Science.gov

Sample records for internal forces

  1. International Quick Response Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-06

    humaijitarian relief, maintenance of a cease-fire, and promocion of national reconciliation - and became a manhunt for Somali warlord Mohamed Farah...maritime components would accompany this 6 5This scheme is adopted from USPACOM’s and USACOM’s Joint Task Force and JuiiL AdapUiv= Fuce Packages

  2. The Air Force Nurse Intern Program.

    PubMed

    Smith, R H

    1991-08-01

    The Air Force Nurse Intern Program is a 5-month-long introduction to Air Force nursing for BSN-prepared graduate nurses. The program is designed to facilitate the transition from civilian nursing student to practicing Air Force Nurse Corps Officer. After attending Military Indoctrination for Medical Service Officers, newly commissioned nurses attend the program at one of 10 Air Force medical centers before going to their permanent duty stations. Preceptors guide and instruct the interns at each of four clinical rotation sites. The author, a former nurse intern, describes some of the many opportunities available to nurse interns.

  3. International Task Force on Volunteer Cleft Missions.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Vincent K L; Lee, Seng-Teik T; Lambrecht, Thomas J; Barnett, John; Gorney, Mark; Hardjowasito, Widanto; Lemperle, Gottfried; McComb, Harold; Natsume, Nagato; Stranc, Mirek; Wilson, Libby

    2002-01-01

    The International Task Force on Volunteer Cleft Missions was set up to provide a report to be presented at the Eighth International Congress of Cleft Palate and Associated Craniofacial Anomalies on September 12, 1997, in Singapore. The aim of the report was to provide data from a wide range of different international teams performing volunteer cleft missions and, thereafter, based on the collected data, to identify common goals and aims of such missions. Thirteen different groups actively participating in volunteer cleft missions worldwide were selected from the International Confederation of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery's list of teams actively participating in volunteer cleft missions. Because of the time frame within which the committee had to work, three groups that did not respond by the stipulated deadline were omitted from the committee. The represented members and their respective institutions have undertaken more than 50 volunteer cleft missions to underdeveloped nations worldwide within the last 3 years. They have visited over 20 different countries, treating more than 3,500 patients worldwide. Based on the data collected and by consensus, the committee outlined recommendations for future volunteer cleft missions based on 1) mission objectives, 2) organization, 3) personal health and liability, 4) funding, 5) trainees in volunteer cleft missions, and 6) public relations. The task force believed that all volunteer cleft missions should have well-defined objectives, preferably with long-term plans. The task force also decided that it was impossible to achieve a successful mission without good organization and close coordination. All efforts should be made, and care taken, to ensure that there is minimal morbidity and no mortality. Finally, as ambassadors of goodwill and humanitarian aid, the participants must make every effort to understand and respect local customs and protocol. The main aims are to provide top-quality surgical service, train local

  4. Industrial Energy Conservation, Forced Internal Recirculation Burner

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser

    2003-06-19

    The overall objective of this research project is to develop and evaluate an industrial low NOx burner for existing and new gas-fired combustion systems for intermediate temperature (1400 degree to 2000 degree F) industrial heating devices such as watertube boilers and process fluid heaters. A multi-phase effort is being pursued with decision points to determine advisability of continuance. The current contract over Phases II and III of this work. The objectives of each phase are as follows. Phase II - to design, fabricate, and evaluate prototype burners based on the Forced Internal Recirculation (FIR) concept. Phase III - to evaluate the performance of an FIR burner under actual operating conditions in a full-scale field test and establish the performance necessary for subsequent commercialization

  5. International Cooperation with Partner Air Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Programming Guidance ASD Assistant Secretary of Defense ASDF Air Self-Defense Forces (Japan) AWACS Airborne Warning and Control System BPC Building...provided training in the use of medical and engineering equipment to civilians in Iraq and East Timor. The Air Self-Defense Forces ( ASDF ) face the most...Southeast Asia and the MSDF is engaged in training the Coast Guard trainers. But the ASDF has few noncombat missions and little equipment that is not

  6. Joining Forces: The Case of Alliant International University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Mergers and acquisitions are a prevalent force in higher education as more colleges and universities are joining forces to expand resources, enhance missions, or prevent closures. This study examines the merger of Alliant University (formerly California School of Professional Psychology) with United States International University to create what…

  7. Locomotive and reptation motion induced by internal force and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Ishihara, Taisuke

    2011-06-01

    We propose a simple mechanical model of locomotion induced by internal force and friction. We first construct a system of two elements as an analog of the bipedal motion. The internal force does not induce a directional motion by itself because of the action-reaction law, but a directional motion becomes possible by the control of the frictional force. The efficiency of these model systems is studied using an analogy to the heat engine. As a modified version of the two-element model, we construct a model that exhibits a bipedal motion similar to kinesin’s motion of molecular motor. Next, we propose a linear chain model and a ladder model as an extension of the original two-element model. We find a transition from a straight to a snake-like motion in a ladder model by changing the strength of the internal force.

  8. Locomotive and reptation motion induced by internal force and friction.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Ishihara, Taisuke

    2011-06-01

    We propose a simple mechanical model of locomotion induced by internal force and friction. We first construct a system of two elements as an analog of the bipedal motion. The internal force does not induce a directional motion by itself because of the action-reaction law, but a directional motion becomes possible by the control of the frictional force. The efficiency of these model systems is studied using an analogy to the heat engine. As a modified version of the two-element model, we construct a model that exhibits a bipedal motion similar to kinesin's motion of molecular motor. Next, we propose a linear chain model and a ladder model as an extension of the original two-element model. We find a transition from a straight to a snake-like motion in a ladder model by changing the strength of the internal force.

  9. Global climate forcing of aerosols embodied in international trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jintai; Tong, Dan; Davis, Steven; Ni, Ruijing; Tan, Xiaoxiao; Pan, Da; Zhao, Hongyan; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David; Feng, Tong; Zhang, Qiang; Yan, Yingying; Hu, Yongyun; Li, Jing; Liu, Zhu; Jiang, Xujia; Geng, Guannan; He, Kebin; Huang, Yi; Guan, Dabo

    2016-10-01

    International trade separates regions consuming goods and services from regions where goods and related aerosol pollution are produced. Yet the role of trade in aerosol climate forcing attributed to different regions has never been quantified. Here, we contrast the direct radiative forcing of aerosols related to regions' consumption of goods and services against the forcing due to emissions produced in each region. Aerosols assessed include black carbon, primary organic aerosol, and secondary inorganic aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium. We find that global aerosol radiative forcing due to emissions produced in East Asia is much stronger than the forcing related to goods and services ultimately consumed in that region because of its large net export of emissions-intensive goods. The opposite is true for net importers such as Western Europe and North America: global radiative forcing related to consumption is much greater than the forcing due to emissions produced in these regions. Overall, trade is associated with a shift of radiative forcing from net importing to net exporting regions. Compared to greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, the short atmospheric lifetimes of aerosols cause large localized differences between consumption- and production-related radiative forcing. International efforts to reduce emissions in the exporting countries will help alleviate trade-related climate and health impacts of aerosols while lowering global emissions.

  10. 47 CFR 2.100 - International regulations in force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false International regulations in force. 2.100 Section 2.100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Allocation, Assignment, and Use of Radio Frequencies §...

  11. 47 CFR 2.100 - International regulations in force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false International regulations in force. 2.100 Section 2.100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Allocation, Assignment, and Use of Radio Frequencies §...

  12. 47 CFR 2.100 - International regulations in force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false International regulations in force. 2.100 Section 2.100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Allocation, Assignment, and Use of Radio Frequencies §...

  13. 47 CFR 2.100 - International regulations in force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false International regulations in force. 2.100 Section 2.100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Allocation, Assignment, and Use of Radio Frequencies §...

  14. 47 CFR 2.100 - International regulations in force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false International regulations in force. 2.100 Section 2.100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Allocation, Assignment, and Use of Radio Frequencies §...

  15. On forced temperature changes, internal variability, and the AMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Michael E.; Steinman, Byron A.; Miller, Sonya K.

    2014-05-01

    We estimate the low-frequency internal variability of Northern Hemisphere (NH) mean temperature using observed temperature variations, which include both forced and internal variability components, and several alternative model simulations of the (natural + anthropogenic) forced component alone. We then generate an ensemble of alternative historical temperature histories based on the statistics of the estimated internal variability. Using this ensemble, we show, first, that recent NH mean temperatures fall within the range of expected multidecadal variability. Using the synthetic temperature histories, we also show that certain procedures used in past studies to estimate internal variability, and in particular, an internal multidecadal oscillation termed the "Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation" or "AMO", fail to isolate the true internal variability when it is a priori known. Such procedures yield an AMO signal with an inflated amplitude and biased phase, attributing some of the recent NH mean temperature rise to the AMO. The true AMO signal, instead, appears likely to have been in a cooling phase in recent decades, offsetting some of the anthropogenic warming. Claims of multidecadal "stadium wave" patterns of variation across multiple climate indices are also shown to likely be an artifact of this flawed procedure for isolating putative climate oscillations.

  16. Forcing, feedback and internal variability in global temperature trends.

    PubMed

    Marotzke, Jochem; Forster, Piers M

    2015-01-29

    Most present-generation climate models simulate an increase in global-mean surface temperature (GMST) since 1998, whereas observations suggest a warming hiatus. It is unclear to what extent this mismatch is caused by incorrect model forcing, by incorrect model response to forcing or by random factors. Here we analyse simulations and observations of GMST from 1900 to 2012, and show that the distribution of simulated 15-year trends shows no systematic bias against the observations. Using a multiple regression approach that is physically motivated by surface energy balance, we isolate the impact of radiative forcing, climate feedback and ocean heat uptake on GMST--with the regression residual interpreted as internal variability--and assess all possible 15- and 62-year trends. The differences between simulated and observed trends are dominated by random internal variability over the shorter timescale and by variations in the radiative forcings used to drive models over the longer timescale. For either trend length, spread in simulated climate feedback leaves no traceable imprint on GMST trends or, consequently, on the difference between simulations and observations. The claim that climate models systematically overestimate the response to radiative forcing from increasing greenhouse gas concentrations therefore seems to be unfounded.

  17. Role of Air Force Special Operations in Foreign Internal Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    defense indicated the im- and religious minorities, and inefficient portance of supporting host-nation forces civil and judicial adinidstrations. Given as...Lawlessness is a manifestation of civil created international drug cartels which disorder and may include examples from have undermined the social and...be used to ex- specific objectives. tort political favors, to sway public opinion, or to give the appearance of In- stability and lack of civil

  18. Permeability of continental crust influenced by internal and external forcing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rojstaczer, S.A.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Hayba, D.O.

    2008-01-01

    The permeability of continental crust is so highly variable that it is often considered to defy systematic characterization. However, despite this variability, some order has been gleaned from globally compiled data. What accounts for the apparent coherence of mean permeability in the continental crust (and permeability-depth relations) on a very large scale? Here we argue that large-scale crustal permeability adjusts to accommodate rates of internal and external forcing. In the deeper crust, internal forcing - fluxes induced by metamorphism, magmatism, and mantle degassing - is dominant, whereas in the shallow crust, external forcing - the vigor of the hydrologic cycle - is a primary control. Crustal petrologists have long recognized the likelihood of a causal relation between fluid flux and permeability in the deep, ductile crust, where fluid pressures are typically near-lithostatic. It is less obvious that such a relation should pertain in the relatively cool, brittle upper crust, where near-hydrostatic fluid pressures are the norm. We use first-order calculations and numerical modeling to explore the hypothesis that upper-crustal permeability is influenced by the magnitude of external fluid sources, much as lower-crustal permeability is influenced by the magnitude of internal fluid sources. We compare model-generated permeability structures with various observations of crustal permeability. ?? 2008 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Forcing of oceanic mean flows by dissipating internal tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisouard, Nicolas; Buhler, Oliver

    2012-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the effective mean force exerted on an oceanic mean flow due to the presence of small-amplitude internal waves that are forced by a barotropic tide flowing over a topography and are also subject to dissipation. Although the details of our computation are quite different, we recover the main action-at-a-distance result familiar from atmospheric wave-mean interaction theory, namely that the effective mean force that is felt by the mean flow is located in regions of wave dissipation, and not necessarily near the topographic wave source. Specifically, using a perturbation series in small wave amplitude, we compute the three-dimensional leading-order wave field using a Green's function approach, derive an explicit expression for the leading-order effective mean force at the next order within the framework of generalized Lagrangian-mean theory, discuss in detail the range of situations in which a strong, secularly growing mean-flow response can be expected, and finally compute the effective mean force numerically in a number of illustrative examples with simple topographies. Financial support under the United States National Science Foundation grants NSF/OCE 1024180 and NSF/DMS 1009213 is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Foot Forces during Treadmill Exercise on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavanagh, Peter R.; Rice, Andrea J.; Maender, Christian C.; Gopalakrishnan, Raghavan; Genc, Kerim O.; Kuklis, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Exercise has been the primary countermeasure to combat musculoskeletal changes during the approximately 6 month missions to the International Space Station (ISS). However, these countermeasures have not been successful in preventing loss of bone mineral density in the spine and hip of astronauts. We examined lower extremity loading during typical bouts of on-orbit exercise performed by 4 ISS crew members on the ISS treadmill (TVIS) and during locomotor activities on earth (1g). In-shoe forces were monitored at 128Hz using force-measuring insoles placed inside the shoes of the exercising crewmember, stored temporarily on Flash cards, and down-linked via satellite for analysis. Custom software extracted peak forces from up to 30 minutes of locomotor activity. All on-orbit loading conditions for walking and running resulted in peak forces and impact loading rates that were significantly less than those measured in 1g. Typical single leg loads on-orbit in walking and running were 0.860 plus or minus 0.04 body weights (BW) and 1.339 plus or minus 0.07 BW compared to 1.2 plus or minus 0.036 BW and 2.36 plus or minus 0.07 BW in 1g BW respectively. These results indicate that typical exercise on the ISS treadmill does not generate 1g-like loading conditions. This may be partly responsible for the loss of bone mineral density that has been observed in these and other crew members. Since on-orbit treadmill exercise requires a restraining load to return the crew member to the treadmill surface, more studies are required to enable comfortable full body weight loading to be applied.

  1. Stopping intense beams of internally cold molecules via centrifugal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xing; Gantner, Thomas; Zeppenfeld, Martin; Chervenkov, Sotir; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    Cryogenic buffer-gas cooling produces intense beams of internally cold molecules. It offers a versatile source for studying collision dynamics and reaction pathways in the cold regime, and could open new avenues for controlled chemistry, precision spectroscopy, and exploration of fundamental physics. However, an efficient deceleration of these beams still presents a challenge. Here, we demonstrate that intense and continuous beams of electrically guided molecules produced by a cryogenic buffer-gas cell can be brought to a halt by the centrifugal force in a rotating frame. Various molecules (e.g. CH3F and CF3CCH) are decelerated to below 20m /s at a corresponding output intensity of ~ 6 ×109mm-2 .s-1 . In addition, our RF-resonant depletion detection shows that up to 90 % rotational-state purity can be achieved in the so-produced slow molecular beams.

  2. International Reference Ionosphere (IRI): Task Force Activity 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilitza, D.

    2000-01-01

    The annual IRI Task Force Activity was held at the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy from July 10 to July 14. The participants included J. Adeniyi (University of Ilorin, Nigeria), D. Bilitza (NSSDC/RITSS, USA), D. Buresova (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Czech Republic), B. Forte (ICTP, Italy), R. Leitinger (University of Graz, Austria), B. Nava (ICTP, Italy), M. Mosert (University National Tucuman, Argentina), S. Pulinets (IZMIRAN, Russia), S. Radicella (ICTP, Italy), and B. Reinisch (University of Mass. Lowell, USA). The main topic of this Task Force Activity was the modeling of the topside ionosphere and the development of strategies for modeling of ionospheric variability. Each day during the workshop week the team debated a specific modeling problem in the morning during informal presentations and round table discussions of all participants. Ways of resolving the specific modeling problem were devised and tested in the afternoon in front of the computers of the ICTP Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory using ICTP s computer networks and internet access.

  3. Internal forces during static prehension: effects of age and grasp configuration.

    PubMed

    Solnik, Stanislaw; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    The authors studied effects of healthy aging on 3 components of the internal force vector during static prehensile tasks. Young and older subjects held an instrumented handle using a 5-digit prismatic grasp under different digit configurations and external torques. Across digit configurations, older subjects showed larger internal normal (grip) and tangential (load-resisting) digit force components and larger internal moment of force. In contrast to earlier reports, safety margin values were not higher in the older subjects. The results show that the increased grip force in older persons is a specific example of a more general age-related problem reflected in the generation of large internal force vectors in prehensile tasks. It is possible that the higher internal forces increase the apparent stiffness of the hand+handle system and, hence, contribute to its stability. This strategy, however, may be maladaptive, energetically wasteful, and inefficient in ensuring safety of hand-held objects.

  4. On the calculation of internal forces in mechanically stressed polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Konda, Sai Sriharsha M.; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2014-10-07

    We discuss how to define and to compute internal forces in a molecule subjected to mechanical stress. Because of the inherently many-body character of intramolecular interactions, internal forces cannot be uniquely defined without specifying a set of internal coordinates used to describe the molecular structure. When such a set is comprised of 3N − 6 interactomic distances (N being the number of atoms) and includes the bond lengths of interest, we show that the associated forces, while satisfying the equation F = ∂V/∂R (where R is the bond length, F is the internal force in this bond, and V is the potential energy of the molecule), can be determined from the molecular geometry alone. We illustrate these ideas using several toy models ranging from small molecules to a graphene sheet and show that the magnitude of the internal force in a bond is not necessarily a good predictor of its strength in response to mechanical loading. At the same time, analysis of internal forces reveals interesting phenomena such as the force multiplication effect, where weak external forces may, e.g., be used to break strong bonds, and offers insight into the catch-bond phenomenon where chemical reactivity is suppressed through application of a force.

  5. Reflections on a Seminal Force in International Accounting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cascini, Karen T.

    2007-01-01

    Accounting is a manifestation of several important environmental factors within a country, including economic, educational and political, and, as such, is evolutionary in accordance with those changing social structures. Because of the major impact that international accounting has had on countries' internal accounting systems, it is important to…

  6. The Educational Composition of the Labour Force: An International Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Psacharopoulos, George; Arriagada, Ana Maria

    1986-01-01

    Argues that although the school enrollment ratio among countries is an available statistic, it may not be the most important indicator for setting investment priorities in education. Offers statistics on the educational composition of the labor force as a more sensitive human capital index. (JOW)

  7. Determination of the Asynchronous Load on a Rotor from the Measured Internal Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, A.-V.; Reynaud, G.

    1997-09-01

    Experimental contributions currently play an important role in determining hydraulic forces due to cavitation. Up to the present date, there is no computational analysis which has proven to be successful in this domain. Experiments are usually carried out to measure the resulting internal forces in a model because these forces are crucial for designing elements under cavitational flows. This paper presents a numerical approach using the theory of rotordynamics coupled with the finite element method (FEM) to determine the hydraulic load on a rotor from the internal forces measured in a cross-section of the rotor. Once the load is found, a program developed can be used to compute the internal forces in any cross-section of interest and to evaluate dynamic effects on the rotor. Two illustrative examples are presented to show the validity of this approach.

  8. America in Transition: The International Frontier. Report of the Task Force on International Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Governors' Association, Washington, DC.

    More than ever, U.S. economic well-being is intertwined with that of other countries through expanding international trade, financial markets, and investments. National security, and even world stability, depend upon U.S. understanding of and communication with other countries. Therefore, international education must be an integral part of the…

  9. Variations in occlusal forces with a resilient internal implant shock absorber.

    PubMed

    Chapman, R J; Kirsch, A

    1990-01-01

    The importance of an internal shock absorber for implant prostheses has concerned many, primarily because the efficacy of a shock absorber to reduce stress has not been demonstrated in vivo. This study examined 15 subjects with unilateral distal extension single implant abutments attached to a single natural tooth abutment to assess the effect of a shock-absorbing element within the implant on occlusal force levels. Occlusal forces and bilateral occlusal similarity were examined using specially adapted research software for the T-Scan occlusal analysis system. The results indicate that there is a significant difference (P less than 0.011) between occlusal forces using an internal shock absorber (18 N) and a titanium internal element (30 N).

  10. External and Internal Factors Shaping the Japan Maritime Self-Defense force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    JAPAN MARITIME SELF-DEFENSE FORCE (JMSDF) by Shinji Tsukigi June, 1993 Thesis Advisor: Katsuaki L. Terasawa Thesis Co-Advisor: Gregory G. Hildebrandt...Eltment No -- [,j-et No ITask No IWork Unit Accession No 11I Title (include security classificazio,.) EXTERNAL. AND INTERNAL FACTORS SHAPIN1G THE JAPAN ...identify’ by block number) This thesis examiunes factors shaping the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF). It focuses on Issues concerning Japan’s

  11. Relating work, change in internal energy, and heat radiated for dispersion force situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Daniel C.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes how Casimir-like forces can be calculated for quasistatic situations of macroscopic bodies composed of different materials. The framework of stochastic electrodynamics (SED) is used for much of this discussion in an attempt to provide a very clear physical picture when considering quantities like forces, work done, changes in internal energy, and heat flow. By relating these quantities, one can readily understand why the different methods of calculating dispersion forces agree, such as when obtaining forces via changes in electromagnetic zero-point energy versus computing the average of the Maxwell stress tensor. In addition, a number of physical subtleties involving dispersion forces are discussed, that were certainly not recognized in early work on blackbody radiation, and that still may not be fully appreciated. .

  12. Computer Network Attack and the Use of Force in International Law: Thoughts on a Normative Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    that it has attained particular significance in the last decade. For instance, Hans Kelsen noted: There are two kinds of force not exercised by...reprisals. HANS KELSEN , COLLECTIVE SECURITY UNDER INTERNATIONAL LAW 57 n.5 (49 Naval War College International Law Studies 1954, 1956). Ian Brownlie...Nations, 41 AM. J. INT’L L. 872 (1947); Hans Kelsen , Collective Security and Collective Self-Defense under the Charter of the United Nations 42 AM. J

  13. Attribution of Atlantic Multidecadal Variability to External Forcing, Internal Variability, and Weather Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colfescu, Ioana

    Detection of externally forced climate change and attribution of the causes of the externally forced and internally generated climate variability during the last century are the central scientific issues of current climate science and the subject of important controversies. This thesis systematically addresses fundamental problems in detection and attribution. A novel three-tier model ensemble strategy is developed and applied in the model world to address these issues. At the top tier, an ensemble of CGCMs with the same external forcing applied to each member is used to separate the results from each ensemble member into the externally forced and internally generated components. At the second tier, an ensemble of atmospheric GCMs (AGCM) with each member forced by the same SST, taken from a member of the CGCM ensemble, is used to separate the atmospheric variability in that CGCM member into SST-and-externally-forced and weather noise components. The third tier, uses an interactive ensemble version of the CGCM, in which the AGCM is replaced by an AGCM ensemble, so that atmospheric weather noise in the CGCM is suppressed. Controlled experiments forcing the interactive ensemble with the atmospheric noise diagnosed in the AGCM ensemble tier isolate the role of the weather noise in generating the internal SST variability found in the CGCM Ensemble tier. The strategy is employed to examine three important detection and attribution issues. The first is why the AGCM ensemble forced by observed SST does not simulate the observed 20th century sea level trends in the Indian Ocean. It has been suggested that this is because of an intrinsic failure of the AGCM Ensemble to correctly represent the SST forced response of the coupled system. The results show that the AGCM and CGCM ensembles are consistent with each other, and suggest that the failure to simulate the observed trends is due to model bias rather than coupling. Next, the spatial and temporal properties of the weather

  14. Analysis of Korean Students' International Mobility by 2-D Model: Driving Force Factor and Directional Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Elisa L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the dynamics of Korean students' international mobility to study abroad by using the 2-D Model. The first D, "the driving force factor," explains how and what components of the dissatisfaction with domestic higher education perceived by Korean students drives students' outward mobility to seek…

  15. Generation of internal solitary waves by frontally forced intrusions in geophysical flows.

    PubMed

    Bourgault, Daniel; Galbraith, Peter S; Chavanne, Cédric

    2016-12-06

    Internal solitary waves are hump-shaped, large-amplitude waves that are physically analogous to surface waves except that they propagate within the fluid, along density steps that typically characterize the layered vertical structure of lakes, oceans and the atmosphere. As do surface waves, internal solitary waves may overturn and break, and the process is thought to provide a globally significant source of turbulent mixing and energy dissipation. Although commonly observed in geophysical fluids, the origins of internal solitary waves remain unclear. Here we report a rarely observed natural case of the birth of internal solitary waves from a frontally forced interfacial gravity current intruding into a two-layer and vertically sheared background environment. The results of the analysis carried out suggest that fronts may represent additional and unexpected sources of internal solitary waves in regions of lakes, oceans and atmospheres that are dynamically similar to the situation examined here in the Saguenay Fjord, Canada.

  16. Generation of internal solitary waves by frontally forced intrusions in geophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgault, Daniel; Galbraith, Peter S.; Chavanne, Cédric

    2016-12-01

    Internal solitary waves are hump-shaped, large-amplitude waves that are physically analogous to surface waves except that they propagate within the fluid, along density steps that typically characterize the layered vertical structure of lakes, oceans and the atmosphere. As do surface waves, internal solitary waves may overturn and break, and the process is thought to provide a globally significant source of turbulent mixing and energy dissipation. Although commonly observed in geophysical fluids, the origins of internal solitary waves remain unclear. Here we report a rarely observed natural case of the birth of internal solitary waves from a frontally forced interfacial gravity current intruding into a two-layer and vertically sheared background environment. The results of the analysis carried out suggest that fronts may represent additional and unexpected sources of internal solitary waves in regions of lakes, oceans and atmospheres that are dynamically similar to the situation examined here in the Saguenay Fjord, Canada.

  17. Generation of internal solitary waves by frontally forced intrusions in geophysical flows

    PubMed Central

    Bourgault, Daniel; Galbraith, Peter S.; Chavanne, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Internal solitary waves are hump-shaped, large-amplitude waves that are physically analogous to surface waves except that they propagate within the fluid, along density steps that typically characterize the layered vertical structure of lakes, oceans and the atmosphere. As do surface waves, internal solitary waves may overturn and break, and the process is thought to provide a globally significant source of turbulent mixing and energy dissipation. Although commonly observed in geophysical fluids, the origins of internal solitary waves remain unclear. Here we report a rarely observed natural case of the birth of internal solitary waves from a frontally forced interfacial gravity current intruding into a two-layer and vertically sheared background environment. The results of the analysis carried out suggest that fronts may represent additional and unexpected sources of internal solitary waves in regions of lakes, oceans and atmospheres that are dynamically similar to the situation examined here in the Saguenay Fjord, Canada. PMID:27922007

  18. Calculation of internal valence force constants for XY 6( Oh) octahedral molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Gomez, Manuel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Juan Jesus; Cardenete Espinosa, Antonio

    1990-04-01

    The valence force constants have been calculated in terms of simple dependent rectilinear internal co-ordinates for a series of XY 6 octahedral molecules that have been amply studied from a vibrational point of view, i.e. the hexafluorides of sulphur, selenium, molybdenum, tungsten and uranium. The calculations have been carried out using the most recent force constants in symmetry co-ordinates to appear in the literature and following Kuczera's treatment, according to which the indetermination of the internal valence force constants involved in redundancies can be solved by using the transformation F* R= WTWFRWTW, which he calls the pure vibrational force field. The results show that the eleven FR dependent constants are reduced to seven F* R independent constants, the same number as the FS independent force constants. This is because of the zero value of the ƒ'* dα constants and the relationships ƒ* dα= -ƒ″* dα ƒ* αα = -ƒ″* αα ƒ* α=-2ƒ'* αα-ƒ'″* αα that are obtained from the combination of the above mentioned F* R transformation and the sum rule in Kuczera's treatment. These latter relationships can be obtained from the interactions between the displacement coordinates with which they are associated. This has allowed individual values to be assigned to the bending, bending—bending and stretching—bending constants for the above mentioned molecules without the need for recourse to any model whatsoever.

  19. Cogging force rejection method of linear motor based on internal model principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Zhenyu; Yang, Tianbo

    2015-02-01

    The cogging force disturbance of linear motor is one of the main factors affecting the positioning accuracy of ultraprecision moving platform. And this drawback could not be completely overcome by improving the design of motor body, such as location modification of permanent magnet array, or optimization design of the shape of teeth-slot. So the active compensation algorithms become prevalent in cogging force rejection area. This paper proposed a control structure based on internal mode principle to attenuate the cogging force of linear motor which deteriorated the accuracy of position, and this structure could make tracking and anti-disturbing performance of close-loop designed respectively. In the first place, the cogging force was seen as the intrinsic property of linear motor and its model constituting controlled object with motor ontology model was obtained by data driven recursive identification method. Then, a control structure was designed to accommodate tracking and anti-interference ability separately by using internal model principle. Finally, the proposed method was verified in a long stroke moving platform driven by linear motor. The experiment results show that, by employing this control strategy, the positioning error caused by cogging force was decreased by 70%.

  20. Perturbation analysis of internal balancing for lightly damped mechanical systems with gyroscopic and circulatory forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blelloch, P. A.; Mingori, D. L.; Wei, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    Approximate expressions are developed for internally balanced singular values corresponding to the modes of mechanical systems with gyroscopic forces, light damping, and small circulatory forces. A brief overview is first given of the balanced realization model reduction method, including a discussion of recent work. The models considered are defined, and a perturbation analysis is used to show that the modal representation becomes asymptotically balanced as damping reduces to zero. The approximate balanced singular values are calculated, and a simple example of a flexible, dual-spin spacecraft is given as an illustration of the results.

  1. 32 CFR 536.113 - Assistance to foreign forces for claims arising under international agreements (as to claims...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Assistance to foreign forces for claims arising under international agreements (as to claims arising in the United States). 536.113 Section 536.113... forces for claims arising under international agreements (as to claims arising in the United States)....

  2. Interactions between internal forces, body stiffness, and fluid environment in a neuromechanical model of lamprey swimming

    PubMed Central

    Tytell, Eric D.; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Williams, Thelma L.; Cohen, Avis H.; Fauci, Lisa J.

    2010-01-01

    Animal movements result from a complex balance of many different forces. Muscles produce force to move the body; the body has inertial, elastic, and damping properties that may aid or oppose the muscle force; and the environment produces reaction forces back on the body. The actual motion is an emergent property of these interactions. To examine the roles of body stiffness, muscle activation, and fluid environment for swimming animals, a computational model of a lamprey was developed. The model uses an immersed boundary framework that fully couples the Navier–Stokes equations of fluid dynamics with an actuated, elastic body model. This is the first model at a Reynolds number appropriate for a swimming fish that captures the complete fluid-structure interaction, in which the body deforms according to both internal muscular forces and external fluid forces. Results indicate that identical muscle activation patterns can produce different kinematics depending on body stiffness, and the optimal value of stiffness for maximum acceleration is different from that for maximum steady swimming speed. Additionally, negative muscle work, observed in many fishes, emerges at higher tail beat frequencies without sensory input and may contribute to energy efficiency. Swimming fishes that can tune their body stiffness by appropriately timed muscle contractions may therefore be able to optimize the passive dynamics of their bodies to maximize peak acceleration or swimming speed. PMID:21037110

  3. Interactions between internal forces, body stiffness, and fluid environment in a neuromechanical model of lamprey swimming.

    PubMed

    Tytell, Eric D; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Williams, Thelma L; Cohen, Avis H; Fauci, Lisa J

    2010-11-16

    Animal movements result from a complex balance of many different forces. Muscles produce force to move the body; the body has inertial, elastic, and damping properties that may aid or oppose the muscle force; and the environment produces reaction forces back on the body. The actual motion is an emergent property of these interactions. To examine the roles of body stiffness, muscle activation, and fluid environment for swimming animals, a computational model of a lamprey was developed. The model uses an immersed boundary framework that fully couples the Navier-Stokes equations of fluid dynamics with an actuated, elastic body model. This is the first model at a Reynolds number appropriate for a swimming fish that captures the complete fluid-structure interaction, in which the body deforms according to both internal muscular forces and external fluid forces. Results indicate that identical muscle activation patterns can produce different kinematics depending on body stiffness, and the optimal value of stiffness for maximum acceleration is different from that for maximum steady swimming speed. Additionally, negative muscle work, observed in many fishes, emerges at higher tail beat frequencies without sensory input and may contribute to energy efficiency. Swimming fishes that can tune their body stiffness by appropriately timed muscle contractions may therefore be able to optimize the passive dynamics of their bodies to maximize peak acceleration or swimming speed.

  4. Bacillus subtilis Bacteria Generate an Internal Mechanical Force within a Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Douarche, Carine; Allain, Jean-Marc; Raspaud, Eric

    2015-01-01

    A key issue in understanding why biofilms are the most prevalent mode of bacterial life is the origin of the degree of resistance and protection that bacteria gain from self-organizing into biofilm communities. Our experiments suggest that their mechanical properties are a key factor. Experiments on pellicles, or floating biofilms, of Bacillus subtilis showed that while they are multiplying and secreting extracellular substances, bacteria create an internal force (associated with a −80 ± 25 Pa stress) within the biofilms, similar to the forces that self-equilibrate and strengthen plants, organs, and some engineered buildings. Here, we found that this force, or stress, is associated with growth-induced pressure. Our observations indicate that due to such forces, biofilms spread after any cut or ablation by up to 15–20% of their initial size. The force relaxes over very short timescales (tens of milliseconds). We conclude that this force helps bacteria to shape the biofilm, improve its mechanical resistance, and facilitate its invasion and self-repair. PMID:26588577

  5. Visualizing clathrin-mediated IgE receptor internalization by electron and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Burns, Alan R; Oliver, Janet M; Pfeiffer, Janet R; Wilson, Bridget S

    2008-01-01

    A significant step in the immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor signaling pathway in mast cell membranes is receptor internalization by clathrin-coated vesicles. Visualization in native membrane sheets of the emerging clathrin lattice structures containing the IgE receptor and associated signaling partners has been accomplished with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). More recently, membrane sheets with labeled clathrin have also been characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM) in combination with fluorescence imaging. We discuss here the procedure for creating fixed, native cell membrane sheets, labeling with immunogold or fluorescent labels, and utilization for TEM or AFM/fluorescence imaging of clathrin-mediated IgE internalization.

  6. What causes periodic beating in sperm flagella: synchronized internal forcing or fluid-structure interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Ranganathan; Nandagiri, Ashwin; Jadhav, Sameer

    2016-11-01

    Eucaryotic cells such as sperm propel themselves using internally driven flagella. Two different models for the origin of the whip-like beating observed in such flagella are compared. The first model assumes that internal protein motors actuate synchronously to cause a traveling active-force wave within the filament. The forcing wave is chosen such that its resultant and the total torque on the filament are zero. In contrast, the second model assumes that forces and torques exerted by the motors locally sum to zero across the scale of the filament diameter. The only effect of the motor activity is to give rise to a stresslet distribution across the filament length. In either model, the slender filament is modeled as a bead-spring chain with hydrodynamic interactions. Flagellar waveforms and trajectory patterns obtained are compared systematically while keeping the dissipation rates the same for the two models. Periodic beating emerges in freely swimming filaments with the second model without any imposed periodicity in the stresslet distribution. This suggests that periodic waveforms in eucaryotic flagella can emerge by fluid-structure interactions alone without significant internal synchronization of protein motor activity.

  7. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  8. Forced migration and mental health: prolonged internal displacement, return migration and resilience.

    PubMed

    Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Stewart, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Forced internal displacement has been rising steadily, mainly due to conflict. Many internally displaced people (IDP) experience prolonged displacement. Global research evidence suggests that many of these IDP are at high risk for developing mental disorders, adding weight to the global burden of disease. However, individual and community resilience may act as protective factors. Return migration may be an option for some IDP populations, especially when conflicts end, although return migration may itself be associated with worse mental health. Limited evidence is available on effects of resettlement or return migration following prolonged forced internal displacement on mental health. Also, the role of resilience factors remains to be clarified following situations of prolonged displacement. The public health impact of internal displacement is not clearly understood. Epidemiological and interventional research in IDP mental health needs to look beyond medicalised models and encompass broader social and cultural aspects. The resilience factor should be integrated and explored more in mental health research among IDP and a clearly focused multidisciplinary approach is advocated.

  9. A Southwest Pacific Coral Perspective on ENSO Variability: Precessional Forcing vs. Internal Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, T. M.; Partin, J. W.; Thirumalai, K.; Maupin, C. R.; Vara, M. A.; Shen, C. C.; Taylor, F. W.

    2014-12-01

    ENSO variability is manifest in the western Pacific through heat and moisture exchanges associated with the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) and the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). Forward modeling (pseudoproxy analysis) results and published coral proxy records from the tropical Pacific indicate that in addition to the central and eastern Pacific regions, corals from the WPWP and SPCZ regions skillfully record ENSO variability. Some studies suggest that precessional forcing directly reduces/enhances ENSO variability. Other studies suggest that internal variability is the primary control on Holocene ENSO changes. Herein, we use coral proxy records from the tropical Pacific and numerical simulations to better understand the response of ENSO to precessional forcing and internal variability. We extend the coral record of ENSO variability using a new modern coral record from the Solomon Islands (1716-2008 CE) and a select suite of Holocene fossil coral records from the WPWP. The new modern coral record captures large ENSO events with considerable skill, providing new evidence for potential large ENSO events during the early 18th and 19th centuries, events that are not represented in current coral and/or multi-proxy reconstructions. We also note that long periods of reduced ENSO activity can occur during intervals with near constant precessional forcing at modern values. The fossil coral records provide discrete time windows into ENSO variability over the Holocene. These records provide evidence of similar patterns of ENSO activity during intervals with different precessional configurations. The modern and fossil coral records imply a strong influence of internal variability in the modulation of ENSO, which may make it difficult to establish a direct control of precessional forcing on ENSO variability over the Holocene.

  10. Binaries Traveling through a Gaseous Medium: Dynamical Drag Forces and Internal Torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J.; Chametla, Raul O.

    2014-10-01

    Using time-dependent linear theory, we investigate the morphology of the gravitational wake induced by a binary, whose center of mass moves at velocity {\\boldsymbol {V}}_cm against a uniform background of gas. For simplicity, we assume that the components of the binary are on circular orbits about their common center of mass. The consequences of dynamical friction is twofold. First, gas dynamical friction may drag the center of mass of the binary and cause the binary to migrate. Second, drag forces also induce a braking torque, which causes the orbits of the components of the binary to shrink. We compute the drag forces acting on one component of the binary due to the gravitational interaction with its own wake. We show that the dynamical friction force responsible for decelerating the center of mass of the binary is smaller than it is in the point-mass case because of the loss of gravitational focusing. We show that the braking internal torque depends on the Mach numbers of each binary component about their center of mass, and also on the Mach number of the center of mass of the binary. In general, the internal torque decreases with increasing the velocity of the binary relative to the ambient gas cloud. However, this is not always the case. We also mention the relevance of our results to the period distribution of binaries.

  11. Quantifying internally generated and externally forced climate signals at regional scales in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Kewei; Zhang, Xuebin; Church, John A.; Hu, Jianyu

    2015-11-01

    The Earth's climate evolves because of both internal variability and external forcings. Using Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models, here we quantify the ratio of externally forced variance to total variance on interannual and longer time scales for regional surface air temperature (SAT) and sea level, which depends on the relative strength of externally forced signal compared to internal variability. The highest ratios are found in tropical areas for SAT but at high latitudes for sea level over the historical period when ocean dynamics and global mean thermosteric contributions are considered. Averaged globally, the ratios over a fixed time interval (e.g., 30 years) are projected to increase during the 21st century under the business-as-usual scenario (RCP8.5). In contrast, under two mitigation scenarios (RCP2.6 and RCP4.5), the ratio declines sharply by the end of the 21st century for SAT, but only declines slightly or stabilizes for sea level, indicating a slower response of sea level to climate mitigation.

  12. Binaries traveling through a gaseous medium: dynamical drag forces and internal torques

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J.; Chametla, Raul O.

    2014-10-20

    Using time-dependent linear theory, we investigate the morphology of the gravitational wake induced by a binary, whose center of mass moves at velocity V{sub cm} against a uniform background of gas. For simplicity, we assume that the components of the binary are on circular orbits about their common center of mass. The consequences of dynamical friction is twofold. First, gas dynamical friction may drag the center of mass of the binary and cause the binary to migrate. Second, drag forces also induce a braking torque, which causes the orbits of the components of the binary to shrink. We compute the drag forces acting on one component of the binary due to the gravitational interaction with its own wake. We show that the dynamical friction force responsible for decelerating the center of mass of the binary is smaller than it is in the point-mass case because of the loss of gravitational focusing. We show that the braking internal torque depends on the Mach numbers of each binary component about their center of mass, and also on the Mach number of the center of mass of the binary. In general, the internal torque decreases with increasing the velocity of the binary relative to the ambient gas cloud. However, this is not always the case. We also mention the relevance of our results to the period distribution of binaries.

  13. Policy lessons from comparing mortality from two global forces: international terrorism and tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, George; Wilson, Nick

    2005-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the mortality burdens from two global impacts on mortality: international terrorism and the major cause of preventable death in developed countries – tobacco use. We also sought to examine the similarities and differences between these two causes of mortality so as to better inform the policy responses directed at prevention. Methods Data on deaths from international terrorism were obtained from a US State Department database for 1994–2003. Estimates for tobacco-attributable deaths were based on Peto et al 2003. The countries were 37 developed and East European countries. Results and discussion The collective annualized mortality burden from tobacco was approximately 5700 times that of international terrorism. The ratio of annual tobacco to international terrorism deaths was lowest for the United States at 1700 times, followed by Russia at 12,900 times. The tobacco death burden in all these countries was equivalent to the impact of an 11 September type terrorist attack every 14 hours. Different perceptions of risk may contribute to the relative lack of a policy response to tobacco mortality, despite its relatively greater scale. The lack is also despite tobacco control having a stronger evidence base for the prevention measures used. Conclusion This comparison highlights the way risk perception may determine different policy responses to global forces causing mortality. Nevertheless, the large mortality differential between international terrorism and tobacco use has policy implications for informing the rational use of resources to prevent premature death. PMID:16354305

  14. Research Priorities and Plans for the International Space Station - Results of the REMAP Task Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kicza, M.

    2002-01-01

    Recent events in the International Space Station (ISS) Program have resulted in the necessity to re-examine the research priorities and research plans for future years. Due to both technical and fiscal resource constraints expected on the International Space Station, it is imperative that research priorities be carefully reviewed and clearly articulated. The U.S. President's Budget language for 2003 states that "...NASA will be working with the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) to engage the scientific community and establish clear high-priority, affordable science objectives with near-term focus on improving scientific productivity. The results of this review will help set the science agenda for Biological and Physical Research that will in turn define how the Space Station is used." In consultation with OSTP and the Office of Management and budget (OMB), NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) is assembling an ad-hoc external advisory committee, the Biological and Physical REsearch MAximization and Prioritization (REMAP) Task Force, which will be under the auspices of the NASA Advisory Council. This paper will describe the outcome of the Task Force and how it will be used to define a roadmap for near and long term Biological and Physical Research objectives. Additionally the paper will discuss the maximization of the International Space Station utilization.

  15. Regional synchrony of temperature variation and internal wave forcing along the Florida Keys reef tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leichter, James J.; Stokes, M. Dale; Vilchis, L. Ignacio; Fiechter, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of 10 year temperature records collected along the Florida Keys reef tract (FLKRT) reveals strong, regional-scale synchrony in high-frequency temperature variation suggestive of internal wave forcing at predominately semidiurnal frequencies. In each year and at all sites, the amplitude of semidiurnal temperature variation was greatest from March to September, and markedly lower from October to February. Comparisons of the semidiurnal component of the temperature variation among sites suggest complex patterns in the arrival of internal waves, with highest cross correlation among closely spaced sites and synchrony in periods of enhanced internal wave activity across the length of the FLKRT, particularly in summer. The periods of enhanced semidiurnal temperature variation at the 20 and 30 m isobaths on the reef slopes appear to be associated with the dynamics of the Florida Current and the onshore movement of warm fronts preceding the passage of Florida Current frontal eddies. Regional-scale satellite altimetry observations suggest temporal linkages to sea surface height anomalies in the Loop Current (upstream of the Florida Current) and setup of the Tortugas Gyre. The synchronized forcing of cool water onto the reef slope sites across the FLKRT is likely to affect physiological responses to temperature variation in corals and other ectothermic organisms, as well as larval transport and nutrient dynamics with the potential for regionally coherent pulses of larvae and nutrients arriving on reef slopes across the FLKRT.

  16. Research priorities and plans for the International Space Station-results of the 'REMAP' Task Force.

    PubMed

    Kicza, M; Erickson, K; Trinh, E

    2003-01-01

    Recent events in the International Space Station (ISS) Program have resulted in the necessity to re-examine the research priorities and research plans for future years. Due to both technical and fiscal resource constraints expected on the International Space Station, it is imperative that research priorities be carefully reviewed and clearly articulated. In consultation with OSTP and the Office of Management and budget (OMB), NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) assembled an ad-hoc external advisory committee, the Biological and Physical Research Maximization and Prioritization (REMAP) Task Force. This paper describes the outcome of the Task Force and how it is being used to define a roadmap for near and long-term Biological and Physical Research objectives that supports NASA's Vision and Mission. Additionally, the paper discusses further prioritizations that were necessitated by budget and ISS resource constraints in order to maximize utilization of the International Space Station. Finally, a process has been developed to integrate the requirements for this prioritized research with other agency requirements to develop an integrated ISS assembly and utilization plan that maximizes scientific output.

  17. Cost Assessment and Validation Task Force on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Cost Assessment and Validation (CAV) Task Force was established for independent review and assessment of cost, schedule and partnership performance on the International Space Station (ISS) Program. The CAV Task Force has made the following key findings: The International Space Station Program has made notable and reasonable progress over the past four years in defining and executing a very challenging and technically complex effort; The Program, size, complexity, and ambitious schedule goals were beyond that which could be reasonably achieved within the $2.1 billion annual cap or $17.4 billion total cap; A number of critical risk elements are likely to have an adverse impact on the International Space Station cost and schedule; The schedule uncertainty associated with Russian implementation of joint Partnership agreements is the major threat to the ISS Program; The Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 budget submission to Congress is not adequate to execute the baseline ISS Program, cover normal program, growth, and address the known critical risks. Additional annual funding of between $130 million and $250 million will be required; and Completion of ISS assembly is likely to be delayed from, one to three years beyond December 2003.

  18. Report of the Cost Assessment and Validation Task Force on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Cost Assessment and Validation (CAV) Task Force was established for independent review and assessment of cost, schedule and partnership performance on the International Space Station (ISS) Program. The CAV Task Force has made the following key findings: The International Space Station Program has made notable and reasonable progress over the past four years in defining and executing a very challenging and technically complex effort. The Program size, complexity, and ambitious schedule goals were beyond that which could be reasonably achieved within the $2.1 billion annual cap or $17.4 billion total cap. A number of critical risk elements are likely to have an adverse impact on the International Space Station cost and schedule. The schedule uncertainty associated with Russian implementation of joint Partnership agreements is the major threat to the ISS Program. The Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 budget submission to Congress is not adequate to execute the baseline ISS Program, cover normal program growth, and address the known critical risks. Additional annual funding of between $130 million and $250 million will be required. Completion of ISS assembly is likely to be delayed from one to three years beyond December 2003.

  19. Research priorities and plans for the International Space Station-results of the 'REMAP' Task Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kicza, M.; Erickson, K.; Trinh, E.

    2003-01-01

    Recent events in the International Space Station (ISS) Program have resulted in the necessity to re-examine the research priorities and research plans for future years. Due to both technical and fiscal resource constraints expected on the International Space Station, it is imperative that research priorities be carefully reviewed and clearly articulated. In consultation with OSTP and the Office of Management and budget (OMB), NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) assembled an ad-hoc external advisory committee, the Biological and Physical Research Maximization and Prioritization (REMAP) Task Force. This paper describes the outcome of the Task Force and how it is being used to define a roadmap for near and long-term Biological and Physical Research objectives that supports NASA's Vision and Mission. Additionally, the paper discusses further prioritizations that were necessitated by budget and ISS resource constraints in order to maximize utilization of the International Space Station. Finally, a process has been developed to integrate the requirements for this prioritized research with other agency requirements to develop an integrated ISS assembly and utilization plan that maximizes scientific output. c2003 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Subthalamic nucleus and internal globus pallidus scale with the rate of change of force production in humans.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, David E; Mayka, Mary A; Thulborn, Keith R; Corcos, Daniel M

    2004-09-01

    The basal ganglia, motor cortex, and cerebellum have been implicated as a circuit that codes for movement velocity. Since movement velocity covaries with the magnitude of force exerted and previous studies have shown that similar regions scale in activation for velocity and force, the scaling of neuronal activity with movement velocity could be due to the force exerted. The present study implemented a parametric functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design to determine which brain regions directly scale with the rate of change of force production, independent of the magnitude of force exerted. Nine healthy adults produced force with their right middle finger and thumb at 25% of their maximal voluntary contraction across four conditions: (1) fast pulse, (2) fast hold, (3) medium hold, and (4) slow hold. There were three primary findings: (i) the activation volume in multiple regions increased with the duration of the force contraction, (ii) only the activation volume in the bilateral internal globus pallidus and left subthalamic nucleus parametrically scaled with the rate of change of force production, and (iii) there was an inverse relation between the activation volume in the subthalamic nucleus and internal globus pallidus with the rate of change of force production. The current findings are the first to have used neuroimaging techniques in humans to segregate the functional anatomy of the internal globus pallidus from external globus pallidus, distinguish functional activation in the globus pallidus from the putamen, and demonstrate task-dependent scaling in the subthalamic nucleus and internal globus pallidus. We conclude that fast, ballistic force production is preprogrammed, requiring a small metabolic demand from the basal ganglia. In contrast, movements that require the internal regulation of the rate of change of force are associated with increased metabolic demand from the subthalamic nucleus and internal segment of the globus pallidus.

  1. The Effects of Forcing Modes on the Simulations of Tidally Generated Internal Bores and Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacsek, S.; Warn-Varnas, A.; Smolarkiewicz, P.; Martin, P.

    2008-12-01

    Numerical experiments were performed on the generation of internal waves by barotropic tidal currents flowing over strongly varying topography, such as sills in straits. The studies concentrated on two aspects of the simulations: (a) the amplitude of the generated waves as functions of tidal velocities, and (b) amplitudes obtained with different modes of forcing prescriptions, such as boundary vs. volume forcing, or analytic vs. model-generated currents. The tidal velocities were obtained from three tidal components, the M2, K1 and O1 tides, and the model currents were computed with a hydrostatic model. In the boundary-forcing approach, the current variations are prescribed as normal inflow at the respective boundaries. In the volume-forcing approach, the currents are prescribed at all interior points, with the model currents already adapted to the interior topography, but the analytic sinusoidal currents had to undergo a flux-conservation modification. Simulations over both idealized topographies, and the sills of the Luzon Strait and South China Sea were carried out. Propagation comparisons were also made with those of the "shape-preserving", analytically constructed type solitons (solutions of the KDV equation).. For tidal currents in the 10-30 cm/sec range, the generated perturbation densities typically ranged peak-to-peak from 1.6 to 3.5 kg/m3, and the vertical velocities from 25 to 70 cm/sec. The analytic solitons maintained their amplitudes during propagation better than the tidally-generated signals.

  2. Internally displaced "victims of armed conflict" in Colombia: the trajectory and trauma signature of forced migration.

    PubMed

    Shultz, James M; Garfin, Dana Rose; Espinel, Zelde; Araya, Ricardo; Oquendo, Maria A; Wainberg, Milton L; Chaskel, Roberto; Gaviria, Silvia L; Ordóñez, Anna E; Espinola, Maria; Wilson, Fiona E; Muñoz García, Natalia; Gómez Ceballos, Angela Milena; Garcia-Barcena, Yanira; Verdeli, Helen; Neria, Yuval

    2014-10-01

    While conflict-induced forced migration is a global phenomenon, the situation in Colombia, South America, is distinctive. Colombia has ranked either first or second in the number of internally displaced persons for 10 years, a consequence of decades of armed conflict compounded by high prevalence of drug trafficking. The displacement trajectory for displaced persons in Colombia proceeds through a sequence of stages: (1) pre-expulsion threats and vulnerability, (2) expulsion, (3) migration, (4) initial adaptation to relocation, (5) protracted resettlement (the end point for most forced migrants), and, rarely, (6) return to the community of origin. Trauma signature analysis, an evidence-based method that elucidates the physical and psychological consequences associated with exposures to harm and loss during disasters and complex emergencies, was used to identify the psychological risk factors and potentially traumatic events experienced by conflict-displaced persons in Colombia, stratified across the phases of displacement. Trauma and loss are experienced differentially throughout the pathway of displacement.

  3. Topography and Mechanical Property Mapping of International Simple Glass Surfaces with Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Nanomechanical Peak Force (PF-QNM) TappingModeTM atomic force microscopy measurements are presented for the first time on polished glass surfaces. The PF-QNM technique allows for topography and mechanical property information to be measured simultaneously at each pixel. Results for the international simple glass which represents a simplified version of SON68 glass suggests an average Young s modulus of 78.8 15.1 GPa is within the experimental error of the modulus measured for SON68 glass (83.6 2 GPa) with conventional approaches. Application of the PF-QNM technique will be extended to in situ glass corrosion experiments with the goal of gaining atomic-scale insights into altered layer development by exploiting the mechanical property differences that exist between silica gel (e.g., altered layer) and pristine glass surface.

  4. Report by the International Space Station (ISS) Management and Cost Evaluation (IMCE) Task Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. Thomas; Kellogg, Yvonne (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Management and Cost Evaluation Task Force (IMCE) was chartered to conduct an independent external review and assessment of the ISS cost, budget, and management. In addition, the Task Force was asked to provide recommendations that could provide maximum benefit to the U.S. taxpayers and the International Partners within the President's budget request. The Task Force has made the following principal findings: (1) The ISS Program's technical achievements to date, as represented by on-orbit capability, are extraordinary; (2) The Existing ISS Program Plan for executing the FY 02-06 budget is not credible; (3) The existing deficiencies in management structure, institutional culture, cost estimating, and program control must be acknowledged and corrected for the Program to move forward in a credible fashion; (4) Additional budget flexibility, from within the Office of Space Flight (OSF) must be provided for a credible core complete program; (5) The research support program is proceeding assuming the budget that was in place before the FY02 budget runout reduction of $1B; (6) There are opportunities to maximize research on the core station program with modest cost impact; (7) The U.S. Core Complete configuration (three person crew) as an end-state will not achieve the unique research potential of the ISS; (8) The cost estimates for the U.S.-funded enhancement options (e.g., permanent seven person crew) are not sufficiently developed to assess credibility. After these findings, the Task Force has formulated several primary recommendations which are published here and include: (1) Major changes must be made in how the ISS program is managed; (2) Additional cost reductions are required within the baseline program; (3) Additional funds must be identified and applied from the Human Space Flight budget; (4) A clearly defined program with a credible end-state, agreed to by all stakeholders, must be developed and implemented.

  5. International PV QA Task Force's Proposed Comparative Rating System for PV Modules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2014-10-01

    The International PV Quality Assurance Task Force is developing a rating system that provides comparative information about the relative durability of PV modules. Development of accelerated stress tests that can provide such comparative information is seen as a major step toward being able to predict PV module service life. This paper will provide details of the ongoing effort to determine the format of such an overall module rating system. The latest proposal is based on using three distinct climate zones as defined in IEC 60721-2-1 for two different mounting systems. Specific stresses beyond those used in the qualification tests are being developed for each of the selected climate zones.

  6. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Task Force Report on Antidepressant Use in Bipolar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Bond, David J.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Nolen, Willem A.; Grunze, Heinz; Licht, Rasmus W.; Post, Robert M.; Berk, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M.; Sachs, Gary S.; Tondo, Leonardo; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Tohen, Mauricio; Undurraga, Juan; González-Pinto, Ana; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Yildiz, Ayşegül; Altshuler, Lori L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Thase, Michael E.; Koukopoulos, Athanasios; Colom, Francesc; Frye, Mark A.; Malhi, Gin S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Vázquez, Gustavo; Perlis, Roy H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Cassidy, Frederick; Akiskal, Hagop; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Valentí, Marc; Mazzei, Diego Hidalgo; Lafer, Beny; Kato, Tadafumi; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Martínez-Aran, Anabel; Parker, Gordon; Souery, Daniel; Özerdem, Ayşegül; McElroy, Susan L.; Girardi, Paolo; Bauer, Michael; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kanba, Shigenobu; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Serretti, Alessandro; Rihmer, Zoltan; Young, Allan H.; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Rybakowski, Janusz; Ha, Kyooseob; Perugi, Giulio; Kasper, Siegfried; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Hirschfeld, Robert M.; Kapczinski, Flávio; Vieta, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The risk-benefit profile of antidepressant medications in bipolar disorder is controversial. When conclusive evidence is lacking, expert consensus can guide treatment decisions. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to seek consensus recommendations on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorders. Method An expert task force iteratively developed consensus through serial consensus-based revisions using the Delphi method. Initial survey items were based on systematic review of the literature. Subsequent surveys included new or reworded items and items that needed to be rerated. This process resulted in the final ISBD Task Force clinical recommendations on antidepressant use in bipolar disorder. Results There is striking incongruity between the wide use of and the weak evidence base for the efficacy and safety of antidepressant drugs in bipolar disorder. Few well-designed, long-term trials of prophylactic benefits have been conducted, and there is insufficient evidence for treatment benefits with antidepressants combined with mood stabilizers. A major concern is the risk for mood switch to hypomania, mania, and mixed states. Integrating the evidence and the experience of the task force members, a consensus was reached on 12 statements on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorder. Conclusions Because of limited data, the task force could not make broad statements endorsing antidepressant use but acknowledged that individual bipolar patients may benefit from antidepressants. Regarding safety, serotonin reuptake inhibitors and bupropion may have lower rates of manic switch than tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and norepinephrine-serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The frequency and severity of antidepressant-associated mood elevations appear to be greater in bipolar I than bipolar II disorder. Hence, in bipolar I patients antidepressants should be prescribed only as an adjunct to mood-stabilizing medications

  7. Internal phase transition induced by external forces in Finsler geometric model for membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koibuchi, Hiroshi; Shobukhov, Andrey

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we numerically study an anisotropic shape transformation of membranes under external forces for two-dimensional triangulated surfaces on the basis of Finsler geometry. The Finsler metric is defined by using a vector field, which is the tangential component of a three-dimensional unit vector σ corresponding to the tilt or some external macromolecules on the surface of disk topology. The sigma model Hamiltonian is assumed for the tangential component of σ with the interaction coefficient λ. For large (small) λ, the surface becomes oblong (collapsed) at relatively small bending rigidity. For the intermediate λ, the surface becomes planar. Conversely, fixing the surface with the boundary of area A or with the two-point boundaries of distance L, we find that the variable σ changes from random to aligned state with increasing of A or L for the intermediate region of λ. This implies that an internal phase transition for σ is triggered not only by the thermal fluctuations, but also by external mechanical forces. We also find that the frame (string) tension shows the expected scaling behavior with respect to A/N (L/N) at the intermediate region of A (L) where the σ configuration changes between the disordered and ordered phases. Moreover, we find that the string tension γ at sufficiently large λ is considerably smaller than that at small λ. This phenomenon resembles the so-called soft-elasticity in the liquid crystal elastomer, which is deformed by small external tensile forces.

  8. Reliability of forced internal rotation and active internal rotation to assess lateral instability of the biceps pulley

    PubMed Central

    ARRIGONI, PAOLO; ROSE, GIACOMO DELLE; D’AMBROSI, RICCARDO; ROTUNDO, GIORGIO; CAMPAGNA, VINCENZO; PIRANI, PIERGIORGIO; PANASCÌ, MANLIO; PETRICCIOLI, DARIO; BERTONE, CELESTE; GRASSO, ANDREA; LATTE, CARMINE; COSTA, ALBERTO; VIOLA, GINO; DE GIORGI, SILVANA; PANELLA, ANTONELLO; PADUA, ROBERTO; BECCARINI, ALESSANDRO; SALCHER, BARBARA; OLIVIERI, MATTEO; MUGNAINI, MARCO; PANNONE, ANTONELLO; CEOLDO, CHIARA; LONGO, UMILE GIUSEPPE; DENARO, VINCENZO; CERCIELLO, SIMONE; PANNI, ALFREDO SCHIAVONE; AVANZI, PAOLO; ZORZI, CLAUDIO; RAGONE, VINCENZA; CASTAGNA, ALESSANDRO; RANDELLI, PIETRO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between positive painful forced internal rotation (FIR) and lateral pulley instability in the presence of a pre-diagnosed posterosuperior cuff tear. The same investigation was conducted for painful active internal rotation (AIR). Methods a multicenter prospective study was conducted in a series of patients scheduled to undergo arthroscopic posterosuperior cuff repair. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH) was administered. The VAS score at rest, DASH score, and presence/absence of pain on FIR and AIR were recorded and their relationships with lesions of the lateral pulley, cuff tear patterns and shape of lesions were analyzed. Results the study population consisted of 115 patients (mean age: 55.1 years) recruited from 12 centers. The dominant arm was affected in 72 cases (62.6%). The average anteroposterior extension of the lesion was 1.61 cm. The mean preoperative VAS and DASH scores were 6.1 and 41.8, respectively. FIR and AIR were positive in 94 (81.7%) and 85 (73.9%) cases, respectively. The lateral pulley was compromised in 50 cases (43.4%). Cuff tears were partial articular in 35 patients (30.4%), complete in 61 (53%), and partial bursal in 19 (16.5%). No statistical correlation between positive FIR or AIR and lateral pulley lesions was detected. Positive FIR and AIR were statistically associated with complete lesions. Negative FIR was associated with the presence of partial articular tears. Conclusions painful FIR in the presence of a postero-superior cuff tear does not indicate lateral pulley instability. When a cuff tear is suspected, positive FIR and AIR are suggestive of full-thickness tear patterns while a negative FIR suggests a partial articular lesion. Level of evidence: level I, validating cohort study with good reference standards. PMID:26151035

  9. Forced response and internal variability of summer climate over western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Shiogama, Hideo; Imada, Yukiko; Mori, Masato; Arakawa, Osamu; Mizuta, Ryo; Yoshida, Kohei; Takahashi, Chiharu; Arai, Miki; Ishii, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Xie, Shang-Ping; Ueda, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, anomalously hot summers and persistent droughts frequented over the western United States (wUS), the condition similar to the 1950s and 1960s. While atmospheric internal variability is important for mid-latitude interannual climate variability, it has been suggested that anthropogenic external forcing and multidecadal modes of variability in sea surface temperature, namely, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), also affect the occurrence of droughts and hot summers. In this study, 100-member ensemble simulations for 1951-2010 by an atmospheric general circulation model were used to explore relative contributions of anthropogenic warming, atmospheric internal variability, and atmospheric response to PDO and AMO to the decadal anomalies over the wUS. By comparing historical and sensitivity simulations driven by observed sea surface temperature, sea ice, historical forcing agents, and non-warming counterfactual climate forcing, we found that large portions of recent increases in mean temperature and frequency of hot summers (66 and 82 %) over the wUS can be attributed to the anthropogenic global warming. In contrast, multidecadal change in the wUS precipitation is explained by a combination of the negative PDO and the positive AMO after the 2000s. Diagnostics using a linear baroclinic model indicate that AMO- and PDO-related diabatic heating anomalies over the tropics contribute to the anomalous atmospheric circulation associated with the droughts and hot summers over wUS on multidecadal timescale. Those anomalies are not robust during the periods when PDO and AMO are in phase. The prolonged PDO-AMO antiphase period since the late twentieth century resulted in the substantial component of multidecadal anomalies in temperature and precipitation over the wUS.

  10. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Task Force report on obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Guilherme R; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Andrade, Carlos A; Andreoli, Laura; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Porter, T Flint; Salmon, Jane; Silver, Robert M; Tincani, Angela; Branch, D Ware

    2014-08-01

    Pregnancy morbidity is one of the clinical manifestations used for classification criteria of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). During the 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL), a Task Force with internationally-known experts was created to carry out a critical appraisal of the literature available regarding the association of aPL with obstetric manifestations present in actual classification criteria (recurrent early miscarriage, fetal death, preeclampsia and placental insufficiency) and the quality of the evidence that treatment(s) provide benefit in terms of avoiding recurrent adverse obstetric outcomes. The association of infertility with aPL and the effectiveness of the treatment of patients with infertility and positive aPL was also investigated. This report presents current knowledge and limitations of published studies regarding pregnancy morbidity, infertility and aPL, identifying areas that need better investigative efforts and proposing how critical flaws could be avoided in future studies, as suggested by participants of the Task Force. Except for fetal death, there are limitations in the quality of the data supporting the association of aPL with obstetric complications included in the current APS classification criteria. Recommended treatments for all pregnancy morbidity associated to APS also lack well-designed studies to confirm its efficacy. APL does not seem to be associated with infertility and treatment does not improve the outcomes in infertile patients with aPL. In another section of the Task Force, Dr. Jane Salmon reviewed complement-mediated inflammation in reproductive failure in APS, considering new therapeutic targets to obstetric APS (Ob APS).

  11. Sea Ice Trends in the AO-UMUKCA model: Interplay of Forcing and Internal Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jrrar, Amna; Abraham, Luke; Holland, David; Pyle, John

    2016-04-01

    While Arctic Sea is showing a declining trend particularly in summer. Antarctic sea is showing a modest increase, a very controversial observation in a warming climate. Several studies have attributed these changes to internal variability. Hence in this paper we investigate sea ice trends in both hemispheres as simulated in a version of the Atmosphere-Ocean coupled chemistry climate model AO-UMUKCA under two different atmospheric forcing scenarios. One simulation is a pre-industrial control, where atmospheric forcing is fixed at 1850 level. The second simulation is also a time slice experiment but forced with the year 2000 atmospheric forcing (TS2000). The model simulates a significant reduction in NH Sea Ice Extent (SIE) under the TS2000 scenario, but shows negligible difference in SH SIE between the two scenarios. In agreement with observational studies, we find that NH SIE and distribution are connected to the Arctic Oscillation and the Dipole Anomaly in both simulations, particularly in summer time. While SH winter SIE shows a high correlation with zonal wave-3 pattern and the Pacific South American mode, particularly in TS2000. Connections between SIE and oceanic modes of variability in both hemispheres are also detected. Total NH SIE shows significant correlation with Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) on interannual and decadal timescales, but shows significant correlation with the Inter Pacific Decadal Oscillation (IPO) on multi-decadal timescale only. However, total SH SIE shows significant correlation only with IPO on decadal and multi-decadal scales. The SIE response to oceanic modes is comparable in both simulations.

  12. Utilizing intentional internal resonance to achieve multi-harmonic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bongwon; Pettit, Chris; Dharmasena, Sajith; Keum, Hohyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Kim, Seok; McFarland, D Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A; Vakakis, Alexander F; Cho, Hanna

    2016-03-29

    During dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM), the deflection of a scanning cantilever generates multiple frequency terms due to the nonlinear nature of AFM tip-sample interactions. Even though each frequency term is reasonably expected to encode information about the sample, only the fundamental frequency term is typically decoded to provide topographic mapping of the measured surface. One of main reasons for discarding higher harmonic signals is their low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we introduce a new design concept for multi-harmonic AFM, exploiting intentional nonlinear internal resonance for the enhancement of higher harmonics. The nonlinear internal resonance, triggered by the non-smooth tip-sample dynamic interactions, results in nonlinear energy transfers from the directly excited fundamental bending mode to the higher-frequency mode and, hence, enhancement of the higher harmonic of the measured response. It is verified through detailed theoretical and experimental study that this AFM design can robustly incorporate the required internal resonance and enable high-frequency AFM measurements. Measurements on an inhomogeneous polymer specimen demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed design, namely that the higher harmonic of the measured response is capable of enhanced simultaneous topography imaging and compositional mapping, exhibiting less crosstalk with an abrupt height change.

  13. Internal Hydration Properties of Single Bacterial Endospores Probed by Electrostatic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Van Der Hofstadt, Marc; Fabregas, Rene; Millan-Solsona, Ruben; Juarez, Antonio; Fumagalli, Laura; Gomila, Gabriel

    2016-12-27

    We show that the internal hydration properties of single Bacillus cereus endospores in air under different relative humidity (RH) conditions can be determined through the measurement of its electric permittivity by means of quantitative electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). We show that an increase in the RH from 0% to 80% induces a large increase in the equivalent homogeneous relative electric permittivity of the bacterial endospores, from ∼4 up to ∼17, accompanied only by a small increase in the endospore height, of just a few nanometers. These results correlate the increase of the moisture content of the endospore with the corresponding increase of environmental RH. Three-dimensional finite element numerical calculations, which include the internal structure of the endospores, indicate that the moisture is mainly accumulated in the external layers of the endospore, hence preserving the core of the endospore at low hydration levels. This mechanism is different from what we observe for vegetative bacterial cells of the same species, in which the cell wall at high humid atmospheric conditions is not able to preserve the cytoplasmic region at low hydration levels. These results show the potential of quantitative EFM under environmental humidity control to study the hygroscopic properties of small-scale biological (and nonbiological) entities and to determine its internal hydration state. A better understanding of nanohygroscopic properties can be of relevance in the study of essential biological processes and in the design of bionanotechnological applications.

  14. Utilizing intentional internal resonance to achieve multi-harmonic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Bongwon; Pettit, Chris; Dharmasena, Sajith; Keum, Hohyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Kim, Seok; McFarland, D. Michael; Bergman, Lawrence A.; Vakakis, Alexander F.; Cho, Hanna

    2016-03-01

    During dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM), the deflection of a scanning cantilever generates multiple frequency terms due to the nonlinear nature of AFM tip-sample interactions. Even though each frequency term is reasonably expected to encode information about the sample, only the fundamental frequency term is typically decoded to provide topographic mapping of the measured surface. One of main reasons for discarding higher harmonic signals is their low signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we introduce a new design concept for multi-harmonic AFM, exploiting intentional nonlinear internal resonance for the enhancement of higher harmonics. The nonlinear internal resonance, triggered by the non-smooth tip-sample dynamic interactions, results in nonlinear energy transfers from the directly excited fundamental bending mode to the higher-frequency mode and, hence, enhancement of the higher harmonic of the measured response. It is verified through detailed theoretical and experimental study that this AFM design can robustly incorporate the required internal resonance and enable high-frequency AFM measurements. Measurements on an inhomogeneous polymer specimen demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed design, namely that the higher harmonic of the measured response is capable of enhanced simultaneous topography imaging and compositional mapping, exhibiting less crosstalk with an abrupt height change.

  15. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies: task force report on antiphospholipid syndrome treatment trends.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Doruk; Aguiar, Cassyanne L; Andrade, Danieli; Cohen, Hannah; Cuadrado, Maria J; Danowski, Adriana; Levy, Roger A; Ortel, Thomas L; Rahman, Anisur; Salmon, Jane E; Tektonidou, Maria G; Willis, Rohan; Lockshin, Michael D

    2014-06-01

    Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) is characterized by vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity occurring in patients with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). The primary objective of the APS Treatment Trends Task Force, created as part of the 14th International Congress on aPL, was to systematically review the potential future treatment strategies for aPL-positive patients. The task force chose as future clinical research directions: a) determining the necessity for controlled clinical trials in venous thromboembolism with the new oral direct thrombin or anti-factor Xa inhibitors pending the results of the ongoing rivaroxaban in APS (RAPS) trial, and designing controlled clinical trials in other forms of thrombotic APS; b) systematically analyzing the literature as well as aPL/APS registries, and creating specific registries for non-warfarin/heparin anticoagulants; c) increasing recruitment for an ongoing primary thrombosis prevention trial, and designing secondary thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity prevention trials with hydroxychloroquine; d) determining surrogate markers to select patients for statin trials; e) designing controlled studies with rituximab and other anti-B-cell agents; f) designing mechanistic and clinical studies with eculizumab and other complement inhibitors; and g) chemically modifying peptide therapy to improve the half-life and minimize immunogenicity. The report also includes recommendations for clinicians who consider using these agents in difficult-to-manage aPL-positive patients.

  16. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus report on epilepsy definition, classification and terminology in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Berendt, Mette; Farquhar, Robyn G; Mandigers, Paul J J; Pakozdy, Akos; Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Matiasek, Kaspar; Muñana, Karen; Patterson, Edward E; Penderis, Jacques; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Pumarola, Martí Batlle; Rusbridge, Clare; Stein, Veronika M; Tipold, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    Dogs with epilepsy are among the commonest neurological patients in veterinary practice and therefore have historically attracted much attention with regard to definitions, clinical approach and management. A number of classification proposals for canine epilepsy have been published during the years reflecting always in parts the current proposals coming from the human epilepsy organisation the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). It has however not been possible to gain agreed consensus, "a common language", for the classification and terminology used between veterinary and human neurologists and neuroscientists, practitioners, neuropharmacologists and neuropathologists. This has led to an unfortunate situation where different veterinary publications and textbook chapters on epilepsy merely reflect individual author preferences with respect to terminology, which can be confusing to the readers and influence the definition and diagnosis of epilepsy in first line practice and research studies.In this document the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force (IVETF) discusses current understanding of canine epilepsy and presents our 2015 proposal for terminology and classification of epilepsy and epileptic seizures. We propose a classification system which reflects new thoughts from the human ILAE but also roots in former well accepted terminology. We think that this classification system can be used by all stakeholders.

  17. Computation of the Nusselt number asymptotes for laminar forced convection flows in internally finned tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ledezma, G.A.; Campo, A.

    1999-04-01

    The utilization of internal longitudinal finned tubes has received unparallel attention in the heat transfer literature over the years as a result of its imminent application in high performance compact heat exchangers to enhance the heat transfer between laminar streams of viscous fluids and tube walls. Here, the central goal of this paper is to report a simple approximate way for the prediction of the two asymptotes for the local Nusselt number in laminar forced convection flows inside internal longitudinal finned tubes. The computational attributes of the Method Of Lines (MOL) are propitious for the determination of asymptotic temperature solutions and corresponding heat transfer rates (one for Z {r_arrow} 0 and the other for z {r_arrow} {infinity}). The two local Nusselt number sub-distributions, namely Nu{sub z{r_arrow}0} and Nu{sub z{r_arrow}{infinity}}, blend themselves into an approximate Nusselt number distribution that covers the entire z-domain in a natural way.

  18. Internal Dynamics and Boundary Forcing Characteristics Associated with Interannual Variability of the Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K.- M.; Kim, K.-M.; Yang, S.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a description of the internal dynamics and boundary forcing characteristics of two major components of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM), i.e., the South Asian (SAM) and the Southeast-East Asian monsoon (SEAM). The description is based on a new monsoon-climate paradigm in which the variability of ASM is considered as the outcome of the interplay of a "fast" and an "intermediate" monsoon subsystem, under the influenced of the "slow" varying external forcings. Two sets of regional monsoon indices derived from dynamically consistent rainfall and wind data are used in this study. For SAM, the internal dynamics is represented by that of a "classical" monsoon system where the anomalous circulation is governed by Rossby-wave dynamics, i.e., generation of anomalous vorticity induced by an off-equatorial heat source is balanced by planetary vorticity advection. On the other hand, the internal dynamics of SEAM is characterized by a "hybrid" monsoon system featuring multi-cellular meridional circulation over the East Asian section, extending from the deep tropics to midlatitudes. These meridional-cells link tropical heating to extratropical circulation system via the East Asian jetstream, and are responsible for the characteristic occurrences of zonally oriented anomalous rainfall patterns over East Asian and the subtropical western Pacific. In the extratropical regions, the major upper level vorticity balance is by anomalous vorticity advection and generation by the anomalous divergent circulation. A consequence of this is that compared to SAM, the SEAM is associated with stronger teleconnection patterns to regions outside the ASM. A strong SAM is linked to basin-scale sea surface temperature (SST) fluctuation with significant signal in the equatorial eastern Pacific. During the boreal spring SST warming in the Arabian Sea and the subtropical western Pacific may lead to a strong SAM. For SEAM, interannual variability is tied to SSTA over the Sea of

  19. All-Atom Internal Coordinate Mechanics (ICM) Force Field for Hexopyranoses and Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Arnautova, Yelena A; Abagyan, Ruben; Totrov, Maxim

    2015-05-12

    We present an extension of the all-atom internal-coordinate force field, ICMFF, that allows for simulation of heterogeneous systems including hexopyranose saccharides and glycan chains in addition to proteins. A library of standard glycan geometries containing α- and β-anomers of the most common hexapyranoses, i.e., d-galactose, d-glucose, d-mannose, d-xylose, l-fucose, N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, sialic, and glucuronic acids, is created based on the analysis of the saccharide structures reported in the Cambridge Structural Database. The new force field parameters include molecular electrostatic potential-derived partial atomic charges and the torsional parameters derived from quantum mechanical data for a collection of minimal molecular fragments and related molecules. The ϕ/ψ torsional parameters for different types of glycosidic linkages are developed using model compounds containing the key atoms in the full carbohydrates, i.e., glycosidic-linked tetrahydropyran-cyclohexane dimers. Target data for parameter optimization include two-dimensional energy surfaces corresponding to the ϕ/ψ glycosidic dihedral angles in the disaccharide analogues, as determined by quantum mechanical MP2/6-31G** single-point energies on HF/6-31G** optimized structures. To achieve better agreement with the observed geometries of glycosidic linkages, the bond angles at the O-linkage atoms are added to the internal variable set and the corresponding bond bending energy term is parametrized using quantum mechanical data. The resulting force field is validated on glycan chains of 1-12 residues from a set of high-resolution X-ray glycoprotein structures based on heavy atom root-mean-square deviations of the lowest-energy glycan conformations generated by the biased probability Monte Carlo (BPMC) molecular mechanics simulations from the native structures. The appropriate BPMC distributions for monosaccharide-monosaccharide and protein-glycan linkages are derived from the

  20. Computational fluid dynamics analysis and noise modeling of jets with internal forced mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Loren Armstrong

    The goal of the current research work is to develop a stand-alone jet noise prediction methodology. The current project is focused on jets with internal forced mixers, which are used in regional jet aircraft. In the current approach a two-step method is adopted. First, the turbulence properties in the jet plume are determined from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis using the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (BANS) equations with a two-equation turbulence model. Second, the far-field noise spectrum is predicted using a noise model based on the combination of simple single stream jet components taken from an existing experimental database. The results of this study show that the CFD predictions of the mean velocity field in the jet plume are in good agreement with experimental particle image velocimetry data. It is also observed that the CFD analysis over-predicts the turbulence levels in a simple single jet shear layer. However, it is determined that the CFD analysis under-predicts the enhancement of the shear layer turbulence levels for the forced mixers. Despite this deficiency, it is seen that the trends in the peak turbulence levels for various mixer geometries are correctly predicted by the CFD analysis. In the current study the far-field noise spectra are predicted using a noise model based on the combination of simple single stream jet components. It is found that the CFD-based two-source model noise predictions are under-predicted when compared to experimental acoustic data. This under-prediction appears to result from the under-prediction of the enhanced turbulence levels in the plume of the jets with forced mixers. In addition to the two-source noise model, a new multi-source model is proposed and evaluated. This model, which has a more general form, takes into account additional mean flow information from the jet plume. As a result, this model should be applicable to a wider range of geometric configurations. The results using this new multi

  1. The role of external forcing and internal variability in regulating global mean surface temperatures on decadal timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lu; McPhaden, Michael J.

    2017-03-01

    Global mean surface temperature (GMST) shows considerable decadal variations superimposed on a pronounced warming trend, with rapid warming during 1920–1945 and 1977–2000 and warming hiatuses during 1946–1976 and 2001–2013. The prevailing view is that internally generated variations associated with the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) dominate decadal variations in GMST, while external forcing from greenhouse gases and anthropogenic aerosols dominate the long-term trend in GMST over the last hundred years. Here we show evidence from observations and climate models that external forcing largely governs decadal GMST variations in the historical record with internally generated variations playing a secondary role, except during those periods of IPO extremes. In particular, the warming hiatus during 1946–1976 started from a negative IPO but was later dominated by the eruption of Mount Agung in 1963, while the subsequent accelerated warming during 1977–2000 was due primarily to increased greenhouse gas forcing. The most recent warming hiatus apparent in observations occurred largely through cooling from a negative IPO extreme that overwhelmed the warming from external forcing. An important implication of this work is that when the phase of the IPO turns positive, as it did in 2014, the combination of external forcing and internal variability should lead to accelerated global warming. This accelerated warming appears to be underway, with record high GMST in 2014, 2015, and 2016.

  2. The Prediction of Labor Force Status: Implications from International Adult Skill Assessments. Research Report. ETS RR-16-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Tongyun; von Davier, Matthias; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    This report investigates the prediction of labor force status using observed variables, such as gender, age, and immigrant status, and more importantly, measured skill variables, including literacy proficiency and a categorical rating of educational attainment based on the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), the 2003 Adult Literacy…

  3. Nomenclature of genetic movement disorders: Recommendations of the international Parkinson and movement disorder society task force.

    PubMed

    Marras, Connie; Lang, Anthony; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Sue, Carolyn M; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Bertram, Lars; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet; Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Warner, Thomas T; Durr, Alexandra; Assmann, Birgit; Lohmann, Katja; Kostic, Vladimir; Klein, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The system of assigning locus symbols to specify chromosomal regions that are associated with a familial disorder has a number of problems when used as a reference list of genetically determined disorders,including (I) erroneously assigned loci, (II) duplicated loci, (III) missing symbols or loci, (IV) unconfirmed loci and genes, (V) a combination of causative genes and risk factor genes in the same list, and (VI) discordance between phenotype and list assignment. In this article, we report on the recommendations of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society Task Force for Nomenclature of Genetic Movement Disorders and present a system for naming genetically determined movement disorders that addresses these problems. We demonstrate how the system would be applied to currently known genetically determined parkinsonism, dystonia, dominantly inherited ataxia, spastic paraparesis, chorea, paroxysmal movement disorders, neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, and primary familial brain calcifications. This system provides a resource for clinicians and researchers that, unlike the previous system, can be considered an accurate and criterion-based list of confirmed genetically determined movement disorders at the time it was last updated.

  4. Internal development of vegetative buds of Norway spruce trees in relation to accumulated chilling and forcing temperatures.

    PubMed

    Viherä-Aarnio, Anneli; Sutinen, Sirkka; Partanen, Jouni; Häkkinen, Risto

    2014-05-01

    The timing of budburst of temperate trees is known to be controlled by complicated interactions of temperature and photoperiod. To improve the phenological models of budburst, better knowledge of the internal bud development preceding budburst in relation to environmental cues is needed. We studied the effect of accumulated chilling and forcing temperatures on the internal development of vegetative buds preceding budburst in Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.]. Branches from 17-year-old trees of southern Finnish origin were transferred eight times at 1- to 2-week intervals from October to December 2007 from the field at Punkaharju (61°48'N, 29°20'E) to the greenhouse with forcing conditions (day length 12 h, +20 °C). After seven different durations of forcing, the developmental phase and primordial shoot growth of the buds were analysed at the stereomicroscopic level. Air temperature was recorded hourly throughout the study period. The accumulated chilling unit sum had a significant effect on the temperature sum that was required to attain a certain developmental phase; a higher amount of chilling required a lower amount of forcing. The variation in the rate of development of different buds within each sample branch in relation to the chilling unit and forcing temperature sum was low. Regarding primordial shoot growth, there was also an inverse relation between accumulated chilling and forcing, i.e., a higher accumulated chilling unit sum before forcing required a lower temperature sum to initiate primordial shoot growth and resulted in a stronger effect of accumulated forcing. A second-order regression model with an interaction of chilling and forcing explained the variation of primordial shoot growth with high precision (R(2) = 0.88). However, further studies are required to determine the final parameter values to be used in phenological modelling.

  5. Criteria for the Minimum Operation Length of Internal Forces as a Function of the Development of an Optimum Structure of Machinery Structural Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fligiel, M.; Patyk, R.

    2016-12-01

    The present study analyzes the operation length of internal forces (DDSW) understood as the length of the flow of internal forces along the shortest possible internal routes. The operation length of internal forces is determined on the basis of stresses and the given volume in the constructional space. The minimum DDSW of the structure satisfies the criterial conditions of the most rigid structure, where the potential energy of deformation and the deformation energy potential is the same in the whole volume and thus the potential gradient is zero.

  6. Diagnostic guidelines for bipolar disorder: a summary of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Diagnostic Guidelines Task Force Report.

    PubMed

    Ghaemi, S Nassir; Bauer, Michael; Cassidy, Frederick; Malhi, Gin S; Mitchell, Philip; Phelps, James; Vieta, Eduard; Youngstrom, Eric

    2008-02-01

    The Diagnostic Guidelines Task Force of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) presents in this document and this special issue a summary of the current nosological status of bipolar illness, a discussion of possible revisions to current DSM-IV and ICD-10 definitions, an examination of the relevant literature, explication of areas of consensus and dissensus, and proposed definitions that might guide clinicians in the most valid approach to diagnosis of these conditions given the current state of our knowledge.

  7. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal: diagnostic approach to epilepsy in dogs.

    PubMed

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen; Penderis, Jacques; Stein, Veronika; Tipold, Andrea; Berendt, Mette; Farqhuar, Robyn; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Mandigers, Paul J J; Matiasek, Kaspar; Packer, Rowena M A; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Ned; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Batlle, Martí Pumarola; Rusbridge, Clare; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient presenting with a history of suspected epileptic seizures incorporates two fundamental steps: to establish if the events the animal is demonstrating truly represent epileptic seizures and if so, to identify their underlying cause. Differentiation of epileptic seizures from other non-epileptic episodic paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more unprovoked epileptic seizures occurring at least 24 h apart, age at epileptic seizure onset of between six months and six years, unremarkable inter-ictal physical and neurological examination, and no significant abnormalities on minimum data base blood tests and urinalysis. Tier II confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and II and identification of electroencephalographic abnormalities characteristic for seizure disorders. The authors recommend performing MRI of the brain and routine CSF analysis, after exclusion of reactive seizures, in dogs with age at epileptic seizure onset <6 months or >6 years, inter-ictal neurological abnormalities consistent with intracranial neurolocalisation, status epilepticus or cluster seizure at epileptic seizure onset

  8. Force-induced melting of DNA--evidence for peeling and internal melting from force spectra on short synthetic duplex sequences.

    PubMed

    Bosaeus, Niklas; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Brown, Tom; Åkerman, Björn; Nordén, Bengt

    2014-07-01

    Overstretching of DNA occurs at about 60-70 pN when a torsionally unconstrained double-stranded DNA molecule is stretched by its ends. During the transition, the contour length increases by up to 70% without complete strand dissociation. Three mechanisms are thought to be involved: force-induced melting into single-stranded DNA where either one or both strands carry the tension, or a B-to-S transition into a longer, still base-paired conformation. We stretch sequence-designed oligonucleotides in an effort to isolate the three processes, focusing on force-induced melting. By introducing site-specific inter-strand cross-links in one or both ends of a 64 bp AT-rich duplex we could repeatedly follow the two melting processes at 5 mM and 1 M monovalent salt. We find that when one end is sealed the AT-rich sequence undergoes peeling exhibiting hysteresis at low and high salt. When both ends are sealed the AT sequence instead undergoes internal melting. Thirdly, the peeling melting is studied in a composite oligonucleotide where the same AT-rich sequence is concatenated to a GC-rich sequence known to undergo a B-to-S transition rather than melting. The construct then first melts in the AT-rich part followed at higher forces by a B-to-S transition in the GC-part, indicating that DNA overstretching modes are additive.

  9. Internal Stresses Lead to Net Forces and Torques on Extended Elastic Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharoni, Hillel; Kolinski, John M.; Moshe, Michael; Meirzada, Idan; Sharon, Eran

    2016-09-01

    A geometrically frustrated elastic body will develop residual stresses arising from the mismatch between the intrinsic geometry of the body and the geometry of the ambient space. We analyze these stresses for an ambient space with gradients in its intrinsic curvature, and show that residual stresses generate effective forces and torques on the center of mass of the body. We analytically calculate these forces in two dimensions, and experimentally demonstrate their action by the migration of a non-Euclidean gel disc in a curved Hele-Shaw cell. An extension of our analysis to higher dimensions shows that these forces are also generated in three dimensions, but are negligible compared to gravity.

  10. Introduction to the IEEE International Symposium on Applications of Ferroelectrics and International Symposium on Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Nanoscale Phenomena in Polar Materials.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zuo-Guang; Tan, Xiaoli; Bokov, Alexei A

    2012-09-01

    The 20th IEEE International Symposium on Applications of Ferroelectrics (ISAF) was held on July 24-27, 2011, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, jointly with the International Symposium on Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Nanoscale Phenomena in Polar Materials (PFM). Over a period of four days, approximately 400 scientists, engineers, and students from around the world presented their work and discussed the latest developments in the field of ferroelectrics, related materials, and their applications. It is particularly encouraging to see that a large number of students (115) were attracted to the joint conference and presented high-quality research works. This trend is not only important to this conference series, but more importantly, it is vital to the future of the ferroelectrics field.

  11. International Education: A Force for Peace and Cross-Cultural Understanding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the notion that the international sojourn has the potential to transform sojourners into cultural mediators who carry the power to improve global relations. A year-long ethnographic study of the adjustment experiences of international postgraduate students in England revealed a universal early enthusiasm for cross-cultural…

  12. Forced and internal variability in temperature simulations and reconstructions of the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Donado, Laura; Fidel González-Rouco, J.; Garcia-Bustamante, Elena; Smerdon, Jason S.; Luterbacher, Juerg; Raible, Christoph C.

    2016-04-01

    The relatively short ranges of external forcing variability within the CE represent a challenge in as much as the consistency between simulations and reconstructions can be affected by the large uncertainties in their respective responses to the external forcings. One of the core questions within this work relates therefore the extent to which a straight response to the external forcing can be identified during the period under study and whether this signal is common to simulated and reconstructed temperature. This study is based on an exhaustive compilation, analysis and intercomparison of the available hemispherical and global temperature reconstructions as well as a complete ensemble of simulations including both PMIP3/CMIP5 and non-PMIP3 model experiments. In addition, the various external forcing configurations applied to the models are characterized and a Total External Forcing, including all the individual forcing contributors, is developed for each experiment. Based on the linear relationship found at multidecadal and longer timescales during the last millennium between the temperature and the total external forcing, a quantitative metric of the ratio of response, the so-called Last Millennium Transient Climate Response (LMTCR), is obtained and compared for simulations and reconstructions. Within the LMTCR context, a significant quantitative consistency between the simulations and reconstructions is addressed. This work also offers a discussion about the impact that a range of generally accepted methodological approaches might have on the reconstructed ensemble uncertainties and their influences on model-data comparison exercises. A segregation among the various existing spatial targets within the NH, based on the different level of temperatura variability observed in the series, suggests a lower level of model-data consistency during the MCA than previously reported.

  13. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2003: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichling, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Direct nanoscale and atomic resolution imaging is a key issue in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The invention of the dynamic force microscope in the early 1990s was an important step forward in this direction as this instrument provides a universal tool for measuring the topography and many other physical and chemical properties of surfaces at the nanoscale. Operation in the so-called non-contact mode now allows direct atomic resolution imaging of electrically insulating surfaces and nanostructures which has been an unsolved problem during the first decade of nanotechnology. Today, we face a most rapid development of the technique and an extension of its capabilities far beyond imaging; atomically resolved force spectroscopy provides information about local binding properties and researchers now develop sophisticated schemes of force controlled atomic manipulation with the tip of the force microscope. Progress in the field of non-contact force microscopy is discussed at the annually held NC-AFM conferences that are part of a series started in 1998 with a meeting in Osaka, Japan. The 6th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy took place in Dingle, Ireland, from 31 August to 3 September 2003 and this special issue is a compilation of the original publications of work presented at this meeting. The papers published here well reflect recent achievements, current trends and some of the challenging new directions in non-contact force microscopy that have been discussed during the most stimulating conference days in Dingle. Fundamental aspects of forces and dissipation relevant in imaging and spectroscopy have been covered by experimental and theoretical contributions yielding a more detailed understanding of tip--surface interaction in force microscopy. Novel and improved imaging and spectroscopy techniques have been introduced that either improve the performance of force microscopy or pave the way towards new functionalities and applications

  14. The Soviet Turn Toward Conventional Force Reduction: The Internal Struggle and the Variables at Play

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    military budget of 77.3 billion rubles, or about 9 per- cent of Soviet GNP as the latter is estimated by the U.S. govern - ’Statement was attributed to Col...continued to omit some categories of military spending from its depiction of the total military budget. The Soviet government has subsequently confirmed...0uSEWe Md idmtp k? Wbf* WNv) Military Forces (Foreign) USSR Military Force Levels 2W. ASTRACT (CosWw* - vwa I, neg M o..Wp kt- l byi~ We waum~eq See

  15. Guidelines and Ethical Considerations for Assessment Center Operations: International Task Force on Assessment Center Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Personnel Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This update of the International Personnel Management Association's guidelines for organizational psychologists, human resource management specialists, and others addresses elements of assessment centers, policy statements, assessor training, informed participation, and participants' rights. (SK)

  16. The Peaceful Uses of Military Forces. Praeger Special Studies in International Politics and Public Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanning, Hugh

    This study of the peaceful uses of military forces (PUMF) offers a compendium of information and principles for the planning and conduct of such PUMF activities as meeting disaster or emergency relief situations, education and training, and economic and social projects. The provision of training opportunities by the military is a means of…

  17. 77 FR 29899 - Safety Zone; International Special Operations Forces Week Capability Exercise, Seddon Channel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... associated with airborne and waterborne activities occurring during the exercise. Persons and vessels are... Week Capability Exercise, Seddon Channel, Tampa, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final... Operations Forces Week Capability Exercise. The exercise is scheduled to take place on Tuesday, May 22,...

  18. Theoretical Model of Drag Force Impact on a Model International Space Station (ISS) Satellite due to Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    The International Space Station (ISS) is the single largest and most complex scientific and engineering space structure in human history. Its orbital parameters make it extremely vulnerable to severe atmospheric drag force. Complex interactions between solar energetic particles, ultraviolet (UV) radiation with atmosphere and geomagnetic field cause heating and subsequent expansion of the upper atmosphere. This condition increases drag on low Earth orbit satellites (LEOSs) and varies with current space weather conditions. In this work, we apply the NRLMSISE-00 empirical atmospheric density model, as a function of space environmental parameters, to model drag force impact on a model LEOS during variation of solar activity. Applying the resulting drag model on a model ISS satellite we observe that depending on the severity and/or stage of solar activity or cycle, a massive artificial satellite could experience orbit decay rate of up to 2.95km/month during solar maximum and up to 1km/month during solar minimum.

  19. Simplified and refined finite element approaches for determining stresses and internal forces in geometrically nonlinear structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Two methods for determining stresses and internal forces in geometrically nonlinear structural analysis are presented. The simplified approach uses the mid-deformed structural position to evaluate strains when rigid body rotation is present. The important feature of this approach is that it can easily be used with a general-purpose finite-element computer program. The refined approach uses element intrinsic or corotational coordinates and a geometric transformation to determine element strains from joint displacements. Results are presented which demonstrate the capabilities of these potentially useful approaches for geometrically nonlinear structural analysis.

  20. The Role of Forcing and Internal Dynamics in explaining the 'Medieval Climate Anomaly'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goossee, Hugues; Crespin, Elisabeth; Dubinkina, Svetlana; Loutre, Marie-France; Mann, Michael E.; Renssen, Hans; Shindell, Drew

    2012-01-01

    Proxy reconstructions suggest that peak global temperature during the past warm interval known as the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, roughly 950-1250 AD) has been exceeded only during the most recent decades. To better understand the origin of this warm period, we use model simulations constrained by data assimilation establishing the spatial pattern of temperature changes that is most consistent with forcing estimates, model physics and the empirical information contained in paleoclimate proxy records. These numerical experiments demonstrate that the reconstructed spatial temperature pattern of the MCA can be explained by a simple thermodynamical response of the climate system to relatively weak changes in radiative forcing combined with a modification of the atmospheric circulation, displaying some similarities with the positive phase of the so-called Arctic Oscillation, and with northward shifts in the position of the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio currents. The mechanisms underlying the MCA are thus quite different from anthropogenic mechanisms responsible for modern global warming.

  1. Transitions to Peace: Effects on Internal Security Forces in Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    rights abuses and to purge the army of its most serious human rights violators.”154 The peace agreement “stipulated that all Salvadoran armed forces...repressive measures that violate individual rights . Despite reports of extrajudicial killings, it is not uncommon for citizens to ignore these...leading human rights violation in both Honduras and Guatemala.”30 El Salvador is not immune to this problem and “there have been reports of a

  2. Turbofan forced mixer-nozzle internal flowfield. Volume 2: Computational fluid dynamic predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werle, M. J.; Vasta, V. N.

    1982-01-01

    A general program was conducted to develop and assess a computational method for predicting the flow properties in a turbofan forced mixed duct. The detail assessment of the resulting computer code is presented. It was found that the code provided excellent predictions of the kinematics of the mixing process throughout the entire length of the mixer nozzle. The thermal mixing process between the hot core and cold fan flows was found to be well represented in the low speed portion of the flowfield.

  3. Report of a workshop on nuclear forces and nonproliferation Woodrow Wilson international center for scholars, Washington, DC October 28, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2010-12-08

    A workshop sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars was held at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC, on October 28, 2010. The workshop addressed evolving nuclear forces and their impacts on nonproliferation in the context of the new strategic environment, the Obama Administration's Nuclear Posture Review and the 2010 NPT Review Conference. The discussions reflected the importance of the NPR for defining the role of US nuclear forces in dealing with 21st century threats and providing guidance for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Department of Defense (DoD) programs and, for many but not all participants, highlighted its role in the successful outcome of the NPT RevCon. There was widespread support for the NPR and its role in developing the foundations for a sustainable nuclear-weapon program that addresses nuclear weapons, infrastructure and expertise in the broader nonproliferation, disarmament and international security contexts. However, some participants raised concerns about its implementation and its long-term effectiveness and sustainability.

  4. Task Force Delay Study. William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    experimal Desain Srigfildsirgniai216 Ai Poriel Siagmulato Model T- 4 ’rgAenyCd omT F r 700.7 contain Repprtcion d cmetiod for thee i led anaysi DATA...Atlanta Simulation Model Calibration and Annual Delay Baseline Experiment Dear Ray: Enclosed are some data materials for use during the second Task...that should be reviewed, revised, and approved by the Atlanta Task Force prior to use in model runs. Sincerely, Stephen-L. M. Hockaday Manager S- n

  5. Joining forces: Collaborating internationally to deliver high-quality, online postgraduate education in pain management

    PubMed Central

    Devonshire, Elizabeth; Siddall, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    The effective management of pain is a complex and costly global issue, requiring a range of innovative educational strategies to enable culturally appropriate and high-quality health care provision. In response to this issue, the Pain Management Research Institute at the University of Sydney (Sydney, Australia) has established several strategic alliances with other overseas universities to deliver online postgraduate education in pain management. The present article discusses the rationale for joining forces, and the approach adopted in creating and maintaining these alliances. It also provides insights into the benefits, challenges and opportunities associated with collaborative educational initiatives of this nature, from institutional, academic and student perspectives. PMID:22184549

  6. Insight into the dynamic behaviour of the Van der Pol/Raleigh oscillator using the internal stiffness and damping forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, M. J.; Tang, B.; Carranza, J. C.

    2016-09-01

    The van der Pol oscillator is an archetypal nonlinear oscillator that has been studied for many years. It is a self-sustaining oscillator that vibrates in a limit cycle, and has the characteristic that it generates energy in the part of the cycle when the displacement is small and dissipates energy in the part of the cycle when the displacement is large. Almost all analyses for this type of oscillator have been conducted in a strict mathematical framework using the displacement and velocity of the mass to describe the motion in the phase plane. Physical insight into the behaviour is then generally only possible for very small or for very large damping nonlinearity. In this paper a fresh approach is taken. The internal forces of the Rayleigh oscillator are studied rather than van der Pol's equation as the key damping force is a function of only velocity. Simulations are presented which show how the stiffness and damping forces vary when the system is vibrating in a steady-state limit cycle.

  7. The Use of Military Force to Counter International Terrorism - A Policy Dilemma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-05

    constitute legitimate measures of self defense. 8 Brian Jenkins, the chief terrorist expect for ’ne Rand Corporation , disputed this in his 1’-U5 sr.uc...study by the Rand Corporation examined 63 major kidnapping and barricade events staged by terrorists between 1968 arc late 1974. Conclusions summarized...Terrorism - An International Journal 8 (1986): 321. 43 Hogle: 7. " enkins, Cpmoatting Terrorism: 1. 4D As quotea oy John M. Osetn. ’ Comnatting i

  8. Minimizing distortion and internal forces in truss structures by simulated annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1989-01-01

    Inaccuracies in the length of members and the diameters of joints of large truss reflector backup structures may produce unacceptable levels of surface distortion and member forces. However, if the member lengths and joint diameters can be measured accurately it is possible to configure the members and joints so that root-mean-square (rms) surface error and/or rms member forces is minimized. Following Greene and Haftka (1989) it is assumed that the force vector f is linearly proportional to the member length errors e(sub M) of dimension NMEMB (the number of members) and joint errors e(sub J) of dimension NJOINT (the number of joints), and that the best-fit displacement vector d is a linear function of f. Let NNODES denote the number of positions on the surface of the truss where error influences are measured. The solution of the problem is discussed. To classify, this problem was compared to a similar combinatorial optimization problem. In particular, when only the member length errors are considered, minimizing d(sup 2)(sub rms) is equivalent to the quadratic assignment problem. The quadratic assignment problem is a well known NP-complete problem in operations research literature. Hence minimizing d(sup 2)(sub rms) is is also an NP-complete problem. The focus of the research is the development of a simulated annealing algorithm to reduce d(sup 2)(sub rms). The plausibility of this technique is its recent success on a variety of NP-complete combinatorial optimization problems including the quadratic assignment problem. A physical analogy for simulated annealing is the way liquids freeze and crystallize. All computational experiments were done on a MicroVAX. The two interchange heuristic is very fast but produces widely varying results. The two and three interchange heuristic provides less variability in the final objective function values but runs much more slowly. Simulated annealing produced the best objective function values for every starting configuration and

  9. The International Neuroblastoma Risk Group (INRG) Classification System: An INRG Task Force Report

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Susan L.; Pearson, Andrew D.J.; London, Wendy B.; Monclair, Tom; Ambros, Peter F.; Brodeur, Garrett M.; Faldum, Andreas; Hero, Barbara; Iehara, Tomoko; Machin, David; Mosseri, Veronique; Simon, Thorsten; Garaventa, Alberto; Castel, Victoria; Matthay, Katherine K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Because current approaches to risk classification and treatment stratification for children with neuroblastoma (NB) vary greatly throughout the world, it is difficult to directly compare risk-based clinical trials. The International Neuroblastoma Risk Group (INRG) classification system was developed to establish a consensus approach for pretreatment risk stratification. Patients and Methods The statistical and clinical significance of 13 potential prognostic factors were analyzed in a cohort of 8,800 children diagnosed with NB between 1990 and 2002 from North America and Australia (Children's Oncology Group), Europe (International Society of Pediatric Oncology Europe Neuroblastoma Group and German Pediatric Oncology and Hematology Group), and Japan. Survival tree regression analyses using event-free survival (EFS) as the primary end point were performed to test the prognostic significance of the 13 factors. Results Stage, age, histologic category, grade of tumor differentiation, the status of the MYCN oncogene, chromosome 11q status, and DNA ploidy were the most highly statistically significant and clinically relevant factors. A new staging system (INRG Staging System) based on clinical criteria and tumor imaging was developed for the INRG Classification System. The optimal age cutoff was determined to be between 15 and 19 months, and 18 months was selected for the classification system. Sixteen pretreatment groups were defined on the basis of clinical criteria and statistically significantly different EFS of the cohort stratified by the INRG criteria. Patients with 5-year EFS more than 85%, more than 75% to ≤ 85%, ≥ 50% to ≤ 75%, or less than 50% were classified as very low risk, low risk, intermediate risk, or high risk, respectively. Conclusion By defining homogenous pretreatment patient cohorts, the INRG classification system will greatly facilitate the comparison of risk-based clinical trials conducted in different regions of the world and the

  10. Treating spondyloarthritis, including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, to target: recommendations of an international task force

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Josef S; Braun, Jürgen; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; FitzGerald, Oliver; Helliwell, Philip; Kavanaugh, Arthur; Kvien, Tore K; Landewé, Robert; Luger, Thomas; Mease, Philip; Olivieri, Ignazio; Reveille, John; Ritchlin, Christopher; Rudwaleit, Martin; Schoels, Monika; Sieper, Joachim; de Wit, Martinus; Baraliakos, Xenofon; Betteridge, Neil; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Collantes-Estevez, Eduardo; Deodhar, Atul; Elewaut, Dirk; Gossec, Laure; Jongkees, Merryn; Maccarone, Mara; Redlich, Kurt; van den Bosch, Filip; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Winthrop, Kevin; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic targets have been defined for diseases like diabetes, hypertension or rheumatoid arthritis and adhering to them has improved outcomes. Such targets are just emerging for spondyloarthritis (SpA). Objective To define the treatment target for SpA including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and develop recommendations for achieving the target, including a treat-to-target management strategy. Methods Based on results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of expert physicians and patients developed recommendations which were broadly discussed and voted upon in a Delphi-like process. Level of evidence, grade and strength of the recommendations were derived by respective means. The commonalities between axial SpA, peripheral SpA and PsA were discussed in detail. Results Although the literature review did not reveal trials comparing a treat-to-target approach with another or no strategy, it provided indirect evidence regarding an optimised approach to therapy that facilitated the development of recommendations. The group agreed on 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations; 9 of these recommendations related commonly to the whole spectrum of SpA and PsA, and only 2 were designed separately for axial SpA, peripheral SpA and PsA. The main treatment target, which should be based on a shared decision with the patient, was defined as remission, with the alternative target of low disease activity. Follow-up examinations at regular intervals that depend on the patient's status should safeguard the evolution of disease activity towards the targeted goal. Additional recommendations relate to extra-articular and extramusculoskeletal aspects and other important factors, such as comorbidity. While the level of evidence was generally quite low, the mean strength of recommendation was 9–10 (10: maximum agreement) for all recommendations. A research agenda was formulated. Conclusions The task force defined the

  11. g-force induced giant efficiency of nanoparticles internalization into living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo, Sandra M.; Rodriguez, Vanessa; de La Cueva, Leonor; Salas, Gorka; Carrascosa, Jose. L.; Josefa Rodríguez, María; García-Romero, Noemí; Luis, Jose; Cuñado, F.; Camarero, Julio; Miranda, Rodolfo; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2015-10-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs)-labelled cells is one of the most promising approaches for a fast and reliable evaluation of grafted cells in both preclinical studies and clinical trials. Current procedures to label living cells with IONPs are based on direct incubation or physical approaches based on magnetic or electrical fields, which always display very low cellular uptake efficiencies. Here we show that centrifugation-mediated internalization (CMI) promotes a high uptake of IONPs in glioblastoma tumour cells, just in a few minutes, and via clathrin-independent endocytosis pathway. CMI results in controllable cellular uptake efficiencies at least three orders of magnitude larger than current procedures. Similar trends are found in human mesenchymal stem cells, thereby demonstrating the general feasibility of the methodology, which is easily transferable to any laboratory with great potential for the development of improved biomedical applications.

  12. g-force induced giant efficiency of nanoparticles internalization into living cells.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Sandra M; Rodriguez, Vanessa; de la Cueva, Leonor; Salas, Gorka; Carrascosa, Jose L; Rodríguez, María Josefa; García-Romero, Noemí; Cuñado, Jose Luis F; Camarero, Julio; Miranda, Rodolfo; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2015-10-19

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs)-labelled cells is one of the most promising approaches for a fast and reliable evaluation of grafted cells in both preclinical studies and clinical trials. Current procedures to label living cells with IONPs are based on direct incubation or physical approaches based on magnetic or electrical fields, which always display very low cellular uptake efficiencies. Here we show that centrifugation-mediated internalization (CMI) promotes a high uptake of IONPs in glioblastoma tumour cells, just in a few minutes, and via clathrin-independent endocytosis pathway. CMI results in controllable cellular uptake efficiencies at least three orders of magnitude larger than current procedures. Similar trends are found in human mesenchymal stem cells, thereby demonstrating the general feasibility of the methodology, which is easily transferable to any laboratory with great potential for the development of improved biomedical applications.

  13. Forced responses of solid axially polarized piezoelectric ceramic finite cylinders with internal losses.

    PubMed

    Ebenezer, D D; Ravichandran, K; Ramesh, R; Padmanabhan, Chandramouli

    2005-06-01

    A method is presented to determine the forced responses of piezoelectric cylinders using weighted sums of only certain exact solutions to the equations of motion and the Gauss electrostatic conditions. One infinite set of solutions is chosen such that each field variable is expressed in terms of Bessel functions that form a complete set in the radial direction. Another infinite set of solutions is chosen such that each field variable is expressed in terms of trigonometric functions that form a complete set in the axial direction. Another solution is used to account for the electric field that can exist even when there is no vibration. The weights are determined by using the orthogonal properties of the functions and are used to satisfy specified, arbitrary, axisymmetric boundary conditions on all the surfaces. Special cases including simultaneous mechanical and electrical excitation of cylinders are presented. All numerical results are in excellent agreement with those obtained using the finite element software ATILA. For example, the five lowest frequencies at which the conductance and susceptance of a stress-free cylinder, of length 10 mm and radius 5 mm, reach a local maximum or minimum differ by less than 0.01% from those computed using ATILA.

  14. Internal Variability Versus Anthropogenic Forcing on Sea Level and Its Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos, Marta; Marzeion, Ben; Dangendorf, Sönke; Slangen, Aimée B. A.; Palanisamy, Hindumathi; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we review and update detection and attribution studies in sea level and its major contributors during the past decades. Tide gauge records reveal that the observed twentieth-century global and regional sea level rise is out of the bounds of its natural variability, evidencing thus a human fingerprint in the reported trends. The signal varies regionally, and it partly depends on the magnitude of the background variability. The human fingerprint is also manifested in the contributors of sea level for which observations are available, namely ocean thermal expansion and glaciers' mass loss, which dominated the global sea level rise over the twentieth century. Attribution studies provide evidence that the trends in both components are clearly dominated by anthropogenic forcing over the second half of the twentieth century. In the earlier decades, there is a lack of observations hampering an improved attribution of causes to the observed sea level rise. At certain locations along the coast, the human influence is exacerbated by local coastal activities that induce land subsidence and increase the risk of sea level-related hazards.

  15. Driving force transmission mechanism using a timing belt for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, S.

    1987-11-24

    A driving force transmission mechanism is described comprising: a timing pulley having teeth, each of the teeth having a width perpendicular to a direction of movement of the teeth; and a timing belt engaging the timing pulley, the timing belt having teeth, each of the timing belt teeth having a width perpendicular to a direction of movement of the timing belt teeth; a width of the timing belt not being larger that a width of the timing pulley; the width of the teeth of the timing belt at dedendums of the teeth being larger than a width of engagement of the teeth of the timing belt with the teeth of the timing pulley; at least one of width end portions of the teeth of the timing pulley and width end portions of the teeth of the timing belt being cut out so that width end portions of the teeth of the timing belt at dedendums of the timing belt do not contact the teeth of the timing pulley.

  16. 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Task Force. Report on antiphospholipid syndrome laboratory diagnostics and trends.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, Maria Laura; Amengual, Olga; Andreoli, Laura; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Chighizola, Cecilia B; Forastiero, Ricardo; de Groot, Philip; Lakos, Gabriella; Lambert, Marc; Meroni, Pierluigi; Ortel, Thomas L; Petri, Michelle; Rahman, Anisur; Roubey, Robert; Sciascia, Savino; Snyder, Melissa; Tebo, Anne E; Tincani, Angela; Willis, Rohan

    2014-09-01

    Current classification criteria for definite Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) require the use of three laboratory assays to detect antiphospholipid antibodies (aCL, anti-β2GPI and LA) in the presence of at least one of the two major clinical manifestations (i.e. thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity) of the syndrome. However, several other autoantibodies shown to be directed to other proteins or their complex with phospholipids have been proposed to be relevant to APS but their clinical utility and their diagnostic value remains elusive. This report summarizes the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the "APS Task Force 3-Laboratory Diagnostics and Trends" meeting that took place during the 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (APLA 2013, September 18-21, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil).

  17. International confederation for cleft lip and palate and related craniofacial anomalies task force report: beyond eurocleft.

    PubMed

    Semb, Gunvor

    2014-11-01

    The assigned objective for the Task Force Beyond Eurocleft was "to make recommendations for initiations of local and/or participation in multi-national cleft outcome studies and consist of individuals from the European experience with cleft outcome studies (Scandcleft, Eurocleft) and those who have initiated, or intend to initiate, similar studies in other geographical areas." By May 2013 the Task Force (TF) consisted of 183 members from 59 countries. It was agreed that this initiative should be truly global and include all cleft specialties as well as representatives from cleft support groups in recognition of the huge commitment for improving cleft care worldwide. The vision for this group is to build a dynamic, well-functioning TF that will work globally and be multidisciplinary with inclusive and respectful behavior to improve care for all individuals born with cleft lip and/or palate. As there is a large diversity in needs and interest in the group a range of parallel approaches would be required depending on the experience, resources, and challenges of regions, teams, and individuals. Important ideas for future work were: (1) Work on a global survey of access, existing outcome studies, current collaborations, and lessons learned. (2) Work towards the creation of a lasting, living resource for newcomers to intercenter collaboration that is kept fresh with new reports, copies of relevant publications, model grant applications, and a list of volunteers with the right experience to provide support and guidance for new initiatives. (3) Develop simple online training modules to provide information about the benefits and principles of multidisciplinary care, collaborative data collection and auditing short and longer-term outcomes. (4) Establish subgroups that will work within all regions of the world with regional and national leaders identified. An evaluation of current standards of care should be undertaken and country/region specific remedies to optimize

  18. Report of a Workshop in Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation held at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    The workshop addressed evolving nuclear forces and their impacts on nonproliferation in the context of the new strategic environment, the Obama Administration's Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) Review and the 2010 Conference (RevCon) of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The issues discussed are at the heart of the debate on nuclear policy issues such asfuture nuclear weapons requirements and nonproliferation, but also the stockpile stewardship program and infrastructure modernization. The workshop discussions reflected the importance of the NPRfor defining the role of US nuclear forces in dealing with 21s1 century threats and providing guidance that will shape NNSA and DoD programs. They also highlighted its importancefor NPT diplomacy. The discussion noted the report of the bipartisan Congressional Commission on the Strategic Posture of the United States, and the expectation that the NPR would likely reflect its consensus to a large degree (although the Administration was not bound by the report). There was widespread support for developing thefoundationsfor a sustainable nuclear-weapon program that addresses nuclear weapons, infrastructure and expertise in the broader nonproliferation, disarmament and international security contexts. The discussion also revealed a convergence of views, but no consensus, on a number of important issues, including the diminished role but continued importance of nuclear weapons; the need to take action to ensure the sustainability of the stockpile, and the recapitalization of the infrastructure and expertise; and the need to take action to promote nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament objectives.

  19. Internally Displaced “Victims of Armed Conflict” in Colombia: The Trajectory and Trauma Signature of Forced Migration

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, James M.; Garfin, Dana Rose; Espinel, Zelde; Araya, Ricardo; Oquendo, Maria A.; Wainberg, Milton L.; Chaskel, Roberto; Gaviria, Silvia L.; Ordóñez, Anna E.; Espinola, Maria; Wilson, Fiona E.; García, Natalia Muñoz; Ceballos, Ángela Milena Gómez; Garcia-Barcena, Yanira; Verdeli, Helen; Neria, Yuval

    2016-01-01

    While conflict-induced forced migration is a global phenomenon, the situation in Colombia, South America, is distinctive. Colombia has ranked either first or second in the number of internally displaced persons for 10 years, a consequence of decades of armed conflict compounded by high prevalence of drug trafficking. The displacement trajectory for displaced persons in Colombia proceeds through a sequence of stages: (1) pre-expulsion threats and vulnerability, (2) expulsion, (3) migration, (4) initial adaptation to relocation, (5) protracted resettlement (the end point for most forced migrants), and, rarely, (6) return to the community of origin. Trauma signature analysis, an evidence-based method that elucidates the physical and psychological consequences associated with exposures to harm and loss during disasters and complex emergencies, was used to identify the psychological risk factors and potentially traumatic events experienced by conflict-displaced persons in Colombia, stratified across the phases of displacement. Trauma and loss are experienced differentially throughout the pathway of displacement. PMID:25135775

  20. A report on older-age bipolar disorder from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Sajatovic, Martha; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Gildengers, Ariel G; Dols, Annemiek; Al Jurdi, Rayan K; Forester, Brent P; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Beyer, John; Manes, Facundo; Rej, Soham; Rosa, Adriane R; Schouws, Sigfried NTM; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Young, Robert C; Shulman, Kenneth I

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the coming generation, older adults with bipolar disorder (BD) will increase in absolute numbers as well as proportion of the general population. This is the first report of the International Society for Bipolar Disorder (ISBD) Task Force on Older-Age Bipolar Disorder (OABD). Methods This task force report addresses the unique aspects of OABD including epidemiology and clinical features, neuropathology and biomarkers, physical health, cognition, and care approaches. Results The report describes an expert consensus summary on OABD that is intended to advance the care of patients, and shed light on issues of relevance to BD research across the lifespan. Although there is still a dearth of research and health efforts focused on older adults with BD, emerging data has brought some answers, innovative questions, and novel perspectives related to the notion of late onset, medical comorbidity, and the vexing issue of cognitive impairment and decline. Conclusions Improving our understanding of the biological, clinical, and social underpinnings relevant to OABD is an indispensable step in building a complete map of BD across the lifespan. PMID:26384588

  1. PHARMACOLOGICAL INTERVENTIONS IN FRAILTY AND SARCOPENIA: REPORT BY THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FRAILTY AND SARCOPENIA RESEARCH TASK FORCE

    PubMed Central

    Cesari, M.; Fielding, R.; Bénichou, O.; Bernabei, R.; Bhasin, S.; Guralnik, J.M.; Jette, A.; Landi, F.; Pahor, M.; Rodriguez-Manas, L.; Rolland, Y.; Roubenoff, R.; Sinclair, A.J.; Studenski, S.; Travison, T.; Vellas, B.

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia and frailty often co-exist and both have physical function impairment as a core component. Yet despite the urgency of the problem, the development of pharmaceutical therapies for sarcopenia and frailty has lagged, in part because of the lack of consensus definitions for the two conditions. A task force of clinical and basic researchers, leaders from the pharmaceutical and nutritional industries, and representatives from non-profit organizations was established in 2012 with the aim of addressing specific issues affecting research and clinical activities on frailty and sarcopenia. The task force came together on April 22, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts, prior to the International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research (ICFSR). The theme of this meeting was to discuss challenges related to drugs designed to target the biology of frailty and sarcopenia as well as more general questions about designing efficient drug trials for these conditions. The present article reports the results of the task force’s deliberations based on available evidence and preliminary results of ongoing activities. Overall, the lack of a consensus definition for sarcopenia and frailty was felt as still present and severely limiting advancements in the field. However, agreement appears to be emerging that low mass alone provides insufficient clinical relevance if not combined with muscle weakness and/or functional impairment. In the next future, it will be important to build consensus on clinically meaningful functional outcomes and test/validate them in long-term observational studies. PMID:26366378

  2. Research conference summary from the 2014 International Task Force on ATP1A3-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rosewich, Hendrik; DeBrosse, Suzanne; Ess, Kevin; Ozelius, Laurie; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Andrasco, Gene; Belgrade, Alice; Brashear, Allison; Ciccodicola, Sharon; Egan, Lynn; George, Alfred L.; Lewelt, Aga; Magelby, Joshua; Merida, Mario; Newcomb, Tara; Platt, Vicky; Poncelin, Dominic; Reyna, Sandra; Sasaki, Masayuki; Sotero de Menezes, Marcio; Sweadner, Kathleen; Viollet, Louis; Zupanc, Mary; Silver, Kenneth; Swoboda, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Objective: ATP1A3-related neurologic disorders encompass a broad range of phenotypes that extend well beyond initial phenotypic criteria associated with alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC) and rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism. Methods: In 2014, the Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood Foundation hosted a multidisciplinary workshop intended to address fundamental challenges surrounding the diagnosis and management of individuals with ATP1A3-related disorders. Results: Workshop attendees were charged with the following: (1) to achieve consensus on expanded diagnostic criteria to facilitate the identification of additional patients, intended to supplement existing syndrome-specific diagnostic paradigms; (2) to standardize definitions for the broad range of paroxysmal manifestations associated with AHC to disseminate to families; (3) to create clinical recommendations for common recurrent issues facing families and medical care providers; (4) to review data related to the death of individuals in the Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood Foundation database to guide future efforts in identifying at-risk subjects and potential preventative measures; and (5) to identify critical gaps where we most need to focus national and international research efforts. Conclusions: This report summarizes recommendations of the workshop committee, highlighting the key phenotypic features to facilitate the diagnosis of possible ATP1A3 mutations, providing recommendations for genetic testing, and outlining initial acute management for common recurrent clinical conditions, including epilepsy. PMID:28293679

  3. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target: 2014 update of the recommendations of an international task force

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R; Bykerk, Vivian; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Kvien, Tore K; Navarro-Compán, M Victoria; Oliver, Susan; Schoels, Monika; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; Stamm, Tanja; Stoffer, Michaela; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Aletaha, Daniel; Andreu, Jose Louis; Aringer, Martin; Bergman, Martin; Betteridge, Neil; Bijlsma, Hans; Burkhardt, Harald; Combe, Bernard; Durez, Patrick; Fonseca, Joao Eurico; Gibofsky, Alan; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Graninger, Winfried; Hannonen, Pekka; Haraoui, Boulos; Kouloumas, Marios; Landewe, Robert; Martin-Mola, Emilio; Nash, Peter; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Östör, Andrew; Richards, Pam; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; Thorne, Carter; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; de Wit, Martinus

    2016-01-01

    Background Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this therapeutic goal in routine clinical practice, but these recommendations need to be re-evaluated for appropriateness and practicability in the light of new insights. Objective To update the 2010 treat-to-target recommendations based on systematic literature reviews (SLR) and expert opinion. Methods A task force of rheumatologists, patients and a nurse specialist assessed the SLR results and evaluated the individual items of the 2010 recommendations accordingly, reformulating many of the items. These were subsequently discussed, amended and voted upon by >40 experts, including 5 patients, from various regions of the world. Levels of evidence, strengths of recommendations and levels of agreement were derived. Results The update resulted in 4 overarching principles and 10 recommendations. The previous recommendations were partly adapted and their order changed as deemed appropriate in terms of importance in the view of the experts. The SLR had now provided also data for the effectiveness of targeting low-disease activity or remission in established rather than only early disease. The role of comorbidities, including their potential to preclude treatment intensification, was highlighted more strongly than before. The treatment aim was again defined as remission with low-disease activity being an alternative goal especially in patients with long-standing disease. Regular follow-up (every 1–3 months during active disease) with according therapeutic adaptations to reach the desired state was recommended. Follow-up examinations ought to employ composite measures of disease activity that include joint counts. Additional items provide further details for particular aspects of the

  4. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2004: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Udo

    2005-03-01

    With the ongoing miniaturization of devices and controlled nanostructuring of materials, the importance of atomic-scale information on surfaces and surface properties is growing continuously. The astonishing progress in nanoscience and nanotechnology that took place during the last two decades was in many ways related to recent progress in high-resolution imaging techniques such as scanning tunnelling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Since the mid-1990s, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) performed in ultrahigh vacuum has evolved as an alternative technique that achieves atomic resolution, but without the restriction to conducting surfaces of the previously established techniques. Advances of the rapidly developing field of NC-AFM are discussed at annual conferences as part of a series that started in 1998 in Osaka, Japan. This special issue of Nanotechnology is a compilation of original work presented at the 7th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy that took place in Seattle, USA, 12-15 September 2004. Over the years, the conference grew in size and scope. Atomic resolution imaging of oxides and semiconductors remains an issue. Noticeable new developments have been presented in this regard such as, e.g., the demonstrated ability to manipulate individual atoms. Additionally, the investigation of individual molecules, clusters, and organic materials gains more and more attention. In this context, considerable effort is undertaken to transfer the NC-AFM principle based on frequency modulation to applications in air and liquids with the goal of enabling high-resolution surface studies of biological material in native environments, as well as to reduce the experimental complexity, which so far involves the availability of (costly) vacuum systems. Force spectroscopy methods continue to be improved and are applied to topics such as the imaging of the three-dimensional force field as a function of the distance with

  5. Eruption triggering of giant magma bodies by internal versus external forcing: A rhyolite-MELTS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, T. L.; Gualda, G. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Miller, C. F.

    2012-12-01

    Silicic volcanism, particularly supereruptions, raises questions about the mechanisms by which magma bodies destabilize and erupt. Are external events necessary to initiate an eruption of a large silicic system, or is possible for internal processes (crystallization, volatile exsolution) to destabilize a system and drive it to erupt? If external triggers are critically important to prompting eruption, are all felsic magma bodies equally prone to erupt? To respond to these questions, we use rhyolite-MELTS (Gualda et al. 2012) to investigate the pre-eruptive chemical evolution and the resultant changes to physical properties of giant (super-eruptive) felsic magma bodies. Simulations are conducted using pumice and glass compositions from the Peach Spring (Southwestern USA) and the Bishop (California USA) Tuffs, two giant high-silica rhyolite deposits. In our simulations, we vary initial pressure (150-350 MPa in 50 MPa intervals), volatile content (initial water ranging from 1-7 wt. %), mode of crystallization (equilibrium vs. fractional), and rheology of the magma reservoir (isobaric vs. isochoric vs. transitional). We run simulations through as much of the crystallization interval as possible, but focus on the first ~50 wt. % crystallization, most relevant for volcanic systems. In all simulations, we observe near-invariant behavior when the system becomes saturated in quartz, two feldspars and a fluid phase, from which point crystallization is essentially isothermal. Prior to the near-invariant, crystallization leads to gradual changes in bulk properties (e.g., < 1% volume decrease over 50 °C), which effectively results in modest pressure changes within the magma body (i.e., ~10 MPa). Upon reaching the near-invariant, the bulk properties change abruptly (e.g., > 5% volume increase in 0.1 °C), causing significant overpressurization of the magma body. The magnitude of this overpressurization (i.e. 10s to 100s of MPa depending on system conditions) is sufficient to

  6. Quartic canonical force field in curvilinear internal coordinates for XY3 (D3h) molecules. The case of the BH3 molecule.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, Consuelo Rosales; Quesada, Juana Vázquez; Torres, Emilio Martínez; González, Juan Jesús López

    2014-06-01

    Using the canonical force field theory, expressions of quadratic, cubic, and quartic canonical force constants are obtained for XY3 (D3h) molecules in curvilinear redundant coordinates, i.e., simple valence internal coordinates (VICs), in terms of force constants in normal coordinates and in independent symmetry coordinates. To carry out this task, it was previously necessary to obtain for the first time the non-linear redundancy relation and the corresponding orthogonal projection onto the pure vibrational manifold for XY3 (D3h) molecules corresponding to a set of seven VICs. As an application, the quartic canonical force field in curvilinear redundant internal coordinates of BH3 is determined from ab initio force fields in normal coordinates calculated at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level with perturbative treatment of the triples in conjunction with a triple- and quadruple-ζ size basis set. This anharmonic force field so obtained for the borane molecule, and in general for XY3 (D3h) molecules, is uniquely defined (therefore in an unambiguous form) and depending on the same number of parameters, i.e., force constants, when independent coordinates (natural or symmetry) are used in its description.

  7. Force decomposition in robot force control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Steve H.; Wen, John T.

    1991-01-01

    The unit inconsistency in force decomposition has motivated an investigation into the force control problem in multiple-arm manipulation. Based on physical considerations, it is argued that the force that should be controlled is the internal force at the specified frame in the payload. This force contains contributions due to both applied forces from the arms and the inertial force from the payload and the arms. A least-squares scheme free of unit inconsistency for finding this internal force is presented. The force control issue is analyzed, and an integral force feedback controller is proposed.

  8. Internal potential mapping of charged solid-state-lithium ion batteries using in situ Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hideki; Ishida, Nobuyuki; Ogata, Yoichiro; Ito, Daigo; Fujita, Daisuke

    2017-01-05

    Solid-state-lithium ion batteries (SS-LIBs) are a promising candidate for next-generation energy storage devices. Novel methods for characterizing electrochemical reactions occurring during battery operation at the nanoscale are highly required for understanding the fundamental working principle and improving the performance of the devices. In this work, we combined Ar ion milling under non-atmospheric conditions with in situ cross-sectional Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) for direct imaging of the internal electrical potential distribution of the SS-LIBs. We succeeded in the direct visualization of the change in the potential distribution of a cathode composite electrode (a mixture of the active materials, solid electrolytes, and conductive additives) arising from battery charging (electrochemical reaction). The observed results provided several insights into battery operation, such as the behavior of Li ions and inhomogeneity of electrochemical reactions in the electrode. Our method paves the way to characterize the fundamental aspects of SS-LIBs for the improvement of device performance, including the evaluation of the distribution of the Li ion depleted regions, visualization of the conductive paths, and analysis of the cause of degradation.

  9. A total internal reflection ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy study of interactions between Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharides and antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gleńska-Olender, J; Sęk, S; Dworecki, K; Kaca, W

    2015-07-01

    Specific antigen-antibody interactions play a central role in the human immune system. The objective of this paper is to detect immune complexes using label-free detection techniques, that is, total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE) and atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based topography and recognition imaging. Interactions of purified rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies with bacterial endotoxins (Proteus mirabilis S1959 O3 lipopolysaccharides) were studied. Lipopolysaccharide was adsorbed on gold surface for TIRE. In the AFM imaging experiments, LPS was attachment to the PEG linker (AFM tip modification). The mica surface was covered by IgG. In TIRE, the optical parameters Ψ and Δ change when a complex is formed. It was found that even highly structured molecules, such as IgG antibodies (anti-O3 LPS rabbit serum), preserve their specific affinity to their antigens (LPS O3). LPS P. mirabilis O3 response of rabbit serum anti-O3 was also tested by topography and recognition imaging. Both TIRE and AFM techniques were recruited to check for possible detection of antigen-antibody recognition event. The presented data allow for determination of interactions between a variety of biomolecules. In future research, this technique has considerable potential for studying a wide range of antigen-antibody interactions and its use may be extended to other biomacromolecular systems.

  10. Effect of mechanical force, rotation and moving internal heat source on a two-temperature fiber-reinforced thermoelastic medium with two theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Samia M.; Othman, Mohamed I. A.

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, the three-phase-lag model and Green-Naghdi theory without energy dissipation are used to study the effect of a mechanical force and a rotation on the wave propagation in a two-temperature fiber-reinforced thermoelastic problem for a medium with an internal heat source that is moving with a constant speed. The methodology applied here is the use of the normal mode analysis to solve the problem of a thermal shock problem to obtain the exact expressions of the displacement components, force stresses, thermal temperature, and conductivity temperature. Numerical results for the considered variables are given and illustrated graphically in the absence and presence of a rotation as well as a mechanical force. A comparison is made with the results in the context of the two theories in the absence and presence of a moving internal heat source.

  11. Fast-track extreme event attribution: How fast can we disentangle thermodynamic (forced) and dynamic (internal) contributions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, Karsten; Otto, Friederike; Uhe, Peter; Allen, Myles; Cullen, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    Within the last decade, extreme weather event attribution has emerged as a new field of science and garnered increasing attention from the wider scientific community and the public. Numerous methods have been put forward to determine the contribution of anthropogenic climate change to individual extreme weather events. So far nearly all such analyses were done months after an event has happened. First, we present our newly established method which can assess the fraction of attributable risk (FAR) of a severe weather event due to an external driver in real-time. The method builds on a large ensemble of atmosphere-only GCM/RCM simulations forced by seasonal forecast sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Taking the UK 2013/14 winter floods as an example, we demonstrate that the change in risk for heavy rainfall during the England floods due to anthropogenic climate change is of similar magnitude using either observed or seasonal forecast SSTs. While FAR is assumed to be independent from event-specific dynamic contributions due to anomalous circulation patterns as a first approximation, the risk of an event to occur under current conditions is clearly a function of the state of the atmosphere. The shorter the event, the more it is a result of chaotic internal weather variability. Hence we are interested to (1) attribute the event to thermodynamic and dynamic causes and to (2) establish a sensible time-scale for which we can make a useful and potentially robust attribution statement with regard to event-specific dynamics. Having tested the dynamic response of our model to SST conditions in January 2014, we find that observed SSTs are required to establish a discernible link between anomalous ocean temperatures and the atmospheric circulation over the North Atlantic in general and the UK in particular. However, for extreme events occurring under strongly anomalous SST patterns, associated with known low-frequency climate modes such as El Nino or La Nina, forecast SSTs can

  12. A review of a method for dynamic load distribution, dynamical modeling, and explicit internal force control when two manipulators mutually lift and transport a rigid body object

    SciTech Connect

    Unseren, M.A.

    1997-04-20

    The paper reviews a method for modeling and controlling two serial link manipulators which mutually lift and transport a rigid body object in a three dimensional workspace. A new vector variable is introduced which parameterizes the internal contact force controlled degrees of freedom. A technique for dynamically distributing the payload between the manipulators is suggested which yields a family of solutions for the contact forces and torques the manipulators impart to the object. A set of rigid body kinematic constraints which restrict the values of the joint velocities of both manipulators is derived. A rigid body dynamical model for the closed chain system is first developed in the joint space. The model is obtained by generalizing the previous methods for deriving the model. The joint velocity and acceleration variables in the model are expressed in terms of independent pseudovariables. The pseudospace model is transformed to obtain reduced order equations of motion and a separate set of equations governing the internal components of the contact forces and torques. A theoretic control architecture is suggested which explicitly decouples the two sets of equations comprising the model. The controller enables the designer to develop independent, non-interacting control laws for the position control and internal force control of the system.

  13. Assessment of forced and internal variability in the AMO through analyses of SST data from CMIP5 historical simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinman, B. A.; Mann, M. E.; Miller, S. K.; Emanuel, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) is a mode of North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) variability that has substantial impacts on Northern Hemisphere precipitation and temperature patterns, as well as Atlantic hurricane activity. Climate models and paleoclimate data suggest that the warm AMO phase can enhance drought in the American mid- and southwest, increase rainfall intensity and amounts in North Eastern Brazil and the African Sahel region, and increase the number of severe Atlantic hurricanes. While models and instrumental data provide some support for the AMO as an internal climate ';oscillation', questions remain regarding the proportion of AMO variability resulting from internal and external forcing, and more specifically, how much of the recent (i.e. late 20th century) north Atlantic warming is anthropogenically forced. Several studies have addressed these issues and proposed various methods for diagnosing the AMO using historical climate model simulations (e.g. from CMIP3) and instrumental data. Here we present results from analyses of the North Atlantic region in historical simulations from Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5). Our approach involves (1) analyzing a grand ensemble mean based on averaging realizations of all available models, such that random, internal variability components cancel and only a forced component remains; (2) for all models with at least four realizations, estimating a forced component by averaging multiple realizations and estimating internal variability components from the residual series of individual realizations and (3) analyzing control simulations for the corresponding models to assess whether or not there is evidence of enhanced AMO-like internal variability.

  14. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2006: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitori, Masahiko; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    The advent of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in the 1980s has significantly promoted nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM), one of the SPM family, has unique capabilities with high spatial resolution for nanoscale measurements in vacuum, air and liquids. In the last decade we have witnessed the rapid progress of NC-AFM with improved performance and increasing applications. A series of NC-AFM international conferences have greatly contributed to this field. Initiated in Osaka in 1998, the NC-AFM meeting has been followed by annual conferences at Pontresina, Hamburg, Kyoto, Montreal, Dingle, Seattle and Bad Essen. The 9th conference was held in Kobe, Japan, 16-20 July 2006. This special issue of Nanotechnology contains the outstanding contributions of the conference. During the meeting delegates learnt about a number of significant advances. Topics covered atomic resolution imaging of metals, semiconductors, insulators, ionic crystals, oxides, molecular systems, imaging of biological materials in various environments and novel instrumentation. Work also included the characterization of electronic and magnetic properties, tip and cantilever fabrication and characterization, atomic distinction based on analysis of tip-sample interaction, atomic scale manipulation, fabrication of nanostructures using NC-AFM, and related theories and simulations. We are greatly impressed by the increasing number of applications, and convinced that NC-AFM and related techniques are building a bridge to a future nano world, where quantum phenomena will dominate and nano devices will be realized. In addition, a special session on SPM road maps was held as a first trial in the field, where the future prospects of SPM were discussed enthusiastically. The overall success of the NC-AFM 2006 conference was due to the efforts of many individuals and groups with respect to scientific and technological progress, as well as the international

  15. PREFACE: NC-AFM 2005: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichling, M.; Mikosch, W.

    2006-04-01

    The 8th International Conference on Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy, held in Bad Essen, Germany, from 15 18th August 2005, attracted a record breaking number of participants presenting excellent contributions from a variety of scientific fields. This clearly demonstrated the high level of activity and innovation present in the community of NC-AFM researchers and the continuous growth of the field. The strongest ever participation of companies for a NC-AFM meeting is a sign for the emergence of new markets for the growing NC-AFM community; and the high standard of the products presented at the exhibition, many of them brand-new developments, reflected the unbroken progress in technology. The development of novel technologies and the sophistication of known techniques in research laboratories and their subsequent commercialization is still a major driving force for progress in this area of nanoscience. The conference was a perfect demonstration of how progress in the development of enabling technologies can readily be transcribed into basic research yielding fundamental insight with an impact across disciplines. The NC-AFM 2005 scientific programme was based on five cornerstones, each representing an area of vivid research and scientific progress. Atomic resolution imaging on oxide surfaces, which has long been a vision for the catalysis community, appears to be routine in several laboratories and after a period of demonstrative experiments NC-AFM now makes unique contributions to the understanding of processes in surface chemistry. These capabilities also open up new routes for the analysis of clusters and molecules deposited on dielectric surfaces where resolution limits are pushed towards the single atom level. Atomic precision manipulation with the dynamic AFM left the cradle of its infancy and flourishes in the family of bottom-up fabrication nanotechnologies. The systematic development of established and the introduction of new concepts of contrast

  16. Part-time careers in academic internal medicine: a report from the association of specialty professors part-time careers task force on behalf of the alliance for academic internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Linzer, Mark; Warde, Carole; Alexander, R Wayne; Demarco, Deborah M; Haupt, Allison; Hicks, Leroi; Kutner, Jean; Mangione, Carol M; Mechaber, Hilit; Rentz, Meridith; Riley, Joanne; Schuster, Barbara; Solomon, Glen D; Volberding, Paul; Ibrahim, Tod

    2009-10-01

    To establish guidelines for more effectively incorporating part-time faculty into departments of internal medicine, a task force was convened in early 2007 by the Association of Specialty Professors. The task force used informal surveys, current literature, and consensus building among members of the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine to produce a consensus statement and a series of recommendations. The task force agreed that part-time faculty could enrich a department of medicine, enhance workforce flexibility, and provide high-quality research, patient care, and education in a cost-effective manner. The task force provided a series of detailed steps for operationalizing part-time practice; to do so, key issues were addressed, such as fixed costs, malpractice insurance, space, cross-coverage, mentoring, career development, productivity targets, and flexible scheduling. Recommendations included (1) increasing respect for work-family balance, (2) allowing flexible time as well as part-time employment, (3) directly addressing negative perceptions about part-time faculty, (4) developing policies to allow flexibility in academic advancement, (5) considering part-time faculty as candidates for leadership positions, (6) encouraging granting agencies, including the National Institutes of Health and Veterans Administration, to consider part-time faculty as eligible for research career development awards, and (7) supporting future research in "best practices" for incorporating part-time faculty into academic departments of medicine.

  17. The study of the wedge-shaped vibration-driven robot motion in a viscous fluid forced by different oscillation laws of the internal mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuriev, A. N.; Zakharova, O. S.; Zaitseva, O. N.; Yunusova, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    A rectilinear motion of a two-mass system in a viscous incompressible fluid is considered. The system consists of a shell having the form of an equilateral triangular cylinder and a movable internal mass. The motion of the system as a whole is forced by longitudinal oscillations of the internal mass relative to the shell. This mechanical system simulates a vibration-driven robot, i.e. a mobile device capable to move in a resistive medium without external moving parts. Investigation of the system is carried out by a direct numerical simulation. A comparative analysis of the characteristics of the motion and flow regimes around the vibration-driven robot is carried out for different internal mass oscillation laws.

  18. Internal radiation exposure of Ground Self-Defense Force members involved in the management of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant disaster.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Yutaka; Fujikawa, Akira; Kyoto, Yukishige; Kunishima, Naoaki; Ono, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yukie

    2013-01-01

    When the Great East Japan Earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011, the Ground Self-Defense Force (GSDF) was dispatched nationally to Northeast area in Japan. The highly trained GSDF members were simultaneously assigned to various missions for the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants disaster. The missions of GSDF terminated on August 31, 2011. Special medical examinations were conducted for the members as they returned to each military unit. GSDF members who were assigned to the nuclear power plant were at risk of radiation exposure; therefore, pocket dosimeters were used to assess external radiation exposure. A few months after the mission was terminated, measurements of internal radiation exposure were performed. This is the first report of the internal exposure of GSDF members who worked in the restricted radiation contamination area. Here, we report the amounts of internal and external exposure of and the equipment used by the GSDF members.

  19. Beyond Triage: The Escalation of Empowerment by U.S. Military Forces in Support of International Disaster Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-13

    international institutions, and a mass of non -governmental organizations shed new light on the difficulties of disaster response. The U.S. military...circumstances. Triage provides a clinical calculus that matches conditions to effects. By rounding down the extremes, focused effort is expended on the...response unavailable from Non -Governmental Organizations, International Institutions, and Private-Voluntary Organizations? 5. Does an initial focus on

  20. Cookery method and end-point temperature can affect the Warner-Bratzler shear force, cooking loss, and internal cooked color of beef longissimus steaks.

    PubMed

    Yancey, J W S; Wharton, M D; Apple, J K

    2011-05-01

    Steaks from 60 beef ribeye rolls were used to test the interactive effects of cookery method and end-point temperature on Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) and internal cooked color. Pairs of longissimus thoracis (LT) steaks were assigned to combinations of 3 different end-point temperatures and 5 cookery methods. The forced-air convection oven (FAC) required the longest time and produced the reddest internal color, regardless of end-point temperature. The clam-shell grill (CLAM) required the least cooking time and resulted in the lowest cooking losses, but CLAM-cooked steaks also had the greatest WBSF values and least red internal color. Repeatability values for WBSF were acceptable (>0.60) for all degrees of doneness when steaks were cooked in the FAC and impingement oven, but steaks cooked on the CLAM were not repeatable. The relationship of myofibrillar toughening, moisture loss and cooked color changes in beef LT steaks also differed due to cookery methods.

  1. An 'inherent' biodegradability test for oil products: description and results of an international ring test. CONCAWE Biodegradation Task Force.

    PubMed

    Battersby, N S; Ciccognani, D; Evans, M R; King, D; Painter, H A; Peterson, D R; Starkey, M

    1999-06-01

    Current test guidelines for assessing 'inherent' (potential) biodegradability were designed for water-soluble, organic compounds of low volatility and are unsuitable for most oil products. It was against this background, that CONCAWE (the oil companies' European organisation for environment, health and safety) formed a task force to develop a standard test protocol for assessing the 'inherent' biodegradability of oil products.

  2. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Trends and Implications of Climate Change on National and International Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Analysis, Inc. PRESENTATIONS TO THE TASK FORCE I 145 NAME TOPIC MG Richard Sherlock US Africa Command, Director, Strategy, Plans, and...Interagency group including NASA) Dr. Susan Clark-Sestak Institute for Defense Analyses Presentation and Discussion Dr. Holmes Hummel Department of

  3. Report of Defense Science Board Task Force on Industry-to-Industry International Armaments Cooperation. Phase II. Japan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    policies for defense procurement are to "choose the best method of procurement" by considering options (1) "To make the best use of our country’s superior...license-produced, a summary of major domestic developments and pr.ocurements, and a breakdown of procurements by procurement method are presented in...best method of procurement" far each case, the Task Force believes there is a real and understandable ambition to achieve self-sufficiency in defense

  4. High frequency (hourly) variation in vertical distribution and abundance of meroplanktonic larvae in nearshore waters during strong internal tidal forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liévana MacTavish, A.; Ladah, L. B.; Lavín, M. F.; Filonov, A.; Tapia, Fabian J.; Leichter, J.

    2016-04-01

    We related the vertical distribution and abundance of nearshore meroplankton at hourly time scales with internal tidal wave events. We proposed that significant changes in plankter abundance would occur across internal tidal fronts, and that surface and bottom strata would respond in opposite fashions. First-mode internal tidal bores propagating in the alongshore direction were detected in water-column currents and baroclinic temperature changes. Surface and bottom currents always flowed in opposite directions, and abrupt flow reversals coincided with large temperature changes during arrival of bores. Crab zoeae and barnacle cyprids were more abundant in the bottom strata, whereas barnacle nauplii showed the opposite pattern. Significant changes in vertical distribution and abundance of target meroplankters occurred across internal tidal fronts, especially for crabs at depth, with surface and bottom organisms responding in opposite fashions. Changes in plankter abundance were significantly correlated with current flows in the strata where they were most abundant. The manner in which plankters were affected (increasing or decreasing abundance) appeared to be modulated by their vertical position within the water column. The significant differences found at the high frequencies of this study, maintained across sampling days, suggest that nearshore meroplankton populations may have greater and more consistent temporal and vertical variability than previously considered.

  5. Can International Large-Scale Assessments Inform a Global Learning Goal? Insights from the Learning Metrics Task Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winthrop, Rebecca; Simons, Kate Anderson

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the global community has developed a range of initiatives to inform the post-2015 global development agenda. In the education community, International Large-Scale Assessments (ILSAs) have an important role to play in advancing a global shift in focus to access plus learning. However, there are a number of other assessment tools…

  6. International confederation for cleft lip and palate and related craniofacial anomalies task force report: palatoplasty in the speaking individual with unrepaired cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Sommerlad, Brian C

    2014-11-01

    Introduction : The benefits or otherwise of late palate repair in older children or adults are uncertain. The outcomes, particularly without appropriate speech therapy, are often disappointing. The issue is of special importance in the poorer countries where these patients are most commonly seen and where limited capacity and facilities may have to be rationed. Method : A task force was set up to report back to the International Congress in Orlando in May 2013. The chairman and some members were nominated by the organizers and further members were added during the discussion process. Some of the members had considerable experience of late palate repair. The task force compiled a report after 9 months of e-mail correspondence. The report includes reports of some previously unpublished studies. A summary of the report was presented at Cleft 2013 in Orlando. Conclusions : There was a general consensus that late palate repair is of benefit for many patients and that, even if normal speech is not attained, outcomes are positive. Outcomes depend on the age of the patient (the younger the better), on the skill of the surgeon and, ideally, on the availability of appropriate speech therapy. A protocol for a prospective international multi-center study is proposed.

  7. Armed conflict, homonegativity, and forced internal displacement: Implications for HIV among Colombian gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals

    PubMed Central

    Reisen, Carol A.; Bianchi, Fernanda T.; Gonzales, Felisa A.; Betancourt, Fabián; Aguilar, Marcela; Poppen, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Colombia has endured six decades of civil unrest, population displacement, and violence. We examined the relationships of contextual conditions, displacement, and HIV among gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals in Bogotá, Colombia. Nineteen key informants provided information about internal displacement of sexual minorities. Life history interviews were conducted with 42 participants aged 18 to 48 years, and included questions about displacement experiences, sexual behaviour, life prior to displacement, and participants’ economic and social situation in Bogotá. The interplay of a variety of factors—including internal conflict and violence, homonegativity and “social cleansing,” gender and sexual identity, and poverty—strongly shaped the varied experiences of displacement. Migration, sexual violence, exchange sex, and low rates of HIV testing were risk factors that increased vulnerability for HIV in this displaced sample. Although displacement and HIV in Colombia are major problems, both are understudied. PMID:23586420

  8. Armed conflict, homonegativity and forced internal displacement: implications for HIV among Colombian gay, bisexual and transgender individuals.

    PubMed

    Zea, Maria Cecilia; Reisen, Carol A; Bianchi, Fernanda T; Gonzales, Felisa A; Betancourt, Fabián; Aguilar, Marcela; Poppen, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Colombia has endured six decades of civil unrest, population displacement and violence. We examined the relationships between contextual conditions, displacement and HIV among gay, bisexual and transgender individuals in Bogotá, Colombia. A total of 19 key informants provided information about internal displacement of sexual minorities. Life-history interviews were conducted with 42 participants aged 18 to 48 years and included questions about displacement experiences, sexual behaviour, life prior to displacement and participants' economic and social situation in Bogotá. The interplay of a variety of factors - including internal conflict and violence, homonegativity and 'social cleansing', gender and sexual identity and poverty - strongly shaped the varied experiences of displacement. Migration, sexual violence, exchange sex and low rates of HIV testing were risk factors that increased vulnerability for HIV in this displaced sample. Although displacement and HIV in Colombia are major problems, both are understudied.

  9. The relevance of "non-criteria" clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome: 14th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies Technical Task Force Report on Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Features.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mirhelen M; Danowski, Adriana; Wahl, Denis G; Amigo, Mary-Carmen; Tektonidou, Maria; Pacheco, Marcelo S; Fleming, Norma; Domingues, Vinicius; Sciascia, Savino; Lyra, Julia O; Petri, Michelle; Khamashta, Munther; Levy, Roger A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this task force was to critically analyze nine non-criteria manifestations of APS to support their inclusion as APS classification criteria. The Task Force Members selected the non-criteria clinical manifestations according to their clinical relevance, that is, the patient-important outcome from clinician perspective. They included superficial vein thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, renal microangiopathy, heart valve disease, livedo reticularis, migraine, chorea, seizures and myelitis, which were reviewed by this International Task Force collaboration, in addition to the seronegative APS (SN-APS). GRADE system was used to evaluate the quality of evidence of medical literature of each selected item. This critical appraisal exercise aimed to support the debate regarding the clinical picture of APS. We found that the overall GRADE analysis was very low for migraine and seizures, low for superficial venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, chorea, longitudinal myelitis and the so-called seronegative APS and moderate for APS nephropathy, heart valve lesions and livedo reticularis. The next step can be a critical redefinition of an APS gold standard, for instance derived from the APS ACTION registry that will include not only current APS patients but also those with antiphospholipid antibodies not meeting current classification criteria.

  10. Legal Bases for the Use of Force Against International Terrorism: The U.S. Paradigm of Humanitarian Self-Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    discuss the missile strikes by the United States on an alleged terrorist target in Sudan. Foreign Minister Datuk Seri Abdullah Ahmad Badawi said...assassination at Marseilles on October 9, 1934, of King Alexander of Yugoslavia and Louis Barthou, Foreign Minister of the French Republic, and lead to the...Sept. 26, 1972), reprinted in CONTROL OF TERRORISM: INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTS 113 ( Alexander , Browne, & Nanes, eds., 1979) [hereinafter Draft U.S

  11. Organization of the United States International Communications Industry. Appendix. Report of the Panel on Satellites and Other Long-Haul Transmission Modes of the National Academy of Engineering. President's Task Force on Communications Policy. Staff Paper Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rostow, Eugene V.

    A staff paper to the President's Task Force on Communications Policy reviews the organization of the American international communications industries and recommends a consolidation of the competing international carriers. Particularly emphasized is the competition and division of ownership between the two technologies involved in international…

  12. Influence of forced internal air circulation on airflow distribution and heat transfer in a gas double-dynamic solid-state fermentation bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongzhang; Qin, Lanzhi; Li, Hongqiang

    2014-02-01

    Internal air circulation affects the temperature field distribution in a gas double-dynamic solid-state fermentation bioreactor (GDSFB). To enhance heat transfer through strengthening internal air circulation in a GDSFB, we put an air distribution plate (ADP) into the bioreactor and studied the effects of forced internal air circulation on airflow, heat transfer, and cellulase activity of Trichoderma viride L3. Results showed that ADP could help form a steady and uniform airflow distribution, and with gas-guide tubes, air reversal was formed inside the bioreactor, thus resulting in a smaller temperature difference between medium and air by enhancing convective heat transfer inside the bioreactor. Using an ADP of 5.35 % aperture ratio caused a 1 °C decrease in the average temperature difference during the solid-state fermentation process of T. viride L3. Meanwhile, the cellulase activity of T. viride L3 increased by 13.5 %. The best heat-transfer effect was attained when using an ADP of 5.35 % aperture ratio and setting the fan power to 125 V (4.81 W) in the gas double-dynamic solid-state fermentation (GDSF) process. An option of suitable aperture ratio and fan power may be conducive to ADPs' industrial amplification.

  13. Turbofan forced mixer-nozzle internal flowfield. Volume 3: A computer code for 3-D mixing in axisymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreskovsky, J. P.; Briley, W. R.; Mcdonald, H.

    1982-01-01

    A finite difference method is developed for making detailed predictions of three dimensional subsonic turbulent flow in turbofan lobe mixers. The governing equations are solved by a forward-marching solution procedure which corrects an inviscid potential flow solution for viscous and thermal effects, secondary flows, total pressure distortion and losses, internal flow blockage and pressure drop. Test calculations for a turbulent coaxial jet flow verify that the turbulence model performs satisfactorily for this relatively simple flow. Lobe mixer flows are presented for two geometries typical of current mixer design. These calculations included both hot and cold flow conditions, and both matched and mismatched Mach number and total pressure in the fan and turbine streams.

  14. Role of Tractional Forces and Internal Limiting Membrane in Macular Hole Formation: Insights from Intraoperative Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Moisseiev, Elad; Yiu, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 69-year-old patient who underwent vitrectomy for vitreomacular traction (VMT) and developed a postoperative macular hole that was observed 1 week after surgery. The hole did not close by in-office fluid-gas exchange alone, but was achieved after repeat surgery with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling. Intraoperative OCT (iOCT) images from the first surgery revealed an occult macular hole that formed after VMT release. We discuss how iOCT findings provide insight into the role of the ILM in macular hole formation and emphasize the importance of carefully inspecting iOCT images in real time to avoid missing small but important findings. PMID:27721786

  15. Use of induced acceleration to quantify the (de)stabilization effect of external and internal forces on postural responses.

    PubMed

    van Asseldonk, Edwin H F; Carpenter, Mark G; van der Helm, Frans C T; van der Kooij, Herman

    2007-12-01

    Due to the mechanical coupling between the body segments, it is impossible to see with the naked eye the causes of body movements and understand the interaction between movements of different body parts. The goal of this paper is to investigate the use of induced acceleration analysis to reveal the causes of body movements. We derive the analytical equations to calculate induced accelerations and evaluate its potential to study human postural responses to support-surface translations. We measured the kinematic and kinetic responses of a subject to sudden forward and backward translations of a moving platform. The kinematic and kinetics served as input to the induced acceleration analyses. The induced accelerations showed explicitly that the platform acceleration and deceleration contributed to the destabilization and restabilization of standing balance, respectively. Furthermore, the joint torques, coriolis and centrifugal forces caused by swinging of the arms, contributed positively to stabilization of the Center of Mass. It is concluded that induced acceleration analyses is a valuable tool in understanding balance responses to different kinds of perturbations and may help to identify the causes of movement in different pathologies.

  16. Ground Reaction Forces and Gait Parameters during Motorized and Non-Motorized Treadmill Walking and Runing on the International Space Station Treadmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagan, Ronald Donald; Norcross, Jason; DeWitt, John; Lee, Stuart M.; McCleary, Frank; Edwards, W. Brent

    2006-01-01

    Both motorized (T-M) and non-motorized (T-NM) treadmill locomotion are used on the International Space Station (ISS) as countermeasures to the deleterious effects of prolonged weightlessness. However, the ground reaction forces (GRF) and gait parameters of these exercise modes have not been examined. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in GRF and gait parameters exist while walking (1.34 m/s) and running (3.13 m/s) on T-M and T-NM. Dissimilar GRF and gait parameters suggest that T-M and T-NM locomotion may elicit different physiologic effects. T-NM may result in a reduced stimulus to bone formation due to a lower LR, but an increased energy cost as a result of shorter, more frequent strides. Therefore, the usage of each mode should depend upon the desired training stimulus.

  17. What are the minimum requirements for ketogenic diet services in resource-limited regions? Recommendations from the International League Against Epilepsy Task Force for Dietary Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kossoff, Eric H; Al-Macki, Nabil; Cervenka, Mackenzie C; Kim, Heung D; Liao, Jianxiang; Megaw, Katherine; Nathan, Janak K; Raimann, Ximena; Rivera, Rocio; Wiemer-Kruel, Adelheid; Williams, Emma; Zupec-Kania, Beth A

    2015-09-01

    Despite the increasing use of dietary therapies for children and adults with refractory epilepsy, the availability of these treatments in developing countries with limited resources remains suboptimal. One possible contributory factor may be the costs. There is often reported a significant perceived need for a large ketogenic diet team, supplements, laboratory studies, and follow-up visits to provide this treatment. The 2009 Epilepsia Consensus Statement described ideal requirements for a ketogenic diet center, but in some situations this is not feasible. As a result, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Task Force on Dietary Therapy was asked to convene and provide practical, cost-effective recommendations for new ketogenic diet centers in resource-limited regions of the world.

  18. Priming Silicic Giant Magma Bodies: Finding Evidence for Internal Forcing Versus External Triggering of Supereruptions by Phase Equilibria Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontano, S.; Gualda, G. A. R.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Kennedy, B.

    2015-12-01

    It is important to understand what triggers silicic eruptions because of the implications for modern-day systems. The goal of this project is to use phase equilibria modeling (i.e. rhyolite-MELTS) to determine to what extent magmas within the crust are induced to erupt due to external triggers (e.g. earthquakes; new magma injection; neighboring eruptions) and to what extent they naturally evolve to a point where eruption is inevitable (e.g. by fluid exsolution and decrease in magma strength and density). Whole-rock compositions from four rhyolite tuffs across the globe associated with large or supereruptions (Mamaku Tuff, New Zealand; Peach Spring Tuff, SW USA; early and late-erupted Bishop Tuff, California; and Toba Tuff, Indonesia) are studied using rhyolite-MELTS modeling. Key physical properties of magma are strongly affected by the initial volatile content due to fluid exsolution. By running simulations with varying water contents, we can track the evolution of fluid exsolution during crystallization. Isobaric (constrained temperature change at constant pressure) and isochoric (constrained temperature change at constant volume) models were run for the four compositions. In constrained-pressure scenarios, fluid is free to exsolve as crystallization proceeds, and the total system volume can increase or decrease accordingly; this would require deformation of the surrounding crust to accommodate the magma volume change. In constrained-volume scenarios, bubble exsolution is limited to the volume change due to crystallization; in this case, pressure can decrease or increase (if bubbles are absent or present). For fixed-pressure scenarios, fluid exsolution is more extensive and leads to internal triggering, at least for fluid-saturated conditions; external triggering is more likely in fluid-undersaturated conditions. For fixed-volume scenarios, none of the systems cross a fragmentation threshold for the crystal contents typically observed in natural pumice. If

  19. Biomarkers in bipolar disorder: a positional paper from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Biomarkers Task Force.

    PubMed

    Frey, Benicio N; Andreazza, Ana C; Houenou, Josselin; Jamain, Stéphane; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Frye, Mark A; Leboyer, Marion; Berk, Michael; Malhi, Gin S; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Taylor, Valerie H; Dodd, Seetal; Frangou, Sophia; Hall, Geoffrey B; Fernandes, Brisa S; Kauer-Sant'Anna, Marcia; Yatham, Lakshmi N; Kapczinski, Flavio; Young, L Trevor

    2013-04-01

    Although the etiology of bipolar disorder remains uncertain, multiple studies examining neuroimaging, peripheral markers and genetics have provided important insights into the pathophysiologic processes underlying bipolar disorder. Neuroimaging studies have consistently demonstrated loss of gray matter, as well as altered activation of subcortical, anterior temporal and ventral prefrontal regions in response to emotional stimuli in bipolar disorder. Genetics studies have identified several potential candidate genes associated with increased risk for developing bipolar disorder that involve circadian rhythm, neuronal development and calcium metabolism. Notably, several groups have found decreased levels of neurotrophic factors and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress markers. Together these findings provide the background for the identification of potential biomarkers for vulnerability, disease expression and to help understand the course of illness and treatment response. In other areas of medicine, validated biomarkers now inform clinical decision-making. Although the findings reviewed herein hold promise, further research involving large collaborative studies is needed to validate these potential biomarkers prior to employing them for clinical purposes. Therefore, in this positional paper from the ISBD-BIONET (biomarkers network from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders), we will discuss our view of biomarkers for these three areas: neuroimaging, peripheral measurements and genetics; and conclude the paper with our position for the next steps in the search for biomarkers for bipolar disorder.

  20. International recommendation for a comprehensive neuropathologic workup of epilepsy surgery brain tissue: A consensus Task Force report from the ILAE Commission on Diagnostic Methods.

    PubMed

    Blümcke, Ingmar; Aronica, Eleonora; Miyata, Hajime; Sarnat, Harvey B; Thom, Maria; Roessler, Karl; Rydenhag, Bertil; Jehi, Lara; Krsek, Pavel; Wiebe, Samuel; Spreafico, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    Epilepsy surgery is an effective treatment in many patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsies. An early decision for surgical therapy is facilitated by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible brain lesion congruent with the electrophysiologically abnormal brain region. Recent advances in the pathologic diagnosis and classification of epileptogenic brain lesions are helpful for clinical correlation, outcome stratification, and patient management. However, application of international consensus classification systems to common epileptic pathologies (e.g., focal cortical dysplasia [FCD] and hippocampal sclerosis [HS]) necessitates standardized protocols for neuropathologic workup of epilepsy surgery specimens. To this end, the Task Force of Neuropathology from the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Commission on Diagnostic Methods developed a consensus standard operational procedure for tissue inspection, distribution, and processing. The aims are to provide a systematic framework for histopathologic workup, meeting minimal standards and maximizing current and future opportunities for morphofunctional correlations and molecular studies for both clinical care and research. Whenever feasible, anatomically intact surgical specimens are desirable to enable systematic analysis in selective hippocampectomies, temporal lobe resections, and lesional or nonlesional neocortical samples. Correct orientation of sample and the sample's relation to neurophysiologically aberrant sites requires good communication between pathology and neurosurgical teams. Systematic tissue sampling of 5-mm slabs along a defined anatomic axis and application of a limited immunohistochemical panel will ensure a reliable differential diagnosis of main pathologies encountered in epilepsy surgery.

  1. Nutritional status of children and adolescents based on body mass index: agreement between World Health Organization and International Obesity Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Cavazzotto, Timothy Gustavo; Brasil, Marcos Roberto; Oliveira, Vinicius Machado; da Silva, Schelyne Ribas; Ronque, Enio Ricardo V.; Queiroga, Marcos Roberto; Serassuelo, Helio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the agreement between two international criteria for classification of children and adolescents nutritional status. Methods: The study included 778 girls and 863 boys aged from six to 13 years old. Body mass and height were measured and used to calculate the body mass index. Nutritional status was classified according to the cut-off points defined by the World Health Organization and the International Obesity Task Force. The agreement was evaluated using Kappa statistic and weighted Kappa. Results: In order to classify the nutritional status, the agreement between the criteria was higher for the boys (Kappa 0.77) compared to girls (Kappa 0.61). The weighted Kappa was also higher for boys (0.85) in comparison to girls (0.77). Kappa index varied according to age. When the nutritional status was classified in only two categories - appropriate (thinness + accentuated thinness + eutrophy) and overweight (overweight + obesity + severe obesity) -, the Kappa index presented higher values than those related to the classification in six categories. Conclusions: A substantial agreement was observed between the criteria, being higher in males and varying according to the age. PMID:24676189

  2. Cookery method and endpoint temperature can affect the Warner-Bratzler shear force, cooking loss, and internal cooked color of beef semimembranosus and infraspinatus steaks.

    PubMed

    Yancey, J W S; Apple, J K; Wharton, M D

    2016-10-01

    Steaks from USDA Select inside rounds (Exp. 1) and shoulder clods (Exp. 2) were used to test the interactive effect of cookery method and endpoint temperature on Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) and internal cooked color. Pairs of 2.5-cm-thick semimembranosus (SM) or infraspinatus (INF) steaks ( = 360/muscle) were cut from each subprimal, labeled, vacuum packaged, and frozen at -30°C in the dark for approximately 60 d before being cooked to 65.5, 71.1, or 76.6°C using 1) a forced-air convection oven (FAC); 2) a forced-air impingement oven (IMP); 3) a gas-fired, open-hearth charbroiler (CHAR); 4) an electric countertop griddle (GRID); or 5) a clam-shell grill (CLAM). Thawed steaks were cooked to their assigned endpoint temperature × cookery method combination, and, after a 5-min cooling period, steaks were weighed to calculate cooking loss percentage and subsequently sliced perpendicular to the cut surface to measure instrumental cooked color. Then, 6 cores were removed for measurement of WBSF. Cooking losses of SM steaks increased ( < 0.05) with each increase in endpoint temperature, whereas INF steaks cooked on a CHAR had the greatest ( < 0.05) cooking losses and cooking INF steaks with the GRID and the CLAM resulted in lesser ( < 0.05) cooking losses than cooking with the FAC and the IMP. Cooking SM steaks on the CHAR resulted in greater ( < 0.05) WBSF values than all other cookery methods when cooked to 65.5 and 76.6°C and greater ( < 0.05) WBSF values than those cooked on the FAC, GRID, and CLAM when cooked to 71.1°C. Shear force values were greater ( < 0.05) for INF steaks cooked to 71.1 and 76.6°C than those cooked to 65.5°C, but INF WBSF values were similar ( = 0.55) among cookery methods. At 65.5°C, FAC-cooked SM steaks were redder ( < 0.05) than those cooked with the GRID and the IMP and, at 71.1°C, CLAM-cooked SM steaks were redder ( < 0.05) than FAC- and IMP-cooked SM steaks; however, a* values were similar ( > 0.05) among cookery methods when

  3. 'Criteria' aPL tests: report of a task force and preconference workshop at the 13th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies, Galveston, Texas, April 2010.

    PubMed

    Pierangeli, S S; de Groot, P G; Dlott, J; Favaloro, E; Harris, E N; Lakos, G; Ortel, T; Meroni, P L; Otomo, K; Pengo, V; Tincani, A; Wong, R; Roubey, R

    2011-02-01

    Current classification criteria for definite antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) mandate the use of one or more of three positive 'standardized' laboratory assays to detect antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) (viz: anticardiolipin [aCL] IgG and IgM; anti-β(2)glycoprotein I [anti-β(2)GPI] antibodies IgG and IgM; and/or a lupus anticoagulant [LAC]), when at least one of the two major clinical manifestations (thrombosis or pregnancy losses) are present. Although, efforts of standardization for these 'criteria' aPL tests have been conducted over the last 27 years, reports of inconsistencies, inter-assay and inter-laboratory variation in the results of aCL, LAC, and anti-β(2)GPI, and problems with the interpretation and the clinical value of the tests still exist, which affect the consistency of the diagnosis of APS. A Task Force of scientists and pioneers in the field from different countries, subdivided in three working groups, discussed and analyzed critical questions related to 'criteria' aPL tests in an evidence-based manner, during the 13(th) International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (APLA 2010, April 13-16, 2010, Galveston, TX). These included: review of the standardization and the need for international consensus protocol for aCL and anti-β(2)GPI tests; the use of monoclonal and/or polyclonal standards in the calibration curve of those tests; and the need for establishment of international units of measurement for anti-β(2)GPI tests. The group also reviewed the recently updated guidelines for LAC testing, and analyzed and discussed the possibility of stratification of 'criteria' aPL tests as risk factors for APS, as well as the clinical value of single positive vs. multiple aPL positivity. The group members presented, discussed, analyzed data, updated and re-defined those critical questions at a preconference workshop that was open to congress attendees. This report summarizes the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of this Task Force.

  4. Effects of composite and coordinated interactions between populations of particle-like individuals involving forces and internal states — A statistical-mechanical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Øien, Alf H.

    2008-09-01

    In this analogue modeling of interacting species we consider in particular interactions we refer to as composite interactions between particles called “daphnicles” and “food particles” that evolve on a third particle component in the background. Other force interactions are also taken account of but they play a smaller role in this study. The states of daphnicles and food particles are not only given by their position- and velocity-variables but also by variables of internal properties they have, which we shall call “saturation” for daphnicles and “nutrition” for food particles. The “laws” of variations of all these variables, where the rates of change of saturation and nutrition take place in the central region of the force interaction range where daphnicles and food particles come close together in their movements, are coupled in the composite interactions we consider. Due to this coupling of the “outer” force interaction to the “inner” saturation-nutrition interaction the inner interaction can be raised or diminished and in this way the distribution of say saturation of daphnicles may be regulated. From an extended Liouville equation for a system of a large number of particles where in particular interactions like these are baked in on the level of individual particles we aim to derive equations for daphnicle and food particle distribution functions on a kinetic level; this derivation constitutes the main part of the paper. Proper equations on a coarser grained level of description are then found quite easily: this “mixed” kinetic/moment level is in between the kinetic- and the full moment (macroscopic) levels such that distribution of saturation and nutrition still play a role and the equations still retain essential characteristics of the composite interactions taking place on the microscopic level, besides other force interactions. Though the terminology used suites modeling of biological systems and the results may throw some

  5. Diabetes mellitus in older people: position statement on behalf of the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics (IAGG), the European Diabetes Working Party for Older People (EDWPOP), and the International Task Force of Experts in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Alan; Morley, John E; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leo; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Bayer, Tony; Zeyfang, Andrej; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Vischer, Ulrich; Woo, Jean; Chapman, Ian; Dunning, Trisha; Meneilly, Graydon; Rodriguez-Saldana, Joel; Gutierrez Robledo, Luis Miguel; Cukierman-Yaffe, Tali; Gadsby, Roger; Schernthaner, Guntram; Lorig, Kate

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent metabolic condition in ageing societies associated with high levels of morbidity, multiple therapies, and functional deterioration that challenges even the best of health care systems to deliver high-quality, individualized care. Most international clinical guidelines have ignored the often-unique issues of frailty, functional limitation, changes in mental health, and increasing dependency that characterize many aged patients with diabetes. A collaborative Expert Group of the IAGG and EDWPOP and an International Task Force have explored the key issues that affect diabetes in older people using a robust method comprising a Delphi process and an evidence-based review of the literature. Eight domains of interest were initially agreed and discussed: hypoglycemia, therapy, care home diabetes, influence of comorbidities, glucose targets, family/carer perspectives, diabetes education, and patient safety. A set of "consensus" statements was produced in each domain of interest. These form a foundation for future policy development in this area and should influence the clinical behavior and approach of all health professionals engaged in delivering diabetes care to older people.

  6. Data mining of external and internal forcing of fluvial systems for catchment management: A case study on the Red River (Song Hong), Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Rafael; Bizzi, Simone; Castelletti, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    The understanding of river hydromorphological processes has been recognized in the last decades as a priority of modern catchment management, since interactions of natural and anthropogenic forces within the catchment drives fluvial geomorphic processes, which shape physical habitat, affect river infrastructures and influence freshwater ecological processes. The characterization of river hydromorphological features is commonly location and time specific and highly resource demanding. Therefore, its routine application at regional or national scales and the assessment of spatio-temporal changes as reaction to internal and external disturbances is rarely feasible at present. Information ranging from recently available high-resolution remote-sensing data (such as DEM), historic data such as land use maps or aerial photographs and monitoring networks of flow and rainfall, open up novel and promising capacity for basin-wide understanding of dominant hydromorphological drivers. Analysing the resulting multiparametric data sets in their temporal and spatial dimensions requires sophisticated data mining tools to exploit the potential of this information. We propose a novel framework that allows for the quantitative assessment of multiparametric data sets to identify classes of channel reaches characterized by similar geomorphic drivers using remote-sensing data and monitoring networks available in the catchment. This generic framework was applied to the Red River (Song Hong) basin, the second largest basin (87,800 sq.km) in Vietnam. Besides its economic importance, the river is experiencing severe river bed incisions due to recent construction of new dams in the upstream part of the catchment and sand mining in the surrounding of the capital city Hanoi. In this context, characterized by an high development rate, current efforts to increase water productivity and minimize impacts on the fluvial systems by means of focused infrastructure and management measures require a

  7. Reaction Based Grasp Force Assignment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    position and internal force trajectory [32]. Yoshikawa et al. have proposed using forms of the so called hybrid position/force control; this method...object. Yoshikawa et al. have defined grasping and manipulative forces similar to the internal and external forces described above [63]. Some authors...methods to solve the problem [42]. Nakamura, Yoshikawa , and other authors have defined optimal contact forces as those which seek to minimize the

  8. The swim force as a body force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  9. A review of a method for dynamic load distribution, dynamic modeling, and explicit internal force control when two serial link manipulators mutually lift and transport a rigid body object

    SciTech Connect

    Unseren, M.A.

    1997-09-01

    The report reviews a method for modeling and controlling two serial link manipulators which mutually lift and transport a rigid body object in a three dimensional workspace. A new vector variable is introduced which parameterizes the internal contact force controlled degrees of freedom. A technique for dynamically distributing the payload between the manipulators is suggested which yields a family of solutions for the contact forces and torques the manipulators impart to the object. A set of rigid body kinematic constraints which restricts the values of the joint velocities of both manipulators is derived. A rigid body dynamical model for the closed chain system is first developed in the joint space. The model is obtained by generalizing the previous methods for deriving the model. The joint velocity and acceleration variables in the model are expressed in terms of independent pseudovariables. The pseudospace model is transformed to obtain reduced order equations of motion and a separate set of equations governing the internal components of the contact forces and torques. A theoretic control architecture is suggested which explicitly decouples the two sets of equations comprising the model. The controller enables the designer to develop independent, non-interacting control laws for the position control and internal force control of the system.

  10. Forceful emplacement of the Eureka Valley-Joshua Flat-Beer Creek composite pluton into a structural basin in eastern California; internal structure and wall rock deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Sven; Law, Richard; de Saint Blanquat, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility parameters have been analyzed at 311 locations in the Eureka Valley-Joshua Flat-Beer Creek (EJB) pluton of eastern California. The large amount of data has allowed for the AMS parameters to be contoured using techniques that both reveal map-scale trends and emphasize small-scale differences. The contour maps suggest that magnetic susceptibility is dominantly controlled by composition of the magma but may also be affected by emplacement-related strain as the magma chamber inflated and forced the wall rocks outward. Pluton construction involved two major pulses of different composition magmas that were emplaced sequentially but with overlapping periods of crystallization. The magmas initially intruded as sill-like bodies into a structural basin. The magnetic foliation of the pluton cuts across internal magmatic contacts on the map scale and is parallel to local contacts between the pluton and surrounding metasedimentary wall rocks. The magnetic fabric is similar in orientation and symmetry to intense flattening strains recorded in the aureole rocks. The metasedimentary wall rocks have been shortened between 60 and 70% and this strain magnitude is approximately equal on the west, south, and east margins of the pluton. Strain in the wall rocks is dominantly flattening and concentrated into a narrow (1 km wide) inner aureole. Mapping of bedding/cleavage intersection lineations south of the pluton indicates that the magma made room for itself by translating the wall rocks outward and rotating the already inward dipping wall rocks of the structural basin to sub-vertical. Stretching of the inner aureole around an expanding magma chamber was responsible for the intense shortening. Limited data on the Marble Canyon pluton to the south of the EJB pluton indicates a very similar emplacement process.

  11. Analysis and comparison of diurnal variations of cloud radiative forcing: Earth Radiation Budget Experiment and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project results

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.

    1994-10-01

    Cloud radiative forcing (CRF) is the radiative impact of clouds on the Earth`s radiation budget. This study examines the diurnal variations of CRF using the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) monthly hourly flux data and the flux data derived from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model radiation code. The results for the months of April, July, and October 1985 and January 1986 are analyzed. We found that, in general, two data sets agreed. For longwave (LW) CRF the diurnal range over land is generally greater than that observed over oceans. For the 4-month averages the ERBE values are 15.8 W/sq m and 6.8 W/sq m for land and ocean, respectively, compared with the ISCCP calculated values of 18.4 W/sq m and 8.0 W/sq m, respectively. The land/ocean contrast is largely associated with changes in cloud amount and the temperature difference between surface and cloud top. It would be more important to note that the clear-sky flux (i.e., surface temperature) variabilities are shown to be a major contributor to the large variabilities over land. The maximum diurnal range is found to be in the summer hemisphere, and the minimum values in the winter hemisphere. It is also shown that the daytime maximum and the nighttime minimum are seen over large portions of land, whereas they occur at any local hour over most oceans. For shortwave (SW) CRF the daytime maximum values are about twice as large as monthly averages, and their highest frequency occurs at local noon, indicating that solar insolation is a primary factor for the diurnal variation of SW CRF. However, the comparison of the ERBE data with the ISCCP results demonstrated that the largest differences in the diurnal range and monthly mean of LW CRF were associated with tropical convergence zones, where clear-sky fluxes could be easily biased by persistent cloudiness and the inadequate treatment of the atmospheric water vapor.

  12. Analysis and comparison of diurnal variations of cloud radiative forcing: Earth Radiation Budget Experiment and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yongseung

    1994-01-01

    Cloud radiative forcing (CRF) is the radiative impact of clouds on the Earth's radiation budget. This study examines the diurnal variations of CRF using the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) monthly hourly flux data and the flux data derived from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model radiation code. The results for the months of April, July, and October 1985 and January 1986 are analyzed. We found that, in general, two data sets agreed. For longwave (LW) CRF the diurnal range over land is generally greater than that observed over oceans. For the 4-month averages the ERBE values are 15.8 W/sq m and 6.8 W/sq m for land and ocean, respectively, compared with the ISCCP calculated values of 18.4 W/sq m and 8.0 W/sq m, respectively. The land/ocean contrast is largely associated with changes in cloud amount and the temperature difference between surface and cloud top. It would be more important to note that the clear-sky flux (i.e., surface temperature) variabilities are shown to be a major contributor to the large variabilities over land. The maximum diurnal range is found to be in the summer hemisphere, and the minimum values in the winter hemisphere. It is also shown that the daytime maximum and the nighttime minimum are seen over large portions of land, whereas they occur at any local hour over most oceans. For shortwave (SW) CRF the daytime maximum values are about twice as large as monthly averages, and their highest frequency occurs at local noon, indicating that solar insolation is a primary factor for the diurnal variation of SW CRF. However, the comparison of the ERBE data with the ISCCP results demonstrated that the largest differences in the diurnal range and monthly mean of LW CRF were associated with tropical convergence zones, where clear-sky fluxes could be easily biased by persistent cloudiness and the inadequate treatment of the atmospheric water vapor.

  13. Force Display and Bi-Lateral Master-Slave Control with an Internal Model under the Consideration of Human Cross-Over Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahata, Nagakatsu; Nishizawa, Masanori; Itoh, Youichirou; Yoshida, Hiroaki

    Human behavior for controlling machines is quite adaptive but restrictive in gain, phase, frequency bandwidth and so on. It is often assumed by a cross-over model especially for compensatory tracking task. Force display system is increasingly important in robotics, remote manipulations, machine handling and etc. The control system design for force display and/or bi-lateral master-slave manipulator is not so easy because of gain limits, mechanical vibration, human-induced oscillation and others. Proposed is a control system design for force display and/or bi-lateral master-slave manipulator based on model-following control under the concept of human crossover model in compensatory tracking. Experimental results are also shown for an actual force display device designed by the proposed method.

  14. Internalized HIV and Drug Stigmas: Interacting Forces Threatening Health Status and Health Service Utilization Among People with HIV Who Inject Drugs in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Sarah K; Burke, Sara E; Dovidio, John F; Levina, Olga S; Uusküla, Anneli; Niccolai, Linda M; Heimer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Marked overlap between the HIV and injection drug use epidemics in St. Petersburg, Russia, puts many people in need of health services at risk for stigmatization based on both characteristics simultaneously. The current study examined the independent and interactive effects of internalized HIV and drug stigmas on health status and health service utilization among 383 people with HIV who inject drugs in St. Petersburg. Participants self-reported internalized HIV stigma, internalized drug stigma, health status (subjective rating and symptom count), health service utilization (HIV care and drug treatment), sociodemographic characteristics, and health/behavioral history. For both forms of internalized stigma, greater stigma was correlated with poorer health and lower likelihood of service utilization. HIV and drug stigmas interacted to predict symptom count, HIV care, and drug treatment such that individuals internalizing high levels of both stigmas were at elevated risk for experiencing poor health and less likely to access health services.

  15. Internalized HIV and Drug Stigmas: Interacting Forces Threatening Health Status and Health Service Utilization Among People with HIV Who Inject Drugs in St. Petersburg, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Sara E.; Dovidio, John F.; Levina, Olga S.; Uusküla, Anneli; Niccolai, Linda M.; Heimer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Marked overlap between the HIV and injection drug use epidemics in St. Petersburg, Russia, puts many people in need of health services at risk for stigmatization based on both characteristics simultaneously. The current study examined the independent and interactive effects of internalized HIV and drug stigmas on health status and health service utilization among 383 people with HIV who inject drugs in St. Petersburg. Participants self-reported internalized HIV stigma, internalized drug stigma, health status (subjective rating and symptom count), health service utilization (HIV care and drug treatment), sociodemographic characteristics, and health/behavioral history. For both forms of internalized stigma, greater stigma was correlated with poorer health and lower likelihood of service utilization. HIV and drug stigmas interacted to predict symptom count, HIV care, and drug treatment such that individuals internalizing high levels of both stigmas were at elevated risk for experiencing poor health and less likely to access health services. PMID:26050155

  16. Basic Education in Developing Countries. Hearing before the International Task Force of the Select Committee on Hunger. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Hunger.

    The responsibility of the U.S. House of Representatives Task Force on Hunger is to investigate the causes and dimensions of world hunger and to develop legislative recommendations addressing the issues raised. At this hearing, the issue discussed was of basic education as a crucial link in expanding opportunities for poor and hungry people to…

  17. Measurement of muscle actions and foot reaction forces from crew members during entire working days on the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedeker, Jess G.; Cavanagh, Peter R.

    2000-01-01

    We present pilot work in preparation for ISS Experiment 318, which will investigate changes in lower limb daily mechanical loading and muscular activity profiles that have been implicated in bone mineral loss and muscle atrophy during spaceflight. Prototype equipment for the musculo-skeletal rack of the Human Research Facility (HRF) was used in conjunction with the Ambulatory Data Acquisition System to record and store data. Right foot ground reaction force profiles, right leg EMG activity profiles from the tibialis anterior and vastus medialis, and joint angular excursion profiles from the right knee and ankle were collected during five minutes each of forward and backward running in 1g as well as over a twelve hour period of activities during daily living. Ground reaction force profiles were analyzed to provide an estimate of 1g daily mechanical load stimulus, while EMG and joint angle profiles characterized the role of individual muscles in generating and absorbing energy. .

  18. Status of Personnel, Use of force, and International Law of Armed Conflict in the Context of New United Nations Peacekeeping Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-27

    against which it was waged. Przetacznik, Frank, The Philosophical and Legal Concept of War 198-99 (1994). 12 Johnson, James Turner, in Sovereignty at...Rights 3 (1994). There is still a place for such missions today; the UNCRO force in the western Slovonia region of Croatia is an example. 32 James ...and the peril of diluting or forsaking consent. Sir Brian Urquhart, wrote in 1990, "A tendency to broaden the United Nations’ capacity to intervene

  19. The Persistence Length of DNA Is Reached from the Persistence Length of Its Null Isomer through an Internal Electrostatic Stretching Force

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Gerald S.

    2006-01-01

    To understand better the effect of electrostatics on the rigidity of the DNA double helix, we define DNA*, the null isomer of DNA, as the hypothetical structure that would result from DNA if its phosphate groups were not ionized. For the purposes of theoretical analysis, we model DNA* as identical to ordinary DNA but supplemented by a longitudinal compression force equal in magnitude but oppositely directed to the stretching (tension) force on DNA caused by phosphate-phosphate repulsions. The null isomer DNA* then becomes an elastically buckled form of fully ionized DNA. On this basis, we derive a nonadditive relationship between the persistence length P of DNA and the persistence length P* of its null isomer. From the formula obtained we can predict the value of P* if P is known, and we can predict the ionic strength dependence of P under the assumption that P* does not depend on ionic strength. We predict a value of P* for null DNA drastically lower than the value of P for DNA in its ordinary state of fully ionized phosphates. The predicted dependence of P on salt concentration is log-c over most of the concentration range, with no tendency toward a salt-independent value in the range of validity of the theory. The predictions are consistent with much of the persistence-length data available for DNA. Alternate theories of the Odijk-Skolnik-Fixman type, including one by the author, are considered skeptically on the grounds that the underlying model may not be realistic. Specifically, we doubt the accuracy for real polyelectrolytes of the Odijk-Skolnik-Fixman assumption that the polymer structure is invariant to changes in electrostatic forces. PMID:16935960

  20. The rotation-vibration structure of the SO2 C̃(1)B2 state explained by a new internal coordinate force field.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Park, G Barratt; Field, Robert W

    2016-04-14

    A new quartic force field for the SO2 C̃(1)B2 state has been derived, based on high resolution data from S(16)O2 and S(18)O2. Included are eight b2 symmetry vibrational levels of S(16)O2 reported in the first paper of this series [G. B. Park et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 144311 (2016)]. Many of the experimental observables not included in the fit, such as the Franck-Condon intensities and the Coriolis-perturbed effective C rotational constants of highly anharmonic C̃ state vibrational levels, are well reproduced using our force field. Because the two stretching modes of the C̃ state are strongly coupled via Fermi-133 interaction, the vibrational structure of the C̃ state is analyzed in a Fermi-system basis set, constructed explicitly in this work via partial diagonalization of the vibrational Hamiltonian. The physical significance of the Fermi-system basis is discussed in terms of semiclassical dynamics, based on study of Fermi-resonance systems by Kellman and Xiao [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 5821 (1990)]. By diagonalizing the vibrational Hamiltonian in the Fermi-system basis, the vibrational characters of all vibrational levels can be determined unambiguously. It is shown that the bending mode cannot be treated separately from the coupled stretching modes, particularly at vibrational energies of more than 2000 cm(-1). Based on our force field, the structure of the Coriolis interactions in the C̃ state of SO2 is also discussed. We identify the origin of the alternating patterns in the effective C rotational constants of levels in the vibrational progressions of the symmetry-breaking mode, νβ (which correlates with the antisymmetric stretching mode in our assignment scheme).

  1. The rotation-vibration structure of the SO2 C1B2 state explained by a new internal coordinate force field

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Jun; Park, G. Barratt; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-14

    A new quartic force field for the SO2 C~1B2 state has been derived, based on high resolution data from S16O2 and S18O2. Included are eight b2 symmetry vibrational levels of S16O2 reported in the first paper of this series [G. B. Park, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 144311 (2016)]. Many of the experimental observables not included in the fit, such as the Franck-Condon intensities and the Coriolis-perturbed effective C rotational constants of highly anharmonic C~ state vibrational levels, are well reproduced using our force field. Because the two stretching modes of the C~ state are strongly coupled via Fermi-133more » interaction, the vibrational structure of the C state is analyzed in a Fermi-system basis set, constructed explicitly in this work via partial diagonalization of the vibrational Hamiltonian. The physical significance of the Fermi-system basis is discussed in terms of semiclassical dynamics, based on study of Fermi-resonance systems by Kellman and coworkers [M. E. Kellman and L. Xiao, J. Chem. Phys. 93, 5821 (1990)]. By diagonalizing the vibrational Hamiltonian in the Fermi-system basis, the vibrational characters of all vibrational levels can be determined unambiguously. It is shown that the bending mode cannot be treated separately from the coupled stretching modes, particularly at vibrational energies of more than 2000 cm–1. Based on our force field, the structure of the Coriolis interactions in the C~ state of SO2 is also discussed. As a result, we identify the origin of the alternating patterns in the effective C rotational constants of levels in the vibrational progressions of the symmetry-breaking mode, νβ (which correlates with the antisymmetric stretching mode in our assignment scheme).« less

  2. The rotation-vibration structure of the SO2 C ˜ 1B2 state explained by a new internal coordinate force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Park, G. Barratt; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-01

    A new quartic force field for the SO2 C ˜ 1B2 state has been derived, based on high resolution data from S16O2 and S18O2. Included are eight b2 symmetry vibrational levels of S16O2 reported in the first paper of this series [G. B. Park et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 144311 (2016)]. Many of the experimental observables not included in the fit, such as the Franck-Condon intensities and the Coriolis-perturbed effective C rotational constants of highly anharmonic C ˜ state vibrational levels, are well reproduced using our force field. Because the two stretching modes of the C ˜ state are strongly coupled via Fermi-133 interaction, the vibrational structure of the C ˜ state is analyzed in a Fermi-system basis set, constructed explicitly in this work via partial diagonalization of the vibrational Hamiltonian. The physical significance of the Fermi-system basis is discussed in terms of semiclassical dynamics, based on study of Fermi-resonance systems by Kellman and Xiao [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 5821 (1990)]. By diagonalizing the vibrational Hamiltonian in the Fermi-system basis, the vibrational characters of all vibrational levels can be determined unambiguously. It is shown that the bending mode cannot be treated separately from the coupled stretching modes, particularly at vibrational energies of more than 2000 cm-1. Based on our force field, the structure of the Coriolis interactions in the C ˜ state of SO2 is also discussed. We identify the origin of the alternating patterns in the effective C rotational constants of levels in the vibrational progressions of the symmetry-breaking mode, νβ (which correlates with the antisymmetric stretching mode in our assignment scheme).

  3. New York Airports Data Package Number 2, John F. Kennedy International Airport, La Guardia Airport. Airport Improvement Task Force Delay Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-01

    potential improve- ments are identified in Appendix B. b. FAA will describe impact of post -1982 ATC systems on model inputs. c. Airfield Simulation...Model. d. Task Force will establish packages of near-term improvements most likely to be implemented in pre-1982 and post -1982 tim frames. f. Not...ZX-’% tar-Vy Uzl4-zn None on 4L 29 cwta runay caupancy --’=a IFRl Values 30 ?nUch-n-90 --unay ocupancy t--as 31. r.atz- -vay curaacy =Lzes 32 T&7- 200

  4. From local force-flux relationships to internal dissipations and their impact on heat engine performance: the illustrative case of a thermoelectric generator.

    PubMed

    Apertet, Y; Ouerdane, H; Goupil, C; Lecoeur, Ph

    2013-08-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of the sometimes understated role of the principle of energy conservation in linear irreversible thermodynamics. Our case study is that of a thermoelectric generator (TEG), which is a heat engine of choice in irreversible thermodynamics, owing to the coupling between the electrical and heat fluxes. We show why Onsager's reciprocal relations must be considered locally and how internal dissipative processes emerge from the extension of these relations to a global scale: The linear behavior of a heat engine at the local scale is associated with a dissipation process that must partake in the global energy balance. We discuss the consequences of internal dissipations on the so-called efficiency at maximum power, in the light of our comparative analyses of exoreversibility and endoreversibility on the one hand and of two classes of heat engines, autonomous and periodically driven, on the other hand. Finally, basing our analysis on energy conservation, we also discuss recent works which claim the possibility to overcome the traditional boundaries on efficiency imposed by finite-time thermodynamics in thermoelectric systems with broken time-reversal symmetry; this we do by introducing a "thermal" thermopower and an "electrical" thermopower which permits an analysis of the thermoelectric response of the TEG considering a possible dissymmetry between the electrical/thermal and the thermal/electrical couplings.

  5. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  6. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  7. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  8. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  9. 22 CFR 130.3 - Armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Armed forces. 130.3 Section 130.3 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.3 Armed forces. Armed forces means the army, navy, marine, air force, or coast guard,...

  10. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  11. Principles of practice parameters for the treatment of sleep disordered breathing in the elderly and frail elderly: the consensus of the International Geriatric Sleep Medicine Task Force.

    PubMed

    Netzer, Nikolaus C; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Bliwise, Donald L; Fulda, Stephany; Roffe, Christine; Almeida, Fernanda; Onen, Hakki; Onen, Fannie; Raschke, Friedhart; Martinez Garcia, Miguel Angel; Frohnhofen, Helmut

    2016-10-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is a leading cause of morbidity worldwide. Its prevalence increases with age. Due to the demographic changes in industrial societies, pulmonologists and sleep physicians are confronted with a rapidly growing number of elderly SDB patients. For many physicians, it remains unclear how current guidelines for SDB management apply to elderly and frail elderly patients. The goal of this consensus statement is to provide guidance based on published evidence for SDB treatment in this specific patient group.Clinicians and researchers with expertise in geriatric sleep medicine representing several countries were invited to participate in a task force. A literature search of PubMed from the past 12 years and a systematic review of evidence of studies deemed relevant was performed.Recommendations for treatment management of elderly and frail elderly SDB patients based on published evidence were formulated via discussion and consensus.In the last 12 years, there have been surprisingly few studies examining treatment of SDB in older adults and even fewer in frail older adults. Studies that have been conducted on the management of SDB in the older patient population were rarely stratified for age. Studies in SDB treatment that did include age stratification mainly focused on middle-aged and younger patient groups. Based on the evidence that is available, this consensus statement highlights the treatment forms that can be recommended for elderly SDB patients and encourages treatment of SDB in this large patient group.

  12. Heat tranfer 1982; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich, West Germany, September 6-10, 1982. Volume 3 - General papers: Forced convection, mixed convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigull, U.; Straub, J.; Hahne, E.; Stephan, K.

    The present conference on forced convection and mixed convection heat transfer covers heat transfer for a developing laminar pulsed flow of air in a tube, a finite analytic numerical solution for heat transfer and flow past a square channel cavity, heat transfer to laminar flow in non-Newtonian pseudoplastic fluids in tubes, heat transfer in a vertical rotating annulus, heat transfer at the tip of an unshrouded turbine blade, convective heat transfer in MHD channels, the turbulent diffusion of heat in recirculating liquid metal and water flows, the effects of molecular vibrational relaxation on stagnation heat transfer, and local heat transfer rates from two adjacent spheres in turbulent axisymmetric flows. Also considered are heat transfer from vibrating tubes in turbulent flow, modeling assumptions for turbulent heat transfer, calculation of heat transfer in turbulent, transpired boundary layers, heat transfer enhancement using vortex generators, modeling of mass transport in turbulent shear flows, cooling of a rotating disk by an impinging jet, profile analysis of heat/mass transfer across the plane wall jet, heat transfer coefficients of water jets impinging on a hot surface, the effect of suction on impingement heat transfer, acoustic enhancement of heat transfer in plane channels, wake interference for a heated oscillating cylinder, and mixed convection heat transfer to supercritical pressure water. (For individual items see A83-42701 to A83-42756)

  13. Recommendations for the diagnosis and initial evaluation of patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinaemia: A Task Force from the 8th International Workshop on Waldenström Macroglobulinaemia.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jorge J; Garcia-Sanz, Ramon; Hatjiharissi, Evdoxia; Kyle, Robert A; Leleu, Xavier; McMaster, Mary; Merlini, Giampaolo; Minnema, Monique C; Morra, Enrica; Owen, Roger G; Poulain, Stephanie; Stone, Marvin J; Tam, Constantine; Varettoni, Marzia; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Treon, Steven P; Kastritis, Efstathios

    2016-10-01

    The diagnosis of Waldenström macroglobulinaemia (WM) can be challenging given the variety of signs and symptoms patients can present. Furthermore, once the diagnosis of WM is established, the initial evaluation should be thorough as well as appropriately directed. During the 8th International Workshop for WM in London, United Kingdom, a multi-institutional task force was formed to develop consensus recommendations for the diagnosis and initial evaluation of patients with WM. In this document, we present the results of the deliberations that took place to address these issues. We provide recommendations for history-taking and physical examination, laboratory studies, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy analysis and imaging studies. We also provide guidance on the initial evaluation of special situations, such as anaemia, hyperviscosity, neuropathy, Bing-Neel syndrome and amyloidosis. We hope these recommendations serve as a practical guidance to clinicians taking care of patients with a suspected or an established diagnosis of WM.

  14. Recommendations for the diagnosis and initial evaluation of patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia: A Task Force from the 8th International Workshop on Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Jorge J.; Garcia-Sanz, Ramon; Hatjiharissi, Evdoxia; Kyle, Robert; Leleu, Xavier; McMaster, Mary L.; Merlini, Giampaolo; Minnema, Monique C.; Morra, Enrica; Owen, Roger; Poulain, Stephanie; Stone, Marvin; Tam, Constantine; Varettoni, Marzia; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Treon, Steven P.; Kastritis, Efstathios

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) can be challenging given the variety of signs and symptoms patients can present. Furthermore, once the diagnosis of WM is established, the initial evaluation should be thorough as well as appropriately directed. During the 8th International Workshop for WM in London, United Kingdom, a multi-institutional task force was formed to develop consensus recommendations for the diagnosis and initial evaluation of patients with WM. In this document, we present the results of the deliberations taken place to address these issues. We provide recommendations for history taking and physical examination, laboratory studies, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy analysis and imaging studies. We also provide guidance on the initial evaluation of special situations such as anemia, hyperviscosity, neuropathy, Bing-Neel syndrome and amyloidosis. We hope these recommendations serve as a practical guidance to clinicians taking care of patients with a suspected or an established diagnosis of WM. PMID:27378193

  15. HRP ForceShoe Evaluation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Maintaining astronaut bone and muscle health in microgravity is an ongoing concern for NASA. In May of 2014, NASA delivered the ForceShoe, designed by XSENS, to the International Space Station (ISS...

  16. EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis: report of a task force of the European Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutics (ESCISIT)

    PubMed Central

    Combe, B; Landewe, R; Lukas, C; Bolosiu, H D; Breedveld, F; Dougados, M; Emery, P; Ferraccioli, G; Hazes, J M W; Klareskog, L; Machold, K; Martin‐Mola, E; Nielsen, H; Silman, A; Smolen, J; Yazici, H

    2007-01-01

    Objective To formulate EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis. Methods In accordance with EULAR's “standardised operating procedures”, the task force pursued an evidence based approach and an approach based on expert opinion. A steering group comprised of 14 rheumatologists representing 10 European countries. The group defined the focus of the process, the target population, and formulated an operational definition of “management”. Each participant was invited to propose issues of interest regarding the management of early arthritis or early rheumatoid arthritis. Fifteen issues for further research were selected by use of a modified Delphi technique. A systematic literature search was carried out. Evidence was categorised according to usual guidelines. A set of draft recommendations was proposed on the basis of the research questions and the results of the literature search.. The strength of the recommendations was based on the category of evidence and expert opinion. Results 15 research questions, covering the entire spectrum of “management of early arthritis”, were formulated for further research; and 284 studies were identified and evaluated. Twelve recommendations for the management of early arthritis were selected and presented with short sentences. The selected statements included recognition of arthritis, referral, diagnosis, prognosis, classification, and treatment of early arthritis (information, education, non‐pharmacological interventions, pharmacological treatments, and monitoring of the disease process). On the basis of expert opinion, 11 items were identified as being important for future research. Conclusions 12 key recommendations for the management of early arthritis or early rheumatoid arthritis were developed, based on evidence in the literature and expert consensus. PMID:16396980

  17. 'Non-criteria' aPL tests: report of a task force and preconference workshop at the 13th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies, Galveston, TX, USA, April 2010.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, M L; Amengual, O; Atsumi, T; Binder, W L; de Laat, B; Forastiero, R; Kutteh, W H; Lambert, M; Matsubayashi, H; Murthy, V; Petri, M; Rand, J H; Sanmarco, M; Tebo, A E; Pierangeli, S S

    2011-02-01

    Abstract: Current classification criteria for definite APS recommend the use of one or more of three positive standardized laboratory assays, including anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL), lupus anticoagulant (LA), and antibodies directed to β(2)glycoprotein I (anti-β(2)GPI) to detect antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in the presence of at least one of the two major clinical manifestations (i.e., thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity) of the syndrome. Several other autoantibodies shown to be directed to phospholipids and/or their complexes with phospholipids and/or to proteins of the coagulation cascade, as well as a mechanistic test for resistance to annexin A5 anticoagulant activity, have been proposed to be relevant to APS. A task force of worldwide scientists in the field discussed and analyzed critical questions related to 'non-criteria' aPL tests in an evidence-based manner during the 13th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (APLA 2010, 13-16 April 2010, Galveston, Texas, USA). This report summarizes the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of this task force.

  18. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Secondhand Smoke Exposure among Internal Chinese Migrant Women of Reproductive Age: Evidence from China's Labor-Force Dynamic Survey.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiao; Luo, Xiaofeng; Ling, Li

    2016-04-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) is a major risk factor for poor health outcomes among women in China, where proportionately few women smoke. This is especially the case as it pertains to women's reproductive health, specifically migrant women who are exposed to SHS more than the population at large. There are several factors which may increase migrant women's risk of SHS exposure. This paper aims to investigate the prevalence and associated factors of SHS exposure among internal Chinese migrant women of reproductive age. The data used were derived from the 2014 Chinese Labor Dynamic Survey, a national representative panel survey. The age-adjusted rate of SHS exposure of women of reproductive age with migration experience was of 43.46% (95% CI: 40.73%-46.40%), higher than those without migration experience (35.28% (95% CI: 33.66%-36.97%)). Multivariate analysis showed that participants with a marital status of "Widowed" had statistically lower exposure rates, while those with a status of "Cohabitation" had statistically higher exposure. Those with an undergraduate degree or above had statistically lower SHS exposure. Those with increasing levels of social support, and those who currently smoke or drink alcohol, had statistically higher SHS exposure. Participants' different work-places had an effect on their SHS exposure, with outdoor workers statistically more exposed. Our findings suggest that urgent tobacco control measures should be taken to reduce smoking prevalence and SHS exposure. Specific attention should be paid to protecting migrant women of reproductive age from SHS.

  19. 26 CFR 301.7701-8 - Military or naval forces and Armed Forces of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Military or naval forces and Armed Forces of... § 301.7701-8 Military or naval forces and Armed Forces of the United States. The term “military or naval forces of the United States” and the term “Armed Forces of the United States” each includes all...

  20. EULAR recommendations for the management of knee osteoarthritis: report of a task force of the Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutic Trials (ESCISIT)

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, A; Arden, N; Dougados, M; Doherty, M; Bannwarth, B; Bijlsma, J; Cluzeau, F; Cooper, C; Dieppe, P; Gunther, K; Hauselmann, H; Herrero-Beaumont, G; Kaklamanis, P; Leeb, B; Lequesne, M; Lohmander, S; Mazieres, B; Mola, E; Pavelka, K; Serni, U; Swoboda, B; Verbruggen, A; Weseloh, G; Zimmermann-Gorska, I

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease encountered throughout Europe. A task force for the EULAR Standing Committee for Clinical Trials met in 1998 to determine the methodological and logistical approach required for the development of evidence based guidelines for treatment of knee OA. The guidelines were restricted to cover all currently available treatments for knee OA diagnosed either clinically and/or radiographically affecting any compartment of the knee.
METHODS—The first stage was the selection of treatment modalities to be considered. The second stage comprised a search of the electronic databases Medline and Embase using a combination of subject headings and keywords. All European language publications in the form of systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, controlled trials, and observational studies were included. During stage three all the relevant studies were quality scored. The summary statistics for validated outcome measures, when available, were recorded and, where practical, the numbers needed to treat and the effect size for each treatment were calculated. In the fourth stage key clinical propositions were determined by expert consensus employing a Delphi approach. The final stage ranked these propositions according to the available evidence. A second set of propositions relating to a future research agenda was determined by expert consensus using a Delphi approach.
RESULTS—Over 2400 English language publications and 400 non-English language publications were identified. Seven hundred and forty four studies presented outcome data of the effects of specific treatments on knee OA. Quantitative analysis of treatment effect was possible in only 61 studies. Recommendations for the management of knee OA based on currently available data and expert opinion are presented. Proposals for a future research agenda are highlighted.
CONCLUSIONS—These are the first clinical guidelines on knee

  1. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Secondhand Smoke Exposure among Internal Chinese Migrant Women of Reproductive Age: Evidence from China’s Labor-Force Dynamic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiao; Luo, Xiaofeng; Ling, Li

    2016-01-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) is a major risk factor for poor health outcomes among women in China, where proportionately few women smoke. This is especially the case as it pertains to women’s reproductive health, specifically migrant women who are exposed to SHS more than the population at large. There are several factors which may increase migrant women’s risk of SHS exposure. This paper aims to investigate the prevalence and associated factors of SHS exposure among internal Chinese migrant women of reproductive age. The data used were derived from the 2014 Chinese Labor Dynamic Survey, a national representative panel survey. The age-adjusted rate of SHS exposure of women of reproductive age with migration experience was of 43.46% (95% CI: 40.73%–46.40%), higher than those without migration experience (35.28% (95% CI: 33.66%–36.97%)). Multivariate analysis showed that participants with a marital status of “Widowed” had statistically lower exposure rates, while those with a status of “Cohabitation” had statistically higher exposure. Those with an undergraduate degree or above had statistically lower SHS exposure. Those with increasing levels of social support, and those who currently smoke or drink alcohol, had statistically higher SHS exposure. Participants’ different work-places had an effect on their SHS exposure, with outdoor workers statistically more exposed. Our findings suggest that urgent tobacco control measures should be taken to reduce smoking prevalence and SHS exposure. Specific attention should be paid to protecting migrant women of reproductive age from SHS. PMID:27043604

  2. Force cycles and force chains.

    PubMed

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Walker, David M; Lin, Qun

    2010-01-01

    We examine the coevolution of N cycles and force chains as part of a broader study which is designed to quantitatively characterize the role of the laterally supporting contact network to the evolution of force chains. Here, we elucidate the rheological function of these coexisting structures, especially in the lead up to failure. In analogy to force chains, we introduce the concept of force cycles: N cycles whose contacts each bear above average force. We examine their evolution around force chains in a discrete element simulation of a dense granular material under quasistatic biaxial loading. Three-force cycles are shown to be stabilizing structures that inhibit relative particle rotations and provide strong lateral support to force chains. These exhibit distinct behavior from other cycles. Their population decreases rapidly during the initial stages of the strain-hardening regime-a trend that is suddenly interrupted and reversed upon commencement of force chain buckling prior to peak shear stress. Results suggest that the three-force cycles are called upon for reinforcements to ward off failure via shear banding. Ultimately though, the resistance to buckling proves futile; buckling wins under the combined effects of dilatation and increasing compressive load. The sudden increase in three-force cycles may thus be viewed as an indicator of imminent failure via shear bands.

  3. [Quality control in the therapy of chronic pain. Results obtained by a task force of the German Section of the International Association for the Study of Pain on psychological assessment of chronic pain. XI. Assessment and multiaxial classification of pain].

    PubMed

    Klinger, R; Denecke, H; Glier, B; Kröner-Herwig, B; Nilges, P; Redegeld, M; Weiss, L

    1997-12-12

    This paper reviews instruments in German language for the psychological assessment and classification of pain. Usually chronic pain syndromes are classified within the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). Instead of the psychiatric chapter of the ICD, it is possible to use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The proposed classification system of the International Association of the Study of Pain (IASP) is based on a multiaxial solution. The numerous ways to classify chronic pain include many problems and limits, especially in the case of an interdisciplinary assessment. They provide no specific system for classifying pain syndromes. They are impractical to handle and restrict classifying pain as either somatogenic or psychogenic. It is not possible to describe both sides in one diagnosis without loss of information. As a result of this situation, a task force of the German Chapter of the International Association for the Study of Pain developed a Multiaxial Classification of Pain (Multiaxiale Schmerzklassifikation; MASK) as an advanced system of pain assessment and an alternative to the common classification systems. MASK embraces a somatic (MASK-S) and a psychological (MASK-P) part. Both parts constitute an 'interdisciplinary diagnosis'. MASK-S enables classifying a pain syndrome using hierarchical levels, with progredient specific degrees of differentiation. In addition there are 6 axes to describe pain syndromes qualitatively and quantitatively (e.g. localization, quality). The psychosocial part (MASK-P) embraces 5 main levels (1. behavioral, 2. emotional, 3. cognitive, 4. stress-related, 5. habitual personal factors) and 2 additional levels (6. functional coherence, 7. ICD/DSM-diagnosis additional). The MASK-P part of the diagnosis is composed of graduation on these levels. Differential axis of the pain syndromes are described phenomenologically and specifically. MASK provides the possibility of establishing an

  4. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  5. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  6. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  7. Task Force Delay Study, Miami International Airport.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    13 . .Pe of Pepo., ond P.,iod Co-e,ed 12. Spo’s-: Agency No-.. and Ad. ness U.S. Department of Transportation Fejr ! Aviation Administration...W, 66 U : ~ Ssz tz - c~7j ~~nz Ll ss til-= - -j E E~ -- n -3 .)- m -Q - v c. ~c E c- ’Z -. E- --. It C. ,: -E mo ;. .- - -VC c-&-,J.tv --- -t -. be

  8. Forced Internal Waves in the Arctic Ocean.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    especially during calm periods when the mixed layer is partially stratified), deviations of the ice motion from the linear behavior assumed for the...Ekman suction. In their studies of the response to a moving huricane , both Geisler and Kajiura find the hurricane propagation speed is much less than...model behavior . The eddy coefficients used by Mork and Krauss are not particularly realistic. Indeed realis- tic eddy coefficients for time varying

  9. 26 CFR 301.7701-8 - Military or naval forces and Armed Forces of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Force. The terms also include the Coast Guard. The members of such forces include commissioned officers and the personnel below the grade of commissioned officer in such forces. ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Military or naval forces and Armed Forces...

  10. 26 CFR 301.7701-8 - Military or naval forces and Armed Forces of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Force. The terms also include the Coast Guard. The members of such forces include commissioned officers and the personnel below the grade of commissioned officer in such forces. ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Military or naval forces and Armed Forces...

  11. 26 CFR 301.7701-8 - Military or naval forces and Armed Forces of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Force. The terms also include the Coast Guard. The members of such forces include commissioned officers and the personnel below the grade of commissioned officer in such forces. ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Military or naval forces and Armed Forces...

  12. 26 CFR 301.7701-8 - Military or naval forces and Armed Forces of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Force. The terms also include the Coast Guard. The members of such forces include commissioned officers and the personnel below the grade of commissioned officer in such forces. ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Military or naval forces and Armed Forces...

  13. Forced Snaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponedel, Benjamin; Knobloch, Edgar

    2016-11-01

    We study spatial localization in the real subcritical Ginzburg-Landau equation ut =m0 u +m1 cos2/π l x u +uxx +d | u | 2 u -| u | 4 u with spatially periodic forcing. When d > 0 and m1 = 0 this equation exhibits bistability between the trivial state u = 0 and a homogeneous nontrivial state u =u0 with stationary localized structures which accumulate at the Maxwell point m0 = - 3d2 / 16 . When spatial forcing is included its wavelength is imprinted on u0 creating conditions favorable to front pinning and hence spatial localization. We use numerical continuation to show that under appropriate conditions such forcing generates a sequence of localized states organized within a snakes-and-ladders structure centered on the Maxwell point, and refer to this phenomenon as forced snaking. We determine the stability properties of these states and show that longer lengthscale forcing leads to stationary trains consisting of a finite number of strongly localized, weakly interacting pulses exhibiting foliated snaking.

  14. Intermolecular forces.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, A D

    1975-11-06

    The nature of molecular interactions is examined. Intermolecular forces are divided into long-range and short-range components; the former operate at distances where the effects of electron exchange are negligible and decrease as an inverse power of the separation. The long-range interactions may be subdividied into electrostatic, induction and dispersion contributions, where the electrostatic component is the interaction of the permanent charge distributions and the others originate in the fluctuations in the distributions. Typical magnitudes of the various contributions are given. The forces between macroscopic bodies are briefly considered, as are the effects of a medium. Some of the manifestations of molecular interactions are discussed.

  15. Forces Motivating Institutional Reform. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee, Jennifer Agnes

    This digest provides an overview of forces, both internal and external, driving change on community college campuses. External agents of change are: (1) societal needs and expectations, which are shifting toward multicultural diversity; (2) international competition, requiring that workers be highly skilled in adapting to international cultures;…

  16. Can a small-changes approach help address the obesity epidemic? A report of the Joint Task Force of the American Society for Nutrition, Institute of Food Technologists, and International Food Information Council.

    PubMed

    Hill, James O

    2009-02-01

    The continued rise in obesity rates in most countries suggests that current programs and initiatives designed to combat obesity have not been successful in reversing the obesity epidemic. Obesity rates are increasing because of a gradual weight gain in most populations. There has been little long-term success in treating established obesity through lifestyle change, perhaps because of the large permanent changes in diet and physical activity required to keep weight off. An alternative strategy to address the obesity epidemic involves not focusing on weight loss but promoting small changes in diet and physical activity to initially prevent further weight gain. With the use of this strategy, obesity rates could first be stabilized in most populations and then, over time, decrease gradually. Supporting data show that small reductions in conscious energy intake and increases in physical activity can reduce excessive weight gain. The opportunity exists to use the small-changes approach to bring different stakeholders together to create a national initiative to address the global epidemic of obesity. The Joint Task Force of the American Society for Nutrition, Institute of Food Technologists, and International Food Information Council believe that a small-changes framework, aimed at helping people make conscious small changes in lifestyle behaviors, in combination with efforts by the private sector to gradually "ratchet down" some of the environmental factors that have contributed to excessive energy intake and the declining rates of physical activity, can be successful in reducing obesity rates. Such an initiative would benefit from the support of educational and social marketing campaigns developed with governmental input and support.

  17. Epidemiology, neurobiology and pharmacological interventions related to suicide deaths and suicide attempts in bipolar disorder: Part I of a report of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force on Suicide in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Ayal; Isometsä, Erkki T; Tondo, Leonardo; Moreno, Doris H; Sinyor, Mark; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Turecki, Gustavo; Weizman, Abraham; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Ha, Kyooseob; Reis, Catherine; Cassidy, Frederick; Goldstein, Tina; Rihmer, Zoltán; Beautrais, Annette; Chou, Yuan-Hwa; Diazgranados, Nancy; Levitt, Anthony J; Zarate, Carlos A; Yatham, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Bipolar disorder is associated with elevated risk of suicide attempts and deaths. Key aims of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force on Suicide included examining the extant literature on epidemiology, neurobiology and pharmacotherapy related to suicide attempts and deaths in bipolar disorder. Methods Systematic review of studies from 1 January 1980 to 30 May 2014 examining suicide attempts or deaths in bipolar disorder, with a specific focus on the incidence and characterization of suicide attempts and deaths, genetic and non-genetic biological studies and pharmacotherapy studies specific to bipolar disorder. We conducted pooled, weighted analyses of suicide rates. Results The pooled suicide rate in bipolar disorder is 164 per 100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval = [5, 324]). Sex-specific data on suicide rates identified a 1.7:1 ratio in men compared to women. People with bipolar disorder account for 3.4–14% of all suicide deaths, with self-poisoning and hanging being the most common methods. Epidemiological studies report that 23–26% of people with bipolar disorder attempt suicide, with higher rates in clinical samples. There are numerous genetic associations with suicide attempts and deaths in bipolar disorder, but few replication studies. Data on treatment with lithium or anticonvulsants are strongly suggestive for prevention of suicide attempts and deaths, but additional data are required before relative anti-suicide effects can be confirmed. There were limited data on potential anti-suicide effects of treatment with antipsychotics or antidepressants. Conclusion This analysis identified a lower estimated suicide rate in bipolar disorder than what was previously published. Understanding the overall risk of suicide deaths and attempts, and the most common methods, are important building blocks to greater awareness and improved interventions for suicide prevention in bipolar disorder. Replication of genetic findings and

  18. Operating internationally

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, R.S.

    1994-02-01

    When Enron Power Corp. took over a 28 MW power facility at the former US Naval base in Subic Bay, the Philippines, the company was required to employ 139 people to run the plant. This large labor force was necessary not because of the plant's operational needs, but because of local labor practices and unemployment pressures. Independent power companies have become all too familiar with the high cost and complexity of developing projects in emerging international markets. Some of the most significant issues involve taxation, unfamiliar legal systems, changing regulations, and foreign investment restrictions. In addition, questions about currency exchange, national credit worthiness, and political stability add to the difficulty of international development. However, one of the most daunting challenges centers not on development, but on long-term operations and maintenance (O M). A key concern is finding qualified labor. Most developers and O M companies agree that local people should run the plant, with the top person, or persons, thoroughly trained in the developer's company philosophy.

  19. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation - Forces Unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    With Nuclear Quantum Gravitation, the Forces are plainly and coherently unified. This most certainly is the missing link in Newtonian Gravitation explaining clearly the internal workings based in the Atomic Nucleus. The gravitational force between two gravitating masses is because of alternating electromagnetic functions in nuclei in matter. The Cavendish Experiment - Demonstration clearly shows the Gravitational attraction between two masses, which is a force proportional to the Newtonian Mechanics. General Relativity fails this real, physical test. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation has 10 logical proofs and 21 more indications. It is Scientifically logical and is compatible with Quantum Mechanics and Newtonian Mechanics.

  20. Vibrational force constants for acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, B.

    1990-05-01

    The vibrational force field of ethanal (acetaldehyde), CH 3CHO, is refined by using procedures with differential increments for the force constants (Commun. Dep. Chem., Bulg. Acad. Sci., 21/3 (1988) 433). The characteristics general valence force constants of the high-dimensional symmetry classes of ethanal, A' of tenth and A″ of fifth order, are determined for the experimental assignment of bands. The low barrier to hindered internal rotation about the single carbon—carbon bond is quantitatively estimated on the grounds of normal vibrational analysis.

  1. Strategic forces

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Air Force now plans to retain the Minuteman II and III missile force through fiscal year 2008. Introduced about 25 years ago, these missiles have served as a nuclear deterrence for longer than initially envisioned. Over the extended lives of the systems, questions have arisen over their continued reliability and operational effectiveness, particularly the Minuteman II system. Limited flight testing, due to a shortage of test missiles, and reduced reliability caused by age-related deterioration of guidance computers and propulsion motors are two factors undermining confidence in the Minuteman II. GAO believes that the Minuteman II could be retired before 1998 as presently contemplated under an assumption of a Strategic Arms Reduction Talks agreement. An alternative would be to reinstate the Air Force's plans to replace deteriorated missile components and acquire the assets needed to resume flight testing at rates necessary to restore and sustain confidence in the system's performance through fiscal year 2008. However, on the basis of current test schedules, GAO is concerned that components to test the missile's warheads will be depleted by about 1999.

  2. World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM) 2016 standards for recording and scoring leg movements in polysomnograms developed by a joint task force from the International and the European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Groups (IRLSSG and EURLSSG).

    PubMed

    Ferri, R; Fulda, S; Allen, R P; Zucconi, M; Bruni, O; Chokroverty, S; Ferini-Strambi, L; Frauscher, B; Garcia-Borreguero, D; Hirshkowitz, M; Högl, B; Inoue, Y; Jahangir, A; Manconi, M; Marcus, C L; Picchietti, D L; Plazzi, G; Winkelman, J W; Zak, R S

    2016-10-01

    This report presents the results of the work by a joint task force of the International and European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Groups and World Association of Sleep Medicine that revised and updated the current standards for recording and scoring leg movements (LM) in polysomnographic recordings (PSG). First, the background of the decisions made and the explanations of the new rules are reported and then specific standard rules are presented for recording, detecting, scoring and reporting LM activity in PSG. Each standard rule has been classified with a level of evidence. At the end of the paper, Appendix 1 provides algorithms to aid implementation of these new standards in software tools. There are two main changes introduced by these new rules: 1) Candidate LM (CLM), are any monolateral LM 0.5-10 s long or bilateral LM 0.5-15 s long; 2) periodic LM (PLM) are now defined by runs of at least four consecutive CLM with an intermovement interval ≥10 and ≤ 90 s without any CLM preceded by an interval <10 s interrupting the PLM series. There are also new options defining CLM associated with respiratory events. The PLM rate may now first be determined for all CLM not excluding any related to respiration (providing a consistent number across studies regardless of the rules used to define association with respiration) and, subsequently, the PLM rate should also be calculated without considering the respiratory related events. Finally, special considerations for pediatric studies are provided. The expert visual scoringof LM has only been altered by the new standards to require accepting all LM > 0.5 s regardless of duration, otherwise the technician scores the LM as for the old standards. There is a new criterion for the morphology of LM that applies only to computerized LM detection to better match expert visual detection. Available automatic scoring programs will incorporate all the new rules so that the new standards should reduce technician burden for

  3. Estimation of Coriolis Force and Torque Acting on Ares-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Ryan M.; Kulikov, Igor K.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Luchinsky, Dmitry; Orr, Jeb

    2011-01-01

    A document describes work on the origin of Coriolis force and estimating Coriolis force and torque applied to the Ares-1 vehicle during its ascent, based on an internal ballistics model for a multi-segmented solid rocket booster (SRB).

  4. Turbulent Shear and Internal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, James; Sutherland, Bruce

    2008-11-01

    A series of experiments is presented that model the generation of non-hydrostatic internal gravity waves in upper ocean by the forcing of wind driven turbulent eddies in the surface mixed layer. A turbulent shear layer is forced by a conveyor belt with affixed flat plates near the surface of a stratified fluid and downward propagating internal waves are generated. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy as well as length and time scales. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine the amplitudes, frequencies, momentum fluxes, and the energy of the generated waves. The fraction of energy that leaks from the mixed layer to the internal wave field is presented. Consistent with other studies, it is found that the frequencies of internal waves generated by turbulence are an approximate constant fraction of the buoyancy frequency. Implications to internal waves propagating into the deep ocean will be discussed.

  5. Gravity Forcing Of Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, K. E.

    2005-12-01

    Surface waves in deep water are forced entirely by gravity at the air-sea interface when no other forces act tangent to the surface. Then according to Newton's second law, the fluid acceleration parallel to the surface must equal the component of gravity parallel to the surface. Between crest and trough the fluid accelerates; between trough and crest the fluid decelerates. By replacing Bernoulli's law, gravity forcing becomes the dynamic boundary condition needed to solve the mathematical problem of these waves. Irrotational waves with a sinusoidal profile satisfy the gravity forcing condition, with the usual dispersion relation, provided the slope is small compared to one, as is true also of the Stokes development. However, the exact wave shape can be calculated using the gravity forcing method in a way that is less complex and less time consuming than that of the Stokes perturbation expansion. To the second order the surface elevation is the same as the Stokes result; the third order calculation has not been made yet. Extensions of the gravity forcing method can easily be carried out for multiple wave trains, solitary waves and bores, waves in finite constant mean depths, and internal waves in a two-layer system. For shoaling surface waves gravity forcing provides a physical understanding of the progressive steepening often observed near shore.

  6. Modeling Robot Flexibility for Endpoint Force Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    SIDM 19. KE9Y WORDS fCntknu. OnPVOO&O 0401 It 00041000111O ed 0000#uF 6P 1111411 amA.w) robot force control * robot control / robot dynamics flexible...no. 3, pp. 62-75. [2] Eppinger, S.D. and Seering, W.P. On Dynamic Models of Robot Force Control . In Proceedings of International Conference on...W.P. Understanding Bandwidth Limitations in Robot Force Control . In Proceedings of International Conference on Robotics and Automation. IEEE, April 1987

  7. Contact sensing from force measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicchi, Antonio; Salisbury, J. K.; Brock, David L.

    1993-01-01

    This article addresses contact sensing (i.e., the problem of resolving the location of a contact, the force at the interface, and the moment about the contact normals). Called 'intrinsic' contact sensing for the use of internal force and torque measurements, this method allows for practical devices that provide simple, relevant contact information in practical robotic applications. Such sensors have been used in conjunction with robot hands to identify objects, determine surface friction, detect slip, augment grasp stability, measure object mass, probe surfaces, and control collision and for a variety of other useful tasks. This article describes the theoretical basis for their operation and provides a framework for future device design.

  8. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  9. Internal displacement in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, James M; Ceballos, Ángela Milena Gómez; Espinel, Zelde; Oliveros, Sofia Rios; Fonseca, Maria Fernanda; Florez, Luis Jorge Hernandez

    2014-01-01

    This commentary aims to delineate the distinguishing features of conflict-induced internal displacement in the nation of Colombia, South America. Even as Colombia is currently implementing a spectrum of legal, social, economic, and health programs for “victims of armed conflict,” with particular focus on internally displaced persons (IDPs), the dynamics of forced migration on a mass scale within this country are little known beyond national borders.   The authors of this commentary are embarking on a global mental health research program in Bogota, Colombia to define best practices for reaching the displaced population and implementing sustainable, evidence-based screening and intervention for common mental disorders. Presenting the defining characteristics of internal displacement in Colombia provides the context for our work and, more importantly, conveys the compelling and complex nature of this humanitarian crisis. We attempt to demonstrate Colombia’s unique position within the global patterning of internal displacement. PMID:28228997

  10. How to design nutritional intervention trials to slow cognitive decline in apparently healthy populations and apply for efficacy claims: a statement from the International Academy on Nutrition and Aging Task Force.

    PubMed

    Ferry, M; Coley, N; Andrieu, S; Bonhomme, C; Caubère, J P; Cesari, M; Gautry, J; Garcia Sanchez, I; Hugonot, L; Mansuy, L; Pahor, M; Pariente, J; Ritz, P; Salva, A; Sijben, J; Wieggers, R; Ythier-Moury, P; Zaïm, M; Zetlaoui, J; Vellas, B

    2013-07-01

    Interventions are crucial as they offer simple and inexpensive public health solutions that will be useful over the long term use. A Task Force on designing trials of nutritional interventions to slow cognitive decline in older adults was held in Toulouse in September 2012. The aim of the Task Force was to bring together leading experts from academia, the food industry and regulatory agencies to determine the best trial designs that would enable us to reach our goal of maintaining or improving cognitive function in apparently healthy aging people. An associated challenge for this Task Force was to determine the type of trials required by the Public Food Agencies for assessing the impact of nutritional compounds in comparison to well established requirements for drug trials. Although the required quality of the study design, rationale and statistical analysis remains the same, the studies designed to show reduction of cognitive decline require a long duration and the objectives of this task force was to determine best design for these trials. Two specific needs were identified to support trials of nutritional interventions: 1- Risk- reduction strategies are needed to tackle the growing burden of cognitive decline that may lead to dementia, 2- Innovative study designs are needed to improve the quality of these studies.

  11. INTERNAL CUTTING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Russell, W.H. Jr.

    1959-06-30

    A device is described for removing material from the interior of a hollow workpiece so as to form a true spherical internal surface in a workpiece, or to cut radial slots of an adjustable constant depth in an already established spherical internal surface. This is accomplished by a spring loaded cutting tool adapted to move axially wherein the entire force urging the tool against the workpiece is derived from the spring. Further features of importance involve the provision of a seal between the workpiece and the cutting device and a suction device for carrying away particles of removed material.

  12. Forced Migration: Refugee Populations

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Joyceen S.

    2015-01-01

    Undocumented migration is a global phenomenon that manifests in various contexts. This article describes the impact of the movement of large numbers of people in several African countries, producing a unique type of migrant—the refugee. We describe issues that refugee movements create on fragile health care systems, situations that precipitate refugee movements, certain human rights violations that are of particular concern such as gender based violence (GBV) and child soldiers, and lastly, implications for nursing practice and policy. We use examples from several countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Mozambique. Drawing on key documents from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, current literature, as well as the international experience of the authors, this article presents an overview of forced migration and discusses opportunities for nurses to impact research, practice and policy related to refugee health. PMID:25645484

  13. Advising Foreign Security Forces: Implications of Korea and Vietnam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-02

    the requirements for successful foreign internal defense operations.”111 In early-2008, Army Special Forces Lieutenant Colonel John Mulberry argued...purpose force is robust enough to execute any advisory effort with little preparation. Similar to Maxwell, Mulberry makes a case for the...April 2009), While Mulberry argues that foreign internal defense http

  14. Foreign Internal Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-12

    projects conducted were a primary factor in the decision to form the JTF. Other JTFs may be organized to accomplish specific functional missions such...IV-8 Table of Contents viii JP 3-22 VI-1 Force Employment Factors in Foreign Internal Defense Operations ........ VI-2 VI-2...US combat operations in support of FID Executive Summary xi operations, which requires a Presidential decision and serves only as a temporary

  15. USSR Report, International Affairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    absorbed by everyone yet, was once expressed with great emotional force by India’s outstanding leader, Indira Gandhi. Imagine, she...their chests sat on the tight hand side of fhe struc- ture, playing religious tunes on musical instruments. The women wore saris and had a dot on their...deterrence, it’s the real evil in the international realtions , because that’s the source of the arms race. [Kuznetsov2 And you think those fears

  16. International Cooperation at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawney, Timothy; Feldstein, Karen

    International cooperation is a cornerstone principle of NASA’s activities, especially within the activities of the Science Mission Directorate. Nearly two thirds of the flight missions in which NASA leads or participates involve international cooperation. Numerous ground based activities also rely on international cooperation, whether because of unique expertise, unique geography, or the need for a global response. Going forward, in an era of tighter budgets and a more integrated global perspective, NASA and the rest of the space agencies around the world will be forced to work more closely together, in a broader array of activities than ever before, in order to be able to afford to push the boundaries of space exploration. The goal of this presentation is to provide an overview of NASA’s current international science cooperative activities. It will include a discussion of why NASA conducts international cooperation and look at the mechanisms through which international cooperation can occur at NASA, including peer-to-peer development of relationships. It will also discuss some of the limiting factors of international cooperation, such as export control, and ways in which to manage those constraints. Finally, the presentation would look at some of the present examples where NASA is working to increase international cooperation and improve coordination. Case studies will be used to demonstrate these mechanisms and concepts. For example, NASA continues to participate in international coordination groups such as the International Mars Exploration Working Group (IMEWG) and International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG), but is expanding into new areas as well. NASA is one of the leaders in expanding and improving international coordination in the area of Near-Earth Object detection, characterization, and mitigation. Having participated in the first meetings of such groups as the International Asteroid Warning Network (IAWN) and Space Missions Planning

  17. 32 CFR 536.104 - Current agreements in force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Current agreements in force. 536.104 Section 536... CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Claims Cognizable Under International Agreements § 536.104 Current agreements in force. Current listings of known agreements in force are also posted on the USARCS Web...

  18. International migration, international relations and foreign policy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, C

    1989-01-01

    Recent literature on migration, international relations, and foreign policy is reviewed in this article, stressing applications of global systems paradigms, studies of state entry and exit rules, and anatomies of domestic policy-setting processes on migration. After a concise assessment of the contemporary theory of global political economy, the paper argues for seeking mid-range generalizations on the international relations of migration. It also suggests that analysis begin with the policy-setting processes of the state. Especially through the use of comparative perspectives available from domestic policy making studies and from the field of international comparative public policy, this approach offers the opportunity to fix empirically the political roles of transnational social forces, which often present themselves as participants in domestic policy contests. Promising future directions in the study of state-to-state relations are also evaluated, with the anticipation that verifying regional or other intermediate patterns of world migration politics may contribute to more general theories of international political economy.

  19. [Migrations forced by violence: the Colombian case].

    PubMed

    Builes, Gloria Marcela Gómez; Arias, Gilberto Mauricio Astaiza; Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza

    2008-01-01

    The human migrations have been one of the motors in the history of humanity. During the twentieth century, internal forced displacement has been an important component of the migration processes in the world. Colombia, a paradigm for this phenomenon, is a country with more than three and a half million people displaced over the last 25 years by force of the violence resulting from an internal armed conflict. Besides the socio-demographic effects in the reconfiguration of the cities, this problem affects the human condition of the victims deteriorating their health and quality of life. This article aims to show the general panorama of migrations forced by violence in the world and to analyze the peculiarities of this phenomenon in the Colombian case. We conclude that forced displacement is a serious violation of human rights producing a human drama by exposing the affected individuals and communities to vulnerability and a deep deterioration of their quality of life and health.

  20. The rotation-vibration structure of the SO2 C1B2 state explained by a new internal coordinate force field

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jun; Park, G. Barratt; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-14

    A new quartic force field for the SO2 C~1B2 state has been derived, based on high resolution data from S16O2 and S18O2. Included are eight b2 symmetry vibrational levels of S16O2 reported in the first paper of this series [G. B. Park, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 144311 (2016)]. Many of the experimental observables not included in the fit, such as the Franck-Condon intensities and the Coriolis-perturbed effective C rotational constants of highly anharmonic C~ state vibrational levels, are well reproduced using our force field. Because the two stretching modes of the C~ state are strongly coupled via Fermi-133 interaction, the vibrational structure of the C state is analyzed in a Fermi-system basis set, constructed explicitly in this work via partial diagonalization of the vibrational Hamiltonian. The physical significance of the Fermi-system basis is discussed in terms of semiclassical dynamics, based on study of Fermi-resonance systems by Kellman and coworkers [M. E. Kellman and L. Xiao, J. Chem. Phys. 93, 5821 (1990)]. By diagonalizing the vibrational Hamiltonian in the Fermi-system basis, the vibrational characters of all vibrational levels can be determined unambiguously. It is shown that the bending mode cannot be treated separately from the coupled stretching modes, particularly at vibrational energies of more than 2000 cm–1. Based on our force field, the structure of the Coriolis interactions in the C~ state of SO2 is also discussed. As a result, we identify the origin of the alternating patterns in the effective C rotational constants of levels in the vibrational progressions of the symmetry-breaking mode, νβ (which correlates with the antisymmetric stretching mode in our assignment scheme).

  1. Protection considerations for force-cooled superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1985-01-01

    This paper treats some hydrodynamic aspects of protecting magnets wound with force-cooled superconductors, namely, the rise in internal pressure and the forceful expulsion of helium during a quench. Two initial conditions are considered: an entire hydraulic path going normal all at once, and an initially small but nonrecovering normal zone. Formulas are given for the quench pressure and expulsion velocity in both cases and are compared with available experimental data.

  2. Mass Transport by Second Mode Internal Solitary Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    simulating internal wave instabilities • Forced wedge displacement – simulating flow over a seamount . 3 Experiments were conducted to measure...internal wave instabilities) while the wedge ( seamount generation) generates medium amplitude waves and the oscillator/box (intrusion generation

  3. Plasma igniter for internal-combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breshears, R. R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hot ionized gas (plasma) ignites air/fuel mixture in internal combustion engines more effectively than spark. Electromagnetic forces propel plasma into combustion zone. Combustion rate is not limited by flame-front speed.

  4. How weather impacts the forced climate response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtman, Ben P.; Schneider, Edwin K.; Straus, David M.; Min, Dughong; Burgman, Robert

    2011-12-01

    The new interactive ensemble modeling strategy is used to diagnose how noise due to internal atmospheric dynamics impacts the forced climate response during the twentieth century (i.e., 1870-1999). The interactive ensemble uses multiple realizations of the atmospheric component model coupled to a single realization of the land, ocean and ice component models in order to reduce the noise due to internal atmospheric dynamics in the flux exchange at the interface of the component models. A control ensemble of so-called climate of the twentieth century simulations of the Community Climate Simulation Model version 3 (CCSM3) are compared with a similar simulation with the interactive ensemble version of CCSM3. Despite substantial differences in the overall mean climate, the global mean trends in surface temperature, 500 mb geopotential and precipitation are largely indistinguishable between the control ensemble and the interactive ensemble. Large differences in the forced response; however, are detected particularly in the surface temperature of the North Atlantic. Associated with the forced North Atlantic surface temperature differences are local differences in the forced precipitation and a substantial remote rainfall response in the deep tropical Pacific. We also introduce a simple variance analysis to separately compare the variance due to noise and the forced response. We find that the noise variance is decreased when external forcing is included. In terms of the forced variance, we find that the interactive ensemble increases this variance relative to the control.

  5. How weather impacts the forced climate response

    SciTech Connect

    Kirtman, Ben P.; Schneider, Edwin K.; Straus, David M.; Min, Dughong; Burgman, Robert

    2011-05-10

    The new interactive ensemble modeling strategy is used to diagnose how noise due to internal atmospheric dynamics impacts the forced climate response during the twentieth century (i.e., 1870–1999). The interactive ensemble uses multiple realizations of the atmospheric component model coupled to a single realization of the land, ocean and ice component models in order to reduce the noise due to internal atmospheric dynamics in the flux exchange at the interface of the component models. A control ensemble of so-called climate of the twentieth century simulations of the Community Climate Simulation Model version 3 (CCSM3) are compared with a similar simulation with the interactive ensemble version of CCSM3. Despite substantial differences in the overall mean climate, the global mean trends in surface temperature, 500 mb geopotential and precipitation are largely indistinguishable between the control ensemble and the interactive ensemble. Large differences in the forced response; however, are detected particularly in the surface temperature of the North Atlantic. Associated with the forced North Atlantic surface temperature differences are local differences in the forced precipitation and a substantial remote rainfall response in the deep tropical Pacific. We also introduce a simple variance analysis to separately compare the variance due to noise and the forced response. We find that the noise variance is decreased when external forcing is included. Finally, in terms of the forced variance, we find that the interactive ensemble increases this variance relative to the control.

  6. Navigation Rules, International-Inland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    of the United Nations ’ Inter-Governmental Maritime Consultative Organization (IMCO) in 1972. The 72 COLREGS enter into force at 12 noon, local zone...OF BARGES ----------------------------- 161 XV REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES------------------ 163 XVI APPENDIX...they appear in the inter- national convention. COLUMN II A cross-reference index to the 1960 International Rules appears in the second column from the

  7. Governing International Education in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidhu, Ravinder

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses the international education sector in Australia as a case study to argue against understanding globalization as an exogenous force. It introduces the notion of globalization as a governmentality and discusses alternative interpretations which take into account notions of subjectivity, positionality and space/time. The paper…

  8. Physicists' Forced Migrations under Hitler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerchen, Alan

    2011-03-01

    When the Nazis came to power in early 1933 they initiated formal and informal measures that forced Jews and political opponents from public institutions such as universities. Some physicists retired and others went into industry, but most emigrated. International communication and contact made emigration a viable option despite the desperate economic times in the Great Depression. Another wave of emigrations followed the annexation of Austria in 1938. Individual cases as well as general patterns of migration and adaptation to new environments will be examined in this presentation. One important result of the forced migrations was that many of the physicists expelled under Hitler played important roles in strengthening physics elsewhere, often on the Allied side in World War II.

  9. International Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... create refugee populations with immediate and long-term health problems. Some of the major diseases currently affecting ... also an international problem which can affect people's health. Many countries and health organizations are working together ...

  10. International Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1977-01-01

    Briefly discusses recent international programs in various areas of geology, including land-use problems, coping with geological hazards, and conserving the environment while searching for energy and mineral resources. (MLH)

  11. Citizen groups: a creative force

    SciTech Connect

    Stoel, T.

    1981-02-01

    The role of citizen groups is as important as that of government agencies when it comes to environmental policy in a democracy. These groups spend little money, yet they have initiated the major US environmental legislation of the past two decades. They are a recent, but effective, force in developing countries even though adversarial approaches are not often appropriate. The methods used by US environmental groups range from lobbying to confrontation in court. Groups outside the US tend to use consensus in democracies and information gathering in developing countries. While the groups' primary concerns are national in scope, international awareness and cooperation are growing. (DCK)

  12. Rural intern training.

    PubMed

    Mugford, B V; Braund, W; Worley, P S; Martin, A

    2001-01-01

    In recent times, legislative initiatives in Australia have changed the method by which doctors enter general practice. One result of this tightening has been to restrict the access of junior doctors to medical experiences outside the hospital environment, and force a closer examination of the 'generalist training' provided to junior doctors. The Australian Medical Training Review Panel, created as part of these legislative changes, developed a series of recommendations about general training in 1996, one of which was to provide for rural and community experiences for junior doctors. This article describes the experience of a 'rural intern' rotation from Flinders Medical Centre to the rural community of Jamestown, in South Australia.

  13. Finding the Effective Mass and Spring Constant of a Force Probe from Simple Harmonic Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Nathaniel R.; Gill, Tom; Eyerly, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Force probes are versatile tools in the physics lab, but their internal workings can introduce artifacts when measuring rapidly changing forces. The Dual-Range Force Sensor by Vernier uses strain gage technology to measure force, based on the bending of a beam. Strain gages along the length of the beam change resistance as the beam bends. The…

  14. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  15. The Strong Nuclear Force

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-05-24

    Scientists are aware of four fundamental forces- gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Most people have at least some familiarity with gravity and electromagnetism, but not the other two. How is it that scientists are so certain that two additional forces exist? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why scientists are so certain that the strong force exists.

  16. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  17. The Strong Nuclear Force

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Scientists are aware of four fundamental forces- gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Most people have at least some familiarity with gravity and electromagnetism, but not the other two. How is it that scientists are so certain that two additional forces exist? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why scientists are so certain that the strong force exists.

  18. Forces in General Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  19. Debunking Coriolis Force Myths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written and debated about the Coriolis force. Unfortunately, this has done little to demystify the paradoxes surrounding this fictitious force invoked by an observer in a rotating frame of reference. It is the purpose of this article to make another valiant attempt to slay the dragon of the Coriolis force! This will be done without…

  20. Crossflow force transducer. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T M

    1982-05-01

    A force transducer for measuring lift and drag coefficients for a circular cylinder in turbulent water flow is presented. In addition to describing the actual design and construction of the strain-gauged force- ring based transducer, requirements for obtained valid fluid force test data are discussed, and pertinent flow test experience is related.

  1. U.S. Transport Task Force 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, P.H.

    2011-09-21

    The Transport Task Force (TTF) Meeting is a venue for vigorous scientific discourse and discussion on topics in transport and turbulence in fusion plasmas. Its participation is international. The 2010 meeting was highly effective, with 139 registered participants and 131 presentations. This is remarkable for an even year (IAEA year) meeting. The meeting clearly fostered progress in understanding and control of turbulent transport.

  2. Nutritional and safety assessments of foods and feeds nutritionally improved through biotechnology: case studies: executive summary of a task force report by the International Life Sciences Institute, Washington, D.C.

    PubMed

    2007-11-01

    During the last 2 decades, the public and private sectors have made substantial international research progress toward improving the nutritional value of a wide range of food and feed crops. Nevertheless, significant numbers of people still suffer from the effects of undernutrition. In addition, the nutritional quality of feed is often a limiting factor in livestock production systems, particularly those in developing countries. As newly developed crops with nutritionally improved traits come closer to being available to producers and consumers, we must ensure that scientifically sound and efficient processes are used to assess the safety and nutritional quality of these crops. Such processes will facilitate deploying these crops to those world areas with large numbers of people who need them. This document describes 5 case studies of crops with improved nutritional value. These case studies examine the principles and recommendations published by the Intl. Life Sciences Inst. (ILSI) in 2004 for the safety and nutritional assessment of foods and feeds derived from nutritionally improved crops (ILSI 2004). One overarching conclusion that spans all 5 case studies is that the comparative safety assessment process is a valid approach. Such a process has been endorsed by many publications and organizations, including the 2004 ILSI publication. The type and extent of data that are appropriate for a scientifically sound comparative safety assessment are presented on a case-by-case basis in a manner that takes into account scientific results published since the 2004 ILSI report. This report will appear in the January issue of Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety.

  3. Equilibrium capillary forces with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sprakel, J; Besseling, N A M; Leermakers, F A M; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2007-09-07

    We present measurements of equilibrium forces resulting from capillary condensation. The results give access to the ultralow interfacial tensions between the capillary bridge and the coexisting bulk phase. We demonstrate this with solutions of associative polymers and an aqueous mixture of gelatin and dextran, with interfacial tensions around 10 microN/m. The equilibrium nature of the capillary forces is attributed to the combination of a low interfacial tension and a microscopic confinement geometry, based on nucleation and growth arguments.

  4. ILO - International Migration Programme.

    PubMed

    Boudraa, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    In a wide International Context characterised not only by the economical development but also by the social, cultural, political and individual development, we witness more and more to a exchange between the developed and the developing countries, which can be translated especially in the migration of the work force. In theory, all countries are either countries of origin either countries of transit or destination, and they are all responsible for the rights of migrant workers by promoting the rights, by monitoring and by preventing the abusive conditions. The process of migration of the workforce can be divided into three stages: the first coincides with the period prior to departure, the second is represented by the aftermath of the departure and the period of stay in the country of destination, the third stage corresponds to the return in the country of origin. The workers must be protected throughout this process by the international organizations that perform the catalytic role of communication and exchange between countries, for the only purpose of protecting the rights of immigrant and/or immigrants workers. The responsibility for the protection of workers is divided among the various players in the International Labour Organisation. Every country has to apply measures according to the international standards regarding workers' rights, standards that guide the various countries in the formulation and implementation of their policies and legislation. These standards are suggested by International Conventions, the ILO Conventions and other international instruments such as the human rights instrument. There has been a big step forward once the ILO Fundamental Conventions and Conventions on Migrant Workers where implemented and this implementation represented the use of the Guidelines "ILO Multilateral Framework on Labour Migration".

  5. International Education--What's in a Name?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Walter C.

    2008-01-01

    Public and private schools in the U.S. increasingly are adopting international education. The author asks, "What is it?" and finds a jumble of meanings and programs. Contradictory forces, such as nationalism and cosmopolitanism, are at play. Thus international education can have very different meanings at different schools.

  6. International Military Cooperation: From Concepts to Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Orazio, Vito

    2013-01-01

    International cooperation on issues of security is a central concept in many theoretical debates in international relations. This dissertation is an attempt to lay the foundation for measuring military cooperation and understanding the forces brought forth through its expansion. The central notion is that the set of policies related to military…

  7. Efficacy of climate forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Lacis, A.; Schmidt, G. A.; Russell, G.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, M.; Bauer, S.; Bell, N.; Cairns, B.; Canuto, V.; Chandler, M.; Cheng, Y.; Del Genio, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Fleming, E.; Friend, A.; Hall, T.; Jackman, C.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N.; Koch, D.; Lean, J.; Lerner, J.; Lo, K.; Menon, S.; Miller, R.; Minnis, P.; Novakov, T.; Oinas, V.; Perlwitz, Ja.; Perlwitz, Ju.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Shindell, D.; Stone, P.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.; Thresher, D.; Wielicki, B.; Wong, T.; Yao, M.; Zhang, S.

    2005-09-01

    We use a global climate model to compare the effectiveness of many climate forcing agents for producing climate change. We find a substantial range in the "efficacy" of different forcings, where the efficacy is the global temperature response per unit forcing relative to the response to CO2 forcing. Anthropogenic CH4 has efficacy ˜110%, which increases to ˜145% when its indirect effects on stratospheric H2O and tropospheric O3 are included, yielding an effective climate forcing of ˜0.8 W/m2 for the period 1750-2000 and making CH4 the largest anthropogenic climate forcing other than CO2. Black carbon (BC) aerosols from biomass burning have a calculated efficacy ˜58%, while fossil fuel BC has an efficacy ˜78%. Accounting for forcing efficacies and for indirect effects via snow albedo and cloud changes, we find that fossil fuel soot, defined as BC + OC (organic carbon), has a net positive forcing while biomass burning BC + OC has a negative forcing. We show that replacement of the traditional instantaneous and adjusted forcings, Fi and Fa, with an easily computed alternative, Fs, yields a better predictor of climate change, i.e., its efficacies are closer to unity. Fs is inferred from flux and temperature changes in a fixed-ocean model run. There is remarkable congruence in the spatial distribution of climate change, normalized to the same forcing Fs, for most climate forcing agents, suggesting that the global forcing has more relevance to regional climate change than may have been anticipated. Increasing greenhouse gases intensify the Hadley circulation in our model, increasing rainfall in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), Eastern United States, and East Asia, while intensifying dry conditions in the subtropics including the Southwest United States, the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and an expanding Sahel. These features survive in model simulations that use all estimated forcings for the period 1880-2000. Responses to localized forcings, such

  8. Tactical Special Operations and Conventional Force Interdependence: The Future of Land Force Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-14

    Conventional Forces DoD Department of Defense FID Foreign Internal Defense JP Joint Publication PME Professional Military Education SFA Security Force...and assistance to other nations. Finally, USSOCOM recently became DoD’s lead for countering threat financing in order to identify and disrupt terrorist... financing efforts (Feickert 2012, 2). The important aspect of this evolution is the observation that, as the complexity of the threat has increased

  9. Entropic force between biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Song, Fan

    2016-10-01

    Undulation force, an entropic force, stems from thermally excited fluctuations, and plays a key role in the essential interactions between neighboring surfaces of objects. Although the characteristics of the undulation force have been widely studied theoretically and experimentally, the distance dependence of the force, which constitutes its most fundamental characteristic, remains poorly understood. In this paper, first, we obtain a novel expression for the undulation force by employing elasticity and statistical mechanics and prove it to be in good agreement with existing experimental results. Second, we clearly demonstrate that the two representative forms of the undulation force proposed by Helfrich and Freund were respectively the upper and lower bounds of the present expression when the separation between membranes is sufficiently small, which was intrinsically different from the existing results where Helfrich's and Freund's forms of the undulation force were only suitable for the intermediate and small separations. The investigations show that only in a sufficiently small separation does Helfrich's result stand for the undulation force with a large wave number and Freund's result express the force with a small wave number. Finally, a critical acting distance of the undulation force, beyond which the entropic force will rapidly decay approaching zero, is presented.

  10. Force-Measuring Clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Force-measuring clamps have been invented to facilitate and simplify the task of measuring the forces or pressures applied to clamped parts. There is a critical need to measure clamping forces or pressures in some applications for example, while bonding sensors to substrates or while clamping any sensitive or delicate parts. Many manufacturers of adhesives and sensors recommend clamping at specific pressures while bonding sensors or during adhesive bonding between parts in general. In the absence of a force-measuring clamp, measurement of clamping force can be cumbersome at best because of the need for additional load sensors and load-indicating equipment. One prior method of measuring clamping force involved the use of load washers or miniature load cells in combination with external power sources and load-indicating equipment. Calibrated spring clamps have also been used. Load washers and miniature load cells constitute additional clamped parts in load paths and can add to the destabilizing effects of loading mechanisms. Spring clamps can lose calibration quickly through weakening of the springs and are limited to the maximum forces that the springs can apply. The basic principle of a force-measuring clamp can be implemented on a clamp of almost any size and can enable measurement of a force of almost any magnitude. No external equipment is needed because the component(s) for transducing the clamping force and the circuitry for supplying power, conditioning the output of the transducers, and displaying the measurement value are all housed on the clamp. In other words, a force-measuring clamp is a complete force-application and force-measurement system all in one package. The advantage of unitary packaging of such a system is that it becomes possible to apply the desired clamping force or pressure with precision and ease.

  11. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  12. Internal shim

    DOEpatents

    Barth, Clyde H.; Blizinski, Theodore W.

    2003-05-13

    An internal shim used to accurately measure spaces in conjunction with a standard small probe has a shim top and a chassis. The internal shim is adjustably fixed within the space to be measured using grippers that emerge from the chassis and which are controlled by an arm pivotably attached to the shim top. A standard small probe passes through the shim along guides on the chassis and measures the distance between the exterior of the chassis and the boundary. By summing the measurements on each side of the chassis and the width of the chassis, the dimension of the space can be determined to within 0.001 inches.

  13. Position And Force Control For Multiple-Arm Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, Samad A.

    1988-01-01

    Number of arms increased without introducing undue complexity. Strategy and computer architecture developed for simultaneous control of positions of number of robot arms manipulating same object and of forces and torques that arms exert on object. Scheme enables coordinated manipulation of object, causing it to move along assigned trajectory and be subjected to assigned internal forces and torques.

  14. Three-nucleon forces and the trinucleon bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Friar, J.L.; Frois, B.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of the bound-state working group session of the ''International Symposium on the Three-Body Force in the Three-Nucleon System'' is presented. The paper includes a discussion of presently used calculational techniques, experimental evidence for three-nucleon forces in trinucleon ground states, future directions in theoretical research and future experimental research. (DWL)

  15. International Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Nancy D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Three reports discuss the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions; the Frankfurt Book Fair, focusing on electronics; and Canadian library trends, including resource sharing, technology projects, information policy, censorship, services for persons with disabilities, construction projects, and library education and…

  16. Internet International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Colin

    1995-01-01

    The unexpectedly rapid expansion of the Internet in Eastern and Central Europe is having a significant effect on institutions of higher education, still suffering from decades of isolation. The benefits include global access to information and cost-effective communications. A number of international efforts are under way to expand Internet access,…

  17. International Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saba, Farhad, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Completes a discussion of a systems model of distance education (in articles since May 1999) focusing on the most complex level, international. Discussion includes transfer of technology from United States universities to developing nations, the free market, and the age of the global economy. Presents a list of "early indicators" of changes in…

  18. International Entomology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pests and diseases of plants in agriculture are a shared international problem. Yet some of the very places that pest invaders come from often lack the institutional structure and organization necessary to help in understanding the biology of the pest or disease. Strengthening entomology by stimulat...

  19. International Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabb, Winston; Bender, David R.; Haycock, Ken; Horodyski, John

    2001-01-01

    Includes three annual reports: one from the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, the Special Libraries Association, and a report on innovations in Canadian libraries that discusses electronic initiatives, partnerships, books and publishing, school libraries, national issues, local challenges, and funding. (LRW)

  20. The United States Air Force in Southeast Asia. The War in South Vietnam. The Years of the Offensive 1965-1968

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    internal opposition and in preparing an agenda for internal reform. As a result, in 1959 the leaders in Hanoi decided to resort to force to overthrow the... International Airport, the Air Force’s headquarters and squadrons coexisted %%ith elenlents of the Vietnamese Air Force, the Vietnamese Army, and the...forces," began Taylor, "except by an international effort." If the Prime Minister agreed, the United States could supply 32 Army and Marine battalions

  1. 76 FR 45311 - International Joint Commission Public Hearings on Binational Management of Lake of the Woods and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... International Joint Commission Public Hearings on Binational Management of Lake of the Woods and Rainy River... International Lake of the Woods and Rainy River Watershed Task Force (Task Force). The Task Force report to the... water quality, water quantity, and related issues in the international Lake of the Woods and Rainy...

  2. Direct measurement of critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertlein, C.; Helden, L.; Gambassi, A.; Dietrich, S.; Bechinger, C.

    2008-01-01

    When fluctuating fields are confined between two surfaces, long-range forces arise. A famous example is the quantum-electrodynamical Casimir force that results from zero-point vacuum fluctuations confined between two conducting metal plates. A thermodynamic analogue is the critical Casimir force: it acts between surfaces immersed in a binary liquid mixture close to its critical point and arises from the confinement of concentration fluctuations within the thin film of fluid separating the surfaces. So far, all experimental evidence for the existence of this effect has been indirect. Here we report the direct measurement of critical Casimir force between a single colloidal sphere and a flat silica surface immersed in a mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its critical point. We use total internal reflection microscopy to determine in situ the forces between the sphere and the surface, with femtonewton resolution. Depending on whether the adsorption preferences of the sphere and the surface for water and 2,6-lutidine are identical or opposite, we measure attractive and repulsive forces, respectively, that agree quantitatively with theoretical predictions and exhibit exquisite dependence on the temperature of the system. We expect that these features of critical Casimir forces may result in novel uses of colloids as model systems.

  3. Direct measurement of critical Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, C; Helden, L; Gambassi, A; Dietrich, S; Bechinger, C

    2008-01-10

    When fluctuating fields are confined between two surfaces, long-range forces arise. A famous example is the quantum-electrodynamical Casimir force that results from zero-point vacuum fluctuations confined between two conducting metal plates. A thermodynamic analogue is the critical Casimir force: it acts between surfaces immersed in a binary liquid mixture close to its critical point and arises from the confinement of concentration fluctuations within the thin film of fluid separating the surfaces. So far, all experimental evidence for the existence of this effect has been indirect. Here we report the direct measurement of critical Casimir force between a single colloidal sphere and a flat silica surface immersed in a mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its critical point. We use total internal reflection microscopy to determine in situ the forces between the sphere and the surface, with femtonewton resolution. Depending on whether the adsorption preferences of the sphere and the surface for water and 2,6-lutidine are identical or opposite, we measure attractive and repulsive forces, respectively, that agree quantitatively with theoretical predictions and exhibit exquisite dependence on the temperature of the system. We expect that these features of critical Casimir forces may result in novel uses of colloids as model systems.

  4. Numerically reproduced internal wave spectra in the deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Yoshifumi; Niwa, Yoshihiro; Hibiya, Toshiyuki

    2009-04-01

    A vertically two-dimensional internal wave field is forced equally at the near-inertial frequency and the semidiurnal tidal frequency both at the lowest vertical wavenumber. These correspond to wind forcing and internal tide forcing, the main energy sources for the internal wave field. After 5 years of spin-up, a quasi-stationary internal wave field with characteristics of the Garrett-Munk-like spectrum is successfully reproduced. Furthermore, we carry out additional experiments by changing the strength of the semidiurnal tidal forcing relative to the near-inertial forcing. It is demonstrated that the Garrett-Munk-like spectrum is created and maintained only when energy is supplied both from the near-inertial forcing and the semidiurnal tidal forcing. So long as both energy sources are available, nonlinear interactions among internal waves occur such that the resulting internal wave spectrum becomes close to the Garrett-Munk-like spectrum irrespective of the ratio of the near-inertial forcing to the semidiurnal tidal forcing.

  5. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  6. Teaching International Law: Concepts in International Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starbird, Caroline; Pettit, Jenny; Singleton, Laurel

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to introduce students to public international law. Topics covered include international public organizations, such as the United Nations and World Trade Organization, international courts, international human rights law, international trade law, and international environmental law. The goal of each study is to examine how…

  7. No fifth force?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Hopes that geophysicists might be able to document a fifth force of nature have diminished, as new measurements and analyses of earlier geodetic experiments have yielded no solid evidence of a non-Newtonian component of gravity.Modern physics recognizes four fundamental forces with distinct spheres of influence: The strong and weak nuclear forces operate over the range of one atom, while gravity and electromagnetism have an infinite range. Gravity measurements over a few centimeters in laboratories and over millions of kilometers in space continue to buttress Issac Newton's conclusion that the gravitational force between two objects decreases as the square of the distance between them.

  8. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  9. Elementary Particles and Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigg, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Discusses subatomic particles (quarks, leptons, and others) revealed by higher accelerator energies. A connection between forces at this subatomic level has been established, and prospects are good for a description of forces that encompass binding atomic nuclei. Colors, fundamental interactions, screening, camouflage, electroweak symmetry, and…

  10. SCM-Forcing Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xie, Shaocheng; Tang, Shuaiqi; Zhang, Yunyan; Zhang, Minghua

    2016-07-01

    Single-Column Model (SCM) Forcing Data are derived from the ARM facility observational data using the constrained variational analysis approach (Zhang and Lin 1997 and Zhang et al., 2001). The resulting products include both the large-scale forcing terms and the evaluation fields, which can be used for driving the SCMs and Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) and validating model simulations.

  11. Forces in yeast flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  12. Nanofluids mediating surface forces.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, Georgia A; Briscoe, Wuge H

    2012-11-01

    Fluids containing nanostructures, known as nanofluids, are increasingly found in a wide array of applications due to their unique physical properties as compared with their base fluids and larger colloidal suspensions. With several tuneable parameters such as the size, shape and surface chemistry of nanostructures, as well as numerous base fluids available, nanofluids also offer a new paradigm for mediating surface forces. Other properties such as local surface plasmon resonance and size dependent magnetism of nanostructures also present novel mechanisms for imparting tuneable surface interactions. However, our fundamental understanding, experimentally and theoretically, of how these parameters might affect surface forces remains incomplete. Here we review recent results on equilibrium and dynamic surface forces between macroscopic surfaces in nanofluids, highlighting the overriding trends in the correlation between the physical parameters that characterise nanofluids and the surface forces they mediate. We also discuss the challenges that confront existing surface force knowledge as a result of this new paradigm.

  13. Employment of the El Salvador Armed Forces for Internal Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-02

    Factores que inciden en el consumo de drogas licitas e ilícitas” http://www.uees.edu.sv/crea2/1_factores.htm, (accessed November 15 2010). 10 La...Primerísima “Suma preocupación por consumo de droga ” June 29, 2008, http://www.radiolaprimerisima.com/noticias/32517, (accessed November 15 2010). 11 La...confirma n- investigacion -a-alto-jefe-policial-salvadoreno&catid=92:ultimas-noticias&Itemid=117, accessed January, 08 2011). 23 El Diario de Hoy

  14. Task Force Delay Study. Denver Stapleton International Airport, Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    Delay through the National Technical Experimental Design Information Service Airfield Simulation Model Springfield, Virginia 22161 19. Security Clossif...Federal Aviation Administration 800 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20591 Re: Input Data for Stapleton Model Calibration and Delay...contains a preliminary description of the inputs to be changed for each simulation model delay experi- ment. " Attachment C contains the preliminary annual

  15. Internal Forced Convection to Low Prandtl Number Gas Mixtures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-15

    0 U.. a r c)Z Cj r ’r -r c %a"m"U - a 𔃺 - -(A U 2 lN1)- 4 DI , G UŘ- -40C O n C m m McJ’.m C 4 0MM n I- CdO CDP - 0 - C3 :3 -A%0 IC.M Cr n( nC I 4U...6* L* t e 4* Li 1- -- 6- cc 4 Or -04wmO 01 vnrI 0 ramI Y M QM .0 0 t" r , 0 mF4 r n l 0t L C 4 0 Sx .- O O 0 4 0 f- . O r c". us . 0 1.-~4 NC IN40 4 At

  16. The Special Forces Organization for Foreign Internal Defense in 2010.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    most delicate and intricate parts of his counterinsurgency campaign. Instituting such legislation opens a Pandora’s Box that may alienate the public...Philippines during World War II. Lansdale’s chief Filipino associate was Colonel Napoleon Valeriano, who commanded units called " skull squadrons" for their...Overt government corruption claimed its fair share of aid, and in the end the program only succeeded in further alienating the public from the government

  17. Developing Security Force Assistance: Lessons from Foreign Internal Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-18

    Information Mangement , and the Embassy Country Team. Each of these ideas supports the others and builds towards the comprehensive focus that SFA seeks to...Management. Although CIM technologies are relatively new, the practice of CIM precedes the use of advanced tools. Civil Information provides the

  18. Flow Visualization of Forced and Natural Convection in Internal Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau; Hugh M. Mcllroy,Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Keith G. Condie; Glenn McCreery; Randy Clarsean; Robert S. Brodkey; Yann G. Guezennec

    2002-01-31

    The report descries innovative flow visualization techniques, fluid mechanics measurements and computational models of flows in a spent nuclear fuel canister. The flow visualization methods used a fluid that reacted with a metal plate to show how a local reaction affects the surrounding flow. A matched index of refraction facility was used to take mean flow and turbulence measurements within a generic spent nuclear fuel canister. Computational models were also made of the flow in the canister. It was determined that the flow field in the canister was very complex, and modifications may need to be made to ensure that the spent fuel elements are completely passivated.

  19. Air Force Environmental Management System Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Key to ~:ning the environn ental portion of lbiJ vi ’lion i3 copcrot:oll41iling cnvirorunentlll monagcmcnt Air Force-wide. Operotiooa:tzl.o...approach for addressing environmental aspects of internal agency operations and activities”  For the AF, “appropriate facilities” equates to “major...y y y Authority 7. Communication y y y 16. Internal EMS Audit y y y 8. Documentation & y y y 17. Management Review y y y Doc Control 9

  20. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  1. Multidomain proteins under force.

    PubMed

    Valle-Orero, Jessica; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Popa, Ionel

    2017-04-28

    Advancements in single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques such as atomic force microscopy and magnetic tweezers allow investigation of how domain folding under force can play a physiological role. Combining these techniques with protein engineering and HaloTag covalent attachment, we investigate similarities and differences between four model proteins: I10 and I91-two immunoglobulin-like domains from the muscle protein titin, and two α + β fold proteins-ubiquitin and protein L. These proteins show a different mechanical response and have unique extensions under force. Remarkably, when normalized to their contour length, the size of the unfolding and refolding steps as a function of force reduces to a single master curve. This curve can be described using standard models of polymer elasticity, explaining the entropic nature of the measured steps. We further validate our measurements with a simple energy landscape model, which combines protein folding with polymer physics and accounts for the complex nature of tandem domains under force. This model can become a useful tool to help in deciphering the complexity of multidomain proteins operating under force.

  2. Manual discrimination of force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Xiao-Dong; Tan, HONG-Z.; Durlach, Nathaniel I.

    1991-01-01

    Optimal design of human-machine interfaces for teleoperators and virtual-environment systems which involve the tactual and kinesthetic modalities requires knowledge of the human's resolving power in these modalities. The resolution of the interface should be appropriately matched to that of the human operator. We report some preliminary results on the ability of the human hand to distinguish small differences in force under a variety of conditions. Experiments were conducted on force discrimination with the thumb pushing an interface that exerts a constant force over the pushing distance and the index finger pressing against a fixed support. The dependence of the sensitivity index d' on force increment can be fit by a straight line through the origin and the just-noticeable difference (JND) in force can thus be described by the inverse of the slope of this line. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was measured by varying the a priori probabilities of the two alternatives, reference force and reference force plus an increment, in one-interval, two-alternative, forced-choice experiments. When plotted on normal deviate coordinates, the ROC's were roughly straight lines of unit slope, thus supporting the assumption of equal-variance normal distributions and the use of the conventional d' measure. The JND was roughly 6-8 percent for reference force ranging from 2.5 to 10 newtons, pushing distance from 5 to 30 mm, and initial finger-span from 45 to 125 mm. Also, the JND remained the same when the subjects were instructed to change the average speed of pushing from 23 to 153 mm/sec. The pushing was terminated by reaching either a wall or a well, and the JND's were essentially the same in both cases.

  3. OOTW Force Design Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  4. 26 CFR 1.113-1 - Mustering-out payments for members of the Armed Forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Forces. 1.113-1 Section 1.113-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY....113-1 Mustering-out payments for members of the Armed Forces. For the purposes of the exclusion from gross income under section 113 of mustering-out payments with respect to service in the Armed...

  5. 26 CFR 1.113-1 - Mustering-out payments for members of the Armed Forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Forces. 1.113-1 Section 1.113-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY....113-1 Mustering-out payments for members of the Armed Forces. For the purposes of the exclusion from gross income under section 113 of mustering-out payments with respect to service in the Armed...

  6. Air Force Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-08

    Air Force Research Laboratory 8 June 2009 Mr. Leo Marple Ai F R h L b t r orce esearc a ora ory Leo.Marple@wpafb.af.mil DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Air Force Research Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Research Laboratory ,Wright

  7. Forced marriage, forced sex: the perils of childhood for girls.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, M; Sen, P; Thomson, M

    1998-11-01

    A recently formed interagency Forum on the Rights of Girls and Women in Marriage is investigating the widespread problem of nonconsensual marriage and forced sex and advocating for legislative and policy initiatives. This article reviews three research projects in this area: research by Anti-Slavery International on child marriage in parts of West Africa, an investigation by Save the Children of children's views of early marriage, and research conducted by CHANGE on women's resistance to domestic violence in Calcutta, India. Girls who marry before 15 years of age are more likely to be illiterate than their older counterparts, more likely to be dowry payment brides, less likely to come into contact with development projects, have higher rates of infant mortality, and are most vulnerable to sexual violence. In many cases, intercourse is initiated before the girl begins to menstruate. Although adult women also face sexual violence within marriage, this problem is all the more traumatic for girls who lack any information about sexuality. Sex with girls below a certain age is usually covered by rape legislation, but, in countries such as India, this is mitigated by the religiously defined personal laws. The absence of adequate legal and policy action frameworks to deal with the rights of girls, coupled with the lack of sanctions against these abuses, comprise state complicity and neglect of duty under international law to this vulnerable group.

  8. Reinvigorating the Air Force Nuclear Enterprise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-24

    Reinvigorating the Air Force Nuclear Enterprise, is the product of these investigations and internal assessments. The reports converged on six recurring...LCOM) determinant products to determine if dual-tasked and PNAF workloads are adequately reflected in each product . (AFRIT-09; BRR-33; CANS-05... Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) capabilities to support ICBM engineering and sustainment. PLM will become the automated tool for Electronic

  9. Assessing the industry using Porter's five forces.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    To develop a business and plan for the future, there is a need to assess the current situation. One way of doing this is to use Porter's five forces framework. This was the brainchild of Harvard Business School's Michael Porter and developed in 1979. Looking at the competitive intensity of an industry, the model assesses internal and external factors that act together to determine the direction of the business; taken together, this gives an indication of the attractiveness of the industry.

  10. Air Force Third Party Financing Management Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    ritic: ’ lf(trical rcquiremerts and the potential value of increased electrica ! hOup capaility. All of the above suggests strong consideration of full...system. In the case of internal labor disturbances, management is usually capable of operating the essential utility services as reded . Other measures...relating to "third party" supply of thermal and/or electrica ’ energy to U.S. Air Force base installations in the United States. Incorpora- tion of

  11. Trends of Measured Climate Forcing Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James E.; Sato, Makiko; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The growth rate of climate forcing by measured greenhouse gases peaked near 1980 at almost 5 W/sq m per century. This growth rate has since declined to approximately equal to 3 W/sq m per century, largely because of cooperative international actions. We argue that trends can be reduced to the level needed for the moderate "alternative" climate scenario (approximately equal to 2 W/M2 per century for the next 50 years) by means of concerted actions that have other benefits, but the forcing reductions are not automatic "co-benefits" of actions that slow CO2 emissions. Current trends of climate forcings by aerosols remain very uncertain. Nevertheless, practical constraints on changes in emission levels suggest that global warming at a rate + 0.15 +/- 0.05 C per decade will occur over the next several decades.

  12. Nongravitational forces on comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, B. G.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are presented and discussed for determining the effects of nongravitational forces on the orbits of comets. These methods are applied to short-period and long-period comets. Results are briefly described.

  13. Riveting-force gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotta, J. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Gage monitors riveting forces applied when components are mounted on printed-circuit boards. Correct swaging pressures have been established for specific substrate materials such as phenolics and ceramics.

  14. Air Force Junior ROTC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, James A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the Junior Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (AFROTC) program presently being operated in 275 units across the country. It is basically a three year course in aerospace studies and leadership education. (BR)

  15. Causal reasoning with forces

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Phillip; Barbey, Aron K.

    2015-01-01

    Causal composition allows people to generate new causal relations by combining existing causal knowledge. We introduce a new computational model of such reasoning, the force theory, which holds that people compose causal relations by simulating the processes that join forces in the world, and compare this theory with the mental model theory (Khemlani et al., 2014) and the causal model theory (Sloman et al., 2009), which explain causal composition on the basis of mental models and structural equations, respectively. In one experiment, the force theory was uniquely able to account for people's ability to compose causal relationships from complex animations of real-world events. In three additional experiments, the force theory did as well as or better than the other two theories in explaining the causal compositions people generated from linguistically presented causal relations. Implications for causal learning and the hierarchical structure of causal knowledge are discussed. PMID:25653611

  16. Forces in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an activity to give students experience with the variables and forces impacting a moving body on an inclined plane by observing a ball as it rolls down an inclined PVC pipe of fixed length. Includes a student worksheet. (MKR)

  17. Force user's manual, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.; Benten, Muhammad S.; Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Ramanan, Aruna V.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology for writing parallel programs for shared memory multiprocessors has been formalized as an extension to the Fortran language and implemented as a macro preprocessor. The extended language is known as the Force, and this manual describes how to write Force programs and execute them on the Flexible Computer Corporation Flex/32, the Encore Multimax and the Sequent Balance computers. The parallel extension macros are described in detail, but knowledge of Fortran is assumed.

  18. Strategic forces briefing

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.; Chrzanowski, P.; May, M.; Nordyke, M.

    1989-04-06

    The Strategic Forces Briefing'' is our attempt, accomplished over the past several months, to outline and highlight the more significant strategic force issues that must be addressed in the near future. Some issues are recurrent: the need for an effective modernized Triad and a constant concern for force survivability. Some issues derive from arms control: the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (SALT) are sufficiently advanced to set broad numerical limits on forces, but not so constraining as to preclude choices among weapon systems and deployment modes. Finally, a new administration faced with serious budgetary problems must strive for the most effective strategic forces limited dollars can buy and support. A review of strategic forces logically begins with consideration of the missions the forces are charged with. We begin the briefing with a short review of targeting policy and implementation within the constraints of available unclassified information. We then review each element of the Triad with sections on SLBMs, ICBMs, and Air-Breathing (bomber and cruise missile) systems. A short section at the end deals with the potential impact of strategic defense on offensive force planning. We consider ABM, ASAT, and air defense; but we do not attempt to address the technical issues of strategic defense per se. The final section gives a brief overview of the tritium supply problem. We conclude with a summary of recommendations that emerge from our review. The results of calculation on the effectiveness of various weapon systems as a function of cost that are presented in the briefing are by Paul Chrzanowski.

  19. Measurement of Surface Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-16

    hydration forces were observed in solutions containing chloride salts of Li+ , K+ , Na 4 , and Cs+ , resulting from electrostatic binding of the cation...concentrated solutions of a series of tetraalkylammonium bromide salts [46] [Fig. 13]. In these measurements, the distance of closest approach of the two...solid metal electrodes separated by an electrolytic solution . Electrostatic forces, which are intimately related to electrode kinetics and adsorption

  20. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  1. 26 CFR 49.4263-4 - Members of the armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Members of the armed forces. 49.4263-4 Section... the armed forces. The tax imposed by section 4261 does not apply to amounts paid for transportation or..., Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, including authorized cadets and midshipmen,...

  2. 75 FR 11893 - Food and Drug Administration Transparency Task Force; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Transparency Task Force... transparent, collaborative, and participatory government. FDA has formed an internal Transparency Task Force..., the Task Force has held two public meetings, on June 24, 2009, and November 3, 2009, and established...

  3. 26 CFR 20.2201-1 - Members of the Armed Forces dying during an induction period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Members of the Armed Forces dying during an... Miscellaneous § 20.2201-1 Members of the Armed Forces dying during an induction period. (a) The additional...) (see paragraph (b) of this section) and while in active service as a member of the Armed Forces of...

  4. 26 CFR 20.2201-1 - Members of the Armed Forces dying during an induction period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Members of the Armed Forces dying during an... Miscellaneous § 20.2201-1 Members of the Armed Forces dying during an induction period. (a) The additional...) (see paragraph (b) of this section) and while in active service as a member of the Armed Forces of...

  5. 26 CFR 49.4263-4 - Members of the armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Members of the armed forces. 49.4263-4 Section... the armed forces. The tax imposed by section 4261 does not apply to amounts paid for transportation or..., Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, including authorized cadets and midshipmen,...

  6. 26 CFR 49.4263-4 - Members of the armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Members of the armed forces. 49.4263-4 Section... the armed forces. The tax imposed by section 4261 does not apply to amounts paid for transportation or..., Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, including authorized cadets and midshipmen,...

  7. 26 CFR 20.2201-1 - Members of the Armed Forces dying during an induction period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Members of the Armed Forces dying during an... Miscellaneous § 20.2201-1 Members of the Armed Forces dying during an induction period. (a) The additional...) (see paragraph (b) of this section) and while in active service as a member of the Armed Forces of...

  8. 26 CFR 49.4263-4 - Members of the armed forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Members of the armed forces. 49.4263-4 Section... the armed forces. The tax imposed by section 4261 does not apply to amounts paid for transportation or..., Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, including authorized cadets and midshipmen,...

  9. 26 CFR 20.2201-1 - Members of the Armed Forces dying during an induction period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Members of the Armed Forces dying during an... Miscellaneous § 20.2201-1 Members of the Armed Forces dying during an induction period. (a) The additional...) (see paragraph (b) of this section) and while in active service as a member of the Armed Forces of...

  10. 26 CFR 20.2201-1 - Members of the Armed Forces dying during an induction period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Members of the Armed Forces dying during an... Miscellaneous § 20.2201-1 Members of the Armed Forces dying during an induction period. (a) The additional...) (see paragraph (b) of this section) and while in active service as a member of the Armed Forces of...

  11. Lactate and force production in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Michael; Albertsen, Janni; Rentsch, Maria; Juel, Carsten

    2005-01-15

    Lactic acid accumulation is generally believed to be involved in muscle fatigue. However, one study reported that in rat soleus muscle (in vitro), with force depressed by high external K(+) concentrations a subsequent incubation with lactic acid restores force and thereby protects against fatigue. However, incubation with 20 mm lactic acid reduces the pH gradient across the sarcolemma, whereas the gradient is increased during muscle activity. Furthermore, unlike active muscle the Na(+)-K(+) pump is not activated. We therefore hypothesized that lactic acid does not protect against fatigue in active muscle. Three incubation solutions were used: 20 mM Na-lactate (which acidifies internal pH), 12 mM Na-lactate +8 mm lactic acid (which mimics the pH changes during muscle activity), and 20 mM lactic acid (which acidifies external pH more than internal pH). All three solutions improved force in K(+)-depressed rat soleus muscle. The pH regulation associated with lactate incubation accelerated the Na(+)-K(+) pump. To study whether the protective effect of lactate/lactic acid is a general mechanism, we stimulated muscles to fatigue with and without pre-incubation. None of the incubation solutions improved force development in repetitively stimulated muscle (Na-lactate had a negative effect). It is concluded that although lactate/lactic acid incubation regains force in K(+)-depressed resting muscle, a similar incubation has no or a negative effect on force development in active muscle. It is suggested that the difference between the two situations is that lactate/lactic acid removes the negative consequences of an unusual large depolarization in the K(+)-treated passive muscle, whereas the depolarization is less pronounced in active muscle.

  12. The missing climate forcing

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Lacis, A.; Ruedy, R.

    1997-01-01

    Observed climate change is consistent with radiative forcings on several time-scales for which the dominant forcings are known, ranging from the few years after a large volcanic eruption to glacial-to-interglacial changes. In the period with most detailed data, 1979 to the present, climate observations contain clear signatures of both natural and anthropogenic forcings. But in the full period since the industrial revolution began, global warming is only about half of that expected due to the principal forcing, increasing greenhouse gases. The direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols contributes only little towards resolving this discrepancy. Unforced climate variability is an unlikely explanation. We argue on the basis of several lines of indirect evidence that aerosol effects on clouds have caused a large negative forcing, at least -1 Wm-2, which has substantially offset greenhouse warming. The tasks of observing this forcing and determining the microphysical mechanisms at its basis are exceptionally difficult, but they are essential for the prognosis of future climate change.

  13. A New Method of Comparing Forcing Agents in Climate Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; MacMartin, Douglas; Rasch, Philip J.; Jarvis, Andrew

    2015-10-14

    We describe a new method of comparing different climate forcing agents (e.g., CO2, CH4, and solar irradiance) that avoids many of the ambiguities introduced by temperature-related climate feedbacks. This is achieved by introducing an explicit feedback loop external to the climate model that adjusts one forcing agent to balance another while keeping global mean surface temperature constant. Compared to current approaches, this method has two main advantages: (i) the need to define radiative forcing is bypassed and (ii) by maintaining roughly constant global mean temperature, the effects of state dependence on internal feedback strengths are minimized. We demonstrate this approach for several different forcing agents and derive the relationships between these forcing agents in two climate models; comparisons between forcing agents are highly linear in concordance with predicted functional forms. Transitivity of the relationships between the forcing agents appears to hold within a wide range of forcing. The relationships between the forcing agents obtained from this method are consistent across both models but differ from relationships that would be obtained from calculations of radiative forcing, highlighting the importance of controlling for surface temperature feedback effects when separating radiative forcing and climate response.

  14. Polynomial force approximations and multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Platz, Daniel; Forchheimer, Daniel; Tholén, Erik A; Haviland, David B

    2013-01-01

    We present polynomial force reconstruction from experimental intermodulation atomic force microscopy (ImAFM) data. We study the tip-surface force during a slow surface approach and compare the results with amplitude-dependence force spectroscopy (ADFS). Based on polynomial force reconstruction we generate high-resolution surface-property maps of polymer blend samples. The polynomial method is described as a special example of a more general approximative force reconstruction, where the aim is to determine model parameters that best approximate the measured force spectrum. This approximative approach is not limited to spectral data, and we demonstrate how it can be adapted to a force quadrature picture.

  15. Measurements of human force control during a constrained arm motion using a force-actuated joystick.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, J; Gurfinkel, E V; Lipshits, M I; Droulez, J; Gurfinkel, V S

    1995-03-01

    1. When interacting with the environment, human arm movements may be prevented in certain directions (i.e., when sliding the hand along a surface) resulting in what is called a "constrained motion." In the directions that the movement is restricted, the subject is instead free to control the forces against the constraint. 2. Control strategies for constrained motion may be characterized by two extreme models. Under the active compliance model, an essentially feedback-based approach, measurements of contact force may be used in real time to modify the motor command and precisely control the forces generated against the constraint. Under the passive compliance model the motion would be executed in a feedforward manner, using an internal model of the constraint geometry. The feedforward model relies on the compliant behavior of the passive mechanical system to maintain contact while avoiding excessive contact forces. 3. Subjects performed a task in which they were required to slide the hand along a rigid surface. This task was performed in a virtual force environment in which contact forces were simulated by a two-dimensional force-actuated joystick. Unknown to the subject, the orientation of the surface constraint was varied from trial to trial, and contact force changes induced by these perturbations were measured. 4. Subjects showed variations in contact force correlated with the direction of the orientation perturbation. "Upward" tilts resulted in higher contact forces, whereas "downward" tilts resulted in lower contact forces. This result is consistent with a feedforward-based control of a passively compliant system. 5. Subject responses did not, however, correspond exactly to the predictions of a static analysis of a passive, feedforward-controlled system. A dynamic analysis reveals a much closer resemblance between a passive, feedforward model and the observed data. Numerical simulations demonstrate that a passive, dynamic system model of the movement captures

  16. International Cooperation in Science. Science Policy Study--Hearings Volume 7. Hearings before the Task Force on Science Policy of the Committee on Science and Technology, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session (June 18, 19, 20, 27, 1985). No. 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    These hearings on international cooperation in science focused on three issues: (1) international cooperation in big science; (2) the impact of international cooperation on research priorities; and (3) coordination in management of international cooperative research. Witnesses presenting testimony and/or prepared statements were: Victor Weisskopf;…

  17. From Topographic Internal Gravity Waves to Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S.; Scotti, A.

    2017-01-01

    Internal gravity waves are a key process linking the large-scale mechanical forcing of the oceans to small-scale turbulence and mixing. In this review, we focus on internal waves generated by barotropic tidal flow over topography. We review progress made in the past decade toward understanding the different processes that can lead to turbulence during the generation, propagation, and reflection of internal waves and how these processes affect mixing. We consider different modeling strategies and new tools that have been developed. Simulation results, the wealth of observational material collected during large-scale experiments, and new laboratory data reveal how the cascade of energy from tidal flow to turbulence occurs through a host of nonlinear processes, including intensified boundary flows, wave breaking, wave-wave interactions, and the instability of high-mode internal wave beams. The roles of various nondimensional parameters involving the ocean state, roughness geometry, and tidal forcing are described.

  18. Motion and force control for multiple cooperative manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    The motion and force control of multiple robot arms manipulating a commonly held object is addressed. A general control paradigm that decouples the motion and force control problems is introduced. For motion control, there are three natural choices: (1) joint torques, (2) arm-tip force vectors, and (3) the acceleration of a generalized coordinate. Choice (1) allows a class of relatively model-independent control laws by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the open-loop system; (2) and (3) require the full model information but produce simpler problems. To resolve the nonuniqueness of the joint torques, two methods are introduced. If the arm and object models are available, the allocation of the desired end-effector control force to the joint actuators can be optimized; otherwise the internal force can be controlled about some set point. It is shown that effective force regulation can be achieved even if little model information is available.

  19. International Education for Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moebius, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    Describes an international trade education program offered by Waukesha (WI) County Technical College. The program includes international business principles, international marketing, cultural awareness, business Spanish, international documentation, transportation, and finance. (JOW)

  20. Universal spin-momentum locked optical forces

    SciTech Connect

    Kalhor, Farid; Thundat, Thomas; Jacob, Zubin

    2016-02-08

    Evanescent electromagnetic waves possess spin-momentum locking, where the direction of propagation (momentum) is locked to the inherent polarization of the wave (transverse spin). We study the optical forces arising from this universal phenomenon and show that the fundamental origin of recently reported non-trivial optical chiral forces is spin-momentum locking. For evanescent waves, we show that the direction of energy flow, the direction of decay, and the direction of spin follow a right hand rule for three different cases of total internal reflection, surface plasmon polaritons, and HE{sub 11} mode of an optical fiber. Furthermore, we explain how the recently reported phenomena of lateral optical force on chiral and achiral particles are caused by the transverse spin of the evanescent field and the spin-momentum locking phenomenon. Finally, we propose an experiment to identify the unique lateral forces arising from the transverse spin in the optical fiber and point to fundamental differences of the spin density from the well-known orbital angular momentum of light. Our work presents a unified view on spin-momentum locking and how it affects optical forces on chiral and achiral particles.

  1. Radiative Forcing by Contrails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meerkoetter, R.; Schumann, U.; Doelling, D. R.; Nakajima, T.; Tsushima, Y.

    1999-01-01

    A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmospheres The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 W/m(exp 2)a daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.

  2. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  3. Radiative Forcing of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

  4. Linear force device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide a mechanical force actuator which is lightweight and manipulatable and utilizes linear motion for push or pull forces while maintaining a constant overall length. The mechanical force producing mechanism comprises a linear actuator mechanism and a linear motion shaft mounted parallel to one another. The linear motion shaft is connected to a stationary or fixed housing and to a movable housing where the movable housing is mechanically actuated through actuator mechanism by either manual means or motor means. The housings are adapted to releasably receive a variety of jaw or pulling elements adapted for clamping or prying action. The stationary housing is adapted to be pivotally mounted to permit an angular position of the housing to allow the tool to adapt to skewed interfaces. The actuator mechanisms is operated by a gear train to obtain linear motion of the actuator mechanism.

  5. Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Research Task Force report.

    PubMed

    Erkan, D; Derksen, R; Levy, R; Machin, S; Ortel, T; Pierangeli, S; Roubey, R; Lockshin, M

    2011-02-01

    The Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) Clinical Research Task Force (CRTF) was one of six Task Forces developed by the 13(th) International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL) organization committee with the purpose of: a) evaluating the limitations of APS clinical research and developing guidelines for researchers to help improve the quality of APS research; and b) prioritizing the ideas for a well-designed multicenter clinical trial and discussing the pragmatics of getting such a trial done. Following a systematic working algorithm, the Task Force identified five major issues that impede APS clinical research and the ability to develop evidence-based recommendations for the management of aPL-positive patients: (1) aPL detection has been based on partially or non-standardized tests, and clinical (and basic) APS research studies have included patients with heterogeneous aPL profiles with different clinical event risks; (2) clinical (and basic) APS research studies have included a heterogeneous group of patients with different aPL-related manifestations (some controversial); (3) thrombosis and/or pregnancy risk stratification and quantification are rarely incorporated in APS clinical research; (4) most APS clinical studies include patients with single positive aPL results and/or low-titer aPL ELISA results; furthermore, study designs are mostly retrospective and not population based, with limited number of prospective and/or controlled population studies; and (5) lack of the understanding the particular mechanisms of aPL-mediated clinical events limits the optimal clinical study design. The Task Force recommended that there is an urgent need for a truly international collaborative approach to design and conduct well-designed prospective large-scale multi-center clinical trials of patients with persistent and clinically significant aPL profiles. An international collaborative meeting to formulate a good research question using 'FINER' (Feasible; Interesting

  6. Memory for fingertip forces: passive hand muscle vibration interferes with predictive grip force scaling.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dennis A; Rosenkranz, Karin; Hermsdörfer, Joachim; Rothwell, John

    2004-06-01

    When subjects repetitively lift an object, the grip force they select is influenced by the mechanical object properties of the preceding lift. Similar effects on grip force scaling are observed whether the subsequent lift is performed with the same hand or the hand contralateral to the preceding lift. Here we demonstrate that passive vibration of the hand muscles involved in the generation of grip force in the interval between two blocks of lifting trials interferes with predictive grip force scaling. Following ten trials in which subjects lifted an object with constant mechanical properties with the dominant hand, muscle vibration was given to the first interosseus and adductor pollicis muscles of the dominant hand during a 10-min rest period. Compared with the last lift preceding vibration, peak rates of grip force increase and peak grip forces were scaled too high during the first lift following vibration whether the lift was made with the dominant or non-dominant hand. Subjects scaled grip force accurately to the object properties within three lifts following vibration. If subjects rested for 10 min after the first ten trials and received no vibration, then there was no significant difference in the peak grip force or its rate of increase between the last lift preceding rest and the first lift following it. We suggest that vibration impairs the memory processes responsible for predictive grip force scaling. Our data are consistent with the recent suggestion that these memory processes are neither specific for a certain motor action nor do they reflect internal representations of mechanical object properties.

  7. DETAIL OF UTILITY PIPES AT THE BOTTOM LEVEL OF INTERNAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF UTILITY PIPES AT THE BOTTOM LEVEL OF INTERNAL PLATFORMS, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  8. Grinding forces and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Brach, K.; Pai, D.M.; Ratterman, E.; Shaw, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    Grinding forces and energy plan an important role in all abrasive machining operations. While specific grinding energy may be obtained from workpiece dynamometer values or by measuring spindle power, care must be exercised in converting dynamometer reading into power consumed. This is particularly true for operations involving a large ratio of wheel depth of cut to wheel diameter or when the radial force on the wheel is large relative to the tangential component. Interpretation of workpiece dynamometer results are discussed and several specific examples are considered including the diamond sawing of granite and the creep feed grinding of metal.

  9. Grinding forces and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Brach, K.; Pai, D.M.; Ratterman, E.; Shaw, M.C.

    1988-02-01

    Grinding forces and energy play an important role in all abrasive machining operations. While specific grinding energy may be obtained from workpiece dynamometer values or by measuring spindle power, care must be exercised in converting dynamometer reading into power consumed. This is particularly true for operations involving a large ratio of wheel depth of cut to wheel diameter or when the radial force on the wheel is large relative to the tangential component. Interpretation of workpiece dynamometer results are discussed and several specific examples are considered including the diamond sawing of granite and the creep feed grinding of metal.

  10. Force-free foliations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Gralla, Samuel E.; Lupsasca, Alexandru

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic field configurations with vanishing Lorentz force density are known as force-free and appear in terrestrial, space, and astrophysical plasmas. We explore a general method for finding such configurations based on formulating equations for the field lines rather than the field itself. The basic object becomes a foliation of spacetime or, in the stationary axisymmetric case, of the half-plane. We use this approach to find some new stationary and axisymmetric solutions, one of which could represent a rotating plasma vortex near a magnetic null point.

  11. Image Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajapaksa, Indrajith

    In this thesis we describe an enhancement to the Atomic force microscope (AFM) to simultaneously gather topographic features and spectroscopic information .Compared to the current state of the art of near-field excitation and far-field detection AFM imaging techniques our system uses a radical new approach near-field excitation and near-field detection. By placing the detector in the near-field we achieve high signal to noise and single molecular resolution. The origin of our near-field detector signal is the image force gradient due to the interaction of the stimulated molecular dipole with its image on the metal probe. We designed and built an optical and electronic system to capture this signal and simultaneously image nano-scale surface topography and optical image force gradient. By varying the wavelength of the excitation beam we measure the induced optical image force gradient spectra of molecules on surface. These spectra show good agreement with the absorption spectra of the bulk molecules measured by conventional absorption spectroscopy. We show that image force gradient is directly proportional to the optical absorption dipole strength. Using Finite Element 3D electromagnetic simulations and using Lorentz model for the excited molecular dipole we showed that the image force gradient has a decay length of 1nm, making the theoretical resolution of this microscopy technique approximately 1 nm. This rapid decay was measured experimentally .This resolution was seen by the high contrasting spectroscopic images of molecules on the surface. In follow on experiments this technique was extended to provide surface Raman spectroscopy and microscopy at molecular resolution. We create an image force gradient interaction through optical parametric down conversion between stimulated Raman excited molecules on a surface and a cantilevered nanometer scale probe brought very close to it. Spectroscopy and microscopy on clusters of molecules have been performed. Single

  12. Electrochemical force microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Collins, Liam F.; Rodriguez, Brian J.

    2017-01-10

    A system and method for electrochemical force microscopy are provided. The system and method are based on a multidimensional detection scheme that is sensitive to forces experienced by a biased electrode in a solution. The multidimensional approach allows separation of fast processes, such as double layer charging, and charge relaxation, and slow processes, such as diffusion and faradaic reactions, as well as capturing the bias dependence of the response. The time-resolved and bias measurements can also allow probing both linear (small bias range) and non-linear (large bias range) electrochemical regimes and potentially the de-convolution of charge dynamics and diffusion processes from steric effects and electrochemical reactivity.

  13. Amplification of actin polymerization forces

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments. PMID:27002174

  14. Amplification of actin polymerization forces.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-03-28

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments.

  15. The Four Forces Airpower Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-19

    The Four Forces Airpower Theory A Monograph by MAJOR Brian P. O’Neill United States Air Force School of...Brian P. O’Neill Title of Monograph: The Four Forces Airpower Theory Approved by: __________________________________ Monograph Director Gerald S...Abstract THE FOUR FORCES AIRPOWER THEORY by MAJOR Brian P. O’Neill, USAF, 67 pages. This monograph suggests an airpower theory that

  16. Interpretation and use of FRAX in clinical practice - position paper of the International Osteoporosis Foundation and the International Society for Clinical Densitometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) and the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) appointed a joint Task Force to develop resource documents in order to make recommendations on how to improve FRAX and better inform clinicians who use FRAX. The Task Force met in November...

  17. Using explicit macroscopic feedback to determine efficacy of climate forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, B.; MacMartin, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Calculating efficacies of climate forcings has been a useful method of determining the importance of forcing agents relative to CO2. However, because the strength of internal feedbacks is dependent upon the climate state, efficacies are dependent upon the strengths of the applied forcings, and simulations designed to capture these efficacies have tradeoffs between simulation length and accurately capturing the steady state climate response. We propose an alternate method of determining a quantity similar to climate efficacy via adjusting the amount of forcing by feeding back the observed climate state. By balancing CO2 forcing with another climate forcing, many internal feedbacks are suppressed, which linearizes the climate response to the forcing and promotes rapid convergence of the simulation. We performed simulations in two fully coupled general circulation models of Earth's climate. Doubling the present day CO2 concentration requires a steady state solar reduction of approximately 2.5%; this answer can be obtained with a simulation of less than 30 years. With this method, the amount of solar reduction scales linearly with the logarithmic change in CO2 concentration. We explore similar calculations using other climate forcings. Because this method circumvents calculation of radiative forcing, intercomparison of values between different climate forcings is difficult and is a drawback of our method as compared to the original method of calculating efficacy. Feedback can be used to estimate the efficacy of solar reductions in models. The solar reduction that is required to maintain temperature in the presence of an instantaneous change in atmospheric CO2 concentrations is computed using feedback. The left-hand panel illustrates both the solar forcing as a function of time for offsetting 2×CO2, and the efficacy estimated as the mean solar reduction after the initial transient; extremely rapid convergence is obtained. The right-hand panel illustrates the linearity

  18. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  19. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Taylor, Foreword by John C.

    2005-10-01

    Foreword John C. Taylor; 1. Unification of fundamental forces Abdus Salam; 2. History unfolding: an introduction to the two 1968 lectures by W. Heisenberg and P. A. M. Dirac Abdus Salam; 3. Theory, criticism, and a philosophy Werner Heisenberg; 4. Methods in theoretical physics Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac.

  20. Force Structure Valuation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    PTS,. Legena 6 ra 328X0 Force Structure pr.Jdotl- V.alu. Notes (After 2th "OSSoo re tent Ion c Mance i o 11th Year Retentton Chang e. _- 32SX0 Suo...Defense-Office of the Secretary of Defense. (1984). Military retirees’ and seoarates ’ post-service earnings (Fifth QRMC - Appendix Q). Flamholtz, E. G

  1. Mining Task Force Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saskatchewan Inst. of Applied Science and Technology, Saskatoon.

    In fall 1988, the Board of Directors of the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) created a task force to study the training needs of the mining industry in the province and evaluate SIAST's responsiveness to those needs. After assessing the technological changes taking place in the industry, surveying manpower needs,…

  2. Reduction in Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phay, Robert

    Chapter 2 in a book on school law discusses the reasons for reduction in force (RIF) and presents a set of model regulations for school districts as the best means of minimizing legal problems resulting from RIF. The reasons for RIF include declining student enrollments; reduced turnover among teachers; changes in programs; and more constrained…

  3. Romanian Armed Forces Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    2’ .7k ingS q•_dns I MaNrtimeBase "* eliminating unnecessary 6 MbIdization Centers, 2Air Bann Rafts I . erlBasse redundancies or _ , _ # capabilities...will receive the highest priority for maintenance and repair. The majority of equipment for territorial forces will be stored and maintained. Note that

  4. BIA Reorganization Task Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Reporting on three hearings held this spring by the Bureau of Indian Affairs Reorganization Task Force, this article presents highlights from the testimony of Forrest Gerard, Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs and discusses the matrix system of organization currently under consideration by the BIA. (JC)

  5. The Dynamic Force Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  6. The Force of Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Carol

    2005-01-01

    "The Force of Ideas" describes a little-known aspect of both educational history and Viennese psychoanalysis during the interwar years: the movement for psychoanalytic pedagogy. The author traces her father's own story, beginning with his application to the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society for training as a psychoanalytic pedagogue, as a…

  7. Lorentz force particle analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Thess, André; Moreau, René; Tan, Yanqing; Dai, Shangjun; Tao, Zhen; Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    A new contactless technique is presented for the detection of micron-sized insulating particles in the flow of an electrically conducting fluid. A transverse magnetic field brakes this flow and tends to become entrained in the flow direction by a Lorentz force, whose reaction force on the magnetic-field-generating system can be measured. The presence of insulating particles suspended in the fluid produce changes in this Lorentz force, generating pulses in it; these pulses enable the particles to be counted and sized. A two-dimensional numerical model that employs a moving mesh method demonstrates the measurement principle when such a particle is present. Two prototypes and a three-dimensional numerical model are used to demonstrate the feasibility of a Lorentz force particle analyzer (LFPA). The findings of this study conclude that such an LFPA, which offers contactless and on-line quantitative measurements, can be applied to an extensive range of applications. These applications include measurements of the cleanliness of high-temperature and aggressive molten metal, such as aluminum and steel alloys, and the clean manufacturing of semiconductors.

  8. International Learning Institutions: Organization, Visions, and Missions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hook, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    This doctoral research examines the challenges, objectives, goals, strategies, and tactics facing leaders, administrators, faculty, students, and other stakeholders with an interest in international higher education. These broad topics necessarily encompass many factors including the market forces of globalization, increasing competition,…

  9. International Relations, Social Studies: 6448.20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, Rose Marie

    The forces affecting relations among nations as well as the effectiveness of decision making processes in international politics are examined and analyzed by 10th through 12th grade students in the elective quinmester course clustering around political studies. Goals emphasize helping students to understand state interaction and the variables…

  10. Collaborative International Education: Reaching across Borders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgers, Michael G.; Flachsbart, Barry B.; Elrod, Cassandra C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As international boundaries fade and financial pressures increase, universities are redefining the norm in educational models. The move from a synchronous classroom to a blended classroom or a completely asynchronous environment has forced faculty to be creative in delivery while overcoming complexities in the associated infrastructure.…

  11. Harmonic Forcing on the Stratified Square Lid Driven Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalim, Jason; Welfert, Bruno; Lopez, Juan; Taylor, Stephanie

    2016-11-01

    Stratified fluids that are driven at an interface, such as oceans or seas, can be periodically driven by wind. As a canonical flow, the square lid driven cavity with a harmonic forcing and a linear temperature gradient serves as a idealized model. Resonances of the harmonic forcing with the internal modes of the system aide energy transfer from the surface to the bulk, leading to interesting dynamics. Using a numerical spectral collocation method, the internal waves of the system are investigated, including their possible interaction and annihilation.

  12. International Tests and the U.S. Educational Reforms: Can Success Be Replicated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turgut, Guliz

    2013-01-01

    The ranking of the United States in major international tests such as the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS), Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), and Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) is used as the driving force and rationale for the current educational reforms in the United…

  13. Development of force adaptation during childhood.

    PubMed

    Konczak, Jürgen; Jansen-Osmann, Petra; Kalveram, Karl-Theodor

    2003-03-01

    Humans learn to make reaching movements in novel dynamic environments by acquiring an internal motor model of their limb dynamics. Here, the authors investigated how 4- to 11-year-old children (N = 39) and adults (N = 7) adapted to changes in arm dynamics, and they examined whether those data support the view that the human brain acquires inverse dynamics models (IDM) during development. While external damping forces were applied, the children learned to perform goal-directed forearm flexion movements. After changes in damping, all children showed kinematic aftereffects indicative of a neural controller that still attempted to compensate the no longer existing damping force. With increasing age, the number of trials toward complete adaptation decreased. When damping was present, forearm paths were most perturbed and most variable in the youngest children but were improved in the older children. The findings indicate that the neural representations of limb dynamics are less precise in children and less stable in time than those of adults. Such controller instability might be a primary cause of the high kinematic variability observed in many motor tasks during childhood. Finally, the young children were not able to update those models at the same rate as the older children, who, in turn, adapted more slowly than adults. In conclusion, the ability to adapt to unknown forces is a developmental achievement. The present results are consistent with the view that the acquisition and modification of internal models of the limb dynamics form the basis of that adaptive process.

  14. Indonesia: Internal Conditions, the Global Economy, and Regional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Helga; Sheppard, Eric S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes recent trends in the economic and regional development of Indonesia and examines the internal and external forces influencing the process. Shows how these forces account for the rise of a strong centralized state. Discusses Indonesia's current problems. Includes tables, maps, and graphs of economic investment figures, world trade, and…

  15. Investigation of Calibrating Force Transducer Using Sinusoidal Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Lizhe

    2010-05-01

    Sinusoidal force calibration method was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). A similar dynamic force calibration system is developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electro-dynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1 N to 20 kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. The force transducer to be calibrated is mounted on the shaker, and a mass block is screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition. The methods of determining Spatial-dependent acceleration on mass block and measuring the end mass of force transducer in dynamic force calibration are discussed in this paper.

  16. Investigation of Calibrating Force Transducer Using Sinusoidal Force

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Li; Wang Yu; Zhang Lizhe

    2010-05-28

    Sinusoidal force calibration method was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). A similar dynamic force calibration system is developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electro-dynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1 N to 20 kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. The force transducer to be calibrated is mounted on the shaker, and a mass block is screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition. The methods of determining Spatial-dependent acceleration on mass block and measuring the end mass of force transducer in dynamic force calibration are discussed in this paper.

  17. 26 CFR 1.692-1 - Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces of the United States upon death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. 1.692-1 Section 1.692-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...) Income in Respect of Decedents § 1.692-1 Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces... active service as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States, and (ii) His death occurs while...

  18. 26 CFR 1.692-1 - Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces of the United States upon death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. 1.692-1 Section 1.692-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...) Income in Respect of Decedents § 1.692-1 Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces... active service as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States, and (ii) His death occurs while...

  19. 26 CFR 1.692-1 - Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces of the United States upon death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. 1.692-1 Section 1.692-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... Respect of Decedents § 1.692-1 Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces of the... as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States, and (ii) His death occurs while he is...

  20. 26 CFR 1.692-1 - Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces of the United States upon death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. 1.692-1 Section 1.692-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...) Income in Respect of Decedents § 1.692-1 Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces... active service as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States, and (ii) His death occurs while...

  1. 26 CFR 1.692-1 - Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces of the United States upon death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the Armed Forces of the United States upon death. 1.692-1 Section 1.692-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL...) Income in Respect of Decedents § 1.692-1 Abatement of income taxes of certain members of the Armed Forces... active service as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States, and (ii) His death occurs while...

  2. Internal Wave Apparatus for Copepod Behavior Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, S.; Haas, K. A.; Webster, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    Internal waves are ubiquitous features in coastal marine environments and have been observed to mediate vertical distributions of zooplankton in situ. Internal waves are generated through oscillations of the pycnocline in stratified waters and thereby create fine-scale hydrodynamic cues that copepods and other zooplankton are known to sense, such as fluid density gradients and velocity gradients (quantified as shear deformation rate). The role of copepod behavior in response to cues associated with internal waves is largely unknown. Thus, a coupled quantification of copepod behavior and hydrodynamic cues will provide insight to the bio-physical interaction and the role of biological versus physical forcing in mediating organism distributions. We constructed a laboratory-scale internal wave apparatus to facilitate fine-scale observations of copepod behavior in flows that replicate in situ conditions of internal waves in a two-layer stratification. Three cases are chosen with density jump ranging between 0.75 - 1.5 kg/m3. Analytical analysis of the two-layer system provides guidance of the target forcing frequency to generate a standing internal wave with a single dominate frequency of oscillation. Flow visualization and signal processing of the interface location are used to quantify the wave characteristics. A copepod behavior assay is conducted, and sample trajectories are analyzed to identify copepod response to internal wave structure.

  3. The Law of Force or The Force of Law: Does Following The Rule of Law Assist Security Forces in Defeating an Armed Insurgency?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-08

    and Policy in International Relations (Spring): 40-79 Arendt , Hannah . 1963. On revolution. New York: Viking Cohen, Eliot A., John Horvath, and...conditions, where the armed forces can be trusted to obey the civil authorities” ( Arendt 1965, 40). This is especially the case in countries where

  4. Microrheology of cells with magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, L M; de Sousa, J S; Mendes Filho, J; Schäpe, J; Doschke, H; Radmacher, M

    2014-04-07

    We propose a magnetic force modulation method to measure the stiffness and viscosity of living cells using a modified AFM apparatus. An oscillating magnetic field makes a magnetic cantilever oscillate in contact with the sample, producing a small AC indentation. By comparing the amplitude of the free cantilever motion (A0) with the motion of the cantilever in contact with the sample (A1), we determine the sample stiffness and viscosity. To test the method, the frequency-dependent stiffness of 3T3 fibroblasts was determined as a power law k(s)(f) = α + β(f/f¯)(γ) (α = 7.6 × 10(-4) N m(-1), β = 1.0 × 10(-4) N m(-1), f¯ = 1 Hz, γ = 0.6), where the coefficient γ = 0.6 is in good agreement with rheological data of actin solutions with concentrations similar to those in cells. The method also allows estimation of the internal friction of the cells. In particular we found an average damping coefficient of 75.1 μN s m(-1) for indentation depths ranging between 1.0 μm and 2.0 μm.

  5. Reconciling Air Force Physicians’ Peacetime and Wartime Capabilities, Demonstration of a Work Force Design Methodology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    ability to perform other more general tasks not in the tni-service list. The peacetime medical specialists in internal medicine and pediatrics ...Specialist 9416B Colon & Rectal Surgery 9356 Aerospace Medical Physician 9416C Cardiac Surgery 9356A Aerospace Medical Specialist 9416D Pediatric Surgery 9356B...Solu10) This report documents a project to investigate alternative ways of bridging important differences between the Air Force Medical Service’s

  6. A topaz international program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, F.V.; Wyant, F.J.; McCarson, T.D. Jr.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.

    1995-01-20

    Little did these visionaries know that the formation of the ``TOPAZ II Program,`` using former military space power technology of the Soviet Union, would become the preeminent example of technology cooperation between two former adversaries. A unique teaming arrangement formed in New Mexico, called the New Mexico Strategic Alliance and consisting of the Air Force Phillips Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, the University of New Mexico, and Los Alamos Nationalo Laboratory, was a key ingredient in making this program a success. A brief summary of some of the highlights of this technology partnership is given to explain how international patnerships of this type can enable commercialization and technology transfer.

  7. Drag force scaling for penetration into granular media.

    PubMed

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki; Durian, Douglas J

    2013-05-01

    Impact dynamics is measured for spherical and cylindrical projectiles of many different densities dropped onto a variety non-cohesive granular media. The results are analyzed in terms of the material-dependent scaling of the inertial and frictional drag contributions to the total stopping force. The inertial drag force scales similar to that in fluids, except that it depends on the internal friction coefficient. The frictional drag force scales as the square-root of the density of granular medium and projectile, and hence cannot be explained by the combination of granular hydrostatic pressure and Coulomb friction law. The combined results provide an explanation for the previously observed penetration depth scaling.

  8. Finite element modeling and experimentation of bone drilling forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lughmani, W. A.; Bouazza-Marouf, K.; Ashcroft, I.

    2013-07-01

    Bone drilling is an essential part of many orthopaedic surgery procedures, including those for internal fixation and for attaching prosthetics. Estimation and control of bone drilling forces are critical to prevent drill breakthrough, excessive heat generation, and mechanical damage to the bone. This paper presents a 3D finite element (FE) model for prediction of thrust forces experienced during bone drilling. The model incorporates the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with the accurate geometrical considerations. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis, for set of machining parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Resolving the Pinning Force of Nanobubbles with Optical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Beng Hau; An, Hongjie; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2017-02-01

    Many of the remarkable properties of surface nanobubbles, such as unusually small contact angles and long lifetimes, are related to the force that pins them onto their substrates. This pinning force is yet to be quantified experimentally. Here, surface-attached nanobubbles are pulled with an atomic force microscope tip while their mechanical responses are observed with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We estimate that a pinning force on the order of 0.1 μ N is required to unpin a nanobubble from its substrate. The maximum force that the tip can exert on the nanobubble is limited by the stability of the neck pulled from the bubble and is enhanced by the hydrophobicity of the tip.

  10. Processes of Internal and International Migration from Chitwan, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Bohra, Pratikshya; Massey, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we examine which factors predict internal and international migration from Chitwan, a flat valley located in the South-Central region of Nepal, seeking to measure the effect of theoretically specified variables such as human capital, social capital, physical capital, and neighborhood socioeconomic conditions while controlling for demographic variables. We use data from the Chitwan Valley Family Study (CVFS) to estimate a series of discrete time event history models of first and repeat migration to three competing destinations: other locations within Chitwan, other districts within Nepal, and places outside of Nepal. Results support hypotheses derived from neoclassical economics, the theory of new economics of migration, social capital theory, and cumulative causation theory. Our results underscore the need for a synthetic theoretical model that incorporates factors operating at the individual, household, and community levels. The use of multiple explanatory models yields a clearer picture of the forces driving internal and international migration from rural districts in developing nations such as Nepal. PMID:21423821

  11. Plates of the dinosaur stegosaurus: forced convection heat loss fins?

    PubMed

    Farlow, J O; Thompson, C V; Rosner, D E

    1976-06-11

    It is suggested that the plates along the arched back and tail of Stegosaurus served an important thermoregulatory function as forced convection "fins." Wind tunnel experiments on finned models, internal heat conduction calculations, and direct observations of the morphology and internal structure of stegosaur plates support this hypothesis, demonstrating the comparative effectiveness of the plates as heat dissipaters, controllable through input blood flow rate, temperature, and body orientation (with respect to wind).

  12. The NATO Special Operations Forces Transformation Initiative: Opportunities and Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    republics in the Caucasus and Central Asia. This definition is cited in David S . Yost, NATO Transformed: The Alliance’s New Roles in International ...David S . Yost, NATO Transformed: The Alliance’s New Roles in International Security (Washington DC: US Institute of Peace Press, 1988), 122. 99...OPERATIONS FORCES TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE: OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES by Steven C. Taylor March 2009 Thesis Co-Advisors: David S . Yost

  13. Community College Internal Auditors: Internal Audit Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ronna; And Others

    This guidebook includes information compiled by the "Audit Manual" committee of Community College Internal Auditors (CCIA) from several California community college districts regarding their internal auditing practices. The first section of the guidebook discusses the purpose of internal audits, indicating that audits assist members of…

  14. Force reflection with compliance control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Two types of systems for force-reflecting control, which enables high force-reflection gain, are presented: position-error-based force reflection and low-pass-filtered force reflection. Both of the systems are combined with shared compliance control. In the position-error-based class, the position error between the commanded and the actual position of a compliantly controlled robot is used to provide force reflection. In the low-pass-filtered force reflection class, the low-pass-filtered output of the compliance control is used to provide force reflection. The increase in force reflection gain can be more than 10-fold as compared to a conventional high-bandwidth pure force reflection system, when high compliance values are used for the compliance control.

  15. Diamagnetic force on a flux tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, T.

    1983-01-01

    The diamagnetic force on a straight flux tube is elucidated. The case when the flux tube has a circular cross section is considered, and the result is generalized to the case of noncircular cross section. The result shows that when the external magnetic field is uniform, the diamagnetic force is simply equal to the vector multiplication of the internal conduction current and the external magnetic field. It is independent of the size and shape of the cross section of the flux tube. This is analogous to the Kutta-Joukowski theorem that the aerodynamic lift force is proportional to the vector multiplication of the unperturbed flow velocity and the circulation around the airfoil. When the external magnetic field is nonuniform, the diamagnetic force has an additional contribution which is proportional to the gradient of magnetic pressure and to the volume of the flux tube. The constant of proportionality, which is shown to be equal to two for a circular cross section, indicates the enhancement of the nonuniformity of the external magnetic field in the vicinity of the periphery by the polarization current.

  16. Longwave radiative forcing by aqueous aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been focused on the role of aerosols in climatic change because of their potential cooling impacts due to light scattering. Recent advances in infrared spectroscopy using cylindrical internal reflectance have allowed the longwave absorption of dissolved aerosol species and the associated liquid water to be accurately determined and evaluated. Experimental measurements using these techniques have shown that dissolved sulfate, nitrate, and numerous other aerosol species will act to cause greenhouse effects. Preliminary calculations indicate that the longwave climate forcing (i.e., heating) for sulfate aerosol will be comparable in magnitude to the cooling effect produced by light scattering. However, more detailed modeling will clearly be needed to address the impact of the longwave forcing due to aerosols as a function of atmospheric height and composition. Their work has shown that aerosol composition will be important in determining longwave forcing, while shortwave forcing will be more related to the physical size of the aerosol droplets. On the basis of these studies, it is increasingly apparent that aerosols, fogs, and clouds play a key role in determining the radiative balance of the atmosphere and in controlling regional and global climates.

  17. Interparticle Forces Underlying Nanoparticle Self-Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Yan, Cong; Wang, Tie

    2015-12-02

    Studies on the self-assembly of nanoparticles have been a hot topic in nanotechnology for decades and still remain relevant for the present and future due to their tunable collective properties as well as their remarkable applications to a wide range of fields. The novel properties of nanoparticle assemblies arise from their internal interactions and assemblies with the desired architecture key to constructing novel nanodevices. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the interparticle forces of nanoparticle self-assemblies is a pre-requisite to the design and control of the assembly processes, so as to fabricate the ideal nanomaterial and nanoproducts. Here, different categories of interparticle forces are classified and discussed according to their origins, behaviors and functions during the assembly processes, and the induced collective properties of the corresponding nanoparticle assemblies. Common interparticle forces, such as van der Waals forces, electrostatic interactions, electromagnetic dipole-dipole interactions, hydrogen bonds, solvophonic interactions, and depletion interactions are discussed in detail. In addition, new categories of assembly principles are summarized and introduced. These are termed template-mediated interactions and shape-complementary interactions. A deep understanding of the interactions inside self-assembled nanoparticles, and a broader perspective for the future synthesis and fabrication of these promising nanomaterials is provided.

  18. Miniature drag force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilevered beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like that of a second order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  19. Force Feedback Joystick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    I-FORCE, a computer peripheral from Immersion Corporation, was derived from virtual environment and human factors research at the Advanced Displays and Spatial Perception Laboratory at Ames Research Center in collaboration with Stanford University Center for Design Research. Entrepreneur Louis Rosenberg, a former Stanford researcher, now president of Immersion, collaborated with Dr. Bernard Adelstein at Ames on studies of perception in virtual reality. The result was an inexpensive way to incorporate motors and a sophisticated microprocessor into joysticks and other game controllers. These devices can emulate the feel of a car on the skid, a crashing plane, the bounce of a ball, compressed springs, or other physical phenomenon. The first products incorporating I-FORCE technology include CH- Products' line of FlightStick and CombatStick controllers.

  20. Force Modulator System

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  1. Stochastically forced zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Kaushik

    This thesis investigates the dynamics of multiple zonal jets, that spontaneously emerge on the barotropic beta-plane, driven by a homogenous and rapidly decorrelating forcing and damped by bottom drag. Decomposing the barotropic vorticity equation into the zonal-mean and eddy equations, and neglecting the eddy-eddy interactions, defines the quasi-linear (QL) system. Numerical solution of the QL system shows zonal jets with length scales comparable to jets obtained by solving the nonlinear (NL) system. Starting with the QL system, one can construct a deterministic equation for the evolution of the two-point single-time correlation function of the vorticity, from which one can obtain the Reynolds stress that drives the zonal mean flow. This deterministic system has an exact nonlinear solution, which is a homogenous eddy field with no jets. When the forcing is also isotropic in space, we characterize the linear stability of this jetless solution by calculating the critical stability curve in the parameter space and successfully comparing this analytic result with numerical solutions of the QL system. But the critical drag required for the onset of NL zonostrophic instability is up to a factor of six smaller than that for QL zonostrophic instability. The constraint of isotropic forcing is then relaxed and spatially anisotropic forcing is used to drive the jets. Meridionally drifting jets are observed whenever the forcing breaks an additional symmetry that we refer to as mirror, or reflexional symmetry. The magnitude of drift speed in our results shows a strong variation with both mu and beta: while the drift speed decreases almost linearly with decreasing mu, it actually increases as beta decreases. Similar drifting jets are also observed in QL, with the same direction (i.e. northward or southward) and similar magnitude as NL jet-drift. Starting from the laminar solution, and assuming a mean-flow that varies slowly with reference to the scale of the eddies, we obtain

  2. Suicide and Forced Marriage

    PubMed Central

    Pridmore, Saxby; Walter, Garry

    2013-01-01

    Background: The prevailing view that the vast majority of those who complete suicide have an underlying psychiatric disorder has been recently challenged by research on the contribution of “predicaments”, in the absence of mental illness, to suicide. In this paper, we sought data to support the notion that forced marriage may lead to suicide without the presence of psychiatric disorder. Methods: Historical records, newspapers, and the electronic media were searched for examples. Results: Two examples from ancient times and six from the last hundred years were located and described. Conclusion: These cases suggest that forced marriage may lead to suicide and complements earlier findings that loss of fortune, health, liberty, and reputation may lead to suicide in the absence of mental disorder. PMID:23983577

  3. Joint Forces Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    for countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in space. The Space Operations Center ( SPOC ), USSPACECOM is the single point...of contact for assessing space capabilities. Combatant commanders, subordinate JFCs, and Services can access this information from the SPOC via the...special operations forces SPOC Space Operations Center SSBN fleet ballistic missile submarine SST space support team UJTL Universal Joint Task List UN

  4. Ultrasonic Force Microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Oleg; Briggs, Andrew

    Ultrasonic Force Microscopy, or UFM, allows combination of two apparently mutually exclusive requirements for the nanomechanical probe—high stiffness for the efficient indentation and high mechanical compliance that brings force sensitivity. Somewhat inventively, UFM allows to combine these two virtues in the same cantilever by using indention of the sample at high frequency, when cantilever is very rigid, but detecting the result of this indention at much lower frequency. That is made possible due to the extreme nonlinearity of the nanoscale tip-surface junction force-distance dependence, that acts as "mechanical diode" detecting ultrasound in AFM. After introducing UFM principles, we discuss features of experimental UFM implementation, and the theory of contrast in this mode, progressing to quantitative measurements of contact stiffness. A variety of UFM applications ranging from semiconductor quantum nanostructures, graphene, very large scale integrated circuits, and reinforced ceramics to polymer composites and biological materials is presented via comprehensive imaging gallery accompanied by the guidance for the optimal UFM measurements of these materials. We also address effects of adhesion and topography on the elasticity imaging and the approaches for reducing artifacts connected with these effects. This is complemented by another extremely useful feature of UFM—ultrasound induced superlubricity that allows damage free imaging of materials ranging from stiff solid state devices and graphene to biological materials. Finally, we proceed to the exploration of time-resolved nanoscale phenomena using nonlinear mixing of multiple vibration frequencies in ultrasonic AFM—Heterodyne Force Microscopy, or HFM, that also include mixing of ultrasonic vibration with other periodic physical excitations, eg. electrical, photothermal, etc. Significant section of the chapter analyzes the ability of UFM and HFM to detect subsurface mechanical inhomogeneities, as well as

  5. The task force process

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, J.S.

    1995-01-31

    This paper focuses on the unique aspects of the Fernald Citizens Task Force process that have contributed to a largely successful public participation effort at Fernald. The Fernald Citizens Task Force passed quickly by many procedural issues. Instead, the Task Force concentrated on (a) educating itself about the site, its problems, and possible solutions, and (b) choosing a directed way to approach its mandate: To make recommendations on several {open_quotes}big picture{close_quotes} issues, including future use of the site, cleanup levels, waste disposition, and cleanup priorities. This paper presents the approach used at Fernald for establishing and running a focused site-specific advisory board, the key issues that have been faced, and how these issues were resolved. The success of Fernald in establishing a strong and functioning site-specific advisory board serves as a useful model for other DOE facilities, although the Fernald model is just one of many approaches that can be taken. However, the approach presented here has worked extremely well for Fernald.

  6. Modified entropic force

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Changjun

    2010-04-15

    The theory of statistical thermodynamics tells us the equipartition law of energy does not hold in the limit of very low temperatures. It is found the Debye model is very successful in explaining the experimental results for most of the solid objects. Motivated by this fact, we modify the entropic force formula which is proposed very recently. Since the Unruh temperature is proportional to the strength of the gravitational field, so the modified entropic force formula is an extension of the Newtonian gravity to the weak field. On the contrary, general relativity extends Newtonian gravity to the strong field case. Corresponding to Debye temperature, there exists a Debye acceleration g{sub D}. It is found the Debye acceleration is g{sub D}=10{sup -15} N kg{sup -1}. This acceleration is very much smaller than the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -4} N kg{sup -1} which is felt by Neptune and the gravitational acceleration 10{sup -10} N kg{sup -1} felt by the Sun. Therefore, the modified entropic force can be very well approximated by the Newtonian gravity in the Solar System and in the Galaxy. With this Debye acceleration, we find the current cosmic speeding up can be explained without invoking any kind of dark energy.

  7. ``Force,'' ontology, and language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, David T.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2009-06-01

    We introduce a linguistic framework through which one can interpret systematically students’ understanding of and reasoning about force and motion. Some researchers have suggested that students have robust misconceptions or alternative frameworks grounded in everyday experience. Others have pointed out the inconsistency of students’ responses and presented a phenomenological explanation for what is observed, namely, knowledge in pieces. We wish to present a view that builds on and unifies aspects of this prior research. Our argument is that many students’ difficulties with force and motion are primarily due to a combination of linguistic and ontological difficulties. It is possible that students are primarily engaged in trying to define and categorize the meaning of the term “force” as spoken about by physicists. We found that this process of negotiation of meaning is remarkably similar to that engaged in by physicists in history. In this paper we will describe a study of the historical record that reveals an analogous process of meaning negotiation, spanning multiple centuries. Using methods from cognitive linguistics and systemic functional grammar, we will present an analysis of the force and motion literature, focusing on prior studies with interview data. We will then discuss the implications of our findings for physics instruction.

  8. Illinois task force on global climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, B.S.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document progress in the areas of national policy development, emissions reduction, research and education, and adaptation, and to identify specific actions that will be undertaken to implement the Illinois state action plan. The task force has been tracking national and international climate change policy, and helping shape national policy agenda. Identification and implementation of cost-effective mitigation measures has been performed for emissions reduction. In the area of research and education, the task force is developing the capacity to measure climate change indicators, maintaining and enhancing Illinois relevant research, and strengthening climate change education. Activities relevant to adaptation to new policy include strengthening water laws and planning for adaptation. 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Adding Value to Force Diagrams: Representing Relative Force Magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, Paul

    2011-05-01

    Nearly all physics instructors recognize the instructional value of force diagrams, and this journal has published several collections of exercises to improve student skill in this area.1-4 Yet some instructors worry that too few students perceive the conceptual and problem-solving utility of force diagrams,4-6 and over recent years a rich variety of approaches has been proposed to add value to force diagrams. Suggestions include strategies for identifying candidate forces,6,7 emphasizing the distinction between "contact" and "noncontact" forces,5,8 and the use of computer-based tutorials.9,10 Instructors have suggested a variety of conventions for constructing force diagrams, including approaches to arrow placement and orientation2,11-13 and proposed notations for locating forces or marking action-reaction force pairs.8,11,14,15

  10. Force transmission in epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Claudia G; Martin, Adam C

    2016-03-01

    In epithelial tissues, cells constantly generate and transmit forces between each other. Forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton regulate tissue shape and structure and also provide signals that influence cells' decisions to divide, die, or differentiate. Forces are transmitted across epithelia because cells are mechanically linked through junctional complexes, and forces can propagate through the cell cytoplasm. Here, we review some of the molecular mechanisms responsible for force generation, with a specific focus on the actomyosin cortex and adherens junctions. We then discuss evidence for how these mechanisms promote cell shape changes and force transmission in tissues.

  11. Risk assessment in international operations

    SciTech Connect

    Stricklin, Daniela L.

    2008-11-15

    During international peace-keeping missions, a diverse number of non-battle hazards may be encountered, which range from heavily polluted areas, endemic disease, toxic industrial materials, local violence, traffic, and even psychological factors. Hence, elevated risk levels from a variety of sources are encountered during deployments. With the emphasis within the Swedish military moving from national defense towards prioritization of international missions in atypical environments, the risk of health consequences, including long term health effects, has received greater consideration. The Swedish military is interested in designing an optimal approach for assessment of health threats during deployments. The Medical Intelligence group at FOI CBRN Security and Defence in Umea has, on request from and in collaboration with the Swedish Armed Forces, reviewed a variety of international health threat and risk assessment models for military operations. Application of risk assessment methods used in different phases of military operations will be reviewed. An overview of different international approaches used in operational risk management (ORM) will be presented as well as a discussion of the specific needs and constraints for health risk assessment in military operations. This work highlights the specific challenges of risk assessment that are unique to the deployment setting such as the assessment of exposures to a variety of diverse hazards concurrently.

  12. Mesoscale Eddy - Internal Wave Coupling:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzin, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    The issue of internal wave--mesoscale eddy interactions is revisited. Direct estimates of energy transfer from the Local Dynamics Experiment of the PolyMode field program (Polzin, 2010 JPO) return viscosity estimates of ν h \\cong 50 m2 s-1 and ν v + (f2)/(N^2) Kh \\cong 2.5×10-3 m2 s-1. These estimates indicate that mesoscale eddy-internal wave interactions may play an O(1) role in the mesoscale eddy energy budget as dissipation and the internal wave budget as a source. Radiation balance equation formulations for this coupling (Müller 1976, JFM) are examined. In these formulations permanent transfer of energy and internal wave pseudomomentum for mesoscale eddy potential vorticity is enabled by nonlinearity in the wavefield. Revision of radiation balance equation formulations to account for non-local effects returns predictions of ν h \\cong 50-100 m2 s-1 and ν v + (f2)/(N^2) Kh \\cong -1×10-3 to 4×10-3 m2 s-1. The prediction for the effective vertical viscosity is sensitive to how internal wave energy is distributed in the spectral domain with negative values appropriate to the Garrett and Munk spectrum and positive values appropriate to the background spectrum in the LDE area. Geographic scalings in terms of latitude, stratification and mesoscale eddy variability will be described. The process described here is best interpreted as an amplifier of a pre-existing or externally forced finite amplitude wavefield rather than the spontaneous imbalance of a linear field. Energy, pseudomomentum and vorticity can be transfered from the slow manifold (geostrophically balanced motions) to the fast manifold (internal gravity waves) via linear wave propagation in asymmetric background flows, but that transfer is reversible. The permanent transfer is accomplished by nonlinearity on the fast manifold.

  13. Air Force Security Forces Professionalism: Useful Insights for Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-27

    perceived ground force within an air force also renders its development analysis worthy. By careful study of Security Forces history , both written and...social science works, historical accounts of each period, and personal interviews. Additionally, Defenders of the Force: The History of the United...29 years in this period hold remarkably significant events in US history , they also hold events significant to the professionalization of Air Police

  14. Exploring Sources of Variation in Studies of Knowledge Structure Coherence: Comparing Force Meanings and Force Meaning Consistency across Two Turkish Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Douglas B.; Menekse, Muhsin; Ozdemir, Gokhan; D'Angelo, Cynthis M.; Price Schleigh, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Substantial variation has been observed across an international series of studies examining the consistency of students' explanations of force and the most common meanings of force apparent in those explanations. On the surface, the variations among studies might be attributed to differences at the national level, but the studies also demonstrate…

  15. Toward an Internal Gravity Wave Spectrum in Global Ocean Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-14

    14 MAY 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Toward an Internal Gravity Wave Spectrum in Global...resolution global ocean models forced by atmospheric fields and tides are beginning to display realistic internal gravity wave spectra, especially as

  16. The Internal Agency Approach to Managing and Developing Marketing Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruell, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    Argues that the internal agency model of a marketing communications department forces the department to compete with outside sources for work, while department members sharpen their skills and improve their knowledge of their company's business. Describes the process for creating such an internal agency, including initiating, implementing, and…

  17. Exploring the Trend toward Isomorphism in International Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Ryan; Henkin, Alan B.

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on isomorphic tendencies among programs in the emerging field of international education. The authors consider forces that may induce movement toward higher levels of homogeneity or isomorphism in both form and structure and examine international education in the context of systems in which programs are embedded. Institutional…

  18. Developing Curriculum: Knowledge and Skills Essential for an International Salesforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhland, Sheila K.

    A study explored the additional knowledge and skills an international salesforce needs based upon 95 respondents from Wisconsin manufacturing companies. Six areas were evaluated by sales representatives involved with international sales and marketing to identify the education and training needed within the next 3 years by the work force. Four…

  19. International Education Hubs: Collaboration for Competitiveness and Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jane

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the development of education hubs, a recent phenomenon in international higher education. Three models of hubs are examined in relation to the forces, risks, and opportunities of globalization and how local and international collaborations are essential for both global competitiveness and sustainability.

  20. State Defense Forces: Forces for NORTHCOM and Homeland Security?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-26

    Listing of State Defense Forces: 1. Alabama State Defense Force (ALSDF). http://www.alsdf.org 2. Alaska State Defense Force ( ASDF ) http://www.ak...prepared.com/ asdf 3. California State Military Reserve (CASMR) http://www.militarymuseum.org/CASMR.html 4. Connecticut State Militia http://ctarng

  1. Surveying your internal customers.

    PubMed

    Weir, V L

    1998-06-01

    Internal customers often are overlooked when business techniques are applied. By applying common external customer satisfaction survey techniques to internal business functions, one hospital identified areas for improvement.

  2. Travelers' Health: International Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... a malaria-endemic area (See Chapter 3, Malaria ). Tuberculosis All internationally adopted children should be screened for tuberculosis (TB) after arriving in the United States. Internationally ...

  3. Globalization and the Growth of International Educational Testing and National Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamens, David H.; McNeely, Connie L.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors develop an argument about the global forces that have led to the explosive growth of national educational assessment and international testing. In particular, the authors argue that the international acceptance of testing comes from key ideological forces in the world polity that are associated with the accelerating…

  4. The Air Force concentrating photovoltaic array program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geis, Jack W.

    1987-01-01

    A summary is given of Air Force solar concentrator projects beginning with the Rockwell International study program in 1977. The Satellite Materials Hardening Programs (SMATH) explored and developed techniques for hardening planar solar cell array power systems to the combined nuclear and laser radiation threat environments. A portion of program dollars was devoted to developing a preliminary design for a hardened solar concentrator. The results of the Survivable Concentrating Photovoltaic Array (SCOPA) program, and the design, fabrication and flight qualification of a hardened concentrator panel are discussed.

  5. Understanding Forces: What's the Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibble, Bob

    2006-01-01

    Misconceptions about forces are very common and seem to arise from everyday experience and use of words. Ways to improve students' understanding of forces, as used in recent a IOP CD-Rom, are discussed here.

  6. Uncertainty in NIST Force Measurements.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Tom

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses upon the uncertainty of force calibration measurements at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The uncertainty of the realization of force for the national deadweight force standards at NIST is discussed, as well as the uncertainties associated with NIST's voltage-ratio measuring instruments and with the characteristics of transducers being calibrated. The combined uncertainty is related to the uncertainty of dissemination for force transfer standards sent to NIST for calibration.

  7. International nursing: the past 25 years and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, S

    2000-01-01

    International nursing has grown substantially in the last 25 years. Once practiced only during war time, with immigrant populations, or in peace time in consultative roles, international nursing is now common, with direct practice, education, consultation, and research collaboration as the roles in which nurses work across borders. A brief history of international nursing, forces that have influenced its growth, and an assessment of its future are discussed.

  8. Force-Field Parameter Fitter

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-27

    ParFit is a flexible and extendable framework and library of classes for fitting force-field parameters to data from high-level ab-initio calculations on the basis of deterministic and stochastic algorithms. Currently, the code is fitting MM3 and Merck force-field parameters but could easily extend to other force-field types.

  9. Congress and the Air Force.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-01

    know where to go to find out that information. The "Congress and the Air Force" Internet web page serves as a " one - stop shop" where Air Force personnel...Congress. The need for a " one - stop " guide is clear. The literature on this topic is not readily accessible by the Air Force member out in the field who

  10. Radiative forcing of climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanswamy, V.; Shine, Keith; Leovy, Conway; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Rodhe, Henning; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Ding, M.; Lelieveld, Joseph; Edmonds, Jae A.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1991-01-01

    An update of the scientific discussions presented in Chapter 2 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report is presented. The update discusses the atmospheric radiative and chemical species of significance for climate change. There are two major objectives of the present update. The first is an extension of the discussion on the Global Warming Potentials (GWP's), including a reevaluation in view of the updates in the lifetimes of the radiatively active species. The second important objective is to underscore major developments in the radiative forcing of climate due to the observed stratospheric ozone losses occurring between 1979 and 1990.

  11. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  12. Mobile Strike force 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-23

    ofDirectots (BOD) meein. However, this schdule was preempted by the CSA’s desir to begin msakng decisions on Force = Ol in July3 1994. In order to...two MSGs And three OPPOR regiments. ____ a aw-i In alternatives 5 And 6, the OPFOR reduced the V.i + 8,4U. 6 two Sstoan aveaeof 92pern U___ 9 Ol 7 U...to the MSF. The MSG commander has his own deep fight and sould be asking for MSF support if needed. The MSF fight must be tied into the corps ble espa

  13. Automated connector force testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmons, L. A.

    1992-11-01

    A gaging system was developed to modernize the force testing of electrical connectors and components using an IBM personal computer based data acquisition system. Two mechanical fixtures were fabricated using load cells and LVDT transducers to perform the measurements. General purpose software routines perform the operator interface, data acquisition, storage, retrieval, and printout. The system will perform statistical analysis of the part data to aid in evaluation of the manufacturing process. The modular software concept allows the system to be tailored for many other applications using a text editor.

  14. Reconstructing the distributed force on an atomic force microscope cantilever.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ryan; Killgore, Jason

    2017-03-10

    A methodology is developed to reconstruct the force applied to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever given the shape in which it vibrates. This is accomplished by rewriting Bernoulli-Euler beam theory such that the force on the cantilever is approximated as a linear superposition of the theoretical cantilever eigenmodes. The weighting factors in this summation are calculated from the amplitude and phase measured along the length of the cantilever. The accuracy of the force reconstruction is shown to depend on the frequency at which the measurement is performed, the number of discrete points measured along the length of the cantilever, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured signal. In contrast to other AFM force reconstruction techniques, this method can reconstruct the distribution of force applied over the length of the AFM cantilever. However, this method performs poorly for localized forces applied to the cantilever, such as is typical of most tip-sample interaction forces. Proof of concept experiments are performed on an electrostatically excited cantilever and the expected force distribution is recovered. This force reconstruction technique offers previously unavailable insight into the distributed forces experienced by an AFM cantilever.

  15. Reconstructing the distributed force on an atomic force microscope cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Killgore, Jason

    2017-03-01

    A methodology is developed to reconstruct the force applied to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever given the shape in which it vibrates. This is accomplished by rewriting Bernoulli–Euler beam theory such that the force on the cantilever is approximated as a linear superposition of the theoretical cantilever eigenmodes. The weighting factors in this summation are calculated from the amplitude and phase measured along the length of the cantilever. The accuracy of the force reconstruction is shown to depend on the frequency at which the measurement is performed, the number of discrete points measured along the length of the cantilever, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured signal. In contrast to other AFM force reconstruction techniques, this method can reconstruct the distribution of force applied over the length of the AFM cantilever. However, this method performs poorly for localized forces applied to the cantilever, such as is typical of most tip–sample interaction forces. Proof of concept experiments are performed on an electrostatically excited cantilever and the expected force distribution is recovered. This force reconstruction technique offers previously unavailable insight into the distributed forces experienced by an AFM cantilever.

  16. Interfacial forces between silica surfaces measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal particle stability and some other interfacial phenomena are governed by interfacial force interactions. The two well known forces are van der Waals force and electrostatic force, as documented by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Moreover, advances in modern instrumentation and colloid science suggested that some short-ranged forces or structure forces are important for relevant colloidal systems. The interfacial and/or molecular forces can be measured as a resultant force as function of separation distance by atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloid probe. This article presents a discussion on AFM colloid probe measurement of silica particle and silica wafer surfaces in solutions with some technical notifications in measurement and data convolution mechanisms. The measured forces are then analyzed and discussed based on the 'constant charge' and 'constant potential' models of DLVO theory. The difference between the prediction of DLVO theory and the measured results indicates that there is a strong short-range structure force between the two hydrophilic surfaces, even at extremely low ionic concentration, such as Milli-Q water purity solution.

  17. Overestimation of force during matching of externally generated forces.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lee D; Taylor, Janet L; Gandevia, Simon C

    2011-02-01

    If a weight is applied to a finger and the subject asked to produce the same force, the subject generates a force larger than the weight. That is, subjects overestimate the force applied by an external target when matching it. Details of this force overestimation are not well understood. We show that subjects overestimate small target weights, but not larger ones. Furthermore we show for the first time that the force overestimation consists of two components. The first component is a constant. The second component depends on the precise magnitude of the weight and is only present when subjects hold the target weight against gravity. We suggest that the two components are generated in different phases of the force-matching task, are due to different processes, and must have an influence on all proprioceptive judgements of force.

  18. Bone contact forces on the distal tibia during the stance phase of running.

    PubMed

    Sasimontonkul, Siriporn; Bay, Brian K; Pavol, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Although the tibia is a common site of stress fractures in runners, the loading of the tibia during running is not well understood. An integrated experimental and modeling approach was therefore used to estimate the bone contact forces acting on the distal end of the tibia during the stance phase of running, and the contributions of external and internal sources to these forces. Motion capture and force plate data were recorded for 10 male runners as they ran at 3.5-4 m/s. From these data, the joint reaction force (JRF), muscle forces, and bone contact force on the tibia were computed at the ankle using inverse dynamics and optimization methods. The distal end of the tibia was compressed and sheared posteriorly throughout most of stance, with respective peak forces of 9.00+/-1.13 and 0.57+/-0.18 body weights occurring during mid stance. Internal muscle forces were the primary source of tibial compression, whereas the JRF was the primary source of tibial shear due to the forward inclination of the leg relative to the external ground reaction force. The muscle forces and JRF both acted to compress the tibia, but induced tibial shear forces in opposing directions during stance, magnifying tibial compression and reducing tibial shear. The superposition of the peak compressive and posterior shear forces at mid stance may contribute to stress fractures in the posterior face of the tibia. The implications are that changes in running technique could potentially reduce stress fracture risk.

  19. International Technology Exchange Division: 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The Office of Technology Development (OTD) was established to ensure that reliable and acceptable technologies are available for implementation at DOE sites and that a technically trained work force is available to complete the EM mission by 2019. OTD established the International Technology Exchange Staff (ITES) to identify, evaluate, and acquire international technologies which can accelerate US DOE cleanup operations. ITES`s goal is to pursue international collaboration among government organizations, educational institutions, and private industry to identify world-wide needs and available technologies that will meet US environmental needs in general, and EM cleanup needs in particular; and establish mechanisms by which US government ER/WM technologies will be transferred to the US private sector for commercialization and export to international markets. ITES has developed the following strategic objectives to implement its international goals: develop and implement EM`s policy for international programs in accordance with DOE and US Government policies and regulations; establish efficient and predictable international technology transfer mechanisms; assist the US private sector in the commercialization and deployment of federally funded EM technologies and related knowledge in international markets; leverage US and non-US resources to accelerate international development and regulatory acceptance of EM technologies; contribute to the improvement of EM`s training of US students, scientists, and managers on international environmental issues. A summary and descriptions of program activities and accomplishments are given for 17 programs which comprise the four main areas of the ITES program: Activities with the Former Soviet Union, International Technology Transfer, International Cooperation, and Information Systems and Publications. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination.

    PubMed

    Vermillion, Billy C; Lum, Peter S; Lee, Sang Wook

    2015-10-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct proximal kinematics (elbow/shoulder), but resulted in similar end-point (hand) trajectories. While temporal coordination of grip and load forces remained similar across the tasks, proximal kinematics significantly affected the grip force-to-load force ratio (P = 0.042), intrinsic finger muscle activation (P = 0.045), and flexor-extensor ratio (P < 0.001). Biomechanical coupling between extrinsic hand muscles and the elbow joint cannot fully explain the observed changes, as task-related changes in intrinsic hand muscle activation were greater than in extrinsic hand muscles. Rather, between-task variation in grip force (highest during task 3) appears to contrast to that in shoulder joint velocity/acceleration (lowest during task 3). These results suggest that complex neural coupling between the distal and proximal upper extremity musculature may affect grip force control during movements, also indicated by task-related changes in intermuscular coherence of muscle pairs, including intrinsic finger muscles. Furthermore, examination of the fingertip force showed that the human motor system may attempt to reduce variability in task-relevant motor output (grip force-to-load force ratio), while allowing larger fluctuations in output less relevant to task goal (shear force-to-grip force ratio).

  1. Bisensory force feedback in telerobotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Lorraine E. P.

    2001-11-01

    Effectively controlling a robot remotely to perform a desired task---teleoperation---offers benefits in improving human safety, reducing workload, providing location accessibility, and in convenience. Because these benefits become more evident under the extreme environmental conditions of space operations, NASA Johnson Space Center has been actively researching the usage of and improvements in teleoperations. Teleoperator task performance has been shown to improve with the addition of sensory feedback. In particular, providing force-feedback to a human operator, has been shown to decrease task completion times and lessen potentially damaging contact forces between the slave robot and its target work environment. We summarize the design, development, and usage of a human interface system built to provide position control as well as both kinesthetic and visual six-axis force-feedback displays to a human teleoperator of a remote manipulator. The system developed is utilized as an experimentation platform evaluating the merit of providing force feedback through both kinesthetic (muscular position and force) and substituted visual displays on a typical space operations task utilizing an anthropomorphic slave robot called "Robonaut". Teleoperator performance of a drill task is measured under four different display scenarios: no force display, visual force display, kinesthetic, and both. Task completion times and contact forces are measured, and subjective questionnaire responses collected. Our results indicate lower maximum force/torque, lower cumulative force/torque, and a greater task consistency with any type of feedback, with no significant differences in task completion time. Cumulative force/torque was reduced between 46--51% with visually substituted force feedback, 69--81% with kinesthetic feedback and 63--92% with both forms of feedback. Maximum force/torque variance between subjects was reduced between 61--90% with any type of force display, indicating improved

  2. Force reflecting hand controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaffee, Douglas A. (Inventor); Snow, Edward R. (Inventor); Townsend, William T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A universal input device for interfacing a human operator with a slave machine such as a robot or the like includes a plurality of serially connected mechanical links extending from a base. A handgrip is connected to the mechanical links distal from the base such that a human operator may grasp the handgrip and control the position thereof relative to the base through the mechanical links. A plurality of rotary joints is arranged to connect the mechanical links together to provide at least three translational degrees of freedom and at least three rotational degrees of freedom of motion of the handgrip relative to the base. A cable and pulley assembly for each joint is connected to a corresponding motor for transmitting forces from the slave machine to the handgrip to provide kinesthetic feedback to the operator and for producing control signals that may be transmitted from the handgrip to the slave machine. The device gives excellent kinesthetic feedback, high-fidelity force/torque feedback, a kinematically simple structure, mechanically decoupled motion in all six degrees of freedom, and zero backlash. The device also has a much larger work envelope, greater stiffness and responsiveness, smaller stowage volume, and better overlap of the human operator's range of motion than previous designs.

  3. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  4. Ground reaction forces during treadmill running in microgravity.

    PubMed

    De Witt, John K; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L

    2014-07-18

    Astronauts perform treadmill exercise during long-duration space missions to counter the harmful effects of microgravity exposure upon bone, muscle, and cardiopulmonary health. When exercising in microgravity, astronauts wear a harness and bungee system that provides forces that maintain attachment to the treadmill. Typical applied forces are less than body weight. The decreased gravity-replacement force could result in differences in ground-reaction force at a given running speed when compared to those achieved in normal gravity, which could influence the adaptive response to the performed exercise. Seven astronauts (6 m/1 f) who completed approximately 6-month missions on the International Space Station (ISS) completed a preflight (1G) and multiple in-flight (0G) data collection sessions. Ground-reaction forces were measured during running at speeds of 8.0 kph and greater on an instrumented treadmill in the lab and on the ISS. Ground-reaction forces in 0G were less than in 1G for a given speed depending upon the gravity-replacement force, but did increase with increased speed and gravity-replacement force. Ground-reaction forces attained in 1G during slower running could be attained by increasing running speed and/or increasing gravity-replacement forces in 0G. Loading rates in 1G, however, could not be replicated in 0G. While current gravity-replacement force devices are limited in load delivery magnitude, we recommend increasing running speeds to increase the mechanical loads applied to the musculoskeletal system during 0G treadmill exercise, and to potentially increase exercise session efficiency.

  5. Short-range Fundamental forces

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniadis, I; Baessler, Stefan; Buechner, M; Fedorov, General Victor; Hoedl, S.; Lambrecht, A; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Pignol, G; Reynaud, S.; Sobolev, Yu.

    2011-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: (1) spin-independent forces; and (2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Different experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experiments. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments.

  6. Updates on Force Limiting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Scharton, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The following conventional force limiting methods currently practiced in deriving force limiting specifications assume one-dimensional translation source and load apparent masses: Simple TDOF model; Semi-empirical force limits; Apparent mass, etc.; Impedance method. Uncorrelated motion of the mounting points for components mounted on panels and correlated, but out-of-phase, motions of the support structures are important and should be considered in deriving force limiting specifications. In this presentation "rock-n-roll" motions of the components supported by panels, which leads to a more realistic force limiting specifications are discussed.

  7. How vinculin regulates force transmission.

    PubMed

    Dumbauld, David W; Lee, Ted T; Singh, Ankur; Scrimgeour, Jan; Gersbach, Charles A; Zamir, Evan A; Fu, Jianping; Chen, Christopher S; Curtis, Jennifer E; Craig, Susan W; García, Andrés J

    2013-06-11

    Focal adhesions mediate force transfer between ECM-integrin complexes and the cytoskeleton. Although vinculin has been implicated in force transmission, few direct measurements have been made, and there is little mechanistic insight. Using vinculin-null cells expressing vinculin mutants, we demonstrate that vinculin is not required for transmission of adhesive and traction forces but is necessary for myosin contractility-dependent adhesion strength and traction force and for the coupling of cell area and traction force. Adhesion strength and traction forces depend differentially on vinculin head (V(H)) and tail domains. V(H) enhances adhesion strength by increasing ECM-bound integrin-talin complexes, independently from interactions with vinculin tail ligands and contractility. A full-length, autoinhibition-deficient mutant (T12) increases adhesion strength compared with VH, implying roles for both vinculin activation and the actin-binding tail. In contrast to adhesion strength, vinculin-dependent traction forces absolutely require a full-length and activated molecule; V(H) has no effect. Physical linkage of the head and tail domains is required for maximal force responses. Residence times of vinculin in focal adhesions, but not T12 or V(H), correlate with applied force, supporting a mechanosensitive model for vinculin activation in which forces stabilize vinculin's active conformation to promote force transfer.

  8. Force oscillations simulating breathing maneuvers do not prevent force adaptation.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Chris; Jiao, Yuekan; Seow, Chun Y; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2012-07-01

    Airway inflammation in patients with asthma exposes the airway smooth muscle (ASM) to a variety of spasmogens. These spasmogens increase ASM tone, which can lead to force adaptation. Length oscillations of ASM, which occur in vivo due to breathing maneuvers, can attenuate force adaptation. However, in the presence of tone, the force oscillations required to achieve these length oscillations may be unphysiologic (i.e., magnitude greater than the ones achieved due to the swings in transpulmonary pressure required for breathing). In the present study, we applied force oscillations simulating the tension oscillations experienced by the wall of a fourth-generation airway during tidal breathing with or without deep inspirations (DI) to ASM. The goal was to investigate whether force adaptation occurs in conditions mimicking breathing maneuvers. Tone was induced by carbachol (average, 20 nM), and the force-generating capacity of the ASM was assessed at 5-minute intervals before and after carbachol administration using electrical field stimulations (EFS). The results show that force oscillations applied before the introduction of tone had a small effect on the force produced by EFS (declined to 96.8% [P > 0.05] and 92.3% [P < 0.05] with and without DI, respectively). The tone induced by carbachol transiently decreased after a DI and declined significantly (P < 0.05) due to tidal breathing oscillations (25%). These force oscillations did not prevent force adaptation (gain of force of 11.2 ± 2.2 versus 13.5 ± 2.7 and 11.2 ± 3.0% in static versus dynamic conditions with or without DI, respectively). The lack of effect of simulated breathing maneuvers on force adaptation suggests that this gain in ASM force may occur in vivo and could contribute to the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.

  9. Internal displacement in Colombia: Fifteen distinguishing features.

    PubMed

    Shultz, James M; Ceballos, Ángela Milena Gómez; Espinel, Zelde; Oliveros, Sofia Rios; Fonseca, Maria Fernanda; Florez, Luis Jorge Hernandez

    2014-01-01

    This commentary aims to delineate the distinguishing features of conflict-induced internal displacement in the nation of Colombia, South America. Even as Colombia is currently implementing a spectrum of legal, social, economic, and health programs for "victims of armed conflict," with particular focus on internally displaced persons (IDPs), the dynamics of forced migration on a mass scale within this country are little known beyond national borders.   The authors of this commentary are embarking on a global mental health research program in Bogota, Colombia to define best practices for reaching the displaced population and implementing sustainable, evidence-based screening and intervention for common mental disorders. Presenting the defining characteristics of internal displacement in Colombia provides the context for our work and, more importantly, conveys the compelling and complex nature of this humanitarian crisis. We attempt to demonstrate Colombia's unique position within the global patterning of internal displacement.

  10. Chin force in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars.

  11. Oil, Earth mass and gravitational force.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-04-01

    Fossil fuels are intensively extracted from around the world faster than they are renewed. Regardless of direct and indirect effects of such extractions on climate change and biosphere, another issue relating to Earth's internal structure and Earth mass should receive at least some interest. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 34 billion barrels of oil (~4.7 trillion metric tons) and 9 billion tons of coal have been extracted in 2014 worldwide. Converting the amounts of oil and coal extracted over the last 3 decades and their respective reserves, intended to be extracted in the future, into mass values suggests that about 355 trillion tons, or ~5.86∗10(-9) (~0.0000000058)% of the Earth mass, would be 'lost'. Although this is a tiny percentage, modeling the potential loss of Earth mass may help figuring out a critical threshold of mass loss that should not be exceeded. Here, I briefly discuss whether such loss would have any potential consequences on the Earth's internal structure and on its gravitational force based on the Newton's law of gravitation that links the attraction force between planets to their respective masses and the distance that separate them.

  12. Assessing the Parameters for Determining Mission Accomplishment of the Philippine Marine Corps in Internal Security Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    the Philippine Marine Corps in Internal Security Operations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT...It is worthy to note that the Marine Corps perceive" s ISO primarily as a mere force on force employment (combat operations) against armed internal ...Virginia 22134-5068 MASTERS OF MILITARY STUDIES ASSESSING THE PARAMETERS FOR DETERMINING MISSION ACCOMPLISHMENT 011 THE PHILIPPINE MARINE CORPS IN INTERNAL

  13. Animal welfare and international trade.

    PubMed

    Thiermann, A B; Babcock, S

    2005-08-01

    Globalisation is becoming a force that is revolutionising international trade, particularly that of animals and animal products. There is increasing interest in animal welfare worldwide, and as part of its 2001-2005 Strategic Plan the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) identified the development of international standards on animal welfare as a priority. The OIE's scientific approach to standard-setting provides the foundation for the development, and acceptance by all OIE Member Countries, of these animal welfare guidelines. The paper discusses how these guidelines on animal welfare can be implemented, both within the provisions of World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements and within the framework of voluntary codes of conduct. Even if animal welfare guidelines are not covered by any WTO agreements in the future, bi- and multilateral agreements, voluntary corporate codes, and transparent labelling of products should result in a progressive acceptance of OIE guidelines. Ultimately, consumer demands and demonstrable gains in animal production will result in an incremental evolution in animal welfare consciousness and adherence to international standards.

  14. Forced to be right.

    PubMed

    Trout, J D

    2014-05-01

    In "Forced to be Free", Neil Levy surveys the raft of documented decision-making biases that humans are heir to, and advances several bold proposals designed to enhance the patient's judgment. Gratefully, Levy is moved by the psychological research on judgment and decision-making that documents people's inaccuracy when identifying courses of action will best promote their subjective well-being. But Levy is quick to favour the patient's present preferences, to ensure they get "final say" about their treatment. I urge the opposite inclination, raising doubts about whether the patient's "present preferences" are the best expression of their "final say". When there is adequate evidence that people, by their own lights, overemphasize their present preferences about the future, we should carefully depreciate those preferences, in effect biasing them to make the right decision by their own lights.

  15. Force Limit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  16. Forced cocurrent smoldering combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Dosanjh, S.S.; Pagni, P.J.; Fernandez-Pello, A.C.

    1987-05-01

    An analytic model of the propagation of smoldering combustion through a very porous solid fuel is presented. Here smoldering is initiated at the top of a long, radially insulated, uniform fuel cylinder, so that the smolder wave propagates downward, opposing an upward forced flow of oxidizer. Because the solid fuel and the gaseous oxidizer enter the reaction zone from the same direction, this configuration is referred to as cocurrent (or premixed-flame-like). It is assumed that the propagation of the smolder wave is one-dimensional and steady in a frame of reference moving with the wave. Buoyancy is included and shown to be negligible in the proposed application of a smoldering combustion experiment for use on the Space Shuttle. Radiation heat transfer is incorporated using the diffusion approximation and smoldering combustion is modeled by a finite rate, one-step reaction mechanism.

  17. [Galileo and centrifugal force].

    PubMed

    Vilain, Christiane

    This work intends to focus on Galileo's study of what is now called "centrifugal force," within the framework of the Second Day of his Dialogo written in 1632, rather than on the previously published commentaries on the topic. Galileo proposes three geometrical demonstrations in order to prove that gravity will always overcome centrifugalforce, and that the potential rotation of the Earth, whatever its speed, cannot in any case project objects beyond it. Each of these demonstrations must consequently contain an error and it has seemed to us that the first one had not been understood up until now. Our analysis offers an opportunity to return to Galileo's geometrical representation of dynamical questions; actually, we get an insight into the sophistication of Galileo's practices more than into his mistakes. Our second point, concerning the historiography of the problem, shows an evolution from anachronic critics to more contextual considerations, in the course of the second half of the twentieth century.

  18. Silicon force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  19. Future Air Force systems.

    PubMed

    Tremaine, S A

    1986-10-01

    Planning for the future is under way in earnest at the Aeronautical Systems Division (ASD) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It has been statistically established that it takes from 14-16 years from the generation of a new system idea to enter into engineering development. With this unpleasing, but realistic, schedule in mind, ASD has, during the last 3 years, been initiating long-term planning projects that are pre-starts for new system ideas. They are generated from throughout the Air Force and are locally managed and funded. Through this process, which spans from 12-14 months, specific and revolutionary new ideas for the systems of the future are generated. This article addresses more than a dozen specific new ideas in work at ASD today. These ideas range from a need to replace the C-130 type aircraft after the year 2000 to planning a follow-on to the B-18 well into the 21st century. Among other specific projects are investigation into an immortal fighter intended to be free of reliability and maintenance demands for an especially long period of operation, a new training system and advanced trainer to replace the T-38, a transatmospheric vehicle that could operate in the 100,000-500,000 foot flight region (30,480-152,400 m), and a new means of defending against hostile cruise missile launchers and cruise missiles. Other ideas are also addressed. The article concludes with emphasis on systems that can operate hypersonically in and out of the known atmosphere and greater use of airbreathing propulsion systems operating between Mach 3 and Mach 6.

  20. Forces and moments on the knee during kneeling and squatting.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Jonisha P; Porter, William L; Redfern, Mark S

    2011-08-01

    Euler angle decomposition and inverse dynamics were used to determine the knee angles and net forces and moments applied to the tibia during kneeling and squatting with and without kneepads for 10 subjects in four postures: squatting (Squat), kneeling on the right knee (One Knee), bilateral kneeling near full flexion (Near Full) and bilateral kneeling near 90° flexion (Near 90). Kneepads affected the knee flexion (p = .002), medial forces (p = .035), and internal rotation moments (p = .006). Squat created loading conditions that had higher varus (p < .001) and resultant moments (p = .027) than kneeling. One Knee resulted in the highest force magnitudes and net moments (p < .001) of the kneeling postures. Thigh-calf and heel-gluteus contact forces decreased the flexion moment on average by 48% during Squat and Near Full.

  1. Integrated force method versus displacement method for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1990-01-01

    A novel formulation termed the integrated force method (IFM) has been developed in recent years for analyzing structures. In this method all the internal forces are taken as independent variables, and the system equilibrium equations (EE's) are integrated with the global compatibility conditions (CC's) to form the governing set of equations. In IFM the CC's are obtained from the strain formulation of St. Venant, and no choices of redundant load systems have to be made, in constrast to the standard force method (SFM). This property of IFM allows the generation of the governing equation to be automated straightforwardly, as it is in the popular stiffness method (SM). In this report IFM and SM are compared relative to the structure of their respective equations, their conditioning, required solution methods, overall computational requirements, and convergence properties as these factors influence the accuracy of the results. Overall, this new version of the force method produces more accurate results than the stiffness method for comparable computational cost.

  2. Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-27

    Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 1 Ara Road Edwards AFB CA 93524-7013 AFRL -RZ-ED-VG-2011-269 9...SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS 11. SPONSOR...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Air Force Research Laboratory Ed d Ai F B CA Col Mike Platt war s r orce

  3. PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO JP-8 JET FUEL VAPORS AND EXHAUST AT AIR FORCE BASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    JP-8 jet fuel (similar to commercial/international jet A-1 fuel) is the standard military fuel for all types of vehicles, including the U.S. Air Force aircraft inventory. As such, JP-8 presents the most common chemical exposure in the Air Force, particularly for flight and gro...

  4. The Effect of Transmission Design on Force-Controlled Manipulator Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    Seering, W.P., "On Dynamic Models of Robot Force Control ," proc. 1986 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, San Francisco, b 9 ph...Measurement, and Control, vol. 99, no. 2, June 1977, pp. 91-97. Whitney, D.E., "Historical Perspective and State of the Art in Robot Force Control ," proc

  5. 19 CFR 207.8 - Questionnaires to have the force of subpoenas; subpoena enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Questionnaires to have the force of subpoenas; subpoena enforcement. 207.8 Section 207.8 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION... Questionnaires to have the force of subpoenas; subpoena enforcement. Any questionnaire issued by the...

  6. 19 CFR 207.8 - Questionnaires to have the force of subpoenas; subpoena enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Questionnaires to have the force of subpoenas; subpoena enforcement. 207.8 Section 207.8 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION... Questionnaires to have the force of subpoenas; subpoena enforcement. Any questionnaire issued by the...

  7. 19 CFR 207.8 - Questionnaires to have the force of subpoenas; subpoena enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Questionnaires to have the force of subpoenas; subpoena enforcement. 207.8 Section 207.8 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION... Questionnaires to have the force of subpoenas; subpoena enforcement. Any questionnaire issued by the...

  8. 26 CFR 1.112-1 - Combat zone compensation of members of the Armed Forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (and members of the Armed Forces are described) in section 7701(a)(15). (4) Military compensation only... States or by an international organization to a member of the Armed Forces whose military active duty... supplement the member's military compensation or is labeled by the employer as compensation for...

  9. 26 CFR 1.112-1 - Combat zone compensation of members of the Armed Forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (and members of the Armed Forces are described) in section 7701(a)(15). (4) Military compensation only... States or by an international organization to a member of the Armed Forces whose military active duty... supplement the member's military compensation or is labeled by the employer as compensation for...

  10. 26 CFR 1.112-1 - Combat zone compensation of members of the Armed Forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (and members of the Armed Forces are described) in section 7701(a)(15). (4) Military compensation only... States or by an international organization to a member of the Armed Forces whose military active duty... supplement the member's military compensation or is labeled by the employer as compensation for...

  11. 26 CFR 1.112-1 - Combat zone compensation of members of the Armed Forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (and members of the Armed Forces are described) in section 7701(a)(15). (4) Military compensation only... States or by an international organization to a member of the Armed Forces whose military active duty... supplement the member's military compensation or is labeled by the employer as compensation for...

  12. 26 CFR 1.112-1 - Combat zone compensation of members of the Armed Forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (and members of the Armed Forces are described) in section 7701(a)(15). (4) Military compensation only... States or by an international organization to a member of the Armed Forces whose military active duty... supplement the member's military compensation or is labeled by the employer as compensation for...

  13. 26 CFR 1.113-1 - Mustering-out payments for members of the Armed Forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....113-1 Mustering-out payments for members of the Armed Forces. For the purposes of the exclusion from gross income under section 113 of mustering-out payments with respect to service in the Armed Forces... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mustering-out payments for members of the...

  14. 26 CFR 1.113-1 - Mustering-out payments for members of the Armed Forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....113-1 Mustering-out payments for members of the Armed Forces. For the purposes of the exclusion from gross income under section 113 of mustering-out payments with respect to service in the Armed Forces... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mustering-out payments for members of the...

  15. 26 CFR 1.113-1 - Mustering-out payments for members of the Armed Forces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....113-1 Mustering-out payments for members of the Armed Forces. For the purposes of the exclusion from gross income under section 113 of mustering-out payments with respect to service in the Armed Forces... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mustering-out payments for members of the...

  16. Near Space: Should Air Force Space Command Take Control of Its Shore? (Maxwell Paper, Number 38)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Author Lt Col Kurt Hall, USAF, is an action officer with Force Application, Joint Functional Capabilities Board, Deputy Chief of Staff for Operational...performed this function . Having launched new ISR systems such as high-altitude-endurance unmanned aerial vehicles (HAE UAV) during Operations Enduring...TACSAT) radios, Iridium phones, Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below information system, blue- force tracking, International Maritime Satellite data

  17. Instances of Use of United States Armed Forces Abroad, 1798-2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-30

    support forces to assist Chad against Libyan and rebel forces. Grenada . On October 25, 1983, President Reagan reported a landing on Grenada by Marines...American interests during an attempted revolution in Montevideo. 1856 Panama, Republic of New Grenada . September 19 to 22. U.S. forces landed to protect...territorial waters but considered international waters by the United States. 1982 Sinai. On March 19, 1982, President Reagan reported the deployment

  18. United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Appendix E: Comments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Headquarters Air Combat Command Installations and Mission Support Directorate, Engineering Division (A7N) 129 Andrews Street Langley Air Force Base, VA...strike fighter aircraft to the Air Force, Marine Corps, and Navy, as well as international partners for the next several decades. Currently, the Air ...Force is scheduled to acquire and field over 1,700 F-35As over the next several decades; this basing action is only a part of the Air Force’s program to

  19. Functional muscle synergies constrain force production during postural tasks.

    PubMed

    McKay, J Lucas; Ting, Lena H

    2008-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that a set of five functional muscle synergies were sufficient to characterize both hindlimb muscle activity and active forces during automatic postural responses in cats standing at multiple postural configurations. This characterization depended critically upon the assumption that the endpoint force vector (synergy force vector) produced by the activation of each muscle synergy rotated with the limb axis as the hindlimb posture varied in the sagittal plane. Here, we used a detailed, 3D static model of the hindlimb to confirm that this assumption is biomechanically plausible: as we varied the model posture, simulated synergy force vectors rotated monotonically with the limb axis in the parasagittal plane (r2=0.94+/-0.08). We then tested whether a neural strategy of using these five functional muscle synergies provides the same force-generating capability as controlling each of the 31 muscles individually. We compared feasible force sets (FFSs) from the model with and without a muscle synergy organization. FFS volumes were significantly reduced with the muscle synergy organization (F=1556.01, p<0.01), and as posture varied, the synergy-limited FFSs changed in shape, consistent with changes in experimentally measured active forces. In contrast, nominal FFS shapes were invariant with posture, reinforcing prior findings that postural forces cannot be predicted by hindlimb biomechanics alone. We propose that an internal model for postural force generation may coordinate functional muscle synergies that are invariant in intrinsic limb coordinates, and this reduced-dimension control scheme reduces the set of forces available for postural control.

  20. International law and law enforcement firearms.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Jorma; Normia, Pertti

    2004-01-01

    Several international agreements set constraints on the legitimate use of firearms as representing lethal force. Their meaning in terms of weapons technology must take into account their operational frame of reference, and legitimate warfare can be regarded as a law enforcement operation with similar principles on the use of force. Changes in weapons technology, such as new types of ammunition, transforming firearms into weapons with less-lethal and even humanitarian options, require new interpretations of the legislation. A division into lethal and non-lethal weapons is an oversimplification and the separation of international humanitarian law into military and law enforcement provisions can be questioned from the technical aspect. The type of technology acceptable for law enforcement use of firearms should be defined. An assessment for weapon injury should not be based on lethality, but rather on the potential for tissue damage and its reversibility.

  1. Match your sales force structure to your business life cycle.

    PubMed

    Zoltners, Andris A; Sinha, Prabhakant; Lorimer, Sally E

    2006-01-01

    Although companies devote considerable time and money to managing their sales forces, few focus much thought on how the structure of the sales force needs to change over the life cycle of a product or a business. However, the organization and goals of a sales operation have to evolve as businesses start up, grow, mature, and decline if a company wants to keep winning the race for customers. Specifically, firms must consider and alter four factors over time: the differing roles that internal salespeople and external selling partners should play, the size of the sales force, its degree of specialization, and how salespeople apportion their efforts among different customers, products, and activities. These variables are critical because they determine how quickly sales forces respond to market opportunities, they influence sales reps' performance, and they affect companies' revenues, costs, and profitability. In this article, the authors use timeseries data and cases to explain how, at each stage, firms can best tackle the relevant issues and get the most out of their sales forces. During start-up, smart companies focus on how big their sales staff should be and on whether they can depend upon selling partners. In the growth phase, they concentrate on getting the sales force's degree of specialization and size right. When businesses hit maturity, companies should better allocate existing resources and hire more general-purpose salespeople. Finally, as organizations go into decline, wise sales leaders reduce sales force size and use partners to keep the business afloat for as long as possible.

  2. Experimental characterization of jet static forces impacting waste tank components

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M. ); Waters, E.D. )

    1990-06-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company plans to install mixer pumps in doubleshell waste tanks to mobilize and suspend settled sludge to allow eventual retrieval for treatment and permanent storage. The mixer pumps produce high momentum, horizontally directed jets that impact and mobilize the sludge and mix it into slurry for removal. There is concern that the force of the jet may damage tank internal components in its path. Scaled experiments were conducted to characterize the velocity profiles of the floor jet and to quantify the drag coefficients and impact forces for three tank components: radiation dry well, air lift circulator, and steam coil. Jet impact forces were measured on the scaled models at a 4 to 1 range of hydraulically scaled flow rates and a scaled range of distances between discharge nozzle and test component. The test were designed to provide hydraulic similarity between test conditions and expected actual waste tank conditions by using equal Reynolds number the jet maximum velocity impacted the test component. Forces measured on the models were used to calculate expected forces on the full scale components. Correlations of force on the test article versus distance from the nozzle were derived for the radiation dry well and air lift circulator based on the velocity correlation and drag parameter. The force data were also used to derive equivalent drag parameters which accounted for component shape factors including variation of jet impact area on the test article with distance from the nozzle. 8 refs., 44 figs., 42 tabs.

  3. Does an instrumented treadmill correctly measure the ground reaction forces?

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Patrick A.; Gosseye, Thierry P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Since the 1990s, treadmills have been equipped with multi-axis force transducers to measure the three components of the ground reaction forces during walking and running. These measurements are correctly performed if the whole treadmill (including the motor) is mounted on the transducers. In this case, the acceleration of the treadmill centre of mass relative to the reference frame of the laboratory is nil. The external forces exerted on one side of the treadmill are thus equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the external forces exerted on the other side. However, uncertainty exists about the accuracy of these measures: due to friction between the belt and the tread-surface, due to the motor pulling the belt, some believe that it is not possible to correctly measure the horizontal components of the forces exerted by the feet on the belt. Here, we propose a simple model of an instrumented treadmill and we demonstrate (1) that the forces exerted by the subject moving on the upper part of the treadmill are accurately transmitted to the transducers placed under it and (2) that all internal forces – including friction – between the parts of the treadmill are cancelling each other. PMID:24285705

  4. Black Carbon Radiative Forcing over the Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    He, Cenlin; Li, Qinbin; Liou, K. N.; Takano, Y.; Gu, Yu; Qi, L.; Mao, Yuhao; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-11-28

    We estimate the snow albedo forcing and direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) in the Tibetan Plateau using a global chemical transport model in conjunction with a stochastic snow model and a radiative transfer model. Our best estimate of the annual BC snow albedo forcing in the Plateau is 2.9 W m-2 (uncertainty: 1.5–5.0 W m-226 ). We find that BC-snow internal mixing increases the albedo forcing by 40-60% compared with external mixing and coated BC increases the forcing by 30-50% compared with uncoated BC, whereas Koch snowflakes reduce the forcing by 20-40% relative to spherical snow grains. Our best estimate of the annual BC DRF at the top of the atmosphere is 2.3 W m-2 (uncertainty: 0.7–4.3 W m-230 ) in the Plateau after scaling the modeled BC absorption optical depth to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations. The BC forcings are attributed to emissions from different regions.

  5. Force Limited Vibration Testing Monograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1997-01-01

    The practice of limiting the shaker force in vibration tests was investigated at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 1990 after the mechanical failure of an aerospace component during a vibration test. Now force limiting is used in almost every major vibration test at JPL and in many vibration tests at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at many aerospace contractors. The basic ideas behind force limiting have been in the literature for several decades, but the piezo-electric force transducers necessary to conveniently implement force limiting have been available only in the last decade. In 1993, funding was obtained from the NASA headquarters Office of Chief Engineer to develop and document the technology needed to establish force limited vibration testing as a standard approach available to all NASA centers and aerospace contractors. This monograph is the final report on that effort and discusses the history, theory, and applications of the method in some detail.

  6. Entropic force and entanglement system

    SciTech Connect

    Myung, Yun Soo; Kim, Yong-Wan

    2010-05-15

    We introduce the isothermal cavity, static holographic screen, and accelerating surface as holographic screen to study the entropic force in the presence of the Schwarzschild black hole. These may merge to provide a consistent holographic screen to define the entropic force on the stretched horizon near the event horizon. Considering the similarity between the stretched horizon of black hole and the entanglement system, we may define the entropic force in the entanglement system without referring to the source mass.

  7. Forces between membranes approaching contact.

    PubMed

    Parsegian, V A

    1981-01-01

    Cell stickiness to surfaces is recognized as an important concern in tests of red cell filterability. Many forces need to be considered in order to think about the sources of cell sticking. As cell membranes are brought together they experience successively the domination of several classes of forces van der Waals attraction, electrostatic repulsion, hydration repulsion, and specific charge-charge interactions at contact. The behaviour of each of these forces is described in the context of red cell adhesion.

  8. Collision forces for compliant projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    1990-01-01

    Force histories resulting from the impact of compliant projectiles were determined experimentally. A long instrumented rod was used as the target, and the impact force was calculated directly from the measured strain response. Results from a series of tests on several different sized impactors were used to define four dimensionless parameters that determine, for a specified impactor velocity and size, the amplitude, duration, shape, and impulse of the impact force history.

  9. Effects of temperature and force requirements on muscle work and power output.

    PubMed

    Olberding, Jeffrey P; Deban, Stephen M

    2017-03-17

    Performance of muscle-powered movements depends on temperature through its effects on muscle contractile properties. In vitro stimulation of Cuban treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis) plantaris muscles reveals that interactions between force and temperature affect the mechanical work of muscle. At low temperatures (9 - 17°C), muscle work depends on temperature when shortening at any force, and temperature effects are greater at higher forces. At warmer temperatures (13 - 21°C), muscle work depends on temperature when shortening with intermediate and high forces (≥ 30% P0). Shortening velocity is most strongly affected by temperature at low temperature intervals and high forces. Power is also most strongly affected at low temperature intervals but this effect is minimized at intermediate forces. Effects of temperature on muscle force explain these interactions; force production decreases at lower temperatures, increasing the challenge of moving a constant force relative to the muscle's capacity. These results suggest that animal performance that requires muscles to do work with low forces relative to a muscle's maximum force production will be robust to temperature changes, and this effect should be true whether muscle acts directly or through elastic-recoil mechanisms and whether force is prescribed (i.e. internal) or variable (i.e. external). Conversely, performance requiring muscles to shorten with relatively large forces is expected to be more sensitive to temperature changes.

  10. Force As A Momentum Current

    SciTech Connect

    Munera, Hector A.

    2010-07-28

    Advantages of a neo-Cartesian approach to classical mechanics are noted. If conservation of linear momentum is the fundamental principle, Newton's three laws become theorems. A minor paradox in static Newtonian mechanics is identified, and solved by reinterpreting force as a current of momentum. Contact force plays the role of a mere midwife in the exchange of momentum; however, force cannot be eliminated from physics because it provides the numerical value for momentum current. In this sense, in a neo-Cartesian formulation of mechanics the concept of force becomes strengthened rather than weakened.

  11. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  12. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  13. 32 CFR 536.107 - Scope for international agreements claims arising in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope for international agreements claims arising... International Agreements § 536.107 Scope for international agreements claims arising in the United States. This... claims arising out of any acts or omissions of members of a foreign military force or civilian...

  14. BPPD Internal Application Checklists

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA, Office of Pesticide Programs, BPPD internal application checklists for internal guidance to assist BPPD employees in their evaluation of applications submitted to BPPD by applicants and/or registrants.

  15. International Space Station Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, William V., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The overview of the International Space Station (ISS) is comprised of the program vision and mission; Space Station uses; definition of program phases; as well as descriptions and status of several scheduled International Space Station Overview assembly flights.

  16. Adding Value to Force Diagrams: Representing Relative Force Magnitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendel, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all physics instructors recognize the instructional value of force diagrams, and this journal has published several collections of exercises to improve student skill in this area. Yet some instructors worry that too few students perceive the conceptual and problem-solving utility of force diagrams, and over recent years a rich variety of…

  17. Contribution of Leg-Muscle Forces to Paddle Force and Kayak Speed During Maximal-Effort Flat-Water Paddling.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Johnny E; Rosdahl, Hans G

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the contribution of leg-muscle-generated forces to paddle force and kayak speed during maximal-effort flat-water paddling. Five elite male kayakers at national and international level participated. The participants warmed up at progressively increasing speeds and then performed a maximal-effort, nonrestricted paddling sequence. This was followed after 5 min rest by a maximal-effort paddling sequence with the leg action restricted--the knee joints "locked." Left- and right-side foot-bar and paddle forces were recorded with specially designed force devices. In addition, knee angular displacement of the right and left knees was recorded with electrogoniometric technique, and the kayak speed was calculated from GPS signals sampled at 5 Hz. The results showed that reduction in both push and pull foot-bar forces resulted in a reduction of 21% and 16% in mean paddle-stroke force and mean kayak speed, respectively. Thus, the contribution of foot-bar force from lower-limb action significantly contributes to kayakers' paddling performance.

  18. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  19. Deep atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  20. The Future of General Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric B; Fihn, Stephan D; Kirk, Lynne M; Levin, Wendy; Loge, Ronald V; Reynolds, Eileen; Sandy, Lewis; Schroeder, Steven; Wenger, Neil; Williams, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The Society of General Internal Medicine asked a task force to redefine the domain of general internal medicine. The task force believes that the chaos and dysfunction that characterize today's medical care, and the challenges facing general internal medicine, should spur innovation. These are our recommendations: while remaining true to its core values and competencies, general internal medicine should stay both broad and deep—ranging from uncomplicated primary care to continuous care of patients with multiple, complex, chronic diseases. Postgraduate and continuing education should develop mastery. Wherever they practice, general internists should be able to lead teams and be responsible for the care their teams give, embrace changes in information systems, and aim to provide most of the care their patients require. Current financing of physician services, especially fee-for-service, must be changed to recognize the value of services performed outside the traditional face-to-face visit and give practitioners incentives to improve quality and efficiency, and provide comprehensive, ongoing care. General internal medicine residency training should be reformed to provide both broad and deep medical knowledge, as well as mastery of informatics, management, and team leadership. General internal medicine residents should have options to tailor their final 1 to 2 years to fit their practice goals, often earning a certificate of added qualification (CAQ) in special generalist fields. Research will expand to include practice and operations management, developing more effective shared decision making and transparent medical records, and promoting the close personal connection that both doctors and patients want. We believe these changes constitute a paradigm shift that can benefit patients and the public and reenergize general internal medicine. PMID:14748863