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Sample records for internal dose coefficients

  1. An analytical model for calculating internal dose conversion coefficients for non-human biota.

    PubMed

    Amato, Ernesto; Italiano, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    To assess the radiation burden of non-human living organisms, dose coefficients are available in the literature, precalculated by assuming an ellipsoidal shape of each organism. A previously developed analytical method was applied for the determination of absorbed fractions inside ellipsoidal volumes from alpha, beta, and gamma radiations to the calculation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) for 15 reference organisms, animals and plants, either terrestrial, amphibian, or aquatic, and six radionuclides ((14)C, (90)Sr, (60)Co, (137)Cs, (238)U, and (241)Am). The results were compared with the reference values reported in Publication 108 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, in which a different calculation approach for DCCs was employed. The results demonstrate that the present analytical method, originally intended for applications in internal dosimetry of nuclear medicine therapy, gives consistent results for all the beta-, beta-gamma-, and alpha-emitting radionuclides tested in a wide range of organism masses, between 8 mg and 1.3 kg. The applicability of the method proposed can take advantage from its ease of implementation in an ordinary electronic spreadsheet, allowing to calculate, for virtually all possible radionuclide emission spectra, the DCCs for ellipsoidal models of non-human living organisms in the environment.

  2. Translation of dose coefficients From ICRP 53 to ICRP 80.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Hanna M; Melanson, Mark A

    2013-02-01

    The effective dose coefficients tabulated in Publication 80 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the radiopharmaceuticals addressed earlier in ICRP Publication 53 are based on the tissue weighting factors of ICRP Publication 60. Presumably these values are derived from the tissue dose coefficients tabulated in Publication 53; however, no details regarding their derivation are provided. The tissue weighting factors of Publication 60 explicitly address tissue for which no dose coefficients were tabulated in Publication 53; for example, esophagus and a number of tissues comprising the remainder. In the absence of guidance, the authors have defined a set of rules for the translation and have undertaken an effort to derive the effective dose coefficients of Publication 80 starting with the organ/tissue dose coefficient of Publication 53.

  3. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  4. Personal Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients For Photons To 1 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2010-09-27

    The personal dose equivalent, H{sub p}(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity Effective Dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk where personal dosemeters are usually worn and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 cm X 30 cm X 15 cm slab-type phantom. For this condition the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H{sub p,slab}(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several MeV, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H{sub p,slab}(10) and H{sub p,slab}(3) using both the kerma approximation and by tracking secondary charged particles. For H{sub p}(0.07) the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H{sub p,slab}(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared to the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on

  5. Basis and implications of the CAP88 age-specific dose coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Scofield, Patricia A; Eckerman, Keith F

    2013-01-01

    Recent versions of CAP88 incorporate age-specific dose coefficients based on biokinetic and dosimetric models applied in Federal Guidance Report 13, Cancer Risk Coefficients for Environmental Exposure to Radionuclides (EPA 1999). With a few exceptions the models are those recommended in a series of reports by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) on estimation of doses to the public from environmental radionuclides. This paper describes the basis for the ICRP s age-specific biokinetic and dosimetric models and examines differences with age in the derived dose coefficients and in estimates of dose per unit exposure based on those coefficients.

  6. DCFPAK: Dose coefficient data file package for Sandia National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.; Leggett, R.W.

    1996-07-31

    The FORTRAN-based computer package DCFPAK (Dose Coefficient File Package) has been developed to provide electronic access to the dose coefficient data files summarized in Federal Guidance Reports 11 and 12. DCFPAK also provides access to standard information regarding decay chains and assembles dose coefficients for all dosimetrically significant radioactive progeny of a specified radionuclide. DCFPAK was designed for application on a PC but, with minor modifications, may be implemented on a UNIX workstation.

  7. Personal dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for 1252 radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Otto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides are useful for routine calculations in radiation protection in industry, medicine and research. They give a simple and often sufficient estimate of dose rates during production, handling and storage of radionuclide sources, based solely on the source's activity. The latest compilation of such conversion coefficients dates from 20 y ago, based on nuclear decay data published 30 y ago. The present publication provides radionuclide-specific conversion coefficients to personal dose based on the most recent evaluations of nuclear decay data for 1252 radionuclides and fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for monoenergetic radiations. It contains previously unknown conversion coefficients for >400 nuclides and corrects those conversion coefficients that were based on erroneous decay schemes. For the first time, estimates for the protection quantity Hp(3) are included.

  8. Comparison of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for deuterons, tritons and helions.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kyle; Friedberg, Wallace; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji

    2012-02-01

    Secondary radiation in aircraft and spacecraft includes deuterons, tritons and helions. Two sets of fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients for isotropic exposure to these particles were compared: one used the particle and heavy ion transport code system (PHITS) radiation transport code coupled with the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms (PHITS-ICRP) and the other the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) radiation transport code coupled with modified BodyBuilder™ phantoms (MCNPX-BB). Also, two sets of fluence-to-effective dose equivalent conversion coefficients calculated using the PHITS-ICRP combination were compared: one used quality factors based on linear energy transfer; the other used quality factors based on lineal energy (y). Finally, PHITS-ICRP effective dose coefficients were compared with PHITS-ICRP effective dose equivalent coefficients. The PHITS-ICRP and MCNPX-BB effective dose coefficients were similar, except at high energies, where MCNPX-BB coefficients were higher. For helions, at most energies effective dose coefficients were much greater than effective dose equivalent coefficients. For deuterons and tritons, coefficients were similar when their radiation weighting factor was set to 2.

  9. Dose conversion coefficients for partial-fan CBCT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlattl, Helmut

    2017-03-01

    Due to the increasing number of cone-beam CT (CBCT) devices on the market, reliable estimates of patient doses for these imaging modality is desired. Cone-beam CT devices differ from conventional CT not only by a larger collimation but also by different recording modes. In this work, it has been investigated whether reliable patient doses can be obtained for CBCT devices in partial-fan mode using pre-computed slices. As an exemplary case, chest CBCT scans for the ICRP reference adult models has been examined. By normalizing organ doses to CTDI100w , the resulting dose conversion coefficients for CBCT could be well reproduced by precomputed slices, with a relative difference in the effective dose conversion coefficients of less than 10%.

  10. ORGAN AND EFFECTIVE DOSE COEFFICIENTS FOR CRANIAL AND CAUDAL IRRADIATION GEOMETRIES: NEUTRONS.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Eckerman, K F; Hertel, N E; Hiller, M M

    2016-08-29

    Dose coefficients based on the recommendations of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57 for the six reference irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right and left lateral, rotational and isotropic. In this work, dose coefficients for neutron irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and downward from above the head (cranial) using the ICRP 103 methodology were computed using the MCNP 6.1 radiation transport code. The dose coefficients were determined for neutrons ranging in energy from 10(-9) MeV to 10 GeV. At energies below about 500 MeV, the cranial and caudal dose coefficients are less than those for the six reference geometries reported in ICRP Publication 116.

  11. Organ and effective dose coefficients for cranial and caudal irradiation geometries: Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.; Eckerman, K. F.; Hertel, N. E.; Hiller, M. M.

    2016-08-29

    Dose coefficients based on the recommendations of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57 for the six reference irradiation geometries: anterior–posterior, posterior–anterior, right and left lateral, rotational and isotropic. In this work, dose coefficients for neutron irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and downward from above the head (cranial) using the ICRP 103 methodology were computed using the MCNP 6.1 radiation transport code. The dose coefficients were determined for neutrons ranging in energy from 10–9 MeV to 10 GeV. Here, at energies below about 500 MeV, the cranial and caudal dose coefficients are less than those for the six reference geometries reported in ICRP Publication 116.

  12. Organ and effective dose coefficients for cranial and caudal irradiation geometries: Neutrons

    DOE PAGES

    Veinot, K. G.; Eckerman, K. F.; Hertel, N. E.; ...

    2016-08-29

    Dose coefficients based on the recommendations of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57 for the six reference irradiation geometries: anterior–posterior, posterior–anterior, right and left lateral, rotational and isotropic. In this work, dose coefficients for neutron irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and downward from above the head (cranial) using the ICRP 103 methodology were computed using the MCNP 6.1 radiation transport code. The dose coefficients were determined for neutrons ranging in energy from 10–9more » MeV to 10 GeV. Here, at energies below about 500 MeV, the cranial and caudal dose coefficients are less than those for the six reference geometries reported in ICRP Publication 116.« less

  13. Evaluation of Dimensionality in the Assessment of Internal Consistency Reliability: Coefficient Alpha and Omega Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2015-01-01

    In the lead article, Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love demonstrate the relationship among homogeneity, internal consistency, and coefficient alpha, and also distinguish among them. These distinctions are important because too often coefficient alpha--a reliability coefficient--is interpreted as an index of homogeneity or internal consistency.…

  14. Evaluation of Dimensionality in the Assessment of Internal Consistency Reliability: Coefficient Alpha and Omega Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2015-01-01

    In the lead article, Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love demonstrate the relationship among homogeneity, internal consistency, and coefficient alpha, and also distinguish among them. These distinctions are important because too often coefficient alpha--a reliability coefficient--is interpreted as an index of homogeneity or internal consistency.…

  15. Organ dose conversion coefficients for pediatric reference computational phantoms in external photon radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lienard A.

    In the event of a radiological accident or attack, it is important to estimate the organ doses to those exposed. In general, it is difficult to measure organ dose directly in the field and therefore dose conversion coefficients (DCC) are needed to convert measurable values such as air kerma to organ dose. Previous work on these coefficients has been conducted mainly for adults with a focus on radiation protection workers. Hence, there is a large gap in the literature for pediatric values. This study coupled a Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code with International Council of Radiological Protection (ICRP)-adopted University of Florida and National Cancer Institute pediatric reference phantoms to calculate a comprehensive list of dose conversion coefficients (mGy/mGy) to convert air-kerma to organ dose. Parameters included ten phantoms (newborn, 1-year, 5-year, 10-year, 15-year old male and female), 28 organs over 33 energies between 0.01 and 20 MeV in six (6) irradiation geometries relevant to a child who might be exposed to a radiological release: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right-lateral (RLAT), left-lateral (LLAT), rotational (ROT), and isotropic (ISO). Dose conversion coefficients to the red bone marrow over 36 skeletal sites were also calculated. It was hypothesized that the pediatric organ dose conversion coefficients would follow similar trends to the published adult values as dictated by human anatomy, but be of a higher magnitude. It was found that while the pediatric coefficients did yield similar patterns to that of the adult coefficients, depending on the organ and irradiation geometry, the pediatric values could be lower or higher than that of the adult coefficients.

  16. Comparison of monoenergetic photon organ dose rate coefficients for stylized and voxel phantoms submerged in air

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy, Michael B.; Hiller, Mauritius M.; Dewji, Shaheen A.; Veinot, Kenneth G.; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F.; Easterly, Clay E.; Hertel, Nolan E.

    2016-02-01

    As part of a broader effort to calculate effective dose rate coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, soil or water, age-specific stylized phantoms have been employed to determine dose coefficients relating dose rate to organs and tissues in the body. In this article, dose rate coefficients computed using the International Commission on Radiological Protection reference adult male voxel phantom are compared with values computed using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory adult male stylized phantom in an air submersion exposure geometry. Monte Carlo calculations for both phantoms were performed for monoenergetic source photons in the range of 30 keV to 5 MeV. Furthermore, these calculations largely result in differences under 10 % for photon energies above 50 keV, and it can be expected that both models show comparable results for the environmental sources of radionuclides.

  17. Comparison of monoenergetic photon organ dose rate coefficients for stylized and voxel phantoms submerged in air

    DOE PAGES

    Bellamy, Michael B.; Hiller, Mauritius M.; Dewji, Shaheen A.; ...

    2016-02-01

    As part of a broader effort to calculate effective dose rate coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, soil or water, age-specific stylized phantoms have been employed to determine dose coefficients relating dose rate to organs and tissues in the body. In this article, dose rate coefficients computed using the International Commission on Radiological Protection reference adult male voxel phantom are compared with values computed using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory adult male stylized phantom in an air submersion exposure geometry. Monte Carlo calculations for both phantoms were performed for monoenergetic source photonsmore » in the range of 30 keV to 5 MeV. Furthermore, these calculations largely result in differences under 10 % for photon energies above 50 keV, and it can be expected that both models show comparable results for the environmental sources of radionuclides.« less

  18. Dose coefficients for ICRP reference pediatric phantoms exposed to idealised external gamma fields.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lienard A; Simon, Steven L; Jorgensen, Timothy J; Schauer, David A; Lee, Choonsik

    2017-03-20

    Organ and effective dose coefficients have been calculated for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference pediatric phantoms externally exposed to mono-energetic photon radiation (x- and gamma-rays) from 0.01 to 20 MeV. Calculations used Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques. Organ dose coefficients, i.e., organ absorbed dose per unit air kerma (Gy/Gy), were calculated for 28 organs and tissues including the active marrow (or red bone marrow) for 10 phantoms (newborn, 1 year, 5 year, 10 year, and 15 year old male and female). Radiation exposure was simulated for 33 photon mono-energies (0.01-20 MeV) in six irradiation geometries: antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior, right lateral, left lateral, rotational, and isotropic. Organ dose coefficients for different ages closely agree in AP geometry as illustrated by a small coefficient of variation (COV) (the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean) of 4.4% for the lungs. The small COVs shown for the effective dose and AP irradiation geometry reflect that most of the radiosensitive organs are located in the front part of the human body. In contrast, we observed differences in organ dose coefficients across the ages of the phantoms for lateral irradiation geometries. We also observed variation in dose coefficients across different irradiation geometries, where the COV ranges from 18% (newborn male) to 38% (15 year old male) across idealised whole body irradiation geometries for the major organs (active marrow, colon, lung, stomach wall, and breast) at the energy of 0.1 MeV. Effective dose coefficients were also derived for applicable situations, e.g., radiation protection or risk projection. Our results are the first comprehensive set of organ and effective dose coefficients applicable to children and adolescents based on the newly adopted ICRP pediatric phantom series. Our tabulated organ and effective dose coefficients for these next-generation phantoms should provide more

  19. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for electrons to 1 Ge V.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2012-04-01

    In a previous paper, conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent, H(p)(d), for photons were reported. This note reports values for electrons calculated using similar techniques. The personal dose equivalent is the quantity used to approximate the protection quantity effective dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations and in practice the personal dose equivalent is determined using a 30×30×15 cm slab-type phantom. Conversion coefficients to 1 GeV have been calculated for H(p)(10), H(p)(3) and H(p)(0.07) in the recommended slab phantom. Although the conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, analytical fits of the conversion coefficients over the energy range are provided using a similar formulation as in the photon results previously reported. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared with the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on Radiological Protection guidance. Effects of eyewear on H(p)(3) are also discussed.

  20. Delimiting Coefficient a from Internal Consistency and Unidimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sijtsma, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    I discuss the contribution by Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love (2015) in which they relate reliability represented by coefficient a to formal definitions of internal consistency and unidimensionality, both proposed by Cronbach (1951). I argue that coefficient a is a lower bound to reliability and that concepts of internal consistency and…

  1. Delimiting Coefficient a from Internal Consistency and Unidimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sijtsma, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    I discuss the contribution by Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love (2015) in which they relate reliability represented by coefficient a to formal definitions of internal consistency and unidimensionality, both proposed by Cronbach (1951). I argue that coefficient a is a lower bound to reliability and that concepts of internal consistency and…

  2. Determination of absolute internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Papadakis, P.; Konki, J.; Cox, D. M.; Auranen, K.; Partanen, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Uusitalo, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Smallcombe, J.; Davies, P. J.; Barton, C. J.; Jenkins, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    A non-reference based method to determine internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer is carried out for transitions in the nuclei of 154Sm, 152Sm and 166Yb. The Normalised-Peak-to-Gamma method is in general an efficient tool to extract internal conversion coefficients. However, in many cases the required well-known reference transitions are not available. The data analysis steps required to determine absolute internal conversion coefficients with the SAGE spectrometer are presented. In addition, several background suppression methods are introduced and an example of how ancillary detectors can be used to select specific reaction products is given. The results obtained for ground-state band E2 transitions show that the absolute internal conversion coefficients can be extracted using the methods described with a reasonable accuracy. In some cases of less intense transitions only an upper limit for the internal conversion coefficient could be given.

  3. Uncertainty Quantification in Internal Dose Calculations for Seven Selected Radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, Vladimir; Li, Wei Bo; Zankl, Maria; Oeh, Uwe; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Dose coefficients of radiopharmaceuticals have been published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the MIRD Committee but without information concerning uncertainties. The uncertainty information of dose coefficients is important, for example, to compare alternative diagnostic methods and choose the method that causes the lowest patient exposure with appropriate and comparable diagnostic quality. For the study presented here, an uncertainty analysis method was developed and used to calculate the uncertainty of the internal doses of 7 common radiopharmaceuticals. On the basis of the generalized schema of dose calculation recommended by the ICRP and MIRD Committee, an analysis based on propagation of uncertainty was developed and applied for 7 radiopharmaceuticals. The method takes into account the uncertainties contributed from pharmacokinetic models and the so-called S values derived from several voxel computational phantoms previously developed at Helmholtz Zentrum München. Random and Latin hypercube sampling techniques were used to sample parameters of pharmacokinetic models and S values, and the uncertainties of absorbed doses and effective doses were calculated. The uncertainty factors (square root of the ratio between 97.5th and 2.5th percentiles) for organ-absorbed doses are in the range of 1.1-3.3. Uncertainty values of effective doses are lower in comparison to absorbed doses, the maximum value being approximately 1.4. The ICRP reference values showed a deviation comparable to the effective dose calculated in this study. A general statistical method was developed for calculating the uncertainty of absorbed doses and effective doses for 7 radiopharmaceuticals. The dose uncertainties can be used to further identify the most important parameters in the dose calculation and provide reliable dose coefficients for risk analysis of the patients in nuclear medicine. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

  4. Uncertainties in dose coefficients from ingestion of 131I, 137Cs, and 90Sr.

    PubMed

    Apostoaei, A Iulian; Miller, Laurence F

    2004-05-01

    Quantification of uncertainties in doses from intakes of radionuclides is important in risk assessments and epidemiologic studies of individuals exposed to radiation. In this study, the uncertainties in the doses per unit intake (i.e., dose coefficients) for ingestion of 131I, 137Cs, and 90Sr by healthy individuals have been determined. Age-dependent thyroid dose coefficients were derived for 131I. The analysis for 131I uses recent measurements of thyroid volume obtained by ultrasonography, which indicate a thyroid mass lower than that previously obtained using autopsy measurements. The coefficients for 137Cs are determined using the relationship between the biological half-lives and the amount of potassium in the human body. The most recent International Commission on Radiological Protection biokinetic model was employed to determine the uncertainties for 90Sr. For 137Cs and 90Sr, the dose coefficients represent exposure in adulthood and they were determined for all organs of radiological importance. The uncertainty in the estimated dose coefficients represent state of knowledge estimates for a reference individual, and they are described by lognormal distributions with a specified geometric mean (GM) and geometric standard deviation (GSD). The estimated geometric means vary only slightly from the dose coefficients reported by ICRP publications. The largest uncertainty is observed in the dose coefficients for bone surface (GSD = 2.6), and red bone marrow (GSD = 2.4) in the case of ingestion of 90Sr. For most other organs, the uncertainty in the 90Sr dose coefficients is characterized by a GSD of 1.8 (or less for some organs). For 131I, the uncertainty in the thyroid dose coefficients is well represented by a GSD of 1.7 for both sexes and all ages other than infants for whom a GSD of 1.8 is more appropriate. The lowest uncertainties are obtained for the dose coefficients from ingestion of 137Cs (GSD = 1.24 for males; 1.4 for females). A dominant source of

  5. Practical applications of internal dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.

    1994-06-01

    Accurate estimates of intake magnitude and internal dose are the goal for any assessment of an actual intake of radioactivity. When only one datum is available on which to base estimates, the choices for internal dose assessment become straight-forward: apply the appropriate retention or excretion function, calculate the intake, and calculate the dose. The difficulty comes when multiple data and different types of data become available. Then practical decisions must be made on how to interpret conflicting data, or how to adjust the assumptions and techniques underlying internal dose assessments to give results consistent with the data. This article describes nine types of adjustments which can be incorporated into calculations of intake and internal dose, and then offers several practical insights to dealing with some real-world internal dose puzzles.

  6. Comparison of Monoenergetic Photon Organ Dose Rate Coefficients for the Female Stylized and Voxel Phantoms Submerged in Air

    DOE PAGES

    Hiller, Mauritius; Dewji, Shaheen Azim

    2017-02-16

    Dose rate coefficients computed using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference adult female voxel phantom were compared with values computed using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) adult female stylized phantom in an air submersion exposure geometry. This is a continuation of previous work comparing monoenergetic organ dose rate coefficients for the male adult phantoms. With both the male and female data computed, effective dose rate as defined by ICRP Publication 103 was compared for both phantoms. Organ dose rate coefficients for the female phantom and ratios of organ dose rates for the voxel and stylized phantoms aremore » provided in the energy range from 30 to 5 MeV. Analysis of the contribution of the organs to effective dose is also provided. Lastly, comparison of effective dose rates between the voxel and stylized phantoms was within 8% at 100 keV and is <5% between 200 and 5000 keV.« less

  7. Internal dose following a major nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.R.; Shapiro, C.S. )

    1992-01-01

    The PATHWAY model results were used, in conjunction with a hypothetical major nuclear attack on the U.S., to arrive at the ratio of internal to external dose for humans from early (48 h) fallout. Considered were the four nuclides (137Cs, 89Sr, 90Sr, 131I) that account for most of the reconstructed whole-body committed equivalent dose from internal radiation in people who lived downwind of the Nevada Test Site during atmospheric tests. Effects of climate perturbations (the 'nuclear winter' effect) on food crops were considered. These could increase internal dose estimates, depending on the severity of the climate perturbations. Internal and external doses to humans for 10 locations within the U.S. have been calculated, with varying local conditions and varying assumption about their shelters. The estimated 50-y internal dose commitment ranged from 0.0-0.17 Sv, the 48-h external dose from 0.15-4.6 Sv. The resultant ratios of internal to external committed dose received in the first months (until food transport was restored) varied from less than 0.01 to about 0.2. In all cases examined, the total dose from early fallout was found to be dominated by the external dose.

  8. Internal dose following a major nuclear war.

    PubMed

    Peterson, K R; Shapiro, C S

    1992-01-01

    The PATHWAY model results were used, in conjunction with a hypothetical major nuclear attack on the U.S., to arrive at the ratio of internal to external dose for humans from early (48 h) fallout. Considered were the four nuclides (137Cs, 89Sr, 90Sr, 131I) that account for most of the reconstructed whole-body committed equivalent dose from internal radiation in people who lived downwind of the Nevada Test Site during atmospheric tests. Effects of climate perturbations (the "nuclear winter" effect) on food crops were considered. These could increase internal dose estimates, depending on the severity of the climate perturbations. Internal and external doses to humans for 10 locations within the U.S. have been calculated, with varying local conditions and varying assumption about their shelters. The estimated 50-y internal dose commitment ranged from 0.0-0.17 Sv, the 48-h external dose from 0.15-4.6 Sv. The resultant ratios of internal to external committed dose received in the first months (until food transport was restored) varied from less than 0.01 to about 0.2. In all cases examined, the total dose from early fallout was found to be dominated by the external dose.

  9. Neutron-fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients in an anthropomorphic phantom.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, A A; Ma, A; Tzortzis, M; Spyrou, N M

    2005-01-01

    A set of fluence-to-effective-dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for neutrons with energies <20 MeV using a high-resolution anthropomorphic phantom (Zubal model) and the MCNPX code. The calculation used 13 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10(-9) to 20 MeV, under three different source irradiation configurations: anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior and left lateral. Dose calculations were performed for 18 selected organs of the body, for which the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements have set tissue weighting factors for the determination of the effective dose. Another set of neutron-fluence-to-effective-dose conversion coefficients was also calculated with the proposed modification wR from ICRP Publication 92. From comparison between the dose results calculated and the data reported for the MIRD and VIPMAN models, it can be concluded that, although some discrepancies exist between the Zubal model and the two other models, there is good agreement in the left lateral irradiation geometry.

  10. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for photons to 1 GeV.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2011-04-01

    The personal dose equivalent, H(p)(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity effective dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk, where personal dosemeters are usually worn, and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 × 30 × 15 cm(3) slab-type phantom. For this condition, the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H(p,slab)(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several megaelectronvolts, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work, conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H(p,slab)(10) and H(p,slab)(3) both by using the kerma approximation and tracking secondary charged particles. For H(p)(0.07), the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H(p,slab)(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom, conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared with the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on Radiological

  11. Organ and effective dose coefficients for cranial and caudal irradiation geometries: photons

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.; Eckerman, K. F.; Hertel, N. E.

    2015-05-02

    With the introduction of new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms. Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for photon irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue kerma and absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to photons ranging in energy from 10 keV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6.1 radiation transport code and the adult reference phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. As with calculations reported in ICRP 116, the effects of charged-particle transport are evident when compared with values obtained by using the kerma approximation. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above similar to 30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater.

  12. Organ and effective dose coefficients for cranial and caudal irradiation geometries: photons.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Eckerman, K F; Hertel, N E

    2016-02-01

    With the introduction of new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms. Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for photon irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue kerma and absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to photons ranging in energy from 10 keV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6.1 radiation transport code and the adult reference phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. As with calculations reported in ICRP 116, the effects of charged-particle transport are evident when compared with values obtained by using the kerma approximation. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above ∼30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater. Published by Oxford University

  13. Organ and effective dose coefficients for cranial and caudal irradiation geometries: photons

    DOE PAGES

    Veinot, K. G.; Eckerman, K. F.; Hertel, N. E.

    2015-05-02

    With the introduction of new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms. Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision ofmore » ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for photon irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue kerma and absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to photons ranging in energy from 10 keV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6.1 radiation transport code and the adult reference phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. As with calculations reported in ICRP 116, the effects of charged-particle transport are evident when compared with values obtained by using the kerma approximation. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above similar to 30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater.« less

  14. Dose conversion coefficients for photon exposure of the human eye lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, R.; Dietze, G.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several papers dealing with the eye lens dose have been published, because epidemiological studies implied that the induction of cataracts occurs even at eye lens doses of less than 500 mGy. Different questions were addressed: Which personal dose equivalent quantity is appropriate for monitoring the dose to the eye lens? Is a new definition of the dose quantity Hp(3) based on a cylinder phantom to represent the human head necessary? Are current conversion coefficients from fluence to equivalent dose to the lens sufficiently accurate? To investigate the latter question, a realistic model of the eye including the inner structure of the lens was developed. Using this eye model, conversion coefficients for electrons have already been presented. In this paper, the same eye model—with the addition of the whole body—was used to calculate conversion coefficients from fluence (and air kerma) to equivalent dose to the lens for photon radiation from 5 keV to 10 MeV. Compared to the values adopted in 1996 by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the new values are similar between 40 keV and 1 MeV and lower by up to a factor of 5 and 7 for photon energies at about 10 keV and 10 MeV, respectively. Above 1 MeV, the new values (calculated without kerma approximation) should be applied in pure photon radiation fields, while the values adopted by the ICRP in 1996 (calculated with kerma approximation) should be applied in case a significant contribution from secondary electrons originating outside the body is present.

  15. INTERNAL CONVERSION COEFFICIENTS - HOW GOOD ARE THEY NOW?

    SciTech Connect

    KIBEDI,T.; BURROWS, T.W.; TRZHASKOVSKAYA, M.B.; NESTOR, JR., C.W.; DAVIDSON, P.M.

    2007-04-22

    Internal conversion coefficients involving atomic electrons (ICC) and electron-positron pairs (IPC) are often required to determine transition multipolarities and total transition rates. A new internal conversion coefficient data base, BrIcc has been developed which integrates a number of tabulations on ICC and IPC, as well as {Omega}(E0) electronic factors. To decide which theoretical internal conversion coefficient table to use, the accurately determined experimental {alpha}{sub K}, {alpha}{sub L}, {alpha}{sub Total} and {alpha}{sub K}/{alpha}{sub L} values were compared with the new Dirac-Fock calculations using extreme assumptions on the effect of the atomic vacancy. While the overall difference between experiment and theory is less than 1%, our analysis shows preference towards the so called ''Frozen Orbital'' approximation, which takes into account the effect of the atomic vacancy.

  16. Dependence of dose coefficients for inhaled 239Pu on absorption parameters.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Sekimoto, H; Ishigure, N

    2001-01-01

    With regard to dissolution of particles in the respiratory tract after inhalation, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has classified all radionuclides into only three types according to the chemical form of compounds, and default values of absorption parameters are proposed for each type. However, it is just a simplification to estimate doses for practical use, and there is a possibility of unfitness in such an assortment. A code has been developed to reproduce the ICRP's dose coefficients for 239Pu, which is one of the most important elements for occupational exposure. By using this code, the respective absorption parameters were modified, and the effect owing to these changes evaluated. It was shown consequently that changes of absorption parameters do not greatly influence the effective doses of 239Pu for workers.

  17. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jan T M; Shrimpton, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990's. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10's of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  18. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  19. Foetal dose conversion coefficients for ICRP-compliant pregnant models from idealised proton exposures

    PubMed Central

    Taranenko, Valery; Xu, X. George

    2009-01-01

    Protection of pregnant women and their foetus against external proton irradiations poses a unique challenge. Assessment of foetal dose due to external protons in galactic cosmic rays and as secondaries generated in aircraft walls is especially important during high-altitude flights. This paper reports a set of fluence to absorbed dose conversion coefficients for the foetus and its brain for external monoenergetic proton beams of six standard configurations (the antero-posterior, the postero-anterior, the right lateral, the left lateral, the rotational and the isotropic). The pregnant female anatomical definitions at each of the three gestational periods (3, 6 and 9 months) are based on newly developed RPI-P series of models whose organ masses were matched within 1% with the International Commission on Radiological Protection reference values. Proton interactions and the transport of secondary particles were carefully simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) and the phantoms consisting of several million voxels at 3 mm resolution. When choosing the physics models in the MCNPX, it was found that the advanced Cascade-Exciton intranuclear cascade model showed a maximum of 9% foetal dose increase compared with the default model combination at intermediate energies below 5 GeV. Foetal dose results from this study are tabulated and compared with previously published data that were based on simplified anatomy. The comparison showed a strong dependence upon the source geometry, energy and gestation period: the dose differences are typically less than 20% for all sources except ISO where systematically 40–80% of higher doses were observed. Below 200 MeV, a larger discrepancy in dose was found due to the Bragg peak shift caused by different anatomy. The tabulated foetal doses represent the latest and most detailed study to date offering a useful set of data to improve radiation protection dosimetry against external protons. PMID:19246483

  20. Respirators, internal dose, and Oyster Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Michal, R.

    1996-06-01

    This article looks at the experience of Oyster Creek in relaxing the requirements for the use of respirators in all facets of plant maintenance, on the overall dose received by plant maintenance personnel. For Roger Shaw, director of radiological controls for three years at GPU Nuclear Corporation`s Oyster Creek nuclear plant the correct dose balance is determined on a job-by-job basis: Does the job require a respirator, which is an effective means of decreasing worker inhalation of airborne radioactive particles? Will wearing a respirator slow down a worker, consequently increasing whole body radiation exposure by prolonging the time spent in fields of high external radiation? How does respiratory protection affect worker safety and to what degree? While changes to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s 10CFR20 have updated the radiation protection requirements for the nuclear industry, certain of the revisions have been directed specifically at reducing worker dose, Shaw said. {open_quotes}It basically delineates that dose is dose,{close_quotes} Shaw said, {open_quotes}regardless of whether it is acquired externally or internally.{close_quotes} The revision of Part 20 changed the industry`s attitude toward internal dose, which had always been viewed negatively. {open_quotes}Internal dose was always seen as preventable by wearing respirators and by using engineering techniques such as ventilation control and decontamination,{close_quotes} Shaw said, {open_quotes}whereas external dose, although reduced where practical, was seen as a fact of the job.{close_quotes}

  1. Organ dose conversion coefficients for voxel models of the reference male and female from idealized photon exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi-Henss, N.

    2007-04-01

    A new series of organ equivalent dose conversion coefficients for whole body external photon exposure is presented for a standardized couple of human voxel models, called Rex and Regina. Irradiations from broad parallel beams in antero-posterior, postero-anterior, left- and right-side lateral directions as well as from a 360° rotational source have been performed numerically by the Monte Carlo transport code EGSnrc. Dose conversion coefficients from an isotropically distributed source were computed, too. The voxel models Rex and Regina originating from real patient CT data comply in body and organ dimensions with the currently valid reference values given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the average Caucasian man and woman, respectively. While the equivalent dose conversion coefficients of many organs are in quite good agreement with the reference values of ICRP Publication 74, for some organs and certain geometries the discrepancies amount to 30% or more. Differences between the sexes are of the same order with mostly higher dose conversion coefficients in the smaller female model. However, much smaller deviations from the ICRP values are observed for the resulting effective dose conversion coefficients. With the still valid definition for the effective dose (ICRP Publication 60), the greatest change appears in lateral exposures with a decrease in the new models of at most 9%. However, when the modified definition of the effective dose as suggested by an ICRP draft is applied, the largest deviation from the current reference values is obtained in postero-anterior geometry with a reduction of the effective dose conversion coefficient by at most 12%.

  2. Construction of new skin models and calculation of skin dose coefficients for electron exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Nguyen, Thang Tat; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2016-08-01

    The voxel-type reference phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), due to their limited voxel resolutions, cannot represent the 50- μm-thick radiosensitive target layer of the skin necessary for skin dose calculations. Alternatively, in ICRP Publication 116, the dose coefficients (DCs) for the skin were calculated approximately, averaging absorbed dose over the entire skin depth of the ICRP phantoms. This approximation is valid for highly-penetrating radiations such as photons and neutrons, but not for weakly penetrating radiations like electrons due to the high gradient in the dose distribution in the skin. To address the limitation, the present study introduces skin polygon-mesh (PM) models, which have been produced by converting the skin models of the ICRP voxel phantoms to a high-quality PM format and adding a 50- μm-thick radiosensitive target layer into the skin models. Then, the constructed skin PM models were implemented in the Geant4 Monte Carlo code to calculate the skin DCs for external exposures of electrons. The calculated values were then compared with the skin DCs of the ICRP Publication 116. The results of the present study show that for high-energy electrons (≥ 1 MeV), the ICRP-116 skin DCs are, indeed, in good agreement with the skin DCs calculated in the present study. For low-energy electrons (< 1 MeV), however, significant discrepancies were observed, and the ICRP-116 skin DCs underestimated the skin dose as much as 15 times for some energies. Besides, regardless of the small tissue weighting factor of the skin ( w T = 0.01), the discrepancies in the skin dose were found to result in significant discrepancies in the effective dose, demonstarting that the effective DCs in ICRP-116 are not reliable for external exposure to electrons.

  3. Photon extremity absorbed dose and kerma conversion coefficients for calibration geometries.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2007-02-01

    Absorbed dose and dose equivalent conversion coefficients are routinely used in personnel dosimetry programs. These conversion coefficients can be applied to particle fluences or to measured air kerma values to determine appropriate operational monitoring quantities such as the ambient dose equivalent or personal dose equivalent for a specific geometry. For personnel directly handling materials, the absorbed dose to the extremities is of concern. This work presents photon conversion coefficients for two extremity calibration geometries using finger and wrist/arm phantoms described in HPS N13.32. These conversion coefficients have been calculated as a function of photon energy in terms of the kerma and the absorbed dose using Monte Carlo techniques and the calibration geometries specified in HPS N13.32. Additionally, kerma and absorbed dose conversion coefficients for commonly used x-ray spectra and calibration source fields are presented. The kerma values calculated in this work for the x-ray spectra and calibration sources compare well to those listed in HPS N13.32. The absorbed dose values, however, differ significantly for higher energy photons because charged particle equilibrium conditions have not been satisfied for the shallow depth. Thus, the air-kerma-to-dose and exposure-to-dose conversion coefficients for Cs and Co listed in HPS N13.32 overestimate the absorbed dose to the extremities. Applying the conversion coefficients listed in HPS N13.32 for Cs, for example, would result in an overestimate of absorbed dose of 62% for the finger phantom and 55% for the wrist phantom.

  4. Evaluation of dose conversion coefficients for an eight-year-old Iranian male phantom undergoing computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Parisa; Hakimabad, Hashem Miri; Motavalli, Laleh Rafat

    2015-11-01

    In order to construct a library of Iranian pediatric voxel phantoms for radiological protection and dosimetry applications, an Iranian eight-year-old phantom was constructed from a series of CT images. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients to this phantom were calculated for head, chest, abdominopelvis and chest-abdomen-pelvis scans at tube voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kVp. To validate the results, the organ and effective dose conversion coefficients obtained were compared with those of the University of Florida eight-year-old voxel female phantom as a function of examination type and anatomical scan area. For a detailed study, depth distributions of organs together with the thickness of surrounding tissues located in the beam path, which are shielding the internal organs, were determined for these two voxel phantoms. The relation between the anatomical differences and the level of delivered dose was investigated and the discrepancies among the results justified.

  5. Effective dose conversion coefficients for health care provider exposed to pediatric and adult victims in radiological dispersal device incident.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Young; Ha, Wi-Ho; Jin, Young-Woo; Bolch, Wesley E; Lee, Choonsik

    2015-03-01

    After an incident of radiological dispersal devices (RDD), health care providers will be exposed to the contaminated patients in the extended medical treatments. Assessment of potential radiation dose to the health care providers will be crucial to minimize their health risk. In this study, we compiled a set of conversion coefficients (mSv MBq(-1) s(-1)) to readily estimate the effective dose from the time-integrated activity for the health care providers while they deal with internally contaminated patients at different ages. We selected Co-60, Ir-192, Am-241, Cs-137, and I-131 as the major radionuclides that may be used for RDD. We obtained the age-specific organ burdens after the inhalation of those radionuclides from the Dose and Risk Calculation Software (DCAL) program. A series of hybrid computational phantoms (1-, 5-, 10-, and 15 year-old, and adult males) were implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo (MC) transport code, MCNPX v 2.7, to simulate an adult male health care provider exposed to contaminated patients at different ages. Two exposure scenarios were taken into account: a health care provider (a) standing at the side of patients lying in bed and (b) sitting face to face with patients. The conversion coefficients overall depended on radionuclides, the age of the patients, and the orientation of the patients. The conversion coefficient was greatest for Co-60 and smallest for Am-241. The dose from the 1 year-old patient phantom was up to three times greater than that from the adult patient phantom. The conversion coefficients were less dependent on the age of the patients in the scenario of a health care provider sitting face to face with patients. The dose conversion coefficients established in this study will be useful to readily estimate the effective dose to the health care providers in RDD events.

  6. Deuterons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2011-01-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to deuterons ((2)H(+)) in the energy range 10 MeV-1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder™ 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of the effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for the equivalent and effective dose incorporated a radiation weighting factor of 2. At 15 of 19 energies for which coefficients for the effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations differed by <3%. The greatest difference, 47%, occurred at 30 MeV.

  7. Organ dose conversion coefficients for tube current modulated CT protocols for an adult population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wanyi; Tian, Xiaoyu; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Zhang, Yakun; Segars, William Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    In computed tomography (CT), patient-specific organ dose can be estimated using pre-calculated organ dose conversion coefficients (organ dose normalized by CTDIvol, h factor) database, taking into account patient size and scan coverage. The conversion coefficients have been previously estimated for routine body protocol classes, grouped by scan coverage, across an adult population for fixed tube current modulated CT. The coefficients, however, do not include the widely utilized tube current (mA) modulation scheme, which significantly impacts organ dose. This study aims to extend the h factors and the corresponding dose length product (DLP) to create effective dose conversion coefficients (k factor) database incorporating various tube current modulation strengths. Fifty-eight extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were included in this study representing population anatomy variation in clinical practice. Four mA profiles, representing weak to strong mA dependency on body attenuation, were generated for each phantom and protocol class. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the organ dose. The organ dose and effective dose was further normalized by CTDIvol and DLP to derive the h factors and k factors, respectively. The h factors and k factors were summarized in an exponential regression model as a function of body size. Such a population-based mathematical model can provide a comprehensive organ dose estimation given body size and CTDIvol. The model was integrated into an iPhone app XCATdose version 2, enhancing the 1st version based upon fixed tube current modulation. With the organ dose calculator, physicists, physicians, and patients can conveniently estimate organ dose.

  8. Dose conversion coefficients for paediatric CT examinations with automatic tube current modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Becker, J.; Hoeschen, C.

    2012-10-01

    A common dose-saving technique used in modern CT devices is automatic tube current modulation (TCM), which was originally designed to also reduce the dose in paediatric CT patients. In order to be able to deduce detailed organ doses of paediatric models, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDIvol for an eight-week-old baby and seven- and eight-year-old children have been computed accounting for TCM. The relative difference in organ dose conversion coefficients with and without TCM is for many organs and examinations less than 10%, but can in some cases amount up to 30%, e.g., for the thyroid in the chest CT of the seven-year-old child. Overall, the impact of TCM on the conversion coefficients increases with increasing age. Besides TCM, also the effect of collimation and tube voltage on organ dose conversion coefficients has been investigated. It could be shown that the normalization to CTDIvol leads to conversion coefficients that can in most cases be considered to be independent of collimation and tube voltage.

  9. Dose conversion coefficients for paediatric CT examinations with automatic tube current modulation.

    PubMed

    Schlattl, H; Zankl, M; Becker, J; Hoeschen, C

    2012-10-21

    A common dose-saving technique used in modern CT devices is automatic tube current modulation (TCM), which was originally designed to also reduce the dose in paediatric CT patients. In order to be able to deduce detailed organ doses of paediatric models, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDI(vol) for an eight-week-old baby and seven- and eight-year-old children have been computed accounting for TCM. The relative difference in organ dose conversion coefficients with and without TCM is for many organs and examinations less than 10%, but can in some cases amount up to 30%, e.g., for the thyroid in the chest CT of the seven-year-old child. Overall, the impact of TCM on the conversion coefficients increases with increasing age. Besides TCM, also the effect of collimation and tube voltage on organ dose conversion coefficients has been investigated. It could be shown that the normalization to CTDI(vol) leads to conversion coefficients that can in most cases be considered to be independent of collimation and tube voltage.

  10. Determining organ dose conversion coefficients for external neutron irradiation by using a voxel mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Qu, Decheng; Ning, Jing; Zhou, Hongmei; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2016-03-01

    A set of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for neutrons with energies <20 MeV using a developed voxel mouse model and Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP), for the purpose of neutron radiation effect evaluation. The calculation used 37 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10(-9) MeV to 20 MeV, under five different source irradiation configurations: left lateral, right lateral, dorsal-ventral, ventral-dorsal, and isotropic. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for selected organs of the body were presented in the paper, and the effect of irradiation geometry conditions, neutron energy and the organ location on the organ dose was discussed. The results indicated that neutron dose conversion coefficients clearly show sensitivity to irradiation geometry at neutron energy below 1 MeV.

  11. Determining organ dose conversion coefficients for external neutron irradiation by using a voxel mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Qu, Decheng; Ning, Jing; Zhou, Hongmei; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2016-01-01

    A set of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for neutrons with energies <20 MeV using a developed voxel mouse model and Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP), for the purpose of neutron radiation effect evaluation. The calculation used 37 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10−9 MeV to 20 MeV, under five different source irradiation configurations: left lateral, right lateral, dorsal–ventral, ventral–dorsal, and isotropic. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for selected organs of the body were presented in the paper, and the effect of irradiation geometry conditions, neutron energy and the organ location on the organ dose was discussed. The results indicated that neutron dose conversion coefficients clearly show sensitivity to irradiation geometry at neutron energy below 1 MeV. PMID:26661852

  12. Critical Dose of Internal Organs Internal Exposure - 13471

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, G.; Amirjanyan, A.; Grigoryan, N.

    2013-07-01

    The health threat posed by radionuclides has stimulated increased efforts to developed characterization on the biological behavior of radionuclides in humans in all ages. In an effort motivated largely by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is assembling a set of age specific biokinetic models for environmentally important radioelements. Radioactive substances in the air, mainly through the respiratory system and digestive tract, is inside the body. Radioactive substances are unevenly distributed in various organs and tissues. Therefore, the degree of damage will depend not only on the dose of radiation have but also on the critical organ, which is the most accumulation of radioactive substances, which leads to the defeat of the entire human body. The main objective of radiation protection, to avoid exceeding the maximum permissible doses of external and internal exposure of a person to prevent the physical and genetic damage people. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of radiation is called a dose of radiation a person in uniform getting her for 50 years does not cause changes in the health of the exposed individual and his progeny. The following classification of critical organs, depending on the category of exposure on their degree of sensitivity to radiation: First group: the whole body, gonads and red bone marrow; Second group: muscle, fat, liver, kidney, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, lungs and lens of the eye; The third group: bone, thyroid and skin; Fourth group: the hands, forearms, feet. MTD exposure whole body, gonads and bone marrow represent the maximum exposures (5 rem per year) experienced by people in their normal activities. The purpose of this article is intended dose received from various internal organs of the radionuclides that may enter the body by inhalation, and gastrointestinal tract. The biokinetic model describes the time dependent distribution and excretion of different

  13. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in cystic fibrosis: dose, variability and coefficient of fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Lerma, Joaquim; Martínez-Barona, Sandra; Masip, Etna; Fornés, Victoria; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) remains a backbone in the nutritional treatment of cystic fibrosis. Currently, there is a lack of an evidence-based tool that allows dose adjustment. To date, no studies have found an association between PERT dose and fat absorption. Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the influence of both the PERT dose and the variability in this dose on the coefficient of fat absorption (CFA). This is a retrospective longitudinal study of 16 pediatric patients (192 food records) with three consecutive visits to the hospital over a twelve-month period. Dietary fat intake and PERT were assessed via a four-day food record and fat content in stools was determined by means of a three-day stool sample collection. A beta regression model was built to explain the association between the CFA and the interaction between the PERT dose (lipase units [LU]/g dietary fat) and the variability in the PERT dose (standard deviation [SD]). The coefficient of fat absorption increased with the PERT dose when the variability in the dose was low. In contrast, even at the highest PERT dose values, the CFA decreased when the variability was high. The confidence interval suggested an association, although the analysis was not statistically significant. The variability in the PERT dose adjustment should be taken into consideration when performing studies on PERT efficiency. A clinical goal should be the maintenance of a constant PERT dose rather than trying to obtain an optimal value.

  14. Tritons at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-12-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult female and an adult male to tritons ((3)H(+)) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder™ 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms. Phantoms were modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and calculation of gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 3%. The greatest difference, 43%, occurred at 30 MeV.

  15. Effective Dose Rate Coefficients for Immersions in Radioactive Air and Water.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, M B; Veinot, K G; Hiller, M M; Dewji, S A; Eckerman, K F; Easterly, C E; Hertel, N E; Leggett, R W

    2016-05-05

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge (CRPK) has undertaken a number of calculations in support of a revision to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) Federal Guidance Report on external exposure to radionuclides in air, water and soil (FGR 12). Age-specific mathematical phantom calculations were performed for the conditions of submersion in radioactive air and immersion in water. Dose rate coefficients were calculated for discrete photon and electron energies and folded with emissions from 1252 radionuclides using ICRP Publication 107 decay data to determine equivalent and effective dose rate coefficients. The coefficients calculated in this work compare favorably to those reported in FGR12 as well as by other authors that employed voxel phantoms for similar exposure scenarios.

  16. Ingestion of Nevada Test Site Fallout: Internal dose estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1996-10-01

    This paper summarizes individual and collective dose estimates for the internal organs of hypothetical yet representative residents of selected communities that received measurable fallout from nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site. The doses, which resulted from ingestion of local and regional food products contaminated with over 20 radionuclides, were estimated with use of the PATHWAY food-chain-transport model to provide estimates of central tendency and uncertainty. The thyroid gland received much higher doses than other internal organs and tissues. In a avery few cases, infants might have received thyroid doses in excess of 1 Gy, depending on location, diet, and timing of fallout. {sup 131}I was the primary thyroid dose contributor, and fresh milk was the main exposure pathway. With the exception of the thyroid, organ doses from the ingestion pathway were much smaller (<3%) than those from external gamma exposure to deposited fallout. Doses to residents living closest to the Nevada Test Site were contributed mainly by a few fallout events; doses to more distantly located people were generally smaller, but a greater number of events provided measurable contributions. The effectiveness of different fallout events in producing internal organ doses through ingestion varied dramatically with seasonal timing of the test, with maximum dose per unit fallout occurring for early summer depositions when milk cows were on pasture and fresh, local vegetables were used. Within specific communities, internal doses differed by age, sex, and lifestyle. Collective internal dose estimates for specific geographic areas are provided.

  17. Organ and Effective Dose Coefficients for Cranial and Caudal Irradiation Geometries: Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veinot, K. G.; Eckerman, K. F.; Hertel, N. E.; Hiller, M. M.

    2017-09-01

    With the introduction of new recommendations by ICRP Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors, and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms (ICRP Publication 110). Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT), and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for neutron irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to neutrons ranging in energy from 10-9 MeV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6 radiation transport code and the adult reference voxel phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above about 30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater.

  18. Organ dose conversion coefficients for external photon irradiation of male and female voxel models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zankl, M.; Fill, U.; Petoussi-Henss, N.; Regulla, D.

    2002-07-01

    New organ equivalent dose conversion coefficients are presented for whole body irradiation with monoenergetic photons of energies between 10 keV and 10 MeV for idealized geometries and seven adult male and female voxel models. The geometries are broad parallel photon beams in anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left- and right-lateral direction and a full 360° rotation around the body length axis. Dose differences between the different voxel models are below approximately 30% for some organs and geometries in the energy range between 60 and 200 keV, but they can be up to 100% or more in single cases, due to differences in stature and individual anatomical details. For low photon energies, the differences may amount to hundreds of per cent. Extensive comparisons of the dose conversion coefficients with respective values calculated using mathematical body models revealed various degrees of unrealistic positioning of single organs in the latter models. Examples are the kidneys, spleen and stomach that are located too superficially in the mathematical models. Over- or underestimations of several tens of per cent may, thus, occur for the mathematical models, compared to the voxel models considered. In contrast to previous assumptions, when the mathematical models have been used to establish reference organ dose conversion coefficients, it can be concluded that they do not properly represent a large population of individuals.

  19. Helions at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, effective dose and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.C.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-12-01

    Conversion coefficients were calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-equivalent dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to helions ((3)He(2+)) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). Calculations were performed using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.C and BodyBuilder™ 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. At 15 of the 19 energies for which coefficients for effective dose were calculated, coefficients based on ICRP 2007 and 1990 recommendations differed by less than 2%. The greatest difference, 62%, occurred at 100 MeV.

  20. Impact of the new nuclear decay data of ICRP publication 107 on inhalation dose coefficients for workers.

    PubMed

    Manabe, K; Endo, A; Eckerman, K F

    2010-03-01

    The impact a revision of nuclear decay data had on dose coefficients was studied using data newly published in ICRP Publication 107 (ICRP 107) and existing data from ICRP Publication 38 (ICRP 38). Committed effective dose coefficients for occupational inhalation of radionuclides were calculated using two sets of decay data with the dose and risk calculation software DCAL for 90 elements, 774 nuclides and 1572 cases. The dose coefficients based on ICRP 107 increased by over 10 % compared with those based on ICRP 38 in 98 cases, and decreased by over 10 % in 54 cases. It was found that the differences in dose coefficients mainly originated from changes in the radiation energy emitted per nuclear transformation. In addition, revisions of the half-lives, radiation types and decay modes also resulted in changes in the dose coefficients.

  1. Dosimetric models of the eye and lens of the eye and their use in assessing dose coefficients for ocular exposures.

    PubMed

    Bolch, W E; Dietze, G; Petoussi-Henss, N; Zankl, M

    2015-06-01

    Based upon recent epidemiological studies of ocular exposure, the Main Commission of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in ICRP Publication 118 states that the threshold dose for radiation-induced cataracts is now considered to be approximately 0.5 Gy for both acute and fractionated exposures. Consequently, a reduction was also recommended for the occupational annual equivalent dose to the lens of the eye from 150 mSv to 20 mSv, averaged over defined periods of 5 years. To support ocular dose assessment and optimisation, Committee 2 included Annex F within ICRP Publication 116 . Annex F provides dose coefficients - absorbed dose per particle fluence - for photon, electron, and neutron irradiation of the eye and lens of the eye using two dosimetric models. The first approach uses the reference adult male and female voxel phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. The second approach uses the stylised eye model of Behrens et al., which itself is based on ocular dimensional data given in Charles and Brown. This article will review the data and models of Annex F with particular emphasis on how these models treat tissue regions thought to be associated with stem cells at risk.

  2. Alpha particles at energies of 10 MeV to 1 TeV: conversion coefficients for fluence-to-absorbed dose, effective dose, and gray equivalent, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.A.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-03-01

    Conversion coefficients have been calculated for fluence to absorbed dose, fluence to effective dose and fluence to gray equivalent, for isotropic exposure to alpha particles in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). The coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.A and BodyBuilder 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose to a Reference Person using tissues and tissue weighting factors from 1990 and 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Coefficients for effective dose are within 30 % of those calculated using ICRP 1990 recommendations.

  3. Fluence to absorbed dose, effective dose and gray equivalent conversion coefficients for iron nuclei from 10 MeV to 1 TeV, calculated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.A.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kyle; Parker, Donald E; Friedberg, Wallace

    2010-03-01

    Conversion coefficients have been calculated for fluence-to-absorbed dose, fluence-to-effective dose and fluence-to-gray equivalent for isotropic exposure of an adult male and an adult female to (56)Fe(26+) in the energy range of 10 MeV to 1 TeV (0.01-1000 GeV). The coefficients were calculated using Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX 2.7.A and BodyBuilder 1.3 anthropomorphic phantoms modified to allow calculation of effective dose using tissues and tissue weighting factors from either the 1990 or 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and gray equivalent to selected tissues as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Calculations using ICRP 2007 recommendations result in fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients that are almost identical at most energies to those calculated using ICRP 1990 recommendations.

  4. Dose coefficients in pediatric and adult abdominopelvic CT based on 100 patient models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Paulson, Erik K.; Samei, Ehsan

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown the feasibility of estimating patient dose from a CT exam using CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose (denoted as h), DLP-normalized-effective dose (denoted as k), and DLP-normalized-risk index (denoted as q). However, previous studies were limited to a small number of phantom models. The purpose of this work was to provide dose coefficients (h, k, and q) across a large number of computational models covering a broad range of patient anatomy, age, size percentile, and gender. The study consisted of 100 patient computer models (age range, 0 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 2-180 kg) including 42 pediatric models (age range, 0 to 16 y.o.; weight range, 2-80 kg) and 58 adult models (age range, 18 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 57-180 kg). Multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) were included. A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which h, k, and q were derived. The relationships between h, k, and q and patient characteristics (size, age, and gender) were ascertained. The differences in conversion coefficients across the scanners were further characterized. CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose (h) showed an exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For organs within the image coverage, the average differences of h across scanners were less than 15%. That value increased to 29% for organs on the periphery or outside the image coverage, and to 8% for distributed organs, respectively. The DLP-normalized-effective dose (k) decreased exponentially with increasing patient size. For a given gender, the DLP-normalized-risk index (q) showed an exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The average differences in k and q across scanners were 8% and 10%, respectively. This study demonstrated that the knowledge of patient information and CTDIvol/DLP values may

  5. Dose coefficients in pediatric and adult abdominopelvic CT based on 100 patient models.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W Paul; Frush, Donald P; Paulson, Erik K; Samei, Ehsan

    2013-12-21

    Recent studies have shown the feasibility of estimating patient dose from a CT exam using CTDI(vol)-normalized-organ dose (denoted as h), DLP-normalized-effective dose (denoted as k), and DLP-normalized-risk index (denoted as q). However, previous studies were limited to a small number of phantom models. The purpose of this work was to provide dose coefficients (h, k, and q) across a large number of computational models covering a broad range of patient anatomy, age, size percentile, and gender. The study consisted of 100 patient computer models (age range, 0 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 2-180 kg) including 42 pediatric models (age range, 0 to 16 y.o.; weight range, 2-80 kg) and 58 adult models (age range, 18 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 57-180 kg). Multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) were included. A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which h, k, and q were derived. The relationships between h, k, and q and patient characteristics (size, age, and gender) were ascertained. The differences in conversion coefficients across the scanners were further characterized. CTDI(vol)-normalized-organ dose (h) showed an exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For organs within the image coverage, the average differences of h across scanners were less than 15%. That value increased to 29% for organs on the periphery or outside the image coverage, and to 8% for distributed organs, respectively. The DLP-normalized-effective dose (k) decreased exponentially with increasing patient size. For a given gender, the DLP-normalized-risk index (q) showed an exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The average differences in k and q across scanners were 8% and 10%, respectively. This study demonstrated that the knowledge of patient information and CTDIvol/DLP values

  6. The neutron dose conversion coefficients calculation in human tooth enamel in an anthropomorphic phantom.

    PubMed

    Khailov, A M; Ivannikov, A I; Skvortsov, V G; Stepanenko, V F; Tsyb, A F; Trompier, F; Hoshi, M

    2010-02-01

    In the present study, MCNP4B simulation code is used to simulate neutron and photon transport. It gives the conversion coefficients that relate neutron fluence to the dose in tooth enamel (molars and pre-molars only) for 20 energy groups of monoenergetic neutrons with energies from 10-9 to 20 MeV for five different irradiation geometries. The data presented are intended to provide the basis for connection between EPR dose values and standard protection quantities defined in ICRP Publication 74. The results of the calculations for critical organs were found to be consistent with ICRP data, with discrepancies generally less than 10% for the fast neutrons. The absorbed dose in enamel was found to depend strongly on the incident neutron energy for neutrons over 10 keV. The dependence of the data on the irradiation geometry is also shown. Lower bound estimates of enamel radiation sensitivity to neutrons were made using obtained coefficients for the secondary photons. Depending on neutron energy, tooth enamel was shown to register 10-120% of the total neutron dose in the human body in the case of pure neutron exposure and AP irradiation geometry.

  7. On the use of age-specific effective dose coefficients in radiation protection of the public

    SciTech Connect

    Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1998-11-01

    Current radiation protection standards for the public include a limit on effective dose in any year for individuals in critical groups. This paper considers the question of how the annual dose limit should be applied in controlling routine exposures of populations consisting of individuals of all ages. The authors assume that the fundamental objective of radiation protection is limitation of lifetime risk and, therefore, that standards for controlling routine exposures of the public should provide a reasonable correspondence with lifetime risk, taking into account the age dependence of intakes and doses and the variety of radionuclides and exposure pathways of concern. Using new calculations of the per capita (population-averaged) risk of cancer mortality per unit activity inhaled or ingested in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Federal Guidance Report No. 13, the authors show that applying a limit on annual effective dose only to adults, which was the usual practice in radiation protection of the public before the development of age-specific effective dose coefficients, provides a considerably better correspondence with lifetime risk than applying the annual dose limit to the critical group of any age.

  8. Conversion coefficients for determination of dispersed photon dose during radiotherapy: NRUrad input code for MCNP

    PubMed Central

    Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a common cancer treatment module, where a certain amount of dose will be delivered to the targeted organ. This is achieved usually by photons generated by linear accelerator units. However, radiation scattering within the patient’s body and the surrounding environment will lead to dose dispersion to healthy tissues which are not targets of the primary radiation. Determination of the dispersed dose would be important for assessing the risk and biological consequences in different organs or tissues. In the present work, the concept of conversion coefficient (F) of the dispersed dose was developed, in which F = (Dd/Dt), where Dd was the dispersed dose in a non-targeted tissue and Dt is the absorbed dose in the targeted tissue. To quantify Dd and Dt, a comprehensive model was developed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) package to simulate the linear accelerator head, the human phantom, the treatment couch and the radiotherapy treatment room. The present work also demonstrated the feasibility and power of parallel computing through the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) version of MCNP5. PMID:28362837

  9. Conversion coefficients for determination of dispersed photon dose during radiotherapy: NRUrad input code for MCNP.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Ng, C Y P; Krstic, D; Nikezic, D; Yu, K N

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a common cancer treatment module, where a certain amount of dose will be delivered to the targeted organ. This is achieved usually by photons generated by linear accelerator units. However, radiation scattering within the patient's body and the surrounding environment will lead to dose dispersion to healthy tissues which are not targets of the primary radiation. Determination of the dispersed dose would be important for assessing the risk and biological consequences in different organs or tissues. In the present work, the concept of conversion coefficient (F) of the dispersed dose was developed, in which F = (Dd/Dt), where Dd was the dispersed dose in a non-targeted tissue and Dt is the absorbed dose in the targeted tissue. To quantify Dd and Dt, a comprehensive model was developed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) package to simulate the linear accelerator head, the human phantom, the treatment couch and the radiotherapy treatment room. The present work also demonstrated the feasibility and power of parallel computing through the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) version of MCNP5.

  10. Organ-specific external dose coefficients and protective apron transmission factors for historical dose reconstruction for medical personnel.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L

    2011-07-01

    While radiation absorbed dose (Gy) to the skin or other organs is sometimes estimated for patients from diagnostic radiologic examinations or therapeutic procedures, rarely is occupationally-received radiation absorbed dose to individual organs/tissues estimated for medical personnel; e.g., radiologic technologists or radiologists. Generally, for medical personnel, equivalent or effective radiation doses are estimated for compliance purposes. In the very few cases when organ doses to medical personnel are reconstructed, the data is usually for the purpose of epidemiologic studies; e.g., a study of historical doses and risks to a cohort of about 110,000 radiologic technologists presently underway at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. While ICRP and ICRU have published organ-specific external dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) (i.e., absorbed dose to organs and tissues per unit air kerma and dose equivalent per unit air kerma), those factors have been published primarily for mono-energetic photons at selected energies. This presents two related problems for historical dose reconstruction, both of which are addressed here. It is necessary to derive conversion factor values for (1) continuous distributions of energy typical of diagnostic medical x-rays (bremsstrahlung radiation), and (2) energies of particular radioisotopes used in medical procedures, neither of which are presented in published tables. For derivation of DCCs for bremsstrahlung radiation, combinations of x-ray tube potentials and filtrations were derived for different time periods based on a review of relevant literature. Three peak tube potentials (70 kV, 80 kV, and 90 kV) with four different amounts of beam filtration were determined to be applicable for historic dose reconstruction. The probabilities of these machine settings were assigned to each of the four time periods (earlier than 1949, 1949-1954, 1955-1968, and after 1968). Continuous functions were fit to each set of discrete values of the

  11. ORGAN-SPECIFIC EXTERNAL DOSE COEFFICIENTS AND PROTECTIVE APRON TRANSMISSION FACTORS FOR HISTORICAL DOSE RECONSTRUCTION FOR MEDICAL PERSONNEL

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    While radiation absorbed dose (Gy) to the skin or other organs is sometimes estimated for patients from diagnostic radiologic examinations or therapeutic procedures, rarely is occupationally-received radiation absorbed dose to individual organs/tissues estimated for medical personnel, e.g., radiologic technologists or radiologists. Generally, for medical personnel, equivalent or effective radiation doses are estimated for compliance purposes. In the very few cases when organ doses to medical personnel are reconstructed, the data is usually for the purpose of epidemiologic studies, e.g., a study of historical doses and risks to a cohort of about 110,000 radiologic technologists presently underway at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. While ICRP and ICRU have published organ-specific external dose conversion coefficients (DCCs), i.e., absorbed dose to organs and tissues per unit air kerma and dose equivalent per unit air kerma, those factors have been primarily published for mono-energetic photons at selected energies. This presents two related problems for historical dose reconstruction, both of which are addressed here. It is necessary to derive conversion factors values for (i) continuous distributions of energy typical of diagnostic medical x rays (bremsstrahlung radiation), and (ii) for energies of particular radioisotopes used in medical procedures, neither of which are presented in published tables. For derivation of DCCs for bremsstrahlung radiation, combinations of x-ray tube potentials and filtrations were derived for different time periods based on a review of relevant literature. Three peak tube potentials (70 kV, 80 kV, and 90 kV) with four different amounts of beam filtration were determined to be applicable for historic dose reconstruction. The probability of these machine settings were assigned to each of the four time periods (earlier than 1949, 1949-1954, 1955-1968, and after 1968). Continuous functions were fit to each set of discrete values of

  12. Dose conversion coefficients for CT examinations of adults with automatic tube current modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Becker, J.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-10-01

    Automatic tube current modulation (TCM) is used in modern CT devices. This is implemented in the numerical calculation of dose conversion coefficients for CT examinations. For four models of adults, the female and male reference models of ICRP and ICRU and a lighter and a heavier female model, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDIvol (DCCCT) have been computed with a Monte Carlo transport code for CT scans with and without TCM. It could be shown for both cases that reliable values for spiral CT scans are obtained when combining the results from an appropriate set of axial scans. The largest organ DCCCT are presented for typical CT examinations for all four models. The impact of TCM is greatest for chest, pelvis and whole-trunk CT examinations, where with TCM the effective DCCCT can be 20-25% lower than without TCM. Typical organs with strong dependence on TCM are thyroid, urinary bladder, lungs and oesophagus. While the DCCCT of thyroid and urinary bladder are mainly sensitive to angular TCM, the DCCCT of lungs and oesophagus are influenced primarily by longitudinal TCM. The impact of the body stature on the effective DCCCT is of the same order as the effect of TCM. Thus, for CT scans in the trunk region, accurate dose values can only be obtained when different sets of DCCCT are employed that are appropriate for the patient's sex and stature and the actual TCM settings.

  13. Dose coefficients and derived guidance and clinical decision levels for contaminated wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, Luiz; Toohey, Richard E

    2009-01-01

    The NCRP Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the ICRP element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Those coefficients have been used to generate derived guidance levels (i.e., the activity in a wound that would result in an effective dose of 20 or 50 mSv, or in some cases, a committed organ equivalent dose of 500 mSv), and clinical decision levels (i.e., activity levels that would indicate the need for consideration of medical intervention to remove activity from the wound site or administration of decorporation therapy or both), typically set at 5 times the derived guidance levels. Data are provided for the radionuclides commonly encountered at nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons, fuel fabrication or recycling, waste disposal, medical and research facilities. These include: {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 210}Po, {sup 226,228}Ra, {sup 228,232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242,244}Cm, and {sup 252}Cf.

  14. Dose conversion coefficients for electron exposure of the human eye lens: calculations including a whole body phantom.

    PubMed

    Behrens, R

    2013-07-01

    In this work, conversion coefficients from electron fluence to absorbed dose to the eye lens were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations based on a detailed stylised eye model and a very simple but whole body phantom. These data supersede and complement data published earlier based on the simulation of only a single stylised eye. The new data differ from the old ones by not more than 3, 4, 7 and 16 % for angles of radiation incidence of α=0°, 15°, 30° and 45°, respectively, due to the inclusion of the whole body phantom. The data presented in the present work also complement those of a recent report of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (ICRP Publication 116), where conversion coefficients from electron fluence to absorbed dose to the lens of the eye are shown for solely 0°, 180° and isotropic radiation incidence (but for a much broader range of energies). In this article, values are provided for angles of incidence of 0° up to 180° in steps of 15° and for rotational geometry; no systematic deviation was observed from the values given in ICRP Publication 116 for 0° (based on the application of a bare eye) and 180° (based on the application of a voxel whole body phantom). Data are given for monoenergetic electrons from 0.1 up to 10 MeV and for a broad parallel beam geometry in vacuum.

  15. Uncertainty of inhalation dose coefficients for representative physical and chemical forms of iodine-131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Richard Paul, III

    Releases of radioactive material have occurred at various Department of Energy (DOE) weapons facilities and facilities associated with the nuclear fuel cycle in the generation of electricity. Many different radionuclides have been released to the environment with resulting exposure of the population to these various sources of radioactivity. Radioiodine has been released from a number of these facilities and is a potential public health concern due to its physical and biological characteristics. Iodine exists as various isotopes, but our focus is on 131I due to its relatively long half-life, its prevalence in atmospheric releases and its contribution to offsite dose. The assumption of physical and chemical form is speculated to have a profound impact on the deposition of radioactive material within the respiratory tract. In the case of iodine, it has been shown that more than one type of physical and chemical form may be released to, or exist in, the environment; iodine can exist as a particle or as a gas. The gaseous species can be further segregated based on chemical form: elemental, inorganic, and organic iodides. Chemical compounds in each class are assumed to behave similarly with respect to biochemistry. Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratories have demonstrated that 131I is released as a particulate, as well as in elemental, inorganic and organic chemical form. The internal dose estimate from 131I may be very different depending on the effect that chemical form has on fractional deposition, gas uptake, and clearance in the respiratory tract. There are many sources of uncertainty in the estimation of environmental dose including source term, airborne transport of radionuclides, and internal dosimetry. Knowledge of uncertainty in internal dosimetry is essential for estimating dose to members of the public and for determining total uncertainty in dose estimation. Important calculational steps in any lung model is regional estimation of deposition fractions

  16. Estimation of internal organ motion-induced variance in radiation dose in non-gated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Sumin; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Mutian; Zheng, Dandan; Lei, Yu; Li, Sicong; Bennion, Nathan; Verma, Vivek; Zhen, Weining; Enke, Charles

    2016-12-01

    In the delivery of non-gated radiotherapy (RT), owing to intra-fraction organ motion, a certain degree of RT dose uncertainty is present. Herein, we propose a novel mathematical algorithm to estimate the mean and variance of RT dose that is delivered without gating. These parameters are specific to individual internal organ motion, dependent on individual treatment plans, and relevant to the RT delivery process. This algorithm uses images from a patient’s 4D simulation study to model the actual patient internal organ motion during RT delivery. All necessary dose rate calculations are performed in fixed patient internal organ motion states. The analytical and deterministic formulae of mean and variance in dose from non-gated RT were derived directly via statistical averaging of the calculated dose rate over possible random internal organ motion initial phases, and did not require constructing relevant histograms. All results are expressed in dose rate Fourier transform coefficients for computational efficiency. Exact solutions are provided to simplified, yet still clinically relevant, cases. Results from a volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) patient case are also presented. The results obtained from our mathematical algorithm can aid clinical decisions by providing information regarding both mean and variance of radiation dose to non-gated patients prior to RT delivery.

  17. Reduced Variance using ADVANTG in Monte Carlo Calculations of Dose Coefficients to Stylized Phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, Mauritius; Bellamy, Michael; Eckerman, Keith; Hertel, Nolan

    2017-09-01

    The estimation of dose coefficients of external radiation sources to the organs in phantoms becomes increasingly difficult for lower photon source energies. This study focus on the estimation of photon emitters around the phantom. The computer time needed to calculate a result within a certain precision can be lowered by several orders of magnitude using ADVANTG compared to a standard run. Using ADVANTG which employs the DENOVO adjoint calculation package enables the user to create a fully populated set of weight windows and source biasing instructions for an MCNP calculation.

  18. An assessment of the reliability of dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides by members of the public.

    PubMed

    Puncher, M

    2014-09-01

    This paper summarises work undertaken on behalf of the Environment Agency for England to quantify uncertainties resulting from internal exposures to a number of radionuclides considered significant because of their anthropogenic origin, namely: (238)U, (226)Ra, (239)Pu, (241)Am, (137)Cs, (90)Sr, (131)I, (129)I and (3)H. Uncertainties in the biokinetic models that are used to calculate the retention and excretion of radionuclides are derived in order to calculate distributions of effective dose per unit intake following their inhalation or ingestion by members of the UK public. The central values and ranges of the distributions are used to inform the derivation of uncertainty factors (UFs) for the different dose coefficients, which can be used to assess reliability. These represent uncertainties inherent in the structures of the biokinetic models and their parameter values. The inferred UF values are typically around 2-3 for ingestion and 2-6 for inhalation for all age groups, and are comparable to UF values inferred from published studies. It is instructive to consider these ranges alongside the likely levels of exposure that are expected from the radionuclides considered (the microsievert range) and the dose limit of planned exposures for members of the public (1000 μSv).

  19. Conversion coefficients for the estimation of effective dose in cone-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Soo; Rashsuren, Oyuntugs

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the conversion coefficients (CCs) from the dose-area product (DAP) value to effective dose in cone-beam CT. Materials and Methods A CBCT scanner with four fields of view (FOV) was used. Using two exposure settings of the adult standard and low dose exposure, DAP values were measured with a DAP meter in C mode (200mm×179 mm), P mode (154 mm×154 mm), I mode (102 mm×102 mm), and D mode (51 mm×51 mm). The effective doses were also investigated at each mode using an adult male head and neck phantom and thermoluminescent chips. Linear regressive analysis of the DAP and effective dose values was used to calculate the CCs for each CBCT examination. Results For the C mode, the P mode at the maxilla, and the P mode at the mandible, the CCs were 0.049 µSv/mGycm2, 0.067 µSv/mGycm2, and 0.064 µSv/mGycm2, respectively. For the I mode, the CCs at the maxilla and mandible were 0.076 µSv/mGycm2 and 0.095 µSv/mGycm2, respectively. For the D mode at the maxillary incisors, molars, and mandibular molars, the CCs were 0.038 µSv/mGycm2, 0.041 µSv/mGycm2, and 0.146 µSv/mGycm2, respectively. Conclusion The CCs in one CBCT device with fixed 80 kV ranged from 0.038 µSv/mGycm2 to 0.146 µSv/mGycm2 according to the imaging modes and irradiated region and were highest for the D mode at the mandibular molar. PMID:24701455

  20. Air kerma calculation in Monte Carlo simulations for deriving normalized glandular dose coefficients in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni; Russo, Paolo

    2017-07-01

    The estimation of the mean glandular dose in mammography using Monte Carlo simulations requires the calculation of the incident air kerma evaluated on the breast surface. In such a calculation, caution should be applied in considering explicitly the presence of the top compression paddle, since Compton scattering in this slab may produce a large spread of the incidence angles of x-ray photons on the scoring surface. Then, the calculation of the incident air kerma should contain the ‘effective’ area of the scoring surface, which takes into account the angle of incidence of photons on such a surface. Using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations with a code previously validated according to the Task Group 195 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, we show that for typical x-ray spectra and energy range adopted in mammography, the resulting discrepancy in the calculation of the incident air kerma may lead to an overestimation from a minimum of 10% up to 12% of normalized dose coefficients and, hence, of the corresponding mean glandular dose if this contribution is not considered.

  1. Dose conversion coefficients for neutron exposure to the lens of the human eye

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, Ryan P; Bellamy, Michael B; Eckerman, Keith F

    2011-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for the lens of the human eye have been calculated for neutron exposure at energies from 1 x 10{sup -9} to 20 MeV and several standard orientations: anterior-to-posterior, rotational and right lateral. MCNPX version 2.6.0, a Monte Carlo-based particle transport package, was used to determine the energy deposited in the lens of the eye. The human eyeball model was updated by partitioning the lens into sensitive and insensitive volumes as the anterior portion (sensitive volume) of the lens being more radiosensitive and prone to cataract formation. The updated eye model was used with the adult UF-ORNL mathematical phantom in the MCNPX transport calculations.

  2. Dose conversion coefficients for neutron exposure to the lens of the human eye.

    PubMed

    Manger, R P; Bellamy, M B; Eckerman, K F

    2012-03-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for the lens of the human eye have been calculated for neutron exposure at energies from 1 × 10(-9) to 20 MeV and several standard orientations: anterior-to-posterior, rotational and right lateral. MCNPX version 2.6.0, a Monte Carlo-based particle transport package, was used to determine the energy deposited in the lens of the eye. The human eyeball model was updated by partitioning the lens into sensitive and insensitive volumes as the anterior portion (sensitive volume) of the lens being more radiosensitive and prone to cataract formation. The updated eye model was used with the adult UF-ORNL mathematical phantom in the MCNPX transport calculations.

  3. Special Session on Internal Dose at HPS Meeting in Portland

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2007-09-22

    In October 2006, the most recent of the usually quadrennial European internal dosimetry meetings was held in Montpellier, France. Based on questions and discussions at that meeting, Health Physics Society (HPS) Past President Ray Guilmette of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) organized and cochaired with Keith Eckerman a special session onCurrent Topics in Internal Dose Assessment.” For a session scheduled on the last day of the Annual HPS Meeting in Portland, Oregon, one might not expect a huge turnout. However, the session was intense and riveting, with well over 100 people at the beginning, and perhaps 60 holding on until well after noon, after the official ending of the meeting. First, Guilmette invited six of our best and brightest in the internal dosimetry and dose reconstruction community. Then he challenged each to answer five questions on assessment or reconstruction of doses due to intakes of radionuclides: Who is the customer (for the dose assessment)? What are the rules and constraints for the dose assessment? What are the appropriate methods, models, and calculation techniques? What are the dose endpoints? How are uncertainties handled?

  4. Dose estimation for astronauts using dose conversion coefficients calculated with the PHITS code and the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Sihver, Lembit; Niita, Koji

    2011-03-01

    Absorbed-dose and dose-equivalent rates for astronauts were estimated by multiplying fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients in the units of Gy.cm(2) and Sv.cm(2), respectively, and cosmic-ray fluxes around spacecrafts in the unit of cm(-2) s(-1). The dose conversion coefficients employed in the calculation were evaluated using the general-purpose particle and heavy ion transport code system PHITS coupled to the male and female adult reference computational phantoms, which were released as a common ICRP/ICRU publication. The cosmic-ray fluxes inside and near to spacecrafts were also calculated by PHITS, using simplified geometries. The accuracy of the obtained absorbed-dose and dose-equivalent rates was verified by various experimental data measured both inside and outside spacecrafts. The calculations quantitatively show that the effective doses for astronauts are significantly greater than their corresponding effective dose equivalents, because of the numerical incompatibility between the radiation quality factors and the radiation weighting factors. These results demonstrate the usefulness of dose conversion coefficients in space dosimetry. © Springer-Verlag 2010

  5. Construction of hybrid Chinese reference adult phantoms and estimation of dose conversion coefficients for muons.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Li, Taosheng; Liu, Chunyu

    2015-04-01

    A set of fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients of external exposure to muons were investigated for Chinese hybrid phantom references, which include both male and female. Both polygon meshes and Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) surfaces were used to descried the boundary of the organs and tissues in these phantoms. The 3D-DOCTOR and Rhinoceros software were used to polygonise the colour slice images and generate the NURBS surfaces, respectively. The voxelisation is completed using the BINVOX software and the assembly finished by using MATLAB codes. The voxel resolutions were selected to be 0.22 × 0.22 × 0.22 cm(3) and 0.2 × 0.2 × 0.2 cm(3) for male and female phantoms, respectively. All parts of the final phantoms were matched to their reference organ masses within a tolerance of ±5%. The conversion coefficients for negative and positive muons were calculated with the FLUKA transport code. There were 21 external monoenergetic beams ranging from 0.01 GeV to 100 TeV in 5 different geometrical conditions of irradiation.

  6. Internal dose following a large-scale nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.R.; Shapiro, C.S.; Harvey, T.F.

    1988-03-01

    In this study, we use the PATHWAY model, in conjunction with a reasonable hypothetical nuclear attack on the US to arrive at calculations of internal and external dose estimates that are based on valid model results. Our own estimates are presented with calculational aids (at every step) that enable readers to use their own nuclear war scenarios, fallout patterns, assumptions about the climatic changes brought on by large fires following a nuclear attack, the viability of the transportation system for food delivery, the quality and quantity of water and foods available locally, the required caloric intakes of the survivors, and several other factors. We conclude that the average American family that survived a large-scale nuclear war, using their own home or workplace as a refuge, would receive a total internal dose from ingestion that is from one to 10 percent of the total external dose. Those who stayed where shelter protection factors and foraged food consumption were large could receive internal doses from 11 percent to more than 100% of the total external dose. 28 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Gamma dose from activation of internal shields in IRIS reactor.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, Stefano; Cammi, Antonio; Garlati, Luisella; Lombardi, Carlo; Padovani, Enrico

    2005-01-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure is a modular pressurised water reactor with an integral design. This means that all the primary system components, such as the steam generators, pumps, pressuriser and control rod drive mechanisms, are located inside the reactor vessel, which requires a large diameter. For the sake of better reliability and safety, it is desirable to achieve the reduction of vessel embrittlement as well as the lowering of the dose beyond the vessel. The former can be easily accomplished by the presence of a wide downcomer, filled with water, which surrounds the core region, while the latter needs the presence of additional internal shields. An optimal shielding configuration is under investigation, for reducing the ex-vessel dose due to activated internals and for limiting the amount of the biological shielding. MCNP 4C calculations were performed to evaluate the neutron and the gamma dose during operation and the 60Co activation of various shields configurations. The gamma dose beyond the vessel from activation of its structural components was estimated in a shutdown condition, with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA 2002 and the MicroShield software. The results of the two codes are in agreement and show that the dose is sufficiently low, even without an additional shield.

  8. JADA: a graphical user interface for comprehensive internal dose assessment in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Joshua; Uribe, Carlos; Celler, Anna

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of this work was to design a comprehensive dosimetry package that would keep all aspects of internal dose calculation within the framework of a single software environment and that would be applicable for a variety of dose calculation approaches. Our MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) can be used for processing data obtained using pure planar, pure SPECT, or hybrid planar/SPECT imaging. Time-activity data for source regions are obtained using a set of tools that allow the user to reconstruct SPECT images, load images, coregister a series of planar images, and to perform two-dimensional and three-dimensional image segmentation. Curve fits are applied to the acquired time-activity data to construct time-activity curves, which are then integrated to obtain time-integrated activity coefficients. Subsequently, dose estimates are made using one of three methods. The organ level dose calculation subGUI calculates mean organ doses that are equivalent to dose assessment performed by OLINDA/EXM. Voxelized dose calculation options, which include the voxel S value approach and Monte Carlo simulation using the EGSnrc user code DOSXYZnrc, are available within the process 3D image data subGUI. The developed internal dosimetry software package provides an assortment of tools for every step in the dose calculation process, eliminating the need for manual data transfer between programs. This saves times and minimizes user errors, while offering a versatility that can be used to efficiently perform patient-specific internal dose calculations in a variety of clinical situations.

  9. Organ dose conversion coefficients based on a voxel mouse model and MCNP code for external photon irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Cheng, Jie; Ning, Jing; Yuan, Yong; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2012-01-01

    A set of conversion coefficients from kerma free-in-air to the organ absorbed dose for external photon beams from 10 keV to 10 MeV are presented based on a newly developed voxel mouse model, for the purpose of radiation effect evaluation. The voxel mouse model was developed from colour images of successive cryosections of a normal nude male mouse, in which 14 organs or tissues were segmented manually and filled with different colours, while each colour was tagged by a specific ID number for implementation of mouse model in Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP). Monte Carlo simulation with MCNP was carried out to obtain organ dose conversion coefficients for 22 external monoenergetic photon beams between 10 keV and 10 MeV under five different irradiation geometries conditions (left lateral, right lateral, dorsal-ventral, ventral-dorsal, and isotropic). Organ dose conversion coefficients were presented in tables and compared with the published data based on a rat model to investigate the effect of body size and weight on the organ dose. The calculated and comparison results show that the organ dose conversion coefficients varying the photon energy exhibits similar trend for most organs except for the bone and skin, and the organ dose is sensitive to body size and weight at a photon energy approximately <0.1 MeV.

  10. Empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient for a rectangular internal-loop airlift bioreactor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An empirical correlation of volumetric mass transfer coefficient was developed for a pilot scale internal-loop rectangular airlift bioreactor that was designed for biotechnology. The empirical correlation combines classic turbulence theory, Kolmogorov’s isotropic turbulence theory with Higbie’s pen...

  11. Dependence of the radon emanation coefficient on radium distribution and internal structure of the material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawska, L.; Phillips, Colin R.

    1993-04-01

    The mechanisms of escape of radon from the solid structure of a particle to the free pore space are examined. According to the present state of knowledge, the most important factors affecting the radon emanation coefficient are the distribution of the parent radium atoms and the internal structure of the material. In early studies of the radon emanation coefficient, it was usually assumed that the material under investigation was homogeneous in radium distribution and in internal structure. It is now known that these assumptions are often not justified for real materials. In consequence, models based on these assumptions may not be useful in explaining the emanation process. The importance of radium distribution and internal structure is explained here, and an analysis made of differences in the internal structure of various natural and man-made materials. The analysis is then developed in order to identify the effect of different models of radium atom distribution on the emanation coefficient. Four models of radium atom distribution are presented, together with mathematical approaches for developing and finding numerical solutions for equations leading to determination of the emanation coefficient for each model.

  12. Dose Calculation Evolution for Internal Organ Irradiation in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez V, Reina A.

    2007-10-26

    The International Commission of Radiation Units (ICRU) has established through the years, a discrimination system regarding the security levels on the prescription and administration of doses in radiation treatments (Radiotherapy, Brach therapy, Nuclear Medicine). The first level is concerned with the prescription and posterior assurance of dose administration to a point of interest (POI), commonly located at the geometrical center of the region to be treated. In this, the effects of radiation around that POI, is not a priority. The second level refers to the dose specifications in a particular plane inside the patient, mostly the middle plane of the lesion. The dose is calculated to all the structures in that plane regardless if they are tumor or healthy tissue. In this case, the dose is not represented by a point value, but by level curves called 'isodoses' as in a topographic map, so you can assure the level of doses to this particular plane, but it also leave with no information about how this values go thru adjacent planes. This is why the third level is referred to the volumetrical description of doses so these isodoses construct now a volume (named 'cloud') that give us better assurance about tissue irradiation around the volume of the lesion and its margin (sub clinical spread or microscopic illness). This work shows how this evolution has resulted, not only in healthy tissue protection improvement but in a rise of tumor control, quality of life, better treatment tolerance and minimum permanent secuelae.

  13. Guidance on internal dose assessments from monitoring data (project IDEAS).

    PubMed

    Doerfel, H; Andrasi, A; Bailey, M; Berkovski, V; Castellani, C M; Hurtgen, C; Jourdain, J R; LeGuen, B

    2003-01-01

    Several international inter-comparison exercises on intake and internal dose assessments from monitoring data led to the conclusion that the results calculated by different participants varied significantly, mainly due to the broad variety of methods and assumptions applied in the assessment procedure. Based on these experiences, the need of harmonisation of the procedures has been formulated as an EU research project under the 5th Framework Programme, with the aim of developing general guidelines for standardising assessments of intakes and internal doses. In the IDEAS project, eight institutions from seven European countries are participating, also using inputs from internal dosimetry professionals from across Europe to ensure broad consensus in the outcome of the project. To ensure that the guidelines are applicable to a wide range of practical situations, the first step will be to compile a database on well documented cases of internal contamination. In parallel, an improved version of existing software will be developed and distributed to the partners for further use. Many cases from the database will be evaluated independently by more partners using the same software and the results will be discussed and the draft guidelines prepared. The guidelines will then be revised and refined on the basis of the experiences and discussions of two workshops, and an intercomparison exercise organised in the frame of the project which will be open to all internal dosimetry professionals.

  14. Influence of DTPA Treatment on Internal Dose Estimates.

    PubMed

    Davesne, Estelle; Blanchardon, Eric; Peleau, Bernadette; Correze, Philippe; Bohand, Sandra; Franck, Didier

    2016-06-01

    In case of internal contamination with plutonium materials, a treatment with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) can be administered in order to reduce plutonium body burden and consequently avoid some radiation dose. DTPA intravenous injections or inhalation can start almost immediately after intake, in parallel with urinary and fecal bioassay sampling for dosimetric follow-up. However, urine and feces excretion will be significantly enhanced by the DTPA treatment. As internal dose is calculated from bioassay results, the DTPA effect on excretion has to be taken into account. A common method to correct bioassay data is to divide it by a factor representing the excretion enhancement under DTPA treatment by intravenous injection. Its value may be based on a nominal reference or observed after a break in the treatment. The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of this factor on internal dose by comparing the dose estimated using default or upper and lower values of the enhancement factor for 11 contamination cases. The observed upper and lower values of the enhancement factor were 18.7 and 63.0 for plutonium and 24.9 and 28.8 for americium. For americium, a default factor of 25 is proposed. This work demonstrates that the use of a default DTPA enhancement factor allows the determination of the magnitude of the contamination because dose estimated could vary by a factor of 2 depending on the value of the individual DTPA enhancement factor. In case of significant intake, an individual enhancement factor should be determined to obtain a more reliable dose assessment.

  15. NEURAL NETWORK MODELLING OF CARDIAC DOSE CONVERSION COEFFICIENT FOR ARBITRARY X-RAY SPECTRA.

    PubMed

    Kadri, O; Manai, K

    2016-12-01

    In this article, an approach to compute the dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) is described for the computational voxel phantom 'High-Definition Reference Korean-Man' (HDRK-Man) using artificial neural networks (ANN). For this purpose, the voxel phantom was implemented into the Monte Carlo (MC) transport toolkit GEANT4, and the DCCs for more than 30 tissues and organs, due to a broad parallel beam of monoenergetic photons with energy ranging from 15 to 150 keV by a step of 5 keV, were calculated. To study the influence of patient size on DCC values, DCC calculation was performed, for a representative body size population, using five different sizes covering the range of 80-120 % magnification of the original HDRK-Man. The focus of the present study was on the computation of DCC for the human heart. ANN calculation and MC simulation results were compared, and good agreement was observed showing that ANNs can be used as an efficient tool for modelling DCCs for the computational voxel phantom. ANN approach appears to be a significant advance over the time-consuming MC methods for DCC calculation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Effect of absorption parameters on calculation of the dose coefficient: example of classification of industrial uranium compounds.

    PubMed

    Chazel, V; Houpert, P; Paquet, F; Ansoborlo, E

    2001-01-01

    In the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) described in ICRP Publication 66, time-dependent dissolution is described by three parameters: the fraction dissolved rapidly, fr, and the rapid and slow dissolution rates sr and ss. The effect of these parameters on the dose coefficient has been studied. A theoretical analysis was carried out to determine the sensitivity of the dose coefficient to variations in the values of these absorption parameters. Experimental values of the absorption parameters and the doses per unit intake (DPUI) were obtained from in vitro dissolution tests, or from in vivo experiments with rats, for five industrial uranium compounds UO2, U3O8, UO4, UF4 and a mixture of uranium oxides. These compounds were classified in terms of absorption types (F, M or S) according to ICRP. The overall result was that the factor which has the greatest influence on the dose coefficient was the slow dissolution rate ss. This was verified experimentally, with a variation of 20% to 55% for the DPUI according to the absorption type of the compound. In contrast, the rapid dissolution rate sr had little effect on the dose coefficient, excepted for Type F compounds.

  17. [Estimators of internal consistency in health research: the use of the alpha coefficient].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Franciele Cascaes; Gonçalves, Elizandra; Arancibia, Beatriz Angélica Valdivia; Bento, Gisele Graziele; Castro, Thiago Luis da Silva; Hernandez, Salma Stephany Soleman; da Silva, Rudney

    2015-01-01

    Academic production has increased in the area of health, increasingly demanding high quality in publications of great impact. One of the ways to consider quality is through methods that increase the consistency of data analysis, such as reliability which, depending on the type of data, can be evaluated by different coefficients, especially the alpha coefficient. Based on this, the present review systematically gathers scientific articles produced in the last five years, which in a methodological manner gave the α coefficient psychometric use as an estimator of internal consistency and reliability in the processes of construction, adaptation and validation of instruments. The identification of the studies was conducted systematically in the databases BioMed Central Journals, Web of Science, Wiley Online Library, Medline, SciELO, Scopus, Journals@Ovid, BMJ and Springer, using inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data analyses were performed by means of triangulation, content analysis and descriptive analysis. It was found that most studies were conducted in Iran (f=3), Spain (f=2) and Brazil (f=2). These studies aimed to test the psychometric properties of instruments, with eight studies using the α coefficient to assess reliability and nine for assessing internal consistency. All studies were classified as methodological research when their objectives were analyzed. In addition, four studies were also classified as correlational and one as descriptive-correlational. It can be concluded that though the α coefficient is widely used as one of the main parameters for assessing internal consistency of questionnaires in health sciences, its use as an estimator of trust of the methodology used and internal consistency has some critiques that should be considered.

  18. Internal dose conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This publication contains 50-year committed dose equivalent factors, in tabular form. The document is intended to be used as the primary reference by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors for calculating radiation dose equivalents for members of the public, resulting from ingestion or inhalation of radioactive materials. Its application is intended specifically for such materials released to the environment during routine DOE operations, except in those instances where compliance with 40 CFR 61 (National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) requires otherwise. However, the calculated values may be equally applicable to unusual releases or to occupational exposures. The use of these committed dose equivalent tables should ensure that doses to members of the public from internal exposures are calculated in a consistent manner at all DOE facilities.

  19. Derived Intervention Levels for Tritium Based on Food and Drug Administration Methodology Using ICRP 56 Dose Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A

    1999-06-09

    In 1998, the FDA released its recommendations for age-dependent derived intervention levels for several radionuclides involved in nuclear accidents. One radionuclide that is not included in that document is tritium. Therefore an analysis is presented here using dose coefficients from ICRP 56 to develop Derived Intervention Levels (DILs) for tritium in two forms: water (HTO) and organically bound tritium (OBT).

  20. Deriving adaptive MRF coefficients from previous normal-dose CT scan for low-dose image reconstruction via penalized weighted least-squares minimization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Wang, Jing; Ma, Jianhua; Liu, Yan; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Repeated computed tomography (CT) scans are required for some clinical applications such as image-guided interventions. To optimize radiation dose utility, a normal-dose scan is often first performed to set up reference, followed by a series of low-dose scans for intervention. One common strategy to achieve the low-dose scan is to lower the x-ray tube current and exposure time (mAs) or tube voltage (kVp) setting in the scanning protocol, but the resulted image quality by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method may be severely degraded due to the excessive noise. Penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) image reconstruction has shown the potential to significantly improve the image quality from low-mAs acquisitions, where the penalty plays an important role. In this work, the authors' explore an adaptive Markov random field (MRF)-based penalty term by utilizing previous normal-dose scan to improve the subsequent low-dose scans image reconstruction. Methods: In this work, the authors employ the widely-used quadratic-form MRF as the penalty model and explore a novel idea of using the previous normal-dose scan to obtain the MRF coefficients for adaptive reconstruction of the low-dose images. In the coefficients determination, the authors further explore another novel idea of using the normal-dose scan to obtain a scale map, which describes an optimal neighborhood for the coefficients determination such that a local uniform region has a small spread of frequency spectrum and, therefore, a small MRF window, and vice versa. The proposed penalty term is incorporated into the PWLS image reconstruction framework, and the low-dose images are reconstructed via the PWLS minimization. Results: The presented adaptive MRF based PWLS algorithm was validated by physical phantom and patient data. The experimental results demonstrated that the presented algorithm is superior to the PWLS reconstruction using the conventional Gaussian MRF penalty or the edge

  1. Shuttle radiation dose measurements in the International Space Station orbits.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, Gautam D

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is now a reality with the start of a permanent human presence on board. Radiation presents a serious risk to the health and safety of the astronauts, and there is a clear requirement for estimating their exposures prior to and after flights. Predictions of the dose rate at times other than solar minimum or solar maximum have not been possible, because there has been no method to calculate the trapped-particle spectrum at intermediate times. Over the last few years, a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) has been flown at a fixed mid-deck location on board the Space Shuttle in 51.65 degrees inclination flights. These flights have provided data that cover the expected changes in the dose rates due to changes in altitude and changes in solar activity from the solar minimum to the solar maximum of the current 23rd solar cycle. Based on these data, a simple function of the solar deceleration potential has been derived that can be used to predict the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) dose rates to within +/-10%. For altitudes to be covered by the ISS, the dose rate due to the trapped particles is found to be a power-law function, rho(-2/3), of the atmospheric density, rho. This relationship can be used to predict trapped dose rates inside these spacecraft to +/-10% throughout the solar cycle. Thus, given the shielding distribution for a location inside the Space Shuttle or inside an ISS module, this approach can be used to predict the combined GCR + trapped dose rate to better than +/-15% for quiet solar conditions.

  2. Dose conversion coefficients calculated using tomographic phantom, KTMAN-2, for X-ray examination of cardiac catheterisation.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Lee, J K; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    In this study, organ-absorbed doses and effective doses to patient during interventional radiological procedures were estimated using tomographic phantom, Korean Typical Man-2 (KTMAN-2). Four projections of cardiac catheterisation were simulated for dose calculation by Monte Carlo technique. The parameters of X-ray source and exposure conditions were obtained from literature data. Particle transport was simulated using general purposed Monte Carlo code, MCNPX 2.5.0. Organ-absorbed doses and effective doses were normalised to dose area product (DAP). The effective doses per DAP were between 0.1 and 0.5 mSv Gy(-1) per cm2. The results were compared with those derived from adult stylised phantom. KTMAN-2 received up to 105% higher effective doses than stylised phantom. The dose differences were mainly caused by more realistic internal topology of KTMAN-2 compared to stylised phantom that are closely positioned organs near the heart and shift of abdominal organs to the thoracic region due to supine position. The results of this study showed that tomographic phantoms are more suitable for dose assessment of supine patients undergoing the interventional radiology. The results derived from KTMAN-2 were the first radiation dose data based on non-Caucasian individuals for interventional procedures.

  3. Dose-area product measurements and determination of conversion coefficients for the estimation of effective dose in dental lateral cephalometric radiology.

    PubMed

    Looe, H K; Eenboom, F; Chofor, N; Pfaffenberger, A; Sering, M; Rühmann, A; Poplawski, A; Willborn, K; Poppe, B

    2007-01-01

    A study has been carried out to propose diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for lateral cephalometric radiology in Germany based on the dose-area product (DAP). DRLs were proposed separately for child and adult exposure settings which are 26.4 and 32.6 mGy cm2, respectively. Organ absorbed doses from lateral cephalometric radiology were also measured using thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs) and an adult anthropomorphic phantom specially design for dosimetric study in dental radiology. Effective doses were then calculated using three different techniques where the salivary gland and brain tissue were given different weighting factors. Conversion coefficients for estimating effective dose from DAP value derived in this study range from 0.042 to 0.149 microSv/mGy cm2.

  4. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20-250 MeV.

    PubMed

    Olsher, R H; McLean, T D; Justus, A L; Devine, R T; Gadd, M S

    2010-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom.

  5. The influence of patient size on dose conversion coefficients: a hybrid phantom study for adult cardiac catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Lee, Choonsik; Johnson, Kevin; Siragusa, Daniel; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, the influence of patient size on organ and effective dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) was investigated for a representative interventional fluoroscopic procedure—cardiac catheterization. The study was performed using hybrid phantoms representing an underweight, average and overweight American adult male. Reference body sizes were determined using the NHANES III database and parameterized based on standing height and total body mass. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients were calculated for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left anterior oblique and right anterior oblique projections using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.5.0 with the metric dose area product being used as the normalization factor. Results show body size to have a clear influence on DCCs which increased noticeably when body size decreased. It was also shown that if patient size is neglected when choosing a DCC, the organ and effective dose will be underestimated to an underweight patient and will be overestimated to an underweight patient, with errors as large as 113% for certain projections. Results were further compared with those published for a KTMAN-2 Korean patient-specific tomographic phantom. The published DCCs aligned best with the hybrid phantom which most closely matched in overall body size. These results highlighted the need for and the advantages of phantom-patient matching, and it is recommended that hybrid phantoms be used to create a more diverse library of patient-dependent anthropomorphic phantoms for medical dose reconstruction.

  6. Monte Carlo calculation of conversion coefficients for dose estimation in mammography based on a 3D detailed breast model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjing; Qiu, Rui; Ren, Li; Liu, Huan; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Niu, Yantao; Li, Junli

    2017-06-01

    At present, the Chinese specification for testing of quality control in x-ray mammography is based on a simple breast model, and does not consider the glandular tissue distribution in the breast. In order to more precisely estimate the mean glandular dose (MGD) in mammography for Chinese women, a three-dimensional (3D) detailed breast model based on realistic structures in the breast and Chinese female breast parameters was built and applied in this study. To characterize the Chinese female breast, Chinese female breast parameters including breast size, compressed breast thickness (CBT), and glandular content were investigated in this study. A mathematical model with the detailed breast structures was constructed based on the Chinese female breast parameters. The mathematical model was then converted to a voxel model with voxels. The voxel model was compressed in craniocaudal (CC) view to obtain a deformation model. The compressed breast model was combined with the Chinese reference adult female whole-body voxel phantom (CRAF) to study the effects of backscatter from the female body. Monte Carlo simulations of the glandular dose in mammography were performed with Geant 4. The glandular tissue dose conversion coefficients for breasts with different glandular contents (5%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% glandularity) and CBTs (3 cm, 4 cm, 5 cm, and 6 cm) were calculated, respectively, at various x-ray tube voltages (25 kV, 28 kV, 30 kV, 32 kV, and 35 kV) for various target/filter combinations (Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, Rh/Rh, and W/Rh). A series of glandular tissue dose conversion coefficients for dose estimation in mammography were calculated. The conversion coefficients calculated in this study were compared with those estimated with the simple breast model. A discrepancy of 5.4-38.0% was observed. This was consistent with the results obtained from the realistic breast models in the literature. A 3D detailed breast model with realistic structures in the breast was constructed

  7. Age-dependent organ and effective dose coefficients for external photons: a comparison of stylized and voxel-based paediatric phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2006-09-01

    This present study investigates the anatomical realism of conventional stylized models of children by comparing organ dose conversion coefficients for the ORNL paediatric phantom series with those determined in the UF (University of Florida) voxel paediatric phantoms. The latter includes whole-body models of a 9 month male, 4 year female, 8 year female, 11 year male and a 14 year male. Of these phantoms, the 1 year, 5 year and 10 year ORNL phantoms, and 9 month male, 4 year female and 11 year male UF voxel phantoms were selected for side-by-side comparisons under idealized external photon irradiation. Organ absorbed dose per unit air kerma (Gy/Gy) for various radiosensitive organs and tissues were calculated for monoenergetic photons over the energy range of 15 keV to 10 MeV and for six irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right lateral (RLAT), left lateral (LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). Differences in organ dose conversion coefficients for the gonads, bone marrow, colon, lung and stomach, to which prominent tissue weighting factors are assigned, were depicted and analysed. Two major causes of observed differences were suggested: differences in organ shape and position and the differences in tissue shielding by overlying tissue regions within the phantoms. Significant discrepancies caused by anatomical differences between the two types of phantoms are also reported for several organs, and in particular, the thyroid and urinary bladder. The results of this study suggest that the paediatric series of ORNL phantoms also have less realistic internal organ and body anatomy and that dose conversion coefficients from these stylized phantoms should be re-evaluated using paediatric voxel phantoms.

  8. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each case, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document.

  9. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each use, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document. 22 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  10. 10 CFR 835.203 - Combining internal and external equivalent doses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... External Exposure § 835.203 Combining internal and external equivalent doses. (a) The total effective dose during a year shall be determined by summing the effective dose from external exposures and the committed... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Combining internal and external equivalent doses....

  11. 241Am Ingrowth and Its Effect on Internal Dose

    DOE PAGES

    Konzen, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Generally, plutonium has been manufactured to support commercial and military applications involving heat sources, weapons and reactor fuel. This work focuses on three typical plutonium mixtures, while observing the potential of 241Am ingrowth and its effect on internal dose. The term “ingrowth” is used to describe 241Am production due solely from the decay of 241Pu as part of a plutonium mixture, where it is initially absent or present in a smaller quantity. Dose calculation models do not account for 241Am ingrowth unless the 241Pu quantity is specified. This work suggested that 241Am ingrowth be considered in bioassay analysis when theremore » is a potential of a 10% increase to the individual’s committed effective dose. It was determined that plutonium fuel mixtures, initially absent of 241Am, would likely exceed 10% for typical reactor grade fuel aged less than 30 years; however, heat source grade and aged weapons grade fuel would normally fall below this threshold. In conclusion, although this work addresses typical plutonium mixtures following separation, it may be extended to irradiated commercial uranium fuel and is expected to be a concern in the recycling of spent fuel.« less

  12. [The methodology development of the calculating and empirical internal dose assessments at far post Chernobyl period].

    PubMed

    Vlasova, N G; Zhuchenko, Iu M; Chunikhin, L A

    2009-01-01

    The comparison analysis of internal dose assessment had been conducted by different calculated methods. The results of the WBC measurements were used as a criteria of internal dose assessment. It was shown that the methodology of the internal dose assessment intended uncertainties reducing of the received results. It is realized by means of the modern WBC modeling.

  13. Use of internal consistency coefficients for estimating reliability of experimental task scores.

    PubMed

    Green, Samuel B; Yang, Yanyun; Alt, Mary; Brinkley, Shara; Gray, Shelley; Hogan, Tiffany; Cowan, Nelson

    2016-06-01

    Reliabilities of scores for experimental tasks are likely to differ from one study to another to the extent that the task stimuli change, the number of trials varies, the type of individuals taking the task changes, the administration conditions are altered, or the focal task variable differs. Given that reliabilities vary as a function of the design of these tasks and the characteristics of the individuals taking them, making inferences about the reliability of scores in an ongoing study based on reliability estimates from prior studies is precarious. Thus, it would be advantageous to estimate reliability based on data from the ongoing study. We argue that internal consistency estimates of reliability are underutilized for experimental task data and in many applications could provide this information using a single administration of a task. We discuss different methods for computing internal consistency estimates with a generalized coefficient alpha and the conditions under which these estimates are accurate. We illustrate use of these coefficients using data for three different tasks.

  14. Use of Internal Consistency Coefficients for Estimating Reliability of Experimental Tasks Scores

    PubMed Central

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun; Alt, Mary; Brinkley, Shara; Gray, Shelley; Hogan, Tiffany; Cowan, Nelson

    2017-01-01

    Reliabilities of scores for experimental tasks are likely to differ from one study to another to the extent that the task stimuli change, the number of trials varies, the type of individuals taking the task changes, the administration conditions are altered, or the focal task variable differs. Given reliabilities vary as a function of the design of these tasks and the characteristics of the individuals taking them, making inferences about the reliability of scores in an ongoing study based on reliability estimates from prior studies is precarious. Thus, it would be advantageous to estimate reliability based on data from the ongoing study. We argue that internal consistency estimates of reliability are underutilized for experimental task data and in many applications could provide this information using a single administration of a task. We discuss different methods for computing internal consistency estimates with a generalized coefficient alpha and the conditions under which these estimates are accurate. We illustrate use of these coefficients using data for three different tasks. PMID:26546100

  15. Using the Monte Carlo technique to calculate dose conversion coefficients for medical professionals in interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, W. S.; Carvalho, A. B., Jr.; Hunt, J. G.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate doses in the physician and the nurse assistant at different positions during interventional radiology procedures. In this study, effective doses obtained for the physician and at points occupied by other workers were normalised by air kerma-area product (KAP). The simulations were performed for two X-ray spectra (70 kVp and 87 kVp) using the radiation transport code MCNPX (version 2.7.0), and a pair of anthropomorphic voxel phantoms (MASH/FASH) used to represent both the patient and the medical professional at positions from 7 cm to 47 cm from the patient. The X-ray tube was represented by a point source positioned in the anterior posterior (AP) and posterior anterior (PA) projections. The CC can be useful to calculate effective doses, which in turn are related to stochastic effects. With the knowledge of the values of CCs and KAP measured in an X-ray equipment, at a similar exposure, medical professionals will be able to know their own effective dose.

  16. Organ dose conversion coefficients on an ICRP-based Chinese adult male voxel model from idealized external photons exposures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liye; Zeng, Zhi; Li, Junli; Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Binquan; Ma, Jizeng; Li, Ren; Li, Wenqian; Bi, Lei

    2009-11-07

    A high-resolution whole-body voxel model called CAM representing the Chinese adult male was constructed in this paper based on a previous individual voxel model. There are more than 80 tissues and organs in CAM, including almost all organs required in the ICRP new recommendation. The mass of individual organs has been adjusted to the Chinese reference data. Special considerations were given to representing the gross spatial distribution of various bone constituents as realistically as possible during the construction of the site-specific skeleton. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated for six idealized external photon exposures from 10 keV to 10 MeV by using Monte Carlo simulation. The resulting dose coefficients were then compared with those from other models, e.g. CMP, ICRP 74, Rex, HDRK-man and VIP-man. Old and new effective male doses of CAM were calculated by using the tissue weighting factors from ICRP 60 and 103 Publications, respectively. Dosimetric differences between mathematical and voxel models, and the differences between Asian and Caucasian models are also discussed in this paper.

  17. Human biokinetics of strontium. Part I: intestinal absorption rate and its impact on the dose coefficient of 90Sr after ingestion.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei Bo; Höllriegl, Vera; Roth, Paul; Oeh, Uwe

    2006-07-01

    Intestinal absorption of strontium (Sr) in thirteen healthy adult German volunteers has been investigated by simultaneous oral and intravenous administration of two stable tracer isotopes, i.e. (84)Sr and (86)Sr. The measured Sr tracer concentration in plasma was analyzed using the convolution integral technique to obtain the intestinal absorption rate. The results showed that the Sr labeled in different foodstuffs was absorbed into the body fluids in a large range of difference. The maximum Sr absorption rates were observed within 60-120 min after administration. The rate of absorption is used to evaluate the intestinal absorption fraction, i.e. the f (1) value for various foodstuffs. The equivalent and effective dose coefficients for ingestion of (90)Sr were calculated using these f (1) values, and they were compared with those recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The geometric and arithmetic means of the f (1) values are 0.38 and 0.45 associated with a geometric standard deviation and a standard deviation of 1.88 and 0.22, respectively. The 90% confidence interval of the f (1) values obtained in the present study ranges from 0.13 to 0.98. Expressed as the ratio of the 95 and 50% percentiles of the estimated probability, the uncertainty for the f (1) value corresponds to a factor of 2.58. The effective dose coefficients of (90)Sr after ingestion are 6.1 x 10(-9) Sv Bq(-1) for an f(1) value of 0.05, 1.0 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.1, 1.9 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.2, 2.8 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.3, 3.6 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.4, 5.3 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.6, 7.1 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.8, and 7.9 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.9, respectively. Taking the effective dose coefficient of 2.8 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for an f (1) value of 0.3, which is recommended by the ICRP, as a reference, the effective dose coefficient of (90)Sr after ingestion varies by a factor of 2.8 when the f (1) value changes by a factor of 3, i.e. it decreases

  18. Dosimetry software Hermes Internal Radiation Dosimetry: from quantitative image reconstruction to voxel-level absorbed dose distribution.

    PubMed

    Hippeläinen, Eero T; Tenhunen, Mikko J; Mäenpää, Hanna O; Heikkonen, Jorma J; Sohlberg, Antti O

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work is to validate a software package called Hermes Internal Radiation Dosimetry (HIRD) for internal dose assessment tailored for clinical practice. The software includes all the necessary steps to perform voxel-level absorbed dose calculations including quantitative reconstruction, image coregistration and volume of interest tools. The basics of voxel-level dosimetry methods and implementations to HIRD software are reviewed. Then, HIRD is validated using simulated SPECT/CT data and data from Lu-DOTATATE-treated patients by comparing absorbed kidney doses with OLINDA/EXM-based dosimetry. In addition, electron and photon dose components are studied separately in an example patient case. The simulation study showed that HIRD can reproduce time-activity curves accurately and produce absorbed doses with less than 10% error for the kidneys, liver and spleen. From the patient data, the absorbed kidney doses calculated using HIRD and using OLINDA/EXM were highly correlated (Pearson's correlation coefficient, r=0.98). From Bland-Altman plot analysis, an average absorbed dose difference of -2% was found between the methods. In addition, we found that in Lu-DOTATATE-treated patients, photons can contribute over 10% of the kidney's total dose and is partly because of cross-irradiation from high-uptake lesions close to the kidneys. HIRD is a straightforward voxel-level internal dosimetry software. Its clinical utility was verified with simulated and clinical Lu-DOTATATE-treated patient data. Patient studies also showed that photon contribution towards the total dose can be relatively high and voxel-level dose calculations can be valuable in cases where the target organ is in close proximity to high-uptake organs.

  19. Increased absorbed liver dose in Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) correlates with increased sphere-cluster frequency and absorbed dose inhomogeneity.

    PubMed

    Högberg, Jonas; Rizell, Magnus; Hultborn, Ragnar; Svensson, Johanna; Henrikson, Olof; Mölne, Johan; Gjertsson, Peter; Bernhardt, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The higher tolerated mean absorbed dose for selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with intra-arterially infused (90)Y microspheres compared to external beam therapy is speculated to be caused by absorbed dose inhomogeneity, which allows for liver regeneration. However, the complex liver microanatomy and rheology makes modelling less valuable if the tolerance doses are not based on the actual microsphere distribution. The present study demonstrates the sphere distribution and small-scale absorbed dose inhomogeneity and its correlation with the mean absorbed dose in liver tissue resected after SIRT. A patient with marginally resectable cholangiocarcinoma underwent SIRT 9 days prior to resection including adjacent normal liver tissue. The resected specimen was formalin-fixed and sliced into 1 to 2-mm sections. Forty-one normal liver biopsies 6-8 mm in diameter were punched from these sections and the radioactivity measured. Sixteen biopsies were further processed for detailed analyses by consecutive serial sectioning of 15 30-μm sections per biopsy, mounted and stained with haematoxylin-eosin. All sections were scrutinised for isolated or conglomerate spheres. Small-scale dose distributions were obtained by applying a (90)Y-dose point kernel to the microsphere distributions. A total of 3888 spheres were found in the 240 sections. Clusters were frequently found as strings in the arterioles and as conglomerates in small arteries, with the largest cluster comprising 453 spheres. An increased mean absorbed dose in the punch biopsies correlated with large clusters and a greater coefficient of variation. In simulations the absorbed dose was 5-1240 Gy; 90% were 10-97 Gy and 45% were <30 Gy, the assumed tolerance in external beam therapy. Sphere clusters were located in both arterioles and small arteries and increased in size with increasing sphere concentration, resulting in increased absorbed dose inhomogeneity, which contradicts earlier modelling studies.

  20. Dose Conversion Coefficients Based on Taiwanese Reference Phantoms and Monte Carlo Simulations for Use in External Radiation Protection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jun; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Hung, Shih-Yen; Liu, Yan-Lin; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Wu, Jay

    2017-05-01

    Reference phantoms are widely applied to evaluate the radiation dose for external exposure. However, the frequently used reference phantoms are based on Caucasians. Dose estimation for Asians using a Caucasian phantom can result in significant errors. This study recruited 40 volunteers whose body sizes are close to the average Taiwanese population. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to obtain the organ volume for construction of the Taiwanese reference man (TRM) and Taiwanese reference woman (TRW). The dose conversion coefficients (DCC) resulting from photo beams in anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right-lateral, left-lateral, and isotropic irradiation geometries were estimated. In the anterior-posterior geometry, the mean DCC differences among organs between the TRM and ORNL phantom at 0.1, 1, and 10 MeV were 7.3%, 5.8%, and 5.2%, respectively. For the TRW, the mean differences from the ORNL phantom at the three energies were 10.6%, 7.4%, and 8.3%. The DCCs of the Taiwanese reference phantoms and the ORNL phantom presented similar trends in other geometries. The torso size of the phantom and the mass and geometric location of the organ have a significant influence on the DCC. The Taiwanese reference phantoms can be used to establish dose guidelines and regulations for radiation protection from external exposure.

  1. Comparison of internal dose estimates obtained using organ-level, voxel S value, and Monte Carlo techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Joshua; Celler, Anna

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The authors’ objective was to compare internal dose estimates obtained using the Organ Level Dose Assessment with Exponential Modeling (OLINDA/EXM) software, the voxel S value technique, and Monte Carlo simulation. Monte Carlo dose estimates were used as the reference standard to assess the impact of patient-specific anatomy on the final dose estimate. Methods: Six patients injected with{sup 99m}Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide were included in this study. A hybrid planar/SPECT imaging protocol was used to estimate {sup 99m}Tc time-integrated activity coefficients (TIACs) for kidneys, liver, spleen, and tumors. Additionally, TIACs were predicted for {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 90}Y assuming the same biological half-lives as the {sup 99m}Tc labeled tracer. The TIACs were used as input for OLINDA/EXM for organ-level dose calculation and voxel level dosimetry was performed using the voxel S value method and Monte Carlo simulation. Dose estimates for {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 90}Y distributions were evaluated by comparing (i) organ-level S values corresponding to each method, (ii) total tumor and organ doses, (iii) differences in right and left kidney doses, and (iv) voxelized dose distributions calculated by Monte Carlo and the voxel S value technique. Results: The S values for all investigated radionuclides used by OLINDA/EXM and the corresponding patient-specific S values calculated by Monte Carlo agreed within 2.3% on average for self-irradiation, and differed by as much as 105% for cross-organ irradiation. Total organ doses calculated by OLINDA/EXM and the voxel S value technique agreed with Monte Carlo results within approximately ±7%. Differences between right and left kidney doses determined by Monte Carlo were as high as 73%. Comparison of the Monte Carlo and voxel S value dose distributions showed that each method produced similar dose volume histograms with a minimum dose covering 90% of the volume (D90

  2. A Monte Carlo study of monoenergetic and polyenergetic normalized glandular dose (DgN) coefficients in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni; Di Lillo, Francesca; Russo, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the influence of model assumptions in GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for the calculation of monoenergetic and polyenergetic normalized glandular dose coefficients (DgN) in mammography, focussing on the effect of the skin thickness and composition, of the role of compression paddles and of the bremsstrahlung processes. We showed that selecting a skin thickness of 4 mm instead of 1.45 mm produced DgN values with deviations from 9% to 32% for x-ray spectra routinely adopted in mammography. Consideration of the bremsstrahlung radiation had a weak influence on monoenergetic DgN. Simulations (in the range 8-40 kVp) which included consideration of bremsstrahlung radiation, a skin thickness of 1.45 mm and a 2 mm thick compression paddles produced polyenergetic DgN coefficients up to 19% higher than corresponding literature data. Adding a 2 mm thick adipose layer between the skin layer and the radiosensitive portion of the breast produces polyenergetic DgN values up to 15% higher than those routinely adopted. These findings provide a quantitative estimate of the influence of model parameters on the calculation of the mean glandular dose in mammography.

  3. Intake retention fractions developed from models used in the determination of dose coefficients developed for ICRP publication 68--particulate inhalation.

    PubMed

    Potter, Charles A

    2002-11-01

    ICRP Publication 68 presents dose coefficients developed using systems of new models for the respiratory tract and metabolism of certain elements. The utility of these dose coefficients and associated models is limited without a method for calculating intake from bioassay results using the same models as in that publication. The calculation of a radionuclide intake requires values of expected fractions of the intake in bioassay samples collected at specific times after intake. The general system of models has been solved using a commercial software package and a method for solution of systems of first-order linear differential equations that uses eigenvectors and eigenvalues derived from the system of equations. The result of this work is a series of tables of fractions of acute inhalation intakes for different bioassay methods, times, and compound classes for intakes for those elements listed in ICRP Publication 68. The values in these tables can be used for intake calculations, development of bioassay frequencies, and development of action levels.

  4. Mean glandular dose coefficients (D(g)N) for x-ray spectra used in contemporary breast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Nosratieh, Anita; Hernandez, Andrew; Shen, Sam Z; Yaffe, Martin J; Seibert, J Anthony; Boone, John M

    2015-09-21

    To develop tables of normalized glandular dose coefficients D(g)N for a range of anode-filter combinations and tube voltages used in contemporary breast imaging systems. Previously published mono-energetic D(g)N values were used with various spectra to mathematically compute D(g)N coefficients. The tungsten anode spectra from TASMICS were used; molybdenum and rhodium anode-spectra were generated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The spectra were filtered with various thicknesses of Al, Rh, Mo or Cu. An initial half value layer (HVL) calculation was made using the anode and filter material. A range of the HVL values was produced with the addition of small thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as a surrogate for the breast compression paddle, to produce a range of HVL values at each tube voltage. Using a spectral weighting method, D(g)N coefficients for the generated spectra were calculated for breast glandular densities of 0%, 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50% and 100% for a range of compressed breast thicknesses from 3 to 8 cm. Eleven tables of normalized glandular dose (D(g)N) coefficients were produced for the following anode/filter combinations: W + 50 μm Ag, W + 500 μm Al, W + 700 μm Al, W + 200 μm Cu, W + 300 μm Cu, W + 50 μm Rh, Mo + 400 μm Cu, Mo + 30 μm Mo, Mo + 25 μm Rh, Rh + 400 μm Cu and Rh + 25 μm Rh. Where possible, these results were compared to previously published D(g)N values and were found to be on average less than 2% different than previously reported values.Over 200 pages of D(g)N coefficients were computed for modeled x-ray system spectra that are used in a number of new breast imaging applications. The reported values were found to be in excellent agreement when compared to published values.

  5. Mean Glandular dose coefficients (DgN) for x-ray spectra used in contemporary breast imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Nosratieh, Anita; Hernandez, Andrew; Shen, Sam Z.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Seibert, J. Anthony; Boone, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop tables of normalized glandular dose coefficients DgN for a range of anode–filter combinations and tube voltages used in contemporary breast imaging systems. Methods Previously published mono-energetic DgN values were used with various spectra to mathematically compute DgN coefficients. The tungsten anode spectra from TASMICS were used; Molybdenum and Rhodium anode-spectra were generated using MCNPx Monte Carlo code. The spectra were filtered with various thicknesses of Al, Rh, Mo or Cu. An initial HVL calculation was made using the anode and filter material. A range of the HVL values was produced with the addition of small thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as a surrogate for the breast compression paddle, to produce a range of HVL values at each tube voltage. Using a spectral weighting method, DgN coefficients for the generated spectra were calculated for breast glandular densities of 0%, 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50% and 100% for a range of compressed breast thicknesses from 3 to 8 cm. Results Eleven tables of normalized glandular dose (DgN) coefficients were produced for the following anode/filter combinations: W + 50 μm Ag, W + 500 μm Al, W + 700 μm Al, W + 200 μm Cu, W + 300 μm Cu, W + 50 μm Rh, Mo + 400 μm Cu, Mo + 30 μm Mo, Mo + 25 μm Rh, Rh + 400 μm Cu and Rh + 25 μm Rh. Where possible, these results were compared to previously published DgN values and were found to be on average less than 2% different than previously reported values. Conclusion Over 200-pages of DgN coefficients were computed for modeled x-ray system spectra that are used in a number of new breast imaging applications. The reported values were found to be in excellent agreement when compared to published values. PMID:26348995

  6. Calculating the Dose of Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin for Primary Immunodeficiency Disease in Patients Switched From Intravenous to Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin Without the Use of a Dose-Adjustment Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Fadeyi, Michael; Tran, Tin

    2013-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) is an inherited disorder characterized by an inadequate immune system. The most common type of PIDD is antibody deficiency. Patients with this disorder lack the ability to make functional immunoglobulin G (IgG) and require lifelong IgG replacement therapy to prevent serious bacterial infections. The current standard therapy for PIDD is intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) infusions, but IVIG might not be appropriate for all patients. For this reason, subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) has emerged as an alternative to IVIG. A concern for physicians is the precise SCIG dose that should be prescribed, because there are pharmacokinetic differences between IVIG and SCIG. Manufacturers of SCIG 10% and 20% liquid (immune globulin subcutaneous [human]) recommend a dose-adjustment coefficient (DAC). Both strengths are currently approved by the FDA. This DAC is to be used when patients are switched from IVIG to SCIG. In this article, we propose another dosing method that uses a higher ratio of IVIG to SCIG and an incremental adjustment based on clinical status, body weight, and the presence of concurrent diseases. PMID:24391400

  7. SU-D-209-06: Study On the Dose Conversion Coefficients in Pediatric Radiography with the Development of Children Voxel Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q; Zhuo, W; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Chen, T

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Conversion coefficients of organ dose normalized to entrance skin dose (ESD) are widely used to evaluate the organ doses directly using ESD without time-consuming dose measurement, this work aims to investigate the dose conversion coefficients in pediatric chest and abdomen radiography with the development of 5 years and 10 years old children voxel phantoms. Methods: After segmentation of organs and tissues from CT slice images of ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms, a 5-year-old and a 10-year-old children computational voxel phantoms were developed for Monte Carlo simulation. The organ doses and the entrance skin dose for pediatric chest postero-anterior projection and abdominal antero-posterior projection were simulated at the same time, and then the organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated.To verify the simulated results, dose measurement was carried out with ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms for 5 year chest radiography. Results: Simulated results and experimental results matched very well with each other, the result differences of all the organs covered in radiation field were below 16% for 5-year-old child in chest projection. I showed that the conversion coefficients of organs covered in the radiation field were much larger than organs out of the field for all the study cases, for example, the conversion coefficients of stomach, liver intestines, and pancreas are larger for abdomen radiography while conversion coefficients of lungs are larger for chest radiography. Conclusion: The voxel children phantoms were helpful to evaluate the radiation doses more accurately and efficiently. Radiation field was the essential factor that affects the organ dose, use reasonably small field should be encouraged for radiation protection. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China(11475047)

  8. Angular absorbed dose dependence of internal radiation-generating devices in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bevelacqua, J J

    2012-01-01

    The angular dependence of the absorbed dose from internal radiation-generating devices located within a tumor mass is investigated. Given the systematics of proton and heavy-ion differential scattering cross sections, candidate internal radiation-generating devices will have a relatively constant absorbed dose output beyond a critical angle. Inside this angle, the absorbed dose output is suppressed because elastic and inelastic differential cross sections are peaked in the beam direction. This peaking increases in severity as the particle energy increases and suggests internal radiation-generating devices must have a limited rotation capability to compensate for the depression in the absorbed dose for angles near the beam direction.

  9. Selected organ dose conversion coefficients for external photons calculated using ICRP adult voxel phantoms and Monte Carlo code FLUKA.

    PubMed

    Patni, H K; Nadar, M Y; Akar, D K; Bhati, S; Sarkar, P K

    2011-11-01

    The adult reference male and female computational voxel phantoms recommended by ICRP are adapted into the Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA. The FLUKA code is then utilised for computation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) expressed in absorbed dose per air kerma free-in-air for colon, lungs, stomach wall, breast, gonads, urinary bladder, oesophagus, liver and thyroid due to a broad parallel beam of mono-energetic photons impinging in anterior-posterior and posterior-anterior directions in the energy range of 15 keV-10 MeV. The computed DCCs of colon, lungs, stomach wall and breast are found to be in good agreement with the results published in ICRP publication 110. The present work thus validates the use of FLUKA code in computation of organ DCCs for photons using ICRP adult voxel phantoms. Further, the DCCs for gonads, urinary bladder, oesophagus, liver and thyroid are evaluated and compared with results published in ICRP 74 in the above-mentioned energy range and geometries. Significant differences in DCCs are observed for breast, testis and thyroid above 1 MeV, and for most of the organs at energies below 60 keV in comparison with the results published in ICRP 74. The DCCs of female voxel phantom were found to be higher in comparison with male phantom for almost all organs in both the geometries.

  10. A PHANTOM FOR DETERMINATION OF CALIBRATION COEFFICIENTS AND MINIMUM DETECTABLE ACTIVITIES USING A DUAL-HEAD GAMMA CAMERA FOR INTERNAL CONTAMINATION MONITORING FOLLOWING RADIATION EMERGENCY SITUATIONS.

    PubMed

    Ören, Ünal; Andersson, Martin; Rääf, Christopher L; Mattsson, Sören

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive calibration coefficients (in terms of cps kBq(-1)) and minimum detectable activities, MDA, (in terms of kBq and corresponding dose rate) for the dual head gamma camera part of an SPECT/CT-instrument when used for in vivo internal contamination measurements in radiation emergency situations. A cylindrical-conical PMMA phantom with diameters in the range of 7-30 cm was developed in order to simulate different body parts and individuals of different sizes. A series of planar gamma camera investigations were conducted using an SPECT/CT modality with the collimators removed for (131)I and (137)Cs, radionuclides potentially associated with radiation emergencies. Energy windows of 337-391 and 490-690 keV were selected for (131)I and (137)Cs, respectively. The measurements show that the calibration coefficients for (137)Cs range from 10 to 19 cps kBq(-1) with MDA values in the range of 0.29-0.55 kBq for phantom diameters of 10-30 cm. The corresponding values for (131)I are 12-37 cps kBq(-1) with MDA values of 0.08-0.26 kBq. An internal dosimetry computer program was used for the estimation of minimum detectable dose rates. A thyroid uptake of 0.1 kBq (131)I (representing MDA) corresponds to an effective dose rate of 0.6 µSv d(-1) A (137)Cs source position representing the colon with an MDA of 0.55 kBq corresponds to an effective dose rate was 1 µSv y(-1) This method using a simple phantom for the determination of calibration coefficients, and MDA levels can be implemented within the emergency preparedness plans in hospitals with nuclear medicine departments. The derived data will help to quickly estimate the internal contamination of humans following radiation emergencies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A quantitative property-property relationship for the internal diffusion coefficients of organic compounds in solid materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Fantke, P; Ernstoff, A; Jolliet, O

    2017-05-26

    Indoor releases of organic chemicals encapsulated in solid materials are major contributors to human exposures and are directly related to the internal diffusion coefficient in solid materials. Existing correlations to estimate the diffusion coefficient are only valid for a limited number of chemical-material combinations. This paper develops and evaluates a quantitative property-property relationship (QPPR) to predict diffusion coefficients for a wide range of organic chemicals and materials. We first compiled a training dataset of 1103 measured diffusion coefficients for 158 chemicals in 32 consolidated material types. Following a detailed analysis of the temperature influence, we developed a multiple linear regression model to predict diffusion coefficients as a function of chemical molecular weight (MW), temperature, and material type (adjusted R(2) of .93). The internal validations showed the model to be robust, stable and not a result of chance correlation. The external validation against two separate prediction datasets demonstrated the model has good predicting ability within its applicability domain (Rext2>.8), namely MW between 30 and 1178 g/mol and temperature between 4 and 180°C. By covering a much wider range of organic chemicals and materials, this QPPR facilitates high-throughput estimates of human exposures for chemicals encapsulated in solid materials. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Linear attenuation coefficient and buildup factor of MCP-96 alloy for dose accuracy, beam collimation, and radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Deidre N; Maqbool, Muhammad; Islam, Mohammed S

    2012-07-01

    The linear attenuation coefficients and buildup factor of MCP-96 alloy were determined for (60)Co, (54)Mn, and (137)Cs gamma emitters and a NaI detector. The thickness of the MCP-96 attenuator was varied from 1 to 4 cm. A collimated beam of gamma rays was allowed to pass through various thicknesses of the MCP-96 alloy. The attenuated beam was detected by a NaI detector, and data were recorded by a multichannel analyzer. The run was repeated without the collimator for broad-beam geometry. For each run, the attenuated beam intensity was normalized by the intensity of the unattenuated incident beam obtained by removing the attenuators. Linear attenuation coefficients were determined by plotting of the intensity of the collimated beam against the attenuator thickness. For every thickness of the alloy, the ratio of the attenuated to the unattenuated beam was found to be higher in broad-beam geometry as compared to the same ratio in narrow-beam geometry. We used the difference in these ratios in broad and narrow-beam geometries to calculate the buildup factor. The buildup factor was found to increase with beam energy and attenuator thickness. Variation in the source-to-detector distance gave a lower value of the buildup factor for a small and a large distance and a higher value for an intermediate distance. The buildup factor was found to be greater than 1 in all cases. We conclude that the buildup factor must be calculated and incorporated for dose correction and precision when the MCP-96 alloy is used for tissue compensation or radiation shielding and protection purposes.

  13. Comparing Hp(3) evaluated from the conversion coefficients from air kerma to personal dose equivalent for eye lens dosimetry calibrated on a new cylindrical PMMA phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esor, J.; Sudchai, W.; Monthonwattana, S.; Pungkun, V.; Intang, A.

    2017-06-01

    Based on a new occupational dose limit recommended by ICRP (2011), the annual dose limit for the lens of the eye for workers should be reduced from 150 mSv/y to 20 mSv/y averaged over 5 consecutive years in which no single year exceeding 50 mSv. This new dose limit directly affects radiologists and cardiologists whose work involves high radiation exposure over 20 mSv/y. Eye lens dosimetry (Hp(3)) has become increasingly important and should be evaluated directly based on dosimeters that are worn closely to the eye. Normally, Hp(3) dose algorithm was carried out by the combination of Hp(0.07) and Hp(10) values while dosimeters were calibrated on slab PMMA phantom. Recently, there were three reports from European Union that have shown the conversion coefficients from air kerma to Hp(3). These conversion coefficients carried out by ORAMED, PTB and CEA Saclay projects were performed by using a new cylindrical head phantom. In this study, various delivered doses were calculated using those three conversion coefficients while nanoDot, small OSL dosimeters, were used for Hp(3) measurement. These calibrations were performed with a standard X-ray generator at Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL). Delivered doses (Hp(3)) using those three conversion coefficients were compared with Hp(3) from nanoDot measurements. The results showed that percentage differences between delivered doses evaluated from the conversion coefficient of each project and Hp(3) doses evaluated from the nanoDots were found to be not exceeding -11.48 %, -8.85 % and -8.85 % for ORAMED, PTB and CEA Saclay project, respectively.

  14. Estimation of Internal Radiation Dose from both Immediate Releases and Continued Exposures to Contaminated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.

    2012-03-26

    A brief description is provided of the basic concepts related to 'internal dose' and how it differs from doses that result from radioactive materials and direct radiation outside of the body. The principles of radiation dose reconstruction, as applied to both internal and external doses, is discussed based upon a recent publication prepared by the US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Finally, ideas are introduced related to residual radioactive contamination in the environment that has resulted from the releases from the damaged reactors and also to the management of wastes that may be generated in both regional cleanup and NPP decommissioning.

  15. Internal conversion coefficients in {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Ba, and {sup 139}La: A precise test of theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nica, N.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; Balonek, C.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2008-03-15

    Recently we measured the ratio of K-shell internal conversion coefficients, {alpha}{sub K}, for the 127.5-keV E3 transition in {sup 134}Cs and the 661.7-keV M4 transition in {sup 137}Ba. We here report a measurement of the 165.9-keV M1 transition in {sup 139}La, based on which we convert our earlier ratio measurement into individual {alpha}{sub K} values for the transitions in {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Ba. These results continue to confirm the Dirac-Fock calculations of internal conversion coefficients that incorporate the atomic K-shell vacancy.

  16. SECOND LATIN AMERICAN INTERCOMPARISON ON INTERNAL DOSE ASSESSMENT.

    PubMed

    Rojo, A; Puerta, N; Gossio, S; Gómez Parada, I; Cruz Suarez, R; López, E; Medina, C; Lastra Boylan, J; Pinheiro Ramos, M; Mora Ramírez, E; Alves Dos Reis, A; Yánez, H; Rubio, J; Vironneau Janicek, L; Somarriba Vanegas, F; Puerta Ortiz, J; Salas Ramírez, M; López Bejerano, G; da Silva, T; Miri Oliveira, C; Terán, M; Alfaro, M; García, T; Angeles, A; Duré Romero, E; Farias de Lima, F

    2016-09-01

    Internal dosimetry intercomparisons are essential for the verification of applied models and the consistency of results'. To that aim, the First Regional Intercomparison was organised in 2005, and that results led to the Second Regional Intercomparison Exercise in 2013, which was organised in the frame of the RLA 9/066 and coordinated by Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear of Argentina. Four simulated cases covering intakes of (131)I, (137)Cs and Tritium were proposed. Ninteen centres from thirteen different countries participated in this exercise. This paper analyses the participants' results in this second exercise in order to test their skills and acquired knowledge, particularly in the application of the IDEAS Guidelines. It is important to highlight the increased number of countries that participated in this exercise compared with the first one and, furthermore, the improvement in the overall performance. The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Projects since 2003 has led to a significant enhancement of internal dosimetry capabilities that strengthen the radiation protection of workers. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and protons calculated using the PHITS code and ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Niita, Koji

    2009-04-07

    The fluence to organ-dose and effective-dose conversion coefficients for neutrons and protons with energies up to 100 GeV was calculated using the PHITS code coupled to male and female adult reference computational phantoms, which are to be released as a common ICRP/ICRU publication. For the calculation, the radiation and tissue weighting factors, w(R) and w(T), respectively, as revised in ICRP Publication 103 were employed. The conversion coefficients for effective dose equivalents derived using the radiation quality factors of both Q(L) and Q(y) relationships were also estimated, utilizing the functions for calculating the probability densities of the absorbed dose in terms of LET (L) and lineal energy (y), respectively, implemented in PHITS. By comparing these data with the corresponding data for the effective dose, we found that the numerical compatibilities of the revised w(R) with the Q(L) and Q(y) relationships are fairly established. The calculated data of these dose conversion coefficients are indispensable for constructing the radiation protection systems based on the new recommendations given in ICRP103 for aircrews and astronauts, as well as for workers in accelerators and nuclear facilities.

  18. Psychometric Inferences from a Meta-Analysis of Reliability and Internal Consistency Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botella, Juan; Suero, Manuel; Gambara, Hilda

    2010-01-01

    A meta-analysis of the reliability of the scores from a specific test, also called reliability generalization, allows the quantitative synthesis of its properties from a set of studies. It is usually assumed that part of the variation in the reliability coefficients is due to some unknown and implicit mechanism that restricts and biases the…

  19. A structured approach for the assessment of internal dose: the IDEAS guidelines.

    PubMed

    Doerfel, H; Andrasi, A; Bailey, M; Berkovski, V; Blanchardon, E; Castellani, C-M; Cruz-Suarez, R; Hurtgen, C; LeGuen, B; Malatova, I; Marsh, J; Stather, J; Zeger, J

    2007-01-01

    The need for harmonisation of the procedures for internal dose assessment has been recognised within an EU research project under the 5th Framework Programme. The aim of the IDEAS project was to develop general guidelines for standardising assessments of intakes and internal doses. It started in October 2001 and ended in June 2005. The project is closely related to some goals of the work of Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and since 2003 there has been close co-operation between the two groups. The general philosophy of the guidelines is focusing on the principles of harmonisation, accuracy and proportionality. The proposed system of 'level of task' to structure the approach of internal dose evaluation is also reported. Some details of the internal structure of the guidelines for the different pathways of intake are provided.

  20. Estimation of internal heat transfer coefficients and detection of rib positions in gas turbine blades from transient surface temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidrich, P.; Wolfersdorf, J. v.; Schmidt, S.; Schnieder, M.

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive, non-destructive, transient inverse measurement technique that allows one to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and rib positions of real gas turbine blades from outer surface temperature measurements after a sudden flow heating. The determination of internal heat transfer coefficients is important during the design process to adjust local heat transfer to spatial thermal load. The detection of rib positions is important during production to fulfill design and quality requirements. For the analysis the one-dimensional transient heat transfer problem inside of the turbine blade's wall was solved. This solution was combined with the Levenberg-Marquardt method to estimate the unknown boundary condition by an inverse technique. The method was tested with artificial data to determine uncertainties with positive results. Then experimental testing with a reference model was carried out. Based on the results, it is concluded that the presented inverse technique could be used to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and to detect rib positions of real turbine blades.

  1. Mathematical phantoms for evaluation of age-specific internal dose

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.

    1980-01-01

    A series of mathematical phantoms representing children has been developed for use with photon transport codes. These phantoms, patterned after the Fisher-Snyder adult phantom, consist of simple mathematical expressions for the boundaries of the major organs and body sections. The location and shape of the organs are consistent with drawings depicting developmental anatomy, with the organ volumes assigned such that the masses at the various ages conform closely with the data presented in Reference Man. The explicit mathematical expressions for the various ages overcome the potential misrepresentation of organ sizes that occurred in phantoms derived from simple mathematical transformations of the adult phantom. Female breast tissue has been added to the phantoms, including the adult, now allowing assessment of doses to this organ.

  2. Estimating the Radiation Dose to the Fetus in Prophylactic Internal Iliac Artery Balloon Occlusion: Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Kentaro; Hamada, Tomohiro; Yuge, Akitoshi; Kiyosue, Hiro; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Nasu, Kaei; Narahara, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although radiation exposure is of great concern to expecting patients, little information is available on the fetal radiation dose associated with prophylactic internal iliac artery balloon occlusion (IIABO). Here we estimated the fetal radiation dose associated with prophylactic IIABO in Caesarean section (CS). Cases. We report our experience with the IIABO procedure in three consecutive patients with suspected placenta previa/accreta. Fetal radiation dose measurements were conducted prior to each CS by using an anthropomorphic phantom. Based on the simulated value, we calculated the fetal radiation dose as the absorbed dose. We found that the fetal radiation doses ranged from 12.88 to 31.6 mGy. The fetal radiation dose during the prophylactic IIABOs did not exceed 50 mGy. Conclusion. The IIABO procedure could result in a very small increase in the risk of harmful effects to the fetus. PMID:26180648

  3. 10 CFR 20.1502 - Conditions requiring individual monitoring of external and internal occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conditions requiring individual monitoring of external and internal occupational dose. 20.1502 Section 20.1502 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Surveys and Monitoring § 20.1502 Conditions requiring individual monitoring of external and internal...

  4. Reassessing benzene risks using internal doses and Monte-Carlo uncertainty analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, L A

    1996-01-01

    Human cancer risks from benzene have been estimated from epidemiological data, with supporting evidence from animal bioassay data. This article reexamines the animal-based risk assessments using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of benzene metabolism in animals and humans. Internal doses (total benzene metabolites) from oral gavage experiments in mice are well predicted by the PBPK model. Both the data and the PBPK model outputs are also well described by a simple nonlinear (Michaelis-Menten) regression model, as previously used by Bailer and Hoel [Metabolite-based internal doses used in risk assessment of benzene. Environ Health Perspect 82:177-184 (1989)]. Refitting the multistage model family to internal doses changes the maximum-likelihood estimate (MLE) dose-response curve for mice from linear-quadratic to purely cubic, so that low-dose risk estimates are smaller than in previous risk assessments. In contrast to Bailer and Hoel's findings using interspecies dose conversion, the use of internal dose estimates for humans from a PBPK model reduces estimated human risks at low doses. Sensitivity analyses suggest that the finding of a nonlinear MLE dose-response curve at low doses is robust to changes in internal dose definitions and more consistent with epidemiological data than earlier risk models. A Monte-Carlo uncertainty analysis based on maximum-entropy probabilities and Bayesian conditioning is used to develop an entire probability distribution for the true but unknown dose-response function. This allows the probability of a positive low-dose slope to be quantified: It is about 10%. An upper 95% confidence limit on the low-dose slope of excess risk is also obtained directly from the posterior distribution and is similar to previous q1* values. This approach suggests that the excess risk due to benzene exposure may be nonexistent (or even negative) at sufficiently low doses. Two types of biological information about benzene effects

  5. Internal dosimetry performing dose assessments via bioassay measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.M.

    1993-05-11

    The Internal Dosimetry Department at the Y-12 Plant maintains a state-of-the-art bioassay program managed under the guidance and regulations of the Department of Energy. The two major bioassay techniques currently used at Y-12 are the in vitro (urinalysis) and in vivo (lung counting) programs. Fecal analysis (as part of the in vitro program) is another alternative; however, since both urine and fecal analysis provide essentially the same capabilities for detecting exposures to uranium, the urinalysis is the main choice primarily for aesthetic reasons. The bioassay frequency is based on meeting NCRP 87 objectives which are to monitor the accumulation of radioactive material in exposed individuals, and to ensure that significant depositions are detected.

  6. AN APPROACH TO REDUCTION OF UNCERTAINTIES IN INTERNAL DOSES RECONSTRUCTED FOR THE TECHA RIVER POPULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M. O.; Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Bougrov, N. G.; Zalyapin, V. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-12-01

    A methodology is being developing for reduction of uncertainties in estimates of internal dose for residents of the Techa Riverside communities, who were exposed as a result of releases of radionuclides from the Mayak plutonium-production facility in 1949–1956. The “Techa River Dosimetry System” (TRDS) was specifically elaborated for reconstruction of doses. A preliminary analysis of uncertainty for doses estimated using the current version of the TRDS showed large ranges in the uncertainty of internal absorbed dose and led to suggestions of methods to reduce uncertainties. The new methodological approaches described in this paper will allow for significant reduction of uncertainties of 90Sr-dose. The major sources of reduction are in making use of individual measured values of 90Sr and through development of a Household Registry to associate unmeasured persons with measured persons living in the same household(s).

  7. Dose estimation for internal organs during boron neutron capture therapy for body-trunk tumors.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Y; Tanaka, H; Suzuki, M; Masunaga, S; Kinashi, Y; Kondo, N; Ono, K; Maruhashi, A

    2014-06-01

    Radiation doses during boron neutron capture therapy for body-trunk tumors were estimated for various internal organs, using data from patients treated at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. Dose-volume histograms were constructed for tissues of the lung, liver, kidney, pancreas, and bowel. For pleural mesothelioma, the target total dose to the normal lung tissues on the diseased side is 5Gy-Eq in average for the whole lung. It was confirmed that the dose to the liver should be carefully considered in cases of right lung disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Internal Energy Dependence of Molecular Condensation Coefficients Determined from Molecular Beam Surface Scattering Experiments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sibener, S. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    1978-05-01

    An experiment was performed which confirms the existence of an internal mode dependence of molecular sticking probabilities for collisions of molecules with a cold surface. The scattering of a velocity selected effusive beam of CCl{sub 4} from a 90 K CC1{sub 4} ice surface has been studied at five translational velocities and for two different internal temperatures. At a surface temperature of 90 K (approx. 99% sticking probability) a four fold increase in reflected intensity was observed for the internally excited (560 K) CC1{sub 4} relative to the room temperature (298 K) CC1{sub 4} at a translational velocity of 2.5 X 10{sup 4} cm/sec. For a surface temperature of 90 K all angular distributions were found to peak 15{sup 0} superspecularly independent of incident velocity.

  9. Internal scatter, the unavoidable major component of the peripheral dose in photon-beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay C; Poppe, Björn

    2012-03-21

    In clinical photon beams, the dose outside the geometrical field limits is produced by photons originating from (i) head leakage, (ii) scattering at the beam collimators and the flattening filter (head scatter) and (iii) scattering from the directly irradiated region of the patient or phantom (internal scatter). While the first two components can be modified, e.g. by reinforcement of shielding components or by re-modeling the filter system, internal scatter remains an unavoidable contributor to the peripheral dose. Its relative magnitude compared to the other components, its numerical variation with beam energy, field size and off-axis distance as well as its spectral distribution are evaluated in this study. We applied a detailed Monte Carlo (MC) model of our 6/15 MV Siemens Primus linear accelerator beam head, provided with ideal head leakage shielding conditions (multi-leaf collimator without gaps) to assess the head scatter contribution. Experimental values obtained under real shielding conditions were used to evaluate the head leakage contribution. It was found that the MC-computed internal scatter doses agree with the results of our previous measurements, that internal scatter is the major contributor to the peripheral dose in the near periphery while head leakage prevails in the far periphery, and that the lateral decline of the internal scatter dose can be represented by the sum of two exponentials, with an asymptotic tenth value of 18 to 19 cm. Internal scatter peripheral doses from various elementary beams are additive, so that their sum increases approximately in proportion with field size. The ratio between normalized internal scatter doses at 6 and 15 MV is approximately 2:1. The energy fluence spectra of the internal scatter component at all points of interest outside the field have peaks near 500 keV. The fact that the energy-shifted internal scatter constitutes the major contributor to the dose in the near periphery has a general bearing for

  10. Internal scatter, the unavoidable major component of the peripheral dose in photon-beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay C.; Poppe, Björn

    2012-03-01

    In clinical photon beams, the dose outside the geometrical field limits is produced by photons originating from (i) head leakage, (ii) scattering at the beam collimators and the flattening filter (head scatter) and (iii) scattering from the directly irradiated region of the patient or phantom (internal scatter). While the first two components can be modified, e.g. by reinforcement of shielding components or by re-modeling the filter system, internal scatter remains an unavoidable contributor to the peripheral dose. Its relative magnitude compared to the other components, its numerical variation with beam energy, field size and off-axis distance as well as its spectral distribution are evaluated in this study. We applied a detailed Monte Carlo (MC) model of our 6/15 MV Siemens Primus linear accelerator beam head, provided with ideal head leakage shielding conditions (multi-leaf collimator without gaps) to assess the head scatter contribution. Experimental values obtained under real shielding conditions were used to evaluate the head leakage contribution. It was found that the MC-computed internal scatter doses agree with the results of our previous measurements, that internal scatter is the major contributor to the peripheral dose in the near periphery while head leakage prevails in the far periphery, and that the lateral decline of the internal scatter dose can be represented by the sum of two exponentials, with an asymptotic tenth value of 18 to 19 cm. Internal scatter peripheral doses from various elementary beams are additive, so that their sum increases approximately in proportion with field size. The ratio between normalized internal scatter doses at 6 and 15 MV is approximately 2:1. The energy fluence spectra of the internal scatter component at all points of interest outside the field have peaks near 500 keV. The fact that the energy-shifted internal scatter constitutes the major contributor to the dose in the near periphery has a general bearing for

  11. Internal friction between fluid particles of MHD tangent hyperbolic fluid with heat generation: Using coefficients improved by Cash and Karp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahuddin, T.; Khan, Imad; Malik, M. Y.; Khan, Mair; Hussain, Arif; Awais, Muhammad

    2017-05-01

    The present work examines the internal resistance between fluid particles of tangent hyperbolic fluid flow due to a non-linear stretching sheet with heat generation. Using similarity transformations, the governing system of partial differential equations is transformed into a coupled non-linear ordinary differential system with variable coefficients. Unlike the current analytical works on the flow problems in the literature, the main concern here is to numerically work out and find the solution by using Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg coefficients improved by Cash and Karp (Naseer et al., Alexandria Eng. J. 53, 747 (2014)). To determine the relevant physical features of numerous mechanisms acting on the deliberated problem, it is sufficient to have the velocity profile and temperature field and also the drag force and heat transfer rate all as given in the current paper.

  12. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients for a sitting female hybrid computational phantom exposed to monoenergetic protons in idealized irradiation geometries.

    PubMed

    Alves, M C; Santos, W S; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E; Hunt, John G; Carvalho Júnior, A B

    2014-12-21

    The conversion coefficients (CCs) relate protection quantities, mean absorbed dose (DT) and effective dose (E), with physical radiation field quantities, such as fluence (Φ). The calculation of CCs through Monte Carlo simulations is useful for estimating the dose in individuals exposed to radiation. The aim of this work was the calculation of conversion coefficients for absorbed and effective doses per fluence (DT/ Φ and E/Φ) using a sitting and standing female hybrid phantom (UFH/NCI) exposure to monoenergetic protons with energy ranging from 2 MeV to 10 GeV. The radiation transport code MCNPX was used to develop exposure scenarios implementing the female UFH/NCI phantom in sitting and standing postures. Whole-body irradiations were performed using the recommended irradiation geometries by ICRP publication 116 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO). In most organs, the conversion coefficients DT/Φ were similar for both postures. However, relative differences were significant for organs located in the abdominal region, such as ovaries, uterus and urinary bladder, especially in the AP, RLAT and LLAT geometries. Anatomical differences caused by changing the posture of the female UFH/NCI phantom led an attenuation of incident protons with energies below 150 MeV by the thigh of the phantom in the sitting posture, for the front-to-back irradiation, and by the arms and hands of the phantom in the standing posture, for the lateral irradiation.

  13. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients for a sitting female hybrid computational phantom exposed to monoenergetic protons in idealized irradiation geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M. C.; Santos, W. S.; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.; Hunt, John G.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    The conversion coefficients (CCs) relate protection quantities, mean absorbed dose (DT) and effective dose (E), with physical radiation field quantities, such as fluence (Φ). The calculation of CCs through Monte Carlo simulations is useful for estimating the dose in individuals exposed to radiation. The aim of this work was the calculation of conversion coefficients for absorbed and effective doses per fluence (DT/ Φ and E/Φ) using a sitting and standing female hybrid phantom (UFH/NCI) exposure to monoenergetic protons with energy ranging from 2 MeV to 10 GeV. The radiation transport code MCNPX was used to develop exposure scenarios implementing the female UFH/NCI phantom in sitting and standing postures. Whole-body irradiations were performed using the recommended irradiation geometries by ICRP publication 116 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO). In most organs, the conversion coefficients DT/Φ were similar for both postures. However, relative differences were significant for organs located in the abdominal region, such as ovaries, uterus and urinary bladder, especially in the AP, RLAT and LLAT geometries. Anatomical differences caused by changing the posture of the female UFH/NCI phantom led an attenuation of incident protons with energies below 150 MeV by the thigh of the phantom in the sitting posture, for the front-to-back irradiation, and by the arms and hands of the phantom in the standing posture, for the lateral irradiation.

  14. Analytical Exponential Decay Coefficients and Internal Radiant Emission Phenomena of the Submarine Light Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    leakage around a blocking filter placed in front of the light sensor or internal emission of radiation from the hydrosol into the waveband of interest. The...series was the effects of the highly asymmetrical volume scattering function of natural hydrosols on the upwelling and downwelling streams of radiant flux...simulation was a demonstration that two-flow type models of radiant flux cannot be inverted in natural hydrosols (Stavn and Weldemann, 1989). An

  15. Dose limits to the lens of the eye: International Basic Safety Standards and related guidance.

    PubMed

    Boal, T J; Pinak, M

    2015-06-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safety requirements: 'General Safety Requirements Part 3--Radiation protection and safety of radiation sources: International Basic Safety Standards' (BSS) was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors at its meeting in September 2011, and was issued as General Safety Requirements Part 3 in July 2014. The equivalent dose limit for the lens of the eye for occupational exposure in planned exposure situations was reduced from 150 mSv year(-1) to 20 mSv year(-1), averaged over defined periods of 5 years, with no annual dose in a single year exceeding 50 mSv. This reduction in the dose limit for the lens of the eye followed the recommendation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in its statement on tissue reactions of 21 April 2011. IAEA has developed guidance on the implications of the new dose limit for the lens of the eye. This paper summarises the process that led to the inclusion of the new dose limit for the lens of the eye in the BSS, and the implications of the new dose limit.

  16. AIR KERMA TO Hp(3) CONVERSION COEFFICIENTS FOR IEC 61267 RQR X-RAY RADIATION QUALITIES: APPLICATION TO DOSE MONITORING OF THE LENS OF THE EYE IN MEDICAL DIAGNOSTICS.

    PubMed

    Principi, S; Guardiola, C; Duch, M A; Ginjaume, M

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies highlight the fact that the new eye lens dose limit can be exceeded in interventional radiology procedures and that eye lens monitoring could be required for these workers. The recommended operational quantity for monitoring of eye lens exposure is the personal dose equivalent at 3 mm depth Hp(3) (ICRU 51). However, there are no available conversion coefficients in international standards, while in the literature coefficients have only been calculated for monoenergetic beams and for ISO 4037-1 X-ray qualities. The aim of this article is to provide air kerma to Hp(3) conversion coefficients for a cylindrical phantom made of ICRU-4 elements tissue-equivalent material for RQR radiation qualities (IEC-61267) from 40 to 120 kV and for angles of incidence from 0 to 180°, which are characteristic of medical workplace. Analytic calculations using interpolation techniques and Monte Carlo modelling have been compared. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Patient doses in CT examinations in 18 countries: initial results from International Atomic Energy Agency projects.

    PubMed

    Muhogora, W E; Ahmed, N A; Beganovic, A; Benider, A; Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Gershan, V; Gershkevitsh, E; Grupetta, E; Kharita, M H; Manatrakul, N; Milakovic, M; Ohno, K; Ben Omrane, L; Ptacek, J; Schandorf, C; Shabaan, M S; Stoyanov, D; Toutaoui, N; Wambani, J S; Rehani, M M

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this prospective study at 73 facilities in 18 countries in Africa, Asia and Eastern Europe was to investigate if the CT doses to adult patients in developing countries are higher than international standards. The dose assessment was performed in terms of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) and dose length product (DLP) for chest, chest (high resolution), lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis CT examinations using standard methods. Except in one case, the mean CTDIw values were below diagnostic reference level (DRL) while for DLP, 17 % of situations were above DRLs. The resulting CT images were of adequate quality for diagnosis. The CTDIw and DLP data presented herein are largely similar to those from two recent national surveys. The study has shown a stronger need to create awareness and training of radiology personnel as well as monitoring of radiation doses in many developing countries so as to conform to the ALARA principle.

  18. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients from monoenergetic neutrons below 20 MeV based on the VIP-Man anatomical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, A.; Chao, T. C.; Xu, X. G.; Bozkurt, A.; Chao, T. C.

    2000-10-01

    A new set of fluence-to-absorbed dose and fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients have been calculated for neutrons below 20 MeV using a whole-body anatomical model, VIP-Man, developed from the high-resolution transverse colour photographic images of the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project®. Organ dose calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP for 20 monoenergetic neutron beams between 1×10-9 MeV and 20 MeV under six different irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right lateral, left lateral, rotational and isotropic. The absorbed dose for 24 major organs and effective dose results based on the realistic VIP-Man are presented and compared with those based on the simplified MIRD-based phantoms reported in the literature. Effective doses from VIP-Man are not significantly different from earlier results for neutrons in the energy range studied. There are, however, remarkable deviations in organ doses due to the anatomical differences between the image-based and the earlier mathematical models.

  19. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients from monoenergetic neutrons below 20 MeV based on the VIP-man anatomical model.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, A; Chao, T C; Xu, X G

    2000-10-01

    A new set of fluence-to-absorbed dose and fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients have been calculated for neutrons below 20 MeV using a whole-body anatomical model, VIP-Man, developed from the high-resolution transverse colour photographic images of the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project. Organ dose calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP for 20 monoenergetic neutron beams between 1 x 10(-9) MeV and 20 MeV under six different irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right lateral, left lateral, rotational and isotropic. The absorbed dose for 24 major organs and effective dose results based on the realistic VIP-Man are presented and compared with those based on the simplified MIRD-based phantoms reported in the literature. Effective doses from VIP-Man are not significantly different from earlier results for neutrons in the energy range studied. There are, however, remarkable deviations in organ doses due to the anatomical differences between the image-based and the earlier mathematical models.

  20. Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics An International Round-Robin Study, Part I: Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Bottner, Harold; Konig, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolett, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Partricia; Sharp, Jeff; Lo, Jason; Keinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo I.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research and development of high temperature thermoelectric materials has demonstrated great potential of converting automobile exhaust heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectrics based on classic bismuth telluride have also started to impact the automotive industry by enhancing air conditioning efficiency and integrated cabin climate control. In addition to engineering challenges of making reliable and efficient devices to withstand thermal and mechanical cycling, the remaining issues in thermoelectric power generation and refrigeration are mostly materials related. The figure-of-merit, ZT, still needs to improve from the current value of 1.0 - 1.5 to above 2 to be competitive to other alternative technologies. In the meantime, the thermoelectric community could greatly benefit from the development of international test standards, improved test methods and better characterization tools. Internationally, thermoelectrics have been recognized by many countries as an important area for improving energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) identified thermoelectric materials as an important area in 2009. This paper is Part I of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk thermoelectrics. The main focuses in Part I are on two electronic transport properties: Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity.

  1. Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics—An International Round-Robin Study, Part I: Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D.; Böttner, Harald; König, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolet, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Patricia; Sharp, Jeff W.; Lo, Jason; Kleinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo

    2013-04-01

    Recent research and development of high-temperature thermoelectric materials has demonstrated great potential for converting automobile exhaust heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectrics based on classic bismuth telluride have also started to impact the automotive industry by enhancing air-conditioning efficiency and integrated cabin climate control. In addition to engineering challenges of making reliable and efficient devices to withstand thermal and mechanical cycling, the remaining issues in thermoelectric power generation and refrigeration are mostly materials related. The dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, still needs to be improved from the current value of 1.0 to 1.5 to above 2.0 to be competitive with other alternative technologies. In the meantime, the thermoelectric community could greatly benefit from the development of international test standards, improved test methods, and better characterization tools. Internationally, thermoelectrics have been recognized by many countries as a key component for improving energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the Implementing Agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) identified thermoelectric materials as an important area in 2009. This paper is part I of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk thermoelectrics. The main foci in part I are the measurement of two electronic transport properties: Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity.

  2. Internal transmission coefficient in charges carrier generation layer of graphene/Si based solar cell device

    SciTech Connect

    Rosikhin, Ahmad Winata, Toto

    2016-04-19

    Internal transmission profile in charges carrier generation layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been explored theoretically. Photovoltaic device was constructed from graphene/Si heterojunction forming a multilayer stuck with Si as generation layer. The graphene/Si sheet was layered on ITO/glass wafer then coated by Al forming Ohmic contact with Si. Photon incident propagate from glass substrate to metal electrode and assumed that there is no transmission in Al layer. The wavelength range spectra used in this calculation was 200 – 1000 nm. It found that transmission intensity in the generation layer show non-linear behavior and partitioned by few areas which related with excitation process. According to this information, it may to optimize the photons absorption to create more excitation process by inserting appropriate material to enhance optical properties in certain wavelength spectra because of the exciton generation is strongly influenced by photon absorption.

  3. Development of an effective dose coefficient database using a computational human phantom and Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate exposure dose for the usage of NORM-added consumer products.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Do Hyeon; Shin, Wook-Geun; Lee, Jaekook; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Chang, Byung-Uck; Min, Chul Hee

    2017-11-01

    After the Fukushima accident in Japan, the Korean Government implemented the "Act on Protective Action Guidelines Against Radiation in the Natural Environment" to regulate unnecessary radiation exposure to the public. However, despite the law which came into effect in July 2012, an appropriate method to evaluate the equivalent and effective doses from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in consumer products is not available. The aim of the present study is to develop and validate an effective dose coefficient database enabling the simple and correct evaluation of the effective dose due to the usage of NORM-added consumer products. To construct the database, we used a skin source method with a computational human phantom and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. For the validation, the effective dose was compared between the database using interpolation method and the original MC method. Our result showed a similar equivalent dose across the 26 organs and a corresponding average dose between the database and the MC calculations of < 5% difference. The differences in the effective doses were even less, and the result generally show that equivalent and effective doses can be quickly calculated with the database with sufficient accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of magnetic field and the built-in internal fields on the absorption coefficients in a strained wurtzite GaN/AlGaN quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minimala, N. S.; Peter, A. John

    2013-02-01

    Effects of magnetic field strength and the built-in electric fields on the exciton binding energy and the non-linear optical property such as absorption coefficients in a GaN/AlGaN wide band gap heterostructure are investigated. The internal fields due to spontaneous and piezo-electric polarizations are included in the Hamiltonian. Our results show that the optical absorption coefficients strongly depend on the internal fields and the applied magnetic field.

  5. Estimates of internal-dose equivalent from inhalation and ingestion of selected radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents internal radiation dose conversion factors for radionuclides of interest in environmental assessments of nuclear fuel cycles. This volume provides an updated summary of estimates of committed dose equivalent for radionuclides considered in three previous Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reports. Intakes by inhalation and ingestion are considered. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Task Group Lung Model has been used to simulate the deposition and retention of particulate matter in the respiratory tract. Results corresponding to activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) of 0.3, 1.0, and 5.0 ..mu..m are given. The gastorintestinal (GI) tract has been represented by a four-segment catenary model with exponential transfer of radioactivity from one segment to the next. Retention of radionuclides in systemic organs is characterized by linear combinations of decaying exponential functions, recommended in ICRP Publication 30. The first-year annual dose rate, maximum annual dose rate, and fifty-year dose commitment per microcurie intake of each radionuclide is given for selected target organs and the effective dose equivalent. These estimates include contributions from specified source organs plus the systemic activity residing in the rest of the body; cross irradiation due to penetrating radiations has been incorporated into these estimates. 15 references.

  6. A comprehensive dose reconstruction methodology for former rocketdyne/atomics international radiation workers.

    PubMed

    Boice, John D; Leggett, Richard W; Ellis, Elizabeth Dupree; Wallace, Phillip W; Mumma, Michael; Cohen, Sarah S; Brill, A Bertrand; Chadda, Bandana; Boecker, Bruce B; Yoder, R Craig; Eckerman, Keith F

    2006-05-01

    Incomplete radiation exposure histories, inadequate treatment of internally deposited radionuclides, and failure to account for neutron exposures can be important uncertainties in epidemiologic studies of radiation workers. Organ-specific doses from lifetime occupational exposures and radionuclide intakes were estimated for an epidemiologic study of 5,801 Rocketdyne/Atomics International (AI) radiation workers engaged in nuclear technologies between 1948 and 1999. The entire workforce of 46,970 Rocketdyne/AI employees was identified from 35,042 Kardex work histories cards, 26,136 electronic personnel listings, and 14,189 radiation folders containing individual exposure histories. To obtain prior and subsequent occupational exposure information, the roster of all workers was matched against nationwide dosimetry files from the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Landauer dosimetry company, the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Air Force. Dosimetry files of other worker studies were also accessed. Computation of organ doses from radionuclide intakes was complicated by the diversity of bioassay data collected over a 40-y period (urine and fecal samples, lung counts, whole-body counts, nasal smears, and wound and incident reports) and the variety of radionuclides with documented intake including isotopes of uranium, plutonium, americium, calcium, cesium, cerium, zirconium, thorium, polonium, promethium, iodine, zinc, strontium, and hydrogen (tritium). Over 30,000 individual bioassay measurements, recorded on 11 different bioassay forms, were abstracted. The bioassay data were evaluated using ICRP biokinetic models recommended in current or upcoming ICRP documents (modified for one inhaled material to reflect site-specific information) to estimate annual doses for 16 organs or tissues taking into account time of exposure, type of radionuclide, and excretion patterns. Detailed internal exposure scenarios were developed and annual internal doses were derived

  7. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients based on the VIP-Man anatomical model and MCNPX code for monoenergetic neutrons above 20 MeV.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, A; Chao, T C; Xu, X G

    2001-08-01

    A new set of fluence-to-absorbed dose and fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for high-energy neutrons using a whole-body anatomical model, VIP-Man, developed from the high-resolution transversal color photographic images of the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project. Organ dose calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX for 20 monoenergetic neutron beams between 20 MeV and 10,000 MeV under 6 different irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral, isotropic, and rotational. For neutron Monte Carlo calculations, results based on an image-based whole-body model were not available in the literature. The absorbed dose results for 24 major organs of VIP-Man are presented in the form of tables and selected figures that compare with those based on simplified mathematical phantoms reported in the literature. VIP-Man yields up to 40% larger values of effective dose and many organ doses, thus suggesting that the results reported in the past may not be conservative.

  8. General guidelines for the assessment of internal dose from monitoring data: progress of the IDEAS project.

    PubMed

    Doerfel, H; Andrasi, A; Bailey, M; Blanchardon, E; Cruz-Suarez, R; Berkovski, V; Castellani, C-M; Hurtgen, C; LeGuen, B; Malatova, I; Marsh, J; Stather, J; Zeger, J

    2007-01-01

    In recent major international intercomparison exercises on intake and internal dose assessments from monitoring data, the results calculated by different participants varied significantly. Based on this experience the need for harmonisation of the procedures has been formulated within an EU 5th Framework Programme research project. The aim of the project, IDEAS, is to develop general guidelines for standardising assessments of intakes and internal doses. The IDEAS project started in October 2001 and ended in June 2005. The project is closely related to some goals of the work of Committee 2 of the ICRP and since 2003 there has been close cooperation between the two groups. To ensure that the guidelines are applicable to a wide range of practical situations, the first step was to compile a database of well-documented cases of internal contamination. In parallel, an improved version of an existing software package was developed and distributed to the partners for further use. A large number of cases from the database was evaluated independently by the partners and the results reviewed. Based on these evaluations, guidelines were drafted and discussed with dosimetry professionals from around the world by means of a virtual workshop on the Internet early in 2004. The guidelines have been revised and refined on the basis of the experiences and discussions in this virtual workshop. The general philosophy of the Guidelines is presented here, focusing on the principles of harmonisation, optimisation and proportionality. Finally, the proposed Levels of Task to structure the approach of internal dose evaluation are reported.

  9. Dose Estimation for a Study of Nuclear Workers in France, the United Kingdom and the United States of America: Methods for the International Nuclear Workers Study (INWORKS)

    PubMed Central

    Thierry-Chef, I.; Richardson, D. B.; Daniels, R. D.; Gillies, M.; Hamra, G. B.; Haylock, R.; Kesminiene, A.; Laurier, D.; Leuraud, K.; Moissonnier, M.; O'Hagan, J.; Schubauer-Berigan, M. K.; Cardis, E.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the International Nuclear Workers Study conducted in France, the UK and the U.S. (INWORKS), updated and expanded methods were developed to convert recorded doses of ionizing radiation to estimates of organ doses or individual personal dose equivalent [Hp(10)] for a total number of 308,297 workers, including 40,035 women. This approach accounts for differences in dosimeter response to predominant workplace energy and geometry of exposure and for the recently published ICRP report on dose coefficients for men and women separately. The overall mean annual individual personal dose equivalent, including zero doses, is 1.73 mSv [median = 0.42; interquartile range (IQR): 0.07, 1.59]. Associated individual organ doses were estimated. INWORKS includes workers who had potential for exposure to neutrons. Therefore, we analyzed neutron dosimetry data to identify workers potentially exposed to neutrons. We created a time-varying indicator for each worker, classifying them according to whether they had a positive recorded neutron dose and if so, whether their neutron dose ever exceeded 10% of their total external penetrating radiation dose. The number of workers flagged as being exposed to neutrons was 13% for the full cohort, with 15% of the cohort in France, 12% of the cohort in the UK and 14% in the U.S. We also used available information on in vivo and bioassay monitoring to identify workers with known depositions or suspected internal contaminations. As a result of this work, information is now available that will allow various types of sensitivity analyses. PMID:26010707

  10. The immune tolerance induction (ITI) dose debate: does the International ITI Study provide a clearer picture?

    PubMed

    Ettingshausen, C Escuriola; Kreuz, W

    2013-01-01

    Among the proposed predictors for immune tolerance induction (ITI) outcome, the therapeutic regimen - specifically the dose and frequency of administered factor VIII (FVIII) as well as FVIII product type - is intensely debated. Are there any advantages for low-dose regimens (50 IU FVIII kg(-1) three times a week) over high-dose regimens (200 IU FVIII kg day(-1)) or vice versa? Are von Willebrand factor (VWF)-containing plasma-derived concentrates superior to recombinant FVIII concentrates for tolerance induction? A review of the available literature indicates that patients with good prognostic factors can achieve success with either low-dose or high-dose ITI regimens. Retrospective data suggest that patient characteristics such as maximum historical inhibitor titres and pre-ITI inhibitor titres are better predictors of treatment success than dose. Results of the prospective International ITI Study have recently become available. In inhibitor patients with good prognosis, success rates were similar between low-dose (50 IU FVIII kg(-1) three times a week) and high-dose (200 IU FVIII kg(-1) daily) regimens. However, patients receiving low-dose ITI took longer to achieve various ITI milestones and had a significantly higher bleed rate per month compared with the high-dose group (0.62 vs. 0.28; P = 0.00024), findings with important clinical implications. Inhibitor patients with poor prognostic features should be treated with a high-dose protocol. This conclusion is supported by a meta-analysis of the International Immune Tolerance Registry and North American Immune Tolerance Registry and by data from Germany showing good success rates with the high-dose, high-frequency Bonn protocol in poor prognosis patients. Type of concentrate also appears to have an influence on ITI success rates in this patient subgroup, with evidence suggesting an advantage for VWF-containing plasma-derived FVIII concentrates over recombinant or VWF-free concentrates. The ongoing prospective

  11. Astronaut's organ doses inferred from measurements in a human phantom outside the international space station.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Guenther; Berger, Thomas; Bilski, Pawel; Facius, Rainer; Hajek, Michael; Petrov, Vladislav; Puchalska, Monika; Zhou, Dazhuang; Bossler, Johannes; Akatov, Yury; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Olko, Pawel; Ptaszkiewicz, Marta; Bergmann, Robert; Fugger, Manfred; Vana, Norbert; Beaujean, Rudolf; Burmeister, Soenke; Bartlett, David; Hager, Luke; Pálfalvi, József; Szabó, Julianna; O'Sullivan, Denis; Kitamura, Hisashi; Uchihori, Yukio; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Nagamatsu, Aiko; Tawara, Hiroko; Benton, Eric; Gaza, Ramona; McKeever, Stephen; Sawakuchi, Gabriel; Yukihara, Eduardo; Cucinotta, Francis; Semones, Edward; Zapp, Neal; Miller, Jack; Dettmann, Jan

    2009-02-01

    Space radiation hazards are recognized as a key concern for human space flight. For long-term interplanetary missions, they constitute a potentially limiting factor since current protection limits for low-Earth orbit missions may be approached or even exceeded. In such a situation, an accurate risk assessment requires knowledge of equivalent doses in critical radiosensitive organs rather than only skin doses or ambient doses from area monitoring. To achieve this, the MATROSHKA experiment uses a human phantom torso equipped with dedicated detector systems. We measured for the first time the doses from the diverse components of ionizing space radiation at the surface and at different locations inside the phantom positioned outside the International Space Station, thereby simulating an extravehicular activity of an astronaut. The relationships between the skin and organ absorbed doses obtained in such an exposure show a steep gradient between the doses in the uppermost layer of the skin and the deep organs with a ratio close to 20. This decrease due to the body self-shielding and a concomitant increase of the radiation quality factor by 1.7 highlight the complexities of an adequate dosimetry of space radiation. The depth-dose distributions established by MATROSHKA serve as benchmarks for space radiation models and radiation transport calculations that are needed for mission planning.

  12. INTDOS: a computer code for estimating internal radiation dose using recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, M.T.

    1981-09-01

    INTDOS is a user-oriented computer code designed to calculate estimates of internal radiation dose commitment resulting from the acute inhalation intake of various radionuclides. It is designed so that users unfamiliar with the details of such can obtain results by answering a few questions regarding the exposure case. The user must identify the radionuclide name, solubility class, particle size, time since exposure, and the measured lung burden. INTDOS calculates the fractions of the lung burden remaining at time, t, postexposure considering the solubility class and particle size information. From the fraction remaining in the lung at time, t, the quantity inhaled is estimated. Radioactive decay is accounted for in the estimate. Finally, effective committed dose equivalents to various organs and tissues of the body are calculated using inhalation committed dose factors presented by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This computer code was written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 computer and is written in Fortran IV. A flow chart and example calculations are discussed in detail to aid the user who is unfamiliar with computer operations.

  13. Internal dose assessment data management system for a large population of Pu workers.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, L; Miller, G; Little, T; Guilmette, R A; Glasser, S M

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) dose assessment (DA) data system. Dose calculations for the most important radionuclides at LANL, namely plutonium, americium, uranium and tritium, are performed through the Microsoft Access DA database. DA includes specially developed forms and macros that perform a variety of tasks, such as retrieving bioassay data, launching the FORTRAN internal dosimetry applications and displaying dose results in the form of text summaries and plots. The DA software involves the following major processes: (1) downloading of bioassay data from a remote data source, (2) editing local and remote databases, (3) setting up and carrying out internal dose calculations using the UF code or the ID code, (3) importing results of the dose calculations into local results databases, (4) producing a secondary database of 'official results' and (5) automatically creating and e-mailing reports. The software also provides summary status and reports of the pending DAs, which are useful for managing the cases in process.

  14. The influence of physique on dose conversion coefficients for idealised external photon exposures: a comparison of doses for Chinese male phantoms with 10th, 50th and 90th percentile anthropometric parameters.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; He, Hengda; Liu, Qian

    2017-03-22

    For evaluating radiation risk, the construction of anthropomorphic computational phantoms with a variety of physiques can help reduce the uncertainty that is due to anatomical variation. In our previous work, three deformable Chinese reference male phantoms with 10th, 50th and 90th percentile body mass indexes and body circumference physiques (DCRM-10, DCRM-50 and DCRM-90) were constructed to represent underweight, normal weight and overweight Chinese adult males, respectively. In the present study, the phantoms were updated by correcting the fat percentage to improve the precision of radiological dosimetry evaluations. The organ dose conversion coefficients for each phantom were calculated and compared for four idealized external photon exposures from 15 keV to 10 MeV, using the Monte Carlo method. The dosimetric results for the three deformable Chinese reference male phantom (DCRM) phantoms indicated that variations in physique can cause as much as a 20% difference in the organ dose conversion coefficients. When the photon energy was <50 keV, the discrepancy was greater. The irradiation geometry and organ position can also affect the difference in radiological dosimetry between individuals with different physiques. Hence, it is difficult to predict the conversion coefficients of the phantoms from the anthropometric parameters alone. Nevertheless, the complex organ conversion coefficients presented in this report will be helpful for evaluating the radiation risk for large groups of people with various physiques.

  15. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modelling of Receptor Internalization with CRTH2 Antagonists to Optimize Dose Selection.

    PubMed

    Krause, Andreas; Zisowsky, Jochen; Strasser, Daniel S; Gehin, Martine; Sidharta, Patricia N; Groenen, Peter M A; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2016-07-01

    The chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper-2 cells (CRTH2) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), a key mediator in inflammatory disorders. Two selective and potent CRTH2 antagonists currently in clinical development, ACT-453859 and setipiprant, were compared with respect to their (predicted) clinical efficacy. Population pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to characterize how plasma concentrations (PK) of ACT-453859, its active metabolite ACT-463036 and setipiprant related to their effect on blocking PGD2-induced internalization of CRTH2 on eosinophils (PD). Simulations were used to identify doses and dosing regimens leading to 90 % of maximum blockade of CRTH2 internalization at trough. A combined concentration of ACT-453859 and its metabolite ACT-463036, with weights proportional to potency (based on an eosinophil shape change assay), enabled good characterization of the PD effect. The modelling and simulation results facilitated decision making by suggesting an ACT-453859 dose of 400 mg once daily (or 100 mg twice daily) for clinically relevant CRTH2 antagonism. Pharmacometric quantification demonstrated that CRTH2 internalization is a useful new biomarker to study CRTH2 antagonism. Ninety percent of maximum blockade of CRTH2 internalization at trough is suggested as a quantitative PD target in clinical studies.

  16. BRADOS - Dose determination in the Russian segment of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, M.; Berger, T.; Fürstner, M.; Fugger, M.; Vana, N.; Akatov, Y.; Shurshakov, V.; Arkhangelsky, V.

    Absorbed dose and dose-average linear energy transfer (LET) were assessed by means of LiF: Mg, Ti thermoluminescence (TL) detectors at different locations onboard the Russian segment (RS) of the International Space Station (ISS) in the timeframe between February and November 2001, i.e. for 248 days. Based on calibrations of the employed detectors in a variety of heavy-ion beams, mainly at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan, the measured absorbed dose values could be corrected for the TL dose registration efficiency in the radiation climate onboard the ISS. Various strategies for efficiency correction are discussed. For the specific case the efficiency correction accounted for a reduction by nearly 20 % in dose, implying that without proper consideration of the TL efficiency behaviour the absorbed dose inside the ISS would be overestimated. The dose-average LET was derived from TLD-700 measurements evaluated according to the well-established high-temperature ratio (HTR) method which analyzes the TL emission in the temperature range between 248 and 310 C. According to the shielding distribution, the efficiency-corrected absorbed dose was found to vary between 155 μ Gy/d for panel N 457 (RS-ISS toilet) and 230 μ Gy/d for panel N 443 (RS-ISS starboard cabin). The determined LET indicated a modification of the spectral composition of the onboard radiation field for the different exposure locations. Arrangement of TLD-600 and TLD-700 in pair allowed also some information about the neutron component to be drawn. Experimentally determined absorbed dose values are compared with model calculations by means of a self-developed code, using as input data detailed shielding distributions and proton fluxes from AP-8 and JPL algorithms.

  17. Internal dose assessment -- Operation Crossroads. Technical report, 11 January 1984-15 April 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.; Klemm, J.; Goetz, J.

    1985-10-30

    The radiation dose commitment to ten body organs/parts, due to inhalation of resuspended nuclear contaminants from target ships exposed to the underwater burst (Test Baker) is determined for personnel who worked on the ships during and after Operation CROSSROADS. Four representative ships, INDEPENDENCE, NEW YORK, PENSACOLA and SALT LAKE CITY, are examined for the personnel activities associated with post-BAKER reboarding. Additionally, the dose due to internal emitters is assessed for personnel who unloaded ammunition from twenty target ships at Kwajalein, and for shipyard workers exposed to eight of the higher intensity ships at Pearl Harbor, Puget Sound, and San Francisco Naval Shipyards. For almost all activities, fifty-year bone dose commitments are less than 0.15 rem from any annual period of exposure.

  18. Internal dose assessment of 238U contaminated soils based on in-vitro gastrointestinal protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perama, Yasmin Mohd Idris; Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Majid, Amran Ab.; Siong, Khoo Kok

    2017-01-01

    Human exposure to natural radioactive uranium has been a great interest as more industrial rapidly growing contributes to radiation risks. The aim of this case study was to determine the internal dose in humans incorporated with ingestion of 238U contaminated soils. A gastrointestinal analogue test was employed to simulate the human digestive tract. In-vitro approach via German DIN 19738 model was developed in order to estimate the internal exposure of 238U due to ingestion of different types of soils. Synthetic gastrointestinal fluids assay via in-vitro method were produced to determine the concentration of 238U in various soils using ICP-MS. Based on the results, concentration of 238U in BRIS, laterite, peat and alluvium soils were in ranged between (0.0061 ± 0.0057 - 0.0488 ± 0.0148) ppm and (0.0005 ± 0.0004 - 0.0046 ± 0.0007) ppm in gastric and gastrointestinal phase respectively. Types of soil compositions and pH medium were some of the factors that influence mobilization and solubility of 238U contaminanted soil into the digestive juices that resembles human gastrointestinal tract. For the purpose of internal dose assessment, the committed efective dose from 238U intake in soils ranged between 1.237 × 10-11 - 9.8993 × 10-11 Sv y-1 for gastric phase and 1.0184 × 10-12 - 9.3294 × 10-12 Sv y-1 for gastric-intestinal phase. The internal dose measurements from this study were much lower from the recommended values. Hence, ingestion of 238U contaminated soils would not be expected to pose major health risk to humans.

  19. Dosimetric evaluation of internal shielding in a high dose rate skin applicator

    PubMed Central

    Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Carmona, Vicente; Pujades, M Carmen; Ballester, Facundo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The Valencia HDR applicators are accessories of the microSelectron HDR afterloading system (Nucletron) shaped as truncated cones. The base of the cone is either 2 or 3 cm diameter. They are intended to treat skin lesions, being the typical prescription depth 3 mm. In patients with eyelid lesions, an internal shielding is very useful to reduce the dose to the ocular globe. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the dose enhancement from potential backscatter and electron contamination due to the shielding. Material and methods Two methods were used: a) Monte Carlo simulation, performed with the GEANT4 code, 2 cm Valencia applicator was placed on the surface of a water phantom in which 2 mm lead slab was located at 3 mm depth; b) radiochromic EBT films, used to verify the Monte Carlo results, positioning the films at 1.5, 3, 5 and 7 mm depth, inside the phantom. Two irradiations, with and without the lead shielding slab, were carried out. Results The Monte Carlo results showed that due to the backscatter component from the lead, the dose level raised to about 200% with a depth range of 0.5 mm. Under the lead the dose level was enhanced to about 130% with a depth range of 1 mm. Two millimeters of lead reduce the dose under the slab with about 60%. These results agree with film measurements within uncertainties. Conclusions In conclusion, the use of 2 mm internal lead shielding in eyelid skin treatments with the Valencia applicators were evaluated using MC methods and EBT film dosimetry. The minimum bolus thickness that was needed above and below the shielding was 0.5 mm and 1 mm respectively, and the shielding reduced the absorbed dose delivered to the ocular globe by about 60%. PMID:27877198

  20. Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan T.

    2014-06-09

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

  1. Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.

    2014-09-24

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

  2. Development of a technique for improving coefficient of variation of CaSO4:Dy teflon-based TLD personnel monitoring system in low-dose region.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S M; Sneha, C; Sahai, M K; Chougaonkar, M P; Babu, D A R

    2015-12-01

    In view of the importance of zero-dose background (null signal) in influencing the coefficient of variation in low-dose region, a technique for the estimation of the same from composite (gross) signal is developed for CaSO4:Dy-based personnel monitoring system being used in India. The technique is based on simple analysis of glow curves (GCs) of unexposed and exposed dosemeters, evolution of trend/model for the zero-dose curves, generation of simulation protocol for individual zero-dose curves, establishment of characteristics of GCs of exposed dosemeters and finally preparation of an algorithm to segregate the components from composite signal. The technique offers the separation of real-time background and gives superior results over other method of approximation of the background. The results also prove efficiency of the empirical trending and simulation protocol of background GCs. The proposed technique can be implemented in routine monitoring without any extra man hours and reader time.

  3. Occupational radiation dose to eyes from interventional radiology procedures in light of the new eye lens dose limit from the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, U; Walsh, C; Gallagher, A; Dowling, A; Guiney, M; Ryan, J M; McEniff, N; O'Reilly, G

    2015-05-01

    In 2011, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommended a substantial reduction in the equivalent dose limit for the lens of the eye, in line with a reduced threshold of absorbed dose for radiation-induced cataracts. This is of particular relevance in interventional radiology (IR) where it is well established that staff doses can be significant, however, there is a lack of data on IR eye doses in terms of Hp(3). Hp(3) is the personal dose equivalent at a depth of 3 mm in soft tissue and is used for measuring lens dose. We aimed to obtain a reliable estimate of eye dose to IR operators. Lens doses were measured for four interventional radiologists over a 3-month period using dosemeters specifically designed to measure Hp(3). Based on their typical workloads, two of the four interventional radiologists would exceed the new ICRP dose limit with annual estimated doses of 31 and 45 mSv to their left eye. These results are for an "unprotected" eye, and for IR staff who routinely wear lead glasses, the dose beneath the glasses is likely to be significantly lower. Staff eye dose normalized to patient kerma-area product and eye dose per procedure have been included in the analysis. Eye doses to IR operators have been established using a dedicated Hp(3) dosemeter. Estimated annual doses have the potential to exceed the new ICRP limit. We have estimated lens dose to interventional radiologists in terms of Hp(3) for the first time in an Irish hospital setting.

  4. Measurement of absorbed dose during the phantom torso experiment on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semones, E.; Gibbons, F.; Golightly, M.; Weyland, M.; Johnson, A.; Smith, G.; Shelfer, T.; Zapp, N.

    The Phantom Torso Experiment (PTE) was flown on the International Space Station (ISS) during Increment 2 (April-August 2001). The experiment was located in the US Lab module Human Research Facility (HRF) rack. The objective of the passive dosimetry portion of the experiment was to measure spatial distributions of absorbed dose in the 34, 1 inch sections of a modified RandoTM phantom. In each section of the phantom, thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) were placed at various locations (depths) to provide the spatial measurement. TLDs were also located at several radiosensitive organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) and two locations on the surface (skin). Active silicon detectors were also placed at these organ locations to provide time resolved results of the absorbed dose rates. Using these detectors, it is possible to separate the trapped and galactic cosmic ray components of the absorbed dose. The TLD results of the spatial and organ dose measurements will be presented and comparisons of the TLD and silicon detector organ absorbed doses will be made.

  5. Internal thyroid doses to Fukushima residents—estimation and issues remaining

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunjoo; Kurihara, Osamu; Kunishima, Naoaki; Momose, Takumaro; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Enormous quantities of radionuclides were released into the environment following the disastrous accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) in March 2011. It is of great importance to determine the exposure doses received by the populations living in the radiologically affected areas; however, there has been significant difficulty in estimating the internal thyroid dose received through the intake of short-lived radionuclides (mainly, 131I), because of the lack of early measurements on people. An estimation by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences for 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2013 was thus performed using a combination of the following three sources: thyroid measurement data (131I) for 1080 children examined in the screening campaign, whole-body counter measurement data (134Cs, 137Cs) for 3000 adults, and atmospheric transport dispersion model simulations. In this study, the residents of Futaba town, Iitate village and Iwaki city were shown to have the highest thyroid equivalent dose, and their doses were estimated to be mostly below 30 mSv. However, this result involved a lot of uncertainties and provided only representative values for the residents. The present paper outlines a more recent dose estimation and preliminary analyses of personal behavior data used in the new method. PMID:27538842

  6. Establishing bounding internal dose estimates for thorium activities at Rocky Flats.

    PubMed

    Ulsh, Brant A; Rich, Bryce L; Chew, Melton H; Morris, Robert L; Sharfi, Mutty; Rolfes, Mark R

    2008-07-01

    As part of an evaluation of a Special Exposure Cohort petition filed on behalf of workers at the Rocky Flats Plant, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) was required to demonstrate that bounding values could be established for radiation doses due to the potential intake of all radionuclides present at the facility. The main radioactive elements of interest at Rocky Flats were plutonium and uranium, but much smaller quantities of several other elements, including thorium, were occasionally handled at the site. Bounding potential doses from thorium has proven challenging at other sites due to the early historical difficulty in detecting this element through urinalysis methods and the relatively high internal dose delivered per unit intake. This paper reports the results of NIOSH's investigation of the uses of thorium at Rocky Flats and provides bounding dose reconstructions for these operations. During this investigation, NIOSH reviewed unclassified reports, unclassified extracts of classified materials, material balance and inventory ledgers, monthly progress reports from various groups, and health physics field logbooks, and conducted interviews with former Rocky Flats workers. Thorium operations included: (1) an experimental metal forming project with 240 kg of thorium in 1960; (2) the use of pre-formed parts in weapons mockups; (3) the removal of Th from U; (4) numerous analytical procedures involving trace quantities of thorium; and (5) the possible experimental use of thorium as a mold coating compound. The thorium handling operations at Rocky Flats were limited in scope, well-monitored and documented, and potential doses can be bounded.

  7. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy. Part I: Absorbed dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Binns, P J; Riley, K J; Harling, O K; Kiger, W S; Munck af Rosenschöld, P M; Giusti, V; Capala, J; Sköld, K; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Uusi-Simola, J; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Spurny, F

    2005-12-01

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study.

  8. Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients based on the posture modification of Adult Male (AM) and Adult Female (AF) reference phantoms of ICRP 110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, D. C.; Santos, W. S.; Alves, M. C.; Souza, D. N.; Carvalho, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to modify the standing posture of the anthropomorphic reference phantoms of ICRP publication 110, AM (Adult Male) and AF (Adult Female), to the sitting posture. The change of posture was performed using the Visual Monte Carlo software (VMC) to rotate the thigh region of the phantoms and position it between the region of the leg and trunk. Scion Image software was used to reconstruct and smooth the knee and hip contours of the phantoms in a sitting posture. For 3D visualization of phantoms, the VolView software was used. In the change of postures, the organ and tissue masses were preserved. The MCNPX was used to calculate the equivalent and effective dose conversion coefficients (CCs) per fluence for photons for six irradiation geometries suggested by ICRP publication 110 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO) and energy range 0.010-10 MeV. The results were compared between the standing and sitting postures, for both sexes, in order to evaluate the differences of scattering and absorption of radiation for different postures. Significant differences in the CCs for equivalent dose were observed in the gonads, colon, prostate, urinary bladder and uterus, which are present in the pelvic region, and in organs distributed throughout the body, such as the lymphatic nodes, muscle, skeleton and skin, for the phantoms of both sexes. CCs for effective dose showed significant differences of up to 16% in the AP irradiation geometry, 27% in the PA irradiation geometry and 13% in the ROT irradiation geometry. These results demonstrate the importance of using phantoms in different postures in order to obtain more precise conversion coefficients for a given exposure scenario.

  9. Internal Dose from Food and Drink Ingestion in the Early Phase after the Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Masaki; Yoshizawa, Nobuaki; Hirakawa, Sachiko; Murakami, Kana; Takizawa, Mari; Sato, Osamu; Takagi, Shunji; Miyatake, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Gen

    2017-09-01

    Activity concentrations in food and drink, represented by water and vegetables, have been monitored continuously since the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, with a focus on radioactive cesium. On the other hand, iodine-131 was not measured systematically in the early phase after the accident. The activity concentrations of iodine-131 in food and drink are important to estimate internal exposure due to ingestion pathway. When the internal dose from ingestion in the evacuation areas is estimated, water is considered as the main ingestion pathway. In this study, we estimated the values of activity concentrations in water in the early phase after the accident, using a compartment model as an estimation method. The model uses measurement values of activity concentration and deposition rate of iodine-131 onto the ground, which is calculated from an atmospheric dispersion simulation. The model considers how drinking water would be affected by radionuclides deposited into water. We estimated the activity concentrations of water on Kawamata town and Minamisouma city during March of 2011 and the committed effective doses were 0.08 mSv and 0.06 mSv. We calculated the transfer parameters in the model for estimating the activity concentrations in the areas with a small amount of measurement data. In addition, we estimated the committed effective doses from vegetables using atmospheric dispersion simulation and FARMLAND model in case of eating certain vegetables as option information.

  10. Cardiac monitoring of high-dose verapamil in cluster headache: An international Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Koppen, H; Stolwijk, J; Wilms, E B; van Driel, V; Ferrari, M D; Haan, J

    2016-12-01

    In many patients, high-dose verapamil (HDV) is the only effective prophylactic treatment for cluster headache. Although cardiac adverse events and EKG abnormalities are relatively common, evidence-based guidelines for screening and monitoring patients on HDV are lacking. Using the Delphi approach, we interviewed 22 international clinical experts in cardiac rhythm disorders to formulate EKG guidelines for the pretreatment screening and monitoring of cluster headache patients using HDV. The panel agreed only on performing pretreatment EKG to screen for pre-existing cardiac arrhythmia. Pretreatment EKG was deemed not necessary by most panel members for patients who did not have cardiac adverse events during a previous period of cluster headache attacks treated with HDV. Half the panel advised Holter EKG for patients on verapamil ≥ 480 mg/day. The highest recommended daily doses varied between 240 and 960 mg. Contraindications for use of verapamil largely followed FDA guidelines. Experts in cardiac rhythm disorders agreed on pretreatment EKG monitoring, but no consensus was reached on EKG monitoring during HDV treatment and around dose adjustments. © International Headache Society 2016.

  11. Austrian dose measurements onboard space station MIR and the International Space Station - overview and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, T.; Hajek, M.; Summerer, L.; Vana, N.; Akatov, Y.; Shurshakov, V.; Arkhangelsky, V.

    2004-01-01

    The Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities has conducted various space research missions in the last 12 years in cooperation with the Institute for Biomedical Problems in Moscow. They dealt with the exact determination of the radiation hazards for cosmonauts and the development of precise measurement devices. Special emphasis will be laid on the last experiment on space station MIR the goal of which was the determination of the depth distribution of absorbed dose and dose equivalent in a water filled Phantom. The first results from dose measurements onboard the International Space Station (ISS) will also be discussed. The spherical Phantom with a diameter of 35 cm was developed at the Institute for Biomedical Problems and had 4 channels where dosemeters can be exposed in different depths. The exposure period covered the timeframe from May 1997 to February 1999. Thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) were exposed inside the Phantom, either parallel or perpendicular to the hull of the spacecraft. For the evaluation of the linear energy transfer (LET), the high temperature ratio (HTR) method was applied. Based on this method a mean quality factor and, subsequently, the dose equivalent is calculated according to the Q(LET ∞) relationship proposed in ICRP 26. An increased contribution of neutrons could be detected inside the Phantom. However the total dose equivalent did not increase over the depth of the Phantom. As the first Austrian measurements on the ISS dosemeter packages were exposed for 248 days, starting in February 2001 at six different locations onboard the ISS. The Austrian dosemeter sets for this first exposure on the ISS contained five different kinds of passive thermoluminescent dosemeters. First results showed a position dependent absorbed dose rate at the ISS.

  12. Impact of Internal Metallic Ports in Temporary Tissue Expanders on Postmastectomy Radiation Dose Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Susie A.; Ogunleye, Tomiwa; Dhabbaan, Anees; Huang, Eugene H.; Losken, Albert; Gabram, Sheryl; Davis, Lawrence; Torres, Mylin A.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Temporary tissue expanders (TTE) with an internal magnetic metal port (IMP) have been increasingly used for breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy patients who receive radiation therapy (XRT). We evaluated XRT plans of patients with IMP to determine its effect on XRT dose distribution. Methods and Materials: Original treatment plans with CT simulation scans of 24 consecutive patients who received XRT (ORI), planned without heterogeneity corrections, to a reconstructed breast containing an IMP were used. Two additional treatment plans were then generated: one treatment plan with the IMP assigned the electron density of the rare earth magnet, nickel plated neodymium-iron-boron (HET), and a second treatment plan with the IMP assigned a CT value of 1 to simulate a homogeneous breast without an IMP (BRS). All plans were prescribed 50 Gy to the reconstructed breast (CTV). Results: CTV coverage by 50 Gy was significantly lower in the HET (mean 87.7% CTV) than in either the ORI (mean 99.7% CTV, P<.001) or BRS plans (mean 95.0% CTV, P<.001). The effect of the port was more pronounced on CT slices containing the IMP with prescription dose coverage of the CTV being less in the HET than in either ORI (mean difference 33.6%, P<.01) or BRS plans (mean difference 30.1%, P<.001). HET had a less homogeneous and conformal dose distribution than BRS or ORI. Conclusion: IMPs increase dose heterogeneity and reduce dose to the breast CTV through attenuation of the beam. For optimal XRT treatment, heterogeneity corrections should be used in XRT planning for patients with TTE with IMP, as the IMP impacts dose distribution.

  13. Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation Contributes to Heart Dose in Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chargari, Cyrus; Castadot, Pierre; MacDermed, Dhara; Vandekerkhove, Christophe; Bourgois, Nicolas; Van Houtte, Paul; Magne, Nicolas

    2010-10-01

    We assessed the impact of internal mammary chain radiotherapy (IMC RT) to the radiation dose received by the heart in terms of heart dose-volume histogram (DVH). Thirty-six consecutive breast cancer patients presenting with indications for IMC RT were enrolled in a prospective study. The IMC was treated by a standard conformal RT technique (50 Gy). For each patient, a cardiac DVH was generated by taking into account the sole contribution of IMC RT. Cardiac HDV were compared according to breast cancer laterality and the type of previous surgical procedure, simple mastectomy or breast conservative therapy (BCT). The contribution of IMC RT to the heart dose was significantly greater for patients with left-sided versus right-sided tumors (13.8% and 12.8% for left-sided tumors versus 3.9% and 4.2% for right-sided tumors in the BCT group and the mastectomy group, respectively; p < 0.0001). There was no statistically significant difference in IMC contribution depending on the initial surgical procedure. IMC RT contributes to cardiac dose for both left-sided and right-sided breast cancers, although the relative contribution is greater in patients with left-sided tumors.

  14. Acute and chronic intakes of fallout radionuclides by Marshallese from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak and related internal radiation doses.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L; Weinstock, Robert M

    2010-08-01

    Annual internal radiation doses resulting from both acute and chronic intakes of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in fallout from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak from 1946 through 1958 have been estimated for the residents living on all atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Internal radiation absorbed doses to the tissues most at risk to cancer induction (red bone marrow, thyroid, stomach, and colon) have been estimated for representative persons of all population communities for all birth years from 1929 through 1968, and for all years of exposure from 1948 through 1970. The acute intake estimates rely on a model using, as its basis, historical urine bioassay data, for members of the Rongelap Island and Ailinginae communities as well as for Rongerik residents. The model also utilizes fallout times of arrival and radionuclide deposition densities estimated for all tests and all atolls. Acute intakes of 63 radionuclides were estimated for the populations of the 20 inhabited atolls and for the communities that were relocated during the testing years for reasons of safety and decontamination. The model used for chronic intake estimates is based on reported whole-body, urine, and blood counting data for residents of Utrik and Rongelap. Dose conversion coefficients relating intake to organ absorbed dose were developed using internationally accepted models but specifically tailored for intakes of particulate fallout by consideration of literature-based evidence to choose the most appropriate alimentary tract absorption fraction (f1) values. Dose estimates were much higher for the thyroid gland than for red marrow, stomach wall, or colon. The highest thyroid doses to adults were about 7,600 mGy for the people exposed on Rongelap; thyroid doses to adults were much lower, by a factor of 100 or more, for the people exposed on the populated atolls of Kwajalein and Majuro. The estimates of radionuclide intake and

  15. ACUTE AND CHRONIC INTAKES OF FALLOUT RADIONUCLIDES BY MARSHALLESE FROM NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTING AT BIKINI AND ENEWETAK AND RELATED INTERNAL RADIATION DOSES

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L.; Weinstock, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Annual internal radiation doses resulting from both acute and chronic intakes of all important dose-contributing radionuclides occurring in fallout from nuclear weapons testing at Bikini and Enewetak from 1946 through 1958 have been estimated for the residents living on all atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Internal radiation absorbed doses to the tissues most at risk to cancer induction (red bone marrow, thyroid, stomach, and colon) have been estimated for representative persons of all population communities for all birth years from 1929 through 1968, and for all years of exposure from 1948 through 1970. The acute intake estimates rely on a model using, as its basis, historical urine bioassay data, for members of the Rongelap Island and Ailinginae communities as well as for Rongerik residents. The model also utilizes fallout times of arrival and radionuclide deposition densities estimated for all tests and all atolls. Acute intakes of 63 radionuclides were estimated for the populations of the 20 inhabited atolls and for the communities that were relocated during the testing years for reasons of safety and decontamination. The model used for chronic intake estimates is based on reported whole-body, urine, and blood counting data for residents of Utrik and Rongelap. Dose conversion coefficients relating intake to organ absorbed dose were developed using internationally accepted models but specifically tailored for intakes of particulate fallout by consideration of literature-based evidence to choose the most appropriate alimentary tract absorption fraction (f1) values. Dose estimates were much higher for the thyroid gland than for red marrow, stomach wall, or colon. The highest thyroid doses to adults were about 7,600 mGy for the people exposed on Rongelap; thyroid doses to adults were much lower, by a factor of 100 or more, for the people exposed on the populated atolls of Kwajalein and Majuro. The estimates of radionuclide intake and

  16. External and internal problems of modeling the heat and mass transfer coefficients at particles motion in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. G.; Lapteva, E. A.

    2017-03-01

    An approach to the determination of the heat and mass transfer coefficients from dispersed particles by the development of the hydrodynamic analogy is considered. The equations for computing the heat and mass transfer coefficients in continuous phase at a laminar regime of the flow around solid particles as well as the mass transfer coefficients in droplets are obtained. Comparisons with the experimental data of different authors are presented.

  17. The Concentration Of Tritium In Urine And Internal Radiation Dose Estimation Of PTNBR Radiation Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Tjahaja, Poppy Intan; Sukmabuana, Putu; Aisyah, Neneng Nur

    2010-12-23

    The operation of Triga 2000 reactor in Nuclear Technology Center for Materials and Radiometry (PTNBR BATAN) normally produce tritium radionuclide which is the activation product of deuterium atom in reactor primary cooling water. According to previous monitoring, tritium was detected with the concentration of 8.236{+-}0.677 kBq/L and 1.704{+-}0.046 Bq/L in the primary cooling water and in reactor hall air, respectively. The tritium in reactor hall air chronically can be inhaled by the workers. In this research, tritium content in radiation workers' urine was determined to estimate the internal radiation doses received by the workers. About 50-100 mL of urine samples were collected from 48 PTNBR workers that is classified as 24 radiation workers and 24 administration staffs as a control. Urine samples of 25 mL were then prepared by active charcoal and KMnO{sub 4} addition and followed with complete distillation. The 2 mL of distillate was added with 13 mL scintillator, shaked vigorously and remained in cool and dark condition for about 24 hours. The tritium in the samples was then measured using liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for 1 hour. From the measurement results it was obtained that the tritium concentration in the urine of radiation workers were in the range of not detected and 5.191 Bq/mL, whereas in the administration staffs the concentration were between not detected and 4.607 Bq/mL. Internally radiation doses were calculated using the tritium concentration data, and it was found the averages about 0.602 {mu}Sv/year and 0.532 {mu}Sv/year for radiation workers and administration staffs, respectively. The doses received by the workers were lower than that of the permissible doses from tritium, i.e. 40 {mu}Sv/year.

  18. Occupational radiation dose to eyes from endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures in light of the revised eye lens dose limit from the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, U; Gallagher, A; Malone, L; O'Reilly, G

    2013-02-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a common procedure that combines the use of X-ray fluoroscopy and endoscopy for examination of the bile duct. Published data on ERCP doses are limited, including staff eye dose from ERCP. Occupational eye doses are of particular interest now as the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recommended a reduction in the dose limit to the lens of the eye. The aim of this study was to measure occupational eye doses obtained from ERCP procedures. A new eye lens dosemeter (EYE-D(™), Radcard, Krakow, Poland) was used to measure the ERCP eye dose, H(p)(3), at two endoscopy departments in Ireland. A review of radiation protection practice at the two facilities was also carried out. The mean equivalent dose to the lens of the eye of a gastroenterologist is 0.01 mSv per ERCP procedure with an undercouch X-ray tube and 0.09 mSv per ERCP procedure with an overcouch X-ray tube. Staff eye dose normalised to patient kerma area product is also presented. Staff eye doses in ERCP have the potential to exceed the revised ICRP limit of 20 mSv per annum when an overcouch X-ray tube is used. The EYE-D dosemeter was found to be a convenient method for measuring lens dose. Eye doses in areas outside of radiology departments should be kept under review, particularly in light of the new ICRP eye dose limit. Occupational eye lens doses from ERCP procedures have been established using a new commercially available dedicated H(p)(3) dosemeter.

  19. Nuclear Decay Data in the MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) Format

    DOE Data Explorer

    MIRD is a database of evaluated nuclear decay data for over 2,100 radioactive nuclei. Data are extracted from ENSDF, processed by the program RadList, and used for medical internal radiation dose calculations. When using the MIRD interface, tables of nuclear and atomic radiations from nuclear decay and decay scheme drawings will be produced in the MIRD format from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) for the specified nuclide. Output may be either HTML-formatted tables and JPEG drawings, PostScript tables and drawings, or PDF tables and drawings.

  20. Application of IDEAS guidelines: the IDEAS/IAEA intercomparison exercise on internal dose assessment.

    PubMed

    Hurtgen, C; Andrasi, A; Bailey, M R; Birchall, A; Blanchardon, E; Berkovski, V; Castellani, C M; Cruz-Suarez, R; Davis, K; Doerfel, H; Leguen, B; Malatova, I; Marsh, J; Zeger, J

    2007-01-01

    As part of the EU Fifth Framework Programme IDEAS project 'General Guidelines for the Evaluation of Incorporation Monitoring Data', and in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency, a new intercomparison exercise for the assessment of doses from intakes of radionuclides was organised. Several cases were selected, to cover a wide range of practices in the nuclear fuel cycle and medical applications. The cases were: (1) acute intake of HTO, (2) acute inhalation of the fission products 137Cs and 90Sr, (3) acute inhalation of 60Co, (4) repeated intakes of 131I, (5) intake of enriched uranium and (6) single intake of Pu isotopes and 241Am. This intercomparison exercise especially focused on the effect of the Guidelines proposed by the IDEAS project for harmonisation of internal dosimetry.

  1. Estimates of intakes and internal doses from ingestion of {sup 32}P at MIT and NIH

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-06-01

    A researcher at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) became internally contaminated with {sup 32}P, probably due to an intentional act. The incident occurred on or about 14 August 1995. Subsequent measurement of activity in urine and a single whole body count were used to estimate the individual`s intake, with the assumption of ingestion as the route of intake. Two separate Sets of urine data were analyzed-one supplied by MIT and one from independent analyses of urine samples conducted at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); the former data set contained 35 samples, the latter 49. In addition, the results of 35 whole body counts, provided by MIT from a chair-type counter calibrated for 32p, were used to obtain a separate estimate of intake. The kinetic model for 32P proposed in ICRP Publication 30 and implemented in NUREG/CR-4884 was used to interpret the data. The data were analyzed using both the weighted and unweighted least squares techniques. All of the intake estimates were in very good agreement with each other, ranging from 18-22 MBq. Based on the dose model in ICRP 30, this would indicate a committed effective dose equivalent of 38-46 mSv. The incident was helpful in assessing the value of the least squares techniques in determining estimates of intake and dose. The ICRP model tended to slightly overestimate the whole body retention data and underestimate the urinary excretion at later times. Further results obtained by visual best fit and development of an individual-specific kinetic and dose model will also be discussed. This incident was quite similar to another case of ingestion of 32p that occurred at the National Institute of Health (NIH) on 28 June 1995. Dose assessment for the NIH case will also be presented if the data are available for public release.

  2. Revised series of stylized anthropometric phantoms for internal and external radiation dose assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Eunyoung

    At present, the dosimetry systems of both the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and the Society of Nuclear Medicine's Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee utilize a series of stylized or mathematical anthropometric models of patient anatomy developed in 1987 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In this study, substantial revisions to the ORNL phantom series are reported with tissue compositions, tissue densities, and organ masses adjusted to match their most recent values in the literature. In addition, both the ICRP and MIRD systems of internal dosimetry implicitly consider that electron and beta-particle energy emitted within the source organs of the patient are fully deposited within these organs. With the development of the revised ORNL phantom series, three additional applications were explored as part of this dissertation research. First, the phantoms were used in combination to assess external radiation exposures to family members caring or interacting with patients released from the hospital following radionuclide therapy with I-131. Values of family member effective dose are then compared to values obtained using NRC guidance and based on a simple point-source methodology which ignores the effects of photon attenuation and scatter within both the source individual (patient) and the target individual (family member). Second, the anatomical structures of the extrathoracic airways and thoracic airways (exclusive of the lungs themselves) have been included in the entire revised ORNL phantom series of pediatric individuals. Values of cross-region photon dose are explored for use in radioactive aerosol inhalation exposures to members of the general public, and comparisons are made to values given by the ICRP in which surrogate organ assignments were made in the absence of explicit models of these airways. Finally, the revised ORNL phantoms of the adult male and adult female are used to determine internal photon exposures to

  3. Exposure versus internal dose: Respiratory tract deposition modeling of inhaled asbestos fibers in rats and humans (Presentation Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to asbestos is associated with respiratory diseases, including asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma. Internal fiber dose depends on fiber inhalability and orientation, fiber density, length and width, and various deposition mechanisms (DM). Species-specific param...

  4. Exposure versus internal dose: Respiratory tract deposition modeling of inhaled asbestos fibers in rats and humans (Presentation Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to asbestos is associated with respiratory diseases, including asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma. Internal fiber dose depends on fiber inhalability and orientation, fiber density, length and width, and various deposition mechanisms (DM). Species-specific param...

  5. Development of wireless communication system in real-time internal radiation dose measurement system using magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Fumihiro; Shinohe, Kohta; Takura, Tetsuya; Matsuki, Hidetoshi; Yamada, Syogo; Sato, Tadakuni

    2009-04-01

    In radiation therapy, excessive radiation occurs because the actual delivered dose to the tumor is unknown. To overcome this problem, we need a system in which the delivered dose is measured inside the body, and the dose data are transmitted from the inside to the outside of the body. In this study, a wireless communication system, using magnetic fields was studied, and an internal circuit for obtaining radiation dose data from an x-ray detector was examined. As a result, a communication distance of 200 mm was obtained. An internal circuit was developed, and a signal transmission experiment was performed using the wireless communication system. As a result, the radiation dose data from an x-ray detector was transmitted over a communication distance of 200 mm, and the delivered dose was determined from the received signal.

  6. Development of wireless communication system in real-time internal radiation dose measurement system using magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Fumihiro; Shinohe, Kohta; Takura, Tetsuya; Matsuki, Hidetoshi; Yamada, Syogo; Sato, Tadakuni

    2009-04-01

    In radiation therapy, excessive radiation occurs because the actual delivered dose to the tumor is unknown. To overcome this problem, we need a system in which the delivered dose is measured inside the body, and the dose data are transmitted from the inside to the outside of the body. In this study, a wireless communication system, using magnetic fields was studied, and an internal circuit for obtaining radiation dose data from an x-ray detector was examined. As a result, a communication distance of 200 mm was obtained. An internal circuit was developed, and a signal transmission experiment was performed using the wireless communication system. As a result, the radiation dose data from an x-ray detector was transmitted over a communication distance of 200 mm, and the delivered dose was determined from the received signal.

  7. Factors that elevate the internal radionuclide and chemical retention, dose and health risks to infants and children in a radiological-nuclear emergency.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Richard B

    2009-06-01

    The factors that influence the dose and risk to vulnerable population groups from exposure and internal uptake of chemicals are examined and, in particular, the radionuclides released in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive events. The paper seeks to identify the areas that would benefit from further research. The intake and body burdens of carbon and calcium were assessed as surrogates for contaminants that either act like or bind to hydrocarbons (e.g. tritium and (14)C) or bone-seeking radionuclides (e.g. (90)Sr and (239)Pu). The shortest turnover times for such materials in the whole body were evaluated for the newborn: 11 d and 0.5 y for carbon and calcium, respectively. However, their biokinetic behaviour is complicated by a particularly high percentage of the gut-absorbed dietary intake of carbon (approximately 16%) and calcium (approximately 100%) that is incorporated into the soft tissue and skeleton of the growing neonate. The International Commission on Radiological Protection dose coefficients (Sv Bq(-1)) were examined for 14 radionuclides, including 9 of concern because of their potential use in radiological dispersal devices. The dose coefficients for a 3-month-old are greater than those for adults (2-56 times more for ingestion and 2-12 times for inhalation). The age-dependent dose and exposure assessment of contaminant intakes would improve by accounting for gender and growth where it is currently neglected. Health risk is evaluated as the product of the exposure and hazard factors, the latter being about 10-fold greater in infants than in adults. The exposure factor is also approximately 10-fold higher for ingestion by infants than by adults, and unity for inhalation varying with the contaminant. Qualitative and quantitative physiological and epidemiological evidence supports infants being more vulnerable to cancer and neurological deficit than older children.

  8. 42 CFR 82.18 - How will NIOSH calculate internal dose to the primary cancer site(s)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... primary cancer site(s)? 82.18 Section 82.18 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Dose Reconstruction Process § 82.18 How will NIOSH calculate internal dose to the primary cancer site(s... cancer covered by a claim is in a tissue not covered by existing ICRP models, NIOSH will use the ICRP...

  9. 42 CFR 82.18 - How will NIOSH calculate internal dose to the primary cancer site(s)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... primary cancer site(s)? 82.18 Section 82.18 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Dose Reconstruction Process § 82.18 How will NIOSH calculate internal dose to the primary cancer site(s... cancer covered by a claim is in a tissue not covered by existing ICRP models, NIOSH will use the ICRP...

  10. 42 CFR 82.18 - How will NIOSH calculate internal dose to the primary cancer site(s)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... primary cancer site(s)? 82.18 Section 82.18 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Dose Reconstruction Process § 82.18 How will NIOSH calculate internal dose to the primary cancer site(s... cancer covered by a claim is in a tissue not covered by existing ICRP models, NIOSH will use the ICRP...

  11. 42 CFR 82.18 - How will NIOSH calculate internal dose to the primary cancer site(s)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... primary cancer site(s)? 82.18 Section 82.18 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Dose Reconstruction Process § 82.18 How will NIOSH calculate internal dose to the primary cancer site(s... cancer covered by a claim is in a tissue not covered by existing ICRP models, NIOSH will use the ICRP...

  12. 42 CFR 82.18 - How will NIOSH calculate internal dose to the primary cancer site(s)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... primary cancer site(s)? 82.18 Section 82.18 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Dose Reconstruction Process § 82.18 How will NIOSH calculate internal dose to the primary cancer site(s... cancer covered by a claim is in a tissue not covered by existing ICRP models, NIOSH will use the ICRP...

  13. Estimating dose rates to organs as a function of age following internal exposure to radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Cristy, M.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Williams, L.R.

    1984-03-01

    The AGEDOS methodology allows estimates of dose rates, as a function of age, to radiosensitive organs and tissues in the human body at arbitrary times during or after internal exposure to radioactive material. Presently there are few, if any, radionuclides for which sufficient metabolic information is available to allow full use of all features of the methodology. The intention has been to construct the methodology so that optimal information can be gained from a mixture of the limited amount of age-dependent, nuclide-specific data and the generally plentiful age-dependent physiological data now available. Moreover, an effort has been made to design the methodology so that constantly accumulating metabolic information can be incorporated with minimal alterations in the AGEDOS computer code. Some preliminary analyses performed by the authors, using the AGEDOS code in conjunction with age-dependent risk factors developed from the A-bomb survivor data and other studies, has indicated that the doses and subsequent risks of eventually experiencing radiogenic cancers may vary substantially with age for some exposure scenarios and may be relatively invariant with age for other scenarios. We believe that the AGEDOS methodology provides a convenient and efficient means for performing the internal dosimetry.

  14. Predictors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure and internal dose in inner city Baltimore children

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Kamau O.; Williams, D’ Ann L.; Abubaker, Salahadin; Curtin-Brosnan, Jean; McCormack, Meredith C.; Peng, Roger; Breysse, Patrick N.; Matsui, Elizabeth C.; Hansel, Nadia N.; Diette, Gregory B.; Strickland, Paul T.

    2017-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the by-products of incomplete combustion of organic materials, are commonly found on particulate matter (PM) and have been associated with the development of asthma and asthma exacerbation in urban populations. We examined time spent in the home and outdoors as predictors of exposures to airborne PAHs and measured urinary 1-hydroxypyrene-glucuronide (1-OHPG) as internal dose of PAHs in 118 children aged 5–12 years from Baltimore, MD. During weeklong periods (Saturday–Saturday) in each of four seasons: daily activities were assessed using questionnaires, indoor air nicotine and PM concentrations were monitored, and urine specimens were collected on Tuesday (day 3) and Saturday (day 7) for measurement of 1-OHPG. Time spent in non-smoking homes was associated with significantly decreased 1-OHPG concentration in urine (β = −0.045, 95% CI (−0.076, −0.013)), and secondhand smoke (SHS) exposures modified these associations, with higher urinary 1-OHPG concentrations in children spending time in smoking homes than non-smoking homes (P-value for interaction = 0.012). Time spent outdoors was associated with increased urinary 1-OHPG concentrations (β=0.097, 95% CI (0.037, 0.157)) in boys only. Our results suggest that SHS and ambient (outdoor) air pollution contribute to internal dose of PAHs in inner city children. PMID:27966668

  15. Application of the International Life Sciences Institute Key Events Dose-Response Framework to food contaminants.

    PubMed

    Fenner-Crisp, Penelope A

    2012-12-01

    Contaminants are undesirable constituents in food. They may be formed during production of a processed food, present as a component in a source material, deliberately added to substitute for the proper substance, or the consequence of poor food-handling practices. Contaminants may be chemicals or pathogens. Chemicals generally degrade over time and become of less concern as a health threat. Pathogens have the ability to multiply, potentially resulting in an increased threat level. Formal structures have been lacking for systematically generating and evaluating hazard and exposure data for bioactive agents when problem situations arise. We need to know what the potential risk may be to determine whether intervention to reduce or eliminate contact with the contaminant is warranted. We need tools to aid us in assembling and assessing all available relevant information in an expeditious and scientifically sound manner. One such tool is the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Key Events Dose-Response Framework (KEDRF). Developed as an extension of the WHO's International Program on Chemical Safety/ILSI mode of action/human relevance framework, it allows risk assessors to understand not only how a contaminant exerts its toxicity but also the dose response(s) for each key event and the ultimate outcome, including whether a threshold exists. This presentation will illustrate use of the KEDRF with case studies included in its development (chloroform and Listeriaonocytogenes) after its publication in the peer-reviewed scientific literature (chromium VI) and in a work in progress (3-monochloro-1, 2-propanediol).

  16. An overview of internal dose estimation using whole-body counters in Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Makoto; Ohtsuru, Akira; Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    A large amount of radioactive cesium was released by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident following the Great East Japan Earthquake. Due to the increasing concerns about internal exposure, more than 50 whole-body counters (WBCs) have been installed at various locations in Fukushima Prefecture. A study on around 10,000 subjects in the early stage after the accident revealed that very few received a committed effective dose of more than 0.3 mSv for subjects (age >13 years old). Another study on WBC results for one hospital showed that the ratio of cesium-positive was 1.0% among all the subjects. Assuming a constant daily intake, the detection limit of 300 Bq/body for a typical WBC corresponds to an effective dose of 21 μSv/y even for a subject of age up to 10. It was also seen out that the subjects with a significant amount of body cesium are likely to regularly eat wild products, which they harvested or caught themselves without testing for radioactive cesium. These study findings suggested that the internal exposure for most of the residents was controlled at a very low level. Future tasks regarding WBC measurements are how to personally explain the WBC results to each subject and how to disclose the statistically processed WBC data to the general public.

  17. Letter to the Editor: Appropriate selection of dose coefficients in radiological assessments: C-14 and Cl-36: response to the letter of G Smith and M Thorne (2015 J. Radiol. Prot. 35 737-40)

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, John D.; Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2016-01-01

    This letter to the editor of Journal of Radiological Protection is in response to a letter to the editor from G. M. Smith and M. C. Thorne of Great Britain concerning the appropriate selection of dose coefficients for ingested carbon-14 and chlorine-36, two of the most important long-lived components of radioactive wastes. Smith and Thorne argue that current biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for carbon and chlorine are overly cautious models from the standpoint of radiation dose estimates for C-14 and Cl-36, and that more realistic models are needed for evaluation of the hazards of these radionuclides in nuclear wastes. We (Harrison and Leggett) point out that new biokinetic models for these and other elements (developed at ORNL) will soon appear in ICRP Publications. These new models generally are considerably more realistic than current ICRP models. Here, examples are given for C-14 inhaled as carbon dioxide or ingested in water as bicarbonate, carbonate, or carbon dioxide.

  18. Letter to the Editor: Appropriate selection of dose coefficients in radiological assessments: C-14 and Cl-36: response to the letter of G Smith and M Thorne (2015 J. Radiol. Prot. 35 737-40)

    DOE PAGES

    Harrison, John D.; Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2016-01-01

    This letter to the editor of Journal of Radiological Protection is in response to a letter to the editor from G. M. Smith and M. C. Thorne of Great Britain concerning the appropriate selection of dose coefficients for ingested carbon-14 and chlorine-36, two of the most important long-lived components of radioactive wastes. Smith and Thorne argue that current biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for carbon and chlorine are overly cautious models from the standpoint of radiation dose estimates for C-14 and Cl-36, and that more realistic models are needed for evaluation of the hazards ofmore » these radionuclides in nuclear wastes. We (Harrison and Leggett) point out that new biokinetic models for these and other elements (developed at ORNL) will soon appear in ICRP Publications. These new models generally are considerably more realistic than current ICRP models. Here, examples are given for C-14 inhaled as carbon dioxide or ingested in water as bicarbonate, carbonate, or carbon dioxide.« less

  19. Warfarin Dosing and Time Required to Reach Therapeutic International Normalized Ratio in Patients with Hypercoagulable Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kahlon, Pushpinderdeep; Nabi, Shahzaib; Arshad, Adeel; Jabbar, Absia; Haythem, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the difference in duration of anticoagulation and dose of warfarin required to reach a therapeutic international normalized ratio [(INR) of 2 to 3] in patients with hypercoagulable conditions as compared to controls. To our knowledge, this study is the first in the literature to delineate such a difference. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed in a tertiary care hospital. The total study population was 622. Cases (n=125) were patients with a diagnosis of a hypercoagulable syndrome who developed venous thromboembolism. Controls (n=497) were patients with a diagnosis of venous thromboembolism in the absence of a hypercoagulable syndrome and were matched for age, sex, and race. Results: The total dose of warfarin required to reach therapeutic INR in cases was higher (50.7±17.6 mg) as compared to controls (41.2±17.7 mg). The total number of days required to reach therapeutic INR in cases was 8.9±3.5 days as compared to controls (6.8±2.9 days). Both of these differences were statistically significant (p<0.001). Conclusion: Patients with hypercoagulable conditions require approximately 10 mg of additional total warfarin dose and also require, on average, 2 extra days to reach therapeutic INR as compared to controls. PMID:27093959

  20. 241Am Ingrowth and Its Effect on Internal Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Konzen, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Generally, plutonium has been manufactured to support commercial and military applications involving heat sources, weapons and reactor fuel. This work focuses on three typical plutonium mixtures, while observing the potential of 241Am ingrowth and its effect on internal dose. The term “ingrowth” is used to describe 241Am production due solely from the decay of 241Pu as part of a plutonium mixture, where it is initially absent or present in a smaller quantity. Dose calculation models do not account for 241Am ingrowth unless the 241Pu quantity is specified. This work suggested that 241Am ingrowth be considered in bioassay analysis when there is a potential of a 10% increase to the individual’s committed effective dose. It was determined that plutonium fuel mixtures, initially absent of 241Am, would likely exceed 10% for typical reactor grade fuel aged less than 30 years; however, heat source grade and aged weapons grade fuel would normally fall below this threshold. In conclusion, although this work addresses typical plutonium mixtures following separation, it may be extended to irradiated commercial uranium fuel and is expected to be a concern in the recycling of spent fuel.

  1. Warfarin Dosing and Time Required to Reach Therapeutic International Normalized Ratio in Patients with Hypercoagulable Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kahlon, Pushpinderdeep; Nabi, Shahzaib; Arshad, Adeel; Jabbar, Absia; Haythem, Ali

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the difference in duration of anticoagulation and dose of warfarin required to reach a therapeutic international normalized ratio [(INR) of 2 to 3] in patients with hypercoagulable conditions as compared to controls. To our knowledge, this study is the first in the literature to delineate such a difference. A retrospective chart review was performed in a tertiary care hospital. The total study population was 622. Cases (n=125) were patients with a diagnosis of a hypercoagulable syndrome who developed venous thromboembolism. Controls (n=497) were patients with a diagnosis of venous thromboembolism in the absence of a hypercoagulable syndrome and were matched for age, sex, and race. The total dose of warfarin required to reach therapeutic INR in cases was higher (50.7±17.6 mg) as compared to controls (41.2±17.7 mg). The total number of days required to reach therapeutic INR in cases was 8.9±3.5 days as compared to controls (6.8±2.9 days). Both of these differences were statistically significant (p<0.001). Patients with hypercoagulable conditions require approximately 10 mg of additional total warfarin dose and also require, on average, 2 extra days to reach therapeutic INR as compared to controls.

  2. The impact of plutonium speciation on the distribution coefficients in a sediment-sea water system, and radiological assessment of doses to humans.

    PubMed

    Skipperud, L; Oughton, D H; Salbu, B

    2000-08-01

    When radionuclides are released from a source into the marine environment, the assessment of long term consequences to humans depends on information on the source term, transport in water, interactions with sediments (KD) and biological uptake (CF). Sensitivity analysis of assessment models demonstrates that KD is one of the most sensitive parameters contributing to large uncertainties in the assessment. Furthermore, the interaction of Pu-species with sediments is a time and temperature dependent process. The distribution coefficient, Bq kg(-1) sediment per Bq L(-1) sea water, increases with time until pseudo-equilibrium/equilibrium is reached (KD). Thus, the contact time between contaminated sea water and sediments should be taken into account in dispersion and dose assessment models. In the present work, dynamic tracer experiments have been performed where different Pu-species are added to a sediment-sea water system to obtain information on KD's. After a defined contact time, the samples have been sequentially extracted to determine mobile and bound fractions. The results indicate that the distribution coefficient, KD, for plutonium depends on Pu-species in question. Thus, sediments act as a sink for Pu(III, IV) (high KD), while Pu(III, IV)-organic and Pu(V, VI) should be considered more mobile (low KD). Furthermore, the interaction with inert fractions obtained from sequential extraction depends less on Pu-species but increase with time. For short time interactions, species-specific time functions rather than KD constants should be applied in assessment models. When the accepted KD (10(5) L kg(-1)) is implemented in the model, the estimated collective dose is about 8 x 10(-4) person-Sv, i.e., a factor of about 2 lower than for Pu(III, IV)-organic and Pu(V, VI). So changes in KD have an impact on the assessment of collective dose received from a potential release of plutonium from fallout, reactor accidents, etc., which underlines the need for more detailed

  3. Prenatal Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure in CD-1 Mice: Low-Dose Developmental Effects and Internal Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Macon, Madisa B.; Villanueva, LaTonya R.; Tatum-Gibbs, Katoria; Zehr, Robert D.; Strynar, Mark J.; Stanko, Jason P.; White, Sally S.; Helfant, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an environmental contaminant that causes adverse developmental effects in laboratory animals. To investigate the low-dose effects of PFOA on offspring, timed-pregnant CD-1 mice were gavage dosed with PFOA for all or half of gestation. In the full-gestation study, mice were administered 0, 0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg PFOA/kg body weight (BW)/day from gestation days (GD) 1–17. In the late-gestation study, mice were administered 0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg PFOA/kg BW/day from GD 10–17. Exposure to PFOA significantly (p < 0.05) increased offspring relative liver weights in all treatment groups in the full-gestation study and in the 1.0 mg PFOA/kg group in the late-gestation study. In both studies, the offspring of all PFOA-treated dams exhibited significantly stunted mammary epithelial growth as assessed by developmental scoring. At postnatal day 21, mammary glands from the 1.0 mg/kg GD 10–17 group had significantly less longitudinal epithelial growth and fewer terminal end buds compared with controls (p < 0.05). Evaluation of internal dosimetry in offspring revealed that PFOA concentrations remained elevated in liver and serum for up to 6 weeks and that brain concentrations were low and undetectable after 4 weeks. These data indicate that PFOA-induced effects on mammary tissue (1) occur at lower doses than effects on liver weight in CD-1 mice, an observation that may be strain specific, and (2) persist until 12 weeks of age following full-gestational exposure. Due to the low-dose sensitivity of mammary glands to PFOA in CD-1 mice, a no observable adverse effect level for mammary developmental delays was not identified in these studies. PMID:21482639

  4. Design and performance characteristics of an experimental cesium-137 irradiator to simulate internal radionuclide dose rate patterns.

    PubMed

    Howell, R W; Goddu, S M; Rao, D V

    1997-05-01

    When radionuclides are administered internally, the biological effect can depend on the total absorbed dose and the rate at which it is delivered. A 137Cs irradiator was designed to deliver dose-rate patterns that simulate those encountered in radionuclide therapy. An 18-Ci 137Cs irradiator was fitted with a computer-controlled mercury attenuator that facilitated changes in dose rates as desired. The absorbed dose and dose rates were calibrated with MOSFET dosimeters customized for low dose-rates. Initial dose rates ranging from 0.01-30 cGy/hr can be delivered depending on the location of the cage in the irradiator and the thickness of the mercury in the attenuator system. To demonstrate the irradiator system's capability to deliver dose-rate patterns encountered in radionuclide therapy, a simulation was performed where the dose rate initially increased exponentially followed by an exponential decrease in the dose rate. The irradiator system is well-suited to expose small animals to any dose-rate pattern, thereby facilitating calibration of biological dosimeters (e.g., cell survival, chromosome aberrations), which can be used to measure the absorbed dose to a target tissue after administration of radionuclides.

  5. Internal dose assessment of 210Po using biokinetic modeling and urinary excretion measurement

    PubMed Central

    Gerstmann, Udo; Giussani, Augusto; Oeh, Uwe; Paretzke, Herwig G.

    2007-01-01

    The mysterious death of Mr. Alexander Litvinenko who was most possibly poisoned by Polonium-210 (210Po) in November 2006 in London attracted the attention of the public to the kinetics, dosimetry and the risk of this high radiotoxic isotope in the human body. In the present paper, the urinary excretion of seven persons who were possibly exposed to traces of 210Po was monitored. The values measured in the GSF Radioanalytical Laboratory are in the range of natural background concentration. To assess the effective dose received by those persons, the time-dependence of the organ equivalent dose and the effective dose after acute ingestion and inhalation of 210Po were calculated using the biokinetic model for polonium (Po) recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the one recently published by Leggett and Eckerman (L&E). The daily urinary excretion to effective dose conversion factors for ingestion and inhalation were evaluated based on the ICRP and L&E models for members of the public. The ingestion (inhalation) effective dose per unit intake integrated over one day is 1.7 × 10−8 (1.4 × 10−7) Sv Bq−1, 2.0 × 10−7 (9.6 × 10−7) Sv Bq−1 over 10 days, 5.2 × 10−7 (2.0 × 10−6) Sv Bq−1 over 30 days and 1.0 × 10−6 (3.0 × 10−6) Sv Bq−1 over 100 days. The daily urinary excretions after acute ingestion (inhalation) of 1 Bq of 210Po are 1.1 × 10−3 (1.0 × 10−4) on day 1, 2.0 × 10−3 (1.9 × 10−4) on day 10, 1.3 × 10−3 (1.7 × 10−4) on day 30 and 3.6 × 10−4 (8.3 × 10−5) Bq d−1 on day 100, respectively. The resulting committed effective doses range from 2.1 × 10−3 to 1.7 × 10−2 mSv by an assumption of ingestion and from 5.5 × 10−2 to 4.5 × 10−1 mSv by inhalation. For the case of Mr. Litvinenko, the mean organ absorbed dose as a function of time was calculated using both the above stated models. The red bone marrow, the

  6. Internal dose assessments: uncertainty studies and update of ideas guidelines and databases within CONRAD project.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J W; Castellani, C M; Hurtgen, C; Lopez, M A; Andrasi, A; Bailey, M R; Birchall, A; Blanchardon, E; Desai, A D; Dorrian, M-D; Doerfel, H; Koukouliou, V; Luciani, A; Malatova, I; Molokanov, A; Puncher, M; Vrba, T

    2008-01-01

    The work of Task Group 5.1 (uncertainty studies and revision of IDEAS guidelines) and Task Group 5.5 (update of IDEAS databases) of the CONRAD project is described. Scattering factor (SF) values (i.e. measurement uncertainties) have been calculated for different radionuclides and types of monitoring data using real data contained in the IDEAS Internal Contamination Database. Based upon this work and other published values, default SF values are suggested. Uncertainty studies have been carried out using both a Bayesian approach as well as a frequentist (classical) approach. The IDEAS guidelines have been revised in areas relating to the evaluation of an effective AMAD, guidance is given on evaluating wound cases with the NCRP wound model and suggestions made on the number and type of measurements required for dose assessment.

  7. Determination of the physical and chemical properties, biokinetics, and dose coefficients of uranium compounds handled during nuclear fuel fabrication in France.

    PubMed

    Ansoborlo, E; Chazel, V; Hengé-Napoli, M H; Pihet, P; Rannou, A; Bailey, M R; Stradling, N

    2002-03-01

    The introduction of new ICRP recommendations, especially the new Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) in ICRP Publication 66 led us to focus on some specific parameters related to industrial uranium aerosols collected between 1990 and 1999 at French nuclear fuel fabrication facilities operated by COGEMA, FBFC, and the CEA. Among these parameters, the activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD), specific surface area (SSA), and parameters describing absorption to blood f(r), s(r) and s(s) defined in ICRP Publication 66 were identified as the most relevant influencing dose assessment. This study reviewed the data for 25 pure and impure uranium compounds. The average value of AMAD obtained was 5.7 microm (range 1.1-8.5 microm), which strongly supports the choice of 5 microm as the default value of AMAD for occupational exposures. The SSA varied between 0.4 and 18.3 m2 g(-1). For most materials, values of the absorption parameters f(r), s(r), and s(s) derived from the in vitro experiments were generally consistent with those derived from the in vivo experiments. Using average values for each pure compound allowed us to classify UO2 and U3O8 as Type S, mixed oxides, UF4, UO3 and ADU as Type M, and UO4 as Type F based on the ICRP Publication 71 criteria. Dose coefficients were also calculated for each pure compound, and average values for each type of pure compound were compared with those derived using default values. Finally, the lung retention kinetics and urinary excretion rates for inhaled U03 were compared using material-specific and default absorption parameters, in order to give a practical example of the application of this study.

  8. External radiation dose and cancer mortality among French nuclear workers: considering potential confounding by internal radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Fournier, L; Laurent, O; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Laroche, P; Le Guen, B; Laurier, D; Leuraud, K

    2016-11-01

    French nuclear workers have detailed records of their occupational exposure to external radiation that have been used to examine associations with subsequent cancer mortality. However, some workers were also exposed to internal contamination by radionuclides. This study aims to assess the potential for bias due to confounding by internal contamination of estimates of associations between external radiation exposure and cancer mortality. A cohort of 59,004 workers employed for at least 1 year between 1950 and 1994 by CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique), AREVA NC, or EDF (Electricité de France) and badge-monitored for external radiation exposure were followed through 2004 to assess vital status and cause of death. A flag based on a workstation-exposure matrix defined four levels of potential for internal contamination. Standardized mortality ratios were assessed for each level of the internal contamination indicator. Poisson regression was used to quantify associations between external radiation exposure and cancer mortality, adjusting for potential internal contamination. For solid cancer, the mortality deficit tended to decrease as the levels of potential for internal contamination increased. For solid cancer and leukemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia, adjusting the dose-response analysis on the internal contamination indicator did not markedly change the excess relative risk per Sievert of external radiation dose. This study suggests that in this cohort, neglecting information on internal dosimetry while studying the association between external dose and cancer mortality does not generate a substantial bias. To investigate more specifically the health effects of internal contamination, an effort is underway to estimate organ doses due to internal contamination.

  9. Influence of coefficient of variation in determining significant difference of quantitative values obtained from 28-day repeated-dose toxicity studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsumi; Sakuratani, Yuki; Abe, Takemaru; Yamazaki, Kazuko; Nishikawa, Satoshi; Yamada, Jun; Hirose, Akihiko; Kamata, Eiichi; Hayashi, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the influence of coefficient of variation (CV) in determining significant difference of quantitative values of 28-day repeated-dose toxicity studies, we examined 59 parameters of 153 studies conducted in accordance with Chemical Substance Control Law in 12 test facilities. Sex difference was observed in 12 parameters and 10 parameters showed large CV in females. The minimum CV was 0.74% for sodium. CV of electrolytes was comparatively small, whereas enzymes had large CV. Large differences in CV were observed for major parameters among 7-8 test facilities. The changes in CV were grossly classified into 11. Our study revealed that a statistical significant difference is usually detected if there is a difference of 7% in mean values between the groups and the groups have a CV of about 7%. A parameter with a CV as high as 30% may be significantly different, if the difference of the mean between the groups is 30%. It would be ideal to use median value to assess the treatment-related effect, rather than mean, when the CV is very high. We recommend using CV of the body weight as a standard to judge the adverse effect level.

  10. ESTIMATION OF EARLY INTERNAL DOSES TO FUKUSHIMA RESIDENTS AFTER THE NUCLEAR DISASTER BASED ON THE ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION SIMULATION.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Tani, Kotaro; Kunishima, Naoaki; Kurihara, Osamu; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Estimating the early internal doses to residents in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident is a difficult task because limited human/environmental measurement data are available. Hence, the feasibility of using atmospheric dispersion simulations created by the Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information 2nd Version (WSPEEDI-II) in the estimation was examined in the present study. This examination was done by comparing the internal doses evaluated based on the human measurements with those calculated using time series air concentration maps ((131)I and (137)Cs) generated by WSPEEDI-II. The results showed that the latter doses were several times higher than the former doses. However, this discrepancy could be minimised by taking into account personal behaviour data that will be available soon. This article also presents the development of a prototype system for estimating the internal dose based on the simulations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Method for Fast CT/SPECT-Based 3D Monte Carlo Absorbed Dose Computations in Internal Emitter Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilderman, S. J.; Dewaraja, Y. K.

    2007-02-01

    The DPM (Dose Planning Method) Monte Carlo electron and photon transport program, designed for fast computation of radiation absorbed dose in external beam radiotherapy, has been adapted to the calculation of absorbed dose in patient-specific internal emitter therapy. Because both its photon and electron transport mechanics algorithms have been optimized for fast computation in 3D voxelized geometries (in particular, those derived from CT scans), DPM is perfectly suited for performing patient-specific absorbed dose calculations in internal emitter therapy. In the updated version of DPM developed for the current work, the necessary inputs are a patient CT image, a registered SPECT image, and any number of registered masks defining regions of interest. DPM has been benchmarked for internal emitter therapy applications by comparing computed absorption fractions for a variety of organs using a Zubal phantom with reference results from the Medical Internal Radionuclide Dose (MIRD) Committee standards. In addition, the beta decay source algorithm and the photon tracking algorithm of DPM have been further benchmarked by comparison to experimental data. This paper presents a description of the program, the results of the benchmark studies, and some sample computations using patient data from radioimmunotherapy studies using 131I

  12. Comparison between absorbed dose to water standards established by water calorimetry at the LNE-LNHB and by application of international air-kerma based protocols for kilovoltage medium energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Perichon, N; Rapp, B; Denoziere, M; Daures, J; Ostrowsky, A; Bordy, J-M

    2013-05-07

    Nowadays, the absorbed dose to water for kilovoltage x-ray beams is determined from standards in terms of air-kerma by application of international dosimetry protocols. New standards in terms of absorbed dose to water has just been established for these beams at the LNE-LNHB, using water calorimetry, at a depth of 2 cm in water in accordance with protocols. The aim of this study is to compare these new standards in terms of absorbed dose to water, to the dose values calculated from the application of four international protocols based on air-kerma standards (IAEA TRS-277, AAPM TG-61, IPEMB and NCS-10). The acceleration potentials of the six beams studied are between 80 and 300 kV with half-value layers between 3.01 mm of aluminum and 3.40 mm of copper. A difference between the two methods smaller than 2.1% was reported. The standard uncertainty of water calorimetry being below 0.8%, and the one associated with the values from protocols being around 2.5%, the results are in good agreement. The calibration coefficients of some ionization chambers in terms of absorbed dose to water, established by application of calorimetry and air-kerma based dosimetry protocols, were also compared. The best agreement with the calibration coefficients established by water calorimetry was found for those established with the AAPM TG-61 protocol.

  13. First international comparison of primary absorbed dose to water standards in the medium-energy X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büermann, Ludwig; Guerra, Antonio Stefano; Pimpinella, Maria; Pinto, Massimo; de Pooter, Jacco; de Prez, Leon; Jansen, Bartel; Denoziere, Marc; Rapp, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first international comparison of primary measurement standards of absorbed dose to water for the medium-energy X-ray range. Three of the participants (VSL, PTB, LNE-LNHB) used their existing water calorimeter based standards and one participant (ENEA) recently developed a new standard based on a water-graphite calorimeter. The participants calibrated three transfer chambers of the same type in terms of absorbed dose to water (NDw) and in addition in terms of air kerma (NK) using the CCRI radiation qualities in the range 100 kV to 250 kV. The additional NK values were intended to be used for a physical analysis of the ratios NDw/NK. All participants had previously participated in the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison of air kerma standards. Ratios of pairs of NMI's NK results of the current comparison were found to be consistent with the corresponding key comparison results within the expanded uncertainties of 0.6 % - 1 %. The NDw results were analysed in terms of the degrees of equivalence with the comparison reference values which were calculated for each beam quality as the weighted means of all results. The participant's results were consistent with the reference value within the expanded uncertainties. However, these expanded uncertainties varied significantly and ranged between about 1-1.8 % for the water calorimeter based standards and were estimated at 3.7 % for the water-graphite calorimeter. It was shown previously that the ratios NDw/NK for the type of ionization chamber used as transfer chamber in this comparison were very close (within less than 1 %) to the calculated values of (bar muen/ρ)w,ad, the mean values of the water-to-air ratio of the mass-energy-absorption coefficients at the depth d in water. Some of the participant's results deviated significantly from the expected behavior. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of

  14. [ESTIMATION OF IONIZING RADIATION EFFECTIVE DOSES IN THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION CREWS BY THE METHOD OF CALCULATION MODELING].

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, V G

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of the radiation loading on cosmonauts requires calculation of absorbed dose dynamics with regard to the stay of cosmonauts in specific compartments of the space vehicle that differ in shielding properties and lack means of radiation measurement. The paper discusses different aspects of calculation modeling of radiation effects on human body organs and tissues and reviews the effective dose estimates for cosmonauts working in one or another compartment over the previous period of the International space station operation. It was demonstrated that doses measured by a real or personal dosimeters can be used to calculate effective dose values. Correct estimation of accumulated effective dose can be ensured by consideration for time course of the space radiation quality factor.

  15. The principal results of the International Immune Tolerance Study: a randomized dose comparison.

    PubMed

    Hay, Charles R M; DiMichele, Donna M

    2012-02-09

    The International Immune Tolerance Study was a multicenter, prospective, randomized comparison of high-dose (HD; 200 IU/kg/d) and low-dose (LD; 50 IU/kg 3 times/week) factor VIII regimens in 115 "good-risk," severe high-titer inhibitor hemophilia A subjects. Sixty-six of 115 subjects reached the defined study end points: success, n = 46 (69.7%); partial response, n = 3 (4.5%); and failure, n = 17 (25.8%). Successes did not differ between treatment arms (24 of 58 LD vs 22/57 HD, P = .909). The times taken to achieve a negative titer (P = .027), a normal recovery (P = .002), and tolerance (P = .116, nonsignificant) were shorter with the HD immune tolerance induction (ITI). Peak historical (P = .026) and on-ITI (P = .002) titers were correlated inversely with success, but only peak titer on ITI predicted outcome in a multivariate analysis (P = .002). LD subjects bled more often (odds ratio, 2.2; P = .0019). The early bleed rate/month was 0.62 (LD) and 0.28 (HD; P = .000 24), decreasing by 90% once negative titers were achieved. Bleeding was absent in 8 of 58 LD versus 21 of 57 HD subjects (P = .0085). One hundred twenty-four central catheter infections were reported in 41 subjects (19 LD); infection frequency did not differ between the treatment arms. Neither bleeding nor infection influenced outcome. Although it was stopped early for futility and safety considerations, this trial contributed valuable data toward evidence-based ITI practice.

  16. Relativistic electrons high doses at International Space Station and Foton M2/M3 satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachev, T. P.; Tomov, B.; Matviichuk, Yu.; Dimitrov, Pl.; Bankov, N.

    2009-12-01

    The paper presents observation of relativistic electrons. Data are collected by the Radiation Risk Radiometer-Dosimeters (R3D) B2/B3 modifications during the flights of Foton M2/M3 satellites in 2005 and 2007 as well as by the R3DE instrument at the European Technology Exposure Facility (EuTEF) on the Columbus External Payload Adaptor at the International Space Station (ISS) in the period February 20 - April 28, 2008. On the Foton M2/M3 satellites relativistic electrons are observed more frequently than on the ISS because of higher (62.8°) inclination of the orbit. At both Foton satellites the usual duration of the observations are a few minutes long. On the ISS the duration usually is about 1 min or less. The places of observations of high doses due to relativistic electrons are distributed mainly at latitudes above 50° geographic latitude in both hemispheres on Foton M2/M3 satellites. A very high maximum is found in the southern hemisphere at longitudinal range 0°-60°E. At the ISS the maximums are observed between 45° and 52° geographic latitude in both hemispheres mainly at longitudes equatorward from the magnetic poles. The measured absolute maximums of dose rates generated by relativistic electrons are found to be as follows: 304 μGy h -1 behind 1.75 g cm -2 shielding at Foton M2, 2314 μGy h -1 behind 0.71 g cm -2 shielding at Foton M3 and 19,195 μGy h -1 (Flux is 8363 cm -2 s -1) behind les than 0.4 g cm -2 shielding at ISS.

  17. WRAITH - A Computer Code for Calculating Internal and External Doses Resulting From An Atmospheric Release of Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, R. I.; Borst, F. J.; Hoenes, G. R.

    1980-12-01

    WRAITH is a FORTRAN computer code which calculates the doses received by a standard man exposed to an accidental release of radioactive material. The movement of the released material through the atmosphere is calculated using a bivariate straight-line Gaussian distribution model, with Pasquill values for standard deviations. The quantity of material in the released cloud is modified during its transit time to account for radioactive decay and daughter production. External doses due to exposure to the cloud can be calculated using a semi-infinite cloud approximation. In situations where the semi-infinite cloud approximation is not a good one, the external dose can be calculated by a "finite plume" three-dimensional point-kernel numerical integration technique. Internal doses due to acute inhalation are cal.culated using the ICRP Task Group Lung Model and a four-segmented gastro-intestinal tract model. Translocation of the material between body compartments and retention in the body compartments are calculated using multiple exponential retention functions. Internal doses to each organ are calculated as sums of cross-organ doses, with each target organ irradiated by radioactive material in a number of source organs. All doses are calculated in rads, with separate values determined for high-LET and low-LET radiation.

  18. Gene Expression Response of Mice after a Single Dose of 137Cs as an Internal Emitter

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sunirmal; Ghandhi, Shanaz A.; Weber, Waylon; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Melo, Dunstana; Guilmette, Raymond; Amundson, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    Cesium-137 is a radionuclide of concern in fallout from reactor accidents or nuclear detonations. When ingested or inhaled, it can expose the entire body for an extended period of time, potentially contributing to serious health consequences ranging from acute radiation syndrome to increased cancer risks. To identify changes in gene expression that may be informative for detecting such exposure, and to begin examining the molecular responses involved, we have profiled global gene expression in blood of male C57BL/6 mice injected with 137CsCl. We extracted RNA from the blood of control or 137CsCl-injected mice at 2, 3, 5, 20 or 30 days after exposure. Gene expression was measured using Agilent Whole Mouse Genome Microarrays, and the data was analyzed using BRB-ArrayTools. Between 466–6,213 genes were differentially expressed, depending on the time after 137Cs administration. At early times (2–3 days), the majority of responsive genes were expressed above control levels, while at later times (20–30 days) most responding genes were expressed below control levels. Numerous genes were overexpressed by day 2 or 3, and then underexpressed by day 20 or 30, including many Tp53-regulated genes. The same pattern was seen among significantly enriched gene ontology categories, including those related to nucleotide binding, protein localization and modification, actin and the cytoskeleton, and in the integrin signaling canonical pathway. We compared the expression of several genes three days after 137CsCl injection and three days after an acute external gamma-ray exposure, and found that the internal exposure appeared to produce a more sustained response. Many common radiation-responsive genes are altered by internally administered 137Cs, but the gene expression pattern resulting from continued irradiation at a decreasing dose rate is extremely complex, and appears to involve a late reversal of much of the initial response. PMID:25162453

  19. Atmospheric Extinction Coefficients in the Ic Band for Several Major International Observatories: Results from the BiSON Telescopes, 1984-2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, S. J.; Chaplin, W. J.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Howe, R.; Lund, M. N.; Moxon, E. Z.; Thomas, A.; Pallé, P. L.; Rhodes, E. J., Jr.

    2017-09-01

    Over 30 years of solar data have been acquired by the Birmingham Solar Oscillations Network (BiSON), an international network of telescopes used to study oscillations of the Sun. Five of the six BiSON telescopes are located at major observatories. The observational sites are, in order of increasing longitude: Mount Wilson (Hale) Observatory (MWO), California, USA; Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; Observatorio del Teide, Izaña, Tenerife, Canary Islands; the South African Astronomical Observatory, Sutherland, South Africa; Carnarvon, Western Australia; and the Paul Wild Observatory, Narrabri, New South Wales, Australia. The BiSON data may be used to measure atmospheric extinction coefficients in the {{{I}}}{{c}} band (approximately 700-900 nm), and presented here are the derived atmospheric extinction coefficients from each site over the years 1984-2016.

  20. Fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients for neutron beams from 0.001 eV to 100 GeV calculated for a set of pregnant female and fetus models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranenko, Valery; Xu, X. George

    2008-03-01

    Protection of fetuses against external neutron exposure is an important task. This paper reports a set of absorbed dose conversion coefficients for fetal and maternal organs for external neutron beams using the RPI-P pregnant female models and the MCNPX code. The newly developed pregnant female models represent an adult female with a fetus including its brain and skeleton at the end of each trimester. The organ masses were adjusted to match the reference values within 1%. For the 3 mm cubic voxel size, the models consist of 10-15 million voxels for 35 organs. External monoenergetic neutron beams of six standard configurations (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, ROT and ISO) and source energies 0.001 eV-100 GeV were considered. The results are compared with previous data that are based on simplified anatomical models. The differences in dose depend on source geometry, energy and gestation periods: from 20% up to 140% for the whole fetus, and up to 100% for the fetal brain. Anatomical differences are primarily responsible for the discrepancies in the organ doses. For the first time, the dependence of mother organ doses upon anatomical changes during pregnancy was studied. A maximum of 220% increase in dose was observed for the placenta in the nine months model compared to three months, whereas dose to the pancreas, small and large intestines decreases by 60% for the AP source for the same models. Tabulated dose conversion coefficients for the fetus and 27 maternal organs are provided.

  1. Fluence-to-Absorbed Dose Conversion Coefficients for Use in Radiological Protection of Embryo and Foetus Against External Exposure to Muons from 20MeV to 50GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jing

    2008-08-07

    This study used the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and foetus when the mother is exposed to external muon fields. Monoenergetic muons ranging from 20 MeV to 50 GeV were considered. The irradiation geometries include anteroposterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT), isotropic (ISO), and top-down (TOP). At each of these irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the foetal body were calculated for the embryo of 8 weeks and the foetus of 3, 6 or 9 months, respectively. Muon fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients were derived for the four prenatal ages. Since such conversion coefficients are yet unknown, the results presented here fill a data gap.

  2. An internal radiation dosimetry computer program, IDAC 2.0, for estimation of patient doses from radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Andersson, M; Johansson, L; Minarik, D; Mattsson, S; Leide-Svegborn, S

    2014-12-01

    The internal dosimetry computer program internal dose assessment by computer (IDAC) for calculations of absorbed doses to organs and tissues as well as effective doses to patients from examinations with radiopharmaceuticals has been developed. The new version, IDAC2.0, incorporates the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP)/ICRU computational adult male and female voxel phantoms and decay data from the ICRP publication 107. Instead of only 25 source and target regions, calculation can now be made with 63 source regions to 73 target regions. The major advantage of having the new phantom is that the calculations of the effective doses can be made with the latest tissue weighting factors of ICRP publication 103. IDAC2.0 uses the ICRP human alimentary tract (HAT) model for orally administrated activity and for excretion through the gastrointestinal tract and effective doses have been recalculated for radiopharmaceuticals that are orally administered. The results of the program are consistent with published data using the same specific absorption fractions and also compared with published data from the same computational phantoms but with segmentation of organs leading to another set of specific absorption fractions. The effective dose is recalculated for all the 34 radiopharmaceuticals that are administered orally and has been published by the ICRP. Using the new HAT model, new tissue weighting factors and the new adult computational voxel phantoms lead to an average effective dose of half of its earlier estimated value. The reduction mainly depends on electron transport simulations to walled organs and the transition from the stylised phantom with unrealistic interorgan distances to more realistic voxel phantoms.

  3. Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008 (MWDS-2008): assessment of internal dose from measurement results of plutonium activity in urine.

    PubMed

    Khokhryakov, Victor V; Khokhryakov, Valentin F; Suslova, Klara G; Vostrotin, Vadim V; Vvedensky, Vladimir E; Sokolova, Alexandra B; Krahenbuhl, Melinda P; Birchall, Alan; Miller, Scott C; Schadilov, Anatoly E; Ephimov, Alexander V

    2013-04-01

    A new modification of the prior human lung compartment plutonium model, Doses-2005, has been described. The modified model was named "Mayak Worker Dosimetry System-2008" (MWDS-2008). In contrast to earlier models developed for workers at the Mayak Production Association (Mayak PA), the new model more correctly describes plutonium biokinetics and metabolism in pulmonary lymph nodes. The MWDS-2008 also provides two sets of doses estimates: one based on bioassay data and the other based on autopsy data, where available. The algorithm of internal dose calculation from autopsy data will be described in a separate paper. Results of comparative analyses of Doses-2005 and MWDS-2008 are provided. Perspectives on the further development of plutonium dosimetry are discussed.

  4. Studies of the mortality of A-bomb survivors. 9. Mortality, 1950-1985: Part 1. Comparison of risk coefficients for site-specific cancer mortality based on the DS86 and T65DR shielded kerma and organ doses

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Y.; Kato, H.; Schull, W.J.; Preston, D.L.; Fujita, S.; Pierce, D.A. )

    1989-06-01

    As a result of the reassessment of the A-bomb dosimetry, new (DS86) doses were calculated in 1986. In this paper, site-specific estimates of cancer mortality in the years 1950-1985, based on these new doses, are compared with those using the T65DR doses. The subjects of the study are 75,991 members of the Life Span Study sample for whom DS86 doses have been calculated. This reevaluation of the exposures does not change the list of radiation-related cancers. Most differences in dose response between Hiroshima and Nagasaki are no longer significant with the DS86 doses. The dose-response curve is closer to linear with the DS86 than the T65DR doses even for leukemia in the entire dose range, though, statistically, many other models cannot be excluded. However, in the low-dose range, the risk of leukemia remains nonlinear. Assuming a linear model at an RBE of 1, and using organ-absorbed doses, the risk coefficients derived from the two dosimetries are very similar, whereas those based on shielded kerma are about 40% higher with the new dosimetry. If RBE values larger than 1 are assumed, the disparity between the two dosimetries increases because the neutron dose is much greater in the T65DR. At an RBE of 10, for the five specific cancers, i.e., female breast, colon, leukemia, lung, and stomach, the increase in excess number of deaths per 10(4) PYSv under the DS86 varies from 12% (colon) to 133% (female breast). The magnitude of the effects of such modifiers of radiation-induced cancer as age at time of bomb and sex do not differ between the two dose systems.

  5. Effects of body habitus on internal radiation dose calculations using the 5-year-old anthropomorphic male models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Tianwu; Kuster, Niels; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-08-01

    Computational phantoms are commonly used in internal radiation dosimetry to assess the amount and distribution pattern of energy deposited in various parts of the human body from different internal radiation sources. Radiation dose assessments are commonly performed on predetermined reference computational phantoms while the argument for individualized patient-specific radiation dosimetry exists. This study aims to evaluate the influence of body habitus on internal dosimetry and to quantify the uncertainties in dose estimation correlated with the use of fixed reference models. The 5-year-old IT’IS male phantom was modified to match target anthropometric parameters, including body weight, body height and sitting height/stature ratio (SSR), determined from reference databases, thus enabling the creation of 125 5-year-old habitus-dependent male phantoms with 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentile body morphometries. We evaluated the absorbed fractions and the mean absorbed dose to the target region per unit cumulative activity in the source region (S-values) of F-18 in 46 source regions for the generated 125 anthropomorphic 5-year-old hybrid male phantoms using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended general purpose Monte Carlo transport code and calculated the absorbed dose and effective dose of five 18F-labelled radiotracers for children of various habitus. For most organs, the S-value of F-18 presents stronger statistical correlations with body weight, standing height and sitting height than BMI and SSR. The self-absorbed fraction and self-absorbed S-values of F-18 and the absorbed dose and effective dose of 18F-labelled radiotracers present with the strongest statistical correlations with body weight. For 18F-Amino acids, 18F-Brain receptor substances, 18F-FDG, 18F-L-DOPA and 18F-FBPA, the mean absolute effective dose differences between phantoms of different habitus and fixed reference models are 11.4%, 11.3%, 10.8%, 13.3% and 11.4%, respectively. Total body

  6. Comparison of normal tissue dose with three-dimensional conformal techniques for breast cancer irradiation including the internal mammary nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Laan, Hans P. van der . E-mail: h.p.van.der.laan@rt.umcg.nl; Dolsma, Wil V.; Veld, Aart A. van 't; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the Para Mixed technique for irradiation of the internal mammary nodes (IMN) with three commonly used strategies, by analyzing the dose to the heart and other organs at risk. Methods and Materials: Four different three-dimensional conformal dose plans were created for 30 breast cancer patients. The IMN were enclosed with the Para Mixed technique by a widened mediolateral tangent photon beam and an anterior electron beam, with the Patched technique by an anterior electron beam, with the Standard technique by an anterior photon and electron beam, and with the PWT technique by partially wide tangents. All techniques were optimized for conformality and produced equally adequate target coverage. Results: Heart dose was lowest with the Para Mixed and Patched technique for all patients and with the PWT technique for right-sided treatment only. Lung dose was highest with the PWT, lowest with the Patched, and intermediate with the Para Mixed and Standard techniques. Skin dose was highest with the Patched, lowest with the PWT, and intermediate with the Para Mixed and the Standard techniques. The Para Mixed technique resulted in a 13-Gy lower dose in an overlap area, and the PWT technique was the only technique that incorporated considerable volumes of the contralateral breast. Conclusion: The Para Mixed technique yielded the overall best results. No other technique resulted in a lower heart dose. Lung and skin were equally spared instead of one of them being compromised, and the contralateral breast was avoided.

  7. Biomarkers of internal dose for the assessment of environmental exposure to benzene.

    PubMed

    Lovreglio, Piero; D'Errico, Maria Nicolà; Fustinoni, Silvia; Drago, Ignazio; Barbieri, Anna; Sabatini, Laura; Carrieri, Mariella; Apostoli, Pietro; Soleo, Leonardo

    2011-10-01

    The urinary excretion of t,t-muconic acid (t,t-MA), S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA) and urinary benzene and the influence of a smoking habit and of exposure to urban traffic on the urinary excretion of these biomarkers were investigated in 137 male adults from the general population. All subjects were not occupationally exposed to benzene and resident in two cities in Puglia (Southern-Italy). Environmental exposure to benzene was measured using passive personal samplers. The biomarkers t,t-MA, SPMA and urinary benzene were determined in urine samples collected from each subject at the end of the environmental sampling. The percentage of cases above the limit of detection was higher for SPMA and urinary benzene in smokers than in non-smokers, and for airborne benzene and urinary benzene in subjects exposed to urban traffic. Airborne benzene was correlated with the time spent in urban traffic during the environmental sampling. Among the biomarkers, urinary benzene was found to be correlated with airborne benzene only in non-smokers, and with the time spent in urban traffic, both in smokers and non-smokers considered together, and in non-smokers only. Finally, multiple regression analysis showed that the urinary excretion of all the biomarkers was dependent on the number of cigarettes smoked per day and, for urinary benzene, also on the time spent in urban traffic. In conclusion, urinary benzene seems to be a more valid biomarker than t,t-MA and SPMA to assess environmental exposure to extremely low concentrations of benzene. Cigarette smoking prevailed over traffic exhaust fumes in determining the internal dose of benzene.

  8. Comparison of 50-year and 70-year internal-dose-conversion factors

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, M.T.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    The 50-year inhalation and ingestion dose commitments associated with an acute intake (of a radionuclide) of 3.7 x 10/sup 4/ Bq (1 ..mu..Ci) in one day were compared with the corresponding dose commitments calculated for a 70-year integration period resulting from a chronic intake of the same amount at a rate of 101 Bq/d (0.00274 ..mu..Ci/d) for one year. These values, known as dose conversion factors, estimate the dose accumulated during a given period of time following a unit of intake of a radionuclide. It was demonstrated that the acute intake of 3.7 x 10/sup 4/ Bq in one day and the chronic intake of 101 Bq/d for one year (a total intake of 3.7 x 10/sup 4/ Bq) result in essentially the same dose commitment for a relatively long integration period. Therefore, the comparison of 50-year acute dose conversion factors and 70-year chronic dose conversion factors is essentially only a measure of the additional dose accumulated in the 50 to 70 year period. It was found that for radionuclides with atomic mass less than 200 the percent difference in the 70-year and 50-year dose conversion factors was essentially zero in most cases. Differences of approximately 5 to 50% were obtained for dose conversion factors for most alpha emitters with atomic masses of greater than 200. Comparisons were made on the basis of both organ dose equivalent and effective dose equivalent. The implications and significance of these results are discussed.

  9. 10 CFR 20.1502 - Conditions requiring individual monitoring of external and internal occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... year, from radiation sources external to the body, a deep dose equivalent in excess of 0.1 rem (1 mSv), a lens dose equivalent in excess of 0.15 rem (1.5 mSv), or a shallow dose equivalent to the skin or to the extremities in excess of 0.5 rem (5 mSv); (3) Declared pregnant women likely to receive during...

  10. 10 CFR 20.1502 - Conditions requiring individual monitoring of external and internal occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... year, from radiation sources external to the body, a deep dose equivalent in excess of 0.1 rem (1 mSv), a lens dose equivalent in excess of 0.15 rem (1.5 mSv), or a shallow dose equivalent to the skin or to the extremities in excess of 0.5 rem (5 mSv); (3) Declared pregnant women likely to receive during...

  11. 10 CFR 20.1502 - Conditions requiring individual monitoring of external and internal occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... year, from radiation sources external to the body, a deep dose equivalent in excess of 0.1 rem (1 mSv), a lens dose equivalent in excess of 0.15 rem (1.5 mSv), or a shallow dose equivalent to the skin or to the extremities in excess of 0.5 rem (5 mSv); (3) Declared pregnant women likely to receive during...

  12. 10 CFR 20.1502 - Conditions requiring individual monitoring of external and internal occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... year, from radiation sources external to the body, a deep dose equivalent in excess of 0.1 rem (1 mSv), a lens dose equivalent in excess of 0.15 rem (1.5 mSv), or a shallow dose equivalent to the skin or to the extremities in excess of 0.5 rem (5 mSv); (3) Declared pregnant women likely to receive during...

  13. Aspects of operational radiation protection during dismantling of nuclear facilities relevant for the estimation of internal doses.

    PubMed

    Labarta, T

    2007-01-01

    Operational radiation protection of workers during the dismantling of nuclear facilities is based on the same radiation protection principles as that applied in its exploitation period with the objective of ensuring proper implementation of the as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) principle. These principles are: prior determination of the nature and magnitude of radiological risk; classification of workplaces and workers depending on the risks; implementation of control measures; monitoring of zones and working conditions, including, if necessary, individual monitoring. From the experiences and the lessons learned during the dismantling processes carried out in Spain, several important aspects in the practical implementation of these principles that directly influence and ensure an adequate prevention of exposures and the estimation of internal doses are pointed out, with special emphasis on the estimation of internal doses due to transuranic intakes.

  14. Austrian radiation dose measurements onboard space station mir and the international space station iss - overview and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, T.; Hajek, M.; Summerer, L.; Vana, N.; Akatov, Y.; Shurshakov, V.; Arkhangelsky, V.

    The Atominstitut of the Austrian Universities has conducted various space research missions in the last 12 years in cooperation with the Institute for Biomedical Problems in Moscow. They dealt with the exact determination of the radiation hazards for cosmonauts and the development o precise measurement devices.f Special emphasis will be laid on the last experiment on space station MIR the goal of which was the determination of the depth distribution of absorbed dose and dose equivalent in a water filled phantom. The first results from dose measurements onboard the International Space Station will also be discussed.. The phantom with a diameter of 35 cm was developed at the Institute for Biomedical Problems and had 4 channels where dosemeters can be exposed in different depths. The exp osure period covered the timeframe from May 1997 to February 1999. Thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) were exposed inside the phantom, either parallel or perpendicular to the hull of the spacecraft. For the evaluation of the linear energy transfer (LET), the High Temperature Ratio (HTR) - method was applied. Based on this method a mean quality factor and, subsequently, the dose equivalent is calculated according to the Q(LET ) relationship proposed in ICRP 26. An increased contribution of neutrons could be detected inside the phantom. However the total dose equivalent did not increase over the depth of the phantom. As the first Austrian measurements on the ISS dosemeter packages were exposed for 248 days, starting in February 2001 at six different locations onboard the ISS. The Austrian dosemeter sets for this first exposure on the ISS contained 5 different kinds of passive thermoluminescent dosemeters. First results showed a position dependent absorbed dose rate and LET at the ISS. Dose rates ranged from 180 to 280 μGy/d. The differences in dose measurements onboard the 2 space stations will be discussed.

  15. (Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations): (Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    This task involved use of the code INDOSE-EGS for calculation of S-values for radionuclides of importance in nuclear medicine. This task was proposed to proceed in a logical fashion as outlined below: identification of radionuclides for which more refined dose estimates are required; identification of the target and source combinations for which the previous assumption is clearly invalid; production of a base of data for monoenergetic radiations with sufficient accuracy to be used in dose calculations; calculation of revised dose estimates, i.e., S-values. The extension of this code to include head and neck models, gall bladder models, and kidney models are discussed. 2 refs.

  16. Awareness and knowledge among internal medicine house-staff for dose adjustment of commonly used medications in patients with CKD.

    PubMed

    Surana, Sikander; Kumar, Neeru; Vasudeva, Amita; Shaikh, Gulvahid; Jhaveri, Kenar D; Shah, Hitesh; Malieckal, Deepa; Fogel, Joshua; Sidhu, Gurwinder; Rubinstein, Sofia

    2017-01-17

    Drug dosing errors result in adverse patient outcomes and are more common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). As internists treat the majority of patients with CKD, we study if Internal Medicine house-staff have awareness and knowledge about the correct dosage of commonly used medications for those with CKD. A cross-sectional survey was performed and included 341 participants. The outcomes were the awareness of whether a medication needs dose adjustment in patients with CKD and whether there was knowledge for the level of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) a medication needs to be adjusted. The overall pattern for all post-graduate year (PGY) groups in all medication classes was a lack of awareness and knowledge. For awareness, there were statistically significant increased mean differences for PGY2 and PGY3 as compared to PGY1 for allergy, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and rheumatologic medication classes but not for analgesic, cardiovascular, and neuropsychotropic medication classes. For knowledge, there were statistically significant increased mean differences for PGY2 and PGY3 as compared to PGY1 for allergy, cardiovascular, endocrine, and gastrointestinal, medication classes but not for analgesic, neuropsychotropic, and rheumatologic medication classes. Internal Medicine house-staff across all levels of training demonstrated poor awareness and knowledge for many medication classes in CKD patients. Internal Medicine house-staff should receive more nephrology exposure and formal didactic educational training during residency to better manage complex treatment regimens and prevent medication dosing errors.

  17. 76 FR 53847 - New International Commission on Radiological Protection; Recommendations on the Annual Dose Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... REIRS database (NUREG-0713, ``Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Annual Dose Limit to the Lens of the Eye AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Request...

  18. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W. Sr. )

    1991-05-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system used relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations were performed. Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessels sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No penetration of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was assumed nor was cross fire between the vessel assumed. The results are useful in assessing the dose to blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures.

  19. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G. ); Poston, J.W. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1991-05-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system used relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations were performed. Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessels sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No diffusion of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was assumed nor cross fire between vessel was assumed. Results are useful in assessing the dose in blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Internal dose assessment for 211At α-emitter in isotonic solution as radiopharmaceutical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuminov, O. A.; Fotina, O. V.; Priselkova, A. B.; Tultaev, A. V.; Platonov, S. Yu.; Eremenko, D. O.; Drozdov, V. A.

    2003-12-01

    The functional fitness of the α-emitter 211At for radiotherapy of the thyroid gland cancer is evaluated. Radiation doses are calculated using the MIRD method and previously obtained pharmacokinetic data for 211At in isotonic solution and for 123I as sodium iodide. Analysis of the 211At radiation dose to the thyroid gland suggests that this radiopharmaceutical may be predominantly used for the treatment of the thyroid cancer.

  1. A comparison of simple and realistic eye models for calculation of fluence to dose conversion coefficients in a broad parallel beam incident of protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhaee, Mahmoud; Vejdani-Noghreiyan, Alireza; Ebrahimi-Khankook, Atiyeh

    2015-01-01

    Radiation induced cataract has been demonstrated among people who are exposed to ionizing radiation. To evaluate the deterministic effects of ionizing radiation on the eye lens, several papers dealing with the eye lens dose have been published. ICRP Publication 103 states that the lens of the eye may be more radiosensitive than previously considered. Detailed investigation of the response of the lens showed that there are strong differences in sensitivity to ionizing radiation exposure with respect to cataract induction among the tissues of the lens of the eye. This motivated several groups to look deeper into issue of the dose to a sensitive cell population within the lens, especially for radiations with low energy penetrability that have steep dose gradients inside the lens. Two sophisticated mathematical models of the eye including the inner structure have been designed for the accurate dose estimation in recent years. This study focuses on the calculations of the absorbed doses of different parts of the eye using the stylized models located in UF-ORNL phantom and comparison with the data calculated with the reference computational phantom in a broad parallel beam incident of protons with energies between 20 MeV and 10 GeV. The obtained results indicate that the total lens absorbed doses of reference phantom has good compliance with those of the more sensitive regions of stylized models. However, total eye absorbed dose of these models greatly differ with each other for lower energies.

  2. Doses to internal organs for various breast radiation techniques--implications on the risk of secondary cancers and cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian M; Ravi, Ananth

    2011-01-14

    Breast cancers are more frequently diagnosed at an early stage and currently have improved long term outcomes. Late normal tissue complications induced by adjuvant radiotherapy like secondary cancers or cardiomyopathy must now be avoided at all cost. Several new breast radiotherapy techniques have been developed and this work aims at comparing the scatter doses of internal organs for those techniques. A CT-scan of a typical early stage left breast cancer patient was used to describe a realistic anthropomorphic phantom in the MCNP Monte Carlo code. Dose tally detectors were placed in breasts, the heart, the ipsilateral lung, and the spleen. Five irradiation techniques were simulated: whole breast radiotherapy 50 Gy in 25 fractions using physical wedge or breast IMRT, 3D-CRT partial breast radiotherapy 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions, HDR brachytherapy delivering 34 Gy in 10 treatments, or Permanent Breast 103Pd Seed Implant delivering 90 Gy. For external beam radiotherapy the wedge compensation technique yielded the largest doses to internal organs like the spleen or the heart, respectively 2,300 mSv and 2.7 Gy. Smaller scatter dose are induced using breast IMRT, respectively 810 mSv and 1.1 Gy, or 3D-CRT partial breast irradiation, respectively 130 mSv and 0.7 Gy. Dose to the lung is also smaller for IMRT and 3D-CRT compared to the wedge technique. For multicatheter HDR brachytherapy a large dose is delivered to the heart, 3.6 Gy, the spleen receives 1,171 mSv and the lung receives 2,471 mSv. These values are 44% higher in case of a balloon catheter. In contrast, breast seeds implant is associated with low dose to most internal organs. The present data support the use of breast IMRT or virtual wedge technique instead of physical wedges for whole breast radiotherapy. Regarding partial breast irradiation techniques, low energy source brachytherapy and external beam 3D-CRT appear safer than 192Ir HDR techniques.

  3. [Spatial distribution of local absorbed doses inside the Russian segment of the International Space Station].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, V A; Mitrikas, V G; Tsetlin, V V

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the procedure of operational radiation safety monitoring with the use of portable Pille-MKS dosimeters, presents the results of ISS dose measurements from September 22, 2003 (after Pille deployment on board the ISS) to March 16, 2011 (completion of the ISS-25 mission). The necessity of continuous dynamic tracking of the radiation environment in ISS compartments arises from the character and uniqueness of space ionizing radiation effects on crew. Radiation loading in the ISS compartments was analyzed and results of using different dosimeters were compared. Experimental radiation studies of the ISS piloted compartments are needed for reliable prediction of doses for the crew that still defy precise estimation.

  4. Dose verification of intensity-modulated arc therapy using an ERGO++ treatment planning system and Elekta internal multileaf collimators for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Yoda, K; Nakagawa, K; Shiraishi, K; Okano, Y; Ohtomo, K; Pellegrini, R G

    2009-04-01

    Dose verification of intensity-modulated arc therapy using an ERGO++ treatment planning system and Elekta internal multileaf collimators is described. Prostate intensity-modulated arc therapy was planned using the arc modulation optimization algorithm inverse planning module of ERGO++. After transferring the plan to Elekta Synergy's controller (Elekta Ltd, Crawley, UK), the isocentre dose was measured and compared with a calculated dose using a pinpoint chamber and a water phantom in a cylindrical acrylic enclosure. Subsequently, an EDR2 film was placed inside a multilayer plastic phantom, and total dose distributions were measured in three axial planes as well as in the coronal and sagittal planes to compare the actual dose with the calculated dose. The dose discrepancy at the isocentre was 1.7%. The calculated gamma indices were less than 1 over 90% of the three axial planes, as well as in the coronal and sagittal planes, having a dose greater than 50% of the maximum target dose.

  5. Modeling of occupational exposure to accidentally released manufactured nanomaterials in a production facility and calculation of internal doses by inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Moralejo, Celina; Jaén, María; Lopez De Ipiña Peña, Jesús; Neofytou, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to manufactured nanomaterials (MNMs) and its potential health impacts are of scientific and practical interest, as previous epidemiological studies associate exposure to nanoparticles with health effects, including increased morbidity of the respiratory and the circulatory system. Objectives To estimate the occupational exposure and effective internal doses in a real production facility of TiO2 MNMs during hypothetical scenarios of accidental release. Methods Commercial software for geometry and mesh generation, as well as fluid flow and particle dispersion calculation, were used to estimate occupational exposure to MNMs. The results were introduced to in-house software to calculate internal doses in the human respiratory tract by inhalation. Results Depending on the accidental scenario, different areas of the production facility were affected by the released MNMs, with a higher dose exposure among individuals closer to the particles source. Conclusions Granted that the study of the accidental release of particles can only be performed by chance, this numerical approach provides valuable information regarding occupational exposure and contributes to better protection of personnel. The methodology can be used to identify occupational settings where the exposure to MNMs would be high during accidents, providing insight to health and safety officials. PMID:27670588

  6. Non-Linear Dose-Response Relationships in Biology, Toxicology and Medicine - An International Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Edward J.; Kostecki, Paul T.

    2002-05-28

    Conference abstract book contains seven sections: Plenary-4 abstracts; Chemical-9 abstracts; Radiation-7 abstracts; Ultra Low Doses and Medicine-6 abstracts; Biomedical-11 abstracts; Risk Assessment-5 abstracts and Poster Sessions-25 abstracts. Each abstract was provided by the author/presenter participating in the conference.

  7. 10 CFR 20.1202 - Compliance with requirements for summation of external and internal doses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... section. (Note: The dose equivalents for the lens of the eye, the skin, and the extremities are not... it in demonstrating compliance with the limits. (d) Intake through wounds or absorption through skin. The licensee shall evaluate and, to the extent practical, account for intakes through wounds or...

  8. Linking Different Exposure Patterns to Internal Lung Dose for Heterogeneous Ambient Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter (PM) in the ambient air is a complex mixture of particles with different sizes and chemical compositions. Because potential health effects are known to be different for different size particles, specific dose of size-fractionated PM under realistic exposure con...

  9. Linking Different Exposure Patterns to Internal Lung Dose for Heterogeneous Ambient Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter (PM) in the ambient air is a complex mixture of particles with different sizes and chemical compositions. Because potential health effects are known to be different for different size particles, specific dose of size-fractionated PM under realistic exposure con...

  10. EXPOSURES AND INTERNAL DOSES OF TRIHALOMETHANES IN HUMANS: MULTI-ROUTE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM DRINKING WATER (FINAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) has released a final report that presents and applies a method to estimate distributions of internal concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) in humans resulting from a residential drinking water exposure. The report presen...

  11. Comparison of Nine Statistical Model Based Warfarin Pharmacogenetic Dosing Algorithms Using the Racially Diverse International Warfarin Pharmacogenetic Consortium Cohort Database.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Li, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Multiple linear regression (MLR) and machine learning techniques in pharmacogenetic algorithm-based warfarin dosing have been reported. However, performances of these algorithms in racially diverse group have never been objectively evaluated and compared. In this literature-based study, we compared the performances of eight machine learning techniques with those of MLR in a large, racially-diverse cohort. MLR, artificial neural network (ANN), regression tree (RT), multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), boosted regression tree (BRT), support vector regression (SVR), random forest regression (RFR), lasso regression (LAR) and Bayesian additive regression trees (BART) were applied in warfarin dose algorithms in a cohort from the International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium database. Covariates obtained by stepwise regression from 80% of randomly selected patients were used to develop algorithms. To compare the performances of these algorithms, the mean percentage of patients whose predicted dose fell within 20% of the actual dose (mean percentage within 20%) and the mean absolute error (MAE) were calculated in the remaining 20% of patients. The performances of these techniques in different races, as well as the dose ranges of therapeutic warfarin were compared. Robust results were obtained after 100 rounds of resampling. BART, MARS and SVR were statistically indistinguishable and significantly out performed all the other approaches in the whole cohort (MAE: 8.84-8.96 mg/week, mean percentage within 20%: 45.88%-46.35%). In the White population, MARS and BART showed higher mean percentage within 20% and lower mean MAE than those of MLR (all p values < 0.05). In the Asian population, SVR, BART, MARS and LAR performed the same as MLR. MLR and LAR optimally performed among the Black population. When patients were grouped in terms of warfarin dose range, all machine learning techniques except ANN and LAR showed significantly higher mean percentage within 20

  12. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma using a sitting and standing female adult voxel simulators exposure to photons in antero-posterior irradiation geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcante, F. R.; Galeano, D. C.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    Due to the difficulty in implementing invasive techniques for calculations of dose for some exposure scenarios, computational simulators have been created to represent as realistically as possible the structures of the human body and through radiation transport simulations to obtain conversion coefficients (CCs) to estimate dose. In most published papers simulators are implemented in the standing posture and this may not describe a real scenario of exposure. In this work we developed exposure scenarios in the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code using a female simulator in standing and sitting postures. The simulator was irradiated in the antero-posterior (AP) geometry by a plane source of monoenergetic photons with energy from 10 keV to 2 MeV. The conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (HT/Kair) were calculated for both scenarios and compared. The results show that the percentage difference of CCs for the organs of the head and thorax was not significant (less than 5%) since the anatomic position of the organs is the same in both postures. The percentage difference is more significant to the ovaries (71% for photon energy of 20 keV), to the bladder (39% at 60 keV) and to the uterus (37% at 100 keV) due to different processes of radiation interactions in the legs of the simulator when its posture is changed. For organs and tissues that are distributed throughout the entire body, such as bone (21% at 100 keV) and muscle (30% at 80 keV) the percentage difference of CCs reflects a reduction of interaction of photons with the legs of the simulator. Therefore, the calculation of conversion coefficients using simulators in the sitting posture is relevant for a more accurate dose estimation in real exposures to radiation.

  13. Measurements of the neutron dose and energy spectrum on the International Space Station during expeditions ISS-16 to ISS-21.

    PubMed

    Smith, M B; Akatov, Yu; Andrews, H R; Arkhangelsky, V; Chernykh, I V; Ing, H; Khoshooniy, N; Lewis, B J; Machrafi, R; Nikolaev, I; Romanenko, R Y; Shurshakov, V; Thirsk, R B; Tomi, L

    2013-01-01

    As part of the international Matroshka-R and Radi-N experiments, bubble detectors have been used on board the ISS in order to characterise the neutron dose and the energy spectrum of neutrons. Experiments using bubble dosemeters inside a tissue-equivalent phantom were performed during the ISS-16, ISS-18 and ISS-19 expeditions. During the ISS-20 and ISS-21 missions, the bubble dosemeters were supplemented by a bubble-detector spectrometer, a set of six detectors that was used to determine the neutron energy spectrum at various locations inside the ISS. The temperature-compensated spectrometer set used is the first to be developed specifically for space applications and its development is described in this paper. Results of the dose measurements indicate that the dose received at two different depths inside the phantom is not significantly different, suggesting that bubble detectors worn by a person provide an accurate reading of the dose received inside the body. The energy spectra measured using the spectrometer are in good agreement with previous measurements and do not show a strong dependence on the precise location inside the station. To aid the understanding of the bubble-detector response to charged particles in the space environment, calculations have been performed using a Monte-Carlo code, together with data collected on the ISS. These calculations indicate that charged particles contribute <2% to the bubble count on the ISS, and can therefore be considered as negligible for bubble-detector measurements in space.

  14. Internal radiation exposure dose in Iwaki city, Fukushima prefecture after the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Nukui, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Naoko; Kudo, Takashi; Matsuda, Naoki; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Takamura, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) on 11 March 2011, a huge amount of radionuclides, including radiocesium, was released and spread over a wide area of eastern Japan. Although three years have passed since the accident, residents around the FNPP are anxious about internal radiation exposure due to radiocesium. In this study, we screened internal radiation exposure doses in Iwaki city of Fukushima prefecture, using a whole-body counter. The first screening was conducted from October 2012 to February 2013, and the second screening was conducted from May to November 2013. Study participants were employees of ALPINE and their families who underwent examination. A total of 2,839 participants (1,366 men and 1,473 women, 1-86 years old) underwent the first screening, and 2,092 (1,022 men and 1,070 women, 1-86 years old) underwent the second screening. The results showed that 99% of subjects registered below 300 Bq per body in the first screening, and all subjects registered below 300 Bq per body in the second screening. The committed effective dose ranged from 0.01-0.06 mSv in the first screening and 0.01-0.02 mSv in the second screening. Long-term follow-up studies are needed to avoid unnecessary chronic internal exposure and to reduce anxiety among the residents by communicating radiation health risks.

  15. Internal Radiation Exposure Dose in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture after the Accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Makiko; Hayashida, Naomi; Nukui, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Naoko; Kudo, Takashi; Matsuda, Naoki; Fukushima, Yoshiko; Takamura, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) on 11 March 2011, a huge amount of radionuclides, including radiocesium, was released and spread over a wide area of eastern Japan. Although three years have passed since the accident, residents around the FNPP are anxious about internal radiation exposure due to radiocesium. In this study, we screened internal radiation exposure doses in Iwaki city of Fukushima prefecture, using a whole-body counter. The first screening was conducted from October 2012 to February 2013, and the second screening was conducted from May to November 2013. Study participants were employees of ALPINE and their families who underwent examination. A total of 2,839 participants (1,366 men and 1,473 women, 1–86 years old) underwent the first screening, and 2,092 (1,022 men and 1,070 women, 1–86 years old) underwent the second screening. The results showed that 99% of subjects registered below 300 Bq per body in the first screening, and all subjects registered below 300 Bq per body in the second screening. The committed effective dose ranged from 0.01–0.06 mSv in the first screening and 0.01–0.02 mSv in the second screening. Long-term follow-up studies are needed to avoid unnecessary chronic internal exposure and to reduce anxiety among the residents by communicating radiation health risks. PMID:25478794

  16. [Low-dose rate brachytherapy with locally integrated beta emitters after internal urethrotomy. A pilot project using an animal model].

    PubMed

    Weidlich, P; Adam, C; Sroka, R; Lanzl, I; Assmann, W; Stief, C

    2007-09-01

    The treatment of urethral strictures represents an unsolved urological problem. The effect of a (32)P-coated urethral catheter in the sense of low-dose rate brachytherapy to modulate wound healing will be analyzed in an animal experiment. Unfortunately it is not possible to present any results because this is being studied for the first time and there are no experiences with low-dose rate brachytherapy and this form of application in the lower urinary tract. Furthermore the animal experiment will only start in the near future. Both decade-long experiences with radiotherapy to treat benign diseases and our own results of previous studies in otolaryngology and ophthalmology let us expect a significantly lower formation of urethral strictures after internal urethrotomy. This study will contribute to improving the treatment of urethral strictures as demanded in previous papers.

  17. Calculation of internal dose from ingested soil-derived uranium in humans: Application of a new method.

    PubMed

    Träber, S C; Li, W B; Höllriegl, V; Nebelung, K; Michalke, B; Rühm, W; Oeh, U

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the internal dose in humans after the ingestion of soil highly contaminated with uranium. Therefore, an in vitro solubility assay was performed to estimate the bioaccessibility of uranium for two types of soil. Based on the results, the corresponding bioavailabilities were assessed by using a recently published method. Finally, these bioavailability data were used together with the biokinetic model of uranium to assess the internal doses for a hypothetical but realistic scenario characterized by a daily ingestion of 10 mg of soil over 1 year. The investigated soil samples were from two former uranium mining sites of Germany with (238)U concentrations of about 460 and 550 mg/kg. For these soils, the bioavailabilities of (238)U were quantified as 0.18 and 0.28 % (geometric mean) with 2.5th percentiles of 0.02 and 0.03 % and 97.5th percentiles of 1.48 and 2.34 %, respectively. The corresponding calculated annual committed effective doses for the assumed scenario were 0.4 and 0.6 µSv (GM) with 2.5th percentiles of 0.2 and 0.3 µSv and 97.5th percentiles of 1.6 and 3.0 µSv, respectively. These annual committed effective doses are similar to those from natural uranium intake by food and drinking water, which is estimated to be 0.5 µSv. Based on the present experimental data and the selected ingestion scenario, the investigated soils-although highly contaminated with uranium-are not expected to pose any major health risk to humans related to radiation.

  18. Comparison of conversion coefficients for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma for photons using a male adult voxel simulator in sitting and standing posture with geometry of irradiation antero-posterior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, D. C.; Cavalcante, F. R.; Carvalho, A. B.; Hunt, J.

    2014-02-01

    The dose conversion coefficient (DCC) is important to quantify and assess effective doses associated with medical, professional and public exposures. The calculation of DCCs using anthropomorphic simulators and radiation transport codes is justified since in-vivo measurement of effective dose is extremely difficult and not practical for occupational dosimetry. DCCs have been published by the ICRP using simulators in a standing posture, which is not always applicable to all exposure scenarios, providing an inaccurate dose estimation. The aim of this work was to calculate DCCs for equivalent dose in terms of air kerma (H/Kair) using the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code and the VOXTISS8 adult male voxel simulator in sitting and standing postures. In both postures, the simulator was irradiated by a plane source of monoenergetic photons in antero-posterior (AP) geometry. The photon energy ranged from 15 keV to 2 MeV. The DCCs for both postures were compared and the DCCs for the standing simulator were higher. For certain organs, the difference of DCCs were more significant, as in gonads (48% higher), bladder (16% higher) and colon (11% higher). As these organs are positioned in the abdominal region, the posture of the anthropomorphic simulator modifies the form in which the radiation is transported and how the energy is deposited. It was also noted that the average percentage difference of conversion coefficients was 33% for the bone marrow, 11% for the skin, 13% for the bone surface and 31% for the muscle. For other organs, the percentage difference of the DCCs for both postures was not relevant (less than 5%) due to no anatomical changes in the organs of the head, chest and upper abdomen. We can conclude that is important to obtain DCCs using different postures from those present in the scientific literature.

  19. Fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients for use in radiological protection of embryo and foetus against external exposure to electrons from 10 MeV TO 10 GeV.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing

    2008-04-01

    Electrons as primary and more often as secondary radiation exist commonly in the environment and workplaces. No conversion coefficients are yet available, in the literature, for use in radiological protection of embryo and foetus against external exposure to electrons. This study uses mathematical models developed by the Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, for the embryo of 8 wk and for the foetus of 3, 6, and 9 mo. Monte Carlo code MCNPX is used to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and foetus when the mother is exposed to external electron fields. Monoenergetic electrons ranging from 10 MeV to 10 GeV were considered. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT), isotropic (ISO), and top-down (TOP). At each of these irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the foetal brain and body were calculated for the embryo of 8 wk and the foetus of 3, 6, and 9 mo. Electron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients were derived for the four prenatal ages.

  20. Image gently, step lightly: increasing radiation dose awareness in pediatric interventions through an international social marketing campaign.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Manrita K; Goske, Marilyn J; Coley, Brian J; Connolly, Bairbre; Racadio, John; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Utley, Tara; Strauss, Keith J

    2009-09-01

    In the past several decades, advances in imaging and interventional techniques have been accompanied by an increase in medical radiation dose to the public. Radiation exposure is even more important in children, who are more sensitive to radiation and have a longer lifespan during which effects may manifest. To address radiation safety in pediatric computed tomography, in 2008 the Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging launched an international social marketing campaign entitled Image Gently. This article describes the next phase of the Image Gently campaign, entitled Step Lightly, which focuses on radiation safety in pediatric interventional radiology.

  1. High-Dose Daptomycin Therapy for Left-Sided Infective Endocarditis: a Prospective Study from the International Collaboration on Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Arnold S.; Miró, Josè M.; Park, Lawrence P.; Guimarães, Armenio C.; Skoutelis, Athanasios; Fortes, Claudio Q.; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Hannan, Margaret M.; Nacinovich, Francisco; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Grossi, Paolo; Tan, Ru-San; Holland, Thomas; Fowler, Vance G.; Corey, Ralph G.; Chu, Vivian H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of daptomycin in Gram-positive left-sided infective endocarditis (IE) has significantly increased. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of high-dose daptomycin on the outcome of left-sided IE due to Gram-positive pathogens. This was a prospective cohort study based on 1,112 cases from the International Collaboration on Endocarditis (ICE)-Plus database and the ICE-Daptomycin Substudy database from 2008 to 2010. Among patients with left-sided IE due to Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, and Enterococcus faecalis, we compared those treated with daptomycin (cohort A) to those treated with standard-of-care (SOC) antibiotics (cohort B). The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Time to clearance of bacteremia, 6-month mortality, and adverse events (AEs) ascribable to daptomycin were also assessed. There were 29 and 149 patients included in cohort A and cohort B, respectively. Baseline comorbidities did not differ between the two cohorts, except for a significantly higher prevalence of diabetes and previous episodes of IE among patients treated with daptomycin. The median daptomycin dose was 9.2 mg/kg of body weight/day. Two-thirds of the patients treated with daptomycin had failed a previous antibiotic regimen. In-hospital and 6-month mortalities were similar in the two cohorts. In cohort A, median time to clearance of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteremia was 1.0 day, irrespective of daptomycin dose, representing a significantly faster bacteremia clearance compared to SOC (1.0 versus 5.0 days; P < 0.01). Regimens with higher daptomycin doses were not associated with increased incidence of AEs. In conclusion, higher-dose daptomycin may be an effective and safe alternative to SOC in the treatment of left-sided IE due to common Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:24080644

  2. Calculation of conversion coefficients for air kerma to ambient dose equivalent using transmitted spectra of megavoltage X-rays through concrete.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, T P V; Silva, A X

    2012-12-01

    With the fast advancement of technology, (60)Co teletherapy units are largely being replaced with medical linear accelerators. In most cases, the linear accelerator tends to be installed in the same room in which the (60)Co teletherapy unit was previously placed. If in-depth structural remodelling is out of the question, high-density concrete is usually used to improve shielding against primary, scatter and leakage radiation originating in the new equipment. This work presents a study based on Monte Carlo simulations of the transmission of some clinical photon spectra (from 6, 10, 15, 18 and 25 MV accelerators) through concrete, considering two different densities. Concrete walls with thickness ranging from 0.70 to 2.0 m were irradiated with 30 cm×30 cm primary beam spectra. The results show that the thickness of the barrier decreases up to ∼65 % when barite (high-density concrete) is used instead of ordinary concrete. The average energies of primary and transmitted beam spectra were also calculated. In addition, conversion coefficients from air kerma to ambient dose equivalent, H*(d)/K(air), and air kerma to effective dose, E/K(air), for photon spectra from the transmitted spectra were calculated and compared. The results suggest that the 10-mm depth is not the best choice to represent the effective dose.

  3. A method for calculating Bayesian uncertainties on internal doses resulting from complex occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Puncher, M; Birchall, A; Bull, R K

    2012-08-01

    Estimating uncertainties on doses from bioassay data is of interest in epidemiology studies that estimate cancer risk from occupational exposures to radionuclides. Bayesian methods provide a logical framework to calculate these uncertainties. However, occupational exposures often consist of many intakes, and this can make the Bayesian calculation computationally intractable. This paper describes a novel strategy for increasing the computational speed of the calculation by simplifying the intake pattern to a single composite intake, termed as complex intake regime (CIR). In order to assess whether this approximation is accurate and fast enough for practical purposes, the method is implemented by the Weighted Likelihood Monte Carlo Sampling (WeLMoS) method and evaluated by comparing its performance with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The MCMC method gives the full solution (all intakes are independent), but is very computationally intensive to apply routinely. Posterior distributions of model parameter values, intakes and doses are calculated for a representative sample of plutonium workers from the United Kingdom Atomic Energy cohort using the WeLMoS method with the CIR and the MCMC method. The distributions are in good agreement: posterior means and Q(0.025) and Q(0.975) quantiles are typically within 20 %. Furthermore, the WeLMoS method using the CIR converges quickly: a typical case history takes around 10-20 min on a fast workstation, whereas the MCMC method took around 12-72 hr. The advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed.

  4. Internal dosimetry - a review.

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus

    2004-06-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  5. Internal dosimetry: a review.

    PubMed

    Potter, Charles A

    2005-06-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  6. Effect of the reduction of skin contamination on the internal dose of creosote workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Van Rooij, J G; Van Lieshout, E M; Bodelier-Bade, M M; Jongeneelen, F J

    1993-06-01

    Ten creosote-exposed workers of a wood impregnation plant participated in this study, which took place in two consecutive weeks on a Monday, after a weekend off. On one of the two days each worker wore Tyvek coveralls underneath his normal workclothes. Dermal contamination measurements (pyrene on exposure pads) and biological monitoring (urinary 1-OH-pyrene) were performed to measure the reduction of both the skin contamination and the internal dose. The total pyrene skin contamination of workers not wearing coveralls ranged between 47 and 1510 micrograms.d-1 (0.2-7.5 mumol.d-1). On the average, the coveralls reduced the pyrene contamination on the workers' skin by about 35 (SD 63)%. The excreted amount of 1-OH-pyrene in urine decreased significantly from 6.6 to 3.2 micrograms (30.2 to 14.7 nmol). Multiple regression analysis showed that skin contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is the main determinant of the internal exposure dose of creosote workers.

  7. Use of in vivo counting measurements to estimate internal doses from (241)Am in workers from the Mayak production association.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Alexandra B; Suslova, Klara G; Efimov, Alexander V; Miller, Scott C

    2014-08-01

    Comparisons between results of in vivo counting measurements of americium burden and results from radiochemical analyses of organ samples taken at autopsy of 11 cases of former Mayak workers were made. The in vivo counting measurements were performed 3-8 y before death. The best agreement between in vivo counting measurements for americium and autopsy data was observed for the skull. For lungs and liver, the ratios of burden measured by in vivo counting to those obtained from radiochemical analyses data ranged from 0.7-3.8, while those for the skull were from 1.0-1.1. There was a good correlation between the estimates of americium burden in the entire skeleton obtained from in vivo counting with those obtained from autopsy data. Specifically, the skeletal burden ratio, in vivo counting/autopsy, averaged 0.9 ± 0.1. The prior human americium model, D-Am2010, used in vivo counting measurements for americium in the skeleton to estimate the contents of americium and plutonium at death. The results using this model indicate that in vivo counting measurements of the skull can be used to estimate internal doses from americium in the Mayak workers. Additionally, these measurements may also be used to provide a qualitative assessment of internal doses from plutonium.

  8. Modern radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma: field and dose guidelines from the international lymphoma radiation oncology group (ILROG).

    PubMed

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis S; Eich, Hans Theodor; Girinsky, Theodore; Hoppe, Richard T; Mauch, Peter; Mikhaeel, N George; Ng, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced volumes and doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. The previously applied extended field (EF) and original involved field (IF) techniques, which treated larger volumes based on nodal stations, have now been replaced by the use of limited volumes, based solely on detectable nodal (and extranodal extension) involvement at presentation, using contrast-enhanced computed tomography, positron emission tomography/computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or a combination of these techniques. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented when their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control. The highly conformal involved node radiation therapy (INRT), recently introduced for patients for whom optimal imaging is available, is explained. A new concept, involved site radiation therapy (ISRT), is introduced as the standard conformal therapy for the scenario, commonly encountered, wherein optimal imaging is not available. There is increasing evidence that RT doses used in the past are higher than necessary for disease control in this era of combined modality therapy. The use of INRT and of lower doses in early-stage HL is supported by available data. Although the

  9. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis S.; Eich, Hans Theodor; Girinsky, Theodore; Hoppe, Richard T.; Mauch, Peter; Mikhaeel, N. George; Ng, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced volumes and doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. The previously applied extended field (EF) and original involved field (IF) techniques, which treated larger volumes based on nodal stations, have now been replaced by the use of limited volumes, based solely on detectable nodal (and extranodal extension) involvement at presentation, using contrast-enhanced computed tomography, positron emission tomography/computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or a combination of these techniques. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented when their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control. The highly conformal involved node radiation therapy (INRT), recently introduced for patients for whom optimal imaging is available, is explained. A new concept, involved site radiation therapy (ISRT), is introduced as the standard conformal therapy for the scenario, commonly encountered, wherein optimal imaging is not available. There is increasing evidence that RT doses used in the past are higher than necessary for disease control in this era of combined modality therapy. The use of INRT and of lower doses in early-stage HL is supported by available data. Although the

  10. A revised model of the kidney for medical internal radiation dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Presently, there is a need for a revised model for the kidneys which clearly distinguishes major regions and structures in the kidneys. This model is needed since radionuclides used currently in nuclear medicine have marked preferences for various regions of the kidneys, and the radiation dose to one or more of these regions is of primary importance. At this time the kidneys are modeled as solid organs of uniform density by the ALGAM computer code, which uses Monte Carlo techniques to calculate absorbed fractions. This presentation will introduce a model in which the source regions will be the cortex, medulla and the papillae, while the target regions will be these regions as well as the other organs of the body. This research presents for the first time estimates of the specific absorbed fractions in various organs of the body from a source in the specific region of the kidneys. 17 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Progress report, August 1993--January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, S.M.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1994-03-01

    This project, ``Use of International Data Sets to Evaluate and Validate Pathway Assessment Models Applicable to Exposure and Dose Reconstruction at DOE Facilities,`` grew out of several activities being conducted by the Principal Investigator Dr. F Owen Hoffman. One activity was originally part of the Chernobyl Studies Project and began as Task 7.1D, ``Internal Dose From Direct Contamination of Terrestrial Food Sources.`` The objective of Task 7.1D was to (1) establish a collaborative US USSR effort to improve and validate our methods of forecasting doses and dose commitments from the direct contamination of food sources, and (2) perform experiments and validation studies to improve our ability to predict rapidly and accurately the long-term internal dose from the contamination of agricultural soil. The latter was to include the consideration of remedial measures to block contamination of food grown on contaminated soil. The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates the activity of Task 7.1D into a multinational effort to evaluate data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two multinational studies, BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (VAlidation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains.

  12. An international model validation exercise on radionuclide transfer and doses to freshwater biota.

    SciTech Connect

    Yankovich, T. L.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Vives-Lynch, S.; Beresford, N. A.; Barnett, C. L.; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Brown, J. E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Copplestone, D.; Heling, R.; Hosseini, A.; Howard, B. J.; Kamboj, S.; Kryshev, A. I.; Nedveckaite, T.; Smith, J. T.; Wood, M. D.; Environmental Science Division; AREVA Resources; Environmental Science, Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd.; Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; IRSN; Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority; The Environment Agency; Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group; Univ. of Liverpool; School of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Inst. of Physics, Lithuania; State Enterprise Scientific Production Association

    2010-06-09

    Under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)'s EMRAS (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) program, activity concentrations of {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 3}H in Perch Lake at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories site were predicted, in freshwater primary producers, invertebrates, fishes, herpetofauna and mammals using eleven modelling approaches. Comparison of predicted radionuclide concentrations in the different species types with measured values highlighted a number of areas where additional work and understanding is required to improve the predictions of radionuclide transfer. For some species, the differences could be explained by ecological factors such as trophic level or the influence of stable analogues. Model predictions were relatively poor for mammalian species and herpetofauna compared with measured values, partly due to a lack of relevant data. In addition, concentration ratios are sometimes under-predicted when derived from experiments performed under controlled laboratory conditions representative of conditions in other water bodies.

  13. An international model validation exercise on radionuclide transfer and doses to freshwater biota.

    PubMed

    Yankovich, T L; Vives i Batlle, J; Vives-Lynch, S; Beresford, N A; Barnett, C L; Beaugelin-Seiller, K; Brown, J E; Cheng, J-J; Copplestone, D; Heling, R; Hosseini, A; Howard, B J; Kamboj, S; Kryshev, A I; Nedveckaite, T; Smith, J T; Wood, M D

    2010-06-01

    Under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)'s EMRAS (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) programme, activity concentrations of (60)Co, (90)Sr, (137)Cs and (3)H in Perch Lake at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Chalk River Laboratories site were predicted, in freshwater primary producers, invertebrates, fishes, herpetofauna and mammals using eleven modelling approaches. Comparison of predicted radionuclide concentrations in the different species types with measured values highlighted a number of areas where additional work and understanding is required to improve the predictions of radionuclide transfer. For some species, the differences could be explained by ecological factors such as trophic level or the influence of stable analogues. Model predictions were relatively poor for mammalian species and herpetofauna compared with measured values, partly due to a lack of relevant data. In addition, concentration ratios are sometimes under-predicted when derived from experiments performed under controlled laboratory conditions representative of conditions in other water bodies.

  14. Improvement of the measuring equipment used in the assessment of internal doses in emergency situations.

    PubMed

    Muikku, M; Rahola, T

    2007-01-01

    Emergency response plans have long been focused on accidents at nuclear power plants. Recently, the malevolent use of radiation aimed at creating disruption in the society has been considered as a possible threat. In this kind of emergency situations casualties will most likely be members of the public and the number of affected people can vary from a few to mass casualties. There is an evident need for rapid measurements of large groups of internally contaminated people. Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) in Finland has obtained new monitors for thyroid and simple whole-body measurements in field conditions as a part of the continuous improving of emergency preparedness. The new monitors consist of a NaI(Tl) detector and a control unit. The monitors work as spectrometers allowing real-time spectrum analysis in the field.

  15. Polonium in size fractionated mainstream cigarette smoke, predicted deposition and associated internal radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, M; Sahu, S K; Bhangare, R C; Pandit, G G

    2016-10-01

    In this study, size fractionated mass and (210)Po activity concentrations in mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) were monitored for three popular cigarette brands. Size segregated collection of MCS was carried out using a cascade type impactor, while mass and (210)Po activity concentration were analyzed gravimetrically and alpha spectrometry (following the radiochemical separation) respectively. Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry (MPPD V2.11) model is used for prediction of deposition fraction calculations for the MCS deposition in different compartment of human respiratory tract. The activity concentration of (210)Po is founds 10.56 ± 2.46 mBq per cigarette for the tested cigarette brands. (210)Po size distribution indicates most of this associates with fine fraction (Dp < 2.23 μm) of cigarette smoke. The committed annual effective dose to smokers (smoking on an average 20 cigarette a day), considering the (210)Po and (210)Pb concentrations (assuming it is in secular equilibrium with (210)Po) in MCS, was estimated between 0.22 and 0.40 mSv, with mean value of 0.30 mSv for tested cigarette brands. Considering the risk factor of fatal cancer due to radiation exposure of lung (exposure time of 30 years); the average collective estimated fatal cancer risk is estimated as 1.5 × 10(-4) due to (210)Po and (210)Pb exposure to smokers. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Benzene risk estimation using radiation equivalent coefficients.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Aki; Isono, Tomomi; Kikuchi, Takuro; Ohnishi, Iichiro; Igarashi, Junichiro; Yoneda, Minoru; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2009-03-01

    We estimated benzene risk using a novel framework of risk assessment that employed the measurement of radiation dose equivalents to benzene metabolites and a PBPK model. The highest risks for 1 microg/m(3) and 3.2 mg/m(3) life time exposure of benzene estimated with a linear regression were 5.4 x 10(-7) and 1.3 x 10(-3), respectively. Even though these estimates were based on in vitro chromosome aberration test data, they were about one-sixth to one-fourteenth that from other studies and represent a fairly good estimate by using radiation equivalent coefficient as an "internal standard."

  17. Telemedicine-guided, very low-dose international normalized ratio self-control in patients with mechanical heart valve implants.

    PubMed

    Koertke, Heinrich; Zittermann, Armin; Wagner, Otto; Secer, Songuel; Sciangula, Alfonso; Saggau, Werner; Sack, Falk-Udo; Ennker, Jürgen; Cremer, Jochen; Musumeci, Francesco; Gummert, Jan F

    2015-06-01

    To study in patients performing international normalized ratio (INR) self-control the efficacy and safety of an INR target range of 1.6-2.1 for aortic valve replacement (AVR) and 2.0-2.5 for mitral valve replacement (MVR) or double valve replacement (DVR). In total, 1304 patients undergoing AVR, 189 undergoing MVR and 78 undergoing DVR were randomly assigned to low-dose INR self-control (LOW group) (INR target range, AVR: 1.8-2.8; MVR/DVR: 2.5-3.5) or very low-dose INR self-control once a week (VLO group) and twice a week (VLT group) (INR target range, AVR: 1.6-2.1; MVR/DVR: 2.0-2.5), with electronically guided transfer of INR values. We compared grade III complications (major bleeding and thrombotic events; primary end-points) and overall mortality (secondary end-point) across the three treatment groups. Two-year freedom from bleedings in the LOW, VLO, and VLT groups was 96.3, 98.6, and 99.1%, respectively (P = 0.008). The corresponding values for thrombotic events were 99.0, 99.8, and 98.9%, respectively (P = 0.258). The risk-adjusted composite of grade III complications was in the per-protocol population (reference: LOW-dose group) as follows: hazard ratio = 0.307 (95% CI: 0.102-0.926; P = 0.036) for the VLO group and = 0.241 (95% CI: 0.070-0.836; P = 0.025) for the VLT group. The corresponding values of 2-year mortality were = 1.685 (95% CI: 0.473-5.996; P = 0.421) for the VLO group and = 4.70 (95% CI: 1.62-13.60; P = 0.004) for the VLT group. Telemedicine-guided very low-dose INR self-control is comparable with low-dose INR in thrombotic risk, and is superior in bleeding risk. Weekly testing is sufficient. Given the small number of MVR and DVR patients, results are only valid for AVR patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. An adaptable internal dose model for risk assessment of dietary and soil dioxin exposures in young children.

    PubMed

    Kerger, Brent D; Leung, Hon-Wing; Scott, Paul K; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2007-11-01

    An adaptable model is presented for assessing the blood lipid concentrations of polychlorodibenzodioxins and polychlorodibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from dietary (breast milk, formula, milk, and other foods) and soil pathway exposures (soil ingestion and dermal contact) utilizing age-specific exposure and intake estimates for young children. The approach includes a simple one-compartment (adipose volume) toxicokinetic model that incorporates empirical data on age-dependent half-lives and bioavailability of PCDD/F congeners, child body size and intake rates, and recent data on breast milk and food dioxin levels. Users can enter site-specific soil concentration data on 2,3,7,8-chlorinated PCDD/F congeners for specific assessment of body burden changes from soil pathways in combination with background dietary exposures from birth through age 7 years. The model produces a profile of the estimated PCDD/F concentration in blood lipid (in World Health Organization 1998 dioxin toxic equivalents) versus time for a child from birth through age 7 years. The peak and time-weighted average (TWA) internal dose (defined as blood lipid dioxin toxic equivalents) for a variety of specific child exposure assumptions can then be compared to safe internal dose benchmarks for risk assessment purposes, similar to an approach taken by United States Environmental Protection Agency for assessing child lead exposures. We conclude that this adaptable toxicokinetic model can provide a more comprehensive assessment of potential health risks of PCDD/Fs to children because it integrates recent empirical findings on PCDD/F kinetics in humans and allows users to assess contributions from varied dietary and site-specific environmental exposure assumptions.

  19. DOSIS & DOSIS 3D: long-term dose monitoring onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Matthiä, Daniel; Reitz, Günther; Burmeister, Sönke; Labrenz, Johannes; Bilski, Pawel; Horwacik, Tomasz; Twardak, Anna; Hajek, Michael; Fugger, Manfred; Hofstätter, Christina; Sihver, Lembit; Palfalvi, Jozsef K.; Szabo, Julianna; Stradi, Andrea; Ambrozova, Iva; Kubancak, Jan; Brabcova, Katerina Pachnerova; Vanhavere, Filip; Cauwels, Vanessa; Van Hoey, Olivier; Schoonjans, Werner; Parisi, Alessio; Gaza, Ramona; Semones, Edward; Yukihara, Eduardo G.; Benton, Eric R.; Doull, Brandon A.; Uchihori, Yukio; Kodaira, Satoshi; Kitamura, Hisashi; Boehme, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on Earth, consisting mostly of highly energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones present on Earth for occupational radiation workers. Since the beginning of the space era, the radiation exposure during space missions has been monitored with various active and passive radiation instruments. Also onboard the International Space Station (ISS), a number of area monitoring devices provide data related to the spatial and temporal variation of the radiation field in and outside the ISS. The aim of the DOSIS (2009-2011) and the DOSIS 3D (2012-ongoing) experiments was and is to measure the radiation environment within the European Columbus Laboratory of the ISS. These measurements are, on the one hand, performed with passive radiation detectors mounted at 11 locations within Columbus for the determination of the spatial distribution of the radiation field parameters and, on the other, with two active radiation detectors mounted at a fixed position inside Columbus for the determination of the temporal variation of the radiation field parameters. Data measured with passive radiation detectors showed that the absorbed dose values inside the Columbus Laboratory follow a pattern, based on the local shielding configuration of the radiation detectors, with minimum dose values observed in the year 2010 of 195-270 μGy/day and maximum values observed in the year 2012 with values ranging from 260 to 360 μGy/day. The absorbed dose is modulated by (a) the variation in solar activity and (b) the changes in ISS altitude.

  20. (32)P measurment of urine samples and internal dose assessment for radiation workers in life science laboratories.

    PubMed

    Yoon, S; Pak, M-J; Park, S; Yoo, J; Ha, W-H; Jang, H-K; Kim, J K

    2014-12-01

    (32)P measurements of urine samples and internal dose assessments were conducted for workers in life science laboratories. A procedure for sample pre-treatment was established and validation was performed to exclude interference and to detect (32)P levels accurately. The detection conditions for Cherenkov radiation were evaluated and the accuracy of Cherenkov radiation measurements validated. The analytical and measurement procedures were applied to urine samples collected from 11 workers from life sciences laboratories. The results of the measurements generally indicated very low background radiation levels, but daily urine samples from two workers were above the minimum detectable activity. The (32)P concentrations for two of the workers were 29.3  ±  10.4 Bq•d(-1) and 24.1  ±  11.8 Bq•d(-1), respectively, at intake levels of 4.12 kBq and 2.61 kBq. The effective doses for these two workers were 4.6 μSv and 2.9 μSv. Overall, the results indicate very low levels of radioactivity, except for cases related to specific working conditions.

  1. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy With Yttrium-90 Glass Microspheres: Biases and Uncertainties in Absorbed Dose Calculations Between Clinical Dosimetry Models.

    PubMed

    Mikell, Justin K; Mahvash, Armeen; Siman, Wendy; Baladandayuthapani, Veera; Mourtada, Firas; Kappadath, S Cheenu

    2016-11-15

    To quantify differences that exist between dosimetry models used for (90)Y selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT). Retrospectively, 37 tumors were delineated on 19 post-therapy quantitative (90)Y single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography scans. Using matched volumes of interest (VOIs), absorbed doses were reported using 3 dosimetry models: glass microsphere package insert standard model (SM), partition model (PM), and Monte Carlo (MC). Univariate linear regressions were performed to predict mean MC from SM and PM. Analysis was performed for 2 subsets: cases with a single tumor delineated (best case for PM), and cases with multiple tumors delineated (typical clinical scenario). Variability in PM from the ad hoc placement of a single spherical VOI to estimate the entire normal liver activity concentration for tumor (T) to nontumoral liver (NL) ratios (TNR) was investigated. We interpreted the slope of the resulting regression as bias and the 95% prediction interval (95%PI) as uncertainty. MCNL(single) represents MC absorbed doses to the NL for the single tumor patient subset; other combinations of calculations follow a similar naming convention. SM was unable to predict MCT(single) or MCT(multiple) (p>.12, 95%PI >±177 Gy). However, SM(single) was able to predict (p<.012) MCNL(single), albeit with large uncertainties; SM(single) and SM(multiple) yielded biases of 0.62 and 0.71, and 95%PI of ±40 and ± 32 Gy, respectively. PMT(single) and PMT(multiple) predicted (p<2E-6) MCT(single) and MCT(multiple) with biases of 0.52 and 0.54, and 95%PI of ±38 and ± 111 Gy, respectively. The TNR variability in PMT(single) increased the 95%PI for predicting MCT(single) (bias = 0.46 and 95%PI = ±103 Gy). The TNR variability in PMT(multiple) modified the bias when predicting MCT(multiple) (bias = 0.32 and 95%PI = ±110 Gy). The SM is unable to predict mean MC tumor absorbed dose. The PM is statistically correlated with mean MC, but the

  2. Comparison of internal dose measures of solvents in breath, blood and urine and genotoxic changes in aircraft maintenance personnel.

    PubMed

    Lemasters, G K; Lockey, J E; Olsen, D M; Selevan, S G; Tabor, M W; Livingston, G K; New, G R

    1999-02-01

    Solvents and fuels are in widespread use both in civilian and military populations. 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), xylene, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and methylene chloride are found in a variety of compounds including degreasing agents, paints, coatings, pesticides and paint strippers. Toluene and xylene are also found in fuels, which are complex mixtures of hundreds of agents. The purpose of this investigation was twofold. The first was to determine the optimum medium to measure internal dose of solvents comparing blood, urine and breath. The second was to determine if low level exposures were associated with genotoxic changes after a short-term exposure of fifteen or thirty weeks. To accomplish the first goal a pilot study was initiated involving eight volunteers who worked in aircraft maintenance including sheet metal, painting and assembly mechanic jobs. Industrial hygiene measurements were evaluated over 30 working days. Breath, blood and a 24-hour urine sample were collected twice to compare internal dose parameters. To achieve the second goal, 58 newly hired subjects were monitored prior to exposure and over 30 weeks to determine if there were genotoxic changes as a result of solvent and/or fuel exposure as measured by sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and micronuclei (MN). Exposure groups included workers involved in sheet metal (fuel cell) activities, painting, fueling operations and flight line. Results of the pilot study demonstrated that industrial hygiene air samples and internal breath measures taken on the same day were highly correlated for measuring TCA (r = 0.93) and toluene (r = 0.90) but was not as well correlated for the other compounds. Breath measures were more sensitive for measuring low level exposure than were either analytes in blood or 24-hour urine samples; these latter two measures were usually below the limit of detection. A small but statistically significant increase in the frequency of SCEs occurred after 30 weeks of

  3. A mobile bioassay laboratory for the assessment of internal doses based on in vivo and in vitro measurements.

    PubMed

    Dantas, B M; Lucena, E A; Dantas, A L A; Santos, M S; Julião, L Q C; Melo, D R; Sousa, W O; Fernandes, P C; Mesquita, S A

    2010-10-01

    Internal exposures may occur in nuclear power plants, radioisotope production, and in medicine and research laboratories. Such practices require quick response in case of accidents of a wide range of magnitudes. This work presents the design and calibration of a mobile laboratory for the assessment of accidents involving workers and the population as well as for routine monitoring. The system was set up in a truck with internal dimensions of 3.30 m × 1.60 m × 1.70 m and can identify photon emitters in the energy range of 100-3,000 keV in the whole body, organs, and in urine. A thyroid monitor consisting of a lead-collimated NaI(Tl)3" × 3" (7.62 × 7.62 cm) detector was calibrated with a neck-thyroid phantom developed at the IRD (Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria). Whole body measurements were performed with a NaI(Tl)8" × 4" (20.32 × 10.16 cm) detector calibrated with a plastic-bottle phantom. Urine samples were measured with another NaI(Tl) 3" × 3" (7.62 × 7.62 cm) detector set up in a steel support. Standard solutions were provided by the National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation of the IRD. Urine measurements are based on a calibration of efficiency vs. energy for standard volumes. Detection limits were converted to minimum committed effective doses for the radionuclides of interest using standard biokinetic and dosimetric models in order to evaluate the applicability and limitations of the system. Sensitivities for high-energy activation and fission products show that the system is suitable for use in emergency and routine monitoring of individuals under risk of internal exposure by such radionuclides.

  4. Development of a tool for calculating early internal doses in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident based on atmospheric dispersion simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Kunishima, Naoaki; Tani, Kotaro; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Furuyama, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Shozo; Akashi, Makoto

    2017-09-01

    A tool was developed to facilitate the calculation of the early internal doses to residents involved in the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster based on atmospheric transport and dispersion model (ATDM) simulations performed using Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Information 2nd version (WSPEEDI-II) together with personal behavior data containing the history of the whereabouts of individul's after the accident. The tool generates hourly-averaged air concentration data for the simulation grids nearest to an individual's whereabouts using WSPEEDI-II datasets for the subsequent calculation of internal doses due to inhalation. This paper presents an overview of the developed tool and provides tentative comparisons between direct measurement-based and ATDM-based results regarding the internal doses received by 421 persons from whom personal behavior data available.

  5. Main internal dose forming factors for inhabitants of contaminated regions at current phase of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident (Kyiv region as an example).

    PubMed

    Vasylenko, V V; Nechaev, S Yu; Tsigankov, M Ya; Ratia, G G; Berkovskyy, V B; Pikta, V O; Shpachenko, D I; Zadorozhna, G M; Mishhenko, L P

    2015-12-01

    Objective of this work is revealing of main dose forming factors of internal doses for inhabitants of contaminated regions of Kyiv region relying on the results of integral dosimetric monitoring. Three villages have been chosen for the investigation. They are: Raghivka, Zelena Poliana (Poliske district), Karpylivka (Ivankiv district). Twice a year, in May and in October those villages' residents were inspected for content of incorporated 137Cs. They were measured by direct method at the place of residence with the help of whole body counters (WBC). The principal food samples were collected for detection of 90Sr and 137Сs content. Those villages' inhabitants were interviewed about food consumption levels. Mathematical, dosimetric and radio chemical methods were used in this workResults and conclusions. The estimation of internal doses due to intake of 137Cs by ingestion of milk and potatoes are in the range 0.3-34% of doses estimated on the base of WBC data. The contribution to the dose of internal expo sure from intake of 137Cs with the milk consumption is no more than two times higher than the contribution of pota toes consumption in the case of equal consumption levels of these products. Contributions to the dose of internal exposure from intake of 90Sr with milk and potatoes consumptions are approximately similar. Consumption of mush rooms and other wild nature products by inhabitants from the inspected settlements is the main forming factor of internal dose due to 137Cs intake. V. V. Vasylenko, S. Yu. Nechaev, M. Ya. Tsigankov, G. G. Ratia, V. B. Berkovskyy, V. О. Pikta, D. I. Shpachenko, G. M. Zadorozhna, L.P. Mishhenko.

  6. The use of spatial dose gradients and probability density function to evaluate the effect of internal organ motion for prostate IMRT treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Runqing; Barnett, Rob B.; Chow, James C. L.; Chen, Jeff Z. Y.

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of internal organ motion on IMRT treatment planning of prostate patients using a spatial dose gradient and probability density function. Spatial dose distributions were generated from a Pinnacle3 planning system using a co-planar, five-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. Five plans were created for each patient using equally spaced beams but shifting the angular displacement of the beam by 15° increments. Dose profiles taken through the isocentre in anterior-posterior (A-P), right-left (R-L) and superior-inferior (S-I) directions for IMRT plans were analysed by exporting RTOG file data from Pinnacle. The convolution of the 'static' dose distribution D0(x, y, z) and probability density function (PDF), denoted as P(x, y, z), was used to analyse the combined effect of repositioning error and internal organ motion. Organ motion leads to an enlarged beam penumbra. The amount of percentage mean dose deviation (PMDD) depends on the dose gradient and organ motion probability density function. Organ motion dose sensitivity was defined by the rate of change in PMDD with standard deviation of motion PDF and was found to increase with the maximum dose gradient in anterior, posterior, left and right directions. Due to common inferior and superior field borders of the field segments, the sharpest dose gradient will occur in the inferior or both superior and inferior penumbrae. Thus, prostate motion in the S-I direction produces the highest dose difference. The PMDD is within 2.5% when standard deviation is less than 5 mm, but the PMDD is over 2.5% in the inferior direction when standard deviation is higher than 5 mm in the inferior direction. Verification of prostate organ motion in the inferior directions is essential. The margin of the planning target volume (PTV) significantly impacts on the confidence of tumour control probability (TCP) and level of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP

  7. SU-E-T-508: Internal Organ Motion Effect On Radiation Dose to a Point Under Half-Beam Block Match Line

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, S; Zhu, X; Zhang, M; Zheng, D; Lei, Y; Zhang, Q; Li, S; Driewer, J; Wang, S; Enke, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Half-beam block is a field matching technique frequently used in radiotherapy. With no setup error, a well calibrated linac, and no internal organ motion, two photon fields can be matched seamlessly dosimetry-wise with their central axes passing the match line. However, in actual clinical situations, internal organ motion is often inevitable. This study was conducted to investigate its influence on radiation dose to patient internal points directly under the matching line. Methods A clinical setting is modeled as two half-space (x<0 and x<0) radiation fields that are turned on sequentially with a time gap of integer times of the patient internal organ motion period (T{sub 0}). Our point of interest moves with patient internal organs periodically and evenly in and out of the radiation fields, resulting in an average location at x=0. When the fields are delivered without any motion management, the initial phase of the point’s movement is unknown. Statistical methods are used to compute the expected value () and variance (σ) of the point dose given the uncertainty. Results Analytical solutions are obtained for and s of dose received by a point directly under the match line. is proportional to the total beam-on time (T1), and σ demonstrates previously unknown periodic behavior. /dose can be zero or double of the expected value. Conclusion We have analytically analyzed the internal organ motion effect on radiation dose received by a patient internal point directly under a half-beam block match line. Our results help us to better understand this phenomenon and facilitate the reduction of point dosimetric uncertainties in our clinical practice.

  8. Estimation of internal radiation dose to the adult Asian population from the dietary intakes of two long-lived radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, G V; Kawamura, H; Dang, H S; Parr, R M; Wang, J W; Akhter, Perveen; Cho, S Y; Natera, E; Miah, F K; Nguyen, M S

    2004-01-01

    Daily dietary intakes of two naturally occurring long-lived radionuclides, 232Th and 238U, were estimated for the adult population living in a number of Asian countries, using highly sensitive analytical methods such as instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis (INAA and RNAA), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The Asian countries that participated in the study were Bangladesh (BGD), China (CPR), India (IND), Japan (JPN), Pakistan (PAK), Philippines (PHI), Republic of Korea (ROK) and Vietnam (VIE). Altogether, these countries represent more than 50% of the world population. The median daily intakes of 232Th ranged between 0.6 and 14.4 mBq, the lowest being for Philippines and the highest for Bangladesh, and daily intakes of 238U ranged between 6.7 and 62.5 mBq, lowest and the highest being for India and China, respectively. The Asian median intakes were obtained as 4.2 mBq for 232Th and 12.7 mBq for 238U. Although the Asian intakes were lower than intakes of 12.3 mBq (3.0 ug) 232Th and 23.6 mBq (1.9 ug) 238U proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the ICRP Reference Man, they were comparable to the global intake values of 4.6 mBq 232Th and 15.6 mBq 238U proposed by the United Nation Scientific Commission on Effects of Radiation (UNSCEAR). The annual committed effective doses to Asian population from the dietary intake of 232Th and 238U were calculated to be 0.34 and 0.20 microSv, respectively, which are three orders of magnitude lower than the global average annual radiation dose of 2400 microSv to man from the natural radiation sources as proposed by UNSCEAR.

  9. Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on Prostate Dose Distribution under Ir-192 Internal and 18 MV External Radiotherapy Procedures Using Gel Dosimetry and Monte Carlo Method

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, H.; Hashemi, B.; Mahdavi, S. R.; Hejazi, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gel polymers are considered as new dosimeters for determining radiotherapy dose distribution in three dimensions. Objective The ability of a new formulation of MAGIC-f polymer gel was assessed by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC) method for studying the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in prostate dose distributions under the internal Ir-192 and external 18MV radiotherapy practices. Method A Plexiglas phantom was made representing human pelvis. The GNP shaving 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM concentration were synthesized using chemical reduction method. Then, a new formulation of MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured in the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs) and bladder locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated to an Ir-192 source and 18 MV beam of a Varian linac separately based on common radiotherapy procedures used for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels were read using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. The absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves resulted from the experimental measurement of the gels and MC simulations following the internal and external radiotherapy practices were compared. Results The mean absorbed doses measured with the gel in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 15% and 8 % higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs under the internal and external radiation therapies, respectively. MC simulations also indicated a dose increase of 14 % and 7 % due to presence of the GNPs, for the same experimental internal and external radiotherapy practices, respectively. Conclusion There was a good agreement between the dose enhancement factors (DEFs) estimated with MC simulations and experiment gel measurements due to the GNPs. The results indicated that the polymer gel dosimetry method as developed and used in this study, can be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the DEF of GNPs in internal and external

  10. Pretargeted Immuno-PET of Pancreatic Cancer: Overcoming Circulating Antigen and Internalized Antibody to Reduce Radiation Doses

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Jacob L.; Zeglis, Brian M.; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    5B1 is a fully human, monoclonal antibody that has shown promise for the PET imaging of cancers expressing carbohydrate antigen 19.9 (CA19.9)—a carbohydrate prevalent in cells with aberrant glycosylation and an established effector of metastasis. The long physiologic half-life of the antibody and interference from circulating CA19.9 may increase the time required to generate quality images as well as the risk of radiation exposure to healthy tissues during repeated PET imaging. Pretargeting methodologies are an effective approach to expeditiously acquire PET images, but in this case, the pretargeting approach is complicated by the internalization of 5B1 by CA19.9-expressing cells. We sought to adapt and optimize a pretargeting strategy that exploits the bioorthogonal reaction between transcyclooctene (TCO) and tetrazine (Tz) to overcome these complications. Methods 5B1 was modified with TCO, and a novel NOTA-PEG7-Tz radioligand was synthesized with the goal of improving on a previously reported analog. BxPC3 and Capan-2 cells were evaluated for their ability to internalize anti-CA19.9 antibodies using a fluorometric assay, and xenografts of the same lines were used for in vivo studies. The pretargeting approach was optimized, and the 2 radioligands were compared using biodistribution and PET imaging in murine models of pancreatic cancer. Results BxPC3 and Capan-2 cells were shown to rapidly internalize anti-CA19.9 monoclonal antibodies, including 5B1. 64Cu-NOTA-PEG7-Tz showed improved in vivo pharmacokinetics relative to 64Cu-NOTA-Tz using 5B1-TCO as the targeting vector. PET imaging and biodistribution studies showed that injecting the radioligand 72 h after the administration of 5B1-TCO resulted in the best uptake (8.2 ± 1.7 percentage injected dose per gram at 20 h after injection) and tumor-to-background activity concentration ratios. Dosimetry calculations revealed that the pretargeting system produced a greater than 25-fold reduction in total body

  11. Pretargeted Immuno-PET of Pancreatic Cancer: Overcoming Circulating Antigen and Internalized Antibody to Reduce Radiation Doses.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Jacob L; Zeglis, Brian M; Abdel-Atti, Dalya; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W; Lewis, Jason S

    2016-03-01

    5B1 is a fully human, monoclonal antibody that has shown promise for the PET imaging of cancers expressing carbohydrate antigen 19.9 (CA19.9)--a carbohydrate prevalent in cells with aberrant glycosylation and an established effector of metastasis. The long physiologic half-life of the antibody and interference from circulating CA19.9 may increase the time required to generate quality images as well as the risk of radiation exposure to healthy tissues during repeated PET imaging. Pretargeting methodologies are an effective approach to expeditiously acquire PET images, but in this case, the pretargeting approach is complicated by the internalization of 5B1 by CA19.9-expressing cells. We sought to adapt and optimize a pretargeting strategy that exploits the bioorthogonal reaction between transcyclooctene (TCO) and tetrazine (Tz) to overcome these complications. 5B1 was modified with TCO, and a novel NOTA-PEG7-Tz radioligand was synthesized with the goal of improving on a previously reported analog. BxPC3 and Capan-2 cells were evaluated for their ability to internalize anti-CA19.9 antibodies using a fluorometric assay, and xenografts of the same lines were used for in vivo studies. The pretargeting approach was optimized, and the 2 radioligands were compared using biodistribution and PET imaging in murine models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC3 and Capan-2 cells were shown to rapidly internalize anti-CA19.9 monoclonal antibodies, including 5B1. (64)Cu-NOTA-PEG7-Tz showed improved in vivo pharmacokinetics relative to (64)Cu-NOTA-Tz using 5B1-TCO as the targeting vector. PET imaging and biodistribution studies showed that injecting the radioligand 72 h after the administration of 5B1-TCO resulted in the best uptake (8.2 ± 1.7 percentage injected dose per gram at 20 h after injection) and tumor-to-background activity concentration ratios. Dosimetry calculations revealed that the pretargeting system produced a greater than 25-fold reduction in total body radiation exposure

  12. Management of complicated chronic anal fissures with high-dose circumferential chemodenervation (HDCC) of the internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Whatley, James Z; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Glover, Porter H; Davis, Eric D; Jex, Kellen T; Wu, Ruonan; Lahr, Christopher J

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum toxin injection into the internal anal sphincter (IAS) is gaining popularity as a second line therapy for chronic anal fissures after patients fail medical therapy. The dosage of Botulinum toxin reported in the literature ranged from 20 to 50 IU. Complicated chronic anal fissure is defined as persistent fissure concurrent with other perianal pathology. We report a new approach involving high-dose circumferential chemodenervation (HDCC) of 100 IU in treating these complicated chronic anal fissures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fissure healing, complication, and recurrence rates with HDCC. Complicated anal fissure was defined as fissure with other perianal pathologies including skin tag, hypertrophied papilla, fistula, symptomatic hemorrhoids, anal condylomata, and abscess. Between 2008 and 2012, 62 consecutive patients (28 Blacks, 33 Whites, 1 Hispanic) with complete follow-up data were included in this single arm study. These patients underwent HDCC-IAS with addition interventions by a single colorectal surgeon. Follow up data were obtained by chart review and office follow up. Of the 62 patients, the overall success rate was greater than 70% at 3 months follow-up. A few patients developed transient flatus or fecal incontinence, but shortly resolved. There was no major complication following HDCC-IAS. Combination therapy involving HDCC-IAS and local anorectal surgery for associated condition is both safe and effective for fissure healing. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at fire stations: firefighters' exposure monitoring and biomonitoring, and assessment of the contribution to total internal dose.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marta; Slezakova, Klara; Alves, Maria José; Fernandes, Adília; Teixeira, João Paulo; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Pereira, Maria do Carmo; Morais, Simone

    2017-02-05

    This work characterizes levels of eighteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the breathing air zone of firefighters during their regular work shift at eight Portuguese fire stations, and the firefighters' total internal dose by six urinary monohydroxyl metabolites (OH-PAHs). Total PAHs (ΣPAHs) concentrations varied widely (46.4-428ng/m(3)), mainly due to site specificity (urban/rural) and characteristics (age and layout) of buildings. Airborne PAHs with 2-3 rings were the most abundant (63.9-95.7% ΣPAHs). Similarly, urinary 1-hydroxynaphthalene and 1-hydroxyacenaphthene were the predominant metabolites (66-96% ΣOH-PAHs). Naphthalene contributed the most to carcinogenic ΣPAHs (39.4-78.1%) in majority of firehouses; benzo[a]pyrene, the marker of carcinogenic PAHs, accounted with 1.5-10%. Statistically positive significant correlations (r≥0.733, p≤0.025) were observed between ΣPAHs and urinary ΣOH-PAHs for firefighters of four fire stations suggesting that, at these sites, indoor air was their major exposure source of PAHs. Firefighter's personal exposure to PAHs at Portuguese fire stations were well below the existent occupational exposure limits. Also, the quantified concentrations of post-shift urinary 1-hydroxypyrene in all firefighters were clearly lower than the benchmark level (0.5μmol/mol) recommended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.

  14. Optimization of vitamin K antagonist drug dose finding by replacement of the international normalized ratio by a bidirectional factor: validation of a new algorithm.

    PubMed

    Beinema, M J; van der Meer, F J M; Brouwers, J R B J; Rosendaal, F R

    2016-03-01

    ESSENTIALS: We developed a new algorithm to optimize vitamin K antagonist dose finding. Validation was by comparing actual dosing to algorithm predictions. Predicted and actual dosing of well performing centers were highly associated. The method is promising and should be tested in a randomized trial. Oral vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) have a narrow therapeutic window and thus require frequent monitoring of its intensity by the international normalized ratio (INR). Improvement of VKA dosing defined as more time in therapeutic range (TTR) can reduce thrombotic disease and bleeding. Computerized decision support programs (CDSs) are used to optimize VKA dosing, but the effects are heterogeneous. CDSs significantly improve the proportion of time in the therapeutic INR range for initiation therapy but not the quality of anticoagulant management in an outpatient setting. One of the major problems of VKA dose finding is that the INR is a ratio and does not present linearity. We developed a new dose-finding algorithm, based on a novel bidirectional factor (BF). This BF is linear transformation of the nonlinear INR. We compared the outcomes of the new algorithm, called BF-N, with dose finding performed at three highly ranked Dutch anticoagulation centers, using both acenocoumarol and phenprocoumon. The outcomes of the BF-N algorithm showed a linear correlation with VKA doses of the three centers (y = 1.001x, r(2) 0.999 for acenocoumarol and y = 0.999x, r(2) 0.999 for phenprocoumon), with a standard deviation of 3.83%. The rate of automated dosage proposals increased to 100%. The BF-N algorithm performs well in real-life settings and increases the rate of automated dosage proposals. The algorithm can be easily built into existing CDSs. Experienced staff remains necessary for complicated situations. The new algorithm needs to be evaluated in a prospective trial. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  15. Internal dosimetry--a review.

    PubMed

    Potter, Charles A

    2004-11-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  16. Calculation of effective dose.

    PubMed

    McCollough, C H; Schueler, B A

    2000-05-01

    The concept of "effective dose" was introduced in 1975 to provide a mechanism for assessing the radiation detriment from partial body irradiations in terms of data derived from whole body irradiations. The effective dose is the mean absorbed dose from a uniform whole-body irradiation that results in the same total radiation detriment as from the nonuniform, partial-body irradiation in question. The effective dose is calculated as the weighted average of the mean absorbed dose to the various body organs and tissues, where the weighting factor is the radiation detriment for a given organ (from a whole-body irradiation) as a fraction of the total radiation detriment. In this review, effective dose equivalent and effective dose, as established by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 1977 and 1990, respectively, are defined and various methods of calculating these quantities are presented for radionuclides, radiography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography and mammography. In order to calculate either quantity, it is first necessary to estimate the radiation dose to individual organs. One common method of determining organ doses is through Monte Carlo simulations of photon interactions within a simplified mathematical model of the human body. Several groups have performed these calculations and published their results in the form of data tables of organ dose per unit activity or exposure. These data tables are specified according to particular examination parameters, such as radiopharmaceutical, x-ray projection, x-ray beam energy spectra or patient size. Sources of these organ dose conversion coefficients are presented and differences between them are examined. The estimates of effective dose equivalent or effective dose calculated using these data, although not intended to describe the dose to an individual, can be used as a relative measure of stochastic radiation detriment. The calculated values, in units of sievert (or rem), indicate the amount of

  17. Development and application of a tomographic model from CT images for calculating internal dose to a pregnant woman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chengyu

    Assessment of radiation dose and possible risk to a pregnant woman and her fetus is an important task in radiation protection. Although stylized models for male and female patients of different ages have been developed, tomographic models for pregnant women have not been developed to date. This dissertation presents an effort to construct a partial-body model of a pregnant woman from a set of CT images. The patient was 30-weeks pregnant, and the CT scan covered the portion of the body between the lower breast and the upper thigh in 70 slices, each 7 mm thick. The image resolution was 512 x 512 pixels in a 48 cm x 48 cm field. The images were carefully segmented to identify 34 organs and tissues, It has been found that the masses are different from the Reference Woman. The characteristics of the resulting model is discussed and compared with one existing stylized mathematical model for pregnant women. Based on this tomographic model, a Monte Carlo code, EGS4-VLSI, was used to derive Specific Absorbed Fractions. Monoenergetic and isotropic photon and electron emitters distributed in different source organs were assumed and the energies ranged from 10 keV to 4 MeV for photons and from 100 keV to 4 MeV for electrons. The results for high energy (>50 keV) photons showed general agreement with previous studies, however, the results for lower energy (<50 keV) photons showed differences of up to several hundreds percent for some source and target organs. For electron results, several tens of percent differences were found. Those differences can be explained by mass differences and the relative geometry differences between source and target organs. In summary, the stylized models for pregnant women are satisfactory for a very large size patient for most of the photon energies (between 50 keV and 4 MeV). However, a tomographic model has to be used to obtain acceptable dose assessments for electrons. The newly calculated SAF data set can provide the nuclear medicine dosimetry

  18. Effect of dose on the frequency of major birth defects following fetal exposure to lamotrigine monotherapy in an international observational study.

    PubMed

    Cunnington, Marianne; Ferber, Sandy; Quartey, George

    2007-06-01

    Data from the International Lamotrigine Pregnancy Registry were analyzed to examine the effect of maximal first-trimester maternal dose of lamotrigine monotherapy on the risk of major birth defects (MBDs). Among 802 exposures, the frequency of MBDs was 2.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8-4.2%). The distribution of dose did not differ between infants with and those without MBDs (mean 248.3 milligrams per day [mg/day] and 278.9 mg/day, respectively, median 200 mg/day for both groups). A logistic regression analysis showed no difference in the risk of MBDs as a continuous function of dose (summary odds ratio [OR] per 100 mg increase =0.999, 95% CI 0.996-1.001). There was also no effect of dose, up to 400 mg/day, on the frequency of MBDs.

  19. THE CHALLENGE OF CIEMAT INTERNAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE FOR ACCREDITATION ACCORDING TO ISO/IEC 17025 STANDARD, FOR IN VIVO AND IN VITRO MONITORING AND DOSE ASSESSMENT OF INTERNAL EXPOSURES.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M A; Martin, R; Hernandez, C; Navarro, J F; Navarro, T; Perez, B; Sierra, I

    2016-09-01

    The accreditation of an Internal Dosimetry Service (IDS) according to ISO/IEC 17025 Standard is a challenge. The aim of this process is to guarantee the technical competence for the monitoring of radionuclides incorporated in the body and for the evaluation of the associated committed effective dose E(50). This publication describes the main accreditation issues addressed by CIEMAT IDS regarding all the procedures involving good practice in internal dosimetry, focussing in the difficulties to ensure the traceability in the whole process, the appropriate calculation of detection limit of measurement techniques, the validation of methods (monitoring and dose assessments), the description of all the uncertainty sources and the interpretation of monitoring data to evaluate the intake and the committed effective dose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Evaluation of backscatter dose from internal lead shielding in clinical electron beams using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    De Vries, Rowen J; Marsh, Steven

    2015-11-08

    Internal lead shielding is utilized during superficial electron beam treatments of the head and neck, such as lip carcinoma. Methods for predicting backscattered dose include the use of empirical equations or performing physical measurements. The accuracy of these empirical equations required verification for the local electron beams. In this study, a Monte Carlo model of a Siemens Artiste linac was developed for 6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV electron beams using the EGSnrc MC package. The model was verified against physical measurements to an accuracy of better than 2% and 2mm. Multiple MC simulations of lead interfaces at different depths, corresponding to mean electron energies in the range of 0.2-14 MeV at the interfaces, were performed to calculate electron backscatter values. The simulated electron backscatter was compared with current empirical equations to ascertain their accuracy. The major finding was that the current set of backscatter equations does not accurately predict electron backscatter, particularly in the lower energies region. A new equation was derived which enables estimation of electron backscatter factor at any depth upstream from the interface for the local treatment machines. The derived equation agreed to within 1.5% of the MC simulated electron backscatter at the lead interface and upstream positions. Verification of the equation was performed by comparing to measurements of the electron backscatter factor using Gafchromic EBT2 film. These results show a mean value of 0.997 ± 0.022 to 1σ of the predicted values of electron backscatter. The new empirical equation presented can accurately estimate electron backscatter factor from lead shielding in the range of 0.2 to 14 MeV for the local linacs.

  1. Evaluation of backscatter dose from internal lead shielding in clinical electron beams using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Rowen J; Marsh, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Internal lead shielding is utilized during superficial electron beam treatments of the head and neck, such as lip carcinoma. Methods for predicting backscattered dose include the use of empirical equations or performing physical measurements. The accuracy of these empirical equations required verification for the local electron beams. In this study, a Monte Carlo model of a Siemens Artiste linac was developed for 6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV electron beams using the EGSnrc MC package. The model was verified against physical measurements to an accuracy of better than 2% and 2 mm. Multiple MC simulations of lead interfaces at different depths, corresponding to mean electron energies in the range of 0.2-14 MeV at the interfaces, were performed to calculate electron backscatter values. The simulated electron backscatter was compared with current empirical equations to ascertain their accuracy. The major finding was that the current set of backscatter equations does not accurately predict electron backscatter, particularly in the lower energies region. A new equation was derived which enables estimation of electron backscatter factor at any depth upstream from the interface for the local treatment machines. The derived equation agreed to within 1.5% of the MC simulated electron backscatter at the lead interface and upstream positions. Verification of the equation was performed by comparing to measurements of the electron backscatter factor using Gafchromic EBT2 film. These results show a mean value of 0.997±0.022 to 1σ of the predicted values of electron backscatter. The new empirical equation presented can accurately estimate electron backscatter factor from lead shielding in the range of 0.2 to 14 MeV for the local linacs. PACS numbers: 87.53.Bn, 87.55.K-, 87.56.bd.

  2. Mayak Worker Dosimetry System (MWDS-2013): Phase I-Quality Assurance of Organ Doses and Excretion Rates From Internal Exposures of Plutonium-239 for the Mayak Worker Cohort.

    PubMed

    Dorrian, M-D; Birchall, A; Vostrotin, V

    2016-06-20

    The calculation of reliable and realistic doses for use in epidemiological studies for the quantification of risk from internal exposure to radioactive material is fundamental to the development of advice, guidance and regulations for the control and use of radioactive material. Thus, any programme of work carried out which requires the calculation of doses for use by epidemiologists ideally should contain a rigorous program of quality assurance (QA). This paper describes the initial QA (Phase I) implemented by Public Health England (PHE) and the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI) as part of the work programme on internal dosimetry in the Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research Project 2.4 for the 2013 Mayak Worker Dosimetry System. SUBI designed and implemented new software (PANDORA) to include the latest Mayak Worker Dosimetry System and to calculate organ burdens, urinary excretion rates, intakes and absorbed doses, while PHE modified their commercially available IMBA Professional Plus software package. Comparisons of output from the two codes for the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 showed calculated values of absorbed doses, intakes, organ burdens and urinary excretion agreed to within 1%. The 1% discrepancy can be explained by the approximation used in IMBA to speed up dose calculations.

  3. Radiation dose to the esophagus from breast cancer radiation therapy, 1943-1996: an international population-based study of 414 patients.

    PubMed

    Lamart, Stephanie; Stovall, Marilyn; Simon, Steven L; Smith, Susan A; Weathers, Rita E; Howell, Rebecca M; Curtis, Rochelle E; Aleman, Berthe M P; Travis, Lois; Kwon, Deukwoo; Morton, Lindsay M

    2013-07-15

    To provide dosimetric data for an epidemiologic study on the risk of second primary esophageal cancer among breast cancer survivors, by reconstructing the radiation dose incidentally delivered to the esophagus of 414 women treated with radiation therapy for breast cancer during 1943-1996 in North America and Europe. We abstracted the radiation therapy treatment parameters from each patient's radiation therapy record. Treatment fields included direct chest wall (37% of patients), medial and lateral tangentials (45%), supraclavicular (SCV, 64%), internal mammary (IM, 44%), SCV and IM together (16%), axillary (52%), and breast/chest wall boosts (7%). The beam types used were (60)Co (45% of fields), orthovoltage (33%), megavoltage photons (11%), and electrons (10%). The population median prescribed dose to the target volume ranged from 21 Gy to 40 Gy. We reconstructed the doses over the length of the esophagus using abstracted patient data, water phantom measurements, and a computational model of the human body. Fields that treated the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were used for 85% of the patients and delivered the highest doses within 3 regions of the esophagus: cervical (population median 38 Gy), upper thoracic (32 Gy), and middle thoracic (25 Gy). Other fields (direct chest wall, tangential, and axillary) contributed substantially lower doses (approximately 2 Gy). The cervical to middle thoracic esophagus received the highest dose because of its close proximity to the SCV and IM fields and less overlying tissue in that part of the chest. The location of the SCV field border relative to the midline was one of the most important determinants of the dose to the esophagus. Breast cancer patients in this study received relatively high incidental radiation therapy doses to the esophagus when the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were treated, whereas direct chest wall, tangentials, and axillary fields contributed lower doses. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Radiation Dose to the Esophagus From Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy, 1943-1996: An International Population-Based Study of 414 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lamart, Stephanie; Stovall, Marilyn; Simon, Steven L.; Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita E.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Travis, Lois; Kwon, Deukwoo; Morton, Lindsay M.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To provide dosimetric data for an epidemiologic study on the risk of second primary esophageal cancer among breast cancer survivors, by reconstructing the radiation dose incidentally delivered to the esophagus of 414 women treated with radiation therapy for breast cancer during 1943-1996 in North America and Europe. Methods and Materials: We abstracted the radiation therapy treatment parameters from each patient’s radiation therapy record. Treatment fields included direct chest wall (37% of patients), medial and lateral tangentials (45%), supraclavicular (SCV, 64%), internal mammary (IM, 44%), SCV and IM together (16%), axillary (52%), and breast/chest wall boosts (7%). The beam types used were {sup 60}Co (45% of fields), orthovoltage (33%), megavoltage photons (11%), and electrons (10%). The population median prescribed dose to the target volume ranged from 21 Gy to 40 Gy. We reconstructed the doses over the length of the esophagus using abstracted patient data, water phantom measurements, and a computational model of the human body. Results: Fields that treated the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were used for 85% of the patients and delivered the highest doses within 3 regions of the esophagus: cervical (population median 38 Gy), upper thoracic (32 Gy), and middle thoracic (25 Gy). Other fields (direct chest wall, tangential, and axillary) contributed substantially lower doses (approximately 2 Gy). The cervical to middle thoracic esophagus received the highest dose because of its close proximity to the SCV and IM fields and less overlying tissue in that part of the chest. The location of the SCV field border relative to the midline was one of the most important determinants of the dose to the esophagus. Conclusions: Breast cancer patients in this study received relatively high incidental radiation therapy doses to the esophagus when the SCV and/or IM lymph nodes were treated, whereas direct chest wall, tangentials, and axillary fields contributed lower

  5. [Accounting the effect of spatial orientation of the International space station on dose rate during traverse of the South-Atlantic anomaly].

    PubMed

    Drobyshev, S G; Bengin, V V

    2009-01-01

    A method was devised to calculate dose rates aboard the International space station (ISS) with account for radiation field anisotropy in the region of South-Atlantic anomaly. The method enables incorporation in an explicit form the spectral-angular distribution of falling radiation in combination with ISS shielding mass distribution. It includes also a procedure of reducing these characteristics to the united coordinates with reference to ISS orientation. The dose rate ratio on the Service module opposite sides was shown to depend essentially on ISS spatial orientation.

  6. Extraction of recombination coefficients and internal quantum efficiency of GaN-based light emitting diodes considering effective volume of active region.

    PubMed

    Kim, Garam; Kim, Jang Hyun; Park, Euy Hwan; Kang, Donghoon; Park, Byung-Gook

    2014-01-27

    An improved rate equation model for GaN-based LEDs considering the effective volume of the active region is proposed. Through numerical simulations, it is confirmed that the IQE, especially efficiency droop is related with small effective volume. Also, we confirmed that the effective volume is controlled by polarization charge, the barriers between the quantum wells, and current density. We also developed a fast and reliable method for extracting the recombination coefficients and the IQE of the GaN-based LEDs by measuring transient characteristics and considering the effective volume.

  7. A dosimetric study of cardiac dose sparing using the reverse semi-decubitus technique for left breast and internal mammary chain irradiation.

    PubMed

    Niglas, Mark; McCann, Claire; Keller, Brian M; Makhani, Nadiya; Presutti, Joseph; Vesprini, Danny; Rakovitch, Eileen; Elzibak, Alyaa; Mashouf, Shahram; Lee, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Breath-hold techniques can reduce cardiac dose in breast radiotherapy. The reverse semi-decubitus (RSD) technique is an alternative free-breathing method used at our centre. This study compares the dosimetry of free-breathing supine, RSD and moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) techniques. Twelve patients with left-sided breast cancer who were simulated using standard supine, RSD and mDIBH techniques were identified retrospectively. New plans using standard breast tangents and techniques for internal mammary chain (IMC) nodal coverage were assessed. Using standard tangents, mean heart dose, heart V25Gy and mean left anterior descending artery (LAD) dose were found to be significantly lower for RSD and mDIBH when compared to free-breathing supine (p ⩽ 0.03). Using wide-tangents, the maximum LAD point dose was also lower for RSD and mDIBH (p ⩽ 0.02). There were no statistically significant dosimetric differences found between the RSD and mDIBH simulation techniques for standard breast-tangent plans, though organ-at-risk doses were lower for mDIBH in wide-tangent plans. There was no improvement in cardiac dosimetry between RSD and free-breathing supine when using an electron field IMC plan. For patients unable to tolerate breath-hold, the RSD technique is an alternative approach that can reduce cardiac dose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1979-01-01

    The International Geological Correlation Project has attained scientific maturity and broad support and participation by geologists world wide. Its purpose is to provide a mechanism for international cooperation and information exchange about geological problems that transcend national boundaries. (Author/BB)

  9. Internal absorbed dose estimation by a TLD method for -FDG and comparison with the dose estimates from whole body PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloar, Hossain M.; Fujiwara, Takehiko; Shidahara, Miho; Nakamura, Takashi; Yamadera, Akira; Itoh, Masatoshi

    1999-02-01

    The thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) method has been proposed as a useful tool for estimating internal radiation absorbed dose in nuclear medicine. An efficient approach to verify the accuracy of the TLD method has been performed in this study. Under the standard protocol for 2-[F-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose , whole body PET experiments and simultaneous body surface dose measurements by TLDs were performed on six normal volunteers. By using the body surface dose measured with TLDs, the cumulated activities of nine source organs were estimated with a mathematical unfolding technique for three different initial guesses. The accuracy of the results obtained by the TLD method was investigated by comparison with the actual cumulated activity of the same source organs measured by whole body PET. The cumulated activities of the source organs obtained by the TLD method and whole body PET show a significant correlation (correlation coefficient, , level of confidence, ) with each other. The mean effective doses in this study are obtained from the TLD method and obtained from the whole body PET. Good agreement between the results of the TLD method and whole body PET was observed.

  10. Cardiovascular disorders associated with naloxone monotherapy and in fixed-dose combination with opioids: Data from international safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Amneet; Kao, David; Mehler, Philip S; Haigney, Mark C P; Krantz, Mori J

    2016-06-01

    The widespread use of opioids has resulted in sharp rise of associated complications, particularly opioid-induced constipation (OIC). Opioid receptor antagonists have been proposed to treat OIC, but could precipitate rapid opioid withdrawal. As cardiovascular safety data are lacking, we assessed disproportionate reporting of adverse cardiac events associated with naloxone across large, international pharmacovigilance systems. Post-marketing data from the World Health Organization (WHO) and FDA Adverse Events Reporting System (FAERS) were evaluated for naloxone and the synthetic opioids oxycodone and tilidine. The proportional reporting ratio (PRR), a measure of reporting frequency analogous to an odds ratio, was assessed. The primary outcome was reporting frequency of the MedDRA System Organ Class (SOC) 'Cardiac Disorders' for naloxone alone and in fixed-dose combination with opioids. Opioid mono-preparations served as quasi-experimental controls. A PRR greater than 2.0 was considered significant. In total, 14,827,374 million adverse drug event reports were reviewed. In WHO, there were 1757 reports of SOC cardiac disorders among 10,866 total reports for oxycodone (PRR 2.38 [95% CI 2.28-2.49, χ(2)=1504]). For oxycodone-naloxone, there were 43/453 reports of SOC cardiac disorders (PRR 1.45 [95% CI 1.09-1.92, χ(2)=6.4]). For the synthetic opioid tilidine there were 13/179 reports (PRR 1.13 [95% CI 0.67-1.91, χ(2)=0.2]) and for tilidine-naloxone, 30/505 reports (PRR 0.92 [95% CI 0.65-1.31, χ(2)=0.2]). In FAERS, the PRR for SOC cardiac disorders was 0.95 [95% CI 0.89-1.01, χ(2)=2.1] for naloxone (all administration routes) and 1.16 [95% CI 0.93-1.45, χ(2)=1.3] for naloxone (oral only). In comparison, the PRR was 1.66 [95% CI 1.63-1.69, χ(2)=4278] for oxycodone and 1.52 [CI 1.28-1.80, χ(2)=1500] for oxycodone-naloxone. Available pharmacovigilance data do not suggest disproportionate reporting of adverse cardiovascular events for opioid antagonists used to treat

  11. Simulations of space radiation interactions with materials, with application to dose estimates for lunar shelter and aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tai T.

    This research performed simulations using the state-of-art three dimensional computer codes to investigate the interactions of space radiation with materials and quantify the biological dose onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and in a lunar shelter for future manned missions. High-energy space radiation of Trapped Protons, Solar Particle Events, and GCRs particles interactions are simulated using MCNPX and PHITS probabilistic codes. The energy loss and energy deposition within the shielding materials and in a phantom are calculated. The contributions of secondary particles produced by spallation reactions are identified. Recent experimental measurements of absorbed dose in a phantom aboard the International Space Station (ISS) was simulated, and used to determine the most appropriate simulation methodology.

  12. Fukushima simulation experiment: assessing the effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal 137Cs radiation exposure on litter size, sex ratio, and biokinetics in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hiroo; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Manabu; Todo, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the transgenerational effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal radiation exposure after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan, 18 generations of mice were maintained in a radioisotope facility, with free access to drinking water containing 137CsCl (0 and 100 Bq/ml). The 137Cs distribution in the organs of the mice was measured after long-term ad libitum intake of the 137CsCl water. The litter size and the sex ratio of the group ingesting the 137Cs water were compared with those of the control group, for all 18 generations of mice. No significant difference was noted in the litter size or the sex ratio between the mice in the control group and those in the group ingesting the 137Cs water. The fixed internal exposure doses were ∼160 Bq/g and 80 Bq/g in the muscles and other organs, respectively. PMID:26825299

  13. Fukushima simulation experiment: assessing the effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal 137Cs radiation exposure on litter size, sex ratio, and biokinetics in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroo; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Manabu; Todo, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the transgenerational effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal radiation exposure after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan, 18 generations of mice were maintained in a radioisotope facility, with free access to drinking water containing (137)CsCl (0 and 100 Bq/ml). The (137)Cs distribution in the organs of the mice was measured after long-term ad libitum intake of the (137)CsCl water. The litter size and the sex ratio of the group ingesting the (137)Cs water were compared with those of the control group, for all 18 generations of mice. No significant difference was noted in the litter size or the sex ratio between the mice in the control group and those in the group ingesting the (137)Cs water. The fixed internal exposure doses were ∼160 Bq/g and 80 Bq/g in the muscles and other organs, respectively.

  14. [The model of geometrical human body phantom for calculating tissue doses in the service module of the International Space Station].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, V A; Mitrikas, V G

    2007-01-01

    The model of a geometrical human body phantom developed for calculating the shielding functions of representative points of the body organs and systems is similar to the anthropomorphic phantom. This form of phantom can be integrated with the shielding model of the ISS Russian orbital segment to make analysis of radiation loading of crewmembers in different compartments of the vehicle. Calculation of doses absorbed by the body systems in terms of the representative points makes it clear that doses essentially depend on the phantom spatial orientation (eye direction). It also enables the absorbed dose evaluation from the shielding functions as the mean of the representative points and phantom orientation.

  15. High-dose circumferential chemodenervation of the internal anal sphincter: A new treatment modality for uncomplicated chronic anal fissure: A retrospective cohort study (with video).

    PubMed

    Glover, Porter H; Tang, Shou-jiang; Whatley, James Z; Davis, Eric D; Jex, Kellen T; Wu, Ruonan; Lahr, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Botulinum toxin injection into the internal anal sphincter is gaining popularity as a second line therapy for chronic anal fissures if medical therapy fails. The dosage of botulinum toxin reported ranged from 20 to 50 IU with no more than 3 injection sites and results in a healing rate of 41%-88% at 3 months. We propose a new injection method of high-dose circumferential chemodenervation of 100 IU in treating chronic anal fissure. This was a retrospective review at a single academic center. 75 patients (50 women and 25 men) with uncomplicated chronic anal fissures underwent high-dose circumferential chemodenervation-internal anal sphincter (100 IU). We measured fissure healing, complication, and recurrence rates at 3 and 6 months post injection. Of the 75 patients, healing rate was 90.7% at 3 months follow up with the first injection and 81.3% with the second injection. The recurrence rates were 20.6% and 12.5% at 6 months after the 1st and 2nd injections respectively. Excluding 5 patients who lost follow up, the total healing rate of the study cohort was 100%. At 2 weeks and 3 months, there were no major complications including hematoma, infection, flatus, fecal, and urinary incontinence. High-dose circumferential chemodenervation-internal anal sphincter (100 IU) is a safe and effective method for uncomplicated chronic anal fissure. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Single-dose adjustment versus no adjustment of warfarin in stably anticoagulated patients with an occasional international normalized ratio (INR) out of range.

    PubMed

    Schulman, S; Melinyshyn, A; Ennis, D; Rudd-Scott, L

    2010-05-01

    Well-controlled patients on warfarin may still have occasional International Normalized Ratios (INRs) outside the therapeutic range. It is unclear whether there is any benefit of a single-dose correction in this situation. To evaluate whether patients with very stable INR results should continue with the maintenance dose of warfarin without a single-dose correction, even when the result unexpectedly is moderately below or above the therapeutic range. A) We reviewed retrospectively 364 patients with unchanged maintenance dose for at least 6 months and an occasional INR outside the therapeutic range regarding decision on dosing and the effect on the next INR. B) We randomized 160 patients with at least 3 months of unchanged maintenance dose, an occasional INR deviating to a minimum of 1.5 or a maximum of 4.4 and unexplained or temporary, removable cause to a single-dose Change or No change. Follow-up INRs and telephone interviews were obtained after 2 weeks. A) Retrospectively, the proportion of follow-up INRs outside the therapeutic range was 29.9% after No change, 27.1% after Increased dose and 25.7% after Skipped/reduced dose. However, the decision on No change was mainly taken in case of minimal INR deviations. B) Forty-eight (60%) of the patients randomized to Change were within the therapeutic range at follow-up versus 45 (56%) of those with No change, odds ratio 1.17 (95% confidence interval 0.59-2.30). For baseline INRs deviating down to 1.6 or up to 3.6 (therapeutic range, INR 2.0-3.0) the 2-week INRs did not differ between the groups. Our results suggest only a small or no difference between the two managements of an occasional INR out of range in terms of the 2-week follow-up INR. In stable patients on warfarin with an occasional INR outside the therapeutic range it seems reasonable to continue with the same dose without a single-dose change and perform a repeat test in about 2 weeks. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00814177.). Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier

  17. Measurement of (131)I activity in thyroid of nuclear medical staff and internal dose assessment in a Polish nuclear medical hospital.

    PubMed

    Brudecki, K; Kowalska, A; Zagrodzki, P; Szczodry, A; Mroz, T; Janowski, P; Mietelski, J W

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents results of (131)I thyroid activity measurements in 30 members of the nuclear medicine personnel of the Department of Endocrinology and Nuclear Medicine Holy Cross Cancer Centre in Kielce, Poland. A whole-body spectrometer equipped with two semiconductor gamma radiation detectors served as the basic research instrument. In ten out of 30 examined staff members, the determined (131)I activity was found to be above the detection limit (DL = 5 Bq of (131)I in the thyroid). The measured activities ranged from (5 ± 2) Bq to (217 ± 56) Bq. The highest activities in thyroids were detected for technical and cleaning personnel, whereas the lowest values were recorded for medical doctors. Having measured the activities, an attempt has been made to estimate the corresponding annual effective doses, which were found to range from 0.02 to 0.8 mSv. The highest annual equivalent doses have been found for thyroid, ranging from 0.4 to 15.4 mSv, detected for a cleaner and a technician, respectively. The maximum estimated effective dose corresponds to 32% of the annual background dose in Poland, and to circa 4% of the annual limit for the effective dose due to occupational exposure of 20 mSv per year, which is in compliance with the value recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  18. Patient risk related to common dental radiographic examinations: the impact of 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations regarding dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, John B; Davies-Ludlow, Laura E; White, Stuart C

    2008-09-01

    In 2007, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) revised estimates of the radiosensitivity of tissues including those in the maxillofacial region. The authors conducted a study to reassess patients' risk related to common dental radiographic exposures using the 2007 ICRP recommendations. The authors used a tissue-equivalent head phantom to measure dose. They calculated effective doses by using both 1990 and revised 2007 ICRP recommendations. Effective dose is a calculation that takes into consideration the different sensitivities of organs to long-term effects from ionizing radiation. It is the preferred method for comparing doses between different types of exposures. Effective doses (per the 2007 ICRP) in microsieverts were as follows: full-mouth radiographs (FMX) with photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP) storage or F-speed film with rectangular collimation, 34.9 microSv; four-image posterior bitewings with PSP or F-speed film with rectangular collimation, 5.0 microSv; FMX using PSP or F-speed film with round collimation, 170.7 microSv; FMX with D-speed film and round collimation, 388 microSv; panoramic Orthophos XG (Sirona Group, Bensheim, Germany) with charge-coupled device (CCD), 14.2 microSv; panoramic ProMax (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) with CCD, 24.3 microSv; posteroanterior cephalogram with PSP, 5.1 microSv; and lateral cephalogram with PSP, 5.6 microSv. These values are 32 to 422 percent higher than those determined according to the 1990 ICRP guidelines. Although radiographs are an indispensable diagnostic tool, the increased effective doses of common intraoral and extraoral imaging techniques are high enough to warrant reconsideration of means to reduce patients' exposure. Clinicians can reduce patients' dose substantively by using digital receptors or F-speed film instead of D-speed film, rectangular collimation instead of round collimation and radiographic selection criteria.

  19. Investigation of dose and flux dynamics in the Liulin-5 dosimeter of the tissue-equivalent phantom onboard the Russian segment of the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Semkova, J; Koleva, R; Todorova, G; Kanchev, N; Petrov, V; Shurshakov, V; Benghin, V; Tchhernykh, I; Akatov, Yu; Redko, V

    2003-03-01

    Described is the Liulin-5 active dosimetric telescope designed for measurement of the space radiation dose depth-distribution in a human phantom on the Russian Segment of the International Space Station (ISS). The Liulin-5 experiment is a part of the international project MATROSHKA-R on ISS. The MATROSHKA-R project is aimed to study the depth-dose distribution at the sites of critical organs of the human body, using models of human body-anthropomorphic and spherical tissue-equivalent phantoms. The aim of Liulin-5 experiment is a long term (4-5 years) investigation of the radiation environment dynamics inside the spherical tissue-equivalent phantom, mounted in different compartments. Energy deposition spectra, linear energy transfer spectra, and flux and dose rates for charged particles will be measured simultaneously with near real time resolution at different depths of the phantom by means of three silicon detectors. Data obtained together with data from other active and passive dosimeters will be used to estimate the radiation risk to the crewmembers, which verify the models of radiation environment in low Earth orbit. Presented are the test results of the prototype unit. Liulin-5 will be flown on the ISS in the year 2003.

  20. LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE EURADOS SURVEY ON INDIVIDUAL MONITORING DATA AND INTERNAL DOSE ASSESSMENTS OF FOREIGNERS EXPOSED IN JAPAN FOLLOWING THE FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI NPP ACCIDENT.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M A; Fojtik, P; Franck, D; Osko, J; Gerstmann, U; Scholl, C; Lebacq, A L; Breustedt, B; Del Risco Norrlid, L

    2016-09-01

    European Radiation Dosimetry Group e.V. (EURADOS) survey on individual monitoring data and dose assessment has been carried out for 550 foreigners returning home after being exposed in Japan to intakes of radionuclides (mainly (131)I, (132)I, (132)Te, (134)Cs and (137)Cs) as a consequence of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. In vivo and in vitro measurements were performed in their respective countries at an early stage after that accident. Intakes of radionuclides were detected in 208 persons from Europe and Canada, but the committed effective dose E(50) was below the annual dose limit for the public (<1 mSv) in all the cases. Lessons learned from this EURADOS survey are presented here regarding not only internal dosimetry issues, but also the management of the emergency situation, the perception of the risk of health effects due to radiation and the communication with exposed persons who showed anxiety and lack of trust in monitoring data and dose assessments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Quantification of dose perturbations induced by external and internal accessories in ocular proton therapy and evaluation of their dosimetric impact.

    PubMed

    Carnicer, A; Angellier, G; Thariat, J; Sauerwein, W; Caujolle, J P; Hérault, J

    2013-06-01

    Proton scattering on beam shaping devices and protons slowing down on media with different densities within the treatment volume may produce dose perturbations and range variations that are not predicted by treatment planning systems. The aim of this work was to assess the dosimetric impact of elements present in ocular proton therapy treatments that may disturb the prescribed treatment plan. Both distal beam shaping devices and intraocular elements were considered. A wedge filter, tantalum fiducial marker, hemispherical compensator, two intraocular endotamponades (densities 0.97 and 1.92 g cm(-3)) and an intraocular eye lens (IOL) were considered in the study. For these elements, longitudinal dose distributions were measured and∕or calculated in water in beam alignment for a clinical spread-out Bragg peak. Under the same conditions, the unperturbed dose distributions were similarly measured and∕or calculated in the absence of the element. The dosimetric impact was assessed by comparison of unperturbed and perturbed dose distributions. Measurements and calculations were carried out with two methods. Measurements are based on EBT3 films with dedicated software, which makes use of a calibration curve and correction for the quenching effect. Calculations are based on the Monte Carlo (MC) code MCNPX and reproduce the experimental conditions. Both dose maps are obtained with a resolution of 300 dpi. The degree of disturbance of distal beam shaping devices is low for the wedge filter (2% overdose ripple all along the central axis) and moderate for the hemispherical compensator (two bands of variable overdose of up to 10% downstream the compensator lateral edges and -5% underdose on the plateau at off-axis distance of 5 cm). Tantalum clips produce important dose shadows (-20% behind the clip parallel to the beam and range reduction of 1.1 mm) and bands of overdose (15%). The presence of endotamponades modifies the dose distribution very significantly (-5% underdose

  2. Experimental assessment of absorbed dose to mineralized bone tissue from internal emitters: An electron paramagnetic resonance study

    SciTech Connect

    Desrosiers, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    EPR resonances attributable to radiation-induced centers in hydroxyapatite were not detectable in bone samples supplied by the USTUR. These centers are the basis for imaging and dose assessment. Presumable, the short range of the alpha particles emitted precluded the formation of appreciable amounts of hydroxyapatite centers. However, one bone sample did offer a suggestion of hydroxyapatite centers and newly-developed methods to extract this information will be pursued.

  3. Implications of the ICRP Task Group's proposed lung model for internal dose assessments in the mineral sands industry

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.C. ); Birchall, A. )

    1990-09-01

    The ICRP Task Group on Respiratory Tract Models for Radiological Projection is proposing a model to describe the deposition, clearance, retention and dosimetry of inhaled radionuclides for dose-intake calculations and interpretation of bioassay data. The deposition model takes into account new data on the regional deposition of aerosol particles in human lung and the inhalability of large particles. The clearance model treats clearance as competition between mechanical transport, which moves particles to the gastro-intestinal tract and lymph nodes, and the translocation of material to blood. This provides a realistic estimate of the amount of a given material (such as mineral sand) that is absorbed systemically, and its variation with aerosol size. The proposed dosimetry model takes into account the relative sensitivities of the various tissue components of the respiratory tract. A new treatment of dose received by epithelia in the tracheo-bronchiolar and extrathoracic regions is proposed. This paper outlines the novel features of the task group model, and then examines the impact that adoption of the model may have on the assessment of doses from occupational exposures to mineral sands and thoron progeny. 39 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. SU-E-T-513: Investigating Dose of Internal Target Volume After Correcting for Tissue Heterogeneity in SBRT Lung Plans with Homogeneity Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, P; Zhuang, T; Magnelli, A; Djemil, T; Shang, Q; Balik, S; Andrews, M; Stephans, K; Videtic, G; Xia, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose It was recommended to use the prescription of 54 Gy/3 with heterogeneity corrections for previously established dose scheme of 60 Gy/3 with homogeneity calculation. This study is to investigate dose coverage for the internal target volume (ITV) with and without heterogeneity correction. Methods Thirty patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to a dose of 60 Gy in 3 fractions with homogeneous planning for early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were selected. ITV was created either from 4DCT scans or a fusion of multi-phase respiratory scans. Planning target volume (PTV) was a 5 mm expansion of the ITV. For this study, we recalculated homogeneous clinical plans using heterogeneity corrections with monitor units set as clinically delivered. All plans were calculated with 3 mm dose grids and collapsed cone convolution algorithm. To account for uncertainties from tumor delineation and image-guided radiotherapy, a structure ITV2mm was created by expanding ITV with 2 mm margins. Dose coverage to the PTV, ITV and ITV2mm were compared with a student paired t-test. Results With heterogeneity corrections, the PTV V60Gy decreased by 10.1% ± 18.4% (p<0.01) while the maximum dose to the PTV increased by 3.7 ± 4.3% (p<0.01). With and without corrections, D99% was 65.8 ± 4.0 Gy and 66.7 ± 4.8 Gy (p=0.15) for the ITV, and 63.9 ± 3.4 Gy and 62.9 ± 4.6 Gy for the ITV2mm (p=0.22), respectively. The mean dose to the ITV and ITV2mm increased 3.6% ± 4.7% (p<0.01) and 2.3% ± 5.2% (p=0.01) with heterogeneity corrections. Conclusion After heterogeneity correction, the peripheral coverage of the PTV decreased to approximately 54 Gy, but D99% of the ITV and ITV2mm was unchanged and the mean dose to the ITV and ITV2mm was increased. Clinical implication of these results requires more investigation.

  5. Factor Scores, Structure Coefficients, and Communality Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Fara

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents heuristic explanations of factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Common misconceptions regarding these topics are clarified. In addition, (a) the regression (b) Bartlett, (c) Anderson-Rubin, and (d) Thompson methods for calculating factor scores are reviewed. Syntax necessary to execute all four…

  6. A correlation study applied to biomarkers of internal and effective dose for acrylonitrile and 4-aminobiphenyl in smokers.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Gerhard; Newland, Kirk; Papadopoulou, Ermioni; Minet, Emmanuel

    2014-06-01

    The urinary metabolites 2-cyanoethylmercapturic acid and 4-aminobiphenyl have been correlated with tobacco smoke exposure. Similarly, 2-cyanoethylvaline and 4-aminobiphenyl haemoglobin adducts have been used as biomarkers of effective dose for the exposure to acrylonitrile and 4-aminobiphenyl, respectively. Each pair of biomarkers is derived from the same parent chemical; however, the correlation between the urinary and the haemoglobin biomarkers has not been investigated. Using clinical study samples, we report a weak correlation between urinary and haemoglobin biomarkers due to different accumulation and elimination rates. Time course analysis showed that a reduction in exposure was paralleled by a delayed reduction in haemoglobin adducts.

  7. FOOD CONSUMPTION PATTERNS OF THE OZYORSK POPULATION IN 1948-1966, IMPORTANT FOR ESTIMATING PERORAL COMPONENT OF INTERNAL EXPOSURE DOSES

    SciTech Connect

    Mokrov, Y.; Martyushov, V. Z.; Stukalov, Pavel M.; Ivanov, I. A.; Beregich, D. A.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2008-06-01

    Results of reconstruction of food consumption patterns are presented for the residents of Ozyorsk for the period of 1948-1966. The reconstruction was performed on the basis analysis of the archive data. The given period of time is characterized by maximum releases into the atmosphere from the Mayak PA sources, and, therefore, it is considered to be the most significant period for calculating peroral component contribution to effective exposure doses to the population. The paper describes main foodstuff suppliers (regions) and their economic indices, as well as delivery rates and consumption rates for most important foodstuffs (primarily whole milk).

  8. Modern Radiation Therapy for Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, Lena; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Illidge, Tim; Wilson, Lynn D.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    2015-05-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment, either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era.

  9. Modern radiation therapy for extranodal lymphomas: field and dose guidelines from the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Hoppe, Richard T; Li, Ye-Xiong; Tsang, Richard; Wirth, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Modern Radiation Therapy for Extranodal Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Hoppe, Richard T.; Li, Ye-Xiong; Tsang, Richard; Wirth, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT.

  11. A kinematic-based methodology for radiological protection: Runoff analysis to calculate the effective dose for internal exposure caused by ingestion of radioactive isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Syota; Yamada, Tadashi; Yamada, Tomohito J.

    2014-05-01

    We aim to propose a kinematic-based methodology similar with runoff analysis for readily understandable radiological protection. A merit of this methodology is to produce sufficiently accurate effective doses by basic analysis. The great earthquake attacked the north-east area in Japan on March 11, 2011. The system of electrical facilities to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was completely destroyed by the following tsunamis. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive isotopes had leaked and been diffused in the vicinity of the plant. Radiological internal exposure caused by ingestion of food containing radioactive isotopes has become an issue of great interest to the public, and has caused excessive anxiety because of a deficiency of fundamental knowledge concerning radioactivity. Concentrations of radioactivity in the human body and internal exposure have been studied extensively. Previous radiologic studies, for example, studies by International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP), employ a large-scale computational simulation including actual mechanism of metabolism in the human body. While computational simulation is a standard method for calculating exposure doses among radiology specialists, these methods, although exact, are too difficult for non-specialists to grasp the whole image owing to the sophistication. In this study, the human body is treated as a vessel. The number of radioactive atoms in the human body can be described by an equation of continuity, which is the only governing equation. Half-life, the period of time required for the amount of a substance decreases by half, is only parameter to calculate the number of radioactive isotopes in the human body. Half-life depends only on the kinds of nuclides, there are no arbitrary parameters. It is known that the number of radioactive isotopes decrease exponentially by radioactive decay (physical outflow). It is also known that radioactive isotopes

  12. Coefficient Alpha and Reliability of Scale Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almehrizi, Rashid S.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of large-scale assessments develop various score scales that are either linear or nonlinear transformations of raw scores for better interpretations and uses of assessment results. The current formula for coefficient alpha (a; the commonly used reliability coefficient) only provides internal consistency reliability estimates of raw…

  13. Coefficient Alpha and Reliability of Scale Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almehrizi, Rashid S.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of large-scale assessments develop various score scales that are either linear or nonlinear transformations of raw scores for better interpretations and uses of assessment results. The current formula for coefficient alpha (a; the commonly used reliability coefficient) only provides internal consistency reliability estimates of raw…

  14. A Method for Maximizing Split-Half Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callender, John C.; Osburn, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for maximizing split-half reliability coefficients is described. Coefficients derived by the algorithm were found to be generally larger than odd-even split-half coefficients or other internal consistency measures and nearly as large as the largest split half coefficients. MSPLIT, Odd-Even, and Kuder-Richardson-20…

  15. Radiation dose assessment of exposure to depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei Bo; Gerstmann, Udo C; Höllriegl, Vera; Szymczak, Wilfried; Roth, Paul; Hoeschen, Christoph; Oeh, Uwe

    2009-07-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is claimed to contribute to human health problems, known as the Gulf War Syndrome and the Balkan Syndrome. Quantitative radiation dose is required to estimate the health risk of DU materials. The influences of the solubility parameters in the human alimentary tract and the respiratory tract systems and the aerosol particles size on the radiation dose of DU materials were evaluated. The dose conversion factor of daily urinary excretion of DU is provided. The retention and excretion of DU in the human body after a contamination at a wound site were predicted. Dose coefficients of DU after ingestion and inhalation were calculated using the solubility parameters of the DU corrosion products in simulated gastric and simulated lung fluid, which were determined in the Helmholtz Zentrum München. (238)U is the main radiation dose contributor per 1 Bq of DU materials. The dose coefficients of DU materials were estimated to be 3.5 x 10(-8) and 2.1 x 10(-6) Sv Bq(-1) after ingestion and inhalation for members of the public. The ingestion dose coefficient of DU materials is about 75% of the natural uranium value. The inhalation dose coefficient of DU material is in between those for Type M and Type S according to the category for inhaled materials defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Radiation dose possibly received from DU materials can directly be estimated by using the dose conversion factor provided in this study, if daily urinary excretion of DU is measured.

  16. Effects of Low-Dose Microwave on Healing of Fractures with Titanium Alloy Internal Fixation: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Han; Fu, Tengfei; Jiang, Lan; Bai, Yuehong

    2013-01-01

    Background Microwave is a method for improving fracture repair. However, one of the contraindications for microwave treatment listed in the literature is surgically implanted metal plates in the treatment field. The reason is that the reflection of electromagnetic waves and the eddy current stimulated by microwave would increase the temperature of magnetic implants and cause heat damage in tissues. Comparing with traditional medical stainless steel, titanium alloy is a kind of medical implants with low magnetic permeability and electric conductivity. But the effects of microwave treatment on fracture with titanium alloy internal fixation in vivo were not reported. The aim of this article was to evaluate the security and effects of microwave on healing of a fracture with titanium alloy internal fixation. Methods Titanium alloy internal fixation systems were implanted in New Zealand rabbits with a 3.0 mm bone defect in the middle of femur. We applied a 30-day microwave treatment (2,450MHz, 25W, 10 min per day) to the fracture 3 days after operation. Temperature changes of muscle tissues around implants were measured during the irradiation. Normalized radiographic density of the fracture gap was measured on the 10th day and 30th day of the microwave treatment. All of the animals were killed after 10 and 30 days microwave treatment with histologic and histomorphometric examinations performed on the harvested tissues. Findings The temperatures did not increase significantly in animals with titanium alloy implants. The security of microwave treatment was also supported by histology of muscles, nerve and bone around the implants. Radiographic assessment, histologic and histomorphometric examinations revealed significant improvement in the healing bone. Conclusion Our results suggest that, in the healing of fracture with titanium alloy internal fixation, a low dose of microwave treatment may be a promising method. PMID:24086626

  17. Development and application of a dosimetry model (ExDoM2) for calculating internal dose of specific particle-bound metals in the human body.

    PubMed

    Chalvatzaki, Eleftheria; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to develop a dosimetry model (ExDoM2) for calculating internal dose of specific particle-bound metals (As, Pb, Cd, Cr and Mn) in the human body. The ExDoM2 is a revised version of a respiratory tract model (ExDoM) incorporating a new particle clearance mechanism in the respiratory tract model and a Physiologically-Based PharmacoKinetic (PBPK) model. The revised respiratory tract model was used to calculate the deposition, clearance and retention of particles in the human respiratory tract and the mass transferred to the oesophagus (gastrointestinal tract) and blood. The PBPK module was used to analyze the distribution of metals (As, Pb, Cd, Cr and Mn) from the blood circulation system to other organs or tissues like liver, kidneys, heart, brain, muscle and bone. The model was applied to calculate the internal human dose for an adult Caucasian male exposed to particulate mass matter (PM), PMPb, PMCd, PMMn and PMCr in an urban area (Athens, Greece). The analysis showed that at the end of the exposure (one day exposure scenario) to PMPb, the major accumulation occurs in the bone, blood and muscle, whereas as regards PMCd the major accumulation occurs in the other tissues, like kidney and liver. In addition, for PMMn, the major accumulation occurs in the other tissues and lungs, whereas as regards PMCr the major accumulation occurs in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and lungs. Therefore, ExDoM2 is an important feature in studying deposition of particles in the human body.

  18. Radiation dose analysis of large and giant internal carotid artery aneurysm treatment with the pipeline embolization device versus traditional coiling techniques.

    PubMed

    Colby, Geoffrey P; Lin, Li-Mei; Nundkumar, Neelesh; Jiang, Bowen; Huang, Judy; Tamargo, Rafael J; Coon, Alexander L

    2015-05-01

    Flow diversion is an effective and increasingly accepted method for endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms. Additionally, the public has heightened concerns regarding radiation exposure from medical procedures. This study analyzes radiation dose and fluoroscopy time during treatment of large and giant proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms with the pipeline embolization device (PED) versus traditional coiling techniques. Radiation dose, fluoroscopy time, and contrast dye administration were retrospectively analyzed in 55 patients undergoing endovascular treatment of aneurysms ≥ 10 mm from petrous to superior hypophyseal ICA segments. Patients were treated by either PED (37 patients) or traditional coiling techniques (18 patients). Aortic arch type and proximal ICA tortuosity were also assessed as markers of access difficulty. Average radiation dose with PED treatment was 2840 ± 213 mGy and 4010 ± 708 mGy with traditional coiling techniques (p=0.048; 29% decrease with PED). Mean fluoroscopy time for PED was 56.1 ± 5.0 min and 85.9 ± 11.9 min for coiling cases (p=0.0087; 35% decrease with PED). These benefits existed despite more difficult arch anatomy and a trend towards greater proximal vessel tortuosity in PED cases. Contrast dye amounts were also reduced by 37.5% in PED cases (75 ± 6 mL) versus coiling cases (120 ± 13 mL, p=0.0008). Treatment of large and giant proximal ICA aneurysms using PED requires less radiation, less fluoroscopy time, and less contrast administration than standard coiling techniques. This further demonstrates the benefits of flow diversion for treatment of these aneurysms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Modern Radiation Therapy for Nodal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma—Target Definition and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Aleman, Berthe; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Dharmarajan, Kavita; Ng, Andrea; Ricardi, Umberto; Wirth, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is an important component of therapy for many patients. Many of the historic concepts of dose and volume have recently been challenged by the advent of modern imaging and RT planning tools. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the ILROG steering committee on the use of RT in NHL in the modern era. The roles of reduced volume and reduced doses are addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional planning and advanced techniques of RT delivery. In the modern era, in which combined-modality treatment with systemic therapy is appropriate, the previously applied extended-field and involved-field RT techniques that targeted nodal regions have now been replaced by limiting the RT to smaller volumes based solely on detectable nodal involvement at presentation. A new concept, involved-site RT, defines the clinical target volume. For indolent NHL, often treated with RT alone, larger fields should be considered. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated RT, breath holding, image guided RT, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented, and their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control.

  20. Modern radiation therapy for nodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma-target definition and dose guidelines from the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Aleman, Berthe; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Dharmarajan, Kavita; Ng, Andrea; Ricardi, Umberto; Wirth, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is an important component of therapy for many patients. Many of the historic concepts of dose and volume have recently been challenged by the advent of modern imaging and RT planning tools. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the ILROG steering committee on the use of RT in NHL in the modern era. The roles of reduced volume and reduced doses are addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional planning and advanced techniques of RT delivery. In the modern era, in which combined-modality treatment with systemic therapy is appropriate, the previously applied extended-field and involved-field RT techniques that targeted nodal regions have now been replaced by limiting the RT to smaller volumes based solely on detectable nodal involvement at presentation. A new concept, involved-site RT, defines the clinical target volume. For indolent NHL, often treated with RT alone, larger fields should be considered. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated RT, breath holding, image guided RT, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented, and their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control.

  1. Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Progress report, March--May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1994-06-01

    The project described in this report was the result of a Memorandum of Cooperation between the US and the former-USSR following the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4. A joint program was established to improve the safety of nuclear power plants and to understand the implications of environmental releases. The task of Working Group 7 was ``to develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future nuclear reactor accident.`` The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two multinational studies, BIOMOVS (Biospheric Model Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (Validation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains. In the future, this project will be considered separately from the Chernobyl Studies Project and the essential activities of former Task 7.1D will be folded within the broader umbrella of the BIOMOVS and VAMP projects. The Working Group Leader of Task 7.1D will continue to provide oversight for this project.

  2. Note on the autocorrelation coefficient as a test statistic for assessment of the goodness-of-fit of biokinetic models to multiple bioassay data sets.

    PubMed

    Gregoratto, D; Marsh, J W

    2013-12-01

    The European Commission project IDEAS has produced guidelines for internal dose assessments from monitoring data. A key stage in the guidelines requires assessment of the goodness-of-fit of biokinetic models to bioassay data. The present note extends the use of an autocorrelation coefficient to assess the fits of multiple types of bioassay quantity simultaneously.

  3. Modified Biserial Correlation Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, Helena Chmura

    1981-01-01

    Asymptotic distribution theory of Brogden's form of biserial correlation coefficient is derived and large sample estimates of its standard error obtained. Its relative efficiency to the biserial correlation coefficient is examined. Recommendations for choice of estimator of biserial correlation are presented. (Author/JKS)

  4. Radiation Dose to Patients from Radiopharmaceuticals: a Compendium of Current Information Related to Frequently Used Substances.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, S; Johansson, L; Leide Svegborn, S; Liniecki, J; Noßke, D; Riklund, K Å; Stabin, M; Taylor, D; Bolch, W; Carlsson, S; Eckerman, K; Giussani, A; Söderberg, L; Valind, S

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a compendium of current information relating to radiation dose to patients, including biokinetic models, biokinetic data, dose coefficients for organ and tissue absorbed doses, and effective dose for major radiopharmaceuticals based on the radiation protection guidance given in Publication 60(ICRP, 1991). These data were mainly compiled from Publications 53, 80, and 106(ICRP, 1987, 1998, 2008), and related amendments and corrections. This report also includes new information for 82Rb-chloride, iodide (123I, 124I, 125I, and 131I) and 123I labeled 2ß-carbomethoxy 3ß-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl) nortropane (FPCIT).The coefficients tabulated in this publication will be superseded in due course by values calculated using new International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements/International Commission on Radiological Protection adult and paediatric reference phantoms and Publication 103 methodology (ICRP,2007). The data presented in this report are intended for diagnostic nuclear medicine and not for therapeutic applications.

  5. Chronic Internal Exposure to Low Dose 137Cs Induces Positive Impact on the Stability of Atherosclerotic Plaques by Reducing Inflammation in ApoE-/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Le Gallic, Clélia; Phalente, Yohann; Manens, Line; Dublineau, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Gueguen, Yann; Lehoux, Stephanie; Ebrahimian, Teni G.

    2015-01-01

    After Chernobyl and Fukushima Daï Chi, two major nuclear accidents, large amounts of radionuclides were released in the environment, mostly caesium 137 (137Cs). Populations living in contaminated territories are chronically exposed to radionuclides by ingestion of contaminated food. However, questions still remain regarding the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. We therefore investigated the effects of a chronic internal exposure to 137Cs on atherosclerosis in predisposed ApoE-/- mice. Mice were exposed daily to 0, 4, 20 or 100 kBq/l 137Cs in drinking water, corresponding to range of concentrations found in contaminated territories, for 6 or 9 months. We evaluated plaque size and phenotype, inflammatory profile, and oxidative stress status in different experimental groups. Results did not show any differences in atherosclerosis progression between mice exposed to 137Cs and unexposed controls. However, 137Cs exposed mice developed more stable plaques with decreased macrophage content, associated with reduced aortic expression of pro-inflammatory factors (CRP, TNFα, MCP-1, IFNγ) and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin). Lesions of mice exposed to 137Cs were also characterized by enhanced collagen and smooth muscle cell content, concurrent with reduced matrix metalloproteinase MMP8 and MMP13 expression. These results suggest that low dose chronic exposure of 137Cs in ApoE-/- mice enhances atherosclerotic lesion stability by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine and MMP production, resulting in collagen-rich plaques with greater smooth muscle cell and less macrophage content. PMID:26046630

  6. Chronic Internal Exposure to Low Dose 137Cs Induces Positive Impact on the Stability of Atherosclerotic Plaques by Reducing Inflammation in ApoE-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Le Gallic, Clélia; Phalente, Yohann; Manens, Line; Dublineau, Isabelle; Benderitter, Marc; Gueguen, Yann; Lehoux, Stephanie; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2015-01-01

    After Chernobyl and Fukushima Daï Chi, two major nuclear accidents, large amounts of radionuclides were released in the environment, mostly caesium 137 (137Cs). Populations living in contaminated territories are chronically exposed to radionuclides by ingestion of contaminated food. However, questions still remain regarding the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. We therefore investigated the effects of a chronic internal exposure to 137Cs on atherosclerosis in predisposed ApoE-/- mice. Mice were exposed daily to 0, 4, 20 or 100 kBq/l 137Cs in drinking water, corresponding to range of concentrations found in contaminated territories, for 6 or 9 months. We evaluated plaque size and phenotype, inflammatory profile, and oxidative stress status in different experimental groups. Results did not show any differences in atherosclerosis progression between mice exposed to 137Cs and unexposed controls. However, 137Cs exposed mice developed more stable plaques with decreased macrophage content, associated with reduced aortic expression of pro-inflammatory factors (CRP, TNFα, MCP-1, IFNγ) and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin). Lesions of mice exposed to 137Cs were also characterized by enhanced collagen and smooth muscle cell content, concurrent with reduced matrix metalloproteinase MMP8 and MMP13 expression. These results suggest that low dose chronic exposure of 137Cs in ApoE-/- mice enhances atherosclerotic lesion stability by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine and MMP production, resulting in collagen-rich plaques with greater smooth muscle cell and less macrophage content.

  7. Mesorad dose assessment model. Volume 1. Technical basis

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, R.I.; Bander, T.J.; Athey, G.F.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1986-03-01

    MESORAD is a dose assessment model for emergency response applications. Using release data for as many as 50 radionuclides, the model calculates: (1) external doses resulting from exposure to radiation emitted by radionuclides contained in elevated or deposited material; (2) internal dose commitment resulting from inhalation; and (3) total whole-body doses. External doses from airborne material are calculated using semi-infinite and finite cloud approximations. At each stage in model execution, the appropriate approximation is selected after considering the cloud dimensions. Atmospheric processes are represented in MESORAD by a combination of Lagrangian puff and Gaussian plume dispersion models, a source depletion (deposition velocity) dry deposition model, and a wet deposition model using washout coefficients based on precipitation rates.

  8. Urinary Metabolomics Revealed Arsenic Internal Dose-Related Metabolic Alterations: A Proof-of-Concept Study in a Chinese Male Cohort

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Urinary biomonitoring provides the most accurate arsenic exposure assessment; however, to improve the risk assessment, arsenic-related metabolic biomarkers are required to understand the internal processes that may be perturbed, which may, in turn, link the exposure to a specific health outcome. This study aimed to investigate arsenic-related urinary metabolome changes and identify dose-dependent metabolic biomarkers as a proof-of-concept of the information that could be obtained by combining metabolomics and targeted analyses. Urinary arsenic species such as inorganic arsenic, methylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid and arsenobetaine were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in a Chinese adult male cohort. Urinary metabolomics was conducted using HPLC-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Arsenic-related metabolic biomarkers were investigated by comparing the samples of the first and fifth quintiles of arsenic exposure classifications using a partial least-squares discriminant model. After the adjustments for age, body mass index, smoking, and alcohol consumption, five potential biomarkers related to arsenic exposure (i.e., testosterone, guanine, hippurate, acetyl-N-formyl-5-methoxykynurenamine, and serine) were identified from 61 candidate metabolites; these biomarkers suggested that endocrine disruption and oxidative stress were associated with urinary arsenic levels. Testosterone, guanine, and hippurate showed a high or moderate ability to discriminate the first and fifth quintiles of arsenic exposure with area-under-curve (AUC) values of 0.89, 0.87, and 0.83, respectively; their combination pattern showed an AUC value of 0.91 with a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 80%. Arsenic dose-dependent AUC value changes were also observed. This study demonstrated that metabolomics can be used to investigate arsenic-related biomarkers of metabolic changes; the dose-dependent trends of

  9. Livingston's Reliability Coefficient and Harris' Index of Efficiency: An Empirical Study of the Two Reliability Coefficients For Criterion-Referenced Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rim, Eui-Do; Bresler, Samuel

    Livingston's reliability coefficients and Harris' indices of efficiency were computed along with the classical internal consistency coefficients, KR-20's (Kuder-Richardson internal consistency coefficient), for 678 criterion-referenced tests in the A through E levels of an individualized mathematics program. The coefficients were carefully studied…

  10. A method for a short-term forecast of the absorbed dose accumulation dynamics on the international space station based on radiation monitoring system data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishnevskii, A. E.; Benghin, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    Many papers are devoted to the prediction of radiation conditions on board of a spacecraft (Pichkhadze et al., 2004; Khamidullina et al., 2008; 2012), and a number of software systems for corresponding calculations have been developed: the US information system CREME96 (https://creme.isde.vander-bilt.edu/); European SPENVIS (http://www.spenvis.oma.be/intro.php); Russian SEREIS (Kuznetsov et al., 2001; Model' kosmosa, 2007) and COSRAD (http://cosrad.sinp.msu.ru/manual.html; Kuznetsov et al., 2011) based on the models of the radiation environment in near-Earth space (Bashkirov et al., 1998; Nymmik, 2004; Model' kosmosa, 2007; Kuznetsov et al., 2011). In this paper we propose a simple calculation algorithm of short-term (for a few days) forecasting of dynamics of the radiation dose on the International Space Station (ISS) in radiation environment undisturbed by solar proton events. This algorithm does not use radiation environment models and detailed ballistic calculations, while it uses data of the onboard radiation monitoring system (RMS) and empirical relations, obtained for ISS orbital motion.

  11. Coefficients of Effective Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Roger H.

    1981-01-01

    Under certain conditions, a validity Coefficient of Effective Length (CEL) can produce highly misleading results. A modified coefficent is suggested for use when empirical studies indicate that underlying assumptions have been violated. (Author/BW)

  12. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E; Poole, L; Cherdak, A; Houghton, W

    1980-05-15

    An instrument has been developed that directly measures the multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. The design incorporates methods for compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in background light level. When used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  13. Correlation of Point B and Lymph Node Dose in 3D-Planned High-Dose-Rate Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Russell, Anthony; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To compare high dose rate (HDR) point B to pelvic lymph node dose using three-dimensional-planned brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with FIGO Stage IB-IIIB cervical cancer received 70 tandem HDR applications using CT-based treatment planning. The obturator, external, and internal iliac lymph nodes (LN) were contoured. Per fraction (PF) and combined fraction (CF) right (R), left (L), and bilateral (Bil) nodal doses were analyzed. Point B dose was compared with LN dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by paired t test and Pearson correlation coefficients. Results: Mean PF and CF doses to point B were R 1.40 Gy +- 0.14 (CF: 7 Gy), L 1.43 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.15 Gy), and Bil 1.41 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.05 Gy). The correlation coefficients between point B and the D100, D90, D50, D2cc, D1cc, and D0.1cc LN were all less than 0.7. Only the D2cc to the obturator and the D0.1cc to the external iliac nodes were not significantly different from the point B dose. Significant differences between R and L nodal DVHs were seen, likely related to tandem deviation from irregular tumor anatomy. Conclusions: With HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer, per fraction nodal dose approximates a dose equivalent to teletherapy. Point B is a poor surrogate for dose to specific nodal groups. Three-dimensional defined nodal contours during brachytherapy provide a more accurate reflection of delivered dose and should be part of comprehensive planning of the total dose to the pelvic nodes, particularly when there is evidence of pathologic involvement.

  14. Age-specific models for evaluating dose and risk from internal exposures to radionuclides: Report of current work of the Metabolism and Dosimetry Research Group, July 1, 1985-June 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.W.; Warren, B.P.

    1987-09-01

    A projection of the health risk to a population internally exposed to a radionuclide requires explicit or implicit use of demographic, biokinetic, dosimetric, and dose-response models. Exposure guidelines have been based on models for a reference adult with a fixed life span. In this report, we describe recent efforts to develop a comprehensive methodology for estimation of radiogenic risk to individuals and to heterogeneous populations. Emphasis is on age-dependent biokinetics and dosimetry for internal emitters, but consideration also is given to conversion of age-specific doses to estimates of risk using realistic, site-specific demographic models and best available age-specific dose-response functions. We discuss how the methods described here may also improve estimates for the reference adult usually considered in radiation protection. 159 refs.

  15. Factors Affecting Coefficient Alpha: A Mini Monte Carlo Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Brian M.

    Factors affecting a lower-bound estimate of internal consistency reliability, Cronbach's coefficient alpha, are explored. Theoretically, coefficient alpha is an estimate of the correlation between two tests drawn at random from a pool of items like the items in the test under consideration. As a practical matter, coefficient alpha can be an index…

  16. Baseline quantity of 131I, 137Cs, 134Cs and 40K in urinary excretions from Thai people and internal exposure dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peekhunthod, D.; Bangvirunrak, J.; Sansakon, S.; Nukultham, A.; Pukkhaw, T.

    2017-06-01

    Today, sealed and unsealed radioactive materials have been used in Thailand for various purposes such as medical, agricultural and industrial applications. There is a growing trend in the use of radioactive materials. Moreover, neighboring countries are planning to construct and operate nuclear power plants. In case of nuclear power plant accidents, radioactive releases in environment and intakes into human body by inhalation and ingestion causing long term health effects. This research aims to determine the radiation baseline quantity of interested relevant radionuclides such as 131I, 137Cs, 134Cs as well as a natural radionuclide, 40K in urine samples of Thai people by gamma spectrometry. Two types of detectors (NaI and HpGe detectors) are calibrated by mixed radionuclide standards of 109Cd, 57Co, 133Ba, 54Mn, 137Cs and 60Co, (energy range from 88 to 1,331 keV). 720 urine samples are collected over a 24 hour period from Thai volunteers with the age older than 18 years old, who lived in eight locations of Thailand. To reduce the effect of geometric difference, 30 ml of urine samples are prepared for counting measurement and efficiency determination. The radiation baseline quantity of 131I, 137Cs, 134Cs and 40K in 30 ml of urine samples are 0.37±0.09, 0.63±0.13, 0.39±0.08 and 7.84±1.63 Bq, respectively. Based on the assumption of intake (50% of the intake by ingestion and 50% of the intake by inhalation), internal dose for members of public are assessed. The committed dose equivalent due to an intake of 131I, 137Cs, 134Cs and 40K are 2.36E-03±1.66-03, 1.15E-01±8.61E-02, 1.16E-01±7.77E-02, 9.44E-01±3.56E-01 mSv per year, respectively.

  17. Cellular internalization and transport of biodegradable polyester dendrimers on a model of the pulmonary epithelium and their formulation in pressurized metered-dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Heyder, Rodrigo S; Zhong, Qian; Bazito, Reinaldo C; da Rocha, Sandro R P

    2017-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of generation and surface PEGylation of degradable polyester-based dendrimers nanocarriers on their interactions with an in vitro model of the pulmonary epithelium as well as to assess the ability to formulate such carriers in propellant-based, portable oral-inhalation devices to determine their potential for local and systemic delivery of drugs to and through the lungs. Hydroxyl (-OH) terminated polyester dendrimers of generation 3 and 4 (G3, and G4) were synthesized using a divergent approach. G4 was surface-modified with PEG (1,000Da). All dendrimers and their building blocks were determined to be highly compatible with the model pulmonary epithelium, with toxicity profiles much more favorable than non-degradable polyamidoamine dendrimers (PAMAM). The transport of the species from the apical to basolateral side across polarized Calu-3 monolayers showed to be generation and surface-chemistry (PEGylation) dependent. The extent of the transport is modulated by their interaction with the polarized epithelium and their transient opening of the tight junctions. G3 was the one most efficiently internalized by the epithelium, and had a small impact on the integrity of the monolayer. On the other hand, the PEGylated G4 was the one least internalized by the polarized epithelium, and at the same time had a more pronounced transient impact on the cellular junctions, resulting in more efficient transport across the cell monolayer. PEGylation of the dendrimer surface played other roles as well. PEGylation modulated the degradation profile of the dendrimer, slowing the process in a step-wise fashion - first the PEG layer is shed and then the dendrimer starts degrading. PEGylation also helped increase the solvation of the nanocarriers by the hydrofluoroalkane propellant used in pressurized metered-dose inhalers, resulting in formulations with excellent dispersibility and aerosol quality (deep lung deposition of 88

  18. Radioisotopic Purity of Sodium Pertechnetate 99mTc Produced with a Medium-Energy Cyclotron: Implications for Internal Radiation Dose, Image Quality, and Release Specifications.

    PubMed

    Selivanova, Svetlana V; Lavallée, Éric; Senta, Helena; Caouette, Lyne; Sader, Jayden A; van Lier, Erik J; Zyuzin, Alexander; van Lier, Johan E; Guérin, Brigitte; Turcotte, Éric; Lecomte, Roger

    2015-10-01

    Cyclotron production of 99mTc is a promising route to supply 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals. Higher 99mTc yields can be obtained with medium-energy cyclotrons in comparison to those dedicated to PET isotope production. To take advantage of this capability, evaluation of the radioisotopic purity of 99mTc produced at medium energy (20-24 MeV) and its impact on image quality and dosimetry was required. Thick 100Mo (99.03% and 99.815%) targets were irradiated with incident energies of 20, 22, and 24 MeV for 2 or 6 h. The targets were processed to recover an effective thickness corresponding to approximately 5-MeV energy loss, and the resulting sodium pertechnetate 99mTc was assayed for chemical, radiochemical, and radionuclidic purity. Radioisotopic content in final formulation was quantified using γ-ray spectrometry. The internal radiation dose for 99mTc-pertechnetate was calculated on the basis of experimentally measured values and biokinetic data in humans. Planar and SPECT imaging were performed using thin capillary and water-filled Jaszczak phantoms. Extracted sodium pertechnetate 99mTc met all provisional quality standards. The formulated solution for injection had a pH of 5.0-5.5, contained greater than 98% of radioactivity in the form of pertechnetate ion, and was stable for at least 24 h after formulation. Radioisotopic purity of 99mTc produced with 99.03% enriched 100Mo was greater than 99.0% decay corrected to the end of bombardment (EOB). The radioisotopic purity of 99mTc produced with 99.815% enriched 100Mo was 99.98% or greater (decay corrected to the EOB). The estimated dose increase relative to 99mTc without any radionuclidic impurities was below 10% for sodium pertechnetate 99mTc produced from 99.03% 100Mo if injected up to 6 h after the EOB. For 99.815% 100Mo, the increase in effective dose was less than 2% at 6 h after the EOB and less than 4% at 15 h after the EOB when the target was irradiated at an incident energy of 24 MeV. Image spatial resolution

  19. Recommendations for implementation of high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy in developing countries by the Advisory Group of International Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Nag, Subir; Dally, Michael; de la Torre, Marcela; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Kizilbash, Nori; Kurusun, Srichai; Pinillos, Luis; Pokrajac, Boris; Sur, Ranjan; Levin, Victor

    2002-09-01

    To provide recommendations for the implementation of high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy technology in developing countries. An Advisory Group Meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) met to address the implementation of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy technology in developing countries. These recommendations reflect only the personal opinions of the authors and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the IAEA. An HDR treatment system should be purchased as a complete unit that includes the 192Ir radioactive source, source loading unit, applicators, treatment planning system, and control console. Infrastructure support may require additional or improved buildings and procurement of or access to new imaging facilities. A supportive budget is needed for quarterly source replacement and the annual maintenance necessary to keep the system operational. The radiation oncologist, medical physicist, and technologist should be specially trained before HDR can be introduced. Training for the oncologist and medical physicist is an ongoing process as new techniques or sites of treatment are introduced. Procedures for quality assurance (QA) of patient treatment, and the planning system must be introduced. Emergency procedures with adequate training of all associated personnel must be in place. The decision to select HDR in preference to alternate methods of brachytherapy is influenced by the ability of the machine to treat a wide variety of clinical sites. In departments with personnel and budgetary resources to support this equipment appropriately, economic advantage becomes evident only if large numbers of patients are treated. Intangible benefits of source safety, personnel safety, and easy adaptation to fluctuating demand for treatments also require consideration when evaluating the need to introduce this treatment system.

  20. Development of Late Toxicity and International Prostate Symptom Score Resolution After External-Beam Radiotherapy Combined With Pulsed Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pieters, Bradley R.; Rezaie, Elisa; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Koedooder, Kees; Grient, Johan N.B. van der; Blank, Leo E.C.M.; Reijke, Theo M. de; Koning, Caro C.E.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the development of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, genitourinary (GU) toxicity, erectile dysfunction, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) resolution in a cohort of patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) followed by a brachytherapy pulsed dose rate (PDR) boost. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2008, 110 patients were treated with 46-Gy EBRT followed by PDR brachytherapy (24.96-28.80 Gy). The investigated outcome variables, GI toxicity, GU toxicity, erectile dysfunction, and IPSS were prospectively scored at several time points during follow-up. Association between time (as continuous and categorical variable) and the outcome variables was assessed using generalized linear models. Results: No statistically significant association was found between time (continuous) and GI toxicity (odds ratio [OR], 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89-1.06), GU toxicity (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.91-1.03), erectile dysfunction (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.99-1.11), and IPSS (-0.11; 95% CI, -0.41-0.20). Also, no statistically significant association was found between these variables and time as a categorical variable. GU toxicity was associated with IPSS resolution (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.09-1.24). Posttreatment IPSS was associated with pretreatment IPSS (0.52; 95% CI, 0.25-0.79). Conclusions: No accumulation of high-grade toxicity over time could be established for a group of patients treated with EBRT and PDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer, probably because high-grade late toxicity resolves with time. Also, differences in IPSS values among patients are smaller after treatment than before treatment.

  1. JKTLD: Limb darkening coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, John

    2015-11-01

    JKTLD outputs theoretically-calculated limb darkening (LD) strengths for equations (LD laws) which predict the amount of LD as a function of the part of the star being observed. The coefficients of these laws are obtained by bilinear interpolation (in effective temperature and surface gravity) in published tables of coefficients calculated from stellar model atmospheres by several researchers. Many observations of stars require the strength of limb darkening (LD) to be estimated, which can be done using theoretical models of stellar atmospheres; JKTLD can help in these circumstances.

  2. Measuring Seebeck Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement apparatus and method with various features to minimize typical sources of errors is described. Common sources of temperature and voltage measurement errors which may impact accurate measurement are identified and reduced. Applying the identified principles, a high temperature Seebeck measurement apparatus and method employing a uniaxial, four-point geometry is described to operate from room temperature up to 1300K. These techniques for non-destructive Seebeck coefficient measurements are simple to operate, and are suitable for bulk samples with a broad range of physical types and shapes.

  3. Can point doses predict volumetric dose to rectum and bladder: a CT-based planning study in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Patil, V M; Patel, F D; Chakraborty, S; Oinam, A S; Sharma, S C

    2011-01-01

    Objective Point doses, as defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), are classically used to evaluate doses to the rectum and bladder in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in cervical cancer. Several studies have shown good correlation between the ICRU point doses and the volumetric doses to these organs. In the present study we attempted to evaluate whether this correlation could be used to predict the volumetric doses to these organs. Methods A total of 150 HDR-ICBT insertions performed between December 2006 and June 2008 were randomly divided into two groups. Group A (n=50) was used to derive the correlation between the point and volumetric doses using regression analysis. This was tested in Group B (n=100) insertions using studentised residuals and Bland–Altman plots. Results Significant correlations were obtained for all volumetric doses and ICRU point doses for rectum and bladder in Group A insertions. The strongest correlation was found for the dose to 2 cc volumes (D2cc). The correlation coefficients for bladder and rectal D2cc versus the respective ICRU point doses were 0.82 and 0.77, respectively (p<0.001). Statistical validation of equations generated in Group B showed mean studentised residual values of 0.001 and 0.000 for the bladder and rectum. However, Bland–Altman analysis showed that the error range for these equations for bladder and rectum were ±64% and ±41% of the point A dose, respectively, which makes these equations unreliable for clinical use. Conclusion Volumetric imaging is essential to obtain proper information about volumetric doses. PMID:21511749

  4. Direct MC conversion of absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water for 60Co radiation.

    PubMed

    Lye, J E; Butler, D J; Franich, R D; Harty, P D; Oliver, C P; Ramanathan, G; Webb, D V; Wright, T

    2013-06-01

    The ARPANSA calibration service for (60)Co gamma rays is based on a primary standard graphite calorimeter that measures absorbed dose to graphite. Measurements with the calorimeter are converted to the absorbed dose to water using the calculation of the ratio of the absorbed dose in the calorimeter to the absorbed dose in a water phantom. ARPANSA has recently changed the basis of this calculation from a photon fluence scaling method to a direct Monte Carlo (MC) calculation. The MC conversion uses an EGSnrc model of the cobalt source that has been validated against water tank and graphite phantom measurements, a step that is required to quantify uncertainties in the underlying interaction coefficients in the MC code. A comparison with the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) as part of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K4 showed an agreement of 0.9973 (53).

  5. Dose accuracy of new versus used Novopen 4 insulin pens.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Hanifi; Taks, Margot; Menheere, Paul; Grouls, Rene; Bravenboer, Bert

    2012-09-01

    To our knowledge, no studies have been performed testing dose accuracy in both new and used patient insulin injection pens. We hypothesized that the dose accuracy of used (>1 year) insulin pens to be less accurate than that of new insulin pens and investigated whether possible differences influence the treatment. This study compared the dosing accuracy of 11 new and 11 used (>1 year) Novopen(®) 4 pens (Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd, Denmark). Dosing accuracy differences between new and used pens were studied by weighing the volume of the dosage of 8 international units of insulin (IU) and 32 IU of 11 pens. Each measurement was repeated 15 times. Whether the pens complied with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) limits of 10% for 8 IU and 5% for 32 IU was tested. The statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney rank sum test (within Sigmaplot version 12.0; Systat Software, Chicago, IL), and a P value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. For the 8 IU dose, the mean delivered dose was 8.04 IU in new pens and 7.91 IU in used insulin pens. For the 32 IU dose, the mean delivered dose was 31.90 in new pens and 31.68 IU in used insulin pens. The difference in the median values between the two groups was statistically significant (P<0.001). Three individual doses in the 32 IU dose exceeded the ISO range in the lower range. The difference in mean variation coefficient between the two groups was also statistically significant (P<0.001). There was a significant difference between the accuracy of new versus used insulin pens. More studies with larger sample sizes are necessary to confirm our findings and further elucidate the relationship between age of insulin pens and dose accuracy.

  6. Long term dose monitoring onboard the European Columbus module of the International Space Station (ISS) in the frame of the DOSIS and DOSIS 3D project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones present on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station (ISS) is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European Columbus module the experiment “Dose Distribution Inside the ISS” (DOSIS), under the project and science lead of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), was launched on July 15th 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The DOSIS experiment consists of a combination of “Passive Detector Packages” (PDP) distributed at eleven locations inside Columbus for the measurement of the spatial variation of the radiation field and two active Dosimetry Telescopes (DOSTELs) with a Data and Power Unit (DDPU) in a dedicated nomex pouch mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module rack (EPM) for the measurement of the temporal variation of the radiation field parameters. The DOSIS experiment suite measured during the lowest solar minimum conditions in the space age from July 2009 to June 2011. In July 2011 the active hardware was transferred to ground for refurbishment and preparation for the follow up DOSIS 3D experiment. The hardware for DOSIS 3D was launched with Soyuz 30S to the ISS on May 15th 2012. The PDPs are replaced with each even number Soyuz flight starting with Soyuz 30S. Data from the active detectors is transferred to ground via the EPM rack which is activated once a month for this action. The presentation will give an overview of the DOSIS and DOSIS 3D experiment and focus on the results from the passive radiation detectors from the DOSIS 3D experiment

  7. [Results of statistical analysis of the dynamics of ionizing radiation dose fields in the service module of the International Space Station in 2000-2012].

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, V G

    2014-01-01

    The on-going 24th solar cycle (SC) is distinguished from the previous ones by low activity. On the contrary, levels of proton fluxes from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are high, which increases the proton flow striking the Earth's radiation belts (ERB). Therefore, at present the absorbed dose from ERB protons should be calculated with consideration of the tangible increase of protons intensity built into the model descriptions based on experimental measurements during the minimum between cycles 19 and 20, and the cycle 21 maximum. The absorbed dose from GCR and ERB protons copies galactic protons dynamics, while the ERB electrons dose copies SC dynamics. The major factors that determine the absorbed dose value are SC phase, ISS orbital altitude and shielding of the dosimeter readings of which are used in analysis. The paper presents the results of dynamic analysis of absorbed doses measured by a variety of dosimeters, namely, R-16 (2 ionization chambers), DB8-1, DB8-2, DB8-3, DB8-4 as a function of ISS orbit altitude and SC phase. The existence of annual variation in the absorbed dose dynamics has been confirmed; several additional variations with the periods of 17 and 52 months have been detected. Modulation of absorbed dose variations by the SC and GCR amplitudes has been demonstrated.

  8. Radiation during deep inspiration allows loco-regional treatment of left breast and axillary-, supraclavicular- and internal mammary lymph nodes without compromising target coverage or dose restrictions to organs at risk.

    PubMed

    Hjelstuen, Mari H B; Mjaaland, Ingvil; Vikström, Johan; Dybvik, Kjell Ivar

    2012-03-01

    Loco-regional radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer represents a treatment planning challenge when the internal mammary chain (IMC) lymph nodes are included in the target volume. This treatment planning study evaluates the reduction in cardiopulmonary doses when radiation is given during deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). This was achieved without compromising dose coverage to the planning target volume (PTV). Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two computed tomography (CT)-scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPM respiratory gating system. Audio-visual guidance was used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed focusing on good coverage (V95% > 98%) of the PTV. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, lungs and contralateral breast were assessed. With equal PTV coverage, average mean heart dose was reduced from 6.2 Gy to 3.1 Gy in DIBH plans as compared to FB. Average volume receiving 25 Gy or more (V25Gy) was reduced from 6.7% to 1.2%, and the number of patients with V25Gy > 5% was reduced from 8 to 1 utilizing DIBH. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 25.0 Gy to 10.9 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving 20 Gy or more (V20Gy) was reduced from 44.5% to 32.7% with DIBH. In 11 of the DIBH plans V20Gy was lower than 35%, in accordance with national guidelines, while none of the FB plans fulfilled this recommendation. Respiratory gated radiotherapy during DIBH is a suitable technique for loco-regional breast irradiation even when IMC lymph nodes are included in the PTV. Cardiopulmonary doses are considerably decreased for all dose levels without compromising the dose coverage to PTV.

  9. Calculation of conversion coefficients using Chinese adult reference phantoms for air submersion and ground contamination.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Qiu, Rui; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Yang, Bo; Liu, Huan; Ren, Li; Li, Junli

    2017-03-21

    The effective and organ equivalent dose coefficients have been widely used to provide assessment of doses received by adult members of the public and by workers exposed to environmental radiation from nuclear facilities under normal or accidental situations. Advancements in phantom types, weighting factors, decay data, etc, have led to the publication of newer results in this regard. This paper presents a new set of conversion coefficients for air submersion and ground contamination (with the use of Geant4) for photons from 15 keV to 10 MeV using the Chinese and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adult reference male and female phantoms. The radiation fields, except for energy spectrum at low energies, were validated by the data obtained from the Monte Carlo code YURI. The effective dose coefficients of monoenergetic photons, obtained for the ICRP adult reference phantoms, agree well with recently published data for air submersion and ground contamination with a plane source at a depth of 0.5 g cm(-2) in soil, but an average difference of 36.5% is observed for ground surface contamination with the abovementioned radiation field. The average differences in organ equivalent dose coefficients between the Chinese and the ICRP adult reference phantoms are within 6% for most organs, but noticeable differences of up to 70% or even higher are found at photon energies below 30 keV under air submersion. The effective dose coefficients obtained with the Chinese adult reference phantoms are greater than those of the ICRP adult reference phantoms above 30 keV and 0.5 MeV for ground contamination and air submersion, respectively; the average differences from the Chinese adult reference phantoms are about 3.6% and 0.4% in the whole energy range with maximum differences of 31.8% and 27.6% at 15 keV for air submersion and ground contamination respectively. These differences are attributed to anatomical discrepancies in overlying tissue mass of an

  10. Calculation of conversion coefficients using Chinese adult reference phantoms for air submersion and ground contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Qiu, Rui; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan; Yang, Bo; Liu, Huan; Ren, Li; Li, Junli

    2017-03-01

    The effective and organ equivalent dose coefficients have been widely used to provide assessment of doses received by adult members of the public and by workers exposed to environmental radiation from nuclear facilities under normal or accidental situations. Advancements in phantom types, weighting factors, decay data, etc, have led to the publication of newer results in this regard. This paper presents a new set of conversion coefficients for air submersion and ground contamination (with the use of Geant4) for photons from 15 keV to 10 MeV using the Chinese and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adult reference male and female phantoms. The radiation fields, except for energy spectrum at low energies, were validated by the data obtained from the Monte Carlo code YURI. The effective dose coefficients of monoenergetic photons, obtained for the ICRP adult reference phantoms, agree well with recently published data for air submersion and ground contamination with a plane source at a depth of 0.5 g cm-2 in soil, but an average difference of 36.5% is observed for ground surface contamination with the abovementioned radiation field. The average differences in organ equivalent dose coefficients between the Chinese and the ICRP adult reference phantoms are within 6% for most organs, but noticeable differences of up to 70% or even higher are found at photon energies below 30 keV under air submersion. The effective dose coefficients obtained with the Chinese adult reference phantoms are greater than those of the ICRP adult reference phantoms above 30 keV and 0.5 MeV for ground contamination and air submersion, respectively; the average differences from the Chinese adult reference phantoms are about 3.6% and 0.4% in the whole energy range with maximum differences of 31.8% and 27.6% at 15 keV for air submersion and ground contamination respectively. These differences are attributed to anatomical discrepancies in overlying tissue mass of an

  11. Contemporary radiation doses to murine rodents inhabiting the most contaminated part of the EURT.

    PubMed

    Malinovsky, G P; Yarmoshenko, I V; Zhukovsky, M V; Starichenko, V I; Chibiryak, M V

    2014-03-01

    The contemporary radiation doses to the organs and tissues of murine rodents inhabiting the most contaminated part of the EURT were estimated. The bones of animals trapped in 2005 at territories with a surface (90)Sr contamination of 24-40 MBq/m(2) were used for dose reconstruction. The concentration of (90)Sr in the animals' skulls was measured using the nondestructive method of bone radiometry. The dose estimation procedure included application of the published values of absorbed fractions of beta-radiation energy for different combinations of source and target organs, accounting for the distribution of radionuclide by organs and tissues. Twelve conversion coefficients were obtained to link the skeleton (90)Sr concentration and doses to eleven organs and the whole body. The whole-body dose rate on the 45th day after the beginning of exposure normalised to whole-body activity is 0.015 (mGy day(-1))/(Bq g(-1)). The estimation yields the following values of doses for Microtus agrestis, Sylvaemus uralensis and Clethrionomys rutilus, respectively: maximum absorbed doses in the skeleton: 267, 121 and 160 mGy; mean whole body internal doses: 37, 14 and 23 mGy; mean internal dose rates on the last day before trapping: 1.2; 0.44 and 0.75 mGy/day. Approaches to the assessment of doses to foetuses and to offspring before weaning were also developed.

  12. Uncertainty analysis of doses from ingestion of plutonium and americium.

    PubMed

    Puncher, M; Harrison, J D

    2012-02-01

    Uncertainty analyses have been performed on the biokinetic model for americium currently used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and the model for plutonium recently derived by Leggett, considering acute intakes by ingestion by adult members of the public. The analyses calculated distributions of doses per unit intake. Those parameters having the greatest impact on prospective doses were identified by sensitivity analysis; the most important were the fraction absorbed from the alimentary tract, f(1), and rates of uptake from blood to bone surfaces. Probability distributions were selected based on the observed distribution of plutonium and americium in human subjects where possible; the distributions for f(1) reflected uncertainty on the average value of this parameter for non-specified plutonium and americium compounds ingested by adult members of the public. The calculated distributions of effective doses for ingested (239)Pu and (241)Am were well described by log-normal distributions, with doses varying by around a factor of 3 above and below the central values; the distributions contain the current ICRP Publication 67 dose coefficients for ingestion of (239)Pu and (241)Am by adult members of the public. Uncertainty on f(1) values had the greatest impact on doses, particularly effective dose. It is concluded that: (1) more precise data on f(1) values would have a greater effect in reducing uncertainties on doses from ingested (239)Pu and (241)Am, than reducing uncertainty on other model parameter values and (2) the results support the dose coefficients (Sv Bq(-1) intake) derived by ICRP for ingestion of (239)Pu and (241)Am by adult members of the public.

  13. Measurement of Entrance Skin Dose and Calculation of Effective Dose for Common Diagnostic X-Ray Examinations in Kashan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Masoumbeigi, Mahboubeh; Salimian, Morteza; Mohseni, Mehran

    2015-02-24

    The knowledge of the radiation dose received by the patient during the radiological examination is essential to prevent risks of exposures. The aim of this work is to study patient doses for common diagnostic radiographic examinations in hospitals affiliated to Kashan University of Medical sciences, Iran. The results of this survey are compared with those published by some national and international values. Entrance surface dose (ESD) was measured based on the exposure parameters used for the actual examination and effective dose (ED) was calculated by use of conversion coefficients calculated by Monte Carlo methods. The mean entrance surface dose and effective dose for examinations of the chest (PA, Lat), abdomen (AP), pelvis (AP), lumbar spine (AP, Lat) and skull (AP, Lat) are 0.37, 0.99, 2.01, 1.76, 2.18, 5.36, 1.39 and 1.01 mGy, and 0.04, 0.1, 0.28, 0,28, 0.23, 0.13, 0.01 and 0.01 mSv, respectively. The ESDs and EDs reported in this study, except for examinations of the chest, are generally lower than comparable reference dose values published in the literature. On the basis of the results obtained in this study can conclude that use of newer equipment and use of the proper radiological parameter can significantly reduce the absorbed dose. It is recommended that radiological parameter in chest examinations be revised.

  14. Measurement of Entrance Skin Dose and Calculation of Effective Dose for Common Diagnostic X-Ray Examinations in Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Masoumbeigi, Mahboubeh; Salimian, Morteza; Mohseni, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of the radiation dose received by the patient during the radiological examination is essential to prevent risks of exposures. The aim of this work is to study patient doses for common diagnostic radiographic examinations in hospitals affiliated to Kashan University of Medical sciences, Iran. The results of this survey are compared with those published by some national and international values. Entrance surface dose (ESD) was measured based on the exposure parameters used for the actual examination and effective dose (ED) was calculated by use of conversion coefficients calculated by Monte Carlo methods. The mean entrance surface dose and effective dose for examinations of the chest (PA, Lat), abdomen (AP), pelvis (AP), lumbar spine (AP, Lat) and skull (AP, Lat) are 0.37, 0.99, 2.01, 1.76, 2.18, 5.36, 1.39 and 1.01 mGy, and 0.04, 0.1, 0.28, 0,28, 0.23, 0.13, 0.01 and 0.01 mSv, respectively. The ESDs and EDs reported in this study, except for examinations of the chest, are generally lower than comparable reference dose values published in the literature. On the basis of the results obtained in this study can conclude that use of newer equipment and use of the proper radiological parameter can significantly reduce the absorbed dose. It is recommended that radiological parameter in chest examinations be revised. PMID:26156930

  15. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and neutron doses, when applicable. In determining the veteran's dose, initial neutron, initial gamma..., doses will be reported as gamma dose, neutron dose, and internal dose. To the extent to which the... of a neutron or internal exposure? What is the reconstruction? Upon request, the participant or...

  16. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., and neutron doses, when applicable. In determining the veteran's dose, initial neutron, initial gamma..., doses will be reported as gamma dose, neutron dose, and internal dose. To the extent to which the... of a neutron or internal exposure? What is the reconstruction? Upon request, the participant or...

  17. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., and neutron doses, when applicable. In determining the veteran's dose, initial neutron, initial gamma..., doses will be reported as gamma dose, neutron dose, and internal dose. To the extent to which the... of a neutron or internal exposure? What is the reconstruction? Upon request, the participant or...

  18. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., and neutron doses, when applicable. In determining the veteran's dose, initial neutron, initial gamma..., doses will be reported as gamma dose, neutron dose, and internal dose. To the extent to which the... of a neutron or internal exposure? What is the reconstruction? Upon request, the participant or...

  19. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and neutron doses, when applicable. In determining the veteran's dose, initial neutron, initial gamma..., doses will be reported as gamma dose, neutron dose, and internal dose. To the extent to which the... of a neutron or internal exposure? What is the reconstruction? Upon request, the participant or...

  20. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Cherdak, A.; Poole, L.; Houghton, W.

    1980-05-01

    The paper presents an instrument that directly measures multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. Attention is given to the design, which is shown to incorporate methods for the compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in the background light level. In addition, when used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Finally, it is reported that systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  1. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E.; Cherdak, A.; Poole, L.; Houghton, W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents an instrument that directly measures multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. Attention is given to the design, which is shown to incorporate methods for the compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in the background light level. In addition, when used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Finally, it is reported that systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  2. Some aspects of the fetal doses given in ICRP Publication 88.

    PubMed

    Phipps, A W; Harrison, J D; Fell, T P; Eckerman, K F; Nosske, D

    2003-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recently published dose coefficients (dose per unit intake, Sv Bq(-1)) for the offspring of women exposed to radionuclides during or before pregnancy. These dose estimates include in utero doses to the embryo and fetus and doses delivered postnatally to the newborn child from radionuclides retained at birth. This paper considers the effect on doses of the time of radionuclide intake and examines the proportion of dose delivered in utero and postnatally for different radionuclides. Methods used to calculate doses to the fetal skeleton are compared. For many radionuclides, doses are greatest for intakes early in pregnancy but important exceptions, for which doses are greatest for intakes later in pregnancy, are iodine isotopes and isotopes of the alkaline earth elements, including strontium. While radionuclides such as 131I deliver dose largely in utero, even for intakes late in pregnancy, others such as 239Pu deliver dose largely postnatally, even for intakes early during pregnancy. For alpha emitters deposited in the skeleton, the assumption made is of uniform distribution of the radionuclide and of target cells for leukaemia and bone cancer in utero; that is, the developing bone structure is not considered. However, for beta emitters, the bone structure was considered. Both approaches can be regarded as reasonably conservative, given uncertainties in particular in the location of the target cells and the rapid growth and remodelling of the skeleton at this stage of development.

  3. Contribution of time-activity pattern and microenvironment to black carbon (BC) inhalation exposure and potential internal dose among elementary school children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeran; Park, Donguk

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify the contributions of activities or microenvironments (MEs) to daily total exposure to and potential dose of black carbon (BC). Daily BC exposures (24-h) were monitored using a micro-aethalometer micoAeth AE51 with forty school-aged children living in an urban area in Korea from August 2015 to January 2016. The children's time-activity patterns and the MEs they visited were investigated by means of a time-activity diary (TAD) and follow-up interviews with the children and their parents. Potential inhaled dose was estimated by multiplying the airborne BC concentrations (μg/m3) we monitored for the time the children spent in a particular ME by the inhalation rate (IR, m3/h) for the time-activity performed. The contribution of activities and MEs to overall daily exposure to and potential dose of BC was quantified. Overall mean daily potential dose was equal to 24.1 ± 10.6 μg/day (range: 6.6-46.3 μg/day). The largest contribution to BC exposure and potential dose (51.9% and 41.7% respectively) occurred in the home thanks to the large amount of time spent there. Transportation was where children received the most intense exposure to (14.8%) and potential dose (20.2%) of BC, while it accounted for 7.6% of daily time. School on weekdays during the semester was responsible for 20.3% of exposure and 22.5% of potential dose. Contribution to BC exposure and potential dose was altered by several time-activity parameters, such as type of day (weekdays vs. weekends; school days vs. holidays), season, and gender. Traveling by motor vehicle and subway showed more elevated exposure or potential dose intensity on weekdays or school days, probably influenced by the increased surrounding traffic volumes on these days compared to on weekends or holidays. This study may be used to prioritize targets for minimizing children's exposure to BC and to indicate outcomes of BC control strategies.

  4. SU-E-T-157: Evaluation and Comparison of Doses to Pelvic Lymph Nodes and to Point B with 3D Image Guided Treatment Planning for High Dose Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandare, N.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate and compare the doses received by the obturator, external and internal iliac lymph nodes and point Methods: CT-MR fused image sets of 15 patients obtained for each of 5 fractions of HDR brachytherapy using tandem and ring applicator, were used to generate treatment plans optimized to deliver a prescription dose to HRCTV-D90 and to minimize the doses to organs at risk (OARs). For each set of image, target volume (GTV, HRCTV) OARs (Bladder, Rectum, Sigmoid), and both left and right pelvic lymph nodes (obturator, external and internal iliac lymph nodes) were delineated. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were generated for pelvic nodal groups (left and right obturator group, internal and external iliac chains) Per fraction DVH parameters used for dose comparison included dose to 100% volume (D100), and dose received by 2cc (D2cc), 1cc (D1cc) and 0.1 cc (D0.1cc) of nodal volume. Dose to point B was compared with each DVH parameter using 2 sided t-test. Pearson correlation were determined to examine relationship of point B dose with nodal DVH parameters. Results: FIGO clinical stage varied from 1B1 to IIIB. The median pretreatment tumor diameter measured on MRI was 4.5 cm (2.7– 6.4cm).The median dose to bilateral point B was 1.20 Gy ± 0.12 or 20% of the prescription dose. The correlation coefficients were all <0.60 for all nodal DVH parameters indicating low degree of correlation. Only 2 cc of obturator nodes was not significantly different from point B dose on t-test. Conclusion: Dose to point B does not adequately represent the dose to any specific pelvic nodal group. When using image guided 3D dose-volume optimized treatment nodal groups should be individually identified and delineated to obtain the doses received by pelvic nodes.

  5. Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Monthly progress reports and final report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, F.O.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of Task 7.lD was to (1) establish a collaborative US-USSR effort to improve and validate our methods of forecasting doses and dose commitments from the direct contamination of food sources, and (2) perform experiments and validation studies to improve our ability to predict rapidly and accurately the long-term internal dose from the contamination of agricultural soil. At early times following an accident, the direct contamination of pasture and food stuffs, particularly leafy vegetation and grain, can be of great importance. This situation has been modeled extensively. However, models employed then to predict the deposition, retention and transport of radionuclides in terrestrial environments employed concepts and data bases that were more than a decade old. The extent to which these models have been tested with independent data sets was limited. The data gathered in the former-USSR (and elsewhere throughout the Northern Hemisphere) offered a unique opportunity to test model predictions of wet and dry deposition, agricultural foodchain bioaccumulation, and short- and long-term retention, redistribution, and resuspension of radionuclides from a variety of natural and artificial surfaces. The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates the activity of Task 7.lD into a multinational effort to evaluate models and data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two studies, BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (VAlidation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains.

  6. Ultrasound-detected thyroid nodule prevalence and radiation dose from fallout.

    PubMed

    Land, C E; Zhumadilov, Z; Gusev, B I; Hartshorne, M H; Wiest, P W; Woodward, P W; Crooks, L A; Luckyanov, N K; Fillmore, C M; Carr, Z; Abisheva, G; Beck, H L; Bouville, A; Langer, J; Weinstock, R; Gordeev, K I; Shinkarev, S; Simon, S L

    2008-04-01

    Settlements near the Semipalatinsk Test Site (SNTS) in northeastern Kazakhstan were exposed to radioactive fallout during 1949-1962. Thyroid disease prevalence among 2994 residents of eight villages was ascertained by ultrasound screening. Malignancy was determined by cytopathology. Individual thyroid doses from external and internal radiation sources were reconstructed from fallout deposition patterns, residential histories and diet, including childhood milk consumption. Point estimates of individual external and internal dose averaged 0.04 Gy (range 0-0.65) and 0.31 Gy (0-9.6), respectively, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.46. Ultrasound-detected thyroid nodule prevalence was 18% and 39% among males and females, respectively. It was significantly and independently associated with both external and internal dose, the main study finding. The estimated relative biological effectiveness of internal compared to external radiation dose was 0.33, with 95% confidence bounds of 0.09-3.11. Prevalence of papillary cancer was 0.9% and was not significantly associated with radiation dose. In terms of excess relative risk per unit dose, our dose-response findings for nodule prevalence are comparable to those from populations exposed to medical X rays and to acute radiation from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings.

  7. An improved determination of the internal beta-ray dose-rate in granite rocks and its effect on thermoluminescence dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachy, A. L.

    1980-12-01

    The dose is due primarily to the potassium 40 contained in the other minerals in the rock. The purpose of improving the dosimeter determination is to produce thermoluminescence (TL) dates of sufficient accuracy that they can be used to calibrate radiocarbon dates beyond 7000 years before present. To accurately determine the dose rate, a matrix representation of the rock is made using color photography of the cathodoluminescence (CL) from polished rock sections to identify and map the minerals. This matrix is the input data for a FORTRAN IV computer program which finds the quartz points and then determines the average distribution of minerals about the quartz points. This is combined with beta ray dosimetry data and the potassium 40 concentrations of the various minerals to yield the dose rate.

  8. Gender Differences in Radiation Dose from Nuclear Cardiology Studies Across the World: Findings from the International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) Registry

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lynn; Dorbala, Sharmila; Paez, Diana; Shaw, Leslee J.; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Pascual, Thomas N. B.; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Vitola, João V.; Better, Nathan; Bokhari, Nadia; Rehani, Madan M.; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Mercuri, Mathew; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to investigate gender-based differences in nuclear cardiology practice, globally, with particular focus on laboratory volume, radiation dose, protocols, and best practices. BACKGROUND It is unclear if gender-based differences exist in radiation exposure for nuclear cardiology procedures. METHODS In a large multicenter observational cross-sectional study encompassing 7911 patients in 65 countries, radiation effective dose was estimated for each examination. Patient-level best practices relating to radiation exposure were compared between genders. Analysis of covariance was utilized to determine any difference in radiation exposure according to gender, region, and the interaction between gender and region. Linear, logistic, and hierarchical regression models were developed to evaluate gender-based differences in radiation exposure and laboratory adherence to best practices. We also included the United Nations’ gender inequality and human development indices as covariates in multivariable models. RESULTS The proportion of MPI studies performed in women varied between countries, however there was no significant correlation with gender inequality index. Globally, mean effective dose for nuclear cardiology procedures was only slightly lower in women (9.6±4.5 mSv) than in men (10.3±4.5 mSv men, p<0.001), with a difference of only 0.3 mSv in a multivariable model adjusting for patient age and weight. Stress-only imaging was performed more frequently in women (12.5% vs. 8.4%, p<0.001), however camera-based dose-reduction strategies were used less frequently in women (58.6% vs. 65.5%, p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Despite significant worldwide variation in best practice use and radiation doses from nuclear cardiology procedures, only small differences were observed between genders worldwide. Regional variations noted in MPI use and radiation dose offer potential opportunities to address gender-related differences in delivery of nuclear

  9. Manufacturing sector carbon dioxide emissions in nine OECD countries 1973--87: A Divisia index decomposition to changes in fuel mix, emission coefficients, industry structure, energy intensities, and international structure

    SciTech Connect

    Torvanger, A. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper the reduction in energy-related manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions for nine OECD countries in the period 1973 to 1987 is analyzed. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from energy use data. The emphasis is on carbon dioxide intensities, defined as emissions divided by value added. The overall manufacturing carbon dioxide intensity for the nine OECD countries was reduced by 42% in the period 1973--1987. Five fuels are specified together with six subsectors of manufacturing. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from fossil fuel consumption, employing emissions coefficients for gas, oil and solids. In addition, electricity consumption is specified. For electricity use an emission coefficient index is calculated from the shares of fossil fuels, nuclear power and hydro power used to generate electricity, and the efficiency in electricity generation from these energy sources. A Divisia index approach is used to sort out the contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity from different components. The major finding is that the main contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity is from the general reduction in manufacturing energy intensity, most likely driven by economic growth and increased energy prices, giving incentives to invest in new technology and new industrial processes. There is also a significant contribution from reduced production in the most carbon dioxide intensive subsectors, and a contribution from higher efficiency in electricity generation together with a larger nuclear power share at the expense of oil. 19 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. A 3D Monte Carlo Method for Estimation of Patient-specific Internal Organs Absorbed Dose for (99m)Tc-hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide Imaging.

    PubMed

    Momennezhad, Mehdi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Parach, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Asl, Ruhollah Ghahraman

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tracers are easily available and more widely used than positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers, and SPECT imaging still remains the most prevalent nuclear medicine imaging modality worldwide. The aim of this study is to implement an image-based Monte Carlo method for patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) absorbed dose calculation in patients after injection of (99m)Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (hynic)-Tyr(3)-octreotide as a SPECT radiotracer. (99m)Tc patient-specific S values and the absorbed doses were calculated with GATE code for each source-target organ pair in four patients who were imaged for suspected neuroendocrine tumors. Each patient underwent multiple whole-body planar scans as well as SPECT imaging over a period of 1-24 h after intravenous injection of (99m)hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide. The patient-specific S values calculated by GATE Monte Carlo code and the corresponding S values obtained by MIRDOSE program differed within 4.3% on an average for self-irradiation, and differed within 69.6% on an average for cross-irradiation. However, the agreement between total organ doses calculated by GATE code and MIRDOSE program for all patients was reasonably well (percentage difference was about 4.6% on an average). Normal and tumor absorbed doses calculated with GATE were slightly higher than those calculated with MIRDOSE program. The average ratio of GATE absorbed doses to MIRDOSE was 1.07 ± 0.11 (ranging from 0.94 to 1.36). According to the results, it is proposed that when cross-organ irradiation is dominant, a comprehensive approach such as GATE Monte Carlo dosimetry be used since it provides more reliable dosimetric results.

  11. A 3D Monte Carlo Method for Estimation of Patient-specific Internal Organs Absorbed Dose for 99mTc-hynic-Tyr3-octreotide Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Momennezhad, Mehdi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Parach, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Asl, Ruhollah Ghahraman

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tracers are easily available and more widely used than positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers, and SPECT imaging still remains the most prevalent nuclear medicine imaging modality worldwide. The aim of this study is to implement an image-based Monte Carlo method for patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) absorbed dose calculation in patients after injection of 99mTc-hydrazinonicotinamide (hynic)-Tyr3-octreotide as a SPECT radiotracer. 99mTc patient-specific S values and the absorbed doses were calculated with GATE code for each source-target organ pair in four patients who were imaged for suspected neuroendocrine tumors. Each patient underwent multiple whole-body planar scans as well as SPECT imaging over a period of 1-24 h after intravenous injection of 99mhynic-Tyr3-octreotide. The patient-specific S values calculated by GATE Monte Carlo code and the corresponding S values obtained by MIRDOSE program differed within 4.3% on an average for self-irradiation, and differed within 69.6% on an average for cross-irradiation. However, the agreement between total organ doses calculated by GATE code and MIRDOSE program for all patients was reasonably well (percentage difference was about 4.6% on an average). Normal and tumor absorbed doses calculated with GATE were slightly higher than those calculated with MIRDOSE program. The average ratio of GATE absorbed doses to MIRDOSE was 1.07 ± 0.11 (ranging from 0.94 to 1.36). According to the results, it is proposed that when cross-organ irradiation is dominant, a comprehensive approach such as GATE Monte Carlo dosimetry be used since it provides more reliable dosimetric results. PMID:27134562

  12. The work of the ICRP dose calculational task group: Issues in implementation of the ICRP dosimetric methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerman, K.F.

    1999-01-01

    Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has had efforts underway to provide the radiation protection community with age-dependent dose coefficients, i.e.g, the dose per unit intake. The Task Group on Dose Calculations, chaired by the author, is responsible for the computation of these coefficients. The Task Group, formed in 1974 to produce ICRP Publication 30, is now international in its membership and its work load has been distributed among the institutions represented on the task group. This paper discusses: (1) recent advances in biokinetic modeling; (2) the recent changes in the dosimetric methodology; (3) the novel computational problems with some of the ICRP quantities; and (4) quality assurance issues which the Task Group has encountered. Potential future developments of the dosimetric framework which might strengthen the relationships with the emerging understanding of radiation risk will also be discussed.

  13. Evaluation of warfarin management with international normalized ratio self-testing and online remote monitoring and management plus low-dose vitamin k with genomic considerations: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bussey, Henry I; Bussey, Marie; Bussey-Smith, Kristin L; Frei, Christopher R

    2013-11-01

    As better international normalized ratio (INR) control and self-testing reduce events in warfarin-treated patients, and vitamin K supplementation may improve INR control, our primary objective was to evaluate the effect of a system combining frequent INR self-testing with online remote monitoring and management (STORM₂) and low-dose vitamin K supplementation on INR control; our secondary objectives were to assess the impact of STORM₂ on clinician time and to evaluate the influence of pharmacogenomics on INR stability and warfarin dose after vitamin K supplementation. Prospective pre- and postintervention study. Freestanding clinical research center. Fifty-five patients treated with long-term warfarin therapy who were referred from four anticoagulation clinics and seven medical practices. All patients performed weekly INR self-testing and received vitamin K 100 µg/day and online anticoagulation management for 1 year. INR control and time required for anticoagulation management were assessed, and an analysis of warfarin dosing and INR stability by genetic polymorphism subgroup (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex 1 [VKORC1] and cytochrome P450 2C9 isoenzyme) was performed; vitamin K product content was also analyzed. The percentage of time that the INR is within the time in therapeutic range (TTR) improved from 56% before the intervention to 81% after the intervention (p<0.0001), and time spent at extreme INR values of lower than 1.5 or higher than 5 was reduced from 3.1% to 0.4% (p=0.01). Clinician time was less than 10 minutes per four patient visits per month. Genetic polymorphisms did not correlate with INR stability or the increase in warfarin dose after vitamin K supplementation. The content of the vitamin K product, however, was only 34-76% of the labeled amount. Patients with the GG VKORC1 genotype required a higher warfarin dose than predicted by the genomic-based dosing chart in the warfarin package insert. The 25% point improvement in TTR with STORM

  14. Ultrasound-Detected Thyroid Nodule Prevalence and Radiation Dose from Fallout

    PubMed Central

    Land, C. E.; Zhumadilov, Z.; Gusev, B. I.; Hartshorne, M. H.; Wiest, P. W.; Woodward, P. W.; Crooks, L. A.; Luckyanov, N. K.; Fillmore, C. M.; Carr, Z.; Abisheva, G.; Beck, H. L.; Bouville, A.; Langer, J.; Weinstock, R.; Gordeev, K. I.; Shinkarev, S.; Simon, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Settlements near the Semipalatinsk Test Site (SNTS) in northeastern Kazakhstan were exposed to radioactive fallout during 1949–1962. Thyroid disease prevalence among 2994 residents of eight villages was ascertained by ultrasound screening. Malignancy was determined by cytopathology. Individual thyroid doses from external and internal radiation sources were reconstructed from fallout deposition patterns, residential histories and diet, including childhood milk consumption. Point estimates of individual external and internal dose averaged 0.04 Gy (range 0–0.65) and 0.31 Gy (0–9.6), respectively, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.46. Ultrasound-detected thyroid nodule prevalence was 18% and 39% among males and females, respectively. It was significantly and independently associated with both external and internal dose, the main study finding. The estimated relative biological effectiveness of internal compared to external radiation dose was 0.33, with 95% confidence bounds of 0.09–3.11. Prevalence of papillary cancer was 0.9% and was not significantly associated with radiation dose. In terms of excess relative risk per unit dose, our dose–response findings for nodule prevalence are comparable to those from populations exposed to medical X rays and to acute radiation from the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. PMID:18363427

  15. Application of the computer program GENMOD for modeling the behaviour of radionuclides in the human body and for performing calculations of internal dose

    SciTech Connect

    Kassing, W.; Eckart, R.; Spitz, H.

    1996-07-01

    GENMOD is a computer program for modeling the behavior of radionuclides in the human body, and for performing various internal dosimetry calculations using the results obtained from the modeling. The program employs seven different mathematical models in describing the behavior of a wide variety of radionuclides in the body.

  16. Direct estimates of cancer mortality due to low doses of ionising radiation: an international study. IARC Study Group on Cancer Risk among Nuclear Industry Workers.

    PubMed

    1994-10-15

    When setting standards for protection against ionising radiation it has been usual to extrapolate from experience with high-dose short-term exposure--studies based on atom bomb survivors and patients exposed to radiation therapeutically. Those who work in the nuclear industry are exposed to low-level predominantly gamma radiation for longer periods, and provide an alternative direct source of information. We have combined mortality data from seven cohort studies on nearly 96,000 nuclear industry workers monitored for external radiation in Canada, UK, and USA to assess directly the carcinogenic effects of protracted low-dose exposure to ionising radiation. The excess relative risk for death from leukaemia, excluding chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, was 2.2 per Sv (90% Cl 0.1 to 5.7). This estimate is intermediate between the linear estimate of 3.7 per Sv and the linear-quadratic estimate (as used in recent leukaemia risk assessments) of 1.4 per Sv derived from Japanese atomic bomb survivors' data. The excess relative risk for death from all cancers, excluding leukaemia, was -0.07 per Sv (90% Cl -0.4 to 0.3). This estimate is consistent with a range of risks varying from negative to nearly twice those estimated from atomic bomb survivors (0.18 per Sv). These are the most precise direct estimates so far made of carcinogenic risk after protracted exposure to low-dose ionising radiation. They provide little evidence that the estimates that form the basis of current radiation protection recommendations are appreciably in error.

  17. Threshold intensity and coefficient of raman scattering amplification in a high- Q bilayer microresonator during the formation of internal and external submicron photonic jets: A photonic nanojet in the near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, M. V.; Solis, N. W.; Peretyagin, P. Yu.; Okun'kova, A. A.; Torrecillas, R.

    2016-04-01

    Using quantum and semiclassical approaches, the energy excitation threshold for induced Raman scattering is estimated and a relationship between the excitation threshold and the concentration of optically active molecules in a bilayer microresonator is established. Estimates are made during the formation of specially configured optical fields: internal and external photonic nanojets. Based on the amount of stored energy per mode and the value of the threshold intensity, an additional generalized selection rule for whispering gallery modes is suggested. It is shown that the bilayer microresonator can focus incident radiation (laser pumping) into a submicron focal volume at a low threshold intensity.

  18. Monte Carlo calculation of patient organ doses from computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oono, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Tsuduki, Shoya; Kawasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate quantitatively the patient organ dose from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo calculations. A multidetector CT unit (Aquilion 16, TOSHIBA Medical Systems) was modeled with the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. The X-ray spectrum and the configuration of the bowtie filter for the Monte Carlo modeling were determined from the chamber measurements for the half-value layer (HVL) of aluminum and the dose profile (off-center ratio, OCR) in air. The calculated HVL and OCR were compared with measured values for body irradiation with 120 kVp. The Monte Carlo-calculated patient dose distribution was converted to the absorbed dose measured by a Farmer chamber with a (60)Co calibration factor at the center of a CT water phantom. The patient dose was evaluated from dose-volume histograms for the internal organs in the pelvis. The calculated Al HVL was in agreement within 0.3% with the measured value of 5.2 mm. The calculated dose profile in air matched the measured value within 5% in a range of 15 cm from the central axis. The mean doses for soft tissues were 23.5, 23.8, and 27.9 mGy for the prostate, rectum, and bladder, respectively, under exposure conditions of 120 kVp, 200 mA, a beam pitch of 0.938, and beam collimation of 32 mm. For bones of the femur and pelvis, the mean doses were 56.1 and 63.6 mGy, respectively. The doses for bone increased by up to 2-3 times that of soft tissue, corresponding to the ratio of their mass-energy absorption coefficients.

  19. Effect of internal pressure and gas/liquid interface area on the CO mass transfer coefficient using hollow fibre membranes as a high mass transfer gas diffusing system for microbial syngas fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Muhammad; Park, Shinyoung; Jeong, Yeseul; Lee, Eun Yeol; Lee, Jinwon; Chang, In Seop

    2014-10-01

    This study proposed a submerged hollow fibre membrane bioreactor (HFMBR) system capable of achieving high carbon monoxide (CO) mass transfer for applications in microbial synthesis gas conversion systems. Hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane fibres were used to fabricate a membrane module, which was used for pressurising CO in water phase. Pressure through the hollow fibre lumen (P) and membrane surface area per unit working volume of the liquid (A(S)/V(L)) were used as controllable parameters to determine gas-liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a) values. We found a k(L)a of 135.72 h(-1) when P was 93.76 kPa and AS/VL was fixed at 27.5m(-1). A higher k(L)a of 155.16 h(-1) was achieved by increasing AS/VL to 62.5m(-1) at a lower P of 37.23 kPa. Practicality of HFMBR to support microbial growth and organic product formation was assessed by CO/CO2 fermentation using Eubacterium limosum KIST612.

  20. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A. W.; Saripan, M. I.; Bradley, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose.

  1. Prevalence of and risks for internal contamination among hospital staff caring for a patient contaminated with a fatal dose of polonium-210.

    PubMed

    le Polain de Waroux, Olivier; Cohuet, Sandra; Bishop, Louise; Johnson, Sandra; Shaw, Karen; Maguire, Helen; Charlett, André; Fraser, Graham

    2011-10-01

    Alexander Litvinenko died on November 23, 2006, from acute radiation sickness syndrome caused by ingestion of polonium-210 (²¹⁰Po). The objective was to assess the prevalence of and risk factors for internal contamination with ²¹⁰Po in healthcare workers (HCWs) caring for the contaminated patient. Hospital. HCWs who had direct contact with the patient. We interviewed 43 HCWs and enquired about their activities and use of personal protective equipment (PPE). Internal contamination was defined as urinary ²¹⁰Po excretion above 20 mBq within 24 hours. We obtained risk ratios (RRs) for internal contamination using Poisson regression. Thirty-seven HCWs (86%) responded, and 8 (22%) showed evidence of internal contamination, all at very low levels that were unlikely to cause adverse health outcomes. Daily care of the patient (washing and toileting the patient) was the main risk factor (RR, 3.6 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-11.6]). In contrast, planned invasive procedures were not associated with a higher risk. There was some evidence of a higher risk associated with handling blood samples (RR, 3.5 [95% CI, 0.8-15.6]) and changing urine bags and/or collecting urine samples (RR, 2.7 [95% CI, 0.8-9.5]). There was also some evidence that those who reported not always using standard PPE were at higher risk than were others (RR, 2.5 [95% CI, 0.8-8.1]). The sensitive quantitative measurement enabled us to identify factors associated with contamination, which by analogy to other conditions with similar transmission mechanisms may help improve protection and preparedness in staff dealing with an ill patient who experiences an unknown illness.

  2. Long-term follow-up of tandem high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell support for adults with high-risk age-adjusted international prognostic index aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphomas: a GOELAMS pilot study.

    PubMed

    Monjanel, Hélène; Deconinck, Eric; Perrodeau, Elodie; Gastinne, Thomas; Delwail, Vincent; Moreau, Anne; François, Sylvie; Berthou, Christian; Gyan, Emmanuel; Milpied, Noël

    2011-06-01

    Single high-dose therapy (HDT) followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) support improves complete response and overall survival (OS) in untreated aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). However, patients with a high age-adjusted international prognostic index (aa-IPI equal to 3) still have poor clinical outcome despite high dose intensity regimen. To improve complete response in this subgroup, the French Groupe Ouest-Est des Leucémies et Autres Maladies du Sang (GOELAMS) conducted a pilot phase II trial (073) evaluating tandem HDT with PBSC support in a series of 45 patients with aa-IPI equal to 3 untreated aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. After induction with an anthracyclin-containing regimen, responders underwent tandem HDT conditioned by high-dose mitoxantrone plus cytarabine for the first HDT and total-body irradiation (TBI), carmustine, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide for the second HDT. Thirty-one patients out of 41 evaluable patients completed the program. There were 4 toxic deaths. The complete response rate was 49%. With a median follow-up of 114 months for surviving patients, the OS was 51%, and 19 out of the 22 patients (86%) who reached a complete response are alive and relapse-free. Recent prospective evaluation of quality of life and comorbidities of surviving patients does not reveal long-term toxicities of the procedure. In the era of monoclonal antibodies and response-adapted therapy, the role of tandem HDT still need to be determined.

  3. The effect of equipment set up on patient radiation dose in conventional and CT angiography of the renal arteries.

    PubMed

    Kemerink, G J; De Haan, M W; Vasbinder, G B C; Frantzen, M J; Schultz, F W; Zoetelief, J; Jansen, J Th M; Van Engelshoven, J M A

    2003-09-01

    Patient radiation dose in angiography of the renal arteries was assessed and optimized after installing new radiological equipment. In three separate studies (n=50, 25 and 20) patient exposure was monitored in detail. For the first study default factory settings were used, for the second the number of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images was halved and the X-ray beam filtering during fluoroscopy was increased, and for the third study filtering during DSA was increased as well. Standard projections were derived and used in Monte Carlo simulations to derive dose conversion coefficients to calculate effective dose from the dose-area product (DAP). Dose conversion coefficients were also calculated for CT angiography (CTA). Using default factory settings on the new angiography system, DAP, number of images and effective dose were much higher than on the replaced unit. For the studies given above, DAP was reduced from 144 Gy cm(2) to 65 Gy cm(2) to 32 Gy cm(2), and effective dose from 22 mSv to 11 mSv to 9.1 mSv, respectively. Effective dose due to CTA was 5.2 mSv. It is concluded that modern angiography systems, resulting in high customer satisfaction, may readily cause much higher patient exposure than older systems. These doses may also be much higher than necessary. Optimization before putting such systems into use is absolutely essential. Internationally accepted recommendations for image quality and technique factors in angiography would be of great help.

  4. Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

    2011-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

  5. Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

    2011-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

  6. Dose from slow negative muons.

    PubMed

    Siiskonen, T

    2008-01-01

    Conversion coefficients from fluence to ambient dose equivalent, from fluence to maximum dose equivalent and quality factors for slow negative muons are examined in detail. Negative muons, when stopped, produce energetic photons, electrons and a variety of high-LET particles. Contribution from each particle type to the dose equivalent is calculated. The results show that for the high-LET particles the details of energy spectra and decay yields are important for accurate dose estimates. For slow negative muons the ambient dose equivalent does not always yield a conservative estimate for the protection quantities. Especially, the skin equivalent dose is strongly underestimated if the radiation-weighting factor of unity for slow muons is used. Comparisons to earlier studies are presented.

  7. Comparison between Measured and Simulated Radiation Doses in the Matoroshka-R Spherical phantom Experiment#1 and Area Monitoring aboard International Space Station using PADLES from May - Sep. 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamatsu, Aiko; Tolochek, Raisa; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Nikolaev, Igor; Tawara, Hiroko; Kitajo, Keiichi; Shimada, Ken

    The measurement of radiation environmental parameters in space is essential to support radiation risk assessments for astronauts and establish a benchmark for space radiation models for present and future human space activities. Since Japanese Experiment Module ‘KIBO’ was attached to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2008, we have been performing continuous space radiation dosimetery using a PADLES (Passive Dosimeter for Life-Science Experiments in Space) consisting of CR-39 PNTDs (Plastic Nuclear track detectors) and TLD-MSOs (Mg2SiO4:Tb) for various space experiments onboard the ‘KIBO’ part of the ISS. The MATROSHKA-R experiments aims to verify of dose distributions in a human body during space flight. The phantom consists of tissue equivalent material covered by a poncho jacket with 32 pockets on the surface. 20 container rods with dosimeters can be struck into the spherical phantom. Its diameter is 370 mm and it is 32 kg in weight. The first experiment onboard the KIBO at Forward No.2 area (JPM1F2 Rack2) was conducted over 114 days from 21 May to 12 September 2012 (the installation schedule inside the phantom) on the way to solar cycle 24th upward curve. 16 PADLES packages were deployed into 16 poncho pockets on the surface of the spherical phantom. Another 12 PADLES packages were deployed inside 4 rods (3 packages per rod in the outer, middle and inner side). Area monitoring in the KIBO was conducted in the same period (Area PADLES series #8 from 15 May to 16 September, 2012). Absorbed doses were measured at 17 area monitoring points in the KIBO and 28 locations (16 packages in poncho pockets and 12 inside 4 rods) in the phantom. The maximum value measured with the PADLES in the poncho pockets on the surface of the spherical phantom facing the outer wall was 0.43 mGy/day and the minimum value measured with the PADLES in the poncho pockets on the surface of the spherical phantom facing the KIBO interior was 0.30 mGy/day. The maximum absorbed

  8. Standardized Discriminant Coefficients: A Rejoinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Ralph O.; Cozad, James B.

    1993-01-01

    Although comments of D.J. Nordlund and R. Nagel are welcomed, their arguments are not sufficient to accept the recommendation of using total variance estimates to standardize canonical discriminant function coefficients. If standardized coefficients are used to help interpret a discriminant analysis, pooled within-group variance estimates should…

  9. Integrated retrospective radiation dose assessment.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M

    1997-01-01

    Radiation dose reconstruction is used to estimate exposure to radiation that has occurred externally, e.g., from an atomic bomb, or internally, e.g., from radionuclide ingestion. This commentary reviews techniques for biological dosimetry that have been developed to estimate radiation doses from internal exposures, but which can also be used to estimate external exposures. The author argues for increased development and use of these biological tools.

  10. INTERNAL DOSES OF THREE PERSONS STAYING 110 KM SOUTH OF THE FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI NUCLEAR POWER STATION DURING THE ARRIVAL OF RADIOACTIVE PLUMES BASED ON DIRECT MEASUREMENTS.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Osamu; Nakagawa, Takahiro; Takada, Chie; Tani, Kotaro; Kim, Eunjoo; Momose, Takumaro

    2016-09-01

    The authors describe the results of direct measurements made on three persons who stayed in Tokai-mura, a village located ∼110 km south of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), during the arrival of significant radioactive plumes released from the FDNPS as a consequence of the Tohoku earthquake/tsunami/FDNPS accident in March 2011. These measurements were made using a NaI(Tl) spectrometer and a whole-body counter shortly after the accident. Their thyroid equivalent doses ((131)I) were estimated to be 0.9-1.4 mSv under the assumption of acute intake via inhalation on 15 March, when the first significant release event was observed. Although greatly depending on the physicochemical form of iodine, the intake amount ratios of (131)I to (137)Cs for the three subjects were calculated as 2.7-3.7, which were much smaller than the radioactivity ratio (7.8) found in air sampling at the same site. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Cytoplasmic hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    al-Baldawi, N F; Abercrombie, R F

    1992-01-01

    The apparent cytoplasmic proton diffusion coefficient was measured using pH electrodes and samples of cytoplasm extracted from the giant neuron of a marine invertebrate. By suddenly changing the pH at one surface of the sample and recording the relaxation of pH within the sample, an apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7) was measured in the acidic or neutral range of pH (6.0-7.2). This value is approximately 5x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the mobile pH buffers (approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm2/s) and approximately 68x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the hydronium ion (93 x 10(-6) cm2/s). A mobile pH buffer (approximately 15% of the buffering power) and an immobile buffer (approximately 85% of the buffering power) could quantitatively account for the results at acidic or neutral pH. At alkaline pH (8.2-8.6), the apparent proton diffusion coefficient increased to 4.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7). This larger diffusion coefficient at alkaline pH could be explained quantitatively by the enhanced buffering power of the mobile amino acids. Under the conditions of these experiments, it is unlikely that hydroxide movement influences the apparent hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient. PMID:1617134

  12. Thyroid cancer in the Marshallese: relative risk of short-lived internal emitters and external radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, E.T.; Brill, A.B.; Adams, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    In a study of the comparative effects of internal versus external irradiation of the thyroid in young people, we determined that the dose from internal irradiation of the thyroid with short-lived internal emitters produced several times less thyroid cancer than did the same dose of radiation given externally. We determined this finding for a group of 85 Marshall Islands children, who were less than 10 years of age at the time of exposure and who were accidentially exposed to internal and external thyroid radiation at an average level of 1400 rad. The external risk coefficient ranged between 2.5 and 4.9 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk, and thus, from our computations, the internal risk coefficient for the Marshallese children was estimated to range between 1.0 and 1.4 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk. In contrast, for individual more than 10 years of age at the time of exposure, the dose from internal irradiation of the thyroid with short-lived internal emitters produced several times more thyroid cancer than did the same dose of radiation given externally. The external risk coefficients for the older age groups were reported in the literature to be in the range of 1.0 to 3.3 cancers per million person-rad-years-at risk. We computed internal risk coefficients of 3.3 to 8.1 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk for adolescent and adult groups. This higher sensitivity to cancer induction in the exposed adolescents and adults, is different from that seen in other exposed groups. 14 refs., 8 tabs.

  13. Computational Seebeck Coefficient Measurement Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    We have employed finite element analysis to develop computational Seebeck coefficient metrology simulations. This approach enables a unique exploration of multiple probe arrangements and measurement techniques within the same temporal domain. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, we have performed these Seebeck coefficient measurement simulations to quantitatively explore perturbations to voltage and temperature correspondence, by comparing simultaneous and staggered data acquisition techniques under the quasi-steady-state condition. The results indicate significant distortions to the Seebeck coefficient and a strong dependence on the time delay, the acquisition sequence, and the probe arrangement. PMID:26900521

  14. Effective radiation dose of ProMax 3D cone-beam computerized tomography scanner with different dental protocols.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xing-min; Li, Gang; Ludlow, John B; Zhang, Zu-yan; Ma, Xu-chen

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare effective doses resulting from different scan protocols for cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990 and 2007 calculations of dose. Average tissue-absorbed dose, equivalent dose, and effective dose for a ProMax 3D CBCT with different dental protocols were calculated using thermoluminescent dosimeter chips in a human equivalent phantom. Effective doses were derived using ICRP 1990 and the superseding 2007 recommendations. Effective doses (ICRP 2007) for default patient sizes from small to large ranged from 102 to 298 μSv. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) between tube current and effective dose (ICRP 2007) was 0.90. When scanning with lower resolution settings, the effective doses were reduced significantly (P < .05). ProMax 3D can provide a wide range of radiation dose levels. Reduction in radiation dose can be achieved when using lower settings of exposure parameters. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. International geomagnetic reference field 1965.0 in dipole coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, G. D.

    1970-01-01

    Computer program transforming spherical harmonic coefficients into arbitrarily tilted coordinate systems, tabulating coefficients of International Geomagnetic Reference Field 1965 in dipole coordinate system

  16. Long term dose monitoring onboard the European Columbus module of the international space station (ISS) in the frame of DOSIS and DOSIS 3D project - results from the active instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Soenke; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther; Boehme, Matthias; Haumann, Lutz; Labrenz, Johannes

    Besides the effects of the microgravity environment, and the psychological and psychosocial problems encountered in confined spaces, radiation is the main health detriment for long duration human space missions. The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones encountered on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station ISS is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European COLUMBUS module the experiment DOSIS (Dose Distribution Inside the ISS) under the lead of DLR has been launched on July 15 (th) 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The experimental package was transferred from the Space Shuttle into COLUMBUS on July 18 (th) . It consists of a combination of passive detector packages (PDP) distributed at 11 locations inside the European Columbus Laboratory and two active radiation detectors (Dosimetry Telescopes = DOSTELs) with a DDPU (DOSTEL Data and Power Unit) in a Nomex pouch (DOSIS MAIN BOX) mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module rack (EPM) inside COLUMBUS. The active components of the DOSIS experiment were operational from July 18 (th) 2009 to June 16 (th) 2011. After refurbishment the hardware has been reactivated on May 15 (th) 2012 as active part of the DOSIS 3D experiment and provides continuous data since this activation. The presentation will focus on the latest results from the two DOSTEL instruments as absorbed dose, dose equivalent and the related LET spectra gathered within the DOSIS (2009 - 2011) and DOSIS 3D (2012 - 2014) experiment. The CAU contributions to DOSIS and DOSIS 3D are

  17. Early Intake of Radiocesium by Residents Living Near the Tepco Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant After the Accident. Part 2: Relationship Between Internal Dose and Evacuation Behavior in Individuals.

    PubMed

    Kunishima, Naoaki; Kurihara, Osamu; Kim, Eunjoo; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Nakano, Takashi; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Tani, Kotaro; Furuyama, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Shozo; Hachiya, Misao; Naoi, Yutaka; Akashi, Makoto

    2017-06-01

    The Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident exposed members of the public to radiation. This study analyses the relation between personal behavior data obtained from 112 out of 174 subjects who underwent whole-body measurements by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) during the period from 27 June to 28 July 2011 and their committed effective doses (CEDs) from Cs and Cs. The whereabouts of the 112 persons living in municipalities near the FDNPP (mainly, Namie town) on several days in March 2011 are graphed on maps. It was confirmed that most subjects started evacuation promptly and had left the 20-km-radius of the FDNPP by the end of 12 March. The individual CEDs were poorly correlated with the person's distances from the FDNPP at any day in March. Meanwhile, the percentage of persons remaining within the 20-km radius of the FDNPP was 100% at 16:00 on 12 March and 42.9% at 0:00 on 15 March for those with CEDs > 0.1 mSv, whereas the corresponding values were much lower for those with CEDs ≤ 0.1 mSv. This suggests that the time of evacuation would be one of the crucial factors for the early intake; however, more personal behavior data are needed to be analyzed to clarify the relevance to the individual internal dose.

  18. Functional constraints on phenomenological coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klika, Václav; Pavelka, Michal; Benziger, Jay B.

    2017-02-01

    Thermodynamic fluxes (diffusion fluxes, heat flux, etc.) are often proportional to thermodynamic forces (gradients of chemical potentials, temperature, etc.) via the matrix of phenomenological coefficients. Onsager's relations imply that the matrix is symmetric, which reduces the number of unknown coefficients is reduced. In this article we demonstrate that for a class of nonequilibrium thermodynamic models in addition to Onsager's relations the phenomenological coefficients must share the same functional dependence on the local thermodynamic state variables. Thermodynamic models and experimental data should be validated through consistency with the functional constraint. We present examples of coupled heat and mass transport (thermodiffusion) and coupled charge and mass transport (electro-osmotic drag). Additionally, these newly identified constraints further reduce the number of experiments needed to describe the phenomenological coefficient.

  19. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  20. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  1. ["Dose-risk" relationships at low doses of radiation].

    PubMed

    Stefanou, E P

    1988-01-01

    The ionizing radiation is inherently harmful to human beings, and people must be protected from unnecessary or excessive exposure to it. The harmful nature of high doses of x rays has been known for many years. However, for low doses such as those commonly employed in dental radiographic procedures the magnitude of the risk (or even if there is a risk) remains uncertain. The purpose of this paper is to do an analysis of the Dose-risk relationships at low doses of radiation according to the latest recommendations and philosophy of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP).

  2. Coefficient alpha and interculture test selection.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Steven; Kishi, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The internal consistency reliability of a measure can be a focal point in an evaluation of the potential adequacy of an instrument for adaptation to another cultural setting. Cronbach's alpha (α) coefficient is often used as the statistical index for such a determination. However, alpha presumes a tau-equivalent test and may constitute an inaccurate population estimate for multidimensional tests. These notions are expanded and examined with a Japanese version of a questionnaire on nursing attitudes toward suicidal patients, originally constructed in Sweden using the English language. The English measure was reported to have acceptable internal consistency (α) albeit the dimensionality of the questionnaire was not addressed. The Japanese scale was found to lack tau-equivalence. An alternative to alpha, "composite reliability," was computed and found to be below acceptable standards in magnitude and precision. Implications for research application of the Japanese instrument are discussed.

  3. Fetal and maternal dose assessment for diagnostic scans during pregnancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafat Motavalli, Laleh; Miri Hakimabad, Hashem; Hoseinian Azghadi, Elie

    2016-05-01

    Despite the concerns about prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation, the number of nuclear medicine examinations performed for pregnant women increased in the past decade. This study attempts to better quantify radiation doses due to diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures during pregnancy with the help of our recently developed 3, 6, and 9 month pregnant hybrid phantoms. The reference pregnant models represent the adult female international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) reference phantom as a base template with a fetus in her gravid uterus. Six diagnostic scintigraphy scans using different radiopharmaceuticals were selected as typical diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. Furthermore, the biokinetic data of radioiodine was updated in this study. A compartment representing iodide in fetal thyroid was addressed explicitly in the biokinetic model. Calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo transport method. Tabulated dose coefficients for both maternal and fetal organs are provided. The comparison was made with the previously published fetal doses calculated for stylized pregnant female phantoms. In general, the fetal dose in previous studies suffers from an underestimation of up to 100% compared to fetal dose at organ level in this study. A maximum of difference in dose was observed for the fetal thyroid compared to the previous studies, in which the traditional models did not contain the fetal thyroid. Cumulated activities of major source organs are primarily responsible for the discrepancies in the organ doses. The differences in fetal dose depend on several other factors including chord length distribution between fetal organs and maternal major source organs, and anatomical differences according to gestation periods. Finally, considering the results of this study, which was based on the realistic pregnant female phantoms, a more informed evaluation of the risks and benefits of the different procedures could be made.

  4. A conversion method of air kerma from the primary, scatter, and leakage radiations to effective dose for calculating x-ray shielding barriers in mammography.

    PubMed

    Kharrati, Hedi

    2005-05-01

    In this study, a new approach has been introduced for derivation of the effective dose from air kerma to calculate shielding requirements in mammography facilities. This new approach has been used to compute the conversion coefficients relating air kerma to the effective dose for the mammography reference beam series of the Netherlands Metrology Institute Van Swinden Laboratorium, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and International Atomic Energy Agency laboratories. The results show that, in all cases, the effective dose in mammography energy range is less than 25% of the incident air kerma for the primary and the scatter radiations and does not exceed 75% for the leakage radiation.

  5. Conversion coefficients and yrast state spins in 180Os

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dracoulis, G. D.; Kibédi, T.; Byrne, A. P.; Fabricius, B.; Stuchbery, A. E.

    1990-03-01

    Internal conversion coefficients of transitions in 180Os have been measured using a superconducting, solenoidal electron spectrometer, operated in the lens mode. The high energy resolution and efficiency allow a precise measurement of the conversion coefficients of the 528 keV yrast transition. The values obtained, αK = 0.015(2), αL = 0.004(1) define pure E2 multipolarity. Taken with the measured γ-ray angular distribution, the conversion coefficient leads to an unambiguous assignment of 16 + → 14 + for the 528 keV transition.

  6. REMEDIATION FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    V. Arakali; E. Faillace

    2004-02-27

    The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel in the Remediation Facility performing operations to receive, prepare, open, repair, recover, disposition, and correct off-normal and non-standard conditions with casks, canisters, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies, and waste packages (WP). The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the Remediation Facility and provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application.

  7. Predicting Abraham model solvent coefficients.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Jean-Claude; Abraham, Michael H; Acree, William E; Lang, Andrew Sid

    2015-01-01

    The Abraham general solvation model can be used in a broad set of scenarios involving partitioning and solubility, yet is limited to a set of solvents with measured Abraham coefficients. Here we extend the range of applicability of Abraham's model by creating open models that can be used to predict the solvent coefficients for all organic solvents. We created open random forest models for the solvent coefficients e, s, a, b, and v that had out-of-bag R(2) values of 0.31, 0.77, 0.92, 0.47, and 0.63 respectively. The models were used to suggest sustainable solvent replacements for commonly used solvents. For example, our models predict that propylene glycol may be used as a general sustainable solvent replacement for methanol. The solvent coefficient models extend the range of applicability of the Abraham general solvation equations to all organic solvents. The models were developed under Open Notebook Science conditions which makes them open, reproducible, and as useful as possible. Graphical AbstractChemical space for solvents with known Abraham coefficients.

  8. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-21

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  9. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M.; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  10. Fluence to Hp(3) conversion coefficients for neutrons from thermal to 15 MeV.

    PubMed

    Gualdrini, G; Ferrari, P; Tanner, R

    2013-12-01

    The recent statement on tissue reactions issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in April 2011 recommends a very significant reduction in the equivalent dose annual limit for the eye lens from 150 to 20 mSv y(-1); this has stimulated a lot of interest in eye lens dosimetry in the radiation protection community. Until now no conversion coefficients were available for the operational quantity Hp(3) for neutrons. The scope of the present work was to extend previous evaluations of H*(10) and Hp(10) performed at the PTB in 1995 to provide also Hp(3) data for neutrons. The present work is also intended to complete the studies carried out on photons during the last 4 y within the European Union-funded ORAMED (optimisation of radiation protection for medical staff) project.

  11. Effect of X-ray High-voltage Variations on the Conversion Coefficients.

    PubMed

    Behnke, B; Hupe, O; Behrens, R

    2016-10-20

    Conversion coefficients (CCs) are an essential vehicle in radiation protection for the determination of the dose (rate) of a given radiation field. According to the current draft of the revision of international standard ISO 4037, an X-ray field is a reference field if the CCs of the field match the tabulated ISO values within 2%. Deviations of the high-voltage (HV) tube-potential from its nominal value influence the resulting spectra and change the corresponding CCs. This work investigates the maximum allowable deviation of the HV from its nominal value such that the requirements of ISO 4037 remain fulfilled. This is achieved using both synthetic spectra created by a software simulation program and spectra measured at one of the X-ray facilities of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. The results are summarised in form of a new proposal for upper limit values which are suggested to be used in the next version of ISO 4037.

  12. Orthogonality of spherical harmonic coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    Orthogonality relations are obtained for the spherical harmonic coefficients of functions defined on the surface of a sphere. Following a brief discussion of the orthogonality of Fourier series coefficients, consideration is given to the values averaged over all orientations of the coordinate system of the spherical harmonic coefficients of a function defined on the surface of a sphere that can be expressed in terms of Legendre polynomials for the special case where the function is the sum of two delta functions located at two different points on the sphere, and for the case of an essentially arbitrary function. It is noted that the orthogonality relations derived have found applications in statistical studies of the geomagnetic field.

  13. Orthogonality of spherical harmonic coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, M. G.

    1980-01-01

    Orthogonality relations are obtained for the spherical harmonic coefficients of functions defined on the surface of a sphere. Following a brief discussion of the orthogonality of Fourier series coefficients, consideration is given to the values averaged over all orientations of the coordinate system of the spherical harmonic coefficients of a function defined on the surface of a sphere that can be expressed in terms of Legendre polynomials for the special case where the function is the sum of two delta functions located at two different points on the sphere, and for the case of an essentially arbitrary function. It is noted that the orthogonality relations derived have found applications in statistical studies of the geomagnetic field.

  14. Seebeck coefficient of one electron

    SciTech Connect

    Durrani, Zahid A. K.

    2014-03-07

    The Seebeck coefficient of one electron, driven thermally into a semiconductor single-electron box, is investigated theoretically. With a finite temperature difference ΔT between the source and charging island, a single electron can charge the island in equilibrium, directly generating a Seebeck effect. Seebeck coefficients for small and finite ΔT are calculated and a thermally driven Coulomb staircase is predicted. Single-electron Seebeck oscillations occur with increasing ΔT, as one electron at a time charges the box. A method is proposed for experimental verification of these effects.

  15. Transport coefficients of gluonic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santosh K.; Alam, Jan-e

    2011-06-01

    The shear ({eta}) and bulk ({zeta}) viscous coefficients have been evaluated for a gluonic fluid. The elastic, gg{yields}gg and the inelastic, number nonconserving, gg{yields}ggg processes have been considered as the dominant perturbative processes in evaluating the viscous coefficients to entropy density (s) ratios. Recently the processes: gg{yields}ggg has been revisited and a correction to the widely used Gunion-Bertsch (GB) formula has been obtained. The {eta} and {zeta} have been evaluated for gluonic fluid with the formula recently derived. At large {alpha}{sub s} the value of {eta}/s approaches its lower bound, {approx}1/4{pi}.

  16. Integer Solutions of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    A good formula is like a good story, rich in description, powerful in communication, and eye-opening to readers. The formula presented in this article for determining the coefficients of the binomial expansion of (x + y)n is one such "good read." The beauty of this formula is in its simplicity--both describing a quantitative situation…

  17. Identities for generalized hypergeometric coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Biedenharn, L.C.; Louck, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Generalizations of hypergeometric functions to arbitrarily many symmetric variables are discussed, along with their associated hypergeometric coefficients, and the setting within which these generalizations arose. Identities generalizing the Euler identity for {sub 2}F{sub 1}, the Saalschuetz identity, and two generalizations of the {sub 4}F{sub 3} Bailey identity, among others, are given. 16 refs.

  18. Effective Viscosity Coefficient of Nanosuspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    Systematic calculations of the effective viscosity coefficient of nanosuspensions have been performed using the molecular dynamics method. It is established that the viscosity of a nanosuspension depends not only on the volume concentration of the nanoparticles but also on their mass and diameter. Differences from Einstein's relation are found even for nanosuspensions with a low particle concentration.

  19. Integer Solutions of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    A good formula is like a good story, rich in description, powerful in communication, and eye-opening to readers. The formula presented in this article for determining the coefficients of the binomial expansion of (x + y)n is one such "good read." The beauty of this formula is in its simplicity--both describing a quantitative situation…

  20. Irrational "Coefficients" in Renaissance Algebra.

    PubMed

    Oaks, Jeffrey A

    2017-06-01

    Argument From the time of al-Khwārizmī in the ninth century to the beginning of the sixteenth century algebraists did not allow irrational numbers to serve as coefficients. To multiply by x, for instance, the result was expressed as the rhetorical equivalent of . The reason for this practice has to do with the premodern concept of a monomial. The coefficient, or "number," of a term was thought of as how many of that term are present, and not as the scalar multiple that we work with today. Then, in sixteenth-century Europe, a few algebraists began to allow for irrational coefficients in their notation. Christoff Rudolff (1525) was the first to admit them in special cases, and subsequently they appear more liberally in Cardano (1539), Scheubel (1550), Bombelli (1572), and others, though most algebraists continued to ban them. We survey this development by examining the texts that show irrational coefficients and those that argue against them. We show that the debate took place entirely in the conceptual context of premodern, "cossic" algebra, and persisted in the sixteenth century independent of the development of the new algebra of Viète, Decartes, and Fermat. This was a formal innovation violating prevailing concepts that we propose could only be introduced because of the growing autonomy of notation from rhetorical text.

  1. TOPAZ II Temperature Coefficient Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiza, David; Haskin, F. Eric; Marshall, Albert C.

    1994-07-01

    A two-dimensional model of the Topaz II reactor core suitable for neutronic analyses of temperature coefficients of reactivity is presented. The model is based on a 30° r-theta segment of the core. Results of TWODANT calculations are used to estimate temperature coefficients associated with fuel, electrodes, moderator, reflector, and tube plates over the range of temperatures anticipated during startup and operation. Results are presented to assess the reactivity effects associated with Doppler broadening, spectral effects and thermal expansion. Comparisons are made between the TWODANT results and empirical Russian curves used for simulating Topaz II system transients. TWODANT results indicate that the prompt temperature coefficients associated with temperature changes in fuel and emitters are negative. This is primarily because of Doppler broadening of the absorption resonances of uranium and molybdenum. The delayed effect of tube plate heating is also negative because fuel is moved radially outward in the core where it is less important. Temperature coefficients associated with delayed heating of the zirconium hydride moderator and the Beryllium reflector are positive, as the change in the neutron spectrum with moderator or reflector temperature decreases the rate of absorption in these components. The TWODANT results agree with the results obtained from the empirical Russian correlations.

  2. Tables of the coefficients A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, N.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical coefficients required to express the angular distribution for the rotationally elastic or inelastic scattering of electrons from a diatomic molecule were tabulated for the case of nitrogen and in the energy range from 0.20 eV to 10.0 eV. Five different rotational states are considered.

  3. Limitations of Coefficient Alpha as an Index of Test Unidimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samual B.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Confusion in the literature between the concepts of internal consistency and homogeneity has led to a misuse of coefficient alpha as an index of item homogeneity. This misuse is discussed and several indices of item homogeneity derived from the model of common factor analysis are offered as alternatives. (Author/JKS)

  4. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  5. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, C.

    2010-12-15

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  6. Study of Dispersion Coefficient Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, K. R.; Bressan, C. K.; Pires, M. S. G.; Canno, L. M.; Ribeiro, L. C. L. J.

    2016-08-01

    The issue of water pollution has worsened in recent times due to releases, intentional or not, of pollutants in natural water bodies. This causes several studies about the distribution of pollutants are carried out. The water quality models have been developed and widely used today as a preventative tool, ie to try to predict what will be the concentration distribution of constituent along a body of water in spatial and temporal scale. To understand and use such models, it is necessary to know some concepts of hydraulic high on their application, including the longitudinal dispersion coefficient. This study aims to conduct a theoretical and experimental study of the channel dispersion coefficient, yielding more information about their direct determination in the literature.

  7. Consistent transport coefficients in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Rovira, M.; Ferrofontan, C.

    1986-01-01

    A consistent theory for dealing with transport phenomena in stellar atmospheres starting with the kinetic equations and introducing three cases (LTE, partial LTE, and non-LTE) was developed. The consistent hydrodynamical equations were presented for partial-LTE, the transport coefficients defined, and a method shown to calculate them. The method is based on the numerical solution of kinetic equations considering Landau, Boltzmann, and Focker-Planck collision terms. Finally a set of results for the transport coefficients derived for a partially ionized hydrogen gas with radiation was shown, considering ionization and recombination as well as elastic collisions. The results obtained imply major changes is some types of theoretical model calculations and can resolve some important current problems concerning energy and mass balance in the solar atmosphere. It is shown that energy balance in the lower solar transition region can be fully explained by means of radiation losses and conductive flux.

  8. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

  9. Convection coefficients at building surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerud, R. C.; Altmayer, E.; Bauman, F. S.; Gadgil, A.; Bohn, M.

    1982-09-01

    Correlations relating the rate of heat transfer from the surfaces of rooms to the enclosed air are being developed, based on empirical and analytic examinations of convection in enclosures. The correlations express the heat transfer rate in terms of boundary conditions relating to room geometry and surface temperatures. Work to date indicates that simple convection coefficient calculation techniques can be developed, which significantly improve accuracy of heat transfer predictions in comparison with the standard calculations recommended by ASHRAE.

  10. Accidental embryo irradiation during barium enema examinations: An estimation of absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, J.; Perisinakis, K.; Grammatikakis, J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to investigate the possibility of an embryo to receive a dose of more than 10 cGy, the threshold of malformation induction in embryos reported by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, during barium enema examinations. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were place in a phantom to calculate the depth-to-skin conversion coefficient needed for dose estimation at the average embryo depth in patients. Barium enema examinations were performed in 20 women of childbearing age with diagnostic problems demanding longer fluoroscopy times. Doses at 6 cm, the average embryo depth, were determined by measurements at the patients` skin followed by dose calculation at the site of interest. The range of doses estimated at embryo depth for patients was 1.9 to 8.2 cGy. The dose always exceeded 5 cGy when fluoroscopy time was longer than 7 minutes. The dose at the embryo depth never exceeded 10 cGy. This study indicates that fluoroscopy time should not exceed 7 minutes in childbearing-age female patients undergoing barium enema examinations. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. The interpretation of selection coefficients.