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Sample records for internal conversion coefficients

  1. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  2. Determination of absolute internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Papadakis, P.; Konki, J.; Cox, D. M.; Auranen, K.; Partanen, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Uusitalo, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Smallcombe, J.; Davies, P. J.; Barton, C. J.; Jenkins, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    A non-reference based method to determine internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer is carried out for transitions in the nuclei of 154Sm, 152Sm and 166Yb. The Normalised-Peak-to-Gamma method is in general an efficient tool to extract internal conversion coefficients. However, in many cases the required well-known reference transitions are not available. The data analysis steps required to determine absolute internal conversion coefficients with the SAGE spectrometer are presented. In addition, several background suppression methods are introduced and an example of how ancillary detectors can be used to select specific reaction products is given. The results obtained for ground-state band E2 transitions show that the absolute internal conversion coefficients can be extracted using the methods described with a reasonable accuracy. In some cases of less intense transitions only an upper limit for the internal conversion coefficient could be given.

  3. INTERNAL CONVERSION COEFFICIENTS - HOW GOOD ARE THEY NOW?

    SciTech Connect

    KIBEDI,T.; BURROWS, T.W.; TRZHASKOVSKAYA, M.B.; NESTOR, JR., C.W.; DAVIDSON, P.M.

    2007-04-22

    Internal conversion coefficients involving atomic electrons (ICC) and electron-positron pairs (IPC) are often required to determine transition multipolarities and total transition rates. A new internal conversion coefficient data base, BrIcc has been developed which integrates a number of tabulations on ICC and IPC, as well as {Omega}(E0) electronic factors. To decide which theoretical internal conversion coefficient table to use, the accurately determined experimental {alpha}{sub K}, {alpha}{sub L}, {alpha}{sub Total} and {alpha}{sub K}/{alpha}{sub L} values were compared with the new Dirac-Fock calculations using extreme assumptions on the effect of the atomic vacancy. While the overall difference between experiment and theory is less than 1%, our analysis shows preference towards the so called ''Frozen Orbital'' approximation, which takes into account the effect of the atomic vacancy.

  4. An analytical model for calculating internal dose conversion coefficients for non-human biota.

    PubMed

    Amato, Ernesto; Italiano, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    To assess the radiation burden of non-human living organisms, dose coefficients are available in the literature, precalculated by assuming an ellipsoidal shape of each organism. A previously developed analytical method was applied for the determination of absorbed fractions inside ellipsoidal volumes from alpha, beta, and gamma radiations to the calculation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) for 15 reference organisms, animals and plants, either terrestrial, amphibian, or aquatic, and six radionuclides ((14)C, (90)Sr, (60)Co, (137)Cs, (238)U, and (241)Am). The results were compared with the reference values reported in Publication 108 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, in which a different calculation approach for DCCs was employed. The results demonstrate that the present analytical method, originally intended for applications in internal dosimetry of nuclear medicine therapy, gives consistent results for all the beta-, beta-gamma-, and alpha-emitting radionuclides tested in a wide range of organism masses, between 8 mg and 1.3 kg. The applicability of the method proposed can take advantage from its ease of implementation in an ordinary electronic spreadsheet, allowing to calculate, for virtually all possible radionuclide emission spectra, the DCCs for ellipsoidal models of non-human living organisms in the environment.

  5. Internal conversion coefficients in {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Ba, and {sup 139}La: A precise test of theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nica, N.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; Balonek, C.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2008-03-15

    Recently we measured the ratio of K-shell internal conversion coefficients, {alpha}{sub K}, for the 127.5-keV E3 transition in {sup 134}Cs and the 661.7-keV M4 transition in {sup 137}Ba. We here report a measurement of the 165.9-keV M1 transition in {sup 139}La, based on which we convert our earlier ratio measurement into individual {alpha}{sub K} values for the transitions in {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Ba. These results continue to confirm the Dirac-Fock calculations of internal conversion coefficients that incorporate the atomic K-shell vacancy.

  6. Conversion coefficients and yrast state spins in 180Os

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dracoulis, G. D.; Kibédi, T.; Byrne, A. P.; Fabricius, B.; Stuchbery, A. E.

    1990-03-01

    Internal conversion coefficients of transitions in 180Os have been measured using a superconducting, solenoidal electron spectrometer, operated in the lens mode. The high energy resolution and efficiency allow a precise measurement of the conversion coefficients of the 528 keV yrast transition. The values obtained, αK = 0.015(2), αL = 0.004(1) define pure E2 multipolarity. Taken with the measured γ-ray angular distribution, the conversion coefficient leads to an unambiguous assignment of 16 + → 14 + for the 528 keV transition.

  7. Personal Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients For Photons To 1 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2010-09-27

    The personal dose equivalent, H{sub p}(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity Effective Dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk where personal dosemeters are usually worn and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 cm X 30 cm X 15 cm slab-type phantom. For this condition the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H{sub p,slab}(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several MeV, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H{sub p,slab}(10) and H{sub p,slab}(3) using both the kerma approximation and by tracking secondary charged particles. For H{sub p}(0.07) the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H{sub p,slab}(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared to the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on

  8. Personal dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for 1252 radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Otto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides are useful for routine calculations in radiation protection in industry, medicine and research. They give a simple and often sufficient estimate of dose rates during production, handling and storage of radionuclide sources, based solely on the source's activity. The latest compilation of such conversion coefficients dates from 20 y ago, based on nuclear decay data published 30 y ago. The present publication provides radionuclide-specific conversion coefficients to personal dose based on the most recent evaluations of nuclear decay data for 1252 radionuclides and fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for monoenergetic radiations. It contains previously unknown conversion coefficients for >400 nuclides and corrects those conversion coefficients that were based on erroneous decay schemes. For the first time, estimates for the protection quantity Hp(3) are included.

  9. Conversion coefficient measurements of 176Lu using ICEBall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Anthony A.

    We have studied the multipolarites of several transitions in the nucleus 176Lu. The synthesis of 176Lu in stellar environments is through the slow (s-) neutron capture process. The s-process is responsible for the creation of 50% of the heavy elements and 15-20 nuclei in the s-process are s-process branching points. Branching points determine if the synthesis path will beta-decay or neutron capture. The branching point 176 Lu is only produced via the s-process only and has both a long-lived ground state (K = 7--) of 37.6 Gy and a short-lived isomeric state (K = 0--) at 3.6 h. There is no direct decay to both the isomer and ground state due to selection rules. However, an intermediate state was found at 839 keV in the K = 4-- band and another intermediate state in the K = 4+ band at 709 keV which communicate to both the isomer and ground state. The communication to both the isomer and ground state through the intermediate states affects the final abundances of 176Lu in stellar environments which is sensitive to temperature. The experiment was performed at the University of Notre Dame Nuclear Science Laboratory (NSL) using a 176Yb(p,n) reaction at 7.75 MeV. Gamma-gamma and gamma-electron coincidences were measured for conversion coefficients using the Internal Conversion Electron Ball (ICEBall) array and two HPGe detectors (109% relative efficiency of a 3"x 3" NaI detector at 1332 keV). ICEBall was upgraded at the NSL for an improved efficiency from 6%-15% over 4. A total of 40 conversion cofficcients were measured and 35 multipolarities wer assigned. 17 new conversion coefficients were measured and the corresponding multipolarities were assigned. Levels and spin assignments in both the K = 4+ band and K = 4-- band were verified in the intermediate states that are important for establishing a thermal equilibrium in the s-process.

  10. Dose conversion coefficients for partial-fan CBCT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlattl, Helmut

    2017-03-01

    Due to the increasing number of cone-beam CT (CBCT) devices on the market, reliable estimates of patient doses for these imaging modality is desired. Cone-beam CT devices differ from conventional CT not only by a larger collimation but also by different recording modes. In this work, it has been investigated whether reliable patient doses can be obtained for CBCT devices in partial-fan mode using pre-computed slices. As an exemplary case, chest CBCT scans for the ICRP reference adult models has been examined. By normalizing organ doses to CTDI100w , the resulting dose conversion coefficients for CBCT could be well reproduced by precomputed slices, with a relative difference in the effective dose conversion coefficients of less than 10%.

  11. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for electrons to 1 Ge V.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2012-04-01

    In a previous paper, conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent, H(p)(d), for photons were reported. This note reports values for electrons calculated using similar techniques. The personal dose equivalent is the quantity used to approximate the protection quantity effective dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations and in practice the personal dose equivalent is determined using a 30×30×15 cm slab-type phantom. Conversion coefficients to 1 GeV have been calculated for H(p)(10), H(p)(3) and H(p)(0.07) in the recommended slab phantom. Although the conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, analytical fits of the conversion coefficients over the energy range are provided using a similar formulation as in the photon results previously reported. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared with the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on Radiological Protection guidance. Effects of eyewear on H(p)(3) are also discussed.

  12. Comparison of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for deuterons, tritons and helions.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kyle; Friedberg, Wallace; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji

    2012-02-01

    Secondary radiation in aircraft and spacecraft includes deuterons, tritons and helions. Two sets of fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients for isotropic exposure to these particles were compared: one used the particle and heavy ion transport code system (PHITS) radiation transport code coupled with the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms (PHITS-ICRP) and the other the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) radiation transport code coupled with modified BodyBuilder™ phantoms (MCNPX-BB). Also, two sets of fluence-to-effective dose equivalent conversion coefficients calculated using the PHITS-ICRP combination were compared: one used quality factors based on linear energy transfer; the other used quality factors based on lineal energy (y). Finally, PHITS-ICRP effective dose coefficients were compared with PHITS-ICRP effective dose equivalent coefficients. The PHITS-ICRP and MCNPX-BB effective dose coefficients were similar, except at high energies, where MCNPX-BB coefficients were higher. For helions, at most energies effective dose coefficients were much greater than effective dose equivalent coefficients. For deuterons and tritons, coefficients were similar when their radiation weighting factor was set to 2.

  13. Organ dose conversion coefficients for pediatric reference computational phantoms in external photon radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lienard A.

    In the event of a radiological accident or attack, it is important to estimate the organ doses to those exposed. In general, it is difficult to measure organ dose directly in the field and therefore dose conversion coefficients (DCC) are needed to convert measurable values such as air kerma to organ dose. Previous work on these coefficients has been conducted mainly for adults with a focus on radiation protection workers. Hence, there is a large gap in the literature for pediatric values. This study coupled a Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code with International Council of Radiological Protection (ICRP)-adopted University of Florida and National Cancer Institute pediatric reference phantoms to calculate a comprehensive list of dose conversion coefficients (mGy/mGy) to convert air-kerma to organ dose. Parameters included ten phantoms (newborn, 1-year, 5-year, 10-year, 15-year old male and female), 28 organs over 33 energies between 0.01 and 20 MeV in six (6) irradiation geometries relevant to a child who might be exposed to a radiological release: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right-lateral (RLAT), left-lateral (LLAT), rotational (ROT), and isotropic (ISO). Dose conversion coefficients to the red bone marrow over 36 skeletal sites were also calculated. It was hypothesized that the pediatric organ dose conversion coefficients would follow similar trends to the published adult values as dictated by human anatomy, but be of a higher magnitude. It was found that while the pediatric coefficients did yield similar patterns to that of the adult coefficients, depending on the organ and irradiation geometry, the pediatric values could be lower or higher than that of the adult coefficients.

  14. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for photons to 1 GeV.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2011-04-01

    The personal dose equivalent, H(p)(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity effective dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk, where personal dosemeters are usually worn, and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 × 30 × 15 cm(3) slab-type phantom. For this condition, the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H(p,slab)(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several megaelectronvolts, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work, conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H(p,slab)(10) and H(p,slab)(3) both by using the kerma approximation and tracking secondary charged particles. For H(p)(0.07), the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H(p,slab)(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom, conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared with the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on Radiological

  15. Evaluation of Dimensionality in the Assessment of Internal Consistency Reliability: Coefficient Alpha and Omega Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2015-01-01

    In the lead article, Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love demonstrate the relationship among homogeneity, internal consistency, and coefficient alpha, and also distinguish among them. These distinctions are important because too often coefficient alpha--a reliability coefficient--is interpreted as an index of homogeneity or internal consistency.…

  16. Evaluation of Dimensionality in the Assessment of Internal Consistency Reliability: Coefficient Alpha and Omega Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2015-01-01

    In the lead article, Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love demonstrate the relationship among homogeneity, internal consistency, and coefficient alpha, and also distinguish among them. These distinctions are important because too often coefficient alpha--a reliability coefficient--is interpreted as an index of homogeneity or internal consistency.…

  17. Delimiting Coefficient a from Internal Consistency and Unidimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sijtsma, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    I discuss the contribution by Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love (2015) in which they relate reliability represented by coefficient a to formal definitions of internal consistency and unidimensionality, both proposed by Cronbach (1951). I argue that coefficient a is a lower bound to reliability and that concepts of internal consistency and…

  18. Delimiting Coefficient a from Internal Consistency and Unidimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sijtsma, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    I discuss the contribution by Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love (2015) in which they relate reliability represented by coefficient a to formal definitions of internal consistency and unidimensionality, both proposed by Cronbach (1951). I argue that coefficient a is a lower bound to reliability and that concepts of internal consistency and…

  19. Neutron-fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients in an anthropomorphic phantom.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, A A; Ma, A; Tzortzis, M; Spyrou, N M

    2005-01-01

    A set of fluence-to-effective-dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for neutrons with energies <20 MeV using a high-resolution anthropomorphic phantom (Zubal model) and the MCNPX code. The calculation used 13 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10(-9) to 20 MeV, under three different source irradiation configurations: anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior and left lateral. Dose calculations were performed for 18 selected organs of the body, for which the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements have set tissue weighting factors for the determination of the effective dose. Another set of neutron-fluence-to-effective-dose conversion coefficients was also calculated with the proposed modification wR from ICRP Publication 92. From comparison between the dose results calculated and the data reported for the MIRD and VIPMAN models, it can be concluded that, although some discrepancies exist between the Zubal model and the two other models, there is good agreement in the left lateral irradiation geometry.

  20. Dose conversion coefficients for photon exposure of the human eye lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, R.; Dietze, G.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several papers dealing with the eye lens dose have been published, because epidemiological studies implied that the induction of cataracts occurs even at eye lens doses of less than 500 mGy. Different questions were addressed: Which personal dose equivalent quantity is appropriate for monitoring the dose to the eye lens? Is a new definition of the dose quantity Hp(3) based on a cylinder phantom to represent the human head necessary? Are current conversion coefficients from fluence to equivalent dose to the lens sufficiently accurate? To investigate the latter question, a realistic model of the eye including the inner structure of the lens was developed. Using this eye model, conversion coefficients for electrons have already been presented. In this paper, the same eye model—with the addition of the whole body—was used to calculate conversion coefficients from fluence (and air kerma) to equivalent dose to the lens for photon radiation from 5 keV to 10 MeV. Compared to the values adopted in 1996 by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the new values are similar between 40 keV and 1 MeV and lower by up to a factor of 5 and 7 for photon energies at about 10 keV and 10 MeV, respectively. Above 1 MeV, the new values (calculated without kerma approximation) should be applied in pure photon radiation fields, while the values adopted by the ICRP in 1996 (calculated with kerma approximation) should be applied in case a significant contribution from secondary electrons originating outside the body is present.

  1. First direct proof of internal conversion between bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreyre, T.; Harston, M. R.; Aiche, M.; Bourgine, F.; Chemin, J. F.; Claverie, G.; Goudour, J. P.; Scheurer, J. N.; Attallah, F.; Bogaert, G.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre, A.; Durell, J.; Grandin, J. P.; Meyerhof, W. E.; Phillips, W.

    2000-08-01

    We present direct evidence for the process of internal conversion between bound atomic states (BIC) when the binding energy of the converted electron becomes larger than the nuclear transition energy. This process has been proposed as an explanation of the measured, unexpectedly short lifetime of the first excited state of 125Te with charge state larger than 44+. We have detected the Kα x rays emitted in flight which follow the filling of the K-shell vacancy created by the bound internal conversion process, together with γ rays from Te ions in charge states ranging between 44+ and 48+. For Te45+ and Te46+, the comparison of the x-ray to γ-ray ratios with the theoretical calculations of the internal conversion coefficients including decay to bound atomic states, assuming Te ions in their ground electronic state, show poor agreement. The agreement becomes good if account is taken of BIC decay of excited initial states with different occupancies of the 2p1/2 and 2p3/2 subshells. In this situation, the half-life becomes sensitive to the precise initial state and simple specification of the charge state alone is no longer appropriate.

  2. Organ dose conversion coefficients for voxel models of the reference male and female from idealized photon exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi-Henss, N.

    2007-04-01

    A new series of organ equivalent dose conversion coefficients for whole body external photon exposure is presented for a standardized couple of human voxel models, called Rex and Regina. Irradiations from broad parallel beams in antero-posterior, postero-anterior, left- and right-side lateral directions as well as from a 360° rotational source have been performed numerically by the Monte Carlo transport code EGSnrc. Dose conversion coefficients from an isotropically distributed source were computed, too. The voxel models Rex and Regina originating from real patient CT data comply in body and organ dimensions with the currently valid reference values given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the average Caucasian man and woman, respectively. While the equivalent dose conversion coefficients of many organs are in quite good agreement with the reference values of ICRP Publication 74, for some organs and certain geometries the discrepancies amount to 30% or more. Differences between the sexes are of the same order with mostly higher dose conversion coefficients in the smaller female model. However, much smaller deviations from the ICRP values are observed for the resulting effective dose conversion coefficients. With the still valid definition for the effective dose (ICRP Publication 60), the greatest change appears in lateral exposures with a decrease in the new models of at most 9%. However, when the modified definition of the effective dose as suggested by an ICRP draft is applied, the largest deviation from the current reference values is obtained in postero-anterior geometry with a reduction of the effective dose conversion coefficient by at most 12%.

  3. Calculation of conversion coefficients using Chinese adult reference phantoms for air submersion and ground contamination.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Qiu, Rui; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Yang, Bo; Liu, Huan; Ren, Li; Li, Junli

    2017-03-21

    The effective and organ equivalent dose coefficients have been widely used to provide assessment of doses received by adult members of the public and by workers exposed to environmental radiation from nuclear facilities under normal or accidental situations. Advancements in phantom types, weighting factors, decay data, etc, have led to the publication of newer results in this regard. This paper presents a new set of conversion coefficients for air submersion and ground contamination (with the use of Geant4) for photons from 15 keV to 10 MeV using the Chinese and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adult reference male and female phantoms. The radiation fields, except for energy spectrum at low energies, were validated by the data obtained from the Monte Carlo code YURI. The effective dose coefficients of monoenergetic photons, obtained for the ICRP adult reference phantoms, agree well with recently published data for air submersion and ground contamination with a plane source at a depth of 0.5 g cm(-2) in soil, but an average difference of 36.5% is observed for ground surface contamination with the abovementioned radiation field. The average differences in organ equivalent dose coefficients between the Chinese and the ICRP adult reference phantoms are within 6% for most organs, but noticeable differences of up to 70% or even higher are found at photon energies below 30 keV under air submersion. The effective dose coefficients obtained with the Chinese adult reference phantoms are greater than those of the ICRP adult reference phantoms above 30 keV and 0.5 MeV for ground contamination and air submersion, respectively; the average differences from the Chinese adult reference phantoms are about 3.6% and 0.4% in the whole energy range with maximum differences of 31.8% and 27.6% at 15 keV for air submersion and ground contamination respectively. These differences are attributed to anatomical discrepancies in overlying tissue mass of an

  4. Calculation of conversion coefficients using Chinese adult reference phantoms for air submersion and ground contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Qiu, Rui; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Yang, Bo; Liu, Huan; Ren, Li; Li, Junli

    2017-03-01

    The effective and organ equivalent dose coefficients have been widely used to provide assessment of doses received by adult members of the public and by workers exposed to environmental radiation from nuclear facilities under normal or accidental situations. Advancements in phantom types, weighting factors, decay data, etc, have led to the publication of newer results in this regard. This paper presents a new set of conversion coefficients for air submersion and ground contamination (with the use of Geant4) for photons from 15 keV to 10 MeV using the Chinese and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adult reference male and female phantoms. The radiation fields, except for energy spectrum at low energies, were validated by the data obtained from the Monte Carlo code YURI. The effective dose coefficients of monoenergetic photons, obtained for the ICRP adult reference phantoms, agree well with recently published data for air submersion and ground contamination with a plane source at a depth of 0.5 g cm-2 in soil, but an average difference of 36.5% is observed for ground surface contamination with the abovementioned radiation field. The average differences in organ equivalent dose coefficients between the Chinese and the ICRP adult reference phantoms are within 6% for most organs, but noticeable differences of up to 70% or even higher are found at photon energies below 30 keV under air submersion. The effective dose coefficients obtained with the Chinese adult reference phantoms are greater than those of the ICRP adult reference phantoms above 30 keV and 0.5 MeV for ground contamination and air submersion, respectively; the average differences from the Chinese adult reference phantoms are about 3.6% and 0.4% in the whole energy range with maximum differences of 31.8% and 27.6% at 15 keV for air submersion and ground contamination respectively. These differences are attributed to anatomical discrepancies in overlying tissue mass of an

  5. Fluence to Hp(3) conversion coefficients for neutrons from thermal to 15 MeV.

    PubMed

    Gualdrini, G; Ferrari, P; Tanner, R

    2013-12-01

    The recent statement on tissue reactions issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in April 2011 recommends a very significant reduction in the equivalent dose annual limit for the eye lens from 150 to 20 mSv y(-1); this has stimulated a lot of interest in eye lens dosimetry in the radiation protection community. Until now no conversion coefficients were available for the operational quantity Hp(3) for neutrons. The scope of the present work was to extend previous evaluations of H*(10) and Hp(10) performed at the PTB in 1995 to provide also Hp(3) data for neutrons. The present work is also intended to complete the studies carried out on photons during the last 4 y within the European Union-funded ORAMED (optimisation of radiation protection for medical staff) project.

  6. Effect of X-ray High-voltage Variations on the Conversion Coefficients.

    PubMed

    Behnke, B; Hupe, O; Behrens, R

    2016-10-20

    Conversion coefficients (CCs) are an essential vehicle in radiation protection for the determination of the dose (rate) of a given radiation field. According to the current draft of the revision of international standard ISO 4037, an X-ray field is a reference field if the CCs of the field match the tabulated ISO values within 2%. Deviations of the high-voltage (HV) tube-potential from its nominal value influence the resulting spectra and change the corresponding CCs. This work investigates the maximum allowable deviation of the HV from its nominal value such that the requirements of ISO 4037 remain fulfilled. This is achieved using both synthetic spectra created by a software simulation program and spectra measured at one of the X-ray facilities of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. The results are summarised in form of a new proposal for upper limit values which are suggested to be used in the next version of ISO 4037.

  7. The feasibility of universal DLP-to-risk conversion coefficients for body CT protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Paulson, Erik K.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-03-01

    The effective dose associated with computed tomography (CT) examinations is often estimated from dose-length product (DLP) using scanner-independent conversion coefficients. Such conversion coefficients are available for a small number of examinations, each covering an entire region of the body (e.g., head, neck, chest, abdomen and/or pelvis). Similar conversion coefficients, however, do not exist for examinations that cover a single organ or a sub-region of the body, as in the case of a multi-phase liver examination. In this study, we extended the DLP-to-effective dose conversion coefficient (k factor) to a wide range of body CT protocols and derived the corresponding DLP-to-cancer risk conversion coefficient (q factor). An extended cardiactorso (XCAT) computational model was used, which represented a reference adult male patient. A range of body CT protocols used in clinical practice were categorized based on anatomical regions examined into 10 protocol classes. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to estimate the organ dose associated with each protocol class. Assuming the reference model to be 20 years old, effective dose and risk index (an index of the total risk for cancer incidence) were then calculated and normalized by DLP to obtain the k and q factors. The k and q factors varied across protocol classes; the coefficients of variation were 28% and 9%, respectively. The small variation exhibited by the q factor suggested the feasibility of universal q factors for a wide range of body CT protocols.

  8. Photon extremity absorbed dose and kerma conversion coefficients for calibration geometries.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2007-02-01

    Absorbed dose and dose equivalent conversion coefficients are routinely used in personnel dosimetry programs. These conversion coefficients can be applied to particle fluences or to measured air kerma values to determine appropriate operational monitoring quantities such as the ambient dose equivalent or personal dose equivalent for a specific geometry. For personnel directly handling materials, the absorbed dose to the extremities is of concern. This work presents photon conversion coefficients for two extremity calibration geometries using finger and wrist/arm phantoms described in HPS N13.32. These conversion coefficients have been calculated as a function of photon energy in terms of the kerma and the absorbed dose using Monte Carlo techniques and the calibration geometries specified in HPS N13.32. Additionally, kerma and absorbed dose conversion coefficients for commonly used x-ray spectra and calibration source fields are presented. The kerma values calculated in this work for the x-ray spectra and calibration sources compare well to those listed in HPS N13.32. The absorbed dose values, however, differ significantly for higher energy photons because charged particle equilibrium conditions have not been satisfied for the shallow depth. Thus, the air-kerma-to-dose and exposure-to-dose conversion coefficients for Cs and Co listed in HPS N13.32 overestimate the absorbed dose to the extremities. Applying the conversion coefficients listed in HPS N13.32 for Cs, for example, would result in an overestimate of absorbed dose of 62% for the finger phantom and 55% for the wrist phantom.

  9. International and American Students' Perceptions of Informal English Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Eun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated international and American students' perceptions of structured but informal English conversations with each other. American and international students perceived the effects of these conversations differently. While the international students claimed increased linguistic and cultural competence, the Americans identified…

  10. Effective dose conversion coefficients for health care provider exposed to pediatric and adult victims in radiological dispersal device incident.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Young; Ha, Wi-Ho; Jin, Young-Woo; Bolch, Wesley E; Lee, Choonsik

    2015-03-01

    After an incident of radiological dispersal devices (RDD), health care providers will be exposed to the contaminated patients in the extended medical treatments. Assessment of potential radiation dose to the health care providers will be crucial to minimize their health risk. In this study, we compiled a set of conversion coefficients (mSv MBq(-1) s(-1)) to readily estimate the effective dose from the time-integrated activity for the health care providers while they deal with internally contaminated patients at different ages. We selected Co-60, Ir-192, Am-241, Cs-137, and I-131 as the major radionuclides that may be used for RDD. We obtained the age-specific organ burdens after the inhalation of those radionuclides from the Dose and Risk Calculation Software (DCAL) program. A series of hybrid computational phantoms (1-, 5-, 10-, and 15 year-old, and adult males) were implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, MCNPX v 2.7, to simulate an adult male health care provider exposed to contaminated patients at different ages. Two exposure scenarios were taken into account: a health care provider (a) standing at the side of patients lying in bed and (b) sitting face to face with patients. The conversion coefficients overall depended on radionuclides, the age of the patients, and the orientation of the patients. The conversion coefficient was greatest for Co-60 and smallest for Am-241. The dose from the 1 year-old patient phantom was up to three times greater than that from the adult patient phantom. The conversion coefficients were less dependent on the age of the patients in the scenario of a health care provider sitting face to face with patients. The dose conversion coefficients established in this study will be useful to readily estimate the effective dose to the health care providers in RDD events.

  11. Test of internal-conversion theory with measurements in {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Ba

    SciTech Connect

    Nica, N.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; Rockwell, W. E.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2007-02-15

    We have measured the ratio of K-shell internal conversion coefficients, {alpha}{sub K}, for the 127.5-keV E3 transition in {sup 134}Cs and the 661.7-keV M4 transition in {sup 137}Ba. Previous measurements of these {alpha}{sub K} values led to a ratio that differed from calculated internal conversion coefficients. Our measured result, 30.01(15), disagrees with, but is a factor of three more precise than, the previous average of all experimental results. Our new result is consistent with calculations.

  12. Dose conversion coefficients for paediatric CT examinations with automatic tube current modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Becker, J.; Hoeschen, C.

    2012-10-01

    A common dose-saving technique used in modern CT devices is automatic tube current modulation (TCM), which was originally designed to also reduce the dose in paediatric CT patients. In order to be able to deduce detailed organ doses of paediatric models, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDIvol for an eight-week-old baby and seven- and eight-year-old children have been computed accounting for TCM. The relative difference in organ dose conversion coefficients with and without TCM is for many organs and examinations less than 10%, but can in some cases amount up to 30%, e.g., for the thyroid in the chest CT of the seven-year-old child. Overall, the impact of TCM on the conversion coefficients increases with increasing age. Besides TCM, also the effect of collimation and tube voltage on organ dose conversion coefficients has been investigated. It could be shown that the normalization to CTDIvol leads to conversion coefficients that can in most cases be considered to be independent of collimation and tube voltage.

  13. Dose conversion coefficients for paediatric CT examinations with automatic tube current modulation.

    PubMed

    Schlattl, H; Zankl, M; Becker, J; Hoeschen, C

    2012-10-21

    A common dose-saving technique used in modern CT devices is automatic tube current modulation (TCM), which was originally designed to also reduce the dose in paediatric CT patients. In order to be able to deduce detailed organ doses of paediatric models, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDI(vol) for an eight-week-old baby and seven- and eight-year-old children have been computed accounting for TCM. The relative difference in organ dose conversion coefficients with and without TCM is for many organs and examinations less than 10%, but can in some cases amount up to 30%, e.g., for the thyroid in the chest CT of the seven-year-old child. Overall, the impact of TCM on the conversion coefficients increases with increasing age. Besides TCM, also the effect of collimation and tube voltage on organ dose conversion coefficients has been investigated. It could be shown that the normalization to CTDI(vol) leads to conversion coefficients that can in most cases be considered to be independent of collimation and tube voltage.

  14. Nuclear internal conversion between bound atomic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, J. F.; Harston, M. R.; Karpeshin, F. F.; Carreyre, J.; Attallah, F.; Aleonard, M. M.; Scheurer, J. N.; Boggaert, G.; Grandin, J. R.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2003-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for rate of decay of the (3/2)+ isomeric state in 125Te versus the ionic charge state. For charge state larger than 44 the nuclear transition lies below the threshold for emission of a K-shell electron into the continuum with the result that normal internal conversion is energetically forbiden. Rather surprisingly, for the charge 45 and 46 the lifetime of the level was found to have a value close to that in neutral atoms. We present direct evidence that the nuclear transition could still be converted but without the emission of the electron into the continuum, the electron being promoted from the K-shell to an other empty bound state lying close to the continuum. We called this process BIC. The experimental results agree whith theoretical calculations if BIC resonances are taken into account. This leads to a nuclear decay constant that is extremely sensitive to the precise initial state and simple specification of the charge state is no longer appropriate. The contribution to decay of the nucleus of BIC has recently been extended to the situation in which the electron is promoted to an intermediate filled bound state (PFBIC) with an apparent violation of the Pauli principle. Numerical results of the expected dependence of PFBIC on the charge state will be presented for the decay of the 77.351 keV level in 197Au.

  15. Evaluation of dose conversion coefficients for an eight-year-old Iranian male phantom undergoing computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Parisa; Hakimabad, Hashem Miri; Motavalli, Laleh Rafat

    2015-11-01

    In order to construct a library of Iranian pediatric voxel phantoms for radiological protection and dosimetry applications, an Iranian eight-year-old phantom was constructed from a series of CT images. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients to this phantom were calculated for head, chest, abdominopelvis and chest-abdomen-pelvis scans at tube voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kVp. To validate the results, the organ and effective dose conversion coefficients obtained were compared with those of the University of Florida eight-year-old voxel female phantom as a function of examination type and anatomical scan area. For a detailed study, depth distributions of organs together with the thickness of surrounding tissues located in the beam path, which are shielding the internal organs, were determined for these two voxel phantoms. The relation between the anatomical differences and the level of delivered dose was investigated and the discrepancies among the results justified.

  16. Determining organ dose conversion coefficients for external neutron irradiation by using a voxel mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Qu, Decheng; Ning, Jing; Zhou, Hongmei; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2016-03-01

    A set of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for neutrons with energies <20 MeV using a developed voxel mouse model and Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP), for the purpose of neutron radiation effect evaluation. The calculation used 37 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10(-9) MeV to 20 MeV, under five different source irradiation configurations: left lateral, right lateral, dorsal-ventral, ventral-dorsal, and isotropic. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for selected organs of the body were presented in the paper, and the effect of irradiation geometry conditions, neutron energy and the organ location on the organ dose was discussed. The results indicated that neutron dose conversion coefficients clearly show sensitivity to irradiation geometry at neutron energy below 1 MeV.

  17. Determining organ dose conversion coefficients for external neutron irradiation by using a voxel mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Qu, Decheng; Ning, Jing; Zhou, Hongmei; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2016-01-01

    A set of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for neutrons with energies <20 MeV using a developed voxel mouse model and Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP), for the purpose of neutron radiation effect evaluation. The calculation used 37 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10−9 MeV to 20 MeV, under five different source irradiation configurations: left lateral, right lateral, dorsal–ventral, ventral–dorsal, and isotropic. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for selected organs of the body were presented in the paper, and the effect of irradiation geometry conditions, neutron energy and the organ location on the organ dose was discussed. The results indicated that neutron dose conversion coefficients clearly show sensitivity to irradiation geometry at neutron energy below 1 MeV. PMID:26661852

  18. The Spectrometer for Internal Conversion Electrons at TRIUMF-ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallcombe, James; Evitts, Lee; Garnsworthy, Adam; Moukaddam, Mohamad; Spice Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    SPICE (SPectrometer for Internal Conversion Electrons) is a powerful tool to measure conversion coefficients and E 0 transitions in nuclei. E 0 transition strengths, which are not accessible by gamma-ray spectroscopy, are a sparsely measured observable. Such transition strengths are particularly sensitive to nuclear shape and state mixing effects and as such are a key item of data in studying the evolution of shape coexistence. SPICE is an ancillary detector that has been commissioned for use with Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) at the ISAC-II facility of TRIUMF. The main feature of SPICE is high efficiency over a range of electron energies from 100 to 3500 keV, crucial for work with RIBs, and an effective reduction of beam-induced backgrounds. This is achieved with an upstream magnetic lens, a high- Z photon shield and a large-area lithium-drifted silicon detector. A major theme of the physics program will be the investigation of shape coexistence and state mixing in exotic nuclei. An overview of the main features of SPICE will be presented alongside details of the commissioning and preliminary data from the first experiment studying excited structures in 110Pd. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation (MRI).

  19. P-Wave to Rayleigh-wave conversion coefficients for wedge corners; model experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gangi, A.F.; Wesson, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    An analytic solution is not available for the diffraction of elastic waves by wedges; however, numerical solutions of finite-difference type are available for selected wedge angles. The P- to Rayleigh-wave conversion coefficients at wedge tips have been measured on two-dimensional seismic models for stress-free wedges with wedge angles, ??0, of 10, 30, 60, 90 and 120??. The conversion coefficients show two broad peaks and a minimum as a function of the angle between the wedge face and the direction of the incident P-wave. The minimum occurs for the P wave incident parallel to the wedge face and one maximum is near an incidence angle of 90?? to the wedge face. The amplitude of this maximum, relative to the other, decreases as the wedge angle increases. The asymmetry of the conversion coefficients, CPR(??; ??0), relative to parallel incidence (?? = 0) increases as the wedge angle increases. The locations of the maxima and the minimum as well as the asymmetry can be explained qualitatively. The conversion coefficients are measured with an accuracy of ??5% in those regions where there are no interfering waves. A comparison of the data for the 10?? wedge with the theoretical results for a half plane (0?? wedge) shows good correlation. ?? 1978.

  20. Symmetry forbidden vibronic spectra and internal conversion in benzene.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Lin, Chih-Kai; Li, Xiang Yuan; Zhu, Chao Yuan; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2010-12-07

    The spectra of symmetry-forbidden transitions and internal conversion were investigated in the present work. Temperature dependence was taken into account for the spectra simulation. The vibronic coupling, essential in the two processes, was calculated based on the Herzberg-Teller theory within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The approach was employed for the symmetry-forbidden absorption/fluorescence, and internal conversion between 1(1)A(1g) and 1(1)B(2u) states in benzene. Vibrational frequencies, normal coordinates, electronic transition dipole moments, and non-adiabatic coupling matrix elements were obtained by ab initio quantum chemical methods. The main peaks, along with the weak peaks, were in good agreement with the observed ones. The rate constant of the 1(1)A(1g)← 1(1)B(2u) internal conversion was estimated within the order of 10(3) s(-1). This could be regarded as the lower limit (about 4.8 × 10(3) s(-1)) of the internal conversion. It is stressed that the distortion effect was taken into account both in the symmetry-forbidden absorption/fluorescence, and the rate constants of internal conversion in the present work. The distortion effects complicate the spectra and increase the rate constants of internal conversion.

  1. Chapter 4: Ultrafast Internal Conversion of Pyrazine via Conical Intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y. I.

    2014-04-01

    We describe recent experimental studies of internal conversion via conical intersection in pyrazine. Ultrafast S2 - S1 internal conversion is observed in real time using a time-resolved photoelectron imaging (TRPEI) method with a time resolution of 22 fs. This method enables us to obtain a time-energy map of the photoelectron angular anisotropy, which unambiguously reveals the signature of internal conversion. Furthermore, the time-energy map of the photoelectron kinetic energy distribution (PKED) exhibits vibrational quantum beats of totally symmetric modes in S1 after internal conversion. We also studied similar conical intersections between D1(π-1) and D0(n-1) by He(I) photoelectron spectroscopy and pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. The existence of ultrafast internal conversion from D1 to D0 is confirmed by broadening of He(I) photoelectron spectra of pyrazine and deuterated pyrazine. Comparison of these spectra with one-color resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of the 3s Rydberg states clearly indicates that the conical intersection between D1 and D0 induces ultrafast internal conversion from the Rydberg state with a D1 ion core to that with a D0 ion core.

  2. Foetal dose conversion coefficients for ICRP-compliant pregnant models from idealised proton exposures

    PubMed Central

    Taranenko, Valery; Xu, X. George

    2009-01-01

    Protection of pregnant women and their foetus against external proton irradiations poses a unique challenge. Assessment of foetal dose due to external protons in galactic cosmic rays and as secondaries generated in aircraft walls is especially important during high-altitude flights. This paper reports a set of fluence to absorbed dose conversion coefficients for the foetus and its brain for external monoenergetic proton beams of six standard configurations (the antero-posterior, the postero-anterior, the right lateral, the left lateral, the rotational and the isotropic). The pregnant female anatomical definitions at each of the three gestational periods (3, 6 and 9 months) are based on newly developed RPI-P series of models whose organ masses were matched within 1% with the International Commission on Radiological Protection reference values. Proton interactions and the transport of secondary particles were carefully simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) and the phantoms consisting of several million voxels at 3 mm resolution. When choosing the physics models in the MCNPX, it was found that the advanced Cascade-Exciton intranuclear cascade model showed a maximum of 9% foetal dose increase compared with the default model combination at intermediate energies below 5 GeV. Foetal dose results from this study are tabulated and compared with previously published data that were based on simplified anatomy. The comparison showed a strong dependence upon the source geometry, energy and gestation period: the dose differences are typically less than 20% for all sources except ISO where systematically 40–80% of higher doses were observed. Below 200 MeV, a larger discrepancy in dose was found due to the Bragg peak shift caused by different anatomy. The tabulated foetal doses represent the latest and most detailed study to date offering a useful set of data to improve radiation protection dosimetry against external protons. PMID:19246483

  3. Organ dose conversion coefficients for external photon irradiation of male and female voxel models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zankl, M.; Fill, U.; Petoussi-Henss, N.; Regulla, D.

    2002-07-01

    New organ equivalent dose conversion coefficients are presented for whole body irradiation with monoenergetic photons of energies between 10 keV and 10 MeV for idealized geometries and seven adult male and female voxel models. The geometries are broad parallel photon beams in anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left- and right-lateral direction and a full 360° rotation around the body length axis. Dose differences between the different voxel models are below approximately 30% for some organs and geometries in the energy range between 60 and 200 keV, but they can be up to 100% or more in single cases, due to differences in stature and individual anatomical details. For low photon energies, the differences may amount to hundreds of per cent. Extensive comparisons of the dose conversion coefficients with respective values calculated using mathematical body models revealed various degrees of unrealistic positioning of single organs in the latter models. Examples are the kidneys, spleen and stomach that are located too superficially in the mathematical models. Over- or underestimations of several tens of per cent may, thus, occur for the mathematical models, compared to the voxel models considered. In contrast to previous assumptions, when the mathematical models have been used to establish reference organ dose conversion coefficients, it can be concluded that they do not properly represent a large population of individuals.

  4. Internal State Conversion in Ultracold Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, J. N.; Gangardt, D. M.; Laloë, F.

    2002-06-01

    We consider an ultracold gas of (noncondensed) bosons or fermions with two internal states, and we study the effect of a gradient of the transition frequency between these states. When a π/2 rf pulse is applied to the sample, exchange effects during collisions transfer the atoms into internal states which depend on the direction of their velocity. This results, after a short time, in a spatial separation between the two states. A kinetic equation is solved analytically and numerically; the results agree well with the recent observations of Lewandowski et al.

  5. Simultaneous measurement of electro-optical and converse-piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-PT ceramics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Pingping; Wang, Xianping; Sun, Jingjing; Huang, Meizhen; Chen, Xianfeng; Cao, Zhuangqi

    2012-06-18

    A new scheme is proposed to measure the electro-optical (EO) and converse-piezoelectric (CPE) coefficients of the PMN-PT ceramics simultaneously, in which the PMN-PT ceramics acts as the guiding layer of a symmetrical metal-cladding waveguide. As the applied electric field exerts on the waveguide, the effective refractive index (RI) (or synchronous angle) can be effectively tuned from a selected mode to another adjacent mode owing to the high sensitivity and the small spacing of the ultra-high order modes. Subsequently, a correlation between EO and CPE coefficients is established. With this correlation and the measurement of the effective RI change to the applied voltage, the quadratic EO and CPE coefficients of PMN-PT ceramics are obtained simultaneously. The obtained results are further checked by fitting the variations of effective RI to a quadratic function. Our measurement method can be extended to a wide range of other materials.

  6. Conversion Intentions of Interns: What Are the Motivating Factors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Jessica L.; Good, Linda K.; Gardner, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate interns' supervisory support expectations, psychological contract obligations, job satisfaction, perception of advancement opportunities and affective organisational commitment in an attempt to gain a better understanding of how these variables influence interns' conversion intentions.…

  7. Conversion Intentions of Interns: What Are the Motivating Factors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Jessica L.; Good, Linda K.; Gardner, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate interns' supervisory support expectations, psychological contract obligations, job satisfaction, perception of advancement opportunities and affective organisational commitment in an attempt to gain a better understanding of how these variables influence interns' conversion intentions.…

  8. Organ dose conversion coefficients for tube current modulated CT protocols for an adult population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wanyi; Tian, Xiaoyu; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Zhang, Yakun; Segars, William Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    In computed tomography (CT), patient-specific organ dose can be estimated using pre-calculated organ dose conversion coefficients (organ dose normalized by CTDIvol, h factor) database, taking into account patient size and scan coverage. The conversion coefficients have been previously estimated for routine body protocol classes, grouped by scan coverage, across an adult population for fixed tube current modulated CT. The coefficients, however, do not include the widely utilized tube current (mA) modulation scheme, which significantly impacts organ dose. This study aims to extend the h factors and the corresponding dose length product (DLP) to create effective dose conversion coefficients (k factor) database incorporating various tube current modulation strengths. Fifty-eight extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were included in this study representing population anatomy variation in clinical practice. Four mA profiles, representing weak to strong mA dependency on body attenuation, were generated for each phantom and protocol class. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the organ dose. The organ dose and effective dose was further normalized by CTDIvol and DLP to derive the h factors and k factors, respectively. The h factors and k factors were summarized in an exponential regression model as a function of body size. Such a population-based mathematical model can provide a comprehensive organ dose estimation given body size and CTDIvol. The model was integrated into an iPhone app XCATdose version 2, enhancing the 1st version based upon fixed tube current modulation. With the organ dose calculator, physicists, physicians, and patients can conveniently estimate organ dose.

  9. Dose conversion coefficients for electron exposure of the human eye lens: calculations including a whole body phantom.

    PubMed

    Behrens, R

    2013-07-01

    In this work, conversion coefficients from electron fluence to absorbed dose to the eye lens were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations based on a detailed stylised eye model and a very simple but whole body phantom. These data supersede and complement data published earlier based on the simulation of only a single stylised eye. The new data differ from the old ones by not more than 3, 4, 7 and 16 % for angles of radiation incidence of α=0°, 15°, 30° and 45°, respectively, due to the inclusion of the whole body phantom. The data presented in the present work also complement those of a recent report of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (ICRP Publication 116), where conversion coefficients from electron fluence to absorbed dose to the lens of the eye are shown for solely 0°, 180° and isotropic radiation incidence (but for a much broader range of energies). In this article, values are provided for angles of incidence of 0° up to 180° in steps of 15° and for rotational geometry; no systematic deviation was observed from the values given in ICRP Publication 116 for 0° (based on the application of a bare eye) and 180° (based on the application of a voxel whole body phantom). Data are given for monoenergetic electrons from 0.1 up to 10 MeV and for a broad parallel beam geometry in vacuum.

  10. Internal conversion from excited electronic states of 229Th ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilous, Pavlo V.; Kazakov, Georgy A.; Moore, Iain D.; Schumm, Thorsten; Pálffy, Adriana

    2017-03-01

    The process of internal conversion from excited electronic states is investigated theoretically for the case of the vacuum-ultraviolet nuclear transition of 229Th. Due to the very low transition energy, the 229Th nucleus offers the unique possibility to open the otherwise forbidden internal conversion nuclear decay channel for thorium ions via optical laser excitation of the electronic shell. We show that this feature can be exploited to investigate the isomeric state properties via observation of internal conversion from excited electronic configurations of +Th and Th+2 ions. A possible experimental realization of the proposed scenario at the nuclear laser spectroscopy facility IGISOL in Jyväskylä, Finland, is discussed.

  11. Internal conversion in highly-stripped {sup 83}Kr ions

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Ahmad, I.; Gehring, J.

    1995-08-01

    The transition probability per unit time for the decay of a nuclear level via internal conversion (IC), {lambda}IC, depends on the electron environment of the nucleus. For example, inner-shell conversion in highly-charged ions can change appreciably as electrons are successively removed from the ion. Magnetic dipole (Ml) transitions are especially sensitive to this effect since the internal conversion depends strongly on the electron density at the nucleus. Hence, measurements of {lambda}IC,q, the internal conversion rate in an ion with charge state q, can provide good tests of theoretical electron wave functions if the electron configuration in the ions is known. In a previous experiment, a new method which identifies charge-changing events during passage of ion beams through a magnetic spectrometer was used to determine {lambda}IC,q for the 14.4-keV isomer in {sup 57}Fe. This contribution reports measurements made using the same technique for the 9.4-keV isomer in {sup 83}Kr. A beam of {sup 83}Kr with energy 650 MeV bombarded a Au target with a thickness 300 {mu}g cm{sup -2}. Secondary scattered beams were accepted and analyzed by an Enge magnetic spectrometer. The numbers of excited nuclei decaying during passage through the spectrometer and their internal conversion rates were deduced from the pattern of events measured in the spectrometer focal plane.

  12. Further test of internal-conversion theory with a measurement in {sup 197}Pt

    SciTech Connect

    Nica, N.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; Goodwin, J.; Balonek, C.; Hernberg, M.; Nolan, J.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2009-12-15

    We have measured the K-shell internal conversion coefficient, {alpha}{sub K}, for the 346.5-keV M4 transition in {sup 197}Pt to be 4.23(7). This result differs from a previous value, which disagreed significantly from theory. Our new value agrees well with Dirac-Fock calculations and removes the earlier discrepancy as a source of concern.

  13. Further Test of Internal-conversion Theory with a Measurement in {sup 119}Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Nica, N. Hardy, J.C.; Iacob, V.E.

    2014-06-15

    Precise measurements are being used to test theoretical K-shell internal conversion coefficients (ICCs): in particular, our program has focused on examining whether the atomic K-vacancy formed during the conversion process must be incorporated into the calculations. We report here a measurement on the 65.66-keV, M4 isomeric transition in {sup 119}Sn. Our preliminary result is α{sub K}=1610(27), which confirms the importance of including the vacancy in the ICC calculations.

  14. Dose conversion coefficients for CT examinations of adults with automatic tube current modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Becker, J.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-10-01

    Automatic tube current modulation (TCM) is used in modern CT devices. This is implemented in the numerical calculation of dose conversion coefficients for CT examinations. For four models of adults, the female and male reference models of ICRP and ICRU and a lighter and a heavier female model, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDIvol (DCCCT) have been computed with a Monte Carlo transport code for CT scans with and without TCM. It could be shown for both cases that reliable values for spiral CT scans are obtained when combining the results from an appropriate set of axial scans. The largest organ DCCCT are presented for typical CT examinations for all four models. The impact of TCM is greatest for chest, pelvis and whole-trunk CT examinations, where with TCM the effective DCCCT can be 20-25% lower than without TCM. Typical organs with strong dependence on TCM are thyroid, urinary bladder, lungs and oesophagus. While the DCCCT of thyroid and urinary bladder are mainly sensitive to angular TCM, the DCCCT of lungs and oesophagus are influenced primarily by longitudinal TCM. The impact of the body stature on the effective DCCCT is of the same order as the effect of TCM. Thus, for CT scans in the trunk region, accurate dose values can only be obtained when different sets of DCCCT are employed that are appropriate for the patient's sex and stature and the actual TCM settings.

  15. Construction of hybrid Chinese reference adult phantoms and estimation of dose conversion coefficients for muons.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Li, Taosheng; Liu, Chunyu

    2015-04-01

    A set of fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients of external exposure to muons were investigated for Chinese hybrid phantom references, which include both male and female. Both polygon meshes and Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) surfaces were used to descried the boundary of the organs and tissues in these phantoms. The 3D-DOCTOR and Rhinoceros software were used to polygonise the colour slice images and generate the NURBS surfaces, respectively. The voxelisation is completed using the BINVOX software and the assembly finished by using MATLAB codes. The voxel resolutions were selected to be 0.22 × 0.22 × 0.22 cm(3) and 0.2 × 0.2 × 0.2 cm(3) for male and female phantoms, respectively. All parts of the final phantoms were matched to their reference organ masses within a tolerance of ±5%. The conversion coefficients for negative and positive muons were calculated with the FLUKA transport code. There were 21 external monoenergetic beams ranging from 0.01 GeV to 100 TeV in 5 different geometrical conditions of irradiation.

  16. SPectrometer for Internal Conversion Electrons (SPICE) at TRIUMF-ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallcombe, J.; Moukaddam, M.; Evitts, L. J.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hallam, S.; Andreoiu, C.; Ball, G. C.; Bolton, C.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Constable, M.; Cross, D. S.; Garrett, P. E.; Hackman, G.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R.; Ketelhut, S.; Kruecken, R.; Kurchaninov, L.; Park, J.; Pore, J. L.; Rand, E. T.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Smith, J. K.; Svensson, C. E.; Williams, M.

    2016-09-01

    A new ancillary detector, SPICE (SPectrometer for Internal Conversion Electrons) has been constructed and recently commissioned for use with radioactive ion beams at the TRIUMF-ISAC II facility. SPICE is designed to be operated in conjunction with the TIGRESS High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) spectrometer to perform combined in-beam γ-ray and internal-conversion-electron spectroscopy. The main feature of SPICE is high effciency over a wide range of electron energies from 100 to 3500 keV, with an effective reduction of beam-induced backgrounds. SPICE will be a powerful tool to measure conversion coeffcients and E0 transitions in atomic nuclei. A recent in-beam commissioning experiment demonstrates the effectiveness of the basic design concept of SPICE in background suppression.

  17. Dose conversion coefficients for neutron exposure to the lens of the human eye

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, Ryan P; Bellamy, Michael B; Eckerman, Keith F

    2011-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for the lens of the human eye have been calculated for neutron exposure at energies from 1 x 10{sup -9} to 20 MeV and several standard orientations: anterior-to-posterior, rotational and right lateral. MCNPX version 2.6.0, a Monte Carlo-based particle transport package, was used to determine the energy deposited in the lens of the eye. The human eyeball model was updated by partitioning the lens into sensitive and insensitive volumes as the anterior portion (sensitive volume) of the lens being more radiosensitive and prone to cataract formation. The updated eye model was used with the adult UF-ORNL mathematical phantom in the MCNPX transport calculations.

  18. Large Seebeck coefficients of protonated titanate nanotubes for high-temperature thermoelectric conversion.

    PubMed

    Miao, L; Tanemura, S; Huang, R; Liu, C Y; Huang, C M; Xu, G

    2010-08-01

    Titanate nanotubes Na(2-x)H(x)Ti(3)O(7) produced by alkali hydrothermally treated ground TiO(2) aerogels are investigated as possible materials for high-temperature thermoelectric conversion by measuring their thermoelectric properties. Strikingly, the Seebeck coefficients increased sharply in the temperature range 745 to 1032 K, reaching a maximum of 302 muV/K. The electrical resistivity of the TNNTs ranged from 325 to 525 Omegam, which is lower than that of bulk TiO(2), and thermal conductivities at room temperature were also very low, ranging from 0.55 to 0.75 Wm(-1) K(-1). The hollow structure of the titanate nanotubes, with small, uniform diameters, is thought to be responsible for the ultralow thermal conductivity. The large thermoelectric power and ultralow thermal conductivity suggest that titanate nanotubes represent a new kind of p-type oxide thermoelectric material.

  19. Dose conversion coefficients for neutron exposure to the lens of the human eye.

    PubMed

    Manger, R P; Bellamy, M B; Eckerman, K F

    2012-03-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for the lens of the human eye have been calculated for neutron exposure at energies from 1 × 10(-9) to 20 MeV and several standard orientations: anterior-to-posterior, rotational and right lateral. MCNPX version 2.6.0, a Monte Carlo-based particle transport package, was used to determine the energy deposited in the lens of the eye. The human eyeball model was updated by partitioning the lens into sensitive and insensitive volumes as the anterior portion (sensitive volume) of the lens being more radiosensitive and prone to cataract formation. The updated eye model was used with the adult UF-ORNL mathematical phantom in the MCNPX transport calculations.

  20. Photon spectrum and polarization for high conversion coefficient in the Compton backscattering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potylitsyn, A. P.; Kolchuzhkin, A. M.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Strokov, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    This study looks to simulate the nonlinear Compton backscattering (CBS) process based on the Monte Carlo technique for the conversion coefficient Kc ⩾ 1 , which can be considered as the average number of photons emitted by each electron. The characteristics of the nonlinear CBS process simulated in this work are as follows: the number of absorbed photons of a laser, the distance in the laser pulse in which the electron passes between two collisions, the energy and the polarization of the emitted photon in each collision, and the polarization of the electron before and after collision. The developed approach allows us to find the spectra and polarization characteristics of the final electrons and photons. When Kc > 1 , the spin-flip processes need to be considered for a correct simulation of the polarization of the final photons and electrons for energies typical of a γ- γ collider.

  1. The neutron dose conversion coefficients calculation in human tooth enamel in an anthropomorphic phantom.

    PubMed

    Khailov, A M; Ivannikov, A I; Skvortsov, V G; Stepanenko, V F; Tsyb, A F; Trompier, F; Hoshi, M

    2010-02-01

    In the present study, MCNP4B simulation code is used to simulate neutron and photon transport. It gives the conversion coefficients that relate neutron fluence to the dose in tooth enamel (molars and pre-molars only) for 20 energy groups of monoenergetic neutrons with energies from 10-9 to 20 MeV for five different irradiation geometries. The data presented are intended to provide the basis for connection between EPR dose values and standard protection quantities defined in ICRP Publication 74. The results of the calculations for critical organs were found to be consistent with ICRP data, with discrepancies generally less than 10% for the fast neutrons. The absorbed dose in enamel was found to depend strongly on the incident neutron energy for neutrons over 10 keV. The dependence of the data on the irradiation geometry is also shown. Lower bound estimates of enamel radiation sensitivity to neutrons were made using obtained coefficients for the secondary photons. Depending on neutron energy, tooth enamel was shown to register 10-120% of the total neutron dose in the human body in the case of pure neutron exposure and AP irradiation geometry.

  2. Internal conversion to bound final states in 125Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harston, M. R.; Carreyre, T.; Chemin, J. F.; Karpeshin, F.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2000-08-01

    Theoretical results are presented for rate of decay of the 3/2+ isomeric nuclear state of 125Te by excitation of atomic electrons to bound states in the ions Te 45+ and Te 46+. In these ions the nuclear transition energy lies just below the threshold for emission of a K-shell electron to the continuum with the result that normal K-shell internal conversion is energetically forbidden. However recent experimental results indicate that excitation of K-shell electrons is still significant in these ions. The theoretical results presented here for internal conversion to bound final states are in quantitative agreement with experiment and thereby confirm the contribution of near-resonant electron-nucleus transitions involving a bound final state.

  3. Conversion Coefficients for Proton Beams using Standing and Sitting Male Hybrid Computational Phantom Calculated in Idealized Irradiation Geometries.

    PubMed

    Alves, M C; Santos, W S; Lee, C; Bolch, W E; Hunt, J G; Júnior, A B Carvalho

    2016-09-24

    The aim of this study was the calculation of conversion coefficients for absorbed doses per fluence (DT/Φ) using the sitting and standing male hybrid phantom (UFH/NCI) exposure to monoenergetic protons with energy ranging from 2 MeV to 10 GeV. Sex-averaged effective dose per fluence (E/Φ) using the results of DT/Φ for the male and female hybrid phantom in standing and sitting postures were also calculated. Results of E/Φ of UFH/NCI standing phantom were also compared with tabulated effective dose conversion coefficients provided in ICRP publication 116. To develop an exposure scenario implementing the male UFH/NCI phantom in sitting and standing postures was used the radiation transport code MCNPX. Whole-body irradiations were performed using the recommended irradiation geometries by ICRP publication 116 antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), right and left lateral, rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). In most organs, the conversion coefficients DT/Φ were similar for both postures. However, relative differences were significant for organs located in the lower abdominal region, such as prostate, testes and urinary bladder, especially in the AP geometry. Results of effective dose conversion coefficients were 18% higher in the standing posture of the UFH/NCI phantom, especially below 100 MeV in AP and PA. In lateral geometry, the conversion coefficients values below 20 MeV were 16% higher in the sitting posture. In ROT geometry, the differences were below 10%, for almost all energies. In ISO geometry, the differences in E/Φ were negligible. The results of E/Φ of UFH/NCI phantom were in general below the results of the conversion coefficients provided in ICRP publication 116.

  4. Sound conversion phenomena at the free surface of liquid helium. II. Experimental determination of acoustic coefficients and surface absorption coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiechert, H.; Buchholz, F. I.

    1983-05-01

    The acoustic coefficients of reflection, transmission, and transformation of first-, second-, and gas sound waves incident normally on the free surface of liquid helium have been determined. The experimental results are compared with the theory developed in Part I of this paper. It is shown that equilibrium theories of boundary conditions disagree with the experiments. Nonequilibrium theories, however, which take into account that mass and energy transport processes occur at the liquid-vapor interface of helium II, lead to a very good description of the experimental data below 2 K. Within experimental accuracy the measurements fully confirm several kinetic models of evaporation and energy transport processes. Near the λ point, deviations from the theory have been found which might be attributed to influences of critical phenomena. The surface absorption coefficients of first-, second-, and gas sound waves could be deduced from the experimental data on the acoustic coefficients, and it is shown that, in agreement with the theory, appreciable energy dissipation occurs at the free surface of helium II when a second-sound or a gas sound wave is incident.

  5. Measurement of internal conversion electrons from Gd neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandlakunta, P.; Cao, L. R.; Mulligan, P.

    2013-03-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) is a suitable material for neutron conversion because of its superior neutron absorption cross-section. However, the principal secondary particles that generate electron-hole pairs in a semiconductor detector after Gd neutron capture are low-energy internal conversion (IC) electrons. We measured the IC electron spectrum due to Gd neutron capture by using a thermal neutron beam and a digitizer-based multidetector spectroscopy. We also discussed the effective use of the IC electrons in the context of a twin-detector design and the associated gamma-ray rejection issues. Extensive simulations of the spectra of IC electrons and gamma rays agreed well with the experimental results; both types of results support the feasibility of the proposed n-γ separation method.

  6. Conversion coefficients for determination of dispersed photon dose during radiotherapy: NRUrad input code for MCNP

    PubMed Central

    Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a common cancer treatment module, where a certain amount of dose will be delivered to the targeted organ. This is achieved usually by photons generated by linear accelerator units. However, radiation scattering within the patient’s body and the surrounding environment will lead to dose dispersion to healthy tissues which are not targets of the primary radiation. Determination of the dispersed dose would be important for assessing the risk and biological consequences in different organs or tissues. In the present work, the concept of conversion coefficient (F) of the dispersed dose was developed, in which F = (Dd/Dt), where Dd was the dispersed dose in a non-targeted tissue and Dt is the absorbed dose in the targeted tissue. To quantify Dd and Dt, a comprehensive model was developed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) package to simulate the linear accelerator head, the human phantom, the treatment couch and the radiotherapy treatment room. The present work also demonstrated the feasibility and power of parallel computing through the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) version of MCNP5. PMID:28362837

  7. Conversion coefficients for determination of dispersed photon dose during radiotherapy: NRUrad input code for MCNP.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Ng, C Y P; Krstic, D; Nikezic, D; Yu, K N

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a common cancer treatment module, where a certain amount of dose will be delivered to the targeted organ. This is achieved usually by photons generated by linear accelerator units. However, radiation scattering within the patient's body and the surrounding environment will lead to dose dispersion to healthy tissues which are not targets of the primary radiation. Determination of the dispersed dose would be important for assessing the risk and biological consequences in different organs or tissues. In the present work, the concept of conversion coefficient (F) of the dispersed dose was developed, in which F = (Dd/Dt), where Dd was the dispersed dose in a non-targeted tissue and Dt is the absorbed dose in the targeted tissue. To quantify Dd and Dt, a comprehensive model was developed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) package to simulate the linear accelerator head, the human phantom, the treatment couch and the radiotherapy treatment room. The present work also demonstrated the feasibility and power of parallel computing through the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) version of MCNP5.

  8. NEURAL NETWORK MODELLING OF CARDIAC DOSE CONVERSION COEFFICIENT FOR ARBITRARY X-RAY SPECTRA.

    PubMed

    Kadri, O; Manai, K

    2016-12-01

    In this article, an approach to compute the dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) is described for the computational voxel phantom 'High-Definition Reference Korean-Man' (HDRK-Man) using artificial neural networks (ANN). For this purpose, the voxel phantom was implemented into the Monte Carlo (MC) transport toolkit GEANT4, and the DCCs for more than 30 tissues and organs, due to a broad parallel beam of monoenergetic photons with energy ranging from 15 to 150 keV by a step of 5 keV, were calculated. To study the influence of patient size on DCC values, DCC calculation was performed, for a representative body size population, using five different sizes covering the range of 80-120 % magnification of the original HDRK-Man. The focus of the present study was on the computation of DCC for the human heart. ANN calculation and MC simulation results were compared, and good agreement was observed showing that ANNs can be used as an efficient tool for modelling DCCs for the computational voxel phantom. ANN approach appears to be a significant advance over the time-consuming MC methods for DCC calculation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Precise test of internal-conversion theory: transitions measured in five nuclei spanning 50≤Z≤78.

    PubMed

    Hardy, J C; Nica, N; Iacob, V E; Miller, S; Maguire, M; Trzhaskovskaya, M B

    2014-05-01

    In a research program aimed at testing calculated internal-conversion coefficients (ICCs), we have made precise measurements of αK values for transitions in five nuclei, (197)Pt, (193)Ir, (137)Ba, (134)Cs and (119)Sn, which span a wide range of A and Z values. In all cases, the results strongly favor calculations in which the final-state electron wave function has been computed using a potential that includes the atomic vacancy created by the internal-conversion process. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Correspondence of electron spectra from photoionization and nuclear internal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Wark, D.L.; Bartlett, R.; Bowles, T.J.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Sivia, D.S.; Trela, W.; Wilkerson, J.F. ); Brown, G.S. ); Crasemann, B.; Sorensen, S.L.; Schaphorst, S.J. ); Knapp, D.A.; Henderson, J. ); Tulkki, J.; Aberg, T. )

    1991-10-21

    Electron energy spectra have been measured that result from {ital K}-shell ionization of Kr by two different mechanisms: (1) photoionization and (2) internal conversion in the decay of the isomeric state of {sup 83}Kr. It is demonstrated experimentally that these spectra, including satellites on the low-energy side of the primary 1{ital s}-electron peak, are identical. A theoretical interpretation of the identity of the spectra is given. The spectra agree well with a relativistic many-electron calculation in which the satellites are attributed to excitation and ionization of {ital M} and {ital N} electrons during the {ital K}-ionization process.

  11. Organ dose conversion coefficients based on a voxel mouse model and MCNP code for external photon irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Cheng, Jie; Ning, Jing; Yuan, Yong; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2012-01-01

    A set of conversion coefficients from kerma free-in-air to the organ absorbed dose for external photon beams from 10 keV to 10 MeV are presented based on a newly developed voxel mouse model, for the purpose of radiation effect evaluation. The voxel mouse model was developed from colour images of successive cryosections of a normal nude male mouse, in which 14 organs or tissues were segmented manually and filled with different colours, while each colour was tagged by a specific ID number for implementation of mouse model in Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP). Monte Carlo simulation with MCNP was carried out to obtain organ dose conversion coefficients for 22 external monoenergetic photon beams between 10 keV and 10 MeV under five different irradiation geometries conditions (left lateral, right lateral, dorsal-ventral, ventral-dorsal, and isotropic). Organ dose conversion coefficients were presented in tables and compared with the published data based on a rat model to investigate the effect of body size and weight on the organ dose. The calculated and comparison results show that the organ dose conversion coefficients varying the photon energy exhibits similar trend for most organs except for the bone and skin, and the organ dose is sensitive to body size and weight at a photon energy approximately <0.1 MeV.

  12. Conversion coefficients for the estimation of effective dose in cone-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Soo; Rashsuren, Oyuntugs

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the conversion coefficients (CCs) from the dose-area product (DAP) value to effective dose in cone-beam CT. Materials and Methods A CBCT scanner with four fields of view (FOV) was used. Using two exposure settings of the adult standard and low dose exposure, DAP values were measured with a DAP meter in C mode (200mm×179 mm), P mode (154 mm×154 mm), I mode (102 mm×102 mm), and D mode (51 mm×51 mm). The effective doses were also investigated at each mode using an adult male head and neck phantom and thermoluminescent chips. Linear regressive analysis of the DAP and effective dose values was used to calculate the CCs for each CBCT examination. Results For the C mode, the P mode at the maxilla, and the P mode at the mandible, the CCs were 0.049 µSv/mGycm2, 0.067 µSv/mGycm2, and 0.064 µSv/mGycm2, respectively. For the I mode, the CCs at the maxilla and mandible were 0.076 µSv/mGycm2 and 0.095 µSv/mGycm2, respectively. For the D mode at the maxillary incisors, molars, and mandibular molars, the CCs were 0.038 µSv/mGycm2, 0.041 µSv/mGycm2, and 0.146 µSv/mGycm2, respectively. Conclusion The CCs in one CBCT device with fixed 80 kV ranged from 0.038 µSv/mGycm2 to 0.146 µSv/mGycm2 according to the imaging modes and irradiated region and were highest for the D mode at the mandibular molar. PMID:24701455

  13. Hp(3)/Φ conversion coefficients for neutrons: discussion on the basis of the new ICRP recommended limit for the eye lens.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, P; Gualdrini, G; Tanner, R; Fantuzzi, E

    2014-10-01

    The new recommendation issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) introducing a 20-mSv annual dose limit for the eye lens stimulated an interesting debate among the radiation protection community. In the present work the problem of estimating Hp(3) for neutron realistic workplace spectra is treated, employing the recently published Hp(3)/Φ conversion coefficients with the aim of establishing a workplace-dependent relationship between Hp(10) and Hp(3). The results demonstrate that, whilst the two quantities can differ by less than 10 %, in general, Hp(10) cannot be considered a conservative estimate of Hp(3).

  14. Conversion of internal gravity waves into magnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, D.; Vasil, G. M.; Fuller, J.; Cantiello, M.; Burns, K. J.

    2017-04-01

    Asteroseismology probes the interiors of stars by studying oscillation modes at a star's surface. Although pulsation spectra are well understood for solar-like oscillators, a substantial fraction of red giant stars observed by Kepler exhibit abnormally low-amplitude dipole oscillation modes. Fuller et al. (2015) suggest this effect is produced by strong core magnetic fields that scatter dipole internal gravity waves (IGWs) into higher multipole IGWs or magnetic waves. In this paper, we study the interaction of IGWs with a magnetic field to test this mechanism. We consider two background stellar structures: one with a uniform magnetic field, and another with a magnetic field that varies both horizontally and vertically. We derive analytic solutions to the wave propagation problem and validate them with numerical simulations. In both cases, we find perfect conversion from IGWs into magnetic waves when the IGWs propagate into a region exceeding a critical magnetic field strength. Downward propagating IGWs cannot reflect into upward propagating IGWs because their vertical wavenumber never approaches zero. Instead, they are converted into upward propagating slow (Alfvénic) waves, and we show they will likely dissipate as they propagate back into weakly magnetized regions. Therefore, strong internal magnetic fields can produce dipole mode suppression in red giants, and gravity modes will likely be totally absent from the pulsation spectra of sufficiently magnetized stars.

  15. Fourth-order perturbative model for photoinduced internal conversion processes.

    PubMed

    Molesky, Brian P; Moran, Andrew M

    2013-12-27

    Essential to the functionality of numerous biological and synthetic molecular systems is the ability to rapidly convert electronic excitation energy into heat. Such internal conversion (IC) transitions often cannot be described by traditional second-order kinetic theories because of time-coincident electronic and nuclear relaxation processes. Here, we present a perturbative fourth-order phenomenological model for photoinduced IC that incorporates effects associated with finite laser bandwidths and nonequilibrium nuclear motions. Specialized knowledge of first-principles computational methods is not required, and many parameters can be obtained with standard spectroscopic measurements. The model is applied to the IC processes that precede electrocyclic ring-opening in α-terpinene. It is shown that the primary factor governing the shape of the population decay profile (Gaussian versus exponential) is the rate at which the wavepacket approaches the geometry corresponding to degeneracy between the excited states. Other parameters such as the displacement in the promoting mode and the thermal fluctuation amplitudes affect the sensitivity of the IC dynamics to motion of the wavepacket but do not alter the basic physical picture. Finally, we suggest a wavepacket representation of the IC process to visualize correlations between population-transfer dynamics and the amount of energy transferred from the system to the bath.

  16. Coherent phase control of internal conversion in pyrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Robert J. Singha, Sima; Zhao, Youbo; Hu, Zhan; Seideman, Tamar; Sukharev, Maxim

    2015-04-14

    Shaped ultrafast laser pulses were used to study and control the ionization dynamics of electronically excited pyrazine in a pump and probe experiment. For pump pulses created without feedback from the product signal, the ion growth curve (the parent ion signal as a function of pump/probe delay) was described quantitatively by the classical rate equations for internal conversion of the S{sub 2} and S{sub 1} states. Very different, non-classical behavior was observed when a genetic algorithm (GA) employing phase-only modulation was used to minimize the ion signal at some pre-determined target time, T. Two qualitatively different control mechanisms were identified for early (T < 1.5 ps) and late (T > 1.5 ps) target times. In the former case, the ion signal was largely suppressed for t < T, while for t ≫ T, the ion signal produced by the GA-optimized pulse and a transform limited (TL) pulse coalesced. In contrast, for T > 1.5 ps, the ion growth curve followed the classical rate equations for t < T, while for t ≫ T, the quantum yield for the GA-optimized pulse was much smaller than for a TL pulse. We interpret the first type of behavior as an indication that the wave packet produced by the pump laser is localized in a region of the S{sub 2} potential energy surface where the vertical ionization energy exceeds the probe photon energy, whereas the second type of behavior may be described by a reduced absorption cross section for S{sub 0} → S{sub 2} followed by incoherent decay of the excited molecules. Amplitude modulation observed in the spectrum of the shaped pulse may have contributed to the control mechanism, although this possibility is mitigated by the very small focal volume of the probe laser.

  17. Internal Conversion and Vibrational Energy Redistribution in Chlorophyll A.

    PubMed

    Shenai, Prathamesh M; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Bricker, William P; Tretiak, Sergei; Zhao, Yang

    2016-01-14

    We have computationally investigated the role of intramolecular vibrational modes in determining nonradiative relaxation pathways of photoexcited electronic states in isolated chlorophyll A (ChlA) molecules. To simulate the excited state relaxation from the initially excited Soret state to the lowest excited state Qy, the approach of nonadiabatic excited state molecular dynamics has been adopted. The intramolecular vibrational energy relaxation and redistribution that accompany the electronic internal conversion process is followed by analyzing the excited state trajectories in terms of the ground state equilibrium normal modes. The time dependence of the normal mode velocities is determined by projecting instantaneous Cartesian velocities onto the normal mode vectors. Our analysis of the time evolution of the average mode energies uncovers that only a small subset of the medium-to-high frequency normal modes actively participate in the electronic relaxation processes. These active modes are characterized by the highest overlap with the nonadiabatic coupling vectors (NACRs) during the electronic transitions. Further statistical analysis of the nonadiabatic transitions reveals that the electronic and vibrational energy relaxation occurs via two distinct pathways with significantly different time scales on which the hopping from Soret to Qx occurs thereby dictating the overall dynamics. Furthermore, the NACRs corresponding to each of the transitions have been consistently found to be predominantly similar to a set of normal modes that vary depending upon the transition and the identified categories. Each pathway exhibits a differential time scale of energy transfer and also a differential set of predominant active modes. Our present analysis can be considered as a general approach allowing identification of a reduced subset of specific vibrational coordinates associated with nonradiative relaxation pathways. Therefore, it represents an adequate prior strategy that

  18. Coherent phase control of internal conversion in pyrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Robert J.; Hu, Zhan; Seideman, Tamar; Singha, Sima; Sukharev, Maxim; Zhao, Youbo

    2015-04-01

    Shaped ultrafast laser pulses were used to study and control the ionization dynamics of electronically excited pyrazine in a pump and probe experiment. For pump pulses created without feedback from the product signal, the ion growth curve (the parent ion signal as a function of pump/probe delay) was described quantitatively by the classical rate equations for internal conversion of the S2 and S1 states. Very different, non-classical behavior was observed when a genetic algorithm (GA) employing phase-only modulation was used to minimize the ion signal at some pre-determined target time, T. Two qualitatively different control mechanisms were identified for early (T < 1.5 ps) and late (T > 1.5 ps) target times. In the former case, the ion signal was largely suppressed for t < T, while for t ≫ T, the ion signal produced by the GA-optimized pulse and a transform limited (TL) pulse coalesced. In contrast, for T > 1.5 ps, the ion growth curve followed the classical rate equations for t < T, while for t ≫ T, the quantum yield for the GA-optimized pulse was much smaller than for a TL pulse. We interpret the first type of behavior as an indication that the wave packet produced by the pump laser is localized in a region of the S2 potential energy surface where the vertical ionization energy exceeds the probe photon energy, whereas the second type of behavior may be described by a reduced absorption cross section for S0 → S2 followed by incoherent decay of the excited molecules. Amplitude modulation observed in the spectrum of the shaped pulse may have contributed to the control mechanism, although this possibility is mitigated by the very small focal volume of the probe laser.

  19. Converse mode piezoelectric coefficient for lead zirconate titanate thin film with interdigitated electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram, N.; Balma, D.; Nigon, R.; Mazzalai, A.; Matloub, R.; Sandu, C. S.; Muralt, P.

    2015-04-01

    The use of interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) in conjunction with ferroelectric thin films shows many attractive features for piezoelectric MEMS applications. In this work, growth of {1 0 0}-textured lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films was achieved on insulating MgO buffered, oxidized silicon substrates. IDEs were fabricated by lift-off techniques and cantilevers were formed by dicing. The deflection upon application of a sweeping voltage was measured as large signal response in parallel to the ferroelectric polarization (PV loop). Likewise, the small signal piezoelectric response was measured in parallel to the capacitance-voltage (CV) measurement. In this way, a complete picture of the ferroelectric-piezoelectric element was obtained. From the deflection, the in-plane piezoelectric stress in the PZT thin film was derived and, from this, the effective piezoelectric coefficients. For the latter, two types were defined: an engineering type corresponding to the average value along the IDE, which can directly be compared to coefficient of a parallel plate electrode (PPE) capacitor and a second one that approximately yields the idealized coefficient governing between the electrode fingers. The IDE structures were experimentally compared with PPE structures of identical film thickness. The resulting coefficients were of opposite sign, as expected. In spite of a much better polarization loop, the IDE device showed a lower average piezoelectric stress. The estimated peak value between the fingers was about the same as in the PPE device, corresponding to about 20 C m-2. Nevertheless, the result is very promising for cases where compressive piezoelectric stresses are required and for preventing cracking due to large piezoelectric tensile stresses in PPE systems.

  20. Monte Carlo calculation of conversion coefficients for dose estimation in mammography based on a 3D detailed breast model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjing; Qiu, Rui; Ren, Li; Liu, Huan; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Niu, Yantao; Li, Junli

    2017-06-01

    At present, the Chinese specification for testing of quality control in x-ray mammography is based on a simple breast model, and does not consider the glandular tissue distribution in the breast. In order to more precisely estimate the mean glandular dose (MGD) in mammography for Chinese women, a three-dimensional (3D) detailed breast model based on realistic structures in the breast and Chinese female breast parameters was built and applied in this study. To characterize the Chinese female breast, Chinese female breast parameters including breast size, compressed breast thickness (CBT), and glandular content were investigated in this study. A mathematical model with the detailed breast structures was constructed based on the Chinese female breast parameters. The mathematical model was then converted to a voxel model with voxels. The voxel model was compressed in craniocaudal (CC) view to obtain a deformation model. The compressed breast model was combined with the Chinese reference adult female whole-body voxel phantom (CRAF) to study the effects of backscatter from the female body. Monte Carlo simulations of the glandular dose in mammography were performed with Geant 4. The glandular tissue dose conversion coefficients for breasts with different glandular contents (5%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% glandularity) and CBTs (3 cm, 4 cm, 5 cm, and 6 cm) were calculated, respectively, at various x-ray tube voltages (25 kV, 28 kV, 30 kV, 32 kV, and 35 kV) for various target/filter combinations (Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, Rh/Rh, and W/Rh). A series of glandular tissue dose conversion coefficients for dose estimation in mammography were calculated. The conversion coefficients calculated in this study were compared with those estimated with the simple breast model. A discrepancy of 5.4-38.0% was observed. This was consistent with the results obtained from the realistic breast models in the literature. A 3D detailed breast model with realistic structures in the breast was constructed

  1. Experimental performance of a fully tunable complex-coefficient optical FIR filter using wavelength conversion and chromatic dispersion.

    PubMed

    Khaleghi, Salman; Chitgarha, Mohammad Reza; Yilmaz, Omer F; Tur, Moshe; Haney, Michael W; Langrock, Carsten; Fejer, Martin M; Willner, Alan E

    2012-08-15

    We experimentally characterize the performance of a continuously tunable all-optical complex-coefficient finite-impulse-response (FIR) filter that exploits nonlinear signal processing (multiplexing and multicasting) and conversion-dispersion-based optical delays. Various length (three and four) optical FIR filters with different tap amplitudes (from 0 to -9 dB), tap phases (from 0 to 2π), and tap delays (~37.4 ps and 25 ps) are realized, showing reconfiguration and tuning capabilities of this FIR filter. The measured frequency responses show close agreement with the theoretical filter responses.

  2. 5 CFR 315.712 - Conversion based on service as a Federal Career Intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Career Intern. 315.712 Section 315.712 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS CAREER AND CAREER-CONDITIONAL EMPLOYMENT Conversion to Career or Career-Conditional Employment From Other Types of Employment § 315.712 Conversion based on service as a Federal Career Intern...

  3. Empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient for a rectangular internal-loop airlift bioreactor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient was developed for a pilot scale internal-loop rectangular airlift bioreactor that was designed for biotechnology. The empirical correlation combines classic turbulence theory, Kolmogorov’s isotropic turbulence theory with Higbie’s pen...

  4. Dependence of the radon emanation coefficient on radium distribution and internal structure of the material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawska, L.; Phillips, Colin R.

    1993-04-01

    The mechanisms of escape of radon from the solid structure of a particle to the free pore space are examined. According to the present state of knowledge, the most important factors affecting the radon emanation coefficient are the distribution of the parent radium atoms and the internal structure of the material. In early studies of the radon emanation coefficient, it was usually assumed that the material under investigation was homogeneous in radium distribution and in internal structure. It is now known that these assumptions are often not justified for real materials. In consequence, models based on these assumptions may not be useful in explaining the emanation process. The importance of radium distribution and internal structure is explained here, and an analysis made of differences in the internal structure of various natural and man-made materials. The analysis is then developed in order to identify the effect of different models of radium atom distribution on the emanation coefficient. Four models of radium atom distribution are presented, together with mathematical approaches for developing and finding numerical solutions for equations leading to determination of the emanation coefficient for each model.

  5. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20-250 MeV.

    PubMed

    Olsher, R H; McLean, T D; Justus, A L; Devine, R T; Gadd, M S

    2010-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom.

  6. The influence of patient size on dose conversion coefficients: a hybrid phantom study for adult cardiac catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Lee, Choonsik; Johnson, Kevin; Siragusa, Daniel; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, the influence of patient size on organ and effective dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) was investigated for a representative interventional fluoroscopic procedure—cardiac catheterization. The study was performed using hybrid phantoms representing an underweight, average and overweight American adult male. Reference body sizes were determined using the NHANES III database and parameterized based on standing height and total body mass. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients were calculated for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left anterior oblique and right anterior oblique projections using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.5.0 with the metric dose area product being used as the normalization factor. Results show body size to have a clear influence on DCCs which increased noticeably when body size decreased. It was also shown that if patient size is neglected when choosing a DCC, the organ and effective dose will be underestimated to an underweight patient and will be overestimated to an underweight patient, with errors as large as 113% for certain projections. Results were further compared with those published for a KTMAN-2 Korean patient-specific tomographic phantom. The published DCCs aligned best with the hybrid phantom which most closely matched in overall body size. These results highlighted the need for and the advantages of phantom-patient matching, and it is recommended that hybrid phantoms be used to create a more diverse library of patient-dependent anthropomorphic phantoms for medical dose reconstruction.

  7. Fluence to absorbed dose, effective dose and gray equivalent conversion coefficients for iron nuclei from 10 MeV to 1 TeV, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.A.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-03-01

    Conversion coefficients have been calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to (56)Fe(26+) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). The coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.A and BodyBuilder 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Calculations using ICRP 2007 recommendations result in fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients that are almost identical at most energies to those calculated using ICRP 1990 recommendations.

  8. [Estimators of internal consistency in health research: the use of the alpha coefficient].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Franciele Cascaes; Gonçalves, Elizandra; Arancibia, Beatriz Angélica Valdivia; Bento, Gisele Graziele; Castro, Thiago Luis da Silva; Hernandez, Salma Stephany Soleman; da Silva, Rudney

    2015-01-01

    Academic production has increased in the area of health, increasingly demanding high quality in publications of great impact. One of the ways to consider quality is through methods that increase the consistency of data analysis, such as reliability which, depending on the type of data, can be evaluated by different coefficients, especially the alpha coefficient. Based on this, the present review systematically gathers scientific articles produced in the last five years, which in a methodological manner gave the α coefficient psychometric use as an estimator of internal consistency and reliability in the processes of construction, adaptation and validation of instruments. The identification of the studies was conducted systematically in the databases BioMed Central Journals, Web of Science, Wiley Online Library, Medline, SciELO, Scopus, Journals@Ovid, BMJ and Springer, using inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data analyses were performed by means of triangulation, content analysis and descriptive analysis. It was found that most studies were conducted in Iran (f=3), Spain (f=2) and Brazil (f=2). These studies aimed to test the psychometric properties of instruments, with eight studies using the α coefficient to assess reliability and nine for assessing internal consistency. All studies were classified as methodological research when their objectives were analyzed. In addition, four studies were also classified as correlational and one as descriptive-correlational. It can be concluded that though the α coefficient is widely used as one of the main parameters for assessing internal consistency of questionnaires in health sciences, its use as an estimator of trust of the methodology used and internal consistency has some critiques that should be considered.

  9. Two different pathways of internal conversion in carotenoids depending on the length of the conjugated chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Ritsuko; Inaba, Toru; Watanabe, Yasutaka; Koyama, Yasushi; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2003-02-01

    Near-infrared, subpicosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopy of all- trans carotenoids having the number of conjugated double bonds, n=9-13, identified two different pathways of internal conversion in accordance with the energy diagram recently determined by measurements of resonance-Raman excitation profiles (RREPs) [K. Furuichi, T. Sashima, Y. Koyama, Chem. Phys. Lett. 356 (2002) 547]: the 1B u+→1B u-→2A g- internal conversion for neurosporene ( n=9) and spheroidene ( n=10), whereas the 1B u+→3A g-→2A g- internal conversion for lycopene ( n=11), anhydrorhodovibrin ( n=12) and spirilloxanthin ( n=13).

  10. Internal Evaluation a Quarter-Century Later: A Conversation with Arnold J. Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkov, Boris B.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter features a recent conversation with Dr. Arnold J. Love, a long-time proponent of internal evaluation and one of the most cited internal evaluation authors. In 1983, Love edited the first issue of "New Directions for Program Evaluation" on the topic of internal evaluation. He is the author of the book "Internal…

  11. Internal Evaluation a Quarter-Century Later: A Conversation with Arnold J. Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkov, Boris B.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter features a recent conversation with Dr. Arnold J. Love, a long-time proponent of internal evaluation and one of the most cited internal evaluation authors. In 1983, Love edited the first issue of "New Directions for Program Evaluation" on the topic of internal evaluation. He is the author of the book "Internal…

  12. Topical applications of resonance internal conversion in laser produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2007-04-01

    Physical aspects of resonance effects arising in plasma due to interactions of nuclei with the electrons are considered. Among them are resonance conversion (TEEN) and the reverse process of NEET. These processes are of great importance for pumping the excited nuclear states (isomers) and for accelerating their decay. Experiment is discussed on studying the unique 3.5-eV 229m Th nuclide.

  13. 5 CFR 315.712 - Conversion based on service as a Federal Career Intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Career Intern. 315.712 Section 315.712 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS CAREER AND CAREER-CONDITIONAL EMPLOYMENT Conversion to Career or Career-Conditional Employment From Other Types of Employment § 315.712 Conversion based on service as a Federal Career...

  14. 5 CFR 315.712 - Conversion based on service as a Federal Career Intern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Career Intern. 315.712 Section 315.712 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS CAREER AND CAREER-CONDITIONAL EMPLOYMENT Conversion to Career or Career-Conditional Employment From Other Types of Employment § 315.712 Conversion based on service as a Federal Career...

  15. Organ dose conversion coefficients on an ICRP-based Chinese adult male voxel model from idealized external photons exposures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liye; Zeng, Zhi; Li, Junli; Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Binquan; Ma, Jizeng; Li, Ren; Li, Wenqian; Bi, Lei

    2009-11-07

    A high-resolution whole-body voxel model called CAM representing the Chinese adult male was constructed in this paper based on a previous individual voxel model. There are more than 80 tissues and organs in CAM, including almost all organs required in the ICRP new recommendation. The mass of individual organs has been adjusted to the Chinese reference data. Special considerations were given to representing the gross spatial distribution of various bone constituents as realistically as possible during the construction of the site-specific skeleton. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated for six idealized external photon exposures from 10 keV to 10 MeV by using Monte Carlo simulation. The resulting dose coefficients were then compared with those from other models, e.g. CMP, ICRP 74, Rex, HDRK-man and VIP-man. Old and new effective male doses of CAM were calculated by using the tissue weighting factors from ICRP 60 and 103 Publications, respectively. Dosimetric differences between mathematical and voxel models, and the differences between Asian and Caucasian models are also discussed in this paper.

  16. Ultrafast internal conversion dynamics of highly excited pyrrole studied with VUV/UV pump probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Spencer L.; Liu, Yusong; Chakraborty, Pratip; Matsika, Spiridoula; Weinacht, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    We study the relaxation dynamics of pyrrole after excitation with an 8 eV pump pulse to a state just 0.2 eV below the ionization potential using vacuum ultraviolet/ultraviolet pump probe spectroscopy. Our measurements in conjunction with electronic structure calculations indicate that pyrrole undergoes rapid internal conversion to the ground state in less than 300 fs. We find that internal conversion to the ground state dominates over dissociation.

  17. SU-D-209-06: Study On the Dose Conversion Coefficients in Pediatric Radiography with the Development of Children Voxel Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q; Zhuo, W; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Chen, T

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Conversion coefficients of organ dose normalized to entrance skin dose (ESD) are widely used to evaluate the organ doses directly using ESD without time-consuming dose measurement, this work aims to investigate the dose conversion coefficients in pediatric chest and abdomen radiography with the development of 5 years and 10 years old children voxel phantoms. Methods: After segmentation of organs and tissues from CT slice images of ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms, a 5-year-old and a 10-year-old children computational voxel phantoms were developed for Monte Carlo simulation. The organ doses and the entrance skin dose for pediatric chest postero-anterior projection and abdominal antero-posterior projection were simulated at the same time, and then the organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated.To verify the simulated results, dose measurement was carried out with ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms for 5 year chest radiography. Results: Simulated results and experimental results matched very well with each other, the result differences of all the organs covered in radiation field were below 16% for 5-year-old child in chest projection. I showed that the conversion coefficients of organs covered in the radiation field were much larger than organs out of the field for all the study cases, for example, the conversion coefficients of stomach, liver intestines, and pancreas are larger for abdomen radiography while conversion coefficients of lungs are larger for chest radiography. Conclusion: The voxel children phantoms were helpful to evaluate the radiation doses more accurately and efficiently. Radiation field was the essential factor that affects the organ dose, use reasonably small field should be encouraged for radiation protection. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China(11475047)

  18. Inequalities, the arts and public health: Towards an international conversation

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Clive; White, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers how participatory arts informed by thinking in public health can play a significant part internationally in addressing inequalities in health. It looks beyond national overviews of arts and health to consider what would make for meaningful international practice, citing recent initiatives of national networks in English-speaking countries and examples of influential developments in South America and the European Union. In the context of public health thinking on inequalities and social justice, the paper posits what would make for good practice and appropriate research that impacts on policy. As the arts and health movement gathers momentum, the paper urges the arts to describe their potency in the policy-making arena in the most compelling ways to articulate their social, economic and cultural values. In the process, it identifies the reflexive consideration of participatory practice – involving people routinely marginalised from decision-making processes – as a possible avenue into this work. PMID:25729409

  19. Selected organ dose conversion coefficients for external photons calculated using ICRP adult voxel phantoms and Monte Carlo code FLUKA.

    PubMed

    Patni, H K; Nadar, M Y; Akar, D K; Bhati, S; Sarkar, P K

    2011-11-01

    The adult reference male and female computational voxel phantoms recommended by ICRP are adapted into the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA. The FLUKA code is then utilised for computation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) expressed in absorbed dose per air kerma free-in-air for colon, lungs, stomach wall, breast, gonads, urinary bladder, oesophagus, liver and thyroid due to a broad parallel beam of mono-energetic photons impinging in anterior-posterior and posterior-anterior directions in the energy range of 15 keV-10 MeV. The computed DCCs of colon, lungs, stomach wall and breast are found to be in good agreement with the results published in ICRP publication 110. The present work thus validates the use of FLUKA code in computation of organ DCCs for photons using ICRP adult voxel phantoms. Further, the DCCs for gonads, urinary bladder, oesophagus, liver and thyroid are evaluated and compared with results published in ICRP 74 in the above-mentioned energy range and geometries. Significant differences in DCCs are observed for breast, testis and thyroid above 1 MeV, and for most of the organs at energies below 60 keV in comparison with the results published in ICRP 74. The DCCs of female voxel phantom were found to be higher in comparison with male phantom for almost all organs in both the geometries.

  20. Dose Conversion Coefficients Based on Taiwanese Reference Phantoms and Monte Carlo Simulations for Use in External Radiation Protection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jun; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Hung, Shih-Yen; Liu, Yan-Lin; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Wu, Jay

    2017-05-01

    Reference phantoms are widely applied to evaluate the radiation dose for external exposure. However, the frequently used reference phantoms are based on Caucasians. Dose estimation for Asians using a Caucasian phantom can result in significant errors. This study recruited 40 volunteers whose body sizes are close to the average Taiwanese population. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to obtain the organ volume for construction of the Taiwanese reference man (TRM) and Taiwanese reference woman (TRW). The dose conversion coefficients (DCC) resulting from photo beams in anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right-lateral, left-lateral, and isotropic irradiation geometries were estimated. In the anterior-posterior geometry, the mean DCC differences among organs between the TRM and ORNL phantom at 0.1, 1, and 10 MeV were 7.3%, 5.8%, and 5.2%, respectively. For the TRW, the mean differences from the ORNL phantom at the three energies were 10.6%, 7.4%, and 8.3%. The DCCs of the Taiwanese reference phantoms and the ORNL phantom presented similar trends in other geometries. The torso size of the phantom and the mass and geometric location of the organ have a significant influence on the DCC. The Taiwanese reference phantoms can be used to establish dose guidelines and regulations for radiation protection from external exposure.

  1. Biomass conversion Task 4 1988 program of work: International Energy Agency Bioenergy Agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.J.

    1987-12-01

    For biomass to meet its potential as an energy resource, conversion processes must be available which are both efficient and environmentally acceptable. Conversion can include direct production of heat and electricity as well as production of intermediate gaseous, liquid, and solid fuels. While many biomass conversion processes are commercially available at present, others are still in the conceptual stage. Additional research and development activities on these advanced concepts will be necessary to fully use biomass resources. Ongoing research on biomass conversion processes is being conducted by many nations throughout the world. In an effort to coordinate this research and improve information exchange, several countries have agreed to a cooperative effort through the International Energy Agency's Bioenergy Agreement (IEA/BA). Under this Agreement, Task IV deals specifically with biomass conversion topics. The cooperative activities consists of information exchange and coordination of national research programs on specific topics. The activities address biomass conversion in a systematic manner, dealing with the pretreatment of biomass prior to conversion, the subsequent conversion of the biomass to intermediate fuels or end-product energy, and then the environmental aspects of the conversion process. This document provides an outline of cooperative work to be performed in 1988. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Alpha particles at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, effective dose, and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.A.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-03-01

    Conversion coefficients have been calculated for fluence to absorbed dose, fluence to effective dose and fluence to gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure to alpha particles in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). The coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.A and BodyBuilder 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for effective dose are within 30 % of those calculated using ICRP 1990 recommendations.

  3. Evaluation of conversion coefficients from measurable to risk quantities for external exposure over contaminated soil by use of physical human phantoms.

    PubMed

    Golikov, V; Wallström, E; Wöhni, T; Tanaka, K; Endo, S; Hoshi, M

    2007-11-01

    Conversion coefficients from measurable quantities such as air kerma free-in-air or personal dose equivalent to effective dose were determined by phantom experiments. Heterogenic anthropomorphic phantoms representing children of one and five years age, and a Rando phantom representing an adult were exposed in the open field contaminated by different levels of radiocesium in the upper soil layer, in a forest site and inside a wooden house. LiF thermoluminescent (TL) detectors were used inside the phantoms for the estimation of organ doses and effective dose. Personal dosimeters similar to those used in radiation protection for individual dose measurements were placed onto the phantom surface (chest area). The ratios of dose values in separate organs to air kerma free-in-air varied from 0.69 to 1.15 for the children phantoms, and from 0.55 to 0.94 for the adult phantom, respectively, when irradiated in the open field. Body size (weight) was found to be the most important factor influencing the values of the conversion coefficients. The differences observed can reach approximately 40% when comparing conversion factors from air kerma free-in-air to effective dose for adults and newborns. For conversion coefficients from personal dose to effective dose, these differences can reach approximately 15%. The dependences of the various conversion coefficients on body mass were quantified by regression analysis. The results were compared with those calculated for a plane mono-energetic photon source having an energy of 700 keV and being located in the ground at a depth of 0.5 g cm(-2). Calculated and measured conversion coefficients from air kerma free-in-air to effective dose agreed within 12%.

  4. Experimental demonstration of internal wavelength conversion in the magnesium atomic filter.

    PubMed

    Chan, Y C; Tabat, M D; Gelbwachs, J A

    1989-07-15

    We describe what is to our knowledge the first experimental demonstration of internal wavelength conversion in the metastable Mg atomic filter. The filter operates at a Fraunhofer line, thereby offering intrinsic solar background rejection. Incoming green Fraunhofer photons (518 nm) are absorbed by metastable Mg atoms in an oven cell and are converted into UV (384-nm) photons. We observed a green-to-UV conversion efficiency of greater than 50%.

  5. Use of internal consistency coefficients for estimating reliability of experimental task scores.

    PubMed

    Green, Samuel B; Yang, Yanyun; Alt, Mary; Brinkley, Shara; Gray, Shelley; Hogan, Tiffany; Cowan, Nelson

    2016-06-01

    Reliabilities of scores for experimental tasks are likely to differ from one study to another to the extent that the task stimuli change, the number of trials varies, the type of individuals taking the task changes, the administration conditions are altered, or the focal task variable differs. Given that reliabilities vary as a function of the design of these tasks and the characteristics of the individuals taking them, making inferences about the reliability of scores in an ongoing study based on reliability estimates from prior studies is precarious. Thus, it would be advantageous to estimate reliability based on data from the ongoing study. We argue that internal consistency estimates of reliability are underutilized for experimental task data and in many applications could provide this information using a single administration of a task. We discuss different methods for computing internal consistency estimates with a generalized coefficient alpha and the conditions under which these estimates are accurate. We illustrate use of these coefficients using data for three different tasks.

  6. Use of Internal Consistency Coefficients for Estimating Reliability of Experimental Tasks Scores

    PubMed Central

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun; Alt, Mary; Brinkley, Shara; Gray, Shelley; Hogan, Tiffany; Cowan, Nelson

    2017-01-01

    Reliabilities of scores for experimental tasks are likely to differ from one study to another to the extent that the task stimuli change, the number of trials varies, the type of individuals taking the task changes, the administration conditions are altered, or the focal task variable differs. Given reliabilities vary as a function of the design of these tasks and the characteristics of the individuals taking them, making inferences about the reliability of scores in an ongoing study based on reliability estimates from prior studies is precarious. Thus, it would be advantageous to estimate reliability based on data from the ongoing study. We argue that internal consistency estimates of reliability are underutilized for experimental task data and in many applications could provide this information using a single administration of a task. We discuss different methods for computing internal consistency estimates with a generalized coefficient alpha and the conditions under which these estimates are accurate. We illustrate use of these coefficients using data for three different tasks. PMID:26546100

  7. Biomass Conversion Task IV 1987 program of work: International Energy Agency Bioenergy Agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.J.

    1986-12-01

    Biomass is a major, renewable energy resource through out the world, and extensive research is being conducted by many countries on bioenergy technologies. In an effort to improve communications and cooperation in the area of biomass energy, several nations have agreed to a cooperative program of work under the International Energy Agency's Bioenergy Agreement (IEA/BA). Three areas of major importance have been identified including Short Rotation Forestry, Conventional Forestry, and Biomass Conversion. This document describes the 1987 Program of Work for cooperative activities in the area of Biomass Conversion. The background of the cooperation and descriptions of specific conversion projects are presented. Details of activity funding are also provided. 3 tabs.

  8. Radiometer offsets and count conversion coefficients for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) spacecraft for the years 1984, 1985, and 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Shivakumar, Netra D.; Stassi, Joseph C.; Wilson, Robert; Bolden, William; Thomas, Susan; Gibson, M. Alan

    1991-01-01

    A compendium is presented of the ground and inflight scanner and nonscanner offsets and count conversion (gain) coefficients used for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) production processing of data from the ERBS, NOAA-9, and NOAA-10 satellites for the 1 Nov. 1984 to 31 Dec. 1986.

  9. Comparing Hp(3) evaluated from the conversion coefficients from air kerma to personal dose equivalent for eye lens dosimetry calibrated on a new cylindrical PMMA phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esor, J.; Sudchai, W.; Monthonwattana, S.; Pungkun, V.; Intang, A.

    2017-06-01

    Based on a new occupational dose limit recommended by ICRP (2011), the annual dose limit for the lens of the eye for workers should be reduced from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y averaged over 5 consecutive years in which no single year exceeding 50 mSv. This new dose limit directly affects radiologists and cardiologists whose work involves high radiation exposure over 20 mSv/y. Eye lens dosimetry (Hp(3)) has become increasingly important and should be evaluated directly based on dosimeters that are worn closely to the eye. Normally, Hp(3) dose algorithm was carried out by the combination of Hp(0.07) and Hp(10) values while dosimeters were calibrated on slab PMMA phantom. Recently, there were three reports from European Union that have shown the conversion coefficients from air kerma to Hp(3). These conversion coefficients carried out by ORAMED, PTB and CEA Saclay projects were performed by using a new cylindrical head phantom. In this study, various delivered doses were calculated using those three conversion coefficients while nanoDot, small OSL dosimeters, were used for Hp(3) measurement. These calibrations were performed with a standard X-ray generator at Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). Delivered doses (Hp(3)) using those three conversion coefficients were compared with Hp(3) from nanoDot measurements. The results showed that percentage differences between delivered doses evaluated from the conversion coefficient of each project and Hp(3) doses evaluated from the nanoDots were found to be not exceeding -11.48 %, -8.85 % and -8.85 % for ORAMED, PTB and CEA Saclay project, respectively.

  10. Extended conversion coefficients for use in radiation protection of the embryo and fetus against external neutrons from 10 MeV to 100 GeV.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing

    2006-03-01

    External neutron exposure is of concern in the environment and in some workplaces. Dose assessments for neutrons frequently rely on fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients. A problem of concern in radiation protection is exposure of pregnant women to ionizing radiation because of the high radiosensitivity of the embryo and fetus. While neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for adults are recommended in ICRP publications and ICRU reports, conversion coefficients for embryos and fetuses are not given in the publications. This study uses the Monte Carlo code MCNPX to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and fetus when the mother is exposed to neutron fields. A previous study has dealt with neutrons from 1 eV to 10 MeV. In this study, monoenergetic neutrons ranging from 10 MeV to 100 GeV are considered. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior, postero-anterior, lateral, rotational, and isotropic. At each of these standard irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the fetal brain and body are calculated for the embryo of 8 wk and the fetus of 3, 6, or 9 mo. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients are derived for the four prenatal ages. The results showed that the fetus at about 3 mo of prenatal age should receive more radiation protection to prevent long-term brain damage. During prenatal life, the fetus generally receives the highest absorbed dose per unit neutron fluence for antero-posterior irradiation. In cases where the irradiation geometry is not specified or not adequately known, conversion coefficients of AP-irradiation can therefore be used in a conservative dose assessment of fetus exposure to external neutrons.

  11. Conversion of external fixation to open reduction and internal fixation for complex distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Natoli, R M; Baer, M R; Bednar, M S

    2016-05-01

    Distal radius fractures are common injuries treated in a multitude of ways. One treatment paradigm not extensively studied is initial treatment by external fixation (EF) followed by conversion to open reduction internal fixation (ORIF). Such a paradigm may be beneficial in damage control situations, when there is extensive soft tissue injury, or when appropriate personnel/hospital resources are not available for immediate internal fixation. There is no increased risk of infection when converting EF to ORIF in the treatment of complex distal radius fractures when conversion occurs early or if EF pin sites are overlapped by the definitive fixation. Using an IRB approved protocol, medical records over nine years were queried to identify patients with distal radius fractures that had undergone initial EF and were later converted to ORIF. Charts were reviewed for demographic data, injury characteristics, operative details, time to conversion from EF to ORIF, assessment of whether the EF pin sites overlapped the definitive fixation, presence of infection after ORIF, complications, and occupational therapy measurements of range of motion and strength. In total, 16 patients were identified, only one of which developed an infection following conversion to ORIF. Fisher's exact testing showed that infection did not depend on open fracture, time to conversion of one week or less, presence of EF pin sites overlapping definitive fixation, fracture classification, high energy mechanism of injury, or concomitant injury to the DRUJ. Planned staged conversion from EF to ORIF for complex distal radius fractures does not appear to result in an increased rate of infection if conversion occurs early or if the EF pin sites are overlapped by definitive fixation. This treatment paradigm may be reasonable for treating complex distal radius fractures in damage control situations, when there is extensive soft tissue injury, or when appropriate personnel/hospital resources are not available

  12. Why Do Individuals Seek Conversion Therapy? The Role of Religiosity, Internalized Homonegativity, and Identity Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tozer, Erinn E.; Hayes, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the potential influence of religiosity, sexual orientation identity development, and internalized homonegativity on the propensity to seek conversion therapy to change one's sexual orientation. An Internet sample of 76 women and 130 men who were gay-identified, lesbian-identified, same-sex attracted, and "questioning" was…

  13. Mechanism of the S1 excited state internal conversion in vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Lodowski, Piotr; Jaworska, Maria; Andruniów, Tadeusz; Garabato, Brady D; Kozlowski, Pawel M

    2014-09-21

    To explain the photostability of vitamin B12, internal conversion of the S1 state was investigated using TD-DFT. The active coordinates for radiationless deactivation were determined to be elongated axial bonds, overcoming a 5.0 kcal mol(-1) energy barrier between the relaxed ligand-to-metal charge transfer (S1), and the ground (S0) states.

  14. Solar energy conversion via hot electron internal photoemission in metallic nanostructures: Efficiency estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Leenheer, Andrew J.; Narang, Prineha; Atwater, Harry A.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2014-04-07

    Collection of hot electrons generated by the efficient absorption of light in metallic nanostructures, in contact with semiconductor substrates can provide a basis for the construction of solar energy-conversion devices. Herein, we evaluate theoretically the energy-conversion efficiency of systems that rely on internal photoemission processes at metal-semiconductor Schottky-barrier diodes. In this theory, the current-voltage characteristics are given by the internal photoemission yield as well as by the thermionic dark current over a varied-energy barrier height. The Fowler model, in all cases, predicts solar energy-conversion efficiencies of <1% for such systems. However, relaxation of the assumptions regarding constraints on the escape cone and momentum conservation at the interface yields solar energy-conversion efficiencies as high as 1%–10%, under some assumed (albeit optimistic) operating conditions. Under these conditions, the energy-conversion efficiency is mainly limited by the thermionic dark current, the distribution of hot electron energies, and hot-electron momentum considerations.

  15. Deuterons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2011-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to deuterons ((2)H(+)) in the energy range 10 MeV-1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder™ 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of the effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for the equivalent and effective dose incorporated a radiation weighting factor of 2. At 15 of 19 energies for which coefficients for the effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations differed by <3%. The greatest difference, 47%, occurred at 30 MeV.

  16. AIR KERMA TO Hp(3) CONVERSION COEFFICIENTS FOR IEC 61267 RQR X-RAY RADIATION QUALITIES: APPLICATION TO DOSE MONITORING OF THE LENS OF THE EYE IN MEDICAL DIAGNOSTICS.

    PubMed

    Principi, S; Guardiola, C; Duch, M A; Ginjaume, M

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies highlight the fact that the new eye lens dose limit can be exceeded in interventional radiology procedures and that eye lens monitoring could be required for these workers. The recommended operational quantity for monitoring of eye lens exposure is the personal dose equivalent at 3 mm depth Hp(3) (ICRU 51). However, there are no available conversion coefficients in international standards, while in the literature coefficients have only been calculated for monoenergetic beams and for ISO 4037-1 X-ray qualities. The aim of this article is to provide air kerma to Hp(3) conversion coefficients for a cylindrical phantom made of ICRU-4 elements tissue-equivalent material for RQR radiation qualities (IEC-61267) from 40 to 120 kV and for angles of incidence from 0 to 180°, which are characteristic of medical workplace. Analytic calculations using interpolation techniques and Monte Carlo modelling have been compared. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Radiometer offsets and count conversion coefficients for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) spacecraft for the years 1987, 1988, and 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Stassi, Joseph C.; Wilson, Robert; Bolden, William; Thomas, Susan; Gibson, M. Alan

    1993-01-01

    This document contains a compendium of the ground and in-flight scanner and non-scanner offsets and count conversion (gain) coefficients used for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) production processing of data from the ERBS satellite for the period from 1 January 1987 to 31 December 1989; for the NOAA-9 satellite, for the month of January 1987; and for the NOAA-10 satellite, for the period from 1 January 1987 to 31 May 1989.

  18. Doubly stochastic Poisson processes in EMARG with detection of. beta. particles and internal-conversion electrons emitted from a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Rusov, V.D.; Zelentsova, T.N.; Grechan, V.I.; Semenov, M.Y.; Kravchenko, S.N.

    1985-12-01

    The form of the counting statistics is determined for detection of ..beta.. particles and internal-conversion electrons by a nuclear emulsion. It is shown experimentally for the first time that photographic detection of ..beta.. particles and internal-conversion electrons obeys a Neyman type-A distribution, and not a Poisson distribution as was previously assumed.

  19. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and protons calculated using the PHITS code and ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Niita, Koji

    2009-04-07

    The fluence to organ-dose and effective-dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and protons with energies up to 100 GeV was calculated using the PHITS code coupled to male and female adult reference computational phantoms, which are to be released as a common ICRP/ICRU publication. For the calculation, the radiation and tissue weighting factors, w(R) and w(T), respectively, as revised in ICRP Publication 103 were employed. The conversion coefficients for effective dose equivalents derived using the radiation quality factors of both Q(L) and Q(y) relationships were also estimated, utilizing the functions for calculating the probability densities of the absorbed dose in terms of LET (L) and lineal energy (y), respectively, implemented in PHITS. By comparing these data with the corresponding data for the effective dose, we found that the numerical compatibilities of the revised w(R) with the Q(L) and Q(y) relationships are fairly established. The calculated data of these dose conversion coefficients are indispensable for constructing the radiation protection systems based on the new recommendations given in ICRP103 for aircrews and astronauts, as well as for workers in accelerators and nuclear facilities.

  20. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients for a sitting female hybrid computational phantom exposed to monoenergetic protons in idealized irradiation geometries.

    PubMed

    Alves, M C; Santos, W S; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E; Hunt, John G; Carvalho Júnior, A B

    2014-12-21

    The conversion coefficients (CCs) relate protection quantities, mean absorbed dose (DT) and effective dose (E), with physical radiation field quantities, such as fluence (Φ). The calculation of CCs through Monte Carlo simulations is useful for estimating the dose in individuals exposed to radiation. The aim of this work was the calculation of conversion coefficients for absorbed and effective doses per fluence (DT/ Φ and E/Φ) using a sitting and standing female hybrid phantom (UFH/NCI) exposure to monoenergetic protons with energy ranging from 2 MeV to 10 GeV. The radiation transport code MCNPX was used to develop exposure scenarios implementing the female UFH/NCI phantom in sitting and standing postures. Whole-body irradiations were performed using the recommended irradiation geometries by ICRP publication 116 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO). In most organs, the conversion coefficients DT/Φ were similar for both postures. However, relative differences were significant for organs located in the abdominal region, such as ovaries, uterus and urinary bladder, especially in the AP, RLAT and LLAT geometries. Anatomical differences caused by changing the posture of the female UFH/NCI phantom led an attenuation of incident protons with energies below 150 MeV by the thigh of the phantom in the sitting posture, for the front-to-back irradiation, and by the arms and hands of the phantom in the standing posture, for the lateral irradiation.

  1. Dose estimation for astronauts using dose conversion coefficients calculated with the PHITS code and the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Sihver, Lembit; Niita, Koji

    2011-03-01

    Absorbed-dose and dose-equivalent rates for astronauts were estimated by multiplying fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients in the units of Gy.cm(2) and Sv.cm(2), respectively, and cosmic-ray fluxes around spacecrafts in the unit of cm(-2) s(-1). The dose conversion coefficients employed in the calculation were evaluated using the general-purpose particle and heavy ion transport code system PHITS coupled to the male and female adult reference computational phantoms, which were released as a common ICRP/ICRU publication. The cosmic-ray fluxes inside and near to spacecrafts were also calculated by PHITS, using simplified geometries. The accuracy of the obtained absorbed-dose and dose-equivalent rates was verified by various experimental data measured both inside and outside spacecrafts. The calculations quantitatively show that the effective doses for astronauts are significantly greater than their corresponding effective dose equivalents, because of the numerical incompatibility between the radiation quality factors and the radiation weighting factors. These results demonstrate the usefulness of dose conversion coefficients in space dosimetry. © Springer-Verlag 2010

  2. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients for a sitting female hybrid computational phantom exposed to monoenergetic protons in idealized irradiation geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M. C.; Santos, W. S.; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.; Hunt, John G.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    The conversion coefficients (CCs) relate protection quantities, mean absorbed dose (DT) and effective dose (E), with physical radiation field quantities, such as fluence (Φ). The calculation of CCs through Monte Carlo simulations is useful for estimating the dose in individuals exposed to radiation. The aim of this work was the calculation of conversion coefficients for absorbed and effective doses per fluence (DT/ Φ and E/Φ) using a sitting and standing female hybrid phantom (UFH/NCI) exposure to monoenergetic protons with energy ranging from 2 MeV to 10 GeV. The radiation transport code MCNPX was used to develop exposure scenarios implementing the female UFH/NCI phantom in sitting and standing postures. Whole-body irradiations were performed using the recommended irradiation geometries by ICRP publication 116 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO). In most organs, the conversion coefficients DT/Φ were similar for both postures. However, relative differences were significant for organs located in the abdominal region, such as ovaries, uterus and urinary bladder, especially in the AP, RLAT and LLAT geometries. Anatomical differences caused by changing the posture of the female UFH/NCI phantom led an attenuation of incident protons with energies below 150 MeV by the thigh of the phantom in the sitting posture, for the front-to-back irradiation, and by the arms and hands of the phantom in the standing posture, for the lateral irradiation.

  3. [Conversion disorder in an internal medicine department: A series of 37 cases].

    PubMed

    Régny, P; Cathébras, P

    2016-04-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics of a series of patients presenting conversion disorder in a general internal medicine ward and outpatient clinic, the arguments retained by the physicians in favour of the diagnosis, the somatic and psychiatric co-morbidities, the management and the outcome of the disorder. We report the study of 37 patients diagnosed with conversion disorder in an internal medicine department of a French university hospital over a period of 14 years. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of the patients and contacted their primary care physicians to obtain follow-up data. No structured instrument was used for the diagnosis of conversion disorder or for the assessment of psychiatric comorbidities. As expected, patients were mostly young females, although a great variety of age, gender, and socio-cultural background was observed. Motor symptoms predominated (62%). A relevant psychogenic factor was explicitly mentioned in only 43% of the cases. In many cases, organic disease was also present, and an organic cause for the symptom initially considered as conversion was suspected in 3 cases. Depressive and anxious disorders were present respectively in 38% and 35% of cases. A pain complaint was associated in half of the cases. Among patients for whom follow-up data is available, conversion symptoms persisted or recurred in 70% of cases and were associated with a poor quality of life. This case series confirms that the DSM-IV-TR criterion of "psychogenicity" (later abandoned in DSM-5) is highly problematic in clinical practice. It suggests a close relationship between conversion disorder and unexplained chronic pain. Copyright © 2015 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. INTERNAL CONVERSION IN THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC MECHANISM OF BLUE-GREEN ALGAE

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, William; Oppenheimer, J. R.

    1950-01-01

    1. In Chroococcus a quantum of light absorbed by phycocyanin has 90 per cent the chance of doing photosynthesis that a quantum absorbed by chlorophyll has. 2. By a process analogous to internal conversion in radioactivity (but with the linear dimensions and the wave length 104 times larger) there will be transferred from phycocyanin to chlorophyll See PDF for Equation (a number of the order of 100) quanta for every one emitted as fluorescent light by the phycocyanin in the Chroococcus cell. 3. The yield of fluorescent light in Chroococcus is between 1 and 2 per cent. 4. The transfer of energy by internal conversion can account for the photosynthesis by phycocyanin observed by Emerson and Lewis. PMID:15410487

  5. Internal connections and conversations: the internalized other interview in bereavement work.

    PubMed

    Moules, Nancy J

    Much of the work of grief lies in the ways the bereaved learn to maintain connection to the deceased in their lives, while living alongside the physical absence of them. The theory of an Internalized Other Interview is that we carry within ourselves impressions, memories, beliefs, assessments, doctrines, and codes of those who have shaped our lives through relationship. This internalized community of commentators is active in our lives on a day-to-day basis, but when someone dies, their active voice in the dialogue is shifted to a perceived inactivity. However, I argue that, despite the physical absence of the other, the voice continues to resonate and interact in our formation of our worlds. How our loved ones live on inside us influences who we are in the world and in our bereavement. As a result of our research and clinical work, I have come to believe that the active interviewing of the deceased person as internalized in the bereaved can have powerful and healing effects. In this article, I share the results of the research related to this intervention, describe the history located in Internalized Other Interviewing, and offer a transcription of an Internalized Other Interview with a young man and his family who recently lost both his brother and father.

  6. Intensification of acoustic beams in crystals at mode conversion near total internal reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshits, V. I.; Bessonov, D. A.; Lyubimov, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    Geometrical conditions under which mode conversion occurs in a crystal near total internal reflection of an acoustic beam are found. In this case, the entire energy of an incident pump wave is spent on the excitation of a narrow intense reflected beam close in structure to an eigenmode. A consistent choice of orientations of the sagittal plane and surface that excludes the reflection of a parasitic wave of leakage is found.

  7. Precise test of internal-conversion theory: αK measurements for transitions in nine nuclei spanning 45 ≤ Z ≤ 78.

    PubMed

    Hardy, J C; Nica, N; Iacob, V E; Trzhaskovskaya, M B

    2017-05-31

    We have been testing the theory used to calculate internal-conversion coefficients (ICCs) by making a series of measurements of αK values with precision better than ±2%. So far we have measured E3 transitions in three nuclei, (103)Rh, (111)Cd and (134)Cs; and M4 transitions in six nuclei, (119)Sn, (125)Te, (127)Te, (137)Ba, (193)Ir and (197)Pt. Together, these span a wide range of A and Z values. In all cases, the results strongly favor Dirac-Fock calculations in which the final-state electron wave function has been computed in an atomic field that includes the vacancy created by the internal-conversion process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrafast decay of the excited singlet states of thioxanthone by internal conversion and intersystem crossing.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Gonzalo; Grilj, Jakob; Vauthey, Eric; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Rubio-Pons, Oscar; Jacques, Patrice

    2010-02-01

    The experimental ultrafast photophysics of thioxanthone in several aprotic organic solvents at room temperature is presented, measured using femtosecond transient absorption together with high-level ab initio CASPT2 calculations of the singlet- and triplet-state manifolds in the gas phase, including computed state minima and conical intersections, transition energies, oscillator strengths, and spin-orbit coupling terms. The initially populated singlet pi pi* state is shown to decay through internal conversion and intersystem crossing processes via intermediate n pi* singlet and triplet states, respectively. Two easily accessible conical intersections explain the favorable internal conversion rates and low fluorescence quantum yields in nonpolar media. The presence of a singlet-triplet crossing near the singlet pi pi* minimum and the large spin-orbit coupling terms also rationalize the high intersystem crossing rates. A phenomenological kinetic scheme is proposed that accounts for the decrease in internal conversion and intersystem crossing (i.e. the very large experimental crescendo of the fluorescence quantum yield) with the increase of solvent polarity.

  9. Tritons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-12-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to tritons ((3)H(+)) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder™ 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and calculation of gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 3%. The greatest difference, 43%, occurred at 30 MeV.

  10. Model of a Generic Natural Uranium Conversion Plant ? Suggested Measures to Strengthen International Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Raffo-Caiado, Ana Claudia; Begovich, John M; Ferrada, Juan J

    2009-11-01

    This is the final report that closed a joint collaboration effort between DOE and the National Nuclear Energy Commission of Brazil (CNEN). In 2005, DOE and CNEN started a collaborative effort to evaluate measures that can strengthen the effectiveness of international safeguards at a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP). The work was performed by DOE s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and CNEN. A generic model of a NUCP was developed and typical processing steps were defined. Advanced instrumentation and techniques for verification purposes were identified and investigated. The scope of the work was triggered by the International Atomic Energy Agency s 2003 revised policy concerning the starting point of safeguards at uranium conversion facilities. Prior to this policy only the final products of the uranium conversion plant were considered to be of composition and purity suitable for use in the nuclear fuel cycle and therefore, subject to the IAEA safeguards control. DOE and CNEN have explored options for implementing the IAEA policy, although Brazil understands that the new policy established by the IAEA is beyond the framework of the Quadripartite Agreement of which it is one of the parties, together with Argentina, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC) and the IAEA. Two technical papers on this subject were published at the 2005 and 2008 INMM Annual Meetings.

  11. A quantitative property-property relationship for the internal diffusion coefficients of organic compounds in solid materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Fantke, P; Ernstoff, A; Jolliet, O

    2017-05-26

    Indoor releases of organic chemicals encapsulated in solid materials are major contributors to human exposures and are directly related to the internal diffusion coefficient in solid materials. Existing correlations to estimate the diffusion coefficient are only valid for a limited number of chemical-material combinations. This paper develops and evaluates a quantitative property-property relationship (QPPR) to predict diffusion coefficients for a wide range of organic chemicals and materials. We first compiled a training dataset of 1103 measured diffusion coefficients for 158 chemicals in 32 consolidated material types. Following a detailed analysis of the temperature influence, we developed a multiple linear regression model to predict diffusion coefficients as a function of chemical molecular weight (MW), temperature, and material type (adjusted R(2) of .93). The internal validations showed the model to be robust, stable and not a result of chance correlation. The external validation against two separate prediction datasets demonstrated the model has good predicting ability within its applicability domain (Rext2>.8), namely MW between 30 and 1178 g/mol and temperature between 4 and 180°C. By covering a much wider range of organic chemicals and materials, this QPPR facilitates high-throughput estimates of human exposures for chemicals encapsulated in solid materials. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Flexible Dielectric Nanocomposites with Ultrawide Zero-Temperature Coefficient Windows for Electrical Energy Storage and Conversion under Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Shehzad, Khurram; Xu, Yang; Gao, Chao; Li, Hanying; Dang, Zhi-Min; Hasan, Tawfique; Luo, Jack; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2017-03-01

    Polymer dielectrics offer key advantages over their ceramic counterparts such as flexibility, scalability, low cost, and high breakdown voltages. However, a major drawback that limits more widespread application of polymer dielectrics is their temperature-dependent dielectric properties. Achieving dielectric constants with low/zero-temperature coefficient (L/0TC) over a broad temperature range is essential for applications in diverse technologies. Here, we report a hybrid filler strategy to produce polymer composites with an ultrawide L/0TC window of dielectric constant, as well as a significantly enhanced dielectric value, maximum energy storage density, thermal conductivity, and stability. By creating a series of percolative polymer composites, we demonstrated hybrid carbon filler based composites can exhibit a zero-temperature coefficient window of 200 °C (from -50 to 150 °C), the widest 0TC window for all polymer composite dielectrics reported to date. We further show the electric and dielectric temperature coefficient of the composites is highly stable against stretching and bending, even under AC electric field with frequency up to 1 MHz. We envision that our method will push the functional limits of polymer dielectrics for flexible electronics in extreme conditions such as in hybrid vehicles, aerospace, power electronics, and oil/gas exploration.

  13. Estimating depth of polarity conversion of shoaling internal solitary waves in the northeastern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Song, Haibin; Guan, Yongxian; Yang, Shengxiong

    2017-07-01

    Internal Solitary Wave (ISW) normally converts its polarity from depression wave to elevation wave during shoaling process. This phenomenon has been verified by model studies and field observations. However, through the comparison between theoretical studies and observations, we find that Extended Kortweg-de Vries (EKdV) theory, often used by numerical simulations, cannot well predict the polarity conversion area of shoaling ISWs. Here we trace seismic reflectors within the water column, captured by exploration seismic data, and systematically analyze the polarity conversion area of the shoaling ISWs in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS). The results show that the ISWs in the northeastern SCS generally begin to convert their polarities from depression to elevation waves at the seafloor depth of about 200 m, and turn into elevation waves at the seafloor depth of about 100 m. The ISWs between depression and elevation waves are newly defined as transition waves, which are distributed between the seafloor depth of 130 m and 220 m; while elevation waves are distributed between 80 m and 120 m. We compared the observation with the theoretical critical conversion depth estimation by the two-layer model based on EKDV equation. The result suggests that the depth of the upper layer in the two-layer model can be selected as the depth of the maximum buoyancy frequency not the base of the mixing layer. Such selection can get better estimation of critical conversion depth of shoaling ISWs. Our analysis also suggests that the polarity conversion process is amplitude-dependent. The ratio of amplitude to depth for elevation waves is more than two times larger than that of the transition waves. This implies that the seafloor plays a more important role in shallow water than in deep water in controlling the amplitudes of ISWs during shoaling process.

  14. Vibrationally Coherent Crossing and Coupling of Electronic States during Internal Conversion in β-Carotene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebel, M.; Schnedermann, C.; Kukura, P.

    2014-05-01

    Coupling of nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom mediates energy flow in molecules after optical excitation. The associated coherent dynamics in polyatomic systems, however, remain experimentally unexplored. Here, we combined transient absorption spectroscopy with electronic population control to reveal nuclear wave packet dynamics during the S2→S1 internal conversion in β-carotene. We show that passage through a conical intersection is vibrationally coherent and thereby provides direct feedback on the role of different vibrational coordinates in the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

  15. Thioxanthone in apolar solvents: ultrafast internal conversion precedes fast intersystem crossing.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Ramona; Villnow, Torben; Ziegenbein, Christian Torres; Gilch, Peter; Marian, Christel; Rai-Constapel, Vidisha

    2016-03-07

    The photophysics of thioxanthone dissolved in cyclohexane was studied by femtosecond fluorescence and transient absorption spectroscopy. From these experiments two time constants of ∼400 fs and ∼4 ps were retrieved. With the aid of quantum chemically computed spectral signatures and rate constants for intersystem crossing, the time constants were assigned to the underlying processes. Ultrafast internal conversion depletes the primarily excited (1)ππ* state within ∼400 fs. The (1)nπ* state populated thereby undergoes fast intersystem crossing (∼4 ps) yielding the lowest triplet state of (3)ππ* character.

  16. Communication: GAIMS—Generalized Ab Initio Multiple Spawning for both internal conversion and intersystem crossing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curchod, Basile F. E.; Rauer, Clemens; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia; Martínez, Todd J.

    2016-03-01

    Full multiple spawning is a formally exact method to describe the excited-state dynamics of molecular systems beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. However, it has been limited until now to the description of radiationless transitions taking place between electronic states with the same spin multiplicity. This Communication presents a generalization of the full and ab initio multiple spawning methods to both internal conversion (mediated by nonadiabatic coupling terms) and intersystem crossing events (triggered by spin-orbit coupling matrix elements) based on a spin-diabatic representation. The results of two numerical applications, a model system and the deactivation of thioformaldehyde, validate the presented formalism and its implementation.

  17. Vibrationally coherent crossing and coupling of electronic states during internal conversion in β-carotene.

    PubMed

    Liebel, M; Schnedermann, C; Kukura, P

    2014-05-16

    Coupling of nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom mediates energy flow in molecules after optical excitation. The associated coherent dynamics in polyatomic systems, however, remain experimentally unexplored. Here, we combined transient absorption spectroscopy with electronic population control to reveal nuclear wave packet dynamics during the S2 → S1 internal conversion in β-carotene. We show that passage through a conical intersection is vibrationally coherent and thereby provides direct feedback on the role of different vibrational coordinates in the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

  18. Features of an interactive writing discourse: conversational involvement, conventional knowledge, and internalization in "Morning Message".

    PubMed

    Mariage, T V

    2001-01-01

    This study describes how meaning potentials were constructed in the literacy event known as Morning Message. Morning Message provided teachers and students with opportunities to construct a written text around the experiences of one student. This discourse of writing allowed for the examination of how meaning was orchestrated and scaffolded between the teacher and her students. Three findings are discussed, including the function of a series of conversational involvement moves utilized by the teacher, the specific writing conventions and metamessages afforded in the Morning Message dialogue, and an examination of how the social dialogues of Morning Message may have come to guide independent action as internalized processes on several transfer measures.

  19. Helions at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-12-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to helions ((3)He(2+)) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Calculations were performed using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder™ 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 2%. The greatest difference, 62%, occurred at 100 MeV.

  20. Psychometric Inferences from a Meta-Analysis of Reliability and Internal Consistency Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botella, Juan; Suero, Manuel; Gambara, Hilda

    2010-01-01

    A meta-analysis of the reliability of the scores from a specific test, also called reliability generalization, allows the quantitative synthesis of its properties from a set of studies. It is usually assumed that part of the variation in the reliability coefficients is due to some unknown and implicit mechanism that restricts and biases the…

  1. ON THE DEGREE OF CONVERSION AND COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION OF A SINGLE FIBER COMPOSITE USING A FBG SENSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, M.; Botsis, J.; Coric, D.; Cugnoni, J.

    2008-08-28

    The increasing needs of extending the lifetime in high-technology fields, such as space and aerospace, rail transport and naval systems, require quality enhancing of the composite materials either from a processing standing point or in the sense of resistance to service conditions. It is well accepted that the final quality of composite materials and structures is strongly influenced by processing parameters like curing and post-curing temperatures, rate of heating and cooling, applied vacuum, etc. To optimize manufacturing cycles, residual strains evolution due to chemical shrinkage and other physical parameters of the constituent materials must be characterized in situ. Such knowledge can lead to a sensible reduction in defects and to improved physical and mechanical properties of final products. In this context continuous monitoring of strains distribution developed during processing is important in understanding and retrieving components' and materials' characteristics such as local strains gradients, degree of curing, coefficient of thermal expansion, moisture absorption, etc.

  2. On the Degree of Conversion and Coefficient of Thermal Expansion of a Single Fiber Composite Using a Fbg Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, M.; Botsis, J.; Coric, D.; Cugnoni, J.

    2008-08-01

    The increasing needs of extending the lifetime in high-technology fields, such as space and aerospace, rail transport and naval systems, require quality enhancing of the composite materials either from a processing standing point or in the sense of resistance to service conditions. It is well accepted that the final quality of composite materials and structures is strongly influenced by processing parameters like curing and post-curing temperatures, rate of heating and cooling, applied vacuum, etc. To optimize manufacturing cycles, residual strains evolution due to chemical shrinkage and other physical parameters of the constituent materials must be characterized in situ. Such knowledge can lead to a sensible reduction in defects and to improved physical and mechanical properties of final products. In this context continuous monitoring of strains distribution developed during processing is important in understanding and retrieving components' and materials' characteristics such as local strains gradients, degree of curing, coefficient of thermal expansion, moisture absorption, etc.

  3. Simulation of time resolved photoelectron spectra with Stieltjes imaging illustrated on ultrafast internal conversion in pyrazine.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ute; Mitrić, Roland; Bonacić-Koutecký, Vlasta

    2010-05-07

    We present an approach for the simulation of time resolved photoelectron spectra based on the combination of the ab initio nonadiabatic molecular dynamics "on the fly" with the Stieltjes imaging method utilizing discrete neutral states above the ionization limit for the approximate description of the ionization continuum. Our approach has been implemented in the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory and has been applied to interrogate the ultrafast internal conversion between the S(2) and S(1) states in pyrazine. The simulations reveal that, parallel to the S(2)-->S(1) internal conversion, a change in the dominant ionization process (S(2)-->D(1) versus S(1)-->D(0)) occurs on the time scale of 20 fs such that no significant change in the photoelectron kinetic energy distribution is observed. The presented results are in full agreement with the experimental results presented in the accompanying paper [Suzuki et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 174302 (2010)] and provide an insight into the interplay between the nonradiative relaxation and the photoionization process in pyrazine as reflected in the time resolved photoelectron spectrum. Our approach represents a general tool for the investigation of ultrafast photoionization processes in complex systems and thus can be used to investigate the ultrafast femtochemistry of complex molecular systems including all degrees of freedom.

  4. Simulation of time resolved photoelectron spectra with Stieltjes imaging illustrated on ultrafast internal conversion in pyrazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Ute; Mitrić, Roland; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta

    2010-05-01

    We present an approach for the simulation of time resolved photoelectron spectra based on the combination of the ab initio nonadiabatic molecular dynamics "on the fly" with the Stieltjes imaging method utilizing discrete neutral states above the ionization limit for the approximate description of the ionization continuum. Our approach has been implemented in the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory and has been applied to interrogate the ultrafast internal conversion between the S2 and S1 states in pyrazine. The simulations reveal that, parallel to the S2→S1 internal conversion, a change in the dominant ionization process (S2→D1 versus S1→D0) occurs on the time scale of 20 fs such that no significant change in the photoelectron kinetic energy distribution is observed. The presented results are in full agreement with the experimental results presented in the accompanying paper [Suzuki et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 174302 (2010)] and provide an insight into the interplay between the nonradiative relaxation and the photoionization process in pyrazine as reflected in the time resolved photoelectron spectrum. Our approach represents a general tool for the investigation of ultrafast photoionization processes in complex systems and thus can be used to investigate the ultrafast femtochemistry of complex molecular systems including all degrees of freedom.

  5. Comparison of effective transverse piezoelectric coefficients e31,f of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 thin films between direct and converse piezoelectric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiura, Yuichi; Kawabe, Saneyuki; Kurokawa, Fumiya; Hida, Hirotaka; Kanno, Isaku

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the effective transverse piezoelectric coefficients (e31,f) of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) thin films from both the direct and converse piezoelectric effects of unimorph cantilevers. (001) preferentially oriented polycrystalline PZT thin films and (001)/(100) epitaxial PZT thin films were deposited on (111)Pt/Ti/Si and (001)Pt/MgO substrates, respectively, by rf-magnetron sputtering, and their piezoelectric responses owing to intrinsic and extrinsic effects were examined. The direct and converse |e31,f| values of the polycrystalline PZT thin films were calculated as 6.4 and 11.5-15.0 C/m2, respectively, whereas those of the epitaxial PZT thin films were calculated as 3.4 and 4.6-4.8 C/m2, respectively. The large |e31,f| of the converse piezoelectric property of the polycrystalline PZT thin films is attributed to extrinsic piezoelectric effects. Furthermore, the polycrystalline PZT thin films show a clear nonlinear piezoelectric contribution, which is the same as the Rayleigh-like behavior reported in bulk PZT. In contrast, the epitaxial PZT thin films on the MgO substrate show a piezoelectric response owing to the intrinsic and linear extrinsic effects, and no nonlinear contribution was observed.

  6. Estimation of internal heat transfer coefficients and detection of rib positions in gas turbine blades from transient surface temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidrich, P.; Wolfersdorf, J. v.; Schmidt, S.; Schnieder, M.

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive, non-destructive, transient inverse measurement technique that allows one to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and rib positions of real gas turbine blades from outer surface temperature measurements after a sudden flow heating. The determination of internal heat transfer coefficients is important during the design process to adjust local heat transfer to spatial thermal load. The detection of rib positions is important during production to fulfill design and quality requirements. For the analysis the one-dimensional transient heat transfer problem inside of the turbine blade's wall was solved. This solution was combined with the Levenberg-Marquardt method to estimate the unknown boundary condition by an inverse technique. The method was tested with artificial data to determine uncertainties with positive results. Then experimental testing with a reference model was carried out. Based on the results, it is concluded that the presented inverse technique could be used to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and to detect rib positions of real turbine blades.

  7. Synchrotron radiation-based Mössbauer spectra of {sup 174}Yb measured with internal conversion electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Ryo Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Kitao, Shinji; Kurokuzu, Masayuki; Saito, Makina; Mitsui, Takaya; Iga, Fumitoshi; Seto, Makoto

    2014-02-24

    A detection system for synchrotron-radiation (SR)-based Mössbauer spectroscopy was developed to enhance the nuclear resonant scattering counting rate and thus increase the available nuclides. In the system, a windowless avalanche photodiode (APD) detector was combined with a vacuum cryostat to detect the internal conversion (IC) electrons and fluorescent X-rays accompanied by nuclear de-excitation. As a feasibility study, the SR-based Mössbauer spectrum using the 76.5 keV level of {sup 174}Yb was observed without {sup 174}Yb enrichment of the samples. The counting rate was five times higher than that of our previous system, and the spectrum was obtained within 10 h. This result shows that nuclear resonance events can be more efficiently detected by counting IC electrons for nuclides with high IC coefficients. Furthermore, the windowless detection system enables us to place the sample closer to the APD elements and is advantageous for nuclear resonant inelastic scattering measurements. Therefore, this detection system can not only increase the number of nuclides accessible in SR-based Mössbauer spectroscopy but also allows the nuclear resonant inelastic scattering measurements of small single crystals or enzymes with dilute probe nuclides that are difficult to measure with the previous detection system.

  8. Precise measurement of K-shell fluorescence yield in iridium: An improved test of internal-conversion theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nica, N.; Hardy, J.C.; Iacob, V.E.; Montague, J.R.; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2005-05-01

    We have measured the total intensity of K x rays relative to 129.4-keV {gamma} rays from decay of the second excited state in {sup 191}Ir. This (M1+E2) transition was observed following the {beta} decay of 15.4-d {sup 191}Os. Our measured ratio yields the result {alpha}{sub K}{omega}{sub K}=2.044(11). When combined with a recent measurement of the same ratio for the 80.2-keV M4 transition from {sup 193}Ir{sup m}, this result strongly confirms the need for the K-shell hole to be included in calculations of internal-conversion coefficients {alpha}{sub K}. Since the {alpha}{sub K} value calculated for the {sup 191}Ir transition is virtually independent of the hole treatment, our result also yields a model-independent value for the iridium fluorescence yield, {omega}{sub K}=0.954(9)

  9. Polymerization Kinetics: Monitoring Monomer Conversion Using an Internal Standard and the Key Role of Sample "t[subscript 0]"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombani, Olivier; Langelier, Ophelie; Martwong, Ekkachai; Castignolles, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    The use of an internal standard is a conventional and convenient way to monitor the conversion of one or several monomers during a controlled radical polymerization. However, the validity of this technique relies on an accurate determination of the initial monomer-to-internal standard ratio, A[subscript 0], because all subsequent calculations of…

  10. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  11. Dose-area product measurements and determination of conversion coefficients for the estimation of effective dose in dental lateral cephalometric radiology.

    PubMed

    Looe, H K; Eenboom, F; Chofor, N; Pfaffenberger, A; Sering, M; Rühmann, A; Poplawski, A; Willborn, K; Poppe, B

    2007-01-01

    A study has been carried out to propose diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for lateral cephalometric radiology in Germany based on the dose-area product (DAP). DRLs were proposed separately for child and adult exposure settings which are 26.4 and 32.6 mGy cm2, respectively. Organ absorbed doses from lateral cephalometric radiology were also measured using thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs) and an adult anthropomorphic phantom specially design for dosimetric study in dental radiology. Effective doses were then calculated using three different techniques where the salivary gland and brain tissue were given different weighting factors. Conversion coefficients for estimating effective dose from DAP value derived in this study range from 0.042 to 0.149 microSv/mGy cm2.

  12. Dose conversion coefficients calculated using tomographic phantom, KTMAN-2, for X-ray examination of cardiac catheterisation.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Lee, J K; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    In this study, organ-absorbed doses and effective doses to patient during interventional radiological procedures were estimated using tomographic phantom, Korean Typical Man-2 (KTMAN-2). Four projections of cardiac catheterisation were simulated for dose calculation by Monte Carlo technique. The parameters of X-ray source and exposure conditions were obtained from literature data. Particle transport was simulated using general purposed Monte Carlo code, MCNPX 2.5.0. Organ-absorbed doses and effective doses were normalised to dose area product (DAP). The effective doses per DAP were between 0.1 and 0.5 mSv Gy(-1) per cm2. The results were compared with those derived from adult stylised phantom. KTMAN-2 received up to 105% higher effective doses than stylised phantom. The dose differences were mainly caused by more realistic internal topology of KTMAN-2 compared to stylised phantom that are closely positioned organs near the heart and shift of abdominal organs to the thoracic region due to supine position. The results of this study showed that tomographic phantoms are more suitable for dose assessment of supine patients undergoing the interventional radiology. The results derived from KTMAN-2 were the first radiation dose data based on non-Caucasian individuals for interventional procedures.

  13. Internal conversion in energy dispersive X-ray analysis of actinide-containing materials.

    PubMed

    Wiss, Thierry; Thiele, Hartmut; Cremer, Bert; Ray, Ian

    2007-06-01

    The use of X-ray elemental analysis tools like energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) is described in the context of the investigation of nuclear materials. These materials contain radioactive elements, particularly alpha-decaying actinides that affect the quantitative EDS measurement by producing interferences in the X-ray spectra. These interferences originating from X-ray emission are the result of internal conversion by the daughter atoms from the alpha-decaying actinides. The strong interferences affect primarily the L X-ray lines from the actinides (in the typical energy range used for EDS analysis) and would require the use of the M lines. However, it is typically at the energy of the actinide's M lines that the interferences are dominant. The artifacts produced in the X-ray analysis are described and illustrated by some typical examples of analysis of actinide-bearing material.

  14. Time-resolved measurement of internal conversion dynamics in strong-field molecular ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliamonti, Vincent; Kaufman, Brian; Zhao, Arthur; Rozgonyi, Tamás; Marquetand, Philipp; Weinacht, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    We time-resolve coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics during strong-field molecular ionization by measuring the momentum-resolved photoelectron yield as a function of pump-probe delay for a pair of strong-field laser pulses. The sub-10-fs pulses are generated using a specially designed ultrafast optical pulse shaper and the electrons are measured using velocity map imaging. Our measurements, in conjunction with calculations that solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, allow us to time-resolve resonance-enhanced strong-field ionization and break it down into three basic steps: (1) Stark-shifted resonant excitation of a high-lying neutral state of the molecule, (2) nonadiabatic dynamics (internal conversion) in which multiple electronic states are coupled, and (3) coupling to the continuum (ionization).

  15. Dynamics of ultrafast internal conversion processes studied by femtosecond time-delayed photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, D.R.; Hayden, C.C.

    1995-08-01

    The authors have studied the dynamics of ultrafast internal conversion processes using femtosecond time-resolved photoionization and photoelectron spectroscopy. In hexatriene, following femtosecond pulse excitation at 250 nm, they use time-delayed photoionization to observe the formation and decay of an intermediate species on the subpicosecond time scale. With time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, the rapid evolution of vibrational excitation in this intermediate is observed, as electronic energy is converted to vibrational energy in the molecule. The photodynamics of cis and trans isomers of hexatriene are compared and found to be surprisingly different on the 2-3 psec time scale. These results are important for understanding the fundamental photochemical processes in linear polyenes, which have served as models for the active chromophores of many biological photosystems.

  16. Report of feasibility study on international-cooperation in high efficient energy conversion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-03-01

    With regard to accelerated introduction of high efficient energy conversion technology to developing countries, the paper investigates the countries' thoughts of the introduction of the technology and the status of the introduction bases. The countries for survey are the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. The Philippine government expects to develop cogeneration as well as large power sources and to widen effective use of natural energy. In Indonesia, they largely expect effective use of biomass energy using Stirling engines by international cooperation and the promoted local electrification using standalone distributed fuel cells. In Malaysia, they have great expectations of the introduction of air conditioning facilities using Stirling engines and the use of standalone distributed fuel cells for promotion of local electrification. Thailand hopes for the use of Stirling engines to air conditioning systems, and the development of solar Stirling generators with solar energy as a heat source and electric vehicles.

  17. Communication: GAIMS—generalized ab initio multiple spawning for both internal conversion and intersystem crossing processes

    DOE PAGES

    Curchod, Basile F. E.; Rauer, Clemens; Marquetand, Philipp; ...

    2016-03-11

    Full Multiple Spawning is a formally exact method to describe the excited-state dynamics of molecular systems beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. However, it has been limited until now to the description of radiationless transitions taking place between electronic states with the same spin multiplicity. This Communication presents a generalization of the full and ab initio Multiple Spawning methods to both internal conversion (mediated by nonadiabatic coupling terms) and intersystem crossing events (triggered by spin-orbit coupling matrix elements) based on a spin-diabatic representation. Lastly, the results of two numerical applications, a model system and the deactivation of thioformaldehyde, validate the presented formalismmore » and its implementation.« less

  18. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients based on the posture modification of Adult Male (AM) and Adult Female (AF) reference phantoms of ICRP 110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, D. C.; Santos, W. S.; Alves, M. C.; Souza, D. N.; Carvalho, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to modify the standing posture of the anthropomorphic reference phantoms of ICRP publication 110, AM (Adult Male) and AF (Adult Female), to the sitting posture. The change of posture was performed using the Visual Monte Carlo software (VMC) to rotate the thigh region of the phantoms and position it between the region of the leg and trunk. Scion Image software was used to reconstruct and smooth the knee and hip contours of the phantoms in a sitting posture. For 3D visualization of phantoms, the VolView software was used. In the change of postures, the organ and tissue masses were preserved. The MCNPX was used to calculate the equivalent and effective dose conversion coefficients (CCs) per fluence for photons for six irradiation geometries suggested by ICRP publication 110 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO) and energy range 0.010-10 MeV. The results were compared between the standing and sitting postures, for both sexes, in order to evaluate the differences of scattering and absorption of radiation for different postures. Significant differences in the CCs for equivalent dose were observed in the gonads, colon, prostate, urinary bladder and uterus, which are present in the pelvic region, and in organs distributed throughout the body, such as the lymphatic nodes, muscle, skeleton and skin, for the phantoms of both sexes. CCs for effective dose showed significant differences of up to 16% in the AP irradiation geometry, 27% in the PA irradiation geometry and 13% in the ROT irradiation geometry. These results demonstrate the importance of using phantoms in different postures in order to obtain more precise conversion coefficients for a given exposure scenario.

  19. Internal friction between fluid particles of MHD tangent hyperbolic fluid with heat generation: Using coefficients improved by Cash and Karp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahuddin, T.; Khan, Imad; Malik, M. Y.; Khan, Mair; Hussain, Arif; Awais, Muhammad

    2017-05-01

    The present work examines the internal resistance between fluid particles of tangent hyperbolic fluid flow due to a non-linear stretching sheet with heat generation. Using similarity transformations, the governing system of partial differential equations is transformed into a coupled non-linear ordinary differential system with variable coefficients. Unlike the current analytical works on the flow problems in the literature, the main concern here is to numerically work out and find the solution by using Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg coefficients improved by Cash and Karp (Naseer et al., Alexandria Eng. J. 53, 747 (2014)). To determine the relevant physical features of numerous mechanisms acting on the deliberated problem, it is sufficient to have the velocity profile and temperature field and also the drag force and heat transfer rate all as given in the current paper.

  20. Generalized trajectory surface-hopping method for internal conversion and intersystem crossing.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ganglong; Thiel, Walter

    2014-09-28

    Trajectory-based fewest-switches surface-hopping (FSSH) dynamics simulations have become a popular and reliable theoretical tool to simulate nonadiabatic photophysical and photochemical processes. Most available FSSH methods model internal conversion. We present a generalized trajectory surface-hopping (GTSH) method for simulating both internal conversion and intersystem crossing processes on an equal footing. We consider hops between adiabatic eigenstates of the non-relativistic electronic Hamiltonian (pure spin states), which is appropriate for sufficiently small spin-orbit coupling. This choice allows us to make maximum use of existing electronic structure programs and to minimize the changes to available implementations of the traditional FSSH method. The GTSH method is formulated within the quantum mechanics (QM)/molecular mechanics framework, but can of course also be applied at the pure QM level. The algorithm implemented in the GTSH code is specified step by step. As an initial GTSH application, we report simulations of the nonadiabatic processes in the lowest four electronic states (S0, S1, T1, and T2) of acrolein both in vacuo and in acetonitrile solution, in which the acrolein molecule is treated at the ab initio complete-active-space self-consistent-field level. These dynamics simulations provide detailed mechanistic insight by identifying and characterizing two nonadiabatic routes to the lowest triplet state, namely, direct S1 → T1 hopping as major pathway and sequential S1 → T2 → T1 hopping as minor pathway, with the T2 state acting as a relay state. They illustrate the potential of the GTSH approach to explore photoinduced processes in complex systems, in which intersystem crossing plays an important role.

  1. Analytical Exponential Decay Coefficients and Internal Radiant Emission Phenomena of the Submarine Light Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    leakage around a blocking filter placed in front of the light sensor or internal emission of radiation from the hydrosol into the waveband of interest. The...series was the effects of the highly asymmetrical volume scattering function of natural hydrosols on the upwelling and downwelling streams of radiant flux...simulation was a demonstration that two-flow type models of radiant flux cannot be inverted in natural hydrosols (Stavn and Weldemann, 1989). An

  2. Feasibility survey on international cooperation for high efficiency energy conversion technology in fiscal 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-03-01

    Following cooperative researches on fuel cell jointly conducted by NEDO and EGAT (Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand), the survey on international cooperation relating to high efficiency energy conversion technology was carried out for the ASEAN countries. The paper summed up the results of the survey. The study of the international cooperation is made for the following three items: a program for periodical exchange of information with EGAT, a project for cooperative research on phosphoric acid fuel cell in Indonesia, and a project for cooperative research with EGAT on electric power storage by advanced battery. In Malaysia, which is small in scale of state, part of the Ministry of Energy, Telecommunication and Posts is only in charge of the energy issue. Therefore, the situation is that they cannot answer well to many items of research/development cooperation brought in from Japan. The item of medium- and long-term developmental research in the Philippines is about the problems which are seen subsequently in the Manila metropolitan area where the problem of outage is being settled. Accordingly, it is essential to promote the cooperative research, well confirming policies and systems of the Ministry of Energy and the national electricity corporation.

  3. Double K-shell ionization accompanying internal conversion of the 0.662-MeV transition in 137Bam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, H. J.; Brady, K. E.; Schupp, G.

    1988-12-01

    Double ionization of the atomic K shell accompanying K-shell internal conversion of the 0.662-MeV transition of 137Bam has been studied by recording coincidences between Kα hypersatellite x rays and Kα satellite x rays emitted when the double vacancies are filled. The probability per K-shell internal conversion that a double vacancy is formed, PKK(IC), was found to be (10.0+/-0.9)×10-5 which is in general agreement with less precise earlier experiments, but is a factor of 2.7+/-0.3 larger than the relativistic, one-step theory of Mukoyama and Shimizu.

  4. Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics An International Round-Robin Study, Part I: Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Bottner, Harold; Konig, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolett, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Partricia; Sharp, Jeff; Lo, Jason; Keinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo I.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research and development of high temperature thermoelectric materials has demonstrated great potential of converting automobile exhaust heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectrics based on classic bismuth telluride have also started to impact the automotive industry by enhancing air conditioning efficiency and integrated cabin climate control. In addition to engineering challenges of making reliable and efficient devices to withstand thermal and mechanical cycling, the remaining issues in thermoelectric power generation and refrigeration are mostly materials related. The figure-of-merit, ZT, still needs to improve from the current value of 1.0 - 1.5 to above 2 to be competitive to other alternative technologies. In the meantime, the thermoelectric community could greatly benefit from the development of international test standards, improved test methods and better characterization tools. Internationally, thermoelectrics have been recognized by many countries as an important area for improving energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) identified thermoelectric materials as an important area in 2009. This paper is Part I of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk thermoelectrics. The main focuses in Part I are on two electronic transport properties: Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity.

  5. Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics—An International Round-Robin Study, Part I: Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D.; Böttner, Harald; König, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolet, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Patricia; Sharp, Jeff W.; Lo, Jason; Kleinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo

    2013-04-01

    Recent research and development of high-temperature thermoelectric materials has demonstrated great potential for converting automobile exhaust heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectrics based on classic bismuth telluride have also started to impact the automotive industry by enhancing air-conditioning efficiency and integrated cabin climate control. In addition to engineering challenges of making reliable and efficient devices to withstand thermal and mechanical cycling, the remaining issues in thermoelectric power generation and refrigeration are mostly materials related. The dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, still needs to be improved from the current value of 1.0 to 1.5 to above 2.0 to be competitive with other alternative technologies. In the meantime, the thermoelectric community could greatly benefit from the development of international test standards, improved test methods, and better characterization tools. Internationally, thermoelectrics have been recognized by many countries as a key component for improving energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the Implementing Agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) identified thermoelectric materials as an important area in 2009. This paper is part I of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk thermoelectrics. The main foci in part I are the measurement of two electronic transport properties: Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity.

  6. Experiments on barotropic-baroclinic conversion and the applicability of linear n-layer internal wave theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincze, Miklós; Bozóki, Tamás

    2017-10-01

    Interfacial internal waves in a stratified fluid excited by periodic free-surface perturbations in a closed tank are studied experimentally. Barotropic-baroclinic energy conversion is induced by the presence of a bottom obstacle. The connection between horizontal surface velocities and internal wave amplitudes is investigated, the developing flow patterns are described qualitatively, and the wave speeds of internal waves are systematically analyzed and compared to linear two- and three-layer theories. We find that, despite the fact that the observed internal waves can have considerable amplitudes, a linear three-layer approximation still gives fairly good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Internal transmission coefficient in charges carrier generation layer of graphene/Si based solar cell device

    SciTech Connect

    Rosikhin, Ahmad Winata, Toto

    2016-04-19

    Internal transmission profile in charges carrier generation layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been explored theoretically. Photovoltaic device was constructed from graphene/Si heterojunction forming a multilayer stuck with Si as generation layer. The graphene/Si sheet was layered on ITO/glass wafer then coated by Al forming Ohmic contact with Si. Photon incident propagate from glass substrate to metal electrode and assumed that there is no transmission in Al layer. The wavelength range spectra used in this calculation was 200 – 1000 nm. It found that transmission intensity in the generation layer show non-linear behavior and partitioned by few areas which related with excitation process. According to this information, it may to optimize the photons absorption to create more excitation process by inserting appropriate material to enhance optical properties in certain wavelength spectra because of the exciton generation is strongly influenced by photon absorption.

  8. International Atomic Energy Agency support of research reactor highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium fuel conversion projects

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.; Adelfang, P.; Goldman, I.N.

    2008-07-15

    The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non- proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly assisted efforts to convert research reactors from HEU to LEU fuel. HEU to LEU fuel conversion projects differ significantly depending on several factors including the design of the reactor and fuel, technical needs of the member state, local nuclear infrastructure, and available resources. To support such diverse endeavours, the IAEA tailors each project to address the relevant constraints. This paper presents the different approaches taken by the IAEA to address the diverse challenges involved in research reactor HEU to LEU fuel conversion projects. Examples of conversion related projects in different Member States are fully detailed. (author)

  9. Effects of magnetic field and the built-in internal fields on the absorption coefficients in a strained wurtzite GaN/AlGaN quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minimala, N. S.; Peter, A. John

    2013-02-01

    Effects of magnetic field strength and the built-in electric fields on the exciton binding energy and the non-linear optical property such as absorption coefficients in a GaN/AlGaN wide band gap heterostructure are investigated. The internal fields due to spontaneous and piezo-electric polarizations are included in the Hamiltonian. Our results show that the optical absorption coefficients strongly depend on the internal fields and the applied magnetic field.

  10. Post-recombination early Universe cooling by translation-internal inter-conversion: The role of minor constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffery, Anthony J.

    2015-09-01

    Little is known of the mechanism by which H and H2, the principal constituents of the post-re-combination early Universe, cooled sufficiently to permit cluster formation, nucleosynthesis, and, eventually, the formation of structured objects. Radiative decay primarily cools the internal modes of H2, as Δj = - 2 jumps accompany quadrupolar emission. This, however, would be a self-limiting mechanism. In this work, a translational energy cooling mechanism based on collision-induced, translation-to-internal mode conversion, is extended, following an earlier study [A. J. McCaffery and R. J. Marsh, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234310 (2013)] of ensembles comprising H2 in a H atom bath gas. Here, the possible influence of minor species, such as HD, on this cooling mechanism is investigated. Results suggest that the influence of HD is small but not insignificant. Conversion is very rapid and an overall translation-to-internal energy conversion efficiency of some 5% could be expected. This finding may be of use in the further development of models of this complex phase of early Universe evolution. An unexpected finding in this study was that H2 + HD ensembles are capable of very rapid translation-to-internal conversion with efficiencies of >40% and relaxation rates that appear to be relatively slow. This may have potential as an energy storage mechanism.

  11. Post-recombination early Universe cooling by translation–internal inter-conversion: The role of minor constituents

    SciTech Connect

    McCaffery, Anthony J.

    2015-09-14

    Little is known of the mechanism by which H and H{sub 2}, the principal constituents of the post-re-combination early Universe, cooled sufficiently to permit cluster formation, nucleosynthesis, and, eventually, the formation of structured objects. Radiative decay primarily cools the internal modes of H{sub 2}, as Δj = − 2 jumps accompany quadrupolar emission. This, however, would be a self-limiting mechanism. In this work, a translational energy cooling mechanism based on collision-induced, translation-to-internal mode conversion, is extended, following an earlier study [A. J. McCaffery and R. J. Marsh, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234310 (2013)] of ensembles comprising H{sub 2} in a H atom bath gas. Here, the possible influence of minor species, such as HD, on this cooling mechanism is investigated. Results suggest that the influence of HD is small but not insignificant. Conversion is very rapid and an overall translation-to-internal energy conversion efficiency of some 5% could be expected. This finding may be of use in the further development of models of this complex phase of early Universe evolution. An unexpected finding in this study was that H{sub 2} + HD ensembles are capable of very rapid translation-to-internal conversion with efficiencies of >40% and relaxation rates that appear to be relatively slow. This may have potential as an energy storage mechanism.

  12. Post-recombination early Universe cooling by translation-internal inter-conversion: The role of minor constituents.

    PubMed

    McCaffery, Anthony J

    2015-09-14

    Little is known of the mechanism by which H and H2, the principal constituents of the post-re-combination early Universe, cooled sufficiently to permit cluster formation, nucleosynthesis, and, eventually, the formation of structured objects. Radiative decay primarily cools the internal modes of H2, as Δj = - 2 jumps accompany quadrupolar emission. This, however, would be a self-limiting mechanism. In this work, a translational energy cooling mechanism based on collision-induced, translation-to-internal mode conversion, is extended, following an earlier study [A. J. McCaffery and R. J. Marsh, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234310 (2013)] of ensembles comprising H2 in a H atom bath gas. Here, the possible influence of minor species, such as HD, on this cooling mechanism is investigated. Results suggest that the influence of HD is small but not insignificant. Conversion is very rapid and an overall translation-to-internal energy conversion efficiency of some 5% could be expected. This finding may be of use in the further development of models of this complex phase of early Universe evolution. An unexpected finding in this study was that H2 + HD ensembles are capable of very rapid translation-to-internal conversion with efficiencies of >40% and relaxation rates that appear to be relatively slow. This may have potential as an energy storage mechanism.

  13. Ultrafast internal conversion in a low band gap polymer for photovoltaics: experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Fazzi, Daniele; Grancini, Giulia; Maiuri, Margherita; Brida, Daniele; Cerullo, Giulio; Lanzani, Guglielmo

    2012-05-14

    Ultrafast dynamics upon photoexcitation in a low band gap polymer for photovoltaics is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Our work sheds light on the excess energy relaxation processes occurring immediately after photon absorption and responsible for dissipation in the photovoltaic process of light harvesting and energy storage. A peculiar non-adiabatic decay path through a conical intersection (CI) between the higher excited state S(2) and the first singlet state S(1) is identified by ultrafast spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. Ultrafast twisting of the initially flat conformation in S(2) drives the system to the CI connecting the two potential energy surfaces, actually eliciting an internal conversion within 60 femtoseconds, followed by planarization along the adiabatic surface in S(1). Relaxed potential energy profiles (PEPs) of ground and lowest excited states along a dihedral coordinate, calculated within the time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approach, support the S(2)/S(1) CI mechanism. Furthermore a screening of the widely used hybrid and range separated exchange-correlation (XC) DFT functionals has been carried out finding different descriptions of S(2)/S(1) PEPs and good agreement between experimental data and long-range corrected DFT. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  14. Visualizing competing intersystem crossing and internal conversion with a complementary measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuzhu; Gerber, Thomas; Qin, Chaochao; Jin, Feng; Knopp, Gregor

    2016-02-01

    A complementary measurement method based on a home-built double-sided velocity map imaging setup is introduced. This method can simultaneously obtain time-resolved photoelectron imaging and fragment ion imaging. It has been successfully applied to investigate the ultrafast dynamics of the second singlet electronically excited state (S2) in m-xylene. Time-resolved photoelectron and ion signals derived from the initial populated S2 state are tracked following two-photon absorption of a pump pulse. Time-of-flight mass spectra (TOFMS) show that there are dominant parent ions and one fragment ions with methyl loss during such a process. According to the measured photoelectron images and fragment ions images, transient kinetic energy distributions and angular distributions of the generated photoelectrons and fragments are obtained and analyzed. Compared to stand-alone photoelectron imaging, the obtained fragment ion imaging is powerful for further understanding the mechanisms especially when the dissociation occurs during the pump-probe ionization. Two competing channels intersystem crossing T3←S2 and internal conversion S1←S2 are attributed to the deactivation of the S2 state. A lifetime of ˜50 fs for the initially excited S2 state, of ˜276 fs for the secondary populated S1 state, and of 5.76 ps for the T3 state is inferred.

  15. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) as Conversion Therapy for Unresectable Primary Liver Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Cucchetti, Alessandro; Cappelli, Alberta; Ercolani, Giorgio; Mosconi, Cristina; Cescon, Matteo; Golfieri, Rita; Pinna, Antonio Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Background Many patients with primary liver cancers are not candidates for surgery, and systemic therapies are seldom effective. Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) has been shown to obtain partial and even complete response in unresectable primary tumors. As a “side effect”, SIRT can induce contra-lateral liver hypertrophy. Tumor response to SIRT can be sufficient to allow disengagement from normal vital structures whose involvement is the cause of the initial unresectability. The contra-lateral hypertrophy can thereby increase the future liver remnant (FLR) volume to over the safe threshold so that extended hepatectomy can be performed. Summary A review of the available literature was performed to assess the tumor response and liver hypertrophy that can be expected after SIRT, in order to delineate whether SIRTcan play a role in conversion therapy for resectability of primary liver malignancies. Key Message Available data suggest that SIRT in unresectable hepatocellular and cholangiocellular carcinomas can provide a considerable down-sizing of the tumors to possibly allow resection. Hypertrophy of the contra-lateral lobe represents a favorable collateral effect that can help in achieving safer subsequent major hepatectomy. In patients whose FLR volume represents the only surgical concern, portal vein embolization remains the treatment of choice. PMID:27781202

  16. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients from monoenergetic neutrons below 20 MeV based on the VIP-Man anatomical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, A.; Chao, T. C.; Xu, X. G.; Bozkurt, A.; Chao, T. C.

    2000-10-01

    A new set of fluence-to-absorbed dose and fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients have been calculated for neutrons below 20 MeV using a whole-body anatomical model, VIP-Man, developed from the high-resolution transverse colour photographic images of the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project®. Organ dose calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP for 20 monoenergetic neutron beams between 1×10-9 MeV and 20 MeV under six different irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right lateral, left lateral, rotational and isotropic. The absorbed dose for 24 major organs and effective dose results based on the realistic VIP-Man are presented and compared with those based on the simplified MIRD-based phantoms reported in the literature. Effective doses from VIP-Man are not significantly different from earlier results for neutrons in the energy range studied. There are, however, remarkable deviations in organ doses due to the anatomical differences between the image-based and the earlier mathematical models.

  17. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients based on the VIP-Man anatomical model and MCNPX code for monoenergetic neutrons above 20 MeV.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, A; Chao, T C; Xu, X G

    2001-08-01

    A new set of fluence-to-absorbed dose and fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for high-energy neutrons using a whole-body anatomical model, VIP-Man, developed from the high-resolution transversal color photographic images of the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project. Organ dose calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX for 20 monoenergetic neutron beams between 20 MeV and 10,000 MeV under 6 different irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral, isotropic, and rotational. For neutron Monte Carlo calculations, results based on an image-based whole-body model were not available in the literature. The absorbed dose results for 24 major organs of VIP-Man are presented in the form of tables and selected figures that compare with those based on simplified mathematical phantoms reported in the literature. VIP-Man yields up to 40% larger values of effective dose and many organ doses, thus suggesting that the results reported in the past may not be conservative.

  18. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients from monoenergetic neutrons below 20 MeV based on the VIP-man anatomical model.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, A; Chao, T C; Xu, X G

    2000-10-01

    A new set of fluence-to-absorbed dose and fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients have been calculated for neutrons below 20 MeV using a whole-body anatomical model, VIP-Man, developed from the high-resolution transverse colour photographic images of the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project. Organ dose calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP for 20 monoenergetic neutron beams between 1 x 10(-9) MeV and 20 MeV under six different irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right lateral, left lateral, rotational and isotropic. The absorbed dose for 24 major organs and effective dose results based on the realistic VIP-Man are presented and compared with those based on the simplified MIRD-based phantoms reported in the literature. Effective doses from VIP-Man are not significantly different from earlier results for neutrons in the energy range studied. There are, however, remarkable deviations in organ doses due to the anatomical differences between the image-based and the earlier mathematical models.

  19. Relaxation dynamics of photoexcited resorcinol: internal conversion versus H atom tunnelling.

    PubMed

    Young, Jamie D; Staniforth, Michael; Chatterley, Adam S; Paterson, Martin J; Roberts, Gareth M; Stavros, Vasilios G

    2014-01-14

    The excited state dynamics of resorcinol (1,3-dihydroxybenzene) following UV excitation at a range of pump wavelengths, 278 ≥ λ ≥ 255 nm, have been investigated using a combination of time-resolved velocity map ion imaging and ultrafast time-resolved ion yield measurements coupled with complementary ab initio calculations. After excitation to the 1(1)ππ* state we extract a timescale, τ1, for excited state relaxation that decreases as a function of excitation energy from 2.70 ns to ~120 ps. This is assigned to competing relaxation mechanisms. Tunnelling beneath the 1(1)ππ*/(1)πσ* conical intersection, followed by coupling onto the dissociative (1)πσ* state, yields H atoms born with high kinetic energy (~5000 cm(-1)). This mechanism is in competition with an internal conversion process that is able to transfer population from the photoexcited 1(1)ππ* state back to a vibrationally excited ground state, S0*. When exciting between 264-260 nm a second decay component, τ2, is observed and we put forth several possible explanations as to the origins of τ2, including conformer specific dynamics. Excitation with 237 nm light (above the 1(1)ππ*/(1)πσ* conical intersection) yields high kinetic energy H atoms (~11,000 cm(-1)) produced in ~260 fs, in line with a mechanism involving ultrafast coupling between the 1(1)ππ* (or 2(1)ππ*) and (1)πσ* state followed by dissociation. The results presented highlight the profound effect the presence of additional functional groups, and more specifically the precise location of the functional groups, can have on the excited state dynamics of model heteroaromatic systems following UV excitation.

  20. The influence of physique on dose conversion coefficients for idealised external photon exposures: a comparison of doses for Chinese male phantoms with 10th, 50th and 90th percentile anthropometric parameters.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; He, Hengda; Liu, Qian

    2017-03-22

    For evaluating radiation risk, the construction of anthropomorphic computational phantoms with a variety of physiques can help reduce the uncertainty that is due to anatomical variation. In our previous work, three deformable Chinese reference male phantoms with 10th, 50th and 90th percentile body mass indexes and body circumference physiques (DCRM-10, DCRM-50 and DCRM-90) were constructed to represent underweight, normal weight and overweight Chinese adult males, respectively. In the present study, the phantoms were updated by correcting the fat percentage to improve the precision of radiological dosimetry evaluations. The organ dose conversion coefficients for each phantom were calculated and compared for four idealized external photon exposures from 15 keV to 10 MeV, using the Monte Carlo method. The dosimetric results for the three deformable Chinese reference male phantom (DCRM) phantoms indicated that variations in physique can cause as much as a 20% difference in the organ dose conversion coefficients. When the photon energy was <50 keV, the discrepancy was greater. The irradiation geometry and organ position can also affect the difference in radiological dosimetry between individuals with different physiques. Hence, it is difficult to predict the conversion coefficients of the phantoms from the anthropometric parameters alone. Nevertheless, the complex organ conversion coefficients presented in this report will be helpful for evaluating the radiation risk for large groups of people with various physiques.

  1. High energy photon reference for radiation protection: technical design of the LINAC beam and ionization chambers; and calculation of monoenergetic conversion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusciac, D.; Bordy, J.-M.; Daures, J.; Blideanu, V.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the results of the first part of a research project aimed at offering a complete response to dosimeters providers and nuclear physicists' demands for high-energy (6 - 9 MeV) photon beams for radiation protection purposes. Classical facilities allowing the production of high-energy photonic radiation (proton accelerators, nuclear reactors) are very rare and need large investment for development and use. A novel solution is proposed, consisting in the use of a medical linear accelerator, allowing a significant decrease of all costs.Using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP5 and PENELOPE codes), a specifically designed electron-photon conversion target allowing for obtaining a high energy photon beam (with an average energy weighted by fluence of about 6 MeV) has been built for radiation protection purposes. Due to the specific design of the target, this "realistic" radiation protection high-energy photon beam presents a uniform distribution of air kerma rate at a distance of 1 m, over a 30 × 30 cm2 surface. Two graphite cavity ionizing chambers for ionometric measurements have been built. For one of these chambers, the charge collection volume has been measured allowing for its use as a primary standard. The second ionizing chamber is used as a transfer standard; as such it has been calibrated in a 60Co beam, and in the high energy photon beam for radiation protection.The measurements with these ionizing chambers allowed for an evaluation of the air kerma rate in the LINAC based high-energy photon beam for radiation protection: the values cover a range between 36 mGy/h and 210 mGy/h, compatible with radiation protection purposes.Finally, using Monte Carlo simulations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent quantities have been calculated in the range between 10 keV and 22.4 MeV, for the spectral distribution of the fluence corresponding to the beam produced by the linear accelerator of the LNE-LNHB.

  2. Identification of a millisecond isomeric state in 129Cd81via the detection of internal conversion and Compton electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Taprogge, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Grawe, H.; Nishimura, S.; Xu, Z. Y.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Nacher, E.; Simpson, G. S.; Soderstrom, P. A.; Sumikama, T.; Kondev, F. G.

    2014-11-10

    The decay of an isomeric state in the neutron-rich nucleus 129Cd has been observed via the detection of internal conversion and Compton electrons providing first experimental information on excited states in this nucleus. The isomer was populated in the projectile fission of a 238U beam at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory at RIKEN. From the measured yields of γ-rays and internal conversion electrons, a multipolarity of E 3 was tentatively assigned to the isomeric transition. A half-life of T1/2=3.6(2) msT1/2=3.6(2) ms was determined for the new state which was assigned a spin of (21/2+)(21/2+), based on a comparison to shell model calculations performed using state-of-the-art realistic effective interactions.

  3. Identification of a millisecond isomeric state in Cd12981 via the detection of internal conversion and Compton electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taprogge, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Grawe, H.; Nishimura, S.; Xu, Z. Y.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Nácher, E.; Simpson, G. S.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Baba, H.; Browne, F.; Fukuda, N.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gey, G.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jung, H. S.; Kameda, D.; Kim, G. D.; Kim, Y.-K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Li, Z.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Steiger, K.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Vajta, Zs.; Watanabe, H.; Wu, J.; Yagi, A.; Yoshinaga, K.; Benzoni, G.; Bönig, S.; Chae, K. Y.; Coraggio, L.; Covello, A.; Daugas, J.-M.; Drouet, F.; Gadea, A.; Gargano, A.; Ilieva, S.; Kondev, F. G.; Kröll, T.; Lane, G. J.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moschner, K.; Mücher, D.; Naqvi, F.; Niikura, M.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Orlandi, R.; Patel, Z.; Podolyák, Zs.; Wendt, A.

    2014-11-01

    The decay of an isomeric state in the neutron-rich nucleus 129Cd has been observed via the detection of internal conversion and Compton electrons providing first experimental information on excited states in this nucleus. The isomer was populated in the projectile fission of a 238U beam at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory at RIKEN. From the measured yields of γ-rays and internal conversion electrons, a multipolarity of E3 was tentatively assigned to the isomeric transition. A half-life of T1/2 = 3.6 (2) ms was determined for the new state which was assigned a spin of (21 /2+), based on a comparison to shell model calculations performed using state-of-the-art realistic effective interactions.

  4. Identification of a millisecond isomeric state in 129Cd81 via the detection of internal conversion and Compton electrons

    DOE PAGES

    Taprogge, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Grawe, H.; ...

    2014-09-26

    The decay of an isomeric state in the neutron-rich nucleus 129Cd has been observed via the detection of internal conversion and Compton electrons providing first experimental information on excited states in this nucleus. The isomer was populated in the projectile fission of a 238U beam at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory at RIKEN. From the measured yields of γ-rays and internal conversion electrons, a multipolarity of E3 was tentatively assigned to the isomeric transition. A half-life of T1/2=3.6(2) ms was determined for the new state which was assigned a spin of (21/2+), based on a comparison to shell model calculationsmore » performed using state-of-the-art realistic effective interactions.« less

  5. Wintertime surgery increases the risk of conversion to hip arthroplasty after internal fixation of femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Sebestyén, A; Mester, S; Vokó, Z; Gajdácsi, J; Cserháti, P; Speer, G; Patczai, B; Warta, V; Bódis, J; Horváth, C; Boncz, I

    2015-03-01

    The study demonstrates that wintertime surgeries are associated with impaired fracture healing and increases the risk of conversion to hip arthroplasty after osteosynthesis of femoral neck fracture. Furthermore, the results raise the possibility of association between seasonal changes in vitamin D levels and impaired fracture healing of femoral neck fracture. Although the changes of vitamin D level and calcitropic hormones influencing bone metabolism are seasonal, the effect of seasons on hip fracture healing is unknown. We assessed the effects of seasonal periodicity on conversion to hip arthroplasty after primary osteosynthesis of femoral neck fracture. This nationwide retrospective observational cohort study involved 2779 patients aged ≥ 60 years who underwent internal screw fixation for primary femoral neck fracture and were discharged in 2000. Cases requiring conversion to arthroplasty during the 8-year follow-up derived from the Hungarian health insurance database were registered. Risk factors assessed included sex, age, fracture type, season of primary surgery and surgical delay. Competing-risks regression analysis was used for data analyses. During the observation period, 190 conversions to hip arthroplasty (6.8%) were identified, yielding an overall incidence of 19.5 per 1000 person-years. The crude incidence rates of conversions after osteosynthesis in winter, spring, summer and fall were 28.6, 17.8, 16.9 and 14.7 per 1000 person-years, respectively. Besides younger age, female sex and intracapsular fracture displacement, wintertime primary osteosynthesis significantly increased the risk of conversion (fall vs. winter, hazard ratio (HR): 0.50, 95% confidence interval [95% CI 0.33-0.76]; spring vs. winter, HR: 0.63, [95% CI 0.44-0.92]; summer vs. winter, HR: 0.62, [95% CI 0.42-0.91]). Our study demonstrate that wintertime primary osteosynthesis increases the risk of conversion surgeries. The results may help improving the outcome of primary fixation of

  6. Precise measurement of {alpha}{sub K} for the M4 transition from {sup 193}Ir{sup m}: A test of internal-conversion theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nica, N.; Hardy, J.C.; Iacob, V.E.; Raman, S.; Nestor, C.W. Jr.; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2004-11-01

    The 10.5-day isomer in {sup 193}Ir decays by a single 80.2-keV M4 transition directly to the ground state of that nucleus. We have measured the total intensity of K x rays relative to 80.2-keV {gamma} rays for this transition to be 98.7(6). With the K-shell fluorescent yield for iridium taken to be 0.958(4), this result yields {alpha}{sub K}=103.0(8) for the K-shell internal conversion coefficient (ICC). The calculated {alpha}{sub K} for this transition is particularly sensitive to the treatment of the hole that is created by conversion in the atomic K shell. Recent ICC tables, which ignore the hole, yield {alpha}{sub K}=92.0. We demonstrate that calculations incorporating the hole produce values between 99.6 and 103.3 depending on the approximation used. Our result strongly supports the need to include the hole.

  7. Optimizing the Verification of Mean Normal Prothrombin Time (MNPT) and International Sensitivity Index (ISI) for Accurate Conversion of Prothrombin Time (PT) to International Normalized Ratio (INR).

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2017-01-01

    The Prothrombin Time (PT) assay is the most common test performed in hemostasis laboratories, most commonly as converted to an international normalized ratio (INR) to monitor anticoagulant therapy using vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) such as warfarin. Although the INR is meant to standardize PT values by taking into consideration reagent and instrument variability, substantial inter-laboratory variation in INRs still exists and suggests that this can be further improved. This paper describes the PT test, its conversion to an INR value, and methods to improve the accuracy of INRs by improving the determination of critical components to the INR, namely the mean normal prothrombin time (MNPT) and the international sensitive index (ISI).

  8. Successful international collaboration improves family donation conversations resulting in increased organ donation.

    PubMed

    Mulvania, P; Mehakovic, E; Wise, C; Cass, Y; Daly, T A; Nathan, H M

    2014-01-01

    Australian donation leaders recognized that to increase organ donation outcomes, health professionals conducting family donation conversations (FDCs) required support and specialist training. An international training institute with programs based on proven results was engaged to create and implement a customized training program to influence change in FDC practice and culture. The goal was to increase donation rates by developing and implementing a customized, self-sustaining training program to enhance FDC practices of health professionals. Other goals included providing training and communications skills to lead FDC, supporting families in making decisions, and influencing health professionals to adopt FDC practices. To gain support and determine program suitability, two 1-day pilot training sessions were provided to 45 Australian donation leaders in 2011. Training was further customized with an emphasis on creating changes to achieve and sustain desired results. A comprehensive national training plan was implemented over 18 months. Twenty-six 2-day FDC training workshops were held in 8 cities (646 participants). Program evaluations and debriefings showed distinct shifts in perspectives and an enthusiasm to implement new processes. In 2012 to 2013, an instructor program was developed to transition training facilitation. The training institute remains involved in development and training to build and sustain skill and expertise. There was a 58% increase in organ donors in Australia from 2009 to 2013 (data reflect 2013 Australian end-of-year organ donation information). This represents a 36% increase in organ donors (2009-2011); the remaining 22% increase was achieved in the 2 years since the FDC training was implemented in Australia (2011-2013). Improved skills training in the conduct of FDCs seem to have contributed to improved donation outcomes in national identification, request, and consent rates. The integration of another organization's process poses

  9. Probing ultrafast ππ*/nπ* internal conversion in organic chromophores via K-edge resonant absorption

    DOE PAGES

    Wolf, T. J. A.; Myhre, R. H.; Cryan, J. P.; ...

    2017-06-22

    Many photoinduced processes including photosynthesis and human vision happen in organic molecules and involve coupled femtosecond dynamics of nuclei and electrons. Organic molecules with heteroatoms often possess an important excited-state relaxation channel from an optically allowed ππ* to a dark nπ* state. The ππ*/nπ* internal conversion is difficult to investigate, as most spectroscopic methods are not exclusively sensitive to changes in the excited-state electronic structure. Here, we report achieving the required sensitivity by exploiting the element and site specificity of near-edge soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. As a hole forms in the n orbital during ππ*/nπ* internal conversion, the absorption spectrummore » at the heteroatom K-edge exhibits an additional resonance. We demonstrate the concept using the nucleobase thymine at the oxygen K-edge, and unambiguously show that ππ*/nπ* internal conversion takes place within (60 ± 30) fs. Furthermore, high-level-coupled cluster calculations confirm the method’s impressive electronic structure sensitivity for excited-state investigations.« less

  10. Probing ultrafast ππ*/nπ* internal conversion in organic chromophores via K-edge resonant absorption.

    PubMed

    Wolf, T J A; Myhre, R H; Cryan, J P; Coriani, S; Squibb, R J; Battistoni, A; Berrah, N; Bostedt, C; Bucksbaum, P; Coslovich, G; Feifel, R; Gaffney, K J; Grilj, J; Martinez, T J; Miyabe, S; Moeller, S P; Mucke, M; Natan, A; Obaid, R; Osipov, T; Plekan, O; Wang, S; Koch, H; Gühr, M

    2017-06-22

    Many photoinduced processes including photosynthesis and human vision happen in organic molecules and involve coupled femtosecond dynamics of nuclei and electrons. Organic molecules with heteroatoms often possess an important excited-state relaxation channel from an optically allowed ππ* to a dark nπ* state. The ππ*/nπ* internal conversion is difficult to investigate, as most spectroscopic methods are not exclusively sensitive to changes in the excited-state electronic structure. Here, we report achieving the required sensitivity by exploiting the element and site specificity of near-edge soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy. As a hole forms in the n orbital during ππ*/nπ* internal conversion, the absorption spectrum at the heteroatom K-edge exhibits an additional resonance. We demonstrate the concept using the nucleobase thymine at the oxygen K-edge, and unambiguously show that ππ*/nπ* internal conversion takes place within (60 ± 30) fs. High-level-coupled cluster calculations confirm the method's impressive electronic structure sensitivity for excited-state investigations.Many photo-induced processes such as photosynthesis occur in organic molecules, but their femtosecond excited-state dynamics are difficult to track. Here, the authors exploit the element and site selectivity of soft X-ray absorption to sensitively follow the ultrafast ππ*/nπ* electronic relaxation of hetero-organic molecules.

  11. Coal conversion and biomass conversion: Volume 1: Final report on USAID (Agency for International Development)/GOI (Government of India) Alternate Energy Resources and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, A.; Saluja, J.

    1987-06-30

    The United States Agency for International Development (AID), in joint collaboration with the Government of India (GOI), supported a research and development program in Alternate Energy Resources during the period March 1983 to June 1987. The primary emphasis of this program was to develop new and advanced coal and biomass conversion technologies for the efficient utilization of coal and biomass feedstocks in India. This final ''summary'' report is divided into two volumes. This Report, Volume I, covers the program overview and coal projects and Volume II summarizes the accomplishments of the biomass projects. The six projects selected in the area of coal were: Evaluation of the Freeboard Performance in a Fluidized-Bed Combustor; Scale-up of AFBC boilers; Rheology, Stability and Combustion of Coal-Water Slurries; Beneficiation of Fine Coal in Dense Medium Cyclones; Hot Gas Cleanup and Separation; and Cold Gas Cleanup and Separation.

  12. External and internal problems of modeling the heat and mass transfer coefficients at particles motion in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. G.; Lapteva, E. A.

    2017-03-01

    An approach to the determination of the heat and mass transfer coefficients from dispersed particles by the development of the hydrodynamic analogy is considered. The equations for computing the heat and mass transfer coefficients in continuous phase at a laminar regime of the flow around solid particles as well as the mass transfer coefficients in droplets are obtained. Comparisons with the experimental data of different authors are presented.

  13. Comparison of 50-year and 70-year internal-dose-conversion factors

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, M.T.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    The 50-year inhalation and ingestion dose commitments associated with an acute intake (of a radionuclide) of 3.7 x 10/sup 4/ Bq (1 ..mu..Ci) in one day were compared with the corresponding dose commitments calculated for a 70-year integration period resulting from a chronic intake of the same amount at a rate of 101 Bq/d (0.00274 ..mu..Ci/d) for one year. These values, known as dose conversion factors, estimate the dose accumulated during a given period of time following a unit of intake of a radionuclide. It was demonstrated that the acute intake of 3.7 x 10/sup 4/ Bq in one day and the chronic intake of 101 Bq/d for one year (a total intake of 3.7 x 10/sup 4/ Bq) result in essentially the same dose commitment for a relatively long integration period. Therefore, the comparison of 50-year acute dose conversion factors and 70-year chronic dose conversion factors is essentially only a measure of the additional dose accumulated in the 50 to 70 year period. It was found that for radionuclides with atomic mass less than 200 the percent difference in the 70-year and 50-year dose conversion factors was essentially zero in most cases. Differences of approximately 5 to 50% were obtained for dose conversion factors for most alpha emitters with atomic masses of greater than 200. Comparisons were made on the basis of both organ dose equivalent and effective dose equivalent. The implications and significance of these results are discussed.

  14. Fluence-to-Absorbed Dose Conversion Coefficients for Use in Radiological Protection of Embryo and Foetus Against External Exposure to Muons from 20MeV to 50GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jing

    2008-08-07

    This study used the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and foetus when the mother is exposed to external muon fields. Monoenergetic muons ranging from 20 MeV to 50 GeV were considered. The irradiation geometries include anteroposterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT), isotropic (ISO), and top-down (TOP). At each of these irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the foetal body were calculated for the embryo of 8 weeks and the foetus of 3, 6 or 9 months, respectively. Muon fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients were derived for the four prenatal ages. Since such conversion coefficients are yet unknown, the results presented here fill a data gap.

  15. Fourth International Conference on Photochemical Conversion and Storage of Solar Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-12-01

    s of 123 papers under the following topics are presented: conversion of sunlight into electrical power and photoassisted electrolysis at semiconductor electrodes; photosensitized reactions on surfaces; the role of porphyrins and chlorophylls in artificial photosynthesis; oxidation reduction photochemistry in homogeneous solutions; photoelectron transfer in organized assemblies; photogalvanic cells and effects; elementary processes in catalytic reactions at the interrace between colloidal microelectrodes and solutions; and luminescent solar collectors and concentrators. Author and subject indexes are included.

  16. Internal loading theory for mantle convection revisited: the trade-off between viscosity and seismic velocity to density conversion factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandan, D.; Peltier, W. R.

    2011-12-01

    The internal loading theory requires information on the radial viscosity profile and the lateral density heterogeneity in the mantle to compute signatures of the dynamical response to convective overturning. Following observations by Masters et al., (1982), that at long wavelengths the geoid is highly correlated with the heterogeneity observed seiemically at the base of the transition region, it has been suggested [Forte and Peltier, 1987, 1991; Pari and Peltier, 1995,1997] that the form of the viscosity profile that best reduces the variance between the observed geoid and the predicted geoid, be such as to include the presence of a low viscosity layer at the base of the transition zone. The geoid kernels computed using the theory will then peak in the transition zone and pick up features of the heterogeneity that provide a good fit to the geoid. However, within the formalism of the internal loading theory, it is possible to vary the amplitude of the seismic conversion factor instead (within the same region), and achieve an equivalent amount of variance reduction. Recent theoretical results based on a self-consistent thermodynamic model [Stixrude and Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2007] suggest that sharp changes in the amplitude of the conversion factor are in fact expected in the transition zone due to the presence of well documented transitions of mineral phase. We explore this tradeoff between variations in the viscosity profile and the body wave to density conversion factor on the variance reduction achievable for the geoid. Since this tradeoff is shown to be extremely important we explore the results achievable by fixing the viscosity profile to that required by the observables related to the global process of glacial isostatic adjustment and optimizing the fit to the data by adjusting the conversion factor. If time allows, we will also present results for the geodynamic observables predicted by the internal loading theory when the density anomaly is generated using the

  17. Prevention of conversion to abnormal transcranial Doppler with hydroxyurea in sickle cell anemia: A Phase III international randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hankins, Jane S; McCarville, Mary Beth; Rankine-Mullings, Angela; Reid, Marvin E; Lobo, Clarisse L C; Moura, Patricia G; Ali, Susanna; Soares, Deanne P; Aldred, Karen; Jay, Dennis W; Aygun, Banu; Bennett, John; Kang, Guolian; Goldsmith, Jonathan C; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Boyett, James M; Ware, Russell E

    2015-12-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and conditional transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound velocities (170-199 cm/sec) may develop stroke. However, with limited available clinical data, the current standard of care for conditional TCD velocities is observation. The efficacy of hydroxyurea in preventing conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD (≥200 cm/sec), which confers a higher stroke risk, has not been studied prospectively in a randomized trial. Sparing Conversion to Abnormal TCD Elevation (SCATE #NCT01531387) was a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded Phase III multicenter international clinical trial comparing alternative therapy (hydroxyurea) to standard care (observation) to prevent conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD velocity in children with SCA. SCATE enrolled 38 children from the United States, Jamaica, and Brazil [HbSS (36), HbSβ(0) -thalassemia (1), and HbSD (1), median age = 5.4 years (range, 2.7-9.8)]. Because of the slow patient accrual and administrative delays, SCATE was terminated early. In an intention-to-treat analysis, the cumulative incidence of abnormal conversion was 9% (95% CI = 0-35%) in the hydroxyurea arm and 47% (95% CI = 6-81%) in observation arm at 15 months (P = 0.16). In post hoc analysis according to treatment received, significantly fewer children on hydroxyurea converted to abnormal TCD velocities when compared with observation (0% vs. 50%, P = 0.02). After a mean of 10.1 months, a significant change in mean TCD velocity was observed with hydroxyurea treatment (-15.5 vs. +10.2 cm/sec, P = 0.02). No stroke events occurred in either arm. Hydroxyurea reduces TCD velocities in children with SCA and conditional velocities.

  18. Conversion, correction, and International Scale standardization: results From a Multicenter External Quality Assessment Study for BCR-ABL1 testing.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Michael; Patton, Simon J; Grossi, Alberto; Clark, Jordan; Paz, Maria Fe; Labourier, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring BCR-ABL1 expression levels relative to clinically validated response criteria on the International Scale (IS) is vital in the optimal management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, yet significant variability remains across laboratories worldwide. To assess method performance, interlaboratory precision, and different IS standardization modalities in representative laboratories performing routine BCR-ABL1 testing. Fifteen blinded test specimens with 5-level nominal BCR-ABL1 to ABL1 IS percentage ratios ranging from 5% to 0.0005% and 4-level secondary IS reference panels, the ARQ IS Calibrator Panels, were tested by relative quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 15 laboratories in 5 countries. Both raw and IS percentage ratios calculated by using local conversion factors (CFs) or analytic correction parameters (CPs) were collected and analyzed. A total of 670 valid positive results were generated. BCR-ABL1 detection was associated with variable ABL1 quality metric passing rates (P < .001) and reached at least 0.01% in 13 laboratories. Intralaboratory precision was within 2.5-fold for all sample levels combined with a relative mean difference greater than 5-fold across laboratories. International Scale accuracy was increased by using both the CF and CP standardization methods. Classification agreement for major molecular response status was 90% after CF conversion and 93% after CP correction, with precision improved by 3-fold for the CP method. Despite preanalytic and analytic differences between laboratories, conversion and correction are effective IS standardization methods. Validated secondary reference materials can facilitate global diffusion of the IS without the need to perform sample exchange and improve the accuracy and precision of BCR-ABL1 quantitative measurements, including at low levels of residual disease.

  19. Talking with the "Enemy": Firing Enthusiasm for History through International Conversation and Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerridge, Richard; Cinnamond, Sacha

    2012-01-01

    Richard Kerridge and Sacha Cinnamond explain how their history department built a culture of international dialogue and collaboration that enriches their students' historical learning. Video-conferencing is at the centre of these activities. Their story begins with an initial, moving encounter with the First World War battlefields that soon turned…

  20. Talking with the "Enemy": Firing Enthusiasm for History through International Conversation and Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerridge, Richard; Cinnamond, Sacha

    2012-01-01

    Richard Kerridge and Sacha Cinnamond explain how their history department built a culture of international dialogue and collaboration that enriches their students' historical learning. Video-conferencing is at the centre of these activities. Their story begins with an initial, moving encounter with the First World War battlefields that soon turned…

  1. Academic Literacy and Plagiarism: Conversations with International Graduate Students and Disciplinary Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abasi, Ali R.; Graves, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    In this study we examine how university plagiarism policies interact with international graduate students' academic writing in English as they develop identities as authors and students. The study is informed by the sociocultural theoretical perspective [Vygotsky, L. (1978). "Mind in society: The development of higher mental processes." Cambridge,…

  2. Working Together to Make Sense of the Past: Mothers' and Children's Use of Internal States Language in Conversations about Traumatic and Nontraumatic Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Stark, Emily N.; Lukowski, Angela F.; Rademacher, Jennifer; Van Abbema, Dana L.; Ackil, Jennifer K.

    2005-01-01

    Mother-child conversations about a devastating tornado and about 2 nontraumatic events were examined to determine whether there were (a) differences in use of internal states language when talking about traumatic and nontraumatic events and (b) similarities in mothers' and children's use of internal states language. At Session 1, which took place…

  3. International Leaders Summit: Using Dialogue to Center the Conversation on the Education of Deaf Children and Youth in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John L.

    2011-01-01

    On July 18, 2010, the eve of the 21st International Congress on the Education of the Deaf (ICED 2010), the International Leaders Summit was held at the Center for Dialogue at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada. A total of 120 world leaders from 32 countries participated. Presenters, including students, led the conversation on current…

  4. Working Together to Make Sense of the Past: Mothers' and Children's Use of Internal States Language in Conversations about Traumatic and Nontraumatic Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Stark, Emily N.; Lukowski, Angela F.; Rademacher, Jennifer; Van Abbema, Dana L.; Ackil, Jennifer K.

    2005-01-01

    Mother-child conversations about a devastating tornado and about 2 nontraumatic events were examined to determine whether there were (a) differences in use of internal states language when talking about traumatic and nontraumatic events and (b) similarities in mothers' and children's use of internal states language. At Session 1, which took place…

  5. International Leaders Summit: Using Dialogue to Center the Conversation on the Education of Deaf Children and Youth in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John L.

    2011-01-01

    On July 18, 2010, the eve of the 21st International Congress on the Education of the Deaf (ICED 2010), the International Leaders Summit was held at the Center for Dialogue at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada. A total of 120 world leaders from 32 countries participated. Presenters, including students, led the conversation on current…

  6. Charge separation and photovoltaic conversion in polymer composites with internal donor/acceptor heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, G.; Heeger, A.J.

    1995-10-01

    The photosensitivity of semiconducting polymers can be enhanced by blending donor and acceptor polymers to optimize photoinduced charge separation. We describe a novel phase-separated polymer blend (composite) made with poly[2-methoxy-5-(2{prime}-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene], MEH-PPV, as donor and cyano-PPV, CN-PPV, as acceptor. The photoluminescence and electroluminescence of both component polymers are quenched in the blend, indicative of rapid and efficient separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs with electrons on the acceptor and holes on the donor. Diodes made with such a composite semiconducting polymer as the photosensitive medium show promising photovoltaic characteristics with carrier collection efficiency of 5% electrons/photon and energy conversion efficiency of 0.9%, {similar_to}20 times larger than in diodes made with pure MEH-PPV and {similar_to}100 times larger than in diodes made with CN-PPV. The photosensitivity and the quantum yield increase with reverse bias voltage, to 0.3 A/W and 80% electrons/photon respectively at {minus}10 V, comparable to results obtained from photodiodes made with inorganic semiconductors. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  7. Cooperative Strategies for Enhancing Performance of Photothermal Therapy (PTT) Agent: Optimizing Its Photothermal Conversion and Cell Internalization Ability.

    PubMed

    Du, Baoji; Ma, Chongbo; Ding, Guanyu; Han, Xu; Li, Dan; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2017-01-23

    Photothermal conversion ability (PCA) and cell internalization ability (CIA) are two key factors for determining the performance of photothermal agents. The previous studies mostly focus on improving the PCA by exploring new photothermal nanomaterials. Herein, the authors take the hybrids of graphene and gold nanostar (GGN) as an example to investigate the gradually enhanced phototherapy effect by changing the PCA and CIA of photothermal therapy (PTT) agent simultaneously. Based on the GGN, the GGN and the reduced GGN protected by bovine serum albumin (BSA) or BSA-FA (folic acid) are prepared, which are named as GGNB, rGGNB, and rGGNB-FA, respectively. The rGGNB showed an enhanced PCA compared to GGNB, leading to strong cell ablation. On the other hand, the 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammoniumpropan (DOTAP) can activate the endocytosis and promote the CIA of rGGNB, further help rGGNB to be more internalized into the cells. Finally, rGGNB-FA with the target ability can make itself further internalized into the cells with the aid of DOTAP, which can significantly destroy the cancer cells even at the low laser density of 0.3 W cm(-2) . Therefore, a new angle of view is brought out for researching the PTT agents of high performance.

  8. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma using a sitting and standing female adult voxel simulators exposure to photons in antero-posterior irradiation geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcante, F. R.; Galeano, D. C.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    Due to the difficulty in implementing invasive techniques for calculations of dose for some exposure scenarios, computational simulators have been created to represent as realistically as possible the structures of the human body and through radiation transport simulations to obtain conversion coefficients (CCs) to estimate dose. In most published papers simulators are implemented in the standing posture and this may not describe a real scenario of exposure. In this work we developed exposure scenarios in the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code using a female simulator in standing and sitting postures. The simulator was irradiated in the antero-posterior (AP) geometry by a plane source of monoenergetic photons with energy from 10 keV to 2 MeV. The conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (HT/Kair) were calculated for both scenarios and compared. The results show that the percentage difference of CCs for the organs of the head and thorax was not significant (less than 5%) since the anatomic position of the organs is the same in both postures. The percentage difference is more significant to the ovaries (71% for photon energy of 20 keV), to the bladder (39% at 60 keV) and to the uterus (37% at 100 keV) due to different processes of radiation interactions in the legs of the simulator when its posture is changed. For organs and tissues that are distributed throughout the entire body, such as bone (21% at 100 keV) and muscle (30% at 80 keV) the percentage difference of CCs reflects a reduction of interaction of photons with the legs of the simulator. Therefore, the calculation of conversion coefficients using simulators in the sitting posture is relevant for a more accurate dose estimation in real exposures to radiation.

  9. Conversion of failed proximal femoral internal fixation to total hip arthroplasty in osteopetrotic bone.

    PubMed

    Ramiah, Reagon D; Baker, Richard P; Bannister, Gordon C

    2006-12-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare disease. When fractures are encountered, fixation is extremely difficult. A 38-year-old man with osteopetrosis who sustained a displaced Pauwels type IV fracture with 3 failed internal fixations required total hip arthroplasty. Two main problems were perceived during preoperative planning: the removal of failed and broken metalwork and reaming of the tight intramedullary canal to allow seating of the femoral stem. We present technical solutions to aid the surgeon in the management of this difficult type of case using custom-made tungsten carbide instrumentation.

  10. Conversion efficiency limits and bandgap designs for multi-junction solar cells with internal radiative efficiencies below unity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Yoshita, Masahiro; Chen, Shaoqiang; Kim, Changsu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2016-05-16

    We calculated the conversion-efficiency limit ηsc and the optimized subcell bandgap energies of 1 to 5 junction solar cells without and with intermediate reflectors under 1-sun AM1.5G and 1000-sun AM1.5D irradiations, particularly including the impact of internal radiative efficiency (ηint) below unity for realistic subcell materials on the basis of an extended detailed-balance theory. We found that the conversion-efficiency limit ηsc significantly drops when the geometric mean ηint* of all subcell ηint in the stack reduces from 1 to 0.1, and that ηsc degrades linearly to logηint* for ηint* below 0.1. For ηint*<0.1 differences in ηsc due to additional intermediate reflectors became very small if all subcells are optically thick for sun light. We obtained characteristic optimized bandgap energies, which reflect both ηint* decrease and AM1.5 spectral gaps. These results provide realistic efficiency targets and design principles.

  11. Realistic vs sudden turn-on of natural incoherent light: Coherences and dynamics in molecular excitation and internal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Grinev, Timur; Brumer, Paul

    2015-12-28

    Molecular excitation with incoherent light is examined using realistic turn-on time scales, and results are compared to those obtained via commonly used sudden turn-on, or pulses. Two significant results are obtained. First, in contrast to prior studies involving sudden turn-on, realistic turn-on is shown to lead to stationary coherences for natural turn-on time scales. Second, the time to reach the final stationary mixed state, known to result from incoherent excitation, is shown to depend directly on the inverse of the molecular energy level spacings, in both sudden and realistic turn-on cases. The S{sub 0} → S{sub 2}/S{sub 1} internal conversion process in pyrazine is used as an example throughout. Implications for studies of natural light harvesting systems are noted.

  12. Time-resolved photoelectron imaging of ultrafast S2-->S1 internal conversion through conical intersection in pyrazine.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Fuji, Takao; Horio, Takuya; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2010-05-07

    A nonadiabatic electronic transition through a conical intersection was studied by pump-probe photoelectron imaging spectroscopy with a 22 fs time resolution in the benchmark polyatomic molecule of pyrazine and deuterated pyrazine. The lifetimes of the S(2) state of pyrazine and deuterated pyrazine were determined to be 22+/-3 fs by the global fitting of the time-energy maps of photoelectron kinetic energy (PKE) distributions. The lifetime of S(3) was determined to be 40-43 fs. Two-dimensional maps of photoelectron distributions were obtained for time (t) and PKE, and individual PKE distributions upon ionization from S(2) and S(1) were extracted. Quantum beat with an approximately 50 fs period was observed after the S(2)-->S(1) internal conversion, which was attributed to the totally symmetric vibration nu(6a) in S(1).

  13. Realistic vs sudden turn-on of natural incoherent light: Coherences and dynamics in molecular excitation and internal conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinev, Timur; Brumer, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Molecular excitation with incoherent light is examined using realistic turn-on time scales, and results are compared to those obtained via commonly used sudden turn-on, or pulses. Two significant results are obtained. First, in contrast to prior studies involving sudden turn-on, realistic turn-on is shown to lead to stationary coherences for natural turn-on time scales. Second, the time to reach the final stationary mixed state, known to result from incoherent excitation, is shown to depend directly on the inverse of the molecular energy level spacings, in both sudden and realistic turn-on cases. The S0 → S2/S1 internal conversion process in pyrazine is used as an example throughout. Implications for studies of natural light harvesting systems are noted.

  14. Internal conversion and intersystem crossing pathways in UV excited, isolated uracils and their implications in prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Jose A; Pollum, Marvin; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia; Ullrich, Susanne

    2016-07-27

    The photodynamic properties of molecules determine their ability to survive in harsh radiation environments. As such, the photostability of heterocyclic aromatic compounds to electromagnetic radiation is expected to have been one of the selection pressures influencing the prebiotic chemistry on early Earth. In the present study, the gas-phase photodynamics of uracil, 5-methyluracil (thymine) and 2-thiouracil-three heterocyclic compounds thought to be present during this era-are assessed in the context of their recently proposed intersystem crossing pathways that compete with internal conversion to the ground state. Specifically, time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measurements evidence femtosecond to picosecond timescales for relaxation of the singlet (1)ππ* and (1)nπ* states as well as for intersystem crossing to the triplet manifold. Trapping in the excited triplet state and intersystem crossing back to the ground state are investigated as potential factors contributing to the susceptibility of these molecules to ultraviolet photodamage.

  15. Communication: GAIMS—generalized ab initio multiple spawning for both internal conversion and intersystem crossing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Curchod, Basile F. E.; Rauer, Clemens; Marquetand, Philipp; Gonzalez, Leticia; Martinez, Todd J.

    2016-03-11

    Full Multiple Spawning is a formally exact method to describe the excited-state dynamics of molecular systems beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. However, it has been limited until now to the description of radiationless transitions taking place between electronic states with the same spin multiplicity. This Communication presents a generalization of the full and ab initio Multiple Spawning methods to both internal conversion (mediated by nonadiabatic coupling terms) and intersystem crossing events (triggered by spin-orbit coupling matrix elements) based on a spin-diabatic representation. Lastly, the results of two numerical applications, a model system and the deactivation of thioformaldehyde, validate the presented formalism and its implementation.

  16. Excited State Dynamics of Cold Protonated Cytosine Tautomers: Characterization of Charge Transfer, Intersystem Crossing, and Internal Conversion Processes.

    PubMed

    Broquier, Michel; Soorkia, Satchin; Pino, Gustavo; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Grégoire, Gilles

    2017-08-31

    Charge transfer reactions are ubiquitous in chemical reactivity and often viewed as ultrafast processes. For DNA, femtochemistry has undeniably revealed the primary stage of the deactivation dynamics of the locally excited state following electronic excitation. We here demonstrate that the full time scale excited state dynamics can be followed up to milliseconds through an original pump-probe photodissociation scheme applied to cryogenic ion spectroscopy. Protonated cytosine is chosen as a benchmark system in which the locally excited (1)ππ* state decays in the femtosecond range toward long-lived charge transfer and triplet states with lifetimes ranging from microseconds to milliseconds, respectively. A three-step mechanism ((1)ππ* → (1)CT → (3)ππ*) is proposed where internal conversion from each state can occur leading ultimately to fragmentation in the ground electronic state.

  17. Realistic vs sudden turn-on of natural incoherent light: Coherences and dynamics in molecular excitation and internal conversion.

    PubMed

    Grinev, Timur; Brumer, Paul

    2015-12-28

    Molecular excitation with incoherent light is examined using realistic turn-on time scales, and results are compared to those obtained via commonly used sudden turn-on, or pulses. Two significant results are obtained. First, in contrast to prior studies involving sudden turn-on, realistic turn-on is shown to lead to stationary coherences for natural turn-on time scales. Second, the time to reach the final stationary mixed state, known to result from incoherent excitation, is shown to depend directly on the inverse of the molecular energy level spacings, in both sudden and realistic turn-on cases. The S0 → S2/S1 internal conversion process in pyrazine is used as an example throughout. Implications for studies of natural light harvesting systems are noted.

  18. Internal dose conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This publication contains 50-year committed dose equivalent factors, in tabular form. The document is intended to be used as the primary reference by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors for calculating radiation dose equivalents for members of the public, resulting from ingestion or inhalation of radioactive materials. Its application is intended specifically for such materials released to the environment during routine DOE operations, except in those instances where compliance with 40 CFR 61 (National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) requires otherwise. However, the calculated values may be equally applicable to unusual releases or to occupational exposures. The use of these committed dose equivalent tables should ensure that doses to members of the public from internal exposures are calculated in a consistent manner at all DOE facilities.

  19. Can Internal Conversion BE Controlled by Mode-Specific Vibrational Excitation in Polyatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnov, Alexander; Epshtein, Michael; Bar, Ilana

    2017-06-01

    Nonadiabatic processes, dominated by dynamic passage of reactive fluxes through conical intersections (CIs) are considered to be appealing means for manipulating reaction paths. One approach that is considered to be effective in controlling the course of dissociation processes is the selective excitation of vibrational modes containing a considerable component of motion. Here, we have chosen to study the predissociation of the model test molecule, methylamine and its deuterated isotopologues, excited to well-characterized quantum states on the first excited electronic state, S_{1}, by following the N-H(D) bond fission dynamics through sensitive H(D) photofragment probing. The branching ratios between slow and fast H(D) photofragments, the internal energies of their counter radical photofragments and the anisotropy parameters for fast H photofragments, confirm correlated anomalies for predissociation initiated from specific rovibronic states, reflecting the existence of a dynamic resonance in each molecule. This resonance strongly depends on the energy of the initially excited rovibronic states, the evolving vibrational mode on the repulsive S_{1} part during N-H(D) bond elongation, and the manipulated passage through the CI that leads to radicals excited with C-N-H(D) bending and preferential perpendicular bond breaking, relative to the photolyzing laser polarization, in molecules containing the NH_{2} group. The indicated resonance plays an important role in the bifurcation dynamics at the CI and can be foreseen to exist in other photoinitiated processes and to control their outcome.

  20. Double K-shell ionization accompanying the internal conversion of the 0.145-MeV transition in 141Pr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, H. J.; Schupp, G.

    1985-12-01

    Double ionization of the atomic K shell accompanying the K-shell internal conversion of the 0.145-MeV transition of 141Pr has been studied by recording coincidences between Kα satellite x rays and Kα hypersatellite x rays emitted when the double vacancies are filled. The probability per K-shell internal conversion that a double vacancy is formed, PKK(IC), was found to be (3.4+/-0.3)×10-5, which is a factor of (0.79+/-0.07) times the theoretical prediction for K-shell electron shakeoff in K-shell internal conversion of Mukoyama and Shimizu. The Kα1 to Kα2 hyper- satellite ratio was found to be (1.50+/-0.13), a value which is about 6% less than the calculation of Åberg et al.

  1. Fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients for neutron beams from 0.001 eV to 100 GeV calculated for a set of pregnant female and fetus models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranenko, Valery; Xu, X. George

    2008-03-01

    Protection of fetuses against external neutron exposure is an important task. This paper reports a set of absorbed dose conversion coefficients for fetal and maternal organs for external neutron beams using the RPI-P pregnant female models and the MCNPX code. The newly developed pregnant female models represent an adult female with a fetus including its brain and skeleton at the end of each trimester. The organ masses were adjusted to match the reference values within 1%. For the 3 mm cubic voxel size, the models consist of 10-15 million voxels for 35 organs. External monoenergetic neutron beams of six standard configurations (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, ROT and ISO) and source energies 0.001 eV-100 GeV were considered. The results are compared with previous data that are based on simplified anatomical models. The differences in dose depend on source geometry, energy and gestation periods: from 20% up to 140% for the whole fetus, and up to 100% for the fetal brain. Anatomical differences are primarily responsible for the discrepancies in the organ doses. For the first time, the dependence of mother organ doses upon anatomical changes during pregnancy was studied. A maximum of 220% increase in dose was observed for the placenta in the nine months model compared to three months, whereas dose to the pancreas, small and large intestines decreases by 60% for the AP source for the same models. Tabulated dose conversion coefficients for the fetus and 27 maternal organs are provided.

  2. Fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients for use in radiological protection of embryo and foetus against external exposure to electrons from 10 MeV TO 10 GeV.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing

    2008-04-01

    Electrons as primary and more often as secondary radiation exist commonly in the environment and workplaces. No conversion coefficients are yet available, in the literature, for use in radiological protection of embryo and foetus against external exposure to electrons. This study uses mathematical models developed by the Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, for the embryo of 8 wk and for the foetus of 3, 6, and 9 mo. Monte Carlo code MCNPX is used to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and foetus when the mother is exposed to external electron fields. Monoenergetic electrons ranging from 10 MeV to 10 GeV were considered. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT), isotropic (ISO), and top-down (TOP). At each of these irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the foetal brain and body were calculated for the embryo of 8 wk and the foetus of 3, 6, and 9 mo. Electron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients were derived for the four prenatal ages.

  3. Atmospheric Extinction Coefficients in the Ic Band for Several Major International Observatories: Results from the BiSON Telescopes, 1984-2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, S. J.; Chaplin, W. J.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Howe, R.; Lund, M. N.; Moxon, E. Z.; Thomas, A.; Pallé, P. L.; Rhodes, E. J., Jr.

    2017-09-01

    Over 30 years of solar data have been acquired by the Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON), an international network of telescopes used to study oscillations of the Sun. Five of the six BiSON telescopes are located at major observatories. The observational sites are, in order of increasing longitude: Mount Wilson (Hale) Observatory (MWO), California, USA; Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; Observatorio del Teide, Izaña, Tenerife, Canary Islands; the South African Astronomical Observatory, Sutherland, South Africa; Carnarvon, Western Australia; and the Paul Wild Observatory, Narrabri, New South Wales, Australia. The BiSON data may be used to measure atmospheric extinction coefficients in the {{{I}}}{{c}} band (approximately 700-900 nm), and presented here are the derived atmospheric extinction coefficients from each site over the years 1984-2016.

  4. Double K-shell ionization accompanying the internal conversion of the 0.166-MeV transition in 139La

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schupp, G.; Nagy, H. J.; Miles, V. A.

    1987-12-01

    Double ionization of the atomic K shell accompanying the K-shell internal conversion of the 0.166-MeV transition of 139La has been studied by recording triple coincidences between La K x rays, La K satellite x rays, and La Kα hypersatellite x rays emitted when the K-shell vacancies are filled. The probability per K-shell internal conversion that a double vacancy is formed, PKK(IC), was found to be (6.0+/-1.4)×10-5, which is in good agreement with the K-shell electron shakeoff prediction of 5.1×10-5 by Mukoyama and Shimizu.

  5. Calculation of conversion coefficients for air kerma to ambient dose equivalent using transmitted spectra of megavoltage X-rays through concrete.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, T P V; Silva, A X

    2012-12-01

    With the fast advancement of technology, (60)Co teletherapy units are largely being replaced with medical linear accelerators. In most cases, the linear accelerator tends to be installed in the same room in which the (60)Co teletherapy unit was previously placed. If in-depth structural remodelling is out of the question, high-density concrete is usually used to improve shielding against primary, scatter and leakage radiation originating in the new equipment. This work presents a study based on Monte Carlo simulations of the transmission of some clinical photon spectra (from 6, 10, 15, 18 and 25 MV accelerators) through concrete, considering two different densities. Concrete walls with thickness ranging from 0.70 to 2.0 m were irradiated with 30 cm×30 cm primary beam spectra. The results show that the thickness of the barrier decreases up to ∼65 % when barite (high-density concrete) is used instead of ordinary concrete. The average energies of primary and transmitted beam spectra were also calculated. In addition, conversion coefficients from air kerma to ambient dose equivalent, H*(d)/K(air), and air kerma to effective dose, E/K(air), for photon spectra from the transmitted spectra were calculated and compared. The results suggest that the 10-mm depth is not the best choice to represent the effective dose.

  6. Study of Ultrafast Internal Conversion in Molecules and Ultrafast Dephasing in Condensed Matter with Picosecond Dye Lasers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yongjin

    A picosecond cascaded transient oscillator (CTO) dye laser system was modified to generate continuous tunable, near transform-limited picosecond pulses. To improve the CTO system, the characteristics of a simple N_2 laser side-pumped dye laser (the first stage of CTO system) was thoroughly examined. It was found that both the pulse shape and the duration were affected strongly by the tuned wavelength, cavity length, pumping intensity, and the feedback signal from both the front and the back reflectors. A single output pulse as short as 40 ps could be generated by optimizing the operating parameters. The final output of the CTO system has a pulse duration less than 10 ps and a bandwidth less than 1 A. The technique of infrared multiphoton ionization was used to obtain state specific internal conversion rates in CrO_2Cl_2. Using narrow-band tunable 10 ps dye laser pulses, different vibrational states in the B_1 manifold were excited and the energy relaxation was monitored by an IR ps laser pulse. The relaxation can be characterized by a fast component, which is due to internal conversion to the ^1A_1 state, and a slow component, which is due to cooling of the vibrationally hot ^1A _1 ground state. The nonradiative energy transfer rate changes by almost three orders of magnitude for an excess vibrational energy change of merely 550 cm ^{-1}. With broadband incoherent picosecond dye laser pulse, the measurement of the dephasing time T _2 in dye solutions and semiconductor-doped glasses by the two pulse correlation method was demonstrated, with T_2<=ss than the correlation time of the excitation pulse tau_ {rm c}. It was found the dephasing time T_2 measured depended on the excitation photon energy relative to the band-edge or the energy difference between the ground state and the first excited electronic state. In the case of band-edge excitation, a quantum beat behavior with a beat frequency about 28 tera-hertz was observed in Rh-560 dye solutions.

  7. Conversational Self-Focus in Adolescent Friendships: Observational Assessment of an Interpersonal Process and Relations with Internalizing Symptoms and Friendship Quality

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz-Mette, Rebecca A.; Rose, Amanda J.

    2009-01-01

    Although youth with internalizing symptoms experience friendship difficulties, surprisingly little is known about their problematic interpersonal behaviors. The current observational study identifies a new construct, conversational self-focus, defined as the tendency to direct the focus of conversations to the self and away from others. Results indicated that youth with internalizing symptoms were especially likely to engage in self-focus when discussing problems with friends and that doing so was related to their friends perceiving the relationship as lower in quality, particularly helping. Content analyses further indicated that self-focused youth talked about themselves in ways that were distracting from their friends’ problems and that they changed the subject abruptly. Last, conversational self-focus was not redundant with related constructs of rumination and self-disclosure. This research highlights the importance of intervention efforts aimed at teaching self-focused youth ways to cope with distress that are more effective and will not damage their friendships. PMID:20717490

  8. Body Image and the Appearance Culture Among Adolescent Girls and Boys: An Examination of Friend Conversations, Peer Criticism, Appearance Magazines, and the Internalization of Appearance Ideals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Diane Carlson; Vigfusdottir, Thorbjorg Helga; Lee, Yoonsun

    2004-01-01

    This research evaluates the contributions of three dimensions of appearance culture (appearance magazine exposure, appearance conversations with friends, and peer appearance criticism) and body mass index (BMI) to internalization of appearance ideals and body image dissatisfaction. Four hundred thirty-three girls and 347 boys in Grades 7 through…

  9. Body Image and the Appearance Culture Among Adolescent Girls and Boys: An Examination of Friend Conversations, Peer Criticism, Appearance Magazines, and the Internalization of Appearance Ideals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Diane Carlson; Vigfusdottir, Thorbjorg Helga; Lee, Yoonsun

    2004-01-01

    This research evaluates the contributions of three dimensions of appearance culture (appearance magazine exposure, appearance conversations with friends, and peer appearance criticism) and body mass index (BMI) to internalization of appearance ideals and body image dissatisfaction. Four hundred thirty-three girls and 347 boys in Grades 7 through…

  10. The Importance of Internal Conversations and Reflexivity for Work-Based Students in Higher Education: Valuing Contextual Continuity and "Giving Something Back"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bovill, Helen

    2012-01-01

    This paper utilises the theories of Archer to explore the impact of student "internal conversations" upon the development of reflexive approaches employed by work-based students (WBS). The study informing this paper draws on the voices of a range of WBS on a Foundation Degree in Educational Support within a new university. A range of reflexivities…

  11. Internal conversion versus intersystem crossing: what drives the gas phase dynamics of cyclic α,β-enones?

    PubMed

    Schalk, Oliver; Schuurman, Michael S; Wu, Guorong; Lang, Peter; Mucke, Melanie; Feifel, Raimund; Stolow, Albert

    2014-03-27

    We investigate the competition between intersystem crossing (ISC) and internal conversion (IC) as nonradiative relaxation pathways in cyclic α,β-unsaturated enones following excitation to their lowest lying (1)ππ* state, by means of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio computation. Upon excitation, the (1)ππ* state of 2-cyclopentenone decays to the lowest lying (1)nπ* state within 120 ± 20 fs. Within 1.2 ± 0.2 ps, the molecule subsequently decays to the triplet manifold and the singlet ground state, with quantum yields of 0.35 and 0.65, respectively. The corresponding dynamics in modified derivatives, obtained by selective methylation, show a decrease in both IC and ISC rates, with the quantum yields of ISC varying between 0.35 and 0.08. The rapid rates of ISC are explained by a large spin orbit coupling of 45-60 cm(-1) over an extended region of near degeneracy between the singlet and triplet state. Furthermore, the rate of IC is depressed by the existence of a well-defined minimum on the (1)nπ* potential energy surface. The nonadiabatic pathways evinced by the present results highlight the fact that these molecular systems conceptually represent "intermediate cases" between ultrafast dynamics mediated by vibrational motions at conical intersections versus those by statistical decay mechanisms.

  12. Spin the light off: rapid internal conversion into a dark doublet state quenches the fluorescence of an RNA spin label.

    PubMed

    Gustmann, Henrik; Lefrancois, Daniel; Reuss, Andreas J; Gophane, Dnyaneshwar B; Braun, Markus; Dreuw, Andreas; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2017-10-04

    The spin label Çm and the fluorophore Çmf are close isosteric relatives: the secondary amine Çmf can be easily oxidized to a nitroxide group to form Çm. Thus, both compounds can serve as EPR and fluorescence labels, respectively, and their high structural similarity allows direct comparison of EPR and fluorescence data, e.g. in the context of investigations of RNA conformation and dynamics. Detailed UV/vis-spectroscopic studies demonstrate that the fluorescence lifetime and the quantum yield of Çmf are directly affected by intermolecular interactions, which makes it a sensitive probe of its microenvironment. On the other hand, Çm undergoes effective fluorescence quenching in the ps-time domain. The established quenching mechanisms that are usually operational for fluorophore-nitroxide compounds, do not explain the spectroscopic data for Çm. Quantum chemical calculations revealed that the lowest excited doublet state D1, which has no equivalent in Çmf, is a key state of the ultrafast quenching mechanism. This dark state is localized on the nitroxide group and is populated via rapid internal conversion.

  13. Solvent effects on internal conversions and intersystem crossings: the radiationless de-excitation of acrolein in water.

    PubMed

    Losa, Aurora Muñoz; Galvan, Ignacio Fdez; Sanchez, M Luz; Martín, M Elena; Aguilar, Manuel A

    2008-01-24

    An extended version of the averaged solvent electrostatic potential from molecular dynamics data (ASEP/MD) method oriented to the study of the solvent effects on internal conversion and intersystem crossing processes is presented. The method allows for the location of crossing points between free energy surfaces both in equilibrium and in frozen solvent conditions. The ground and excited states of the solute molecule are described at the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) level while the solvent structure is obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. As an application, we studied the nonradiative de-excitation of s-trans-acrolein 1(n --> pi*) in aqueous solution. We found that the solvent modifies the relative stability of the different crossing points but not enough as to alter the relative order of stability with respect to the in vacuo situation. The relaxation through an equilibrium path involves a strong solvent reorganization. On the contrary, the nonequilibrium path does not involve solvent motion and the de-excitation could proceed with the same speed as in vacuo.

  14. On the rejection of internal and external disturbances in a wind energy conversion system with direct-driven PMSG.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengquan; Zhang, Kezhao; Li, Juan; Liu, Chao

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the critical issue in a wind energy conversion system (WECS) based on a direct-driven permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG): the rejection of lumped disturbance, including the system uncertainties in the internal dynamics and unknown external forces. To simultaneously track the motor speed in real time and capture the maximum power, a maximum power point tracking strategy is proposed based on active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) theory. In real application, system inertia, drive torque and some other parameters change in a wide range with the variations of disturbances and wind speeds, which substantially degrade the performance of WECS. The ADRC design must incorporate the available model information into an extended state observer (ESO) to compensate the lumped disturbance efficiently. Based on this principle, a model-compensation ADRC is proposed in this paper. Simulation study is conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed control strategy. It is shown that the effect of lumped disturbance is compensated in a more effective way compared with the traditional ADRC approach.

  15. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    It is our great pleasure to welcome you to the 14th International Conference on Micro- and Nano-Technology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications, or PowerMEMS 2014, in Awaji Island, Japan. The aim of PowerMEM is to present the latest research results in the field of miniature, micro- and nano-scale technologies for power generation and energy conversion. The conference will also- give us the opportunity to exchange informations and new ideas in the field of Power MEMS/NEMS. The current status of the field of PowerMEMS spans the full spectrum from basic research to practical applications. We will enjoy valuable discussions not only from the viewpoint of academia but from commercial and industrial perspectives. In the conference, three invited speakers lead the technical program. We received 172 abstracts and after a careful reviewing process by the Technical Program Committee a total of 133 papers were selected for presentation. These have been organized into 16 Oral sessions in two parallel streams and two poster sessions including some late-news papers. The oral and regular poster papers are published by the Institute of Physics (IOP). We have also organized a PowerMEMS School in Kobe-Sannomiya contiguous to the main conference. This two-day school will cover various topics of energy harvesting. World leading experts will give invited lectures on their main topics. This is a new experiment to broaden the technology remit of our conference by organizing mini symposiums that aim to gather the latest research on the following topics by the organizers: Microscale Combustion, Wideband Vibration Energy Harvesting, RF Energy Transfer and Industrial Application. We hope this, and other activities will make PowerMEMS2014 a memorable success. One of the important programs in an international conference is the social program, and we prepare the PowerMEMS2014 banquet in the banquet room at the Westin Awaji Island Hotel. This will provide an opportunity to

  16. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma for photons using a male adult voxel simulator in sitting and standing posture with geometry of irradiation antero-posterior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, D. C.; Cavalcante, F. R.; Carvalho, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    The dose conversion coefficient (DCC) is important to quantify and assess effective doses associated with medical, professional and public exposures. The calculation of DCCs using anthropomorphic simulators and radiation transport codes is justified since in-vivo measurement of effective dose is extremely difficult and not practical for occupational dosimetry. DCCs have been published by the ICRP using simulators in a standing posture, which is not always applicable to all exposure scenarios, providing an inaccurate dose estimation. The aim of this work was to calculate DCCs for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (H/Kair) using the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code and the VOXTISS8 adult male voxel simulator in sitting and standing postures. In both postures, the simulator was irradiated by a plane source of monoenergetic photons in antero-posterior (AP) geometry. The photon energy ranged from 15 keV to 2 MeV. The DCCs for both postures were compared and the DCCs for the standing simulator were higher. For certain organs, the difference of DCCs were more significant, as in gonads (48% higher), bladder (16% higher) and colon (11% higher). As these organs are positioned in the abdominal region, the posture of the anthropomorphic simulator modifies the form in which the radiation is transported and how the energy is deposited. It was also noted that the average percentage difference of conversion coefficients was 33% for the bone marrow, 11% for the skin, 13% for the bone surface and 31% for the muscle. For other organs, the percentage difference of the DCCs for both postures was not relevant (less than 5%) due to no anatomical changes in the organs of the head, chest and upper abdomen. We can conclude that is important to obtain DCCs using different postures from those present in the scientific literature.

  17. A PHANTOM FOR DETERMINATION OF CALIBRATION COEFFICIENTS AND MINIMUM DETECTABLE ACTIVITIES USING A DUAL-HEAD GAMMA CAMERA FOR INTERNAL CONTAMINATION MONITORING FOLLOWING RADIATION EMERGENCY SITUATIONS.

    PubMed

    Ören, Ünal; Andersson, Martin; Rääf, Christopher L; Mattsson, Sören

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive calibration coefficients (in terms of cps kBq(-1)) and minimum detectable activities, MDA, (in terms of kBq and corresponding dose rate) for the dual head gamma camera part of an SPECT/CT-instrument when used for in vivo internal contamination measurements in radiation emergency situations. A cylindrical-conical PMMA phantom with diameters in the range of 7-30 cm was developed in order to simulate different body parts and individuals of different sizes. A series of planar gamma camera investigations were conducted using an SPECT/CT modality with the collimators removed for (131)I and (137)Cs, radionuclides potentially associated with radiation emergencies. Energy windows of 337-391 and 490-690 keV were selected for (131)I and (137)Cs, respectively. The measurements show that the calibration coefficients for (137)Cs range from 10 to 19 cps kBq(-1) with MDA values in the range of 0.29-0.55 kBq for phantom diameters of 10-30 cm. The corresponding values for (131)I are 12-37 cps kBq(-1) with MDA values of 0.08-0.26 kBq. An internal dosimetry computer program was used for the estimation of minimum detectable dose rates. A thyroid uptake of 0.1 kBq (131)I (representing MDA) corresponds to an effective dose rate of 0.6 µSv d(-1) A (137)Cs source position representing the colon with an MDA of 0.55 kBq corresponds to an effective dose rate was 1 µSv y(-1) This method using a simple phantom for the determination of calibration coefficients, and MDA levels can be implemented within the emergency preparedness plans in hospitals with nuclear medicine departments. The derived data will help to quickly estimate the internal contamination of humans following radiation emergencies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Effects of hydrogen bonding on internal conversion of GFP-like chromophores. I. The para-amino systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guan-Jhih; Cheng, Chi-Wen; Hsu, Hung-Yu; Prabhakar, Ch; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Yang, Jye-Shane

    2013-03-07

    To understand the effects of solvent-solute hydrogen bonding (SSHB) on the excited-state dynamics of two GFP-like chromophores, p-ABDI and p-CFABDI, we have determined the quantum yields for fluorescence (Φf) and the isomerization Z → E (ΦZE) and the femtosecond fluorescence and transient infrared absorption in selected solvents. The behavior that ΦZE ≅ 0.50 in aprotic solvents, such as CH3CN, indicates that the E-Z photoisomerization adopts a one-bond-flip mechanism through the torsion of the exocyclic C═C bond (the τ torsion) to form a perpendicular species (τ ∼90°) in the singlet excited state followed by internal conversion (IC) to the ground state and partition to form the E and Z isomers with equal probabilities. The observed ΦZE decreased from 0.50 to 0.15-0.28 when CH3CN was replaced with the protic solvents CH3OH and CF3CH2OH. In conjunction with the solvent-independent rapid (<1 ps) kinetics for the fluorescence decay and the solvent-dependent slow (7-20 ps) kinetics for the ground-state recovery, we conclude that the SSHB modifies the potential energy surface for the τ torsion in a way that the IC occurs also for the twisted intermediates with a τ-torsion angle smaller than 90°, which favors the formation of the Z isomers. The possibility of IC induced by torsion of the exocyclic C-C bond (the φ torsion) is also considered but excluded.

  19. The 13th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitcheson, Paul; Beeby, Steve

    2013-12-01

    It is a pleasure to welcome you to The Royal Society in London and the 13th International Conference on Micro- and Nano-Technology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications, or PowerMEMS 2013. The objective of PowerMEMS 2013 is to catalyse innovation in miniature, micro- and nano-scale technologies for power generation and energy conversion. The conference aims to stimulate the exchange of insights and information, and the development of new ideas in the Power MEMS/NEMS field as well as at the meso-scale. It will allow the attendees to interact and network within our multidisciplinary community that includes professionals from many branches of science and engineering. The technical program is led by four invited speakers covering inductive power transfer, chip scale power sources, thermal energy harvesting and implantable biofuel cells. We received 177 abstracts and following a careful reviewing process by the Technical Program Committee a total of 137 papers were selected for presentation. These have been organised into 16 oral sessions in two parallel streams and two poster sessions that have been augmented by 10 late news papers. The oral and regular poster papers are, for the first time, being published by the Institute of Physics. We have made every effort to make PowerMEMS 2013 the busiest yet and have included for the first time the PowerMEMS School. This two-day school held at Imperial College London covered a wide range of power-MEMS topics including technologies for power generation, power transmission, energy storage, power electronics interfaces and metrology. Registrations for the School exceeded our expectations and it was full by early November. We hope this, and other activities such as the Discussion Panel and the inclusion of late news papers, will make PowerMEMS 2013 a memorable success. We have also reached out to new communities, such as those working in wireless power transfer and RF harvesting to broaden the technology remit of

  20. Coherent quantum control of internal conversion: {S}_{2}\\;\\leftrightarrow \\;{S}_{1} in pyrazine via {S}_{0}\\;\\to \\;{S}_{2}/{S}_{1} weak field excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinev, Timur; Shapiro, Moshe; Brumer, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Coherent control of internal conversion (IC) between the first (S1) and second (S2) singlet excited electronic states in pyrazine, where the S2 state is populated from the ground singlet electronic state S0 by weak field excitation, is examined. Control is implemented by shaping the laser which excites S2. Excitation and IC are considered simultaneously, using the recently introduced resonance-based control approach. Highly successful control is achieved by optimizing both the amplitude and phase profiles of the laser spectrum. The dependence of control on the properties of resonances in S2 is demonstrated.

  1. International Leaders Summit: using dialogue to Center the Conversation on the Education of Deaf Children and Youth in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John L

    2011-01-01

    Om July 18, 2010, the eve of the 21st International Congress on the Education of the Deaf (ICED 2010), the International Leaders Summit was held at the Center for Dialogue at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada. A total of 120 world leaders from 32 countries participated. Presenters, including students, led the conversation on current perspectives, teacher preparation, worldwide resources, and major issues affecting the education of d/Deaf and hard of hearing infants, children, and youth. Summit participants recognized that advances in detection, early intervention, and technology present challenges in meeting the needs of a student population more diverse than at any other stage in history. While it was acknowledged that needs differ in various parts of the world, there was a consensus that change is required to prepare students to handle challenges in the 21st century.

  2. Excited-state dynamics and viscosity-dependent internal conversion in 3,3-dimethyl-2-phenyl-3H-indole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belletête, Michel; Sarpal, Ranjit S.; Durocher, Gilles

    1993-01-01

    The fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes (τ F) of 3,3-dimethyl-2-phenyl-3H-indole ( 1), in a series of eighteen nonpolar, polar aprotic and/or protic solvents, range from 2.4 X 10 -4 to 0.12 and from 1 to 520 ps, respectively, as a result of viscosity dependent fast internal conversion. Rates of internal conversion are shown to be dependent upon the bulk viscosity of the solvent as opposed to the microviscosity (free volume effect of the solvent). Both φ F (or τ F) = Cη 2/3 with an identical value of C whatever the nature of the solvent is. This molecule may then be regarded as an excellent viscosity probe for heterogeneous systems and polymers over a large range of viscosities. Various solvatochromic methods have been used to evaluate the ground and excited state dipole moments of 1. The Bilot—Kawski method gives optimized values of 3.8 and 7.8 D, respectively, with a negligible polarizability of the molecule.

  3. Application of vibrational correlation formalism to internal conversion rate: case study of Cu(n) (n = 3, 6, and 9) and H2/Cu3.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, Sandro Giuseppe; Mineva, Tzonka

    2015-03-21

    This work reports non-radiative internal conversion (IC) rate constants obtained for Cun with n = 3, 6, and 9 and H2 on Cu3. The Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) method was employed with three different functionals in order to investigate the electronic structures and the absorption spectra. The performance of the generalized gradient approximation of Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (PBE) and the hybrid B3LYP and PBE0 exchange correlation functionals in combination with the SVP and the def2-TZVP basis sets was examined. TDDFT results were used as input data to compute internal conversion rate constants. For this purpose, we have developed a program package. A description of the theoretical background used in our numerical implementation and the program input file is presented. In view of future applications of this program package in photoinduced catalysis, we present the analysis of the IC rate processes for the photodissociation of H2 on Cu3. These results showed the applicability of the method and the computational program to identify the vibrational modes in transition metal clusters giving rise to the largest IC rate constant due to their interactions with the excited electronic states occurring in the hot-electron induced dissociation phenomena.

  4. Current status of revascularization surgery for Moyamoya disease: special consideration for its 'internal carotid-external carotid (IC-EC) conversion' as the physiological reorganization system.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Miki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a chronic cerebrovascular disease with unknown etiology, which is characterized by bilateral steno-occlusive changes at the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and an abnormal vascular network formation at the base of the brain. Moyamoya disease is known to have unique and dynamic nature to convert the vascular supply for the brain from internal carotid (IC) system to the external carotid (EC) system, as indicated by Suzuki's angiographic staging established in 1969. Insufficiency of this 'IC-EC conversion system' may result in cerebral ischemia, as well as in intracranial hemorrhage from inadequate collateral vascular network, both of which represent the clinical presentation of moyamoya disease. Therefore, surgical revascularization by extracranial-intracranial bypass is the preferred procedure for moyamoya disease to complement 'IC-EC conversion' and thus to avoid cerebral infarction and/or intracranial hemorrhage. Long-term outcome of revascularization surgery for moyamoya disease is favorable, but rapid increase in cerebral blood flow on the affected hemisphere could temporarily cause unfavorable phenomenon such as cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome. We would review the current status of revascularization surgery for moyamoya disease based on its basic pathology, and sought to discuss the significance of measuring cerebral blood flow in the acute stage and intensive perioperative management.

  5. Application of vibrational correlation formalism to internal conversion rate: Case study of Cun (n = 3, 6, and 9) and H2/Cu3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodo, Sandro Giuseppe; Mineva, Tzonka

    2015-03-01

    This work reports non-radiative internal conversion (IC) rate constants obtained for Cun with n = 3, 6, and 9 and H2 on Cu3. The Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) method was employed with three different functionals in order to investigate the electronic structures and the absorption spectra. The performance of the generalized gradient approximation of Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (PBE) and the hybrid B3LYP and PBE0 exchange correlation functionals in combination with the SVP and the def2-TZVP basis sets was examined. TDDFT results were used as input data to compute internal conversion rate constants. For this purpose, we have developed a program package. A description of the theoretical background used in our numerical implementation and the program input file is presented. In view of future applications of this program package in photoinduced catalysis, we present the analysis of the IC rate processes for the photodissociation of H2 on Cu3. These results showed the applicability of the method and the computational program to identify the vibrational modes in transition metal clusters giving rise to the largest IC rate constant due to their interactions with the excited electronic states occurring in the hot-electron induced dissociation phenomena.

  6. Outcomes of anterolateral thigh-free flaps and conversion from external to internal fixation with bone grafting in gustilo type IIIB open tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Chung, Duke Whan; Han, Chung Soo

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the utility and the clinical outcomes of anterolateral thigh (ALT)-free flaps and conversion from external to internal fixation with plating and bone grafting in Gustilo type IIIB open tibial fractures. A total of 21 patients were analyzed retrospectively. The mean follow-up period was 18 months and the mean age was 46.7 years. There were 18 men and three women. The mean time from injury to flap coverage was 11.6 days. The mean size of flaps used was 15.3 × 8.2 cm. The mean size of bone defects was 2.26 cm. Segmental bone defects were observed in 5 five cases, for which bone transport or vascularized fibular graft were performed. When flaps were successful and the fracture sites did not have any evidence of infection, internal fixation with plates and bone grafting were performed. Flaps survived in 20 cases. In the 20 cases with successful flaps, two cases developed osteomyelitis, but the 20 cases achieved solid bone union at a mean of 8.6 months after the injury, salvaging the lower extremity in 100% of the cases. At the last follow-up, 9 nine cases were measured excellent or good; 6, fair; and 6, poor in the functional assessment based on the method developed by Puno et al. ALT- free flaps to cover soft tissue defects in Gustilo type IIIB open tibial fractures are considered as useful option for the treatment of composite defects. In addition, conversion to internal fixation and bone grafting can be an alternative method in order to reduce the risk of complications and inconvenience of external fixators.

  7. EDITORIAL: The 6th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnologies for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fréchette, Luc G.

    2007-09-01

    Energy is a sector of paramount importance over the coming decades if we are to ensure sustainable development that respects our environment. The research and development of novel approaches to convert available energy into usable forms using micro and nanotechnologies can contribute towards this goal and meet the growing need for power in small scale portable applications. The dominant power sources for handheld and other portable electronics are currently primary and rechargeable batteries. Their limited energy density and adverse effects on the environment upon disposal suggest that alternative approaches need to be explored. This special issue will showcase some of the leading work in this area, initially presented at PowerMEMS 2006, the 6th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnologies for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications. Power MEMS are defined as microsystems for electrical power generation and other energy conversion applications, including propulsion and cooling. The range of power MEMS technologies includes micro thermodynamic machines, such as microturbines, miniature internal combustion engines and micro-coolers; solid-state direct energy conversion, such as thermoelectric and photovoltaic microstructures; micro electrochemical devices, such as micro fuel cells and nanostructure batteries; vibration energy harvesting devices, such as piezoelectric, magnetic or electrostatic micro generators, as well as micro thrusters and rocket engines for propulsion. These can either be driven by scavenging thermal, mechanical or solar energy from the environment, or from a stored energy source, such as chemical fuel or radioactive material. The unique scope leads to unique challenges in the development of power MEMS, ranging from the integration of novel materials to the efficient small scale implementation of energy conversion principles. In this special issue, Mitcheson et al provide a comparative assessment of three inertial vibration

  8. Working Definitions of the Roles and an Organizational Structure in Health Professions Education Scholarship: Initiating an International Conversation.

    PubMed

    Varpio, Lara; Gruppen, Larry; Hu, Wendy; O'Brien, Bridget; Ten Cate, Olle; Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Irby, David M; van der Vleuten, Cees; Hamstra, Stanley J; Durning, Steven J

    2017-02-01

    Health professions education scholarship (HPES) is an important and growing field of inquiry. Problematically, consistent use of terminology regarding the individual roles and organizational structures that are active in this field are lacking. This inconsistency impedes the transferability of current and future findings related to the roles and organizational structures of HPES. Based on data collected during interviews with HPES leaders in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the United States, and the Netherlands, the authors constructed working definitions for some of the professional roles and an organizational structure that support HPES. All authors reviewed the definitions to ensure relevance across multiple countries. The authors define and offer illustrative examples of three professional roles in HPES (clinician educator, HPES research scientist, and HPES administrative leader) and an organizational structure that can support HPES participation (HPES unit). These working definitions are foundational and not all-encompassing and, thus, are offered as stimulus for international dialogue and understanding. With these working definitions, scholars and administrative leaders can examine HPES roles and organizational structures across and between national contexts to decide how lessons learned in other contexts can be applied to their local contexts. Although rigorously constructed, these definitions need to be vetted by the international HPES community. The authors argue that these definitions are sufficiently transferable to support such scholarly investigation and debate.

  9. Solvent-mediated internal conversion in diphenoxyethane-(H{sub 2}O){sub n}clusters, n = 2-4

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Patrick S.; Buchanan, Evan G.; Gord, Joseph R.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2015-04-21

    1,2-diphenoxyethane (DPOE) is a flexible bichromophore whose excited states come in close-lying pairs whose splitting and vibronic coupling can be modulated by solvent. Building on the ground state infrared spectroscopy of DPOE-(H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters with n = 2-4 from the adjoining paper [Walsh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 154303 (2015)], the present work focuses on the vibronic and excited state infrared spectroscopies of the clusters. The type and degree of asymmetry of the water cluster binding to DPOE is reflected in the variation in the magnitude of the S{sub 1}/S{sub 2} splitting with cluster size. Excited state resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy was performed at the electronic origins of the first two excited states in order to explore how the water clusters’ OH stretch spectra report on the nature of the two excited states, and the interaction of the S{sub 2} state with nearby S{sub 1} vibronic levels mediated by the water clusters. The data set, when taken as a whole, provides a state-to-state view of internal conversion and the role of solvent in mediating conversion of electronic excitation between two chromophores, providing a molecular-scale view of Kasha’s rule.

  10. Bound internal conversion versus nuclear excitation by electron transition: Revision of the theory of optical pumping of the Thm229 isomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpeshin, F. F.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2017-03-01

    Two-photon optical pumping of the 7.6-eV nuclear isomer in the singly ionized atoms of 229Th is considered. Differences between two mechanisms of the pumping, nuclear excitation in the electronic transition (NEET) and bound internal conversion (BIC), are derived and analyzed numerically. The BIC mechanism turns out to be more effective, by orders of magnitude, in accordance with previous calculations. Moreover, a numerical smallness in the NEET scheme is explicitly pointed out concerning singly and doubly charged ions. That is related to the smallness of the final vertex, responsible for conservation of energy. In the case of BIC, the calculated pumping rate of the isomer for the most effective scheme may be as high as 0.03 s-1.

  11. Effect of internal conversion of vibrational quanta in electron tunneling: a scheme for direct experimental observation and current/voltage relationships.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Alexander M

    2006-01-01

    Electron tunneling through bridge molecular groups with a strong coupling to a local quantum vibrational mode is considered. A scheme is suggested for direct experimental observation of the effect of internal conversion of vibrational quanta in inelastic electron tunneling. The effect consists of excitation and re-absorption of vibrational quanta in bridge by tunneling electrons. The tunnel current produced by the absorption of vibrational quanta by the same or another electron can in principle be detected in an experimental setup a scheme of which is suggested. Current/voltage dependences have general spectroscopic features. Possible effects that can take place in the case of additional strong interaction with classical vibrational modes are discussed.

  12. The Effect of Conjugation on the Competition between Internal Conversion and Electron Detachment: A Comparison between Green Fluorescent and Red Kaede Protein Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Tay, Jamie; Parkes, Michael A; Addison, Kiri; Chan, Yohan; Zhang, Lijuan; Hailes, Helen C; Bulman Page, Philip C; Meech, Stephen R; Blancafort, Lluís; Fielding, Helen H

    2017-02-16

    Kaede, an analogue of green fluorescent protein (GFP), is a green-to-red photoconvertible fluorescent protein used as an in vivo "optical highlighter" in bioimaging. The fluorescence quantum yield of the red Kaede protein is lower than that of GFP, suggesting that increasing the conjugation modifies the electronic relaxation pathway. Using a combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations, we find that the isolated red Kaede protein chromophore in the gas phase is deprotonated at the imidazole ring, unlike the GFP chromophore that is deprotonated at the phenol ring. We find evidence of an efficient electronic relaxation pathway from higher-lying electronically excited states to the S1 state of the red Kaede chromophore that is not accessible in the GFP chromophore. Rapid autodetachment from high-lying vibrational states of S1 is found to compete efficiently with internal conversion to the ground electronic state.

  13. Conversational Dominance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esau, Helmut; Poth, Annette

    Details of conversational behavior can often not be interpreted until the social interaction, including the rights and obligations of the participants, their intent, the topic, etc., has been defined. This paper presents a model of conversation in which the conversational image a person presents in a given conversational situation is a function of…

  14. Vibrational relaxation and internal conversion in the overlapped optically-allowed 1Bu+ and optically-forbidden 1Bu- or 3Ag- vibronic levels of carotenoids: Effects of diabatic mixing as determined by Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakitani, Yoshinori; Miki, Takeshi; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kanematsu, Yasuo

    2009-07-01

    The time constants of the vibrational relaxation, υ = 2 → υ = 1 and υ = 1 → υ = 0, in the 1Bu+ manifold and those of internal conversion from the 1Bu+(0) level, which is isoenergetic (so-called 'diabatic') with the 1Bu- vibronic levels in neurosporene and spheroidene and with the 3Ag- vibronic levels in lycopene and anhydrorhodovibrin, were determined by Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopy. The time constants of the vibrational relaxation were in the ˜1:2 ratio, and those of internal conversion agreed with the lifetimes of the diabatic counterparts, i.e., the 1Bu- and 3Ag- electronic states, respectively.

  15. PREFACE: The 15th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livermore, C.; Velásquez-García, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Greetings, and welcome to Boston, MA and PowerMEMS 2015 - the 15th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications! The objective of PowerMEMS 2015 is to catalyze innovation in micro- and nano-scale technologies for the energy domain. The scope of the meeting ranges from basic principles, to materials and fabrication, to devices and systems, to applications. The many applications of Power MEMS range from the harvesting, storage, conversion and conditioning of energy, to integrated systems that manage these processes, to actuation, pumping, and propulsion. Our Conference aims to stimulate the exchange of insights and information, as well as the development of new ideas, in the Power MEMS field. Our goal is to allow the attendees to interact and network within our multidisciplinary community that includes professionals from many branches of science and engineering, as well as energy, policy, and entrepreneurial specialists interested in the commercialization of Power MEMS technologies. Since the first PowerMEMS in Sendai, Japan in 2000, the Conference has grown in size, reputation, impact, and technical breadth. This continuing growth is evident in this year's technical program, which includes an increasing number of papers on nanomaterials, additive manufacturing for energy systems, actuators, energy storage, harvesting strategies and integrated energy harvesting systems, for example. This year's technical program is highlighted by six plenary talks from prominent experts on piezoelectrics, robotic insects, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, nanocomposite cathodes, and thermal energy conversion systems. The contributed program received a large number of abstract submissions this year, 169 in total. After careful review by the 34-member Technical Program Committee, a total of 135 papers were selected for presentation. The 60 contributed oral presentations are arranged in two parallel sessions. The 75 posters

  16. Biphasic versus monophasic shock waveform for conversion of atrial fibrillation: the results of an international randomized, double-blind multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Page, Richard L; Kerber, Richard E; Russell, James K; Trouton, Tom; Waktare, Johan; Gallik, Donna; Olgin, Jeff E; Ricard, Philippe; Dalzell, Gavin W; Reddy, Ramakota; Lazzara, Ralph; Lee, Kerry; Carlson, Mark; Halperin, Blair; Bardy, Gust H

    2002-06-19

    This study compared a biphasic waveform with a conventional monophasic waveform for cardioversion of atrial fibrillation (AF). Biphasic shock waveforms have been demonstrated to be superior to monophasic shocks for termination of ventricular fibrillation, but data regarding biphasic shocks for conversion of AF are still emerging. In an international, multicenter, randomized, double-blind clinical trial, we compared the effectiveness of damped sine wave monophasic versus impedance-compensated truncated exponential biphasic shocks for the cardioversion of AF. Patients received up to five shocks, as necessary for conversion: 100 J, 150 J, 200 J, a fourth shock at maximum output for the initial waveform (200 J biphasic, 360 J monophasic) and a final cross-over shock at maximum output of the alternate waveform. Analysis included 107 monophasic and 96 biphasic patients. The success rate was higher for biphasic than for monophasic shocks at each of the three shared energy levels (100 J: 60% vs. 22%, p < 0.0001; 150 J: 77% vs. 44%, p < 0.0001; 200 J: 90% vs. 53%, p < 0.0001). Through four shocks, at a maximum of 200 J, biphasic performance was similar to monophasic performance at 360 J (91% vs. 85%, p = 0.29). Biphasic patients required fewer shocks (1.7 +/- 1.0 vs. 2.8 +/- 1.2, p < 0.0001) and lower total energy delivered (217 +/- 176 J vs. 548 +/- 331 J, p < 0.0001). The biphasic shock waveform was also associated with a lower frequency of dermal injury (17% vs. 41%, p < 0.0001). For the cardioversion of AF, a biphasic shock waveform has greater efficacy, requires fewer shocks and lower delivered energy, and results in less dermal injury than a monophasic shock waveform.

  17. Extraction of recombination coefficients and internal quantum efficiency of GaN-based light emitting diodes considering effective volume of active region.

    PubMed

    Kim, Garam; Kim, Jang Hyun; Park, Euy Hwan; Kang, Donghoon; Park, Byung-Gook

    2014-01-27

    An improved rate equation model for GaN-based LEDs considering the effective volume of the active region is proposed. Through numerical simulations, it is confirmed that the IQE, especially efficiency droop is related with small effective volume. Also, we confirmed that the effective volume is controlled by polarization charge, the barriers between the quantum wells, and current density. We also developed a fast and reliable method for extracting the recombination coefficients and the IQE of the GaN-based LEDs by measuring transient characteristics and considering the effective volume.

  18. International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1979-01-01

    The International Geological Correlation Project has attained scientific maturity and broad support and participation by geologists world wide. Its purpose is to provide a mechanism for international cooperation and information exchange about geological problems that transcend national boundaries. (Author/BB)

  19. A first detection of singlet to triplet conversion from the 1 1B u- to the 1 3A g state and triplet internal conversion from the 1 3A g to the 1 3B u state in carotenoids: dependence on the conjugation length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondonuwu, Ferdy S.; Watanabe, Yasutaka; Fujii, Ritsuko; Koyama, Yasushi

    2003-07-01

    Subpicosecond time-resolved absorption spectra were recorded in the visible region for a set of photosynthetic carotenoids having different numbers of conjugated double bonds ( n), which include neurosporene ( n=9), spheroidene ( n=10), lycopene ( n=11), anhydrorhodovibrin ( n=12) and spirilloxanthin ( n=13). Singular-value decomposition and global fitting of the spectral-data matrices lead us to a branched relaxation scheme including both (1) the singlet internal conversion in the sequence of 1 1B u+ → 1 1B u- → 2 1A g- → 1 1A g-(ground), and (2) the singlet-to-triplet conversion of 1 1B u- → 1 3A g followed by triplet internal conversion of 1 3A g → 1 3B u.

  20. Hierarchical transformation of Hamiltonians with linear and quadratic couplings for nonadiabatic quantum dynamics: application to the ππ∗∕nπ∗ internal conversion in thymine.

    PubMed

    Picconi, David; Lami, Alessandro; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2012-06-28

    We face with the general problem of defining a reduced number of effective collective coordinates to describe accurately the short-time nonadiabatic dynamics of large semirigid systems, amenable to a description in terms of coupled harmonic potential energy surfaces. We present a numeric iterative protocol to define a hierarchical representation of the Hamiltonian taking into account both linear and quadratic intra- and inter-state couplings (QVC, quadratic vibronic coupling model), thus generalizing the method introduced recently in the literature [E. Gindensperger, H. Köppel, and L. S. Cederbaum, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 034106 (2007)] for the linear vibronic coupling (LVC) model. This improvement allows to take into account the effect of harmonic frequency changes and Duschinsky mixings among the different electronic states, providing a route to upgrade the models for nonadiabatic harmonic systems to those nowadays routinely used for the simulation of vibronic spectra of adiabatic systems (negligible nonadiabatic couplings). We apply our method to the study of ππ∗ → nπ∗ internal conversion in thymine, analysing the differences in LVC and QVC predictions both for the absorption spectrum and the dynamics of electronic populations.

  1. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 11th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2011) Selected papers from the 11th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Ho

    2012-09-01

    This special section of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering features papers selected from the 11th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2011), held at Sejong Hotel in Seoul, Korea during 15-18 November 2011. Since the first PowerMEMS workshop held in Sendai, Japan in 2000, the workshop has developed as the premier forum for reporting research results in micro and nanotechnology for power generation, energy conversion, harvesting and processing applications, including in-depth technical issues on nanostructures and materials for small-scale high-density energy and thermal management. Potential PowerMEMS applications cover not only portable power devices for consumer electronics and remote sensors, but also micro engines, impulsive thrusters and fuel cells for systems ranging from the nanometer to the millimeter scale. The 2011 technical program consists of 1 plenary talk, 4 invited talks and 118 contributed presentations. The 48 oral and 70 poster presentations, selected by 27 Technical Program Committee Members from 131 submitted abstracts, have stimulated lively discussion maximizing the interaction between participants. Among them, this special section includes 9 papers covering micro-scale power generators, energy converters, harvesters, thrusters and thermal coolers. Finally, we are grateful to the members of the International Steering Committee, the Technical Program Committee, and the Local Organizing Committee for their efforts and contributions to PowerMEMS 2011. We also thank the two companies Samsung Electro-Mechanics and LG Elite for technical tour arrangements. Special thanks go to Dr Ian Forbes, the editorial staff of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, as well as to the staff of IOP Publishing for making this special section possible.

  2. EDITORIAL: Special issue for papers selected from The 8th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2008) Special issue for papers selected from The 8th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shuji

    2009-09-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering features papers selected from The 8th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2008) with the 2nd Symposium on Micro Environmental Machine Systems (μMEMS 2008). The workshop was held in Sendai, Japan on 9-12 November 2008 by Tohoku University. This is the second time that the PowerMEMS workshop has been held in Sendai, following the first workshop in 2000. Power MEMS is one of the newest categories of MEMS, which encompasses microdevices and microsystems for power generation, energy conversion and propulsion. The first concept of Power MEMS was born in the late 1990's from a MEMS-based gas turbine project at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After that, the research and development of Power MEMS have been promoted by the strong need for compact power sources with high energy and/or power density. Since its inception, Power MEMS has expanded to include not only various MEMS-based power generators but also small energy machines and microdevices for macro power generators. Previously, the main topics of the PowerMEMS workshop were miniaturized gas turbines and micro fuel cells, but recently, energy harvesting has been the hottest topic. In 2008, energy harvesting had a 41% share in the 118 accepted regular papers. This special issue includes 19 papers on various topics. Finally, I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the members of the International Steering Committee, the Technical Program Committee, the Local Organizing Committee and financial supporters. This special issue was edited in collaboration with the staff of IOP Publishing.

  3. Deconvolution of (238,239,240)Pu conversion electron spectra measured with a silicon drift detector.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Marouli, M; Paepen, J; Marković, N; Pöllänen, R

    2017-09-13

    Internal conversion electron (ICE) spectra of thin (238,239,240)Pu sources, measured with a windowless Peltier-cooled silicon drift detector (SDD), were deconvoluted and relative ICE intensities were derived from the fitted peak areas. Corrections were made for energy dependence of the full-energy-peak counting efficiency, based on Monte Carlo simulations. A good agreement was found with the theoretically expected internal conversion coefficient (ICC) values calculated from the BrIcc database. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Contentious Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuidema, Leah A.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of joining a conversation through reading and writing is not new; in his 1941 book "The Philosophy of Literary Form: Studies in Symbolic Action," Kenneth Burke suggests that the acts of reading and writing are like entering a parlor where others are already conversing. The author explores the place of professional debate within NCTE and…

  5. Contentious Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuidema, Leah A.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of joining a conversation through reading and writing is not new; in his 1941 book "The Philosophy of Literary Form: Studies in Symbolic Action," Kenneth Burke suggests that the acts of reading and writing are like entering a parlor where others are already conversing. The author explores the place of professional debate within NCTE and…

  6. MR-based attenuation correction for PET/MRI neurological studies with continuous-valued attenuation coefficients for bone through a conversion from R2* to CT-Hounsfield units.

    PubMed

    Juttukonda, Meher R; Mersereau, Bryant G; Chen, Yasheng; Su, Yi; Rubin, Brian G; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Lalush, David S; An, Hongyu

    2015-05-15

    MR-based correction for photon attenuation in PET/MRI remains challenging, particularly for neurological applications requiring quantitation of data. Existing methods are either not sufficiently accurate or are limited by the computation time required. The goal of this study was to develop an MR-based attenuation correction method that accurately separates bone tissue from air and provides continuous-valued attenuation coefficients for bone. PET/MRI and CT datasets were obtained from 98 subjects (mean age [±SD]: 66yrs [±9.8], 57 females) using an IRB-approved protocol and with informed consent. Subjects were injected with 352±29MBq of (18)F-Florbetapir tracer, and PET acquisitions were begun either immediately or 50min after injection. CT images of the head were acquired separately using a PET/CT system. Dual echo ultrashort echo-time (UTE) images and two-point Dixon images were acquired. Regions of air were segmented via a threshold of the voxel-wise multiplicative inverse of the UTE echo 1 image. Regions of bone were segmented via a threshold of the R2* image computed from the UTE echo 1 and UTE echo 2 images. Regions of fat and soft tissue were segmented using fat and water images decomposed from the Dixon images. Air, fat, and soft tissue were assigned linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of 0, 0.092, and 0.1cm(-1), respectively. LACs for bone were derived from a regression analysis between corresponding R2* and CT values. PET images were reconstructed using the gold standard CT method and the proposed CAR-RiDR method. The RiDR segmentation method produces mean Dice coefficient±SD across subjects of 0.75±0.05 for bone and 0.60±0.08 for air. The CAR model for bone LACs greatly improves accuracy in estimating CT values (28.2%±3.0 mean error) compared to the use of a constant CT value (46.9%±5.8, p<10(-6)). Finally, the CAR-RiDR method provides a low whole-brain mean absolute percent-error (MAPE±SD) in PET reconstructions across subjects of 2.55%±0

  7. Energy conversion in laser propulsion: III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Carl W.; Mead, Franklin B., Jr.; Kalliomaa, Wayne M.

    2002-09-01

    Conversion of pulses of CO2 laser energy (18 microsecond pulses) to propellant kinetic energy was studied in a Myrabo Laser Lightcraft (MLL) operating with laser heated STP air and laser ablated delrin propellants. The MLL incorporates an inverted parabolic reflector that focuses laser energy into a toroidal volume where it is absorbed by a unit of propellant mass that subsequently expands in the geometry of the plug nozzle aerospike. With Delrin propellant, measurements of the coupling coefficients and the ablated mass as a function of laser pulse energy showed that the efficiency of conversion of laser energy to propellant kinetic energy was approximately 54%. With STP air, direct experimental measurement efficiency was not possible because the propellant mass associated with measured coupling coefficients was not known. Thermodynamics predicted that the upper limit of the efficiency of conversion of the internal energy of laser heated air to jet kinetic energy, (alpha) , is approximately 0.30 for EQUILIBRIUM expansion to 1 bar pressure. For FROZEN expansion (alpha) approximately 0.27. These upper limit efficiencies are nearly independent of the initial specific energy from 1 to 110 MJ/kg. With heating of air at its Mach 5 stagnation density (5.9 kg/m3 as compared to STP air density of 1.18 kg/m3) these efficiencies increase to about 0.55 (equilibrium) and 0.45 (frozen). Optimum blowdown from 1.18 kg/m3 to 1 bar occurs with expansion ratios approximately 1.5 to 4 as internal energy increases from 1 to 100 MJ/kg. Optimum expansion from the higher density state requires larger expansion ratios, 8 to 32. Expansion of laser ablated Delrin propellant appears to convert the absorbed laser energy more efficiently to jet kinetic energy because the effective density of the ablated gaseous Delrin is significantly greater than that of STP air.

  8. Energy conversion in laser propulsion III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B.; Kalliomaa, Wayne M.

    2003-05-01

    Conversion of pulses of CO2 laser energy (18 microsecond pulses) to propellant kinetic energy was studied in a Myrabo Laser Lightcraft (MLL) operating with laser heated STP air and laser ablated delrin propellants. The MLL incorporates an inverted parabolic reflector that focuses laser energy into a toroidal volume where it is absorbed by a unit of propellant mass that subsequently expands in the geometry of the plug nozzle aerospike. With Delrin propellant, measurements of the coupling coefficients and the ablated mass as a function of laser pulse energy showed that the efficiency of conversion of laser energy to propellant kinetic energy was ~ 54%. With STP air, direct experimental measurement of efficiency was not possible because the propellant mass associated with measured coupling coefficients was not known. Thermodynamics predicted that the upper limit of the efficiency of conversion of the internal energy of laser heated air to jet kinetic energy, α, is ~ 0.30 for EQUILIBRIUM expansion to 1 bar pressure. For FROZEN expansion α ~ 0.27. These upper limit efficiencies are nearly independent of the initial specific energy from 1 to 110 MJ/kg. With heating of air at its Mach 5 stagnation density (5.9 kg/m3 as compared to STP air density of 1.18 kg/m3) these efficiencies increase to about 0.55 (equilibrium) and 0.45 (frozen). Optimum blowdown from 1.18 kg/m3 to 1 bar occurs with expansion ratios ~ 1.5 to 4 as internal energy increases from 1 to 100 MJ/kg. Optimum expansion from the higher density state requires larger expansion ratios, 8 to 32. Expansion of laser ablated Delrin propellant appears to convert the absorbed laser energy more efficiently to jet kinetic energy because the effective density of the ablated gaseous Delrin is significantly greater than that of STP air.

  9. Factor Scores, Structure Coefficients, and Communality Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Fara

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents heuristic explanations of factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Common misconceptions regarding these topics are clarified. In addition, (a) the regression (b) Bartlett, (c) Anderson-Rubin, and (d) Thompson methods for calculating factor scores are reviewed. Syntax necessary to execute all four…

  10. Effect of internal pressure and gas/liquid interface area on the CO mass transfer coefficient using hollow fibre membranes as a high mass transfer gas diffusing system for microbial syngas fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Muhammad; Park, Shinyoung; Jeong, Yeseul; Lee, Eun Yeol; Lee, Jinwon; Chang, In Seop

    2014-10-01

    This study proposed a submerged hollow fibre membrane bioreactor (HFMBR) system capable of achieving high carbon monoxide (CO) mass transfer for applications in microbial synthesis gas conversion systems. Hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane fibres were used to fabricate a membrane module, which was used for pressurising CO in water phase. Pressure through the hollow fibre lumen (P) and membrane surface area per unit working volume of the liquid (A(S)/V(L)) were used as controllable parameters to determine gas-liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a) values. We found a k(L)a of 135.72 h(-1) when P was 93.76 kPa and AS/VL was fixed at 27.5m(-1). A higher k(L)a of 155.16 h(-1) was achieved by increasing AS/VL to 62.5m(-1) at a lower P of 37.23 kPa. Practicality of HFMBR to support microbial growth and organic product formation was assessed by CO/CO2 fermentation using Eubacterium limosum KIST612.

  11. Metric Conversion

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-12

    ... 1,000,000 1,000,000 micrometers nano- 1,000,000,000 1,000,000,000 nanometers ... conversions, see the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publications: NIST Guide to SI Units: ...

  12. Conversation Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiffrin, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the current state of research in conversation analysis, referring primarily to six different perspectives that have developed from the philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and linguistics disciplines. These include pragmatics; speech act theory; interactional sociolinguistics; ethnomethodology; ethnography of communication; and…

  13. Recirculation in multiple wave conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A. N.; Brizard, A.J.; Kaufman, A.N.; Tracy, E.R.

    2008-07-30

    A one-dimensional multiple wave-conversion model is constructed that allows energy recirculation in ray phase space. Using a modular eikonal approach, the connection coefficients for this model are calculated by ray phase-space methods. Analytical results (confirmed numerically) show that all connection coefficients exhibit interference effects that depend on an interference phase, calculated from the coupling constants and the area enclosed by the intersecting rays. This conceptual model, which focuses on the topology of intersecting rays in phase space, is used to investigate how mode conversion between primary and secondary waves is modified by the presence of a tertiary wave.

  14. Preliminary Neutronic Study of D2O-cooled High Conversion PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a preliminary neutronics analysis of tight-pitch D2O-cooled high-conversion PWRs loaded with MOX fuel aiming at high Pu conversion and negative void coefficient. SCALE6.1 has been exclusively utilized for this study. The analyses are performed in two separate parts. The first part of this paper investigates the performance of axial and internal blankets and seeks break-even or near-breeder core even without the presence of radial blankets. The second part of this paper performs sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of integral parameters (keff and void coefficient) for selected systems in order to analyze the characters of this high-conversion PWR from different aspects.

  15. EDITORIAL: The 7th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnologies for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebling, C.; Woias, P.

    2008-10-01

    This special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (JMM) contains a selection of papers from the 7th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnologies for Power Generation and Energy Conversion (PowerMEMS 2007). The workshop was held in Freiburg, Germany on 27-29 November 2007 under the joint organization of the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (FhG-ISE), Freiburg and the Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK) of the Albert-Ludwig-University of Freiburg. PowerMEMS 2007 continues a series of workshops initiated in 2000 in Japan to create an annual discussion forum in the emerging field of micro energy technology. With a single exception in 2001, the workshop has continued as an annual meeting ever since, with a continuous increase in the number of presentations and participants. The program of PowerMEMS 2007 was composed of 2 invited talks, 25 oral talks and 61 poster presentations. From these 88 presentations 16 have been selected for this special issue. It was at the end of 1959 when the Caltech physicist Richard Feynman gave his famous lecture entitled 'There Is Plenty of Room at the Bottom' in which he discussed the possibilities of miniaturization for both storage capacity ('Encyclopaedia Britannica on the head of a pin') as well as micro machining ('rearranging the atoms'), although there were absolutely no technological possibilities in sight for an adequate realization of such ideas. Now, nearly 50 years later, we not only have incredible knowledge about the nanoworld, but even more we are now able to generate microelectromechanical devices which, next to their electronic properties, can integrate physical and analytical functions. Today, Feynman might easily have added a second lecture entitled 'There is Plenty of Energy at the Bottom'. Micro energy technology has seen a tremendous rise in MEMS and material sciences and is regarded today as one of their hot topics. Also, there are more and more companies in this

  16. Coefficient Alpha and Reliability of Scale Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almehrizi, Rashid S.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of large-scale assessments develop various score scales that are either linear or nonlinear transformations of raw scores for better interpretations and uses of assessment results. The current formula for coefficient alpha (a; the commonly used reliability coefficient) only provides internal consistency reliability estimates of raw…

  17. Coefficient Alpha and Reliability of Scale Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almehrizi, Rashid S.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of large-scale assessments develop various score scales that are either linear or nonlinear transformations of raw scores for better interpretations and uses of assessment results. The current formula for coefficient alpha (a; the commonly used reliability coefficient) only provides internal consistency reliability estimates of raw…

  18. A Method for Maximizing Split-Half Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callender, John C.; Osburn, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for maximizing split-half reliability coefficients is described. Coefficients derived by the algorithm were found to be generally larger than odd-even split-half coefficients or other internal consistency measures and nearly as large as the largest split half coefficients. MSPLIT, Odd-Even, and Kuder-Richardson-20…

  19. Conversational Telugu.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beinstein, Judith; And Others

    The purpose of this text is to develop elementary conversational skills in Telugu. The language materials consist of four types of language learning activities. The first, and most predominant, is the unit microwave cycle. These cycles divide the learning process into two basic phases, the first of which involves mimicry, memorization, and…

  20. Conversational Tamil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beinstein, Judith; And Others

    The purpose of this text is to develop conversational skills in Tamil. It is to be used as a review of what has been learned in class and not as a teaching device. The language materials consist of four types of language learning activities. The unit microwave cycle divides the learning process into two basic phases. The first phase involves…

  1. Measurement of γ and conversion electron spectra following the decay of 125Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainath, M.; Venkataramaniah, K.; Sood, P. C.

    1998-12-01

    Relative intensities of γ rays and conversion electron lines in the decay of 125Sb are measured precisely using an HPGe detector and a miniorange electron spectrometer. These data are used to derive the K- and L-shell internal conversion coefficients and to deduce the multipolarities of the respective transitions. A revised level scheme is presented for 125Te incorporating 37 transitions between 13 energy levels up to an excitation energy of 675 keV. The newly established levels at 538 and 653 keV complete the hextuplet corresponding to the (s1/2⊗2+) and (d3/2⊗2+) phonon-coupled configurations.

  2. Conversational sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  3. Conversational sensemaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Alun; Webberley, Will; Braines, Dave

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in natural language question-answering systems and context-aware mobile apps create opportunities for improved sensemaking in a tactical setting. Users equipped with mobile devices act as both sensors (able to acquire information) and effectors (able to act in situ), operating alone or in collectives. The currently- dominant technical approaches follow either a pull model (e.g. Apple's Siri or IBM's Watson which respond to users' natural language queries) or a push model (e.g. Google's Now which sends notifications to a user based on their context). There is growing recognition that users need more flexible styles of conversational interaction, where they are able to freely ask or tell, be asked or told, seek explanations and clarifications. Ideally such conversations should involve a mix of human and machine agents, able to collaborate in collective sensemaking activities with as few barriers as possible. Desirable capabilities include adding new knowledge, collaboratively building models, invoking specific services, and drawing inferences. As a step towards this goal, we collect evidence from a number of recent pilot studies including natural experiments (e.g. situation awareness in the context of organised protests) and synthetic experiments (e.g. human and machine agents collaborating in information seeking and spot reporting). We identify some principles and areas of future research for "conversational sensemaking".

  4. Application of vibrational correlation formalism to internal conversion rate: Case study of Cu{sub n} (n = 3, 6, and 9) and H{sub 2}/Cu{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Chiodo, Sandro Giuseppe; Mineva, Tzonka

    2015-03-21

    This work reports non-radiative internal conversion (IC) rate constants obtained for Cu{sub n} with n = 3, 6, and 9 and H{sub 2} on Cu{sub 3}. The Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) method was employed with three different functionals in order to investigate the electronic structures and the absorption spectra. The performance of the generalized gradient approximation of Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (PBE) and the hybrid B3LYP and PBE0 exchange correlation functionals in combination with the SVP and the def2-TZVP basis sets was examined. TDDFT results were used as input data to compute internal conversion rate constants. For this purpose, we have developed a program package. A description of the theoretical background used in our numerical implementation and the program input file is presented. In view of future applications of this program package in photoinduced catalysis, we present the analysis of the IC rate processes for the photodissociation of H{sub 2} on Cu{sub 3}. These results showed the applicability of the method and the computational program to identify the vibrational modes in transition metal clusters giving rise to the largest IC rate constant due to their interactions with the excited electronic states occurring in the hot-electron induced dissociation phenomena.

  5. Modified Biserial Correlation Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, Helena Chmura

    1981-01-01

    Asymptotic distribution theory of Brogden's form of biserial correlation coefficient is derived and large sample estimates of its standard error obtained. Its relative efficiency to the biserial correlation coefficient is examined. Recommendations for choice of estimator of biserial correlation are presented. (Author/JKS)

  6. Livingston's Reliability Coefficient and Harris' Index of Efficiency: An Empirical Study of the Two Reliability Coefficients For Criterion-Referenced Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rim, Eui-Do; Bresler, Samuel

    Livingston's reliability coefficients and Harris' indices of efficiency were computed along with the classical internal consistency coefficients, KR-20's (Kuder-Richardson internal consistency coefficient), for 678 criterion-referenced tests in the A through E levels of an individualized mathematics program. The coefficients were carefully studied…

  7. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 10th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2010) Selected papers from the 10th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaerts, Dominiek; Vullers, Ruud

    2011-10-01

    This special section of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering features papers selected from the 10th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2010). The workshop was organized in Leuven, Belgium from 30 November to 3 December 2010 by Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and the imec/Holst Centre. This was a special PowerMEMS Workshop, for several reasons. First of all, we celebrated the 10th anniversary of the workshop: the first PowerMEMS meeting was organized in Sendai, Japan in 2000. None of the organizers or participants of this first meeting could have predicted the impact of the workshop over the next decade. The second reason was that, for the first time, the conference organization spanned two countries: Belgium and the Netherlands. Thanks to the advances in information technology, teams from Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium) and the imec/Holst Centre in Eindhoven (the Netherlands) have been able to work together seamlessly as one team. The objective of the PowerMEMS Workshop is to stimulate innovation in micro and nanotechnology for power generation and energy conversion applications. Its scope ranges from integrated microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for power generation, dissipation, harvesting, and management, to novel nanostructures and materials for energy-related applications. True to the objective of the PowerMEMSWorkshop, the 2010 technical program covered a broad range of energy related research, ranging from the nanometer to the millimeter scale, discussed in 5 invited and 52 oral presentations, and 112 posters. This special section includes 14 papers covering vibration energy harvesters, thermal applications and micro power systems. Finally, we wish to express sincere appreciation to the members of the International Steering Committee, the Technical Program Committee and last but not least the Local Organizing Committee. This special issue was edited in

  8. Defining the coupling coefficient for electrodynamic transducers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuo; Arnold, David P

    2013-11-01

    This paper provides a simple, practical definition of the coupling coefficient for electrodynamic transducers. Comparing to efforts made in previous works that assumed a lossless spring-inductor model, the definition presented here is based on a lossy mass-inductor model. Time-harmonic analysis is used to model the energy flow in the transducer. Both energy storage and energy dissipation are included in the electrodynamic coupling coefficient definition. An in-depth discussion is provided to explain and justify the derivation and overall methodology. This definition is expected to provide a useful and practical measure of the electromechanical energy conversion performance of electrodynamic transducers, both actuators and generators.

  9. Intercultural Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slapac, Alina; Kim, Sujin

    2014-01-01

    Building a culturally responsive learning community begins with global awareness and cultural responsiveness. Preservice and PreK-12 practicing teachers can use the interactive questions showcased here to enhance their intercultural competence by drawing on the knowledge, skills, and experiences of international faculty and colleagues.

  10. Intercultural Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slapac, Alina; Kim, Sujin

    2014-01-01

    Building a culturally responsive learning community begins with global awareness and cultural responsiveness. Preservice and PreK-12 practicing teachers can use the interactive questions showcased here to enhance their intercultural competence by drawing on the knowledge, skills, and experiences of international faculty and colleagues.

  11. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  12. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E; Poole, L; Cherdak, A; Houghton, W

    1980-05-15

    An instrument has been developed that directly measures the multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. The design incorporates methods for compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in background light level. When used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  13. More on the catalysis of internal conversion in chlorophyll a by an adjacent carotenoid in light-harvesting complex (Chl a/ b LHCII) of higher plants: time-resolved triplet-minus-singlet spectra of detergent-perturbed complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, K. Razi; Jávorfi, Tamás; Melø, T. B.; Garab, Gyözö

    1998-12-01

    Wavelength-selective photo-excitation of samples containing a detergent and LHCII (the main light-harvesting complex pertaining to photosystem II of green plants) is used for recording time-resolved triplet-minus-singlet (TmS) difference spectra, with a view to probing interactions between chlorophyll a (Chl a) and chlorophyll b (Chl b), and between Chl a and lutein (Lut). Once the detergent concentration ( CD) exceeds a threshold, C©, the TmS spectrum becomes sensitive to λ⊗, the wavelength of excitation, and to t, the delay between excitation and observation. Each increment in CD brings about a diminution in the efficiency of a†→ x† transfer (triplet-triplet transfer from Chl a to Lut) and a rise in both the triplet formation yield and the fluorescence yield of Chl a. What is more, b*→ a* transfer (singlet-singlet transfer from Chl b to Chl a) slackens to such an extent that Chl b*→Chl b† intersystem crossing, negligible when CD is below C©, begins to vie with transfer, for the deactivation of Chl b* (in the foregoing an asterisk/dagger denotes singlet/triplet excitation). The reduction in the efficiencies of the two transfers is easily understood by: (i) invoking the Kühlbrandt-Wang-Fujiyoshi model of LHCII, which posits each Chl b in contact with a Chl a and each Chl a in contact with a Lut, and (ii) assuming that the detergent severs contact between adjacent chromophores. That a growth in the triplet yield of Chl a* accompanies the detergent-induced decrease in the efficiency of a†→ x† transfer becomes intelligible if one assumes, further, that internal conversion in Chla* is faster than that in overlineChla * , where under or over lining betokens the presence or absence of a carotenoid neighbour. When CD is close to C©, most Chl a molecules are adjacent to a Lut, internal conversion dominates, and the overall triplet yield is low. As CD is gradually raised the Chla → overlineChla transformation sets in, causing concomitant drops in

  14. Factors Affecting Coefficient Alpha: A Mini Monte Carlo Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Brian M.

    Factors affecting a lower-bound estimate of internal consistency reliability, Cronbach's coefficient alpha, are explored. Theoretically, coefficient alpha is an estimate of the correlation between two tests drawn at random from a pool of items like the items in the test under consideration. As a practical matter, coefficient alpha can be an index…

  15. Monitoring on internal temperature of composite insulator with embedding fiber Bragg grating for early diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Tang, Ming

    2017-04-01

    The abnormal temperature rise is the precursor of the defective composite insulator in power transmission line. However no consolidated techniques or methodologies can on line monitor its internal temperature now. Thus a new method using embedding fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rod is adopted to monitor its internal temperature. To correctly demodulate the internal temperature of FRP rod from the Bragg wavelength shift of FBG, the conversion coefficient between them is deduced theoretically based on comprehensive investigation on the thermal stresses of the metal-composite joint, as well as its material and structural properties. Theoretical model shows that the conversion coefficients of FBG embedded in different positions will be different because of non-uniform thermal stress distribution, which is verified by an experiment. This work lays the theoretical foundation of monitoring the internal temperature of composite insulator with embedding FBG, which is of great importance to its health structural monitoring, especially early diagnosis.

  16. JKTLD: Limb darkening coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, John

    2015-11-01

    JKTLD outputs theoretically-calculated limb darkening (LD) strengths for equations (LD laws) which predict the amount of LD as a function of the part of the star being observed. The coefficients of these laws are obtained by bilinear interpolation (in effective temperature and surface gravity) in published tables of coefficients calculated from stellar model atmospheres by several researchers. Many observations of stars require the strength of limb darkening (LD) to be estimated, which can be done using theoretical models of stellar atmospheres; JKTLD can help in these circumstances.

  17. Measuring Seebeck Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement apparatus and method with various features to minimize typical sources of errors is described. Common sources of temperature and voltage measurement errors which may impact accurate measurement are identified and reduced. Applying the identified principles, a high temperature Seebeck measurement apparatus and method employing a uniaxial, four-point geometry is described to operate from room temperature up to 1300K. These techniques for non-destructive Seebeck coefficient measurements are simple to operate, and are suitable for bulk samples with a broad range of physical types and shapes.

  18. Effectiveness Factors and Conversion in a Biocatalytic Membrane Reactor.

    PubMed

    Godongwana, Buntu

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions of the effectiveness factor of a biocatalytic membrane reactor, and its asymptote as the Thiele modulus becomes large, are presented. The evaluation of the effectiveness factor is based on the solution of the governing equations for solute transport in the two regions of the reactor, i.e. the lumen and the matrix (with the biofilm immobilized in the matrix). The lumen solution accounts for both axial diffusion and radial convective flow, while the matrix solution is based on Robin-type boundary conditions. The effectiveness factor is shown to be a function of the Thiele modulus, the partition coefficient, the Sherwood number, the Peclet number, and membrane thickness. Three regions of Thiele moduli are defined in the effectiveness factor graphs. These correspond with reaction rate limited, internal-diffusion limited, and external mass transfer limited solute transport. Radial convective flows were shown to only improve the effectiveness factor in the region of internal diffusion limitation. The assumption of first order kinetics is shown to be applicable only in the Thiele modulus regions of internal and external mass transfer limitation. An iteration scheme is also presented for estimating the effectiveness factor when the solute fractional conversion is known. The model is validated with experimental data from a membrane gradostat reactor immobilised with Phanerochaete chrysosporium for the production of lignin and manganese peroxidases. The developed model and experimental data allow for the determination of the Thiele modulus at which the effectiveness factor and fractional conversion are optimal.

  19. Effectiveness Factors and Conversion in a Biocatalytic Membrane Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Godongwana, Buntu

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions of the effectiveness factor of a biocatalytic membrane reactor, and its asymptote as the Thiele modulus becomes large, are presented. The evaluation of the effectiveness factor is based on the solution of the governing equations for solute transport in the two regions of the reactor, i.e. the lumen and the matrix (with the biofilm immobilized in the matrix). The lumen solution accounts for both axial diffusion and radial convective flow, while the matrix solution is based on Robin-type boundary conditions. The effectiveness factor is shown to be a function of the Thiele modulus, the partition coefficient, the Sherwood number, the Peclet number, and membrane thickness. Three regions of Thiele moduli are defined in the effectiveness factor graphs. These correspond with reaction rate limited, internal-diffusion limited, and external mass transfer limited solute transport. Radial convective flows were shown to only improve the effectiveness factor in the region of internal diffusion limitation. The assumption of first order kinetics is shown to be applicable only in the Thiele modulus regions of internal and external mass transfer limitation. An iteration scheme is also presented for estimating the effectiveness factor when the solute fractional conversion is known. The model is validated with experimental data from a membrane gradostat reactor immobilised with Phanerochaete chrysosporium for the production of lignin and manganese peroxidases. The developed model and experimental data allow for the determination of the Thiele modulus at which the effectiveness factor and fractional conversion are optimal. PMID:27104954

  20. Workplace conversations: building and maintaining collaborative capital.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Glenda; Vickers, Margaret H; Mohan, Shantala; Wilkes, Lesley; Jackson, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Heavy, pressured workloads are a feature of health workplaces internationally, presenting challenges to communication and contributing to tension and negative emotions. This paper explores supportive and unsupportive workplace conversations between nurses and midwives and their colleagues. The findings focus on qualitative interviews of ten nurses and midwives that were audio-taped and analysed for perceptions about the role of workplace conversations. Conversations between colleagues were significant for building and maintaining collaborative capital, but unsupportive conversations also threatened it. Findings suggest the need for considering the impact of co-worker conversations on workplace culture. Nurse managers and management may play a pivotal role in establishing and maintaining supportive conversations. Recognising the role and potential of workplace conversations for building capacities for support, conflict resolution, job satisfaction and the personal resilience of nurses and midwives can raise the collaborative capital of the workplace.

  1. Cupola Corner 1 - Conversation With Chris Ferguson

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Atlantis Commander Chris Ferguson joined Expedition 28 Flight Engineer Ron Garan in the International Space Station cupola for some conversation about the space shuttle, and how the astronauts can ...

  2. Excited-state dynamics of trans,trans-1,3,5,7-octatetraene: estimation of decay rate constants of 1(1)B(u) ⇝ 2(1)A(g) and 2(1)A(g) ⇝ 1(1)A(g) internal conversions.

    PubMed

    Islampour, Reza; Miralinaghi, Mahsasadat; Khavaninzadeh, Azam

    2011-08-18

    The general expressions we previously derived for calculating internal conversion rate constants between two adiabatic displaced-distorted-rotated potential energy surfaces, by including all vibratinal modes, are applied to estimate the decay rate constants of 1(1)B(u) ⇝ 2(1)A(g) and 2(1)A(g) ⇝ 1(1)A(g) internal conversions in trans,trans-1,3,5,7-octatetraene molecule. The minimal models with respect to the number and types of vibrational modes are determined for these processes. Our calculations show that in the low temperature limit the 1(1)B(u) ⇝ 2(1)A(g) internal conversion takes place on a 232-290 fs time scale in the condensed phase and 2 ps in the gas phase, whereas 2(1)A(g) ⇝ 1(1)A(g) internal conversion takes place on a 2 μs time scale under the isolated conditions. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Cherdak, A.; Poole, L.; Houghton, W.

    1980-05-01

    The paper presents an instrument that directly measures multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. Attention is given to the design, which is shown to incorporate methods for the compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in the background light level. In addition, when used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Finally, it is reported that systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  4. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E.; Cherdak, A.; Poole, L.; Houghton, W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents an instrument that directly measures multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. Attention is given to the design, which is shown to incorporate methods for the compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in the background light level. In addition, when used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Finally, it is reported that systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  5. Internal electron conversion of the isomeric {sup 57}Fe nucleus state with an energy of 14.4 keV excited by the radiation of the plasma of a high-power femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Golovin, G V; Savel'ev-Trofimov, Andrei B; Uryupina, D S; Volkov, Roman V

    2011-03-31

    We recorded the spectrum of delayed secondary electrons ejected from the target, which was coated with a layer of iron enriched with the {sup 57}Fe isotope to 98%, under its irradiation by fluxes of broadband X-ray radiation and fast electrons from the plasma produced by a femtosecond laser pulse at an intensity of 10{sup 17} W cm{sup -2}. Maxima were identified at energies of 5.6, 7.2, and 13.6 keV in the spectrum obtained for a delay of 90 - 120 ns. The two last-listed maxima owe their origin to the internal electron conversion of the isomeric level with an energy of 14.4 keV and a lifetime of 98 ns to the K and L shells of atomic iron, respectively; the first-named level arises from a cascade K - L{sub 2}L{sub 3} Auger process. Photoexcitaion by the X-ray plasma radiation is shown to be the principal channel of the isomeric level excitation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  6. Manufacturing sector carbon dioxide emissions in nine OECD countries 1973--87: A Divisia index decomposition to changes in fuel mix, emission coefficients, industry structure, energy intensities, and international structure

    SciTech Connect

    Torvanger, A. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper the reduction in energy-related manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions for nine OECD countries in the period 1973 to 1987 is analyzed. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from energy use data. The emphasis is on carbon dioxide intensities, defined as emissions divided by value added. The overall manufacturing carbon dioxide intensity for the nine OECD countries was reduced by 42% in the period 1973--1987. Five fuels are specified together with six subsectors of manufacturing. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from fossil fuel consumption, employing emissions coefficients for gas, oil and solids. In addition, electricity consumption is specified. For electricity use an emission coefficient index is calculated from the shares of fossil fuels, nuclear power and hydro power used to generate electricity, and the efficiency in electricity generation from these energy sources. A Divisia index approach is used to sort out the contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity from different components. The major finding is that the main contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity is from the general reduction in manufacturing energy intensity, most likely driven by economic growth and increased energy prices, giving incentives to invest in new technology and new industrial processes. There is also a significant contribution from reduced production in the most carbon dioxide intensive subsectors, and a contribution from higher efficiency in electricity generation together with a larger nuclear power share at the expense of oil. 19 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Pashto Conversation Manual and Pashto Conversation Tapescript.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tegey, Habibullah; Robson, Barbara

    This conversation manual and tapescript are part of a set of materials that have been developed to teach oral and written Afghan Pashto to English speakers. In addition to the conversation manual and tapescript, the set consists of a beginning textbook, an intermediate textbook, a reader, and a set of taped lessons that correlate with the…

  8. Selected papers from the 12th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2012) (Atlanta, GA, USA, 2-5 December 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Mark G.; Lang, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    Welcome to this special section of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (JMM). This section, co-edited by myself and by Professor Jeffrey Lang of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, contains expanded versions of selected papers presented at the Power MEMS meeting held in Atlanta, GA, USA, in December of 2012. Professor Lang and I had the privilege of co-chairing Power MEMS 2012, the 12th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications. The scope of the PowerMEMS series of workshops ranges from basic principles, to materials and fabrication, to devices and systems, to applications. The many applications of power MEMS (microelectromehcanical systems) range from MEMS-enabled energy harvesting, storage, conversion and conditioning, to integrated systems that manage these processes. Why is the power MEMS field growing in importance? Smaller-scale power and power supplies (microwatts to tens of watts) are gaining in prominence due to many factors, including the ubiquity of low power portable electronic equipment and the proliferation of wireless sensor nodes that require extraction of energy from their embedding environment in order to function. MEMS manufacturing methods can be utilized to improve the performance of traditional power supply elements, such as allowing batteries to charge faster or shrinking the physical size of passive elements in small-scale power supplies. MEMS technologies can be used to fabricate energy harvesters that extract energy from an embedding environment to power wireless sensor nodes, in-body medical implants and other devices, in which the harvesters are on the small scales that are appropriately matched to the overall size of these microsystems. MEMS can enable the manufacturing of energy storage elements from nontraditional materials by bringing appropriate structure and surface morphology to these materials as well as fabricating the electrical interfaces

  9. 26 CFR 1.1001-5 - European Monetary Union (conversion to the euro).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false European Monetary Union (conversion to the euro). 1.1001-5 Section 1.1001-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Gain Or Loss § 1.1001-5 European Monetary Union (conversion to the euro). (a) Conversion of currencies...

  10. 26 CFR 1.1001-5 - European Monetary Union (conversion to the euro).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false European Monetary Union (conversion to the euro). 1.1001-5 Section 1.1001-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Gain Or Loss § 1.1001-5 European Monetary Union (conversion to the euro). (a) Conversion of...

  11. 26 CFR 1.1001-5 - European Monetary Union (conversion to the euro).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false European Monetary Union (conversion to the euro). 1.1001-5 Section 1.1001-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Gain Or Loss § 1.1001-5 European Monetary Union (conversion to the euro). (a) Conversion of...

  12. 26 CFR 1.1001-5 - European Monetary Union (conversion to the euro).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false European Monetary Union (conversion to the euro). 1.1001-5 Section 1.1001-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Gain Or Loss § 1.1001-5 European Monetary Union (conversion to the euro). (a) Conversion of...

  13. Thermal Energy Conversion Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielozer, Matthew C.; Schreiber, Jeffrey, G.; Wilson, Scott D.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermal Energy Conversion Branch (5490) leads the way in designing, conducting, and implementing research for the newest thermal systems used in space applications at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Specifically some of the most advanced technologies developed in this branch can be broken down into four main areas: Dynamic Power Systems, Primary Solar Concentrators, Secondary Solar Concentrators, and Thermal Management. Work was performed in the Dynamic Power Systems area, specifically the Stirling Engine subdivision. Today, the main focus of the 5490 branch is free-piston Stirling cycle converters, Brayton cycle nuclear reactors, and heat rejection systems for long duration mission spacecraft. All space exploring devices need electricity to operate. In most space applications, heat energy from radioisotopes is converted to electrical power. The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) already supplies electricity for missions such as the Cassini Spacecraft. The focus of today's Stirling research at GRC is aimed at creating an engine that can replace the RTG. The primary appeal of the Stirling engine is its high system efficiency. Because it is so efficient, the Stirling engine will significantly reduce the plutonium fuel mission requirements compared to the RTG. Stirling is also being considered for missions such as the lunar/Mars bases and rovers. This project has focused largely on Stirling Engines of all types, particularly the fluidyne liquid piston engine. The fluidyne was developed by Colin D. West. This engine uses the same concepts found in any type of Stirling engine, with the exception of missing mechanical components. All the working components are fluid. One goal was to develop and demonstrate a working Stirling Fluidyne Engine at the 2nd Annual International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference in Providence, Rhode Island.

  14. Direct Conversion of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corliss, William R.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Direct energy conversion involves energy transformation without moving parts. The concepts of direct and dynamic energy conversion plus the laws governing energy conversion are investigated. Among the topics…

  15. Learning through Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Patricia R.; Klein, Adria F.; Pinnell, Gay Su

    1996-01-01

    Through teacher-child conversation, experts use oral language to help novices take on more complex tasks; and Reading Recovery children, who are obviously having difficulty with school-based learning, are especially in need of significant conversations with adults. Reading and writing processes are supported through conversation with Reading…

  16. Threshold intensity and coefficient of raman scattering amplification in a high- Q bilayer microresonator during the formation of internal and external submicron photonic jets: A photonic nanojet in the near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, M. V.; Solis, N. W.; Peretyagin, P. Yu.; Okun'kova, A. A.; Torrecillas, R.

    2016-04-01

    Using quantum and semiclassical approaches, the energy excitation threshold for induced Raman scattering is estimated and a relationship between the excitation threshold and the concentration of optically active molecules in a bilayer microresonator is established. Estimates are made during the formation of specially configured optical fields: internal and external photonic nanojets. Based on the amount of stored energy per mode and the value of the threshold intensity, an additional generalized selection rule for whispering gallery modes is suggested. It is shown that the bilayer microresonator can focus incident radiation (laser pumping) into a submicron focal volume at a low threshold intensity.

  17. Development and application of a complex numerical model and software for the computation of dose conversion factors for radon progenies.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Árpád; Balásházy, Imre

    2015-04-01

    A more exact determination of dose conversion factors associated with radon progeny inhalation was possible due to the advancements in epidemiological health risk estimates in the last years. The enhancement of computational power and the development of numerical techniques allow computing dose conversion factors with increasing reliability. The objective of this study was to develop an integrated model and software based on a self-developed airway deposition code, an own bronchial dosimetry model and the computational methods accepted by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to calculate dose conversion coefficients for different exposure conditions. The model was tested by its application for exposure and breathing conditions characteristic of mines and homes. The dose conversion factors were 8 and 16 mSv WLM(-1) for homes and mines when applying a stochastic deposition model combined with the ICRP dosimetry model (named PM-A model), and 9 and 17 mSv WLM(-1) when applying the same deposition model combined with authors' bronchial dosimetry model and the ICRP bronchiolar and alveolar-interstitial dosimetry model (called PM-B model). User friendly software for the computation of dose conversion factors has also been developed. The software allows one to compute conversion factors for a large range of exposure and breathing parameters and to perform sensitivity analyses.

  18. Cascaded wavelength conversion as favorable application of nonlinear optical polymers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Su; Ju, Jung Jin; Park, Seung Koo; Do, Jung Yun; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2008-06-23

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) polymers have been considered promising materials for wavelength conversion at a low pump power. However, they have not been readily adopted to practical applications due to their high absorption coefficients, especially at a shorter interacting wavelength. Our theoretical analysis proves that the influence of absorption coefficients can be mitigated significantly in cascaded wavelength conversion (CWC) processes. According to our example study, maximum conversion efficiencies for CWC can compare even with those for second-harmonic generation in many NLO polymers. Thus CWC can become a pertinent application of NLO polymers. However, to obtain such efficient CWC, several realistic problems should be resolved in practical devices.

  19. Iterated multidimensional wave conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Brizard, A. J.; Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D.; Kaufman, A. N.; Richardson, A. S.; Zobin, N.

    2011-12-23

    Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

  20. NGL data conversion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Masahiro; Horiuchi, Nobuyasu

    2005-06-01

    We are developing a NGL data conversion system for EPL, for LEEPL, and for EBDW, which is based on our established photomask data conversion system, PATACON PC-cluster. For EPL data conversion, it has SF division, Complementary division, Stitching, Proximity effect correction, Alignment mark insertion, EB stepper control data creation, and Mask inspection data creation. For LEEPL data conversion, it has Pattern checking, Complementary division, Stitching, Stress distortion correction, Alignment mark insertion, and Mask inspection data creation. For EB direct-writing data conversion, it has Proximity effect correction and Extraction of aperture pattern for cell projection exposure.

  1. Quantum Frequency Conversion between Infrared and Ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rütz, Helge; Luo, Kai-Hong; Suche, Hubertus; Silberhorn, Christine

    2017-02-01

    We report on the implementation of quantum frequency conversion between infrared and ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths by using single-stage up-conversion in a periodically poled potassium-titanyl-phosphate waveguide. Because of the monolithic waveguide design, we manage to transfer a telecommunication-band input photon to the wavelength of the ionic dipole transition of Yb+ at 369.5 nm. The external (internal) conversion efficiency is around 5% (10%). The high-energy pump used in this converter introduces a spontaneous parametric down-conversion process, which is a cause for noise in the UV mode. Using this process, we show that the converter preserves nonclassical correlations in the up-conversion process, rendering this miniaturized interface a source for quantum states of light in the UV.

  2. Singlet internal conversion processes in the order of 1Bu+→3Ag-→1Bu-→2Ag-→1Ag- in all- trans-spheroidene and lycopene as revealed by subpicosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondonuwu, Ferdy S.; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Tamura, Hiroshi; Koyama, Yasushi

    2006-09-01

    Key Raman lines ascribable to the 1Bu+, 3Ag-, 1Bu- and 2Ag- states were identified in the subpicosecond time-resolved Raman spectra of spheroidene and lycopene having 10 and 11 conjugated double bonds, respectively. The sequential rise-and-decay of the key Raman lines showed the internal conversion processes of 1Bu+→3Ag-→1Bu-→2Ag-→1Ag- (ground). The time constant in each step of internal conversion reflects the energy gap between the relevant states that had been determined by measurement of resonance - Raman excitation profiles [K. Furuichi, T. Sashima, Y. Koyama, Chem. Phys. Lett. 356 (2002) 547].

  3. Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

    2011-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

  4. Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

    2011-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

  5. Thermionic Energy Conversion (TEC) topping thermoelectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Performance expectations for thermionic and thermoelectric energy conversion systems are reviewed. It is noted that internal radiation effects diminish thermoelectric figures of merit significantly at 1000 K and substantially at 2000 K; the effective thermal conductivity contribution of intrathermoelectric radiative dissipation increases with the third power of temperature. It is argued that a consideration of thermoelectric power generation with high temperature heat sources should include utilization of thermionic energy conversion (TEC) topping thermoelectrics. However TEC alone or TEC topping more efficient conversion systems like steam or gas turbines, combined cycles, or Stirling engines would be more desirable generally.

  6. Temperature dependence of mode conversion in warm, unmagnetized plasmas with a linear density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Dae Jung; Lee, Dong-Hun; Kim, Kihong

    2013-06-15

    We study theoretically the linear mode conversion between electromagnetic waves and Langmuir waves in warm, stratified, and unmagnetized plasmas, using a numerically precise calculation based on the invariant imbedding method. We verify that the principle of reciprocity for the forward and backward mode conversion coefficients holds precisely regardless of temperature. We also find that the temperature dependence of the mode conversion coefficient is substantially stronger than that previously reported. Depending on the wave frequency and the incident angle, the mode conversion coefficient is found to increase or decrease with the increase of temperature.

  7. Transfer having a coupling coefficient higher than its active material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, George A. (Inventor); Davis, Christopher L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A coupling coefficient is a measure of the effectiveness with which a shape-changing material (or a device employing such a material) converts the energy in an imposed signal to useful mechanical energy. Device coupling coefficients are properties of the device and, although related to the material coupling coefficients, are generally different from them. This invention describes a class of devices wherein the apparent coupling coefficient can, in principle, approach 1.0, corresponding to perfect electromechanical energy conversion. The key feature of this class of devices is the use of destabilizing mechanical pre-loads to counter inherent stiffness. The approach is illustrated for piezoelectric and thermoelectrically actuated devices. The invention provides a way to simultaneously increase both displacement and force, distinguishing it from alternatives such as motion amplification, and allows transducer designers to achieve substantial performance gains for actuator and sensor devices.

  8. Standardized Discriminant Coefficients: A Rejoinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Ralph O.; Cozad, James B.

    1993-01-01

    Although comments of D.J. Nordlund and R. Nagel are welcomed, their arguments are not sufficient to accept the recommendation of using total variance estimates to standardize canonical discriminant function coefficients. If standardized coefficients are used to help interpret a discriminant analysis, pooled within-group variance estimates should…

  9. Conversing with Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    I/NET, Inc., is making the dream of natural human-computer conversation a practical reality. Through a combination of advanced artificial intelligence research and practical software design, I/NET has taken the complexity out of developing advanced, natural language interfaces. Conversational capabilities like pronoun resolution, anaphora and ellipsis processing, and dialog management that were once available only in the laboratory can now be brought to any application with any speech recognition system using I/NET s conversational engine middleware.

  10. Cytoplasmic hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    al-Baldawi, N F; Abercrombie, R F

    1992-01-01

    The apparent cytoplasmic proton diffusion coefficient was measured using pH electrodes and samples of cytoplasm extracted from the giant neuron of a marine invertebrate. By suddenly changing the pH at one surface of the sample and recording the relaxation of pH within the sample, an apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7) was measured in the acidic or neutral range of pH (6.0-7.2). This value is approximately 5x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the mobile pH buffers (approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm2/s) and approximately 68x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the hydronium ion (93 x 10(-6) cm2/s). A mobile pH buffer (approximately 15% of the buffering power) and an immobile buffer (approximately 85% of the buffering power) could quantitatively account for the results at acidic or neutral pH. At alkaline pH (8.2-8.6), the apparent proton diffusion coefficient increased to 4.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7). This larger diffusion coefficient at alkaline pH could be explained quantitatively by the enhanced buffering power of the mobile amino acids. Under the conditions of these experiments, it is unlikely that hydroxide movement influences the apparent hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient. PMID:1617134

  11. Analysis of Linear Conversion to Two Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizard, Alain J.; Jaun, Andre; Kaufman, Allan N.; Tracy, Eugene R.

    2003-10-01

    Recent experimental observations [1] and computer simulations [2] show that, in a tokamak plasma with multispecies ions, an incident magnetosonic wave converts either to an ion-hybrid Bernstein wave or to an ion-cyclotron wave, depending on the location of the conversion region in the poloidal cross section. We present a cold-plasma model of simultaneous conversion to these two modes, and obtain explicit expressions for transmission and conversion coefficients. Our approach is based on phase-space analysis of multiple conversion [3], in two or four phase-space dimensions (i.e., one or two spatial dimensions).Our ray-tracing algorithm [4], for detection of conversion and for treatment of ray-splitting due to conversion, will be applied to this process. 1.E Nelson-Melby, M Porkolab, P T Bonoli, Y Lin, A Mazurenko, S J Wukitch, Phys Rev Lett 90 (2003) 155004 2.E F Jaeger, L A Berry, J R Myra, D B Batchelor, E D'Azevedo, P T Bonoli, C K Phillips, D N Smithe, D A D'Ippolito, M D Carter, R J Dumont, J C Wright, R W Harvey, Phys Rev Lett 90 (2003) 195001 3. Y-M Liang, J J Morehead, D R Cook, T Fla, A N Kaufman, Physics Letters A193 (1994) 82 4. E R Tracy, A N Kaufman, A Jaun, Physics Letters A290 (2001) 309

  12. Conversation et Television (Conversation and Television)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadde, Jean-Pierre

    1977-01-01

    Czechosovakian television has just presented a series of French Conversation Classes using audiovisual techniques and starring Czech actors and actresses. The setting of each dialog is in Czechoslovakia, and the situations are those in which a Czech would use French in his or her native land. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  13. Computational Seebeck Coefficient Measurement Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    We have employed finite element analysis to develop computational Seebeck coefficient metrology simulations. This approach enables a unique exploration of multiple probe arrangements and measurement techniques within the same temporal domain. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, we have performed these Seebeck coefficient measurement simulations to quantitatively explore perturbations to voltage and temperature correspondence, by comparing simultaneous and staggered data acquisition techniques under the quasi-steady-state condition. The results indicate significant distortions to the Seebeck coefficient and a strong dependence on the time delay, the acquisition sequence, and the probe arrangement. PMID:26900521

  14. Benzene risk estimation using radiation equivalent coefficients.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Aki; Isono, Tomomi; Kikuchi, Takuro; Ohnishi, Iichiro; Igarashi, Junichiro; Yoneda, Minoru; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2009-03-01

    We estimated benzene risk using a novel framework of risk assessment that employed the measurement of radiation dose equivalents to benzene metabolites and a PBPK model. The highest risks for 1 microg/m(3) and 3.2 mg/m(3) life time exposure of benzene estimated with a linear regression were 5.4 x 10(-7) and 1.3 x 10(-3), respectively. Even though these estimates were based on in vitro chromosome aberration test data, they were about one-sixth to one-fourteenth that from other studies and represent a fairly good estimate by using radiation equivalent coefficient as an "internal standard."

  15. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions. [in thermionic energy conversion and metallic fluid heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs), offering unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing by virtue of operating on working-fluid vaporization/condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures, share complex materials problems. Simplified equations are presented that verify and solve such problems, suggesting the possibility of cost-effective applications in the near term for TEC and MFHP devices. Among the problems discussed are: the limitation of alkali-metal corrosion, protection against hot external gases, external and internal vaporization, interfacial reactions and diffusion, expansion coefficient matching, and creep deformation.

  16. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions. [in thermionic energy conversion and metallic fluid heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs), offering unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing by virtue of operating on working-fluid vaporization/condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures, share complex materials problems. Simplified equations are presented that verify and solve such problems, suggesting the possibility of cost-effective applications in the near term for TEC and MFHP devices. Among the problems discussed are: the limitation of alkali-metal corrosion, protection against hot external gases, external and internal vaporization, interfacial reactions and diffusion, expansion coefficient matching, and creep deformation.

  17. International geomagnetic reference field 1965.0 in dipole coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, G. D.

    1970-01-01

    Computer program transforming spherical harmonic coefficients into arbitrarily tilted coordinate systems, tabulating coefficients of International Geomagnetic Reference Field 1965 in dipole coordinate system

  18. Conversations in Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardige, Betty; Segal, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    In this article, Bardige and Segal discuss how teachers can help a toddler's language and literacy development through conversation. They suggest an array of tactics, from asking young children open-ended, intellectually challenging questions to going beyond the here and now when carrying on a conversation. Research has shown that the practice of…

  19. Energy conversion alternatives study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shure, L. T.

    1979-01-01

    Comparison of coal based energy systems is given. Study identifies and compares various advanced energy conversion systems using coal or coal derived fuels for baselaoad electric power generation. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS) reports provede government, industry, and general public with technically consistent basis for comparison of system's options of interest for fossilfired electric-utility application.

  20. The Art of Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ervin-Tripp, Susan

    1984-01-01

    Criticizes Dorval and Eckerman (included in this issue) for their findings' lack of generality due to the artificial nature of the conversational groups studied. Also both age changes in the ability to plan large conversational units and the functions of particular kinds of turns within these larger units are left unexplored. (CB)

  1. Recording Conversations in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluckman, Ivan B.; Koerner, Thomas J., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In general, because of varying federal and state legislation and a paucity of court decisions, the law governing the recording of conversations is in considerable flux. School personnel desiring to record conversations in school without the consent or knowledge of all parties involved must proceed with considerable caution. (Author)

  2. Content for Conversation Partners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that a good strategy for helping English language learners to develop communicative competence in English is by pairing them with native English speakers. In such conversation programs, conversation partners should be provided with topics and activities that incorporate the goals, interests, and experiences of the learners. Recommends…

  3. The Conversation Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Acy L.

    2012-01-01

    The conversation class occupies a unique place in the process of learning English as a second or foreign language. From the author's own experience in conducting special conversation classes with Persian-speaking adults, he has drawn up a number of simple but important guidelines, some of which he hopes may provide helpful suggestions for the…

  4. NUCLEAR CONVERSION APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-09-13

    A nuclear conversion apparatus is described which comprises a body of neutron moderator, tubes extending therethrough, uranium in the tubes, a fluid- circulating system associated with the tubes, a thorium-containing fluid coolant in the system and tubes, and means for withdrawing the fluid from the system and replacing it in the system whereby thorium conversion products may be recovered.

  5. Functional constraints on phenomenological coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klika, Václav; Pavelka, Michal; Benziger, Jay B.

    2017-02-01

    Thermodynamic fluxes (diffusion fluxes, heat flux, etc.) are often proportional to thermodynamic forces (gradients of chemical potentials, temperature, etc.) via the matrix of phenomenological coefficients. Onsager's relations imply that the matrix is symmetric, which reduces the number of unknown coefficients is reduced. In this article we demonstrate that for a class of nonequilibrium thermodynamic models in addition to Onsager's relations the phenomenological coefficients must share the same functional dependence on the local thermodynamic state variables. Thermodynamic models and experimental data should be validated through consistency with the functional constraint. We present examples of coupled heat and mass transport (thermodiffusion) and coupled charge and mass transport (electro-osmotic drag). Additionally, these newly identified constraints further reduce the number of experiments needed to describe the phenomenological coefficient.

  6. Alpine radar conversion for LAWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, M.; Burlando, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) is a ship-born weather radar system operating in X-band developed by the DHI Group to detect precipitation in urban areas. To date more than thirty units are installed in different settings around the world. A LAWR was also deployed in the Alps, at 3883 m a.s.l. on the Kl. Matterhorn (Valais, Switzerland). This was the highest LAWR of the world and it led to the development of an Alpine LAWR system that, besides featuring important technological improvements needed to withstand the severe Alpine conditions, required the development of a new Alpine Radar COnversion Model (ARCOM), which is the main focus of this contribution. The LAWR system is equipped with the original FURUNO fan-beam slotted antenna and the original logarithmic receiver, which limits the radar observations to the video signal (L) withour providing the reflectivity (Z). The beam is 0.95 deg wide and 20 deg high. It can detect precipitation to a max range of 60 km. In order to account for the limited availability of raw signal and information and the specific mountain set-up, the conversion model had to be developed differently from the state-of-the-art radar conversion technique used for this class of radars. In particular, the ARCOM is based on a model used to simulate a spatial dependent factor, hereafter called ACF, which is in turn function of parameters that take in account climatological conditions, also used in other conversion methods, but additionally accounting for local radar beam features and for orographic forcings such as the effective sampling power (sP), which is modelled by means of antenna pattern, geometric ground clutter and their interaction. The result is a conversion factor formulated to account for a range correction that is based on the increase of the sampling volume, partial beam blocking and local climatological conditions. The importance of the latter in this study is double with respect to the standard conversion technique for this

  7. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  8. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  9. Coefficient alpha and interculture test selection.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Steven; Kishi, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The internal consistency reliability of a measure can be a focal point in an evaluation of the potential adequacy of an instrument for adaptation to another cultural setting. Cronbach's alpha (α) coefficient is often used as the statistical index for such a determination. However, alpha presumes a tau-equivalent test and may constitute an inaccurate population estimate for multidimensional tests. These notions are expanded and examined with a Japanese version of a questionnaire on nursing attitudes toward suicidal patients, originally constructed in Sweden using the English language. The English measure was reported to have acceptable internal consistency (α) albeit the dimensionality of the questionnaire was not addressed. The Japanese scale was found to lack tau-equivalence. An alternative to alpha, "composite reliability," was computed and found to be below acceptable standards in magnitude and precision. Implications for research application of the Japanese instrument are discussed.

  10. Translation of dose coefficients From ICRP 53 to ICRP 80.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Hanna M; Melanson, Mark A

    2013-02-01

    The effective dose coefficients tabulated in Publication 80 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the radiopharmaceuticals addressed earlier in ICRP Publication 53 are based on the tissue weighting factors of ICRP Publication 60. Presumably these values are derived from the tissue dose coefficients tabulated in Publication 53; however, no details regarding their derivation are provided. The tissue weighting factors of Publication 60 explicitly address tissue for which no dose coefficients were tabulated in Publication 53; for example, esophagus and a number of tissues comprising the remainder. In the absence of guidance, the authors have defined a set of rules for the translation and have undertaken an effort to derive the effective dose coefficients of Publication 80 starting with the organ/tissue dose coefficient of Publication 53.

  11. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Solar Thermal Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

    1982-11-01

    The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

  13. Predicting Abraham model solvent coefficients.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Jean-Claude; Abraham, Michael H; Acree, William E; Lang, Andrew Sid

    2015-01-01

    The Abraham general solvation model can be used in a broad set of scenarios involving partitioning and solubility, yet is limited to a set of solvents with measured Abraham coefficients. Here we extend the range of applicability of Abraham's model by creating open models that can be used to predict the solvent coefficients for all organic solvents. We created open random forest models for the solvent coefficients e, s, a, b, and v that had out-of-bag R(2) values of 0.31, 0.77, 0.92, 0.47, and 0.63 respectively. The models were used to suggest sustainable solvent replacements for commonly used solvents. For example, our models predict that propylene glycol may be used as a general sustainable solvent replacement for methanol. The solvent coefficient models extend the range of applicability of the Abraham general solvation equations to all organic solvents. The models were developed under Open Notebook Science conditions which makes them open, reproducible, and as useful as possible. Graphical AbstractChemical space for solvents with known Abraham coefficients.

  14. Thermocatalytic converter of solar energy to chemical energy with a high energy storage coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikeev, V. I.; Parmon, V. N.; Aristov, Iu. I.; Zheivot, V. I.; Kirillov, V. A.

    1986-08-01

    Experimental results are presented on the efficiency of the thermochemical conversion of solar energy in processes involving the conversion of saturated hydrocarbons. Three reactions were considered: (1) CH4 + CO2 yields 2H2 + 2CO; (2) CH4 + H2O yields 3H2 + CO; and (3) CnH2N + 2 + nH2O yields (2n + 1)H2 + nCO where (n = 3,4). The study has demonstrated the promise of the vapor conversion of saturated gaseous hydrocarbons to achieve thermochemical conversion of solar energy and has confirmed the feasibility of obtaining a high storage coefficient of chemical energy in this process.

  15. Orthogonality of spherical harmonic coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    Orthogonality relations are obtained for the spherical harmonic coefficients of functions defined on the surface of a sphere. Following a brief discussion of the orthogonality of Fourier series coefficients, consideration is given to the values averaged over all orientations of the coordinate system of the spherical harmonic coefficients of a function defined on the surface of a sphere that can be expressed in terms of Legendre polynomials for the special case where the function is the sum of two delta functions located at two different points on the sphere, and for the case of an essentially arbitrary function. It is noted that the orthogonality relations derived have found applications in statistical studies of the geomagnetic field.

  16. Orthogonality of spherical harmonic coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    Orthogonality relations are obtained for the spherical harmonic coefficients of functions defined on the surface of a sphere. Following a brief discussion of the orthogonality of Fourier series coefficients, consideration is given to the values averaged over all orientations of the coordinate system of the spherical harmonic coefficients of a function defined on the surface of a sphere that can be expressed in terms of Legendre polynomials for the special case where the function is the sum of two delta functions located at two different points on the sphere, and for the case of an essentially arbitrary function. It is noted that the orthogonality relations derived have found applications in statistical studies of the geomagnetic field.

  17. Responsive Teaching through Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dozier, Cheryl; Garnett, Susan; Tabatabai, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Conversations are the heart of responsive teaching. By talking with struggling learners, teachers can find out about their interests in order to design effective, personalized instruction; build relationships; work through complexities in teaching and learning; and celebrate successes.

  18. Photochemical Energy Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batschelet, William H.; George, Arnold

    1986-01-01

    Describes procedures for two demonstrations: (1) photochemical energy conversion using ferric oxalate actinometry and (2) liquification of gases using Freon 114. Safety precautions are given for both demonstrations, as are procedures and material specifications. (JM)

  19. Responsive Teaching through Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dozier, Cheryl; Garnett, Susan; Tabatabai, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Conversations are the heart of responsive teaching. By talking with struggling learners, teachers can find out about their interests in order to design effective, personalized instruction; build relationships; work through complexities in teaching and learning; and celebrate successes.

  20. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  1. Conversion of laser energy to gas kinetic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Techniques for the gas phase absorption of laser radiation for ultimate conversion to gas kinetic energy are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on absorption by the vibration rotation bands of diatomic molecules at high pressures. This high pressure absorption appears to offer efficient conversion of laser energy to gas translational energy. Bleaching and chemical effects are minimized and the variation of the total absorption coefficient with temperature is minimal.

  2. Study on High Conversion BWR with Island Type Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Takao Kondo; Takaaki Mochida; Junichi Yamashita

    2002-07-01

    High Conversion Boiling Water Reactor (HCBWR) has been studied as one of the next generation BWRs. HCBWR can be improved by the use of Island Type Fuel to have inherently negative void coefficient. The proposed reactor concept also has the sustainability to extend LWR's period by about 180 years, and the compatibility with conventional BWR system that only substitution of fuel bundles and control rods are required. As an example case, High Conversion ABWR-II was evaluated here. (authors)

  3. Seebeck coefficient of one electron

    SciTech Connect

    Durrani, Zahid A. K.

    2014-03-07

    The Seebeck coefficient of one electron, driven thermally into a semiconductor single-electron box, is investigated theoretically. With a finite temperature difference ΔT between the source and charging island, a single electron can charge the island in equilibrium, directly generating a Seebeck effect. Seebeck coefficients for small and finite ΔT are calculated and a thermally driven Coulomb staircase is predicted. Single-electron Seebeck oscillations occur with increasing ΔT, as one electron at a time charges the box. A method is proposed for experimental verification of these effects.

  4. Transport coefficients of gluonic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santosh K.; Alam, Jan-e

    2011-06-01

    The shear ({eta}) and bulk ({zeta}) viscous coefficients have been evaluated for a gluonic fluid. The elastic, gg{yields}gg and the inelastic, number nonconserving, gg{yields}ggg processes have been considered as the dominant perturbative processes in evaluating the viscous coefficients to entropy density (s) ratios. Recently the processes: gg{yields}ggg has been revisited and a correction to the widely used Gunion-Bertsch (GB) formula has been obtained. The {eta} and {zeta} have been evaluated for gluonic fluid with the formula recently derived. At large {alpha}{sub s} the value of {eta}/s approaches its lower bound, {approx}1/4{pi}.

  5. Conversational flow promotes solidarity.

    PubMed

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H

    2013-01-01

    Social interaction is fundamental to the development of various aspects of "we-ness". Previous research has focused on the role the content of interaction plays in establishing feelings of unity, belongingness and shared reality (a cluster of variables referred to as solidarity here). The present paper is less concerned with content, but focuses on the form of social interaction. We propose that the degree to which conversations flow smoothly or not is, of itself, a cue to solidarity. We test this hypothesis in samples of unacquainted and acquainted dyads who communicate via headsets. Conversational flow is disrupted by introducing a delay in the auditory feedback (vs. no delay). Results of three studies show that smoothly coordinated conversations (compared with disrupted conversations and a control condition) increase feelings of belonging and perceptions of group entitativity, independently of conversation content. These effects are driven by the subjective experience of conversational flow. Our data suggest that this process occurs largely beyond individuals' control. We conclude that the form of social interaction is a powerful cue for inferring group solidarity. Implications for the impact of modern communication technology on developing a shared social identity are discussed.

  6. Inverse problem of electro-seismic conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Yang, Yang

    2013-11-01

    When a porous rock is saturated with an electrolyte, electrical fields are coupled with seismic waves via the electro-seismic conversion. Pride (1994 Phys. Rev. B 50 15678-96) derived the governing models, in which Maxwell equations are coupled with Biot's equations through the electro-kinetic mobility parameter. The inverse problem of the linearized electro-seismic conversion consists in two steps, namely the inversion of Biot's equations and the inversion of Maxwell equations. We analyze the reconstruction of conductivity and electro-kinetic mobility parameter in Maxwell equations with internal measurements, while the internal measurements are provided by the results of the inversion of Biot's equations. We show that knowledge of two internal data based on well-chosen boundary conditions uniquely determines these two parameters. Moreover, a Lipschitz-type stability is proved based on the same sets of well-chosen boundary conditions.

  7. Integer Solutions of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    A good formula is like a good story, rich in description, powerful in communication, and eye-opening to readers. The formula presented in this article for determining the coefficients of the binomial expansion of (x + y)n is one such "good read." The beauty of this formula is in its simplicity--both describing a quantitative situation…

  8. Identities for generalized hypergeometric coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Biedenharn, L.C.; Louck, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Generalizations of hypergeometric functions to arbitrarily many symmetric variables are discussed, along with their associated hypergeometric coefficients, and the setting within which these generalizations arose. Identities generalizing the Euler identity for {sub 2}F{sub 1}, the Saalschuetz identity, and two generalizations of the {sub 4}F{sub 3} Bailey identity, among others, are given. 16 refs.

  9. Effective Viscosity Coefficient of Nanosuspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    Systematic calculations of the effective viscosity coefficient of nanosuspensions have been performed using the molecular dynamics method. It is established that the viscosity of a nanosuspension depends not only on the volume concentration of the nanoparticles but also on their mass and diameter. Differences from Einstein's relation are found even for nanosuspensions with a low particle concentration.

  10. Integer Solutions of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    A good formula is like a good story, rich in description, powerful in communication, and eye-opening to readers. The formula presented in this article for determining the coefficients of the binomial expansion of (x + y)n is one such "good read." The beauty of this formula is in its simplicity--both describing a quantitative situation…

  11. Irrational "Coefficients" in Renaissance Algebra.

    PubMed

    Oaks, Jeffrey A

    2017-06-01

    Argument From the time of al-Khwārizmī in the ninth century to the beginning of the sixteenth century algebraists did not allow irrational numbers to serve as coefficients. To multiply by x, for instance, the result was expressed as the rhetorical equivalent of . The reason for this practice has to do with the premodern concept of a monomial. The coefficient, or "number," of a term was thought of as how many of that term are present, and not as the scalar multiple that we work with today. Then, in sixteenth-century Europe, a few algebraists began to allow for irrational coefficients in their notation. Christoff Rudolff (1525) was the first to admit them in special cases, and subsequently they appear more liberally in Cardano (1539), Scheubel (1550), Bombelli (1572), and others, though most algebraists continued to ban them. We survey this development by examining the texts that show irrational coefficients and those that argue against them. We show that the debate took place entirely in the conceptual context of premodern, "cossic" algebra, and persisted in the sixteenth century independent of the development of the new algebra of Viète, Decartes, and Fermat. This was a formal innovation violating prevailing concepts that we propose could only be introduced because of the growing autonomy of notation from rhetorical text.

  12. TOPAZ II Temperature Coefficient Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiza, David; Haskin, F. Eric; Marshall, Albert C.

    1994-07-01

    A two-dimensional model of the Topaz II reactor core suitable for neutronic analyses of temperature coefficients of reactivity is presented. The model is based on a 30° r-theta segment of the core. Results of TWODANT calculations are used to estimate temperature coefficients associated with fuel, electrodes, moderator, reflector, and tube plates over the range of temperatures anticipated during startup and operation. Results are presented to assess the reactivity effects associated with Doppler broadening, spectral effects and thermal expansion. Comparisons are made between the TWODANT results and empirical Russian curves used for simulating Topaz II system transients. TWODANT results indicate that the prompt temperature coefficients associated with temperature changes in fuel and emitters are negative. This is primarily because of Doppler broadening of the absorption resonances of uranium and molybdenum. The delayed effect of tube plate heating is also negative because fuel is moved radially outward in the core where it is less important. Temperature coefficients associated with delayed heating of the zirconium hydride moderator and the Beryllium reflector are positive, as the change in the neutron spectrum with moderator or reflector temperature decreases the rate of absorption in these components. The TWODANT results agree with the results obtained from the empirical Russian correlations.

  13. Tables of the coefficients A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, N.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical coefficients required to express the angular distribution for the rotationally elastic or inelastic scattering of electrons from a diatomic molecule were tabulated for the case of nitrogen and in the energy range from 0.20 eV to 10.0 eV. Five different rotational states are considered.

  14. Inequivalence of direct and converse magnetoelectric coupling at electromechanical resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gaojian; Nan, Tianxiang; Zhang, Ru; Zhang, Ning; Li, Shandong; Sun, Nian X.

    2013-10-01

    Resonant direct and converse magnetoelectric (ME) effects have been investigated experimentally and theoretically in FeGa/PZT/FeGa sandwich laminate composites under the same electric and magnetic bias conditions. Resonant direct ME effect (DME) occurs at antiresonance frequency while resonant converse ME effect (CME) occurs at resonance frequency. The antiresonance and resonance frequencies have close but different values under identical bias conditions. The magnitudes of resonant effective ME coefficients for direct and converse ME effects are also not equal. A model was developed to describe the frequency response of DME and CME in laminate composite, which was in good agreement with experimental results.

  15. Clients as conversational agents.

    PubMed

    Massfeller, Helen F; Strong, Tom

    2012-08-01

    Conversational agency is our invented term that orients us to ways in which clients participate in therapeutic dialogues. In this study we examined how clients' conversational correctives and initiatives influenced collaborative therapeutic consultations. Thirty-five single-session lifestyle consultations were videotaped in which adult clients volunteered to discuss concerns of non-clinical severity with a counselor. We discursively microanalyzed excerpts where clients initiated topic shifts or corrected counselor misunderstandings and how counselors responded to them. Clients were actively involved in co-managing conversational developments during the consultations. They influenced the content and course of the conversations with the counselors by correcting, interrupting, or speaking from positions contrary or unrelated to those of the counselors. Clients observably influenced the conversational agenda through their correctives and initiatives if counselors were responsive during face-to-face consultations. Clinicians should demonstrate increased sensitivity and relational responsivity by intentionally engaging with clients' agentive contributions to consultative dialogues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Isomolybdate conversion coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minevski, Zoran (Inventor); Maxey, Jason (Inventor); Nelson, Carl (Inventor); Eylem, Cahit (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A conversion coating solution and process forms a stable and corrosion-resistant layer on metal substrates or layers or, more preferably, on a boehmite layer or other base conversion coating. The conversion coating process involves contacting the substrate, layer or coating with an aqueous alkali metal isomolybdate solution in order to convert the surface of the substrate, layer or coating to a stable conversion coating. The aqueous alkali metal molybdates are selected from sodium molybdate (Na.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), lithium molybdate (Li.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), potassium molybdate (K.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), or combinations thereof, with the most preferred alkali metal molybdate being sodium molybdate. The concentration of alkali metal molybdates in the solution is preferably less than 5% by weight. In addition to the alkali metal molybdates, the conversion coating solution may include alkaline metal passivators selected from lithium nitrate (LiNO.sub.3), sodium nitrate (NaNO.sub.3), ammonia nitrate (NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3), and combinations thereof; lithium chloride, potassium hexafluorozirconate (K.sub.2 ZrF.sub.6) or potassium hexafluorotitanate (K.sub.2 TiF.sub.6).

  17. Laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    The conversion of laser energy to other, more useful, forms is an important element of any space power transmission system employing lasers. In general the user, at the receiving sight, will require the energy in a form other than laser radiation. In particular, conversion to rocket power and electricity are considered to be two major areas where one must consider various conversion techniques. Three systems (photovoltaic cells, MHD generators, and gas turbines) have been identified as the laser-to-electricity conversion systems that appear to meet most of the criteria for a space-based system. The laser thruster also shows considerable promise as a space propulsion system. At this time one cannot predict which of the three laser-to-electric converters will be best suited to particular mission needs. All three systems have some particular advantages, as well as disadvantages. It would be prudent to continue research on all three systems, as well as the laser rocket thruster. Research on novel energy conversion systems, such as the optical rectenna and the reverse free-electron laser, should continue due to their potential for high payoff.

  18. Laser energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1989-07-01

    The conversion of laser energy to other, more useful, forms is an important element of any space power transmission system employing lasers. In general the user, at the receiving sight, will require the energy in a form other than laser radiation. In particular, conversion to rocket power and electricity are considered to be two major areas where one must consider various conversion techniques. Three systems (photovoltaic cells, MHD generators, and gas turbines) have been identified as the laser-to-electricity conversion systems that appear to meet most of the criteria for a space-based system. The laser thruster also shows considerable promise as a space propulsion system. At this time one cannot predict which of the three laser-to-electric converters will be best suited to particular mission needs. All three systems have some particular advantages, as well as disadvantages. It would be prudent to continue research on all three systems, as well as the laser rocket thruster. Research on novel energy conversion systems, such as the optical rectenna and the reverse free-electron laser, should continue due to their potential for high payoff.

  19. Mechanical properties and energy conversion of 3D close-packed lattice model for brittle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun; Xu, Qiang; Shi, Bin; Deng, Shang; Zhu, Honghu

    2017-06-01

    Numerical simulations using the 3D discrete element method can yield mechanical and dynamic behaviors similar to rocks and grains. In the model, rock is represented by bonded elements, which are arranged on a tetrahedral lattice. The conversion formulas between inter-element parameters and rock mechanical properties were derived. By using the formulas, inter-element parameters can be determined according to mechanical properties of model, including Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, tensile strength (Tu), compressive strength (Cu) and coefficient of internal friction. The energy conversion rules of the model are proposed. Based on the methods, a Matlab code ;MatDEM; was developed. Numerical models of quartzite were used to validate the formulas. The tested mechanical properties of a single unit correspond reasonably well with the values of quartzite. Tested Tu and Cu with multiple elements are lower than the values predicted by the formulas. In the simulation of rock failure processes, mechanical energy conversed between different forms and heat is generated, but the mechanical energy plus heat always remains constant. Variations of breaking heat and frictional heat provide clues of the fracturing and slipping behaviors of the Tu and Cu tests. The model may be applied to a wide range of geological structures that involve breakage at multiple scales, heat generation and dynamic processes.

  20. Limitations of Coefficient Alpha as an Index of Test Unidimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samual B.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Confusion in the literature between the concepts of internal consistency and homogeneity has led to a misuse of coefficient alpha as an index of item homogeneity. This misuse is discussed and several indices of item homogeneity derived from the model of common factor analysis are offered as alternatives. (Author/JKS)

  1. Pyroelectric energy conversion: optimization principles.

    PubMed

    Sebald, Gael; Lefeuvre, Elie; Guyomar, Daniel

    2008-03-01

    In the framework of microgenerators, we present in this paper the key points for energy harvesting from temperature using ferroelectric materials. Thermoelectric devices profit from temperature spatial gradients, whereas ferroelectric materials require temporal fluctuation of temperature, thus leading to different applications targets. Ferroelectric materials may harvest perfectly the available thermal energy whatever the materials properties (limited by Carnot conversion efficiency) whereas thermoelectric material's efficiency is limited by materials properties (ZT figure of merit). However, it is shown that the necessary electric fields for Carnot cycles are far beyond the breakdown limit of bulk ferroelectric materials. Thin films may be an excellent solution for rising up to ultra-high electric fields and outstanding efficiency. Different thermodynamic cycles are presented in the paper: principles, advantages, and drawbacks. Using the Carnot cycle, the harvested energy would be independent of materials properties. However, using more realistic cycles, the energy conversion effectiveness remains dependent on the materials properties as discussed in the paper. A particular coupling factor is defined to quantify and check the effectiveness of pyroelectric energy harvesting. It is defined similarly to an electromechanical coupling factor as k2=p2theta0/(epsilontheta33cE), where p, theta0, epsilontheta33, cE are pyroelectric coefficient, maximum working temperature, dielectric permittivity, and specific heat, respectively. The importance of the electrothermal coupling factor is shown and discussed as an energy harvesting figure of merit. It gives the effectiveness of all techniques of energy harvesting (except the Carnot cycle). It is finally shown that we could reach very high efficiency using 1110.75Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)-0.25PbTiO3 single crystals and synchronized switch harvesting on inductor (almost 50% of Carnot efficiency). Finally, practical implementation key

  2. Direct conversion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Massier, P.F.; Back, L.H.; Ryan, M.A.; Fabris, G.

    1992-01-07

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991. Research on AMTEC and on LMMHD was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions (Refs. 1--5) contain descriptive and performance discussions of the following direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (Nitionol heat engine); and also, more complete descriptive discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  3. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency conversion system comprises first and second gain sources providing first and second frequency radiation outputs where the second gain source receives as input the output of the first gain source and, further, the second gain source comprises a Raman or Brillouin gain fiber for wave shifting a portion of the radiation of the first frequency output into second frequency radiation output to provided a combined output of first and second frequencies. Powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  4. Overview of coal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, B.R.

    1981-03-27

    The structure of coal and the processes of coal gasification and coal liquefaction are reviewed. While coal conversion technology is not likely to provide a significant amount of synthetic fuel within the next several years, there is a clear interest both in government and private sectors in the development of this technology to hedge against ever-diminishing petroleum supplies, especially from foreign sources. It is evident from this rather cursory survey that there is some old technology that is highly reliable; new technology is being developed but is not ready for commercialization at the present state of development. The area of coal conversion is ripe for exploration both on the applied and basic research levels. A great deal more must be understood about the reactions of coal, the reactions of coal products, and the physics and chemistry involved in the various stages of coal conversion processes in order to make this technology economically viable.

  5. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massier, Paul F.; Bankston, C. P.; Williams, R.; Underwood, M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Fabris, G.

    1989-01-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1989 through December 31, 1989. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (nitinol heat engines); and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  6. Digital optical conversion module

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K.; Rankin, Richard A.

    1991-02-26

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

  7. Digital optical conversion module

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

    1988-07-19

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

  8. Predictability of Conversation Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-08-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information-theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, [C. Song , ScienceSCIEAS0036-8075 327, 1018 (2010)] found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one’s conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one’s next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between sensor nodes in close proximity. We find that the conversation events are predictable to a certain extent; knowing the current partner decreases the uncertainty about the next partner by 28.4% on average. Much of the predictability is explained by long-tailed distributions of interevent intervals. However, a predictability also exists in the data, apart from the contribution of their long-tailed nature. In addition, an individual’s predictability is correlated with the position of the individual in the static social network derived from the data. Individuals confined in a community—in the sense of an abundance of surrounding triangles—tend to have low predictability, and those bridging different communities tend to have high predictability.

  9. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  10. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, C.

    2010-12-15

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  11. Study of Dispersion Coefficient Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, K. R.; Bressan, C. K.; Pires, M. S. G.; Canno, L. M.; Ribeiro, L. C. L. J.

    2016-08-01

    The issue of water pollution has worsened in recent times due to releases, intentional or not, of pollutants in natural water bodies. This causes several studies about the distribution of pollutants are carried out. The water quality models have been developed and widely used today as a preventative tool, ie to try to predict what will be the concentration distribution of constituent along a body of water in spatial and temporal scale. To understand and use such models, it is necessary to know some concepts of hydraulic high on their application, including the longitudinal dispersion coefficient. This study aims to conduct a theoretical and experimental study of the channel dispersion coefficient, yielding more information about their direct determination in the literature.

  12. Consistent transport coefficients in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Rovira, M.; Ferrofontan, C.

    1986-01-01

    A consistent theory for dealing with transport phenomena in stellar atmospheres starting with the kinetic equations and introducing three cases (LTE, partial LTE, and non-LTE) was developed. The consistent hydrodynamical equations were presented for partial-LTE, the transport coefficients defined, and a method shown to calculate them. The method is based on the numerical solution of kinetic equations considering Landau, Boltzmann, and Focker-Planck collision terms. Finally a set of results for the transport coefficients derived for a partially ionized hydrogen gas with radiation was shown, considering ionization and recombination as well as elastic collisions. The results obtained imply major changes is some types of theoretical model calculations and can resolve some important current problems concerning energy and mass balance in the solar atmosphere. It is shown that energy balance in the lower solar transition region can be fully explained by means of radiation losses and conductive flux.

  13. ADEPT: Efficient Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    ADEPT Project: In today’s increasingly electrified world, power conversion—the process of converting electricity between different currents, voltage levels, and frequencies—forms a vital link between the electronic devices we use every day and the sources of power required to run them. The 14 projects that make up ARPA-E’s ADEPT Project, short for “Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,” are paving the way for more energy efficient power conversion and advancing the basic building blocks of power conversion: circuits, transistors, inductors, transformers, and capacitors.

  14. Power conversion technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Haigh, R E

    1998-01-01

    The Power Conservation Technologies thrust area supports initiatives that enhance the core competencies of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Engineering Directorate in the area of solid-state power electronics. Through partnerships with LLNL programs, projects focus on the development of enabling technologies for existing and emerging programs that have unique power conversion requirements. This year, a multi-disciplinary effort was supported which demonstrated solid-state, high voltage generation by using a dense, monolithic photovoltaic array. This effort builds upon Engineering's strengths in the core technology areas of power conversion, photonics, and microtechnologies.

  15. Direct Conversion Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Back, L.H.; Fabris, G.; Ryan, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. Initially, two systems were selected for exploratory research and advanced development. These are Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and Two-Phase Liquid Metal MD Generator (LMMHD). This report describes progress that has been made during the first six months of 1992 on research activities associated with these two systems. (GHH)

  16. Convection coefficients at building surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerud, R. C.; Altmayer, E.; Bauman, F. S.; Gadgil, A.; Bohn, M.

    1982-09-01

    Correlations relating the rate of heat transfer from the surfaces of rooms to the enclosed air are being developed, based on empirical and analytic examinations of convection in enclosures. The correlations express the heat transfer rate in terms of boundary conditions relating to room geometry and surface temperatures. Work to date indicates that simple convection coefficient calculation techniques can be developed, which significantly improve accuracy of heat transfer predictions in comparison with the standard calculations recommended by ASHRAE.

  17. The interpretation of selection coefficients.

    PubMed

    Barton, N H; Servedio, M R

    2015-05-01

    Evolutionary biologists have an array of powerful theoretical techniques that can accurately predict changes in the genetic composition of populations. Changes in gene frequencies and genetic associations between loci can be tracked as they respond to a wide variety of evolutionary forces. However, it is often less clear how to decompose these various forces into components that accurately reflect the underlying biology. Here, we present several issues that arise in the definition and interpretation of selection and selection coefficients, focusing on insights gained through the examination of selection coefficients in multilocus notation. Using this notation, we discuss how its flexibility-which allows different biological units to be identified as targets of selection-is reflected in the interpretation of the coefficients that the notation generates. In many situations, it can be difficult to agree on whether loci can be considered to be under "direct" versus "indirect" selection, or to quantify this selection. We present arguments for what the terms direct and indirect selection might best encompass, considering a range of issues, from viability and sexual selection to kin selection. We show how multilocus notation can discriminate between direct and indirect selection, and describe when it can do so. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Ultrasound coefficient of nonlinearity imaging.

    PubMed

    van Sloun, Ruud; Demi, Libertario; Shan, Caifeng; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    Imaging the acoustical coefficient of nonlinearity, β, is of interest in several healthcare interventional applications. It is an important feature that can be used for discriminating tissues. In this paper, we propose a nonlinearity characterization method with the goal of locally estimating the coefficient of nonlinearity. The proposed method is based on a 1-D solution of the nonlinear lossy Westerfelt equation, thereby deriving a local relation between β and the pressure wave field. Based on several assumptions, a β imaging method is then presented that is based on the ratio between the harmonic and fundamental fields, thereby reducing the effect of spatial amplitude variations of the speckle pattern. By testing the method on simulated ultrasound pressure fields and an in vitro B-mode ultrasound acquisition, we show that the designed algorithm is able to estimate the coefficient of nonlinearity, and that the tissue types of interest are well discriminable. The proposed imaging method provides a new approach to β estimation, not requiring a special measurement setup or transducer, that seems particularly promising for in vivo imaging.

  19. A dynamic compressometer for converse electrostriction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yimnirun, Rattikorn; Moses, Paul J.; Newnham, Robert E.; Meyer, Richard J.

    2003-07-01

    A simple dynamic instrument for measuring very small stress dependence of capacitance is presented in this article. We describe the design and development of a dynamic compressometer for converse electrostrictive measurements on low dielectric constant materials. This redesigned system is capable of resolving a change in capacitance of 10-17 F or smaller. The most important feature is the dynamic stressing system incorporated to improve the accuracy and the reproducibility of the measurements. Furthermore, the uniaxiality and uniformity of the applied stress are found to be critical to the measurements. Therefore, a uniaxial stress delivery scheme using ball bearings is employed in the measurements to improve the accuracy of the experimental results. The converse electrostrictive coefficients obtained from this instrument agree reasonably well with those measured directly by a single-beam interferometer.

  20. Planetary image conversion task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. D.; Stanley, C. L.; Laughlin, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Planetary Image Conversion Task group processed 12,500 magnetic tapes containing raw imaging data from JPL planetary missions and produced an image data base in consistent format on 1200 fully packed 6250-bpi tapes. The output tapes will remain at JPL. A copy of the entire tape set was delivered to US Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Ariz. A secondary task converted computer datalogs, which had been stored in project specific MARK IV File Management System data types and structures, to flat-file, text format that is processable on any modern computer system. The conversion processing took place at JPL's Image Processing Laboratory on an IBM 370-158 with existing software modified slightly to meet the needs of the conversion task. More than 99% of the original digital image data was successfully recovered by the conversion task. However, processing data tapes recorded before 1975 was destructive. This discovery is of critical importance to facilities responsible for maintaining digital archives since normal periodic random sampling techniques would be unlikely to detect this phenomenon, and entire data sets could be wiped out in the act of generating seemingly positive sampling results. Reccomended follow-on activities are also included.

  1. Clinical Linguistics: Conversational Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crystal, David

    2013-01-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference…

  2. Stories in Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Roberta Senner

    Although conversational stories within one individual's corpus share the same structure, they have features that set them apart from one another. Based on the stories' general characteristics and the way they function in ongoing talk, they can be identified as: (1) durable personal experience narratives (PENs), which are often repeated during the…

  3. Evaluating Energy Conversion Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Smith, B. T.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    Devices that convert solar radiation directly into storable chemical or electrical energy, have characteristic energy absorption spectrum; specifically, each of these devices has energy threshold. The conversion efficiency of generalized system that emcompasses all threshold devices is analyzed, resulting in family of curves for devices of various threshold energies operating at different temperatures.

  4. A Conversation about Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.; Mao, Minnie Yuan

    2012-01-01

    In the spirit of the Lindau Meeting, we present a dialogue between a Nobel laureate and a young researcher. This interchange started online, where it continues to unfold. Here is a digest of this conversation, which has developed across time and space.

  5. Conversations and Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korpan, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at how a series of conversations contributed to the development of a newly formed role at the University of Victoria--Teaching Assistant Consultants (TACs). TACs act as departmental mentors for teaching assistants (TAs) in their respective departments, charged with providing support in the form of discipline-specific workshops…

  6. Clinical Linguistics: Conversational Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crystal, David

    2013-01-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference…

  7. Ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, W.H.

    1983-03-17

    A brief explanation of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) concept and an estimate of the amount of energy that can be produced from the ocean resource without introducing environmental concerns are presented. Use of the OTEC system to generate electric power and products which can replace fossil fuels is shown. The OTEC program status and its prospects for the future are discussed.

  8. Electromechanical Energy Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LePage, Wilbur R.

    This programed text on electromechanical energy conversion (motors and generators) was developed under contract with the U.S. Office of Education as Number 12 in a series of materials for use in an electrical engineering sequence. It is intended to be used in conjunction with other materials and with other short texts in the series. (DH)

  9. Evaluating Energy Conversion Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Smith, B. T.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    Devices that convert solar radiation directly into storable chemical or electrical energy, have characteristic energy absorption spectrum; specifically, each of these devices has energy threshold. The conversion efficiency of generalized system that emcompasses all threshold devices is analyzed, resulting in family of curves for devices of various threshold energies operating at different temperatures.

  10. Conversational English Program, 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instituto de Idiomas Yazigi, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Linguistica Aplicada.

    This second book of a conversational English program for adults contains an introductory section in Portuguese and exercises in English. The text centers around an English-speaking family from the United States that goes to live in Brazil. It contains color photographs with captions followed by exercises. The exercises are in English and involve…

  11. Mechanochemical Energy Conversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the thermodynamics of macromolecular systems, including theories and experiments of cyclic energy conversion with rubber and collagen as working substances. Indicates that an early introduction into the concept of chemical potential and solution thermodynamics is made possible through the study of the cyclic processes. (CC)

  12. Conversational English Program, 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instituto de Idiomas Yazigi, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Linguistica Aplicada.

    This first book of a conversational English program for adults contains an introductory section in Portuguese and exercises in English. The text centers around an English-speaking family from the United States that goes to live in Brazil. It contains color photographs with captions followed by exercises. The exercises are in English and involve…

  13. Mechanochemical Energy Conversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the thermodynamics of macromolecular systems, including theories and experiments of cyclic energy conversion with rubber and collagen as working substances. Indicates that an early introduction into the concept of chemical potential and solution thermodynamics is made possible through the study of the cyclic processes. (CC)

  14. Leadership is a conversation.

    PubMed

    Groysberg, Boris; Slind, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Globalization and new technologies have sharply reduced the efficacy of command-and-control management and its accompanying forms of corporate communication. In the course of a recent research project, the authors concluded that by talking with employees, rather than simply issuing orders, leaders can promote operational flexibility, employee engagement, and tight strategic alignment. Groysberg and Slind have identified four elements of organizational conversation that reflect the essential attributes of interpersonal conversation: intimacy, interactivity, inclusion, and intentionality. Intimacy shifts the focus from a top-down distribution of information to a bottom-up exchange of ideas. Organizational conversation is less corporate in tone and more casual. And it's less about issuing and taking orders than about asking and answering questions. Interactivity entails shunning the simplicity of monologue and embracing the unpredictable vitality of dialogue. Traditional one-way media-print and broadcast, in particular-give way to social media buttressed by social thinking. Inclusion turns employees into full-fledged conversation partners, entitling them to provide their own ideas, often on company channels. They can create content and act as brand ambassadors, thought leaders, and storytellers. Intentionality enables leaders and employees to derive strategically relevant action from the push and pull of discussion and debate.

  15. Conversations on ecology IV

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere

    1963-01-01

    The conversations on ecology have mentioned the pesticide problem, and in such discussion it is easy to lose sight of the basic philosophic view which is an undercurrent in Miss Carson's book. I should like to expand on that philosophic premise and examine some of its implications for planning vegetation management measures as well as other measures for resource development.

  16. Conversion or New Building?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkeley, Phil

    1970-01-01

    Examined first is "the overall problem of housing a TV studio complex to see what particular sorts of buildings are required and how they must be related," and then considered are "the relative merits and particular problems of new studio building or a conversion." (LS)

  17. Solar energy conversion.

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.; Lewis, N. S.

    2008-03-01

    If solar energy is to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels, we must have efficient ways to convert photons into electricity, fuel, and heat. The need for better conversion technologies is a driving force behind many recent developments in biology, materials, and especially nanoscience. The Sun has the enormous untapped potential to supply our growing energy needs. The barrier to greater use of the solar resource is its high cost relative to the cost of fossil fuels, although the disparity will decrease with the rising prices of fossil fuels and the rising costs of mitigating their impact on the environment and climate. The cost of solar energy is directly related to the low conversion efficiency, the modest energy density of solar radiation, and the costly materials currently required. The development of materials and methods to improve solar energy conversion is primarily a scientific challenge: Breakthroughs in fundamental understanding ought to enable marked progress. There is plenty of room for improvement, since photovoltaic conversion efficiencies for inexpensive organic and dye-sensitized solar cells are currently about 10% or less, the conversion efficiency of photosynthesis is less than 1%, and the best solar thermal efficiency is 30%. The theoretical limits suggest that we can do much better. Solar conversion is a young science. Its major growth began in the 1970s, spurred by the oil crisis that highlighted the pervasive importance of energy to our personal, social, economic, and political lives. In contrast, fossil-fuel science has developed over more than 250 years, stimulated by the Industrial Revolution and the promise of abundant fossil fuels. The science of thermodynamics, for example, is intimately intertwined with the development of the steam engine. The Carnot cycle, the mechanical equivalent of heat, and entropy all played starring roles in the development of thermodynamics and the technology of heat engines. Solar-energy science faces

  18. A conversion method of air kerma from the primary, scatter, and leakage radiations to effective dose for calculating x-ray shielding barriers in mammography.

    PubMed

    Kharrati, Hedi

    2005-05-01

    In this study, a new approach has been introduced for derivation of the effective dose from air kerma to calculate shielding requirements in mammography facilities. This new approach has been used to compute the conversion coefficients relating air kerma to the effective dose for the mammography reference beam series of the Netherlands Metrology Institute Van Swinden Laboratorium, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and International Atomic Energy Agency laboratories. The results show that, in all cases, the effective dose in mammography energy range is less than 25% of the incident air kerma for the primary and the scatter radiations and does not exceed 75% for the leakage radiation.

  19. Age-dependent organ and effective dose coefficients for external photons: a comparison of stylized and voxel-based paediatric phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2006-09-01

    This present study investigates the anatomical realism of conventional stylized models of children by comparing organ dose conversion coefficients for the ORNL paediatric phantom series with those determined in the UF (University of Florida) voxel paediatric phantoms. The latter includes whole-body models of a 9 month male, 4 year female, 8 year female, 11 year male and a 14 year male. Of these phantoms, the 1 year, 5 year and 10 year ORNL phantoms, and 9 month male, 4 year female and 11 year male UF voxel phantoms were selected for side-by-side comparisons under idealized external photon irradiation. Organ absorbed dose per unit air kerma (Gy/Gy) for various radiosensitive organs and tissues were calculated for monoenergetic photons over the energy range of 15 keV to 10 MeV and for six irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right lateral (RLAT), left lateral (LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). Differences in organ dose conversion coefficients for the gonads, bone marrow, colon, lung and stomach, to which prominent tissue weighting factors are assigned, were depicted and analysed. Two major causes of observed differences were suggested: differences in organ shape and position and the differences in tissue shielding by overlying tissue regions within the phantoms. Significant discrepancies caused by anatomical differences between the two types of phantoms are also reported for several organs, and in particular, the thyroid and urinary bladder. The results of this study suggest that the paediatric series of ORNL phantoms also have less realistic internal organ and body anatomy and that dose conversion coefficients from these stylized phantoms should be re-evaluated using paediatric voxel phantoms.

  20. Measurements of thermal accommodation coefficients.

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, Daniel John; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John Robert; Grasser, Thomas W.; Trott, Wayne Merle

    2005-10-01

    A previously-developed experimental facility has been used to determine gas-surface thermal accommodation coefficients from the pressure dependence of the heat flux between parallel plates of similar material but different surface finish. Heat flux between the plates is inferred from measurements of temperature drop between the plate surface and an adjacent temperature-controlled water bath. Thermal accommodation measurements were determined from the pressure dependence of the heat flux for a fixed plate separation. Measurements of argon and nitrogen in contact with standard machined (lathed) or polished 304 stainless steel plates are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, the accommodation coefficient of 304 stainless steel with nitrogen and argon is estimated to be 0.80 {+-} 0.02 and 0.87 {+-} 0.02, respectively, independent of the surface roughness within the range likely to be encountered in engineering practice. Measurements of the accommodation of helium showed a slight variation with 304 stainless steel surface roughness: 0.36 {+-} 0.02 for a standard machine finish and 0.40 {+-} 0.02 for a polished finish. Planned tests with carbon-nanotube-coated plates will be performed when 304 stainless-steel blanks have been successfully coated.

  1. Measurement and prediction of aromatic solute distribution coefficients for aqueous-organic solvent systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.R.; Luthy, R.G.

    1984-06-01

    Experimental and modeling activities were performed to assess techniques for measurement and prediction of distribution coefficients for aromatic solutes between water and immiscible organic solvents. Experiments were performed to measure distribution coefficients in both clean water and wastewater systems, and to assess treatment of a wastewater by solvent extraction. The theoretical portions of this investigation were directed towards development of techniques for prediction of solute-solvent/water distribution coefficients. Experiments were performed to assess treatment of a phenolic-laden coal conversion wastewater by solvent extraction. The results showed that solvent extraction for recovery of phenolic material offered several wastewater processing advantages. Distribution coefficients were measured in clean water and wastewater systems for aromatic solutes of varying functionality with different solvent types. It was found that distribution coefficients for these compounds in clean water systems were not statistically different from distribution coefficients determined in a complex coal conversion process wastewater. These and other aromatic solute distribution coefficient data were employed for evaluation of modeling techniques for prediction of solute-solvent/water distribution coefficients. Eight solvents were selected in order to represent various chemical classes: toluene and benzene (aromatics), hexane and heptane (alkanes), n-octanol (alcohols), n-butyl acetate (esters), diisopropyl ether (ethers), and methylisobutyl ketone (ketones). The aromatic solutes included: nonpolar compounds such as benzene, toluene and naphthalene, phenolic compounds such as phenol, cresol and catechol, nitrogenous aromatics such as aniline, pyridine and aminonaphthalene, and other aromatic solutes such as naphthol, quinolinol and halogenated compounds. 100 references, 20 figures, 34 tables.

  2. Equation of state and transport coefficients for dense plasmas.

    PubMed

    Blancard, C; Faussurier, G

    2004-01-01

    We hereby present a model to describe the thermodynamic and transport properties of dense plasmas. The electronic and ionic structures are determined self-consistently using finite-temperature density functional theory and Gibbs-Bogolyubov inequality. The main thermodynamic quantities, i.e., internal energy, pressure, entropy, and sound speed, are obtained by numerical differentiation of the plasma total Helmholtz free energy. Electronic electrical and thermal conductivities are calculated from the Ziman approach. Ionic transport coefficients are estimated using those of hard-sphere system and the Rosenfeld semiempirical "universal" correspondence between excess entropy and dimensionless transport coefficients of dense fluids. Numerical results and comparisons with experiments are presented and discussed.

  3. Wind energy conversion system

    DOEpatents

    Longrigg, Paul

    1987-01-01

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  4. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength sources include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  5. Clinical linguistics: conversational reflections.

    PubMed

    Crystal, David

    2013-04-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference participants during that time.

  6. Advanced Thermal Conversion Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-18

    BAA09-31 3  Figure 1. (a) Energy diagram of the PETE process. Photo -excitation leads to enhanced...photovoltaic cells at 3000x concentration (~38%). As shown in Fig. 2(b), the highest conversion efficiencies are obtained by using photo -cathodes...p-type 4H-SiC (left) and polycrystalline n-type 3C-SiC (right). The fabrication process for p-type devices used bulk p- doped 4H-SiC wafers from

  7. Session: Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, David; LaSala, Raymond J.; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Bliem, Carl J.; Premuzic, Eugene T.; Weare, John H.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology'' by David Robertson and Raymond J. LaSala; ''Materials for Geothermal Production'' by Lawrence E. Kukacka; ''Supersaturated Turbine Expansions for Binary Geothermal Power Plants'' by Carl J. Bliem; ''Geothermal Waster Treatment Biotechnology: Progress and Advantages to the Utilities'' by Eugen T. Premuzic; and ''Geothermal Brine Chemistry Modeling Program'' by John H. Weare.

  8. Persuasion Detection in Conversation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    is the first step in developing machine learning systems that can automatically detect persuasion in conversations. This corpus was developed from...requires some form of persuasion. Based on this research, it may be possible to construct a machine learning system that can automatically detect...specific markers, can these markers be learned and identified by annotators? Our research attempted to answer all of these questions by annotating a

  9. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massier, P. F.; Bankston, C. P.; Fabris, G.; Kirol, L. D.

    1988-01-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1988 through December 1988. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. In addition, status reviews and assessments are presented for thermomagnetic converter concepts and for thermoelastic converters (Nitinol heat engines). Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic thermophotovoltaic and thermoacoustic; and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems. A tabulated summary of the various systems which have been reviewed thus far has been prepared. Some of the important technical research needs are listed and a schematic of each system is shown.

  10. Natural gas conversion process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The experimental apparatus was dismantled and transferred to a laboratory space provided by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is already equipped with a high-ventilation fume hood. This will enable us to make tests at higher gas flow rates in a safe environment. Three papers presented at the ACS meeting in San Francisco (Symposium on Natural Gas Upgrading II) April 5--10, 1992 show that the goal of direct catalytic conversion of Methane into heavier Hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere is actively pursued in three other different laboratories. There are similarities in their general concept with our own approach, but the temperature range of the experiments reported in these recent papers is much lower and this leads to uneconomic conversion rates. This illustrates the advantages of Methane activation by a Hydrogen plasma to reach commercial conversion rates. A preliminary process flow diagram was established for the Integrated Process, which was outlined in the previous Quarterly Report. The flow diagram also includes all the required auxiliary facilities for product separation and recycle of the unconverted feed as well as for the preparation and compression of the Syngas by-product.

  11. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massier, P. F.; Bankston, C. P.; Fabris, G.; Kirol, L. D.

    1988-12-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1988 through December 1988. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. In addition, status reviews and assessments are presented for thermomagnetic converter concepts and for thermoelastic converters (Nitinol heat engines). Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic thermophotovoltaic and thermoacoustic; and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems. A tabulated summary of the various systems which have been reviewed thus far has been prepared. Some of the important technical research needs are listed and a schematic of each system is shown.

  12. Improved Depth and Temperature Conversion Equations for Sippican AXBTs (Air-Deployed Expendable Bathythermographs).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    into depth. fall time to depth conversions. Contract and lot numbers and To check the accuracy of the conversion equations and, if NALC (Naval...all AXBTsSn using te neu equation T = - 38.05 + (2. 71075 x O -2)F Coefficient Value Standard a 1,6325 0.0060 , for other lot numbers : clearly an

  13. Beneficial effect of internal hydrogen bonding interactions on the beta-fragmentation of primary alkoxyl radicals. Two-step conversion of D-xylo- and D-ribofuranoses into L-threose and D-erythrose, respectively.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-García, Luís; Quintero, Leticia; Sánchez, Mario; Sartillo-Piscil, Fernando

    2007-10-26

    Primary alkoxyl free radicals were generated from their readily synthesized N-phthalimido derivatives under reductive conditions. Primary alkoxyl radicals derived from their corresponding xylo- and ribofuranose derivatives underwent, exclusively, an unusual beta-fragmentation affording L-threose and D-erythrose derivatives, respectively. This occurs because the alkoxyl radical is capable of achieving an internal hydrogen-bonding interaction leading to a stable six-membered ring intramolecular hydrogen-bonded structure. When the hydroxyl group is protected, the beta-fragmentation pathway is prevented and the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) pathway occurs. Computational studies provided strong support for the experimental observations.

  14. A comparison of two indices for the intraclass correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, we examined the behavior of two indices for measuring the intraclass correlation in the one-way random effects model: the prevailing ICC(1) (Fisher, 1938) and the corrected eta-squared (Bliese & Halverson, 1998). These two procedures differ both in their methods of estimating the variance components that define the intraclass correlation coefficient and in their performance of bias and mean squared error in the estimation of the intraclass correlation coefficient. In contrast with the natural unbiased principle used to construct ICC(1), in the present study it was analytically shown that the corrected eta-squared estimator is identical to the maximum likelihood estimator and the pairwise estimator under equal group sizes. Moreover, the empirical results obtained from the present Monte Carlo simulation study across various group structures revealed the mutual dominance relationship between their truncated versions for negative values. The corrected eta-squared estimator performs better than the ICC(1) estimator when the underlying population intraclass correlation coefficient is small. Conversely, ICC(1) has a clear advantage over the corrected eta-squared for medium and large magnitudes of population intraclass correlation coefficient. The conceptual description and numerical investigation provide guidelines to help researchers choose between the two indices for more accurate reliability analysis in multilevel research.

  15. Conversion of Questionnaire Data

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC&A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC&A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC&A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC&A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC&A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A.D. Swain and H.E. Guttmann

  16. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-03-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV-even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presentedThe coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m valueThe electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic.

  17. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV—even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Key Points Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presented The coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m value The electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic PMID:26167440

  18. Ultra-Wideband Analog-to-Digital Conversion Via Signal Expansion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    46963.4-CI We consider analog to digital (A/D) conversion, based on the quantization of coefficients obtained via the projection of a continuous time... based on pulse code modulation (PCM). Fundamental figures of merit in A/D conversion and system tradeoffs are discussed for the proposed ADC. The...Brian M. Sadler, Senior Member, IEEE (Invited Paper) Abstract—We consider analog to digital (A/D) conversion, based on the quantization of

  19. Thermodynamics fundamentals of energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Nicolae

    The work reported in the chapters 1-5 focuses on the fundamentals of heat transfer, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and electrical phenomena related to the conversion of one form of energy to another. Chapter 6 is a re-examination of the fundamental heat transfer problem of how to connect a finite-size heat generating volume to a concentrated sink. Chapter 1 extends to electrical machines the combined thermodynamics and heat transfer optimization approach that has been developed for heat engines. The conversion efficiency at maximum power is 1/2. When, as in specific applications, the operating temperature of windings must not exceed a specified level, the power output is lower and efficiency higher. Chapter 2 addresses the fundamental problem of determining the optimal history (regime of operation) of a battery so that the work output is maximum. Chapters 3 and 4 report the energy conversion aspects of an expanding mixture of hot particles, steam and liquid water. At the elemental level, steam annuli develop around the spherical drops as time increases. At the mixture level, the density decreases while the pressure and velocity increases. Chapter 4 describes numerically, based on the finite element method, the time evolution of the expanding mixture of hot spherical particles, steam and water. The fluid particles are moved in time in a Lagrangian manner to simulate the change of the domain configuration. Chapter 5 describes the process of thermal interaction between the molten material and water. In the second part of the chapter the model accounts for the irreversibility due to the flow of the mixture through the cracks of the mixing vessel. The approach presented in this chapter is based on exergy analysis and represents a departure from the line of inquiry that was followed in chapters 3-4. Chapter 6 shows that the geometry of the heat flow path between a volume and one point can be optimized in two fundamentally different ways. In the "growth" method the

  20. Tables and conversions for microclimatology.

    Treesearch

    James M. Brown

    1973-01-01

    A series of tables, charts, and conversion factors have been prepared for use in microclimatic and ecological studies. Included are: the solution to various equations of radiant energy exchange; solar radiation diagrams; psychometric and precipitation data; and unit conversion factors.

  1. Equivalent circuit model of converse magnetoelectric effect for the tri-layer magnetoelectric laminates with thermal and stress loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao-Miao; Li, Meng-Han; Liu, Hui; Cui, Xiao-Le

    2015-12-01

    For the converse magnetoelectric coupling effect of the piezoelectric/magnetostrictive/piezoelectric tri-layer symmetric magnetoelectric laminates, based on the nonlinear thermo-magneto-mechanical constitutive equations of the giant magnetostrictive materials and the thermo-electro-mechanical constitutive equations of the piezoelectric materials, according to Newton's second law and the magnetic circuit theorem, an equivalent circuit is established. Then an expression of the converse magnetoelectric coefficient describing nonlinear thermo-magneto-electro-mechanical coupling is established. The curve of the nonlinear converse magnetoelectric coefficient versus the bias magnetic field, is predicted effectively by the expression, and the predictions are in good agreement with the experimental result both qualitatively and quantitatively. Furthermore, the model can predict the complex influences of the bias magnetic field, the stress and the ambient temperature on the converse magnetoelectric coefficient. It can be found from these predictions that the converse magnetoelectric coefficient decreases with the increasing temperature and increases with the increasing tensile stress. Under the common effect of the ambient temperature and the stress, it is also found that the converse magnetoelectric coefficient changes sharply with the ambient temperature when the tensile stress is applied on the laminates, but it has a good stability of temperature when a large compressive stress is applied. Therefore, this work contributes to the researches on the giant converse magnetoelectric coefficient and the designs of magnetoelectric devices based on the converse magnetoelectric coupling.

  2. Enhanced converse magnetoelectric effect in cylindrical piezoelectric-magnetostrictive composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gaojian; Zhang, Ru; Zhang, Ning

    2016-10-01

    Enhanced converse magnetoelectric (ME) effect has been experimentally observed in cylindrical PZT-Terfenol-D piezoelectric-magnetostrictive bilayered composites, where the piezoelectric and magnetostrictive components are coupled through normal stresses instead of shear stresses that act in most of previous multiferroic composites. A theoretical model based on elastodynamics analysis has been proposed to describe the frequency response of converse ME effect for axial and radial modes in the bilayered cylindrical composites. The theory shows good agreement with the experimental results. The different variation tendency of resonant converse ME coefficient, as well as different variation rate of resonance frequency with bias magnetic field for axial and radial modes is interpreted in terms of demagnetizing effect. This work is of theoretical and technological significance for the application of converse ME effect as magnetic sensor, transducers, coil-free flux switch, etc.

  3. Full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion via photonic nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianglei; Xuan, Yimin

    2017-07-24

    Volumetric solar thermal conversion is an emerging technique for a plethora of applications such as solar thermal power generation, desalination, and solar water splitting. However, achieving broadband solar thermal absorption via dilute nanofluids is still a daunting challenge. In this work, full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion is demonstrated over a thin layer of the proposed 'photonic nanofluids'. The underlying mechanism is found to be the photonic superposition of core resonances, shell plasmons, and core-shell resonances at different wavelengths, whose coexistence is enabled by the broken symmetry of specially designed composite nanoparticles, i.e., Janus nanoparticles. The solar thermal conversion efficiency can be improved by 10.8% compared with core-shell nanofluids. The extinction coefficient of Janus dimers with various configurations is also investigated to unveil the effects of particle couplings. This work provides the possibility to achieve full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion, and may have potential applications in efficient solar energy harvesting and utilization.

  4. Microbial Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, Merry; Wall, Judy D.

    2006-10-01

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium March 10-12, 2006, in San Francisco, California, to discuss the production of energy fuels by microbial conversions. The status of research into various microbial energy technologies, the advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches, research needs in the field, and education and training issues were examined, with the goal of identifying routes for producing biofuels that would both decrease the need for fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, the choices for providing energy are limited. Policy makers and the research community must begin to pursue a broader array of potential energy technologies. A diverse energy portfolio that includes an assortment of microbial energy choices will allow communities and consumers to select the best energy solution for their own particular needs. Funding agencies and governments alike need to prepare for future energy needs by investing both in the microbial energy technologies that work today and in the untested technologies that will serve the world’s needs tomorrow. More mature bioprocesses, such as ethanol production from starchy materials and methane from waste digestors, will find applications in the short term. However, innovative techniques for liquid fuel or biohydrogen production are among the longer term possibilities that should also be vigorously explored, starting now. Microorganisms can help meet human energy needs in any of a number of ways. In their most obvious role in energy conversion, microorganisms can generate fuels, including ethanol, hydrogen, methane, lipids, and butanol, which can be burned to produce energy. Alternatively, bacteria can be put to use in microbial fuel cells, where they carry out the direct conversion of biomass into electricity. Microorganisms may also be used some day to make oil and natural gas technologies more efficient by sequestering carbon or by assisting in the recovery of oil and

  5. Crucial Conversations about America's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John C.; Protheroe, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    It's up to school leaders to shift the momentum away from conversations based on misperceptions and toward those that study critical issues about school improvement. "Crucial Conversations About America's Schools" talks about how to do this and provides examples of how to reframe conversations on the hot-button but important topics of…

  6. The Personal Enjoyment of Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Paul W.

    Conversation reminds us that we are not alone, that shared language is the opportunity to try on our many masks to see how many of them we can do without. The variety of pleasures accrued from conversation--"layers of pleasure"--deepen only as they move away from the individual orbits into the circle of mutual experience. When conversation is…

  7. Crucial Conversations about America's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John C.; Protheroe, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    It's up to school leaders to shift the momentum away from conversations based on misperceptions and toward those that study critical issues about school improvement. "Crucial Conversations About America's Schools" talks about how to do this and provides examples of how to reframe conversations on the hot-button but important topics of…

  8. Special Features in Children's Conversations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karjalainen, Merja

    In a study of features that seem to be typical of children's conversations, 10 Finnish preschool children's conversations were videotaped and audiotaped over a period of 10 hours. The children were taped in conversation, play, fairy tale, and eating situations. Among the findings are that all children enjoy playing with language, but some initiate…

  9. Nonlinear resonance converse magnetoelectric effect modulated by voltage for the symmetrical magnetoelectric laminates under magnetic and thermal loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao-Miao; Liu, Hui; Zhou, Yun; Hu, Wen-Wen

    2016-12-01

    Based on the tri-layer symmetrical magnetoelectric laminates, a equivalent circuit for the nonlinear resonance converse magnetoelectric coupling effect is established. Because the nonlinear thermo-magneto-mechanical constitutive equations of magnetostrictive material were introduced, a converse magnetoelectric coefficient model was derived from the equivalent circuit, which can describe the influence of bias electric field, bias magnetic field and ambient temperature on the resonance converse magnetoelectric coupling effect. Especially, the model can well predict the modulation effect of bias electric field/voltage on the magnetism of magnetoelectric composite or the converse magnetoelectric coefficient, which is absolutely vital in applications. Both of the converse magnetoelectric coefficient and the resonance frequency predicted by the model have good agreements with the existing experimental results in qualitatively and quantitatively, and the validity of the model is confirmed. On this basis, according to the model, the nonlinear trends of the resonance converse magnetoelectric effect under different bias voltages, bias magnetic fields and ambient temperatures are predicted. From the results, it can be found that the bias voltage can effectively modulate the curve of the resonance converse magnetoelectric coefficient versus bias magnetic field, and then change the corresponding optimal bias magnetic field of the maximum converse magnetoelectric coefficient; with the increasing volume ratio of piezoelectric layers, the modulation effect of bias voltage becomes more obvious; under different bias magnetic fields, the modulation effect of bias voltage on the converse magnetoelectric effect has nonvolatility in a wide temperature region.

  10. The emission coefficient of uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Campbell, H. D.; Mack, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The emission coefficient for uranium plasmas (Temperature: 8000 K) was measured for the wavelength range (200 A - 6000 A). The results are compared to theory and other measurements. The absorption coefficient for the same wavelength interval is also given.

  11. Note on Two Generalizations of Coefficient Alpha.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, Nambury S.

    1979-01-01

    An important relationship is given for two generalizations of coefficient alpha: (1) Rajaratnam, Cronbach, and Gleser's generalizability formula for stratified-parallel tests, and (2) Raju's coefficient beta. (Author/CTM)

  12. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  13. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  14. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  15. Conversing Cooperatively: Using "Mini-Conversations" to Develop Conversational Knowledge and Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth B.

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Interpersonal communication, relational communication, language and social interaction, professional communication, interviewing practices. Objectives: This single class activity enables students to understand the theoretical foundations of conversation and to develop their conversational skills by talking in dyads with classmates. Upon…

  16. Minimum Sample Size for Cronbach's Coefficient Alpha: A Monte-Carlo Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurdugul, Halil

    2008-01-01

    The coefficient alpha is the most widely used measure of internal consistency for composite scores in the educational and psychological studies. However, due to the difficulties of data gathering in psychometric studies, the minimum sample size for the sample coefficient alpha has been frequently debated. There are various suggested minimum sample…

  17. Minimum Sample Size for Cronbach's Coefficient Alpha: A Monte-Carlo Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurdugul, Halil

    2008-01-01

    The coefficient alpha is the most widely used measure of internal consistency for composite scores in the educational and psychological studies. However, due to the difficulties of data gathering in psychometric studies, the minimum sample size for the sample coefficient alpha has been frequently debated. There are various suggested minimum sample…

  18. Assessment of the Maximal Split-Half Coefficient to Estimate Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Barry L.; Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2010-01-01

    The maximal split-half coefficient is computed by calculating all possible split-half reliability estimates for a scale and then choosing the maximal value as the reliability estimate. Osburn compared the maximal split-half coefficient with 10 other internal consistency estimates of reliability and concluded that it yielded the most consistently…

  19. M-Bonomial Coefficients and Their Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2010-01-01

    In this note, we introduce M-bonomial coefficients or (M-bonacci binomial coefficients). These are similar to the binomial and the Fibonomial (or Fibonacci-binomial) coefficients and can be displayed in a triangle similar to Pascal's triangle from which some identities become obvious.

  20. Coefficient rings of formal group laws

    SciTech Connect

    Buchstaber, V M; Ustinov, A V

    2015-11-30

    We describe the coefficient rings of universal formal group laws which arise in algebraic geometry, algebraic topology and their application to mathematical physics. We also describe the homomorphisms of these coefficient rings coming from reductions of one formal group law to another. The proofs are based on the number-theoretic properties of binomial coefficients. Bibliography: 37 titles.

  1. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  2. M-Bonomial Coefficients and Their Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2010-01-01

    In this note, we introduce M-bonomial coefficients or (M-bonacci binomial coefficients). These are similar to the binomial and the Fibonomial (or Fibonacci-binomial) coefficients and can be displayed in a triangle similar to Pascal's triangle from which some identities become obvious.

  3. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  4. A Note on the Dynamic Correlation Coefficient.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-04

    The use of the dynamic correlation coefficient as a test of spuriousness in longitudinal designs was examined. It was shown that given conditions of...spuriousness and perfect stationarity, the dynamic correlation coefficient was positively, rather than inversely, related to spuriousness. It was...recommended that the dynamic correlation coefficient not be used in the future as a test of spuriousness. (Author)

  5. Note on Methodology: The Coefficient of Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheret, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Addresses applications of the coefficient of variation as a measure of educational inequality or as a means of measuring changes of inequality status. Suggests the Gini coefficient has many advantages over the coefficient of variation since it can be used with the Lorenz curve (Lorenz provides detail Gini omits). (BRR)

  6. Standards for Standardized Logistic Regression Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Standardized coefficients in logistic regression analysis have the same utility as standardized coefficients in linear regression analysis. Although there has been no consensus on the best way to construct standardized logistic regression coefficients, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest a single best approach to the construction of a…

  7. Standards for Standardized Logistic Regression Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Standardized coefficients in logistic regression analysis have the same utility as standardized coefficients in linear regression analysis. Although there has been no consensus on the best way to construct standardized logistic regression coefficients, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest a single best approach to the construction of a…

  8. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jan T M; Shrimpton, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990's. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10's of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  9. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  10. Review of solar cell temperature coefficients for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Energy conversion efficiency is an important parameter for solar cells, and well reported in the literature. However, solar cells heat up in sunlight, and the efficiency decreases. The temperature coefficient of the conversion efficiency is thus also extremely important, especially in mission modeling, but is much less well reported. It is of value to have a table which compiles into a single document values of temperature coefficients reported in the literature. In addition to modeling performance of solar cells in Earth orbit, where operating temperatures may range from about 20 C to as high as 85 C, it is of interest to model solar cells for several other recently proposed missions. These include use for the surface of Mars, for solar electric propulsion missions that may range from Venus to the Asteroid belt, and for laser-photovoltaic power that may involve laser intensities equivalent several suns. For all of these applications, variations in operating temperature away from the nominal test conditions result in significant changes in operating performance. In general the efficiency change with temperature is non-linear, however, in the range from negative 100 C through room temperature to a few hundred degrees C, efficiency is usually quite well modeled as a linear function of temperature (except for a few unusual cell types, such as amorphous silicon, and for extremely low bandgap cells, such as InGaAs).

  11. Radon emanation coefficients for phosphogypsum.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, P M; Dudas, M J; Arocena, J M

    1995-10-01

    Phosphogypsum is a by-product of the phosphate fertilizer industry which is stockpiled in large quantities world-wide. Phosphogypsum consists mainly of dihydrate gypsum (CaSO42H2O) but also contains elevated concentrations of 226Ra and other inorganic species which originate from the processing of phosphate rock. 222Rn gas is the first decay product of 226Ra and has been identified as one of the major environmental concerns associated with phosphogypsum. This study was conducted to determine effects of particle size, weathering, and moisture content on the 222Rn emanation coefficient (epsilon) for phosphogypsum. Average epsilon for air-dry, unfractionated phosphogypsums derived from Togo, Florida, or Idaho rock was approximately 12%. Average epsilon for fine fraction phosphogypsum (< 20 microns diameter) was greater than for unfractionated phosphogypsum by a factor of 4.6, 1.4, and 4.4 for samples derived from Idaho rock, Togo rock, and Florida rock, respectively. Phosphogypsum samples subjected to an artificial weathering procedure lost 40% mass, with no change in epsilon. Increasing water content was found to first slightly decrease, then to increase epsilon compared to air-dry samples; epsilon for 100% saturated phosphogypsum was 1.9-fold greater than in air-dry phosphogypsum. Particle size sorting could account for variability of 222Rn exhalation at repositories. Very high moisture contents could slightly increase 222Rn emanation, but exhalation would likely be reduced due to slow diffusion through porosity of saturated phosphogypsum.

  12. Generating Matrices of C-nomial Coefficients and Their Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-20

    International Conf. Fibonacci Numbers & Applic . 2010. 14. ABSTRACT In this paper, we consider a generalization of binomial coe cients, called C{ nomial coe...combinatorial matrices, Congressus Numerantium Vol. 201 (2010), Proc. Internat. Conf. Fibonacci Numbers & Applic . – ’08, 223–236. [18] E. Kilic and P...coefficients via generating func- tion, Discrete Appl. Math. 155 (2007), 2017–2024. [24] S. Vajda, Fibonacci & Lucas numbers , and the golden section, John

  13. Direct somatic lineage conversion

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Koji; Haag, Daniel; Wernig, Marius

    2015-01-01

    The predominant view of embryonic development and cell differentiation has been that rigid and even irreversible epigenetic marks are laid down along the path of cell specialization ensuring the proper silencing of unrelated lineage programmes. This model made the prediction that specialized cell types are stable and cannot be redirected into other lineages. Accordingly, early attempts to change the identity of somatic cells had little success and was limited to conversions between closely related cell types. Nuclear transplantation experiments demonstrated, however, that specialized cells even from adult mammals can be reprogrammed into a totipotent state. The discovery that a small combination of transcription factors can reprogramme cells to pluripotency without the need of oocytes further supported the view that these epigenetic barriers can be overcome much easier than assumed, but the extent of this flexibility was still unclear. When we showed that a differentiated mesodermal cell can be directly converted to a differentiated ectodermal cell without a pluripotent intermediate, it was suggested that in principle any cell type could be converted into any other cell type. Indeed, the work of several groups in recent years has provided many more examples of direct somatic lineage conversions. Today, the question is not anymore whether a specific cell type can be generated by direct reprogramming but how it can be induced. PMID:26416679

  14. Conversion program in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson, E.B.

    1997-08-01

    The conversion of the Swedish 50 MW R2 reactor from HEU to LEU fuel has been successfully accomplished over a 16 cycles long process. The conversion started in January 1991 with the introduction of 6 LEU assemblies in the 8*8 core. The first all LEU core was loaded in March 1993 and physics measurements were performed for the final licensing reports. A total of 142 LEU fuel assemblies have been irradiated up until September 1994 without any fuel incident. The operating licence for the R2 reactor was renewed in mid 1994 taking into account new fuel type. The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate (SKI) pointed out one crucial problem with the LEU operation, that the back end of the LEU fuel cycle has not yet been solved. For the HEU fuel Sweden had the reprocessing alternative. The country is now relying heavily on the success of the USDOEs Off Site Fuels Policy to take back the spent fuel from the research reactors. They have in the meantime increased their intermediate storage facilities. There is, however, a limit both in time and space for storage of MTR-type of assemblies in water. The penalty of the lower thermal neutron flux in LEU cores has been reduced by improvements of the new irradiation rigs and by fine tuning the core calculations. The Studsvik code package, CASMO-SIMULATE, widely used for ICFM in LWRs has been modified to suit the compact MTR type of core.

  15. Energy conversion system

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1987-01-01

    The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weatherproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction, and operational with a minimal power draw.

  16. Natural gas conversion process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The main objective is to design and operate a laboratory apparatus for the catalytic reforming of natural gas in order to provide data for a large-scale process. To accelerate the assembly and calibration of this equipment, a request has been made to the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for assistance, under the DOE's Industrial Visitor Exchange Program. Pr. Heinz Heinemann (Catalysis), Dr. John Apps (Geochemistry) and Dr. Robert Fulton (Mechanical Engineering) have expressed interest in supporting our request. Pr. Heinemann's recent results on the conversion of Petroleum Coke residues into CO2 and H2 mixtures using highly basic metal oxides catalysts, similar to ours, are very encouraging regarding the possibility of converting the Coke residue on our catalyst into Syngas in the Regenerator/riser, as proposed. To minimize Coke formation in the vapor phase, by the Plasmapyrolytic Methane Conversion reactions, the experimental data of H. Drost et al. (Ref. 12) have been reviewed. Work is underway to design equipment for the safe and non-polluting disposal of the two gaseous product streams of the flow loop. 2 refs.

  17. Mode conversion in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2006-10-01

    Fast magnetosonic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) can convert to much shorter wavelength modes such as ion Bernstein waves (IBW) and ion cyclotron waves (ICW) [1]. These modes are potentially useful for plasma control through the generation of localized currents and sheared flows. As part of the SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions project, the AORSA global-wave solver [2] has been ported to the new, dual-core Cray XT-3 (Jaguar) at ORNL where it demonstrates excellent scaling with the number of processors. Preliminary calculations using 4096 processors have allowed the first full-wave simulations of mode conversion in ITER. Mode conversion from the fast wave to the ICW is observed in mixtures of deuterium, tritium and helium3 at 53 MHz. The resulting flow velocity and electric field shear will be calculated. [1] F.W. Perkins, Nucl. Fusion 17, 1197 (1977). [2] E.F. Jaeger, L.A. Berry, J.R. Myra, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 195001-1 (2003).

  18. Energy conversion system

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1985-09-16

    The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weathproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction and operational with a minimal power draw.

  19. Spatial language and converseness.

    PubMed

    Burigo, Michele; Coventry, Kenny R; Cangelosi, Angelo; Lynott, Dermot

    2016-12-01

    Typical spatial language sentences consist of describing the location of an object (the located object) in relation to another object (the reference object) as in "The book is above the vase". While it has been suggested that the properties of the located object (the book) are not translated into language because they are irrelevant when exchanging location information, it has been shown that the orientation of the located object affects the production and comprehension of spatial descriptions. In line with the claim that spatial language apprehension involves inferences about relations that hold between objects it has been suggested that during spatial language apprehension people use the orientation of the located object to evaluate whether the logical property of converseness (e.g., if "the book is above the vase" is true, then also "the vase is below the book" must be true) holds across the objects' spatial relation. In three experiments using sentence acceptability rating tasks we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that when converseness is violated people's acceptability ratings of a scene's description are reduced indicating that people do take into account geometric properties of the located object and use it to infer logical spatial relations.

  20. Light alkane conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a process for the aromatization of an aliphatic feedstream. It comprises fluidizing finely divided solid particles in a combustion zone; charging oxygen-containing combustion gas and fuel to the combustion zone under combustion conditions; withdrawing a stream of finely divided particles from the combustion zone; flowing the withdrawn stream of finely divided particles above to a cracking/dehydrogenation zone; fluidizing the finely divided particles above in an aliphatic feedstream under conditions within the cracking/dehydrogenation zone controlled to at least partially crack and at least partially dehydrogenate the aliphatic feedstream to form an intermediate product stream containing a quantity of C{sub 4}-olefins such that the exothermic catalytic conversion of the C{sub 4}-olefins is sufficient to supply a portion of the endothermic heat of reaction for the endothermic catalytic conversion of paraffins contained in the intermediate feedstream to aromatics; contacting the intermediate product stream with an aromatization catalyst under aromatization conditions sufficient to evolve an aromatics-rich products stream.

  1. Using the Monte Carlo technique to calculate dose conversion coefficients for medical professionals in interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, W. S.; Carvalho, A. B., Jr.; Hunt, J. G.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate doses in the physician and the nurse assistant at different positions during interventional radiology procedures. In this study, effective doses obtained for the physician and at points occupied by other workers were normalised by air kerma-area product (KAP). The simulations were performed for two X-ray spectra (70 kVp and 87 kVp) using the radiation transport code MCNPX (version 2.7.0), and a pair of anthropomorphic voxel phantoms (MASH/FASH) used to represent both the patient and the medical professional at positions from 7 cm to 47 cm from the patient. The X-ray tube was represented by a point source positioned in the anterior posterior (AP) and posterior anterior (PA) projections. The CC can be useful to calculate effective doses, which in turn are related to stochastic effects. With the knowledge of the values of CCs and KAP measured in an X-ray equipment, at a similar exposure, medical professionals will be able to know their own effective dose.

  2. 26 CFR 1.381(c)(13)-1 - Involuntary conversions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Involuntary conversions. 1.381(c)(13)-1 Section 1.381(c)(13)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, is treated as though it were an involuntary...

  3. Second virial coefficients for chain molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bokis, C.P.; Donohue, M.D. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Hall, C.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    The importance of having accurate second virial coefficients in phase equilibrium calculations, especially for the calculation of dew points, is discussed. The square-well potentials results in a simple but inaccurate equation for the second virial coefficient for small, spherical molecules such as argon. Here, the authors present a new equation for the second virial coefficient of both spherical molecules and chain molecules which is written in a form similar to that for the square-well potential. This new equation is accurate in comparison to Monte Carlo simulation data on second virial coefficients for square-well chain molecules and with second virial coefficients obtained from experiments on n-alkanes.

  4. Direct observation of up-conversion via femtosecond photoelectron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuzhu; Knopp, Gregor; Gerber, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Ultrafast relaxation dynamics in 2-methylfuran has been investigated by time-resolved photoelectron imaging. An "up" internal conversion from a low-lying state into a higher-lying one has been observed experimentally. Temporal photoelectron kinetic-energy distributions and angular distributions of the photoelectrons are analyzed. In the up-conversion process, the vibrational energy in the initial state is converted to the electronic energy of the final state during the energy transfer. And the time scale for the up-conversion process is estimated by the observed onset delay for the corresponding photoelectron bands.

  5. Matrix method to find a new set of Zernike coefficients from an original set when the aperture radius is changed.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Charles E

    2003-02-01

    A matrix method is developed that allows a new set of Zernike coefficients that describe a surface or wave front appropriate for a new aperture size to be found from an original set of Zernike coefficients that describe the same surface or wave front but use a different aperture size. The new set of coefficients, arranged as elements of a vector, is formed by multiplying the original set of coefficients, also arranged as elements of a vector, by a conversion matrix formed from powers of the ratio of the new to the original aperture and elements of a matrix that forms the weighting coefficients of the radial Zernike polynomial functions. In developing the method, a new matrix method for expressing Zernike polynomial functions is introduced and used. An algorithm is given for creating the conversion matrix along with computer code to implement the algorithm.

  6. Conversion properties of short-range autodyne systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damgov, V. N.

    1990-04-01

    An analysis is made of the conversion properties of Doppler autodyne systems (for use in short-range navigation systems) described by a third-order differential equation. Expressions are obtained for the conversion coefficients of the echo signal from a moving object as a function of the degree of regeneration and detuning of the oscillation circuit of the autodyne, the time constant of the shift circuit, the self-oscillation amplitude, the degree of nonlinearity of the active-element characteristics, and the Doppler-shift frequency.

  7. Mode conversion in magneto photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    otmani, Hamza; Bouchemat, Mohamed; Hocini, Abdesselam; Boumaza, Touraya; benmerkhi, ahlem

    2017-01-01

    The first concept of an integrated isolator was based on nonreciprocal TE-TM mode conversion, the nonreciprocal coupling between these modes is caused by the Faraday rotation if the magnetization is aligned along the z-axis, parallel to mode propagation. We propose to study this magneto-optical phenomenon, by the simulation of magneto photonic crystal fibre (MPCF), it consists of a periodic triangular lattice of air-holes filled with magnetic fluid which consists of magnetic nanoparticles into a BIG (Bismuth Iron Garnet) fibre. We simulated the influence of gyrotropy and the wavelength, and calculated Faraday rotation and modal birefringence. In this fibre the light is guided by internal total reflection, like classical fibres. However it was shown that they could function on a mode conversion much stronger than conventional fibres.

  8. Non-editorial Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, John

    1974-01-01

    In his position as retiring chief of the Workers' Education Branch of the International Labour Office (ILO), Paul B. J. Chu is interviewed on worker education, the ILO organization and tole, personal disappointments and satisfactions, future educational developments in which the ILO will be involved, and problems facing workers' education. (AG)

  9. Non-editorial Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, John

    1974-01-01

    In his position as retiring chief of the Workers' Education Branch of the International Labour Office (ILO), Paul B. J. Chu is interviewed on worker education, the ILO organization and tole, personal disappointments and satisfactions, future educational developments in which the ILO will be involved, and problems facing workers' education. (AG)

  10. Power conversion technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M. A.

    1997-02-01

    The Power Conversion Technologies thrust area identifies and sponsors development activities that enhance the capabilities of engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the area of solid- state power electronics. Our primary objective is to be a resource to existing and emerging LLNL programs that require advanced solid-state power electronic technologies.. Our focus is on developing and integrating technologies that will significantly impact the capability, size, cost, and reliability of future power electronic systems. During FY-96, we concentrated our research efforts on the areas of (1) Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR); (2) novel solid-state opening switches; (3) advanced modulator technology for accelerators; (4) compact accelerators; and (5) compact pulse generators.

  11. Advanced thermionic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Developments towards space and terrestrial applications of thermionic energy conversion are presented. Significant accomplishments for the three month period include: (1) devised a blade-type distributed lead design with many advantages compared to the stud-type distributed lead; (2) completed design of Marchuk tube test apparatus; (3) concluded, based on current understanding, that residual hydrogen should not contribute to a negative space charge barrier at the collector; (4) modified THX design program to include series-coupled designs as well as inductively-coupled designs; (5) initiated work on the heat transfer technology, THX test module, output power transfer system, heat transfer system, and conceptual plant design tasks; and (6) reached 2200 hours of operation in JPL-5 cylindrical converter envelope test.

  12. Automated FORTRAN conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonian, Gregory

    1986-01-01

    The most pratical solution to the conversion of FORTRAN to other programming languages which STO and a few others have adopted, uses an intermediate language that is easy to translate FORTRAN into, and allows for source codes in other languages to be generated automatically. The intermediate language is the union of all other programming languages (and the trick is to create a useful union) with some extensions that reflect the nature of the algorithms. The benefits of this approach are many. First the original FORTRAN program has to be rewritten only once, and then only parts of the program: most FORTRAN code passes through without and change (i.e., assignment and simple IF statements). Software tools are provided to ease this initial translation. Once in the intermediate language, the algorithm can then be obtained in any other language automatically. An example of a subroutine from the Rispack library in ten different languages is given.

  13. Laser plasmadynamic energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1976-01-01

    The generation of electrons ions by interacting an intense laser beam with cesium vapor is considered. Theoretical calculation shows that the conversion efficiency is as high as 40 percent if the entire photon energy is utilized in ionizing the cesium vapor that is generated initially by the incoming laser beam. An output voltage is expected to be generated across two electrodes, one of which is the liquid cesium, by keeping the other electrode at a different work function. Evaluation of the laser plasmadynamic (LPD) converter was performed using pulsed ruby and Nd-glass lasers. Although the results obtained to date indicate an efficiency smaller than that of theoretical predictions, an unoptimized LPD converter did demonstrate the capability of converting laser energy at large power levels. The limitations in the performance may by due to converter geometry, the types of lasers used, and other limitations inherent to the cesium plasma.

  14. Excitatory and inhibitory conversive experiences: neurobiological features involving positive and negative conversion symptoms.

    PubMed

    Río-Casanova, Lucía Del; González, Anabel; Páramo, Mario; Brenlla, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Previous reviews have focused on neurobiological and physiological mechanisms underlying conversion disorder, but they do not usually distinguish between negative and positive conversion symptoms. Some authors have proposed that different phenomena should underlie both situations and that diverse emotion regulation strategies (under- vs. overregulation of affect) should be related to different internal experiences (excitatory experiences with hyperarousal manifestations vs. inhibitory experiences coexisting with hypoarousal states, respectively). After a careful review of the literature, we conclude that there is not a unique theory comprising all findings. Nevertheless, we have also collected some replicated findings that should be salient. Patients manifesting positive conversion symptoms tended to present with limbic hyperfunction, not sufficiently counteracted by prefrontal control. This leads to underregulation of affect mechanisms, increased emotional reactivity and autonomic hyperarousal. The opposite pattern (with a prefrontal overfunction working as a cognitive brake over the limbic system) has been described during negative conversion manifestations. We also highlight the influence of fronto-limbic circuits over cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits' regulation, whose horizontal and vertical synchronization has been at the spotlight of the genesis of conversion and dissociative disorders.

  15. The Role of Conversation Policy in Carrying Out Agent Conversations

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Hamilton E.; Phillips, Laurence R.

    1999-05-20

    Structured conversation diagrams, or conversation specifications, allow agents to have predictable interactions and achieve predefined information-based goals, but they lack the flexibility needed to function robustly in an unpredictable environment. We propose a mechanism that combines a typical conversation structure with a separately established policy to generate an actual conversation. The word "policy" connotes a high-level direction external to a specific planned interaction with the environment. Policies, which describe acceptable procedures and influence decisions, can be applied to broad sets of activity. Based on their observation of issues related to a policy, agents may dynamically adjust their communication patterns. The policy object describes limitations, constraints, and requirements that may affect the conversation in certain circumstances. Using this new mechanism of interaction simplifies the description of individual conversations and allows domain-specific issues to be brought to bear more easily during agent communication. By following the behavior of the conversation specification when possible and deferring to the policy to derive behavior in exceptional circumstances, an agent is able to function predictably under normal situations and still act rationally in abnormal situations. Different conversation policies applied to a given conversation specification can change the nature of the interaction without changing the specification.

  16. Internal dosimetry - a review.

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus

    2004-06-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  17. Internal dosimetry: a review.

    PubMed

    Potter, Charles A

    2005-06-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  18. Basis and implications of the CAP88 age-specific dose coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Scofield, Patricia A; Eckerman, Keith F

    2013-01-01

    Recent versions of CAP88 incorporate age-specific dose coefficients based on biokinetic and dosimetric models applied in Federal Guidance Report 13, Cancer Risk Coefficients for Environmental Exposure to Radionuclides (EPA 1999). With a few exceptions the models are those recommended in a series of reports by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) on estimation of doses to the public from environmental radionuclides. This paper describes the basis for the ICRP s age-specific biokinetic and dosimetric models and examines differences with age in the derived dose coefficients and in estimates of dose per unit exposure based on those coefficients.

  19. Investigating bias in squared regression structure coefficients.

    PubMed

    Nimon, Kim F; Zientek, Linda R; Thompson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The importance of structure coefficients and analogs of regression weights for analysis within the general linear model (GLM) has been well-documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate bias in squared structure coefficients in the context of multiple regression and to determine if a formula that had been shown to correct for bias in squared Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination could be used to correct for bias in squared regression structure coefficients. Using data from a Monte Carlo simulation, this study found that squared regression structure coefficients corrected with Pratt's formula produced less biased estimates and might be more accurate and stable estimates of population squared regression structure coefficients than estimates with no such corrections. While our findings are in line with prior literature that identified multicollinearity as a predictor of bias in squared regression structure coefficients but not coefficients of determination, the findings from this study are unique in that the level of predictive power, number of predictors, and sample size were also observed to contribute bias in squared regression structure coefficients.

  20. Investigating bias in squared regression structure coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Nimon, Kim F.; Zientek, Linda R.; Thompson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The importance of structure coefficients and analogs of regression weights for analysis within the general linear model (GLM) has been well-documented. The purpose of this study was to investigate bias in squared structure coefficients in the context of multiple regression and to determine if a formula that had been shown to correct for bias in squared Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination could be used to correct for bias in squared regression structure coefficients. Using data from a Monte Carlo simulation, this study found that squared regression structure coefficients corrected with Pratt's formula produced less biased estimates and might be more accurate and stable estimates of population squared regression structure coefficients than estimates with no such corrections. While our findings are in line with prior literature that identified multicollinearity as a predictor of bias in squared regression structure coefficients but not coefficients of determination, the findings from this study are unique in that the level of predictive power, number of predictors, and sample size were also observed to contribute bias in squared regression structure coefficients. PMID:26217273