closed and open-ended questions. Some of the open-ended questions had to be coded in the form that allowed their analysis quantitatively. Results In both districts, respondents acknowledged IPTp as an essential intervention, but expressed dissatisfaction with their working environments constraining their performance, including health facility (HF) unit understaffing; unsystematic and unfriendly supervision by CHMT members; limited opportunities for HW career development; and poor (HF) infrastructure and staff houses. Data also suggest that poor working conditions negatively affect health workers' motivation to perform for ANC (including IPTp) services. Similarities and differences were noted in terms of motivational factors for ANC service delivery between the HWs employed in private HFs and those in public HFs: those in private facilities were more comfortable with staff residential houses, HF buildings, equipment, availability of water

  3. Prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum resistance markers to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine among pregnant women receiving intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Birungi, Josephine; Yanow, Stephanie K; Shokoples, Sandra; Malamba, Samuel; Alifrangis, Michael; Magnussen, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of mutations in Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) genes among pregnant women using sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) as an intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp). A molecular epidemiological study of P. falciparum parasite resistance markers to SP was conducted from August 2010 to February 2012 in Mukono district in central Uganda. DNA was extracted from 413 P. falciparum-positive samples. Real-time PCR, followed by melting curve analysis, was used to characterize point mutations in the Pfdhfr and Pfdhps genes that are associated with SP resistance. The prevalence of the single-nucleotide mutations in Pfdhfr at codons 51I, 59R, and 108N and in Pfdhps at codons 437G and 540E was high (>98%), reaching 100% fixation after one dose of SP, while the prevalence of 581G was 3.3% at baseline, reaching 12.5% after one dose of SP. At baseline, the prevalence of Pfdhfr and Pfdhps quintuple mutations was 89%, whereas the sextuple mutations (including 581G) were not prevalent (3.9%), reaching 16.7% after one dose of SP. However, the numbers of infections at follow-up visits were small, and hence there was insufficient statistical power to test whether there was a true rise in the prevalence of this allele. The overall high frequency of Pfdhfr and Pfdhps quintuple mutations throughout pregnancy excluded further analyses of possible associations between certain haplotypes and the risk of lower birth weight and anemia. However, women infected with P. falciparum had 1.3-g/dl-lower hemoglobin levels (P = 0.001) and delivered babies with a 400-g-lower birth weight (P = 0.001) compared to nonparasitemic women. Despite this, 44 women who were P. falciparum positive at baseline became negative after one or two doses of SP (i.e., 50.5%), implying that SP-IPTp still has some efficacy. P. falciparum resistance markers to SP are high in this population, whereas P. falciparum

  4. Efficacy of malaria prevention during pregnancy in an area of low and unstable transmission: an individually-randomised placebo-controlled trial using intermittent preventive treatment and insecticide-treated nets in the Kabale Highlands, south western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Clarke, Siân E; Hutchison, Coll L; Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Magnussen, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) and insecticide-treated nets (ITN) are recommended malaria interventions during pregnancy; however, there is limited information on their efficacy in areas of low malaria transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. An individually-randomised placebo-controlled trial involving 5775 women of all parities examined the effect of IPTp, ITNs alone or ITNs used in combination with IPTp on maternal anaemia and low birth weight (LBW) in a highland area of southwestern Uganda. The overall prevalence of malaria infection, maternal anaemia and LBW was 15.0%, 14.7% and 6.5%, respectively. Maternal and foetal outcomes were generally remarkably similar across all intervention groups (p>0.05 for all outcomes examined). A marginal difference in maternal Hb was observed in the dual intervention group (12.57 g/dL) compared with the IPTp and ITN alone groups (12.40 g/dL and 12.44 g/dL respectively; p=0.04), but this was too slight to be of clinical importance. In conclusion, none of the preventive strategies was found to be superior to the others, and no substantial additional benefit to providing both IPTp and ITNs during routine antenatal services was observed. With ITNs offering a number of advantages over IPTp, yet showing comparable efficacy, we discuss why ITNs could be an appropriate preventive strategy for malaria control during pregnancy in areas of low and unstable transmission. Trial Registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT0042207 PMID:21962292

  5. Cutaneous sporotrichosis. Intermittent treatment (pulses) with itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Fierro, Leonel; Saúl, Amado; Ponce, Rosa María

    2008-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous and exceptionally deep mycosis caused by a dimorphic fungus, Sporothrix schenckii. Itraconazole is a triazole derivative leading to good results in the treatment of sporotrichosis. Patients with cutaneous sporotrichosis proven with mycological tests (direct examination and culture) were enrolled. All patients underwent laboratory tests (at baseline and on a monthly basis) and received oral itraconazole 400 mg/day for one week with a 3-week break (pulses); thereafter the drug was administered as pulses until clinical and mycological cure was achieved. Five patients with sporotrichosis were enrolled, 4 with cutaneous lymphangitic form and one with fixed cutaneous form. Clinical and mycological cure was achieved in 4/5 cases (80%), with a mean number of pulses of 3.5. No patient had side effects and no laboratory test abnormalities occurred. Intermittent or pulsed itraconazole was effective in treating cutaneous sporotrichosis. It may be considered as a new treatment choice that entails an important reduction in total medication use.

  6. Carotid body denervation prevents fasting hyperglycemia during chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mi-Kyung; Yao, Qiaoling; Jun, Jonathan C; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Yoo, Doo-Young; Han, Woobum; Mesarwi, Omar; Richardson, Ria; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Schwartz, Alan R; Shirahata, Machiko; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) and is associated with impaired glucose metabolism, but mechanisms are unknown. Carotid bodies orchestrate physiological responses to hypoxemia by activating the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that carotid body denervation would abolish glucose intolerance and insulin resistance induced by chronic IH. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent carotid sinus nerve dissection (CSND) or sham surgery and then were exposed to IH or intermittent air (IA) for 4 or 6 wk. Hypoxia was administered by decreasing a fraction of inspired oxygen from 20.9% to 6.5% once per minute, during the 12-h light phase (9 a.m.-9 p.m.). As expected, denervated mice exhibited blunted hypoxic ventilatory responses. In sham-operated mice, IH increased fasting blood glucose, baseline hepatic glucose output (HGO), and expression of a rate-liming hepatic enzyme of gluconeogenesis phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), whereas the whole body glucose flux during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was not changed. IH did not affect glucose tolerance after adjustment for fasting hyperglycemia in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. CSND prevented IH-induced fasting hyperglycemia and increases in baseline HGO and liver PEPCK expression. CSND trended to augment the insulin-stimulated glucose flux and enhanced liver Akt phosphorylation at both hypoxic and normoxic conditions. IH increased serum epinephrine levels and liver sympathetic innervation, and both increases were abolished by CSND. We conclude that chronic IH induces fasting hyperglycemia increasing baseline HGO via the CSN sympathetic output from carotid body chemoreceptors, but does not significantly impair whole body insulin sensitivity. PMID:25103977

  7. Acute intermittent porphyria: Diagnostic dilemma and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Mohan Deep; Hazarika, Nita; Saraswat, Namita; Sood, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) presents with diverse group of symptoms making its early diagnosis difficult. Delaying diagnosis and treatment of AIP can be fatal or can cause long term or permanent neurological damage. We present here a case report of AIP where the diagnosis was missed. The diversity of symptoms and details concerning the treatment options for AIP are discussed. PMID:26330726

  8. Effectiveness of intermittent -Gx gravitation in preventing deconditioning due to simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Fan; Sun, Biao; Cao, Xin-Sheng; Liu, Chun; Yu, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Le-Ning; Cheng, Jiu-Hua; Wu, Yan-Hong; Wu, Xing-Yu

    2003-07-01

    This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of daily short-duration -Gx gravity exposure in preventing adverse changes in skeletal and cardiac muscles and bone due to simulated microgravity. Tail suspension for 28 days was used to simulate microgravity-induced deconditioning effects. Daily standing (STD) at 1 G for 1, 2, or 4 h/day or centrifugation (CEN) at 1.5 or 2.6 G for 1 h/day was used to provide -Gx gravitation as a countermeasure. The results indicate that the minimum gravity exposure requirements vary greatly in different systems. Cardiac muscle is most responsive to such treatment: 1 h/day of -Gx gravitation by STD was sufficient to prevent adverse changes in myocardial contractility; bone is most resistant: 4 h/day of -Gx gravitation only partially alleviated the adverse changes in physical and mechanical properties of the femur. The responsiveness of skeletal muscle is moderate: 4 h/day of -Gx gravitation prevented mass reduction and histomorphometric changes in the soleus muscle during a 28-day simulation period. Increasing gravitational intensity to 2.6 G showed less benefit or no additional benefit in preventing adverse changes in muscle and bone. The present work suggests that system specificity in responsiveness to intermittent gravity exposure should be considered one of the prerequisites in proposing intermittent artificial gravity as a potential countermeasure.

  9. [Intermittent thrombolytic treatment. Results during severe, chronic arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Fiessinger, J N; Aiach, M; Lagneau, P; Cormier, J M; Housset, E

    1975-04-20

    38 patients with severe chronic arteritis of the lower limbs were treated with streptokinase intermittently. All had been refused for surgical operation. One patient died, 4 others had early interruption of treatment. Eleven of the 38 patients had efficient thrombolysis confirmed by arteriography. The facts confirm the possibility of thrombolysis during chronic arterial disease. The fact that the aggravation was recent was favourable factor in prognosis. The eleven patients improved, had severe aggravation of symptomes for less than 2 months. Thus thrombolytic treatment has a place of choice in the treatment of severe arterial disease where surgery is impossible, or dangerous, owing to the uncertain state of the vascular bed below the lesion. Efficacious, it permits reconstructive surgery in cases where it had been at first refused. The use of intermittent treatment, apart from advantages of confort and cost, seems to increase the efficacy of treatment.

  10. [Intermittent thrombolytic treatment. Results during severe, chronic arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Fiessinger, J N; Aiach, M; Lagneau, P; Cormier, J M; Housset, E

    1975-04-20

    38 patients with severe chronic arteritis of the lower limbs were treated with streptokinase intermittently. All had been refused for surgical operation. One patient died, 4 others had early interruption of treatment. Eleven of the 38 patients had efficient thrombolysis confirmed by arteriography. The facts confirm the possibility of thrombolysis during chronic arterial disease. The fact that the aggravation was recent was favourable factor in prognosis. The eleven patients improved, had severe aggravation of symptomes for less than 2 months. Thus thrombolytic treatment has a place of choice in the treatment of severe arterial disease where surgery is impossible, or dangerous, owing to the uncertain state of the vascular bed below the lesion. Efficacious, it permits reconstructive surgery in cases where it had been at first refused. The use of intermittent treatment, apart from advantages of confort and cost, seems to increase the efficacy of treatment. PMID:176733

  11. Impact of Intermittent Preventive Treatment in Pregnancy with Azithromycin-Containing Regimens on Maternal Nasopharyngeal Carriage and Antibiotic Sensitivity of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus: a Cross-Sectional Survey at Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Holger W.; Aho, Celestine; Ome-Kaius, Maria; Wangnapi, Regina A.; Umbers, Alexandra J.; Jack, Wanda; Lafana, Alice; Michael, Audrey; Hanieh, Sarah; Siba, Peter; Mueller, Ivo; Greenhill, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) plus azithromycin (AZ) (SPAZ) has the potential for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp), but its use could increase circulation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria associated with severe pediatric infections. We evaluated the effect of monthly SPAZ-IPTp compared to a single course of SP plus chloroquine (SPCQ) on maternal nasopharyngeal carriage and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus at delivery among 854 women participating in a randomized controlled trial in Papua New Guinea. Serotyping was performed, and antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by disk diffusion and Etest. Potential risk factors for carriage were examined. Nasopharyngeal carriage at delivery of S. pneumoniae (SPAZ, 7.2% [30/418], versus SPCQ, 19.3% [84/436]; P < 0.001) and H. influenzae (2.9% [12/418] versus 6.0% [26/436], P = 0.028), but not S. aureus, was significantly reduced among women who had received SPAZ-IPTp. The number of macrolide-resistant pneumococcal isolates was small but increased in the SPAZ group (13.3% [4/30], versus SPCQ, 2.2% [2/91]; P = 0.033). The proportions of isolates with serotypes covered by the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine were similar (SPAZ, 10.3% [3/29], versus SPCQ, 17.6% [16/91]; P = 0.352). Although macrolide-resistant isolates were rare, they were more commonly detected in women who had received SPAZ-IPTp, despite the significant reduction of maternal carriage of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae observed in this group. Future studies on SPAZ-IPTp should evaluate carriage and persistence of macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae and other pathogenic bacteria in both mothers and infants and assess the clinical significance of their circulation. PMID:25673788

  12. Impact of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy with azithromycin-containing regimens on maternal nasopharyngeal carriage and antibiotic sensitivity of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus: a cross-sectional survey at delivery.

    PubMed

    Unger, Holger W; Aho, Celestine; Ome-Kaius, Maria; Wangnapi, Regina A; Umbers, Alexandra J; Jack, Wanda; Lafana, Alice; Michael, Audrey; Hanieh, Sarah; Siba, Peter; Mueller, Ivo; Greenhill, Andrew R; Rogerson, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) plus azithromycin (AZ) (SPAZ) has the potential for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp), but its use could increase circulation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria associated with severe pediatric infections. We evaluated the effect of monthly SPAZ-IPTp compared to a single course of SP plus chloroquine (SPCQ) on maternal nasopharyngeal carriage and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus at delivery among 854 women participating in a randomized controlled trial in Papua New Guinea. Serotyping was performed, and antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by disk diffusion and Etest. Potential risk factors for carriage were examined. Nasopharyngeal carriage at delivery of S. pneumoniae (SPAZ, 7.2% [30/418], versus SPCQ, 19.3% [84/436]; P<0.001) and H. influenzae (2.9% [12/418] versus 6.0% [26/436], P=0.028), but not S. aureus, was significantly reduced among women who had received SPAZ-IPTp. The number of macrolide-resistant pneumococcal isolates was small but increased in the SPAZ group (13.3% [4/30], versus SPCQ, 2.2% [2/91]; P=0.033). The proportions of isolates with serotypes covered by the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine were similar (SPAZ, 10.3% [3/29], versus SPCQ, 17.6% [16/91]; P=0.352). Although macrolide-resistant isolates were rare, they were more commonly detected in women who had received SPAZ-IPTp, despite the significant reduction of maternal carriage of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae observed in this group. Future studies on SPAZ-IPTp should evaluate carriage and persistence of macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae and other pathogenic bacteria in both mothers and infants and assess the clinical significance of their circulation. PMID:25673788

  13. Psychosocial, behavioural and health system barriers to delivery and uptake of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy in Tanzania – viewpoints of service providers in Mkuranga and Mufindi districts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) using sulphurdoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is one of key malaria control strategies in Africa. Yet, IPTp coverage rates across Africa are still low due to several demand and supply constraints. Many countries implement the IPTp-SP strategy at antenatal care (ANC) clinics. This paper reports from a study on the knowledge and experience of health workers (HWs) at ANC clinics regarding psychosocial, behavioural and health system barriers to IPTp-SP delivery and uptake in Tanzania. Methods Data were collected through questionnaire-based interviews with 78 HWs at 28 ANC clinics supplemented with informal discussions with current and recent ANC users in Mkuranga and Mufindi districts. Qualitative data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis approach. Quantitative data derived from interviews with HWs were analysed using non-parametric statistical analysis. Results The majority of interviewed HWs were aware of the IPTp-SP strategy’s existence and of the recommended one month spacing of administration of SP doses. Some HWs were unsure of that it is not recommended to administer IPTp-SP and ferrous/folic acid concurrently. Others were administering three doses of SP per client following instruction from a non-governmental agency while believing that this was in conflict with national guidelines. About half of HWs did not find it appropriate for the government to recommend private ANC providers to provide IPTp-SP free of charge since doing so forces private providers to recover the costs elsewhere. HWs noted that pregnant women often register at clinics late and some do not comply with the regularity of appointments for revisits, hence miss IPTp and other ANC services. HWs also noted some amplified rumours among clients regarding health risks and treatment failures of SP used during pregnancy, and together with clients’ disappointment with waiting times and the sharing of cups at ANC

  14. Continuous morphine produces more tolerance than intermittent or acute treatment.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Shveta V; Madia, Priyanka A; Sirohi, Sunil; Yoburn, Byron C

    2009-05-01

    Dosing protocol and analgesic efficacy have been proposed to be important determinants of the magnitude of opioid tolerance. The present study examined the effect of acute, intermittent and continuous treatment with the low analgesic efficacy agonist morphine on analgesic tolerance. Mice were implanted s.c. with a 25 mg morphine pellet for 1-7 days. Other mice were implanted s.c. with two 25 mg, or one 75 mg morphine pellet for 7 days. The release of morphine from subcutaneous implanted pellets was quantitated using a spectrophotometric assay. In other studies, mice were injected with morphine once (18.5-185 mg/kg/day; approximately 10-100 times ED(50) for morphine analgesia) or once/day for 7 days. Controls were implanted with a placebo pellet or injected with saline. Analysis of drug release from a 25 mg pellet indicated that release was greatest during the first 24 h, declined and then remained relatively constant. The amount of morphine released over 7 days by a 75 mg pellet (23.9 mg) was more than that of a single 25 mg pellet (15.4 mg) but less than two 25 mg pellets (30.8 mg). Following treatment, morphine cumulative dose-response studies were conducted (tail flick). Continuous treatment with morphine using pellet implantation produced a dose-dependent shift in the morphine ED(50) by 3.3, 5.8 and 8.5 fold for one 25 mg pellet, one 75 mg pellet and two 25 mg pellets, respectively. Acute and intermittent morphine administration produced substantially less analgesic tolerance than continuous release of morphine by implant pellets. The maximum shift in the ED(50) was 1.6 for acute treatment and 2.7 for 7 day intermittent treatment; despite a larger total daily dose. The present results indicate that continuous treatment with morphine results in greater analgesic tolerance than acute or intermittent morphine treatment even at comparable daily doses. These results are consistent with the suggestion that intermittent dosing has reduced risk of producing opioid

  15. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy: a qualitative study of knowledge, attitudes and practices of district health managers, antenatal care staff and pregnant women in Korogwe District, North-Eastern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mubyazi, Godfrey; Bloch, Paul; Kamugisha, Mathias; Kitua, Andrew; Ijumba, Jasper

    2005-01-01

    Background Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) is a key intervention in the national strategy for malaria control in Tanzania. SP, the current drug of choice, is recommended to be administered in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy during antenatal care (ANC) visits. To allow for a proper design of planned scaling up of IPT services in Tanzania it is useful to understand the IPTp strategy's acceptability to health managers, ANC service providers and pregnant women. This study assesses the knowledge, attitudes and practices of these groups in relation to malaria control with emphasis on IPTp services. Methods The study was conducted in February 2004, in Korogwe District, Tanzania. It involved in-depth interviews with the district medical officer (DMO), district hospital medical officer in charge and relevant health service staff at two peripheral dispensaries, and separate focus group discussions (FGDs) with district Council Health Management Team members at district level and pregnant women at dispensary and community levels. Results Knowledge of malaria risks during pregnancy was high among pregnant women although some women did not associate coma and convulsions with malaria. Contacting traditional healers and self-medication with local herbs for malaria management was reported to be common. Pregnant women and ANC staff were generally aware of SP as the drug recommended for IPTp, albeit some nurses and the majority of pregnant women expressed concern about the use of SP during pregnancy. Some pregnant women testified that sometimes ANC staff allow the women to swallow SP tablets at home which gives a room for some women to throw away SP tablets after leaving the clinic. The DMO was sceptical about health workers' compliance with the direct observed therapy in administering SP for IPTp due to a shortage of clean water and cups at ANC clinics. Intensified sensitization of pregnant women about the benefits of IPTp was

  16. Mortality, Morbidity, and Developmental Outcomes in Infants Born to Women Who Received Either Mefloquine or Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine as Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria in Pregnancy: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rupérez, María; González, Raquel; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor M.; Sevene, Esperança; Ouédraogo, Smaïla; Kakolwa, Mwaka A.; Vala, Anifa; Accrombessi, Manfred; Briand, Valérie; Aponte, John J.; Manego Zoleko, Rella; Adegnika, Ayôla A.; Cot, Michel; Kremsner, Peter G.; Massougbodji, Achille; Abdulla, Salim; Ramharter, Michael; Macete, Eusébio; Menéndez, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) on the health of sub-Saharan African infants. We have evaluated the safety of IPTp with mefloquine (MQ) compared to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for important infant health and developmental outcomes. Methods and Findings In the context of a multicenter randomized controlled trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of IPTp with MQ compared to SP in pregnancy carried out in four sub-Saharan countries (Mozambique, Benin, Gabon, and Tanzania), 4,247 newborns, 2,815 born to women who received MQ and 1,432 born to women who received SP for IPTp, were followed up until 12 mo of age. Anthropometric parameters and psychomotor development were assessed at 1, 9, and 12 mo of age, and the incidence of malaria, anemia, hospital admissions, outpatient visits, and mortality were determined until 12 mo of age. No significant differences were found in the proportion of infants with stunting, underweight, wasting, and severe acute malnutrition at 1, 9, and 12 mo of age between infants born to women who were on IPTp with MQ versus SP. Except for three items evaluated at 9 mo of age, no significant differences were observed in the psychomotor development milestones assessed. Incidence of malaria, anemia, hospital admissions, outpatient visits, and mortality were similar between the two groups. Information on the outcomes at 12 mo of age was unavailable in 26% of the infants, 761 (27%) from the MQ group and 377 (26%) from the SP group. Reasons for not completing the study were death (4% of total study population), study withdrawal (6%), migration (8%), and loss to follow-up (9%). Conclusions No significant differences were found between IPTp with MQ and SP administered in pregnancy on infant mortality, morbidity, and nutritional outcomes. The poorer performance on certain psychomotor development milestones at 9 mo of age in children born to women in the MQ group compared

  17. Feasibility and coverage of implementing intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnant women contacting private or public clinics in Tanzania: experience-based viewpoints of health managers in Mkuranga and Mufindi districts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence on healthcare managers’ experience on operational feasibility of malaria intermittent preventive treatment for malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) using sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in Africa is systematically inadequate. This paper elucidates the perspectives of District Council Health Management Team (CHMT)s regarding the feasibility of IPTp with SP strategy, including its acceptability and ability of district health care systems to cope with the contemporary and potential challenges. Methods The study was conducted in Mkuranga and Mufindi districts. Data were collected between November 2005 and December 2007, involving focus group discussion (FGD) with Mufindi CHMT and in-depth interviews were conducted with few CHMT members in Mkuranga where it was difficult to summon all members for FGD. Results Participants in both districts acknowledged the IPTp strategy, considering the seriousness of malaria in pregnancy problem; government allocation of funds to support healthcare staff training programmes in focused antenatal care (fANC) issues, procuring essential drugs distributed to districts, staff remuneration, distribution of fANC guidelines, and administrative activities performed by CHMTs. The identified weaknesses include late arrival of funds from central level weakening CHMT’s performance in health supervision, organising outreach clinics, distributing essential supplies, and delivery of IPTp services. Participants anticipated the public losing confidence in SP for IPTp after government announced artemither-lumefantrine (ALu) as the new first-line drug for uncomplicated malaria replacing SP. Role of private healthcare staff in IPTp services was acknowledged cautiously because CHMTs rarely supplied private clinics with SP for free delivery in fear that clients would be required to pay for the SP contrary to government policy. In Mufindi, the District Council showed a strong political support by supplementing ANC clinics with bottled water

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Azithromycin-Chloroquine versus Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine for Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Infection in Pregnant Women in Africa: An Open-Label, Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kimani, Joshua; Phiri, Kamija; Kamiza, Steve; Duparc, Stephan; Ayoub, Ayman; Rojo, Ricardo; Robbins, Jeffery; Orrico, Russell; Vandenbroucke, Pol

    2016-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization recommends intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in African regions with moderate to high malaria transmission. However, growing resistance to SP threatens the effectiveness of IPTp-SP, and alternative drugs are needed. This study tested the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of a fixed-dose combination azithromycin-chloroquine (AZCQ; 250 mg AZ/155 mg CQ base) for IPTp relative to IPTp-SP. Methods and Findings A randomized, Phase 3, open-label, multi-center study was conducted in sub-Saharan Africa (Benin, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, and Uganda) between October 2010 and November 2013. Pregnant women received 3 IPTp courses with AZCQ (each course: 1,000/620 mg AZCQ QD for 3 days) or SP (each course 1,500/75 mg SP QD for 1 day) at 4- to 8-week intervals during the second and third trimester. Long-lasting insecticide-treated bednets were also provided at enrollment. Study participants were followed up until day 28 post delivery (time window: day 28–42). The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants with sub-optimal pregnancy outcomes (a composite endpoint comprising live-borne neonates with low birth weight [LBW, <2,500 g], premature birth [<37 weeks], still birth [>28 weeks], abortion [≤28 weeks], lost to follow-up prior to observation of pregnancy outcome, or missing birth weight). The study was terminated early after recruitment of 2,891 of the planned 5,044 participants, due to futility observed in a pre-specified 35% interim analysis. In the final intent-to-treat dataset, 378/1,445 (26.2%) participants in the AZCQ and 342/1,445 (23.7%) in the SP group had sub-optimal pregnancy outcomes, with an estimated risk ratio (RR) of 1.11 (95% CI: 0.97, 1.25; p = 0.12). There was no significant difference in the incidence of LBW between treatment groups (57/1138 [5.0%] in the AZCQ group, 68/1188 [5.7%] in the SP group, RR 0.87 [95% CI: 0.62, 1.23]; p = 0.44). IPTp

  19. Preventive Migraine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article reviews the evidence base for the preventive treatment of migraine. Recent Findings: Evidence-based guidelines for the preventive treatment of migraine have recently been published by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the Canadian Headache Society (CHS), providing valuable guidance for clinicians. Strong evidence exists to support the use of metoprolol, timolol, propranolol, divalproex sodium, sodium valproate, and topiramate for migraine prevention, according to the AAN. Based on best available evidence, adverse event profile, and expert consensus, topiramate, propranolol, nadolol, metoprolol, amitriptyline, gabapentin, candesartan, Petasites (butterbur), riboflavin, coenzyme Q10, and magnesium citrate received a strong recommendation for use from the CHS. Summary: Migraine preventive drug treatments are underutilized in clinical practice. Principles of preventive treatment are important to improve compliance, minimize side effects, and improve patient outcomes. Choice of preventive treatment of migraine should be based on the presence of comorbid and coexistent illness, patient preference, reproductive potential and planning, and best available evidence. PMID:26252585

  20. Novel preventive treatment options.

    PubMed

    Longbottom, C; Ekstrand, K; Zero, D; Kambara, M

    2009-01-01

    A number of novel preventive treatment options which, as with traditional methods, can be differentiated into 3 categories of prevention (primary, secondary and tertiary), have been and are being currently investigated. Those reviewed are either commercially available or appear relatively close to that point. These include: approximal sealants; fluoride applications, including slow-release devices; measures to help remineralize demineralized tissue, including 3 different methods of delivering amorphous calcium phosphate; measures to help modify the biofilm to reduce the cariogenic challenge, including ozone therapy and probiotics; measures to increase enamel resistance to demineralization, including laser treatment of enamel, and a novel 'hybrid' technique for the treatment of primary molar caries which involves 'overlapping' of secondary and tertiary prevention--the Hall technique. Although many of these techniques show considerable promise and dentists should be aware of these developments and follow their progress, the evidence for each of these novel preventive treatment options is currently insufficient to make widespread recommendations. Changes in dental practice should be explored to see how oral health can be best supported through novel preventive systems. Further research is also required involving double-blind randomized controlled trials in order to bring further benefits of more effective caries control to patients. Implementation in practice should follow promptly as new techniques are shown to be clinically valuable for individual patients.

  1. Chickenpox Prevention and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... People on chemotherapy, immunosuppressive medications, or long-term use of steroids Treatments at Home for People with Chickenpox There are several things that can be done at home to help relieve the symptoms and prevent skin ... Use non-aspirin medications, such as acetaminophen, to relieve ...

  2. Traditional preventive treatment options.

    PubMed

    Longbottom, C; Ekstrand, K; Zero, D

    2009-01-01

    Preventive treatment options can be divided into primary, secondary and tertiary prevention techniques, which can involve patient- or professionally applied methods. These include: oral hygiene (instruction), pit and fissure sealants ('temporary' or 'permanent'), fluoride applications (patient- or professionally applied), dietary assessment and advice (modification), other measures to help remineralize demineralized tissue and other measures to help modify the biofilm to reduce the cariogenic challenge. There is a considerable body of strong evidence supporting the use of specific techniques for primary prevention of caries in children, e.g. pit and fissure sealants and topically applied fluorides (including patient-applied fluoride toothpastes and professionally applied fluoride varnishes), but limited strong evidence for these techniques for secondary prevention--i.e. where early to established lesions with ICDAS codes 1-4 (and also the severer lesions coded 5 or 6) are involved--and in relation to adults. This lack of evidence reflects a shortage of high-quality trials in the area, as opposed to a series of good studies showing no effect. Since there is also limited longitudinal evidence supporting conventional operative care, and since controlling the caries process prior to first restoration is the key to breaking the repair cycle and improving care for patients, future research should address the shortcomings in the current level of supporting evidence for the various traditional preventive treatment options.

  3. Safety and Feasibility of Intermittent Electrical Stimulation for the Prevention of Deep Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetović, Alisa; Mushahwar, Vivian K.; Sommer, Ryan; Schnepf, Dana; Kawasaki, Lisa; Warwaruk-Rogers, Robyn; Barlott, Tim; Chong, Su Ling; Isaacson, Glen; Kim, Seoyoung; Ferguson-Pell, Martin; Stein, Richard B.; Ho, Chester; Dukelow, Sean; Chan, K. Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the safety, feasibility, and acceptability of a novel treatment, intermittent electrical stimulation (IES), for preventing deep tissue injury (DTI) in different healthcare settings. Approach: Testing was conducted in an acute rehabilitation unit of a general hospital, a tertiary rehabilitation hospital, a long-term care facility, and homecare (HC). IES was delivered through surface electrodes placed either directly on the gluteal muscles or through mesh panels inside a specialized garment. Study participants at risk for DTI used the system for an average of 4 weeks. Outcome measures included skin reaction to long-term stimulation, demands on the caregiver, stability of induced muscle contraction, and acceptability as part of the users' daily routine. Results: A total of 48 study participants used the IES system. The system proved to be safe and feasible in all four clinical settings. No pressure ulcers were observed in any of the participants. There was no difference between the clinical settings in patient positioning, ease of finding optimal stimulation site, and patient acceptance. Although donning and doffing time was longer in the long-term care and HC settings than the acute rehabilitation unit and tertiary rehabilitation facility, time required to apply the IES system was <18 min (including data collection). The patients and caregivers did not find the application disruptive and indicated that the stimulation was acceptable as part of their daily routine in over 97% of the time. Innovation and Conclusion: We demonstrated the safety, feasibility, and acceptability of a novel method of IES to prevent DTI in a continuum of healthcare settings. PMID:25785240

  4. [Cellulite - causes, prevention, treatment ].

    PubMed

    Janda, Katarzyna; Tomikowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Cellulite is a multifactorial etiology ailment. It changes the skin topography by the formation of the skin surface's appearance, changes described as "orange peel". This prob- lem concerns 85-98% of women, and for them it is one of the most intolerable aesthetic imperfections. In the past few years the interest of scientists in this problem has clearly increased. Several theories on the pathophysiology of cel- lulite have been produced A number of different thera- peutic regimens have been developed using modern tech- nology. However, despite the many treatment options for cellulite, it is extremely important that patients should be aware that only multidirectional treatment can bring sat- isfactory results. The aim of this review was to describe the causes of cellulite, and its prevention and treatment.

  5. Prevention and Treatment of Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Prevention & Treatment of Arrhythmia Updated:Sep 2,2016 Do ... Risk for Arrhythmia • Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring of Arrhythmia • Prevention & Treatment of Arrhythmia Introduction Medications Ablation Devices for ...

  6. Intermittent aeration to improve wastewater treatment efficiency in pilot-scale constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Uggetti, Enrica; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Morris, Robert H; Newton, Michael I; Trabi, Christophe L; Hawes, Patrick; Puigagut, Jaume; García, Joan

    2016-07-15

    Forced aeration of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSF CWs) is nowadays a recognized method to improve treatment efficiency, mainly in terms of ammonium removal. While numerous investigations have been reported testing constant aeration, scarce information can be found about the efficiency of intermittent aeration. This study aims at comparing continuous and intermittent aeration, establishing if there is an optimal regime that will increase treatment efficiency of HSSF CWs whilst minimizing the energy requirement. Full and intermittent aeration were tested in a pilot plant of three HSSF CWs (2.64m(2) each) fed with primary treated wastewater. One unit was fully aerated; one intermittently aerated (i.e. by setting a limit of 0.5mg/L dissolved oxygen within the bed) with the remaining unit not aerated as a control. Results indicated that intermittent aeration was the most successful operating method. Indeed, the coexistence of aerobic and anoxic conditions promoted by the intermittent aeration resulted in the highest COD (66%), ammonium (99%) and total nitrogen (79%) removals. On the other hand, continuous aeration promotes ammonium removal (99%), but resulted in nitrate concentrations in the effluent of up to 27mg/L. This study demonstrates the high potential of the intermittent aeration to increase wastewater treatment efficiency of CWs providing an extreme benefit in terms of the energy consumption.

  7. Prevention and drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Testa, Mark F; Smith, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Evidence linking alcohol and other drug abuse with child maltreatment, particularly neglect, is strong. But does substance abuse cause maltreatment? According to Mark Testa and Brenda Smith, such co-occurring risk factors as parental depression, social isolation, homelessness, or domestic violence may be more directly responsible than substance abuse itself for maltreatment. Interventions to prevent substance abuse-related maltreatment, say the authors, must attend to the underlying direct causes of both. Research on whether prevention programs reduce drug abuse or help parents control substance use and improve their parenting has had mixed results, at best. The evidence raises questions generally about the effectiveness of substance abuse services in preventing child maltreatment. Such services, for example, raise only marginally the rates at which parents are reunified with children who have been placed in foster care. The primary reason for the mixed findings, say Testa and Smith, is that almost all the parents face not only substance abuse problems but the co-occurring issues as well. To prevent recurring maltreatment and promote reunification, programs must ensure client progress in all problem areas. At some point in the intervention process, say Testa and Smith, attention must turn to the child's permanency needs and well-being. The best evidence to date suggests that substance-abusing parents pose no greater risk to their children than do parents of other children taken into child protective custody. It may be sensible, say the authors, to set a six-month timetable for parents to engage in treatment and allow twelve to eighteen months for them to show sufficient progress in all identified problem areas. After that, permanency plans should be expedited to place the child with a relative caregiver or in an adoptive home. Investing in parental recovery from substance abuse and dependence, the authors conclude, should not substitute for a comprehensive approach

  8. Comparison of intermittent with continuous simvastatin treatment in hypercholesterolemic patients with end stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Fatma; Muderrisoglu, Haldun; Guz, Galip; Bozbas, Huseyin; Korkmaz, Mehmet Emin; Ozin, Mehmet Bulent; Tayfun, Egemen

    2004-11-01

    Coronary artery disease is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal failure (RF). Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for coronary heart disease. Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) have difficulties in compliance with their care and treatment. Intermittent simvastatin treatment may help to increase compliance and can be a treatment alternative in patients with CRF at risk of coronary artery disease. We investigated the effects of simvastatin and compared intermittent with continuous simvastatin treatment in hypercholesterolamic patients with CRF. The study group included 40 of 422 CRF patients on dialysis in our clinic. The inclusion criterion was low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) of 130 mg/dL or more. Twenty patients received simvastatin 10 mg/day (continuous group) and 20 patients received simvastatin 20 mg three times a week (only dialysis days- intermittent group) for four months. Nineteen patients served as controls and they were given a prescribed diet only. Total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-C decreased markedly in patients receiving intermittent and continuous simvastatin compared to controls. Continuous simvastatin decreased TC by 23% (P < 0.001) and LDL-C by 39% (P < 0.001). Intermittent simvastatin decreased TC by 26% (P < 0.001) and LDL-C by 40% (P < 0.001). The atherogenic index ratios in both the continuous and intermittent groups (TC/High density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL-C/HDL-C) decreased significantly. There was no significant difference in patient compliance between the two groups. Intermittent simvastatin is as effective and reliable as continuous simvastatin treatment and can be an alternative treatment in hypercholesterolemic patients on dialysis. PMID:15655271

  9. Intermittent Administration of Parathyroid Hormone [1–34] Prevents Particle-Induced Periprosthetic Osteolysis in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Fanggang; Shi, Zhongli; Zhou, Chenhe; Liu, An; Shen, Yue; Yan, Shigui

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone [1–34] (PTH[1–34]; 60 μg/kg/day) can prevent the negative effects of titanium (Ti) particles on implant fixation and periprosthetic osteolysis in a rat model. Eighteen adult male rats (12 weeks old, bones still growing) received intramedullary Ti implants in their bilateral femurs; 6 rats from the blank group received vehicle injections, and 12 rats from the control group and PTH treatment group received Ti particle injections at the time of operation and intra-articular injections 2 and 4 weeks postoperatively. Six of the rats that received Ti particles from the PTH group also received PTH[1–34] treatment. Six weeks postoperatively, all specimens were collected for assessment by X-ray, micro-CT, biomechanical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and dynamic histomorphometry. A lower BMD, BV/TV, Tb.N, maximal fixation strength, and mineral apposition rate were observed in the control group compared to the blank group, demonstrating that a periprosthetic osteolysis model had been successfully established. Administration of PTH[1–34] significantly increased the bone mineral density of the distal femur, BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp, Con.D, SMI, and maximal fixation strength in the PTH group compared to that in the control group. SEM revealed higher bone–implant contact, thicker lamellar bone, and larger trabecular bone area in the PTH group than in the control group. A higher mineral apposition rate was observed in the PTH group compared to both the blank and control groups. These findings imply that intermittent administration of PTH[1–34] prevents periprosthetic osteolysis by promoting bone formation. The effects of PTH[1–34] were evaluated at a suprapharmacological dosage to the human equivalent in rats; therefore, additional studies are required to demonstrate its therapeutic potential in periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:26441073

  10. Intermittent Administration of Parathyroid Hormone [1-34] Prevents Particle-Induced Periprosthetic Osteolysis in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Bi, Fanggang; Shi, Zhongli; Zhou, Chenhe; Liu, An; Shen, Yue; Yan, Shigui

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone [1-34] (PTH[1-34]; 60 μg/kg/day) can prevent the negative effects of titanium (Ti) particles on implant fixation and periprosthetic osteolysis in a rat model. Eighteen adult male rats (12 weeks old, bones still growing) received intramedullary Ti implants in their bilateral femurs; 6 rats from the blank group received vehicle injections, and 12 rats from the control group and PTH treatment group received Ti particle injections at the time of operation and intra-articular injections 2 and 4 weeks postoperatively. Six of the rats that received Ti particles from the PTH group also received PTH[1-34] treatment. Six weeks postoperatively, all specimens were collected for assessment by X-ray, micro-CT, biomechanical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and dynamic histomorphometry. A lower BMD, BV/TV, Tb.N, maximal fixation strength, and mineral apposition rate were observed in the control group compared to the blank group, demonstrating that a periprosthetic osteolysis model had been successfully established. Administration of PTH[1-34] significantly increased the bone mineral density of the distal femur, BV/TV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp, Con.D, SMI, and maximal fixation strength in the PTH group compared to that in the control group. SEM revealed higher bone-implant contact, thicker lamellar bone, and larger trabecular bone area in the PTH group than in the control group. A higher mineral apposition rate was observed in the PTH group compared to both the blank and control groups. These findings imply that intermittent administration of PTH[1-34] prevents periprosthetic osteolysis by promoting bone formation. The effects of PTH[1-34] were evaluated at a suprapharmacological dosage to the human equivalent in rats; therefore, additional studies are required to demonstrate its therapeutic potential in periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:26441073

  11. Preventing Venous Thromboembolism with Use of Intermittent Pneumatic Compression after Total Hip Arthroplasty in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent Pneumatic Compression (IPC) device has been used to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE). This study investigated the effectiveness of IPC device. We evaluated incidences of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients after use of IPC device, and compared with historical incidences from our institution. We applied IPC device in 741 patients who underwent 870 elective primary THAs from January 2010 to December 2013, DVT was detected in 3 patients (0.3%) by sonography, and one (0.1%) of them was symptomatic. Symptomatic PE occurred in 1 patient (0.1%) and there were no cases of fatal PE. The incidence of symptomatic DVT was significantly lower than the historical control (P = 0.042). The IPC is a safe and effective prophylaxis of VTE after primary THA in Korea. PMID:27478345

  12. Cancer treatment: preventing infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells drop too low, it is called neutropenia . Often this is a short-lived side effect ... 17, 2015. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Neutropenia and Risk for Infection. www.cdc.gov/cancer/ ...

  13. Low Bone Turnover and Low BMD in Down Syndrome: Effect of Intermittent PTH Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Akel, Nisreen S.; Vander Schilden, Jaclyn; Bacon, Anthony W.; Bracey, John W.; Sowder, Timothy; Skinner, Robert A.; Swain, Frances L.; Hogue, William R.; Leblanc, Donna B.; Gaddy, Dana; Wenger, Galen R.; Suva, Larry J.

    2012-01-01

    Trisomy 21 affects virtually every organ system and results in the complex clinical presentation of Down syndrome (DS). Patterns of differences are now being recognized as patients’ age and these patterns bring about new opportunities for disease prevention and treatment. Low bone mineral density (BMD) has been reported in many studies of males and females with DS yet the specific effects of trisomy 21 on the skeleton remain poorly defined. Therefore we determined the bone phenotype and measured bone turnover markers in the murine DS model Ts65Dn. Male Ts65Dn DS mice are infertile and display a profound low bone mass phenotype that deteriorates with age. The low bone mass was correlated with significantly decreased osteoblast and osteoclast development, decreased bone biochemical markers, a diminished bone formation rate and reduced mechanical strength. The low bone mass observed in 3 month old Ts65Dn mice was significantly increased after 4 weeks of intermittent PTH treatment. These studies provide novel insight into the cause of the profound bone fragility in DS and identify PTH as a potential anabolic agent in the adult low bone mass DS population. PMID:22916188

  14. Lifespan extension and cancer prevention in HER-2/neu transgenic mice treated with low intermittent doses of rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Popovich, Irina G; Anisimov, Vladimir N; Zabezhinski, Mark A; Semenchenko, Anna V; Tyndyk, Margarita L; Yurova, Maria N; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2014-01-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) is involved in cellular and organismal aging. Rapamycin extends lifespan and delays cancer in mice. It is important to determine the minimum effective dose and frequency of its administration that still extends lifespan and prevents cancer. Previously we tested 1.5 mg/kg of rapamycin given subcutaneously 6 times per two weeks followed by a two-week break (1.5 × 6/bi-weekly schedule: total of 6 injections during a 4-week period). This intermittent treatment prolonged lifespan and delayed cancer in cancer-prone female FVB/N HER-2/neu mice. Here, the dose was decreased from 1.5 mg/kg to 0.45 mg/kg per injection. This treatment was started at the age of 2 months (group Rap-2), 4 months (Rap-4), and 5 months (Rap-5). Three control groups received the solvent from the same ages. Rapamycin significantly delayed cancer and decreased tumor burden in Rap-2 and Rap-5 groups, increased mean lifespan in Rap-4 and Rap-5 groups, and increased maximal lifespan in Rap-2 and Rap-5 groups. In Rap-4 group, mean lifespan extension was achieved without significant cancer prevention. The complex relationship between life-extension and cancer-prevention depends on both the direct effect of rapamycin on cancer cells and its anti-aging effect on the organism, which in turn prevents cancer indirectly. We conclude that total doses of rapamycin that are an order of magnitude lower than standard total doses can detectably extend life span in cancer-prone mice. PMID:24556924

  15. Intermittent axial wrist traction as a conservative treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome: a case series.

    PubMed

    Brunarski, David J; Kleinberg, Brian A; Wilkins, Kathryn R

    2004-09-01

    Four patients with clinical and electrodiagnostic evidence of carpal tunnel syndrome underwent intermittent axial wrist traction with a pneumatic device which applied a controlled traction force of forty to sixty pounds per square inch along the axis of the forearm. Traction cycled intermittently five seconds on and five seconds off. Treatment duration was five minutes. Patients in this study received between five and twelve treatment sessions over a three month period. All neurophysiological tests were performed at an independent site without knowledge of treatment plan before treatment commenced and then repeated after the last treatment three months later. Clinical tests were performed initially, after three months and after one year. Significant subjective improvement in all cases were accompanied by objective improvement and normalization of the nerve conduction studies.

  16. Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment Overview How can learning ... gov] Top of page How can knowing about genetics help treat disease? Every year, more than two ...

  17. Intermittent Versus Daily Pulmonary Tuberculosis Treatment Regimens: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kasozi, Samuel; Clark, Justin; Doi, Suhail A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several systematic reviews suggest that intermittent pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) chemotherapy is effective, but intensity (daily versus intermittent) and duration of rifampicin use (intensive phase only versus both phases) have not been distinguished. In addition, the various outcomes (success, failure, relapse, and default) have only selectively been evaluated. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of proportions using all four outcomes as multi-category proportions to examine the effectiveness of WHO category 1 TB treatment regimens. Database searches of studies reporting treatment outcomes of HIV negative subjects were included and stratified by intensity of therapy and duration of rifampicin therapy. Using a bias-adjusted statistical model, we pooled proportions of the four treatment outcome categories using a method that handles multi-category proportions. Results A total of 27 studies comprising of 48 data sets with 10,624 participants were studied. Overall, treatment success was similar among patients treated with intermittent (I/I) (88%) (95% CI, 81–92) and daily (D/D) (90%) (95% CI, 84–95) regimens. Default was significantly less with I/I (0%) (95% CI, 0–2) compared to D/D regimens (5%) (95% CI, 1–9). Nevertheless, I/I relapse rates (7%) (95% CI, 3–11) were higher than D/D relapse rates (1%) (95% CI, 0–3). Conclusion Treatment regimens that are offered completely intermittently versus completely daily are associated with a trade-off between treatment relapse and treatment default. There is a possibility that I/I regimens can be improved by increasing treatment duration, and this needs to be urgently addressed by future studies. PMID:26056374

  18. Managing chronic myeloid leukaemia in the elderly with intermittent imatinib treatment

    PubMed Central

    Russo, D; Malagola, M; Skert, C; Cancelli, V; Turri, D; Pregno, P; Bergamaschi, M; Fogli, M; Testoni, N; De Vivo, A; Castagnetti, F; Pungolino, E; Stagno, F; Breccia, M; Martino, B; Intermesoli, T; Cambrin, G R; Nicolini, G; Abruzzese, E; Tiribelli, M; Bigazzi, C; Usala, E; Russo, S; Russo-Rossi, A; Lunghi, M; Bocchia, M; D'Emilio, A; Santini, V; Girasoli, M; Lorenzo, R Di; Bernardi, S; Palma, A Di; Cesana, B M; Soverini, S; Martinelli, G; Rosti, G; Baccarani, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a non-standard, intermittent imatinib treatment in elderly patients with Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukaemia and to answer the question on which dose should be used once a stable optimal response has been achieved. Seventy-six patients aged ⩾65 years in optimal and stable response with ⩾2 years of standard imatinib treatment were enrolled in a study testing a regimen of intermittent imatinib (INTERIM; 1-month on and 1-month off). With a minimum follow-up of 6 years, 16/76 patients (21%) have lost complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) and major molecular response (MMR), and 16 patients (21%) have lost MMR only. All these patients were given imatinib again, the same dose, on the standard schedule and achieved again CCyR and MMR or an even deeper molecular response. The probability of remaining on INTERIM at 6 years was 48% (95% confidence interval 35–59%). Nine patients died in remission. No progressions were recorded. Side effects of continuous treatment were reduced by 50%. In optimal and stable responders, a policy of intermittent imatinib treatment is feasible, is successful in about 50% of patients and is safe, as all the patients who relapsed could be brought back to optimal response. PMID:26383820

  19. Managing chronic myeloid leukaemia in the elderly with intermittent imatinib treatment.

    PubMed

    Russo, D; Malagola, M; Skert, C; Cancelli, V; Turri, D; Pregno, P; Bergamaschi, M; Fogli, M; Testoni, N; De Vivo, A; Castagnetti, F; Pungolino, E; Stagno, F; Breccia, M; Martino, B; Intermesoli, T; Cambrin, G R; Nicolini, G; Abruzzese, E; Tiribelli, M; Bigazzi, C; Usala, E; Russo, S; Russo-Rossi, A; Lunghi, M; Bocchia, M; D'Emilio, A; Santini, V; Girasoli, M; Lorenzo, R Di; Bernardi, S; Palma, A Di; Cesana, B M; Soverini, S; Martinelli, G; Rosti, G; Baccarani, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a non-standard, intermittent imatinib treatment in elderly patients with Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukaemia and to answer the question on which dose should be used once a stable optimal response has been achieved. Seventy-six patients aged ⩾65 years in optimal and stable response with ⩾2 years of standard imatinib treatment were enrolled in a study testing a regimen of intermittent imatinib (INTERIM; 1-month on and 1-month off). With a minimum follow-up of 6 years, 16/76 patients (21%) have lost complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) and major molecular response (MMR), and 16 patients (21%) have lost MMR only. All these patients were given imatinib again, the same dose, on the standard schedule and achieved again CCyR and MMR or an even deeper molecular response. The probability of remaining on INTERIM at 6 years was 48% (95% confidence interval 35-59%). Nine patients died in remission. No progressions were recorded. Side effects of continuous treatment were reduced by 50%. In optimal and stable responders, a policy of intermittent imatinib treatment is feasible, is successful in about 50% of patients and is safe, as all the patients who relapsed could be brought back to optimal response. PMID:26383820

  20. Peritoneal Metastases: Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sugarbaker, Paul H

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is a surgicaly curable disease. It requires multimodality of treatment in Localy advanced and metastatic disease. Molecular markers like RAS mutation has brought in change in the mangement of metastatic disease. Nearly 15 to 20 % presents with peritonieal surface metastasis. The debate continues with systomic vs Cyutoreductive surgery with are without HIPEC. This article highlights management of peritoneal metastasis with special reference to prevention and treatment. PMID:27065703

  1. Preventing Infections During Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Angela; Tai, Eric; Nielsen, Danielle Beauchesne; Shropshire, Sonya; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in oncology care, infections from both community and healthcare settings remain a major cause of hospitalization and death among patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Neutropenia (low white blood cell count) is a common and potentially dangerous side effect in patients receiving chemotherapy treatments and may lead to higher risk of infection. Preventing infection during treatment can result in significant decreases in morbidity and mortality for patients with cancer. As part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients public health campaign, a public-private partnership was formed between the CDC Foundation and Amgen, Inc. The CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control developed and launched an interactive website, www.PreventCancerInfections.org, designed for patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The site encourages patients to complete a risk assessment for developing neutropenia during their treatment. After completing the assessment, patients receive information about how to lower the risk for infection and keep themselves healthy while receiving chemotherapy. PMID:25095295

  2. Superficially, longer, intermittent ozone theraphy in the treatment of the chronic, infected wounds.

    PubMed

    Białoszewski, Dariusz; Kowalewski, Michał

    2003-10-30

    Background. Ozone therapy - i.e. the treatment of patients by a mixture of oxygen and ozone - has been used for many years as a method ancillary to basic treatment, especially in those cases in which traditional treatment methods do not give satisfactory results, e.g. skin loss in non-healing wounds, ulcers, pressure sores, fistulae, etc. Material and methods. In the Department of Phisiotherapy of the Medical Faculty and the Department of the Orthopedics and Traumatology of the Locomotor System at the Medical University of Warsaw in the period from January 2001 until November 2002, 23 patients with heavy,chronic, antibiotic resistants septic complications after trauma, surgical procedures and secundary skin infetions were treated with ozone. The ozone therapy was administered using an authorial technique of superficially, longer, intermittent ozone application. Results. In the wounds of the all experienced patients the inhibition of septic processes and wound healing was much faster than normal. Conclusions. Our data confirm the advantages wich result from the technique of superficially, longer, intermittent ozone theraphy in combined treatment for septic complications in the soft tissue, especially in the locomotor system. These technique makes posttraumatic infections and promotes quicker healing of post-surgical and post-traumal complications - chronic septic infections. This method also lowers the cost of antibiotic therapy and is sometimes the only available auxiliary technique to support surgical procedures.

  3. Prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Chapuy, M C; Meunier, P J

    1995-08-01

    Because the lifetime risk of fragility fracture for a 50-year-old Caucasian woman is about 40 per cent, a whole-life strategy of osteoporosis prevention is necessary. In childhood, primary prevention of osteoporosis is based on exercise and adequate dietary calcium. In women undergoing menopause, hormone replacement therapy administered for at least ten years remains the preventive treatment of choice, and is associated with a substantial reduction in vertebral and non-vertebral fractures. Intranasal salmon calcitonin and bisphosphonates are effective alternatives, but their effects on fracture rate and their long-term safety require further evaluation. Regarding the prevention of the late bone loss leading to senile osteoporosis, there is now evidence that the reduction of the secondary hyperparathyroidism induced by calcium and vitamin D insufficiencies through the administration of calcium and vitamin D supplements significantly decreases the hip fracture incidence. There is no general consensus about the efficacy of treatment for established osteoporosis with fractures. Fluoride salts have proven their direct stimulating effects on bone formation; dosage must be moderate, and the duration of treatment should be limited to 2-3 years in order not to impair the quality of the new bone. Cyclical therapy with etidronate induces beneficial effects on bone mass in the spine, but its effect on the vertebral fracture rate is not yet established. The new bisphosphonates seem to be promising for the management of osteoporosis. Several other agents such as growth factors, silicon derivatives and strontium salts are in various stages of testing. The new definition of osteoporosis proposed by a WHO study group, no longer based on the fracture but on a low bone mass, is of major interest, because it should make possible to have a more effective therapeutic approach, before the occurrence of an irreversible degree of bone loss.

  4. Reconsidering the benefit of intermittent versus continuous treatment in the maintenance treatment setting of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sunakawa, Y; Bekaii-Saab, T; Stintzing, S

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent solid tumors in the western world, with low survival rates in patients with metastatic disease. Doublet chemotherapy regimens such as FOLFOX or FOLFIRI are the mainstay of standard first-line chemotherapy in the metastatic setting. The conventional treatment as a first-line approach is continuous application until progression or intolerable toxicities. However, only one third of patients are treated until progression mainly due to the side effects of chemotherapy. Notably, oxaliplatin-containing regimens such as FOLFOX/CapOx or FOLFOXIRI are associated with oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, which is the main reason for treatment discontinuation or treatment de-escalation. On this basis, recent studies have investigated the clinical benefits of bevacizumab-based intermittent and continuous treatment regimens in the metastatic colorectal setting, together with various strategies to optimize maintenance therapy including regimens with targeted therapies, such as cetuximab, ziv-aflibercept and regorafenib. Recent studies have also investigated when maintenance therapy should be initiated as well individualizing treatment based on patient, tumor and treatment characteristics, as well as molecular biomarkers. This article reviews the current evidence for the clinical benefit of intermittent versus continuous treatment in the maintenance treatment setting of metastatic colorectal cancer, and also evaluates the effect of RAS and BRAF mutational status on maintenance strategies. PMID:27002945

  5. Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Stroke More Kawasaki Disease: Complications, Treatment and Prevention Updated:Apr 27,2016 Complications The possibility of ... problems that did not show up right away. Prevention There is no known prevention for Kawasaki disease. ...

  6. Intermittent operation of ultra-low pressure ultrafiltration for decentralized drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Peter-Varbanets, Maryna; Gujer, Willi; Pronk, Wouter

    2012-06-15

    River water was treated by ultrafiltration at a relatively low transmembrane pressure (40 mbar). As observed before, flux stabilization occurred after several days of operation although no back-flushing or cross flow was applied. Interruptions in flux were applied by temporary offset of the transmembrane pressure. After restoration of the transmembrane pressure, the initial flux was higher than the stable flux level, and the flux recovery depended on the standstill time. Furthermore, if a short cross flow was applied after standstill, the flux was restored to an even higher level. In all cases, the flux decreased again during operation to reach finally the same stable level as before standstill. In order to evaluate the influence of intermittent operation as practiced for water treatment on a household level, daily interruptions of flux were applied. An optimum of total daily water production rate was obtained at 21 h of operation and 3 h of standstill per day. A model was developed which can describe the impact of intermittent operation on the flux depending on the duration of the standstill and operating periods. This enables the prediction of production capacity of the system operated intermittently. The flux increase during standstill could be explained by a relaxation and expansion of the biofouling layer, while the higher flux after forward-flushing was caused by this layer being partially sloughed off. Household water treatment with the process presented here will generally be operated on a discontinuous basis. The results show that such operation schemes do not compromise the permeability of the system, but actually lead to higher fluxes after standstill. PMID:22497767

  7. Intermittent operation of ultra-low pressure ultrafiltration for decentralized drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Peter-Varbanets, Maryna; Gujer, Willi; Pronk, Wouter

    2012-06-15

    River water was treated by ultrafiltration at a relatively low transmembrane pressure (40 mbar). As observed before, flux stabilization occurred after several days of operation although no back-flushing or cross flow was applied. Interruptions in flux were applied by temporary offset of the transmembrane pressure. After restoration of the transmembrane pressure, the initial flux was higher than the stable flux level, and the flux recovery depended on the standstill time. Furthermore, if a short cross flow was applied after standstill, the flux was restored to an even higher level. In all cases, the flux decreased again during operation to reach finally the same stable level as before standstill. In order to evaluate the influence of intermittent operation as practiced for water treatment on a household level, daily interruptions of flux were applied. An optimum of total daily water production rate was obtained at 21 h of operation and 3 h of standstill per day. A model was developed which can describe the impact of intermittent operation on the flux depending on the duration of the standstill and operating periods. This enables the prediction of production capacity of the system operated intermittently. The flux increase during standstill could be explained by a relaxation and expansion of the biofouling layer, while the higher flux after forward-flushing was caused by this layer being partially sloughed off. Household water treatment with the process presented here will generally be operated on a discontinuous basis. The results show that such operation schemes do not compromise the permeability of the system, but actually lead to higher fluxes after standstill.

  8. HPV: diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, Jon K

    2012-09-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the world. Almost 80% of the world's population is exposed by the age of 50. HPV can cause oropharyngeal, genital, and anal cancers. It also causes genital warts. There is no cure for HPV but vaccines are available to prevent infection by the most common HPV viruses; unfortunately, usage is low. Most people will clear HPV spontaneously. Those who do not are at high risk for developing malignancy. Treatment mainstays are destruction and excision of the lesions. PMID:22828099

  9. Why continued surveillance? Intermittent blood pressure and heart rate abnormality under treatment

    PubMed Central

    Katinas, G. S.; Cornélissen, G.; Otsuka, K.; Haus, E.; Bakken, E. E.; Halberg, F.

    2008-01-01

    Several opinion leaders have monitored their blood pressure systematically a sufficient number of times a day for chronomic (time structural) analyses, from the time of encountering chronobiology until their death; they set an example for others who also may not wish to base treatment on single spotchecks in a health care office. Such self-measurements, while extremely helpful, were not readily feasible without a noteworthy interruption of activities during waking as well as of sleep. New, relatively unobtrusive instrumentation now makes monitoring possible and cost-effective and will save lives. Illustrative results and problems encountered in an as-one-goes self-survey by GSK, a physician-scientist, are presented herein. Both MESOR-hypertension and CHAT (circadian hyper-amplitude-tension) can be intermittent conditions even under treatment, and treatment is best adjusted based on monitoring, rather than “flying blind”. PMID:16275483

  10. Skin tears: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Wick, Jeannette Y; Zanni, Guido R

    2008-07-01

    While skin tears are common among the elderly in general, and residents of long-term care facilities in particular, there has been limited research into their treatment. Many facilities voluntarily track skin tears, and some states require facilities to report these events. Risk factors include age, xerosis (abnormal eye, skin, or mouth dryness), need for help in activities of daily living, presence of senile purpura, visual impairment, and poor nutrition. Plans to prevent skin tears that employ skin sleeves, padded side rails, gentle skin cleansers, moisturizing lotions, as well as staff education, can decrease by half the number of skin tears incurred in a long-term care facility. Although the treatment process seems simple, it is time consuming and can be painful for the patient. Residents with dementia or agitation often try to remove bulky dressings used to cover skin tears. Dressing changes may injure the fragile wound via skin stripping.

  11. [Acute intermittent porphyria].

    PubMed

    Catania, A; Caimi, G

    1983-11-10

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a congenital disease which as its name suggests, runs intermittently. Biochemically it is characterised by over-production of hepatic ALA synthetase (ALA-s), inducible mitochondrial enzyme and an increase in prophyrinic precursors (PBG, ac S-ALA). Clinically it is characterised by an abdominal nervous symptomatology. The primary metabolic error has been identified as a deficiency in enzyme activity which partially blocks haem biosynthesis. During the appearance of clinical manifestations, certain factors are present which have the capacity of inducing hepatic ALA-s production in vitro. Apart from some preventive measures treatment is mainly of symptomatology and complications. More recently the use of ALA-s inhibitors has been introduced. PMID:6657112

  12. Osteoporosis Patient Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire in postmenopausal women intermittently treated with oral bisphosphonates: the BRAVO study.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ki Won; Kim, Deog-Yoon; Lee, Yil-Seob; Kang, Moo Il

    2012-05-01

    The Osteoporosis Patient Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (OPSAT-Q) is a psychometric measure of patient satisfaction with bisphosphonate treatment for osteoporosis. The study was a multicenter, nationwide, cross-sectional, patient-reported outcome study conducted to evaluate treatment satisfaction and quality of life using the OPSAT-Q in patients receiving oral bisphosphonate therapy. This study enrolled postmenopausal women from 43 hospitals and 112 clinics who had intermittently taken oral bisphosphonates for treatment of osteoporosis. 4,220 postmenopausal Korean women with a mean age of 65.3 years and a mean body mass index of 22.9 kg/m(2) participated in the study. All items within each subscale domain were more highly correlated with their hypothesized subscale domain relative to the other subscale domains, and all 16 items were significantly correlated with an overall composite satisfaction score (CSS). All scores showed acceptable internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha >0.70, range 0.88-0.91). Comparisons of OPSAT-Q scores were made between selective subgroups of participants: monthly versus weekly administration, years of taking bisphosphonates, smoking habitus, acid-related medication and comorbid conditions. Mean OPSAT-Q subscale domains and CSS were higher for users of monthly bisphosphonates, with shorter duration, non-smokers, and non-users of acid-related medication. Mean OPSAT-Q subscale domain scores of side-effects were high for absence of comorbid conditions. The OPSAT-Q demonstrated acceptable measurement properties, including validity and reliability of subscale domains and CSS, in oriental women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Postmenopausal women intermittently using oral bisphosphonate therapy reported increased satisfaction with monthly administration, with shorter duration, non-smokers, non-users of acid-related medication, and an absence of comorbid conditions.

  13. Prevention and treatment of leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Charles N; Levett, Paul N

    2004-04-01

    Leptospirosis is a common zoonosis acquired by exposure to body fluids, to tissues of infected animals, or to contaminated soil or fresh water. Large outbreaks of leptospirosis have occurred following excess rainfall or in tourists following exposure to fresh water during adventure activities. Prevention may be achieved through the use of protective clothing or by changes in animal husbandry. Immunization is not widely used in human populations but has a role in agriculture. Oral administration of doxycycline (Periostat , CollaGenex) once-weekly can give short-term protection in high-risk environments. The disease in humans has a broad range of symptoms. Treatment may be symptomatic or may require administration of antibiotics, such as doxycycline or penicillin. PMID:15482194

  14. Prevention and Treatment of Drowning.

    PubMed

    Mott, Timothy F; Latimer, Kelly M

    2016-04-01

    Nearly 4,000 drowning deaths occur annually in the United States, with drowning representing the most common injury-related cause of death in children one to four years of age. Drowning is a process that runs the spectrum from brief entry of liquid into the airways with subsequent clearance and only minor temporary injury, to the prolonged presence of fluid in the lungs leading to lung dysfunction, hypoxia, neurologic and cardiac abnormalities, and death. The World Health Organization has defined drowning as "the process of experiencing respiratory impairment from submersion/immersion in liquid." Terms such as near, wet, dry, passive, active, secondary, and silent drowning should no longer be used because they are confusing and hinder proper categorization and management. The American Heart Association's Revised Utstein Drowning Form and treatment guidelines are important in guiding care, disposition, and prognosis. Prompt resuscitation at the scene after a shorter duration of submersion is associated with better outcomes. Because cardiac arrhythmias due to drowning are almost exclusively caused by hypoxia, the resuscitation order prioritizes airway and breathing before compressions. Prevention remains the best treatment. Education, swimming and water safety lessons, and proper pool fencing are the interventions with the highest level of current evidence, especially in children two to four years of age. Alcohol use during water activities dramatically increases the risk of drowning; therefore, abstinence is recommended for all participants and supervisors. PMID:27035042

  15. Prevention: The Best Treatment for Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... DO Video Library Prevention: The Best Treatment for Back Pain Page Content A n estimated 50 million Americans ... natural tendency toward self-healing. Tips to Minimize Back Pain Here are some tips for preventing or minimizing ...

  16. Metallothionein as a compensatory component prevents intermittent hypoxia-induced cardiomyopathy in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Xia; Zhou, Shanshan; Zheng, Yang; Tan, Yi; Kong, Maiying; Wang, Bo; Feng, Wenke; Epstein, Paul N.; Cai, Jun; Cai, Lu

    2014-05-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) to induce cardiovascular disease, which may be related to oxidative damage. Metallothionein (MT) has been extensively proved to be an endogenous and highly inducible antioxidant protein expressed in the heart. Therefore, we tested the hypotheses that oxidative stress plays a critical role in OSA induced cardiac damage and MT protects the heart from OSA-induced cardiomyopathy. To mimic hypoxia/reoxygenation events that occur in adult OSA patients, mice were exposed to IH for 3 days to 8 weeks. The IH paradigm consisted of alternating cycles of 20.9% O{sub 2}/8% O{sub 2} F{sub I}O{sub 2} (30 episodes per hour) with 20 s at the nadir F{sub I}O{sub 2} for 12 h a day during daylight. IH significantly increased the ratio of heart weight to tibia length at 4 weeks with a decrease in cardiac function from 4 to 8 weeks. Cardiac oxidative damage and fibrosis were observed after 4 and 8 weeks of IH exposures. Endogenous MT expression was up-regulated in response to 3-day IH, but significantly decreased at 4 and 8 weeks of IH. In support of MT as a major compensatory component, mice with cardiac overexpression of MT gene and mice with global MT gene deletion were completely resistant, and highly sensitive, respectively, to chronic IH induced cardiac effects. These findings suggest that chronic IH induces cardiomyopathy characterized by oxidative stress-mediated cardiac damage and the antioxidant MT protects the heart from such pathological and functional changes. - Highlights: • The effect of intermittent hypoxia (IH) on cardiac metallothionein (MT) • Cardiac MT expression was up-regulated in response to 3-day IH. • Exposure to 4- or 8-week IH downregulated cardiac MT expression. • Overexpression of cardiac MT protects from IH-induced cardiac damage. • Global deletion of MT gene made the heart more sensitive to IH damage.

  17. RNAi-mediated silencing of hepatic Alas1 effectively prevents and treats the induced acute attacks in acute intermittent porphyria mice.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Makiko; Gan, Lin; Chen, Brenden; Kadirvel, Senkottuvelan; Yu, Chunli; Phillips, John D; New, Maria I; Liebow, Abigail; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Querbes, William; Desnick, Robert J

    2014-05-27

    The acute hepatic porphyrias are inherited disorders of heme biosynthesis characterized by life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks. Factors that induce the expression of hepatic 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (ALAS1) result in the accumulation of the neurotoxic porphyrin precursors 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG), which recent studies indicate are primarily responsible for the acute attacks. Current treatment of these attacks involves i.v. administration of hemin, but a faster-acting, more effective, and safer therapy is needed. Here, we describe preclinical studies of liver-directed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting Alas1 (Alas1-siRNAs) in a mouse model of acute intermittent porphyria, the most common acute hepatic porphyria. A single i.v. dose of Alas1-siRNA prevented the phenobarbital-induced biochemical acute attacks for approximately 2 wk. Injection of Alas1-siRNA during an induced acute attack significantly decreased plasma ALA and PBG levels within 8 h, more rapidly and effectively than a single hemin infusion. Alas1-siRNA was well tolerated and a therapeutic dose did not cause hepatic heme deficiency. These studies provide proof-of-concept for the clinical development of RNA interference therapy for the prevention and treatment of the acute attacks of the acute hepatic porphyrias.

  18. Making a Difference through Prevention and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Robbie M.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the related nature of prevention and treatment of drug abuse and alcohol abuse. For both prevention and treatment, the focus must be on outreach, culturally specific needs, and community-based needs. Treatment modalities that have been most effective are those that put the basic needs of the client first. (SLD)

  19. Intermittent fasting vs daily calorie restriction for type 2 diabetes prevention: a review of human findings.

    PubMed

    Barnosky, Adrienne R; Hoddy, Kristin K; Unterman, Terry G; Varady, Krista A

    2014-10-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) regimens have gained considerable popularity in recent years, as some people find these diets easier to follow than traditional calorie restriction (CR) approaches. IF involves restricting energy intake on 1-3 d/wk, and eating freely on the nonrestriction days. Alternate day fasting (ADF) is a subclass of IF, which consists of a "fast day" (75% energy restriction) alternating with a "feed day" (ad libitum food consumption). Recent findings suggest that IF and ADF are equally as effective as CR for weight loss and cardioprotection. What remains unclear, however, is whether IF/ADF elicits comparable improvements in diabetes risk indicators, when compared with CR. Accordingly, the goal of this review was to compare the effects of IF and ADF with daily CR on body weight, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese adults. Results reveal superior decreases in body weight by CR vs IF/ADF regimens, yet comparable reductions in visceral fat mass, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance. None of the interventions produced clinically meaningful reductions in glucose concentrations. Taken together, these preliminary findings show promise for the use of IF and ADF as alternatives to CR for weight loss and type 2 diabetes risk reduction in overweight and obese populations, but more research is required before solid conclusions can be reached.

  20. Intermittent fasting vs daily calorie restriction for type 2 diabetes prevention: a review of human findings.

    PubMed

    Barnosky, Adrienne R; Hoddy, Kristin K; Unterman, Terry G; Varady, Krista A

    2014-10-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) regimens have gained considerable popularity in recent years, as some people find these diets easier to follow than traditional calorie restriction (CR) approaches. IF involves restricting energy intake on 1-3 d/wk, and eating freely on the nonrestriction days. Alternate day fasting (ADF) is a subclass of IF, which consists of a "fast day" (75% energy restriction) alternating with a "feed day" (ad libitum food consumption). Recent findings suggest that IF and ADF are equally as effective as CR for weight loss and cardioprotection. What remains unclear, however, is whether IF/ADF elicits comparable improvements in diabetes risk indicators, when compared with CR. Accordingly, the goal of this review was to compare the effects of IF and ADF with daily CR on body weight, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese adults. Results reveal superior decreases in body weight by CR vs IF/ADF regimens, yet comparable reductions in visceral fat mass, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance. None of the interventions produced clinically meaningful reductions in glucose concentrations. Taken together, these preliminary findings show promise for the use of IF and ADF as alternatives to CR for weight loss and type 2 diabetes risk reduction in overweight and obese populations, but more research is required before solid conclusions can be reached. PMID:24993615

  1. Intermittent azithromycin for treatment of Mycobacterium avium infection in beige mice.

    PubMed Central

    Klemens, S P; Cynamon, M H

    1994-01-01

    The activity of azithromycin (AZI) was evaluated in the beige mouse model of disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection. Mice were infected intravenously with approximately 10(7) viable avium ATCC 49601. AZI at 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg of body weight or clarithromycin (CLA) at 200 mg/kg was given by gavage 5 days per week for 4 weeks. Groups of treated mice were compared with untreated control animals. A dose-related reduction in cell counts in organs was observed with AZI treatment. AZI at 200 mg/kg was more active than CLA at 200 mg/kg against organisms in spleens. The activities of these two agents at 200 mg/kg were comparable against organisms in lungs. In a second study, AZI at 200 mg/kg was given daily for 5 days; this was followed by intermittent AZI treatment for the next 3 weeks. The activities of AZI given on a three-times- and five-times-per-week basis in the continuation phase were comparable. AZI given on a once-weekly basis was less active. The regimen of AZI given in combination with rifapentine on a once-weekly basis for 8 weeks showed promising activity. Clinical evaluation of AZI and rifapentine will help to define the roles of these agents in the treatment of disseminated M. avium complex infection. PMID:7986001

  2. Prevention of deep tissue injury through muscle contractions induced by intermittent electrical stimulation after spinal cord injury in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Leandro R.; Twist, Elizabeth; Seres, Peter; Thompson, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Deep tissue injury (DTI) is a severe medical complication that commonly affects those with spinal cord injury. It is caused by prolonged external loading of the muscles, entrapping them between a bony prominence and the support surface. The entrapment causes excessive mechanical deformation and increases in interstitial pressure, leading to muscle breakdown deep around the bony prominences. We proposed the use of intermittent electrical stimulation (IES) as a novel prophylactic method for the prevention of DTI. In this study, we assessed the long-term effectiveness of this technique in pigs that had received a partial spinal cord injury that paralyzed one hindlimb. The pigs recovered for 2 wk postsurgery, and subsequently, their paralyzed limbs were loaded to 25% of their body weights 4 h/day for 4 consecutive days each week for 1 mo. One group of pigs (n = 3) received IES during the loading, whereas another group (n = 3) did not. DTI was quantified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and postmortem histology. In the group that did not receive IES, MRI assessments revealed signs of tissue damage in 48% of the volume of the loaded muscle. In the group that did receive IES, only 8% of the loaded muscle volume showed signs of tissue damage. Similar findings were found through postmortem histology. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that IES may be an effective technique for preventing the formation of DTI in loaded muscles after spinal cord injury. PMID:23172030

  3. Cost analysis of school-based intermittent screening and treatment of malaria in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The control of malaria in schools is receiving increasing attention, but there remains currently no consensus as to the optimal intervention strategy. This paper analyses the costs of intermittent screening and treatment (IST) of malaria in schools, implemented as part of a cluster-randomized controlled trial on the Kenyan coast. Methods Financial and economic costs were estimated using an ingredients approach whereby all resources required in the delivery of IST are quantified and valued. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to investigate how programme variation affects costs and to identify potential cost savings in the future implementation of IST. Results The estimated financial cost of IST per child screened is US$ 6.61 (economic cost US$ 6.24). Key contributors to cost were salary costs (36%) and malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) (22%). Almost half (47%) of the intervention cost comprises redeployment of existing resources including health worker time and use of hospital vehicles. Sensitivity analysis identified changes to intervention delivery that can reduce programme costs by 40%, including use of alternative RDTs and removal of supervised treatment. Cost-effectiveness is also likely to be highly sensitive to the proportion of children found to be RDT-positive. Conclusion In the current context, school-based IST is a relatively expensive malaria intervention, but reducing the complexity of delivery can result in considerable savings in the cost of intervention. (Costs are reported in US$ 2010). PMID:21933376

  4. [Performance and simulation of intermittent decanted extended aeration treatment plants in a tropical climate].

    PubMed

    Dagor, C; Sommanawan, N; Baudu, M; Anderson, R

    2001-10-01

    The paper discusses the design and performance of package sewage treatment plants using the Intermittently Decanted Extended Aeration Process (IDEA-Process) in a tropical climate. This hybrid SBR process has been developed overcome traditional drawbacks associated with the SBR process, such as high Sludge Volume Index, high weir loading rate for decanting, and the need to achieve a better effluent quality, especially in terms of nutrient removal. Three domestic sewage plants in Thailand has been selected for field-testing and results of analyses are presented. The average measured biological removal efficiencies in terms of BOD removal and COD removal are about 95.5% and 90% respectively, and the average total nitrogen removal efficiency is about 90%. A computer model is used to study the performance of IDEA-processes compared to results from laboratory tests. The model experience gained through this research are discussed regarding the limitations of computer models such as ASM 1 (Activated Sludge Model n degrees 1) applied to the IDEA-Process in order to develop a new computer model suitable for design and operation of package treatment plant using IDEA-Process Technology in the future.

  5. T cell-expressed CD40L potentiates the bone anabolic activity of intermittent PTH treatment.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jerid W; Li, Jau-Yi; Walker, Lindsey D; Tyagi, Abdul Malik; Reott, Michael A; Yu, Mingcan; Adams, Jonathan; Weitzmann, M Neale; Pacifici, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    T cells are known to potentiate the bone anabolic activity of intermittent parathyroid hormone (iPTH) treatment. One of the involved mechanisms is increased T cell secretion of Wnt10b, a potent osteogenic Wnt ligand that activates Wnt signaling in stromal cells (SCs). However, additional mechanisms might play a role, including direct interactions between surface receptors expressed by T cells and SCs. Here we show that iPTH failed to promote SC proliferation and differentiation into osteoblasts (OBs) and activate Wnt signaling in SCs of mice with a global or T cell-specific deletion of the T cell costimulatory molecule CD40 ligand (CD40L). Attesting to the relevance of T cell-expressed CD40L, iPTH induced a blunted increase in bone formation and failed to increase trabecular bone volume in CD40L(-/-) mice and mice with a T cell-specific deletion of CD40L. CD40L null mice exhibited a blunted increase in T cell production of Wnt10b and abrogated CD40 signaling in SCs in response to iPTH treatment. Therefore, expression of the T cell surface receptor CD40L enables iPTH to exert its bone anabolic activity by activating CD40 signaling in SCs and maximally stimulating T cell production of Wnt10b.

  6. Prevention of deep vein thrombosis in potential neurosurgical patients. A randomized trial comparing graduated compression stockings alone or graduated compression stockings plus intermittent pneumatic compression with control

    SciTech Connect

    Turpie, A.G.; Hirsh, J.; Gent, M.; Julian, D.; Johnson, J.

    1989-03-01

    In a randomized trial of neurosurgical patients, groups wearing graduated compression stockings alone (group 1) or graduated compression stockings plus intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) (group 2) were compared with an untreated control group in the prevention of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). In both active treatment groups, the graduated compression stockings were continued for 14 days or until hospital discharge, if earlier. In group 2, IPC was continued for seven days. All patients underwent DVT surveillance with iodine 125-labeled fibrinogen leg scanning and impedance plethysmography. Venography was carried out if either test became abnormal. Deep vein thrombosis occurred in seven (8.8%) of 80 patients in group 1, in seven (9.0%) of 78 patients in group 2, and in 16 (19.8%) of 81 patients in the control group. The observed differences among these rates are statistically significant. The results of this study indicate that graduated compression stockings alone or in combination with IPC are effective methods of preventing DVT in neurosurgical patients.

  7. Vancomycin intermittent dosing versus continuous infusion for treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Thomas M; Christmas, A Britton; Norton, H James; Heniford, B Todd; Sing, Ronald F

    2013-11-01

    Current guidelines for the empiric treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) recommend that vancomycin is dosed 15 mg/kg and administered twice daily for a target trough level of 15 to 20 μg/mL. This study compared conventional intermittent vancomycin infusion (IVI) with continuous vancomycin infusion (CVI). Our prospective, randomized study compared CVI with IVI in trauma patients with suspected VAP. The primary outcome measure was a serum vancomycin level within the target level 48 hours after initiation of therapy. Treatment groups were compared using standard statistical methods. The study included 73 patients, 36 IVI and 37 CVI. Eighteen patients were withdrawn from the study as a result of discontinuation of the drug before 48 hours or failure to draw levels at the appropriate time, resulting in 27 IVI and 28 CVI study patients. There were no differences between treatment groups in gender (P = 0.97), Injury Severity Score (P = 0.70), total body weight (P = 0.36), or age (P = 0.81). The mean serum vancomycin level for the IVI group was 8.9 ± 3.9 μg/mL, and the CVI level was 19.8 ± 6.13 μg/mL (P < 0.0001). Two patients in the IVI group (7.4%) were in the therapeutic range compared with 16 (57.1%) in the CVI group (P < 0.0001). Six patients in the CVI group (21.4%) and none of the IVI patients had supratherapeutic levels. Four patients developed renal insufficiency, three IVI (11.1%) and one CVI (3.6%) (P = 0.36). The current American Trauma Society dosing recommendations for vancomycin for presumptive VAP treatment are inadequate. Continuous vancomycin infusion should be adopted as the standard dosing strategy.

  8. Intermittent cryogen spray cooling for optimal heat extraction during dermatologic laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majaron, Boris; Svaasand, Lars O.; Aguilar, Guillermo; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2002-09-01

    Fast heat extraction is critically important to obtain the maximal benefit of cryogen spray cooling (CSC) during laser therapy of shallow skin lesions, such as port wine stain birthmarks. However, a film of liquid cryogen can build up on the skin surface, impairing heat transfer due to the relatively low thermal conductivity and higher temperature of the film as compared to the impinging spray droplets. In an attempt to optimize the cryogen mass flux, while minimally affecting other spray characteristics, we apply a series of 10 ms spurts with variable duty cycles. Heat extraction dynamics during such intermittent cryogen sprays were measured using a custom-made metal-disc detector. The highest cooling rates were observed at moderate duty cycle levels. This confirms the presence, and offers a practical way to eliminate the adverse effect of liquid cryogen build-up on the sprayed surface. On the other hand, lower duty cycles allow a substantial reduction in the average rate of heat extraction, enabling less aggressive and more efficient CSC for treatment of deeper targets, such as hair follicles.

  9. [Treatment and prevention of acute radiation dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Benomar, S; Boutayeb, S; Lalya, I; Errihani, H; Hassam, B; El Gueddari, B K

    2010-06-01

    Acute radiation dermatitis is a common side-effect of radiotherapy which often necessitates interruption of the therapy. Currently, there is no general consensus about its prevention or about the treatment of choice. The goal of this work was to focus on optimal methods to prevent and manage acute skin reactions related to radiation therapy and to determine if there are specific topical or oral agents for the prevention of this acute skin reaction. The prevention and the early treatment are the two focus points of the management of the acute radiation dermatitis.

  10. Middle age onset short-term intermittent fasting dietary restriction prevents brain function impairments in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rumani; Manchanda, Shaffi; Kaur, Taranjeet; Kumar, Sushil; Lakhanpal, Dinesh; Lakhman, Sukhwinder S; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2015-12-01

    Intermittent fasting dietary restriction (IF-DR) is recently reported to be an effective intervention to retard age associated disease load and to promote healthy aging. Since sustaining long term caloric restriction regimen is not practically feasible in humans, so use of alternate approach such as late onset short term IF-DR regimen which is reported to trigger similar biological pathways is gaining scientific interest. The current study was designed to investigate the effect of IF-DR regimen implemented for 12 weeks in middle age rats on their motor coordination skills and protein and DNA damage in different brain regions. Further, the effect of IF-DR regimen was also studied on expression of energy regulators, cell survival pathways and synaptic plasticity marker proteins. Our data demonstrate that there was an improvement in motor coordination and learning response with decline in protein oxidative damage and recovery in expression of energy regulating neuropeptides. We further observed significant downregulation in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and cytochrome c (Cyt c) levels and moderate upregulation of mortalin and synaptophysin expression. The present data may provide an insight on how a modest level of short term IF-DR, imposed in middle age, can slow down or prevent the age-associated impairment of brain functions and promote healthy aging by involving multiple regulatory pathways aimed at maintaining energy homeostasis.

  11. Middle age onset short-term intermittent fasting dietary restriction prevents brain function impairments in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rumani; Manchanda, Shaffi; Kaur, Taranjeet; Kumar, Sushil; Lakhanpal, Dinesh; Lakhman, Sukhwinder S; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2015-12-01

    Intermittent fasting dietary restriction (IF-DR) is recently reported to be an effective intervention to retard age associated disease load and to promote healthy aging. Since sustaining long term caloric restriction regimen is not practically feasible in humans, so use of alternate approach such as late onset short term IF-DR regimen which is reported to trigger similar biological pathways is gaining scientific interest. The current study was designed to investigate the effect of IF-DR regimen implemented for 12 weeks in middle age rats on their motor coordination skills and protein and DNA damage in different brain regions. Further, the effect of IF-DR regimen was also studied on expression of energy regulators, cell survival pathways and synaptic plasticity marker proteins. Our data demonstrate that there was an improvement in motor coordination and learning response with decline in protein oxidative damage and recovery in expression of energy regulating neuropeptides. We further observed significant downregulation in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and cytochrome c (Cyt c) levels and moderate upregulation of mortalin and synaptophysin expression. The present data may provide an insight on how a modest level of short term IF-DR, imposed in middle age, can slow down or prevent the age-associated impairment of brain functions and promote healthy aging by involving multiple regulatory pathways aimed at maintaining energy homeostasis. PMID:26318578

  12. An update on short-course intermittent and prevention therapies for herpes labialis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stanley; Corey, Lawrence; Cunningham, Anthony; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Stanberry, Lawrence; Whitley, Richard; Spruance, Spotswood

    2007-06-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) has increased in prevalence worldwide over the past two decades, making it a major public health concern. Approximately 90% of recurrent HSV type 1 (HSV-1) infections manifest as non-genital disease, primarily as orofacial lesions known as herpes labialis. Improvements in our understanding of the natural history of herpes labialis support the rationale for early treatment (during the prodrome or erythema stages) with high doses of antiviral agents in order to maximize drug benefit. When evaluating the efficacy of different antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents in clinical trials, episode duration, lesion healing time, reduction in maximum lesion size and the proportion of aborted lesions should be used as the most reliable measures of therapeutic efficacy. There has also been considerable research into the most beneficial treatment for recurrent episodes of herpes labialis in immunocompetent individuals. Data from clinical studies confirm that short-course, high-dose oral antiviral therapy should be offered to patients with recurrent herpes labialis to accelerate healing, reduce pain and most likely increase treatment adherence. Optimal benefits may be obtained when these oral antiviral agents are combined with topical corticosteroids, but more research is needed with this combination. Patients undergoing facial cosmetic procedures (i.e.facial resurfacing) are at risk of HSV reactivation, but further data are required on the actual risk according to the specific procedure. Aciclovir, valaciclovir and famciclovir all provide effective prophylaxis against HSV-1 reactivation following ablative facial resurfacing. However, no definitive recommendations can be made regarding prophylactic therapy for minimally invasive procedures at present.

  13. HIV / AIDS: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: Symptoms , Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment Past Issues / ... Most people who have become recently infected with HIV will not have any symptoms. They may, however, ...

  14. Osteoporosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Osteoporosis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents Osteoporosis can strike at any age, although the risk ...

  15. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will test your blood. You ...

  16. Intermittent venovenous hemofiltration as a chronic treatment for refractory and intractable heart failure.

    PubMed

    Biasioli, S; Barbaresi, F; Barbiero, M; Petrosino, L; Cavallini, L; Zambello, A; Cavalcanti, G; Foroni, R; Bonofiglio, C

    1992-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is considered to be refractory when persisting despite an intensive drug regimen, or intractable when requiring "artificial" supports. Among them, hemofiltration (HE) has been used frequently, but only on an "acute" basis, to induce fast and safe water removal. Since 1985 the authors have treated refractory and intractable HF first by means of acute CAVH (continuous arteriovenous HE: 11 patients) and then (1988-1992) with IVVH (intermittent venovenous HE), initially done on an "acute" basis (13 patients) and then an a chronic basis (CIVVH): 8 subjects (6M, 2F; mean age, 60.8 years), 3 with RCHF and 5 with ICHF. This report deals with our experience in CIVVH. All patients were in severe failure. During a follow-up period of 63 months (range, 1-17/patient), 82 IVVH treatments (10.2/patient) were carried out, using this schedule: permanent Tesio catheter in superior vena cava, 0.6 m2 filter, double blood pump (blood flow = 80-250 ml/min); transmembrane pressure = 50-150 mmHg; mean ultrafiltration = 19 ml/min; replacement fluid = 8.6 ml/min; and session time = 340 +/- 88 min, according to individual dry weight (bioimpedance system). Six patients died (1-13 months after IVVH began); four of six had ICHF and two of six had RCHF; five of eight patients showed a significant amelioration of functional state, changing from fourth to third, to second and first degree failure, but this was after heart transplantation. In all cases a marked reduction in the drug regimen and in hospitalization was the rule. PMID:1457943

  17. Palatal sclerotherapy: A potentially useful treatment of intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate in juvenile standardbred racehorses

    PubMed Central

    Marcoux, Marcel; Picandet, Valerie; Céleste, Christophe; Macieira, Susana; Morisset, Sophie; Rossier, Yves; Schambourg, Morgane; Jean, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the tolerability and the efficacy of palatal sclerotherapy in juvenile standardbred racehorses with easily audible “snoring-like” respiratory noises suspected to be the result of intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate. The palate of 8 horses was injected with sodium tetradecyl sulfate under videoendoscopic guidance. Palatal sclerotherapy resulted in resolution of the respiratory noise in 7 horses, improvement of performance in 6 horses, and mild side effects in only 3 horses. This preliminary study suggests that palatal sclerotherapy is a safe, repeatable, inexpensive, and promising technique that should be considered as an alternative to existing treatments of intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate. PMID:18624069

  18. [Prevention and treatment of obesity in children].

    PubMed

    Togashi, Kenji; Iguchi, Kosei; Masuda, Hidenari

    2013-02-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity and its comorbidities is high in Japan. Increasing prevalence of obesity among children emphasizes the importance of focusing on primary prevention to avoid health complications later in life. We emphasize the prevention of obesity by recommending breast-feeding of infants for at least 6 months and advocating that schools provide for 60 min of moderate to vigorous daily exercise in all grades. Treatment interventions include behavioral therapy, reduction in sedentary behavior, and dietary and exercise education. After dietary treatment combined with exercise treatment, the areas of subcutaneous and visceral fat decreased significantly. These data suggest that dietary treatment combined with exercise treatment in obese children normalizes the distribution of abdominal fat and reduces the risk factors for chronic disease.

  19. Spices for Prevention and Treatment of Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Spices have been widely used as food flavorings and folk medicines for thousands of years. Numerous studies have documented the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of spices, which might be related to prevention and treatment of several cancers, including lung, liver, breast, stomach, colorectum, cervix, and prostate cancers. Several spices are potential sources for prevention and treatment of cancers, such as Curcuma longa (tumeric), Nigella sativa (black cumin), Zingiber officinale (ginger), Allium sativum (garlic), Crocus sativus (saffron), Piper nigrum (black pepper) and Capsicum annum (chili pepper), which contained several important bioactive compounds, such as curcumin, thymoquinone, piperine and capsaicin. The main mechanisms of action include inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, migration and invasion of tumors, and sensitizing tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This review summarized recent studies on some spices for prevention and treatment of cancers, and special attention was paid to bioactive components and mechanisms of action. PMID:27529277

  20. Spices for Prevention and Treatment of Cancers.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-08-12

    Spices have been widely used as food flavorings and folk medicines for thousands of years. Numerous studies have documented the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of spices, which might be related to prevention and treatment of several cancers, including lung, liver, breast, stomach, colorectum, cervix, and prostate cancers. Several spices are potential sources for prevention and treatment of cancers, such as Curcuma longa (tumeric), Nigella sativa (black cumin), Zingiber officinale (ginger), Allium sativum (garlic), Crocus sativus (saffron), Piper nigrum (black pepper) and Capsicum annum (chili pepper), which contained several important bioactive compounds, such as curcumin, thymoquinone, piperine and capsaicin. The main mechanisms of action include inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, migration and invasion of tumors, and sensitizing tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This review summarized recent studies on some spices for prevention and treatment of cancers, and special attention was paid to bioactive components and mechanisms of action.

  1. Spices for Prevention and Treatment of Cancers.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Spices have been widely used as food flavorings and folk medicines for thousands of years. Numerous studies have documented the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of spices, which might be related to prevention and treatment of several cancers, including lung, liver, breast, stomach, colorectum, cervix, and prostate cancers. Several spices are potential sources for prevention and treatment of cancers, such as Curcuma longa (tumeric), Nigella sativa (black cumin), Zingiber officinale (ginger), Allium sativum (garlic), Crocus sativus (saffron), Piper nigrum (black pepper) and Capsicum annum (chili pepper), which contained several important bioactive compounds, such as curcumin, thymoquinone, piperine and capsaicin. The main mechanisms of action include inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, migration and invasion of tumors, and sensitizing tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This review summarized recent studies on some spices for prevention and treatment of cancers, and special attention was paid to bioactive components and mechanisms of action. PMID:27529277

  2. Biofilter treatment of volatile organic compound emissions from reformulated paint: complex mixtures, intermittent operation, and startup.

    PubMed

    Moe, William M; Qi, Bing

    2005-07-01

    Two biofilters were operated to treat a waste gas stream intended to simulate off-gases generated during the manufacture of reformulated paint. The model waste gas stream consisted of a five-component solvent mixture containing acetone (450 ppm(v)), methyl ethyl ketone (12 ppm(v)), toluene (29 ppm(v)), ethylbenzene (10 ppm(v)), and p-xylene (10 ppm(v)). The two biofilters, identical in construction and packed with a polyurethane foam support medium, were inoculated with an enrichment culture derived from compost and then subjected to different loading conditions during the startup phase of operation. One biofilter was subjected to intermittent loading conditions with contaminants supplied only 8 hr/day to simulate loading conditions expected at facilities where manufacturing operations are discontinuous. The other biofilter was subjected to continuous contaminant loading during the initial start period, and then was switched to intermittent loading conditions. Experimental results demonstrate that both startup strategies can ultimately achieve high contaminant removal efficiency (>99%) at a target contaminant mass loading rate of 80.3 g m(-3) hr(-1) and an empty bed residence time of 59 sec. The biofilter subjected to intermittent loading conditions at startup, however, took considerably longer to reach high performance. In both biofilters, ketone components (acetone and methyl ethyl ketone) were, more rapidly degraded than aromatic hydrocarbons (toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-xylene). Scanning electron microscopy and plate count data revealed that fungi, as well as bacteria, populated the biofilters. PMID:16111134

  3. Novel diode-based laser system for combined transcutaneous monitoring and computer-controlled intermittent treatment of jaundiced neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Mostafa; El-Ahl, Mohammad H. S.; Hamza, Ahmad M.

    2001-06-01

    The high efficacy of laser phototherapy combined with transcutaneous monitoring of serum bilirubin provides optimum safety for jaundiced infants from the risk of bilirubin encephalopathy. In this paper the authors introduce the design and operating principles of a new laser system that can provide simultaneous monitoring and treatment of several jaundiced babies at one time. The new system incorporates diode-based laser sources oscillating at selected wavelengths to achieve both transcutaneous differential absorption measurements of bilirubin concentration in addition to the computer controlled intermittent laser therapy through a network of optical fibers. The detailed description and operating characteristics of this system are presented.

  4. Continuous versus intermittent levofloxacin treatment in complicated urinary tract infections caused by urinary obstruction temporarily relieved by foreign body insertion.

    PubMed

    Tenke, Peter; Kovacs, Bela; Benkõ, Ria; Ashaber, David; Nagy, Elizabeth

    2006-08-01

    This study was one of the first to examine the in vivo levofloxacin adsorption to stent surfaces. The results demonstrated the ability of this antibiotic to adsorb to the conditioning film and to the surface of the inserted device, and showed that 1-2 weeks after the discontinuation of antibiotic administration some amount of the antibiotic still could be detected on them. The second aim of the investigation was to determine whether continuous or intermittent levofloxacin treatment is advantageous for the patients who have acute complicated urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by urinary obstruction. The results did not show any clinical or microbiological advantages of the continuous therapy.

  5. Experimental study of multiple-intermittent cryogen spurts and laser pulses for the treatment of port wine stain birthmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Guillermo; Choi, Bernard; Viator, John A.; Andersen, Dan; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2003-06-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to minimize the risk of epidermal damage during pulsed laser treatment of port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks. Unfortunately, the current approach to CSC does not provide the necessary epidermal protection for all patients, particularly those with darker skin types. Therefore, alternative approaches need to be sought to improve PWS laser therapy. On a previous numerical study we showed that using multiple-intermittent CSC spurts and laser pulses could permit, under certain conditions, the use of higher laser doses while providing sufficient epidermal protection. In this study we show some results of ongoing experimental to study the feasibility of implementing clinically such an approach.

  6. Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Fazlul H. Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Cancer-associated thrombosis: prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brose, K.M.J.; Lee, A.Y.Y.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with cancer are at high risk to develop venous thromboembolism, and they are also more likely to develop complications from anticoagulant treatment. Because little research has focused on the oncology population to date, the optimal methods of prophylaxis and treatment remain uncertain in some clinical situations. Currently, low molecular weight heparin and warfarin are the most frequently used pharmacologic agents; however, they have their limitations. Other therapeutic options, such as inferior caval filters, are poorly studied and remain controversial. A summary of the most recent evidence on the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients is presented here. PMID:18231650

  8. Prevention and Treatment of Swimmer's Shoulder.

    PubMed

    Tovin, Brian J

    2006-11-01

    Swimmer's shoulder is a musculoskeletal condition that results in symptoms in the area of the anterior lateral aspect of the shoulder, sometimes confined to the subacromial region. The onset of symptoms may be associated with impaired posture, glenohumeral joint mobility, neuromuscular control, or muscle performance. Additionally, training errors such as overuse, misuse, or abuse may also contribute to this condition. In extreme cases, patients with swimmer's shoulder may have soft tissue pathology of the rotator cuff, long head of the biceps, or glenoid labrum. Physical therapists involved in the treatment of competitive swimmers should focus on prevention and early treatment, addressing the impairments associated with this condition, and analyzing training methods and stroke mechanics. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview of the biomechanics of swimming, the etiology of the clinical entity referred to as swimmer's shoulder, and strategies for injury prevention and treatment. PMID:21522219

  9. [Comprehensive treatment of obesity and its prevention].

    PubMed

    Montero, J C; Cúneo, A; Facchini, M; Bressan, J

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is associated to chronic metabolic entities affecting the quality of life and life expectancy. An early treatment, if efficient, can overcome most of the problems. The normalisation of body composition, of energy reserves and their distribution, as well as the minimisation of weight dependent metabolic upsets and the establishment of therapeutic priorities, according to the repercussions of obesity, are important factors for the treatment of this disease. Prevention is important and its basis is teaching and the setting in healthy life style with modification of the food habits and the incorporation of physical work into everyday activities. Diet therapy, physical activity, pharmacotherapy, surgery education and psychology are the forms proposed for the treatment and prevention of obesity.

  10. The case for intermittent pneumatic compression of the lower extremity as a novel treatment in arterial claudication.

    PubMed

    Delis, Konstantinos T

    2005-03-01

    Appreciation of the physiologic role of the natural muscle pumps of the lower limb in enhancing the return of venous blood promoted the development of intermittent pneumatic limb compression (IPC) systems that could activate these pumps artificially. The application of IPC to the foot (IPC(foot)), calf (IPC(calf)) or both (IPC(foot + calf)) on dependency generates a significant acute arterial leg inflow enhancement in patients with intermittent claudication that is highest with IPC(foot + calf), followed by IPC(calf) and IPC(foot). This enhancement is attributable to the leg venous pressure decrease after venous expulsion with IPC, which results in arteriovenous pressure elevation, and a marked attenuation in peripheral resistance to flow due to a transient abolition of peripheral sympathetic autoregulation and the release of nitric oxide. Implementation of IPC(foot) and IPC(foot + calf) for 3 to 5 months (> or = 2.5 hours/day) has been shown to improve the walking capacity and the ankle pressure indices of patients with intermittent claudication, with a significant beneficial impact on the quality of life. As the prevalence of symptomatic peripheral arterial disease is projected to increase substantially over the next decades with the aging population in Western societies and in the absence of established, cost-effective methods of treatment for claudication, the reported efficacy of IPC in claudication certainly warrants clinical attention. Level-1 clinical evidence by three independent investigators supports the clinical role of IPC in arterial claudication, reinforced by its domiciliary applicability, the high patient compliance with which it is associated, and the modest cost. This review offers an insight into the hemodynamic and clinical effects of IPC in patients with claudication in relation to the physiologic mechanisms proposed in explanation of these effects. PMID:15952694

  11. Osteoporosis - a current view of pharmacological prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhajit; Crockett, Julie C

    2013-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most common bone disease, associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and pathological fractures which lead to significant morbidity. It is defined clinically by a BMD of 2.5 standard deviations or more below the young female adult mean (T-score =-2.5). Osteoporosis was a huge global problem both socially and economically - in the UK alone, in 2011 £6 million per day was spent on treatment and social care of the 230,000 osteoporotic fracture patients - and therefore viable preventative and therapeutic approaches are key to managing this problem within the aging population of today. One of the main issues surrounding the potential of osteoporosis management is diagnosing patients at risk before they develop a fracture. We discuss the current and future possibilities for identifying susceptible patients, from fracture risk assessment to shape modeling and in relation to the high heritability of osteoporosis now that a plethora of genes have been associated with low BMD and osteoporotic fracture. This review highlights the current therapeutics in clinical use (including bisphosphonates, anti-RANKL [receptor activator of NF-κB ligand], intermittent low dose parathyroid hormone, and strontium ranelate) and some of those in development (anti-sclerostin antibodies and cathepsin K inhibitors). By highlighting the intimate relationship between the activities of bone forming (osteoblasts) and bone-resorbing (osteoclasts) cells, we include an overview and comparison of the molecular mechanisms exploited in each therapy. PMID:23807838

  12. Osteoporosis – a current view of pharmacological prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhajit; Crockett, Julie C

    2013-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most common bone disease, associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and pathological fractures which lead to significant morbidity. It is defined clinically by a BMD of 2.5 standard deviations or more below the young female adult mean (T-score =−2.5). Osteoporosis was a huge global problem both socially and economically – in the UK alone, in 2011 £6 million per day was spent on treatment and social care of the 230,000 osteoporotic fracture patients – and therefore viable preventative and therapeutic approaches are key to managing this problem within the aging population of today. One of the main issues surrounding the potential of osteoporosis management is diagnosing patients at risk before they develop a fracture. We discuss the current and future possibilities for identifying susceptible patients, from fracture risk assessment to shape modeling and in relation to the high heritability of osteoporosis now that a plethora of genes have been associated with low BMD and osteoporotic fracture. This review highlights the current therapeutics in clinical use (including bisphosphonates, anti-RANKL [receptor activator of NF-κB ligand], intermittent low dose parathyroid hormone, and strontium ranelate) and some of those in development (anti-sclerostin antibodies and cathepsin K inhibitors). By highlighting the intimate relationship between the activities of bone forming (osteoblasts) and bone-resorbing (osteoclasts) cells, we include an overview and comparison of the molecular mechanisms exploited in each therapy. PMID:23807838

  13. Prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, J Christopher; Tella, Sri Harsha

    2014-01-01

    In the beginning, that is from the 1960's, when a link between menopause and osteoporosis was first identified; estrogen treatment was the standard for preventing bone loss, however there was no fracture data, even though it was thought to be effective. This continued until the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study in 2001 that published data on 6 years of treatment with hormone therapy that showed an increase in heart attacks and breast cancer. Even though the risks were small, 1 per 1500 users annually, patients were worried and there was a large drop off in estrogen use. In later analyses the WHI study showed that estrogen reduced fractures and actually prevented heart attacks in the 50-60 year age group. Estrogen alone appeared to be safer to use than estrogen + the progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate and actually reduced breast cancer. PMID:24176761

  14. Genomics for Disease Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Jeste, Dilip V.; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    The enormous advances in genetics and genomics of the past decade have the potential to revolutionize health care, including mental health care, and bring about a system predominantly characterized by the practice of genomic and personalized medicine. We briefly review the history of genetics and genomics and present heritability estimates for major chronic diseases of aging and neuropsychiatric disorders. We then assess the extent to which the results of genetic and genomic studies are currently being leveraged clinically for disease treatment and prevention and identify priority research areas in which further work is needed. Pharmacogenomics has emerged as one area of genomics that already has had notable impacts on disease treatment and the practice of medicine. Little evidence, however, for the clinical validity and utility of predictive testing based on genomic information is available, and thus has, to some extent, hindered broader-scale preventive efforts for common, complex diseases. Furthermore, although other disease areas have had greater success in identifying genetic factors responsible for various conditions, progress in identifying the genetic basis of neuropsychiatric diseases has lagged behind. We review social, economic, and policy issues relevant to genomic medicine, and find that a new model of health care based on proactive and preventive health planning and individualized treatment will require major advances in health care policy and administration. Specifically, incentives for relevant stakeholders are critical, as are realignment of incentives and education initiatives for physicians, and updates to pertinent legislation. Moreover, the translational behavioral and public health research necessary for fully integrating genomics into health care is lacking, and further work in these areas is needed. In short, while the pace of advances in genetic and genomic science and technology has been rapid, more work is needed to fully realize the

  15. Repetitive strain injury: causes, treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, Ann

    Repetitive strain injury (RSI) has become increasingly prevalent with the growth of computer-based and automated occupations. While environmental factors such as work stations and repetitive tasks are primary causes, a number of secondary causes can increase a person's risk of RSI. Various treatments provide relief but the rate of recovery varies widely. Prevention involves adopting a range of measures that will also promote recovery in those with RSI.

  16. Palatal sclerotherapy for the treatment of intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate in 51 standardbred racehorses

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Daniel; Picandet, Valerie; Céleste, Christophe; Macieira, Susana; Cesarini, Carla; Morisset, Sophie; Rossier, Yves; Marcoux, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the efficacy and side effects of palatal sclerotherapy in standardbred racehorses suspected to have intermittent dorsal displacement of the soft palate (IDDSP). Fifty-one horses were treated with multiple endoscopically guided injections of 3% sodium tetradecyl sulfate in the soft palate. Two groups were identified: those that had respiratory noises during exercise (n = 27) and those that did not (n = 24). Treatment was well-tolerated. Furthermore, horses significantly reduced their racing times for the last 400 m compared with their times before treatment and even when their times were compared to the mean times for horses in the same race. In conclusion, palatal sclerotherapy appears to be a suitable alternative therapeutic option for horses suspected to have IDDSP. PMID:22547840

  17. Neonatal candidiasis: diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Rachel G; Benjamin, Daniel K

    2014-11-01

    Infection with Candida species is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in infants. The incidence of Candida infection varies widely across centers, likely due to differences in practice related to modifiable risk factors such as exposure to empiric antibiotics and length of parenteral nutrition. Early diagnosis of Candida and prompt treatment with appropriate antifungal agents, such as fluconazole, amphotericin B deoxycholate, and micafungin, are critical for improved outcomes. This paper reviews the current literature relating to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of Candida infections in the neonatal intensive care unit.

  18. Probiotics for prevention and treatment of diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Guandalini, Stefano

    2011-11-01

    Probiotics have been extensively studied over the past several years in the prevention and, to a larger extent, in the treatment of diarrheal diseases, especially in pediatric populations. Diarrhea is a symptom, and not a disease. This review will not address chronic disorders associated with diarrhea, or Clostridium difficile-induced diarrhea. Rather it will focus on published clinical trials performed on acute-onset, likely infectious diarrhea occurring in the settings of day-care centers, in the community, acquired in the hospital, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, and treatment of acute infectious diarrhea. For prevention of diarrhea acquired in day-care centers, 9 randomized and placebo-controlled trials have been published, conducted in different parts of the world. Probiotics tested were Lactobacillus GG, Bifidobacterium lactis (alone or in combination with Streptococcus thermophilus, and Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (not GG), and Lactobacillus acidophilus, in various trials either alone or in comparison with each other. The evidence of their efficacy in these settings is only modest for the prevention of diarrhea, although somewhat better for prevention of upper respiratory infections. In the community, new trails conducted in underprivileged areas of India, again with modest efficacy. Previous trials that examined the potential role of probiotics in preventing the spreading of diarrhea in hospitalized children had yielded conflicting results. More recently, a large trial in Poland showed, however, rather good evidence of efficacy for Lactobacillus GG. The prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea has been the subject of many investigations, both in children and in adults. Most commonly used probiotics were Lactobacillus GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium ssp, Streptococcus ssp, and the yeast Saccharomyces boulardii. In general, most of these trials do show clear evidence of efficacy, with the 2 most

  19. Drug abuse treatment as AIDS prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, D S; Navaline, H; Woody, G E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: As the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic among drug users enters its third decade in the United States, it is important to consider the role playing by substance abuse treatment in the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. METHODS: The authors review the research literature, examining findings from studies with behavioral and serologic measures on the association among treatment participation, HIV risk reduction, and HIV infection. RESULTS: Numerous studies have now documented that significantly lower rates of drug use and related risk behaviors are practiced by injecting drug users (IDUs) who are in treatment. Importantly, these behavioral differences, based primarily on self-report, are consistent with studies that have examined HIV seroprevalence and seroincidence among drug users. CONCLUSION: The underlying mechanism of action suggested by the collective findings of the available literature is rather simple-- individuals who enter and remain in treatment reduce their drug use, when leads to fewer instances of drug-related risk behavior. This lower rate of exposure results in fewer infections with HIV. The protective effects of treatment, however, can only be achieved when programs are accessible and responsive to the changing needs of drug users. Future research needs to be directed at developing a better understanding of the factors that enhance treatment entry and retention. PMID:9722815

  20. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Characteristics, Prevention, Treatment and Long Term Outlook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seward, Cynthia A.; Barber, William H.

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) including causes, common characteristics, secondary characteristics, prevention, and treatment. Economic implications are noted which suggest that treatment costs are 100 times the cost of prevention programs. (DB)

  1. Childhood cancer and vitamins: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Virginia A

    2008-02-01

    Discussions of pediatric nutrition and cancer usually focus on important issues of ensuring an adequate nutrient intake (enteral and parenteral) during and after the early treatment phase of care. However, information is available that suggests that vitamin status may have additional roles in the care of children with cancer. Over the last decade, investigators have reported findings that suggest that maternal preconception and perinatal vitamin intake and status influence the cancer risk of the infant and child. Others have shown a relationship between vitamin and antioxidant status and the prevalence and severity of adverse side effects for children undergoing chemotherapy. Vitamin D has potential anti-cancer activity and vitamin D status is suboptimal in many children in North America. Each of these issues is briefly presented from a perspective of prevention and treatment of childhood cancer.

  2. [Childhood obesity--assessment, prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Dubnov-Raz, Gal; Berry, Elliot M; Constantini, Naama W

    2009-12-01

    As in other parts of the western world, the rates of pediatric overweight and obesity are also rising in Israel. This fact warrants immediate action by several government offices and health care providers, and also by the trinity of physician, parent(s) and child. An overweight child is likely to remain undiagnosed if relying on observation alone, unless height and weight are objectively measured by the caring medical staff. This review is based on recommendations on the assessment, prevention, and treatment of children and youth who are overweight and obese, recently published on behalf of the American Medical Association and additional health organizations. In general, preventing and treating pediatric obesity is fairly similar: adhering to a healthy lifestyle which emphasizes healthy food choices and habits, regular physical activity, and limiting screen time. Treating and preventing obesity is a timely, but extremely difficult task. Medical personnel and parents should be continuously educated in this field, while supplied with practical tools for childhood lifestyle modification.

  3. Probiotics for Prevention and Treatment of Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Alfredo; Guandalini, Stefano; Lo Vecchio, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are increasingly used for prevention and treatment of diarrhea more in children than in adults. Given the broad spectrum of diarrhea, this review focuses on the main etiologies: acute gastroenteritis, antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD), and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). For each, we reviewed randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and guidelines. For acute gastroenteritis we found 12 guidelines: 5 recommended probiotics and 7 did not. However, the guidelines containing positive recommendations provided proof of evidence from clinical trials and meta-analyses. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Saccharomyces boulardii had the most compelling evidence of efficacy as they reduced the duration of the disease by 1 day. For AAD 4 meta-analyses were found, reporting variable efficacy of probiotics in preventing diarrhea, based on the setting, patient's age, and antibiotics. The most effective strains were LGG and S. boulardii. For NEC, we found 3 randomized controlled trials, 5 meta-analyses, and 4 position papers. Probiotics reduced the risk of NEC enterocolitis and mortality in preterm babies. Guidelines did not support a routine use of probiotics and asked for further data for such sensitive implications. In conclusion, there is strong and solid proof of efficacy of probiotics as active treatment of gastroenteritis in addition to rehydration. There is solid evidence that probiotics have some efficacy in prevention of AAD, but the number needed to treat is an issue. For both etiologies LGG and S. boulardii have the strongest evidence. In NEC the indications are more debated, yet on the basis of available data and their implications, probiotics should be carefully considered.

  4. Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting alter hepatic lipid droplet proteome and diacylglycerol species and prevent diabetes in NZO mice.

    PubMed

    Baumeier, Christian; Kaiser, Daniel; Heeren, Jörg; Scheja, Ludger; John, Clara; Weise, Christoph; Eravci, Murat; Lagerpusch, Merit; Schulze, Gunnar; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schwenk, Robert Wolfgang; Schürmann, Annette

    2015-05-01

    Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are known to improve glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance in several species including humans. The aim of this study was to unravel potential mechanisms by which these interventions improve insulin sensitivity and protect from type 2 diabetes. Diabetes-susceptible New Zealand Obese mice were either 10% calorie restricted (CR) or fasted every other day (IF), and compared to ad libitum (AL) fed control mice. AL mice showed a diabetes prevalence of 43%, whereas mice under CR and IF were completely protected against hyperglycemia. Proteomic analysis of hepatic lipid droplets revealed significantly higher levels of PSMD9 (co-activator Bridge-1), MIF (macrophage migration inhibitor factor), TCEB2 (transcription elongation factor B (SIII), polypeptide 2), ACY1 (aminoacylase 1) and FABP5 (fatty acid binding protein 5), and a marked reduction of GSTA3 (glutathione S-transferase alpha 3) in samples of CR and IF mice. In addition, accumulation of diacylglycerols (DAGs) was significantly reduced in livers of IF mice (P=0.045) while CR mice showed a similar tendency (P=0.062). In particular, 9 DAG species were significantly reduced in response to IF, of which DAG-40:4 and DAG-40:7 also showed significant effects after CR. This was associated with a decreased PKCε activation and might explain the improved insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, our data indicate that protection against diabetes upon caloric restriction and intermittent fasting associates with a modulation of lipid droplet protein composition and reduction of intracellular DAG species. PMID:25645620

  5. A combined system of microbial fuel cell and intermittently aerated biological filter for energy self-sufficient wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yue; Feng, Yujie; Qu, Youpeng; Du, Yue; Zhou, Xiangtong; Liu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Energy self-sufficiency is a highly desirable goal of sustainable wastewater treatment. Herein, a combined system of a microbial fuel cell and an intermittently aerated biological filter (MFC-IABF) was designed and operated in an energy self-sufficient manner. The system was fed with synthetic wastewater (COD = 1000 mg L(-1)) in continuous mode for more than 3 months at room temperature (~25 °C). Voltage output was increased to 5 ± 0.4 V using a capacitor-based circuit. The MFC produced electricity to power the pumping and aeration systems in IABF, concomitantly removing COD. The IABF operating under an intermittent aeration mode (aeration rate 1000 ± 80 mL h(-1)) removed the residual nutrients and improved the water quality at HRT = 7.2 h. This two-stage combined system obtained 93.9% SCOD removal and 91.7% TCOD removal (effluent SCOD = 61 mg L(-1), TCOD = 82.8 mg L(-1)). Energy analysis indicated that the MFC unit produced sufficient energy (0.27 kWh m(-3)) to support the pumping system (0.014 kWh m(-3)) and aeration system (0.22 kWh m(-3)). These results demonstrated that the combined MFC-IABF system could be operated in an energy self-sufficient manner, resulting to high-quality effluent. PMID:26666392

  6. A combined system of microbial fuel cell and intermittently aerated biological filter for energy self-sufficient wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yue; Feng, Yujie; Qu, Youpeng; Du, Yue; Zhou, Xiangtong; Liu, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Energy self-sufficiency is a highly desirable goal of sustainable wastewater treatment. Herein, a combined system of a microbial fuel cell and an intermittently aerated biological filter (MFC-IABF) was designed and operated in an energy self-sufficient manner. The system was fed with synthetic wastewater (COD = 1000 mg L−1) in continuous mode for more than 3 months at room temperature (~25 °C). Voltage output was increased to 5 ± 0.4 V using a capacitor-based circuit. The MFC produced electricity to power the pumping and aeration systems in IABF, concomitantly removing COD. The IABF operating under an intermittent aeration mode (aeration rate 1000 ± 80 mL h−1) removed the residual nutrients and improved the water quality at HRT = 7.2 h. This two-stage combined system obtained 93.9% SCOD removal and 91.7% TCOD removal (effluent SCOD = 61 mg L−1, TCOD = 82.8 mg L−1). Energy analysis indicated that the MFC unit produced sufficient energy (0.27 kWh m−3) to support the pumping system (0.014 kWh m−3) and aeration system (0.22 kWh m−3). These results demonstrated that the combined MFC-IABF system could be operated in an energy self-sufficient manner, resulting to high-quality effluent. PMID:26666392

  7. [Treatment and prevention of cancer treatment related oral mucositis].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Esquide, Gonzalo; Nervi, Bruno; Vargas, Alex; Maíz, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    One of the most common and troublesome complications of modern intensive anticancer treatments is oral mucositis. The purpose of this review is to summarize current evidence and clinical guidelines regarding its prevention and therapy. The use of keratinocyte growth factor-1, supplementary glutamine and other recently developed treatment modalities are discussed. The injury of the oral mucosa caused by antineoplastic agents promotes the local expression of multiple pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic molecules and eventually leads to the development of ulcers. Such lesions predispose patients to several infectious and nutritional complications. Also, they lead to modification of treatment schedules, potentially affecting overall prognosis. Local cryotherapy with ice chips and phototherapy with low energy laser may be useful as preventive measures. Mouthwashes with allopurinol and phototherapy with low energy laser can be used as treatment. In radiotherapy, special radiation administration techniques should be used to minimize mucosal injury. Pain control should always be optimized, with the use of patient controlled analgesia and topical use of morphine. Supplemental glutamine should not be used outside of research protocols. Lastly, thorough attention should be paid to general care and hygiene measures.

  8. A Preliminary Investigation of Continuous and Intermittent Exposures in the Treatment of Public Speaking Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seim, Richard W.; Waller, Stacey A.; Spates, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    It is often argued that exposure-based treatments for anxiety disorders are only effective if the exposures are presented continuously until a marked decrement in anxiety is achieved (e.g. Foa & Kozak, 1986). However, the data supporting this conclusion is limited. This study compared two treatments for public speaking anxiety: one requiring…

  9. A cognitive deficit induced in rats by chronic intermittent cold stress is reversed by chronic antidepressant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Danet, M.; Lapiz-Bluhm, S.; Morilak, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that 14-days of chronic intermittent cold (CIC) stress induced a cognitive deficit in reversal learning on the rat attentional set-shifting test. This effect may be related to dysregulation of 5-HT function in orbitofrontal cortex, as a model of cognitive dysfunction in depression. To test the ability of chronic antidepressant drug treatment to reverse the cognitive deficit induced by CIC, it was first necessary to assess the temporal characteristics of the CIC-induced cognitive deficit. Thus, in the first study, we assessed the duration of the cognitive deficit following 2-weeks CIC stress. Replicating previous experiments, CIC induced a reversal learning deficit tested 3 days after the last cold exposure. However, cognitive performance of CIC-stressed rats was no different from unstressed controls when tested 7, 14 or 21 days after termination of the stress treatment. We next compared behavior 3 days after 2-weeks CIC to that seen 3 days after 5-weeks CIC, and found similar deficits in reversal learning. Thus, in the final study, antidepressant drug treatment was initiated after 2-weeks of CIC stress, and was maintained for 3 weeks, concurrent with the continuation of CIC stress. Both chronic and acute treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram, but not the norepinephrine reuptake blocker, desipramine, reversed the cognitive deficit induced by CIC stress. Thus, this stress-induced cognitive deficit may be a useful model for cognitive deficits related to prefrontal cortical hypoactivity in depression, and for investigating neurobiological mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of chronic antidepressant drug treatment. PMID:20149267

  10. Recurrent gastric bezoars. A new approach to treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Klamer, T W; Max, M H

    1983-03-01

    A recurrent gastric phytobezoar was successfully dispersed using an endoscopically directed intermittent jet of dilute papain. Dissolution analysis of a retrieved bezoar fragment showed pancrelipase and Adolph's Meat Tenderizer to be effective specific solvents. The patient remained free of symptoms while on a prophylactic regimen of pancrelipase taken daily. However, when the patient discontinued his medication, the bezoar recurred. The dissolution process was successfully repeated. Selecting a reagent on the basis of demonstrated effectiveness should enhance the chance of successful dissolution of a phytobezoar, whereas prophylactic doses of the reagent may prevent its recurrence. PMID:6837873

  11. Blood viscosity during long-term treatment with ticlopidine in patients with intermittent claudication. A double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Fagher, B; Persson, S; Persson, G; Larsson, H

    1993-04-01

    The aim was to test within a randomized, double-blind trial whether the antiaggregant drug ticlopidine might reduce blood viscosity as has been claimed. Sixteen patients with intermittent claudication were studied before and after three years of treatment with ticlopidine, 500 mg/day, or placebo. At baseline, the viscosity values were significantly higher as compared with a reference group of healthy subjects. Whole-blood viscosity, measured at four different shear rates at hematocrit adjusted to a standard 40%, decreased significantly at follow-up, with no difference between ticlopidine treatment and placebo. Hematocrit showed a slight increase in the placebo group. The viscosity parameters were unrelated to lower limb blood flow variables, ankle/brachial index, and walking distances. The mechanism behind the overall decrease in whole-blood viscosity is obscure but could possibly be explained by lifestyle changes. Smoking habits were, however, unaltered. Since plasma viscosity remained increased, it might indicate that some erythrocyte factor, notably red cell aggregability and deformability, had improved. It is concluded that ticlopidine had no long-term effect on blood viscosity.

  12. Prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Tella, Sri Harsha; Gallagher, J Christopher

    2014-07-01

    In the beginning, that is from the 1960's, when a link between menopause and osteoporosis was first identified; estrogen treatment was the standard for preventing bone loss, however there was no fracture data, even though it was thought to be effective. This continued until the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study in 2001 that published data on 6 years of treatment with hormone therapy that showed an increase in heart attacks and breast cancer. Even though the risks were small, 1 per 1500 users annually, patients were worried and there was a large drop off in estrogen use. In later analyses the WHI study showed that estrogen reduced fractures and actually prevented heart attacks in the 50-60 year age group. Estrogen alone appeared to be safer to use than estrogen+the progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate and actually reduced breast cancer. At the same time other drugs were being developed for bone that belong to the bisphosphonate group and the first generation of compounds showed moderate potency on bone resorption. The second and third generation compounds were much more potent and in a series of large trials were shown to reduce fractures. For the last 15 years the treatment of osteoporosis belonged to the bisphosphonate compounds, most of which reduce fracture rates by 50 percent. With the exception of gastrointestinal irritation the drugs are well tolerated and highly effective. The sophistication of the delivery systems now allow treatment that can be given daily, weekly, monthly and annually either orally or intravenously. Bone remodeling is a dynamic process that repairs microfractures and replaces old bone with new bone. In the last 10 years there has been a remarkable understanding of bone biology so that new therapies can be specifically designed on a biological basis. The realization that RANKL was the final cytokine involved in the resorption process and that marrow cells produced a natural antagonist called Osteoprotegerin (OPG) quickly led to two

  13. Personalizing Treatment: Between Primary and Secondary Prevention.

    PubMed

    Blaha, Michael J

    2016-09-15

    Current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines for the management of patients with elevated blood cholesterol increasingly emphasize assessment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk in deciding when to initiate pharmacotherapy. The decision to treat is based primarily on mathematical integration of traditional risk factors, including age, sex, race, lipid values, systolic blood pressure, hypertension therapy, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. Advanced risk testing is selectively endorsed for patients when the decision to treat is otherwise uncertain, or more broadly interpreted as those patients who are at so-called "intermediate risk" of ASCVD events using traditional risk factors alone. These new guidelines also place new emphasis on a clinician-patient risk discussion, a process of shared decision making in which patient and physician consider the potential benefits of treatment, risk of adverse events, and patient preferences before making a final decision to initiate treatment. Advanced risk testing is likely to play an increasingly important role in this process as weaknesses in exclusive reliance on traditional risk factors are recognized, new non-statin therapies become available, and guidelines are iteratively updated. Comparative efficacy studies of the various advanced risk testing options suggest that coronary artery calcium scoring is most strongly predictive of ASCVD events. Most importantly, coronary artery calcium scoring appears to identify an important subgroup of patients with advanced subclinical atherosclerosis-who are "between" primary and secondary prevention-that might benefit from the most aggressive lipid-lowering pharmacotherapy. PMID:27620358

  14. PIXE studies of osteoporosis preventive treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ynsa, M. D.; Pinheiro, T.; Ager, F. J.; Alves, L. C.; Millán, J. C.; Gómez-Zubelbia, M. A.; Respaldiza, M. A.

    2002-04-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and nuclear microprobe (NMP) have been used in an exploratory work to study elemental alterations in tissues of experimental animals submitted to osteoporosis preventive treatments. Osteopathologies have been associated with several factors, such as hormonal disturbances, metabolic aberrations, low dietary Ca and vitamin D intake, excess of iron, among other possible factors. Hormonal treatments seem to be beneficial to the incorporation of Ca in bone but breast and endometrial cancers constitute significant side effects that cannot be ignored. Wistar female rats were used to test the effect of estrogen therapy in osteoporosis progression. The variations of elemental concentrations in uterus and the Ca content of femoral bones of ovariectomised rats under estrogen therapy were investigated. PIXE, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and secondary electron microscopy techniques were applied for the characterisation of biological materials, with respect to morphology and trace element distribution determination. The increase of Ca and Fe concentrations in uterus and the variations for Ca distribution patterns in bone of rats submitted to estrogen therapy were the major features observed.

  15. Targeting AMPK for cancer prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Young, Matthew R.; Chen, Guohong; Hua, Baojin

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important mediator in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. AMPK is activated in response to a shortage of energy. Once activated, AMPK can promote ATP production and regulate metabolic energy. AMPK is a known target for treating metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes; however, recently AMPK is emerging as a possible metabolic tumor suppressor and target for cancer prevention and treatment. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that treatment with metformin, an AMPK activator reduces the incidence of cancer. In this article we review the role of AMPK in regulating inflammation, metabolism, and other regulatory processes with an emphasis on cancer, as well as, discuss the potential for targeting AMPK to treat various types of cancer. Activation of AMPK has been found to oppose tumor progression in several cancer types and offers a promising cancer therapy. This review evaluates the evidence linking AMPK with tumor suppressor function and analyzes the molecular mechanisms involved. AMPK activity opposes tumor development and progression in part by regulating inflammation and metabolism. PMID:25812084

  16. Colonic diverticular disease. Treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Gargallo Puyuelo, Carla J; Sopeña, Federico; Lanas Arbeloa, Angel

    2015-12-01

    Diverticular disease represents the most common disease affecting the colon in the Western world. Most cases remain asymptomatic, but some others will have symptoms or develop complications. The aims of treatment in symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease are to prevent complications and reduce the frequency and intensity of symptoms. Fibre, probiotics, mesalazine, rifaximin and their combinations seem to be usually an effective therapy. In the uncomplicated diverticulitis, outpatient management is considered the optimal approach in the majority of patients, and oral antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment. Admission to hospital and intravenous antibiotic are recommended only when the patient is unable to intake food orally, affected by severe comorbidity or does not improve. However, inpatient management and intravenous antibiotics are necessary in complicated diverticulitis. The role of surgery is also changing. Most diverticulitis-associated abscesses can be treated with antibiotics and/or percutaneous drainage and emergency surgery is considered only in patients with acute peritonitis. Finally, patient related factors, and not the number of recurrences, play the most important role in selecting recipients of elective surgery to avoid recurrences. PMID:25979437

  17. Hydrogen gas attenuates embryonic gene expression and prevents left ventricular remodeling induced by intermittent hypoxia in cardiomyopathic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ryuji; Nomura, Atsuo; Sakamoto, Aiji; Yasuda, Yuki; Amatani, Koyuha; Nagai, Sayuri; Sen, Yoko; Ijiri, Yoshio; Okada, Yoshikatsu; Yamaguchi, Takehiro; Izumi, Yasukatsu; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of sleep apnea is very high in patients with heart failure (HF). The aims of this study were to investigate the influence of intermittent hypoxia (IH) on the failing heart and to evaluate the antioxidant effect of hydrogen gas. Normal male Syrian hamsters (n = 22) and cardiomyopathic (CM) hamsters (n = 33) were exposed to IH (repeated cycles of 1.5 min of 5% oxygen and 5 min of 21% oxygen for 8 h during the daytime) or normoxia for 14 days. Hydrogen gas (3.05 vol/100 vol) was inhaled by some CM hamsters during hypoxia. IH increased the ratio of early diastolic mitral inflow velocity to mitral annulus velocity (E/e', 21.8 vs. 16.9) but did not affect the LV ejection fraction (EF) in normal Syrian hamsters. However, IH increased E/e' (29.4 vs. 21.5) and significantly decreased the EF (37.2 vs. 47.2%) in CM hamsters. IH also increased the cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area (672 vs. 443 μm(2)) and interstitial fibrosis (29.9 vs. 9.6%), along with elevation of oxidative stress and superoxide production in the left ventricular (LV) myocardium. Furthermore, IH significantly increased the expression of brain natriuretic peptide, β-myosin heavy chain, c-fos, and c-jun mRNA in CM hamsters. Hydrogen gas inhalation significantly decreased both oxidative stress and embryonic gene expression, thus preserving cardiac function in CM hamsters. In conclusion, IH accelerated LV remodeling in CM hamsters, at least partly by increasing oxidative stress in the failing heart. These findings might explain the poor prognosis of patients with HF and sleep apnea.

  18. Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of gout.

    PubMed

    Hainer, Barry L; Matheson, Eric; Wilkes, R Travis

    2014-12-15

    Gout is characterized by painful joint inflammation, most commonly in the first metatarsophalangeal joint, resulting from precipitation of monosodium urate crystals in a joint space. Gout is typically diagnosed using clinical criteria from the American College of Rheumatology. Diagnosis may be confirmed by identification of monosodium urate crystals in synovial fluid of the affected joint. Acute gout may be treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, or colchicine. To reduce the likelihood of recurrent flares, patients should limit their consumption of certain purine-rich foods (e.g., organ meats, shellfish) and avoid alcoholic drinks (especially beer) and beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup. Consumption of vegetables and low-fat or nonfat dairy products should be encouraged. The use of loop and thiazide diuretics can increase uric acid levels, whereas the use of the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan increases urinary excretion of uric acid. Reduction of uric acid levels is key to avoiding gout flares. Allopurinol and febuxostat are first-line medications for the prevention of recurrent gout, and colchicine and/or probenecid are reserved for patients who cannot tolerate first-line agents or in whom first-line agents are ineffective. Patients receiving urate-lowering medications should be treated concurrently with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine, or low-dose corticosteroids to prevent flares. Treatment should continue for at least three months after uric acid levels fall below the target goal in those without tophi, and for six months in those with a history of tophi.

  19. Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of gout.

    PubMed

    Hainer, Barry L; Matheson, Eric; Wilkes, R Travis

    2014-12-15

    Gout is characterized by painful joint inflammation, most commonly in the first metatarsophalangeal joint, resulting from precipitation of monosodium urate crystals in a joint space. Gout is typically diagnosed using clinical criteria from the American College of Rheumatology. Diagnosis may be confirmed by identification of monosodium urate crystals in synovial fluid of the affected joint. Acute gout may be treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, or colchicine. To reduce the likelihood of recurrent flares, patients should limit their consumption of certain purine-rich foods (e.g., organ meats, shellfish) and avoid alcoholic drinks (especially beer) and beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup. Consumption of vegetables and low-fat or nonfat dairy products should be encouraged. The use of loop and thiazide diuretics can increase uric acid levels, whereas the use of the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan increases urinary excretion of uric acid. Reduction of uric acid levels is key to avoiding gout flares. Allopurinol and febuxostat are first-line medications for the prevention of recurrent gout, and colchicine and/or probenecid are reserved for patients who cannot tolerate first-line agents or in whom first-line agents are ineffective. Patients receiving urate-lowering medications should be treated concurrently with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine, or low-dose corticosteroids to prevent flares. Treatment should continue for at least three months after uric acid levels fall below the target goal in those without tophi, and for six months in those with a history of tophi. PMID:25591183

  20. Chronic intermittent ethanol treatment selectively alters N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit surface expression in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Mei; Denny, Ashley D; Ticku, Maharaj K

    2007-07-01

    A chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure regimen consists of repeated episodes of ethanol intoxication and withdrawal. CIE treatment has been reported to result in a significant enhancement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic responses in vivo, and trafficking of NMDA receptors is emerging a key regulatory mechanism that underlies the channel function. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the effects of CIE on NMDA receptor subunit surface expression. Cultured cortical neurons were exposed to 75 mM ethanol for 14 h followed by 10 h of withdrawal, repeated this cycle five times, and followed by 2 or 5 days of withdrawal. Surface-expressed NMDA receptor subunits and their endocytosis were measured by biotinylation and Western blots. CIE significantly increased NMDA receptor (NR) 1 and NR2B but not NR2A subunit surface expression after 5 days of treatment. However, CIE treatment did not reduce the NMDA receptor endocytosis. Quantification of immunocytochemistry confirmed CIE-induced increase in both the total number of NR1 and NR2B subunit clusters and their targeting to synaptic sites. It is noteworthy that this effect persisted even after ethanol withdrawal with a peak expression occurring between 0 and 2 days after withdrawal, and the expression on the plasma membrane was still at high levels after 5 days of withdrawal. In addition, this was accompanied by significant increases in postsynaptic density protein 95 clusters. Protein kinase A inhibitor completely reversed CIE-induced increase in NR1 and partially in NR2B surface level and a long-lasting effect. These changes may contribute to the development of ethanol-induced neurotoxicity and ethanol dependence.

  1. The effect of anthelmintic treatment on coccidia oocyst shedding in a wild mammal host with intermittent cestode infection.

    PubMed

    Václav, Radovan; Blažeková, Jana

    2014-01-01

    While hosts are routinely exploited by a community of parasite species, the principles governing host responses towards parasites are unclear. Identifying the health outcomes of coinfections involving helminth macroparasites and microparasites is one area of importance for public and domestic animal health. For instance, it is controversial how deworming programmes affect incidence and severity of such important microparasite diseases as malaria. One problem is that most study systems involve domestic and laboratory animals with conditions hardly comparable to those of free-living animals. Here, we study the effect of anthelmintic treatment on coccidia infection intensity in wild Alpine marmots, M. marmota. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that helminth infection has a positive effect on concurrent microparasite infection. However, our work also points to the fact that within-host interactions between helminths and microparasites are context-dependent and can turn to negative ones once helminth burdens increase. Our study suggests that coccidia benefit from intermittent helminth infection in marmots due to the protective effects of helminth infection only during the early phase of the host's active season. Also, the marmot's response towards coccidia infection appears optimal only under no helminth infection when the host immune response towards coccidia would not be compromised, thereby pointing to the importance of regular intestinal helminth elimination by marmots just before hibernation. PMID:25506065

  2. Intermittent Theta Burst Over M1 May Increase Peak Power of a Wingate Anaerobic Test and Prevent the Reduction of Voluntary Activation Measured with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Giboin, Louis-Solal; Thumm, Patrick; Bertschinger, Raphael; Gruber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Despite the potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to improve performances in patients suffering from motor neuronal afflictions, its effect on motor performance enhancement in healthy subjects during a specific sport task is still unknown. We hypothesized that after an intermittent theta burst (iTBS) treatment, performance during the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) will increase and supraspinal fatigue following the exercise will be lower in comparison to a control treatment. Ten subjects participated in two randomized experiments consisting of a WAnT 5 min after either an iTBS or a control treatment. We determined voluntary activation (VA) of the right knee extensors with TMS (VATMS) and with peripheral nerve stimulation (VAPNS) of the femoral nerve, before and after the WAnT. T-tests were applied to the WAnT results and a two way within subject ANOVA was applied to VA results. The iTBS treatment increased the peak power and the maximum pedalling cadence and suppressed the reduction of VATMS following the WAnT compared to the control treatment. No behavioral changes related to fatigue (mean power and fatigue index) were observed. These results indicate for the first time that iTBS could be used as a potential intervention to improve anaerobic performance in a sport specific task. PMID:27486391

  3. Intermittent Theta Burst Over M1 May Increase Peak Power of a Wingate Anaerobic Test and Prevent the Reduction of Voluntary Activation Measured with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Giboin, Louis-Solal; Thumm, Patrick; Bertschinger, Raphael; Gruber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Despite the potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to improve performances in patients suffering from motor neuronal afflictions, its effect on motor performance enhancement in healthy subjects during a specific sport task is still unknown. We hypothesized that after an intermittent theta burst (iTBS) treatment, performance during the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) will increase and supraspinal fatigue following the exercise will be lower in comparison to a control treatment. Ten subjects participated in two randomized experiments consisting of a WAnT 5 min after either an iTBS or a control treatment. We determined voluntary activation (VA) of the right knee extensors with TMS (VATMS) and with peripheral nerve stimulation (VAPNS) of the femoral nerve, before and after the WAnT. T-tests were applied to the WAnT results and a two way within subject ANOVA was applied to VA results. The iTBS treatment increased the peak power and the maximum pedalling cadence and suppressed the reduction of VATMS following the WAnT compared to the control treatment. No behavioral changes related to fatigue (mean power and fatigue index) were observed. These results indicate for the first time that iTBS could be used as a potential intervention to improve anaerobic performance in a sport specific task. PMID:27486391

  4. Preventive treatments for breast cancer: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Alés-Martínez, J E; Ruiz, A; Chacón, J I; Lluch Hernández, A; Ramos, M; Córdoba, O; Aguirre, E; Barnadas, A; Jara, C; González, S; Plazaola, A; Florián, J; Andrés, R; Sánchez Rovira, P; Frau, A

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is a burden for western societies, and an increasing one in emerging economies, because of its high incidence and enormous psychological, social, sanitary and economic costs. However, breast cancer is a preventable disease in a significant proportion. Recent developments in the armamentarium of effective drugs for breast cancer prevention (namely exemestane and anastrozole), the new recommendation from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to use preventative drugs in women at high risk as well as updated Guidelines from the US Preventive Services Task Force and the American Society of Clinical Oncology should give renewed momentum to the pharmacological prevention of breast cancer. In this article we review recent major developments in the field and examine their ongoing repercussion for breast cancer prevention. As a practical example, the potential impact of preventive measures in Spain is evaluated and a course of practical actions is delineated.

  5. Stress fractures: diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Patel, Deepak S; Roth, Matt; Kapil, Neha

    2011-01-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in athletes and military recruits. These injuries occur more commonly in lower extremities than in upper extremities. Stress fractures should be considered in patients who present with tenderness or edema after a recent increase in activity or repeated activity with limited rest. The differential diagnosis varies based on location, but commonly includes tendinopathy, compartment syndrome, and nerve or artery entrapment syndrome. Medial tibial stress syndrome (shin splints) can be distinguished from tibial stress fractures by diffuse tenderness along the length of the posteromedial tibial shaft and a lack of edema. When stress fracture is suspected, plain radiography should be obtained initially and, if negative, may be repeated after two to three weeks for greater accuracy. If an urgent diagnosis is needed, triple-phase bone scintigraphy or magnetic resonance imaging should be considered. Both modalities have a similar sensitivity, but magnetic resonance imaging has greater specificity. Treatment of stress fractures consists of activity modification, including the use of nonweight-bearing crutches if needed for pain relief. Analgesics are appropriate to relieve pain, and pneumatic bracing can be used to facilitate healing. After the pain is resolved and the examination shows improvement, patients may gradually increase their level of activity. Surgical consultation may be appropriate for patients with stress fractures in high-risk locations, nonunion, or recurrent stress fractures. Prevention of stress fractures has been studied in military personnel, but more research is needed in other populations.

  6. Stress fractures: diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Patel, Deepak S; Roth, Matt; Kapil, Neha

    2011-01-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in athletes and military recruits. These injuries occur more commonly in lower extremities than in upper extremities. Stress fractures should be considered in patients who present with tenderness or edema after a recent increase in activity or repeated activity with limited rest. The differential diagnosis varies based on location, but commonly includes tendinopathy, compartment syndrome, and nerve or artery entrapment syndrome. Medial tibial stress syndrome (shin splints) can be distinguished from tibial stress fractures by diffuse tenderness along the length of the posteromedial tibial shaft and a lack of edema. When stress fracture is suspected, plain radiography should be obtained initially and, if negative, may be repeated after two to three weeks for greater accuracy. If an urgent diagnosis is needed, triple-phase bone scintigraphy or magnetic resonance imaging should be considered. Both modalities have a similar sensitivity, but magnetic resonance imaging has greater specificity. Treatment of stress fractures consists of activity modification, including the use of nonweight-bearing crutches if needed for pain relief. Analgesics are appropriate to relieve pain, and pneumatic bracing can be used to facilitate healing. After the pain is resolved and the examination shows improvement, patients may gradually increase their level of activity. Surgical consultation may be appropriate for patients with stress fractures in high-risk locations, nonunion, or recurrent stress fractures. Prevention of stress fractures has been studied in military personnel, but more research is needed in other populations. PMID:21888126

  7. Treatment and prevention of music performance anxiety.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Music performance anxiety (MPA) regularly occurs when musicians present themselves before an audience in performance situations, and thus, it plays an important role in the careers of professional musicians. MPA is expressed on the emotional and physical level, as well as on the levels of thinking and behavior, and extends along a continuum of varying severity. Its performance-impairing, afflicting form is considered to be a specific type of social phobia, which requires therapy. There are different psychological theories, which contribute to the understanding of the phenomenon of MPA and provide basic principles for the various treatment approaches. Current "best practice," in our clinical experience, is a personal- and problem-oriented approach within a multimodal therapy model, including the range of psychoanalytic and cognitive behavioral therapies, body-oriented methods, and mental techniques. In order to avoid severe MPA, prevention in the field of music pedagogic is very important. Thus, the concepts of dealing positively with MPA should be implemented very early into the instrumental and vocal education of musicians.

  8. Pediatric obesity: Causes, symptoms, prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    XU, SHUMEI; XUE, YING

    2016-01-01

    , and mitochondrial uncoupling proteins, are known to affect body weight. These molecules serve as potential targets for the pharmacological manipulation of obesity. Sibutramine and orlistat are primariliy used for the treatment of adult obesity, which produces modest weight loss, of 3–8% compared to placebo. For children and obese adolescents, metformin is used in the case of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. Octreotide is used for hypothalamic obesity. Bariatric surgery is performed for the treatment of severe childhood obesity. The causes, symptoms, prevention and treatment of pediatric obesity are described in the present review. PMID:26834850

  9. Rationale for using intermittent calorie restriction as a dietary treatment for drug resistant epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Alan W C; Sander, Josemir W

    2014-04-01

    There has been resurgence in the use of dietary treatment, principally the classical ketogenic diet and its variants, for people with epilepsy. These diets generally require significant medical and dietician support. An effective but less restrictive dietary regimen is likely to be more acceptable and more widely used. Calorie-restricted diets appear to produce a range of biochemical and metabolic changes including reduced glucose levels, reduced inflammatory markers, increased sirtuins, increased AMPK signaling, inhibition of mTOR signaling, and increase in autophagy. There are studies in animal seizure models that suggest that these biochemical and metabolic changes may decrease ictogenesis and epileptogenesis. A calorie-restricted diet might be effective in reducing seizures in people with epilepsy. Hence, there is a sufficient rationale to undertake clinical trials to assess the efficacy and safety of calorie-restricted diets in people with epilepsy. PMID:24657501

  10. Non-specific monitoring to resolve intermittent pollutant problems associated with wastewater treatment and potable supply.

    PubMed

    Stuetz, R M

    2004-01-01

    An online monitoring system based on an array of non-specific sensors was used for the detection of chemical pollutants in wastewater and water. By superimposing sensor profiles for defined sampling window, the identification of data points outside these normal sensor response patterns was used to represent potential pollution episodes or other abnormalities within the process stream. Principle component analysis supported the detection of outliers or rapid changes in the sensor responses as an indicator of chemical pollutants. A model based on the comparison of sensor relative responses to a moving average for a defined sample window was tested for detecting and identifying sudden changes in the online data over a 6-month period. These results show the technical advantages of using a non-specific based monitoring system that can respond to a range of chemical species, due to broad selectivity of the sensor compositions. The findings demonstrate how this non-invasive technique could be further developed to provide early warning systems for application at the inlet of wastewater treatment plants.

  11. [Microabrasive tooth preparation for early caries prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Dmitrova, A G; Kulakov, A A; Vinnichenko, Iu A; Monastyreva, E G

    2011-01-01

    Based on the 4-year experience with the method of air-abrasion treatment on the stages of treatment and prevention of dental caries in the article provides data on the indications for its use, benefits and complications.

  12. Initial Treatment of Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Nasal Intermittent Mandatory Ventilation versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Armanian, Amir-Mohammad; Badiee, Zohreh; Heidari, Ghobad; Feizi, Awat; Salehimehr, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in premature infants who survived and its complications are a common problem. Due to high morbidity and mechanical ventilation (MV) nowadays researchers in interested minimizing MV. To determine, in very low birth weight (BW) preterm neonates with RDS, if initial treatment with nasal intermittent mandatory ventilation (early NIMV) compared with early nasal continuous positive airway pressure (early NCPAP) obtains more favorable outcomes in terms of the duration of treatment, and the need for endotracheal tube ventilation. Methods: In this single-center randomized control trial study, infants (BW ≤ 1500 g and/or gestational age ≤ 34 weeks) with respiratory distress were considered eligible. Forty-four infants were randomly assigned to receive early-NIMV and 54 comparable infants to early-NCPAP. Surfactants were given, when FIO2 requirement was of >30%. Primary outcomes were failure of noninvasive respiratory support, that is, the need for MV in the first 48 h of life and for the duration of noninvasive respiratory support in each group. Results: 98 infants were enrolled (44 in the NIMV and 54 in the NCPAP group). The Preventive power of MV of NIMV usage (95.5%) was not lower than the NCPAP (98.1%) strength (hazard ratio: 0.21 (95% confidence interval: 0.02-2.66); P: 0.23). The duration of noninvasive respiratory support in the NIMV group was significantly shorter than NCPAP (the median (range) was 24 (18.00-48.00) h versus 48.00 (22.00-120.00) h in NIMV versus NCPAP groups; P < 0.001). Similarly, the duration of dependency on oxygen was less, for NIMV (the median (range) was 96.00 (41.00-504.00) h versus144.00 (70.00-1130.00) h in NIMV versus NCPAP groups; P: 0.009). Interestingly, time to full enteral feeds and length of hospital stay were more favorable in the NIMV versus the NCPAP group. Conclusions: Initial treatment of RDS with NIMV was safe, and well tolerated. Furthermore, NIMV had excellent

  13. Burnout: Treatment and Prevention Strategies for College Student Affairs Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keener, Roger

    1990-01-01

    Presents possible prevention and treatment strategies for combating burnout among college student affairs professionals. Includes definition of burnout, review of symptoms of burnout, discussion of causes of burnout, and suggestions for treatment and prevention of burnout. Interventions discussed include personal counseling, using stress…

  14. Infection prevention and treatment in patients with major burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Rowley-Conwy, G

    Infection is a significant challenge in burn care, particularly for those patients who have major burn injuries. This article aims to review the literature and establish best practice in prevention and treatment of infection in patients with major burns. The article considers the causes and clinical features of wound infection, and examines systemic and local methods of prevention and treatment. PMID:21138123

  15. Preventing Vomiting Caused by Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... vomiting and help prevent these symptoms during future cycles of chemotherapy . It is very important to call or see your doctor if you cannot keep food or water in your body because of severe nausea and ...

  16. Decision Thresholds and Changes in Risk for Preventive Treatment.

    PubMed

    Courbage, Christophe; Rey, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the notion of treatment threshold for preventive treatment with potential side effects in the context of changes in risk. Changes in risk are defined by the concept of nth-order stochastic dominance and concern the effectiveness of preventive treatment, side effects, severity of the potential disease, and comorbidity risk. The impact of a riskier environment on the probability of disease threshold above which the preferable decision is to undergo preventive treatment is shown to depend on both mixed risk averse individual preferences and the configuration of increase in risk considered. These results suggest that neglecting differences between risks when evaluating the treatment threshold is likely to lead to substantial errors in most cost-benefit applications for preventive treatment.

  17. Treatment and prevention of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials have ascertained the efficiency of antibiotics in treating erythema migrans, the hallmark of early stage Lyme borreliosis. Oral amoxicillin and doxycycline are first-line treatment options, though phenoxymethylpenicillin, cefuroxime axetil and azithromycin are alternative second-line options. Treatments for secondary and tertiary Lyme borreliosis are more poorly documented, and antibiotics are not always effective. This is due to the unique pathophysiology of late Lyme borreliosis, which involves not only bacterial infection, but also immunological response. Since there is no completely reliable method of diagnosis, it is difficult to choose the proper treatment and to evaluate treatment efficacy. However, numerous studies have shown that ceftriaxone and doxycycline are the 2 most efficient antibiotics, particularly in Lyme arthritis and in neuroborreliosis. In late Lyme borreliosis, these antibiotics are less efficient, and different treatment schemes with variations in dosage or duration did not produce convincing results.

  18. Screening, prevention, and treatment of congenital cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julie; Anderson, Brenna

    2014-12-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading cause of permanent disability in children. The main source of maternal infection is from contact with young children. Primary maternal infection is diagnosed with demonstration of seroconversion or a positive CMV IgM in combination with a low-avidity CMV IgG. Fetal infection may be diagnosed with amniotic fluid polymerase chain reaction and culture. CMV-specific hyperimmune globulin has shown promise as a possible means to prevent congenital infection; large randomized trials are ongoing. To date, the only effective means of prevention is through reducing exposure to the virus. Rates of maternal infection may be reduced through education regarding sources of infection and improved hygiene.

  19. [Compulsory outpatient treatment can prevent involuntary commitment].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lene Nørregård; Svensson, Eva Maria Birgitta; Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette

    2014-04-14

    Compulsory outpatient treatment (co-pt) has been possible in Denmark since 2010. The aim is to secure necessary treatment, reduce involuntary commitment and improve quality of life for patients with a severe psychiatric illness. Co-pt has been brought into use in 33 cases. This case report describes a patient with paranoid schizophrenia who several times developed severe psychotic symptoms shortly after discharge due to lack of compliance with treatment. Within one year of co-pt the patient was not admitted to hospital and improved in overall functioning. After terminating co-pt the patient rapidly deteriorated into psychotic relapse.

  20. Intermittent hypoxia induces functional recovery following cervical spinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Vinit, Stéphane; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory-related complications are the leading cause of death in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Few effective SCI treatments are available after therapeutic interventions are performed in the period shortly after injury (e.g. spine stabilization and prevention of further spinal damage). In this review we explore the capacity to harness endogenous spinal plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia to optimize function of surviving (spared) neural pathways associated with breathing. Two primary questions are addressed: 1) does intermittent hypoxia induce plasticity in spinal synaptic pathways to respiratory motor neurons following experimental SCI? and 2) can this plasticity improve respiratory function? In normal rats, intermittent hypoxia induces serotonin-dependent plasticity in spinal pathways to respiratory motor neurons. Early experiments suggest that intermittent hypoxia also enhances respiratory motor output in experimental models of cervical SCI, (cervical hemisection) and that the capacity to induce functional recovery is greater with longer durations post-injury. Available evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia-induced spinal plasticity has considerable therapeutic potential to treat respiratory insufficiency following chronic cervical spinal injury. PMID:19651247

  1. Osteoporosis: incidence, prevention, and treatment of the silent killer.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Lynn C

    2005-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a nationwide health care concern affecting millions of Americans. Health care dollars to prevent and treat osteoporosis are needed. Osteoporosis-related injuries and resulting disabilities, and consequent admissions to hospitals, nursing homes, and long-term care facilities is costing billions of dollars for care and treatment. Healthy lifestyle choices including vitamin and mineral therapy; safe home environments; a diet replete with calcium, vitamin D, and protein; weight-bearing and resistance exercises; and fall prevention programs for home-bound and hospitalized elders are needed to prevent osteoporosis-related fractures and injuries. Nurses must educate the public on osteoporosis and osteoporosis-prevention activities. Research in nursing, pharmacy, and allied health fields such as physical therapy and nutrition must expand to improve understanding of the risks associated with osteoporosis and to evaluate health-promotion and disease- prevention activities. Interdisciplinary partnerships should be established to study the issues, prevention, and treatment modalities of this "silent killer."

  2. Episodic migraines in children: limited evidence on preventive pharmacological treatments.

    PubMed

    Shamliyan, Tatyana A; Kane, Robert L; Ramakrishnan, Rema; Taylor, Frederick R

    2013-10-01

    The authors conducted a systematic literature review of preventive pharmacological treatments for episodic childhood migraines searching several databases through May 20, 2012. Episodic migraine prevention was examined in 24 publications of randomized controlled trials that enrolled 1578 children in 16 nonrandomized studies. Single randomized controlled trials provided low-strength evidence that propranolol would result in complete cessation of migraine attacks in 713 per 1000 children treated (95% confidence interval, 452-974); trazodone and nimodipine decreased migraine days, while topiramate, divalproex, and clonidine were no more effective than placebo in preventing migraines. Migraine prevention with multidisciplinary drug management was not sustained at 6 months. Divalproex resulted in treatment discontinuation due to adverse effects, and topiramate increased the risk of paresthesia, upper respiratory tract infection, and weight loss. Long-term preventive benefits and improvement in disability and quality of life are unknown. No studies examined quality of life or provided evidence for individualized treatment decisions.

  3. [Significance of precision medicine in pancreatic cancer prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Wang, C F

    2016-03-23

    The morbidity and mortality of pancreatic cancer has been increasing year by year, however, the treatment progress and prevention effect were minimal. With the development of basic research, especially the advances of gene sequencing technology, it was possible to clarify the etiology and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, and achieve the first stage prevention. The discovery of pancreatic cancer exosomes of high sensitivity and specificity made early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (the second stage prevention) no longer a worldwide problem. The build of pancreatic cancer genotyping with clinical applicability made the precision treatment of pancreatic cancer (the third stage prevention) possible. Thus, the precision medicine which is based on advances of gene sequencing, popularity of the Internet and the big data technology has brought a ray of hope for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26988819

  4. Early Childhood Health--Mental Health Prevention and Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lawrence S.

    The Maimonides Early Childhood Health-Mental Health Prevention and Treatment Program is described. The program provides a broad range of preventive services to children who are five years of age and younger. Services are organized into Post-Natal and Pre-School Programs. The Post-Natal Program offers group education and counseling, individual…

  5. Preventive Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis: Issues Regarding Patient Preferences.

    PubMed

    Finckh, Axel; Escher, Monica; Liang, Matthew H; Bansback, Nick

    2016-08-01

    The detection of biomarkers in the preclinical phase of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and recent therapeutic advances suggest that it may be possible to identify and treat persons at high risk and to prevent the development of RA. Several trials are ongoing to test the efficacy of a therapeutic intervention in primary prevention. This paper reviews potential populations that might be considered for preventative medication. Further, we review the medications that are being explored to treat individuals considered at high risk of developing RA. Finally, in a group of asymptomatic individuals at high risk of developing RA, we assessed which factors mattered most when considering a preventive therapeutic intervention and what type of preventive treatment would be most acceptable to them. Understanding subjects' perceptions of risks and benefits and willingness to undergo preventive therapy will be important in designing and implementing screening and preventive strategies. PMID:27402108

  6. Prevention and management of lymphedema after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Shaila J; Chen, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema of the arm after breast cancer treatment continues to challenge clinicians worldwide. In this review, we examine the main modalities, both nonsurgical and surgical, to prevent and treat this as yet incurable condition. PMID:25772311

  7. Prevention and Treatment of Avian Influenza A Viruses in People

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Making a Candidate Vaccine Virus Related Links Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... Button Past Newsletters Prevention and Treatment of Avian Influenza A Viruses in People Language: English Español ...

  8. Impact of Intermittent Screening and Treatment for Malaria among School Children in Kenya: A Cluster Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Katherine E.; Okello, George; Turner, Elizabeth L.; Njagi, Kiambo; Mcharo, Carlos; Kengo, Juddy; Allen, Elizabeth; Dubeck, Margaret M.; Jukes, Matthew C. H.; Brooker, Simon J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Improving the health of school-aged children can yield substantial benefits for cognitive development and educational achievement. However, there is limited experimental evidence of the benefits of alternative school-based malaria interventions or how the impacts of interventions vary according to intensity of malaria transmission. We investigated the effect of intermittent screening and treatment (IST) for malaria on the health and education of school children in an area of low to moderate malaria transmission. Methods and Findings A cluster randomised trial was implemented with 5,233 children in 101 government primary schools on the south coast of Kenya in 2010–2012. The intervention was delivered to children randomly selected from classes 1 and 5 who were followed up for 24 months. Once a school term, children were screened by public health workers using malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), and children (with or without malaria symptoms) found to be RDT-positive were treated with a six dose regimen of artemether-lumefantrine (AL). Given the nature of the intervention, the trial was not blinded. The primary outcomes were anaemia and sustained attention. Secondary outcomes were malaria parasitaemia and educational achievement. Data were analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. During the intervention period, an average of 88.3% children in intervention schools were screened at each round, of whom 17.5% were RDT-positive. 80.3% of children in the control and 80.2% in the intervention group were followed-up at 24 months. No impact of the malaria IST intervention was observed for prevalence of anaemia at either 12 or 24 months (adjusted risk ratio [Adj.RR]: 1.03, 95% CI 0.93–1.13, p = 0.621 and Adj.RR: 1.00, 95% CI 0.90–1.11, p = 0.953) respectively, or on prevalence of P. falciparum infection or scores of classroom attention. No effect of IST was observed on educational achievement in the older class, but an apparent negative effect was

  9. Understanding Cancer Prevention, Detection, Treatment, Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH/NCI NCI: 70 Years of Excellence in Cancer Research Welcome to this special section on cancer research and treatment. August 5 of this year marks ... creation of what has become the world's preeminent cancer research organization, the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Our nation ...

  10. Prevention and treatment of intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jantzen, Jan-Peter A H

    2007-12-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure exerted by cranial contents on the dural envelope. It comprises the partial pressures of brain, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Normal intracranial pressure is somewhere below 10 mmHg; it may increase as a result of traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, Reye's syndrome, hepatic coma, or other pathologies. When ICP increases above 20 mmHg it may damage neurons and jeopardize cerebral perfusion. If such a condition persists, treatment is indicated. Control of ICP requires measurement, which can only be performed invasively. Standard techniques include direct ventricular manometry or measurement in the parenchyma with electronic or fiberoptic devices. Displaying the time course of pressure (high-resolution ICP tonoscopy) allows assessment of the validity of the signal and identification of specific pathological findings, such as A-, B- and C-waves. When ICP is pathologically elevated--at or above 20-25 mmHg--it needs to be lowered. A range of treatment modalities is available and should be applied with consideration of the underlying cause. When intracranial hypertension is caused by hematoma, contusion, tumor, hygroma, hydrocephalus or pneumatocephalus, surgical treatment is indicated. In the absence of a surgically treatable condition, ICP may be controlled by correcting the patient's position, temperature, ventilation or hemodynamics. If intracranial hypertension persists, drainage of CSF via external drainage is most effective. Other first-tier options include induced hypocapnea (hyperventilation; paCO2 < 35 mmHg), hyperosmolar therapy (mannitol, hypertonic saline) and induced arterial hypertension (CPP concept). When autoregulation of cerebral blood flow is compromised, hyperoncotic treatment aimed at reducing vasogenic edema and intracranial blood volume may be applied. When intracranial hypertension persists, second-tier treatments may be indicated. These include 'forced hyperventilation' (paCO2 < 25 mm

  11. Few Patient, Treatment, and Diagnostic or Microbiological Factors, Except Complications and Intermittent Negative Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Cultures During First CSF Shunt Infection, Are Associated With Reinfection

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Tamara D.; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Whitlock, Kathryn B.; Langley, Marcie; Kestle, John R. W.; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Thorell, Emily A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between first and subsequent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt infections is poorly understood. By understanding the factors associated with increased risk of reinfection, researchers may provide optimal treatment strategies at the time of first infection. The objective of this study was to describe and compare children with and without CSF shunt reinfection. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed among 118 children who underwent initial CSF shunt placement and developed first CSF shunt infection. The primary outcome variable was CSF shunt reinfection. Patient risk factors and medical and surgical management of initial CSF shunt placement and first CSF shunt infection were compared between children with and without reinfection. Results Of 118 children with first infection, 31 (26%) developed a reinfection during the study period (overall median follow-up, 2096 days). Factors associated with reinfection in this cohort included ventriculoatrial or complex shunt at initial CSF shunt placement, complications after first CSF shunt infection, and intermittent negative CSF cultures. Conclusions Few patient or treatment factors were associated with reinfection. Factors associated with difficult-to-treat first CSF shunt infection, including complications after first CSF shunt infection and intermittent negative CSF cultures, were associated with reinfection. Clinicians who treat patients with unusual CSF shunts or more difficult first infections should have a high index of suspicion for reinfection after treatment is completed. PMID:24567841

  12. Ethics of ARV based prevention: treatment-as-prevention and PrEP.

    PubMed

    Haire, Bridget; Kaldor, John M

    2013-08-01

    Published data show that new HIV prevention strategies including treatment-as-prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using oral antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) are highly, but not completely, effective if regimens are taken as directed. Consequently, their implementation may challenge norms around HIV prevention. Specific concerns include the potential for ARV-based prevention to reframe responsibility, erode beneficial sexual norms and waste resources. This paper explores what rights claims uninfected people can make for access to ARVs for prevention, and whether moral claims justify the provision of ARV therapy to those who do not yet clinically require treatment as a way of reducing HIV transmission risk. An ethical analysis was conducted of the two strategies, PrEP and treatment-as-prevention, using a public health stewardship model developed by the Nuffield Bioethics Council to consider and compare the application of PrEP and treatment-as-prevention strategies. We found that treating the person with HIV rather than the uninfected person offers advantages in settings where there are limited opportunities to access care. A treatment-as-prevention strategy that places all the emphasis upon the positive person's adherence however carries a disproportionate burden of responsibility. PrEP remains an important option for receptive partners who face increased biological vulnerability. We conclude that the use of ARV for prevention is ethically justified, despite imperfect global to drugs for those in clinical need. The determination of which ARV-based HIV prevention strategy is ethically preferable is complex and must take into account both public health and interpersonal considerations. PMID:23594312

  13. Youth baseball injuries: recognition, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Ray, Tracy R

    2010-01-01

    Baseball is a very popular and safe sport for children and adolescents. Understanding bone maturation and risk factors for overuse will guide the practitioner to manage these athletes properly. Overuse injury risk can be minimized by limiting pitch counts, ensuring adequate recovery, developing proper mechanics, and allowing for early evaluation and intervention. Rest, albeit difficult for the athlete, is the mainstay of treatment for many of the maladies affecting this age group of throwers. Individualized approaches to treatment for this population are advised. Structural damage that may lead to surgery is rare but may need consideration if there is no response to conservative measures. Several resources are available to educate players, coaches, and parents regarding safe play.

  14. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox ... Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation Ban Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum Orf Virus ( ...

  15. Prevention and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Mohini; Wozniak, Daniel J; Stoodley, Paul; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne

    2015-01-01

    S. aureus colonizes both artificial and tissue surfaces in humans causing chronic persistent infections that are difficult to cure. It is a notorious pathogen due to its antibiotic recalcitrance and phenotypic adaptability, both of which are facilitated by its ability to develop biofilms. S. aureus biofilms challenge conventional anti-infective approaches, most notably antibiotic therapy. Therefore there is an unmet need to develop and include parallel approaches that target S. aureus biofilm infections. This review discusses two broad anti-infective strategies: (1) preventative approaches (anti-biofilm surface coatings, the inclusion of biofilm-specific vaccine antigens); and (2) approaches aimed at eradicating established S. aureus biofilms, particularly those associated with implant infections. Advances in understanding the distinct nature of S. aureus biofilm development and pathogenesis have led to growing optimism in S. aureus biofilm targeted anti-infective strategies. Further research is needed however, to see the successful administration and validation of these approaches to the diverse types of infections caused by S. aureus biofilms from multiple clinical strains. PMID:26646248

  16. Prevention of dental disease versus surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2014-01-01

    The members of the Minnesota legislature have debated methods by which access to dental care and treatment of dental disease can be improved at a cost lower than that of present delivery systems. This review sheds light on some significant aspects of what the dental profession has learned over the last century that has proven significantly beneficial to the overall health of the American populace. Recommendations are made in the use of cost-effective dental public health interventions that could be used to provide better access and improved dental health at lower cost.

  17. Treatment and prevention of insect bites: mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Williams, LaVonn A; Allen, Loyd V

    2012-01-01

    Insect bites are a common complaint of patients during the summer months, when more time is spent enjoying the warm weather. While most reactions to insect bites are mild, in rare cases, a severe allergic reaction may occur. In addition, certain insects may transmit potentially serious diseases. Counseling patients on the proper use of insect repellants and good first aid techniques can significantly reduce the risks posed by the presence of summertime pests. This article focuses on mosquitoes, the diseases they spread, and suggested treatments.

  18. Treatment and prevention of alcohol hangover.

    PubMed

    Verster, Joris C; Penning, Renske

    2010-06-01

    The search for alcohol hangover cures is as old as alcohol itself. Many cures and prophylactic agents are available, but scientific evidence for their effectiveness is generally lacking. This review summarizes and discusses the limited number of studies that examined the effectiveness of alcohol hangover treatments. From these studies it must be concluded that most remedies do not significantly reduce overall hangover severity. Some compounds reduce specific symptoms such as vomiting and headache, but are not effective in reducing other common hangover symptoms such as drowsiness and fatigue. Hangover cures that showed positive effects were those inhibiting prostaglandin synthesis or accelerating alcohol metabolism. Future studies should elucidate the pathology of alcohol hangover. Until then, it is unlikely that an effective hangover cure will be developed.

  19. [Prevention and treatment of febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Montemurro, F; Gallicchio, M; Aglietta, M

    1997-01-01

    -positive infections are becoming increasingly problematic. The association with an agent that can be absorbed orally, active against gram-positive cocci, seems to be an effective strategy. Fungal infections are an important cause of morbility and mortality in severely neutropenic patients. Safety and efficacy of antifungal triazoles and the lipid formulations of amphotericin B used prophylactically still require investigation. In patients at high risk for fungal infections, monitoring cultures are predictive for systemic mycoses and should guide prophylactic and therapeutic choices. The standard treatment of oncologic patients with potential infectious neutropenia complications is admission to the hospital and treatment with broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Until third generation cephalosporin and carbapenems became available, most neutropenic febrile patients were treated with associations of an aminoglycoside plus a beta-lactam. Monotherapy with the new antibiotics has proven to be effective as an association therapy and offers advantages in terms of cost and tolerability. Whether or not vancomycin is included in the initial antibiotic regimen should be decided on the basis of epidemiological consideration (i.e. prevalence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus mitis in certain centers). Antifungal therapy is indicated in neutropenic patients who remain febrile after one week of broad-spectrum antibiotics or have recurrent fever. Amphotericin B should be promptly administered in patients suspected of invasive mycoses. Selected patients with fever and neutropenia, that can be identified on the basis of reduced risk of severe complications, do not need hospitalization. In the first reports, outpatient treatment has proven to be effective, cost saving and well received by patients, but further studies are needed to accurately define low risk status and the optimal home antibiotic regimens. PMID:9235724

  20. Tradeoffs in cardiovascular disease prevention, treatment, and research

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Matthew; Roehrig, Charles

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that the US health care system needs to transition from a culture of reactive treatment of disease to one of proactive prevention. As a tool for understanding the appropriate allocation of spending to prevention versus treatment (including research into improved prevention and treatment), a simple Markov model is used to represent the flow of individuals among states of health, where the transition rates are governed by the magnitude of appropriately-lagged expenditures in each of these categories. The model estimates the discounted cost and discounted effectiveness (measured in quality adjusted life years or QALYs) associated with a given spending mix, and it allows computing the marginal cost-effectiveness associated with additional spending in a category. We apply the model to explore interactions of alternative investments in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to identify an optimal spending mix. Under the assumptions of our model structure, we find that the marginal cost-effectiveness of prevention of CVD varies with changes in spending on treatment (and vice versa), and that the optimal mix of CVD spending (i.e., the spending mix that maximizes the overall QALYs achieved) would, indeed, shift spending from treatment to prevention. PMID:23090664

  1. Prevention and treatment of drug-induced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Speeg, K V; Bay, M K

    1995-12-01

    Many drugs may cause liver damage; some damage is predictable, but most is not. The most important preventive measure is judicious drug use by the prescribing physician. Early recognition of hepatotoxicity and cessation of the offending agent is essential for treatment. The best example of a specific treatment for drug-induced liver disease is N-acetylcysteine treatment for acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Many examples are cited of other attempts at treatment in animal models of drug-induced liver disease. If drug-induced liver disease leads to fulminant hepatic failure, intensive management of the resulting complications is required. Liver transplantation may be the only treatment option.

  2. Long-term and preventative treatment for seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Westrin, Asa; Lam, Raymond W

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent major depressive disorder with regular seasonal patterns, commonly known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD), has evoked substantial research in the last two decades. It is now recognised that SAD is a common condition with prevalence rates between 0.4% and 2.9% of the general population, and that patients with SAD experience significant morbidity and impairment in psychosocial function. There is good evidence that bright light therapy and antidepressant medications are effective for the short-term treatment of SAD; however, given that SAD is characterised by recurrent major depressive episodes, long-term and maintenance treatment must be considered. Unfortunately, there are few studies of longer term (>8 weeks) and maintenance (preventative) treatments for SAD. The weight of evidence suggests that light therapy usually needs to be continued daily throughout the winter season because of rapid relapse when light is stopped too early in the treatment period. However, some studies support the use of antidepressants to continue the response from a brief (1-2 weeks) course of light therapy early in the depressive episode, as soon as the first symptoms emerge in autumn. Only small studies have examined preventative treatment (before onset of symptoms) with light therapy, all of which have methodological limitations. The best evidence for preventative treatment in SAD comes from antidepressant studies. Three large, randomised, placebo-controlled studies have shown that preventative treatment with bupropion XL reduces the recurrence rate of depressive episodes in patients with SAD. Given the limitations in the evidence base and the inconsistent recurrence rate of winter depressive episodes, clinical recommendations for long-term and preventative treatment must individualise treatment choices and weigh potential benefits against possible adverse effects. PMID:17927295

  3. The obligation to provide antiretroviral treatment in HIV prevention trials.

    PubMed

    Lo, Bernard; Padian, Nancy; Barnes, Mark

    2007-06-19

    Providing antiretroviral therapy (ART) to participants who seroconvert during HIV prevention trials in developing countries is an ethical expectation. Promising treatment to the few seroconverters widens disparities within a resource-poor country and would be unjust. Such an assurance should be done in a way that also improves access to ART for others in the country. US funds for ART in poor countries from the PEPFAR should be available to all countries that host HIV prevention and clinical trials. PMID:17545698

  4. Towards prevention of autoantibody-positive rheumatoid arthritis: from lifestyle modification to preventive treatment.

    PubMed

    Gerlag, Danielle M; Norris, Jill M; Tak, Paul P

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in research into the earliest phases of RA have provided additional insights into the processes leading from the healthy to the diseased state. These insights have opened the way for the development of preventive strategies for RA, which represents a significant paradigm shift from treatment to prevention and will have major implications for patients as well as society. It would be a huge step forward if clinical signs and symptoms, disability, impaired quality of life and the need for chronic immunosuppressive treatment could be prevented. RA can be seen as a prototypic autoimmune disease, and discoveries about the preclinical diseased state for RA could potentially facilitate research into prevention of other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as type 1 diabetes, SLE and multiple sclerosis. This review focuses on the current knowledge of factors contributing to the development of RA and discusses the opportunities for intervention. PMID:26374913

  5. Laser Application in Prevention of Demineralization in Orthodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sadr Haghighi, Hooman; Skandarinejad, Mahsa; Abdollahi, Amir Ardalan

    2013-01-01

    One common negative side effect of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances is the development of incipient caries lesions around brackets, particularly in patients with poor oral hygiene. Different methods have been used to prevent demineralization such as fluoride therapy and application of sealant to prevent caries. The recent effort to improve the resistance against the demineralization is by the application of different types of lasers. The purpose of this review article is discussing the effects of laser in prevention of demineralization in orthodontic patients. PMID:25606317

  6. Prevention and treatment of senile osteoporosis and hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Duque, G; Demontiero, O; Troen, B R

    2009-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health issue worldwide, with significant economic consequences and adverse impacts on the quality of life. Hip fractures are the most devastating complication of osteoporosis, are likely to increase exponentially with an increasingly aged population, are associated with high recurrence rate, and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. This review discusses the prevalence and impact of hip fractures, the assessment of fracture risk, fall prevention, and treatment of osteoporosis with emphasis on evidence for hip fracture reduction among the various agents currently available. The aim is to provide recommendations to optimize hip fracture prevention and treatment. Ample evidence exists in the literature of many other risk factors independent from bone mineral density that increase fracture risk. These clinical risk factors have been validated in large cohorts and are incorporated into clinical tools that are invaluable in treatment decisions. In addition, strategies to prevent or reduce falls are integral to comprehensive osteoporosis management. Vitamin D combined with calcium has a role in primary prevention. Alendronate, residronate, strontium and zoledronic acid have proven efficacy in primary and secondary hip fracture prevention. An aggressive approach to investigate, assess and manage an individual's fracture risk and fall risk is paramount to reduce the high morbidity and mortality associated with hip fractures. The choice of therapy should be determined by the patient's calculated fracture risk and efficacy of the potential treatment, including long term compliance associated with the agent of choice. PMID:19277006

  7. Clinical Neuroprotective Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Kiyoshi; Uchikado, Hisaaki; Morioka, Motohiro; Murai, Yoshinaka; Tanaka, Eiichiro

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is an enormous public health problem with an imperative need for more effective therapies. In therapies for ischemic stroke, tissue plasminogen activators, antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants are used mainly for their antithrombotic effects. However, free radical scavengers, minocycline and growth factors have shown neuroprotective effects in the treatment of stroke, while antihypertensive drugs, lipid-lowering drugs and hypoglycemic drugs have shown beneficial effects for the prevention of stroke. In the present review, we evaluate the treatment and prevention of stroke in light of clinical studies and discuss new anti-stroke effects other than the main effects of drugs, focusing on optimal pharmacotherapy. PMID:22837724

  8. Treatment and Prevention of Osteoarthritis through Exercise and Sports

    PubMed Central

    Valderrabano, Victor; Steiger, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease with a high prevalence among older people. To date, the pathogenesis of the disease and the link between muscle function and OA is not entirely understood. As there is no known cure for OA, current research focuses on prevention and symptomatic treatment of the disorder. Recent research has indicated that muscle weakness precedes the onset of OA symptoms. Furthermore, several studies show a beneficial effect of land-based aerobic and strengthening exercises on pain relief and joint function. Therefore, current research focuses on the possibility to employ exercise and sports in the prevention and treatment of OA. PMID:21188091

  9. Paediatric HIV: Progress on Prevention, Treatment and Cure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Maria H; Ahmed, Saeed; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review provides an update on current developments with prevention, treatment and cure strategies in the field of pediatric HIV. Recent findings/Summary There has been tremendous progress in the prevention and treatment of pediatric HIV infection. With new strategies for prevention of mother-to-child transmission, we are growing ever closer towards elimination of pediatric HIV, though challenges with retention of pregnant woman and their HIV-exposed infants remain. Ongoing vigilance regarding the potential hazards of in utero ART exposure to infants continues with no significant alarms yet identified. Though cure has not been achieved, evidence of the impact of early treatment on reducing HIV-1 reservoir size with subsequent prolonged remission has enlivened efforts to rapidly identify and treat HIV-infected newborns. There is an increasing array of treatment options for pediatric patients and reassuring evidence regarding long-term complications of ART. Unfortunately, despite evidence suggesting the benefit of early treatment, timely identification and treatment of children remains a challenge. Better strategies for effective case-finding and engagement in care are urgently needed in addition to an improved understanding of how to retain HIV-positive children and adolescents on treatment. However, further emboldened by recent international commitments and robust global support, the future is hopeful. PMID:26709366

  10. Recent Progress in Cancer-Related Lymphedema Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Cromwell, Kate D.; Rasmussen, John C.; Stout, Nicole L.; Armer, Jane M.; Lasinski, Bonnie B.; Cormier, Janice N.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the recent developments in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer-related lymphedema. Lymphedema incidence by tumor site is evaluated. Measurement techniques and trends in patient education and treatment are also summarized to include current trends in therapeutic and surgical treatment options as well as longer-term management. Finally, an overview of the policies related to insurance coverage and reimbursement will give the clinician an overview of important trends in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of cancer-related lymphedema. PMID:25410402

  11. Preventive pharmacological treatment --an evolving new concept in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sabbag, Rony; Levin, Raz; Edelman, Shany; Heresco-Levy, Uriel

    2011-01-01

    Treatment for schizophrenia remains one of the major challenges of modern medicine. The development of innovative pharmacological approaches for this disorder can potentially alleviate tremendous human suffering and revolutionize mental health delivery systems. While current treatment guidelines for schizophrenia refer to the post-psychosis onset phase of illness, presently there is a strong resurgent interest in secondary prevention intervention applied during schizophrenia prodrome. This development stems largely from the recognition that neurobiological deficit processes associated with schizophrenia severity and chronicity are already active by the time clinical onset is recognized. Proposed preventive treatments include presently used medications and experimental compounds that hypothetically may influence ongoing pathophysiological processes earlier in their development. The future establishment of the early recognition and intervention concept in schizophrenia is critically dependent on the outcome of ongoing research assessing the feasibility of prodrome diagnosis, the efficacy of specific medications and the alleviation of the risks associated with early pharmacological treatment.

  12. Prevention and treatment of fungal infections in bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif B

    2003-07-01

    There has not been as much success in the prevention and treatment of invasive fungal infections, particularly aspergillosis, compared to the prevention and treatment of cytomegalovirus infection and graft-versus-host disease in bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients. Allogeneic BMT recipients who develop graft-versus-host disease and remain immunosuppressed for long periods are at major risk for development of these infections. Prevention of environmental exposure, antifungal chemoprophylaxis, and attempts at early diagnosis are essential for the reduction of mortality from invasive fungal infections. Chest computerized axial tomography is extremely useful in diagnosing pulmonary aspergillosis. However, microbiologic or histologic identification of infection remains essential. Unfortunately, the response to therapy in BMT recipients remains suboptimal. With the development of the lipid formulations of amphotericin B, the newer azoles, and the echinocandins, safer and more efficacious options have become available. The optimal use of antifungal agents or their combinations remains to be determined. PMID:12901327

  13. Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Infections.

    PubMed

    Leung, Steven; Danik, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) infections are complex medical problems that are increasingly encountered. They are associated with significant morbidity and mortality with tremendous economic cost. The current review will emphasize the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of this clinical entity using the relatively limited evidence that is currently available. Because there is a paucity of high quality evidence regarding prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of CIED infections, this review will attempt to summarize the best evidence as well as to suggest, when possible, paradigms for care. The topic of CIED infections is a dynamic one as the scope of CIED continues to widen. Furthermore, there are promising advancements in CIED technology which may help reduce its occurrence the future. Unfortunately, significant gaps in knowledge remain, and definitive recommendations regarding CIED infections and future studies should be directed at improving our ability to prevent infections. PMID:27147510

  14. Southeast Asian Mental Health: Treatment, Prevention, Services, Training and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owan, Tom Choken, Ed.

    This sourcebook contains 19 papers which discuss the mental health service needs of Southeast Asian refugees in the United States. The volume is divided into five sections: Treatment; Prevention; Services; Training; and Research. The papers (and their authors) are: (1) "Psychiatric Care for Southeast Asians: How Different Is Different?" (Tran Minh…

  15. Cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in people with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Lara C; Stefancic, Ana; Cunningham, Amy T; Hurley, Katelyn E; Cabassa, Leopodo J; Wender, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    People with mental illness die decades earlier in the United States compared with the general population. Most of this disparity is related to preventable and treatable chronic conditions, with many studies finding cancer as the second leading cause of death. Individual lifestyle factors, such as smoking or limited adherence to treatment, are often cited as highly significant issues in shaping risk among persons with mental illness. However, many contextual or systems-level factors exacerbate these individual factors and may fundamentally drive health disparities among people with mental illness. The authors conducted an integrative review to summarize the empirical literature on cancer prevention, screening, and treatment for people with mental illness. Although multiple interventions are being developed and tested to address tobacco dependence and obesity in these populations, the evidence for effectiveness is quite limited, and essentially all prevention interventions focus at the individual level. This review identified only one published article describing evidence-based interventions to promote cancer screening and improve cancer treatment in people with mental illness. On the basis of a literature review and the experience and expertise of the authors, each section in this article concludes with suggestions at the individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and policy levels that may improve cancer prevention, screening, and treatment in people with mental illness.

  16. Prevention and Treatment of Smoking in School Age Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzzeri, Alfred; Jason, Leonard A.

    1979-01-01

    Considerable erosion of gains have often been found during follow-up periods for behavioral treatment programs directed towards adult smokers. Focusing more attention on preventing smoking among youngsters currently not smoking or reducing smoking among those just beginning the habit might produce more favorable results. (Author)

  17. Reducing Aversion to Side Effects in Preventive Medical Treatment Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Erika A.; Weinstein, Neil D.; Colditz, Graham A.; Emmons, Karen M.

    2007-01-01

    Laypeople tend to be overly sensitive to side effects of treatments that prevent illness, possibly leading them to refuse beneficial therapies. This Internet-based study attempted to reduce such side effect aversion by adding graphic displays to the numerical risk probabilities. It also explored whether graphics reduce side effect aversion by…

  18. Prevention and Treatment of Bone Metastases in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carla, Ripamonti; Fabio, Trippa; Gloria, Barone; Ernesto, Maranzano

    2013-01-01

    In breast cancer patients, bone is the most common site of metastases. Medical therapies are the basic therapy to prevent distant metastases and recurrence and to cure them. Radiotherapy has a primary role in pain relief, recalcification and stabilization of the bone, as well as the reduction of the risk of complications (e.g., bone fractures, spinal cord compression). Bisphosphonates, as potent inhibitors of osteoclastic-mediated bone resorption are a well-established, standard-of-care treatment option to reduce the frequency, severity and time of onset of the skeletal related events in breast cancer patients with bone metastases. Moreover bisphosphonates prevent cancer treatment-induced bone loss. Recent data shows the anti-tumor activity of bisphosphonates, in particular, in postmenopausal women and in older premenopausal women with hormone-sensitive disease treated with ovarian suppression. Pain is the most frequent symptom reported in patients with bone metastases, and its prevention and treatment must be considered at any stage of the disease. The prevention and treatment of bone metastases in breast cancer must consider an integrated multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26237068

  19. Vascular effects of intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kanagy, Nancy L

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is characterized by repeated upper airway obstruction during sleep and affects between 5% and 20% of the population. Epidemiological studies reveal that sleep apnea and associated intermittent hypoxemia increase the risk for hypertension and vascular disease but the mechanisms underlying these effects are incompletely understood. This review reports the results of rodent models of intermittent hypoxia (IH) and relates them to the observed hemodynamic and vascular consequences of sleep apnea. These animal studies have demonstrated that IH exposure in the absence of any other comorbidity causes hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and augmented constrictor sensitivity, all due at least in part to increased vascular oxidative stress. Animal studies have used a variety of exposure paradigms to study intermittent hypoxia and these different exposure protocols can cause hypocapnia or hypercapnia-or maintain eucapnia-with accompanying alterations in plasma pH. It appears that these different profiles of arterial blood gases can lead to divergent results but the impact of these differences is still being investigated. Overall, the studies in rodents have clearly demonstrated that the vascular and hemodynamic impact of intermittent hypoxia provides a strong rationale for treating clinical sleep apnea to prevent the resulting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  20. Intermittent versus continuous total androgen blockade in the treatment of patients with advanced hormone-naive prostate cancer: results of a prospective randomized multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    de Leval, Jean; Boca, Philippe; Yousef, Enis; Nicolas, Hubert; Jeukenne, Michel; Seidel, Laurence; Bouffioux, Christian; Coppens, Luc; Bonnet, Pierre; Andrianne, Robert; Wlatregny, David

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of total intermittent androgen deprivation (IAD) versus total continuous androgen deprivation (CAD) for treating patients with advanced prostate cancer in a phase III randomized trial. A total of 68 evaluable patients with hormone-naive advanced or relapsing prostate cancer were randomized to receive combined androgen blockade according to a continuous (n = 33) or intermittent (n = 35) regimen. Therapeutic monitoring was assessed by use of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurements. Patients in the CAD and IAD groups were equally stratified for age, biopsy Gleason score, and baseline serum PSA levels. The outcome variable was time to androgen-independence of the tumor, which was defined as increasing serum PSA levels despite androgen blockade. Mean follow-up was 30.8 months. The 35 IAD-treated patients completed 91 cycles, and 19 of them (54.3%) completed > or = 3 cycles. Median cycle length and percentage of time off therapy were 9.0 months and 59.5, respectively. The estimated 3-year progression rate was significantly lower in the IAD group (7.0% +/- 4.8%) than in the CAD group (38.9% +/- 11.2%, P = 0.0052). Our data suggest that IAD treatment may maintain the androgen-dependent state of advanced human prostate cancer, as assessed by PSA measurements, at least as long as CAD treatment. Further studies with longer follow-up times and larger patient cohorts are needed to determine the comparative impacts of CAD and IAD on survival.

  1. Different depth intermittent sand filters for laboratory treatment of synthetic wastewater with concentrations close to measured septic tank effluent.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, M; Walsh, G; Healy, M G

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply hydraulic and chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rates at the upper limits of the design criteria for buried sand filters to test the sand filter depth design criteria. Over a 274-day study duration, synthetic effluent with a strength of domestic wastewater was intermittently dosed onto two sand filters of 0.2 m diameter, with depths of 0.3 and 0.4 m. Hydraulic and organic carbon loading rates of 105 L m(-2) d(-1) and 40 g COD m(-2) d(-1), respectively, were applied to the filters. The filters did not clog and had good effluent removal capabilities for 274 and 190 days, respectively. However, the 0.3 m-deep filter did experience a reduced performance towards the end of the study period. In the 0.3 and 0.4 m-deep filters, the effluent COD and SS concentrations were less than 86 and 31 mg L(-1), respectively, and nitrification was nearly complete in both these columns. Ortho-phosphorus (PO(4)-P) removal in fine sand and laterite 'upflow' filters, receiving effluent from the 0.3 m-deep filter, was 10% and 44%, respectively. PMID:21104498

  2. Different depth intermittent sand filters for laboratory treatment of synthetic wastewater with concentrations close to measured septic tank effluent.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, M; Walsh, G; Healy, M G

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply hydraulic and chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rates at the upper limits of the design criteria for buried sand filters to test the sand filter depth design criteria. Over a 274-day study duration, synthetic effluent with a strength of domestic wastewater was intermittently dosed onto two sand filters of 0.2 m diameter, with depths of 0.3 and 0.4 m. Hydraulic and organic carbon loading rates of 105 L m(-2) d(-1) and 40 g COD m(-2) d(-1), respectively, were applied to the filters. The filters did not clog and had good effluent removal capabilities for 274 and 190 days, respectively. However, the 0.3 m-deep filter did experience a reduced performance towards the end of the study period. In the 0.3 and 0.4 m-deep filters, the effluent COD and SS concentrations were less than 86 and 31 mg L(-1), respectively, and nitrification was nearly complete in both these columns. Ortho-phosphorus (PO(4)-P) removal in fine sand and laterite 'upflow' filters, receiving effluent from the 0.3 m-deep filter, was 10% and 44%, respectively.

  3. [Intrauterine lavage in the treatment and prevention of puerperal endometritis].

    PubMed

    Mirov, I M; Avdeev, Iu V; Solomatina, L M

    1993-01-01

    Addition of intrauterine lavage with cooled furacilin solution (0-4 degrees C) to a complex of treatment of 87 patients with postpartum endometritis resulted in a sooner recovery as against that in 61 patients administered traditional treatment alone; such a therapeutic course required lesser amounts of drugs, too. To specify endometritis severity and monitor the treatment efficacy, metro-aspirated specimen cytology was examined. Preventive lavage of the uterine cavity postpartum in cases with a 'dry' period longer than 24 h and other factors of risk of infectious complications proved to be highly effective. PMID:8250131

  4. Infection prevention and control in deployed military medical treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Hospenthal, Duane R; Green, Andrew D; Crouch, Helen K; English, Judith F; Pool, Jane; Yun, Heather C; Murray, Clinton K

    2011-08-01

    Infections have complicated the care of combat casualties throughout history and were at one time considered part of the natural history of combat trauma. Personnel who survived to reach medical care were expected to develop and possibly succumb to infections during their care in military hospitals. Initial care of war wounds continues to focus on rapid surgical care with debridement and irrigation, aimed at preventing local infection and sepsis with bacteria from the environment (e.g., clostridial gangrene) or the casualty's own flora. Over the past 150 years, with the revelation that pathogens can be spread from patient to patient and from healthcare providers to patients (including via unwashed hands of healthcare workers, the hospital environment and fomites), a focus on infection prevention and control aimed at decreasing transmission of pathogens and prevention of these infections has developed. Infections associated with combat-related injuries in the recent operations in Iraq and Afghanistan have predominantly been secondary to multidrug-resistant pathogens, likely acquired within the military healthcare system. These healthcare-associated infections seem to originate throughout the system, from deployed medical treatment facilities through the chain of care outside of the combat zone. Emphasis on infection prevention and control, including hand hygiene, isolation, cohorting, and antibiotic control measures, in deployed medical treatment facilities is essential to reducing these healthcare-associated infections. This review was produced to support the Guidelines for the Prevention of Infections Associated With Combat-Related Injuries: 2011 Update contained in this supplement of Journal of Trauma.

  5. New Anticoagulants for the Prevention and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    McRae, Simon J; Ginsberg, Jeffrey S

    2005-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is effective at preventing the development of venous thromboembolism in high-risk patients, and reduces morbidity and mortality in individuals with established thromboembolic disease. Vitamin K antagonists and heparins are currently the most commonly used anticoagulant drugs, but they have practical limitations. Therefore, new antithrombotic agents with predictable dose-responses (thereby decreasing the need for monitoring without compromising efficacy or safety), ideally available in an oral formulation and with a rapidly reversible anticoagulant effect, are needed. New drugs fulfilling some of the above criteria have been developed and have proven to be effective agents for the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism. PMID:17319097

  6. Prevention and treatment of biofilms by hybrid- and nanotechnologies

    PubMed Central

    Kasimanickam, Ramanathan K; Ranjan, Ashish; Asokan, GV; Kasimanickam, Vanmathy R; Kastelic, John P

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria growing as adherent biofilms are difficult to treat and frequently develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. To counter biofilms, various approaches, including prevention of bacterial surface adherence, application of device applicators, and assimilation of antimicrobials in targeted drug delivery machinery, have been utilized. These methods are also combined to achieve synergistic bacterial killing. This review discusses various multimodal technologies, presents general concepts, and describes therapies relying on the principles of electrical energy, ultrasound, photodynamics, and targeted drug delivery for prevention and treatment of biofilms. PMID:23946652

  7. Cardiovascular complications of rheumatoid arthritis: assessment, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Mariana J

    2010-05-01

    Morbidity and mortality rates are higher in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) than in the general population. Ischemic heart disease and heart failure now represent one of the most common causes of death in RA. Indeed, RA appears to represent an independent risk factor for ischemic heart disease, similar to diabetes mellitus. However, no clear guidelines with regard to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and prevention in RA have been developed. This review highlights recent investigations on the assessment, prevention, and treatment of cardiovascular disease in RA.

  8. Splenic irradiation in the treatment of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia. Results of daily and intermittent fractionation with and without concomitant hydroxyurea

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H. Jr.; McKeough, P.G.; Desforges, J.; Madoc-Jones, H.

    1986-09-15

    Seventeen patients with either chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia (MMM) received 24 courses of splenic irradiation at this institution from 1973 to 1982. Eleven of the 17 patients had received prior chemotherapy. Patients were treated with /sup 60/Co gamma rays or 6 MV photons. The fraction size ranged from 15 to 100 rad and the total dose per treatment course from 15 to 650 rad, with the exception of one patient who received 1650 rad. Fourteen of 19 courses (71%) given for splenic pain yielded significant subjective relief while 17 of 26 courses given for splenomegaly obtained at least 50% regression of splenic size. Blood counts were carefully monitored before each treatment to limit hematologic toxicity. From this experience, the authors conclude that splenic irradiation effectively palliates splenic pain and reverses splenomegaly in the majority of patients with CML and MMM. Intermittent fractionation (twice or thrice weekly) is more convenient for the patient, appears to be as effective as daily treatment, and may be associated with less hematologic toxicity. Preliminary results of concurrent treatment with splenic irradiation and oral hydroxyurea show promise and warrant further study.

  9. Optimization, ex vivo permeation, and stability study of lipid nanocarrier loaded gelatin capsules for treatment of intermittent claudication

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Marwa Ahmed; Marín Boscá, María Teresa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an optimized nanodispersible oral dosage form (containing a lactate ester) was developed for cilostazol (CZL). CZL is a phosphodiesterase inhibitor used for intermittent claudication. We aimed to improve the dissolution rate and absorption of CZL giving it a better chance of oral bioavailability, and to evaluate its stability on storage. Suitable compositions of nanoemulsion preconcentrate formulations were screened via solubility and compatibility tests. Response surface methodology and a desirability approach were applied to optimize preconcentrates containing minimum amount of surfactant mixture, maximum amount of lipid, and possessing the smallest globule size, with the highest emulsification and dissolution rates and minimum risk of drug precipitation. As part of the optimization process, the main effect, interaction effects and quadratic effects of amounts of lipid, and surfactant/co-surfactant ratio on % transmittance, globule size, emulsification time, drug precipitation, and drug release were investigated. The optimized formulation consisting of 28.9% butyl lactate, 28.9% Capryol®, 27.82% Solubilisant Gamma® 2429, and 14.18% Transcutol® possessing a globule size of 60 nm was mixed with Aerosil® 200. This gave uniform free flowing granules, which were characterized for surface and powder properties. The self-nanoemulsifying granules (SNEGs) filled into hard gelatin capsules showed two- and threefold increase in CZL released compared with conventional tablet and pure drug, respectively. The amount of drug permeated using non-everted sac technique from the SNEGs was twofold higher than that permeated from the tablet suspension. The shelf life was 526 days at 25°C. Our study illustrated that the developed SNEGs, with bioenhancing ingredients, held great potential as a superior alternative to traditional oral formulations of CZL. PMID:26203244

  10. Adolescent inhalant use prevention, assessment, and treatment: A literature synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jacqueline; O'Brien, Casey; Schapp, Salena

    2016-05-01

    Inhalant use refers to the use of substances such as gases, glues, and aerosols in order to achieve intoxication, while inhalant use disorder (IUD) encompasses both DSM-IV-TR criteria for inhalant abuse and dependence. Inhalant use among adolescents is an international public health concern considering the severe medical and cognitive consequences and biopsychosocial correlates. In this paper, we summarize the current state of the literature on inhalant use among adolescents focusing on social context, prevention, assessment, and treatment strategies. Psychoeducation, skills training, and environmental supply reduction are helpful strategies for preventing adolescent inhalant use, while parent and adolescent self-report as well as physician report of medical signs and symptoms can aid in assessment and diagnosis. Although research has only begun to explore the treatment of inhalant use, preliminary findings suggest that a multimodal approach involving individual counselling (i.e., CBT brief intervention), family therapy, and activity and engagement programs is the first-line treatment, with residential treatment programs indicated for more severe presentations. The limited nature of treatments developed specifically for inhalant use combined with high prevalence rates and potential for significant impairment within the adolescent population indicate the need for further research. Research should focus on understanding the social context of use, establishing the efficacy of current adolescent substance use treatments adapted for inhalant use, and exploring long-term outcomes. PMID:26969125

  11. Iatrogenic possibilities of orthodontic treatment and modalities of prevention

    PubMed Central

    Meeran, Nazeer Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of orthodontic treatment are numerous and in most cases, the benefits outweigh the possible disadvantages. Orthodontic treatment can play an important role in enhancing esthetics, function, and self-esteem in patients. However, it carries with it the risks of enamel demineralization, tissue damage, root resorption, open gingival embrasures in the form of triangular spaces, allergic reactions to nickel, and treatment failure in the form of relapse. These potential complications are easily avoidable by undertaking certain precautions and timely interventions by both the orthodontist and the patient. The orthodontist must ensure that the patient is aware of the associated risks and stress the importance of the patient's role in preventing these untoward outcomes. The decision whether to proceed with the orthodontic treatment is essentially a risk-benefit analysis, where the perceived benefits of commencing treatment outweigh the potential risks. This article provides an overview of the iatrogenic possibilities of orthodontic treatment and the role of the patient as well as the orthodontist in preventing the associated risks. PMID:24987646

  12. Preservation of micro-architecture and angiogenic potential in a pulmonary acellular matrix obtained using intermittent intra-tracheal flow of detergent enzymatic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Georgiades, Fanourios; Tyraskis, Athanasios; Totonelli, Giorgia; Loukogeorgakis, Stavros P.; Orlando, Giuseppe; Shangaris, Panicos; Lange, Peggy; Delalande, Jean-Marie; Burns, Alan J.; Cenedese, Angelo; Sebire, Neil J.; Turmaine, Mark; Guest, Brogan N.; Alcorn, John F.; Atala, Anthony; Birchall, Martin A.; Elliott, Martin J.; Eaton, Simon; Pierro, Agostino; Gilbert, Thomas W.; De Coppi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering of autologous lung tissue aims to become a therapeutic alternative to transplantation. Efforts published so far in creating scaffolds have used harsh decellularization techniques that damage the extracellular matrix (ECM), deplete its components and take up to 5 weeks to perform. The aim of this study was to create a lung natural acellular scaffold using a method that will reduce the time of production and better preserve scaffold architecture and ECM components. Decellularization of rat lungs via the intratracheal route removed most of the nuclear material when compared to the other entry points. An intermittent inflation approach that mimics lung respiration yielded an acellular scaffold in a shorter time with an improved preservation of pulmonary micro-architecture. Electron microscopy demonstrated the maintenance of an intact alveolar network, with no evidence of collapse or tearing. Pulsatile dye injection via the vasculature indicated an intact capillary network in the scaffold. Morphometry analysis demonstrated a significant increase in alveolar fractional volume, with alveolar size analysis confirming that alveolar dimensions were maintained. Biomechanical testing of the scaffolds indicated an increase in resistance and elastance when compared to fresh lungs. Staining and quantification for ECM components showed a presence of collagen, elastin, GAG and laminin. The intratracheal intermittent decellularization methodology could be translated to sheep lungs, demonstrating a preservation of ECM components, alveolar and vascular architecture. Decellularization treatment and methodology preserves lung architecture and ECM whilst reducing the production time to 3 h. Cell seeding and in vivo experiments are necessary to proceed towards clinical translation. PMID:23727263

  13. Green tea compounds in breast cancer prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min-Jing; Yin, Yan-Cun; Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. In recent years, many in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that green tea possesses anti-cancer effects. The epidemiological studies, however, have produced inconclusive results in humans. Likewise, results from animal models about the preventive or therapeutic effects of green tea components are inconclusive. The mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence the risk of breast cancer in humans remain elusive mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence. Here, we review recent studies of green tea polyphenols and their applications in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the effect of green tea components on breast cancer by reviewing epidemiological studies, animal model studies and clinical trials. At last, we discuss the mechanisms by which green tea components suppress the development and recurrence of breast cancer. A better understanding of the mechanisms will improve the utilization of green tea in breast cancer prevention and therapy and pave the way to novel prevention and treatment strategies for breast cancer. PMID:25114865

  14. Green tea compounds in breast cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Jing; Yin, Yan-Cun; Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2014-08-10

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. In recent years, many in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that green tea possesses anti-cancer effects. The epidemiological studies, however, have produced inconclusive results in humans. Likewise, results from animal models about the preventive or therapeutic effects of green tea components are inconclusive. The mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence the risk of breast cancer in humans remain elusive mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence. Here, we review recent studies of green tea polyphenols and their applications in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the effect of green tea components on breast cancer by reviewing epidemiological studies, animal model studies and clinical trials. At last, we discuss the mechanisms by which green tea components suppress the development and recurrence of breast cancer. A better understanding of the mechanisms will improve the utilization of green tea in breast cancer prevention and therapy and pave the way to novel prevention and treatment strategies for breast cancer. PMID:25114865

  15. Reducing Fatal Opioid Overdose: Prevention, Treatment and Harm Reduction Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hawk, Kathryn F.; Vaca, Federico E.; D’Onofrio, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The opioid overdose epidemic is a major threat to the public’s health, resulting in the development and implementation of a variety of strategies to reduce fatal overdose [1-3]. Many strategies are focused on primary prevention and increased access to effective treatment, although the past decade has seen an exponential increase in harm reduction initiatives. To maximize identification of opportunities for intervention, initiatives focusing on prevention, access to effective treatment, and harm reduction are examined independently, although considerable overlap exists. Particular attention is given to harm reduction approaches, as increased public and political will have facilitated widespread implementation of several initiatives, including increased distribution of naloxone and policy changes designed to increase bystander assistance during a witnessed overdose [4-7]. PMID:26339206

  16. Otitis externa: a practical guide to treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Sander, R

    2001-03-01

    Otitis externa is most commonly caused by infection (usually bacterial, although occasionally fungal), but it may also be associated with a variety of noninfectious systemic or local dermatologic processes. The most characteristic symptom is discomfort that is limited to the external auditory canal, while the most characteristic signs are erythema and swelling of the canal with variable discharge. Excessive moisture and trauma, both of which impair the canal's natural defenses, are the two most common precipitants of otitis externa, and avoidance of these precipitants is the cornerstone of prevention. Thorough cleansing of the canal is essential for diagnosis and treatment, but flushing should be avoided. Acidification with a topical solution of 2 percent acetic acid combined with hydrocortisone for inflammation is effective treatment in most cases and, when used after exposure to moisture, is an excellent prophylactic. Other prophylactic measures such as drying the ears with a hair dryer and avoiding manipulation of the external auditory canal may help prevent recurrence.

  17. Update on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, L T; Klempner, M S

    2001-01-01

    With our better understanding of Lyme disease, we now know it is not the "great imitator" of disease it once was thought to be. Limited, identifiable syndromes can be related to Lyme disease. Most of the disease's manifestations resolve without treatment. Treatment with standard antibiotics is very effective at preventing the development of long-term sequelae. The Lyme disease vaccine is safe and effective at preventing transmission of Lyme disease. Future improvements in the care of patients with Lyme disease should focus on identifying the etiology and most effective therapies for patients with posttreatment chronic Lyme disease syndrome, determining the safety and efficacy of vaccination in children, and developing second generation vaccines with improved efficacy and dosing schedules, possibly through the addition of antigens expressed in the human host.

  18. Dietary Natural Products for Prevention and Treatment of Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Zhou, Tong; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-03-01

    Liver cancer is the most common malignancy of the digestive system with high death rate. Accumulating evidences suggests that many dietary natural products are potential sources for prevention and treatment of liver cancer, such as grapes, black currant, plum, pomegranate, cruciferous vegetables, French beans, tomatoes, asparagus, garlic, turmeric, ginger, soy, rice bran, and some edible macro-fungi. These dietary natural products and their active components could affect the development and progression of liver cancer in various ways, such as inhibiting tumor cell growth and metastasis, protecting against liver carcinogens, immunomodulating and enhancing effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the potential prevention and treatment activities of dietary natural products and their major bioactive constituents on liver cancer, and discusses possible mechanisms of action. PMID:26978396

  19. Dietary Natural Products for Prevention and Treatment of Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Zhou, Tong; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is the most common malignancy of the digestive system with high death rate. Accumulating evidences suggests that many dietary natural products are potential sources for prevention and treatment of liver cancer, such as grapes, black currant, plum, pomegranate, cruciferous vegetables, French beans, tomatoes, asparagus, garlic, turmeric, ginger, soy, rice bran, and some edible macro-fungi. These dietary natural products and their active components could affect the development and progression of liver cancer in various ways, such as inhibiting tumor cell growth and metastasis, protecting against liver carcinogens, immunomodulating and enhancing effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the potential prevention and treatment activities of dietary natural products and their major bioactive constituents on liver cancer, and discusses possible mechanisms of action. PMID:26978396

  20. Dietary Natural Products for Prevention and Treatment of Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Zhou, Tong; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-03-01

    Liver cancer is the most common malignancy of the digestive system with high death rate. Accumulating evidences suggests that many dietary natural products are potential sources for prevention and treatment of liver cancer, such as grapes, black currant, plum, pomegranate, cruciferous vegetables, French beans, tomatoes, asparagus, garlic, turmeric, ginger, soy, rice bran, and some edible macro-fungi. These dietary natural products and their active components could affect the development and progression of liver cancer in various ways, such as inhibiting tumor cell growth and metastasis, protecting against liver carcinogens, immunomodulating and enhancing effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the potential prevention and treatment activities of dietary natural products and their major bioactive constituents on liver cancer, and discusses possible mechanisms of action.

  1. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of medical treatments in acid-related diseases. The Markov chain approach applied to a comparison between intermittent and maintenance treatment of reflux esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Stålhammar, N O

    1993-01-01

    Escalating medical costs have made it increasingly important to carry out economic evaluations of drug therapy. In the area of acid-related diseases, much of the current interest is focused on comparisons between omeprazole and H2 receptor antagonists. After having discussed the basic methodology used in these analyses, viz. the decision-tree analysis, this paper presents an extension of this methodology, the Markov chain approach, which is more appropriate for analyses of longer time periods. Thereafter, this methodology is used to analyze the cost-effectiveness of omeprazole in intermittent versus maintenance treatment of reflux esophagitis. The cost data are from Sweden and the time period studied is one year. It is found that maintenance treatment provides 63 more healthy days per year at an extra direct cost of SEK 40 per day. From a sensitivity analysis it is concluded that the cost-effectiveness of intermittent versus maintenance treatment is mainly determined by the probability of relapse when off treatment, the severity of the symptoms in the case of a relapse and the value to the patient of a healthy day, i.e. a day free from reflux esophagitis. PMID:8171303

  2. Role of nitric oxide in cardiovascular adaptation to intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Manukhina, Eugenia B; Downey, H Fred; Mallet, Robert T

    2006-04-01

    Hypoxia is one of the most frequently encountered stresses in health and disease. The duration, frequency, and severity of hypoxic episodes are critical factors determining whether hypoxia is beneficial or harmful. Adaptation to intermittent hypoxia has been demonstrated to confer cardiovascular protection against more severe and sustained hypoxia, and, moreover, to protect against other stresses, including ischemia. Thus, the direct and cross protective effects of adaptation to intermittent hypoxia have been used for treatment and prevention of a variety of diseases and to increase efficiency of exercise training. Evidence is mounting that nitric oxide (NO) plays a central role in these adaptive mechanisms. NO-dependent protective mechanisms activated by intermittent hypoxia include stimulation of NO synthesis as well as restriction of NO overproduction. In addition, alternative, nonenzymic sources of NO and negative feedback of NO synthesis are important factors in optimizing NO concentrations. The adaptive enhancement of NO synthesis and/or availability activates or increases expression of other protective factors, including heat shock proteins, antioxidants and prostaglandins, making the protection more robust and sustained. Understanding the role of NO in mechanisms of adaptation to hypoxia will support development of therapies to prevent and treat hypoxic or ischemic damage to organs and cells and to increase adaptive capabilities of the organism. PMID:16565431

  3. Economics of antiretroviral treatment vs. circumcision for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E; Humair, Salal

    2012-12-26

    The HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 study, which showed the effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment in reducing HIV transmission, has been hailed as a "game changer" in the fight against HIV, prompting calls for scaling up treatment as prevention (TasP). However, it is unclear how TasP can be financed, given flat-lining support for global HIV programs. We assess whether TasP is indeed a game changer or if comparable benefits are obtainable at similar or lower cost by increasing coverage of medical male circumcision (MMC) and antiretroviral treatment (ART) at CD4 <350/μL. We develop a new mathematical model and apply it to South Africa, finding that high ART coverage combined with high MMC coverage provides approximately the same HIV incidence reduction as TasP, for $5 billion less over 2009-2020. MMC outperforms ART significantly in cost per infection averted ($1,096 vs. $6,790) and performs comparably in cost per death averted ($5,198 vs. $5,604). TasP is substantially less cost effective at $8,375 per infection and $7,739 per death averted. The prevention benefits of HIV treatment are largely reaped with high ART coverage. The most cost-effective HIV prevention strategy is to expand MMC coverage and then scale up ART, but the most cost-effective HIV-mortality reduction strategy is to scale up MMC and ART jointly. TasP is cost effective by commonly used absolute benchmarks but it is far less cost effective than MMC and ART. Given South Africa's current annual ART spending, the $5 billion in savings offered by MMC and ART over TasP in the next decade, for similar health benefits, challenges the widely hailed status of TasP as a game changer.

  4. Dilutional Hyponatremia during Hysteroscpic Surgery: Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ling; Zhang, Yu-Guan; Wang, Jin; Gong, Ya-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Dilutional hyponatremia caused by excess absorption of hypo-osmotic irrigation fluids is one of the severe complications during hysteroscopic surgery. Appropriate delivery system and distending media,proper distending pressure,and reducing destruction of uterine venous sinus may remarkably lower the morbidity. Meanwhile,early detection and timely treatment of moderate and severe hyponatremia to avoid the occurrence of secondary nervous system demyelination are particularly important during the surgery. This review summarizes the risk factors and the prevention and treatment strategies of dilutional hyponatremia during hysteroscopic surgery. PMID:27594163

  5. Treatment of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder: Acute, Preventive, and Symptomatic

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Remi A.; Mealy, Maureen A.; Levy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a rare, autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that primarily attacks the optic nerves and spinal cord leading to blindness and paralysis. The spectrum of the disease has expanded based on the specificity of the autoimmune response to the aquaporin-4 water channel on astrocytes. With wider recognition of NMOSD, a standard of care for treatment of this condition has condition based on a growing series of retrospective and prospective studies. This review covers the present state of the field in the treatment of acute relapses, preventive approaches, and therapies for symptoms of NMOSD. PMID:26705758

  6. Retinoids for prevention and treatment of actinic keratosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ianhez, Mayra; Fleury, Luiz Fernando Fróes; Miot, Hélio Amante; Bagatin, Edileia

    2013-01-01

    Actinic keratosis is a common cause of dermatological consultations and it presents a strong association with squamous cell carcinoma. Many substances are used for treatment and prevention, such as retinoids. Nevertheless, many studies on retinoids emphasize their application in treating and preventing non melanoma skin cancers. In this article, we reviewed studies about systemic and topical retinoids used with immunocompetent patients and organ transplant recipients with actinic keratosis, as primary or secondary outcomes. The majority of these papers pointed to a reduction in actinic keratosis count after treatment with retinoids. However, studies need to be better-defined in order to address the lack of a standardized dose, the absence of control groups, the low number of patients and short follow-up periods. Blind, randomized and controlled clinical trials with adequate sample sizes, specifically focused on actinic keratosis, are needed to clarify the real benefit of topical and/or oral retinoids. Comparison of efficacy and safety between oral and topical retinoids in the prevention and treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers and actinic keratosis is an essential pre requisite to establish new strategies to control these conditions. PMID:24068130

  7. Candidiasis: predisposing factors, prevention, diagnosis and alternative treatment.

    PubMed

    Martins, Natália; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Barros, Lillian; Silva, Sónia; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-06-01

    Candidiasis is the most common opportunistic yeast infection. Candida species and other microorganisms are involved in this complicated fungal infection, but Candida albicans continues to be the most prevalent. In the past two decades, it has been observed an abnormal overgrowth in the gastrointestinal, urinary and respiratory tracts, not only in immunocompromised patients, but also related to nosocomial infections and even in healthy individuals. There is a widely variety of causal factors that contribute to yeast infection which means that candidiasis is a good example of a multifactorial syndrome. Due to rapid increase in the incidence in these infections, this is the subject of numerous studies. Recently, the focus of attention is the treatment and, above all, the prevention of those complications. The diagnosis of candidiasis could become quite complicated. Prevention is the most effective "treatment," much more than eradication of the yeast with antifungal agents. There are several aspects to consider in the daily routine that can provide a strength protection. However, a therapeutic approach is necessary when the infection is established, and therefore, other alternatives should be explored. This review provides an overview on predisposition factors, prevention and diagnosis of candidiasis, highlighting alternative approaches for candidiasis treatment.

  8. Intermittent Control Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Thomas L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The technique of intermittent control systems for air quality control as developed and used by the Tennessee Valley Authority is investigated. Although controversial, all Tennessee Valley Authority sulfur dioxide elimination programs are scheduled to be operational this year. Existing or anticipated intermittent control systems are identified. (BT)

  9. Intermittent search strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphael

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Animals looking for food * Model of intermittent search * Minimizing the search time * Should animals really perform Lévy strategies? * How does a protein find its target sequence on DNA? * Active intermittent transport in cells * Optimizing the kinetic rate constant * Robustness of the results * Conclusion * Bibliography

  10. Therapies for Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia associated with a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, with a prevalence of 44 million people throughout the world in 2015, and this figure is estimated to double by 2050. This disease is characterized by blood-brain barrier disruption, oxidative stress, mitochondrial impairment, neuroinflammation, and hypometabolism; it is related to amyloid-β peptide accumulation and tau hyperphosphorylation as well as a decrease in acetylcholine levels and a reduction of cerebral blood flow. Obesity is a major risk factor for AD, because it induces adipokine dysregulation, which consists of the release of the proinflammatory adipokines and decreased anti-inflammatory adipokines, among other processes. The pharmacological treatments for AD can be divided into two categories: symptomatic treatments such as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists and etiology-based treatments such as secretase inhibitors, amyloid binders, and tau therapies. Strategies for prevention of AD through nonpharmacological treatments are associated with lifestyle interventions such as exercise, mental challenges, and socialization as well as caloric restriction and a healthy diet. AD is an important health issue on which all people should be informed so that prevention strategies that minimize the risk of its development may be implemented. PMID:27547756

  11. Therapies for Prevention and Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Mendiola-Precoma, J; Berumen, L C; Padilla, K; Garcia-Alcocer, G

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia associated with a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, with a prevalence of 44 million people throughout the world in 2015, and this figure is estimated to double by 2050. This disease is characterized by blood-brain barrier disruption, oxidative stress, mitochondrial impairment, neuroinflammation, and hypometabolism; it is related to amyloid-β peptide accumulation and tau hyperphosphorylation as well as a decrease in acetylcholine levels and a reduction of cerebral blood flow. Obesity is a major risk factor for AD, because it induces adipokine dysregulation, which consists of the release of the proinflammatory adipokines and decreased anti-inflammatory adipokines, among other processes. The pharmacological treatments for AD can be divided into two categories: symptomatic treatments such as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists and etiology-based treatments such as secretase inhibitors, amyloid binders, and tau therapies. Strategies for prevention of AD through nonpharmacological treatments are associated with lifestyle interventions such as exercise, mental challenges, and socialization as well as caloric restriction and a healthy diet. AD is an important health issue on which all people should be informed so that prevention strategies that minimize the risk of its development may be implemented. PMID:27547756

  12. Treatment of severe secondary hyperparathyroidism with administration of calcium carbonate, intermittent high oral doses of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and dialysate with 3 mEq/1 calcium concentration.

    PubMed

    Perez-Mijares, R; Gomez-Fernandez, P; Almaraz-Jimenez, M; Ramos-Diaz, M; Rivero-Bohorquez, J

    1993-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of long-term administration of daily calcium carbonate (2-4 g/day) and intermittent high oral doses of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3, 3-4 micrograms, given twice a week] in conjunction with a 3-mEq/1 calcium concentration in the dialysate for the treatment of severe secondary hyperparathyroidism in 6 hemodialysis patients. All patients had reduced serum levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3, which increased significantly (p < 0.005) reaching the maximum level in the 4th month. Serum total and ionized calcium levels significantly increased also, in relation to those before treatment. No patients developed hypercalcemia. Serum phosphorus did not significantly change during the study. Initial serum intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1,241 +/- 233 pg/ml, mean +/- SEM) markedly decreased after starting treatment with 1,25-(OH)2D3, being 542 +/- 174 pg/ml in the 5th month and 477 +/- 174 pg/ml in the 8th month. These changes are statistically significant (p < 0.05 and < 0.007, respectively). Alkaline phosphatase behavior was similar to that of intact PTH. A constant direct correlation between intact PTH and alkaline phosphatase and an inverse significant correlation between intact PTH and 1,25-(OH)2D3 was evidenced by us. We conclude that oral 1,25-(OH)2D3 pulse therapy is very effective in suppressing PTH secretion. The administration of calcium carbonate and the use of dialysate with a reduced calcium concentration would allow to prevent hyperphosphatemia and the administration of high oral doses of 1,25-(OH)2D3 without concomitant hypercalcemia.

  13. Prevention and treatment of head lice in children.

    PubMed

    Mumcuoglu, K Y

    1999-01-01

    Head louse infestations (pediculosis) are prevalent worldwide. In developed countries, the infestation rate of 4- to 13-year-old children remains high despite preventive efforts. This is due to the existence of numerous ineffective pediculicides, the incorrect use of the effective agents, toxicological concerns and the development of louse strains resistant to insecticides. One of the most effective tools for the prevention and control of lice is the louse comb, which should be used regularly for the detection of living lice at an early stage of infestation, and as an accessory to any treatment method to remove living and dead lice. The louse comb can also be used systematically for the treatment of infestations, for confirmation that treatment with pediculicides has been successful, and for the removal of nits (dead eggs or egg shells). Most pediculicides are only partially ovicidal. Therefore, 10 days after beginning treatment with any antilouse product, the scalp of the child should be examined. If no living lice are found, the treatment should be discontinued. If living lice are still present, treatment should be continued with a product containing a different active ingredient. Suffocating agents such as olive, soya, sunflower and corn oils, hair gels and mayonnaise are able to kill a significant number of lice only if they are applied in liberal quantities for more than 12 hours. However, they lubricate the hair and therefore may facilitate combing and removing lice and eggs from the scalp. Nits may remain glued on the hair for at least 6 months, even after a successful treatment, and lead to a false positive diagnosis of louse infestation. If nits are seen on the hair, the child should be examined, but treatment should be initiated only if living lice are found. Formulations containing 5% acetic acid or 8% formic acid, as well as acid shampoos (pH 4.5 to 5.5) and conditioners, in combination with a louse comb, can be helpful for removing nits. There is no

  14. Pelvic inflammatory disease: improving awareness, prevention, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Das, Breanne B; Ronda, Jocelyn; Trent, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a common disorder of the reproductive tract that is frequently misdiagnosed and inadequately treated. PID and its complications, such as infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain, are preventable by screening asymptomatic patients for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and promptly treating individuals with STIs and PID. Recent findings The rates of adverse outcomes in women with PID are high and disproportionately affect young minority women. There are key opportunities for prevention including improving provider adherence with national screening guidelines for STIs and PID treatment recommendations and patient medication adherence. Nearly half of all eligible women are not screened for STIs according to national quality standards, which may increase the risk of both acute and subclinical PID. Moreover, in clinical practice, providers poorly adhere to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for treatment of PID. Additionally, patients with PID struggle to adhere to the current management strategies in the outpatient setting. Conclusion Novel evidence-based clinical and public health interventions to further reduce the rates of PID and to improve outcomes for affected women are warranted. We propose potential cost-effective approaches that could be employed in real-world settings. PMID:27578991

  15. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Outpatient treatment and prevention].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Ruiz Contreras, J; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-12-01

    There have been significant changes in community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children in the last decade. These changes relate to epidemiology and clinical presentation. Resistance to antibiotics is also a changing issue. These all have to be considered when treating CAP. In this document, two of the main Spanish pediatric societies involved in the treatment of CAP in children, propose a consensus concerning therapeutic approach. These societies are the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases. The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) has also been involved in the prevention of CAP. An attempt is made to provide up-to-date guidelines to all paediatricians. The first part of the statement presents the approach to ambulatory, previously healthy children. We also review the prevention with currently available vaccines. In a next second part, special situations and complicated forms will be addressed.

  16. [Delirium prevention and treatment in elderly hip fracture].

    PubMed

    Robles, María José; Formiga, Francesc; Vidán, M Teresa

    2014-04-22

    The fracture of the proximal femur or hip fracture in the elderly usually happens after a fall and carries a high morbidity and mortality. One of the most common complications during hospitalization for hip fracture is the onset of delirium or acute confusional state that in elderly patients has a negative impact on the hospital stay, and prognosis, worsening functional ability, cognitive status and mortality. Also the development of delirium during hospitalization increases health care costs. Strategies to prevent and treat delirium during hospitalization for hip fracture have been less studied. In this context, this paper aims to conduct a review of the literature on strategies that exist in the prevention and treatment of delirium in elderly patients with hip fracture.

  17. Infant Formulas for Food Allergy Treatment and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Hetu; Bahna, Sami L

    2016-04-01

    The number of infant formulas intended for food allergy treatment or prevention has been increasing. Some products fulfill the criteria for hypoallergenicity, such as extensively hydrolyzed protein (casein or whey) and synthesized amino acid formulas (elemental diet). Numerous partially hydrolyzed formulas have been derived from bovine milk, soybean, and rice. They are not hypoallergenic and are not recommended for children allergic to the parent protein, yet certain preparations have shown efficacy for allergy prevention. Soybean-derived preparations, although not hypoallergenic, have been tolerated by a majority of children allergic to bovine milk. Studies on the addition of probiotics or prebiotics to infant formulas have shown inconsistent findings. Numerous hypoallergenic formulas or milk substitutes are available for pediatricians to choose for children with food allergy. Caution is needed in prescribing formulas that are erroneously marketed as hypoallergenic.

  18. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Outpatient treatment and prevention].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Ruiz Contreras, J; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-12-01

    There have been significant changes in community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children in the last decade. These changes relate to epidemiology and clinical presentation. Resistance to antibiotics is also a changing issue. These all have to be considered when treating CAP. In this document, two of the main Spanish pediatric societies involved in the treatment of CAP in children, propose a consensus concerning therapeutic approach. These societies are the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases. The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) has also been involved in the prevention of CAP. An attempt is made to provide up-to-date guidelines to all paediatricians. The first part of the statement presents the approach to ambulatory, previously healthy children. We also review the prevention with currently available vaccines. In a next second part, special situations and complicated forms will be addressed. PMID:25488029

  19. Experiences of living with intermittent claudication.

    PubMed

    Egberg, Louise; Andreassen, Sissel; Mattiasson, Anne-Cathrine

    2012-03-01

    Intermittent claudication is a symptom caused by peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and is associated with pain, impaired mobility and loss of control. Walking ability is reduced due to the pain, and both physical and social functions are often negatively affected, which may lead to patients feeling they are a burden to others. An interview study using a qualitative descriptive design to describe experiences of living with intermittent claudication caused by PAD was carried out during Winter and Spring 2009/2010. Fifteen people suffering from intermittent claudication were interviewed, and the interviews were analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. Intermittent claudication greatly affects daily living. Six themes were identified: "Experiencing discomfort in the legs," "Moving around in a new way," "Feeling inconvenient when forced to stop," "Missing previous life," "Incorporating intermittent claudication in daily life," and "To lead a strenuous life." The main theme was "Adjusting to a restricted life." The findings show that intermittent claudication has a major impact on daily life. Apart from the severity of symptoms, how the illness is experienced differs among patients, depending on how active the ill person is or wants to be. These findings suggest that increased knowledge about living with intermittent claudication is important to understand the effects on the ill person's life, as a complement to physical examinations when planning individual treatment. PMID:22321401

  20. 77 FR 23733 - CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and Treatment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ...) Enhancing Hepatitis Prevention Treatment and Care in the United States; (2) Integrating HIV Prevention and..., CDC, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road,...

  1. Access for all: contextualising HIV treatment as prevention in Swaziland.

    PubMed

    Vernooij, Eva; Mehlo, Mandhla; Hardon, Anita; Reis, Ria

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how notions of the individual and population are evoked in two ongoing HIV treatment as prevention (TasP) implementation studies in Swaziland. By contrasting policy discourses with lived kinship experiences of people living with HIV, we seek to understand how TasP unfolds in the Swazi context. Data collection consisted of eight focus group discussions with people living with HIV who were members of support groups to examine their perspectives about TasP. In addition, 18 key informant interviews were conducted with study team members, national-level policy-makers and NGO representatives involved in the design of health communication messages about TasP in Swaziland. Thematic analysis was used to identify recurrent themes in transcripts and field notes. Policy-makers and people living with HIV actively resisted framing HIV treatment as a prevention technology but promoted it as (earlier) access to treatment for all. TasP was not conceptualised in terms of individual or societal benefits, which are characteristic of international public health debates; rather its locally situated meanings were embedded in kinship experiences, concerns about taking responsibility for one's own health and others, local biomedical knowledge about drug resistance, and secrecy. The findings from this study suggest that more attention is needed to understand how the global discourse of TasP becomes shaped in practice in different cultural contexts. PMID:27421047

  2. Time issues in multilevel interventions for cancer treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeffrey; Prabhu Das, Irene; Johnson, Timothy P

    2012-05-01

    The concept of time introduces important complexities in estimating intervention effects, program and evaluation design, and measurement and analysis of individual change in multilevel interventions (MLIs). Despite growing recognition that time is a critical element for assessing both individual-level outcomes and higher-level changes in organizational, community, and policy contexts, most MLI designs and evaluations have not addressed these issues. In this chapter we discuss 1) conceptualizing disease life-course and treatment theory in MLIs, 2) approaches to incorporating time in research and program design for MLIs in cancer treatment and prevention, 3) analysis of time-varying multilevel data in the context of cancer treatment and prevention, and 4) resource considerations and trade-offs of incorporating time as a dimension of MLIs and analysis. Although analytic techniques for analyzing time-related phenomena are becoming more available and powerful, there has not been corresponding progress made in the development of theory to guide the application of these techniques in program design and implementation.

  3. [Technical guidelines for the prevention and treatment of chikungunya fever].

    PubMed

    Barrera-Cruz, Antonio; Díaz-Ramos, Rita Delia; Viniegra-Osorio, Arturo; Grajales-Muñiz, Concepción; Dávila-Torres, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is an emerging disease caused by an alphavirus belonging to the Togaviridae family, transmitted by the bite of Aedes genus species: Aedesaegypti and Aedesalbopictus. In 2013, PAHO/WHO received confirmation of the first cases of indigenous transmission of chikungunya in the Americas. This disease may be acute, subacute and chronic, affecting all age groups. Following an incubation period from three to seven days, the patient usually begins with a high fever (greater than 39 °C), arthralgia, back pain, headache, nausea, vomiting, arthritis, rash, and conjunctivitis (acute phase: 3-10 days). Most patients recover fully, but in some cases, joint involvement may persist chronically and cause discapacity and affect life quality. Serious complications are rare, however, attention must be focused on vulnerable populations (the elderly, children and pregnant women). So far, there is no specific antiviral treatment or effective vaccine, so it is giving priority symptomatic and supportive treatment for the acute phase and make an early diagnosis of atypical and severe forms, and to implement effective prevention and control measures. Given the eco-epidemiological conditions and distribution of vectors in the region of the Americas, the spread of the virus to other countries is likely, so that health professionals should be aware of and identify risk factors and major clinical manifestations, allow timely prevention and safe and effective treatment of this disease.

  4. Highly active antiretroviral treatment for the prevention of HIV transmission

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 an estimated 33 million people were living with HIV; 67% resided in sub-Saharan Africa, with 35% in eight countries alone. In 2007, there were about 1.4 million HIV-positive tuberculosis cases. Globally, approximately 4 million people had been given highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) by the end of 2008, but in 2007, an estimated 6.7 million were still in need of HAART and 2.7 million more became infected with HIV. Although there has been unprecedented investment in confronting HIV/AIDS - the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS estimates $13.8 billion was spent in 2008 - a key challenge is how to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic given limited and potentially shrinking resources. Economic disparities may further exacerbate human rights issues and widen the increasingly divergent approaches to HIV prevention, care and treatment. HIV transmission only occurs from people with HIV, and viral load is the single greatest risk factor for all modes of transmission. HAART can lower viral load to nearly undetectable levels. Prevention of mother to child transmission offers proof of the concept of HAART interrupting transmission, and observational studies and previous modelling work support using HAART for prevention. Although knowing one's HIV status is key for prevention efforts, it is not known with certainty when to start HAART. Building on previous modelling work, we used an HIV/AIDS epidemic of South African intensity to explore the impact of testing all adults annually and starting persons on HAART immediately after they are diagnosed as HIV positive. This theoretical strategy would reduce annual HIV incidence and mortality to less than one case per 1000 people within 10 years and it would reduce the prevalence of HIV to less than 1% within 50 years. To explore HAART as a prevention strategy, we recommend further discussions to explore human rights and ethical considerations, clarify research priorities and review feasibility and acceptability

  5. HIV Treatment as Prevention: Issues in Economic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bärnighausen, Till; Salomon, Joshua A.; Sangrujee, Nalinee

    2012-01-01

    Meyer-Rath and Over assert in another article in the July 2012 PLoS Medicine Collection, “Investigating the Impact of Treatment on New HIV Infections”, that economic evaluations of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in currently existing programs and in HIV treatment as prevention (TasP) programs should use cost functions that capture cost dependence on a number of factors, such as scale and scope of delivery, health states, ART regimens, health workers' experience, patients' time on treatment, and the distribution of delivery across public and private sectors. We argue that for particular evaluation purposes (e.g., to establish the social value of TasP) and from particular perspectives (e.g., national health policy makers) less detailed cost functions may be sufficient. We then extend the discussion of economic evaluation of TasP, describing why ART outcomes and costs assessed in currently existing programs are unlikely to be generalizable to TasP programs for several fundamental reasons. First, to achieve frequent, widespread HIV testing and high uptake of ART immediately following an HIV diagnosis, TasP programs will require components that are not present in current ART programs and whose costs are not included in current estimates. Second, the early initiation of ART under TasP will change not only patients' disease courses and treatment experiences—which can affect behaviors that determine clinical treatment success, such as ART adherence and retention—but also quality of life and economic outcomes for HIV-infected individuals. Third, the preventive effects of TasP are likely to alter the composition of the HIV-infected population over time, changing its biological and behavioral characteristics and leading to different costs and outcomes for ART. PMID:22802743

  6. HIV treatment as prevention: issues in economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bärnighausen, Till; Salomon, Joshua A; Sangrujee, Nalinee

    2012-01-01

    Meyer-Rath and Over assert in another article in the July 2012 PLoS Medicine Collection, "Investigating the Impact of Treatment on New HIV Infections", that economic evaluations of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in currently existing programs and in HIV treatment as prevention (TasP) programs should use cost functions that capture cost dependence on a number of factors, such as scale and scope of delivery, health states, ART regimens, health workers' experience, patients' time on treatment, and the distribution of delivery across public and private sectors. We argue that for particular evaluation purposes (e.g., to establish the social value of TasP) and from particular perspectives (e.g., national health policy makers) less detailed cost functions may be sufficient. We then extend the discussion of economic evaluation of TasP, describing why ART outcomes and costs assessed in currently existing programs are unlikely to be generalizable to TasP programs for several fundamental reasons. First, to achieve frequent, widespread HIV testing and high uptake of ART immediately following an HIV diagnosis, TasP programs will require components that are not present in current ART programs and whose costs are not included in current estimates. Second, the early initiation of ART under TasP will change not only patients' disease courses and treatment experiences--which can affect behaviors that determine clinical treatment success, such as ART adherence and retention--but also quality of life and economic outcomes for HIV-infected individuals. Third, the preventive effects of TasP are likely to alter the composition of the HIV-infected population over time, changing its biological and behavioral characteristics and leading to different costs and outcomes for ART.

  7. Application of nanotechnology in cancers prevention, early detection and treatment.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shraddha P; Patel, Parshottambhai B; Parekh, Bhavesh B

    2014-01-01

    Use of nanotechnology in medical science is a rapidly developing area. New opportunities of diagnosis, imaging and therapy have developed due to recent rapid advancement by nanotechnology. The most common areas to be affected are diagnostic, imaging and targeted drug delivery in gastroenterology, oncology, cardiovascular medicine, obstetrics and gynecology. Mass screening with inexpensive imaging might be possible in the near future with the help of nanotechnology. This review paper provides an overview of causes of cancer and the application of nanotechnology in cancer prevention, detection and treatment.

  8. Prevention, Treatment and Parent Education for Diaper Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Diaper dermatitis is a common cutaneous condition characterized by an acute inflammatory eruption of the skin in the diaper area of an infant. Although this condition is relatively common, it can cause considerable pain and stress for infants and can be troublesome for their caregivers. In the United States, the frequency of diaper dermatitis is substantial and accounts for a high number of visits to health care providers. The three most common types of diaper dermatitis are chafing dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis and diaper candidiasis. This article reviews common causes, differential diagnosis, current prevention and treatment recommendations, nursing implications and practical tips for families to utilize while caring for their infants at home.

  9. Local complications in dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    ANNIBALI, S.; RIPARI, M.; LA MONACA, G.; TONOLI, F.; CRISTALLI, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY There are many detailed articles regarding accidents and local complications in dental implantation. Comparison of the data they report is not always easy because different criteria have been followed in the various classifications and there is confusion between the terms accident and complication. The aim of this paper is to propose a classification that considers the timing of the events and makes a distinction between the two terms. Accidents are events that occur during surgery and complications are all the pathological conditions that appear postoperatively. The proper diagnostic procedures and surgical techniques for complications prevention and treatment are also described. PMID:23285333

  10. Natural Polyphenols for Prevention and Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Jie; Li, Ya; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Chen, Yu-Ming; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    There is much epidemiological evidence that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables could lower the risk of certain cancers. The effect has been attributed, in part, to natural polyphenols. Besides, numerous studies have demonstrated that natural polyphenols could be used for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Potential mechanisms included antioxidant, anti-inflammation as well as the modulation of multiple molecular events involved in carcinogenesis. The current review summarized the anticancer efficacy of major polyphenol classes (flavonoids, phenolic acids, lignans and stilbenes) and discussed the potential mechanisms of action, which were based on epidemiological, in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies within the past five years. PMID:27556486

  11. Osteochondritis dissecans of the elbow: diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Hall, T L; Galea, A M

    1999-02-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is an inflammation of the bone and cartilage that usually affects adolescents and young adults. A 16-year-old baseball player who had chronic elbow pain illustrates the typical course of OCD of the elbow. Radiographs may be diagnostic, but bone scan is a more sensitive diagnostic tool, and magnetic resonance imaging offers information for staging and characterization of lesions. If symptoms do not resolve with rest, surgery is recommended, including loose-body removal with curettage or drilling. The prognosis is good with early diagnosis and treatment. Left untreated, OCD may progress to degenerative joint disease. Prevention includes strengthening and stretching exercises and limits on throwing activities.

  12. Natural Polyphenols for Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Jie; Li, Ya; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Chen, Yu-Ming; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    There is much epidemiological evidence that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables could lower the risk of certain cancers. The effect has been attributed, in part, to natural polyphenols. Besides, numerous studies have demonstrated that natural polyphenols could be used for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Potential mechanisms included antioxidant, anti-inflammation as well as the modulation of multiple molecular events involved in carcinogenesis. The current review summarized the anticancer efficacy of major polyphenol classes (flavonoids, phenolic acids, lignans and stilbenes) and discussed the potential mechanisms of action, which were based on epidemiological, in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies within the past five years. PMID:27556486

  13. Regulatory Impact on Thrombosis Treatment, Prevention, and Anticoagulant Use.

    PubMed

    Dannemiller, Robert; Ward, Tucker; Fanikos, John

    2016-10-01

    Thromboembolism afflicts millions of patients annually in the United States and is associated with a significant cost burden. Oral anticoagulants provide clinicians with options for management of these diseases and their use continues to grow. Accordingly, regulatory, legislative, and nonprofit organizations have set performance standards with the goal of improving patient outcomes, ensuring patient safety, and reducing costs. Recent efforts in quality improvement have introduced changes surrounding regulatory requirements, surveillance, litigation, and oversight that clinicians should be familiar with. This article summarizes key updates related to the management of anticoagulant therapy as it relates to thrombosis prevention and treatment. PMID:27637311

  14. Natural Polyphenols for Prevention and Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Zheng, Jie; Li, Ya; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Chen, Yu-Ming; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    There is much epidemiological evidence that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables could lower the risk of certain cancers. The effect has been attributed, in part, to natural polyphenols. Besides, numerous studies have demonstrated that natural polyphenols could be used for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Potential mechanisms included antioxidant, anti-inflammation as well as the modulation of multiple molecular events involved in carcinogenesis. The current review summarized the anticancer efficacy of major polyphenol classes (flavonoids, phenolic acids, lignans and stilbenes) and discussed the potential mechanisms of action, which were based on epidemiological, in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies within the past five years.

  15. Selection of Antimalarial Drug Resistance after Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Infants and Children (IPTi/c) in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Magatte; Tine, Roger; Faye, Babacar; Ndiaye, Jean Louis; Lo, Ami Colle; Sylla, Khadime; Abiola, Annie; Dieng, Yémou; Ndiaye, Daouda; Hallett, Rachel; Gaye, Oumar; Alifrangis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Our study investigated the possible impact of SP-IPT given to infants and children on the prevalence of SP-resistant haplotypes in the Plasmodium falciparum genes Pfdhfr and Pfdhps, comparing sites with and without IPTi/c. P. falciparum positive samples (N = 352) collected from children < 5 years were analyzed to determine the prevalence of SP resistance-related haplotypes by nested PCR followed by sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The prevalence of the Pfdhfr triple mutant haplotype (CIRN) increased in both groups, but only significantly in the IPTi/c group from 41% to 65% in 2011 (P = 0.005). Conversely, the Pfdhps 437G mutation decreased in both groups from 44.6% to 28.6% (P = 0.07) and from 66.7% to 47.5% (P = 0.02) between 2010 and 2011 in the control and the IPTi/c groups, respectively. A weak trend for decreasing prevalence of quadruple mutants (triple Pfdhfr + Pfdhps 437G) was noted in both groups (P = 0.15 and P = 0.34). During the two cross-sectional surveys some significant changes were observed in the SP resistance-related genes. PMID:23589534

  16. Long-term moderate dose exogenous erythropoietin treatment protects from intermittent hypoxia-induced spatial learning deficits and hippocampal oxidative stress in young rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Qahtani, Jobran M; Abdel-Wahab, Basel A; Abd El-Aziz, Samy M

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH) is associated with cognitive impairments and oxidative stress in brain regions involved in learning and memory. In earlier studies, erythropoietin (EPO) showed a neuroprotective effect in large doses. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of smaller doses of EPO, such as those used in the treatment of anemia, on IH-induced cognitive deficits and hippocampal oxidative stress in young rats. The effect of concurrent EPO treatment (500 and 1,000 IU/kg/day ip) on spatial learning and memory deficits induced by long-term exposure to IH for 6 weeks was tested using the Morris water maze (MWM) test and the elevated plus maze (EPM) test. Moreover, the effect on hippocampal glutamate and oxidative stress were assessed. Exposure to IH induced a significant impairment of spatial learning and cognition of animals in both MWM and EPM performance parameters. Moreover, hippocampal glutamate and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) increased while antioxidant defenses (GSH and GSH-Px) decreased. EPO in the tested doses significantly reduced the IH-induced spatial learning deficits in both MWM and EPM tests and dose-dependently antagonized the effects of IH on hippocampal glutamate, TBARS, GSH levels, and GSH-Px activity. Treatment with EPO in moderate doses that used for anemia, concurrently with IH exposure can antagonize IH-induced spatial learning deficits and protect hippocampal neurons from IH-induced lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress-induced damage in young rats, possibly through multiple mechanisms involving a potential antioxidative effect.

  17. A stochastic model of cancer growth subject to an intermittent treatment with combined effects: reduction in tumor size and rise in growth rate.

    PubMed

    Spina, Serena; Giorno, Virginia; Román-Román, Patricia; Torres-Ruiz, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    A model of cancer growth based on the Gompertz stochastic process with jumps is proposed to analyze the effect of a therapeutic program that provides intermittent suppression of cancer cells. In this context, a jump represents an application of the therapy that shifts the cancer mass to a return state and it produces an increase in the growth rate of the cancer cells. For the resulting process, consisting in a combination of different Gompertz processes characterized by different growth parameters, the first passage time problem is considered. A strategy to select the inter-jump intervals is given so that the first passage time of the process through a constant boundary is as large as possible and the cancer size remains under this control threshold during the treatment. A computational analysis is performed for different choices of involved parameters. Finally, an estimation of parameters based on the maximum likelihood method is provided and some simulations are performed to illustrate the validity of the proposed procedure.

  18. [Clostridium difficile infecion--diagnostics, prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Piekarska, Marta; Wandałowicz, Alicja D; Miigoć, Henryka

    2014-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of an antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Frequency of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) increased in the last decade. This study presents current preventive measure i.e. hand washing, disposable gloves. Additionally, the article presents diagnostic methods: detection glutamine dehydrogenase (GDH), toxins A and B, cytotoxicity neutralization test, polymerase chain reaction methods (PCR) i.e. nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) and stool culture. Moreover available methods of treatment were presented depending on severity of CDI e.i. metronidazole, vancomycin, fidaxomicin, rifaximin. Furthermore, the review provides information about alternative methods of treatment in view of new hypervirulent strains of C. difficile and increasing resistance to commonly used antibiotics, including: fuscid acid, bacitracin, probiotics, non-toxigenic strains, immunoglobulins, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, toxins binders and fecal transplant. PMID:24868904

  19. [Prevention and treatment of dento-maxillary discrepancy].

    PubMed

    Delhaye, S; Saba, S Bou; Delatte, M

    2006-06-01

    The many clinical and radiological signs of arch length discrepancy simplify the practitioner's task of diagnosing it early. When they need to deal with insufficient room in the dental arch, orthodontists have available to them a large variety of therapeutic possibilities that require relatively little cooperation from young patients and that often work quickly to correct beginning malocclusions in the mixed dentition or that prevent them from worsening. Orthodontists decide whether to use space maintainers, increase arch length, or embark on a program of serial extraction depending upon the type of disorder, its severity, and its etiology. The principle objectives of early treatment in arch length discrepancy cases are to re-establish a balanced occlusion and to reduce the duration and the complexity of definitive treatment in the adult dentition.

  20. Prevention and treatment of bone fragility in cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Ottanelli, Silva

    2015-01-01

    Summary It is well known that fractures increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. The various mechanisms responsible for bone loss in cancer patients may have a different impact depending on the characteristics of the clinical case and correlates with the therapies used, or caused by the therapies used against cancer. Some hormonal treatments cause hypogonadism, event which contributes to the progressive loss of bone mass. This is detectable in patients with breast cancer receiving determines that estrogen-deprivation and in men with prostate cancer with therapies that determine androgen deprivation. Chemotherapy treatments used in cancer patients have reduced bone mass. In addition, low bone mass is detectable in patients with lymphoma treated with corticosteroids or radiation or alkylating agents. In premenopausal patients suffering from breast cancer, treatment with cytotoxic therapy or ablation of ovarian function, can lead to an 8% reduction in bone mineral density at the spine and 4% in the femur. With a chemotherapy regimen in CMF, the reduction of BMD is 6.5%; this bone loss is not recovered after discontinuation of therapy. Tamoxifen given for five years reduces bone remodeling and cause a 32% increase in the risk of osteoporotic fractures when used in premenopausal. After menopause, tamoxifen has a protective effect on bone mass, with a reduced risk of new fractures. Aromatase inhibitors in post-menopausal women, depending on the formulation can cause different effects on the reduction of BMD and fracture risk. We have in fact steroids, exemestane and nonsteroidal, letrozole and anastrozole. Patients at increased risk of fragility fractures should undergo preventive therapies as soon as possible after tests performed for the study of bone health. They can be used DEXA and the FRAX algorithm, which can define a secondary osteoporosis. Prevention and treatment of the increased risk of osteoporotic fracture is to maintain adequate levels of calcium and

  1. [Prevention and treatment of hepatitis C in illicit drug users].

    PubMed

    Sakoman, Slavko

    2009-12-01

    Drug use is a complex behavior with multidimensional determinants, including social, psychological, cultural, economic, and biological factors. Blood borne viral infections including hepatitis C virus are transmitted when an uninfected intravenous drug user (IVDU) uses injection equipment, especially syringes, that have previously been used by an infected person. The transmission can also result from sharing other injection equipment such as 'cookers' and 'cottons'. Recent studies have shown that the prevalence and incidence of drug abuse have declined substantially since the introduction of needle exchange. Infection with hepatitis C may spontaneously resolve during the acute stage and never progress to chronic infection, or the infection may become chronic without medical complications, or the infection may become chronic with progressive medical complications. Regular testing for infection is an important strategy for secondary prevention of chronic hepatitis C infection. Care for hepatitis C is a vital component of a comprehensive health program for persons using illicit drugs. Such care includes screening for transmission risk behavior, prevention counseling and education, testing for HCV antibody and RNA. IDUs found to have chronic HCV infection should be assessed for the presence and degree of liver disease and evaluated for treatment for HCV Hepatitis C care also requires providing access to treatment for substance use and abuse. Therapy with opioid agonists, including methadone maintenance treatment, has been shown to diminish and often eliminate opioid use and reduce transmission of infection. Approval of buprenorphine makes office-based pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction possible. When considering treatment for hepatitis C, particular attention must be paid to mental health conditions. As a group, IDUs exhibit higher rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders than the general population. IFN-based regimens for hepatitis C are often complicated by

  2. [The application of "preventive treatment theory" in chronic airway inflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing-Cheng; Liu, Bao-Jun; Zhang, Hong-Ying

    2013-07-01

    Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as chronic airway inflammatory diseases, seriously threaten the health of human beings. Chinese medicine has obvious advantages in prevention and treatment of them. "Preventive treatment theory" is a sort summarization of preventive medicine in Chinese medicine. The theory is not only reflected at the disease prevention levels, also embodied in the active treatment and the rehabilitation process. It was especially deep and colorfully embodied in the prevention and treatment of chronic airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma and COPD. In this paper,clarified were the prevention and treatment targets, ways of thinking and methods in different stages of asthma and COPD from various viewpoints including prevention before disease occurrence, treating disease at disease onset, preventing the aggravation once disease occurs, and consolidation after disease occurs. We hope to improve ways of thinking and prevention and treatment levels of bronchial asthma and COPD by Chinese medicine. PMID:24063226

  3. Antioxidant Phytochemicals for the Prevention and Treatment of Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Jie; Gan, Ren-You; Li, Sha; Zhou, Yue; Li, An-Na; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Overproduction of oxidants (reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species) in the human body is responsible for the pathogenesis of some diseases. The scavenging of these oxidants is thought to be an effective measure to depress the level of oxidative stress of organisms. It has been reported that intake of vegetables and fruits is inversely associated with the risk of many chronic diseases, and antioxidant phytochemicals in vegetables and fruits are considered to be responsible for these health benefits. Antioxidant phytochemicals can be found in many foods and medicinal plants, and play an important role in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases caused by oxidative stress. They often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities, as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits, such as anticancer, anti-aging, and protective action for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, obesity and neurodegenerative diseases. This review summarizes recent progress on the health benefits of antioxidant phytochemicals, and discusses their potential mechanisms in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. PMID:26633317

  4. Antioxidant Phytochemicals for the Prevention and Treatment of Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Jie; Gan, Ren-You; Li, Sha; Zhou, Yue; Li, An-Na; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2015-11-27

    Overproduction of oxidants (reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species) in the human body is responsible for the pathogenesis of some diseases. The scavenging of these oxidants is thought to be an effective measure to depress the level of oxidative stress of organisms. It has been reported that intake of vegetables and fruits is inversely associated with the risk of many chronic diseases, and antioxidant phytochemicals in vegetables and fruits are considered to be responsible for these health benefits. Antioxidant phytochemicals can be found in many foods and medicinal plants, and play an important role in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases caused by oxidative stress. They often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities, as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits, such as anticancer, anti-aging, and protective action for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, obesity and neurodegenerative diseases. This review summarizes recent progress on the health benefits of antioxidant phytochemicals, and discusses their potential mechanisms in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases.

  5. Scorpion sting prevention and treatment in ancient Iran

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Rouhullah; Arani, Mohammad Ghannaee

    2015-01-01

    Due to the medical and therapeutic importance of scorpions in Iranian traditional medicine, this review was conducted on the treatment of scorpion sting as performed by traditional healers in order to realize complications, clinical manifestations, diversities, and deficiencies in the prevention, control, and treatment as mentioned in the pertained literatures. This study tried to make known and investigate attitudes of the Iranian national and traditional medicine towards controlling these venomous animals. Keywords and articles were searched through relevant sites on the Internet. We investigated different journals and references for the Iranian traditional medicine. Based on the articles and books found, we tried to find suitable solutions to problems from the viewpoint of traditional medicine. Scorpion sting dates back to ancient Iran and has been widely reflected in the resources of Iranian traditional medicine. The traditional medicine offers various guidelines that can be beneficial in this respect. New attitude towards scorpion sting with regard to traditional medicine resources can enhance control and prevention of scorpion stings. Consequently, this attitude leads authorities and researchers to a decreased level of scorpion stings or related consequences. PMID:26151015

  6. Scorpion sting prevention and treatment in ancient Iran.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Rouhullah; Arani, Mohammad Ghannaee

    2015-04-01

    Due to the medical and therapeutic importance of scorpions in Iranian traditional medicine, this review was conducted on the treatment of scorpion sting as performed by traditional healers in order to realize complications, clinical manifestations, diversities, and deficiencies in the prevention, control, and treatment as mentioned in the pertained literatures. This study tried to make known and investigate attitudes of the Iranian national and traditional medicine towards controlling these venomous animals. Keywords and articles were searched through relevant sites on the Internet. We investigated different journals and references for the Iranian traditional medicine. Based on the articles and books found, we tried to find suitable solutions to problems from the viewpoint of traditional medicine. Scorpion sting dates back to ancient Iran and has been widely reflected in the resources of Iranian traditional medicine. The traditional medicine offers various guidelines that can be beneficial in this respect. New attitude towards scorpion sting with regard to traditional medicine resources can enhance control and prevention of scorpion stings. Consequently, this attitude leads authorities and researchers to a decreased level of scorpion stings or related consequences. PMID:26151015

  7. Compression for Primary Prevention, Treatment, and Prevention of Recurrence of Venous Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Stephanie; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a prevalent disease that frequently leads to development of venous leg ulcers. While a number of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines have been developed that provide guidance for clinicians when caring for patients with chronic venous insufficiency, they lack adequate detail concerning selection and application of compression for prevention and management of venous leg ulcers. In order to address this need, the WOCN Society appointed a task force to develop an algorithm for compression for primary prevention, treatment, and prevention of recurrent venous leg ulcers in persons with chronic venous insufficiency. The task force used findings from a scoping literature review to identify current best evidence needed to support decision points and pathways within the algorithm. In addition, the task force convened a panel of 20 clinicians and researchers with expertise in lower extremity venous disorders in order to establish consensus around pathways and decision points within the algorithm lacking robust evidence. Following initial construction of the algorithm, a second interdisciplinary group of expert clinicians established content validity and provided additional qualitative feedback used to complete final revisions of the algorithm. This article reviews the process used to create this landmark algorithm, including generation of the evidence- and consensus-based statements used in its construction, the various pathways, and rich supplemental materials embedded within the algorithm, and the process used to establish content validity. PMID:27163774

  8. Nanotechnology and Pediatric Cancer: Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zare-Zardini, H; Amiri, A; Shanbedi, M; Taheri-Kafrani, A; Sadri, Z; Ghanizadeh, F; Neamatzadeh, H; Sheikhpour, R; Keyvani Boroujeni, F; Masoumi Dehshiri, R; Hashemi, A; Aminorroaya, MM; Dehgahnzadeh, MR; Shahriari, Sh

    2015-01-01

    Despite development of new approaches for the treatment of cancer disease, it is the second cause of mortality in world. Annually, 30000 persons die in Iran due to cancer diseases. Eighty percent of cancer patients are children which about 50% children lead to death. Given the high rate of cancer-related death, the new approaches for prevention, control, early diagnosis, and treatment of this disease seem necessary. Investigation of new strategies is the major challenge for scientists at recent century. Nanotechnology as a new scientific field with novel and small compounds utilized different fields over the past ten years especially in medicine. This science has come to the forefront in the areas of medical diagnostics, imaging, and therapeutic scheduls. Therefore, it has the potential applications for cancer detection and therapy. This review will discuss the therapeutic applications of different nano-materials in diagnosis, imaging, and delivery of therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer with a major focus on their applications for the treatment of cancer and cancer- related diseases in children. The advancements in established nanoparticle technologies such as liposomes, polymer micelles, and functionalization regarding tumor targeting and controlled release strategies as well as drug delivery were discussed. It will also review the blood toxicity of used nanostructures. PMID:26985357

  9. [Anorexia nervosa with refeeding syndrome: prevention and treatment of RS].

    PubMed

    Kasai, Makiko; Okajima, Yoshirou; Takano, Eisuke; Kato, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome (RS), seen in the early stages of anorexia nervosa (AN) treatment, has not been paid sufficient attention regarding its strong association with poor outcomes. This report describes a case of AN restriction type (AN-R) with sequent RS appearance despite the introduction of progressive and careful low-calorie nutrition, and discusses RS treatment. The patient was a 16-year-old female. She was first diagnosed with AN at the age of 14 when she went on a diet, admitted into pediatrics, and recovered: however, AN recurred after she started high school, and her weight decreased to 31.8 kg. She was admitted to pediatrics again, refused to receive treatment, discharged from the hospital, and introduced to our department. Soon after she came to us, her weight went down to 29.6 kg, and continued to decrease to 26.8 kg. She was recommended to receive inpatient care, but she firmly refused. A few days later, her experience of loss of consciousness made her agree to receive inpatient care. At this time, she was already weakened and had difficulty performing voluntary body movements as well as excretion. She was treated carefully and placed on 125 kcal/day. On the 6th day of treatment, severe liver damage was observed, her serum phosphorus level went down to 2.0 mg/dL, and she was diagnosed with RS. The lowest concentration of serum phosphorus observed was 1.3 mg/dL with blood abnormality and delirium; however, our strict management with intravascular phosphorus administration supported her increased dietary intake, and the patient was able to leave the hospital on the 54th day after admission. Based on this experience, the pathogenesis of RS was overviewed, and RS prevention as well as treatment was discussed. It has been reported that low phosphorus levels are observed in approximately one quarter of AN patients, and, thus, immediate action and treatment of hypophosphatemia are necessary when considering RS occurrence. In this study, the observed serum

  10. Chronic administration of THC prevents the behavioral effects of intermittent adolescent MDMA administration and attenuates MDMA-induced hyperthermia and neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Erica Y; Ali, Syed F; Meyer, Jerrold S

    2011-12-01

    Most recreational users of 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") also take cannabis, in part because cannabis can reduce the dysphoric symptoms of the ecstasy come-down such as agitation and insomnia. Although previous animal studies have examined the acute effects of co-administering MDMA and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the major psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, research on chronic exposure to this drug combination is lacking. Therefore, the present study was conducted to investigate the effects of chronic adolescent administration of both THC and MDMA on behavior and on regional serotonin transporter (SERT) binding and serotonin (5-HT) concentrations as indices of serotonergic system integrity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four drug administration groups: (1) MDMA alone, (2) THC alone, (3) MDMA plus THC, and (4) vehicle controls. MDMA (2 × 10 mg/kg × 4 h) was administered every fifth day from postnatal day (PD) 35 to 60 to simulate intermittent recreational ecstasy use, whereas THC (5mg/kg) was given once daily over the same time period to simulate heavy cannabis use. THC unexpectedly produced a modest hyperthermic effect when administered alone, but in animals co-treated with both THC and MDMA, there was an attenuation of MDMA-induced hyperthermia on dosing days. Subsequent testing conducted after a drug washout period revealed that THC reduced MDMA-related behavioral changes in the emergence and social interaction tests of anxiety-like behavior and also blunted the MDMA-induced decrease in exploratory behavior in the hole-board test. THC additionally attenuated MDMA -induced decreases in 5-HT levels and in SERT binding in the frontal cortex, parietal cortex, and striatum, but not in the hippocampus. These results suggest that chronic co-administration of THC during adolescence can provide some protection against various adverse physiological, behavioral, and neurochemical effects produced by MDMA. PMID

  11. Wound infections on board ship--prevention, pathogens, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2011-01-01

    Wounds are common in seafarers and they can easily become infected in the marine environment. Pre-sea tetanus immunization is essential. Without diagnostic facilities and only a limited range of antibiotics onboard, injury prevention and early treatment to reduce the likelihood of infection are important measures. Suturing clean cuts reduces healing time and risk of infection. Fresh, clean cuts, especially on the face or head, can be closed by adhesive tape or sutures, but if infection arises, then one or more sutures should be removed to enable drainage. Most wounds must be considered contaminated and should not be closed, just covered with sterile dressing after cleaning. Antibiotic treatment should be started immediately in seafarers with hand and puncture wounds. The primary treatment for a simple abscess is incision and drainage. Antibiotic treatment is recommended for abscesses if the infection spreads to the surrounding tissue (associated cellulitis), if there is lack of response to incision and drainage alone, or if the abscess is in an area difficult or dangerous to drain (e.g. face, palm, genitalia). Recommended therapy for cellulitis is 5-10 days of dicloxacillin, cephalexin, clindamycin, or erythromycin, but if there is no improvement after 2-3 days, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) should be suspected. Bites and burn wounds require special attention. Since wound infections can deteriorate rapidly, a telemedicine advice service (TMAS) should be consulted during the early stages, and serial digital photographs of the affected area, transmitted by e-mail to TMAS, are often useful during treatment at sea.

  12. The uncertainty of treatment: Women's use of HIV treatment as prevention in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Amy

    2016-06-01

    In countries throughout sub-Saharan Africa, antiretroviral therapy is seen as the solution to not only treat existing patients, but also to prevent the future spread of HIV. New policies for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission place women on lifelong treatment as soon as they are tested HIV positive. This article looks at how women understand this prescription for lifelong treatment. Drawing on interviews with HIV-positive women in Lilongwe, Malawi (N = 65) during July-September 2014, I examine the process of making treatment decisions, and why - despite increased access - women refuse or stop treatment. Using treatment for preventative purposes transforms the experience of HIV from an acute to a chronic condition where both the symptoms of disease and the efficacy of treatment are unclear. Women look for evidence of the cost and benefit of treatment through their personal experiences with illness and drug-taking. For some women, the benefits were clearer: they interpreted past illnesses as signs of HIV infection, and felt healthier and more economically productive afterwards. For others, taking treatment sometimes led to marital problems, and side effects made them feel worse and disrupted their ability to work. While women understand the health benefits of antiretroviral therapy, taking treatment does not always make sense in their present circumstances when there are costly physical and economic repercussions. This study builds on existing sociological research on medical decision-making by situating decisions in a broader political economy of changing HIV policies, economic conditions, and everyday uncertainty. PMID:27111435

  13. An adjunctive preventive treatment for cancer: ultraviolet light and ginkgo biloba, together with other antioxidants, are a safe and powerful, but largely ignored, treatment option for the prevention of cancer.

    PubMed

    Eli, Robert; Fasciano, James A

    2006-01-01

    effect on preventing free radical-induced cancer; (7) an enhancing effect on radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer; and (8) a therapeutic effect on reducing the size of cancer tumors. Ginkgo biloba is widely-used and has few adverse effects. The proposed preventive treatment for cancer consists of short intermittent exposure of the least sensitive areas of the body to sunlight and/or artificial ultraviolet light. The routine testing of plasma vitamin D levels help monitor the effectiveness of the treatment and periodic checkups with a dermatologist help monitor the safety.

  14. Dietary Polyphenols in Prevention and Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lall, Rahul K.; Syed, Deeba N.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Khan, Mohammad Imran; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent disease affecting males in many Western countries, with an estimated 29,480 deaths in 2014 in the US alone. Incidence rates for prostate cancer deaths have been decreasing since the early 1990s in men of all races/ethnicities, though they remain about 60% higher in African Americans than in any other group. The relationship between dietary polyphenols and the prevention of prostate cancer has been examined previously. Although results are sometimes inconsistent and variable, there is a general agreement that polyphenols hold great promise for the future management of prostate cancer. Various dietary components, including polyphenols, have been shown to possess anti-cancer properties. Generally considered as non-toxic, dietary polyphenols act as key modulators of signaling pathways and are therefore considered ideal chemopreventive agents. Besides possessing various anti-tumor properties, dietary polyphenols also contribute to epigenetic changes associated with the fate of cancer cells and have emerged as potential drugs for therapeutic intervention. Polyphenols have also been shown to affect post-translational modifications and microRNA expressions. This article provides a systematic review of the health benefits of selected dietary polyphenols in prostate cancer, especially focusing on the subclasses of polyphenols, which have a great effect on disease prevention and treatment. PMID:25654230

  15. Fasting and Caloric Restriction in Cancer Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Brandhorst, Sebastian; Longo, Valter D

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the USA and among the leading major diseases in the world. It is anticipated to continue to increase because of the growth of the aging population and prevalence of risk factors such as obesity, smoking, and/or poor dietary habits. Cancer treatment has remained relatively similar during the past 30 years with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in combination with surgery remaining the standard therapies although novel therapies are slowly replacing or complementing the standard ones. According to the American Cancer Society, the dietary recommendation for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy is to increase calorie and protein intake. In addition, there are no clear guidelines on the type of nutrition that could have a major impact on cancer incidence. Yet, various forms of reduced caloric intake such as calorie restriction (CR) or fasting demonstrate a wide range of beneficial effects able to help prevent malignancies and increase the efficacy of cancer therapies. Whereas chronic CR provides both beneficial and detrimental effects as well as major compliance challenges, periodic fasting (PF), fasting-mimicking diets (FMDs), and dietary restriction (DR) without a reduction in calories are emerging as interventions with the potential to be widely used to prevent and treat cancer. Here, we review preclinical and preliminary clinical studies on dietary restriction and fasting and their role in inducing cellular protection and chemotherapy resistance. PMID:27557543

  16. Fucoxanthin and Its Metabolite Fucoxanthinol in Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Luc J.

    2015-01-01

    Fucoxanthin is a carotenoid present in the chloroplasts of brown seaweeds. When ingested, it is metabolized mainly to fucoxanthinol by digestive enzymes of the gastrointestinal tract. These compounds have been shown to have many beneficial health effects, including anti-mutagenic, anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic actions. In every cancer tested, modulatory actions of fucoxanthinol on viability, cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis and members of the NF-κB pathway were more pronounced than that of fucoxanthin. Anti-proliferative and cancer preventing influences of fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol are mediated through different signalling pathways, including the caspases, Bcl-2 proteins, MAPK, PI3K/Akt, JAK/STAT, AP-1, GADD45, and several other molecules that are involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, anti-angiogenesis or inhibition of metastasis. In this review, we address the mechanisms of action of fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol according to different types of cancers. Current findings suggest that these compounds could be effective for treatment and/or prevention of cancer development and aggressiveness. PMID:26264004

  17. Modern concepts of treatment and prevention of lightning injuries.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Farinholt, Heidi-Marie A; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2005-01-01

    Lightning is the second most common cause of weather-related death in the United States. Lightning is a natural atmospheric discharge that occurs between regions of net positive and net negative electric charges. There are several types of lightning, including streak lightning, sheet lightning, ribbon lightning, bead lightning, and ball lightning. Lightning causes injury through five basic mechanisms: direct strike, flash discharge (splash), contact, ground current (step voltage), and blunt trauma. While persons struck by lightning show evidence of multisystem derangement, the most dramatic effects involve the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Cardiopulmonary arrest is the most common cause of death in lightning victims. Immediate resuscitation of people struck by lightning greatly affects the prognosis. Electrocardiographic changes observed following lightning accidents are probably from primary electric injury or burns of the myocardium without coronary artery occlusion. Lightning induces vasomotor spasm from direct sympathetic stimulation resulting in severe loss of pulses in the extremities. This vasoconstriction may be associated with transient paralysis. Damage to the central nervous system accounts for the second most debilitating group of injuries. Central nervous system injuries from lightning include amnesia and confusion, immediate loss of consciousness, weakness, intracranial injuries, and even brief aphasia. Other organ systems injured by lightning include the eye, ear, gastrointestinal system, skin, and musculoskeletal system. The best treatment of lightning injuries is prevention. The Lightning Safety Guidelines devised by the Lightning Safety Group should be instituted in the United States and other nations to prevent these devastating injuries.

  18. New players in the preventive treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Rapoport, Alan M

    2015-11-10

    Migraine is a common, chronic disorder of the brain causing much disability, as well as personal, familial and societal impact. Several oral preventive agents are available in different countries for the prevention of migraine, but none have performed better than 50% improvement in 50% of patients in a clinical trial. Additionally, each has various possible adverse events making their tolerability less than optimal. Recently, three monoclonal antibodies targeting the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) ligand (LY2951742, ALD403 and TEV-48125) and one targeting the CGRP receptor (AMG 334) have completed phase 2 trials, and the results have been reported. These early results show them all to be somewhat more effective than placebo, with no serious adverse events. Three have been studied for episodic migraine, and only TEV-48125 has been studied for both high frequency episodic and chronic migraine. Moreover, preliminary data suggests that neurostimulation is effective in migraine treatment, including stimulation of the sphenopalatine ganglion, transcutaneous supraorbital and supratrochlear nerve, and transcutaneous vagus nerve. In this article, these innovative therapies will be reviewed.

  19. Treatment Prevents Corrosion in Steel and Concrete Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, to protect rebar from corrosion, NASA developed an electromigration technique that sends corrosion-inhibiting ions into rebar to prevent rust, corrosion, and separation from the surrounding concrete. Kennedy Space Center worked with Surtreat Holding LLC, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a company that had developed a chemical option to fight structural corrosion, combining Surtreat's TPS-II anti-corrosive solution and electromigration. Kennedy's materials scientists reviewed the applicability of the chemical treatment to the electromigration process and determined that it was an effective and environmentally friendly match. Ten years later, NASA is still using this approach to fight concrete corrosion, and it has also developed a new technology that will further advance these efforts-a liquid galvanic coating applied to the outer surface of reinforced concrete to protect the embedded rebar from corrosion. Surtreat licensed this new coating technology and put it to use at the U.S. Army Naha Port, in Okinawa, Japan. The new coating prevents corrosion of steel in concrete in several applications, including highway and bridge infrastructures, piers and docks, concrete balconies and ceilings, parking garages, cooling towers, and pipelines. A natural compliment to the new coating, Surtreat's Total Performance System provides diagnostic testing and site analysis to identify the scope of problems for each project, manufactures and prescribes site-specific solutions, controls material application, and verifies performance through follow-up testing and analysis.

  20. Fasting and Caloric Restriction in Cancer Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Brandhorst, Sebastian; Longo, Valter D

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the USA and among the leading major diseases in the world. It is anticipated to continue to increase because of the growth of the aging population and prevalence of risk factors such as obesity, smoking, and/or poor dietary habits. Cancer treatment has remained relatively similar during the past 30 years with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in combination with surgery remaining the standard therapies although novel therapies are slowly replacing or complementing the standard ones. According to the American Cancer Society, the dietary recommendation for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy is to increase calorie and protein intake. In addition, there are no clear guidelines on the type of nutrition that could have a major impact on cancer incidence. Yet, various forms of reduced caloric intake such as calorie restriction (CR) or fasting demonstrate a wide range of beneficial effects able to help prevent malignancies and increase the efficacy of cancer therapies. Whereas chronic CR provides both beneficial and detrimental effects as well as major compliance challenges, periodic fasting (PF), fasting-mimicking diets (FMDs), and dietary restriction (DR) without a reduction in calories are emerging as interventions with the potential to be widely used to prevent and treat cancer. Here, we review preclinical and preliminary clinical studies on dietary restriction and fasting and their role in inducing cellular protection and chemotherapy resistance.

  1. Major depression during interferon-α treatment: vulnerability and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Lotrich, Francis E.

    2009-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) during interferons (IFN-α) treatment can occur within a few months of therapy, and shares many homologies with other forms of MDD, Most patients are resilient to the side effect ofinterferon-induced depression (IFN-MDD), but 15% to 40% are vulnerable. Several studies have employed antidepressants to prevent the incidence of an IFN-MDD episode, and the results suggest that prophylactic antidepressants may be specifically useful in those with pre-existing subthreshold depressive symptoms andlor a history of prior MDD episodes. Several other potential markers of vulnerability for IFN-MDD have been implicated in assessments of nondepressed patients before they start IFN-α These include poor sleep quality, premorbid elevations in inflammatory cytokines, genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin system, personality, and social support. The interplay of these factors strongly predicts who is at risk for IFN-MDD, and indicates several potentially modifiable targets for the personalized prevention of IFN-MDD, PMID:20135899

  2. Fucoxanthin and Its Metabolite Fucoxanthinol in Cancer Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Martin, Luc J

    2015-08-01

    Fucoxanthin is a carotenoid present in the chloroplasts of brown seaweeds. When ingested, it is metabolized mainly to fucoxanthinol by digestive enzymes of the gastrointestinal tract. These compounds have been shown to have many beneficial health effects, including anti-mutagenic, anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic actions. In every cancer tested, modulatory actions of fucoxanthinol on viability, cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis and members of the NF-κB pathway were more pronounced than that of fucoxanthin. Anti-proliferative and cancer preventing influences of fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol are mediated through different signalling pathways, including the caspases, Bcl-2 proteins, MAPK, PI3K/Akt, JAK/STAT, AP-1, GADD45, and several other molecules that are involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, anti-angiogenesis or inhibition of metastasis. In this review, we address the mechanisms of action of fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol according to different types of cancers. Current findings suggest that these compounds could be effective for treatment and/or prevention of cancer development and aggressiveness. PMID:26264004

  3. Modern concepts of treatment and prevention of lightning injuries.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Farinholt, Heidi-Marie A; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2005-01-01

    Lightning is the second most common cause of weather-related death in the United States. Lightning is a natural atmospheric discharge that occurs between regions of net positive and net negative electric charges. There are several types of lightning, including streak lightning, sheet lightning, ribbon lightning, bead lightning, and ball lightning. Lightning causes injury through five basic mechanisms: direct strike, flash discharge (splash), contact, ground current (step voltage), and blunt trauma. While persons struck by lightning show evidence of multisystem derangement, the most dramatic effects involve the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Cardiopulmonary arrest is the most common cause of death in lightning victims. Immediate resuscitation of people struck by lightning greatly affects the prognosis. Electrocardiographic changes observed following lightning accidents are probably from primary electric injury or burns of the myocardium without coronary artery occlusion. Lightning induces vasomotor spasm from direct sympathetic stimulation resulting in severe loss of pulses in the extremities. This vasoconstriction may be associated with transient paralysis. Damage to the central nervous system accounts for the second most debilitating group of injuries. Central nervous system injuries from lightning include amnesia and confusion, immediate loss of consciousness, weakness, intracranial injuries, and even brief aphasia. Other organ systems injured by lightning include the eye, ear, gastrointestinal system, skin, and musculoskeletal system. The best treatment of lightning injuries is prevention. The Lightning Safety Guidelines devised by the Lightning Safety Group should be instituted in the United States and other nations to prevent these devastating injuries. PMID:15777170

  4. Antibiotic therapy of aortic graft infection: treatment and prevention recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hodgkiss-Harlow, Kelley D; Bandyk, Dennis F

    2011-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after aortic intervention, an uncommon but serious vascular condition, requires patient-specific antibiotic therapy. Effective treatment and prevention requires the vascular surgeon to be cognizant of changing SSI microbiology, advances in antibiotic delivery, and patient characteristics. The majority of aortic graft infections are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus now the prevalent pathogen. Nasal carriage of methicillin-sensitive or methicillin-resistant S aureus strains, diabetes mellitus, recent hospitalization, a failed arterial reconstruction, and the presence of a groin incision are important SSI risk factors. Overall, the aortic SSI rate is higher than predicted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance risk category system; ranging from 5% after open or endovascular aortic interventions to as high as 10% to 15% after aortofemoral bypass or uni-aortoiliac grafting with femorofemoral bypass. Perioperative measures to reduce S aureus nares and skin colonization, administration of antibiotic prophylaxis, meticulous wound closure/care, and therapy directed to optimize patient host defense regulation mechanisms (eg, temperature, oxygenation, blood sugar) can minimize SSI occurrence. Antibiotic therapy for aortic graft infection should utilize bactericidal drugs that penetrate bacteria biofilms and can be delivered to the surgical site both parenterally and locally in the form of antibiotic-impregnated beads or prosthetic grafts.

  5. Prevention and treatment of cancers by immune modulating nutrients.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, Naveena B; Mohammed, Altaf; Madka, Venkateshwar; Kumar, Gaurav; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological and laboratory data support the protective effects of bioactive nutrients in our diets for various diseases. Along with various factors, such as genetic history, alcohol, smoking, exercise, and dietary choices play a vital role in affecting an individual's immune responses toward a transforming cell, by either preventing or accelerating a neoplastic transformation. Ample evidence suggests that dietary nutrients control the inflammatory and protumorigenic responses in immune cells. Immunoprevention is usually associated with the modulation of immune responses that help in resolving the inflammation, thus improving clinical outcome. Various metabolic pathway-related nutrients, including glutamine, arginine, vitamins, minerals, and long-chain fatty acids, are important components of immunonutrient mixes. Epidemiological studies related to these substances have reported different results, with no or minimal effects. However, several studies suggest that these nutrients may have immune-modulating effects that may lower cancer risk. Preclinical studies submit that most of these components may provide beneficial effects. The present review discusses the available data, the immune-modulating functions of these nutrients, and how these substances could be used to study immune modulation in a neoplastic environment. Further research will help to determine whether the mechanistic signaling pathways in immune cells altered by nutrients can be exploited for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:26833775

  6. Prevention and treatment of cancers by immune modulating nutrients.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, Naveena B; Mohammed, Altaf; Madka, Venkateshwar; Kumar, Gaurav; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological and laboratory data support the protective effects of bioactive nutrients in our diets for various diseases. Along with various factors, such as genetic history, alcohol, smoking, exercise, and dietary choices play a vital role in affecting an individual's immune responses toward a transforming cell, by either preventing or accelerating a neoplastic transformation. Ample evidence suggests that dietary nutrients control the inflammatory and protumorigenic responses in immune cells. Immunoprevention is usually associated with the modulation of immune responses that help in resolving the inflammation, thus improving clinical outcome. Various metabolic pathway-related nutrients, including glutamine, arginine, vitamins, minerals, and long-chain fatty acids, are important components of immunonutrient mixes. Epidemiological studies related to these substances have reported different results, with no or minimal effects. However, several studies suggest that these nutrients may have immune-modulating effects that may lower cancer risk. Preclinical studies submit that most of these components may provide beneficial effects. The present review discusses the available data, the immune-modulating functions of these nutrients, and how these substances could be used to study immune modulation in a neoplastic environment. Further research will help to determine whether the mechanistic signaling pathways in immune cells altered by nutrients can be exploited for cancer prevention and treatment.

  7. Dietary polyphenols in prevention and treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lall, Rahul K; Syed, Deeba N; Adhami, Vaqar M; Khan, Mohammad Imran; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2015-02-03

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent disease affecting males in many Western countries, with an estimated 29,480 deaths in 2014 in the US alone. Incidence rates for prostate cancer deaths have been decreasing since the early 1990s in men of all races/ethnicities, though they remain about 60% higher in African Americans than in any other group. The relationship between dietary polyphenols and the prevention of prostate cancer has been examined previously. Although results are sometimes inconsistent and variable, there is a general agreement that polyphenols hold great promise for the future management of prostate cancer. Various dietary components, including polyphenols, have been shown to possess anti-cancer properties. Generally considered as non-toxic, dietary polyphenols act as key modulators of signaling pathways and are therefore considered ideal chemopreventive agents. Besides possessing various anti-tumor properties, dietary polyphenols also contribute to epigenetic changes associated with the fate of cancer cells and have emerged as potential drugs for therapeutic intervention. Polyphenols have also been shown to affect post-translational modifications and microRNA expressions. This article provides a systematic review of the health benefits of selected dietary polyphenols in prostate cancer, especially focusing on the subclasses of polyphenols, which have a great effect on disease prevention and treatment.

  8. Cultural considerations in adolescent suicide prevention and psychosocial treatment.

    PubMed

    Goldston, David B; Molock, Sherry Davis; Whitbeck, Leslie B; Murakami, Jessica L; Zayas, Luis H; Hall, Gordon C Nagayama

    2008-01-01

    Ethnic groups differ in rates of suicidal behaviors among youths, the context within which suicidal behavior occurs (e.g., different precipitants, vulnerability and protective factors, and reactions to suicidal behaviors), and patterns of help-seeking. In this article, the authors discuss the cultural context of suicidal behavior among African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian American and Pacific Islander, and Latino adolescents, and the implications of these contexts for suicide prevention and treatment. Several cross-cutting issues are discussed, including acculturative stress and protective factors within cultures; the roles of religion and spirituality and the family in culturally sensitive interventions; different manifestations and interpretations of distress in different cultures; and the impact of stigma and cultural distrust on help-seeking. The needs for culturally sensitive and community- based interventions are discussed, along with future opportunities for research in intervention development and evaluation.

  9. DIETARY AGENTS FOR PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF LUNG CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naghma; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a prominent cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. The main reason for high mortality due to lung cancer is attributable to the fact that the diagnosis is generally made when it has spread beyond a curable stage and cannot be treated surgically or with radiation therapy. Therefore, new approaches like dietary modifications could be extremely useful in reducing lung cancer incidences. Several fruits and vegetables offer a variety of bioactive compounds to afford protection against several diseases, including lung cancer. A number of research studies involving dietary agents provide strong evidence for their role in the prevention and treatment of lung cancer, and have identified their molecular mechanisms of action and potential targets. In this review article, we summarize data from in-vitro and in-vivo studies and where available, in clinical trials, on the effects of some of the most promising dietary agents against lung cancer. PMID:25644088

  10. Deformational plagiocephaly, brachycephaly, and scaphocephaly. Part II: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Gary F

    2011-01-01

    Cranial deformation is the most common cause of abnormal head shape. Intentional and unintentional alterations of cranial form are associated with the application of external pressure to the growing infant head, and such changes have been recorded throughout man's history. Recent changes in Western sleeping practices, instituted to reduce the incidence of sudden infant death syndrome, have led to a dramatic rise in cranial deformation and renewed interest in this subject. This 2-part review presents a pragmatic clinical approach to this topic including a critical review of the literature as it applies to each aspect of this common diagnosis: historical perspective, terminology, differential diagnosis, etiopathogenesis and predisposing factors, and prevention and treatment. PMID:21187782

  11. Cultural Considerations in Adolescent Suicide Prevention and Psychosocial Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Goldston, David B.; Molock, Sherry Davis; Whitbeck, Leslie B.; Murakami, Jessica L.; Zayas, Luis H.; Nagayama Hall, Gordon C.

    2009-01-01

    Ethnic groups differ in rates of suicidal behaviors among youths, the context within which suicidal behavior occurs (e.g., different precipitants, vulnerability and protective factors, and reactions to suicidal behaviors), and patterns of help-seeking. In this article, the authors discuss the cultural context of suicidal behavior among African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian American and Pacific Islander, and Latino adolescents, and the implications of these contexts for suicide prevention and treatment. Several cross-cutting issues are discussed, including acculturative stress and protective factors within cultures; the roles of religion and spirituality and the family in culturally sensitive interventions; different manifestations and interpretations of distress in different cultures; and the impact of stigma and cultural distrust on help-seeking. The needs for culturally sensitive and community-based interventions are discussed, along with future opportunities for research in intervention development and evaluation. PMID:18193978

  12. Preventive and Therapeutic Euphol Treatment Attenuates Experimental Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Allisson F.; Marcon, Rodrigo; Schmidt, Éder C.; Bouzon, Zenilda L.; Pianowski, Luiz F.; Calixto, João B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The tetracyclic triterpene euphol is the main constituent found in the sap of Euphorbia tirucalli. This plant is widely known in Brazilian traditional medicine for its use in the treatment of several kinds of cancer, including leukaemia, prostate and breast cancers. Here, we investigated the effect of euphol on experimental models of colitis and the underlying mechanisms involved in its action. Methodology/Principal Findings Colitis was induced in mice either with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) or with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS), and the effect of euphol (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg) on colonic injury was assessed. Pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines were measured by immunohistochemistry, enzyme-Linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA), real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry. Preventive and therapeutic oral administration of euphol attenuated both DSS- and TNBS-induced acute colitis as observed by a significant reduction of the disease activity index (DAI), histological/microscopic damage score and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in colonic tissue. Likewise, euphol treatment also inhibited colon tissue levels and expression of IL-1β, CXCL1/KC, MCP-1, MIP-2, TNF-α and IL-6, while reducing NOS2, VEGF and Ki67 expression in colonic tissue. This action seems to be likely associated with inhibition of activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, euphol decreased LPS-induced MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ, but increased IL-10 secretion from bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. Of note, euphol, at the same schedule of treatment, markedly inhibited both selectin (P- and E-selectin) and integrin (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and LFA-1) expression in colonic tissue. Conclusions/Significance Together, these results clearly demonstrated that orally-administered euphol, both preventive or therapeutic treatment were effective in reducing the severity of colitis in two models of chemically-induced mouse colitis and suggest this plant

  13. Ghrelin treatment prevents development of activity based anorexia in mice.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Romain; Lucas, Nicolas; Breton, Jonathan; Azhar, Saïda; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2016-06-01

    Stimulation of feeding is necessary for treatment of pathological conditions of chronic malnutrition due to anorexia. Ghrelin, a hunger hormone, is one of the candidate for pharmacological treatments of anorexia, but because of its instability in plasma has limited efficacy. We previously showed that plasmatic IgG protect ghrelin from degradation and that IgG from obese subjects and mice may increase ghrelin׳s orexigenic effect. In this study we tested if ghrelin alone or combined with IgG may improve feeding in chronically food-restricted mice with or without physical activity-based anorexia (ABA) induced by free access to a running wheel. Mice received a single daily intraperitoneal injection of ghrelin (1nM) together or not with total IgG (1nM) from obese ob/ob or lean mice before access to food during 8 days of 3h/day feeding time. We found that both ghrelin and ghrelin combined with IgG from obese, but not lean mice, prevented ABA, however, they were not able to diminish body weight loss. Physical activity was lower during the feeding period and was increased shortly after feeding in mice receiving ghrelin together with IgG from obese mice. In food-restricted mice without ABA, ghrelin treatments did not have significant effects on food intake. Thus, this study supports pharmacological use of ghrelin or ghrelin combined with IgG from obese animals for treatment of anorexia accompanied by elevated physical activity. The utility of combining ghrelin with protective IgG should be further determined in animal models of anorexia with unrestricted access to food.

  14. Treatment and prevention of bone complications from prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard J; Saylor, Philip J; Smith, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Bone metastases and skeletal complications are major causes of morbidity in prostate cancer patients. Despite the osteoblastic appearance of bone metastases on imaging studies, patients have elevated serum and urinary markers of bone resorption, indicative of high osteoclast activity. Increased osteoclast activity is independently associated with higher risk of subsequent skeletal complications, disease progression, and death. Osteoclast-targeted therapies are therefore a rational approach to reduction of risk for disease-related skeletal complications, bone metastases, and treatment-related fractures. This review focuses on recent advances in osteoclast-targeted therapy in prostate cancer. Bisphosphonates have been extensively studied in men with prostate cancer. Zoledronic acid significantly decreased the risk of skeletal complications in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer and bone metastases, and it is FDA-approved for this indication. Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody that binds and inactivates RANKL, a critical mediator of osteoclast differentiation, activation, and survival. Recent global phase 3 clinic trials demonstrated an emerging role for denosumab in the treatment of prostate cancer bone metastases and prevention of fractures associated with androgen deprivation therapy.

  15. Hamstring injuries. Proposed aetiological factors, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Agre, J C

    1985-01-01

    Injuries to the hamstring muscles can be devastating to the athlete because these injuries frequently heal slowly and have a tendency to recur. It is thought that many of the recurrent injuries to the hamstring musculotendinous unit are the result of inadequate rehabilitation following the initial injury. The severity of hamstring injuries is usually of first or second degree, but occasionally third-degree injuries (complete rupture of the musculotendinous unit) do occur. Most hamstring strain injuries occur while running or sprinting. Several aetiological factors have been proposed as being related to injury of the hamstring musculotendinous unit. They include: poor flexibility, inadequate muscle strength and/or endurance, dyssynergic muscle contraction during running, insufficient warm-up and stretching prior to exercise, awkward running style, and a return to activity before complete rehabilitation following injury. Treatment for hamstring injuries includes rest and immobilisation immediately following injury and then a gradually increasing programme of mobilisation, strengthening, and activity. Permission to return to athletic competition should be withheld until full rehabilitation has been achieved (complete return of muscle strength, endurance, and flexibility in addition to a return of co-ordination and athletic agility). Failure to achieve full rehabilitation will only predispose the athlete to recurrent injury. The best treatment for hamstring injuries is prevention, which should include training to maintain and/or improve strength, flexibility, endurance, co-ordination, and agility.

  16. Animal models for arthritis: innovative tools for prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kollias, George; Papadaki, Piyi; Apparailly, Florence; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J; Holmdahl, Rikard; Baumans, Vera; Desaintes, Christian; Di Santo, James; Distler, Jörg; Garside, Paul; Hegen, Martin; Huizinga, Tom W J; Jüngel, Astrid; Klareskog, Lars; McInnes, Iain; Ragoussis, Ioannis; Schett, Georg; Hart, Bert 't; Tak, Paul P; Toes, Rene; van den Berg, Wim; Wurst, Wolfgang; Gay, Steffen

    2011-08-01

    The development of novel treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) requires the interplay between clinical observations and studies in animal models. Given the complex molecular pathogenesis and highly heterogeneous clinical picture of RA, there is an urgent need to dissect its multifactorial nature and to propose new strategies for preventive, early and curative treatments. Research on animal models has generated new knowledge on RA pathophysiology and aetiology and has provided highly successful paradigms for innovative drug development. Recent focus has shifted towards the discovery of novel biomarkers, with emphasis on presymptomatic and emerging stages of human RA, and towards addressing the pathophysiological mechanisms and subsequent efficacy of interventions that underlie different disease variants. Shifts in the current paradigms underlying RA pathogenesis have also led to increased demand for new (including humanised) animal models. There is therefore an urgent need to integrate the knowledge on human and animal models with the ultimate goal of creating a comprehensive 'pathogenesis map' that will guide alignment of existing and new animal models to the subset of disease they mimic. This requires full and standardised characterisation of all models at the genotypic, phenotypic and biomarker level, exploiting recent technological developments in 'omics' profiling and computational biology as well as state of the art bioimaging. Efficient integration and dissemination of information and resources as well as outreach to the public will be necessary to manage the plethora of data accumulated and to increase community awareness and support for innovative animal model research in rheumatology.

  17. 45 CFR 96.46 - Substance abuse prevention and treatment services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Substance abuse prevention and treatment services... BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.46 Substance abuse prevention... organizations under the substance abuse prevention and treatment Block Grant. (b) For the purpose of...

  18. 45 CFR 96.46 - Substance abuse prevention and treatment services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Substance abuse prevention and treatment services... BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.46 Substance abuse prevention... organizations under the substance abuse prevention and treatment Block Grant. (b) For the purpose of...

  19. 45 CFR 96.46 - Substance abuse prevention and treatment services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Substance abuse prevention and treatment services... BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.46 Substance abuse prevention... organizations under the substance abuse prevention and treatment Block Grant. (b) For the purpose of...

  20. 45 CFR 96.46 - Substance abuse prevention and treatment services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Substance abuse prevention and treatment services... BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.46 Substance abuse prevention... organizations under the substance abuse prevention and treatment Block Grant. (b) For the purpose of...

  1. 45 CFR 96.46 - Substance abuse prevention and treatment services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Substance abuse prevention and treatment services... BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.46 Substance abuse prevention... organizations under the substance abuse prevention and treatment Block Grant. (b) For the purpose of...

  2. Prevention and Treatment of Esophageal Stenosis after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Lu, Zhongsheng; Liu, Qingsen

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for the treatment of esophageal mucosal lesions is associated with a risk of esophageal stenosis, especially for near-circumferential or circumferential esophageal mucosal defects. Here, we review historic and modern studies on the prevention and treatment of esophageal stenosis after ESD. These methods include prevention via pharmacological treatment, endoscopic autologous cell transplantation, endoscopic esophageal dilatation, and stent placement. This short review will focus on direct prevention and treatment, which may help guide the way forward. PMID:25386186

  3. Intermittent facial swelling

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Charlie; Gopala Pillai, Suresh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent facial swelling is an unusual presentation in the emergency department. The differential diagnosis may range from a variety of causes. Most common differential diagnosis is angio-oedema. However, more serious presentations such as superior venacaval obstruction must not be ignored. This case report presents a patient who was investigated in the hospital for 2 weeks (2 admissions) with intermittent facial swelling. He presented to the emergency department (3rd admission) and was diagnosed to have superior venacaval obstruction secondary to metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma. He underwent emergency endovascular stenting; however, he died within a few weeks. PMID:25326556

  4. Considerations in the pharmacologic treatment and prevention of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Stockmann, Chris; Spigarelli, Michael G; Campbell, Sarah C; Constance, Jonathan E; Courter, Joshua D; Thorell, Emily A; Olson, Jared; Sherwin, Catherine M T

    2014-02-01

    The management of neonatal sepsis is challenging owing to complex developmental and environmental factors that contribute to inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many antimicrobial agents. In this review, we describe (i) the changing epidemiology of early- and late-onset neonatal sepsis; (ii) the pharmacologic considerations that influence the safety and efficacy of antibacterials, antifungals, and immunomodulatory adjuvants; and (iii) the recommended dosing regimens for pharmacologic agents commonly used in the treatment and prevention of neonatal sepsis. Neonatal sepsis is marked by high morbidity and mortality, such that prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is essential following culture collection. Before culture results are available, combination therapy with ampicillin and an aminoglycoside is recommended. When meningitis is suspected, ampicillin and cefotaxime may be considered. Following identification of the causative organism and in vitro susceptibility testing, antimicrobial therapy may be narrowed to provide targeted coverage. Therapeutic drug monitoring should be considered for neonates receiving vancomycin or aminoglycoside therapies. For neonates with invasive fungal infections, the development of new antifungal agents has significantly improved therapeutic outcomes in recent years. Liposomal amphotericin B has been found to be safe and efficacious in patients with renal impairment or toxicity caused by conventional amphotericin B. Antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole has also been reported to dramatically reduce rates of neonatal invasive fungal infections and to improve long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes among treated children. Additionally, several large multicenter studies are currently investigating the safety and efficacy of oral lactoferrin as an immunoprophylactic agent for the prevention of neonatal sepsis. PMID:24218112

  5. Prevention and Treatment of Influenza with Hyperimmune Bovine Colostrum Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wy Ching; Wong, Victor; Muller, Brian; Rawlin, Grant; Brown, Lorena E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of specific vaccines and antiviral drugs, influenza continues to impose a heavy toll on human health worldwide. Passive transfer of specific antibody (Ab) may provide a useful means of preventing or treating disease in unvaccinated individuals or those failing to adequately seroconvert, especially now that resistance to antiviral drugs is on the rise. However, preparation of appropriate Ab in large scale, quickly and on a yearly basis is viewed as a significant logistical hurdle for this approach to control seasonal influenza. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, bovine colostrum, which contains approximately 500 g of IgG per milking per animal, has been investigated as a source of polyclonal antibody for delivery to the respiratory tract. IgG and F(ab')2 were purified from the hyperimmune colostrum of cows vaccinated with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) vaccine and were shown to have high hemagglutination-inhibitory and virus-neutralizing titers. In BALB/c mice, a single administration of either IgG or F(ab')2 could prevent the establishment of infection with a sublethal dose of PR8 virus when given as early as 7 days prior to exposure to virus. Pre-treated mice also survived an otherwise lethal dose of virus, the IgG- but not the F(ab')2-treated mice showing no weight loss. Successful reduction of established infection with this highly virulent virus was also observed with a single treatment 24 hr after virus exposure. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that a novel and commercially-scalable technique for preparing Ab from hyperimmune bovine colostrum could allow production of a valuable substitute for antiviral drugs to control influenza with the advantage of eliminating the need for daily administration. PMID:21049034

  6. Models For Prevention and Treatment of Cancer: Problems vs Promises

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Danda, Divya; Gupta, Shan; Gehlot, Prashasnika

    2009-01-01

    Current estimates from the American Cancer Society and from the International Union Against Cancer indicate that 12 million cases of cancer were diagnosed last year, with 7 million deaths worldwide; these numbers are expected to double by 2030 (27 million cases with 17 million deaths). Despite tremendous technological developments in all areas, and President Richard Nixon’s initiative in the 1974 “War against Cancer”, the US cancer incidence is the highest in the world and the cancer death rate has not significantly changed in the last 50 years (193.9 per 100,000 in 1950 vs 193.4 per 100,000 in 2002). Extensive research during the same time, however, has revealed that cancer is a preventable disease that requires major changes in life style; with one third of all cancers assigned to Tobacco, one third to diet, and remaining one third to the environment. Approximately 20 billion dollars are spent annually to find a cure for cancer. We propose that our inability to find a cure to cancer lies in the models used. Whether cell culture or animal studies, no model has yet been found that can reproduce the pathogenesis of the disease in the laboratory. Mono-targeted therapies, till know in most cases, have done a little to make a difference in cancer treatment. Similarly, molecular signatures/predictors of the diagnosis of the disease and response are also lacking. This review discusses the pros and cons of current cancer models based on cancer genetics, cell culture, animal models, cancer biomarkers/signature, cancer stem cells, cancer cell signaling, targeted therapies, therapeutic targets, clinical trials, cancer prevention, personalized medicine, and off-label uses to find a cure for cancer and demonstrates an urgent need for “out of the box” approaches. PMID:19481061

  7. Models for prevention and treatment of cancer: problems vs promises.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Danda, Divya; Gupta, Shan; Gehlot, Prashasnika

    2009-11-01

    Current estimates from the American Cancer Society and from the International Union Against Cancer indicate that 12 million cases of cancer were diagnosed last year, with 7 million deaths worldwide; these numbers are expected to double by 2030 (27 million cases with 17 million deaths). Despite tremendous technological developments in all areas, and President Richard Nixon's initiative in the 1974 "War against Cancer", the US cancer incidence is the highest in the world and the cancer death rate has not significantly changed in the last 50 years (193.9 per 100,000 in 1950 vs 193.4 per 100,000 in 2002). Extensive research during the same time, however, has revealed that cancer is a preventable disease that requires major changes in life style; with one third of all cancers assigned to Tobacco, one third to diet, and remaining one third to the environment. Approximately 20 billion dollars are spent annually to find a cure for cancer. We propose that our inability to find a cure to cancer lies in the models used. Whether cell culture or animal studies, no model has yet been found that can reproduce the pathogenesis of the disease in the laboratory. Mono-targeted therapies, till know in most cases, have done a little to make a difference in cancer treatment. Similarly, molecular signatures/predictors of the diagnosis of the disease and response are also lacking. This review discusses the pros and cons of current cancer models based on cancer genetics, cell culture, animal models, cancer biomarkers/signature, cancer stem cells, cancer cell signaling, targeted therapies, therapeutic targets, clinical trials, cancer prevention, personalized medicine, and off-label uses to find a cure for cancer and demonstrates an urgent need for "out of the box" approaches.

  8. Current status on prevention and treatment of canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Reguera, Rosa M; Morán, Miguel; Pérez-Pertejo, Yolanda; García-Estrada, Carlos; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael

    2016-08-30

    Canine leishmaniasis (CanL) is a parasite-borne disease mainly induced by Leishmania infantum in the Old World and Leishmania chagasi (infantum) in the New World. CanL is a zoonosis transmitted by the bite of infected Phlebotominae flies that act as vectors. CanL is a very serious disease that usually produces death when remains untreated and can be a focus of transmission to other dogs or humans. Infected dogs and other domestic and wild animals act as reservoirs and are a real threat to uninfected/healthy dogs and humans in endemic areas where the sand flies are present. Prevention of new infections in dogs can help to stop the current increase of the disease in humans, reinforcing the concept of "One Health" approach. The management of CanL is being performed using prophylactic measures in healthy dogs - insecticides impregnated in collars or immunostimulants applied by spot-on devices - and chemotherapy in animals that suffer from the disease. Antimonials as first-line monotherapy have proven efficacy in reducing most of the clinical signs of CanL, but they need to be administered during several days, and no complete parasite clearance is achieved, favouring the presence of relapses among treated dogs. Therefore, new drugs, such as miltefosine, or combinations of this drug or antimonials with allopurinol are in the pipeline of clinical treatment of CanL. Recently, there has been an emergence of protective - prophylactic - and curative - autogenous vaccines - immunotherapy tools to face CanL, whose results are still under study. This review highlights the current use of preventive and eradicative weapons to fight against this disease, which is a scourge for dogs and a continuous threat to human beings. PMID:27523945

  9. Increasing the efficacy of cue exposure treatment in preventing relapse of addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Havermans, Remco C; Jansen, Anita T M

    2003-07-01

    Theoretically, cue exposure treatment should be able to prevent relapse by extinguishing conditioned drug responding (e.g. cue-elicited craving). According to contemporary learning theory, though, extinction does not eliminate conditioned responding. Analogous cue exposure with response prevention (CERP) as a treatment of addictive behavior might not eliminate the learned relation between drug-related cues and drug use. This does not necessarily mean that cue exposure cannot successfully prevent relapse. Various suggestions for increasing the efficacy of cue exposure treatment are being discussed from a contemporary learning theory perspective. It is suggested that cue exposure treatment incorporating retrieval cues can be a beneficial treatment in preventing relapse of addictive behavior.

  10. Take 3 Steps Toward Preventing Infections During Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Risk Patient Caregiver Healthcare Provider Discover the 3 Steps Prepare, Prevent, & Protect Fact Sheet & Cut-Out ... Your Risk Patient Caregiver Healthcare Provider Discover the 3 Steps Prepare, Prevent, & Protect Fact Sheet & Cut-Out ...

  11. Promotion, Prevention, and Treatment: What Are the Differences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coohey, Carol; Marsh, Jeanne C.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a content analysis of prevention definitions in prevention literature. Examines the pros and cons of the traditional trilogy (primary, secondary, and tertiary) of prevention definitions, along with a description of key concepts, such as end-states, timing, targets, and eligibility criteria. Proposes a conceptual alternative to the…

  12. Intermittent versus Continuous Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiansen, Annette Sandahl; Lange, Christa

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the delivery of the same amount of intermittent versus continuous physiotherapy given to children with cerebral palsy (CP). This was organized either in an intermittent regime four times a week for 4 weeks alternating with a 6-week treatment pause, or a continuous once or twice a week regime, both…

  13. Prevention and treatment of the gastric symptoms of radiation sickness

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Fiala, N.; Boward, C.A.; Bogo, V.

    1988-09-01

    Currently available treatments for radiation-induced nausea and vomiting either are ineffective or reduce performance. The new antiemetic and gastrokinetic agent zacopride was tested in rhesus monkeys to assess its behavioral toxicity and its ability to inhibit radiation-induced emesis. Zacopride (intragastric, 0.3 mg/kg) or a placebo was given blindly and randomly in the basal state and 15 min before a whole-body 800 cGy 60Co gamma-radiation dose (except for the legs which were partially protected to permit survival of some bone marrow). We determined (1) gastric emptying rates; (2) the presence and frequency of retching and vomiting; and (3) the effect of zacopride on the performance of a visual discrimination task in nonirradiated subjects. No vomiting, retching, or decreased performance was observed after either placebo or zacopride in the control state. Following irradiation plus placebo, 70 emeses were observed in 5 of 6 monkeys, and 353 retches were observed in all 6 monkeys. In contrast, only 1 emesis was observed in 1 of 6 monkeys and 173 retches were seen in 4 of 6 monkeys after irradiation plus zacopride (P less than 0.01). Zacopride also significantly inhibited radiation-induced suppression of gastric emptying. When given after the first vomiting episode in a separate group of irradiated monkeys, zacopride completely prevented any subsequent vomiting. The present results demonstrate that intragastric administration of zacopride significantly inhibited radiation-induced retching, vomiting, and suppression of gastric emptying in rhesus monkeys and did not cause detectable behavioral side effects when given to nonradiated monkeys. This observation has important implications in the treatment of radiation sickness.

  14. The Potential Role of Probiotics in Cancer Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ai-Qun; Li, Lianqin

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiota has a significant effect on many aspects of human physiology such as metabolism, nutrient absorption, and immune function. Imbalance of the microbiota has been implicated in many disorders including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, asthma, psychiatric illnesses, and cancers. As a kind of functional foods, probiotics have been shown to play a protective role against cancer development in animal models. Clinical application of probiotics indicated that some probiotic strains could diminish the incidence of postoperative inflammation in cancer patients. Chemotherapy or radiotherapy-related diarrhea was relieved in patients who were administered oral probiotics. The present review summarizes the up-to-date studies on probiotic effects and the underlying mechanisms related to cancer. At present, it is commonly accepted that most commercial probiotic products are generally safe and can improve the health of the host. By modulating intestinal microbiota and immune response, some strains of probiotics can be used as an adjuvant for cancer prevention or/and treatment. PMID:27144297

  15. High-Altitude Illnesses: Physiology, Risk Factors, Prevention, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    High-altitude illnesses encompass the pulmonary and cerebral syndromes that occur in non-acclimatized individuals after rapid ascent to high altitude. The most common syndrome is acute mountain sickness (AMS) which usually begins within a few hours of ascent and typically consists of headache variably accompanied by loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, disturbed sleep, fatigue, and dizziness. With millions of travelers journeying to high altitudes every year and sleeping above 2,500 m, acute mountain sickness is a wide-spread clinical condition. Risk factors include home elevation, maximum altitude, sleeping altitude, rate of ascent, latitude, age, gender, physical condition, intensity of exercise, pre-acclimatization, genetic make-up, and pre-existing diseases. At higher altitudes, sleep disturbances may become more profound, mental performance is impaired, and weight loss may occur. If ascent is rapid, acetazolamide can reduce the risk of developing AMS, although a number of high-altitude travelers taking acetazolamide will still develop symptoms. Ibuprofen can be effective for headache. Symptoms can be rapidly relieved by descent, and descent is mandatory, if at all possible, for the management of the potentially fatal syndromes of high-altitude pulmonary and cerebral edema. The purpose of this review is to combine a discussion of specific risk factors, prevention, and treatment options with a summary of the basic physiologic responses to the hypoxia of altitude to provide a context for managing high-altitude illnesses and advising the non-acclimatized high-altitude traveler. PMID:23908794

  16. Eggshell calcium in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Rovenský, J; Stancíková, M; Masaryk, P; Svík, K; Istok, R

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the most significant biological and clinical aspects of a biopreparation made of chicken eggshells are reviewed. Eggshell powder is a natural source of calcium and other elements (e.g. strontium and fluorine) which may have a positive effect on bone metabolism. Experimental and clinical studies performed to date have shown a number of positive properties of eggshell powder, such as antirachitic effects in rats and humans. A positive effect was observed on bone density in animal models of postmenopausal osteoporosis in ovariectomized female rats. In vitro eggshell powder stimulates chondrocyte differentiation and cartilage growth. Clinical studies in postmenopausal women and women with senile osteoporosis showed that eggshell powder reduces pain and osteoresorption and increases mobility and bone density or arrests its loss. The bioavailability of calcium from this source, as tested in piglets, was similar or better than that of food grade purified calcium carbonate. Clinical and experimental studies showed that eggshell powder has positive effects on bone and cartilage and that it is suitable in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:15018022

  17. Dietary flavonoid fisetin for cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lall, Rahul K; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2016-06-01

    Cancer remains a major public health concern and a significant cause of death worldwide. Identification of bioactive molecules that have the potential to inhibit carcinogenesis continues to garner interest among the scientific community. In particular, flavonoids from dietary sources are the most sought after because of their safety, cost-effectiveness, and feasibility of oral administration. Emerging data have provided newer insights into understanding the molecular mechanisms that are essential to identify novel mechanism-based strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. Dietary flavonoid fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone) found in many fruits and vegetables has been shown in preclinical studies to inhibit cancer growth through alteration of cell cycle, inducing apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis without causing any toxicity to normal cells. Although data from in-vitro and in-vivo studies look convincing, well-designed clinical trials in humans are needed to conclusively determine the efficacy across various cancers. This review highlights the chemopreventive and therapeutic effects, molecular targets, and mechanisms that contribute to the observed anticancer activity of fisetin against various cancers.

  18. Nuts in the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Bulló, Mònica; Sabaté, Joan

    2014-07-01

    Nuts are rich in many bioactive compounds that can exert beneficial effects on cardiovascular health. We reviewed the evidence relating nut consumption and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components. Nuts reduce the postprandial glycemic response; however, long-term trials of nuts on insulin resistance and glycemic control in diabetic individuals are inconsistent. Epidemiologic studies have shown that nuts may lower the risk of diabetes incidence in women. Few studies have assessed the association between nuts and abdominal obesity, although an inverse association with body mass index and general obesity has been observed. Limited evidence suggests that nuts have a protective effect on blood pressure and endothelial function. Nuts have a cholesterol-lowering effect, but the relation between nuts and hypertriglyceridemia and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is not well established. A recent pooled analysis of clinical trials showed that nuts are inversely related to triglyceride concentrations only in subjects with hypertriglyceridemia. An inverse association was found between the frequency of nut consumption and the prevalence and the incidence of MetS. Several trials evaluated the effect of nuts on subjects with MetS and found that they may have benefits in some components. Compared with a low-fat diet, a Mediterranean diet enriched with nuts could be beneficial for MetS management. The protective effects on metabolism could be explained by the modulation of inflammation and oxidation. Further trials are needed to clarify the role of nuts in MetS prevention and treatment.

  19. [Nerve injury following implant placement: prevention, diagnosis and treatment modalities].

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Y; Eliav, E; Nahlieli, O

    2003-07-01

    Nerve injury is a well-known complication following oral and maxillofacial surgery. Direct trauma, inflammation and infection are postoperative neural disturbances main causes. The most inflicted nerves associated with endosseous implant placement are those innervating the mandible: the inferior alveolar nerve, the mental nerve and the lingual nerve. Evaluation of the nerve injury characteristics and severity as early as possible has always imposed a great challenge for clinicians. We demonstrate a reliable yet simple way of dealing with this kind of problem in conjunction with comparing preoperative and postoperative sensation of the chin, the tongue and the lower lip. On the other hand, it is considerably important to take preventive measures for such injuries by using appropriate radiographic images. If a nerve damage has occurred, best prognosis is to be expected by early and appropriate treatment. It is imperative to treat such injuries in four months following the injury, otherwise a permanent nerve damage may occur. Further investigation of nerve damage risks following implant placement should be performed in order to enable patient to decide whether having implants dependent rehabilitation or choosing an alternative. PMID:14515628

  20. Bifurcation analysis on a hybrid systems model of intermittent hormonal therapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Gouhei; Tsumoto, Kunichika; Tsuji, Shigeki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-10-01

    Hybrid systems are widely used to model dynamical phenomena that are characterized by interplay between continuous dynamics and discrete events. An example of biomedical application is modeling of disease progression of prostate cancer under intermittent hormonal therapy, where continuous tumor dynamics is switched by interruption and reinstitution of medication. In the present paper, we study a hybrid systems model representing intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) therapy for advanced prostate cancer. Intermittent medication with switching between on-treatment and off-treatment periods is intended to possibly prevent a prostatic tumor from developing into a hormone-refractory state and is anticipated as a possible strategy for delaying or hopefully averting a cancer relapse which most patients undergo as a result of long-term hormonal suppression. Clinical efficacy of IAS therapy for prostate cancer is still under investigation but at least worth considering in terms of reduction of side effects and economic costs during off-treatment periods. In the model of IAS therapy, it depends on some clinically controllable parameters whether a relapse of prostate cancer occurs or not. Therefore, we examine nonlinear dynamics and bifurcation structure of the model by exploiting a numerical method to clarify bifurcation sets in the hybrid system. Our results suggest that adjustment of the normal androgen level in combination with appropriate medication scheduling could enhance the possibility of relapse prevention. Moreover, a two-dimensional piecewise-linear system reduced from the original model highlights the origin of nonlinear phenomena specific to the hybrid system.

  1. Prevention and treatment of traveler's diarrhea: a clinical pharmacological approach.

    PubMed

    Scarpignato, C; Rampal, P

    1995-01-01

    Diarrhea represents a major health problem for travelers to developing countries. Although the syndrome is usually self-limited and recovery occurs in the majority of cases without any specific form of therapy, there is a need for safe and effective ways of preventing and treating it. Since the syndrome is most often caused by an infection acquired by ingesting fecally contaminated food or beverages, precautions regarding dietary habits remain the cornerstone of prophylaxis, but dietary self-restrictions do not always translate to reduced rates of diarrheal illness. Administration of probiotics (e.g. lactobacilli or Saccharomyces boulardii) and immunoprophylaxis with the newer oral cholera vaccines have been tried with promising results. Antimicrobials remain, however, the most successful form of prophylaxis, being effective in up to 90% of travelers. For those with impaired health who will take prophylaxis, systemic agents with proved efficacy should be recommended. For other otherwise healthy persons, poorly absorbed agents are preferable in order to avoid the serious, albeit rare, toxicity of systemic drugs. The key factor in the management of acute watery traveler's diarrhea, particularly in infants and young children, is the restoration of water and electrolyte balance. This does not reduce the duration of the illness but will limit dehydration and prevent acidosis. Many patients will require no additional therapy, whereas some will need pharmacologic treatment to shorten the duration of diarrhea or to relieve the accompanying symptoms, like abdominal discomfort, nausea and vomiting. A typical 3- to 5-day illness can be reduced to approximately 1 day by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) combination. Some other systemic antimicrobials have been successfully used but, during the last few years, the 4-fluoroquinolone drugs have received considerable attention and have been shown to be highly effective in reducing the duration of traveler's diarrhea. These

  2. TEV-48125 for the preventive treatment of chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Dodick, David W.; Krymchantowski, Abouch V.; VanderPluym, Juliana H.; Tepper, Stewart J.; Aycardi, Ernesto; Loupe, Pippa S.; Ma, Yuju; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the onset of efficacy of TEV-48125, a monoclonal antibody against calcitonin gene-related peptide, recently shown to be effective for the preventive treatment of chronic migraine (CM) and high-frequency episodic migraine. Methods: A randomized placebo-controlled study tested once-monthly injections of TEV-48125 675/225 mg or 900 mg vs placebo. Headache information was captured daily using an electronic headache diary. The primary endpoint was change from baseline in the number of headache hours in month 3. Herein, we assess the efficacy of each dose at earlier time points. Results: The sample consisted of 261 patients. For headache hours, the 675/225-mg dose separated from placebo on day 7 and the 900-mg dose separated from placebo after 3 days of therapy (p = 0.048 and p = 0.033, respectively). For both the 675/225-mg and 900-mg doses, the improvement was sustained through the second (p = 0.004 and p < 0.001) and third (p = 0.025 and p < 0.001) weeks of therapy and throughout the study (month 3, p = 0.0386 and p = 0.0057). For change in weekly headache days of at least moderate intensity, both doses were superior to placebo at week 2 (p = 0.031 and p = 0.005). Conclusions: TEV-48125 demonstrated a significant improvement within 1 week of therapy initiation in patients with CM. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with CM, TEV-48125 significantly decreases the number of headache hours within 3 to 7 days of injection. PMID:27281531

  3. [Hypersensitivity pneumonitis: Diagnostic criteria, treatment, prognosis and prevention].

    PubMed

    Jędrych, Małgorzata E; Szturmowicz, Monika; Bestry, Iwona; Kuś, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is caused by inhalation of environmental antigens. Farmers and bird keepers are most frequently affected by this desease. The HP diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (cough, dyspnea) in a person exposed to environmental antigens, and the presence of characteristic changes in high resolution chest computed tomography (HRCT) (bilateral, mosaic, ground glass opacities in the middle and lower lung zones, ill-defined centrilobular nodules and the sign of air-trapping on expiration). This type of HRCT pattern is most frequently found in the patients with subacute HP. Bronchioloalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) examination is helpful in establishing the HP diagnosis, when the increased total number of cells, with the predominance of T lymphocytes (> 50%), and the increased number of neutrophils (> 3%) and mastocytes (> 1%) are found. The presence of specific serum precipitins increases the likelihood of HP. In case of atypical clinical presentation, lung biopsy is recommended. The diagnostic criterion of HP is the presence of ill-defined non-necrotising granulomas, after excluding other granulomatous lung diseases. The prevention and treatment of HP is based on the elimination of the antigen from the environment. Corticosteroids may contribute to the improvement in the acute and sub-acute form of the disease but their long term effectiveness is uncertain. The prognosis of HP patients is generally perceived as good, especially in those patients in whom antigen avoidance is possible. Nevertheless, in some patients progressive pulmonary fibrosis and development of severe respiratory insufficiency is observed. Med Pr 2016;67(4):517-527. PMID:27623832

  4. Solar Injury and Heat Illness. Treatment and Prevention in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Greg

    1995-01-01

    Children are especially vulnerable to solar injury and heat illness. Physicians can lower children's risk through education about short-term and long-term sequelae and through various prevention efforts. The paper discusses how to screen for risk factors and how to prevent and treat heat illness and solar injury. (SM)

  5. Psychological Treatment as Part of Dropout Prevention: An Israeli Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Hava; Hain, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the integration of psychotherapy in a comprehensive dropout prevention program developed at the Dean of Students' office of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel. The program's psychologists conducted psychotherapy with a subset of dropout prevention program participants who had reacted with emotional…

  6. Oral diagnosis and treatment planning: part 5. Preventive and treatment planning for dental caries.

    PubMed

    Yip, K; Smales, R

    2012-09-01

    The practice of operative dentistry continues to evolve, to reflect the many changes occurring in society and in dental diseases and conditions. However, the belief that all questionable and early carious lesions should be restored still persists. This belief is largely based upon the concept that the removal of all carious tissue followed by meticulous restoration of the tooth is the treatment of choice for dental caries. Yet restorations are not permanent and do not cure caries, as the causes remain. On the other hand, preventive measures can remove or partially remove the causes, thereby reducing the risks for future caries recurrence at the same site or elsewhere in the mouth.

  7. The Prevention of Ill-Treatment of Children in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    The report discusses the prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect in the Netherlands. Two Dutch institutions concerned specifically with the prevention of child abuse are described: a network of special teams consisting of doctors, social workers, and administrators; and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. Aspects of…

  8. Intermittent Plate Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, P. G.; Behn, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    Intermittent Plate Tectonics A basic premise of Earth Science is that plate tectonics has been continuously operating since it began early in Earth's history. Yet, plate-tectonic theory itself, specifically the collisional phase of the Wilson Cycle, constitutes a process that is capable of stopping all plate motion. The plausibility of a plate-tectonic hiatus is most easily illustrated by considering the expected future of the present-day plate-tectonic configuration. Since the opening of the Atlantic at ~200 ma, the area of the Atlantic basin has been growing at the expense of the Pacific. If this trend continues, relative plate motion models predict that in ~350 my, the Pacific Ocean basin will effectively close leading to widespread continent-continent collisions. Since a continent-continent collision represents the termination of subduction locally, the accumulated effect of all collisions is to stop subduction globally. In this scenario, ridges would then stop spreading and young oceanic lithosphere would cool, reaching a steady-state thickness of 100 km in about 80 my, based on the properties of oceanic lithosphere today. This would constitute the stoppage of plate tectonics. The presumption that plate tectonics never stops in the face of continental collisions is equivalent to requiring that subduction flux is approximately constant through time, such that subduction initiation roughly balances subduction termination. Such a balance then raises several questions about the subduction initiation process. When and how does subduction initiate? Is there a detectible relationship between subduction cessation and subduction initiation? We can gain some guidance into these questions by examining the plate motion history over the last 200 my. Subduction initiation has occurred over the last 80 my in three intra- oceanic subduction zones: Aleutians, Marianas-Izu-Bonin and Tonga-Kermadec in the Pacific basin. In these cases, however, subduction initiation would not

  9. Treatment and Prevention of Acute Diarrhoea. Guidelines for the Trainers of Health Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This booklet, intended primarily for the trainers of middle-level community health workers in underdeveloped countries, is designed to help such workers present the topic of diarrhea treatment and prevention in training courses. Divided into five sections, the booklet gives guidelines on treatment and prevention, with particular emphasis on the…

  10. Peripheral nerve injuries in athletes. Treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Lorei, M P; Hershman, E B

    1993-08-01

    Peripheral nerve lesions are uncommon but serious injuries which may delay or preclude an athlete's safe return to sports. Early, accurate anatomical diagnosis is essential. Nerve lesions may be due to acute injury (e.g. from a direct blow) or chronic injury secondary to repetitive microtrauma (entrapment). Accurate diagnosis is based upon physical examination and a knowledge of the relative anatomy. Palpation, neurological testing and provocative manoeuvres are mainstays of physical diagnosis. Diagnostic suspicion can be confirmed by electrophysiological testing, including electromyography and nerve conduction studies. Proper equipment, technique and conditioning are the keys to prevention. Rest, anti-inflammatories, physical therapy and appropriate splinting are the mainstays of treatment. In the shoulder, spinal accessory nerve injury is caused by a blow to the neck and results in trapezius paralysis with sparing of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Scapular winging results from paralysis of the serratus anterior because of long thoracic nerve palsy. A lesion of the suprascapular nerve may mimic a rotator cuff tear with pain a weakness of the rotator cuff. Axillary nerve injury often follows anterior shoulder dislocation. In the elbow region, musculocutaneous nerve palsy is seen in weightlifters with weakness of the elbow flexors and dysesthesias of the lateral forearm. Pronator syndrome is a median nerve lesion occurring in the proximal forearm which is diagnosed by several provocative manoeuvres. Posterior interosseous nerve entrapment is common among tennis players and occurs at the Arcade of Froshe--it results in weakness of the wrist and metacarpophalangeal extensors. Ulnar neuritis at the elbow is common amongst baseball pitchers. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common neuropathy seen in sport and is caused by median nerve compression in the carpal tunnel. Paralysis of the ulnar nerve at the wrist is seen among bicyclists resulting in weakness of grip and

  11. Guidelines for the first-line treatment of restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease, prevention and treatment of dopaminergic augmentation: a combined task force of the IRLSSG, EURLSSG, and the RLS-foundation.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Silber, Michael H; Winkelman, John W; Högl, Birgit; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn; Buchfuhrer, Mark; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios; Inoue, Yuichi; Manconi, Mauro; Oertel, Wolfgang; Ondo, William; Winkelmann, Juliane; Allen, Richard P

    2016-05-01

    A Task Force was established by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) in conjunction with the European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG) and the RLS Foundation (RLS-F) to develop evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of long-term pharmacologic treatment of dopaminergic-induced augmentation in restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED). The Task Force made the following prevention and treatment recommendations: As a means to prevent augmentation, medications such as α2δ ligands may be considered for initial RLS/WED treatment; these drugs are effective and have little risk of augmentation. Alternatively, if dopaminergic drugs are elected as initial treatment, then the daily dose should be as low as possible and not exceed that recommended for RLS/WED treatment. However, the physician should be aware that even low dose dopaminergics can cause augmentation. Patients with low iron stores should be given appropriate iron supplementation. Daily treatment by either medication should start only when symptoms have a significant impact on quality of life in terms of frequency and severity; intermittent treatment might be considered in intermediate cases. Treatment of existing augmentation should be initiated, where possible, with the elimination/correction of extrinsic exacerbating factors (iron levels, antidepressants, antihistamines, etc.). In cases of mild augmentation, dopamine agonist therapy can be continued by dividing or advancing the dose, or increasing the dose if there are breakthrough night-time symptoms. Alternatively, the patient can be switched to an α2δ ligand or rotigotine. For severe augmentation the patient can be switched either to an α2δ ligand or rotigotine, noting that rotigotine may also produce augmentation at higher doses with long-term use. In more severe cases of augmentation an opioid may be considered, bypassing α2δ ligands and rotigotine.

  12. Guidelines for the first-line treatment of restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease, prevention and treatment of dopaminergic augmentation: a combined task force of the IRLSSG, EURLSSG, and the RLS-foundation.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Silber, Michael H; Winkelman, John W; Högl, Birgit; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn; Buchfuhrer, Mark; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios; Inoue, Yuichi; Manconi, Mauro; Oertel, Wolfgang; Ondo, William; Winkelmann, Juliane; Allen, Richard P

    2016-05-01

    A Task Force was established by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) in conjunction with the European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG) and the RLS Foundation (RLS-F) to develop evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of long-term pharmacologic treatment of dopaminergic-induced augmentation in restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED). The Task Force made the following prevention and treatment recommendations: As a means to prevent augmentation, medications such as α2δ ligands may be considered for initial RLS/WED treatment; these drugs are effective and have little risk of augmentation. Alternatively, if dopaminergic drugs are elected as initial treatment, then the daily dose should be as low as possible and not exceed that recommended for RLS/WED treatment. However, the physician should be aware that even low dose dopaminergics can cause augmentation. Patients with low iron stores should be given appropriate iron supplementation. Daily treatment by either medication should start only when symptoms have a significant impact on quality of life in terms of frequency and severity; intermittent treatment might be considered in intermediate cases. Treatment of existing augmentation should be initiated, where possible, with the elimination/correction of extrinsic exacerbating factors (iron levels, antidepressants, antihistamines, etc.). In cases of mild augmentation, dopamine agonist therapy can be continued by dividing or advancing the dose, or increasing the dose if there are breakthrough night-time symptoms. Alternatively, the patient can be switched to an α2δ ligand or rotigotine. For severe augmentation the patient can be switched either to an α2δ ligand or rotigotine, noting that rotigotine may also produce augmentation at higher doses with long-term use. In more severe cases of augmentation an opioid may be considered, bypassing α2δ ligands and rotigotine. PMID

  13. Dabigatran for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Andres; Baranchuk, Adrian; Redfearn, Damian; Simpson, Christopher; Abdollah, Hoshiar; Michael, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Dabigatran, an oral direct thrombin inhibitor, was the first of a new class of drugs referred to as non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants. Dabigatran is better than warfarin for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (dose of 150 mg twice a day), non-inferior to enoxaparin for venous thromboembolism prevention after orthopedic surgery and non-inferior to warfarin in preventing recurrence after acute venous thromboembolism. The safety profile is similar to standard anticoagulants, with significant reduction observed in intracranial hemorrhage. Other advantages include a rapid onset of action and a predictable pharmacokinetic profile, allowing a fixed-dose regimen without the need for routine anticoagulation monitoring. In the event of bleeding, general support measures are recommended and if severe, the use of non-specific hemostatic agents such as prothrombin complex concentrates and recombinant factor VIIa must be considered. A specific reversal agent (idarucizumab) is in development.

  14. Attitudes, Knowledge, and Practices Regarding Malaria Prevention and Treatment among Pregnant Women in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Sabin, Lora L.; Rizal, Abanish; Brooks, Mohamad I.; Singh, Mrigendra P.; Tuchman, Jordan; Wylie, Blair J.; Joyce, Katherine M.; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Singh, Neeru; Hamer, Davidson H.

    2010-01-01

    We explored views toward and use of malaria prevention and treatment measures among pregnant women in Jharkhand, India. We conducted 32 in-depth interviews and six focus group discussions (total = 73 respondents) with pregnant women in urban, semi-urban, and rural locations in a region with moderate intensity malaria transmission. Most respondents ranked malaria as an important health issue affecting pregnant women, had partially correct understanding of malaria transmission and prevention, and reported using potentially effective prevention methods, usually untreated bed nets. However, most conveyed misinformation and described using unproven prevention and/or treatment methods. Many described using different ineffective traditional malaria remedies. The majority also showed willingness to try new prevention methods and take medications if doctor-prescribed. Misconceptions and use of unproven prevention and treatment methods are common among pregnant women in eastern India. Policy makers should focus on improving knowledge and availability of effective malaria control strategies in this population. PMID:20519593

  15. Attitudes, knowledge, and practices regarding malaria prevention and treatment among pregnant women in Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Sabin, Lora L; Rizal, Abanish; Brooks, Mohamad I; Singh, Mrigendra P; Tuchman, Jordan; Wylie, Blair J; Joyce, Katherine M; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Singh, Neeru; Hamer, Davidson H

    2010-06-01

    We explored views toward and use of malaria prevention and treatment measures among pregnant women in Jharkhand, India. We conducted 32 in-depth interviews and six focus group discussions (total = 73 respondents) with pregnant women in urban, semi-urban, and rural locations in a region with moderate intensity malaria transmission. Most respondents ranked malaria as an important health issue affecting pregnant women, had partially correct understanding of malaria transmission and prevention, and reported using potentially effective prevention methods, usually untreated bed nets. However, most conveyed misinformation and described using unproven prevention and/or treatment methods. Many described using different ineffective traditional malaria remedies. The majority also showed willingness to try new prevention methods and take medications if doctor-prescribed. Misconceptions and use of unproven prevention and treatment methods are common among pregnant women in eastern India. Policy makers should focus on improving knowledge and availability of effective malaria control strategies in this population.

  16. Given Resource Constraints, It Would Be Unethical To Divert Antiretroviral Drugs From Treatment To Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Macklin, Ruth; Cowan, Ethan

    2013-01-01

    Striking advances in HIV prevention have set the stage for renewed debate on setting priorities in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Two new prevention strategies preexposure prophylaxis and treatment as prevention—use antiretroviral drugs for prevention of HIV/AIDS in addition to treating patients. The potential for success of these new prevention strategies sets up an ethical dilemma: where resources are limited and supplies of lifesaving antiretroviral medications are insufficient to treat those currently living with HIV, how should these resources be divided between treatment and prevention? This article explores several ethical principles used in formulating public health policy. Assuming that limited resources are available for spending on drugs, we conclude that it would be unethical to watch patients with treatable AIDS worsen and die, even with supportive care, so that medications for treatment can be diverted for prevention. PMID:22778343

  17. [Dental diseases prevention and treatment among foreign students from different regions of the world].

    PubMed

    Makeeva, I M; Daurova, F Iu; Piatigorskaia, N V

    2013-01-01

    420 foreign first year students of Peoples' Friendship University of Russia from different regions of the world were examined for oral health status. The main dental indexes were analyzed and recommendations for dental diseases prevention and treatment were given for each region group. For students from Africa the leading direction is caries prevention. Students from Middle East and Latin America need in caries treatment and endodontic treatment. The main problem of students from Asia is periodontal diseases.

  18. Intermittent hypoxia and neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Lee, Kun-Ze; Dale, Erica A; Reier, Paul J; Mitchell, Gordon S; Fuller, David D

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, it has become clear that brief, repeated presentations of hypoxia [i.e., acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH)] can boost the efficacy of more traditional therapeutic strategies in certain cases of neurologic dysfunction. This hypothesis derives from a series of studies in animal models and human subjects performed over the past 35 yr. In 1980, Millhorn et al. (Millhorn DE, Eldridge FL, Waldrop TG. Respir Physiol 41: 87-103, 1980) showed that electrical stimulation of carotid chemoafferent neurons produced a persistent, serotonin-dependent increase in phrenic motor output that outlasts the stimulus for more than 90 min (i.e., a "respiratory memory"). AIH elicits similar phrenic "long-term facilitation" (LTF) by a mechanism that requires cervical spinal serotonin receptor activation and de novo protein synthesis. From 2003 to present, a series of studies demonstrated that AIH can induce neuroplasticity in the injured spinal cord, causing functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that repeated AIH (rAIH) can induce recovery of limb function, and the functional benefits of rAIH are greatest when paired with task-specific training. Since uncontrolled and/or prolonged intermittent hypoxia can elicit pathophysiology, a challenge of intermittent hypoxia research is to ensure that therapeutic protocols are well below the threshold for pathogenesis. This is possible since many low dose rAIH protocols have induced functional benefits without evidence of pathology. We propose that carefully controlled rAIH is a safe and noninvasive modality that can be paired with other neurorehabilitative strategies including traditional activity-based physical therapy or cell-based therapies such as intraspinal transplantation of neural progenitors. PMID:25997947

  19. Postoperative infection in hand surgery. Cause, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, D B

    1994-02-01

    The consequences of postoperative infection in hand surgery are fortunately uncommon but can lead to severe disability. This article reviews the pathogenesis of infections and the role of antibiotics, skin preparation, and surgical technique in the development and prevention of infection. The final sections discuss the role that different disease states and different types of surgery have on the risk of postoperative infection.

  20. Eating Disorders in Childhood: Prevention and Treatment Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Cottone, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) are chronic clinical mental disorders that are disruptive to the psychological and social development of children and adolescents. They can be difficult to prevent and treat and are considered among the most chronic and medically lethal of mental disorders. Research suggests that the incidence and prevalence of eating…

  1. Anger and Violence Prevention: Enhancing Treatment Effects through Booster Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Alysha; McWhirter, Paula T.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of booster sessions on the maintenance of intervention gains following an anger management prevention program: "Student Created Aggression Replacement Education Program" ("SCARE"). Participants who had completed the "SCARE" program a year earlier were randomly assigned into either a booster…

  2. Tick-Associated Diseases: Symptoms, Treatment and Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Alice; Chaney, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are eleven tick-associated diseases prevalent in the United States. Most commonly diagnosed are Lyme disease, anaplasmosis (ehrlichiosis) and babeisois, with Lyme disease being the most common vector-borne disease in the country. In southeastern states, studies have shown the…

  3. Prevention and treatment of influenza in the primary care office.

    PubMed

    Golovyan, Dmitriy M; Mossad, Sherif B

    2014-03-01

    Influenza, a common respiratory infection, is a source of significant rates of illness, death, and loss of productivity. Annual vaccination is safe and effective in preventing disease and in reducing its severity. Yet a majority of eligible US adults do not receive the annual vaccine, at least in part because of misunderstandings about adverse reactions and clinical effectiveness. PMID:24591474

  4. The Role of Calcium in Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaney, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    Osteoporosis results from several factors. Calcium deficiency is only one, and high calcium intake will prevent only those cases in which calcium is the limiting factor. Calcium cannot reverse, but only arrest, bone loss. A high calcium intake for every member of the population is advocated. (Author/MT)

  5. Eating Disorder Intervention, Prevention, and Treatment: Recommendations for School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.; McCulloch, Ariana R. M.; Witko, Kim D.; Spriddle, Jennifer W.; Roest, Allison R.

    2004-01-01

    School counselors are in daily contact with the highest risk group for developing eating disorders--children and adolescents. School counselors are in a position to identify at-risk individuals, implement effective school-based prevention programs, make appropriate referrals, and provide support for recovering individuals. An overview of a theory…

  6. High-intensity intermittent exercise and fat loss.

    PubMed

    Boutcher, Stephen H

    2011-01-01

    The effect of regular aerobic exercise on body fat is negligible; however, other forms of exercise may have a greater impact on body composition. For example, emerging research examining high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) indicates that it may be more effective at reducing subcutaneous and abdominal body fat than other types of exercise. The mechanisms underlying the fat reduction induced by HIIE, however, are undetermined. Regular HIIE has been shown to significantly increase both aerobic and anaerobic fitness. HIIE also significantly lowers insulin resistance and results in a number of skeletal muscle adaptations that result in enhanced skeletal muscle fat oxidation and improved glucose tolerance. This review summarizes the results of HIIE studies on fat loss, fitness, insulin resistance, and skeletal muscle. Possible mechanisms underlying HIIE-induced fat loss and implications for the use of HIIE in the treatment and prevention of obesity are also discussed.

  7. Duration of First Off-Treatment Interval Is Prognostic for Time to Castration Resistance and Death in Men With Biochemical Relapse of Prostate Cancer Treated on a Prospective Trial of Intermittent Androgen Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Evan Y.; Gulati, Roman; Telesca, Donatello; Jiang, Peter; Tam, Stephen; Russell, Kenneth J.; Nelson, Peter S.; Etzioni, Ruth D.; Higano, Celestia S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This was an exploratory analysis of a trial of intermittent androgen deprivation (IAD) in men with biochemical relapse (BR) to establish first cycle characteristics prognostic for progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and death. Patients and Methods Men with BR of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiation (RT) were treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) comprised of leuprolide and flutamide. After 9 months on treatment, ADT was stopped, and monthly prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were observed during the off-treatment interval. When the PSA reached a threshold value (1 ng/mL for RP, 4 ng/mL for RT), ADT was resumed in a new cycle. Patients were treated intermittently in this manner until CRPC, which was defined as ≥ two consecutive increasing PSA values while on ADT with castrate testosterone levels. Results Seventy-two of 100 patients enrolled onto the study met criteria for this analysis. The duration of the first off-treatment interval (≤ v > 40 weeks) was associated with shorter time to CRPC (hazard ratio = 2.9; 95% CI, 1.1 to 7.7; P = .03) and death (hazard ratio = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.1 to 13.6; P = .04) after adjusting for age, stage, grade, and PSA at diagnosis. Conclusion In patients who completed the first cycle of IAD, a duration of the first off-treatment interval of ≤ 40 weeks defines a subset of patients at higher risk of CRPC and death. Conversely, patients with an off-treatment interval of more than 40 weeks have a significantly better long-term prognosis. PMID:20421544

  8. Separate goals, converging priorities: on the ethics of treatment as prevention.

    PubMed

    Ostmann, Florian; Saenz, Carla

    2013-08-01

    Recent evidence confirming that the administration of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to HIV-infected persons may effectively reduce their risk of transmission has revived the discussion about priority setting in the fight against HIV/AIDS. The fact that the very same drugs can be used both for treatment purposes and for preventive purposes (Treatment as Prevention) has been seen as paradigm-shifting and taken to spark a new controversy: In a context of scarce resources, should the allocation of ARVs be prioritized based on the goal of providing treatment, or on the goal of preventing the spread of the HIV epidemic? Contributions to this discussion tend to assume that treatment and prevention constitute two divergent goals that entail conflicting priorities. We challenge that assumption on the basis of both conceptual and empirical examination. We argue that, as far as the provision of ARVs to HIV-infected persons is concerned, the goals of treatment and prevention do not entail conflicting priorities; to the contrary, they dictate converging strategies for the optimal allocation of ARVs. In light of the current evidence, the concept of Treatment as Prevention can indeed be seen as paradigm-shifting, yet in a novel way: Rather than extending the tension between the goals of treatment and prevention to the level of drug-allocation, it dissolves this tension by providing a rationale for a unified strategy for allocating ARVs.

  9. Randomized trial comparing mindfulness-based relapse prevention with relapse prevention for women offenders at a residential addiction treatment center.

    PubMed

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Warner, Kaitlin; Sully, Betsy; Barricks, Adria; Stauffer, Connie; Thompson, Brian L; Luoma, Jason B

    2014-04-01

    Reincarceration rates are high among substance-involved criminal offenders. This study (conducted during 2010-2011 in an urban area and funded by a Washington State University-Vancouver mini-grant) used a randomized design to examine the effectiveness of mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) as compared to relapse prevention (RP), as part of a residential addictions treatment program for women referred by the criminal-justice system (N = 105). At 15-week follow up, regression analyses found women in MBRP, compared to RP, reported significantly fewer drug use days and fewer legal and medical problems. Study limitations and future research directions for studying the efficacy of MBRP are discussed.

  10. Topical modalities for treatment and prevention of postsurgical hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Foo, Chong Wee; Tristani-Firouzi, Payam

    2011-08-01

    There is no universally accepted treatment regimen and no evidence-based literature to guide management of hypertrophic scars. This article summarizes the existing literature regarding topical treatments such as silicone gel sheeting and ointment, onion extract, vitamin E, pressure garment therapy, massage therapy, and topical imiquimod 5% cream in the management of hypertrophic scars.

  11. Topical modalities for treatment and prevention of postsurgical hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Foo, Chong Wee; Tristani-Firouzi, Payam

    2011-08-01

    There is no universally accepted treatment regimen and no evidence-based literature to guide management of hypertrophic scars. This article summarizes the existing literature regarding topical treatments such as silicone gel sheeting and ointment, onion extract, vitamin E, pressure garment therapy, massage therapy, and topical imiquimod 5% cream in the management of hypertrophic scars. PMID:21856542

  12. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Prevention Basic Facts & Information Some factors that affect your ... control of the things that you can change. Preventive Recommendations for Adults Aged 65 and Older The ...

  13. Clean intermittent catheterization revisited.

    PubMed

    Lamin, Eliza; Newman, Diane K

    2016-06-01

    Catheterization is the insertion of a hollow flexible tube (called a catheter) to drain the urine from the bladder and is probably one of the oldest urologic procedures, dating back 3000 years. Since 1972, when urologist Dr Jack Lapides described a procedure for performing clean intermittent catheterization, this method of bladder management has become lifesaving for an individual who cannot empty their bladder independently. If the bladder is not emptied regularly, elevated storage pressures can develop which may put the upper tracts at risk of subsequent deterioration. Intermittent catheterization (IC) has become the first-line and preferred method of drainage in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, as long as dexterity or available caregiver support and body habitus allow access. However, over the past 20 years, an evolution has occurred in the technology of catheters used for IC. But with these advances, so has controversy arisen. This article is a review of the current application of IC, the current technology in catheter material and systems, differences between reusable and one-time, or single-use catheters, the cost benefit of doing IC, and the infectious benefit.

  14. Prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of influenza: current and future options.

    PubMed

    Poehling, K A; Edwards, K M

    2001-02-01

    Because influenza significantly affects the health of children, this review describes the current and future options for preventing, diagnosing, and treating influenza infections. Currently, the inactivated influenza vaccine is recommended for prevention of influenza; however, the live, attenuated, intranasal influenza vaccine is a potential future option. For diagnosis, viral culture is the gold standard, although four rapid diagnostic tests are available for more immediate results. The impetus for rapid results is the availability of effective antiviral agents indicated for early influenza infection. The four currently approved antiviral agents are amantadine, rimantadine, zanamivir [Relenza, Glaxo Wellcome, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC] and oseltamivir [Tamiflu, Roche Pharmaceuticals, Nutley, NJ]. The indications, benefits, side effects and ages for which each drug is approved are reviewed. PMID:11176246

  15. [Aggressive and violent behaviour. Diagnosis, prevention, and treatment].

    PubMed

    Steinert, T; Bergk, J

    2008-03-01

    Some mental disorders are associated with an increased illness-related risk of aggressive behaviour. Epidemiologically, substance abuse disorders are most frequently implicated, followed by psychotic disorders. Dealing with the problems of violence and coercion is the oldest problem of psychiatric institutions. Aggressive patient behaviour still represents a typical risk for staff in psychiatric institutions. Associations with patient characteristics such as diagnosis, gender, and age have not been consistently confirmed. Preventive aspects comprise interventions such as adapting institutional processes to patients' needs, patients participating in decisions, and systematic training for staff. Emergency medication and preventive pharmacotherapy are also important. As last resort coercive measures such as involuntary medication, seclusion, or mechanical restraint can be applied. The state of the art in these areas is presented. Ethical considerations and questions of adequateness have a significant effect.

  16. [Prevention and treatment of hepatic veno-occlusive disease].

    PubMed

    Carreras, Enric

    2011-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is currently the main cause of hepatic veno-occlusive disease, which is the early complication of this procedure with the highest short-term morbidity and mortality. Given that mortality from severe hepatic veno-occlusive disease can be nearly 100%, the search for measures to prevent of treat this complication is essential. Several risk factors for this complication have been identified and the triggering event that leads to sinusoidal obstruction has been shown to be sinusoidal endothelial cell injury. The present review analyzes measures to avoid or modify the casual risk factors for this complication, as well as the pharmacological agents that can prevent or modify the initial endothelial dysfunction or the resulting sinusoidal occlusion. PMID:21571396

  17. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of lightning injuries: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Davis, Chris; Engeln, Anna; Johnson, Eric L; McIntosh, Scott E; Zafren, Ken; Islas, Arthur A; McStay, Christopher; Smith, William R; Cushing, Tracy

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and prevention of lightning injuries. These guidelines include a review of the epidemiology of lightning and recommendations for the prevention of lightning strikes, along with treatment recommendations organized by organ system. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Lightning Injuries published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2012;23(3):260-269. PMID:25498265

  18. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of lightning injuries: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Davis, Chris; Engeln, Anna; Johnson, Eric L; McIntosh, Scott E; Zafren, Ken; Islas, Arthur A; McStay, Christopher; Smith, William R; Cushing, Tracy

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and prevention of lightning injuries. These guidelines include a review of the epidemiology of lightning and recommendations for the prevention of lightning strikes, along with treatment recommendations organized by organ system. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Lightning Injuries published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2012;23(3):260-269.

  19. Present and future aspects of dydrogesterone in prevention or treatment of pregnancy disorders: an outlook.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Adolf E

    2016-08-01

    Over time, it became evident that with the use of micronized progesterone and dydrogesterone prevention or treatment of pregnancy disorders such as threatened miscarriage, recurrent (habitual) miscarriage, preterm labor or preeclampsia appears to be possible. The results so far obtained will be delineated and concepts of prevention or treatment are suggested with the aim to further explore these pregnancy disorders either by prevention or treatment concepts to obtain not only benefits to the mother and the fetus, but furthermore this results in benefits for lifetime for the individual, for the family and last but not least for society. PMID:27662647

  20. [Potential dietary interventions for prevention and treatment of infant allergy].

    PubMed

    Bascuñán Gamboa, Karla Amada; Araya Quezada, Magdalena

    2014-05-01

    The incidence of atopic diseases such as asthma, atopic dermatitis and food allergies has increased exponentially in recent decades. Although atopic diseases have a clear genetic basis, environmental factors such as the diet, seems to play an important role in its development. This article summarizes main studies exploring whether feeding practices of mothers and infants intervenes in the development of allergic diseases. The potential role of dietary practices of the mother and infants for the prevention and/or management of allergies in infants is discussed. The available evidence was analyzed for: (1) does mothers consumption of essential fatty acids, prebiotics and probiotics modulates the onset of allergic disorders?, (2) Does breastfeeding and artificial formula prevent/trigger the onset of allergy symptoms? (3) Does timing of introduction of solid feeding and the selection of certain common food allergens participate in achieving oral tolerance in infants? Accumulated evidence in recent years suggest that exposure to allergens early in life may promote immune tolerance and contribute to prevent infant food sensitization.

  1. ENERGY PRODUCTION AND POLLUTION PREVENTION AT SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS USING FUEL CELL POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses energy production and pollution prevention at sewage treatment plants using fuel cell power plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at waste water treatment plants during the anaerobic treatment of sewage to reduce solids. The major constituents are...

  2. Metabolic consequences of intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Christopher P

    2007-01-01

    Insulin resistance is being recognized increasingly as the basis for the constellation of metabolic abnormalities that make up the metabolic syndrome, or Syndrome X. Insulin resistance is also the primary risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is currently reaching epidemic proportions by affecting more than 170 million people worldwide. A combination of environmental and genetic factors have led to a dramatic rise in visceral adiposity, the predominant factor causing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Visceral adiposity is also the major risk factor for the development of Sleep Apnea (SA)--an association that has fueled interest in the co-morbidity of SA and the metabolic syndrome, but hampered attempts to ascribe an independent causative role for Sleep Apnea in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Numerous population and clinic-based epidemiologic studies have shown associations, often independent of obesity, between SA (or surrogates such as snoring) and measures of glucose dysregulation or type 2 diabetes. However, treatment of SA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has not been conclusive in demonstrating improvements in insulin resistance, perhaps due to the overwhelming effects of obesity. Here we show that in lean, otherwise healthy mice that exposure to intermittent hypoxia produced whole-body insulin resistance as determined by the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and reduced glucose utilization in oxidative muscle fibers, but did not cause a change in hepatic glucose output. Furthermore, the increase in insulin resistance was not affected by blockade of the autonomic nervous system. We conclude that intermittent hypoxia can cause acute insulin resistance in otherwise lean healthy animals, and the response occurs independent of activation of the autonomic nervous system. PMID:18269187

  3. [Importance of local skin treatments during radiotherapy for prevention and treatment of radio-induced epithelitis].

    PubMed

    Chargari, C; Fromantin, I; Kirova, Y M

    2009-07-01

    Radio-epithelitis represents a common problem, for which treatments are characterized by a great heterogeneity. The present review of literature focuses on data referenced in Pubmed((c))/Medline((c)) and published in French/English. Despite a real preclinical rationale, aloe vera and trolamine failed to demonstrate any benefit in the prophylactic settings. In a prospective assessment phase III assessment, Calendula Officinalis was shown to be superior to trolamine for the prevention of radio-epithelitis. In the curative settings, sucrafalte failed to demonstrate any benefit. The benefit of dermocorticoids was suggested in terms of erythema and itching. Promising clinical results are available with hyaluronic acid (MA S065D and Ialugen) and silver leaf may reduce the intensity of cutaneous radio-induced side effects. Data from the literature are conflicting, making real the difficulty to adopt from clinical trials any proof-of-principle strategy. Considering these uncertainties, several strategies are allowed. New topics are under investigation. Present data from the literature highlight the need for further trials, in order to propose evidence-based treatments and to harmonize clinical practice.

  4. Commentary: male osteoporosis-policy gaps in prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Marx, Katherine A; Quinn, Charlene C

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a disabling disease affecting 10 million Americans, leading to increased risk of fractures and poor functional ability. Although typically thought of as a women's disease, millions of men are diagnosed with osteoporosis or low bone mass, and the risk for osteoporotic fractures is increasing. To address undetected and untreated osteoporosis among men, public health education should be targeted to males. Insurance programs, including Medicare, should add the heel qualitative ultrasound (QUS) for age-eligible men with follow-up every 2 years. Policy changes should address funding of targeted education and prevention programs for aging males, including coverage of screening tests.

  5. Latin America: actions for the prevention and treatment of malnutrition.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, A M; Britos, S

    1991-01-01

    The stagnation of the social and economic progress of Latin America in the 1980s is an aftermatch of its enormous external debt and of the drop in the international price of agricultural goods which are its main exports. Today in LA more people is malnourished and live under the line of poverty than in the 1970s. Programs for the prevention of malnutrition and for the rehabilitation of malnourished children have been enforced in most countries in order to mitigate the effects of the crisis. Such actions are briefly discussed.

  6. Air embolism in central venous catheterization: diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M J

    1982-10-01

    Air embolism associated with central venous catheterization carries with it a significant morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis should be suggested by sudden alterations in cardiovascular, respiratory, or central nervous system function in a patient with a central venous catheter. A "mill wheel" cardiac murmur is characteristic. Placing the patient in the left lateral decubitus with the head down allows displacement of the air from the pulmonary outflow tract. Prevention of the complication involves thorough patient and physician preparation before subclavian catheterization, use of a Luer lock between catheter and tubing, meticulous catheter care, and employment of a pump with an in-line air detector.

  7. The urgent need for HIV and hepatitis prevention in drug treatment programs in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Rácz, József; Neaigus, Alan; Ujhelyi, Eszter

    2008-01-01

    We assess HIV and hepatitis testing and counseling in drug treatment programs in Hungary, a country with low rates of HIV but high rates of HCV among injecting drug users. The official context of drug treatment programs is described, and, using key informants from representative drug treatment programs, the practice of HIV and hepatitis testing and counseling in such programs is assessed. While HIV testing and counseling occurs, testing and counseling for HBV and HCV are rare, especially in outpatient settings; and sexual risk in the drug use context is ineffectively addressed by treatment programs. Drug treatment centers are not adequately addressing the need to provide either HIV or hepatitis prevention services. There is an urgent need for preventing HIV and related infections among drug users by integrating HIV and hepatitis B and C prevention with drug treatment. PMID:15237056

  8. 75 FR 39264 - CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and Treatment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and Treatment In accordance with section 10(a)(2..., CDC and the Administrator, HRSA, regarding activities related to prevention and control of HIV/AIDS and other STDs, the support of health care services to persons living with HIV/AIDS, and education...

  9. Gordon Wilson Lecture: Infectious Disease Causes of Cancer: Opportunities for Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Howley, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The role of infectious agents in cancer is generally underappreciated. However, approximately 20% of human cancers are caused by infectious agents and as such they rank second only to tobacco as a potentially preventable cause in humans. Specific viruses, parasites, and bacteria have been linked to specific human cancers. The infectious etiology for these specific cancers provides opportunities for prevention and treatment.

  10. Comment on "Intermittent plate tectonics?".

    PubMed

    Korenaga, Jun

    2008-06-01

    Silver and Behn (Reports, 4 January 2008, p. 85) proposed that intermittent plate tectonics may resolve a long-standing paradox in Earth's thermal evolution. However, their analysis misses one important term, which subsequently brings their main conclusion into question. In addition, the Phanerozoic eustasy record indicates that the claimed effect of intermittency is probably weak.

  11. Food Allergies: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... only ease the symptoms. Preventing a food allergy reaction There are no drugs or treatments available that ... wheat, shellfish, and fish. Treating a Food Allergy Reaction Unintentional exposure When you have food allergies, you ...

  12. Clinical utility of apixaban in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism: current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Zalpour, Ali; Oo, Thein Hlaing

    2014-01-01

    Anticoagulation with heparin and vitamin K antagonist has been the mainstay of prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) for many years. In recent years, novel oral anticoagulants such as dabigatran etexilate (a direct thrombin inhibitor) and rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban (a direct factor Xa inhibitor) have emerged for the prevention and treatment of VTE. Novel oral anticoagulants have been shown to be noninferior to vitamin K antagonist or heparin in the prevention and treatment of VTE. This review specifically examines the role of apixaban in the prevention and treatment of VTE based on the available literature. The management of apixaban in the perioperative setting is also explored because some patients on apixaban may require surgical intervention. Finally, we discuss the management of apixaban-induced major bleeding complications, the relevance of drug–drug interactions, and patient education. PMID:25395835

  13. [Toxoplasmosis in pregnancy: prevention, prenatal diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Hohlfeld, P; Biedermann, K; Extermann, P; Gyr, T

    1995-01-01

    Maternal infection with Toxoplasma gondii acquired during pregnancy occurs in more than 500 women per year in Switzerland. Systematic screening at the beginning of pregnancy allows the introduction of health education programs. The screening during pregnancy is performed to diagnose primary maternal infections and to propose prenatal diagnosis and treatment. The administration of specific antibiotherapy during pregnancy (spiramycine or the association of pyrimethamine and sulfonamides) significantly reduces the risk of fetal infection. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis is possible and reliable. It avoids unnecessary termination of pregnancy when the fetus is not infected and specific therapy in case of infection (association of pyrimethamine and sulfonamides). Prenatal treatment may be proposed without prenatal diagnosis as of the 16th week of gestation. In any case, prenatal treatment seems to reduce the incidence of severe congenital toxoplasmosis.

  14. Wilderness medical society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of lightning injuries.

    PubMed

    Davis, Chris; Engeln, Anna; Johnson, Eric; McIntosh, Scott E; Zafren, Ken; Islas, Arthur A; McStay, Christopher; Smith, William 'Will' R; Cushing, Tracy

    2012-09-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and prevention of lightning injuries. These guidelines include a review of the epidemiology of lightning strikes and recommendations for the prevention of lightning strikes, along with treatment recommendations organized by organ system. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians.

  15. Modeling Wind Erosion Intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, S.

    2015-12-01

    To improve dust emission schemes in large scale transport models, we developed the first physically-based model simulating the full erosion process in a turbulent flow by resolving explicitly saltating particle trajectories and dust suspension, in presence of vegetation. The large-eddy simulation technic is used here to simulate the turbulent flow, allowing to solve explicitly the main wind gusts near the surface and so the intermittency of the erosion process. The model appeared able to reproduce the saltation intermittency as visualized through the presence of blowing sand structures near the surface, known as aeolian streamers observed on beaches during windy days. In presence of vegetation, the model further allowed us to investigate the sensitivity of sand erosion to the arrangement and morphology of plants (shrubs versus trees). More recently, we further used the model to reanalyze the dependence of the size distribution of the dust flux to the wind speed for idealized erosion events starting from an air free of dust. We found that the suspension of small dust (around 1 μm) can be a long nonstationary process (several hours depending on the wind intensity) due to the low deposition velocity of this particle size range. This leads to a continuous enrichment of the near-surface dust flux in small particles, enrichment that is enhanced with wind intensity, independently of the possible role of saltators. The model also showed that the size distribution and magnitude of dust fluxes at a few meters height differ from those of the emitted flux at the surface as particles start to be sorted through the deposition process within the saltation layer. This last result should be considered when evaluating or calibrating "physically based" dust emission schemes against measured near-surface turbulent diffusive dust fluxes.

  16. Progress towards the prevention and treatment of norovirus infections

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Armando; Emmott, Edward; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses are now recognized as the major cause of acute gastroenteritis in the developed world, yet our ability to prevent and control infection is limited. Recent work has highlighted that, while typically an acute infection in the population, immunocompromised patients often experience long-term infections that may last many years. This cohort of patients and those regularly exposed to infectious material, for example, care workers and others, would benefit greatly from the development of a vaccine or antiviral therapy. While a licensed vaccine or antiviral has yet to be developed, work over the past 10 years in this area has intensified and trials with a vaccine candidate have proven promising. Numerous antiviral targets and small molecule inhibitors that have efficacy in cell culture have now been identified; however, further studies in this area are required in order to make these suitable for clinical use. PMID:24199805

  17. Acute otitis media in children-current treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Gisselsson-Solen, Marie

    2015-05-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is the most common bacterial infection in children and has a very varied clinical spectrum, ranging from spontaneous resolutions to serious complications. The effect of antibiotics in AOM depends on the chosen outcome, but has been shown to reduce pain somewhat, and have a greater beneficial effect in severe cases of AOM. Today, not all episodes of AOM are treated with antibiotics, but most countries have issued guidelines that include an option of watchful waiting in many cases. Prevention of AOM reaches from modification of environmental risk factors to vaccinations and surgery. Conjugate pneumococcal vaccines and influenza vaccines have been shown to somewhat reduce the number of AOM episodes in different groups of children. Grommets, with or without adenoidectomy, are effective at least during the first 6 months after surgery. PMID:25896748

  18. [Prevention and treatment of intraoperative complications of thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Lampl, L

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve a minimal complication rate there is a need for a comprehensive strategy. This means in the first line preventive steps which include patient positioning, suitable approaches and access, an appropriately qualified surgical team as well as a carefully planned dissection and preparation. Furthermore, a supply of additional instrumentation, such as thrombectomy catheters, special vascular clamps and even extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and a heart-lung machine (HLM) in cases of centrally located lesions should be on stand-by. Control instruments, such as a bronchoscope and esophagoscope should not be forgotten. In selected cases a preoperative embolization (vascular malformation) or cream swallow (thoracic duct injury) can be helpful. Special interventions to overcome complications arising are described for the chest wall, lung parenchyma, pulmonary vessels, great vessels, bronchial arteries, trachea and bronchi, esophagus, thoracic duct, heart, vertebral column and sternum corresponding to the topography.

  19. Congenital toxoplasmosis: Clinical features, outcomes, treatment, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarman

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by a coccidian parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. The parasite is highly prevalent both in humans and in warm-blooded animals. Cat family animals are definitive host, and these animals excrete the infective oocysts in their feces. Humans, though not definitive host, get infection by consuming water or food contaminated with cat feces. Rarely, infection can also take place through transfusing the infected blood, through transplantation of infected organs, or transplacentally from infected mother to fetus. Transplacental infection can cause congenital infection with varied degree of clinical manifestations, which depend on the age of fetus when infection took place. Diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis is difficult to establish until it is suspected and laboratory investigations are carried out. In more than 75% of cases, acute infection is missed due to very mild or unnoticeable clinical symptoms and signs. In India, a prevalence rate of 22.4% (8.8-37.3%) has been reported with an overall IgM positivity of 1.43%. It is estimated that approximately between 56,737 and 176,882 children per year are born in India with a possible risk of congenital toxoplasmosis. The diagnosis of congenital toxoplasmosis can be made by serological methods which are most commonly used. The other methods are parasite isolation by culture and molecular methods. Toxoplasmosis is treatable and transplacental transmission can be prevented by spiramycin, which concentrates in the placenta. However, if infection has done any damage to the fetus or the parasite has passed the placenta, spiramycin cannot reverse the damage. Prevention remains the best remedy. PMID:27722099

  20. Pressure ulcers in the ICU patient: an update on prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Anna E; Monfre, Jill

    2015-03-01

    The occurrence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) is a recognized metric of quality of care by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and treatment have become a priority for many facilities as the reimbursement for hospital-acquired PUs has been significantly restricted by regulations implemented by CMS in 2008. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients are at higher risk for PU development due to comorbidities and life-saving treatment modalities in this environment. PU occurrence in ICUs ranges from 8.8 to 23 %. The literature was reviewed for recent advances in PU prevention and treatment in ICU patients. Advancements include risk assessment, education, turning schedules, providing staff with feedback from audits, lift teams, review of linen, consensus statement regarding unavoidable PU, treatment modalities, and an assessment of the knowledge providers have of PU prevention and treatment.

  1. [Prevention and complex treatment of duodenal stump incompetence].

    PubMed

    Salikhov, I A; Fedorov, V V; Krasil'nikov, D M; Knubovets, S Ia; Minnegaliev, M M; Mosikhin, B B

    1989-10-01

    The results of surgical treatment of 1,069 patients for gastric and duodenal ulcer were studied. Duodenal stump incompetence (DSI) developed in 25 patients (6.3%) after the Billroth II operation; the incompetence was manifested by three clinical forms: infiltrative, primary-fistular, and perforative-peritoneal. Each form of DSI calls for specific tactics of treatment. The perforative-peritoneal form is most dangerous; during its operative management active aspiration-perfusion drainage of the zone of the stump must be installed and the duodenum relieved of a load as much as possible. Drugs reducing pancreatic function, postural drainage, and a diet is included in the complex of therapeutic measures in DSI. The wide introduction of organ-preserving operations into surgical practice will make it possible to avoid this threatening complication.

  2. Food Allergy in childhood: phenotypes, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, Silvia; Cipriani, Francesca; Ricci, Giampaolo

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of food allergy in childhood increased in the last decades, especially in Westernized countries where this phenomenon has been indicated as a second wave of the allergic epidemic. In parallel, scientific interest also increased with the effort to explain the reasons of this sudden rise and to identify potential protective and risk factors. A great attention has been focused on early exposures to allergenic foods, as well as on other nutritional factors or supplements that may influence the immune system in a positive direction. Both interventions on maternal diet before birth or during breastfeeding and then directly on infant nutrition have been investigated. Furthermore, the natural history of food allergy also seems to be changing over time; IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy and egg allergy seem to be more frequently a persistent rather than a transient disease in childhood, as described in the last years. Food avoidance and the emergency drugs in case of an adverse event, such as epinephrine self-injector, are currently the first-line treatment in patients with food allergies, with a resulting impairment in the quality of life and social behaviour. During the last decade, oral immunotherapy emerged as an optional treatment with remarkable results, offering a novel perspective in the treatment for and management of food allergy. PMID:26595763

  3. Novel Nanotechnology Strategies for the Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jian Jun; Sun, Xiao Hui; Ma, Xue Ting; Guan, Jian Qing; Wang, Cun Xin

    2013-09-01

    It is a hard work to develop an hightly effective cure and prevention of HIV/AIDS. The widespread used of some therapy approaches such as highly active anti retroviral therapy (HAART) has improved life quality and span of infected individuals. However, some limitations of these approaches prevent them achieving further advancement. Recent research on drug delivery approaches indicates that engineered nanosystems may bring positive effect on the improvement of current antiretroviral therapy. Furthermore, the basic researches of nanotechnology- based systems which prevent HIV transmission have been started. Therefore, nanotechnology may become a potential approach in the field of HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention. This chapter reviews the latest advancement in the field of nanotechnology-based systems which improve the fields of HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention.

  4. Prevention of SHIV transmission by topical IFN-β treatment

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Pilch Cooper, Heather A.; Hope, Thomas J.; Alter, Galit; Carias, Ann M.; Sips, Magdalena; Wang, Xiaolei; Rodriguez, Benigno; Sieg, Scott F.; Reich, Adrian; Wilkinson, Peter; Cameron, Mark J.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding vaginal and rectal HIV transmission and protective cellular and molecular mechanisms is critical for designing new prevention strategies, including those required for an effective vaccine. The determinants of protection against HIV infection are, however, poorly understood. Increasing evidence suggest that innate immune defenses may help protect mucosal surfaces from HIV transmission in highly exposed, uninfected subjects 1. More recent studies suggest that systemically administered type 1 interferon protects against simian immunodeficiency virus infection of macaques 2. Here we hypothesized that topically applied type 1 interferons might stimulate vaginal innate responses that could protect against HIV transmission. We therefore applied a recombinant human type 1 interferon (IFN-β) to the vagina of rhesus macaques and vaginally challenged them with pathogenic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV). Vaginal administration of IFN-β resulted in marked local changes in immune cell phenotype, increasing immune activation and HIV coreceptor expression, yet provided significant protection from SHIV acquisition as interferon response genes (IRGs) were also upregulated. These data suggest that protection from vaginal HIV acquisition may be achieved by activating innate mucosal defenses. PMID:26838048

  5. Amiodarone in the prevention and treatment of arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Auer, Johann; Berent, Robert; Eber, Bernd

    2002-07-01

    There is good evidence that amiodarone is effective against a variety of arrhythmias and that it may be superior to other drugs in some settings. Because of its proven efficacy and safety, amiodarone is currently the leading antiarrhythmic drug. The electrophysiological actions of amiodarone are complex and not completely understood. It is generally classified as a Vaughan-Williams class III agent, prolonging repolarization by inhibition of outward potassium channels. Amiodarone is particularly useful because its safety has been clearly demonstrated by a large body of evidence, including several randomized trials. Compared with many other antiarrhythmic drugs, amiodarone causes few cardiovascular adverse effects; however, its overall tolerance is limited by considerable non-cardiac toxicity. Although amiodarone will continue to give way to the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) as primary therapy for many patients presenting with sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF), it is likely that the use of amiodarone in ICD patients will continue to prevent ICD discharges. Evaluation of combined use of amiodarone and ICD may provide the first opportunity to conduct a placebo-controlled trial of amiodarone efficacy against VT recurrence. Pharmacological therapy remains the major approach to management of atrial fibrillation (AF), and the use of amiodarone is likely to increase in future years. This review will analyze the evidence that amiodarone is a safe and effective antiarrhythmic drug.

  6. Prevention and treatment of the gastric symptoms of radiation sickness

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Fiala, N.

    1988-01-01

    The new antiemetic and gastrokinetic agent zacopride was tested in rhesus monkeys to assess its behavioral toxicity and its ability to inhibit radiation-induced emesis. Zacopride (intragastric, 0.3 mg/kg) or a placebo was given blindly and randomly in the basal state and 15 min before a whole-body 800 cG Co-60 gamma radiation dose (except for the legs which were partially protected to permit survival of some bone marrow). The authors determined 1) gastric emptying rates; 2) the presence and frequency of retching and vomiting; and 3) the effect of zacopride on the performance of a visual discrimination task in nonirradiated subjects. When given after the first vomiting episode in a separate group of irradiated monkeys, zacopride completely prevented any subsequent vomiting. Results demonstrate that intragastric administration of zacopride significantly inhibited radiation-induced retching, vomiting, and suppression of gastric emptying in rhesus monkeys and did not cause detectable behavioral side effects when given to nonradiated monkeys.

  7. The role of antioxidants in skin cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Godic, Aleksandar; Poljšak, Borut; Adamic, Metka; Dahmane, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Skin cells are constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress from exogenous and endogenous sources. UV radiation is the most important environmental factor in the development of skin cancer and skin aging. The primary products caused by UV exposure are generally direct DNA oxidation or generation of free radicals which form and decompose extremely quickly but can produce effects that can last for hours, days, or even years. UV-induced generation of ROS in the skin develops oxidative stress when their formation exceeds the antioxidant defense ability. The reduction of oxidative stress can be achieved on two levels: by lowering exposure to UVR and/or by increasing levels of antioxidant defense in order to scavenge ROS. The only endogenous protection of our skin is melanin and enzymatic antioxidants. Melanin, the pigment deposited by melanocytes, is the first line of defense against DNA damage at the surface of the skin, but it cannot totally prevent skin damage. A second category of defense is repair processes, which remove the damaged biomolecules before they can accumulate and before their presence results in altered cell metabolism. Additional UV protection includes avoidance of sun exposure, usage of sunscreens, protective clothes, and antioxidant supplements.

  8. Juvenile delinquency treatment and prevention: a literature review.

    PubMed

    May, Jessica; Osmond, Kristina; Billick, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    In the last three decades there has been ample research to demonstrate that instituting Multisystemic Therapy for serious juvenile offenders, keeping them in the community with intensive intervention, can significantly reduce recidivism. When there is recidivism, it is less severe than in released incarcerated juveniles. Multisystemic Therapy provides 24 h available parental guidance, family therapy, individual therapy, group therapy, educational support and quite importantly a change of peer group. In New York City, there is the new mandate through the Juvenile Justice Initiative to implement interventions to keep juvenile offenders in the community rather than sending them to be incarcerated. However, this paper aims to examine how teaching prosocial values in early childhood can reduce the incidence of first-time juvenile delinquency. Programs such as the Perry School Project will be discussed to demonstrate that although somewhat expensive, these innovative programs nonetheless are quite cost-effective as the cost to society of adjudication, incarceration and victim damages are significantly greater. Along with teaching prosocial 0020 values, there has been renewed interest in early identification of youth at risk for developing Antisocial Personality Disorder. An update is given on the status of both promising approaches in early intervention to prevent serious juvenile delinquency and hence adult criminality.

  9. Complications after tracheal resection and reconstruction: prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Auchincloss, Hugh G.

    2016-01-01

    Tracheal resection and reconstruction (TRR) and laryngotracheal resection and reconstruction (LTRR) is commonly performed for post-intubation tracheal stenosis, tracheal tumor, idiopathic laryngotracheal stenosis (ILTS), and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). Ninety-five percent of patients have a good result from surgery. Complications occur in ~20% of patients, of which half are anastomotic complications. Complications include granulation tissue formation, restenosis of the trachea, anastomotic separation, TEF and tracheoinnominate fistula (TIF), wound infection, laryngeal edema, and glottic dysfunction. Risk factors for anastomotic complication include diabetes, reoperation, previous tracheal appliance, and long-segment tracheal resection. Bronchoscopy should be part of the diagnostic workup when a complication is suspected. Anastomotic separation—the most feared complication of tracheal surgery—may present subtly with stridor and wound infection, or with respiratory distress and extremis. Prompt management is required to prevent devastating consequences. The airway should be secured, bronchoscopy should be performed to address the degree of separation, and the anastomosis should be revised if needed, usually with the addition of t-tube or tracheostomy. Anastomotic complications that are managed aggressively typically yield good results. More than half of such patients will eventually have a satisfactory airway. However, an anastomotic complication is associated with a thirteen-fold increase in the risk of death following tracheal resection. PMID:26981267

  10. Pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Leucht, S; Heres, S; Kissling, W; Davis, J M

    2013-05-01

    We present the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia based on a simple algorithm that starts with the most important decisions starting from the choice of an antipsychotic drug for an acutely ill patient and ends with maintenance treatment. It represents experts opinions, a formal guideline development process was not followed. Concerning acute treatment we present recommendations for the choice of drug in acutely patients, the treatment of agitated patients, persistent depression, negative symptoms and treatment resistance. Concerning maintenance treatment with antipsychotics we discuss indication, choice of drug, continuous versus intermittent treatment, duration of relapse prevention and dose.

  11. Pharmaceutical aerosols for the treatment and prevention of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Shumaila N. M.; Garcia-Contreras, Lucila

    2012-01-01

    Historically, pharmaceutical aerosols have been employed for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but in the past decades their use has been expanded to treat lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other respiratory diseases. Tuberculosis (TB) is acquired after inhalation of aerosol droplets containing the bacilli from the cough of infected individuals. Even though TB affects other organs, the lungs are the primary site of infection, which makes the pulmonary route an ideal alternative route to administer vaccines or drug treatments. Optimization of formulations and delivery systems for anti-TB vaccines and drugs, as well as the proper selection of the animal model to evaluate those is of paramount importance if novel vaccines or drug treatments are to be successful. Pharmaceutical aerosols for patient use are generated from metered dose inhalers, nebulizers, and dry powder inhalers (DPIs). In addition to the advantages of providing more efficient delivery of the drug, low cost, and portability, pharmaceutical dry powder aerosols are more stable than inhalable liquid dosage forms and do not require refrigeration. Methods to manufacture dry powders in respirable sizes include micronization, spray drying, and other proprietary technologies. Inhalable dry powders are characterized in terms of their drug content, particle size, and dispersibility to ensure deposition in the appropriate lung region and effective aerosolization from the device. These methods will be illustrated as they were applied for the manufacture and characterization of powders containing anti-tubercular agents and vaccines for pulmonary administration. The influence of formulation, selection of animal model, method of aerosol generation, and administration on the efficacy demonstrated in a given study will be illustrated by the evaluation of pharmaceutical aerosols of anti-TB drugs and vaccines in guinea pigs by our

  12. Pharmaceutical aerosols for the treatment and prevention of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Shumaila N M; Garcia-Contreras, Lucila

    2012-01-01

    Historically, pharmaceutical aerosols have been employed for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but in the past decades their use has been expanded to treat lung infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other respiratory diseases. Tuberculosis (TB) is acquired after inhalation of aerosol droplets containing the bacilli from the cough of infected individuals. Even though TB affects other organs, the lungs are the primary site of infection, which makes the pulmonary route an ideal alternative route to administer vaccines or drug treatments. Optimization of formulations and delivery systems for anti-TB vaccines and drugs, as well as the proper selection of the animal model to evaluate those is of paramount importance if novel vaccines or drug treatments are to be successful. Pharmaceutical aerosols for patient use are generated from metered dose inhalers, nebulizers, and dry powder inhalers (DPIs). In addition to the advantages of providing more efficient delivery of the drug, low cost, and portability, pharmaceutical dry powder aerosols are more stable than inhalable liquid dosage forms and do not require refrigeration. Methods to manufacture dry powders in respirable sizes include micronization, spray drying, and other proprietary technologies. Inhalable dry powders are characterized in terms of their drug content, particle size, and dispersibility to ensure deposition in the appropriate lung region and effective aerosolization from the device. These methods will be illustrated as they were applied for the manufacture and characterization of powders containing anti-tubercular agents and vaccines for pulmonary administration. The influence of formulation, selection of animal model, method of aerosol generation, and administration on the efficacy demonstrated in a given study will be illustrated by the evaluation of pharmaceutical aerosols of anti-TB drugs and vaccines in guinea pigs by our

  13. Concepts in Onychomycosis Treatment and Recurrence Prevention: An Update.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore

    2016-03-01

    In considering therapy for onychomycosis, the most important factor to take into account is patient selection rather than treatment selection. Patients should be screened and evaluated for the extent of nail involvement, the amount of subungual debris, the degree of dystrophy, their ability and willingness to follow the regimen, and whether comorbidities are present that may affect the efficacy and/or safety of one or more therapies. Onychomycosis is a chronic disease with a high recurrence rate. Commonsense measures to reduce the risk for reinfection include patient education and a clinician-patient team approach to long-term management. PMID:27074701

  14. The prevention and treatment of radiotherapy - induced xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Rhodus, Nelson; Rosenthal, David; Murphy, Barbara; Rasch, Coen; Sonis, Stephen; Scarantino, Charles; Brizel, David

    2003-07-01

    Efforts to reduce the severity of postradiotherapy xerostomia include the use of salivary substitutes to gain symptomatic relief, salivary gland stimulants, agents delivered to protect the glands during radiotherapy (RT), and physical means to partially spare the major salivary glands from RT while adequately irradiating tumor targets. These means include advanced RT treatment planning and salivary tissue transfer to nonirradiated areas. The relative potential gain from each of these strategies is discussed in this article. The combination of partial salivary gland sparing and radiation protectors/stimulants may provide additive or synergistic gains in reducing the severity of xerostomia. PMID:12903018

  15. Nutrients for prevention and treatment of mental health disorders.

    PubMed

    Akhondzadeh, Shahin; Gerbarg, Patricia L; Brown, Richard P

    2013-03-01

    The choice of nutrients for review is based on clinical evidence of efficacy in neuropsychiatric disorders and biochemical effects that are neuroprotective or reparative. Vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and metabolites have been shown to augment antidepressants, improve symptoms in anxiety disorders, depression, neurodegenerative diseases, brain injury, ADHD, and schizophrenia, and to reduce medication side effects. Detection and correction of vitamin and mineral deficiencies can be essential for recovery. Generally low in adverse effects when taken in therapeutic doses, nutrients can be combined for greater benefits. Further studies are warranted to validate these promising treatments. PMID:23538074

  16. Centers for disease control and prevention expert panel meetings on prevention and treatment of anthrax in adults.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Katherine A; Wright, Mary E; Shadomy, Sean V; Bradley, John S; Morrow, Meredith G; Pavia, Andy T; Rubinstein, Ethan; Holty, Jon-Erik C; Messonnier, Nancy E; Smith, Theresa L; Pesik, Nicki; Treadwell, Tracee A; Bower, William A

    2014-02-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention convened panels of anthrax experts to review and update guidelines for anthrax postexposure prophylaxis and treatment. The panels included civilian and military anthrax experts and clinicians with experience treating anthrax patients. Specialties represented included internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, infectious disease, emergency medicine, critical care, pulmonology, hematology, and nephrology. Panelists discussed recent patients with systemic anthrax; reviews of published, unpublished, and proprietary data regarding antimicrobial drugs and anthrax antitoxins; and critical care measures of potential benefit to patients with anthrax. This article updates antimicrobial postexposure prophylaxis and antimicrobial and antitoxin treatment options and describes potentially beneficial critical care measures for persons with anthrax, including clinical procedures for infected nonpregnant adults. Changes from previous guidelines include an expanded discussion of critical care and clinical procedures and additional antimicrobial choices, including preferred antimicrobial drug treatment for possible anthrax meningitis.

  17. Patient factors influencing dermal filler complications: prevention, assessment, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    De Boulle, Koenraad; Heydenrych, Izolda

    2015-01-01

    While rare, complications do occur with the esthetic use of dermal fillers. Careful attention to patient factors and technique can do much to avoid these complications, and a well-informed practitioner can mitigate problems when they do occur. Since cosmetic surgery is usually an elective process, requested by the patient, clinical trials are complex to organize and run. For this reason, an international group of practicing physicians in the field of esthetics came together to share knowledge and to try and produce some informed guidance for their colleagues, considering the literature and also pooling their own extensive clinical experience. This manuscript aims to summarize the crucial aspects of patient selection, including absolute contraindications as well as situations that warrant caution, and also covers important considerations for the pre- and posttreatment periods as well as during the procedure itself. Guidance is given on both immediate and long-term management of adverse reactions. The majority of complications are related to accepting patients inappropriate for treatment or issues of sterility, placement, volume, and injection technique. It is clear that esthetic practitioners need an in-depth knowledge of all aspects of treatment with dermal fillers to achieve optimal outcomes for their patients. PMID:25926750

  18. Relapse and Recurrence Prevention in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Anne D.; Rohde, Paul; Kennard, Betsy D.; Robins, Michele

    2005-01-01

    Relapse and recurrence in adolescent depression are important problems. Much less is known about relapse prevention compared to the acute treatment of depression in adolescents. Based on previous research, theoretical predictions, and clinical experience, the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) protocol was designed to determine…

  19. Development of an Art Psychotherapy Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Unresolved Grief during Midlife.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turetsky, Cheryl J.; Hays, Ronald E.

    2003-01-01

    Presents an integrated model as an appropriate intervention to enable mourning and creativity and thus help in the prevention and treatment of unresolved grief in midlife. Two examples of this model in art-psychotherapy group treatment are provided. (Contains 53 references, 1 table, and 2 figures.) (GCP)

  20. [Prevention and Information for Patients Undergoing Periodontal Treatment: Potentials for Improvement from the Patients' Perspective].

    PubMed

    Klingenberg, A; Walther, W; Dörfer, C E; Szecsenyi, J

    2016-05-01

    2 334 patients from 29 dental practices took part in a written survey on their experiences with dental treatment in general as well as treatment of periodontal disease (response rate 80.8%). 72.6% of all participating patients fully agreed that they could recommend their dentist to their friends. 63.6% of patients undergoing treatment of periodontitis (N=328) rated this treatment as "excellent". However, for important aspects (prevention, patient information, treatment) potentials for improvement became obvious. 43.7% of patients treated for periodontitis were not completely satisfied with information on how this disease develops; 40.7% saw potentials for better information on preventive care (dental-hygiene, nutrition). An even higher percentage of patients actually not treated for periodontitis was interested in more information on prevention (51.4%). The results of the survey show that dentists should offer information and exercise on how to prevent periodontal desease more actively. There is a lack of research on the present state of affairs and potentials for improvement concerning treatment and prevention of periodontitis including the patients' perspective. PMID:26086539

  1. Effectiveness of foot orthoses for treatment and prevention of lower limb injuries : a review.

    PubMed

    Hume, Patria; Hopkins, Will; Rome, Keith; Maulder, Peter; Coyle, Greg; Nigg, Benno

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare professionals prescribe foot orthoses (FOs) for treatment and prevention of lower limb injuries, but previous reviews of the effectiveness of FOs have been inconclusive. We have therefore performed a review emphasizing the magnitude of treatment effects to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of FOs in the treatment and prevention of lower limb injuries.Qualifying studies were mainly controlled trials, but some uncontrolled clinical trials of patients with chronic injuries were analysed separately. Injuries included plantar fasciitis, tibial stress fractures and patellofemoral pain syndrome; these were included because of the large treatment costs for these frequent injuries in New Zealand. Outcomes were pain, comfort, function and injury status. Continuous measures were expressed as standardized differences using baseline between-subject standard deviations, and magnitudes were inferred from the intersection of 90% confidence intervals with thresholds of a modified Cohen scale. Effects based on frequencies were expressed as hazard ratios and their magnitudes were inferred from intersection of confidence intervals with a novel scale of thresholds.The effects of FOs for treatment of pain or injury prevention were mostly trivial. FOs were not effective in treating or preventing patellofemoral pain syndrome. Some studies showed moderate effects for treatment of plantar fasciitis. Only a few studies showed moderate or large beneficial effects of FOs in preventing injuries.Customized semi-rigid FOs have moderate to large beneficial effects in treating and preventing plantar fasciitis and posterior tibial stress fractures, and small to moderate effects in treating patellofemoral pain syndrome. Given the limited randomized controlled trials or clinical controlled trials available for the injuries of interest, it may be that more or less benefit can be derived from the use of FOs, but many studies did not provide enough information for the standardized effect

  2. Bladder emptying by intermittent electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Joseph W.; Wenzel, Brian J.; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2006-03-01

    Persons with a suprasacral spinal cord injury cannot empty their bladder voluntarily. Bladder emptying can be restored by intermittent electrical stimulation of the sacral nerve roots (SR) to cause bladder contraction. However, this therapy requires sensory nerve transection to prevent dyssynergic contraction of the external urethral sphincter (EUS). Stimulation of the compound pudendal nerve trunk (PN) activates spinal micturition circuitry, leading to a reflex bladder contraction without a reflex EUS contraction. The present study determined if PN stimulation could produce bladder emptying without nerve transection in cats anesthetized with α-chloralose. With all nerves intact, intermittent PN stimulation emptied the bladder (64 ± 14% of initial volume, n = 37 across six cats) more effectively than either distention-evoked micturition (40 ± 19%, p < 0.001, n = 27 across six cats) or bilateral intermittent SR stimulation (25 ± 23%, p < 0.005, n = 4 across two cats). After bilateral transection of the nerves innervating the urethral sphincter, intermittent SR stimulation voided 79 ± 17% (n = 12 across three cats), comparable to clinical results obtained with SR stimulation. Voiding via intermittent PN stimulation did not increase after neurotomy (p > 0.10), indicating that PN stimulation was not limited by bladder-sphincter dyssynergia. Intermittent PN stimulation holds promise for restoring bladder emptying following spinal injury without requiring nerve transection.

  3. Sex differences in drug abuse: Etiology, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Evans, Suzette M; Reynolds, Brady

    2015-08-01

    This special issue exemplifies one of the major goals of the current editor of Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology (Dr. Suzette Evans): to increase the number of manuscripts that emphasize females and address sex differences. Taken together, these articles represent a broad range of drug classes and approaches spanning preclinical research to treatment to better understand the role of sex differences in drug abuse. While not all studies found sex differences, we want to emphasize that finding no sex difference is just as important as confirming one, and should be reported in peer-reviewed journals. It is our intention and hope that this special issue will further advance scientific awareness about the importance of accounting for sex differences in the study of substance abuse. Participant sex is an essential variable to consider in developing a more comprehensive understanding of substance abuse. Rather than viewing investigating sex differences as burdensome, investigators should seize this opportune area ripe for innovative research that is long overdue.

  4. Randomized trial comparing mindfulness-based relapse prevention with relapse prevention for women offenders at a residential addiction treatment center.

    PubMed

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Warner, Kaitlin; Sully, Betsy; Barricks, Adria; Stauffer, Connie; Thompson, Brian L; Luoma, Jason B

    2014-04-01

    Reincarceration rates are high among substance-involved criminal offenders. This study (conducted during 2010-2011 in an urban area and funded by a Washington State University-Vancouver mini-grant) used a randomized design to examine the effectiveness of mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) as compared to relapse prevention (RP), as part of a residential addictions treatment program for women referred by the criminal-justice system (N = 105). At 15-week follow up, regression analyses found women in MBRP, compared to RP, reported significantly fewer drug use days and fewer legal and medical problems. Study limitations and future research directions for studying the efficacy of MBRP are discussed. PMID:24611849

  5. Neem components as potential agents for cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hao, Fang; Kumar, Sandeep; Yadav, Neelu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2014-08-01

    Azadirachta indica, also known as neem, is commonly found in many semi-tropical and tropical countries including India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. The components extracted from neem plant have been used in traditional medicine for the cure of multiple diseases including cancer for centuries. The extracts of seeds, leaves, flowers, and fruits of neem have consistently shown chemopreventive and antitumor effects in different types of cancer. Azadirachtin and nimbolide are among the few bioactive components in neem that have been studied extensively, but research on a great number of additional bioactive components is warranted. The key anticancer effects of neem components on malignant cells include inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of cell death, suppression of cancer angiogenesis, restoration of cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) balance, and enhancement of the host immune responses against tumor cells. While the underlying mechanisms of these effects are mostly unclear, the suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway is, at least partially, involved in the anticancer functions of neem components. Importantly, the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of neem components are tumor selective as the effects on normal cells are significantly weaker. In addition, neem extracts sensitize cancer cells to immunotherapy and radiotherapy, and enhance the efficacy of certain cancer chemotherapeutic agents. This review summarizes the current updates on the anticancer effects of neem components and their possible impact on managing cancer incidence and treatment. PMID:25016141

  6. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease: identification, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Levin, Johannes; Hasan, Alkomiet; Höglinger, Günter U

    2016-01-01

    Psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequent condition affecting >20 % of all PD patients. It is characterized by vivid dreams, nightmares, illusions, delusions and mostly visual hallucinations. Typically psychosis occurs in the late stage of PD, affecting up to 70 % of the patients following a disease duration of 20 years or more, and can severely interfere with the care of the patients, especially if the patients develop delusions. Psychosis is the principal cause of admission to a nursing home for PD patients. Hence, preemptive identification of risk factors, and avoidance and elimination of triggers are most important measures against psychosis in PD patients. Secondarily, pharmaceutical measures are being undertaken successively, including simplification of medication regimes, discontinuation of non-essential CNS-active drugs, ordered reduction of antiparkinsonian drugs, addition of cholesterinase inhibitors in cognitively impaired patients, and finally addition of antipsychotic medication with limited parkinsonian side effects. As psychosis in PD is a frequent and important problem, we set out to write a state-of-the-art guideline for its identification and treatment. PMID:25894288

  7. Neem components as potential agents for cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hao, Fang; Kumar, Sandeep; Yadav, Neelu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2014-08-01

    Azadirachta indica, also known as neem, is commonly found in many semi-tropical and tropical countries including India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. The components extracted from neem plant have been used in traditional medicine for the cure of multiple diseases including cancer for centuries. The extracts of seeds, leaves, flowers, and fruits of neem have consistently shown chemopreventive and antitumor effects in different types of cancer. Azadirachtin and nimbolide are among the few bioactive components in neem that have been studied extensively, but research on a great number of additional bioactive components is warranted. The key anticancer effects of neem components on malignant cells include inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of cell death, suppression of cancer angiogenesis, restoration of cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) balance, and enhancement of the host immune responses against tumor cells. While the underlying mechanisms of these effects are mostly unclear, the suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway is, at least partially, involved in the anticancer functions of neem components. Importantly, the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of neem components are tumor selective as the effects on normal cells are significantly weaker. In addition, neem extracts sensitize cancer cells to immunotherapy and radiotherapy, and enhance the efficacy of certain cancer chemotherapeutic agents. This review summarizes the current updates on the anticancer effects of neem components and their possible impact on managing cancer incidence and treatment.

  8. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease: identification, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Levin, Johannes; Hasan, Alkomiet; Höglinger, Günter U

    2016-01-01

    Psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequent condition affecting >20 % of all PD patients. It is characterized by vivid dreams, nightmares, illusions, delusions and mostly visual hallucinations. Typically psychosis occurs in the late stage of PD, affecting up to 70 % of the patients following a disease duration of 20 years or more, and can severely interfere with the care of the patients, especially if the patients develop delusions. Psychosis is the principal cause of admission to a nursing home for PD patients. Hence, preemptive identification of risk factors, and avoidance and elimination of triggers are most important measures against psychosis in PD patients. Secondarily, pharmaceutical measures are being undertaken successively, including simplification of medication regimes, discontinuation of non-essential CNS-active drugs, ordered reduction of antiparkinsonian drugs, addition of cholesterinase inhibitors in cognitively impaired patients, and finally addition of antipsychotic medication with limited parkinsonian side effects. As psychosis in PD is a frequent and important problem, we set out to write a state-of-the-art guideline for its identification and treatment.

  9. Hemodialysis Catheter Heat Transfer for Biofilm Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ian P; Sturtevant, Rachael; Heung, Michael; Solomon, Michael J; Younger, John G; VanEpps, J Scott

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are not easily treated, and many catheters (e.g., hemodialysis catheters) are not easily replaced. Biofilms (the source of infection) on catheter surfaces are notoriously difficult to eradicate. We have recently demonstrated that modest elevations of temperature lead to increased staphylococcal susceptibility to vancomycin and significantly soften the biofilm matrix. In this study, using a combination of microbiological, computational, and experimental studies, we demonstrate the efficacy, feasibility, and safety of using heat as an adjuvant treatment for infected hemodialysis catheters. Specifically, we show that treating with heat in the presence of antibiotics led to additive killing of Staphylococcus epidermidis with similar trends seen for Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The magnitude of temperature elevation required is relatively modest (45-50°C) and similar to that used as an adjuvant to traditional cancer therapy. Using a custom-designed benchtop model of a hemodialysis catheter, positioned with tip in the human vena cava as well as computational fluid dynamic simulations, we demonstrate that these temperature elevations are likely achievable in situ with minimal increased in overall blood temperature.

  10. Crocin treatment prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Razmaraii, Nasser; Babaei, Hossein; Mohajjel Nayebi, Alireza; Assadnassab, Gholamreza; Ashrafi Helan, Javad; Azarmi, Yadollah

    2016-07-15

    Doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity is well-known as a serious complication of chemotherapy in patients with cancer. It is unknown whether crocin (CRO), main component of Crocus sativus L. (Saffron), could reduce the severity of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Therefore, this study was undertaken to assess the protective impact of CRO on DOX-induced cardiotoxicity in rats. The rats were divided into four groups: control, DOX (2mg/kg/48h, for 12days), and CRO groups that receiving DOX as in group 2 and CRO (20 and 40mg/kg/24h, for 20days) starting 4days prior to first DOX injection and throughout the study. Echocardiographic, electrocardiographic and hemodynamic studies, along with histopathological examination and MTT test were carried out. Our findings demonstrate that DOX resulted in cardiotoxicity manifested by decreased the left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic pressures, rate of rise/drop of LV pressure, ejection fraction, fractional shortening and contractility index, as compared to control group. In addition, histopathological analysis of heart confirmed adverse structural changes in myocardial cells following DOX administration. The results also showed that CRO treatment significantly improved DOX-induced heart damage, structural changes in the myocardium and ventricular function. In addition, CRO did not affect the in vitro antitumor activity of DOX. Taken together, our data confirm that CRO is protective against cardiovascular-related disorders produced by DOX, and clinical studies are needed to examine these findings in human. PMID:27297631

  11. Hemodialysis Catheter Heat Transfer for Biofilm Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ian P; Sturtevant, Rachael; Heung, Michael; Solomon, Michael J; Younger, John G; VanEpps, J Scott

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are not easily treated, and many catheters (e.g., hemodialysis catheters) are not easily replaced. Biofilms (the source of infection) on catheter surfaces are notoriously difficult to eradicate. We have recently demonstrated that modest elevations of temperature lead to increased staphylococcal susceptibility to vancomycin and significantly soften the biofilm matrix. In this study, using a combination of microbiological, computational, and experimental studies, we demonstrate the efficacy, feasibility, and safety of using heat as an adjuvant treatment for infected hemodialysis catheters. Specifically, we show that treating with heat in the presence of antibiotics led to additive killing of Staphylococcus epidermidis with similar trends seen for Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The magnitude of temperature elevation required is relatively modest (45-50°C) and similar to that used as an adjuvant to traditional cancer therapy. Using a custom-designed benchtop model of a hemodialysis catheter, positioned with tip in the human vena cava as well as computational fluid dynamic simulations, we demonstrate that these temperature elevations are likely achievable in situ with minimal increased in overall blood temperature. PMID:26501916

  12. Cancer treatment-related cardiac toxicity: prevention, assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Fanous, Ibrahim; Dillon, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Cancer therapies, especially anthracyclines and monoclonal antibodies, have been linked with increased rates of cardiotoxicity. The development of some cardiac side effects happens over several months, and changes in ejection fraction can be detected long before permanent damage or disability occurs. Advanced heart failure could be averted with better and earlier detection. Methodologies for early detection of cardiac changes include stress echocardiograms, cardiac velocity measurements, radionuclide imaging, cardiac MRI and several potential biomarkers. Many agents have been described for prophylaxis of cardiac events precipitated by cancer therapy. Prophylactic use of beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors may be considered for use with trastuzumab in breast cancer as tolerated. Recovery of cardiac function is possible early after the injury from a cancer therapy. Late complications for coronary artery disease, hypertension and arrhythmia are underappreciated. Treatments for severe cancer therapy-related cardiac complications follow the existing paradigms for congestive heart failure and coronary artery disease, although outcomes for cancer patients differ from outcomes for non-cancer patients. PMID:27372782

  13. Neem components as potential agents for cancer prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Fang; Kumar, Sandeep; Yadav, Neelu; Chandra, Dhyan

    2016-01-01

    Azadirachta indica, also known as neem, is commonly found in many semi-tropical and tropical countries including India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. The components extracted from neem plant have been used in traditional medicine for the cure of multiple diseases including cancer for centuries. The extracts of seeds, leaves, flowers, and fruits of neem have consistently shown chemopreventive and antitumor effects in different types of cancer. Azadirachtin and nimbolide are among the few bioactive components in neem that have been studied extensively, but research on a great number of additional bioactive components is warranted. The key anticancer effects of neem components on malignant cells include inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of cell death, suppression of cancer angiogenesis, restoration of cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) balance, and enhancement of the host immune responses against tumor cells. While the underlying mechanisms of these effects are mostly unclear, the suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway is, at least partially, involved in the anticancer functions of neem components. Importantly, the anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects of neem components are tumor selective as the effects on normal cells are significantly weaker. In addition, neem extracts sensitize cancer cells to immunotherapy and radiotherapy, and enhance the efficacy of certain cancer chemotherapeutic agents. This review summarizes the current updates on the anticancer effects of neem components and their possible impact on managing cancer incidence and treatment. PMID:25016141

  14. The multifaceted role of curcumin in cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Muthu K; Rane, Grishma; Kanchi, Madhu Mathi; Arfuso, Frank; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M E; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Tan, Benny K H; Kumar, Alan Prem; Sethi, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant advances in treatment modalities over the last decade, neither the incidence of the disease nor the mortality due to cancer has altered in the last thirty years. Available anti-cancer drugs exhibit limited efficacy, associated with severe side effects, and are also expensive. Thus identification of pharmacological agents that do not have these disadvantages is required. Curcumin, a polyphenolic compound derived from turmeric (Curcumin longa), is one such agent that has been extensively studied over the last three to four decades for its potential anti-inflammatory and/or anti-cancer effects. Curcumin has been found to suppress initiation, progression, and metastasis of a variety of tumors. These anti-cancer effects are predominantly mediated through its negative regulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, inflammatory cytokines, protein kinases, and other oncogenic molecules. It also abrogates proliferation of cancer cells by arresting them at different phases of the cell cycle and/or by inducing their apoptosis. The current review focuses on the diverse molecular targets modulated by curcumin that contribute to its efficacy against various human cancers.

  15. Sex differences in drug abuse: Etiology, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Evans, Suzette M; Reynolds, Brady

    2015-08-01

    This special issue exemplifies one of the major goals of the current editor of Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology (Dr. Suzette Evans): to increase the number of manuscripts that emphasize females and address sex differences. Taken together, these articles represent a broad range of drug classes and approaches spanning preclinical research to treatment to better understand the role of sex differences in drug abuse. While not all studies found sex differences, we want to emphasize that finding no sex difference is just as important as confirming one, and should be reported in peer-reviewed journals. It is our intention and hope that this special issue will further advance scientific awareness about the importance of accounting for sex differences in the study of substance abuse. Participant sex is an essential variable to consider in developing a more comprehensive understanding of substance abuse. Rather than viewing investigating sex differences as burdensome, investigators should seize this opportune area ripe for innovative research that is long overdue. PMID:26237316

  16. Stress-induced structural remodeling in hippocampus: Prevention by lithium treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Gwendolyn E.; Young, L. Trevor; Reagan, Lawrence P.; Chen, Biao; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2004-03-01

    Chronic restraint stress, psychosocial stress, as well as systemic or oral administration of the stress-hormone corticosterone induces a morphological reorganization in the rat hippocampus, in which adrenal steroids and excitatory amino acids mediate a reversible remodeling of apical dendrites on CA3 pyramidal cell neurons of the hippocampus. This stress-induced neuronal remodeling is accompanied also by behavioral changes, some of which can be prevented with selective antidepressant and anticonvulsive drug treatments. Lithium is an effective treatment for mood disorders and has neuroprotective effects, which may contribute to its therapeutic properties. Thus, we wanted to determine whether lithium treatment could prevent the effects of chronic stress on CA3 pyramidal cell neuroarchitecture and the associated molecular and behavioral measures. Chronic lithium treatment prevented the stress-induced decrease in dendritic length, as well as the stress-induced increase in glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) mRNA expression and the phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding in the hippocampus. Lithium treatment, however, did not prevent stress effects on behavior in the open field or the plus-maze. These data demonstrate that chronic treatment with lithium can protect the hippocampus from potentially deleterious effects of chronic stress on glutamatergic activation, which may be relevant to its therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder.

  17. Viruses and disease: emerging concepts for prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Herrington, C S; Coates, P J; Duprex, W P

    2015-01-01

    Viruses cause a wide range of human diseases, ranging from acute self-resolving conditions to acute fatal diseases. Effects that arise long after the primary infection can also increase the propensity for chronic conditions or lead to the development of cancer. Recent advances in the fields of virology and pathology have been fundamental in improving our understanding of viral pathogenesis, in providing improved vaccination strategies and in developing newer, more effective treatments for patients worldwide. The reviews assembled here focus on the interface between virology and pathology and encompass aspects of both the clinical pathology of viral disease and the underlying disease mechanisms. Articles on emerging diseases caused by Ebola virus, Marburg virus, coronaviruses such as SARS and MERS, Nipah virus and noroviruses are followed by reviews of enteroviruses, HIV infection, measles, mumps, human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV). The issue concludes with a series of articles reviewing the relationship between viruses and cancer, including the role played by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of lymphoma and carcinoma; how human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are involved in the development of skin cancer; the involvement of hepatitis B virus infection in hepatocellular carcinoma; and the mechanisms by which Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) leads to Kaposi's sarcoma. We hope that this collection of articles will be of interest to a wide range of scientists and clinicians at a time when there is a renaissance in the appreciation of the power of pathology as virologists dissect the processes of disease.

  18. Insights from a national survey into why substance abuse treatment units add prevention and outreach services

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Rebecca; Lemak, Christy Harris; D'Aunno, Thomas A

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found that even limited prevention-related interventions can affect health behaviors such as substance use and risky sex. Substance abuse treatment providers are ideal candidates to provide these services, but typically have little or no financial incentive to do so. The purpose of this study was therefore to explore why some substance abuse treatment units have added new prevention and outreach services. Based on an ecological framework of organizational strategy, three categories of predictors were tested: (1) environmental, (2) unit-level, and (3) unit leadership. Results A lagged cross-sectional logistic model of 450 outpatient substance abuse treatment units revealed that local per capita income, mental health center affiliation, and clinical supervisors' graduate degrees were positively associated with likelihood of adding prevention-related education and outreach services. Managed care contracts and methadone treatment were negatively associated with addition of these services. No hospital-affiliated agencies added prevention and outreach services during the study period. Conclusion Findings supported the study's ecological perspective on organizational strategy, with factors at environmental, unit, and unit leadership levels associated with additions of prevention and outreach services. Among the significant predictors, ties to managed care payers and unit leadership graduate education emerge as potential leverage points for public policy. In the current sample, units with managed care contracts were less likely to add prevention and outreach services. This is not surprising, given managed care's emphasis on cost control. However, the association with this payment source suggests that public managed care programs might affects prevention and outreach differently through revised incentives. Specifically, government payers could explicitly compensate substance abuse treatment units in managed care contracts for prevention and

  19. Bleeding from peristomal varices: perspectives on prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Fucini, C; Wolff, B G; Dozois, R R

    1991-12-01

    Peristomal variceal bleeding is a serious complication in patients with chronic liver disease undergoing colon surgery with a stoma. Our aim was to examine the morbidity of bleeding for peristomal, perianastomotic, and esophageal varices in a group of patients with chronic liver disease who underwent colectomy at the Mayo Clinic between 1970 and 1988. Morbidity was evaluated in terms of the number of major bleeding episodes and the number of units of blood transfused. The treatment of bleeding was also evaluated. One hundred seventeen patients (74 males and 43 females) aged 11-78 years were studied. Sixty-two patients (53 percent) had a permanent stoma, while 55 patients (47 percent) had a colonic resection and anastomosis. Sixty-seven patients (62 percent) had chronic ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. In the stoma group, bleeding appeared from stomal and/or esophageal varices in 19 patients (31 percent), while, in the non-stoma group, bleeding exclusively from the esophageal varices occurred in eight patients (15 percent). Perianastomotic variceal bleeding was never observed. The 5-year cumulative probabilities of one major bleed occurring from gastrointestinal varices appeared to be similar between the two groups. Patients who bled from peristomal varices with or without esophageal bleeding (n = 17) rebled more frequently (6.5 +/- 5.5 vs. 3 +/- 1.6; P less than 0.05) and were transfused more often (14.9 +/- 12.3 vs. 7.5 +/- 4.1; P less than 0.05) than patients who bled exclusively from esophageal varices (n = 10). No difference was found in the incidence of recurrent bleeding and the number of units of blood transfused between patients who bled exclusively from peristomal varices (n = 10) and those who bled from both peristomal and esophageal varices (n = 7). Medical and local measures were more effective in controlling esophageal bleeding than in controlling peristomal bleeding. Therefore, patients with chronic liver disease who must undergo

  20. [Evidence-based renal replacement therapy--intermittent versus CRRT].

    PubMed

    Jörres, Achim

    2013-03-01

    Continuous and intermittent renal replacement procedures are equally adequate therapies for acute kidney injury. The choice of modality should be made individually and on the basis of the specific clinical situation which may include switching between modalities during the course of treatment. In patients with haemodynamic instability or at risk of disequilibrium and cerebral edema CRRT or prolonged intermittent treatment may offer advantages whilst IHD should be preferred for the acute treatment of life-threatening electrolyte abnormalities or metabolic acidosis. Overall, the different modalities should be viewed as complementary.

  1. Relative Efficacy of Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention, Standard Relapse Prevention, and Treatment as Usual for Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Sarah; Witkiewitz, Katie; Clifasefi, Seema L.; Grow, Joel; Chawla, Neharika; Hsu, Sharon H.; Carroll, Haley A.; Harrop, Erin; Collins, Susan E.; Lustyk, M. Kathleen; Larimer, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Relapse is highly prevalent following substance abuse treatments, highlighting the need for improved aftercare interventions. Mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP), a group-based psychosocial aftercare, integrates evidence-based practices from mindfulness-based interventions and cognitive-behavioral relapse prevention (RP) approaches. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the long-term efficacy of MBRP in reducing relapse compared with RP and treatment as usual (TAU [12-step programming and psychoeducation]) during a 12-month follow-up period. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Between October 2009 and July 2012, a total of 286 eligible individuals who successfully completed initial treatment for substance use disorders at a private, nonprofit treatment facility were randomized to MBRP, RP, or TAU aftercare and monitored for 12 months. Participants medically cleared for continuing care were aged 18 to 70 years; 71.5% were male and 42.1% were of ethnic/racial minority. INTERVENTIONS Participants were randomly assigned to 8 weekly group sessions of MBRP, cognitive-behavioral RP, or TAU. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcomes included relapse to drug use and heavy drinking as well as frequency of substance use in the past 90 days. Variables were assessed at baseline and at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up points. Measures used included self-report of relapse and urinalysis drug and alcohol screenings. RESULTS Compared with TAU, participants assigned to MBRP and RP reported significantly lower risk of relapse to substance use and heavy drinking and, among those who used substances, significantly fewer days of substance use and heavy drinking at the 6-month follow-up. Cognitive-behavioral RP showed an advantage over MBRP in time to first drug use. At the 12-month follow-up, MBRP participants reported significantly fewer days of substance use and significantly decreased heavy drinking compared with RP and TAU. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE For individuals in aftercare

  2. Coordinated Technology-Delivered Treatment to Prevent Rehospitalization in Schizophrenia: A Novel Model of Care.

    PubMed

    Brunette, Mary F; Rotondi, Armando J; Ben-Zeev, Dror; Gottlieb, Jennifer D; Mueser, Kim T; Robinson, Delbert G; Achtyes, Eric D; Gingerich, Susan; Marcy, Patricia; Schooler, Nina R; Meyer-Kalos, Piper; Kane, John M

    2016-04-01

    Despite advances in schizophrenia treatment, symptom relapses and rehospitalizations impede recovery for many people and are a principal driver of the high cost of care. Technology-delivered or technology-enhanced treatment may be a cost-effective way to provide flexible, personalized evidence-based treatments directly to people in their homes and communities. However, evidence for the safety, acceptability, and efficacy of such interventions is only now being established. The authors of this Open Forum describe a novel, technology-based approach to prevent relapse after a hospitalization for psychosis, the Health Technology Program (HTP), which they developed. HTP provides in-person relapse prevention planning that directs use of tailored, technology-based treatment based on cognitive-behavioral therapy for psychosis, family psychoeducation for schizophrenia, and prescriber decision support through a Web-based program that solicits information from clients at every visit. Technology-based treatments are delivered through smartphones and computers.

  3. Coordinated Technology-Delivered Treatment to Prevent Rehospitalization in Schizophrenia: A Novel Model of Care.

    PubMed

    Brunette, Mary F; Rotondi, Armando J; Ben-Zeev, Dror; Gottlieb, Jennifer D; Mueser, Kim T; Robinson, Delbert G; Achtyes, Eric D; Gingerich, Susan; Marcy, Patricia; Schooler, Nina R; Meyer-Kalos, Piper; Kane, John M

    2016-04-01

    Despite advances in schizophrenia treatment, symptom relapses and rehospitalizations impede recovery for many people and are a principal driver of the high cost of care. Technology-delivered or technology-enhanced treatment may be a cost-effective way to provide flexible, personalized evidence-based treatments directly to people in their homes and communities. However, evidence for the safety, acceptability, and efficacy of such interventions is only now being established. The authors of this Open Forum describe a novel, technology-based approach to prevent relapse after a hospitalization for psychosis, the Health Technology Program (HTP), which they developed. HTP provides in-person relapse prevention planning that directs use of tailored, technology-based treatment based on cognitive-behavioral therapy for psychosis, family psychoeducation for schizophrenia, and prescriber decision support through a Web-based program that solicits information from clients at every visit. Technology-based treatments are delivered through smartphones and computers. PMID:26725297

  4. Executive Summary: Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  5. Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  6. Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  7. Executive Summary: Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  8. Articulating A Rights-Based Approach to HIV Treatment and Prevention Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Barr, David; Amon, Joseph J; Clayton, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Since the beginning of the epidemic, the protection of human rights has been an integral component in the response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). The high degree of stigma and discrimination associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has made human rights protection not only a priority to ensure the rights of people living with and at-risk for HIV, but to address public health goals as well. Advances in understanding the impact of antiretroviral treatment on HIV prevention provide exciting opportunities and even a paradigm shift in terms of AIDS prevention. However, this potential cannot be reached unless the advancement of human rights is a primary component of treatment and prevention programme and policy development. The use of antiretroviral treatment as prevention reinforces the value of basic principles related to the dignity and agency of people living with HIV to participate in the design and implementation of programmes, to be informed and to make informed decisions about their health and lives, to be protected from harm, and to have opportunities to seek redress and accountability for abuses. The possibility of using HIV treatment as a prevention tool means that now, more than ever, legal reform and community empowerment and mobilisation are necessary to realize the rights and health of people affected by HIV. PMID:21999775

  9. HIV/Hepatitis Prevention in Drug Abuse Treatment Programs: Guidance From Research

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, James L.; Masson, Carmen L.; Perlman, David C.

    2002-01-01

    A large body of research examines the relationship between HIV and drug dependence, but considerably less information is available on viral hepatitis and drug dependence. This article summarizes research indicating what drug abuse treatment programs can do to prevent their patients from acquiring HIV or hepatitis infection and to limit the consequences for patients who are already infected. Drug treatment programs can play a pivotal role in preventing, detecting, and treating HIV and hepatitis. Some activities can be accomplished by providers’ simply becoming aware of the issues; others will require significant infusion of leadership, education, and fiscal support. PMID:18567957

  10. [Physical exercise and yoga in prevention and treatment of addictive diseases].

    PubMed

    Nespor, K

    2005-01-01

    Prevention of addictive diseases should be complex and systematic and it should include training of social skills, decision-making skills, family intervention, etc. Similarly, effective treatment is usually long-term, systematic and complex. Physical exercise and yoga can be useful components of comprehensive prevention and treatment programmes. On the other hand, competitive professional sport rather increases the number of risk factors for substance-related problems. Practical experience with the use of yoga in substance dependent patients and pathological gambles are mentioned. One of the advantages of yoga is the integration of physical exercise and relaxation.

  11. Scaling up HIV treatment and prevention through national responses and innovative leadership.

    PubMed

    Kanki, Phyllis; Kakkattil, Pradeep; Simao, Mariangela

    2012-08-01

    Over the past decade, there has been an unprecedented global response to the AIDS epidemic. This infusion of new funding has led to a rapid scale-up of HIV treatment and prevention and consequently has saved millions of lives and transformed communities around the world. However, as clearly demonstrated by a review of national responses, successes have been due in large part to strong and innovative leadership from governments, the private sector, and nongovernmental organizations. Examples from Brazil, Botswana, Nigeria, Uganda, and India illustrate the vital role played by bold and collaborative leadership in the global and local scale-up of HIV prevention and treatment.

  12. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of frostbite: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott E; Opacic, Matthew; Freer, Luanne; Grissom, Colin K; Auerbach, Paul S; Rodway, George W; Cochran, Amalia; Giesbrecht, Gordon G; McDevitt, Marion; Imray, Christopher H; Johnson, Eric L; Dow, Jennifer; Hackett, Peter H

    2014-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop a set of evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of frostbite. We present a review of pertinent pathophysiology. We then discuss primary and secondary prevention measures and therapeutic management. Recommendations are made regarding each treatment and its role in management. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each modality according to methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original guidelines published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2011;22(2):156-166.

  13. Dyslipidemia Induced by Drugs Used for the Prevention and Treatment of Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Athyros, Vasilios G; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2011-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major vascular risk factor. Interestingly, several agents used for the prevention and treatment of vascular diseases have an adverse effect on the lipid profile. In addition, agents belonging to the same class (e.g. beta blockers) can have significantly different actions on lipid levels. We summarize the effects of drugs used for the prevention and treatment of vascular diseases on the lipid profile. These effects should be considered when selecting a specific agent, particularly in high-risk patients. PMID:21769302

  14. Prevention and Treatment of White Spot Lesions During and After Treatment with Fixed Orthodontic Appliances: a Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lopatiene, Kristina; Lapenaite, Egle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of the systematic literature review is to update the evidence for the prevention of white spot lesions, using materials containing fluoride and/or casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate during and after treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Material and Methods Information search for controlled studies on humans published between January 2008 and February 2016 was performed in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Embase, The Cochrane Library. Inclusion criteria were: the English language, study on humans, patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances, randomized or quasi-randomized controlled clinical studies fluoride-containing product or casein derivates used throughout the appliance therapy or straightaway after debonding. Results 326 articles were reviewed (Embase 141, PubMed 129, ScienceDirect 41, Cochrane 15). Twelve clinical studies fulfilled all inclusion criteria. Use of fluoridated toothpaste had a remineralizing effect on white spot lesions (WSLs) (P < 0.05); fluoride varnish and casein supplements were effective in prevention and early treatment of WSLs (P < 0.05). Conclusions Early detection of white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment would allow implementing preventive measures to control the demineralization process before lesions progress. The systemic review has showed that the usage of fluoride and casein supplements in ameliorating white spot lesions during and after fixed orthodontic treatment is significantly effective. However the use of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate can be more beneficial than fluoride rinse in the reduction of demineralization spots. PMID:27489605

  15. Clinical review: Early treatment of acute lung injury - paradigm shift toward prevention and treatment prior to respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Despite improved understanding of the pathogenesis of ALI, supportive care with a lung protective strategy of mechanical ventilation remains the only treatment with a proven survival advantage. Most clinical trials in ALI have targeted mechanically ventilated patients. Past trials of pharmacologic agents may have failed to demonstrate efficacy in part due to the resultant delay in initiation of therapy until several days after the onset of lung injury. Improved early identification of at-risk patients provides new opportunities for risk factor modification to prevent the development of ALI and novel patient groups to target for early treatment of ALI before progression to the need for mechanical ventilation. This review will discuss current strategies that target prevention of ALI and some of the most promising pharmacologic agents for early treatment of ALI prior to the onset of respiratory failure that requires mechanical ventilation. PMID:22713281

  16. Challenges to Cabin Humidity Removal Presented by Intermittent Condensing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonJouanne, Roger G.; Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    On-orbit temperature and humidity control (THC) is more easily accomplished when the THC hardware is either consistently dry (i.e., no humidity control is occurring), or consistently wet. The system is especially challenged when intermittent wet/dry conditions occur. The first six years of on-orbit ISS operations have revealed specific concerns within the THC system, specifically in the condensing heat exchanger and the downstream air/water separator. Failed or degraded hardware has been returned to ground and investigated. This paper presents the investigation findings, and the recommended hardware and procedural revisions to prevent and recover from the effects of intermittent condensing conditions.

  17. Episodic and chronic migraine headache: breaking down barriers to optimal treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Lipton, Richard B; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2015-03-01

    Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder that affects an estimated 36 million Americans. Migraine headaches often occur over many years or over an individual's lifetime. By definition, episodic migraine is characterized by headaches that occur on fewer than 15 days per month. According to the recent International Classification of Headache Disorders (third revision) beta diagnostic criteria, chronic migraine is defined as "headaches on at least 15 days per month for at least 3 months, with the features of migraine on at least 8 days per month." However, diagnostic criteria distinguishing episodic from chronic migraine continue to evolve. Persons with episodic migraine can remit, not change, or progress to high-frequency episodic or chronic migraine over time. Chronic migraine is associated with a substantially greater personal and societal burden, more frequent comorbidities, and possibly with persistent and progressive brain abnormalities. Many patients are poorly responsive to, or noncompliant with, conventional preventive therapies. The primary goals of migraine treatment include relieving pain, restoring function, and reducing headache frequency; an additional goal may be preventing progression to chronic migraine. Although all migraineurs require abortive treatment, and all patients with chronic migraine require preventive treatment, there are no definitive guidelines delineating which persons with episodic migraine would benefit from preventive therapy. Five US Food and Drug Association strategies are approved for preventing episodic migraine, but only injections with onabotulinumtoxinA are approved for preventing chronic migraine. Identifying persons who require migraine prophylaxis and selecting and initiating the most appropriate treatment strategy may prevent progression from episodic to chronic migraine and alleviate the pain and suffering associated with frequent migraine.

  18. Scar prevention and remodeling: a review of the medical, surgical, topical and light treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Leonard Y; El Tal, Abdel Kader; Stiff, Mark A; Fakhouri, Tarek M

    2014-08-01

    Cosmetic, functional, and structural sequelae of scarring are innumerable, and measures exist to optimize and ultimately minimize these sequelae. To evaluate the innumerable methods available to decrease the cosmetic, functional, and structural repercussions of scarring, pubMed search of the English literature with key words scar, scar revision, scar prevention, scar treatment, scar remodeling, cicatrix, cicatrix treatment, and cicatrix remodeling was done. Original articles and reviews were examined and included. Seventy-nine manuscripts were reviewed. Techniques, comparisons, and results were reviewed and tabulated. Overall, though topical modalities are easier to use and are usually more attractive to the patient, the surgical approaches still prove to be superior and more reliable. However, advances in topical medications for scar modification are on the rise and a change towards medical treatment of scars may emerge as the next best approach. Comparison studies of the innumerable specific modalities for scar revision and prevention are impossible. Standardization of techniques is lacking. Scarring, the body's natural response to a wound, can create many adverse effects. At this point, the practice of sound, surgical fundamentals still trump the most advanced preventative methods and revision techniques. Advances in medical approaches are available, however, to assist the scarring process, which even the most advanced surgical fundamentals will ultimately lead to. Whether through newer topical therapies, light treatment, or classical surgical intervention, our treatment armamentarium of scars has expanded and will allow us to maximize scar prevention and to minimize scar morbidity.

  19. Prevention and Treatment of Respiratory Consequences Induced by Sulfur Mustard in Iranian Casualties

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed M.; Salamati, Payman; Harandi, Ali Amini; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Background: About 100,000 Iranian have been exposed to chemical weapons during Iraq-Iran conflict (1980-88). After being spent of more than two decades, still about 30,000 of them are under follow-up treatment. The main aim of this study was to review various preventive and therapeutic methods for injured patients with sulfur mustard in different phases. Methods: For gathering information, we have used the electronic databases including Scopus, Medline, ISI, IranMedex, Irandoc sites. According to this search strategy, 104 published articles associated to respiratory problems and among them 50 articles related to prevention and treatment of respiratory problems were found and reviewed. Results: There is not any curative treatment for sulfur mustard induced lung injuries, but some valuable experienced measures for prevention and palliative treatments are available. Some useful measures in acute phase include: Symptomatic management, oxygen supplementation, tracheostomy in laryngospasm, use of moist air, respiratory physical therapy, mucolytic agents and bronchodilators. In the chronic phases, these measures include: Periodic clinical examinations, administration of inhaled corticosteroids alone or with long-acting beta 2 agonists, use of antioxidants, magnesium ions, long term oxygen supplement, therapeutic bronchoscopy, laser therapy, and use of respiratory tract stents. Conclusions: Most treatments are symptomatic but using preventive points immediately after exposure could improve following outcomes. PMID:23671768

  20. Scar prevention and remodeling: a review of the medical, surgical, topical and light treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Leonard Y; El Tal, Abdel Kader; Stiff, Mark A; Fakhouri, Tarek M

    2014-08-01

    Cosmetic, functional, and structural sequelae of scarring are innumerable, and measures exist to optimize and ultimately minimize these sequelae. To evaluate the innumerable methods available to decrease the cosmetic, functional, and structural repercussions of scarring, pubMed search of the English literature with key words scar, scar revision, scar prevention, scar treatment, scar remodeling, cicatrix, cicatrix treatment, and cicatrix remodeling was done. Original articles and reviews were examined and included. Seventy-nine manuscripts were reviewed. Techniques, comparisons, and results were reviewed and tabulated. Overall, though topical modalities are easier to use and are usually more attractive to the patient, the surgical approaches still prove to be superior and more reliable. However, advances in topical medications for scar modification are on the rise and a change towards medical treatment of scars may emerge as the next best approach. Comparison studies of the innumerable specific modalities for scar revision and prevention are impossible. Standardization of techniques is lacking. Scarring, the body's natural response to a wound, can create many adverse effects. At this point, the practice of sound, surgical fundamentals still trump the most advanced preventative methods and revision techniques. Advances in medical approaches are available, however, to assist the scarring process, which even the most advanced surgical fundamentals will ultimately lead to. Whether through newer topical therapies, light treatment, or classical surgical intervention, our treatment armamentarium of scars has expanded and will allow us to maximize scar prevention and to minimize scar morbidity. PMID:24697346

  1. Early treatment of an ectopic premolar to prevent molar-premolar transposition.

    PubMed

    Cannavale, Rosangela; Matarese, Giovanni; Isola, Gaetano; Grassia, Vincenzo; Perillo, Letizia

    2013-04-01

    Orthodontic treatment is planned on an individual, case-by-case basis after thoroughly considering the patient's overall facial and dental characteristics, the expected duration of treatment, costs, patient preferences, and the orthodontist's experience. This article reports the treatment of a patient with a maxillary premolar-molar transposition in the permanent dentition that was successfully managed with orthodontic treatment. A girl, aged 10 years 2 months, came for treatment with an ectopic maxillary left premolar. Radiographic analysis indicated a developing complete transposition of the maxillary left premolar. The patient was treated with extraction of the deciduous molar and surgical exposure and ligation of the premolar. Eruption was properly guided, and the correct order of the 2 teeth was restored in the arch. This challenging treatment approach is described in detail, including the mechanics used to align the ectopic premolar. Early treatment can, in many cases, prevent a molar-premolar transposition.

  2. Mindfulness-based treatment to prevent addictive behavior relapse: theoretical models and hypothesized mechanisms of change.

    PubMed

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Bowen, Sarah; Harrop, Erin N; Douglas, Haley; Enkema, Matthew; Sedgwick, Carly

    2014-04-01

    Mindfulness-based treatments are growing in popularity among addiction treatment providers, and several studies suggest the efficacy of incorporating mindfulness practices into the treatment of addiction, including the treatment of substance use disorders and behavioral addictions (i.e., gambling). The current paper provides a review of theoretical models of mindfulness in the treatment of addiction and several hypothesized mechanisms of change. We provide an overview of mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP), including session content, treatment targets, and client feedback from participants who have received MBRP in the context of empirical studies. Future research directions regarding operationalization and measurement, identifying factors that moderate treatment effects, and protocol adaptations for specific populations are discussed.

  3. Preventing infections during cancer treatment: development of an interactive patient education website.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Angela; Tai, Eric; Nielsen, Danielle Beauchesne; Shropshire, Sonya; Richardson, Lisa C

    2014-08-01

    Despite advances in oncology care, infections from both community and healthcare settings remain a major cause of hospitalization and death among patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Neutropenia (low white blood cell count) is a common and potentially dangerous side effect in patients receiving chemotherapy treatments and may lead to higher risk of infection. Preventing infection during treatment can result in significant decreases in morbidity and mortality for patients with cancer. As part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients public health campaign, a public-private partnership was formed between the CDC Foundation and Amgen, Inc. The CDC's Division of Cancer Prevention and Control developed and launched an interactive website, www.PreventCancerInfections.org, designed for patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. The site encourages patients to complete a risk assessment for developing neutropenia during their treatment. After completing the assessment, patients receive information about how to lower the risk for infection and keep themselves healthy while receiving chemotherapy.

  4. Probiotic lactic acid bacteria and their potential in the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wróblewska, Paula; Adamczuk, Piotr; Silny, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Allergy is one of the most important and very common health problems worldwide. To reduce the proportion of people suffering from allergy, alternative methods of prevention and treatment are sought. The aim of this paper is to present the possibilities of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases. Probiotics are live microorganisms belonging mainly to the lactic acid bacteria. They modify the microflora of the human digestive system, especially the intestinal microflora. Prophylactic administration of probiotics in the early stages of life (naturally in breast milk or milk substitute synthetic compounds) is very important because intestinal microflora plays a huge role in the development of the immune system. Prevention of allergies as early as in the prenatal and postnatal periods provides huge opportunities for inhibiting the growing problem of allergy in emerging and highly developed societies. Effects of probiotic therapy depend on many factors such as the species of the microorganism used, the dose size and characteristics of the bacteria such as viability and capacity of adhesion to the intestinal walls. Authors of several studies showed beneficial effects of probiotics in the perinatal period, infancy, and also in adults in the prevention of atopic dermatitis or allergic rhinitis. Probiotics, due to their immunomodulatory properties and safety of use are a good, natural alternative for the prevention and treatment of many diseases including allergies. It is therefore important to explore the knowledge about their use and to carry out further clinical trials. PMID:26155109

  5. The use of prebiotics during the first year of life for atopy prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, Priscilla Negrão; Rosário Filho, Nelson Augusto

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of allergic diseases has increased in recent decades. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to assess the efficacy of prebiotics for the prevention and treatment of allergic manifestations in children. We sought to conduct a systematic review of the effectiveness of prebiotics in the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases in children. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, LILACS, SciELO, IBECS, Web of Science and Clinical Trials databases as well as Google Scholar and the references of the articles identified. Randomised clinical trials, in which one of the treatments was performed with prebiotics and the control group was treated with placebo, were included in the review. The data selection were performed by two reviewers, and the study quality was evaluated according to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) items, according to the recommendations for improving the quality of reports of randomised clinical trials. The selected studies showed heterogeneity with regard to the participants, albeit with similar outcomes. The treatment group size ranged from 134 to 259 children, and the studies compared prebiotic to placebo treatment in each group. In general, these articles showed a trend toward less allergic reactions in the groups receiving active therapy with prebiotics. Although there was a trend for reduced allergic symptoms following the administration of prebiotics, there was not sufficient evidence to establish that such treatment is effective for the prevention of allergies in children. PMID:25400918

  6. Therapeutics Role of Azadirachta indica (Neem) and Their Active Constituents in Diseases Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Alzohairy, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica) is a member of the Meliaceae family and its role as health-promoting effect is attributed because it is rich source of antioxidant. It has been widely used in Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Unani medicines worldwide especially in Indian Subcontinent in the treatment and prevention of various diseases. Earlier finding confirmed that neem and its constituents play role in the scavenging of free radical generation and prevention of disease pathogenesis. The studies based on animal model established that neem and its chief constituents play pivotal role in anticancer management through the modulation of various molecular pathways including p53, pTEN, NF-κB, PI3K/Akt, Bcl-2, and VEGF. It is considered as safe medicinal plants and modulates the numerous biological processes without any adverse effect. In this review, I summarize the role of Azadirachta indica in the prevention and treatment of diseases via the regulation of various biological and physiological pathways.

  7. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of acute altitude illness: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M; McIntosh, Scott E; Grissom, Colin K; Auerbach, Paul S; Rodway, George W; Schoene, Robert B; Zafren, Ken; Hackett, Peter H

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for prevention and treatment of acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, and high altitude pulmonary edema. These guidelines present the main prophylactic and therapeutic modalities for each disorder and provide recommendations about their role in disease management. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested approaches to prevention and management of each disorder that incorporate these recommendations. This is an updated version of the original WMS Consensus Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Acute Altitude Illness published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2010;21(2):146-155.

  8. Therapeutics Role of Azadirachta indica (Neem) and Their Active Constituents in Diseases Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alzohairy, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica) is a member of the Meliaceae family and its role as health-promoting effect is attributed because it is rich source of antioxidant. It has been widely used in Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Unani medicines worldwide especially in Indian Subcontinent in the treatment and prevention of various diseases. Earlier finding confirmed that neem and its constituents play role in the scavenging of free radical generation and prevention of disease pathogenesis. The studies based on animal model established that neem and its chief constituents play pivotal role in anticancer management through the modulation of various molecular pathways including p53, pTEN, NF-κB, PI3K/Akt, Bcl-2, and VEGF. It is considered as safe medicinal plants and modulates the numerous biological processes without any adverse effect. In this review, I summarize the role of Azadirachta indica in the prevention and treatment of diseases via the regulation of various biological and physiological pathways. PMID:27034694

  9. Candidiasis: a fungal infection--current challenges and progress in prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hani, Umme; Shivakumar, Hosakote G; Vaghela, Rudra; Osmani, Riyaz Ali M; Shrivastava, Atul

    2015-01-01

    Despite therapeutic advances candidiasis remains a common fungal infection most frequently caused by C. albicans and may occur as vulvovaginal candidiasis or thrush, a mucocutaneous candidiasis. Candidiasis frequently occurs in newborns, in immune-deficient people like AIDS patients, and in people being treated with broad spectrum antibiotics. It is mainly due to C. albicans while other species such as C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis and C. krusei are increasingly isolated. OTC antifungal dosage forms such as creams and gels can be used for effective treatment of local candidiasis. Whereas, for preventing spread of the disease to deeper vital organs, candidiasis antifungal chemotherapy is preferred. Use of probiotics and development of novel vaccines is an advanced approach for the prevention of candidiasis. Present review summarizes the diagnosis, current status and challenges in the treatment and prevention of candidiasis with prime focus on host defense against candidiasis, advancements in diagnosis, probiotics role and recent progress in the development of vaccines against candidiasis.

  10. Parents are key players in the prevention and treatment of weight-related problems.

    PubMed

    Golan, Moria; Crow, Scott

    2004-01-01

    There is growing agreement among experts that an obesogenic environment, which encourage excess food intake and idealizes thinness, plays a crucial role in the epidemic of childhood obesity and eating disorders. Because parents provide a child's contextual environment, they should be considered key players in interventions aimed at preventing or treating weight-related problems. Parenting style and feeding style are crucial factors in fostering healthy lifestyle and awareness of internal hunger and satiety cues and de-emphasizing thinness. Effective interventions for prevention and treatment of weight-related problems should be approached from a health-centered rather than a weight-centered perspective, with the parents as central agents of change. This paper reviews the environmental risk factors and parents' role in the prevention and treatment of children's weight-related problems.

  11. 42 CFR 2.34 - Disclosures to prevent multiple enrollments in detoxification and maintenance treatment programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disclosures to prevent multiple enrollments in detoxification and maintenance treatment programs. 2.34 Section 2.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE...

  12. Federal Standards for Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention and Treatment Programs and Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, A. Catherine

    Presented are federal standards designed to synthesize and describe the knowledge available on the prevention and treatment of child abuse and negect. A summary chapter (Chapter I) covers background information, organization and content of the standards, and utilization of the standards. Chapter II discusses the relationships among children,…

  13. A systematic review on zinc for the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc is a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) due to its high concentration in the retina and role as a cofactor for antioxidant enzymes. The objective of this work was to conduct a systematic review of studies that investigated dietary inta...

  14. Future Directions in Etiologic, Prevention, and Treatment Research for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; South, Kelsey; Shaw, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances have occurred regarding the understanding of etiologic processes that give rise to eating disorders and the design and evaluation of efficacious prevention programs and treatment interventions. Herein we offer suggestions regarding potentially fruitful directions for future research in these areas. We suggest it would be…

  15. The Adolescent Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment (ADAPT) Program: A Mental Health-Law Enforcement Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hasselt, Vincent B.; Schlessinger, Kari M.; DiCicco, Tina M.; Anzalone, William F.; Leslie, Tricia L.; George, John A.; Werder, Edward J.; Massey, Larry L.

    2006-01-01

    The present study provides preliminary data concerning the efficacy of the Adolescent Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment (ADAPT) Program, a collaborative effort involving mental health and law enforcement. ADAPT is a multi-component, cognitive-behavioral outpatient intervention serving children and youth referred directly from local police…

  16. Habituation of Premonitory Sensations during Exposure and Response Prevention Treatment in Tourette's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdellen, Cara W. J.; Hoogduin, Cees A. L.; Kato, Bernet S.; Keijsers, Ger P. J.; Cath, Danielle C.; Hoijtink, Herbert B.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to premonitory sensations and response prevention of tics (ER) has been shown to be a promising new treatment for Tourette's syndrome (TS). The present study tested the hypothesis that habituation to unpleasant premonitory sensations associated with the tic is an underlying mechanism of change in ER. Patients rated the severity of…

  17. Healing Childhood Ear Infections: Prevention, Home Care, and Alternative Treatment. 2nd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Michael A.

    This book describes current controversy in medical journals over existing treatments for chronic childhood earaches. It suggests that the causes of otitis media are a series of events which flourish when poor nutrition occurs, noting that careful attention to diet and nutrition to prevent food allergies, and the use of acupressure, homeopathic…

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine for prevention and treatment of the common cold

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, Richard; Balla, Agneta

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the evidence supporting complementary and alternative medicine approaches to treatment and prevention of the common cold in adults. Quality of Evidence MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched from January 1966 to September 2009 combining the key words common cold or influenza with echinacea, garlic, ginseng, probiotics, vitamin C, and zinc. Clinical trials and prospective studies were included. Main Message For prevention, vitamin C demonstrated benefit in a large meta-analysis, with possibly increased benefit in patients subjected to cold stress. There is inconsistent evidence for Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) and North American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius). Allicin was highly effective in 1 small trial. For treatment, Echinacea purpurea is the most consistently useful variety; it was effective in 5 of 6 trials. Zinc lozenges were effective in 5 of 9 trials, likely owing to dose and formulation issues. Overall, the evidence suggests no benefit from probiotics for prevention or treatment of the common cold. Conclusion Vitamin C can be recommended to Canadian patients for prevention of the common cold. There is moderate evidence supporting the use of Echinacea purpurea and zinc lozenges for treatment. Ginseng and allicin warrant further research. PMID:21322286

  19. Eating Disorders in Female College Athletes: Risk Factors, Prevention, and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Frances C.; Rivers, Tara C.

    2006-01-01

    Female athletes are at risk for developing eating disorders because of the pressures that are placed on them by society, their peers, their coaches, and the sports culture itself. This paper reviews the literature on the risk factors involved and various methods of prevention and treatment. The authors conclude that individual and group approaches…

  20. Family Factors in the Development, Treatment, and Prevention of Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Kelly L.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that anxiety disorders run in families, and current etiological models have proposed both genetic and environmental pathways to anxiety development. In this paper, the familial role in the development, treatment, and prevention of anxiety disorders in children is reviewed. We focus on three anxiety disorders in youth,…

  1. The Relationship between Relapse Prevention Treatment Outcome and Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantrell, Peggy J.; And Others

    The majority of alcoholics and drug addicts relapse after treatment, with many substance abusers developing a chronic relapse pattern. For this study, 43 patients, who went through a 3-week inpatient relapse prevention program, answered the Situational Confidence Questionnaire (a measure of self-efficacy for alcohol-related, high-risk situations)…

  2. Delinquency and Crime Prevention: Overview of Research Comparing Treatment Foster Care and Group Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osei, Gershon K.; Gorey, Kevin M.; Jozefowicz, Debra M. Hernandez

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence of treatment foster care (TFC) and group care's (GC) potential to prevent delinquency and crime has been developing. Objectives: We clarified the state of comparative knowledge with a historical overview. Then we explored the hypothesis that smaller, probably better resourced group homes with smaller staff/resident ratios have…

  3. State Part C Agency Practices and the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Sutton, Danielle Thorp; Fox, Lise; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2008-01-01

    Each year nearly 900,000 cases of child abuse and neglect are substantiated in the United States, with the highest rates of maltreatment occurring among infants and toddlers. Children exposed to maltreatment are at increased risk of developmental delay. The Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act specifies that children under age 3 with…

  4. The Rehabilitation of Adolescents in a Medical and Preventive Treatment Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherkasova, I.

    2008-01-01

    The author discusses the weaknesses of medical and preventive treatment facilities (MPTFs) that provide specialized medical assistance to an increasing number of youth with complex psychophysical impairments. Maintaining that substantial improvement of the effectiveness of rehabilitation measures for adolescents in an MPTF is possible by creating…

  5. [Adaptogenic potentialities of dynamic magnetotherapy in the treatment and prevention of ENT pathology in ailing children].

    PubMed

    Bolotova, N V; Grinkevich, A V; Grishchenko, T P; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M; Tupkin, V D

    2007-01-01

    Efficacy of dynamic magnetotherapy (in transcranial and adrenal variants) for treatment of ENT pathology and prevention of its exacerbations is demonstrated in 126 ailing children. Mechanism of action of this magnetotherapy is due to formation of adequate adaptation reactions raising resistance to pathogens. PMID:17828083

  6. Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention and Treatment in Rural Communities: Two Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Child Advocacy (DHEW/OHD), Washington, DC.

    The two reports reprinted here address prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect in rural areas through self-help programs. The larger report, that of the Appalachian Citizens for Children's Rights (ACCR) Project, describes project purposes: to develop a community development model for child abuse/neglect using resources already existing…

  7. The Educator's Role in the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadhurst, Diane D.

    The manual delineates the roles of the educator in child abuse and neglect identification, treatment, and prevention. Chapter I addresses the nature, extent, causes, and effects of child abuse and neglect. Chapter II explains why educators should be involved with discussion of legal and ethical issues relating to the problem. A third chapter…

  8. Prevention and Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruczek, Theresa; Salsman, Jill

    2006-01-01

    Trauma has the potential to undermine both the educational and personal achievement of students. This article will provide a review and an integration of theoretical and empirical literature on the prevention and treatment of stress disorders, particularly posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children and teens. An initial review of the…

  9. Considerations for a Human Rights Impact Assessment of a Population Wide Treatment for HIV Prevention Intervention.

    PubMed

    Hanefeld, Johanna; Bond, Virginia; Seeley, Janet; Lees, Shelley; Desmond, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the potential of anti-retroviral treatment (ART) for HIV prevention. The possibility of eliminating HIV from a population through a universal test and treat intervention, where all people within a population are tested for HIV and all positive people immediately initiated on ART, as part of a wider prevention intervention, was first proposed in 2009. Several clinical trials testing this idea are now in inception phase. An intervention which relies on universally testing the entire population for HIV will pose challenges to human rights, including obtaining genuine consent to testing and treatment. It also requires a context in which people can live free from fear of stigma, discrimination and violence, and can access services they require. These challenges are distinct from the field of medical ethics which has traditionally governed clinical trials and focuses primarily on patient researcher relationship. This paper sets out the potential impact of a population wide treatment as prevention intervention on human rights. It identifies five human right principles of particular relevance: participation, accountability, the right to health, non-discrimination and equality, and consent and confidentiality. The paper proposes that explicit attention to human rights can strengthen a treatment as prevention intervention, contribute to mediating likely health systems challenges and offer insights on how to reach all sections of the population.

  10. Mapping the evidence for the prevention and treatment of eating disorders in young people

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Eating disorders often develop during adolescence and young adulthood, and are associated with significant psychological and physical burden. Identifying evidence-based interventions is critical and there is need to take stock of the extant literature, to inform clinical practice regarding well-researched interventions and to direct future research agendas by identifying gaps in the evidence base. Aim To investigate and quantify the nature and distribution of existing high-quality research on the prevention and treatment of eating disorders in young people using evidence mapping methodology. Method A systematic search for prevention and treatment intervention studies in adolescents and young adults (12–25 years) was conducted using EMBASE, PSYCINFO and MEDLINE. Studies were screened and mapped according to disorder, intervention modality, stage of eating disorder and study design. Included studies were restricted to controlled trials and systematic reviews published since 1980. Results The eating disorders evidence map included 197 trials and 22 systematic reviews. Prevention research was dominated by trials of psychoeducation (PE). Bulimia nervosa (BN) received the most attention in the treatment literature, with cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and antidepressants the most common interventions. For anorexia nervosa (AN), family based therapy (FBT) was the most studied. Lacking were trials exploring treatments for binge eating disorder (BED) and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS). Relapse prevention strategies were notably absent across the eating disorders. Conclusions Despite substantial literature devoted to the prevention and treatment of eating disorders in young people, the evidence base is not well established and significant gaps remain. For those identified as being at-risk, there is need for prevention research exploring strategies other than passive PE. Treatment interventions targeting BED and EDNOS are required, as are

  11. Intermittency in dilute granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenxuan; Zhang, Qiang; Wylie, Jonathan J.

    2016-07-01

    In this letter, we show that dilute granular systems can exhibit a type of intermittency that has no analogue in gas dynamics. We consider a simple system in which a very dilute set of granular particles falls under gravity through a nozzle. This setting is analogous to the classical problem of high-speed nozzle flow in the study of compressible gases. It is well known that very dilute granular systems exhibit behavior qualitatively similar to gases, and that gas flowing through a nozzle does not exhibit intermittency. Nevertheless, we show that the intermittency in dilute granular nozzle flows can occur and corresponds to complicated transitions between supersonic and subsonic regimes. We also provide detailed explanations of the mechanism underlying this phenomenon.

  12. Elastic wave turbulence and intermittency.

    PubMed

    Chibbaro, Sergio; Josserand, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the onset of intermittency for vibrating elastic plate turbulence in the framework of the weak wave turbulence theory using a numerical approach. The spectrum of the displacement field and the structure functions of the fluctuations are computed for different forcing amplitudes. At low forcing, the spectrum predicted by the theory is observed, while the fluctuations are consistent with Gaussian statistics. When the forcing is increased, the spectrum varies at large scales, corresponding to the oscillations of nonlinear structures made of ridges delimited by d cones. In this regime, the fluctuations exhibit small-scale intermittency that can be fitted via a multifractal model. The analysis of the nonlinear frequency shows that the intermittency is linked to the breakdown of the weak turbulence at large scales only. PMID:27575068

  13. Elastic wave turbulence and intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibbaro, Sergio; Josserand, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the onset of intermittency for vibrating elastic plate turbulence in the framework of the weak wave turbulence theory using a numerical approach. The spectrum of the displacement field and the structure functions of the fluctuations are computed for different forcing amplitudes. At low forcing, the spectrum predicted by the theory is observed, while the fluctuations are consistent with Gaussian statistics. When the forcing is increased, the spectrum varies at large scales, corresponding to the oscillations of nonlinear structures made of ridges delimited by d cones. In this regime, the fluctuations exhibit small-scale intermittency that can be fitted via a multifractal model. The analysis of the nonlinear frequency shows that the intermittency is linked to the breakdown of the weak turbulence at large scales only.

  14. A family with acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Billoo, Abdul Gaffar; Lone, Saira Waqar

    2008-05-01

    Porphyrias are inherited defects in heme metabolism that result in excessive secretion of porphyrins and porphyrin precursors. Porphyrias can be classified into acute, (neuropsychiatric), cutaneous and mixed forms. There are seven main types of porphyrias; acute intermittent porphyria and plumboporphyria are predominantly neuropsychiatric; congenital erythropoietic porphyria, porphyria cutanea tarda and erythropoietic protoporphyria have predominantly cutaneous manifestations and hereditary coproporphyria and variegate porphyria are classified as mixed as they both have neuropsychiatric and cutaneous features. They cause life-threatening attacks of neurovisceral symptoms that mimic many other acute medical and psychiatric conditions. Lack of clinical recognition often delays effective treatment, and inappropriate diagnostic tests may lead to misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment. Although the specific enzyme and gene defect have been identified, diagnosis and treatment of these disorders present formidable challenges because their signs and symptoms mimic other common conditions. We present a case report of a 13 years old girl who suffers from acute intermittent porphyria and the family tree showing all members who suffer from it.

  15. Incorporating primary and secondary prevention approaches to address childhood obesity prevention and treatment in a low-income, ethnically diverse population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is consensus that development and evaluation of a systems-oriented approach for child obesity prevention and treatment that includes both primary and secondary prevention efforts is needed. This article describes the study design and baseline data from the Texas Childhood Obesity Research Demo...

  16. HCV Treatment as Prevention in People Who Inject Drugs – testing the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Matthew; De Angelis, Daniela; Vickerman, Peter; Hutchinson, Sharon; Martin, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review The majority of HCV infections in UK and many developing countries were acquired through injecting. New clinical guidance suggests that HCV treatment should be offered to people with a transmission risk – such as people who inject drugs (PWID) – irrespective of severity of liver disease. We consider the strength of the evidence base and potential problems in evaluating HCV treatment as prevention among PWID. Recent Findings There is good theoretical evidence from dynamic models that HCV treatment for PWID could reduce HCV chronic prevalence and incidence among PWID. Economic evaluations from high-income settings have suggested HCV treatment for PWID is cost-effective, and that in many settings HCV treatment of PWID could be more cost-effective than treating those at an equivalent stage with no ongoing transmission risk. Epidemiological studies of older interferon treatments have suggested that PWID can achieve similar treatment outcomes to other patient groups treated for chronic HCV. Impact and cost-effectiveness of HCV treatment is driven by the potential “prevention benefit” of treating PWID. Model projections suggest that more future infections, End Stage Liver Disease, and HCV related deaths will be averted than lost through re-infection of PWID treated successfully for HCV. However, there is to date no empirical evidence from trials or observational studies that test the model projections and “prevention benefit” hypothesis. In part this also is because of uncertainty in the evidence base but also because PWID HCV treatment rates historically in most sites have been low, and any scale-up and switch to the new DAA has not yet occurred. There are a number of key uncertainties in the data available on PWID that need to be improved and addressed in order to evaluate treatment as prevention. These include estimates of the prevalence of PWID, measurements of HCV chronic prevalence and incidence among PWID, and how to interpret re

  17. Human African trypanosomiasis prevention, treatment and control costs: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Keating, Joseph; Yukich, Joshua O; Sutherland, C Simone; Woods, Geordie; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2015-10-01

    The control and eventual elimination of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) requires the expansion of current control and surveillance activities. A systematic review of the published literature on the costs of HAT prevention, treatment, and control, in addition to the economic burden, was conducted. All studies that contained primary or secondary data on costs of prevention, treatment and control were considered, resulting in the inclusion of 42 papers. The geographically focal nature of the disease and a lack of standardization in the cost data limit the usefulness of the available information for making generalizations across diverse settings. More recent information on the costs of treatment and control interventions for HAT is needed to provide accurate information for analyses and planning. The cost information contained herein can be used to inform rational decision making in control and elimination programs, and to assess potential synergies with existing vector-borne disease control programs, but programs would benefit significantly from new cost data collection.

  18. [FEDERAL CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE DIAGNOSIS, PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF PNEUMOCONIOSIS].

    PubMed

    Artemoval, L V; Baskova, N V; Burmistrova, T B; Buryakinal, E A; Buhtiyarov, I V; Bushmanov, A Yu; Vasilyeva, O S; Vlasov, V G; Gorblyansky, Y Y; Zhabina, S A; Zaharinskaya, O N; Ismerov, N F; Kovalevsky, E V; Kuznetsova, G V; Kuzmina, L P; Kunyaeva, T A; Logvinenko, I I; Lutsenko, L A; Mazitova, N N; Obukhova, T Yu; Odintseva, O V; Orlova, G P; Panacheva, L A; Piktushanskaya, I N; Plyukhin, A E; Poteryaeva, E L; Pravilo, S M; Razumov, V V; Roslaya, N A; Roslyi, O F; Rushkevich, O P; Semenihin, V A; Serebryakov, P V; Smirnova, E L; Sorkina, N S; Tsidil'kovskaya, E S; Chasovskikh, E V; Shpagina, L A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of development of this clinical practice guidelines was to provide evidence-based protocols that help the practitioner and the patient make the right decision for the health assessment, treatment and prevention of pneumoconiosis. Pneumoconiosis is the interstitial lung disease of occupational origin caused by prolonged inhalation of inorganic dust, characterized by chronic diffuse aseptic inflammation in lung tissue with the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Currently, thereare no treatment that provide a cure pulmonary fibrosis and changes in the dynamics of decline in lung function. Regular, individually tailored treatment should be directed to the pathogenic mechanisms and some clinical symptoms of pneumoconiosis, as well as the prevention of complications. To enhance the effect of pharmacotherapy is recommended to use non-drug therapies that enhance the functionality of the respiratory system.

  19. [Dual antiplatelet therapy for treatment and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease: indications, modalities and duration].

    PubMed

    Degrauwe, Sophie; Iglesias, Juan F

    2016-05-25

    The choice and optimal duration of dualantiplatelet therapy (DAPT) for the treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) represent a challenging clinical dilemma. Antiplatelet treatment strategies are determined by the clinical setting, patient comorbidities and management strategy. While aspirin remains the cornerstone for secondary prevention of CAD, DAPT significantly reduces recurrent ischemic adverse events at the expense of an increased risk of major bleeding complications. A tailored approach based on individual ischemic and hemorrhagic risk assessment is currently recommended. This review aims to provide a contemporary overview on the current body of evidence concerning DAPT for treatment and secondary prevention of CAD with practical emphasis on current indications, choice, combination and optimal duration of antiplatelet therapy. PMID:27424342

  20. Recent Advances in Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bawage, Swapnil Subhash; Tiwari, Pooja Munnilal; Singh, Shree Ram

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of respiratory infection in infants and the elderly, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. The interdisciplinary fields, especially biotechnology and nanotechnology, have facilitated the development of modern detection systems for RSV. Many anti-RSV compounds like fusion inhibitors and RNAi molecules have been successful in laboratory and clinical trials. But, currently, there are no effective drugs for RSV infection even after decades of research. Effective diagnosis can result in effective treatment, but the progress in both of these facets must be concurrent. The development in prevention and treatment measures for RSV is at appreciable pace, but the implementation into clinical practice still seems a challenge. This review attempts to present the promising diverse research approaches and advancements in the area of diagnosis, prevention, and treatment that contribute to RSV management. PMID:24382964

  1. Alternating and intermittent regimens of zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine) and dideoxycytidine (2',3'-dideoxycytidine) in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex.

    PubMed

    Skowron, G; Merigan, T C

    1990-05-21

    The deoxynucleoside analogues 2',3'-dideoxy-cytidine (ddC) and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (zidovudine, AZT) are active as single agents in conferring immunologic and virologic benefits in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-related complex. Both drugs, however, produce dose-limiting toxicities. AZT is associated with unacceptable levels of bone marrow suppression, and ddC can cause painful peripheral neuropathy. The different toxicity profiles of these two drugs provide the rationale for testing them in alternating dosing combinations in an attempt to retain the antiretroviral activity of each against human immunodeficiency virus, while reducing the toxicities of both. A preliminary trial showed that 200 mg AZT given orally every four hours for seven-day periods, alternating with ddC at 0.03 mg/kg body weight orally every four hours for seven-day periods is a promising treatment regimen. An expanded multicenter study is evaluating ddC at 0.01 mg/kg and 0.03 mg/kg alternating with AZT at 200 mg in weekly or monthly periods. Weekly intermittent doses of AZT at 200 mg and ddC at 0.03 mg/kg are also being tested. The rationale and methods of the trial are discussed.

  2. Risk, prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers--nursing staff knowledge and documentation.

    PubMed

    Gunningberg, L; Lindholm, C; Carlsson, M; Sjödén, P O

    2001-01-01

    The aims were to investigate (i) registered nurses' and nursing assistants' knowledge of risk, prevention and treatment of pressure ulcer before implementing a system for risk assessment and pressure ulcer classification for patients with hip fracture (ii) interventions documented in the patient's records by registered nurses, and (iii) to what extent reported and documented interventions accord with the Swedish quality guidelines. Nursing staff (n=85) completed a questionnaire, and patient's records (n=55) were audited retrospectively. The majority of the nursing staff reported that they performed risk assessment when caring for a patient with hip fracture. These risk assessments were, however, not comprehensive. The most frequently reported preventive interventions were repositioning, use of lotion, mattresses/overlays and cushions for the heels. These interventions were to some extent documented in the patient's records. Nutritional support, reduction of shear and friction, hygiene and skin moisture, and patient's education were reported to a small extent and not documented at all. The Swedish quality guidelines regarding prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers were not fully implemented in clinical practice. It was concluded that nursing staff's knowledge and documentation of risk, prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers for patients with hip fractures could be improved.

  3. Prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Daniel R.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2005-01-01

    Strategies for confronting the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have included a range of different approaches that focus on prevention and treatment. However, debate persists over what levels of emphasis are appropriate for the different components of the global response. This paper presents an overview of this debate and briefly summarizes the evidence on a range of interventions designed to prevent the spread of HIV infection, paying particular attention to voluntary counselling and testing, treatment for sexually transmitted infections and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We also review the experience with antiretroviral therapy to date in terms of response rates and survival rates, adherence, drug resistance, behavioural change and epidemiological impact. Although various studies have identified strategies with proven effectiveness in reducing the risks of HIV infection and AIDS mortality, considerable uncertainties remain. Successful integration of treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS will require a balanced approach and rigorous monitoring of the impact of programmes in terms of both individual and population outcomes. PMID:15744406

  4. Prediction and personalised treatment of atrial fibrillation-stroke prevention: consolidated position paper of CVD professionals.

    PubMed

    Helms, Thomas M; Duong, Giang; Zippel-Schultz, Bettina; Tilz, Roland Richard; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Karle, Christoph A

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the major morbidity and health economic factors in Europe and often associated with several co-morbidities. This paper (1) underlines the importance of highly professional AF management utilising a multi-disciplinary expertise, especially considering the role of AF regarding the stroke risk and prevention, (2) demonstrates the consolidated position of CVD professionals and (3) emphasises those research aspects that could deepen the understanding of the emergence and the treatment of AF and therefore helps to provide a personalised preventive and more effective management of AF. Specialised calls are considered for that within the new European Programme 'Horizon 2020'.

  5. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of heat-related illness.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Grant S; Eifling, Kurt P; Ellis, Mark A; Gaudio, Flavio G; Otten, Edward M; Grissom, Colin K

    2013-12-01

    The Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop a set of evidence-based guidelines for the recognition, prevention, and treatment of heat-related illness. We present a review of the classifications, pathophysiology, and evidence-based guidelines for planning and preventive measures as well as best-practice recommendations for both field- and hospital-based therapeutic management of heat-related illness. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each modality.

  6. [Problem of motivation of the population to prevention and treatment dental diseases].

    PubMed

    Kochlashvili, L Sh; Gogilashvili, K T; Gerzmava, O Kh

    2012-10-01

    Dental health is an integral part of a normal state of a human body and, first of all, depends on knowledge of the population of bases of individual hygiene of an oral cavity and ability to use them in practical life. Numerous researches indicate low level of knowledge of the population in questions of prevention of dental diseases and individual hygiene of an oral cavity that testifies to existence of problems in the organization of sanitary education. Existing practice of hygienic training and education, in a certain measure, lags behind modern requirements, and some questions demand specification and optimization. For efficiency of sanitary and preventive actions it is necessary to study character and motivation structure to prevention and treatment of dental diseases and to develop an effective method of its increase. Therefore actual search of new forms of psycho hygiene and psycho prevention with use of modern information technologies which should provide high level of dental health of the military personnel is represented. The purpose of the real research was establishment of the factors forming motivation to prevention and treatment of the main dental diseases, and development of a psycho physiological method of its increase. The carried-out research allows to expand and systematize ideas necessary for the practical doctor of the major factors forming motivation to prevention and treatment of the main dental diseases. Development of an objective technique of a complex assessment of level of motivation of patients to prevention and treatment of dental pathology will allow to prove the new perspective direction of the sanitary educational work, allowing to reduce fobiya level, effectively to increase motivation of the patient to receiving the timely dental help. It especially is important if to consider that numerous programs of hygienic training and the education, applied in our country, didn't lead to change of hygienic skills of the population in expected

  7. Stress-induced increases in brainstem amino acid levels are prevented by chronic sodium hydrosulfide treatment.

    PubMed

    Warenycia, M W; Kombian, S B; Reiffenstein, R J

    1990-01-01

    Neurotransmitter amino acid levels were measured in select brain regions of rats and mice after chronic treatment with sublethal doses of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). Brainstem aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, taurine and GABA levels increased in chronically but not acutely saline-treated rats. These increases may have been due to stress from frequent handling, and were prevented by chronic NaHS treatment (7.5 mg/kg ip every 8 hr for 3 consecutive days). In contrast, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine increased in female but not in male ICR mouse brainstems after once daily treatment with 7.0 mg/kg NaHS for 5 consecutive days. These effects of NaHS may indicate chronic low level H2S neurotoxicity. Differences between chronic and acute treatments, female and male responses, and treatment paradigms may complicate interpretations of such toxicity studies.

  8. Protective value of prophylactic antibiotic treatment of tick bite for Lyme disease prevention: an animal model.

    PubMed

    Piesman, Joseph; Hojgaard, Andrias

    2012-06-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that prophylactic antibiotic treatment of tick bites by Ixodes scapularis in Lyme disease hyperendemic regions in the northeastern United States can be effective in preventing infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the Lyme disease spirochete. A large clinical trial in Westchester County, NY (USA), demonstrated that treatment of tick bite with 200mg of oral doxycycline was 87% effective in preventing Lyme disease in tick-bite victims (Nadelman, R.B., Nowakowski, J., Fish, D., Falco, R.C., Freeman, K., McKenna, D., Welch, P., Marcus, R., Agúero-Rosenfeld, M.E., Dennis, D.T., Wormser, G.P., 2001. Prophylaxis with single-dose doxycycline for the prevention of Lyme disease after an Ixodes scapularis tick bite. N. Engl. J. Med. 345, 79-84.). Although this excellent clinical trial provided much needed information, the authors enrolled subjects if the tick bite occurred within 3 days of their clinical visit, but did not analyze the data based on the exact time between tick removal and delivery of prophylaxis. An animal model allows for controlled experiments designed to determine the point in time after tick bite when delivery of oral antibiotics would be too late to prevent infection with B. burgdorferi. Accordingly, we developed a tick-bite prophylaxis model in mice that gave a level of prophylactic protection similar to what had been observed in clinical trials and then varied the time post tick bite of antibiotic delivery. We found that two treatments of doxycycline delivered by oral gavage to mice on the day of removal of a single potentially infectious nymphal I. scapularis protected 74% of test mice compared to controls. When treatment was delayed until 24 h after tick removal, only 47% of mice were protected; prophylactic treatment was totally ineffective when delivered ≥2 days after tick removal. Although the dynamics of antibiotic treatment in mice may differ from humans, and translation of animal studies to

  9. Protective value of prophylactic antibiotic treatment of tick bite for Lyme disease prevention: an animal model.

    PubMed

    Piesman, Joseph; Hojgaard, Andrias

    2012-06-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that prophylactic antibiotic treatment of tick bites by Ixodes scapularis in Lyme disease hyperendemic regions in the northeastern United States can be effective in preventing infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the Lyme disease spirochete. A large clinical trial in Westchester County, NY (USA), demonstrated that treatment of tick bite with 200mg of oral doxycycline was 87% effective in preventing Lyme disease in tick-bite victims (Nadelman, R.B., Nowakowski, J., Fish, D., Falco, R.C., Freeman, K., McKenna, D., Welch, P., Marcus, R., Agúero-Rosenfeld, M.E., Dennis, D.T., Wormser, G.P., 2001. Prophylaxis with single-dose doxycycline for the prevention of Lyme disease after an Ixodes scapularis tick bite. N. Engl. J. Med. 345, 79-84.). Although this excellent clinical trial provided much needed information, the authors enrolled subjects if the tick bite occurred within 3 days of their clinical visit, but did not analyze the data based on the exact time between tick removal and delivery of prophylaxis. An animal model allows for controlled experiments designed to determine the point in time after tick bite when delivery of oral antibiotics would be too late to prevent infection with B. burgdorferi. Accordingly, we developed a tick-bite prophylaxis model in mice that gave a level of prophylactic protection similar to what had been observed in clinical trials and then varied the time post tick bite of antibiotic delivery. We found that two treatments of doxycycline delivered by oral gavage to mice on the day of removal of a single potentially infectious nymphal I. scapularis protected 74% of test mice compared to controls. When treatment was delayed until 24 h after tick removal, only 47% of mice were protected; prophylactic treatment was totally ineffective when delivered ≥2 days after tick removal. Although the dynamics of antibiotic treatment in mice may differ from humans, and translation of animal studies to

  10. Intermittent control of coexisting attractors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wiercigroch, Marian; Ing, James; Pavlovskaia, Ekaterina

    2013-06-28

    This paper proposes a new control method applicable for a class of non-autonomous dynamical systems that naturally exhibit coexisting attractors. The central idea is based on knowledge of a system's basins of attraction, with control actions being applied intermittently in the time domain when the actual trajectory satisfies a proximity constraint with regards to the desired trajectory. This intermittent control uses an impulsive force to perturb one of the system attractors in order to switch the system response onto another attractor. This is carried out by bringing the perturbed state into the desired basin of attraction. The method has been applied to control both smooth and non-smooth systems, with the Duffing and impact oscillators used as examples. The strength of the intermittent control force is also considered, and a constrained intermittent control law is introduced to investigate the effect of limited control force on the efficiency of the controller. It is shown that increasing the duration of the control action and/or the number of control actuations allows one to successfully switch between the stable attractors using a lower control force. Numerical and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:23690639

  11. The evolution of intermittent breeding.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Allison K; Levin, Simon A

    2013-03-01

    A central issue in life history theory is how organisms trade off current and future reproduction. A variety of organisms exhibit intermittent breeding, meaning sexually mature adults will skip breeding opportunities between reproduction attempts. It's thought that intermittent breeding occurs when reproduction incurs an extra cost in terms of survival, energy, or recovery time. We have developed a matrix population model for intermittent breeding, and use adaptive dynamics to determine under what conditions individuals should breed at every opportunity, and under what conditions they should skip some breeding opportunities (and if so, how many). We also examine the effect of environmental stochasticity on breeding behavior. We find that the evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) for breeding behavior depends on an individual's expected growth and mortality, and that the conditions for skipped breeding depend on the type of reproductive cost incurred (survival, energy, recovery time). In constant environments there is always a pure ESS, however environmental stochasticity and deterministic population fluctuations can both select for a mixed ESS. Finally, we compare our model results to patterns of intermittent breeding in species from a range of taxonomic groups.

  12. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. OBJECTIVE To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. EVIDENCE REVIEW A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. FINDINGS Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory

  13. [Development of technologies for the prevention and treatment of domestic emergencies in the blind].

    PubMed

    Pagliuca, L M; Costa, E M; Costa, N M; Sousa, K M

    1996-01-01

    The improvement of the development in the sensitive organs is given by the process of perceiving what his taken the man to the acquaintance apprehension. The blind man runs a risk of household incident, that is common to all the normal people, but he has no access to educational process about prevention and attendance of these incidents. In a prevention and attendance course for blind people we have developed a pedagogic know-how about anatomy and physiology of the skeleton, circulation of the blood respiratory system, xonder prevention and treatment, for clearance, heart attack and respiratory stop, burned people, electrical shock, traumatism, hemorrhage, intoxication, collapse, spasm and oral medication. We have employed the human skeleton, mannequin, mould, paper, plastic tubes and mainay verbal communication and touching. The instructed contents has been applied in simulation. The know-how has shown efficiency about to be able and it has indicated by the blind people into verbalization and repetition of the proceeding and exercise.

  14. Amiodarone for the treatment and prevention of ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Van Herendael, Hugo; Dorian, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Amiodarone has emerged as the leading antiarrhythmic therapy for termination and prevention of ventricular arrhythmia in different clinical settings because of its proven efficacy and safety. In patients with shock refractory out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and hemodynamically destabilizing ventricular arrhythmia, amiodarone is the most effective drug available to assist in resuscitation. Although the superiority of the transvenous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) over amiodarone has been well established in the preventive treatment of patients at high risk of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, amiodarone (if used with a beta-blocker) is the most effective antiarrhythmic drug to prevent ICD shocks and treat electrical storm. Both the pharmacokinetics and the electrophysiologic profile of amiodarone are complex, and its optimal and safe use requires careful patient surveillance with respect to potential adverse effects. PMID:20730062

  15. HIV Treatment as Prevention: Models, Data, and Questions—Towards Evidence-Based Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for those infected with HIV can prevent onward transmission of infection, but biological efficacy alone is not enough to guide policy decisions about the role of ART in reducing HIV incidence. Epidemiology, economics, demography, statistics, biology, and mathematical modelling will be central in framing key decisions in the optimal use of ART. PLoS Medicine, with the HIV Modelling Consortium, has commissioned a set of articles that examine different aspects of HIV treatment as prevention with a forward-looking research agenda. Interlocking themes across these articles are discussed in this introduction. We hope that this article, and others in the collection, will provide a foundation upon which greater collaborations between disciplines will be formed, and will afford deeper insights into the key factors involved, to help strengthen the support for evidence-based decision-making in HIV prevention. PMID:22802739

  16. 5 CFR 340.403 - Intermittent employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 340.403 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS OTHER THAN FULL-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT (PART-TIME, SEASONAL, ON-CALL, AND INTERMITTENT) Seasonal and intermittent... has an obligation to document the change in work schedule from intermittent to part-time or...

  17. 5 CFR 340.403 - Intermittent employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 340.403 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS OTHER THAN FULL-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT (PART-TIME, SEASONAL, ON-CALL, AND INTERMITTENT) Seasonal and intermittent... has an obligation to document the change in work schedule from intermittent to part-time or...

  18. 5 CFR 340.403 - Intermittent employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 340.403 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS OTHER THAN FULL-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT (PART-TIME, SEASONAL, ON-CALL, AND INTERMITTENT) Seasonal and intermittent... has an obligation to document the change in work schedule from intermittent to part-time or...

  19. 5 CFR 340.403 - Intermittent employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 340.403 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS OTHER THAN FULL-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT (PART-TIME, SEASONAL, ON-CALL, AND INTERMITTENT) Seasonal and intermittent... has an obligation to document the change in work schedule from intermittent to part-time or...

  20. 5 CFR 340.403 - Intermittent employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 340.403 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS OTHER THAN FULL-TIME CAREER EMPLOYMENT (PART-TIME, SEASONAL, ON-CALL, AND INTERMITTENT) Seasonal and intermittent... has an obligation to document the change in work schedule from intermittent to part-time or...