Science.gov

Sample records for internal medicine tip

  1. Injector tip for an internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Shyu, Tsu Pin; Ye, Wen

    2003-05-20

    This invention relates to a the tip structure of a fuel injector as used in a internal combustion engine. Internal combustion engines using Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) technology require a tip structure that directs fuel spray in a downward direction. This requirement necessitates a tip design that is capable of withstanding mechanical stresses associated with the design.

  2. [Fundamentals of internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Stehouwer, C D A

    2006-04-08

    The most important diagnostic tools of the internist are the patient history and physical examination, after which a plan must be made for further diagnostic evaluation and treatment. For this the internist uses clinical reasoning based on his or her knowledge of evidence-based medicine and pathobiology. Pathobiology is primarily concerned with the question of how something works; evidence-based medicine is concerned with whether something works, and if so, how often or how much on average. Diseases do not exist in their own right and diagnostic criteria are based on consensus. A diagnosis of a 'disease' is based on our observation of patients as well as our opinions, whether right or wrong, regarding its cause. It is important to distinguish between 'partial causes' and a 'causative complement'. As a result of this concept, the biological relevance of a partial cause in the development of a disease cannot be derived from the strength of the link between it and the disease. Our opinions regarding the cause of disease appear to be based on induction. However, induction is not a good foundation from which to determine causation. Hypotheses on the cause of disease cannot be proved. They can, however, be disproved. Education, training, research and patient care all depend on effective communication. Communication is enhanced if the thesis is given first and thereafter the arguments. Hence, transfer of patient information such as during a morning report should begin with a working diagnosis (the 'thesis') and thereafter the findings of patient history, et cetera (the 'arguments'). At this time, too little attention is given to these branches of clinical reasoning and communication in education and continuing education in internal medicine.

  3. Update in Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    López-Jiménez, Francisco; Brito, Máximo; Aude, Y. Wady; Scheinberg, Phillip; Kaplan, Mariana; Dixon, Denise A.; Schneiderman, Neil; Trejo, Jorge F.; López-Salazar, Luis Humberto; Ramírez-Barba, Ector Jaime; Kalil, Roberto; Ortiz, Carmen; Goyos, José; Buenaño, Alvaro; Kottiech, Samer; Lamas, Gervasio A.

    2009-01-01

    More than 500,000 new medical articles are published every year and available time to keep updated is scarcer every day. Nowadays, the task of selecting useful, consistent, and relevant information for clinicians is a priority in many major medical journals. This review has the aim of gathering the results of the most important findings in clinical medicine in the last few years. It is focused on results from randomized clinical trials and well-designed observational research. Findings were included preferentially if they showed solid results, and we avoided as much as possible including only preliminary data, or results that included only non-clinical outcomes. Some of the most relevant findings reported here include the significant benefit of statins in patients with coronary artery disease even with mean cholesterol level. It also provides a substantial review of the most significant trials assessing the effectiveness of IIb/IIIa receptor blockers. In gastroenterology many advances have been made in the H. pylori eradication, and the finding that the cure of H. pylori infection may be followed by gastroesophageal reflux disease. Some new antivirals have shown encouraging results in patients with chronic hepatitis. In the infectious disease arena, the late breaking trials in anti-retroviral disease are discussed, as well as the new trends regarding antibiotic resistance. This review approaches also the role of leukotriene modifiers in the treatment of asthma and discusses the benefit of using methylprednisolone in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome, among many other advances in internal medicine. PMID:11068074

  4. Core competencies in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Porcel, José Manuel; Casademont, Jordi; Conthe, Pedro; Pinilla, Blanca; Pujol, Ramón; García-Alegría, Javier

    2012-06-01

    The working group on Competencies of Internal Medicine from the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) proposes a series of core competencies that we consider should be common to all European internal medicine specialists. The competencies include aspects related to patient care, clinical knowledge, technical skills, communication skills, professionalism, cost-awareness in medical care and academic activities. The proposal could be used as a working document for the Internal Medicine core curriculum in the context of the educational framework of medical specialties in Europe.

  5. [Core competencies in internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M; Casademont, J; Conthe, P; Pinilla, B; Pujol, R; García-Alegría, J

    2011-06-01

    The working group of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) on "Competencies of the Internist" has defined the basic medical knowledge, skills and attitudes that all internists in Spain should have. This list of competencies represents the Internal Medicine core curriculum within the context of the future educational framework of medical specialties in Health Sciences.

  6. Strategic business planning for internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Ervin, F R

    1996-07-01

    The internal medicine generalist is at market risk with expansion of managed care. The cottage industry of Academic Departments of internal medicine should apply more business tools to the internal medicine business problem. A strength, weakness, opportunity, threat (SWOT) analysis demonstrates high vulnerability to the internal medicine generalist initiative. Recommitment to the professional values of internal medicine and enhanced focus on the master clinician as the competitive core competency of internal medicine will be necessary to retain image and market share.

  7. Redesigning training for internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Steven E; Smith, Lawrence G; Collier, Virginia U

    2006-06-20

    The American College of Physicians supports the need for reform throughout the continuum of training in internal medicine. Today's internists must have the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes to meet the challenges of an expanding body of medical knowledge and a rapidly evolving system of health care delivery. Suggested priorities for undergraduate medical education include redesigning curricular experiences to afford students earlier and more exposure to career opportunities in internal medicine, improving ambulatory education, exposing students to outstanding faculty role models in internal medicine, and incorporating educational experiences during the fourth year that optimize its value and relevance to the student's future career plans in internal medicine. Internal medicine residency training should remain a 3-year experience, with a component of core education common to all trainees and a component of customized training in the third year targeted toward the resident's career goals. Residency programs should be designed around educational rather than institutional service needs. The ambulatory component of training requires substantial reform in its structure, sites, content, and timing. Team-based models should be used both for patient care and for flexibility in design of residency training. Better faculty models must be developed that build on the concept of a "core faculty," improve the rewards for teaching faculty, and provide appropriate faculty development focusing on a necessary set of educator competencies.

  8. International classification of traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Morris, William; Gomes, Stacy; Allen, Marilyn

    2012-09-01

    The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) provides alphanumeric codes that have a longstanding place in the annals of contemporary medicine for epidemiology, health management, and clinical diagnoses from patient encounters to death certificates. This system is maintained by the World Health Organization (WHO). Traditional medicine (TM) has historical usage patterns established by treating people through the centuries but has never before been included in the ICD code set. The inclusion of traditional Asian medicine in the International Family of Classifications is a new venture and scheduled to be included in the ICD-11 revision of the codes. This may enable the comparison of diagnostic, clinical outcome, and epidemiological information across medical systems. WHO recently completed a survey among member nations and discovered that 82% of the world's population uses some form of TM.(2.)

  9. International Classification of Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Morris, William; Allen, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) provides alphanumeric codes that have a longstanding place in the annals of contemporary medicine for epidemiology, health management, and clinical diagnoses from patient encounters to death certificates. This system is maintained by the World Health Organization (WHO). Traditional medicine (TM) has historical usage patterns established by treating people through the centuries but has never before been included in the ICD code set. The inclusion of traditional Asian medicine in the International Family of Classifications is a new venture and scheduled to be included in the ICD-11 revision of the codes. This may enable the comparison of diagnostic, clinical outcome, and epidemiological information across medical systems. WHO recently completed a survey among member nations and discovered that 82% of the world's population uses some form of TM.2 PMID:24278830

  10. [Internal medicine and public health].

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    A special Committee on Internal Medicine and Public Health was established by Sociedad Médica de Santiago (Chilean Society of Internal Medicine) in April 2007 with the duty to write a Consensus Paper on the interaction between both branches of medical profession. The main objective was to find the common grounds on which to construct a positive approach to regain space for Internal Medicine, based on prevalent epidemiológical features related to adult health issues. The authors describe the reasons to explain the gap between clinical medicine and population health and identify the nature and evolution of chronic diseases as the point of encounter between both. With Chilean health surveys data, they state that chronic diseases explain the high proportion of burden of disease, mortality and disability, and stress that by the year 2025 one in every five inhabitants will be over 65 years of age, with ageing as another main problem for the health care sector. Population with multiple risks and multimorbidity is the most important challenge for the Chilean Health Care System. A new model of care is needed to tackle this scenario with new skills regarding psychosocial determinants of health. The leading role of internists and ideally geriatricians, will be crucial in this process and will help the implementation of sound population based interventions. Both individual and community level interventions will help to improve quality of life of Chilean families.

  11. Documentation tips for pulmonary medicine: implications for the inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Sherine

    2012-10-01

    Clinical documentation improvement is an important aspect to achieve top performance. Clinical documentation in a patient's record includes any and all documentation that relates to the care of the patient during the patient's stay or encounter at the hospital. Documentation is key to accurate clinical coding, validating length of stay, resource utilization, physician profiling, case management, severity of illness, risk of mortality, quality management, risk management, clinical outcomes, critical pathways, regulatory compliance, Joint Commission accreditation, managed care, and reimbursement. Good documentation minimizes coding errors, reduces claim denials, and optimizes reimbursement. Implementing quality improvement strategies that make documentation and coding an organizational priority can positively influence operations, services, and revenue. Other external and internal coding audits show that the cause of improper coding is due to lack of proper physician documentation to support reimbursement at the appropriate level. The purpose of this article is to provide tips for documenting pulmonary diagnoses that not only would ensure appropriate reimbursement but also would accurately represent the severity of a patient's condition.

  12. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Your Health Care Providers: A Workbook and Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... inventory number (P042). Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) Oversees NCI's projects in CAM. Provides patients with information on specific cancer CAM therapies, tips for talking to health care providers, and ...

  13. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Providers: A Workbook and Tips

    Cancer.gov

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  14. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with your Health Care Provider: A workbook and tips

    Cancer.gov

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  15. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Health Care Provider: A Workbook and Tips

    Cancer.gov

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  16. Talking about complementary and alternative medicine with your health care provider: A workbook and Tips

    Cancer.gov

    A workbook to help patients and doctors talk about the use of complementary and alternative medicine(CAM) during and after cancer care. Worksheets, tips, and resources are provided for patients and doctors to help track CAM use.

  17. Magnetic field measurements using the transient internal probe (TIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.P.; Bohnet, M.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mattick, A.T.

    1995-12-31

    Knowledge of the internal magnetic field profile in hot plasmas is fundamental to understanding the structure and behavior of the current profile. The transient internal probe (TIP) is a novel diagnostic designed to measure internal magnetic fields in hot plasmas. The diagnostic involves shooting a magneto-optic probe through the plasma at high velocities (greater than 2 km/s) using a two stage light gas gun. Local fields are obtained by illuminating the probe with an argon ion laser and measuring the amount of Faraday rotation in the reflected beam. Initial development of the diagnostic is complete. Results of magnetic field measurements conducted at 2 km/s will be presented. Helium muzzle gas introduction to the plasma chamber has been limited to less than 0.4 Torr-{ell}. Magnetic field resolution of 40 Gauss and spatial resolution of 5 mm have been achieved. System frequency response is 10 MHz.

  18. Bloodstream infections in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Del Bono, Valerio; Giacobbe, Daniele Roberto

    2016-04-02

    Bloodstream infections (BSI) carry a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality in modern internal medicine wards (IMW). These wards are often filled with elderly subjects with several risk factors for BSI, such as multiple comorbidities, polypharmacy, immunosuppression, and indwelling devices. Diagnosing BSI in such a setting might require a high degree of suspicion, since the clinical presentation could be affected by underlying conditions and concomitant medications, which might delay the administration of an appropriate antimicrobial therapy, an event strongly and unfavorably influencing survival. Furthermore, selecting the appropriate antimicrobial therapy to treat these patients is becoming an increasingly complex task in which all possible benefits and costs should be carefully analyzed from patient and public health perspectives. Only a specialized, continuous, and interdisciplinary approach could really improve the management of IMW patients in an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance and complexity of care.

  19. Bloodstream infections in internal medicine

    PubMed Central

    Del Bono, Valerio; Giacobbe, Daniele Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bloodstream infections (BSI) carry a heavy burden of morbidity and mortality in modern internal medicine wards (IMW). These wards are often filled with elderly subjects with several risk factors for BSI, such as multiple comorbidities, polypharmacy, immunosuppression, and indwelling devices. Diagnosing BSI in such a setting might require a high degree of suspicion, since the clinical presentation could be affected by underlying conditions and concomitant medications, which might delay the administration of an appropriate antimicrobial therapy, an event strongly and unfavorably influencing survival. Furthermore, selecting the appropriate antimicrobial therapy to treat these patients is becoming an increasingly complex task in which all possible benefits and costs should be carefully analyzed from patient and public health perspectives. Only a specialized, continuous, and interdisciplinary approach could really improve the management of IMW patients in an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance and complexity of care. PMID:26760780

  20. Teaching Prevention in Internal Medicine Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsinger, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the rationale for including prevention in the clinical medicine clerkship. Summarizes current guidelines, presents examples of curricula in several medical schools, and proposes a future direction that stresses integrating teaching preventive medicine into internal medicine clerkships and across the entire four-year medical curriculum. (DB)

  1. Teaching Prevention in Internal Medicine Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsinger, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the rationale for including prevention in the clinical medicine clerkship. Summarizes current guidelines, presents examples of curricula in several medical schools, and proposes a future direction that stresses integrating teaching preventive medicine into internal medicine clerkships and across the entire four-year medical curriculum. (DB)

  2. Internal Medicine Training in the Inpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Di Francesco; Pistoria, Michael J; Auerbach, Andrew D; Nardino, Robert J; Holmboe, Eric S

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE Although the inpatient setting has served as the predominant educational site of internal medicine training programs, many changes and factors are currently affecting education in this setting. As a result, many educational organizations are calling for reforms in inpatient training. This report reviews the available literature on specific internal medicine inpatient educational interventions and proposes recommendations for improving internal medicine training in this setting. METHOD We searched Medline for articles published between 1966 and August 2004 which focused on internal medicine training interventions in the inpatient setting; bibliographies of Medline-identified articles, as well as articles suggested by experts in the field provided additional citations. We then reviewed, classified, and abstracted only articles where an assessment of learner outcomes was included. RESULTS Thirteen studies of inpatient internal medicine educational interventions were found that included an outcome assessment. All were single institution studies. The majority of these studies was of poor methodological quality and focused on specific content areas of internal medicine. None assessed the effectiveness or impact of internal medicine core inpatient experiences or curriculum. CONCLUSION This review identifies significant gaps in our understanding of what constitutes effective inpatient education. The paucity of high quality research in the internal medicine inpatient setting highlights the urgent need to formally define and study what constitutes an effective “core” inpatient curriculum. PMID:16423111

  3. [Ethical problems in internal medicine].

    PubMed

    von Eiff, A W

    1992-03-28

    In medical and scientific work a physician cannot act without first weighing the issues. This is often purely a weighing of utility and risks; sometimes, however, the issues must be weighted against the background of an image of the human being in which psychological and ethical aspects require consideration. Weighing of the issues is therefore possible only on the basis of expert grounding in the latest discoveries in each particular field, and in such cases also on the foundation of anthropological knowledge and awareness of ethical principles ("nil nocere"). In internal medicine weighing of the issues covers the patient's history, diagnostic and therapeutic measures, and prophylaxis. At a time when cost restraint in health care is necessary to preserve the state's finances and therewith the common good, one issue to be weighed is whether a cost-intensive diagnostic or therapeutic measure is justified in the individual case. In therapy the weighing of issues in the clinic may, however, produce a different result from that in general practice.

  4. Development of transient internal probe (TIP) magnetic field diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.P.; Bohnet, M.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mattick, A.T.

    1994-12-31

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) is designed to permit measurement of internal magnetic fields, in hot, high density plasmas. The concept consists of accelerating a probe to high velocities (2.2 Km/s) in order to minimize probe exposure time to plasma. Faraday rotation within the probe is used to measure the local magnetic field. An Argon laser illuminates the probe consisting of a Faraday-rotator material with a retro-reflector that returns the incident light to the detection system. Performance results of the light gas gun and optical detection system will be shown. To date, the gas gun has been extensively tested consistently achieving velocities between 2 and 3 km/s. The probe and detection scheme have been tested by dropping the probe through a static magnetic field. Magnetic field resolution of 20 gauss and spatial resolution of 5 mm has been achieved. System frequency response is 10Mhz. Work is currently being conducted to integrate the diagnostic system with laboratory plasma experiments. Specifically a gas interfaced system has been developed to prevent helium muzzle gas from entering the plasma chamber with the probe. Additionally the probe must be separated from the sabot which protects the probe during acceleration in the gas gun. Data will be presented showing the results of various separation techniques.

  5. International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join the ISMRM Journals History & Mission Central Office Society Award Winners Strategic Plan Policies Corporate Members Contact ... E-Library Virtual Meetings Connect With Us International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2300 Clayton Road, ...

  6. [Organizational structure of internal medicine in Chile].

    PubMed

    Parrochia, E

    1996-04-01

    Internal Medicine, as a comprehensive discipline, has become increasingly dismembered during the last decades due to several reasons, some of which are the growing complexities of its practice, its obstinate confinement to hospital-based practice, its generation of and subsequent disfunction from general internal medicine and the medical subspecialities. In Chile internal medicine is currently organized in three levels of patient care, each of anarchical and distortioned proportions. These levels do not constitute a fluent network of progressive patient care but rather an heterogeneous combination of ironclad compartments in search of their own autonomy. A few of the many problems and challenges that internal medicine faces in Chile are: (a) in primary care medicine, problem-solving abilities must be improved and programmed care must be privileged over free choice. Specialist in general medicine must be assigned to primary care and multiprofessional teams must be strengthened; (b) Secondary care is underdeveloped due to the waning prestige of internal medicine and waxing attractiveness of its subspecialities. Programmed formation of specialist in internal medicine has been so far rigorous and demanding, but excessive in number in relation to available post. This leads trained internist to practice as subspecialist, without having the adequate conditions for such a practice. To avoid this situation, the scope of internal medicine emergency wards, integral medicine clinics, and medical student teaching should be handed over to it; (c) Tertiary care is a task of subspecialist. It is not known how many subspecialist are required, or how many physicians are currently practicing as a subspecialist. Most of the currently practicing subspecialist are self-qualified or have received quick training through short rotations by not always well-qualified centers. Many are only former internal medicine residents. In this setting, it is not possible to devise a prospective plan of

  7. Tips for Teachers of Evidence-based Medicine: Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs) and Estimating Pretest Probability

    PubMed Central

    McGinn, Thomas; Jervis, Ramiro; Wisnivesky, Juan; Keitz, Sheri

    2008-01-01

    Background Clinical prediction rules (CPR) are tools that clinicians can use to predict the most likely diagnosis, prognosis, or response to treatment in a patient based on individual characteristics. CPRs attempt to standardize, simplify, and increase the accuracy of clinicians’ diagnostic and prognostic assessments. The teaching tips series is designed to give teachers advice and materials they can use to attain specific educational objectives. Educational Objectives In this article, we present 3 teaching tips aimed at helping clinical learners use clinical prediction rules and to more accurately assess pretest probability in every day practice. The first tip is designed to demonstrate variability in physician estimation of pretest probability. The second tip demonstrates how the estimate of pretest probability influences the interpretation of diagnostic tests and patient management. The third tip exposes learners to various examples and different types of Clinical Prediction Rules (CPR) and how to apply them in practice. Pilot Testing We field tested all 3 tips with 16 learners, a mix of interns and senior residents. Teacher preparatory time was approximately 2 hours. The field test utilized a board and a data projector; 3 handouts were prepared. The tips were felt to be clear and the educational objectives reached. Potential teaching pitfalls were identified. Conclusion Teaching with these tips will help physicians appreciate the importance of applying evidence to their every day decisions. In 2 or 3 short teaching sessions, clinicians can also become familiar with the use of CPRs in applying evidence consistently in everyday practice. PMID:18491194

  8. The Future of General Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric B; Fihn, Stephan D; Kirk, Lynne M; Levin, Wendy; Loge, Ronald V; Reynolds, Eileen; Sandy, Lewis; Schroeder, Steven; Wenger, Neil; Williams, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The Society of General Internal Medicine asked a task force to redefine the domain of general internal medicine. The task force believes that the chaos and dysfunction that characterize today's medical care, and the challenges facing general internal medicine, should spur innovation. These are our recommendations: while remaining true to its core values and competencies, general internal medicine should stay both broad and deep—ranging from uncomplicated primary care to continuous care of patients with multiple, complex, chronic diseases. Postgraduate and continuing education should develop mastery. Wherever they practice, general internists should be able to lead teams and be responsible for the care their teams give, embrace changes in information systems, and aim to provide most of the care their patients require. Current financing of physician services, especially fee-for-service, must be changed to recognize the value of services performed outside the traditional face-to-face visit and give practitioners incentives to improve quality and efficiency, and provide comprehensive, ongoing care. General internal medicine residency training should be reformed to provide both broad and deep medical knowledge, as well as mastery of informatics, management, and team leadership. General internal medicine residents should have options to tailor their final 1 to 2 years to fit their practice goals, often earning a certificate of added qualification (CAQ) in special generalist fields. Research will expand to include practice and operations management, developing more effective shared decision making and transparent medical records, and promoting the close personal connection that both doctors and patients want. We believe these changes constitute a paradigm shift that can benefit patients and the public and reenergize general internal medicine. PMID:14748863

  9. Internal medicine residency training and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Griffith, C H; Rich, E C; Hillson, S D; Wilson, J F

    1997-06-01

    To review the impact of the clinical education of internal medicine residents on patients' outcomes. English-language studies of the relation between internal medicine housestaff training and patients' outcomes were systematically identified by a MEDLINE search and from bibliographies and reference lists of recently published articles. We hypothesized that the primary impact of internal medicine residency training on patients' outcomes would be the result of: (1) the inexperience of the residents; (2) the heavy workload these inexperienced residents are expected to manage: or (3) some structural feature of the internal medicine teaching services, such as the discontinuity of patient care inherent in night float systems and the fact that residents rotate to different services each month. We also hypothesized that residents may in may ways provide superior care, and many actually improve certain patient outcomes. Housestaff inexperience, workload, and structural features that promote discontinuity have been shown to affect especially outcomes of resource utilization, length of stay, and patient satisfaction. No study has demonstrated that internal medicine residents contribute to excess patient morbidity or mortality. However, the published studies in this area are for the most part retrospective and were conducted 10 to 15 years ago. The full extent of the untoward (or the beneficial) effects of internal medicine residency training on patients' outcomes is unknown. Multisite, prospective studies would remedy the deficiencies in the published research in this area and would yield the most valid insight into the range and extent of the effects of housestaff training on patients' outcomes. In the absence of such studies and in a rapidly changing managed care environment, academic medical centers and departments of medicine need to be aware of those aspects of the clinical education of residents that are most likely to affect patients' outcomes.

  10. Internal magnetic field measurements on the Helicity Injected Tokamak (HIT) using the Transient Internal Probe (TIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.P.; Bohnet, M.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mattick, A.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) is a novel diagnostic designed to measure internal magnetic fields in hot plasmas. The diagnostic involves shooting a magneto-optic probe through the plasma at high velocities (greater than 2 km/s) using a two stage light gas gun. Local fields are obtained by illuminating the probe with an argon ion laser and measuring the amount of Faraday rotation in the laser light reflected from the moving probe. Currently, internal magnetic profile measurements are being conducted on the Helicity Injected tokamak (HIT). HIT is a low aspect ratio (A = 1.5) tokamak designed to investigate steady state current drive using coaxial helicity injection. Operating parameters are T{sub e} {approx} 100, n{sub e} {approx} 5 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} and I{sub p} = 250 kA. Internal magnetic field profile data will be presented. The TIP diagnostic has a spatial resolution of 1 cm and 20 gauss magnetic field resolution. System frequency response is 10 MHz.

  11. General medicine vs subspecialty career plans among internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    West, Colin P; Dupras, Denise M

    2012-12-05

    Current medical training models in the United States are unlikely to produce sufficient numbers of general internists and primary care physicians. Differences in general internal medicine (GIM) career plans between internal medicine residency program types and across resident demographics are not well understood. To evaluate the general medicine career plans of internal medicine residents and how career plans evolve during training. A study of US internal medicine residents using an annual survey linked to the Internal Medicine In-Training Examination taken in October of 2009-2011 to evaluate career plans by training program, sex, and medical school location. Of 67,207 US eligible categorical and primary care internal medicine residents, 57,087 (84.9%) completed and returned the survey. Demographic data provided by the National Board of Medical Examiners were available for 52,035 (77.4%) of these residents, of whom 51,390 (76.5%) responded to all survey items and an additional 645 (1.0%) responded to at least 1 survey item. Data were analyzed from the 16,781 third-year residents (32.2%) in this sample. Self-reported ultimate career plans of internal medicine residents. A GIM career plan was reported by 3605 graduating residents (21.5%). A total of 562 primary care program (39.6%) and 3043 categorical (19.9%) residents reported GIM as their ultimate career plan (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.76; 99% CI, 2.35-3.23; P < .001). Conversely, 10 008 categorical (65.3%) and 745 primary care program (52.5%) residents reported a subspecialty career plan (AOR, 1.90; 99% CI, 1.62-2.23; P < .001). GIM career plans were reported more frequently by women than men (26.7% vs 17.3%, respectively; AOR, 1.69; 99% CI, 1.53-1.87; P < .001). US medical graduates were slightly more likely to report GIM career plans than international medical graduates (22.0% vs 21.1%, respectively; AOR, 1.76; 99% CI, 1.50-2.06; P < .001). Within primary care programs, US medical graduates were much more

  12. Rational error in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Federspil, Giovanni; Vettor, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    Epistemologists have selected two basic categories: that of errors committed in scientific research, when a researcher devises or accepts an unfounded hypothesis, and that of mistakes committed in the application of scientific knowledge whereby doctors rely on knowledge held to be true at the time in order to understand an individual patient's signs and symptoms. The paper will deal exclusively with the latter, that is to say the mistakes which physicians make while carrying out their day-to-day medical duties. The paper will deal with the mistakes committed in medicine trying also to offer a classification. It will take into account also examples of mistakes in Bayesian reasoning and mistakes of reasoning committed by clinicians regard inductive reasoning. Moreover, many other mistakes are due to fallacies of deductive logic, logic which they use on a day-to-day basis while examining patients in order to envisage the consequences of the various diagnostic or physiopathologic hypotheses. The existence of a different type of mistakes that are part of the psychology of thought will be also pointed out. We conclude that internists often make mistakes because, unknowingly, they fail to reason correctly. These mistakes can occur in two ways: either because he does not observe the laws of formal logic, or because his practical rationality does not match theoretical rationality and so his reasoning becomes influenced by the circumstances in which he finds himself.

  13. [Everyday bioethics in general internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Lamy, O; Aujesky, D; Vollenweider, P; Waeber, G; Foppa, C

    2006-11-08

    The knowledge of the national legislation and the key concepts of bioethics are necessary for medical practice. The four principles of bioethics are autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. General internal medicine is the speciality of comprehensive care for often elderly patients with multiple chronic illnesses. This care is related to many ethically difficult decisions. In our article, we discuss common ethical problems in general internal medicine, including ethical aspects of the patient-physician relationship and medical decision making, the ethical significance of time management, research in bioethics and medical education.

  14. [Hospital based internal medicine in 2012].

    PubMed

    John, G; Darbellay, P; Drepper, M; Spechbach, H; Fosenbauer, M Becerra; Perrier, A; Carballo, S

    2013-01-23

    In an era in which primary and secondary prevention have important implications for public health and health care costs, a series of publications and guidelines give added weight or precision to current medical practice in the fields of hospital based internal medicine. This article presents a selective review of new guidelines and therapeutic options for areas of cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, gastroenterology and oncology.

  15. The international translational regenerative medicine center.

    PubMed

    Alexis, Mardi de Veuve; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik; Jove, Richard

    2012-11-01

    The International Translational Regenerative Medicine Center, an organizing sponsor of the World Stem Cell Summit 2012, is a global initiative established in 2011 by founding partners Karolinska Institutet (Stockholm, Sweden) and Beckman Research Institute at City of Hope (CA, USA) with a mission to facilitate the acceleration of translational research and medicine on a global scale. Karolinska Institutet, home of the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology, is one of the most prestigious medical research institutions in the world. The Beckman Research Institute/City of Hope is ranked among the leading NIH-designated comprehensive cancer research and treatment institutions in the USA, has the largest academic GMP facility and advanced drug discovery capability, and is a pioneer in diabetes research and treatment.

  16. Tips for a Healthy Long-Life Learned from Space Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shin; Matsuo, Tomoaki; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Mukai, Chiaki

    2013-02-01

    The field of space medicine is responsible for maintaining astronauts’ health and optimizing their performance. A prolonged stay in space with little gravity results in weakening of the bones and muscles that otherwise support body weight, which is precisely the problem faced by elderly people on Earth. Space medicine provides the means of alleviating such problems. Bone loss, muscle atrophy, and disturbed circadian rhythms are common issues for both astronauts and the elderly alike and can be prevented, if the risks are addressed correctly. To have a healthy long-life, it is important to practice effective health improvement techniques and take preventive measures. The space medicine technologies a for astronauts will provide helpful information to people living in a super aging society. and Japanese medical societies for health promotion. With the aids of the Japanese Society of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine, the Japanese Orthopaedic Association, and the Japanese Association of Rehabilitation Medicine, JAXA has made a leaflet titled for general citizen to show the tips for a healthy long-life learned from space medicine from the viewpoints of their respective expertise.

  17. Abstracts from international Emergency Medicine journals.

    PubMed

    Weber, Ellen J

    2017-07-01

    Editor's note: EMJ has partnered with the journals of multiple international emergency medicine societies to share from each a highlighted research study, as selected by their editors. This edition will feature an abstract from each publication. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Abstracts from international Emergency Medicine journals.

    PubMed

    Weber, Ellen J

    2017-04-01

    Editor's note: EMJ has partnered with the journals of multiple international emergency medicine societies to share from each a highlighted research study, as selected by their editors. This edition will feature an abstract from each publication. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Abstracts from international Emergency Medicine Journals.

    PubMed

    Weber, Ellen J

    2017-03-01

    Editor's note: EMJ has partnered with the journals of multiple international emergency medicine societies to share from each a highlighted research study, as selected by their editors. This edition will feature an abstract from each publication. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. The management of pneumonia in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Giannella, M; Pinilla, B; Pujol, R; Capdevila, J A; Muñoz, P

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia generates a high workload for internal medicine departments. Management of this disease is challenging, because patients are usually elderly and have multiple comorbid conditions. Furthermore, the interpretation and adherence to guidelines are far from clear in this setting. We report the opinion of 43 internists especially interested in infectious diseases that were questioned at the 2011 XXXII National Conference of Spanish Society of Internal Medicine about the main issues involved in the management of pneumonia in the internal medicine departments, namely, classification, admission criteria, microbiological workup, therapeutic management, discharge policy, and prevention of future episodes. Participants were asked to choose between 2 options for each statement by 4 investigators. Consensus could not be reached in many cases. The most controversial issues concerned recognition and management of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). Most participants were aware of the differences in terms of underlying diseases, etiological distribution, and outcome of HCAP compared with community-acquired pneumonia, but only a minority agreed to manage HCAP as hospital-acquired pneumonia, as suggested by some guidelines. A clinical patient-to-patient approach proved to be the option preferred by internists in the management of HCAP.

  1. Curricula and Organization of Primary Care Residencies in Internal Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, John M.

    1980-01-01

    The organization and curricula of internal medicine residencies programs that emphasize primary care are described and compared with traditional residencies in internal medicine. It is noted that primary care residents spend more time in ambulatory care and are allowed more electives in specialties outside of internal medicine. Out-of-hospital…

  2. [Internal medicine in the last 40 years].

    PubMed

    Mandema, E

    1997-01-04

    Internal medicine in the last 40 years has known many eminent teachers at universities, such as Hijmans van den Bergh, Van Buchem, Borst, Mulder, Lindeboom, De Langen, Hulst, Jordan, Formijne, Major, Snapper, Groen and Querido, and others outside universities such as Stuyt, Van Hees, Eindhoven, Pannekoek, Schalm, Bruins Slot, Heeres, Stolte and Pompen. The main scientific platform on which the bequeathors assembled in the first few decades after World War II was the Algemene Ziektekundige Vereniging ('General Medical Association'), which met in Utrecht. Important medical steps forward in that period were the virtually complete eradication of tuberculosis in the Netherlands, the developing of vaccines against smallpox and polio, but also against the various types of virus hepatitis, and the progress in intensive care, transplantation and molecular biology. The Nederlandsche Internisten Vereeniging ('Dutch Association of Internists') has had its own scientific journal since 1958. Essentials in modern internal medicine are appropriate care and demonstrated usefulness of a treatment (evidence-based medicine); standards, values and ethics are core issues, as are quality control and cost control. Change is also in progress in the doctor-patient relationship, as manifested in the Wet Geneeskundige Behandelingsovereenkomst ('Medical Treatment Accord Act').

  3. [Integration of Internal and Clinical Laboratory Medicine].

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    The mission of our department is to contribute to diagnostic improvement in medicine in order to promote better outcomes. We have clinical expertise in internal medicine including primary care medicine, hematology, allergy, rheumatology, and nephrology. We also have expertise in clinical laboratory medicine and hospital infection control. Specific areas of academic interest include immune-mediated hematological diseases, allergic diseases, autoimmune diseases, and chronic kidney disease. Immune recovery following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the immunopathophysiology of bone marrow failure syndrome have been our main topics of interest, and we have been applying our knowledge of T-cell receptor diversity to these areas in order to explore the mechanisms of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity in hematological disorders. We have found that the peripheral expansion of mature T cells in grafts plays an important role in immune reconstitution after stem cell transplantation in humans, and have also found altered T-cell repertoires in immune-mediated chronic acquired pure red cell aplasia. Thus, quantitative and qualitative analyses of immune receptors could be a promising method for assessing immunocompetence and exploring the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases. Research and development of novel approaches in this field should be intensively conducted.

  4. The new UK internal medicine curriculum .

    PubMed

    Black, David

    2017-04-01

    Reform of physician education is needed to meet the needs of patients, based on comorbidities, chronic disease management and complexity. The Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians Training Board has developed a new internal medicine curriculum for physician training that aims to not only deliver this expectation, but will simplify competency-based education, smooth the transition to the medical registrar role and hopefully fill some of the current empty funded training posts. However, the change process is complex and requires close working with the General Medical Council and other partners in curriculum delivery. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  5. What skills should new internal medicine interns have in july? A national survey of internal medicine residency program directors.

    PubMed

    Angus, Steven; Vu, T Robert; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Aiyer, Meenakshy; McKown, Kevin; Chmielewski, Amy F; McDonald, Furman S

    2014-03-01

    The transition from medical student to intern may cause stress and burnout in new interns and the delivery of suboptimal patient care. Despite a formal set of subinternship curriculum guidelines, program directors have expressed concern regarding the skill set of new interns and the lack of standardization in that skill set among interns from different medical schools. To address these issues, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System focuses on the development of a competency-based education continuum spanning undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education. In 2010, the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine subinternship task force, in collaboration with the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine survey committee, surveyed internal medicine residency program directors to determine which competencies or skills they expected from new medical school graduates. The authors summarized the results using categories of interest. In both an item rank list and free-text responses, program directors were nearly uniform in ranking the skills they deemed most important for new interns-organization and time management and prioritization skills; effective communication skills; basic clinical skills; and knowing when to ask for assistance. Stakeholders should use the results of this survey as they develop a milestone-based curriculum for the fourth year of medical school and for the internal medicine subinternship. By doing so, they should develop a standardized set of skills that meet program directors' expectations, reduce the stress of transitions across the educational continuum, and improve the quality of patient care.

  6. Understanding Cultural Differences: Tips for Working with International Staff and Campers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Sandy

    2000-01-01

    As camps employ more international staff, effective intercultural communication becomes important. Tips include being aware of cultural differences in the meaning of smiles, eye contact, and hand gestures; speaking slowly and clearly; avoiding slang; explaining common camp phrases; asking people how they would like to be addressed; learning common…

  7. Understanding Cultural Differences: Tips for Working with International Staff and Campers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Sandy

    2000-01-01

    As camps employ more international staff, effective intercultural communication becomes important. Tips include being aware of cultural differences in the meaning of smiles, eye contact, and hand gestures; speaking slowly and clearly; avoiding slang; explaining common camp phrases; asking people how they would like to be addressed; learning common…

  8. Sports Information Online: Searching the SPORT Database and Tips for Finding Sports Medicine Information Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janke, Richard V.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The first article describes SPORT, a database providing international coverage of athletics and physical education, and compares it to other online services in terms of coverage, thesauri, possible search strategies, and actual usage. The second article reviews available online information on sports medicine. (CLB)

  9. Sports Information Online: Searching the SPORT Database and Tips for Finding Sports Medicine Information Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janke, Richard V.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The first article describes SPORT, a database providing international coverage of athletics and physical education, and compares it to other online services in terms of coverage, thesauri, possible search strategies, and actual usage. The second article reviews available online information on sports medicine. (CLB)

  10. Twelve tips for developing training programs for international medical graduates.

    PubMed

    Couser, Geoff

    2007-06-01

    International Medical Graduates (IMGs) are a diverse group of doctors who provide essential health services in many western countries, and hospitals are increasingly relying upon IMGs to fill vacancies in all staff grades. Clinical skills and experience vary greatly between doctors, and orientation and clinical skills training is a way of addressing any identified deficiencies. This paper relates the experiences of establishing a training program and support services for IMGs working in the public hospital system in Tasmania, Australia, and offers advice for other agencies contemplating establishing similar programs. A 'hub and spoke' model is a useful model to adopt: a central coordinating office designs and implements programs informed by best available evidence, and clinical educators on site at healthcare facilities implement programs and provide direct assistance and orientation. Broad-based programs attending to orientation, doctor's families' needs, communication skills and clinical skills training are required. Support from health administrators is essential.

  11. [Sports death--an Internal Medicine problem?].

    PubMed

    Sack, Stefan

    2004-06-01

    Sports means fitness and endurance, regeneration and balance, game and fun. Lack of physical exercise is one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Terrifying and not conclusive in the public's mind are events of sudden death, in particular if those are of nontraumatic cause and thus of cardiovascular origin. Organic pathologic examination revealed that a higher proportion of males are affected by sports death. Only 7-9% of those events are related to women, although the percentage of active women among sports people accounts for nearly 50%. The relative risk increases with age and intensity of endurance. For people who are untrained or not used to train, the risk of sudden death is potentially higher. In athletes > 35 years of age, coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause (85%) of sudden death. In the group < 35 years, CAD and acute myocarditis are the predominant causes of sudden death, but also hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), disorders of the conducting system, and Marfan's syndrome. Additional risk factors like acute infections and misuse of doping drugs require the care of a specialist in internal medicine and/or cardiology on top of the care by a specialist in orthopedics and accident/rehabilitation medicine. Physical examination as a precaution and prevention strategy should be available for leisure sports as well as for athlete sports.

  12. Acute Internal Medicine Trainee Survey 2015.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Nicholas; Conway, Nerys

    2015-01-01

    To ascertain current Acute Internal Medicine (AIM) trainees' opinions on their training programme, practical procedures, specialist skills and AIM as a specialty. This can then be used to feedback to the national training committee to help shape training priorities. Online survey sent to all AIM Higher Specialty Trainees registered on the Society for Acute Medicine database, and advertised through e-mail communication and social media. The majority of trainees (55.5%) were quite happy or very happy with their training currently, although significant difficulties were highlighted with time off for specialist skill training and difficulty achieving certain procedural skills. The majority of trainees believe ultrasound should form a core component of AIM training (82.3%). A high proportion of trainees would recommend AIM as a specialty despite these difficulties. A number of issues were highlighted causing difficulties within AIM training, despite which the vast majority of trainees would recommend AIM as a career choice. The results were fed back to the training committee in March.

  13. [Urinary tract infections in internal medicine].

    PubMed

    García Viejo, M A; Noguerado Asensio, A

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of characteristics of patients in internal medicine (IM) hospital wards in Spain with the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI). Observational, descriptive, retrospective study of a population of inpatients with UTI diagnosis (October-December, 2007). Recorded variables included personal data, risk factors for complicated UTI, diagnosis criteria, microbiological results and antibiotics used. A total of 992 patients (61.8% women), from 57 hospitals, were recruited. Mean age was 75.3 years old (SD 16.5), with 18.1% from nursing homes and with some physical dependence in 53.5%. The majority (78.3 %) had some risk factors (diabetes mellitus 33.6%, vesical catheterization 24.1%). Non-specific UTI was the most frequent diagnosis (38.1%). UTI was diagnosed in 46%, based exclusively on urinary sediment alterations and/or positive cultures. E. coli was the most frequent pathogen (64.17%), with intermediate sensitivity or resistance of 22.8% to amoxicillin-clavunanic, 34.8% to levofloxacin and 40.6% to ciprofloxacin. Amoxicillin-clavulanic was the most used antibiotic (30.9%). UTI delayed hospital discharge in a 13.3%. Intrahospital-UTI was statistically more frequent (23%) with vesical catheterization (50.5 vs 16.2%) and mortality (3.4%) in older patients (81.2 vs. 75.1 years old.), in patients with P. aeruginosa cultures (11.8 vs 4.1%) and in those with urinary sepsis (41.4 vs 16.2%). Patients in internal medicine wards with a UTI diagnosis are older and with risk factors. Frequently, UTI is diagnosed based on non-specific criteria. E. coli is the most frequent pathogen. Quinolones should not be the first-line treatment in complicated or severe UTI, due to the high percentages of resistance. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. American Internal Medicine in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Huddle, Thomas S; Centor, Robert; Heudebert, Gustavo R

    2003-01-01

    American internal medicine suffers a confusion of identity as we enter the 21st century. The subspecialties prosper, although unevenly, and retain varying degrees of connection to their internal medicine roots. General internal medicine, identified with primary care since the 1970s, retains an affinity for its traditional consultant-generalist ideal even as primary care further displaces that ideal. We discuss the origins and importance of the consultant-generalist ideal of internal medicine as exemplified by Osler, and its continued appeal in spite of the predominant role played by clinical science and accompanying subspecialism in determining the academic leadership of American internal medicine since the 1920s. Organizing departmental clinical work along subspecialty lines diminished the importance of the consultant-generalist ideal in academic departments of medicine after 1950. General internists, when they joined the divisions of general internal medicine that appeared in departments of medicine in the 1970s, could sometimes emulate Osler in practicing a general medicine of complexity, but often found themselves in a more limited role doing primary care. As we enter the 21st century, managed care threatens what remains of the Oslerian ideal, both in departments of medicine and in clinical practice. Twenty-first century American internists will have to adjust their conditions of work should they continue to aspire to practice Oslerian internal medicine. PMID:12950486

  15. Reflective writing in the internal medicine clerkship: a national survey of clerkship directors in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Chretien, Katherine C; Chheda, Shobhina G; Torre, Dario; Papp, Klara K

    2012-01-01

    Reflective writing programs have been implemented at many medical schools, but it is unclear to what extent and how they are structured. We surveyed the 107 Clerkship Directors of Internal Medicine member institutions on use of reflective writing assignments during the internal medicine clerkship. Eighty-six of 107 (80%) institutional members completed the survey. Thirty-five percent reported having a reflective writing assignment, 48% did not, and 6% did not but were considering starting one within the next 2 years. Of the 30 assignments, most were partially structured (60%), involved small-group discussion (57%), and provided individual student feedback (73%). A minority (30%) contributed to the students' grade. Respondents believed assignments contributed to students' learning in multiple domains, most often Professionalism (97%) and Communication (77%). Although reflective writing programs were common, variability existed in their structure. Further research is needed to determine how best to implement them.

  16. [Strategic orientation of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine].

    PubMed

    García Alegría, J; Conthe Gutiérrez, P

    2011-01-01

    The council of the Spanish Society of Internal express its position within the general society, origins, objectives, and strategies. The Spanish Foundation of Internal Medicina promotes scientific research and continued education within Internal Medicine, by means of the 17 working groups. Taking into account the actual situation, the authors analyze this situation and formulate the strategy objectives for the upcoming years. These contents are summarized in 10 message decalogue that express the essence and future of Internal Medicine.

  17. Field-induced wooden-tip electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for high-throughput analysis of herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunyun; Deng, Jiewei; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2015-08-05

    This study demonstrates the first application of field-induced wooden-tip electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) for high-throughput analysis of herbal medicines. By application of an opposite and sample-contactless high voltage on the MS inlet rather than wooden tips, a high-throughput analysis device is easily set up, and a relatively fast analysis speed of 6 s per sample was successfully achieved. In addition, fast polarity switching between positive and negative ion detection mode is readily accomplished, which provides more complete chemical information for quality assessment and control of herbal medicines. By using the proposed method, various active ingredients present in different herbal medicines were rapidly detected, and the obtained mass spectra were served as the samples' fingerprints for tracing the origins, establishing the authenticity, and assessing the quality consistency and stability of herbal medicines. Our experimental results demonstrated that field-induced wooden-tip ESI-MS is a desirable method for high-throughput analysis of herbal medicines, with promising prospects for rapidly differentiating the origin, determining the authenticity, and assessing the overall quality of pharmaceuticals.

  18. [Oncologic pathology at an internal medicine service].

    PubMed

    de Miranda, M I; da Luz, R; Gonçalves, F M; Monteiro, J S; da Costa, J N

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective survey of the patients with oncological disease admitted to our Department of Internal Medicine in 1987 was conducted to determine its prevalence and to draw a descriptive profile of these patients' admissions. The results show that oncological diseases were the second cause of hospital admissions that year (12%) only exceeded by cardiovascular diseases. About 60% of the patients had neoplasms already diagnosed elsewhere and were admitted for complications or with therapeutic purposes; in 40% of cases the disease was diagnosed in our Department. A wide variety of hematological and non-hematological tumors was found. There were some difficulties in interdisciplinary coordination in the diagnostic and therapeutic approach. More than 50% of the patients had advanced disease, limiting medical intervention to supportive measures. In about 60% of them were oriented to primary care physicians after physicians after discharged from Hospital. These results suggest the dispersion of the available resources for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of oncological diseases in our population. A better cancer patients' assistance in Portugal will depend on the promotion of national cancer registers as well as the improvement of cancer prevention and early detection programs, according to the directives of EEC and WHO. We also emphasize the need of investment on undergraduate and postgraduate education programs, specially for primary care physicians.

  19. Research in Biological and Medical Sciences, Including Biochemistry, Communicable Disease and Immunology, Internal Medicine, Nuclear Medicine, Physiology, Psychiatry, Surgery, and Veterinary Medicine. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: In-house laboratory independent research; Communicable diseases and immunology; Surgery, internal medicine , psychiatry, Biochemistry...surgery, military internal medicine , military psychiatry; Malaria prophylaxis; and Biosensor systems.

  20. [Patient centered practice in internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Rui; Freire, Elga; Alves, Júlia; Rocha, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    We made a cross-sectional study aimed at 50 professionals (18 doctors, 32 nurses) of a tertiary hospital Internal Medicine (IM) ward, focusing the relevant knowledge in various areas of Patient-Centered Care in Chronic Disease: symptom control, pharmacology and palliative prognostic discussion. Almost 98% believe that most patients need strategies for symptomatic care, which died in hospital in considerable suffering (68%). Provision of palliative care in the community was rarely established with the primary health team. 90% were favourable on the creation of a hospital palliative care team. Around 57% find essential to prognosticate before thinking about mitigation strategies. While 75% of professionals had already discussed end-of-life directives with, at least, one patient, only one case could be formalized in writing. The rate of use of scales for assessing the intensity of pain was less than 50% and 38% did not indicate major opioids for the treatment of moderate intensity pain. These were considered contra-indicated for relief of dyspnoea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by 20% of professionals and 55% of those were unaware that its use and titration is governed by the same principles used in pain control. Around 44% of the respondents had already used the subcutaneous route for administration of drugs and 58% for hydration. Despite the team recognition of the potential for suffering of patients and the need for mitigation strategies, they remain linked to prognosis and not to symptomatic complexity. There are gaps in regard to control of pain, dyspnoea and in continuity of care.

  1. Vitamin D insufficiency in internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Haney, E M; Stadler, D; Bliziotes, M M

    2005-01-01

    Medical residents may be vulnerable to low vitamin D status because of long work hours and lack of sun exposure. We conducted a prospective cohort study to measure serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations among internal medicine residents, document seasonal variation in vitamin D status, and assess risk factors for inadequate vitamin D stores. Dietary intake of calcium and vitamin D, lifestyle characteristics, and serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were measured in 35 resident volunteers before and after the winter season. A total of 63-69% of medical residents consumed <400 IU/day of vitamin D; 61-67% consumed <1000 mg/day of calcium. Twenty-five (74%) had lower serum 25(OH)-vitamin D concentrations and 23 (68%) had higher serum iPTH in the spring than in the fall. Nine (26%) residents had serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D of <20 ng/mL in the fall; and sixteen (47%) in the spring. Seven residents (20%) had serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D of <20 ng/mL at both time-periods; Eighteen residents (51.4%) had 25(OH)-vitamin D levels of <20 ng/mL for at least one of the time-periods. Medical residents are at risk for hypovitaminosis D, particularly during the winter months and should be aware of the need to supplement their vitamin D stores. Insufficient vitamin D status and inadequate vitamin D intake may have long-term implications for bone health in these individuals. Increased educational efforts to promote healthy dietary and lifestyle choices that allow attainment and maintenance of skeletal health are appropriate in this population.

  2. The future of general internal medicine. Report and recommendations from the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) Task Force on the Domain of General Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Larson, Eric B; Fihn, Stephan D; Kirk, Lynne M; Levinson, Wendy; Loge, Ronald V; Reynolds, Eileen; Sandy, Lewis; Schroeder, Steven; Wenger, Neil; Williams, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The Society of General Internal Medicine asked a task force to redefine the domain of general internal medicine. The task force believes that the chaos and dysfunction that characterize today's medical care, and the challenges facing general internal medicine, should spur innovation. These are our recommendations: while remaining true to its core values and competencies, general internal medicine should stay both broad and deep-ranging from uncomplicated primary care to continuous care of patients with multiple, complex, chronic diseases. Postgraduate and continuing education should develop mastery. Wherever they practice, general internists should be able to lead teams and be responsible for the care their teams give, embrace changes in information systems, and aim to provide most of the care their patients require. Current financing of physician services, especially fee-for-service, must be changed to recognize the value of services performed outside the traditional face-to-face visit and give practitioners incentives to improve quality and efficiency, and provide comprehensive, ongoing care. General internal medicine residency training should be reformed to provide both broad and deep medical knowledge, as well as mastery of informatics, management, and team leadership. General internal medicine residents should have options to tailor their final 1 to 2 years to fit their practice goals, often earning a certificate of added qualification (CAQ) in special generalist fields. Research will expand to include practice and operations management, developing more effective shared decision making and transparent medical records, and promoting the close personal connection that both doctors and patients want. We believe these changes constitute a paradigm shift that can benefit patients and the public and reenergize general internal medicine.

  3. [Incident-reporting electronic-based system in internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Servet, J; Bart, P-A; Wasserfallen, J-B; Castioni, J

    2015-11-04

    How to recognize, announce and analyze incidents in internal medicine units is a daily challenge that is taught to all hospital staff. It allows suggesting useful improvements for patients, as well as for the medical department and the institution. Here is presented the assessment made in the CHUV internal medicine department one year after the beginning of the institutional procedure which promotes an open process regarding communication and risk management. The department of internal medicine underlines the importance of feedback to the reporters, ensures the staff of regular follow-up concerning the measures being taken and offers to external reporters such as general practioners the possibility of using this reporting system too.

  4. Experiences with a combined residency in internal and preventive medicine.

    PubMed

    Wild, Dorothea M G; Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Jekel, James F; Ahmadi, Ramin; D'Souza, Seema; Nawaz, Haq

    2008-10-01

    The importance of integrating preventive medicine training into other residency programs was reinforced recently by the residency review committee for preventive medicine. Griffin Hospital in Derby CT has offered a 4-year integrated internal medicine and preventive medicine residency program since 1997. This article reports the outcomes of that program. Data were collected from surveys of program graduates and the American Boards of Internal and Preventive Medicine in 2005-2007, and analyzed in 2007-2008. Graduates rated the program in regard to job preparation, the ease of transition to employment, the value of skills learned, the perceived quality of board preparation, and the quality of the program overall. Graduates rated themselves on core competencies set by the Accreditation Committee for Graduate Medical Education. Since 1997, the program has enrolled 22 residents. Residents and graduates contribute significantly toward quality of care at the hospital. Graduates take and pass at high rates the boards for both for internal and preventive medicine: 100% took internal medicine boards, 90% of them passed; 63% took preventive medicine boards, 100% of them passed). The program has recruited residents mainly through the match. Graduates rated most elements of the program highly. They felt well-prepared for their postgraduation jobs; most respondents reported routinely using preventive medicine skills learned during residency. Graduates either have gone into academic medicine (31%); public health (14%); clinical fellowships (18%); or primary care (9%); or they combine elements of clinical medicine and public health (28%). Integrating preventive medicine training into clinical residency programs may be an efficient, viable, and cost-effective way of creating more medical specialists with population-medicine skills.

  5. International assistance and cooperation for access to essential medicines.

    PubMed

    Mok, Emily A

    2010-06-15

    Access to essential medicines is a critical problem that plagues many developing countries. With a daunting number of domestic constraints - technologically, economically, and otherwise - developing countries are faced with a steep uphill battle to meet the human rights obligation of providing essential medicines immediately. To meet these challenges, the international human rights obligations of international assistance and cooperation can play a key role to help developing countries fulfill the need for access to essential medicines. This article seeks to highlight and expand upon the current understanding of international assistance and cooperation for access to essential medicines through a review of obligations identified in international human rights law and a synthesis of official guidance provided on the matter.

  6. A "Firm" System for Graduate Training in General Internal Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Waggoner, David M.

    1979-01-01

    The Department of Medicine at Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital fosters general internal medicine in a graduate training program with a "medical firm" system of medical care. The firm system consists of four medical teams that care for distinct patient populations, closely integrating outpatient and inpatient care. (Author/JMD)

  7. The Teaching of Liberal Arts in Internal Medicine Residency Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Povar, Gail J.; Keith, Karla J.

    1984-01-01

    A survey on the teaching of liberal arts in internal medicine residency programs and the importance of liberal arts to the practice of medicine is discussed. Law and organization of the health care system as well as economics and bioethics were rated as essential to medical practice. (Author/MLW)

  8. The Teaching of Liberal Arts in Internal Medicine Residency Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Povar, Gail J.; Keith, Karla J.

    1984-01-01

    A survey on the teaching of liberal arts in internal medicine residency programs and the importance of liberal arts to the practice of medicine is discussed. Law and organization of the health care system as well as economics and bioethics were rated as essential to medical practice. (Author/MLW)

  9. Development of a Central Division of General Internal Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpf, Michael; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine's Division of General Internal Medicine is described, focusing on personnel and organization, educational programs, clinical and research activities, special programs, finances, and related issues and pressures. The program is proposed as a model for other institutions. (MSE)

  10. Enhanced Dielectrophoretic Enrichment of Nanoparticles Using a Nanostructured Tip for Nanoengineered Medicine and Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Woonhong

    2011-12-01

    Enrichment of low-concentration nanoparticles (NPs) is of great interest in the fields of medicine, biology, and environment. In particular, the enrichment of bioparticles such as virus, quantum dots, DNA, or protein can have broad impacts on disease diagnosis, drug discovery, and environmental monitoring. Currently available NP enrichment methods employ centrifugation, microfiltration, or magnetic field. However, these methods are limited in cumbersome preparation steps, low yield, and low throughput. Electric field-based methods have demonstrated potential for NP enrichment, but two-dimensional planar electrodes are limited in sensitivity, molecular transfer, and imaging capability. In addition, the detection of low abundance, non-amplifiable particles such as proteins and metals is very challenging due to the low efficiency of current methods. In this dissertation, the challenges are addressed by nanotip-based NP enrichment. Fundamentals of NP enrichment are studied with a nanostructured tip. The nanotip-based NP enrichment is investigated by correlating a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force with Brownian motion force. In experiment, the predicted NP enrichment is validated by using gold (Au) NPs. The DEP effective distance for NP enrichment with a nanotip is suggested. Sequence-specific enrichment of oligonucleotides is studied by considering DEP force, Brownian motion, and affinity binding. In experiment, the optimal parameters for ultimate enrichment performance are studied using a hybridization assay. In the assay, a nanotip is functionalized with probe-oligonucleotides for sequence-specific binding. Size-specific NP enrichment is explored by studying DEP, capillary action, and viscosity. The capillary action force with a nanotip is calculated analytically, which is then compared with the DEP force. The viscosity effect is considered for NP capturing on a nanotip. The studied size-specific enrichment mechanism is validated in experiment by using various

  11. International programs of the National Library of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, R K

    1988-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has a broad mission in biomedical information service. There are three major reasons for NLM, as a national institution, having an international program: first, the global nature of disease; second, the international scope of medical literature; and third, the universal goal of better communication. This paper reviews NLM's programs in relation to international medical information exchange: International MEDLARS Centers, collaboration with WHO and PAHO, NLM Special Foreign Currency Program, and development of the NLM collection.

  12. Advances in internal medicine. Volume 30

    SciTech Connect

    Stollerman, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the recent advances made in medicine. Topics discussed are--pathogenesis of T-cell Leukemia Virus; Immunosuppression; Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)--organs affected and etiology; molecular biology of bacterial infections; pneumonia; patterns of aspergillosillosis infections; leukotrienes; cardiovascular action of beta-blockers; toxicity of drugs and biological effects of metals; and carcinogenesis of various carcinogens.

  13. [The practice of Internal Medicine in Andalusia follows the evidence-based medicine basic principles].

    PubMed

    Zambrana García, J L; Velasco Malagón, M J; Díez García, F; Martín-Escalante, M D; Cruz-Caparrós, G

    2003-10-01

    To know the proportion of medical interventions carried out in the Services of Internal Medicine of the public hospitals of Andalusia based on randomized clinical trials. We have analyzed the primary treatments prescribed in a random sample of 326 patients admitted to these Internal Medicine services during 1998. One hundred and forty-three of the 326 treatments analyzed (43.9%) were based in clinical trials and 135 (41.4%) were interventions unanimously accepted by the medical community without being based in clinical trials. Most of the primary Andalusian treatments prescribed in the Internal Medicine services are evidence-based.

  14. Complexity in graduate medical education: a collaborative education agenda for internal medicine and geriatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Anna; Fernandez, Helen; Cayea, Danelle; Chheda, Shobhina; Paniagua, Miguel; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Day, Hollis

    2014-06-01

    Internal medicine residents today face significant challenges in caring for an increasingly complex patient population within ever-changing education and health care environments. As a result, medical educators, health care system leaders, payers, and patients are demanding change and accountability in graduate medical education (GME). A 2012 Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) retreat identified medical education as an area for collaboration between internal medicine and geriatric medicine. The authors first determined a short-term research agenda for resident education by mapping selected internal medicine reporting milestones to geriatrics competencies, and listing available sample learner assessment tools. Next, the authors proposed a strategy for long-term collaboration in three priority areas in clinical medicine that are challenging for residents today: (1) team-based care, (2) transitions and readmissions, and (3) multi-morbidity. The short-term agenda focuses on learner assessment, while the long-term agenda allows for program evaluation and improvement. This model of collaboration in medical education combines the resources and expertise of internal medicine and geriatric medicine educators with the goal of increasing innovation and improving outcomes in GME targeting the needs of our residents and their patients.

  15. The internal medicine clerkship and ambulatory learning experiences: results of the 2010 clerkship directors in internal medicine survey.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Amy; Papp, Klara K; Torre, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Education in the ambulatory setting should be an integral part of undergraduate medical education. However, previous studies have shown education in this setting has been lacking in medical school. Ambulatory education occurs on some internal medicine clerkships. The extent of this education is unclear. The purpose of this survey was to assess the structure, curriculum, assessment methods, and barriers to implementation of ambulatory education on the internal medicine clerkship. An annual survey of institutional members of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) was done in April 2010. The data were anonymous and descriptive statistics were used to summarize responses. Free text results were analyzed using qualitative techniques. The response rate was 75%. The majority of respondents had a required ambulatory component to the clerkship. Ambulatory experiences distinct from the inpatient internal medicine experience were common (46%). Integration with either the inpatient experiences or other departmental clerkships also occurred. The majority of ambulatory educational experiences were with generalists (74%) and/or subspecialists (45%). The most common assessment tool was the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) ambulatory shelf exam. Thematic analysis of the question about how practice based learning was taught elicited four major themes: Not taught; taught in the context of learning evidence based medicine; taught while learning chronic disease management with quality improvement; taught while learning about health care finance. Barriers to implementation included lack of faculty and financial resources. There have been significant increases in the amount of time dedicated to ambulatory internal medicine. The numbers of medical schools with ambulatory internal medicine education has increased. Integration of the ambulatory experiences with other clerkships such as family medicine occurs. Curriculum was varied but difficulties with dissemination

  16. The Yale Affiliated Hospital Program in Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Black, Henry R.; Thier, Samuel O.; Felig, Philip F.; Jekel, James F.; Belsky, Joseph; Bernene, James L.; Cooper, Everett; De Luca, Vincent A.; Floch, Martin H.; Garrell, Marvin; Perillie, Pasquale E.; Piscatelli, Robert L.; Thornton, George F.

    1977-01-01

    In July, 1975, the Departments of Internal Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine and eight community hospitals in southern and western Connecticut formed the Yale Affiliated Hospital Program (YAHP) in Internal Medicine. The YAHP provides a planned and focused program of continuing education for medical staff and housestaff at the affiliated hospitals. Six formats for the over 1,000 rounds, lectures, and conferences given annually are used. The members of the YAHP also cooperate in housestaff and faculty recruiting, evaluation of quality of care and evaluation of the process of continuing medical education itself. This report summarizes the organization, goals and future plans of the YAHP. PMID:610055

  17. Canada's Patented Medicine Notice of Compliance regulations: balancing the scales or tipping them?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In order to comply with the provisions of the North American Free Trade Agreement, in 1993 the Canadian federal government introduced the Patented Medicine Notice of Compliance Linkage Regulations. These regulations were meant to achieve a balance between the timely entry of generic medicines and the rights of patent holders. The regulations tied the regulatory approval of generic medicines to the patent status of the original brand-name product. Discussion Since their introduction the regulations have been a source of contention between the generic and the brand-name industry. While the regulations have generated a considerable amount of work for the Federal Court of Canada both sides dispute the interpretation of the "win rate" in the court cases. Similarly, there is no agreement on whether multiple patents on single drugs represent a legitimate activity by the brand-name industry or an "evergreening" tactic. The generic industry's position is that the regulations are being abused leading to the delay in the introduction of lower cost generic products by as much as 8 years. The brand-name companies counter that the regulations are necessary because injunctions against the introduction of generic products are frequently unavailable to them. The regulations were amended in 2006 and again in 2008 but both sides continue to claim that the regulations favour the other party. The battle around the regulations also has an international dimension with interventions by PhRMA, the trade association representing the United States based multinational companies, arguing that the regulations are not stringent enough and that Canada needs to be placed on the U.S. Priority Watch List of countries. Finally, there are multiple costs to Canadian society as a result of the NOC regulations. Summary Despite the rhetoric there has been almost no empiric academic research done into the effect of the regulations. In order to develop rational policy in this area a number of key

  18. Canada's patented medicine notice of compliance regulations: balancing the scales or tipping them?

    PubMed

    Lexchin, Joel

    2011-03-24

    In order to comply with the provisions of the North American Free Trade Agreement, in 1993 the Canadian federal government introduced the Patented Medicine Notice of Compliance Linkage Regulations. These regulations were meant to achieve a balance between the timely entry of generic medicines and the rights of patent holders. The regulations tied the regulatory approval of generic medicines to the patent status of the original brand-name product. Since their introduction the regulations have been a source of contention between the generic and the brand-name industry. While the regulations have generated a considerable amount of work for the Federal Court of Canada both sides dispute the interpretation of the "win rate" in the court cases. Similarly, there is no agreement on whether multiple patents on single drugs represent a legitimate activity by the brand-name industry or an "evergreening" tactic. The generic industry's position is that the regulations are being abused leading to the delay in the introduction of lower cost generic products by as much as 8 years. The brand-name companies counter that the regulations are necessary because injunctions against the introduction of generic products are frequently unavailable to them. The regulations were amended in 2006 and again in 2008 but both sides continue to claim that the regulations favour the other party. The battle around the regulations also has an international dimension with interventions by PhRMA, the trade association representing the United States based multinational companies, arguing that the regulations are not stringent enough and that Canada needs to be placed on the U.S. Priority Watch List of countries. Finally, there are multiple costs to Canadian society as a result of the NOC regulations. Despite the rhetoric there has been almost no empiric academic research done into the effect of the regulations. In order to develop rational policy in this area a number of key research questions have been

  19. Travel medicine and the international athlete.

    PubMed

    Kary, Joel M; Lavallee, Mark

    2007-07-01

    International travel for athletic competition presents unique challenges for athletes and medical staff. This article provides strategies for all phases of an international trip, including travel preparation, travel, competition, and post competition. Adequate planning should encompass the needs of all members of the traveling team (athletes and nonathletes), proper documentation and licensure, emergency planning, venue set-up, and appropriate medical supplies and equipment.

  20. Research in Biological and Medical Sciences Including Biochemistry, Communicable Disease and Immunology, Internal Medicine, Nuclear Medicine, Physiology, Psychiatry, Surgery, and Veterinary Medicine. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    preventive medicine; Military medical research program S. E. Asia; Combat surgery; Military internal medicine ; Military psychiatry; Ionizing radiation injury, prevention and treatment; Malaria prophyaxis; Biosensor systems.

  1. Palliative Care Exposure in Internal Medicine Residency Education.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Asher; Nam, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    As the baby boomer generation ages, the need for palliative care services will be paramount and yet training for palliative care physicians is currently inadequate to meet the current palliative care needs. Nonspecialty-trained physicians will need to supplement the gap between supply and demand. Yet, no uniform guidelines exist for the training of internal medicine residents in palliative care. To our knowledge, no systematic study has been performed to evaluate how internal medicine residencies currently integrate palliative care into their training. In this study, we surveyed 338 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited internal medicine program directors. We queried how palliative care was integrated into their training programs. The vast majority of respondents felt that palliative care training was "very important" (87.5%) and 75.9% of respondents offered some kind of palliative care rotation, often with a multidisciplinary approach. Moving forward, we are hopeful that the data provided from our survey will act as a launching point for more formal investigations into palliative care education for internal medicine residents. Concurrently, policy makers should aid in palliative care instruction by formalizing required palliative care training for internal medicine residents.

  2. Definitions of Internal Medicine activities outside of the im department.

    PubMed

    Montero Ruiz, E; Monte Secades, R

    2015-04-01

    The inpatient profile is changing towards patients with multiple diseases, the elderly and those with high comorbidity. The growing complexity of their care, the progressive medical superspecialization and the organizational problems that often hinder daily patient follow-up by the same physician have contributed to a progressive increase in the participation of medical departments, especially Internal Medicine, in the care of patients hospitalized in other medical and surgical specialties. The hospital activities that the departments of internal medicine perform outside of their own department do not have well-established definitions and criteria at the organizational level; their assessment and accountability are different in each hospital. In this document, we establish the definitions for shared care, advisory medicine, perioperative medicine and interconsultation, as well as their types in terms of priority, formality, care setting, timeliness, relationship with surgery and other circumstances.

  3. Academic general internal medicine: a mission for the future.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Katrina; Keating, Nancy L; Landry, Michael; Crotty, Bradley H; Phillips, Russell S; Selker, Harry P

    2013-06-01

    After five decades of growth that has included advances in medical education and health care delivery, value cohesion, and integration of diversity, we propose an overarching mission for academic general internal medicine to lead excellence, change, and innovation in clinical care, education, and research. General internal medicine aims to achieve health care delivery that is comprehensive, technologically advanced and individualized; instills trust within a culture of respect; is efficient in the use of time, people, and resources; is organized and financed to achieve optimal health outcomes; maximizes equity; and continually learns and adapts. This mission of health care transformation has implications for the clinical, educational, and research activities of divisions of general internal medicine over the next several decades.

  4. Musculoskeletal exam and joint injection training for internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Tracie; Oyler, Julie; Harada, Caroline; Utset, Tammy

    2006-05-01

    We developed a musculoskeletal education intervention for internal medicine residents consisting of lectures, anatomic models, and a joint injection clinic. Written tests, observed musculoskeletal exams, and self-confidence scales were administered to 27 internal medicine residents before and after the intervention. Improvement was found in observed physical exam and self-reported confidence levels in performing knee injections. Confidence in shoulder injection skills improved, but remained low. Improved scores on written examination, though statistically significant, were not educationally significant. This single-institution pilot study demonstrates that a simple educational program results in improved knee and shoulder examination skills and confidence in performing knee injections.

  5. The relationship between medicine's internal morality and religion.

    PubMed

    Welie, Jos V M

    2002-08-01

    In the face of managed care and market economies infringing on the practice of medicine, reducing its autonomy and determining the moral guidelines for medical practice, many physicians are calling out for a return to what is perceived as a traditional medical ethic. Many religiously motivated critics of certain modern developments in medicine have made similar appeals. These calls are best understood as an attempt to define medicine as a practice that is necessarily ethical in nature, a practice the moral basis of which is internal to that practice. This article examines and assesses this definition of medicine in reference to Aristotle's division of human undertakings into three distinct categories: theory, poieisis (i.e., production), and praxis. It is concluded that medicine can be understood as a praxis (as opposed to a theory or production, both of which are morally neutral), because the practice of medicine, and all of its constitutive acts, can only be explained and assessed in reference to health, which is itself a final good and hence of moral value. Such an understanding would immunize medicine against usurpation by the free market. However, by the same token it would also dissociate medicine from all other moralities external to it, including those grounded in faith and religion.

  6. Intern underperformance is detected more frequently in emergency medicine rotations.

    PubMed

    Aram, Narelle; Brazil, Victoria; Davin, Lorna; Greenslade, Jaimi

    2013-02-01

    To determine the frequency and nature of intern underperformance as documented on in-training assessment forms. A retrospective review of intern assessment forms from a 2 year period (2009-2010) was conducted at a tertiary referral hospital in Brisbane, Queensland. The frequency of interns assessed as 'requiring substantial assistance' and/or 'requires further development' on mid- or end-of-term assessment forms was determined. Forms were analysed by the clinical rotation, time of year and domain(s) of clinical practice in which underperformance was documented. During 2009 and 2010 the overall documented incidence of intern underperformance was 2.4% (95% CI 1.5-3.9%). Clinical rotation in emergency medicine detected significantly more underperformance compared with other rotations (P < 0.01). Interns predominantly had difficulty with 'clinical judgment and decision-making skills', 'time management skills' and 'teamwork and colleagues' (62.5%, 55% and 32.5% of underperforming assessments, respectively). Time of the year did not affect frequency of underperformance. A proportion of 13.4% (95% CI 9.2-19.0%) of interns working at the institution over the study period received at least one assessment in which underperformance was documented. Seventy-six per cent of those interns who had underperformance identified by mid-term assessment successfully completed the term following remediation. The prevalence of underperformance among interns is low, although higher than previously suggested. Emergency medicine detects relatively more interns in difficulty than other rotations. © 2012 The Authors. EMA © 2012 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  7. The International System of Units (SI) and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bergeson, Paul S.; Smith, E. Ide

    1981-01-01

    A major international movement is in progress to extend metrication using the International System of Units. Significantly involved is the field of medicine. Extensive changes adopted abroad now appear in foreign medical literature, and physicians in the United States commonly are unprepared to interpret medical information from abroad because the data are reported in unfamiliar terms. The system has broad immediate and future implications to American physicians. PMID:7336719

  8. Core curricular elements for fellowship training in international emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Jamil; Rosborough, Stephanie; Bartels, Susan; Lis, Julian; VanRooyen, Michael J; Kapur, G Bobby; Anderson, Philip D

    2010-07-01

    The objective was to describe the common educational goals, curricular elements, and methods of evaluation used in international emergency medicine (IEM) fellowship training programs currently. IEM fellowship programs have been developed to provide formal training for emergency physicians (EPs) interested in pursuing careers in IEM. Those fellowships are variable in scope, objectives, and duration. Previously published articles have suggested a general curriculum structure for IEM fellowships. A search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases from 1950 to June 2008 was performed, combining the terms international, emergency medicine, and fellowship. Online curricula and descriptive materials from IEM fellowships listed by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) were reviewed. Knowledge and skill areas common to multiple programs were organized in discrete categories. IEM fellowship directors were contacted for input and feedback. Eight articles on IEM fellowships were identified. Two articles described a general structure for fellowship curriculum. Sixteen of 20 IEM fellowship programs had descriptive materials posted online. These information sources, plus input from seven fellowship program directors, yielded the following seven discrete knowledge and skill areas: 1) emergency medicine systems development, 2) humanitarian relief, 3) disaster management, 4) public health, 5) travel and field medicine, 6) program administration, and 7) academic skills. While IEM fellowships vary with regard to objectives and structure, this article presents an overview of the current focus of IEM fellowship training curricula that could serve as a resource for IEM curriculum development at individual institutions. 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

  9. International emergency medicine: a review of the literature from 2007.

    PubMed

    Levine, Adam C; Becker, Joseph; Lippert, Suzanne; Rosborough, Stephanie; Arnold, Kris

    2008-09-01

    The subspecialty of international emergency medicine (IEM) continues to grow within the United States, just as the specialty of emergency medicine (EM) continues to spread to both developed and developing countries around the world. One of the greatest obstacles, however, faced by IEM researchers and practitioners alike, remains the lack of a high-quality, consolidated, and easily accessible evidence-base of literature. In response to this perceived need, members of the Emergency Medicine Resident Association (EMRA) International Emergency Medicine Committee, in conjunction with members of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) International Health Interest Group, have embarked on the task of creating a recurring review of IEM literature. This publication represents the third annual review, covering the top 30 IEM research articles published in 2007. Articles were selected for the review according to explicit, predetermined criteria that included both methodologic quality and perceived impact of the research. It is hoped that this annual review will act as a forum for disseminating best practices, while also stimulating further research in the field of IEM.

  10. Do internal medicine interns practice etiquette-based communication? A critical look at the inpatient encounter.

    PubMed

    Block, Lauren; Hutzler, Lindsey; Habicht, Robert; Wu, Albert W; Desai, Sanjay V; Novello Silva, Kathryn; Niessen, Timothy; Oliver, Nora; Feldman, Leonard

    2013-11-01

    Etiquette-based communication may improve the inpatient experience but is not universally practiced. We sought to determine the extent to which internal medicine interns practice behaviors that characterize etiquette-based medicine. Trained observers evaluated the use of 5 key communication strategies by internal medicine interns during inpatient clinical encounters: introducing one's self, explaining one's role in the patient's care, touching the patient, asking open-ended questions, and sitting down with the patient. Participants at 1 site then completed a survey estimating how frequently they performed each of the observed behaviors. A convenience sample of 29 interns was observed on a total of 732 patient encounters. Overall, interns introduced themselves 40% of the time and explained their role 37% of the time. Interns touched patients on 65% of visits, asked open-ended questions on 75% of visits, and sat down with patients during 9% of visits. Interns at 1 site estimated introducing themselves and their role and sitting with patients significantly more frequently than was observed (80% vs 40%, P < 0.01; 80% vs 37%, P < 0.01; and 58% vs 9%, P < 0.01, respectively). Resident physicians introduced themselves to patients, explained their role, and sat down with patients infrequently during observed inpatient encounters. Residents surveyed tended to overestimate their own practice of etiquette-based medicine. © 2013 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  11. International Telemedicine/Disaster Medicine Conference: Papers and Presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The first International Telemedicine/Disaster Medicine Conference was held in Dec. 1991. The overall purpose was to convene an international, multidisciplinary gathering of experts to discuss the emerging field of telemedicine and assess its future directions; principally the application of space technology to disaster response and management, but also to clinical medicine, remote health care, public health, and other needs. This collection is intended to acquaint the reader with recent landmark efforts in telemedicine as applied to disaster management and remote health care, the technical requirements of telemedicine systems, the application of telemedicine and telehealth in the U.S. space program, and the social and humanitarian dimensions of this area of medicine.

  12. Internal Medicine Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum: Consensus Recommendations from the Canadian Internal Medicine Ultrasound (CIMUS) Group.

    PubMed

    Ma, Irene W Y; Arishenkoff, Shane; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Desy, Janeve; Ailon, Jonathan; Martin, Leslie; Otremba, Mirek; Halman, Samantha; Willemot, Patrick; Blouw, Marcus

    2017-05-11

    Bedside point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is increasingly used to assess medical patients. At present, no consensus exists for what POCUS curriculum is appropriate for internal medicine residency training programs. This document details the consensus-based recommendations by the Canadian Internal Medicine Ultrasound (CIMUS) group, comprising 39 members, representing 14 institutions across Canada. Guiding principles for selecting curricular content were determined a priori. Consensus was defined as agreement by at least 80% of the members on POCUS applications deemed appropriate for teaching and assessment of trainees in the core (internal medicine postgraduate years [PGY] 1-3) and expanded (general internal medicine PGY 4-5) training programs. We recommend four POCUS applications for the core PGY 1-3 curriculum (inferior vena cava, lung B lines, pleural effusion, and abdominal free fluid) and three ultrasound-guided procedures (central venous catheterization, thoracentesis, and paracentesis). For the expanded PGY 4-5 curriculum, we recommend an additional seven applications (internal jugular vein, lung consolidation, pneumothorax, knee effusion, gross left ventricular systolic function, pericardial effusion, and right ventricular strain) and four ultrasound-guided procedures (knee arthrocentesis, arterial line insertion, arterial blood gas sampling, and peripheral venous catheterization). These recommendations will provide a framework for training programs at a national level.

  13. Second International Electronic Conference on Medicinal Chemistry (ECMC-2)

    PubMed Central

    Mayence, Annie; Vanden Eynde, Jean Jacques

    2017-01-01

    The second International Electronic Conference on Medicinal Chemistry, organized and sponsored by the publisher MDPI AG and the Journal Pharmaceuticals, took place in November 2016 on the SciForum website (www.sciforum.net/conference/ecmc-12). More than 150 authors from 22 countries participated in the event. Selected works presented during the scientific meeting are disclosed in this report. PMID:28146112

  14. Internal Medicine Residents' Preferences regarding Medical Ethics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Jay A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A survey of residents (N=323) in 6 internal medicine programs investigated the topics students wanted included in the medical ethics curriculum and by which of 17 methods they would prefer to be taught. About three-fourths had previous medical ethics instruction, and most wanted more on specific topics, especially legal and end-of-life issues.…

  15. Screening for Cancer by Residents in an Internal Medicine Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Garrett R.; Prout, Marianne N.

    1986-01-01

    A study of cancer screening by internal medicine residents in an inner-city clinic revealed that screening was more frequent for male patients, and breast examinations and Pap smears were performed on less than a third of female patients, suggesting a need for more intensive early-detection education of residents. (MSE)

  16. Internal Medicine Residents Do Not Accurately Assess Their Medical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Roger; Panda, Mukta; Desbiens, Norman

    2008-01-01

    Background: Medical knowledge is essential for appropriate patient care; however, the accuracy of internal medicine (IM) residents' assessment of their medical knowledge is unknown. Methods: IM residents predicted their overall percentile performance 1 week (on average) before and after taking the in-training exam (ITE), an objective and well…

  17. Internal Medicine Residents' Preferences regarding Medical Ethics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Jay A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A survey of residents (N=323) in 6 internal medicine programs investigated the topics students wanted included in the medical ethics curriculum and by which of 17 methods they would prefer to be taught. About three-fourths had previous medical ethics instruction, and most wanted more on specific topics, especially legal and end-of-life issues.…

  18. Internal Medicine Residents Do Not Accurately Assess Their Medical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Roger; Panda, Mukta; Desbiens, Norman

    2008-01-01

    Background: Medical knowledge is essential for appropriate patient care; however, the accuracy of internal medicine (IM) residents' assessment of their medical knowledge is unknown. Methods: IM residents predicted their overall percentile performance 1 week (on average) before and after taking the in-training exam (ITE), an objective and well…

  19. Screening for Cancer by Residents in an Internal Medicine Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Garrett R.; Prout, Marianne N.

    1986-01-01

    A study of cancer screening by internal medicine residents in an inner-city clinic revealed that screening was more frequent for male patients, and breast examinations and Pap smears were performed on less than a third of female patients, suggesting a need for more intensive early-detection education of residents. (MSE)

  20. A Combined Primary Care Residency in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Kim; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A program combining pediatrics and internal medicine is described. The four-year program, focusing on ambulatory care, alternates six-month rotations in each field and includes clinic training. Success factors include comparison of outpatient and inpatient care, developing an ambulatory practice to support resident salaries, and preparation for…

  1. Unhappy with internal corporate search? : learn tips and tricks for building a controlled vocabulary ontology.

    SciTech Connect

    Arpin, Bettina Karin Schimanski; Jones, Brian S.; Bemesderfer, Joy; Ralph, Mark E.; Miller, Jennifer L

    2010-06-01

    Are your employees unhappy with internal corporate search? Frequent complaints include: too many results to sift through; results are unrelated/outdated; employees aren't sure which terms to search for. One way to improve intranet search is to implement a controlled vocabulary ontology. Employing this takes the guess work out of searching, makes search efficient and precise, educates employees about the lingo used within the corporation, and allows employees to contribute to the corpus of terms. It promotes internal corporate search to rival its superior sibling, internet search. We will cover our experiences, lessons learned, and conclusions from implementing a controlled vocabulary ontology at Sandia National Laboratories. The work focuses on construction of this ontology from the content perspective and the technical perspective. We'll discuss the following: (1) The tool we used to build a polyhierarchical taxonomy; (2) Examples of two methods of indexing the content: traditional 'back of the book' and folksonomy word-mapping; (3) Tips on how to build future search capabilities while building the basic controlled vocabulary; (4) How to implement the controlled vocabulary as an ontology that mimics Google's search suggestions; (5) Making the user experience more interactive and intuitive; and (6) Sorting suggestions based on preferred, alternate and related terms using SPARQL queries. In summary, future improvements will be presented, including permitting end-users to add, edit and remove terms, and filtering on different subject domains.

  2. Traveling Internal Plane-wave Synthesis (TIPS) for uniform B1 in high field MRI.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Adam W

    2017-02-01

    A new target-field approach to generating uniform radio frequency (RF) fields within the human body for high field MRI is described. The method involves producing a set of external fields which, after interaction with a dielectric object, superimpose to produce a traveling plane wave, exposing all spins to the same RF amplitude (B1) over a cycle of the harmonic field. Conceptually this is similar to conventional RF shimming, but uses a different RF source design, input data, and objective function. The method requires a detailed knowledge of the coupling between exterior field modes, produced by an array of RF sources, and field modes within the body. Given an estimate of the coupling matrix, the linear superposition of external modes that produces a desired internal target field can be determined. The new method is termed Traveling Internal Plane-wave Synthesis (TIPS). A simple design of a coil array is described that can, in principle, generate the required field modes. Simulations demonstrate that radio frequency magnetic fields of nearly uniform (<1% variation) magnitude can be produced within dielectric objects larger than a wavelength in size. If the dielectric medium has non-zero conductivity, traveling waves are attenuated as they traverse the object, but field uniformity within planar slices is preserved. For general 3D imaging, a superposition of plane waves can provide field focusing to balance conductive losses, thereby achieving nearly uniform-magnitude B1+ magnetic fields over a volume of interest.

  3. Molecular Medicine - CHI's 17th International Tri-Conference: Mastering Medicinal Chemistry - CHI's Seventh Annual Conference.

    PubMed

    Terrett, Nick

    2010-04-01

    CHI's 17th International Tri-Conference on Molecular Medicine, held in San Francisco, included topics covering new developments in the field of medicinal chemistry. This conference report highlights selected presentations on fragment-based drug discovery, quantum mechanical energy decomposition for the analysis of SARs, medicinal chemistry strategies and the role of imaging in drug discovery. Investigational drugs discussed include MLN-4924 (Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc), GDC-0449 (Chugai Pharmaceutical Co Ltd/Curis Inc/F Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd/Genentech Inc/NCI), RDEA-119 (Ardea Biosciences Inc/Bayer HealthCare AG) and tafamidis (Fx-1006A; FoldRx Pharmaceuticals Inc).

  4. Review of intern preparedness and education experiences in General Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gome, J J; Paltridge, D; Inder, W J

    2008-04-01

    Few studies assess the transition from medical student to intern and there is limited understanding of what measures are required to assist intern development. The aim of the study was to assess interns' perception of their preparedness before commencing and on completion of their rotation in General Medicine, and their attitudes towards educational experiences at a tertiary metropolitan teaching hospital. Self-assessed preparedness for the General Medical internship and educational experiences were evaluated using a quantitative 5-point scale (1 = low score and 5 = high score) and qualitatively through interview, on interns based at St Vincent's Hospital (Melbourne). Data were collected at the beginning and at the end of each 10-week rotation (n = 25). Before commencement of the rotation, the interns identified areas where they felt inadequately prepared, particularly resuscitation skills and medico-legal aspects. When resurveyed at the completion of their 10-week rotation, the interns felt they had been better prepared for their role than they initially perceived, both generally and in specific aspects. Nine out of 16 parameters showed a significant increase in preparedness score at week 10 compared to week 1. The educational experiences most valued were peer driven education sessions and informal registrar teaching. Formal consultant teaching and online learning were perceived as being the least useful. Interns at St Vincent's Hospital have been adequately prepared for their role in General Medicine, although many realize this only in retrospect. Deficiencies in educational opportunities for interns have been uncovered that emphasize areas of attention for medical educators.

  5. An Efficient In Vitro Plantlet Regeneration from Shoot Tip Cultures of Curculigo latifolia, a Medicinal Plant

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Nahid; Psyquay Abdullah, Nur Ashikin; Saleh, Ghizan; Lee Abdullah, Thohirah

    2014-01-01

    A procedure was developed for in vitro propagation of Curculigo latifolia through shoot tip culture. Direct regeneration and indirect scalp induction of Curculigo latifolia were obtained from shoot tip grown on MS medium supplemented with different concentrations and combinations of thidiazuron and indole-3-butyric acid. Maximum response for direct regeneration in terms of percentage of explants producing shoot, shoot number, and shoot length was obtained on MS medium supplemented with combination of thidiazuron (0.5 mg L−1) and indole-3-butyric acid (0.25 mg L−1) after both 10 and 14 weeks of cultures. Indole-3-butyric acid in combination with thidiazuron exhibited a synergistic effect on shoot regeneration. The shoot tips were able to induce maximum scalp from basal end of explants on the medium with 2 mg L−1 thidiazuron. Cultures showed that shoot number, shoot length, and scalp size increased significantly after 14 weeks of culture. Transferring of the shoots onto the MS medium devoid of growth regulators resulted in the highest percentage of root induction and longer roots, while medium supplemented with 0.25 mg L−1 IBA produced more numbers of roots. PMID:24723799

  6. Teaching strategies used by internal medicine residents on the wards.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dustin T; Kohlwes, R Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Residents serve as teachers to interns and students in most internal medicine residency programs. The purpose of our study is to explore what internal medicine residents perceive as effective teaching strategies in the inpatient setting and to formulate a guideline for preparing residents to lead their ward teams. Housestaff identified as excellent teaching residents were recruited from a large internal medicine residency program. Focus groups were formed and interviews were conducted using open-ended questions. Transcripts of the interviews were reviewed, analyzed, and compared for accuracy by two investigators. The transcripts were then coded to categorize data into similar subjects from which recurrent themes in resident teaching were identified. Twenty-two residents participated in four focus group interviews held in 2008. We identified five principal themes for effective teaching by residents: (T)aking advantage of teaching opportunities, (E)mpowering learners, (A)ssuming the role of leader, (C)reating a learning environment, and (H)abituating the practice of teaching. Strategies for effective teaching by residents exist. The TEACH mnemonic is a resident-identified method of instruction. Use of this tool could enable residency programs to create instructional curricula to prepare their residents and interns to take on the roles of team leaders and teachers.

  7. Performance of International Medical Students In psychosocial medicine.

    PubMed

    Huhn, D; Lauter, J; Roesch Ely, D; Koch, E; Möltner, A; Herzog, W; Resch, F; Herpertz, S C; Nikendei, C

    2017-07-10

    Particularly at the beginning of their studies, international medical students face a number of language-related, social and intercultural challenges. Thus, they perform poorer than their local counterparts in written and oral examinations as well as in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) in the fields of internal medicine and surgery. It is still unknown how international students perform in an OSCE in the field of psychosocial medicine compared to their local fellow students. All students (N = 1033) taking the OSCE in the field of psychosocial medicine and an accompanying written examination in their eighth or ninth semester between 2012 and 2015 were included in the analysis. The OSCE consisted of four different stations, in which students had to perform and manage a patient encounter with simulated patients suffering from 1) post-traumatic stress disorder, 2) schizophrenia, 3) borderline personality disorder and 4) either suicidal tendency or dementia. Students were evaluated by trained lecturers using global checklists assessing specific professional domains, namely building a relationship with the patient, conversational skills, anamnesis, as well as psychopathological findings and decision-making. International medical students scored significantly poorer than their local peers (p < .001; η(2) = .042). Within the specific professional domains assessed, they showed poorer scores, with differences in conversational skills showing the highest effect (p < .001; η(2) = .053). No differences emerged within the multiple-choice examination (p = .127). International students showed poorer results in clinical-practical exams in the field of psychosocial medicine, with conversational skills yielding the poorest scores. However, regarding factual and practical knowledge examined via a multiple-choice test, no differences emerged between international and local students. These findings have decisive implications for relationship building in

  8. Safety Tips: Baseball (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by U.S.A. Little League and the American Sports Medicine Institute: 7-8 years old: 50 pitches a ... ON THIS TOPIC Signing Kids Up for Sports Sports Medicine Center Safety Tips: Hockey Safety Tips: Basketball Competitive ...

  9. [Improving compliance in internal medicine: the motivational discussion].

    PubMed

    Lugoboni, Fabio; Quaglio, Gianluca; Mezzelani, Paolo; Pajusco, Benedetta; Casari, Rebecca; Lechi, Alessandro

    2004-01-01

    Compliance to treatment is of crucial importance in medicine. High levels of noncompliance to treatment have been reported in the most relevant diseases such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes and asthma. The aim of this article was to fully evaluate the lack of adherence to treatments in internal medicine. The prevalence of noncompliance and methods to cope with it are presented. The theory of the stages of change is thoroughly examined. Motivational interviewing in low-compliant patients is illustrated dealing both with the theoretical principles and practical applications. Several communication blocks which interfere with the relationship between doctor and patient are finally presented through concrete examples.

  10. Reforming the core clerkship in internal medicine: the SGIM/CDIM Project. Society of General Internal Medicine/Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Goroll, A H; Morrison, G; Bass, E B; Jablonover, R; Blackman, D; Platt, R; Whelan, A; Hekelman, F P

    2001-01-02

    Dramatic changes in health care have stimulated reform of undergraduate medical education. In an effort to improve the teaching of generalist competencies and encourage learning in the outpatient setting, the Society of General Internal Medicine joined with the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine in a federally sponsored initiative to develop a new curriculum for the internal medicine core clerkship. Using a broad-based advisory committee and working closely with key stakeholders (especially clerkship directors), the project collaborators helped forge a new national consensus on the learning agenda for the clerkship (a prioritized set of basic generalist competencies) and on the proportion of time that should be devoted to outpatient care (at least one third of the clerkship). From this consensus emerged a new curricular model that served as the basis for production of a curriculum guide and faculty resource package. The guide features the prioritized set of basic generalist competencies and specifies the requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes/values needed to master them, as well as a list of suggested training problems. It also includes recommended training experiences, schedules, and approaches to faculty development, precepting, and student evaluation. Demand for the guide has been strong and led to production of a second edition, which includes additional materials, an electronic version, and a pocket guide for students and faculty. A follow-up survey of clerkship directors administered soon after completion of the first edition revealed widespread use of the curricular guide but also important barriers to full implementation of the new curriculum. Although this collaborative effort appears to have initiated clerkship reform, long-term success will require an enhanced educational infrastructure to support teaching in the outpatient setting.

  11. Burnout and Physical Activity in Minnesota Internal Medicine Resident Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Shawn M.; Odo, Nnaemeka U.; Duran, Alisa M.; Pereira, Anne G.; Mandel, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity plays an important role in the amelioration of several mental health disorders; however, its relationship with burnout has not yet been clarified. Objective To determine the association between achievement of national physical activity guidelines and burnout in internal medicine resident physicians. Methods A Web-based survey of internal medicine resident physicians at the University of Minnesota and Hennepin County Medical Center was conducted from September to October 2012. Survey measures included the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Results Of 149 eligible residents, 76 (51.0%) completed surveys, which were used in the analysis. Burnout prevalence, determined by the Maslach Burnout Inventory, was 53.9% (41 of 76). Prevalence of failure to achieve US Department of Health and Human Services physical activity guidelines was 40.8% (31 of 76), and 78.9% (60 of 76) of residents reported that their level of physical activity has decreased since they began medical training. Residents who were able to meet physical activity guidelines were less likely to be burned out than their fellow residents (OR, 0.38, 95% CI 0.147–0.99). Conclusions Among internal medicine resident physicians, achievement of national physical activity guidelines appears to be inversely associated with burnout. Given the high national prevalence of burnout and inactivity, additional investigation of this relationship appears warranted. PMID:26140116

  12. Documentation of quality improvement exposure by internal medicine residency applicants.

    PubMed

    Kolade, Victor O; Sethi, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) has become an essential component of medical care in the United States. In residency programs, QI is a focus area of the Clinical Learning Environment Review visits conducted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The readiness of applicants to internal medicine residency to engage in QI on day one is unknown. To document the reporting of QI training or experience in residency applications. Electronic Residency Application Service applications to a single internal medicine program were reviewed individually looking for reported QI involvement or actual projects in the curriculum vitae (CVs), personal statements (PSs), and letters of recommendation (LORs). CVs were also reviewed for evidence of education in QI such as completion of Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) modules. Of 204 candidates shortlisted for interview, seven had QI items on their CVs, including one basic IHI certificate. Three discussed their QI work in their PSs, and four had recommendation letters describing their involvement in QI. One applicant had both CV and LOR evidence, so that 13 (6%) documented QI engagement. Practice of or instruction in QI is rarely mentioned in application documents of prospective internal medicine interns.

  13. Ambulatory Education in the Internal Medicine Clerkship at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovach, Regina

    1993-01-01

    The ambulatory care segment of the Southern Illinois University internal medicine clerkship provides extensive clinical exposure in a variety of settings and includes formal educational activities in seminars and workshops. Despite problems, educational quality has improved. Planned expansion includes a longitudinal experience for students.…

  14. Molecular Medicine - CHI's 17th International Tri-Conference: Mastering Medicinal Chemistry - CHI's Seventh Annual Conference.

    PubMed

    Semple, Graeme

    2010-04-01

    CHI's 17th International Tri-Conference on Molecular Medicine, held in San Francisco, included topics covering the drug discovery process, with an emphasis on lead optimization. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the development of several launched and investigational drugs, including Plerixafor, Trox-1 (CombinatoRX Inc), lorcaserin (Arena Pharmaceuticals Inc), vorapaxar (Merck & Co Inc) and ulimorelin (Tranzyme Pharma Inc).

  15. Study on Internal Flow and External Performance of a Semi-open Impeller Centrifugal Pump with Different Tip Clearances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiao-Qi; Cui, Bao-Ling; Zhang, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Zu-Chao

    2015-04-01

    To study the influence of tip clearance on internal flow characteristics and external performance of a prototype centrifugal pump with a semi-open impeller, the unsteady numerical simulation and performance experiments are carried out in this paper. The evolution process of leakage vortex with time t, the flow characteristics and the magnitude of leakage rate in tip clearance are obtained in details. The results indicate that the H-Q curve hump of centrifugal pump shows a weakened trend with the increasing of tip clearance Δc. Meanwhile, the leakage rate ΔQ and the ratio of leakage rate to discharge flow rate (ψ) gradually increase. At the same tip clearance, the leakage rate ΔQ increases, while the ratio of leakage rate to discharge flow rate (ψ) decreases with the increasing of discharge flow rate Q. It is found that higher volumetric loss account for a higher percentage of the total loss at small flow rate condition. There easily exist strong leakage vortexes in the impeller inlet, impeller passage and impeller outlet. The pressure difference between suction side and pressure side makes the fluid pass through the tip clearance layer to form a lower pressure region and leakage vortex.

  16. Development of crystallographic-orientation-dependent internal strains around a fatigue-crack tip during overloading and underloading

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Huang, E.-W.; Wu, W.; Liaw, P.K.; Paradowska, A.M.

    2013-05-15

    In-situ neutron diffraction was employed to directly measure the crystallographic-orientation-dependent (i.e. hkl) internal strains as a function of distance from the crack tip on the pre-cracked Hastelloy C-2000 compact-tension specimen. Both in-plane (IP) and through-thickness (TT) strain evolutions for various grain orientations were examined during tensile overloading and compressive underloading cycles. After overloading, underloading and their combination loadings were applied and unloaded, the significantly different (hkl) residual strain profiles were obtained in the vicinity of the crack tip. The load responses of the (200) grain orientation in both the IP and TT directions were more significant than those of any other orientations. It is suggested that the different orientation-dependent strain distributions around the crack tip are caused by the combined effects of elastic and plastic anisotropy of each (hkl) reflection upon loading and the subsequent development of residual stresses generated near the crack tip during unloading as a result of the plastic deformation. - Highlights: ► (hkl) strains are examined in situ using neutron diffraction. ► Distinct strain responses are developed around the crack tip under loading. ► The strain response of the (200) grain orientation is more significant. ► Possible mechanisms for the orientation-dependent strain responses are provided.

  17. Ten Tips for Engaging the Millennial Learner and Moving an Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum into the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Toohey, Shannon L; Wray, Alisa; Wiechmann, Warren; Lin, Michelle; Boysen-Osborn, Megan

    2016-05-01

    Millennial learners are changing the face of residency education because they place emphasis on technology with new styles and means of learning. While research on the most effective way to teach the millennial learner is lacking, programs should consider incorporating educational theories and multimedia design principles to update the curriculum for these new learners. The purpose of the study is to discuss strategies for updating an emergency medicine (EM) residency program's curriculum to accommodate the modern learner. These 10 tips provide detailed examples and approaches to incorporate technology and learning theories into an EM curriculum to potentially enhance learning and engagement by residents. While it is unclear whether technologies actually promote or enhance learning, millennials use these technologies. Identifying best practice, grounded by theory and active learning principles, may help learners receive quality, high-yield education. Future studies will need to evaluate the efficacy of these techniques to fully delineate best practices.

  18. Ten Tips for Engaging the Millennial Learner and Moving an Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum into the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Toohey, Shannon L.; Wray, Alisa; Wiechmann, Warren; Lin, Michelle; Boysen-Osborn, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Millennial learners are changing the face of residency education because they place emphasis on technology with new styles and means of learning. While research on the most effective way to teach the millennial learner is lacking, programs should consider incorporating educational theories and multimedia design principles to update the curriculum for these new learners. The purpose of the study is to discuss strategies for updating an emergency medicine (EM) residency program’s curriculum to accommodate the modern learner. Discussion These 10 tips provide detailed examples and approaches to incorporate technology and learning theories into an EM curriculum to potentially enhance learning and engagement by residents. Conclusion While it is unclear whether technologies actually promote or enhance learning, millennials use these technologies. Identifying best practice, grounded by theory and active learning principles, may help learners receive quality, high-yield education. Future studies will need to evaluate the efficacy of these techniques to fully delineate best practices. PMID:27330668

  19. Tips for teaching evidence-based medicine in a clinical setting: lessons from adult learning theory. Part one.

    PubMed

    Das, Kausik; Malick, Sadia; Khan, Khalid S

    2008-10-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an indispensable tool in clinical practice. Teaching and training of EBM to trainee clinicians is patchy and fragmented at its best. Clinically integrated teaching of EBM is more likely to bring about changes in skills, attitudes and behaviour. Provision of evidence-based health care is the most ethical way to practice, as it integrates up-to-date, patient-oriented research into the clinical decision making process, thus improving patients' outcomes. In this article, we aim to dispel the myth that EBM is an academic and statistical exercise removed from practice by providing practical tips for teaching the minimum skills required to ask questions and critically identify and appraise the evidence and presenting an approach to teaching EBM within the existing clinical and educational training infrastructure.

  20. [Integration of psychosomatics to internal medicine (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Dagnelie, J

    1979-01-01

    After a long experience of about fourty years, an internist with an anatomopathological background explains how he has been brought to improve his knowledge in psychology, psychopathology and psychiatry. He did it not only by reading classical publications, starting with Freud, but also through teaching of highly qualified masters in psychotherapy and psychosomatic medicine. He describes about twelve personal cases particularly interesting where only modern psychotherapy has brought spectacular improvement, even long term care, while drug treatment ever failed. The author concludes that for young specialists in internal medicine who would have the motivation and courage to learn the bases of psychosomatics and psychotherapy, there is in practice of future medicine a place of choice waiting for them.

  1. International emergency medicine: a review of the literature from 2009.

    PubMed

    Foran, Mark; Levine, Adam; Lippert, Suzanne; Chan, Jennifer; Aschkenasy, Miriam; Arnold, Kris; Rosborough, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    As the specialty of emergency medicine evolves in countries around the world, and as interest in international emergency medicine (IEM) grows within the United States, the IEM Literature Review Group recognizes an ongoing need for a high-quality, consolidated, and easily accessible evidence base of literature. The IEM Literature Review Group produces an annual publication that strives to provide readers with access to the highest quality and most relevant IEM research from the previous year. This publication represents our fifth annual review, covering the top 24 IEM research articles published in 2009. Articles were selected for the review according to explicit, predetermined criteria that emphasize both methodologic quality and impact of the research. It is our hope that this annual review acts as a forum for disseminating best practices, while also stimulating further research in the field of IEM. © 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  2. International Federation for Emergency Medicine point of care ultrasound curriculum.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Paul; Bowra, Justin; Lambert, Mike; Lamprecht, Hein; Noble, Vicki; Jarman, Bob

    2015-03-01

    To meet a critical and growing need for a standardized approach to emergency point of care ultrasound (PoCUS) worldwide, emergency physicians must be trained to deliver and teach this skill in an accepted and reliable format. Currently, there is no globally recognized, standard PoCUS curriculum that defines the accepted applications, as well as standards for training and practice of PoCUS by specialists and trainees in emergency medicine. To address this deficit, the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (IFEM) convened a sub-committee of international experts in PoCUS to outline a curriculum for training of specialists in emergency PoCUS. This curriculum document represents the consensus of recommendations by this sub-committee. The curriculum is designed to provide a framework for PoCUS education in emergency medicine. The focus is on the processes required to select core and enhanced applications, as well as the key elements required for the delivery of PoCUS training from introduction through to continuing professional development and skill maintenance. It is designed not to be prescriptive but to assist educators and emergency medicine leadership to advance PoCUS education in emergency medicine no matter the training venue. The content of this curriculum is relevant not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems but in particular for developing nations or for nations seeking to develop PoCUS training programs within the current educational structure. We anticipate that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught, reflecting the existing educational environment, resources and goals of educational programs.

  3. First International Electronic Conference on Medicinal Chemistry (ECMC-1)

    PubMed Central

    Mayence, Annie; Vanden Eynde, Jean Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The first International Electronic Conference on Medicinal Chemistry, organized and sponsored by MDPI AG, publisher, and the Journal Pharmaceuticals, took place in November 2015 on the SciForum website. More than 200 authors from 18 countries participated in the event and was attended by 25,000 visitors who had the opportunity to browse among 55 presentations, keynotes, and videos. A short description of some works presented during that scientific meeting is disclosed in this report.

  4. Catatonia as an internal medicine disease: infrequent or still underdiagnosed?

    PubMed

    Proenca, Margarida; Marques, Filipa; Cardoso, Débora; Fonseca, Cândida

    2016-04-22

    Catatonia is a motor and behavioural syndrome with multiple psychiatric, general medical and neurological aetiologies that might be simultaneously present. B12 deficiency is a rare, treatable cause of catatonia, not always easy to rule out. The authors present a case of a woman with catatonia associated with severe cyanocobalamin deficiency, admitted to an internal medicine ward. The benign course was related to an adequate and early diagnosis.

  5. Top 10 Tips for Using Advance Care Planning Codes in Palliative Medicine and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher A; Acevedo, Jean; Bull, Janet; Kamal, Arif H

    2016-12-01

    Although recommended for all persons with serious illness, advance care planning (ACP) has historically been a charitable clinical service. Inadequate or unreliable provisions for reimbursement, among other barriers, have spurred a gap between the evidence demonstrating the importance of timely ACP and recognition by payers for its delivery.(1) For the first time, healthcare is experiencing a dramatic shift in billing codes that support increased care management and care coordination. ACP, chronic care management, and transitional care management codes are examples of this newer recognition of the value of these types of services. ACP discussions are an integral component of comprehensive, high-quality palliative care delivery. The advent of reimbursement mechanisms to recognize these services has an enormous potential to impact palliative care program sustainability and growth. In this article, we highlight 10 tips to effectively using the new ACP codes reimbursable under Medicare. The importance of documentation, proper billing, and nuances regarding coding is addressed.

  6. Prevalence of myofascial pain in general internal medicine practice.

    PubMed Central

    Skootsky, S A; Jaeger, B; Oye, R K

    1989-01-01

    Myofascial pain is a regional pain syndrome characterized in part by a trigger point in a taut band of skeletal muscle and its associated referred pain. We examined a series of 172 patients presenting to a university primary care general internal medicine practice. Of 54 patients whose reason for a visit included pain, 16 (30%) satisfied criteria for a clinical diagnosis of myofascial pain. These patients were similar in age and sex to other patients with pain, and the frequency of pain as a primary complaint was similar for myofascial pain as compared with other reasons for pain. The usual intensity of myofascial pain as assessed by a visual analog scale was high, comparable to or possibly greater than pain due to other causes. Patients with upper body pain were more likely to have myofascial pain than patients with pain located elsewhere. Physicians rarely recognized the myofascial pain syndrome. Commonly applied therapies for myofascial pain provided substantial abrupt reduction in pain intensity. The prevalence and severity of myofascial pain in this university internal medicine setting suggest that regional myofascial pain may be an important cause of pain complaints in the practice of general internal medicine. PMID:2788962

  7. Recent trends in internal medicine education: a brief update.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Michael T

    2014-03-01

    This perspective attempts to bring graduate medical offices, residency programs and medical students interested in categorical internal medicine (CIM) a brief update on the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the National Registry for Medical Programs (NRMP) changes for the past 3-5 years in the United States (US). The US model for certification and recertification may serve as a homogenous example for other countries. This model will be described so that there is an understanding of the importance of such changes in the American system and its effect on resident education. This is critical knowledge for both teachers and learners in internal medicine in preparation for a lifetime career and requirements for certification/credentialing for both programs and their residents/fellows. Data from the review indicate a small increase in the number of applicants but a concordant decrease in ABIM initial certification exams. Programs should well be aware of the new focus on outcomes via the Next Accreditation System (NAS) being put forth by the ACGME.

  8. International Perspectives on General Internal Medicine and the Case for “Globalization” of a Discipline

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, William A; Greenberg, Peter B; Mejia, Raul; Otaki, Junji; Cornuz, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    General internal medicine (GIM) has flourished in the United States (U.S.). Unlike other subspecialties of internal medicine, however, GIM's evolution has not been global in scope, but rather appears to have occurred in isolation within countries. Here, we describe international models of GIM from Canada, Switzerland, Australia/New Zealand, Argentina, and Japan, and compare these with the U.S. model. There are notable differences in the typical clinical roles assumed by General Internists across these 7 countries, but also important overlap in clinical and academic domains. Despite this overlap, there has been a relative lack of contact among General Internists from these and other countries at a truly international GIM meeting; the time is now for increased international exchange and the “globalization” of GIM. PMID:16336623

  9. [Training in internal medicine and its specialties: universities' proposals].

    PubMed

    Norero, C

    1996-04-01

    Medical School graduates can enter a medicine subspecialty training program upon completion of a 3 year Internal Medicine residency. The Ministry of Health has contributed to postgraduate training by defining the type of physician the country needs, and by financial support of specially (Internal Medicine) training. Before 1995, when applicants began being charged a fee, finding for subspecialty training was provided exclusively by the universities. Currently, 450 training post are available for 550 graduates from all medical schools. Of these, 59 are in Internal Medicine and 58 in its subspecialties. A quantitative analysis of 40 years of training programs in Internal Medicine by the traditional medical schools shows that only the Catholic University of Chile Medical School privileges subspecially training whereas all other schools favor general Internal Medicine training. A high number of Internal Medicine trainees never take final examination. Nevertheless, training through practice, not necessarily in a university setting, accounts for 67% of Autonomous National Corporation for Certification of Medical Specialties. CONACEM accredited subspecialists. About 63% of those who finish an Internal Medicine training program decide to go into subspecialization. It is felt that subspecialization involves technical as well as non-professional aspects, such as a philosophical stance towards the search for truth through research and creativity. An integral education in a subspecialty can only be given by the university. Non-university centers, however, can contribute to subspecialization by allowing trainees to gain access to newer technology or to larger numbers of patients. A critical question is how many subspecialists should exist in relation to the number of generalists and according to the country's health requirements. In my personal view, the proportion of subspecialists is excessive. The decision to subspecialize should not be exclusively a personal choice, but

  10. Research in Biological and Medical Sciences, Including Biochemistry, Communicable Disease and Immunology, Internal Medicine, Nuclear Medicine, Physiology, Psychiatry, Surgery, and Veterinary Medicine. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Military preventive medicine; Military medical research program S. E. Asia; Military medical materiel; Combat surgery; Military internal ... medicine ; Military psychiatry; Ionizing radiation injury, prevention, and treatment; Malaria prophylaxis; and Biosensor systems.

  11. Predictors of final specialty choice by internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Andrew K; Kumar, Vineeta; Gateley, Ann; Appleby, Jane L; O'Keefe, Mary E

    2006-10-01

    Sociodemographic factors and personality attributes predict career decisions in medical students. Determinants of internal medicine residents' specialty choices have received little attention. To identify factors that predict the clinical practice of residents following their training. Prospective cohort study. Two hundred and four categorical residents from 2 university-based residency programs. Sociodemographic and personality inventories performed during residency, and actual careers 4 to 9 years later. International medical school graduates (IMGs) were less likely to practice general medicine than U.S. graduates (33.3% vs 70.6%, P < .001). Residents with higher loan indebtedness more often became generalists (P = .001). A corresponding trend favoring general internal medicine was observed among those who perceived General Internists to have lower potential incomes (69.0% vs 53.3%, P = .08). There was a trend for generalists to have lower scores on scales measuring authoritarianism, negative orientation to psychological problems, and Machiavellianism (0.05 < P < .10). In a logistic regression, graduation from a U.S. medical school (odds ratio [OR] 3.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 9.10, P = .049) and perception of low future income (OR 1.65; 95% CI, 1.06 to 2.56, P = .03) predicted entry into general medicine, with trends apparent for higher debt (P = .05) and greater comfort caring for patients with psychological problems (P = .07). Recruitment of IMGs may not increase the supply of General Internists. Prospects of lower income, even in the face of large debt, may not discourage residents from becoming generalists. If increasing generalist manpower is a goal, residencies should consider weighing applicants' personal attributes during the selection process.

  12. Predictors of Final Specialty Choice by Internal Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Andrew K; Kumar, Vineeta; Gateley, Ann; Appleby, Jane L; O'Keefe, Mary E

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sociodemographic factors and personality attributes predict career decisions in medical students. Determinants of internal medicine residents' specialty choices have received little attention. OBJECTIVE To identify factors that predict the clinical practice of residents following their training. DESIGN Prospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS Two hundred and four categorical residents from 2 university-based residency programs. MEASUREMENTS Sociodemographic and personality inventories performed during residency, and actual careers 4 to 9 years later. RESULTS International medical school graduates (IMGs) were less likely to practice general medicine than U.S. graduates (33.3% vs 70.6%, P<.001). Residents with higher loan indebtedness more often became generalists (P = .001). A corresponding trend favoring general internal medicine was observed among those who perceived General Internists to have lower potential incomes (69.0% vs 53.3%, P = .08). There was a trend for generalists to have lower scores on scales measuring authoritarianism, negative orientation to psychological problems, and Machiavellianism (0.05medicine, with trends apparent for higher debt (P = .05) and greater comfort caring for patients with psychological problems (P = .07). CONCLUSION Recruitment of IMGs may not increase the supply of General Internists. Prospects of lower income, even in the face of large debt, may not discourage residents from becoming generalists. If increasing generalist manpower is a goal, residencies should consider weighing applicants' personal attributes during the selection process. PMID:16836624

  13. A Needs Assessment for a Longitudinal Emergency Medicine Intern Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Shappell, Eric; Ahn, James

    2017-01-01

    A key task of emergency medicine (EM) training programs is to develop a consistent knowledge of core content in recruits with heterogeneous training backgrounds. The traditional model for delivering core content is lecture-based weekly conference; however, a growing body of literature finds this format less effective and less appealing than alternatives. We sought to address this challenge by conducting a needs assessment for a longitudinal intern curriculum for millennial learners. We surveyed all residents from the six EM programs in the greater Chicago area regarding the concept, format, and scope of a longitudinal intern curriculum. We received 153 responses from the 300 residents surveyed (51% response rate). The majority of respondents (80%; 82% of interns) agreed or strongly agreed that a dedicated intern curriculum would add value to residency education. The most positively rated teaching method was simulation sessions (91% positive responses), followed by dedicated weekly conference time (75% positive responses) and dedicated asynchronous resources (71% positive responses). Less than half of respondents (47%; 26% of interns) supported use of textbook readings in the curriculum. There is strong learner interest in a longitudinal intern curriculum. This needs assessment can serve to inform the development of a universal intern curriculum targeting the millennial generation.

  14. A Needs Assessment for a Longitudinal Emergency Medicine Intern Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Shappell, Eric; Ahn, James

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A key task of emergency medicine (EM) training programs is to develop a consistent knowledge of core content in recruits with heterogeneous training backgrounds. The traditional model for delivering core content is lecture-based weekly conference; however, a growing body of literature finds this format less effective and less appealing than alternatives. We sought to address this challenge by conducting a needs assessment for a longitudinal intern curriculum for millennial learners. Methods We surveyed all residents from the six EM programs in the greater Chicago area regarding the concept, format, and scope of a longitudinal intern curriculum. Results We received 153 responses from the 300 residents surveyed (51% response rate). The majority of respondents (80%; 82% of interns) agreed or strongly agreed that a dedicated intern curriculum would add value to residency education. The most positively rated teaching method was simulation sessions (91% positive responses), followed by dedicated weekly conference time (75% positive responses) and dedicated asynchronous resources (71% positive responses). Less than half of respondents (47%; 26% of interns) supported use of textbook readings in the curriculum. Conclusion There is strong learner interest in a longitudinal intern curriculum. This needs assessment can serve to inform the development of a universal intern curriculum targeting the millennial generation. PMID:28116005

  15. A Learning-Curve Approach to the Self-Assessment of Internal Medicine Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Susan C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    In response to the perceived need for primary care physicians, two major changes in internal medicine training have occurred: (1) a third year of general training was required for internal medicine board certification and (2) many hospitals developed primary care internal medicine residencies with an increased emphasis on ambulatory training.…

  16. Correlation of United States Medical Licensing Examination and Internal Medicine In-Training Examination Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Jose A., Jr.; Greer, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (ITE) is administered during residency training in the United States as a self-assessment and program assessment tool. Performance on this exam correlates with outcome on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying examination. Internal Medicine Program Directors use the United States Medical…

  17. Knowledge of addiction medicine among internal medicine residents and medical students.

    PubMed

    Brown, Angel T; Kolade, Victor O; Staton, Lisa J; Patel, Neha K

    2013-03-01

    More than 22 million Americans are living with addiction, including nearly seven million who misuse prescription medications. However, most medical schools and residency programs provide little to no education addressing alcohol and drug addiction. Implementation of a new addiction medicine curriculum at a single internal medicine program provided an opportunity for knowledge assessment in a select population of health professionals. We hypothesized that knowledge of addiction medicine would not differ by training level or geographical location of medical school, but that knowledge would improve following a structured curriculum. Study participants included internal medicine and transitional year residents, as well as a group of medical students who were enrolled in a single internal medicine program at the time of the didactic series. A pre-test was administered prior to a four-week structured curriculum. The topics addressed included but were not limited to: 1) an overview of addiction, 2) opioids and chronic pain, 3) benzodiazepines and illicit stimulants, and 4) alcohol. A panel discussion was convened at the end of the fourth session. Following participation in the symposium, participants completed an online post-test. ANOVA was used to compare means. Paired t-tests were used to compare pre-test and post-test scores. 36 of 44 eligible medical students and residents completed the pre-test. Mean pre-test percentage scores were 64 percent for fourth year medical students and 62.5 percent for all residents. For residents, U.S. medical school trainees answered 65 percent of the pre-test questions correctly, versus 58.6 percent correct responses among their international medical graduate peers. No inter-group differences were statistically significant. Of the 36 participants, 20 completed both pre-tests and post-tests. The mean post-test score of 68.75 percent was higher than the mean pre-test score of 61.75 percent, p = 0.009. Knowledge of addiction medicine can be

  18. International reference preparations for standardization of biological medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Minor, P

    2014-10-01

    International standards are prepared as materials assigned an arbitrary unitage for a biological activity by the Expert Committee on Biological Standardization of the World Health Organization. Working reference materials are calibrated against international standards giving a common unit of measurement between laboratories. The references are assessed by a collaborative study including all relevant assays rather than by a single reference method as in the SI (Le Système international d'unités) system and the unitage assigned is an arbitrary value derived from a consensus of all valid methods. The process has proved valuable in assaying the activity of therapeutic biological medicines and in standardizing certain types of diagnostics. Issues arise with maintaining the unit when the primary reference must be replaced and to some extent in assessing the commutability of the reference with real life analytes.

  19. Internal medicine, art and science in the third millennium.

    PubMed

    Muñoz C, Félix

    2013-02-01

    Internal medicine, art and science in the third millennium is a statement that Medicine is not only science. It acts on the sick individual to reestablish a natural state as a curative art. Medical art, commissioned by an individual or a society, is service. It requires vocation to obtain satisfaction. However due to the incidence of value changes, market globalization, technological and industrial development, the patient/physician relationship is becoming a user/provider relationship. Physician-related factors such as a higher health care demand, resource shortage and a progressive specialization have also influenced this change of paradigm. This is causing dissatisfaction, loss of self-esteem and a lower ethical commitment among professionals. We need to recover a professional repertoire of ideas in the context of a global ethics. Responsibility and co-responsibility are ethical principles addressed to technological civilizations and their collateral effects on people and environment that lead to a "responsible globalization". We also need a scientific futurology to define risks and avoid errors. In this era of progressive specialization, Internal Medicine, with its holistic vision of mankind, may play a fundamental role in the field of bioethics.

  20. [Pharmacovigilance center --internal medicine interactions: A useful diagnostic tool].

    PubMed

    Rochoy, M; Gautier, S; Bordet, R; Caron, J; Launay, D; Hachulla, E; Hatron, P-Y; Lambert, M

    2015-08-01

    Patients hospitalized in internal medicine often have unexplained clinical symptoms for which a drug origin can be considered. The prevalence of patients hospitalized for iatrogenic is estimated between 4-22%. We wanted to evaluate the diagnostic value of the regional center of pharmacovigilance to identify or confirm an iatrogenic disease in the department of internal medicine of Lille and characterize factors associated with drug-related side effect. This is a single-center prospective diagnostic study. We included all subsequent requests from the department of internal medicine with the Nord-Pas-de-Calais regional pharmacovigilance center between 2010 and 2012. The opinion of the regional pharmacovigilance centre was held on the record of the adverse drug reaction in the national pharmacovigilance database and analyzed according to the conclusion of iatrogenic used by clinicians in internal medicine (reference diagnosis) with a follow-up to June 2013. The variables relating to the patient, medication and adverse events were analyzed by binary logistic regression. We analyzed 160 contacts: 118 concordant cases, 38 false-positives (drug-related side effect retained by the regional pharmacovigilance center only), 4 false negatives. Registration in the national pharmacovigilance database had a sensitivity of 96% (95% CI [0.92 to 0.99]), a specificity of 46% (95% CI [0.38 to 0.53]), a value positive predictive of 69% (95% CI [0.62 to 0.76]), a negative predictive value of 89% (95% CI [0.84 to 0.94]) and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.1. False-positive had chronological and semiological accountabilities questionable (adjusted RR=2.1, 95% CI [1.2 to 2.8]). In our study, the regional pharmacovigilance center confirms the clinician's suspicion of drug-related side effects and helps to exclude drug-induced with a high negative predictive value. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. International emergency medicine: a review of the literature from 2008.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Suzanne; Levine, Adam C; Becker, Joseph; Foran, Mark; Rosborough, Stephanie; Arnold, Kris

    2009-12-01

    As the specialty of emergency medicine (EM) continues to evolve in countries around the world, and as interest in international emergency medicine (IEM) continues to grow within the United States, the IEM Literature Review Group recognizes a need for a high-quality, consolidated, and easily accessible evidence base of literature. In response to that need, the group created an annual publication that strives to provide readers with access to the highest quality and most relevant IEM research. This publication represents our fourth annual review, covering the top 26 IEM research articles published in 2008. Articles were selected for the review according to explicit, predetermined criteria that include both methodologic quality and perceived impact of the research. It is our hope that this annual review will act as a forum for disseminating best practices while also stimulating further research in the field of IEM.

  2. [Development and status of intensive care medicine in internal medicine at the Karl Marx University in Leipzig].

    PubMed

    Engelmann, L; Schneider, D

    1989-01-15

    Issuing from the accomplishments of Köhler for the development of the intensive medicine in internal medicine-in 1964 he performed the first long-term respiration at the then Medical Clinic of the Karl Marx University, in 1969 he institutionalized the young subdiscipline at the clinic, in 1978 he founded the department for intensive medicine and is at work by his decisions concerning the development of young scientists, by the handbook "Intensive Medicine. Internal Medicine and Adjacent Subjects" as well as a member of the presidium of the GDR Society for Internal Medicine for the development of the internal intensive medicine-a description of the development of the department, its achievements and problems is given. The promotion of the intensive medicine by Köhler results, as we think, also from the comprehension that it has the duty to perform a function integrating the subdisciplines, which the modern internal medicine oriented to organs and systems threatens to lose, which, however, makes its self-apprehension, which the patient wishes and the teaching is demanding. From this and from the charge for a highly specialized care of patients who life-threateningly fell ill with internal diseases as well as from the duty to create a scientific forerunning results the stringent necessity of the development of the non-operative, in reality internal intensive medicine in the clinics for internal medicine of the county hospitals and university institutions as well as the greater identification of the internist with the subdiscipline in the district hospitals dealing with multidisciplinary intensive medicine.

  3. Medication discrepancies at discharge from an internal medicine service.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Herrero, José-Ignacio; García-Aparicio, Judit

    2011-02-01

    Medication errors most commonly occur at the time of medication prescribing and particularly at the moment of the transitions of care. The objectives of this study were to identify and characterize the discrepancies between the physicians' discharge medication orders and the medication lists at admission obtained by an internal medicine specialist physician in a general internal medicine service. This descriptive, retrospective, study was carried out at a tertiary care university teaching hospital in Spain. It was based on the review of non selected, consecutive, hospital discharge reports. Discrepancies were identified, categorized and characterized through the analysis of the information (medication lists, laboratory tests results, diagnosis, and clinical evolution) contained in them. We analyzed 954 discharge reports. In the medication reconciliation process, we find discrepancies in 832 (87.2%) of them. Justified discrepancies were found in 828 (86.8%) reports and unjustified discrepancies in 52 (5.4%). Omission of a medication was the most frequent medication error detected in 86.4% of cases, followed by incomplete prescription (9.6%). The number of diagnosis, the length of hospital stay and the number of permanent medications at admission were the characteristics of cases associated with medication discrepancies in multivariate linear regression (P<0.01). Although considering the limitations in its design, it is remarkable the low number of medication errors detected in our study. Appropriate routines to ensure an accurate medication history collection and a methodical elaboration of the medication list at discharge, when performed by trained internists, are important for an adequate medication reconciliation process. Copyright © 2010 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors Influencing the Selection of General Internal Medicine Fellowship Programs

    PubMed Central

    Caiola, Enrico; Litaker, David

    2000-01-01

    Although criteria are available to guide the selection of general internal medicine (GIM) fellowship programs, the factors actually used in this process are unclear. Using a survey of current GIM fellows, we determined that most received information from their residency advisors, and many viewed them as the most important source of fellowship information. Program location was the top selection factor for fellows, followed by research opportunities, availability of a mentor, and the reputation of the program. This information may be useful to both fellowship candidates as an additional selection guide and to program directors seeking to best structure and market their fellowships. PMID:11029680

  5. Psychiatric side effects of medications prescribed in internal medicine

    PubMed Central

    Casagrande Tango, Rodrigo

    2003-01-01

    Several pharmacological treatments used in internal medicine can induce psychiatric side effects (PSEs) that mimic diagnoses seen in psychiatry. PSEs may occur upon withdrawal or intoxication, and also at usual therapeutic doses. Drugs that may lead to depressive, anxious, or psychotic syndromes include corticosteroids, isotretinoin, levo-dopar mefloquine, interferon-a, and anabolic steroids, as well as some over-the-counter medications. PSEs are often difficult to diagnose and can be very harmful to patients. PSEs are discussed in this review, as well as diagnostic clues to facilitate their identification. PMID:22034468

  6. Benchmarks of support in internal medicine residency training programs.

    PubMed

    Wolfsthal, Susan D; Beasley, Brent W; Kopelman, Richard; Stickley, William; Gabryel, Timothy; Kahn, Marc J

    2002-01-01

    To identify benchmarks of financial and staff support in internal medicine residency training programs and their correlation with indicators of quality. A survey instrument to determine characteristics of support of residency training programs was mailed to each member program of the Association of Program Directors of Internal Medicine. Results were correlated with the three-year running average of the pass rates on the American Board of Internal Medicine certifying examination using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Of 394 surveys, 287 (73%) were completed: 74% of respondents were program directors and 20% were both chair and program director. The mean duration as program director was 7.5 years (median = 5), but it was significantly lower for women than for men (4.9 versus 8.1; p =.001). Respondents spent 62% of their time in educational and administrative duties, 30% in clinical activities, 5% in research, and 2% in other activities. Most chief residents were PGY4s, with 72% receiving compensation additional to base salary. On average, there was one associate program director for every 33 residents, one chief resident for every 27 residents, and one staff person for every 21 residents. Most programs provided trainees with incremental educational stipends, meals while oncall, travel and meeting expenses, and parking. Support from pharmaceutical companies was used for meals, books, and meeting expenses. Almost all programs provided meals for applicants, with 15% providing travel allowances and 37% providing lodging. The programs' board pass rates significantly correlated with the numbers of faculty fulltime equivalents (FTEs), the numbers of resident FTEs per office staff FTEs, and the numbers of categorical and preliminary applications received and ranked by the programs in 1998 and 1999. Regression analyses demonstrated three independent predictors of the programs' board pass rates: number of faculty (a positive predictor), percentage of clinical work

  7. [Electronic calendar as an organization element in Internal Medicine services].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-García, R; Blasco-Fontecilla, H; Legido-Gil, T; López-Castromán, J; Montoya-Ferrer, A; Baca-García, E

    2011-02-01

    The growing volume of information and introduction of new technologies in the Internal Medicine hospital department mare making the traditional updating «methods» of knowledge and organization obsolete. The development of new tools could help the management of information and organization of the medical departments is outdated. Electronic calendar such as the Google calendar facilitate adequate coordination among health care professionals. Our experience suggests that the Google calendar is a simple and useful tool that helps planning and organization of the clinical, educational, and research activities of the different medical departments, limits loss of information and improves efficacy with a close to zero cost of infrastructure.

  8. Turkey and its international relations in the history of medicine.

    PubMed

    Sari, N

    2001-12-01

    My discussions with ISHM members have disclosed considerable interest in the history of the relations that Turkey and its medicine have had with other countries. Dr Lellouch, the secretary of ISHM, originally suggested that I address the subject of Turkish-French relations by means of an essay in Vesalius. This led me to consider a wider ranging paper on Ottoman-European relations. For completeness, I have briefly covered the Turkish peoples' relations with the Eastern, as well as the Western World. The overall aim of this article is to act as a stimulus for further discussion on the international relations in health sciences between Turks and other peoples.

  9. Clinical holistic medicine: chronic pain in internal organs.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav

    2005-03-19

    Holistic medicine seems to be efficient in the treatment of chronic pain in internal organs, especially when the pain has no known cause. It is quite surprising that while chronic pain can be one of the toughest challenges in the biomedical clinic, it is often one of the simplest things to alleviate in the holistic clinic. These pains are regarded as being caused by repressed emotions and are explained as psychosomatic reactions. Using holistic medicine, the patients can often be cured of their suffering when they assume responsibility for the repressed feelings. The holistic process theory of healing states that the return to the natural (pain free) state of being is possible whenever the person obtains the resources needed for existential healing. This shift is explained by the related quality of life and life mission theories. The resources needed are "holding" or genuine care in the dimensions of awareness, respect, care, acknowledgment, and acceptance with support and processing in the dimensions of feeling, understanding, and letting go of negative attitudes and beliefs. The preconditions for the holistic healing to take place are "love" and trust. Obtaining the full trust of the patient, therefore, seems to be the biggest challenge of holistic medicine, especially when dealing with a patient in pain.

  10. Training Student and Adult Assistants, Interns, and Volunteers: Tips for New Librarians Servicing Small Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smallwood, Carol

    1999-01-01

    Provides tips for designing effective training programs for library assistants. Discusses general points to consider; acquainting new assistants with the library; and assigning jobs that reflect assistants' interests. Suggests special projects for assistants including: arranging displays; cataloging; covering paperback and hardback books;…

  11. Integrating an evidence-based medicine rotation into an internal medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Akl, Elie A; Izuchukwu, Ifeoma S; El-Dika, Samer; Fritsche, Lutz; Kunz, Regina; Schünemann, Holger J

    2004-09-01

    To measure the impact of a resident focused evidence-based medicine (EBM) educational intervention on EBM knowledge of residents and students, to assess its feasibility, and to evaluate residents' attitudes regarding this rotation. In 2002, based on the EBM user and EBM practitioner model, the authors designed the EBM elective rotation and conducted a controlled trial of its implementation in the internal medicine residency program in three teaching hospitals affiliated with the University at Buffalo, New York. The intervention group (one hospital, 17 medical students and residents) received a multifaceted intervention. In the control group (two hospitals, 23 medical students and residents), there was no curriculum change. The effectiveness in a pre- and post-test was assessed using the English version of the Berlin Questionnaire. A survey of all internal medicine residents (n = 119) was conducted to evaluate their attitudes toward the EBM elective rotation. In the intervention group, knowledge improved slightly, but not significantly (.71 on a scale ranging from 0-15 on the Berlin questionnaire, p =.3). The mean score in the control group decreased significantly (1.65, p =.005). The difference in change scores between the two groups was significant even after adjustment for covariates (2.52, p =.006). Residents (response rate 83%) had positive attitudes regarding the rotation. An EBM elective rotation was successfully integrated into a residency program. This multifaceted educational approach with an "on-the-ward" EBM resident, may improve the EBM knowledge and skills of targeted students and residents.

  12. Internal Hernia Following Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: Prevention and Tips for Intra-operative Management.

    PubMed

    Nimeri, Abdelrahman A; Maasher, Ahmed; Al Shaban, Talat; Salim, Elnazeer; Gamaleldin, Maysoon M

    2016-09-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is considered the golden standard for bariatric surgery. However, the potential risk for internal hernia after LRYGB remains a significant concern to both patients and surgeons. In addition, patients presenting with abdominal pain after LRYGB warrant careful attention to avoid missing or delaying the diagnosis of internal hernia. The aim of this study was to describe our technique to prevent internal hernia after LRYGB, intra-operative findings, and our management strategies for patients with internal hernia after LRYGB. In this video, we review different technical tips and tricks to explore patients with suspected internal hernia after RYGB, how to reduce obstructed small bowel, and effectively close mesenteric defects to prevent internal hernia after LRYGB. A high index of suspicion and evaluation of the CT scan of the patient by an experienced bariatric surgeon is essential to avoid missing cases of internal hernia after LRYGB. In addition, patients presenting with incarcerated small bowel due to an internal hernia are best managed by standing on the left side of the patient with the left arm tucked and starting at the ileocecal valve and running the small bowel backwards towards the ligament of Treitz. Furthermore, patients with bowel obstruction due to internal hernia may need to have a gastrostomy placed at the remnant of the stomach. Recurrent abdominal pain is not uncommon after LRYGB. Systematic closure of mesenteric defects, the use of diagnostic laparoscopy, and high index of suspicion are all necessary to avoid delay in diagnosis.

  13. Associations between subspecialty fellowship interest and knowledge of internal medicine: a hypothesis-generating study of internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Ofoma, Uchenna R; Lehman, Erik E; Haidet, Paul; Yacht, Andrew C

    2011-01-31

    Little is known about whether and how medical knowledge relates to interest in subspecialty fellowship training. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between residents' interest in subspecialty fellowship training and their knowledge of internal medicine (IM). A questionnaire was emailed to 48 categorical postgraduate-year (PGY) two and three residents at a New York university-affiliated IM residency program in 2007 using the Survey Monkey online survey instrument. Overall and content area-specific percentile scores from the IM in-training examination (IM-ITE) for the same year was used to determine objective knowledge. Forty-five of 48 residents (response rate was 93.8%) completed the survey. Twenty-two (49%) were PG2 residents and 23(51%) were PGY3 residents. Sixty percent of respondents were male. Six (13%) residents were graduates of U.S. medical schools. Eight (18%) reported formal clinical training prior to starting internal medicine residency in the U.S. Of this latter group, 6 (75%) had training in IM and 6 (75) % reported a training length of 3 years or less. Thirty-seven of 45 (82%) residents had a subspecialty fellowship interest. Residents with a fellowship interest had a greater mean overall objective knowledge percentile score (56.44 vs. 31.67; p = 0.04) as well as greater mean percentile scores in all content areas of IM. The adjusted mean difference was statistically significant (p < 0.02) across three content areas. More than half of surveyed residents indicated interest in pursuing a subspecialty fellowship. Fellowship interest appears positively associated with general medical knowledge in this study population. Further work is needed to explore motivation and study patterns among internal medicine residents.

  14. The international effort: building the bridge for Translational Medicine: Report of the 1st International Conference of Translational Medicine (ICTM)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Supported by the International Society for Translational Medicine (ISTM), Wenzhou Medical College and the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, the International Conference on Translational Medicine (ICTM) was held on October 22–23, 2011 in Wenzhou, China. Nearly 800 registrants attended the meeting, primarily representing institutes and hospitals in Europe, The United States of America, And Asia, and China. The meeting was chaired and organized by Dr. Xiangdong Wang, Xiaoming Chen, Richard Coico, Jeffrey M. Drazen, Richard Horton, Francesco M. Marincola, Laurentiu M. Popescu, Jia Qu and Aamir Shahzad. Findings The meeting focused on the communication of the need to foster translational medicine (TM) by building and broadening bridges between basic research and clinical studies at the international level. The meeting included distinguished TM experts from academia, the pharmaceutical and diagnostics industries, government agencies, regulators, and clinicians and provided the opportunity to identify shared interests and efforts for collaborative approaches utilizing cutting edge technologies, innovative approaches and novel therapeutic interventions. The meeting defined the concept of TM in its two-way operational scheme and emphasized the need for bed to bench efforts based directly on clinical observation. Conclusions It was the meeting participants’ realization that the shared main goals of TM include breaking the separation between clinic practice and basic research, establishing positive feedback by understanding the basis of expected and unexpected clinical outcomes and accelerating basic research relevant to human suffering. The primary objectives of the meeting were two-fold: to accelerate the two-way translation by informing the participants representing the different disciplines about the state of art activities around TM approaches; and to identify areas that need to be supported by redirecting limited resources as well as

  15. Moral distress and burnout in internal medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Sajjadi, Sharareh; Norena, Monica; Wong, Hubert; Dodek, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background Residents frequently encounter situations in their workplace that may induce moral distress or burnout. The objective of this study was to measure overall and rotation-specific moral distress and burnout in medical residents, and the relationship between demographics and moral distress and burnout. Methods The revised Moral Distress Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (Human Service version) were administered to Internal Medicine residents in the 2013–2014 academic year at the University of British Columbia. Results Of the 88 residents, 45 completed the surveys. Participants (mean age 30+/−3; 46% male) reported a median moral distress score (interquartile range) of 77 (50–96). Twenty-six percent of residents had considered quitting because of moral distress, 21% had a high level of burnout, and only 5% had a low level of burnout. Moral distress scores were highest during Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and Clinical Teaching Unit (CTU) rotations, and lowest during elective rotations (p<0.0001). Women reported higher emotional exhaustion. Moral distress was associated with depersonalization (p=0.01), and both moral distress and burnout were associated with intention to leave the job. Conclusion Internal Medicine residents report moral distress that is greatest during ICU and CTU rotations, and is associated with burnout and intention to leave the job. PMID:28344714

  16. Internal medicine program directors' perceptions of resident work rounds.

    PubMed

    Boutros, A; Della Ratta, R K

    1994-08-01

    Work rounds have received little attention in the medical education literature. At the outset of the second post graduate year, medical residents are expected to function, without much guidance, as both team leaders and teacher. New York State health code regulation 405 restrict house staff work hours and may influence the manner and content of work rounds. The goals of work rounds were identified through a literature review and our own experiences. A 36-item questionnaire utilizing the identified goals was used in this cross-sectional descriptive study. The participants were the Program Directors of New York State Internal Medicine residency programs. Each of the fourteen goals identified reflects one of three resident behaviors: patient care, teaching, and evaluation. The goals that received the highest importance scores were patient management and updating team leader of events. Ninety percent (90%) or more of the participants indicated that patient management, teaching clinical reasoning and problem solving, verifying important chart data, and verifying physical examination should be performed "often" or "almost always." Most programs employed verbal instructions but only few held conference or provided literature on the expectations and conduct of work rounds. New York State Internal Medicine program directors perceive work rounds as primarily a patient care task, and many rely on verbal instructions to convey the objectives to the house staff. While previous research has demonstrated that work rounds are an important setting for house staff education, this study reveals that in most New York State programs this opportunity may be missed.

  17. Short sleep times predict obesity in internal medicine clinic patients.

    PubMed

    Buscemi, Dolores; Kumar, Ashwani; Nugent, Rebecca; Nugent, Kenneth

    2007-12-15

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between short sleep times and obesity as defined by body mass index (BMI). We wanted to determine whether this association occurs in patients with chronic medical diagnoses since the number of confounding factors is likely higher in patients than the general population. Two hundred patients attending internal medicine clinics completed a survey regarding sleep habits, lifestyle characteristics, and medical diagnoses. An independent surveyor collected the information on the questionnaires and reviewed the medical records. Height and weight were measured by clinic personnel. Data were analyzed with multivariate logistic regression. Subjects with short sleep times (< 7 hours) had an increased likelihood of obesity as defined by a BMI > or = 30 kg/m2 when compared to the reference group of (8, 9] hours (odds ratio 2.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-8.09). There was a U-shaped relationship between obesity and sleep time in women but not in men. Young age (18 to 49 years), not smoking, drinking alcohol, hypertension, diabetes, and sleep apnea were also associated with obesity in the overall model. This study demonstrates an association between short sleep times and obesity in undifferentiated patients attending an internal medicine clinic using models adjusting for age, lifestyle characteristics, and some medical diagnoses. The U-shaped relationship in women suggests that sleep patterns may have gender specific associations. These observations provide the background for therapeutic trials in weight loss in patients with established medical problems.

  18. Italian intersociety consensus on DOAC use in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Prisco, Domenico; Ageno, Walter; Becattini, Cecilia; D'Angelo, Armando; Davì, Giovanni; De Cristofaro, Raimondo; Dentali, Francesco; Di Minno, Giovanni; Falanga, Anna; Gussoni, Gualberto; Masotti, Luca; Palareti, Gualtiero; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Santi, Roberto M; Santilli, Francesca; Silingardi, Mauro; Tufano, Antonella; Violi, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are drugs used in clinical practice since 2009 for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolism in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, and for the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism. The four DOACs, including the three factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) and one direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) provide oral anticoagulation therapy alternatives to Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Despite their clear advantages, the DOACs require on the part of the internist a thorough knowledge of their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics to ensure their correct use, laboratory monitoring and the appropriate management of adverse events. This document represents a consensus paper on the use of DOACs by representatives of three Italian scientific societies: the Italian Society of Internal Medicine (SIMI), the Federation of the Associations of Hospital Managers (FADOI), and the Society for the Study of Haemostasis and Thrombosis (SISET). This document formulates expert opinion guidance for pragmatic managing, monitoring and reversing the anticoagulant effect of DOACs in both chronic and emergency settings. This practical guidance may help the internist to create adequate protocols for patients hospitalized ion internal medicine wards, where patients are often elderly subjects affected by poly-morbidities and renal insufficiency, and, thus, require particular attention to drug-drug interactions and peri-procedural protocols.

  19. The Use of Smartphones on General Internal Medicine Wards

    PubMed Central

    Morra, D.; Lo, V.; Quan, S.; Wu, R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective To describe the uses of institutional and personal smartphones on General Internal Medicine wards and highlight potential consequences from their use. Methods A mixed methods study consisting of both quantitative and qualitative research methods was conducted in General Internal Medicine wards across four academic teaching hospitals in Toronto, Ontario. Participants included medical students, residents, attending physicians and allied health professionals. Data collection consisted of work shadowing observations, semi-structured interviews and surveys. Results Personal smartphones were used for both clinical communication and non-work-related activities. Clinicians used their personal devices to communicate with their medical teams and with other medical specialties and healthcare professionals. Participants understood the risks associated with communicating confidential health information via their personal smartphones, but appear to favor efficiency over privacy issues. From survey responses, 9 of 23 residents (39%) reported using their personal cell phones to email or text patient information that may have contained patient identifiers. Although some residents were observed using their personal smartphones for non-work-related activities, personal use was infrequent and most residents did not engage in this activity. Conclusion Clinicians are using personal smartphones for work-related purposes on the wards. With the increasing popularity of smartphone devices, it is anticipated that an increasing number of clinicians will use their personal smartphones for clinical work. This trend poses risks to the secure transfer of confidential personal health information and may lead to increased distractions for clinicians. PMID:25298819

  20. [HIV infection - a new disease of internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Snopková, Svatava

    2017-01-01

    Modern antiretroviral treatment belongs to the greatest success of current medicine. HIV infection has gone from a death sentence to a manageable chronic disease which develops several decades. Thanks to treatment advances, people with HIV can and do live long and full lives. In the last two decades, the incidence AIDS defining illnesses have been dramatically reduced especially opportunistic infections and malignancies, whereas the role of non-infection comorbidities has risen than age-matched HIV uninfected adults. These comorbidities include cardiovascular diseases, venous and arterial thrombosis, metabolic disorders, chronic liver and renal diseases, nervous system disorders, osteoporosis and some cancers. This relatively large group of diseases is known as non-AIDS defining or indicating diseases and these diseases are associated in HIV uninfected general population with older age and ageing Most HIV positive individuals on antiretrovirals present an abnormal level of immune activation, inflammation and hypercoagulable condition. These hallmarks are typically seen in older HIV uninfected general population and are associated with aging and the immunosenescent phenotype. The explanation for this phenomenon is unclear. There are multiple factors, which may apply pathophysiologically, including the residual immune dysregulation syndrome and antiretrovirals alone. It is clear that changes in the nature of chronic HIV infection put it in internal medicine. Cardiology, internal medicine, geriatric and oncology syndromes are dominating manifestations in HIV positive patients on antiretrovirals. Care management for HIV infected individuals will need to draw on a wide range of medical disciplines in diagnosis and treatment. Clarification of these phenomena would be beneficial for the treatment of these non-infectious diseases in HIV positive and as well in HIV negative general population.Key words: antiretroviral therapy - HIV infection - immune dysregulation

  1. Perception of Thromboembolism Risk: Differences between the Departments of Internal Medicine and Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Vincentelli, Giovanni Maria; Monti, Manuel; Pirro, Maria Rosaria; Bertazzoni, Giuliano; Pugliese, Francesco Rocco; Ciammaichella, Maurizio; Ruggieri, Maria Pia; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    The latest developments in emergency medicine (EM) have introduced new typologies of patients that have not been taken into account in previous studies of venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk. The aim of the current study was to evaluate by comparing the main international risk scores whether different perceptions of VTE risk exist in internal medicine (IM) departments and in EM departments. This cross-sectional observational study involved 23 IM and 10 EM departments of 21 different hospitals. The patient data were collected by physicians who were blinded to the purpose of the study. The data were analyzed using the main international risk scores. We analyzed 742 patients, 222 (30%) hospitalized in EM departments and the remaining 520 (70%) in IM departments. We found that fewer patients at risk for VTE were treated with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) in EM departments than in IM departments. Moreover, there was significant statistical difference in the use of LMWH between IM and EM departments when the Padua score and immobilization criteria were used to assess the risk. The infrequent use of LMWH in EM patients may have several causes. For example, in EM departments, treatment of acute illness often takes higher priority than VTE risk evaluation. Moreover, immobilization criteria cannot be evaluated for all EM patients because of the intrinsic time requirements. For the aforementioned reasons, we believe that a different VTE risk score is required that takes into account the peculiarities of EM, and establishing such a score should be the object of future study.

  2. Delirium in elderly patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards.

    PubMed

    Fortini, Alberto; Morettini, Alessandro; Tavernese, Giuseppe; Facchini, Sofia; Tofani, Lorenzo; Pazzi, Maddalena

    2014-06-01

    A prospective observational study was conducted to evaluate the impact of delirium on geriatric inpatients in internal medical wards and to identify predisposing factors for the development of delirium. The study included all patients aged 65 years and older, who were consecutively admitted to the internal medicine wards of two public hospitals in Florence, Italy. On admission, 29 baseline risk factors were examined, cognitive impairment was evaluated by Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire, and prevalent delirium cases were diagnosed by Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Enrolled patients were evaluated daily with CAM to detect incident delirium cases. Among the 560 included patients, 19 (3 %) had delirium on admission (prevalent) and 44 (8 %) developed delirium during hospitalization (incident). Prevalent delirium cases were excluded from the statistical analysis. Incident delirium was associated with increased length of hospital stay (p < 0.01) and institutionalization (p < 0.01, OR 3.026). Multivariate analysis found that cognitive impairment on admission (p < 0.0002), diabetes (p < 0.05, OR 1.936), chronic kidney failure (p < 0.05, OR 2.078) and male gender (p < 0.05, OR 2.178) was significantly associated with the development of delirium during hospitalization. Results show that delirium impact is relevant to older patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards. The present study confirms cognitive impairment as a risk factor for incident delirium. The cognitive evaluation proved to be an important instrument to improve identification of patients at high risk for delirium. In this context, our study may contribute to improve application of preventive strategies.

  3. International emergency medicine: a review of the literature from 2010.

    PubMed

    Aschkenasy, Miriam; Arnold, Kris; Foran, Mark; Lippert, Suzanne; Schroeder, Erika D; Bertsch, Karina; Levine, Adam C

    2011-08-01

    The International Emergency Medicine (IEM) Literature Review aims to highlight and disseminate high-quality global EM research in the fields of EM development, disaster and humanitarian response, and emergency care in resource-limited settings. For this review, we conducted a Medline search for articles published between January 1 and December 31, 2010, using a set of international and EM search terms and a manual search of journals that have produced large numbers of IEM articles for past reviews. This search produced 6,936 articles, which were divided among 20 reviewers who screened them using established inclusion and exclusion criteria to select articles relevant to the field of IEM. Two-hundred articles were selected by at least one reviewer and approved by an editor for scoring. Two independent reviewers using a standardized and predetermined set of criteria then scored each of the 200 articles. The 27 top-scoring articles were chosen for full review. The articles this year trended toward evidence-based research for treatment and care options in resource-limited settings, with an emphasis on childhood illness and obstetric care. These articles represent examples of high-quality international emergency research that is currently ongoing in high-, middle-, and low-income countries alike. This article is not intended to serve as a systematic review or clinical guideline but is instead meant to be a selection of current high-quality IEM literature, with the hope that it will foster further growth in the field, highlight evidence-based practice, and encourage discourse. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  4. Necessity of Internal Monitoring for Nuclear Medicine Staff in a Large Specialized Chinese Hospital.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Zhang, Zhen; Hou, Chang-Song; Li, Wen-Liang; Yang, Hui; Sun, Quan-Fu

    2016-04-12

    This work intends to quantify the risk of internal contaminations in the nuclear medicine staff of one hospital in Henan province, China. For this purpose, the criteria proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to determine whether it is necessary to conduct internal individual monitoring was applied to all of the 18 nuclear medicine staff members who handled radionuclides. The activity of different radionuclides used during a whole calendar year and the protection measures adopted were collected for each staff member, and the decision as to whether nuclear medicine staff in the hospital should be subjected to internal monitoring was made on the basis of the criteria proposed by IAEA. It is concluded that for all 18 members of the nuclear medicine staff in the hospital, internal monitoring is required. Internal exposure received by nuclear medicine staff should not be ignored, and it is necessary to implement internal monitoring for nuclear medicine staff routinely.

  5. The internal morality of medicine: explication and application to managed care.

    PubMed

    Brody, H; Miller, F G

    1998-06-01

    Some ethical issues facing contemporary medicine cannot be fully understood without addressing medicine's internal morality. Medicine as a profession is characterized by certain moral goals and morally acceptable means for achieving those goals. The list of appropriate goals and means allows some medical actions to be classified as clear violations of the internal morality, and others as borderline or controversial cases. Replies are available for common objections, including the superfluity of internal morality for ethical analysis, the argument that internal morality is merely an apology for medicine's traditional power and authority, and the claim that there is no single, "core" internal morality. The value of addressing the internal morality of medicine may be illustrated by a detailed investigation of ethical issues posed by managed care. Managed care poses some fundamental challenges for medicine's internal morality, but also calls for thoughtful reflection and reconsideration of some traditionally held moral views on patient fidelity in particular.

  6. Necessity of Internal Monitoring for Nuclear Medicine Staff in a Large Specialized Chinese Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Zhang, Zhen; Hou, Chang-Song; Li, Wen-Liang; Yang, Hui; Sun, Quan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    This work intends to quantify the risk of internal contaminations in the nuclear medicine staff of one hospital in Henan province, China. For this purpose, the criteria proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to determine whether it is necessary to conduct internal individual monitoring was applied to all of the 18 nuclear medicine staff members who handled radionuclides. The activity of different radionuclides used during a whole calendar year and the protection measures adopted were collected for each staff member, and the decision as to whether nuclear medicine staff in the hospital should be subjected to internal monitoring was made on the basis of the criteria proposed by IAEA. It is concluded that for all 18 members of the nuclear medicine staff in the hospital, internal monitoring is required. Internal exposure received by nuclear medicine staff should not be ignored, and it is necessary to implement internal monitoring for nuclear medicine staff routinely. PMID:27077874

  7. Standardized sign-out reduces intern perception of medical errors on the general internal medicine ward.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Stephen M; Arnett, Michael V; Domanski, Jeremy P

    2009-01-01

    Prior research on reducing variation in housestaff handoff procedures have depended on proprietary checkout software. Use of low-technology standardization techniques has not been widely studied. We wished to determine if standardizing the process of intern sign-out using low-technology sign-out tools could reduce perception of errors and missing handoff data. We conducted a pre-post prospective study of a cohort of 34 interns on a general internal medicine ward. Night interns coming off duty and day interns reassuming care were surveyed on their perception of erroneous sign-out data, mistakes made by the night intern overnight, and occurrences unanticipated by sign-out. Trainee satisfaction with the sign-out process was assessed with a 5-point Likert survey. There were 399 intern surveys performed 8 weeks before and 6 weeks after the introduction of a standardized sign-out form. The response rate was 95% for the night interns and 70% for the interns reassuming care in the morning. After the standardized form was introduced, night interns were significantly (p < .003) less likely to detect missing sign-out data including missing important diseases, contingency plans, or medications. Standardized sign-out did not significantly alter the frequency of dropped tasks or missed lab and X-ray data as perceived by the night intern. However, the day teams thought there were significantly less perceived errors on the part of the night intern (p = .001) after introduction of the standardized sign-out sheet. There was no difference in mean Likert scores of resident satisfaction with sign-out before and after the intervention. Standardized written sign-out sheets significantly improve the completeness and effectiveness of handoffs between night and day interns. Further research is needed to determine if these process improvements are related to better patient outcomes.

  8. Cryopreservation of in vitro shoot tips of Dioscorea deltoidea Wall., an endangered medicinal plant: effect of cryogenic procedure and storage duration.

    PubMed

    Mandal, B B; Dixit-Sharma, Sonali

    2007-01-01

    In vitro shoot tips of Dioscorea deltoidea Wall., an endangered medicinal plant, were successfully cryopreserved using the vitrification and the encapsulation-dehydration techniques with subsequent high frequency plant regeneration. Using vitrification, post-liquid nitrogen (LN) shoot regeneration up to 83% was recorded when excised shoot tips were pretreated overnight on MS medium containing 0.3 M sucrose followed by loading with MS containing 2 M glycerol plus 0.4 M sucrose for 20 min at 25 degree C, dehydration with PVS2 for 90 min at 0 degree C and quenching in LN. After 1 h of storage in LN, the shoot tips were rewarmed in a water-bath at 40 degrees C, unloaded with 1.2 M sucrose solution for 20 min and cultured on recovery growth medium. While using encapsulation-dehydration, the highest regeneration frequency recorded was 76% when sucrose-pretreated shoot tips were encapsulated with 3% calcium alginate, precultured in 0.75 M sucrose for 3 days, dehydrated to 25% moisture content (FW basis) under the laminar air flow, stored in LN for 1h and rewarmed at 40 degree C. The cryopreserved shoot tips maintained their viability and an unaltered level of regeneration capability after up to one year of storage in LN.

  9. Preparing for the primary care clinic: an ambulatory boot camp for internal medicine interns.

    PubMed

    Esch, Lindsay M; Bird, Amber-Nicole; Oyler, Julie L; Lee, Wei Wei; Shah, Sachin D; Pincavage, Amber T

    2015-01-01

    Internal medicine (IM) interns start continuity clinic with variable ambulatory training. Multiple other specialties have utilized a boot camp style curriculum to improve surgical and procedural skills, but boot camps have not been used to improve interns' ambulatory knowledge and confidence. The authors implemented and assessed the impact of an intern ambulatory boot camp pilot on primary care knowledge, confidence, and curricular satisfaction. During July 2014, IM interns attended ambulatory boot camp. It included clinically focused case-based didactic sessions on common ambulatory topics as well as orientation to the clinic and electronic medical records. Interns anonymously completed a 15-question pre-test on topics covered in the boot camp as well as an identical post-test after the boot camp. The interns were surveyed regarding their confidence and satisfaction. Thirty-eight interns participated in the boot camp. Prior to the boot camp, few interns reported confidence managing common outpatient conditions. The average pre-test knowledge score was 46.3%. The average post-test knowledge score significantly improved to 76.1% (p<0.001). All interns reported that the boot camp was good preparation for clinics and 97% felt that the boot camp boosted their confidence. The ambulatory boot camp pilot improved primary care knowledge, and interns thought it was good preparation for clinic. The ambulatory boot camp was well received and may be an effective way to improve the preparation of interns for primary care clinic. Further assessment of clinical performance and expansion to other programs and specialties should be considered.

  10. The effect of a primary-care pathway on internal medicine residents' career plans.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, D L; Pozen, J T; Cohen, A S

    1979-08-01

    There has been no evidence that primary-care pathways, a recent innovation in internal medicine residency programs, have affected the career choices of their trainees. We report the experience of the first four cohorts of primary-care trainees in internal medicine compared with traditional-pathway trainees at Boston City Hospital. Primary-care residents remained committed to their plans for a career in general internal medicine throughout training. In contrast, two thirds of the traditionally trained residents who were planning a career in general internal medicine at the beginning of their training changed their plans to subspecialty medicine. Thus, the primary-care pathway reinforced the career plans of trainees in general internal medicine, whereas traditional training influenced potential generalists toward subspecialty medicine.

  11. International Health Experiences in Family Medicine Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Porter, Maribeth; Mims, Lisa; Garven, Chad; Gavin, Jennifer; Carek, Peter; Diaz, Vanessa

    2016-02-01

    International health experiences (IHEs) have been associated with improved clinical skills, altruistic attitudes, cross-cultural sensitivity, and exposure to community medicine for residents and medical students. Although an increasing number of family medicine residencies offer IHEs, there are currently no standardized competencies or guidelines for developing IHEs. The aim of this study was to examine the content of IHEs in order to provide an overview of the current landscape of global health training in family medicine residency programs. Residency programs self-identifying as offering IHEs on the American Medical Association's (AMA) FREIDA Online website were emailed an electronic survey with questions regarding IHE characteristics, resident selection criteria, faculty support, motivations for participation, challenges to implementation, and funding. Of the 153 programs that responded, 84% still offered IHEs. Most IHEs are 3--4 weeks (71.1%) and are funded by the resident (74.2%). Faculty from the resident's department or institution generally provide supervision (76.6%) and have undergone some type of specialized training in global health (65.6%). Being in good academic standing was the most important eligibility criteria for residents participating in an IHE (86.7%), and funding was reported as the most challenging aspect (62.5%) of offering IHEs. IHEs are increasing in number and receiving more funding, but the experiences are variable among residency programs. While most program directors believe residents participate in IHEs to gain exposure with underserved populations, only a small percentage (5.5%) include a commitment to community service as part of a requirement for participation in an IHE.

  12. [100 essential drugs. An internal medicine approach].

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Arlet, P; Aumaitre, O; Cosserat, J; Grosbois, B; Guillevin, L; Kettaneh, A; Le Jeunne, C; Massot, C; Morlat, P

    2013-08-01

    Up to 4600 drugs in about 15,000 pharmaceutical forms are available in France which may be a source of misuse with increased occurrence of side effects and costs. While the World Health Organization is encouraging each developed country to work out its own list of essential drugs. The list provided in 2008 by the French Office for the safety of health products has had so far limited impact on practice, so it became obvious to a group of internists to work out a "wise list" of 100 essential medicines covering 95% of the disorders observed in France. In June 2011, 10 internists agreed to each provide a list of 100 essential medicines, according to individual experience. In December 2011, a meeting of the participants provided a list as initial consensus and mandated five among them to make proposals for those areas neglected by too many participants or in which needless dispersion of medicines was stated. After internet-facilitated exchanges, an additional list was validated in mild-January 2012. Fifty-four drugs were included in the list of initial consensus (including nine selected by all 10 participants), and 46 in the additional list. So the final "wise list" included 100 drugs. In June 2012, 56 of these drugs were available as generics. This list was compared to those lists set out by five countries in the European Union. Generating such a list is feasible. Undoubtedly still non-comprehensive, this list will benefit from the expertise of 14 general practitioners who are currently working out a similar list across France. The final list will be submitted for validation by the French associations of generalist teachers and Internists. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of a Substance Use Disorder Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Melissa R.; Arnsten, Julia H.; Parish, Sharon J.; Kunins, Hillary V.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching about diagnosis, treatment, and sequelae of substance use disorders (SUDs) is insufficient in most Internal Medicine residency programs. To address this, the authors developed, implemented, and evaluated a novel and comprehensive SUD curriculum for first year residents (interns) in Internal Medicine, which anchors the ensuing 3-year…

  14. Evaluation of a Substance Use Disorder Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Melissa R.; Arnsten, Julia H.; Parish, Sharon J.; Kunins, Hillary V.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching about diagnosis, treatment, and sequelae of substance use disorders (SUDs) is insufficient in most Internal Medicine residency programs. To address this, the authors developed, implemented, and evaluated a novel and comprehensive SUD curriculum for first year residents (interns) in Internal Medicine, which anchors the ensuing 3-year…

  15. Implementing standardized, inter-unit communication in an international setting: handoff of patients from emergency medicine to internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Balhara, Kamna S; Peterson, Susan M; Elabd, Mohamed Moheb; Regan, Linda; Anton, Xavier; Al-Natour, Basil Ali; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Scheulen, James; Stewart de Ramirez, Sarah A

    2017-02-03

    Standardized handoffs may reduce communication errors, but research on handoff in community and international settings is lacking. Our study at a community hospital in the United Arab Emirates characterizes existing handoff practices for admitted patients from emergency medicine (EM) to internal medicine (IM), develops a standardized handoff tool, and assesses its impact on communication and physician perceptions. EM physicians completed a survey regarding handoff practices and expectations. Trained observers utilized a checklist based on the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety model to observe 40 handoffs. EM and IM physicians collaboratively developed a written tool encouraging bedside handoff of admitted patients. After the intervention, surveys of EM physicians and 40 observations were subsequently repeated. 77.5% of initial observed handoffs occurred face-to-face, with 42.5% at bedside, and in four different languages. Most survey respondents considered face-to-face handoff ideal. Respondents noted 9-13 patients suffering harm due to handoff in the prior month. After handoff tool implementation, 97.5% of observed handoffs occurred face-to-face (versus 77.5%, p = 0.014), with 82.5% at bedside (versus 42.5%, p < 0.001), and all in English. Handoff was streamlined from 7 possible pathways to 3. Most post-intervention survey respondents reported improved workflow (77.8%) and safety (83.3%); none reported patient harm. Respondents and observers noted reduced inefficiency (p < 0.05). Our standardized tool increased face-to-face and bedside handoff, positively impacted workflow, and increased perceptions of safety by EM physicians in an international, non-academic setting. Our three-step approach can be applied towards developing standardized, context-specific inter-specialty handoff in a variety of settings.

  16. [Withdrawal in opiate addicts in an internal medicine hospital unit].

    PubMed

    Crémer, G A; Boissonnas, A

    1995-10-01

    Withdrawal of opiates drug addicts in Internal Medicine is unusual in France. Four main preliminary conditions are requested: 1--Drug addict preparation and self motivation, 2--Inter and intra institution team collaboration, 3--Opening the hospital towards community agencies, 4--Hospital staff recruited on volunteer basis. Within two years (1992-1993), 210 opiates drug addicts were hospitalized for withdrawal. Two third were males, median age was 27, median years of addiction was 7. Thirty percent were seropositive for HIV, 70% for HCV. Hospitalisation lasted 7 days for heroin addicts and 10 days for morphin, codein or buprenorphin addicts. Successful withdrawn was observed for 70% patients but six months after withdrawal, only 15% remained abstinent.

  17. Assessment of empathy in different years of internal medicine training.

    PubMed

    Mangione, Salvatore; Kane, Gregory C; Caruso, John W; Gonnella, Joseph S; Nasca, Thomas J; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2002-07-01

    The operational measurement of physician empathy, as well as the question of whether empathy could change at different levels of medical education, is of interest to medical educators. To address this issue, 98 internal medicine residents from all 3 years of training were studied. The Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy was administered, and residents' empathy scores correlated with ratings on humanistic attributes made by postgraduate program directors. No statistically significant differences in scores were found among residents of different training levels. Empathy scores remained also stable during internship (test-retest reliability = 0.72). Correlation between empathy and ratings on humanism was 0.17. Thus, the findings suggest that empathy is a relatively stable trait that is not easily amenable to change in residency training programs. The issue of whether targeted educational activities for the purpose of cultivating empathy can improve empathy scores awaits empirical scrutiny.

  18. Effective Research Strategies for Trainees in Internal Medicine Residency Programs

    PubMed Central

    Wiederman, Michael W.; Sawyer, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    For most training programs, the development of research endeavors among trainees is an ongoing challenge. In this article, we review various considerations when attempting to undertake research activities within an internal medicine residency training program, including availability of institutional resources (eg, dedicated research time for trainees and faculty, available faculty mentors, accessible adjunctive personnel), engagement of residents into research, classic project quagmires in training programs, the institutional review board, publication options (eg, letters to the editor, case reports, literature reviews, original research reports), and journal submission strategies. Given that research entails multiple components and distinct skills, the overall program goal should be to make research an educationally understandable process for trainees. Research can be a rewarding activity when nurtured in a facilitating educational environment. PMID:26137359

  19. Real time curriculum map for internal medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Roger Y; Roberts, J Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background To manage the voluminous formal curriculum content in a limited amount of structured teaching time, we describe the development and evaluation of a curriculum map for academic half days (AHD) in a core internal medicine residency program. Methods We created a 3-year cyclical curriculum map (an educational tool combining the content, methodology and timetabling of structured teaching), comprising a matrix of topics under various specialties/themes and corresponding AHD hours. All topics were cross-matched against the ACP-ASIM in-training examination, and all hours were colour coded based on the categories of core competencies. Residents regularly updated the map on a real time basis. Results There were 208 topics covered in 283 AHD hours. All topics represented core competencies with minimal duplication (78% covered once in 3 years). Only 42 hours (15%) involved non-didactic teaching, which increased after implementation of the map (18–19 hours/year versus baseline 5 hours/year). Most AHD hours (78%) focused on medical expert competencies. Resident satisfaction (90% response) was high throughout (range 3.64 ± 0.21, 3.84 ± 0.14 out of 4), which improved after 1 year but returned to baseline after 2 years. Conclusion We developed and implemented an internal medicine curriculum map based on real time resident input, with minimal topic duplication and high resident satisfaction. The map provided an opportunity to balance didactic versus non-didactic teaching, and teaching on medical versus non medical expert topics. PMID:17988402

  20. Preparing for the primary care clinic: an ambulatory boot camp for internal medicine interns

    PubMed Central

    Esch, Lindsay M.; Bird, Amber-Nicole; Oyler, Julie L.; Lee, Wei Wei; Shah, Sachin D.; Pincavage, Amber T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Internal medicine (IM) interns start continuity clinic with variable ambulatory training. Multiple other specialties have utilized a boot camp style curriculum to improve surgical and procedural skills, but boot camps have not been used to improve interns’ ambulatory knowledge and confidence. The authors implemented and assessed the impact of an intern ambulatory boot camp pilot on primary care knowledge, confidence, and curricular satisfaction. Methods During July 2014, IM interns attended ambulatory boot camp. It included clinically focused case-based didactic sessions on common ambulatory topics as well as orientation to the clinic and electronic medical records. Interns anonymously completed a 15-question pre-test on topics covered in the boot camp as well as an identical post-test after the boot camp. The interns were surveyed regarding their confidence and satisfaction. Results Thirty-eight interns participated in the boot camp. Prior to the boot camp, few interns reported confidence managing common outpatient conditions. The average pre-test knowledge score was 46.3%. The average post-test knowledge score significantly improved to 76.1% (p<0.001). All interns reported that the boot camp was good preparation for clinics and 97% felt that the boot camp boosted their confidence. Conclusions The ambulatory boot camp pilot improved primary care knowledge, and interns thought it was good preparation for clinic. The ambulatory boot camp was well received and may be an effective way to improve the preparation of interns for primary care clinic. Further assessment of clinical performance and expansion to other programs and specialties should be considered. PMID:26609962

  1. Evidence-based medicine among internal medicine residents in a community hospital program using smart phones.

    PubMed

    León, Sergio A; Fontelo, Paul; Green, Linda; Ackerman, Michael; Liu, Fang

    2007-02-21

    This study implemented and evaluated a point-of-care, wireless Internet access using smart phones for information retrieval during daily clinical rounds and academic activities of internal medicine residents in a community hospital. We did the project to assess the feasibility of using smart phones as an alternative to reach online medical resources because we were unable to find previous studies of this type. In addition, we wanted to learn what Web-based information resources internal medicine residents were using and whether providing bedside, real-time access to medical information would be perceived useful for patient care and academic activities. We equipped the medical teams in the hospital wards with smart phones (mobile phone/PDA hybrid devices) to provide immediate access to evidence-based resources developed at the National Library of Medicine as well as to other medical Websites. The emphasis of this project was to measure the convenience and feasibility of real-time access to current medical literature using smart phones. The smart phones provided real-time mobile access to medical literature during daily rounds and clinical activities in the hospital. Physicians found these devices easy to use. A post-study survey showed that the information retrieved was perceived to be useful for patient care and academic activities. In community hospitals and ambulatory clinics without wireless networks where the majority of physicians work, real-time access to current medical literature may be achieved through smart phones. Immediate availability of reliable and updated information obtained from authoritative sources on the Web makes evidence-based practice in a community hospital a reality.

  2. Evidence-based medicine among internal medicine residents in a community hospital program using smart phones

    PubMed Central

    León, Sergio A; Fontelo, Paul; Green, Linda; Ackerman, Michael; Liu, Fang

    2007-01-01

    Background This study implemented and evaluated a point-of-care, wireless Internet access using smart phones for information retrieval during daily clinical rounds and academic activities of internal medicine residents in a community hospital. We did the project to assess the feasibility of using smart phones as an alternative to reach online medical resources because we were unable to find previous studies of this type. In addition, we wanted to learn what Web-based information resources internal medicine residents were using and whether providing bedside, real-time access to medical information would be perceived useful for patient care and academic activities. Methods We equipped the medical teams in the hospital wards with smart phones (mobile phone/PDA hybrid devices) to provide immediate access to evidence-based resources developed at the National Library of Medicine as well as to other medical Websites. The emphasis of this project was to measure the convenience and feasibility of real-time access to current medical literature using smart phones. Results The smart phones provided real-time mobile access to medical literature during daily rounds and clinical activities in the hospital. Physicians found these devices easy to use. A post-study survey showed that the information retrieved was perceived to be useful for patient care and academic activities. Conclusion In community hospitals and ambulatory clinics without wireless networks where the majority of physicians work, real-time access to current medical literature may be achieved through smart phones. Immediate availability of reliable and updated information obtained from authoritative sources on the Web makes evidence-based practice in a community hospital a reality. PMID:17313680

  3. An evaluation of career paths among 30 years of general internal medicine/primary care internal medicine residency graduates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Reinert, Steven; Landau, Carol; McGarry, Kelly

    2014-10-01

    Interest in primary care careers has been dwindling among medical trainees over the past decade, with poor quality of life among the perceived disadvantages. We sought to evaluate factors influencing career satisfaction among graduates of Brown's General Internal Medicine (GIM)/Primary Care residency program and assess its contribution to the primary care work force. Using an anonymous online survey, we queried GIM alumni from 1981-2012 to obtain information about demographics, job characteristics and career satisfaction measures. Fifty-nine percent of Brown's GIM/Primary Care residency graduates practice primary care, a rate higher than most primary care track programs. Seventy-six percent of respondents were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with their current jobs. Career satisfaction correlated with self-rating of physical and emotional health and did not correlate with age, gender, income, debt burden, or practice setting. Among the diverse factors associated with attaining career satisfaction, attention to personal health plays a central role.

  4. Using the American Board of Internal Medicine Practice Improvement Modules to Teach Internal Medicine Residents Practice Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Shunk, Rebecca; Dulay, Maya; Julian, Kathy; Cornett, Patricia; Kohlwes, Jeffrey; Tarter, Laura; Hollander, Harry; O'Brien, Bridget; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Background Although residency programs must prepare physicians who can analyze and improve their practice, practice improvement (PI) is new for many faculty preceptors. We describe the pilot of a PI curriculum incorporating a practice improvement module (PIM) from the American Board of Internal Medicine for residents and their faculty preceptors. Methods Residents attended PI didactics and completed a PIM during continuity clinic and outpatient months working in groups under committed faculty. Results All residents participated in PI group projects. Residents agreed or strongly agreed that the projects and the curriculum benefited their learning and patient care. A self-assessment revealed significant improvement in PI competencies, but residents were just reaching a “somewhat confident” level. Conclusion A PI curriculum incorporating PIMs is an effective way to teach PI to both residents and faculty preceptors. We recommend the team approach and use of the PIM tutorial approach especially for faculty. PMID:21975892

  5. Topics of internal medicine for undergraduate dental education: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Kunde, A; Harendza, S

    2015-08-01

    Due to the ageing population, internal medicine has become increasingly important for dental education. Although several studies have reported dentists' dissatisfaction with their internal medicine training, no guidelines exist for internal medicine learning objectives in dental education. The aim of this study was to identify topics of internal medicine considered to be relevant for dental education by dentists and internists. Eight dentists from private dental practices in Hamburg and eight experienced internal medicine consultants from Hamburg University Hospital were recruited for semi-structured interviews about internal medicine topics relevant for dentists. Internal diseases were clustered into representative subspecialties. Dentists and internists were also asked to rate medical diseases or emergencies compiled from the literature by their relevance to dental education. Coagulopathy and endocarditis were rated highest by dentists, whilst anaphylaxis was rated highest by internists. Dentists rated hepatitis, HIV, organ transplantation and head/neck neoplasm significantly higher than internists. The largest number of different internal diseases mentioned by dentists or internists could be clustered under cardiovascular diseases. The number of specific diseases dentists considered to be relevant for dental education was higher in the subspecialties cardiovascular diseases, haematology/oncology and infectiology. We identified the internal medicine topics most relevant for dental education by surveying practising dentists and internists. The relevance of these topics should be confirmed by larger quantitative studies to develop guidelines how to design specific learning objectives for internal medicine in the dental curriculum. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Factors associated with performance in an internal medicine clerkship

    PubMed Central

    McNeal, Tresa; Lezama, Maybelline; Chandler, Martha; Forrester, Lisa; Metting, Austin; Mirkes, Curtis; Van Cleave, Holly; Win, Sonny; Myers, John D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to examine the relationship between demographic and educational variables and student performance on an internal medicine (IM) clerkship in order to target areas for educational intervention and potential early remediation. This study examined data associated with third-year medical student performance (N = 505) during the IM clerkship at Baylor Scott & White, Temple/Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine from 2005 to 2011. Multiple regression analysis (N = 341) showed that a model containing the following variables was significantly associated with scores on the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject exam, accounting for 46.5% of the variance: Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE), Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT), US Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) Step 1, second-year grade point average (GPA), and clinical evaluation. A model containing USMLE Step 1, clinical evaluation, and NBME was significantly associated with OSCE score, accounting for 30% of the variance. Additionally, a model containing age, MCAT score, undergraduate GPA, NBME subject exam score, and OSCE was significantly associated with clinical evaluation score, accounting for 22% of score variance. Age accounted for the most unique variance in clinical evaluation score. Gender and IM interest group were not significantly associated with any outcome variable. In conclusion, in contrast to previous studies in the field, we did not find a significant association between undergraduate GPA and NBME score. Our findings supply further evidence that the OSCE, typically believed to be a clinical performance exam, actually assesses a broader set of domains. Interest group membership did not confer any academic benefit to medical students in IM clerkships in our study. PMID:28127127

  7. Tips for Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Tips for Chronic Pain The SSF thanks Stuart S. Kassan, MD, FACP, Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado, for authoring ...

  8. The impact of the internal medicine sub-internship on medical student career choice.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Jennifer R; Shea, Judy A; O'Grady, Elizabeth; Bellini, Lisa M; Ciminiello, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Medical student interest in internal medicine is decreasing. Whether the internal medicine sub-internship affects intent to pursue internal medicine is unknown. Determine the immediate and longer-term effect of the medicine sub-internship on students' decision to pursue internal medicine residency. Mixed method, single institution, prospective cohort study. Ninety-two students completing an internal medicine sub-internship in 2006. Survey administered prior to and immediately after the sub-internship and prior to the match. Questions included likelihood of applying in internal medicine and perceived impact of the sub-internship on career choice. Seventy-seven percent of students (N = 63) completed the first two surveys; 63% (N = 58) completed the second and third. Immediately post sub-internship, 21% (N = 13) were less likely to apply in internal medicine and 11% (N = 7) were more likely to apply (net change in plans was not significant, p = 0.38). There was a significant relationship between the perceived impact of the sub-internship and likelihood of applying in medicine (ANOVA comparison across means, p < 0.001). Compared to the second survey, on the third survey more students (41%, N = 24) believed the sub-internship positively impacted their decision to apply in medicine, though overall shifting was not significant (p = 0.39). Key themes describing sub-internship impact included the intense workload, value of experiencing internship, rewards of assuming the physician role, and education received (30%, 25%, 20% and 16% of comments, respectively). Overall, there was not a significant effect of the sub-internship on students' decision to apply in internal medicine. Additional research about the relative impact of the sub-internship in relationship to other career choice predictors is needed to better address factors that may encourage or dissuade students from pursuing internal medicine.

  9. The Impact of the Internal Medicine Sub-internship on Medical Student Career Choice

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Judy A.; O’Grady, Elizabeth; Bellini, Lisa M.; Ciminiello, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Background Medical student interest in internal medicine is decreasing. Whether the internal medicine sub-internship affects intent to pursue internal medicine is unknown. Objective Determine the immediate and longer-term effect of the medicine sub-internship on students’ decision to pursue internal medicine residency. Design Mixed method, single institution, prospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS Ninety-two students completing an internal medicine sub-internship in 2006. Measurements Survey administered prior to and immediately after the sub-internship and prior to the match. Questions included likelihood of applying in internal medicine and perceived impact of the sub-internship on career choice. Main Results Seventy-seven percent of students (N = 63) completed the first two surveys; 63% (N = 58) completed the second and third. Immediately post sub-internship, 21% (N = 13) were less likely to apply in internal medicine and 11% (N = 7) were more likely to apply (net change in plans was not significant, p = 0.38). There was a significant relationship between the perceived impact of the sub-internship and likelihood of applying in medicine (ANOVA comparison across means, p <  0.001). Compared to the second survey, on the third survey more students (41%, N = 24) believed the sub-internship positively impacted their decision to apply in medicine, though overall shifting was not significant (p = 0.39). Key themes describing sub-internship impact included the intense workload, value of experiencing internship, rewards of assuming the physician role, and education received (30%, 25%, 20% and 16% of comments, respectively). Conclusions Overall, there was not a significant effect of the sub-internship on students’ decision to apply in internal medicine. Additional research about the relative impact of the sub-internship in relationship to other career choice predictors is needed to better address factors that may encourage or dissuade

  10. Six decades of the chair of Internal Medicine at the Medical Faculty in Skopje.

    PubMed

    Chakalaroski, K

    2013-01-01

    The chair of internal medicine in Republic of Macedonia was created in 1947. The Department of Internal Medicine (CIM) is the most numerous at Skopje's medical faculty (currently 56 members). According to the archive material from the first session of the Scientific Teaching Council of the Faculty of Medicine (17.03.1947), Mr Mario Krmpotic (Professor of Internal Medicine) was proposed as the first Director of the Internal Clinic (1947). For reasons unknown, Mr Krmpotic never came to Skopje to accept the post. As a consequence of this fact, the real founder of the CIM was the Russian Professor Alexandar Ignjatovski (1875-1955). Mr Ignjatovski was elected as the first Director of the Clinic for Internal Medicine in 1948 for a period of 4 years (1948-1952). At the same time, he was the first Chief of the CIM in Skopje (Macedonia). Dr D. Arsov was elected as the first Assistant Professor of Medicine in 1947, and second (and last) Director of the Clinic for Internal Medicine (1952-1974). For the same period (22 years) he was Head of the CIM. Dr D. Arsov sequentially and successively became first associated and then ordinary professor of medicine in the years 1951 and 1958. The regular activities of the CIM are as follows: 1) Undergraduate education for students (Clinical Investigation, Internal Medicine, Clinical Pharmacy) in general medicine, dentistry, geriatrics, urgent and family medicine (ECKTS); Undergraduate educationfor nurses, speech therapists, physiotherapists, radiologists (high /three year/ nurses School, ECKTS); 2) Postgraduate education (candidates for specialisation in internal medicine, infectology, anaesthesiology, neurology and surgery; 3) Continual medical education (a traditional morning scientific meeting on Thursdays, 08 h; weekly meetings of all internal medicine subspecialists); Scientific meetings, symposiums, congresses of former internal medicine associations (cardiology, pulmoallergology, gastroenterology, nephrology, haematology

  11. Divergent Fates of the Medical Humanities in Psychiatry and Internal Medicine: Should Psychiatry Be Rehumanized?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Bret R.; Hellerstein, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the degree to which the medical humanities have been integrated into the fields of internal medicine and psychiatry, the authors assessed the presence of medical humanities articles in selected psychiatry and internal medicine journals from 1950 to 2000. Methods: The journals searched were the three highest-ranking…

  12. Divergent Fates of the Medical Humanities in Psychiatry and Internal Medicine: Should Psychiatry Be Rehumanized?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Bret R.; Hellerstein, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the degree to which the medical humanities have been integrated into the fields of internal medicine and psychiatry, the authors assessed the presence of medical humanities articles in selected psychiatry and internal medicine journals from 1950 to 2000. Methods: The journals searched were the three highest-ranking…

  13. Audit of the consultation process on general internal medicine services.

    PubMed

    Conley, J; Jordan, M; Ghali, W A

    2009-02-01

    To determine the proportion of consultations requested by general internal medicine services that communicate key components of the consultation process to medical subspecialists. Retrospective chart review by two researchers, using a standardised chart abstraction instrument (93.1% agreement, kappa 0.85). Calgary, Alberta, Canada. A random sample of medical consultations was selected from those generated on two medical teaching units (MTUs) from 2003 to 2004. The primary measure of interest was whether a "clear clinical question" was posed to the subspecialist, a binary variable. Two hundred consultations were sampled from the 2885 subspecialty consultations. Of the selected consultations, 94.0% (188/200) were available for review. A clear clinical question was posed in 69.7% (131/188) of consultations (CI 0.63 to 0.74). In a secondary analysis involving a larger sample permitting comparison across subspecialties, 95.1% (368/387) of the consultations, representative of the subspecialties, were available for review. An MTU member contacted the subspecialist for 74.2% of consultations. If a consultation was urgent, a member of the MTU contacted the subspecialist in 81.0% of consultations. Of these urgent consultations, 63.3% had a clear clinical question. More than one in four consultations does not contain a clear clinical question, illustrating suboptimal communication between physicians. Innovative strategies that provide a sustainable solution for overcoming barriers to communication could have a significant impact on quality of care.

  14. Travel medicine advice to UK based international motor sport teams.

    PubMed

    Walters, A

    2000-01-01

    International motor sport teams travel extensively. Over the years, the design and build of racing cars has improved so that morbidity and mortality in motor sport has been lessened. Those team members supporting the competitors need to be physically and mentally fit to perform complicated tasks, despite having traveled. This group of travelers has not been studied to any extent previously. An anonymous questionnaire asking some basic travel medicine related questions was distributed to the support team members of a Rally team, and Formula One Grand Prix team. Both teams were based in the UK, and competed in all the rounds of their respective world championships. Ten Rally team members and 18 Formula One team members responded to the questionnaire. The results showed moderate coverage of commonly used vaccinations; appropriate use of antimalarials and insect repellents, but by no means by all team members; little or no problems with traveler's diarrhea; some tendencies to problems related to jet lag, but no real attempt to prevent the problem; and finally some attempt at skin protection against solar damage. Support teams are reasonably well prepared for the combination of, the rigors of frequent travel, and a demanding job. There is a deficit in vaccine coverage, especially of both hepatitis A and B, some education is needed in preventing skin problems later in life due to sun exposure, and further study of jet lag and its implications might be appropriate.

  15. A global resource to translational medicine: the International Park of Translational Medicine and BioMedicine (IPTBM).

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodan; Marincola, Francesco M; Liebman, Michael N; Wang, Xiangdong

    2013-01-08

    Translational science consists of research and development that integrates multiple resources to expedite the successful treatment of disease. The International Park of Translational BioMedicine (IPTBM) is currently being developed within the interface between Zhejiang Province and Shanghai Municipality. IPTBM has been designed to pioneer comprehensive biomedical research that spans the continuum from the education of young scientists to providing the infrastructure necessary for clinical testing and direct observation to better understand human biology while promoting viable commercial results within a vibrant biotechnology community. IPTBM's goal is to attract global partners organized around five fundamental pillars: 1) Institutional Development, 2) Project Implementation, 3) Development and Production, 4) Investment and 5) Regulatory Clusters to address the needs of an international platform of scientists, institutes, universities, commercial enterprises, investors, politicians, and other stakeholders. The IPTBM differs from existing models including CTSA's (US, NIH) technology because of its comprehensive approach to merge education, research, innovation, and development to translate clinical and public health needs into target-oriented and cost-efficient projects.

  16. Determining and prioritizing competencies in the undergraduate internal medicine curriculum in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Almoallim, H

    2011-08-01

    To determine knowledge and skills competencies in internal medicine for the undergraduate curriculum in Saudi Arabia, competencies were identified based on group work utilizing common textbooks. The Delphi Technique was used as a consensus method to determine and prioritize competencies in internal medicine. A group of 20 clinicians rated the identified competencies from 0-3 (0: no need to know, 1: interesting to know, 2: should know and 3: must know). After formulating the results, a second Delphi round was conducted with 5 experts in internal medicine. A total of 1513 knowledge competencies and 189 skills competencies were determined and prioritized. The competencies corresponded to the 12 systems in internal medicine. All competencies rated 2.2-3.0 were produced separately and considered core competencies for the undergraduate internal medicine curriculum. Determining and prioritizing competencies should influence the curriculum reform process.

  17. Update in outpatient general internal medicine: practice-changing evidence published in 2014.

    PubMed

    Sundsted, Karna K; Wieland, Mark L; Szostek, Jason H; Post, Jason A; Mauck, Karen F

    2015-10-01

    The practice of outpatient general internal medicine requires a diverse and evolving knowledge base. General internists must identify practice-changing shifts in the literature and reflect on their impact. Accordingly, we conducted a review of practice-changing articles published in outpatient general internal medicine in 2014. To identify high-quality, clinically relevant publications, we reviewed all titles and abstracts published in the following primary data sources in 2014: New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Annals of Internal Medicine, JAMA Internal Medicine, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. All 2014 primary data summaries from Journal Watch-General Internal Medicine and ACP JournalWise also were reviewed. The authors used a modified Delphi method to reach consensus on inclusion of 8 articles using the following criteria: clinical relevance to outpatient internal medicine, potential for practice change, and strength of evidence. Clusters of important articles around one clinical question were considered as a single-candidate series. The article merits were debated until consensus was reached on the final 8, spanning a variety of topics commonly encountered in outpatient general internal medicine.

  18. International differences in sport medicine access and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Neil; Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary I undertook the 2012 ECOSEP travelling fellowship, sponsored by Bauerfeind, between May and August 2012, which involved visiting 5 European sport medicine centres and spending approximately one week in each centre. The 5 centres included: National Track and Field Centre, SEGAS, Thessaloniki, Greece; Professional School in Sport & Exercise Medicine, University of Barcelona, Spain; Sport Medicine Frankfurt Institute, Germany; Isokinetic Medical Group, FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence, Bologna, Italy, and Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Mile End Hospital, England. Throughout the fellowship, the clinical cases which were routinely encountered were documented. The following sections detail my experiences throughout the fellowship, the sports of the athletes and the injuries which were treated at each of the sport medicine centres during the fellowship visit and the different forms of management employed. PMID:23738305

  19. Differences in prescribing patterns for anxiety and depression between General Internal Medicine and Family Medicine.

    PubMed

    Brieler, Jay A; Scherrer, Jeffrey F; Salas, Joanne

    2015-02-01

    Depression and anxiety are routinely managed by physicians in Family Medicine (FM) or General Internal Medicine (GIM). Because FM requires more behavioral health training than GIM, we sought to determine if prescribing patterns for patients with anxiety, depression, or both differed between FM vs. GIM providers. In a cross-sectional design, patient data and provider type were obtained from 2008 to 2013 electronic medical record patient data registry (n=27,225 (FM=10,994, GIM=16,231)) Prescription orders were modeled for specific benzodiazepines and antidepressants and by drug class. Covariates included gender, age, race, marital status and comorbidity index. Separate logistic regression models were computed, before and after adjusting for covariates, to estimate the odds of FM vs. GIM providers prescribing benzodiazepine or antidepressant medication to patients with anxiety, depression, and both disorders. After adjusting for covariates, patients with anxiety alone, depression alone, and both had significantly greater odds of receiving an antidepressant (OR=2.08;95%CI:1.46-2.96, OR=2.13;95%CI:1.48-3.06, and OR=2.26;95%CI:1.09-4.66, respectively) if treated by FM vs. GIM. Benzodiazepine prescription did not differ by physician type. It is not known if results will generalize to other regions of the United States. Patients with anxiety, depression, and both seen by FM providers, as compared to GIM providers, are more likely to receive antidepressant medications. Further investigation into the determinants of these differences is warranted. Under-treatment in GIM may result in less advantageous outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Senior internal medicine residents' confidence with essential topics in evidence-based medicine taught during internship.

    PubMed

    Keddis, Mira T; Beckman, Thomas J; Cullen, Michael W; Reed, Darcy A; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Wittich, Christopher M; West, Colin P; McDonald, Furman S

    2011-12-01

    Few studies have examined residents' retained knowledge and confidence regarding essential evidence-based medicine (EBM) topics. To compare postgraduate year-3 (PGY-3) residents' confidence with EBM topics taught during internship with that of PGY-1 residents before and after exposure to an EBM curriculum. All residents participated in an EBM curriculum during their intern year. We surveyed residents in 2009. PGY-1 residents completed a Likert-scale type survey (which included questions from the validated Berlin questionnaire and others, developed based on input from local EBM experts). We administered the Berlin questionnaire to a subset of PGY-3 residents. Forty-five PGY-3 (88%; n  =  51) and 42 PGY-1 (91%; n  =  46) residents completed the survey. Compared with PGY-1 residents pre-curriculum, PGY-3 residents were significantly more confident in their knowledge of pre- and posttest probability (mean difference, 1.14; P  =  .002), number needed to harm (mean difference, 1.09; P  =  .002), likelihood ratio (mean difference, 1.01; P  =  .003), formulation of a focused clinical question (mean difference, 0.98; P  =  .001), and critical appraisal of therapy articles (mean difference, 0.91; P  =  .002). Perceived confidence was significantly lower for PGY-3 than post-curriculum PGY-1 residents on relative risk (mean difference, -0.86; P  =  .002), study design for prognosis questions (mean difference, -0.75; P  =  .004), number needed to harm (mean difference, -0.67; P  =  .01), ability to critically appraise systematic reviews (mean difference, -0.65, P  =  .009), and retrieval of evidence (mean difference, -0.56; P  =  .008), among others. There was no relationship between confidence with and actual knowledge of EBM topics. Our findings demonstrate lower confidence among PGY-3 than among PGY-1 internal medicine residents for several EBM topics. PGY-3 residents demonstrated poor knowledge of several core topics taught

  1. [A national qualifying internal medicine examination for Israeli medical students].

    PubMed

    Notzer, N; Shalev, O; Alkan, M; Levinski, U; Rubin, A; Melamed, R

    1995-08-01

    In 1991 the deans of the 4 medical schools in Israel decided to institute a national qualifying examination in internal medicine. This marked the beginning of the process of unifying the qualifying examinations in all major medical fields. We describe the development of the examination, experience with its administration to 720 students in 1992-1994, and the outcome of this initial effort. The examinations were prepared by a committee of senior faculty from the 4 schools, representing all the relevant clinical areas. Professional consultation was provided by the Unit for Medical Education of Tel Aviv University. Each examination consisted of 180 multiple choice items, reflecting an agreed representation of the various medical specialties, and was designed to test both comprehension and problem-solving ability. A syllabus was published by the committee and distributed to students and faculty in preparation for the examination. In composing the examination, the committee took into consideration differences in general policy and varying emphases in the curricula of the 4 schools. Analysis of the results of the 3 annual examinations showed both a high level of reliability and high quality of the majority of the individual test items. There was a trend with time to slightly lower average scores, and fewer passed the exam last year. There was improvement in the results after the first 2 years in the area of problem-solving related to interpretation of imaging, blood smears and clinical photographs, but this trend did not continue into 1994. The introduction of a high level examination based on a common syllabus provided important feedback, improving both student motivation and clinical teaching. For all schools, the outcome of the examination served as an important external indicator of teaching standards. Following this positive experience, uniform examinations in surgical subjects and pediatrics were introduced for the first time in 1993. The committee recommends that

  2. Resident Career Planning Needs in Internal Medicine: A Qualitative Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rina L.; Windish, Donna M.; Rosenbaum, Julie R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Few residency programs have centralized resources for career planning. As a consequence, little is known about residents' informational needs regarding career planning. Objective To examine career preparation stressors, practical needs, and information that residents wished they were privy to when applying. Methods In 2007 and 2008, we surveyed 163 recent graduates or graduating residents from 10 Yale-based and Yale-affiliated hospitals' internal medicine programs regarding their experiences with applying for positions after residency. We included questions about demographics, mentorship, stress of finding a job or fellowship, and open-ended questions to assess barriers and frustrations. Qualitative data were coded independently and a classification scheme was negotiated by consensus. Results A total of 89 residents or recent graduates responded, and 75% of them found career planning during residency training at least somewhat stressful. Themes regarding the application process included (1) knowledge about the process, (2) knowledge about career paths and opportunities, (3) time factors, (4) importance of adequate personal guidance and mentorship, and (5) self-knowledge regarding priorities and the desired outcome. Residents identified the following advice as most important: (1) start the process as early as possible and with a clear knowledge of the process timeline, (2) be clear about personal goals and priorities, and (3) be well-informed about a prospective employer and what that employer is looking for. Most residents felt career planning should be structured into the curriculum and should occur in the first year or throughout residency. Conclusions This study highlights residents' desire for structured dissemination of information and counseling with regard to career planning during residency. Our data suggest that exposure to such resources may be beneficial as early as the first year of training. PMID:22132271

  3. Resident career planning needs in internal medicine: a qualitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Rina L; Windish, Donna M; Rosenbaum, Julie R

    2010-12-01

    Few residency programs have centralized resources for career planning. As a consequence, little is known about residents' informational needs regarding career planning. To examine career preparation stressors, practical needs, and information that residents wished they were privy to when applying. In 2007 and 2008, we surveyed 163 recent graduates or graduating residents from 10 Yale-based and Yale-affiliated hospitals' internal medicine programs regarding their experiences with applying for positions after residency. We included questions about demographics, mentorship, stress of finding a job or fellowship, and open-ended questions to assess barriers and frustrations. Qualitative data were coded independently and a classification scheme was negotiated by consensus. A total of 89 residents or recent graduates responded, and 75% of them found career planning during residency training at least somewhat stressful. Themes regarding the application process included (1) knowledge about the process, (2) knowledge about career paths and opportunities, (3) time factors, (4) importance of adequate personal guidance and mentorship, and (5) self-knowledge regarding priorities and the desired outcome. Residents identified the following advice as most important: (1) start the process as early as possible and with a clear knowledge of the process timeline, (2) be clear about personal goals and priorities, and (3) be well-informed about a prospective employer and what that employer is looking for. Most residents felt career planning should be structured into the curriculum and should occur in the first year or throughout residency. This study highlights residents' desire for structured dissemination of information and counseling with regard to career planning during residency. Our data suggest that exposure to such resources may be beneficial as early as the first year of training.

  4. Internal Medicine Residents' Perspectives on Receiving Feedback in Milestone Format

    PubMed Central

    Angus, Steven; Moriarty, John; Nardino, Robert J.; Chmielewski, Amy; Rosenblum, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In contrast to historical feedback, which was vague or provided residents' numerical scores without clear meaning, milestone-based feedback is focused on specific knowledge, skills, and behaviors that define developmental trajectory. It was anticipated that residents would welcome the more specific and actionable feedback provided by the milestone framework, but this has not been studied. Objective We assessed internal medicine (IM) residents' perceptions of receiving feedback in the milestone framework, particularly assessing perception of the utility of milestone-based feedback compared to non–milestone-based feedback. Methods We surveyed a total of 510 IM residents from 7 institutions. Survey questions assessed resident perception of milestone feedback in identifying strengths, weaknesses, and trajectory of professional development. Postgraduate years 2 and 3 (PGY-2 and PGY-3) residents were asked to compare milestones with prior methods of feedback. Results Of 510 residents, 356 (69.8%) responded. Slightly less than half of the residents found milestone-based feedback “extremely useful” or “very useful” in identifying strengths (44%), weaknesses (43%), specific areas for improvement (45%), and appropriate education progress (48%). Few residents found such feedback “not very useful” or “not at all useful” in these domains. A total of 51% of PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents agreed that receiving milestone-based feedback was more helpful than previous forms of feedback. Conclusions IM residents are aware of the concepts of milestones, and half of the residents surveyed found milestone feedback more helpful than previous forms of feedback. More work needs to be done to understand how milestone-based feedback could be delivered more effectively to enhance resident development. PMID:26221438

  5. Internal Medicine Residents' Perspectives on Receiving Feedback in Milestone Format.

    PubMed

    Angus, Steven; Moriarty, John; Nardino, Robert J; Chmielewski, Amy; Rosenblum, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to historical feedback, which was vague or provided residents' numerical scores without clear meaning, milestone-based feedback is focused on specific knowledge, skills, and behaviors that define developmental trajectory. It was anticipated that residents would welcome the more specific and actionable feedback provided by the milestone framework, but this has not been studied. We assessed internal medicine (IM) residents' perceptions of receiving feedback in the milestone framework, particularly assessing perception of the utility of milestone-based feedback compared to non-milestone-based feedback. We surveyed a total of 510 IM residents from 7 institutions. Survey questions assessed resident perception of milestone feedback in identifying strengths, weaknesses, and trajectory of professional development. Postgraduate years 2 and 3 (PGY-2 and PGY-3) residents were asked to compare milestones with prior methods of feedback. Of 510 residents, 356 (69.8%) responded. Slightly less than half of the residents found milestone-based feedback "extremely useful" or "very useful" in identifying strengths (44%), weaknesses (43%), specific areas for improvement (45%), and appropriate education progress (48%). Few residents found such feedback "not very useful" or "not at all useful" in these domains. A total of 51% of PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents agreed that receiving milestone-based feedback was more helpful than previous forms of feedback. IM residents are aware of the concepts of milestones, and half of the residents surveyed found milestone feedback more helpful than previous forms of feedback. More work needs to be done to understand how milestone-based feedback could be delivered more effectively to enhance resident development.

  6. Arsov Dimitar, founder of the modern internal medicine in the Republic of Macedonia (1908-2008).

    PubMed

    Polenakovic, Momir

    2008-12-01

    Arsov Dimitar (Kriva Palanka, 28. IX 1908 - Skopje, 2. VII 1974) - specialist of internal medicine, rheumatologist, Professor at the Medical Faculty of the University of Ss. Cyril and Methodius in Skopje, member of the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts. D. Arsov is the founder of the modern internal medicine in the Republic of Macedonia. He has completed medical studies and specialized in internal medicine at Sorbonne, Paris, France. For 22 years he was the Director of the Clinic for Internal Medicine in Skopje and a Head of the Chair for Internal Medicine of the Medical Faculty in Skopje. He has published over 200 scientific and expert papers and five textbooks, in which he introduced series of medical terms, which entered the Macedonian medical terminology. With his researches he has penetrated in all areas of the internal medicine. An original contribution is his study on intravenous application of adrenalin in the treatment of rheumatic fever and rheumatic endocarditis. He was a member and a head of many medical associations. He received a number of awards. He was promoted for Doctor Honoris Causa at the University of Besanson (France) in 1961. As a great clinician, educator and Professor of internal medicine, and scientist he was one of the most distinguished medical persons of the second part of the XX century in the Republic of Macedonia.

  7. Neurology for internal medicine residents: working towards a national Canadian curriculum consensus.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Jason; Hopyan, Julia; Panisko, Danny; Tai, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Partly due to the absence of a standardized neurology curriculum, internal medicine residents often perceive neurology lowest in terms of the level of knowledge and clinical confidence. To compare the learning needs of internal medicine residents with the perceived learning needs of neurology and internal medicine program directors and to integrate these needs by developing a focused nationwide neurology curriculum for internal medicine residents rotating through neurology. Medical residents and neurology and internal medicine program directors from programs across the Canada were asked to complete an online survey and to rank an exhaustive list of neurology topics. A modified Delphi approach was used to obtain consensus on the top 20 topics to include in the curriculum. Over 80% of residents felt their competency in neurology was average or below after completing their neurology rotation. There was very high correlation between the topics ranked by residents and staff. We were able to achieve consensus on 20 topics to be included in a neurology curriculum for internal medicine residents. Through a modified Delphi approach we were able to produce a neurology curriculum for internal medicine residents rotating through neurology based on the input of program directors across the country.

  8. Comparison of Patient Health History Questionnaires Used in General Internal and Family Medicine, Integrative Medicine, and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Clinics.

    PubMed

    Laube, Justin G R; Shapiro, Martin F

    2017-05-01

    Health history questionnaires (HHQs) are a set of self-administered questions completed by patients prior to a clinical encounter. Despite widespread use, minimal research has evaluated the content of HHQs used in general internal medicine and family medicine (GIM/FM), integrative medicine, and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; chiropractic, naturopathic, and Traditional Chinese Medicine [TCM]) clinics. Integrative medicine and CAM claim greater emphasis on well-being than does GIM/FM. This study investigated whether integrative medicine and CAM clinics' HHQs include more well-being content and otherwise differ from GIM/FM HHQs. HHQs were obtained from GIM/FM (n = 9), integrative medicine (n = 11), naturopathic medicine (n = 5), chiropractic (n = 4), and TCM (n = 7) clinics in California. HHQs were coded for presence of medical history (chief complaint, past medical history, social history, family history, surgeries, hospitalizations, medications, allergies, review of systems), health maintenance procedures (immunization, screenings), and well-being components (nutrition, exercise, stress, sleep, spirituality). In HHQs of GIM/FM clinics, the average number of well-being components was 1.4 (standard deviation [SD], 1.4) compared with 4.0 (SD, 1.1) for integrative medicine (p < 0.01), 3.2 (SD, 2.1) for naturopathic medicine (p = 0.04), 2.0 (SD, 1.4) for chiropractic (p = 0.54), and 2.0 (SD, 1.5) for TCM (p = 0.47). In HHQs of GIM/FM clinics, the average number of medical history components was 6.4 (SD, 1.9) compared with 8.3 (SD, 1.2) for integrative medicine (p = 0.01), 9.0 (SD, 0) for naturopathic medicine (p = 0.01), 7.1 (SD, 2.8) for chiropractic (p = 0.58), and 7.1 (SD, 1.7) for TCM (p = 0.41). Integrative and naturopathic medicine HHQs included significantly more well-being and medical history components than did GIM/FM HHQs. Further investigation is warranted to determine the optimal HHQ content to

  9. [The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine resident: validity and reliability of a questionnaire for self-assessment of competences in internal medicine residents].

    PubMed

    Oristrell, J; Casanovas, A; Jordana, R; Comet, R; Gil, M; Oliva, J C

    2012-12-01

    There are no simple and validated instruments for evaluating the training of specialists. To analyze the reliability and validity of a computerized self-assessment method to quantify the acquisition of medical competences during the Internal Medicine residency program. All residents of our department participated in the study during a period of 28 months. Twenty-two questionnaires specific for each rotation (the Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident) were constructed with items (questions) corresponding to three competence domains: clinical skills competence, communication skills and teamwork. Reliability was analyzed by measuring the internal consistency of items in each competence domain using Cronbach's alpha index. Validation was performed by comparing mean scores in each competence domain between senior and junior residents. Cut-off levels of competence scores were established in order to identify the strengths and weaknesses of our training program. Finally, self-assessment values were correlated with the evaluations of the medical staff. There was a high internal consistency of the items of clinical skills competences, communication skills and teamwork. Higher scores of clinical skills competence and communication skills, but not in those of teamwork were observed in senior residents than in junior residents. The Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident identified the strengths and weaknesses of our training program. We did not observe any correlation between the results of the self- evaluations and the evaluations made by staff physicians. The items of Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident showed high internal consistency and made it possible to measure the acquisition of medical competences in a team of Internal Medicine residents. This self-assessment method should be complemented with other evaluation methods in order to assess the acquisition of medical competences by an individual resident. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Espa

  10. Politics and Graduate Medical Education in Internal Medicine: A Dynamic Landscape.

    PubMed

    Wardrop, Richard M; Berkowitz, Lee R

    2017-02-01

    The promotion of change and growth within medical education is oftentimes the result of a complex mix of societal, cultural and economic forces. Graduate medical education in internal medicine is not immune to these forces. Several entities and organizations can be identified as having a major influence on internal medicine training and graduate medical education as a whole. We have reviewed how this is effectively accomplished through these entities and organizations. The result is a constantly changing and dynamic landscape for internal medicine training.

  11. Principles to Consider in Defining New Directions in Internal Medicine Training and Certification

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Barbara J; Centor, Robert M; Rosenthal, Gary E

    2006-01-01

    SGIM endoreses seven principles related to current thinking about internal medicine training: 1) internal medicine requires a full three years of residency training before subspecialization; 2) internal medicine residency programs must dramatically increase support for training in the ambulatory setting and offer equivalent opportunities for training in both inpatient and outpatient medicine; 3) in settings where adequate support and time are devoted to ambulatory training, the third year of residency could offer an opportunity to develop further expertise or mastery in a specific type or setting of care; 4) further certification in specific specialties within internal medicine requires the completion of an approved fellowship program; 5) areas of mastery in internal medicine can be demonstrated through modified board certification and recertification examinations; 6) certification processes throughout internal medicine should focus increasingly on demonstration of clinical competence through adherence to validated standards of care within and across practice settings; and 7) regardless of the setting in which General Internists practice, we should unite to promote the critical role that this specialty serves in patient care. PMID:16637826

  12. Principles to consider in defining new directions in internal medicine training and certification.

    PubMed

    Turner, Barbara J; Centor, Robert M; Rosenthal, Gary E

    2006-03-01

    SGIM endorses seven principles related to current thinking about internal medicine training: 1) internal medicine requires a full three years of residency training before subspecialization; 2) internal medicine residency programs must dramatically increase support for training in the ambulatory setting and offer equivalent opportunities for training in both inpatient and outpatient medicine; 3) in settings where adequate support and time are devoted to ambulatory training, the third year of residency could offer an opportunity to develop further expertise or mastery in a specific type or setting of care; 4) further certification in specific specialties within internal medicine requires the completion of an approved fellowship program; 5) areas of mastery in internal medicine can be demonstrated through modified board certification and recertification examinations; 6) certification processes throughout internal medicine should focus increasingly on demonstration of clinical competence through adherence to validated standards of care within and across practice settings; and 7) regardless of the setting in which General Internists practice, we should unite to promote the critical role that this specialty serves in patient care.

  13. Interdisciplinary, interinstitutional and international collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Tseng, Yen-Han; Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Ming-Hwai; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-01-01

    The family medicine researches flourished worldwide in the past decade. However, the collaborative patterns of family medicine publications had not been reported. Our study analyzed the collaborative activity of family medicine researchers in Taiwan. We focused on the types of collaboration among disciplines, institutions and countries. We searched "family medicine" AND "Taiwan" in address field from Web of Science and documented the disciplines, institutions and countries of all authors. We analyzed the collaborative patterns of family medicine researchers in Taiwan from 2010 to 2014. The journal's impact factor of each article in the same publication year was also retrieved. Among 1,217 articles from 2010 to 2014, interdisciplinary collaboration existed in 1,185 (97.3%) articles, interinstitutional in 1,012 (83.2%) and international in 142 (11.7%). Public health was the most common collaborative discipline. All international researches were also interdisciplinary and interinstitutional. The United States (75 articles), the United Kingdom (21) and the People's Republic of China (20) were the top three countries with which family medicine researchers in Taiwan had collaborated. We found a high degree of interdisciplinary and interinstitutional collaboration of family medicine researches in Taiwan. However, the collaboration of family medicine researchers in Taiwan with family medicine colleagues of other domestic or foreign institutions was insufficient. The future direction of family medicine studies could focus on the promotion of communication among family medicine researchers.

  14. Improvements for international medicine donations: a review of the World Health Organization Guidelines for Medicine Donations, 3rd edition.

    PubMed

    Cañigueral-Vila, Nuria; Chen, Jennifer C; Frenkel-Rorden, Lindsey; Laing, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Some humanitarian and development organizations respond to major natural disasters and emergencies by donating medicines. Many provide medicines on a routine basis to support health systems, particularly those run by Faith-Based Organizations. Although such donations can provide essential medicines to populations in great need, inappropriate donations also take place, with burdensome consequences. The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed the interagency Guidelines for Medicine Donations for use by donors and recipients in the context of emergency aid and international development assistance. Although comprehensive in nature and transferable to various emergency situations, adjustments to both content and formatting would improve this resource. Recommendations for the next version of these guidelines include: specific wording and consistent formatting; definition of who is a recipient, clear distinction between acute and long-term emergencies, and proper donation procedures pertaining to each; inclusion of visual aides such as flowcharts, checklists, and photos; and improving the citations system.

  15. The Impact of Managed Care on Internal Medicine Graduate Medical Education at Brooke Army Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    managed care among residents and staff physicians (Simon, Pan , Sullivan, Clark-Chiarelli, Connelly, Peters, Singer, Inui, and Block, 1999). In fact...have Internal Medicine GME 11 shown that managed care has decreased time for research and teaching (Simon, Pan , Sullivan, Clark-Chiarelli, Connely...Residents on Operational Medicine, Managed Care, Graduate Medical Education, and Continued Military Service. Military Medicine, 163(6), 392. Simon, S. R., Pan

  16. European School of Internal Medicine: a window of opportunity for RCP activities in Europe.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Chris; Higgens, Clare

    2009-04-01

    The Royal College of Physicians (RCP) is to host the European School of Internal Medicine for two years from 2009-10. This affords a unique opportunity for specialist registrars to exchange ideas about professional development and training and to make contacts with young internists from across Europe. Such links should prove useful for future RCP initiatives in European medicine.

  17. Nurses as Evaluators of the Humanistic Behavior of Internal Medicine Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Paula S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The reliability of a 13-item questionnaire designed to assess the humanistic behaviors of internal medicine residents and the reliability of nurses as raters of those behaviors were examined. Residents were evaluated by nurses on two general medicine services and on cardiology and hematology-oncology services. (Author/MLW)

  18. International guidance on the establishment of quality assurance programmes for radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, B E; Herbst, C; Norenberg, J P; Woods, M J

    2006-01-01

    A new guidance document for the implementation of quality assurance (QA) programmes for nuclear medicine radioactivity measurement, produced by the International Atomic Energy Agency, is described. The proposed programme is based on the principles of ISO 17025 and will enable laboratories, particularly in developing countries, to provide consistent, safe and effective radioactivity measurement services to the nuclear medicine community.

  19. A Qualitative Study of Work-Life Choices in Academic Internal Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, Carol; Byars-Winston, Angela; McSorley, Rebecca; Schultz, Alexandra; Kaatz, Anna; Carnes, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    The high attrition rate of female physicians pursuing an academic medicine research career has not been examined in the context of career development theory. We explored how internal medicine residents and faculty experience their work within the context of their broader life domain in order to identify strategies for facilitating career…

  20. A Qualitative Study of Work-Life Choices in Academic Internal Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, Carol; Byars-Winston, Angela; McSorley, Rebecca; Schultz, Alexandra; Kaatz, Anna; Carnes, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    The high attrition rate of female physicians pursuing an academic medicine research career has not been examined in the context of career development theory. We explored how internal medicine residents and faculty experience their work within the context of their broader life domain in order to identify strategies for facilitating career…

  1. Nurses as Evaluators of the Humanistic Behavior of Internal Medicine Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Paula S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The reliability of a 13-item questionnaire designed to assess the humanistic behaviors of internal medicine residents and the reliability of nurses as raters of those behaviors were examined. Residents were evaluated by nurses on two general medicine services and on cardiology and hematology-oncology services. (Author/MLW)

  2. Involvement of Visit Companions in Internal Medicine Resident Ambulatory Clinic Visits: Perspectives of Patients, Companions, and Internal Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Colburn, Jessica L; Christmas, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    information about the general health of the patient was the most important, followed by education about warning signs and symptoms, and the opportunity to share concerns about the patient. These rankings were consistent with the views of the companions themselves. In this pilot investigation, half of the patients of the internal medicine clinic who brought a companion did so for every visit. These patients relied on their companions to ask questions during the visit and to help remember the physician's instructions. Residents and companions generally agreed on the roles of companions, but almost none of the residents had any formal training in interacting with visit companions.

  3. Divergent fates of the medical humanities in psychiatry and internal medicine: should psychiatry be rehumanized?

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Bret R; Hellerstein, David J

    2008-01-01

    To determine the degree to which the medical humanities have been integrated into the fields of internal medicine and psychiatry, the authors assessed the presence of medical humanities articles in selected psychiatry and internal medicine journals from 1950 to 2000. The journals searched were the three highest-ranking psychiatry and internal medicine journals on the Institute for Scientific Information's Impact Factor rankings that were published in English and aimed at a clinical audience. Operationalized criteria defining the medical humanities allowed the percentage of text in the selected journals constituting medical humanities to be quantified. Journals were hand searched at 10-year intervals from 1950 to 2000. Mixed effects models were used to describe the change in medical humanities over time. The percentage of text within psychiatry journals meeting the criteria for medical humanities declined from a peak of 17% in 1970 to a low of 2% in 2000, while the percentage of humanities articles in internal medicine journals roughly doubled from 5% to 11% over the same time period. A linear model increasing over time best fit the medical humanities in the internal medicine journals, while a cubic model decreasing over time best fit the psychiatry humanities data. Humanities articles in medical journals had a greater breadth and diversity than those in psychiatry journals. Medical humanities publications dramatically decreased over time in psychiatry journals while they more than doubled in internal medicine journals. These data suggest the need for further empirical research and discussion of the potential roles of the humanities in psychiatry.

  4. Drug related hospital admissions in subspecialities of internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Hallas, J

    1996-04-01

    It is well established in the literature that adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug non-compliance contribute substantially to the admissions at medical wards. Some important questions, however, remain unanswered. The purpose of this thesis was to characterise the drug-related hospital admissions (DRH) and to assess the magnitude of the problem seen in relation to the demographic parameters and drug use of the background population. In addition, an attempt was made to reduce the DRH incidence by an intervention program. The scope of the study program was adverse drug reactions, intended self-poisoning, non-compliance, underdosing and interactions. The material included 1999 admissions to six departments of internal medicine at Odense University Hospital. The patients were reviewed prospectively, while they were still in the wards, but use of standardised criteria fOR assessment of drug-ADR causality. With inclusion of a definite, probable and possible causal relationship, ADRs and toxic reactions were found as an important factor in 8.4% of all admissions. The incidense of ADR related admissions was 400 per 100,000 per year for the background population as a whole, but showing a strong increase with age. The drug-specific ADR incidences were generally small compared to the drug sales figures. Non-compliance contributed to 2.0% of admissions with diuretics and anti-asthmatics as the drugs most frequently involved. Two departments were re-investigated after an intervention program, primarily targetting general practitioners. The over-all incidence of DRHs was unaffected by the intervention, but the subset classified as avoidable DRHs showed a significant decline. The case material was subject to a blinded evaluation by an external peer group using the same criteria as the investigators. There was no indication that the observed decline in avoidable DRHs should be explained by a shift in the investigators' assessment of cases. It was concluded that the intervention

  5. Trend and impact of international collaboration in clinical medicine papers published in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Low, Wah Yun; Ng, Kwan Hoong; Kabir, M A; Koh, Ai Peng; Sinnasamy, Janaki

    2014-01-01

    Research collaboration is the way forward in order to improve quality and impact of its research findings. International research collaboration has resulted in international co-authorship in scientific communications and publications. This study highlights the collaborating research and authorship trend in clinical medicine in Malaysia from 2001 to 2010. Malaysian-based author affiliation in the Web of Science (Science Citation Index Expanded) and clinical medicine journals (n = 999) and articles (n = 3951) as of 30th Oct 2011 were downloaded. Types of document analyzed were articles and reviews, and impact factors (IF) in the 2010 Journal Citation Report Science Edition were taken to access the quality of the articles. The number of publications in clinical medicine increased from 4.5 % (n = 178) in 2001 to 23.9 % (n = 944) in 2010. The top three contributors in the subject categories are Pharmacology and Pharmacy (13.9 %), General and Internal Medicine (13.6 %) and Tropical Medicine (7.3 %). By journal tier system: Tier 1 (18.7 %, n = 738), Tier 2 (22.5 %, n = 888), Tier 3 (29.6 %, n = 1170), Tier 4 (27.2 %, n = 1074), and journals without IF (2.1 %, n = 81). University of Malaya was the most productive. Local collaborators accounted for 60.3 % and international collaborations 39.7 %. Articles with international collaborations appeared in journals with higher journal IFs than those without international collaboration. They were also cited more significantly than articles without international collaborations. Citations, impact factor and journal tiers were significantly associated with international collaboration in Malaysia's clinical medicine publications. Malaysia has achieved a significant number of ISI publications in clinical medicine participation in international collaboration.

  6. Full text publication rates of studies presented at an international emergency medicine scientific meeting.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jannet W M; Graham, Colin A

    2011-09-01

    The publication rate of full text papers following an abstract presentation at a medical conference is variable, and few studies have examined the situation with respect to international emergency medicine conferences. This retrospective study aimed to identify the publication rate of abstracts presented at the 2006 International Conference on Emergency Medicine (ICEM) held in Halifax, Canada. The full text publication rate was 33.2%, similar to previous emergency medicine meetings. English language barriers may play a role in the low publication rate seen.

  7. Introduction of the World Health Organization project of the International Classification of Traditional Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng-fei; Watanabe, Kenji

    2011-11-01

    The World Health Organization plans to incorporate "traditional medicine" into the next revision of its International Classification of Diseases-Version 11 (ICD-11). If traditional medicine is included in ICD-11, it is definitely an epoch-making issue. The expected result is the International Classification of Traditional Medicine, China, Japan and Korea Version (ICTM-CJK). The intention of the ICTM project is not only beneficial for traditional medical components, but also might be beneficial for Western biomedicine. For this shared purpose, China, Japan and Korea must understand the meaning of this project and collaborate to develop it.

  8. International cooperation in support of homeopathy and complementary medicine in developing countries: the Tuscan experience.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Elio; Di Stefano, Mariella; Baccetti, Sonia; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Verdone, Marco; Facchini, Mario; Stambolovich, Vuk; Viña, Martha Perez; Caldés, Maria José

    2010-10-01

    Health is a fundamental human right which contributes to reducing poverty, and encourages social development, human safety, and economic growth. International initiatives have fallen far short of their goals. This paper describes collaboration between the region of Tuscany and Cuba, Western Sahara, Senegal and Serbia. These have introduced various forms of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, including homeopathy and Traditional Chinese Medicine into primary healthcare particularly obstetrics, and into veterinary medicine. Complementary and traditional medicine can represent a useful and sustainable resource in various fields of health care. Inclusion in the public health system must go hand in hand with scientific evaluation.

  9. Update in Outpatient General Internal Medicine: Practice-Changing Evidence Published in 2015.

    PubMed

    Szostek, Jason H; Wieland, Mark L; Post, Jason A; Sundsted, Karna K; Mauck, Karen F

    2016-08-01

    Identifying new practice-changing articles is challenging. To determine the 2015 practice-changing articles most relevant to outpatient general internal medicine, 3 internists independently reviewed the titles and abstracts of original articles, synopses of single studies and syntheses, and databases of syntheses. For original articles, internal medicine journals with the 7 highest impact factors were reviewed: New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), British Medical Journal, Public Library of Science Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and JAMA Internal Medicine. For synopses of single studies and syntheses, collections in American College of Physicians Journal Club, Journal Watch, and Evidence-Based Medicine were reviewed. For databases of synthesis, Evidence Updates and the Cochrane Library were reviewed. More than 100 articles were identified. Criteria for inclusion were as follows: clinical relevance, potential for practice change, and strength of evidence. Clusters of important articles around one topic were considered as a single-candidate series. The 5 authors used a modified Delphi method to reach consensus on inclusion of 7 topics for in-depth appraisal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Internal medicine interns' and residents' pressure ulcer prevention and assessment attitudes and abilities: results of an exploratory study .

    PubMed

    Suen, Winnie; Parker, Victoria A; Harney, Lauren; Nevin, Siobhan; Jansen, Jane; Alexander, Linda; Berlowitz, Dan

    2012-04-01

     To evaluate and determine differences between attitudes of internal medicine interns and residents toward pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and to evaluate the interns' abilities to accurately identify wounds and stage PUs, an exploratory, quantitative study was conducted in a 639-bed, safety net academic center. Participants (21 internal medicine interns and 21 internal medicine residents) attending an educational session on PU prevention and care were eligible to participate. The 1-hour conference session was prepared and provided by a physician and wound care nurses. Before the lecture, participants were asked to complete an 11-question paper-and-pencil PU attitude survey. Following the lecture, they were asked to identify 11 wounds and stage PUs using the inpatient admission history and physical template used in the hospital's electronic medical record. An audience response system was used to record correct and incorrect responses. Nineteen (19) interns and 20 residents completed the survey. Twenty-one (21) interns successfully completed the wound assessment quiz. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the survey data and residents' and interns' average attitude scores were compared using independent group t-test. The results suggest that interns and residents have a positive attitude toward and are concerned about PU prevention. The significantly higher overall score among interns compared to residents (average 43.8 versus 38.8 respectively, P = 0.002) suggests interns have a more positive attitude than residents. Statistically significant differences between item scores showed that, compared to residents, interns perceived PU prevention to be more time-consuming (P = 0.01), less of a concern in practice (P = 0.02), and a lower priority than other areas of care (P = 0.003). Compared to residents, interns also were more likely to agree to with statement, "In my opinion, patients tend to not get as many pressure

  11. Development of an International Elective in an Emergency Medicine Residency.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Stephen R; Valderrama, Chad M; Xu, Marian; Curran, Maureen A; Mazondo, Roberto; Soliman, Mounir A

    2016-01-01

    There is a continued interest in global emergency medicine (EM) training, research, and clinical program development. There are many opportunities for "voluntourism" in medicine, but many of these experiences do not have standard goals and objectives. This article describes a rotation for EM residents from the United States to have a structured learning experience focusing on emergency medical settings in the prehospital phase (something often lacking in U.S. programs). The authors discuss the structure of the training program, including goals, objectives, and core competencies. First-hand accounts of the training experience are also presented. Global training experiences can have clear benefits. Students go to places to "learn," but can also "teach" at the same time. Setting goals and objectives helps to assure that students are gaining specific core competencies as part of the experience. Other global rotations would benefit from having a defined structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Promoting Success: A Professional Development Coaching Program for Interns in Medicine.

    PubMed

    Palamara, Kerri; Kauffman, Carol; Stone, Valerie E; Bazari, Hasan; Donelan, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Residency is an intense period. Challenges, including burnout, arise as new physicians develop their professional identities. Residency programs provide remediation, but emotional support for interns is often limited. Professional development coaching of interns, regardless of their performance, has not been reported. Design, implement, and evaluate a program to support intern professional development through positive psychology coaching. We implemented a professional development coaching program in a large residency program. The program included curriculum development, coach-intern interactions, and evaluative metrics. A total of 72 internal medicine interns and 26 internal medicine faculty participated in the first year. Interns and coaches were expected to meet quarterly; expected time commitments per year were 9 hours (per individual coached) for coaches, 5 1/2 hours for each individual coachee, and 70 hours for the director of the coaching program. Coaches and interns were asked to complete 2 surveys in the first year and to participate in qualitative interviews. Eighty-two percent of interns met with their coaches 3 or more times. Coaches and their interns assessed the program in multiple dimensions (participation, program and professional activities, burnout, coping, and coach-intern communication). Most of the interns (94%) rated the coaching program as good or excellent, and 96% would recommend this program to other residency programs. The experience of burnout was lower in this cohort compared with a prior cohort. There is early evidence that a coaching program of interactions with faculty trained in positive psychology may advance intern development and partially address burnout.

  13. The International Certification of Addiction Medicine: Validating Clinical Knowledge across Borders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    el-Guebaly, Nady; Violato, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The experience of the International Society of Addiction Medicine in setting up the first international certification of clinical knowledge is reported. The steps followed and the results of a psychometric analysis of the tests from the first 65 candidates are reported. Lessons learned in the first 5 years and challenges for the future are…

  14. Relationship between internal medicine program board examination pass rates, accreditation standards, and program size.

    PubMed

    Falcone, John L; Gonzalo, Jed D

    2014-01-19

    To determine Internal Medicine residency program compliance with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 80% pass-rate standard and the correlation between residency program size and performance on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination. Using a cross-sectional study design from 2010-2012 American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination data of all Internal Medicine residency pro-grams, comparisons were made between program pass rates to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standard. To assess the correlation between program size and performance, a Spearman's rho was calculated. To evaluate program size and its relationship to the pass-rate standard, receiver operative characteristic curves were calculated. Of 372 Internal Medicine residency programs, 276 programs (74%) achieved a pass rate of =80%, surpassing the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education minimum standard. A weak correlation was found between residency program size and pass rate for the three-year period (p=0.19, p<0.001). The area underneath the receiver operative characteristic curve was 0.69 (95% Confidence Interval [0.63-0.75]), suggesting programs with less than 12 examinees/year are less likely to meet the minimum Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standard (sensitivity 63.8%, specificity 60.4%, positive predictive value 82.2%, p<0.001). Although a majority of Internal Medicine residency programs complied with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standards, a quarter of the programs failed to meet this requirement. Program size is positively but weakly associated with American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination performance, suggesting other unidentified variables significantly contribute to program performance.

  15. Relationship between internal medicine program board examination pass rates, accreditation standards, and program size

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, John L.; Gonzalo, Jed D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine Internal Medicine residency program compliance with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 80% pass-rate standard and the correlation between residency program size and performance on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination. Methods Using a cross-sectional study design from 2010-2012 American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination data of all Internal Medicine residency programs, comparisons were made between program pass rates to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standard. To assess the correlation between program size and performance, a Spearman’s rho was calculated. To evaluate program size and its relationship to the pass-rate standard, receiver operative characteristic curves were calculated. Results Of 372 Internal Medicine residency programs, 276 programs (74%) achieved a pass rate of ≥80%, surpassing the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education minimum standard. A weak correlation was found between residency program size and pass rate for the three-year period (ρ=0.19, p<0.001). The area underneath the receiver operative characteristic curve was 0.69 (95% Confidence Interval [0.63-0.75]), suggesting programs with less than 12 examinees/year are less likely to meet the minimum Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standard (sensitivity 63.8%, specificity 60.4%, positive predictive value 82.2%, p<0.001). Conclusions Although a majority of Internal Medicine residency programs complied with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education pass-rate standards, a quarter of the programs failed to meet this requirement. Program size is positively but weakly associated with American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination performance, suggesting other unidentified variables significantly contribute to program performance. PMID:25341205

  16. Internal radiation therapy: a neglected aspect of nuclear medicine in the molecular era.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yansong

    2015-09-01

    With increasing evidence, internal radiation therapy, also known as brachytherapy, has become a neglected aspect of nuclear medicine in the molecular era. In this paper, recent developments regarding internal radiation therapy, including developments in radioiodine-131 ((131)I) and thyroid, radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and radiopharmaceuticals for bone metastases. Relevant differences and status of their applications in China were mentioned as well. These molecular mediated internal radiation therapies are gaining increasing importance by providing palliative and curative treatments for an increasing number of diseases and becoming one of the important parts of molecular nuclear medicine.

  17. Variation in Emergency Department vs Internal Medicine Excess Charges in the United States.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tim; Park, Angela; Bai, Ge; Joo, Sarah; Hutfless, Susan M; Mehta, Ambar; Anderson, Gerard F; Makary, Martin A

    2017-08-01

    Uninsured and insured but out-of-network emergency department (ED) patients are often billed hospital chargemaster prices, which exceed amounts typically paid by insurers. To examine the variation in excess charges for services provided by emergency medicine and internal medicine physicians. Retrospective analysis was conducted of professional fee payment claims made by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services for all services provided to Medicare Part B fee-for-service beneficiaries in calendar year 2013. Data analysis was conducted from January 1 to July 31, 2016. Markup ratios for ED and internal medicine professional services, defined as the charges submitted by the hospital divided by the Medicare allowable amount. Our analysis included 12 337 emergency medicine physicians from 2707 hospitals and 57 607 internal medicine physicians from 3669 hospitals in all 50 states. Services provided by emergency medicine physicians had an overall markup ratio of 4.4 (340% excess charges), which was greater than the markup ratio of 2.1 (110% excess charges) for all services performed by internal medicine physicians. Markup ratios for all ED services ranged by hospital from 1.0 to 12.6 (median, 4.2; interquartile range [IQR], 3.3-5.8); markup ratios for all internal medicine services ranged by hospital from 1.0 to 14.1 (median, 2.0; IQR, 1.7-2.5). The median markup ratio by hospital for ED evaluation and management procedure codes varied between 4.0 and 5.0. Among the most common ED services, laceration repair had the highest median markup ratio (7.0); emergency medicine physician review of a head computed tomographic scan had the greatest interhospital variation (range, 1.6-27.7). Across hospitals, markups in the ED were often substantially higher than those in the internal medicine department for the same services. Higher ED markup ratios were associated with hospital for-profit ownership (median, 5.7; IQR, 4.0-7.1), a greater percentage of uninsured patients seen

  18. Medical Students' Perception of OSCE at the Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, King Khalid University, Abha, KSA.

    PubMed

    Elfaki, Omer Abdelgadir; Al-Humayed, Suliman

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the students' acceptance of Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) as a method of assessment of clinical competence in internal medicine. This cross sectional study was conducted from June to August 2013, at King Khalid University, Abha, KSA, through a self-administered questionnaire which was completed by fourth year medical students, immediately after the OSCE. Student feedback confirmed their acceptance of OSCE. This was encouraging to the department to consider implementing OSCE for graduating students.

  19. Burnout syndrome during residency in internal medicine and pediatrics in a country without working time directive.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Duygu Yazgan; Durusu Tanriover, Mine; Unal, Sule; Dizdar, Omer; Kalyoncu, Umut; Karakaya, Jale; Unal, Serhat; Kale, Gulsev

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate burnout syndrome among internal medicine and pediatrics residents in a country that does not have the working time directive (WTD) and also to determine the risk factors and consequent impact on efficient functioning in clinical areas. A 57-item questionnaire was given to internal medicine and pediatrics residents. Responses from 22 pediatrics and 33 internal medicine residents were evaluated. Demographic findings, burnout scores, having hobbies, social activities and reading books unrelated to medicine were similar between the two groups. Six pediatrics residents (27.3 per cent) and 11 (33.3 per cent) internal medicine residents met the criteria for clinically significant burnout. Personal accomplishment scores and reading books unrelated to medicine were found to be related to burnout. Burnout is a syndrome characterized by depersonalization, emotional exhaustion and a low sense of personal accomplishment. It is important to document burnout in countries where WTDs are not implemented. Further studies might demonstrate burnout's effect on patient safety, service quality and physician's performance.

  20. Successful Percutaneous Transcatheter Patent Foramen Ovale Closure Through The Right Internal Jugular Vein Using Stiff Amplatzer Catheter With A Reshaped Tip

    PubMed Central

    Fanari, Zaher; Hammami, Sumaya; Hopkins, James T.

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) remains challenging when femoral venous approach is not available. We describe the successful closure of a PFO using the right internal jugular venous approach and a catheter delivery system with a reshaped tip in a patient with a PFO, recurrent stroke, recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, bilateral deep venous thrombosis and thrombosed bilateral inferior vena cava filter. PMID:28751787

  1. [Inventory of training of internal medicine in France: Results of a national survey].

    PubMed

    Samson, M; Terrier, B; Mangin, O; Mouthon, L

    2017-05-01

    To make an inventory of training of Internal Medicine in France. This study was conducted between May and September 2015 with coordinators (interviews of 45minutes) of local Internal Medicine training and fellows (online questionnaire). All coordinators (n=28) responded to the interviews. Local training of Internal Medicine exists in 86% of regions (3.1±3.1hours/month) and an interregional training in all interregions (34.7±13.9hours/year). When excluding Île-de-France, no correlation between the number of teachers and the amount of lessons was noted (P=0.61). Of the 550 fellows in Internal Medicine in 2014-2015, 223 (41%) responded to the online questionnaire. Mean level was 5.5±2.7 semesters. The rate of satisfaction (1=very dissatisfied and 5=very satisfied) was 3.0±1.0 and 3.8±0.8 for regional and interregional teaching, respectively (P<0.0001). Regional teaching satisfaction was correlated with the perceived expanse of diseases covered into the program (P<0.0001). In addition, 89% of fellows wish to evaluate themselves online, 66% wish to have a practical evaluation at the bedside and 70% in simulation centers. Finally, 91% of fellows support the establishment of a national program for the training of Internal Medicine. This survey states for the first time an inventory of training of Internal Medicine dedicated to fellows in France. This report highlights that fellows wish to have a national program, be further evaluated and have access to more interactive approach of teaching. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Reducing weight in an internal medicine outpatient clinic using a lifestyle medicine approach: A proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Lucini, Daniela; Cesana, Giovanna; Vigo, Chiara; Malacarne, Mara; Pagani, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases represent the major drivers of disease burden, being responsible for the majority of health care cost and deaths. Almost half of premature deaths is due to behaviors amenable to change. Accordingly, addressing behavior might represent a strategic change in the health delivery system. Improving lifestyle requires a specific strategy embedding the active collaboration of individuals with a multilevel team-oriented medical practice. With the present study we sought to assess whether the implementation of cognitive-behavioral strategies, following the principles of lifestyle medicine in an outpatient clinic provides better results in weight reduction as compared to simpler strategies as presently executed in General Practitioners' offices. This is an observational study on 173 subjects (age 53.1 ± 11.5), comparing three different groups of preventive practice: a personalized lifestyle medicine, combining cognitive behavioral strategies with patient tailored prescription of exercise and nutrition (Group A); a semi-structured approach with generic counseling (Group B); and an unstructured advice (Group C). At the end of the intervention period (17-20 months), group A showed an average weight loss of 5.4 ± 5.1 kg, which was significantly (p<0.001)more than observed in group B (2.8 ± 5.1 kg) and group C (1.2 ± 4.8 kg). Likewise BMI and waist were progressively more reduced from A to C. It is possible to implement preventive cognitive-behavioral lifestyle strategies in outpatient internal medicine clinics. This methodology appears more efficacious in inducing weight reduction after more than a year as compared to usual family medicine approaches. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [The informatics: a remarkable tool for teaching general internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Ombelli, Julien; Pasche, Olivier; Sohrmann, Marc; Monti, Matteo

    2015-05-13

    INTERMED training implies a three week course, integrated in the "primary care module" for medical students in the first master year at the school of medicine in Lausanne. INTERMED uses an innovative teaching method based on repetitive sequences of e-learning-based individual learning followed by collaborative learning activities in teams, named Team-based learning (TBL). The e-learning takes place in a web-based virtual learning environment using a series of interactive multimedia virtual patients. By using INTERMED students go through a complete medical encounter applying clinical reasoning and choosing the diagnostic and therapeutic approach. INTERMED offers an authentic experience in an engaging and safe environment where errors are allowed and without consequences.

  4. The International Society for Sexual Medicine: A Rich History and a Bright Future.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ronald W

    2013-07-01

    Based upon physical presence at most of the historical moments of the development of the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM), extensive personal records on meetings and correspondence associated with the business and the work of the International Society for Sexual and Impotence Research and the ISSM, and information provided by the business office of the ISSM, a review paper was created to present to the reader an accurate history of the ISSM. The article is divided into the early beginnings of the idea of the field of sexual medicine, followed by the organization of what was to become eventually the International Society for Sexual Medicine, description of the development of biennial meetings and some of the major events that occurred at these meetings, a description of officers and leaders of the society and some of their key contributions, other meetings that the ISSM was actively involved in in the field of sexual medicine, a detailed discussion of publications and communications of the organization, and finally a description of the involvement of the ISSM with the recognition of scientific achievement and research in the field. This history is indeed very rich and unique for the parallelism to the development of the entire field of sexual medicine as a true science. The author has spent a great deal of time in making sure that there is written material that substantiates the history that is outlined in this document. It is provided to the reader as a true historical perspective on the ISSM. Lewis RW. The International Society for Sexual Medicine: A rich history and a bright future. Sex Med Rev 2013; 1:65-75. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of an internal research funding program in a school of veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Baker, David G; Kearney, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    The present article describes a paradigm for evaluating the internal research funding program of a college or school of veterinary medicine, using as an example a similar exercise recently conducted at the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine (LSU SVM). The purpose of the exercise was to quantify and evaluate the effectiveness of the LSU SVM internal research funding mechanism known as the Competitive Organized Research Program (CORP). The evaluation resulted in several important observations that will allow us to further improve the effectiveness of our internal research funding program investment. Among the most important of these was the greater return on investment for CORP projects funded with smaller awards (approximately $10,000 US) compared to projects funded with larger awards (approximately $52,000 US). Other colleges and schools of veterinary medicine may find such an exercise similarly informative and beneficial.

  6. The Internal Medicine of the 21st century: Organizational and operational standards.

    PubMed

    Casariego-Vales, E; Zapatero-Gaviria, A; Elola-Somoza, F J

    2017-07-19

    The Spanish Society of Internal Medicine has developed a consensus document on the standards and recommendations that they consider essential to the organisation of internal medicine units for conducting their activities efficiently and with high quality. We defined 3 groups of key processes: the care of acutely ill adult patients, the comprehensive care of complex chronic patients and the examination of a patient with a difficult diagnosis and no organ-specific disease. As support processes, we identified the structure and operation of the Internal Medicine units. As strategic processes, we identified training and research. The main subprocesses are structured below, and we established the standards and recommendations for each of them. Lastly, we proposed resulting workloads. The prepared standards must be reviewed within a maximum of 4 years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  7. Postgraduate internal medicine residents' roles at patient discharge - do their perceived roles and perceptions by other health care providers correlate?

    PubMed

    Card, Sharon Elizabeth; Ward, Heather A; Chipperfield, Dylan; Sheppard, M Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Knowing one's own role is a key collaboration competency for postgraduate trainees in the Canadian competency framework (CanMEDS®). To explore methods to teach collaborative competency to internal medicine postgraduate trainees, baseline role knowledge of the trainees was explored. The perceptions of roles (self and others) at patient discharge from an acute care internal medicine teaching unit amongst 69 participants, 34 physicians (25 internal medicine postgraduate trainees and 9 faculty physicians) and 35 health care professionals from different professions were assessed using an adapted previously validated survey (Jenkins et al., 2001). Internal medicine postgraduate trainees agreed on 8/13 (62%) discharge roles, but for 5/13 (38%), there was a substantial disagreement. Other professions had similar lack of clarity about the postgraduate internal medicine residents' roles at discharge. The lack of interprofessional and intraprofessional clarity about roles needs to be explored to develop methods to enhance collaborative competence in internal medicine postgraduate trainees.

  8. Internal medicine point-of-care ultrasound assessment of left ventricular function correlates with formal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Tierney, David M; Rosborough, Terry K; Harris, Kevin M; Newell, Marc C

    2016-02-01

    Although focused cardiac ultrasonographic (FoCUS) examination has been evaluated in emergency departments and intensive care units with good correlation to formal echocardiography, accuracy for the assessment of left ventricular systolic function (LVSF) when performed by internal medicine physicians still needs independent evaluation. This prospective observational study in a 640-bed, academic, quaternary care center, included 178 inpatients examined by 10 internal medicine physicians who had completed our internal medicine bedside ultrasound training program. The ability to estimate LVSF with FoCUS as "normal," "mild to moderately decreased," or "severely decreased" was compared with left ventricular ejection fraction (>50%, 31-49%, and <31%, respectively) from formal echocardiography interpreted by a cardiologist. Sensitivity and specificity of FoCUS for any degree of LVSF impairment were 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80, 0.97) and 0.88 (95% CI 0.81, 0.93), respectively. The interrater agreement between internal medicine physician-performed FoCUS and formal echocardiography for any LVSF impairment was "good/substantial" with κ = 0.77 (p < 0.001), 95% CI (0.67, 0.87). Formal echocardiography was classified as "technically limited due to patient factors" in 20% of patients; however, echogenicity was sufficient in 100% of FoCUS exams to classify LVSF. Internal medicine physicians using FoCUS identify normal versus decreased LVSF with high sensitivity, specificity, and "good/substantial" interrater agreement when compared with formal echocardiography. These results support the role of cardiac FoCUS by properly trained internal medicine physicians for discriminating normal from reduced LVSF. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. How far has The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine advanced in terms of journal metrics?

    PubMed

    Huh, Sun

    2013-11-01

    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine has already been valued as an international journal, according to a citation analysis in 2011. Now, 2 years later, I would like to confirm how much the Journal has advanced from the point of view of journal metrics by looking at the impact factor, cites per document (2 years), SCImago Journal Rank (SJR), and the Hirsch index. These were obtained from a variety of databases, such as the Korean Medical Citation Index, KoreaMed Synapse, Web of Science, JCR Web, and SCImago Journal & Country Rank. The manually calculated 2012 impact factor was 1.252 in the Web of Science, with a ranking of 70/151 (46.4%) in the category of general and internal medicine. Cites per documents (2 years) for 2012 was 1.619, with a ranking of 267/1,588 (16.8%) in the category of medicine (miscellaneous). The 2012 SJR was 0.464, with a ranking of 348/1,588 (21.9%) in the category of medicine (miscellaneous). The Hirsch index from KoreaMed Synapse, Web of Science, and SCImago Journal & Country Rank were 12, 15, and 19, respectively. In comparison with data from 2010, the values of all the journal metrics increased consistently. These results reflect favorably on the increased competency of editors and authors of The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.

  10. How far has The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine advanced in terms of journal metrics?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine has already been valued as an international journal, according to a citation analysis in 2011. Now, 2 years later, I would like to confirm how much the Journal has advanced from the point of view of journal metrics by looking at the impact factor, cites per document (2 years), SCImago Journal Rank (SJR), and the Hirsch index. These were obtained from a variety of databases, such as the Korean Medical Citation Index, KoreaMed Synapse, Web of Science, JCR Web, and SCImago Journal & Country Rank. The manually calculated 2012 impact factor was 1.252 in the Web of Science, with a ranking of 70/151 (46.4%) in the category of general and internal medicine. Cites per documents (2 years) for 2012 was 1.619, with a ranking of 267/1,588 (16.8%) in the category of medicine (miscellaneous). The 2012 SJR was 0.464, with a ranking of 348/1,588 (21.9%) in the category of medicine (miscellaneous). The Hirsch index from KoreaMed Synapse, Web of Science, and SCImago Journal & Country Rank were 12, 15, and 19, respectively. In comparison with data from 2010, the values of all the journal metrics increased consistently. These results reflect favorably on the increased competency of editors and authors of The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine. PMID:24307835

  11. Training Internal Medicine Residents in Social Medicine and Research-Based Health Advocacy: A Novel, In-Depth Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Basu, Gaurab; Pels, Richard J; Stark, Rachel L; Jain, Priyank; Bor, David H; McCormick, Danny

    2017-04-01

    Health disparities are pervasive worldwide. Physicians have a unique vantage point from which they can observe the ways social, economic, and political factors impact health outcomes and can be effective advocates for enhanced health outcomes and health equity. However, social medicine and health advocacy curricula are uncommon in postgraduate medical education. In academic year (AY) 2012, the Cambridge Health Alliance internal medicine residency program transformed an elective into a required social medicine and research-based health advocacy curriculum. The course has three major innovations: it has a yearlong longitudinal curriculum, it is required for all residents, and all residents complete a group research-based health advocacy project within the curricular year. The authors describe the structure, content, and goals of this curriculum. Over the last four years (AYs 2012-2015), residents (17/32; 53%) have rated the overall quality of the course highly (mean = 5.2, where 6 = outstanding; standard deviation = 0.64). In each year since the new course has been implemented, all scholarly work from the course has been presented at conferences by 31 resident presenters and/or coauthors. The course seems to enhance the residency program's capacity to recruit high-caliber residents and faculty members. The authors are collecting qualitative and quantitative data on the impact of the course. They will use their findings to advocate for a national health advocacy competency framework. Recommendations about how to initiate or further develop social medicine and health advocacy curricula are offered.

  12. Oxygen is an essential medicine: a call for international action

    PubMed Central

    Duke, T.; Graham, S. M.; Cherian, M. N.; Ginsburg, A. S.; English, M.; Howie, S.; Peel, D.; Enarson, P. M.; Wilson, I. H.; Were, W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Hypoxaemia is commonly associated with mortality in developing countries, yet feasible and cost-effective ways to address hypoxaemia receive little or no attention in current global health strategies. Oxygen treatment has been used in medicine for almost 100 years, but in developing countries most seriously ill newborns, children and adults do not have access to oxygen or the simple test that can detect hypoxaemia. Improving access to oxygen and pulse oximetry has demonstrated a reduction in mortality from childhood pneumonia by up to 35% in high-burden child pneumonia settings. The cost-effectiveness of an oxygen systems strategy compares favourably with other higher profile child survival interventions, such as new vaccines. In addition to its use in treating acute respiratory illness, oxygen treatment is required for the optimal management of many other conditions in adults and children, and is essential for safe surgery, anaesthesia and obstetric care. Oxygen concentrators provide the most consistent and least expensive source of oxygen in health facilities where power supplies are reliable. Oxygen concentrators are sustainable in developing country settings if a systematic approach involving nurses, doctors, technicians and administrators is adopted. Improving oxygen systems is an entry point for improving the quality of care. For these broad reasons, and for its vital importance in reducing deaths due to lung disease in 2010: Year of the Lung, oxygen deserves a higher priority on the global health agenda. PMID:20937173

  13. The association of students requiring remediation in the internal medicine clerkship with poor performance during internship.

    PubMed

    Hemann, Brian A; Durning, Steven J; Kelly, William F; Dong, Ting; Pangaro, Louis N; Hemmer, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    To determine whether the Uniformed Services University (USU) system of workplace performance assessment for students in the internal medicine clerkship at the USU continues to be a sensitive predictor of subsequent poor performance during internship, when compared with assessments in other USU third year clerkships. Utilizing Program Director survey results from 2007 through 2011 and U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 3 examination results as the outcomes of interest, we compared performance during internship for students who had less than passing performance in the internal medicine clerkship and required remediation, against students whose performance in the internal medicine clerkship was successful. We further analyzed internship ratings for students who received less than passing grades during the same time period on other third year clerkships such as general surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, family medicine, and psychiatry to evaluate whether poor performance on other individual clerkships were associated with future poor performance at the internship level. Results for this recent cohort of graduates were compared with previously published findings. The overall survey response rate for this 5 year cohort was 81% (689/853). Students who received a less than passing grade in the internal medicine clerkship and required further remediation were 4.5 times more likely to be given poor ratings in the domain of medical expertise and 18.7 times more likely to demonstrate poor professionalism during internship. Further, students requiring internal medicine remediation were 8.5 times more likely to fail USMLE Step 3. No other individual clerkship showed any statistically significant associations with performance at the intern level. On the other hand, 40% of students who successfully remediated and did graduate were not identified during internship as having poor performance. Unsuccessful clinical performance which requires remediation in

  14. Combat internist: the internal medicine experience in a combat hospital in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rachel U; Parrish, Scott C; Saeed, Omar; Fiedler, Joyce P

    2015-01-01

    Military internists and internal medicine subspecialists are physicians who generally work in traditional internal medicine settings. However, when deployed to combat settings, they must prepare and adapt their skills for a wide spectrum of complex, polytrauma, and multinational patients. There are limitations in personnel, equipment, and technical resources that make the circumstances complex and demanding. This article highlights some of the unique roles, challenges, and experiences of four military internists at the NATO Role 3, a deployed combat hospital in Afghanistan. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  15. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine International Workshop.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-07

    81-6-877-0900, e-mail: yoon@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp. 17. Victor I. Shmalhausen, International Laser Center, Moscow State University, Vorob’evy Gory,t 119899... Manuel Toledo- Quinones 3 Adaptive Optics Associates 54 CambridgePark Drive 3 Cambridge, MA 02140 (617)864-0201 (voice) * (617)864-1348 (fax) marty...maximum value) I LSE References: ST. Luna , "Linear Stochastic Estimation of Optical Beam Deflection through a Heated Round Turbulent Jet," MS Thesis

  16. Rapid in vitro propagation system through shoot tip cultures of Vitex trifolia L.-an important multipurpose plant of the Pacific traditional Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rafique; Anis, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    A rapid and efficient plant propagation system through shoot tip explants was established in Vitex trifolia L., a medicinally important plant belonging to the family Verbenaceae. Multiple shoots were induced directly on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium consisting of different cytokinins, 6-benzyladenine (BA), kinetin (Kin) and 2-isopentenyl adenine (2-iP), BA at an optimal concentration of 5.0 μM was most effective in inducing multiple shoots where 90 % explants responded with an average shoot number (4.4±0.1) and shoot length (2.0±0.1 cm) after 6 weeks of culture. Inclusion of NAA in the culture medium along with the optimum concentration of BA promoted a higher rate of shoot multiplication and length of the shoot, where 19.2±0.3 well-grown healthy shoots with an average shoot length of 4.4±0.1 cm were obtained on completion of 12 weeks culture period. Ex vitro rooting was achieved best directly in soilrite when basal portion of the shoots were treated with 500 μM indole-3-butyric acid for 15 min which was the most effective in inducing roots, as 95 % of the microshoots produced roots. Plantlets went through a hardening phase in a controlled plant growth chamber, prior to ex-vitro transfer. Micropropagated plants grew well, attained maturity and flowered with 92 % survival rate. The results of this study provide the first report on in vitro plant regeneration of Vitex trifolia L. using shoot tip explants.

  17. International trade and determinants of price differentials of insulin medicine.

    PubMed

    Helble, Matthias; Aizawa, Toshiaki

    2017-02-01

    Empirical studies on pharmaceutical pricing across countries have found evidence that prices vary according to per capita income. These studies are typically based on survey data from a subset of countries and cover only one year. In this paper, we study the international trade and price of insulin by using detailed trade data for 186 importing countries from 1995 to 2013. With almost 12,000 observations, our study constitutes the largest comparative study on pharmaceutical pricing conducted so far. The large dataset allows us to uncover new determinants of price differentials. Our analysis shows that the international trade of insulin increased substantially over this time period, clearly outpacing the increasing prevalence of diabetes. Using the unit values of imports, we also study the determinants of price differentials between countries. Running various panel regressions, we find that the differences in prices across countries can be explained by the following factors: First, corroborating earlier studies, we find that per capita GDP is positively correlated with the unit price of insulin. Second, the price of insulin drugs originating from Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries tends to be substantially higher than for those imported from developing countries. Third, more intense competition among suppliers leads to lower insulin prices. Fourth, higher out-of-pocket payments for health care are associated with higher prices. Finally, higher volumes and tariffs seem to result in lower unit prices.

  18. The (paper) work of medicine: understanding international medical costs.

    PubMed

    Cutler, David M; Ly, Dan P

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on international evidence on medical spending to examine what the United States can learn about making its healthcare system more efficient. We focus primarily on understanding contemporaneous differences in the level of spending, generally from the 2000s. Medical spending differs across countries either because the price of services differs (for example, a coronary bypass surgery operation may cost more in the United States than in other countries) or because people receive more services in some countries than in others (for example, more bypass surgery operations). Within the price category, there are two further issues: whether factors earn different returns across countries and whether more clinical or administrative personnel are required to deliver the same care in different countries. We first present the results of a decomposition of healthcare spending along these lines in the United States and in Canada. We then delve into each component in more detail—administrative costs, factor prices, and the provision of care received—bringing in a broader range of international evidence when possible. Finally, we touch upon the organization of primary and chronic disease care and discuss possible gains in that area.

  19. Evaluation of a required palliative care rotation for internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Olden, Aaron M; Quill, Timothy E; Bordley, Donald; Ladwig, Susan

    2009-02-01

    Internal medicine programs are now required to integrate palliative care into teaching conferences, and palliative care content is already tested on the American Board of Internal Medicine examination. Previous research has focused on integration of palliative care into existing rotations and seminars, but none has studied a required inpatient palliative care rotation. We evaluate the impact of a required palliative care rotation for internal medicine residents in four domains: pain management, non-pain symptom management, communication/ethics, and terminal care. All second-year internal medicine residents (R2s) completed a required 2-week rotation in inpatient palliative care, and were asked to complete a previously validated palliative care examination immediately before and within 2 weeks after the rotation. During the same year, all interns (R1s) were also asked to complete this examination, as were third-year residents (R3s) who had completed the rotation one year earlier, to provide a basis for comparison. Participation in the examination was voluntary for all. All interns (100%), and 71% and 87% of R2s and R3s, respectively, completed the examination. Mean examination scores improved by 12.4% between internship and start of the palliative care rotation, and by an additional 9.7% by the end of the rotation. Mean examination scores were consistent from the R2 to the R3 year. At all levels, residents scored well above the national average on the examination. Scores improved in all domains measured. Palliative care knowledge, as tested by objective examination, improves during internal medicine residency at our institution and specifically over the course of a required, 2-week palliative care rotation. Further study is warranted to determine the relative contributions to this improvement from the palliative care rotation itself, the institutional culture and/or Rochester residents' preexisting interest in the bio-psychosocial model.

  20. An educational intervention to improve internal medicine interns' awareness of hazards of hospitalization in acutely ill older adults.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Loren M; Iwata, Isao; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Heflin, Mitchell T

    2014-04-01

    Hospitalized older adults are susceptible to complications termed "hazards of hospitalization" (HOH), which collectively result in poor patient outcomes. Previous research has shown that residents are not aware of their patients' risk factors for HOH. This study investigated the effect of an educational intervention to increase internal medicine interns' knowledge and self-efficacy of HOH and to improve their care of hospitalized older adults as measured by their documentation of HOH. Targeted learners were internal medicine interns on their geriatrics rotation at a large academic hospital in 2011 to 2012. The intervention covered 10 specific HOH: delirium, pressure ulcers, urinary incontinence and retention, functional decline, falls, suboptimal prescribing, dehydration and malnutrition, infection, depression, and inappropriate interventions. Knowledge and self-efficacy were measured before and after training. HOH documentation rates of interns who did and did not complete the training were compared over a preset 8-week period. Forty-two of 43 eligible interns completed the curriculum. After training, knowledge was significantly greater (approximately 1 more correct question out of 3, P < .001). Self-reported confidence in managing each hazard also significantly increased (13 questions on two 5-point Likert scales, P < .001). Trained interns had significantly more-frequent documentation of patients' activities of daily living, gait, and plan for functional decline prevention than interns who were not trained (P < .05). Conversely, documentation of instrumental activities of daily living was more frequent among interns who were not trained (P < .01). Implementation of an educational intervention was successful in improving educational and behavior change outcomes regarding HOH.

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in an Italian cohort of pediatric headache patients: the tip of the iceberg.

    PubMed

    Dalla Libera, D; Colombo, B; Pavan, G; Comi, G

    2014-05-01

    The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) in paediatric populations is considerably increased, especially for pain and chronic conditions, as demonstrated by epidemiological surveys both in Europe and in the USA. In our study, CAM was used in 76 % patients of a cohort of 124 children affected by headache (age 4-16 years; 67 % female; 70 % migraine without aura, 12 % migraine with aura, 18 % tensive headache according to IHS criteria) consecutively recruited at a Pediatric Headache University Center. CAM was used as preventive treatment in 80 % cases. The main reasons for seeking CAM were: the wish of avoiding chronic use of drugs with their related side effects, the desire of an integrated approach, the reported inefficacy of conventional medicine, and a more suitable children disposition to CAM than to pharmacological compound. Female gender, younger age, migraine without aura, parents' higher educational status, maternal use of CAM and other associated chronic conditions, correlated with CAM use (p < 0.05). 73 % patients chose CAM also to treat other diseases (i.e. allergies, colitis, asthma, insomnia, muscle-scheletric disorders and dysmenorrhoea). The most assumed CAM were: herbal remedies (64 %) such as Valeriana, Ginkgo biloba, Boswellia serrata, Vitex agnus-castus, passion flower, Linden tree; vitamins/minerals supplements (40 %) with magnesium, 5-Hydroxytryptophan, vitamin B6 or B12, Multivitamin compounds; Homeopathy (47 %) with Silicea, Ignatia Amara, Pulsatilla, Aconitum, Nux Vomica, Calcarea phosphorica; physical treatment (45 %) such as Ayurvedic massage, shiatsu, osteopathy; yoga (33 %); acupuncture (11 %). CAM-often integrated with conventional care-was auto-prescribed in 30 % of the cases, suggested by non-physician in 22 %, by the General Practitioner in 24 % and by paediatrician in 24 %. Both general practitioners and neurologists were mostly unaware of their patients' CAM use. In conclusion, neurologists should inquire for CAM use and

  2. [Assessing research productivity in Department of Internal Medicine, University of Zagreb, School of Medicine and University Hospital Centre Zagreb].

    PubMed

    Petrak, Jelka; Sember, Marijan; Granić, Davorka

    2012-01-01

    Bibliometric analysis may give an objective information about publishing activity, citation rate and collaboration patterns of individuals, groups and institutions. The publication productivity of the present medical staff (79 with specialist degree and 22 residents) in Department of Internal Medicine, University of Zagreb School of Medicine in University Hospital Centre Zagreb was measured by the number of papers indexed by Medline, their impact was measured by the number of times these papers had subsequently been cited in the medical literature, while the collaboration pattern was estimated by the authors' addresses listed in the papers. PubMed database was a source for verifying the bibliographic data, and the citation data were searched via Thomson Web of Scence (WoS) platform. There were a total of 1182 papers, published from 1974 to date. The number of papers per author ranged from 0 to 252. Sixty of papers were published in English, and 39% in Croatian language. The roughly equal share was published in local and foreign journals. The RCT studies and practice guidelines were among the most cited papers and were at the same time published by the highly ranked journals. The collaboration analysis confirmed the extensive involment in the international multicentric clinical trials as well as in the development of international/local practice guidelines.

  3. [International exchanges in the early stage of the Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang

    2015-11-01

    The Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine under the Ministry of Health was established in 1955. It exerted worldwide influence, and attracted extensive attention internationally. During its early days, lots of letters from abroad asking for TCM consultation were accepted consistently. TCM experts were invited to treat a great number of foreign patients in China or overseas. It also received visits of many foreign government delegations and academic groups. Moreover, physicians were dispatched to visit abroad, international academic conferences were held and training classes were sponsored for returned students and medical interns. Frequent international academic exchanges promoted the friendly intercourse with foreign countries, and the spread of TCM overseas, which displayed the function and value of traditional Chinese medicine, reflecting its unique significance and charm, and its great contributions to the improvement of people's health the world over.

  4. Promoting Success: A Professional Development Coaching Program for Interns in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Palamara, Kerri; Kauffman, Carol; Stone, Valerie E.; Bazari, Hasan; Donelan, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background Residency is an intense period. Challenges, including burnout, arise as new physicians develop their professional identities. Residency programs provide remediation, but emotional support for interns is often limited. Professional development coaching of interns, regardless of their performance, has not been reported. Objective Design, implement, and evaluate a program to support intern professional development through positive psychology coaching. Methods We implemented a professional development coaching program in a large residency program. The program included curriculum development, coach-intern interactions, and evaluative metrics. A total of 72 internal medicine interns and 26 internal medicine faculty participated in the first year. Interns and coaches were expected to meet quarterly; expected time commitments per year were 9 hours (per individual coached) for coaches, 5 1/2 hours for each individual coachee, and 70 hours for the director of the coaching program. Coaches and interns were asked to complete 2 surveys in the first year and to participate in qualitative interviews. Results Eighty-two percent of interns met with their coaches 3 or more times. Coaches and their interns assessed the program in multiple dimensions (participation, program and professional activities, burnout, coping, and coach-intern communication). Most of the interns (94%) rated the coaching program as good or excellent, and 96% would recommend this program to other residency programs. The experience of burnout was lower in this cohort compared with a prior cohort. Conclusions There is early evidence that a coaching program of interactions with faculty trained in positive psychology may advance intern development and partially address burnout. PMID:26692977

  5. Is Training in a Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Associated with a Career in Primary Care Medicine?

    PubMed

    Stanley, Marion; O'Brien, Bridget; Julian, Katherine; Jain, Sharad; Cornett, Patricia; Hollander, Harry; Baron, Robert B; Kohlwes, R Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Professional and governmental organizations recommend an ideal US physician workforce composed of at least 40 % primary care physicians. They also support primary care residencies to promote careers in primary care. Our study examines the relationship between graduation from a primary care or categorical internal medicine residency program and subsequent career choice. We conducted a cross-sectional electronic survey of a cohort of internal medicine residency alumni who graduated between 2001 and 2010 from a large academic center. Our primary predictor was graduation from a primary care versus a categorical internal medicine program and our primary outcome is current career role. We performed chi-square analysis comparing responses of primary care and categorical residents. We contacted 481 out of 513 alumni, of whom 322 responded (67 %). We compared 106 responses from primary care alumni to 169 responses from categorical alumni. Fifty-four percent of primary care alumni agreed that the majority of their current clinical work is in outpatient primary care vs. 20 % of categorical alumni (p < 0.001). While 92.5 % of primary-care alumni were interested in a primary care career prior to residency, only 63 % remained interested after residency. Thirty of the 34 primary care alumni (88 %) who lost interest in a primary care career during residency agreed that their ambulatory experience during residency influenced their subsequent career choice. A higher percentage of primary care alumni practice outpatient primary care as compared to categorical alumni. Some alumni lost interest in primary care during residency. The outpatient clinic experience may impact interest in primary care.

  6. Basic Geriatrics Knowledge Among Internal Medicine Trainees in a Teaching Hospital in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Aama, Tareef

    2016-06-01

    To assess the basic knowledge of medical trainees, in the absence of a structured geriatrics curriculum, around a variety of geriatric medicine components that are considered essential for the care of the rapidly increasing elderly population. Eighty-three trainees at different levels of training in internal medicine were asked about a variety of common geriatric conditions. Those included: delirium, falls, geriatric syndromes, pain, cognitive impairment, and medications. The trainees' knowledge about common geriatric condition was overall poor. The most pronounced deficits included: the lack of familiarity in diagnosing geriatric syndromes (63 %) or managing them (67 %), the underestimation of the prevalence of delirium (49 %), and the tendency to undertreat pain (64 %). Poor familiarity with polypharmacy and its impact, as well as inappropriate prescription practices in the elderly were also observed. In the absence of a structured geriatric medicine curriculum, internal medicine trainees' knowledge about important geriatric conditions is poor, even if their internal medicine knowledge is overall adequate. This would translate into suboptimal care for this vulnerable and rapidly expanding segment of the population.

  7. The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3rd IGMC, 2015): overall activities and outcome highlights.

    PubMed

    Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Assidi, Mourad; Dallol, Ashraf; Buhmeida, Abdelbaset; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Kalamegam, Gauthaman; Al-Hamzi, Emad; Shay, Jerry W; Scherer, Stephen W; Agarwal, Ashok; Budowle, Bruce; Gari, Mamdooh; Chaudhary, Adeel; Abuzenadah, Adel; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed

    2016-10-17

    The Third International Genomic Medicine Conference (3(rd) IGMC) was organised by the Centre of Excellence in Genomic Medicine Research (CEGMR) at the King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). This conference is a continuation of a series of meetings, which began with the first International Genomic Medicine Conference (1(st) IGMC, 2011) followed by the second International Genomic Medicine Conference (2(nd) IGMC, 2013). The 3(rd) IGMC meeting presented as a timely opportunity to bring scientists from across the world to gather, discuss, and exchange recent advances in the field of genomics and genetics in general as well as practical information on using these new technologies in different basic and clinical applications. The meeting undoubtedly inspired young male and female Saudi researchers, who attended the conference in large numbers, as evidenced by the oversubscribed oral and poster presentations. The conference also witnessed the launch of the first content for npj Genomic Medicine, a high quality new journal was established in partnership by CEGMR with Springer Nature and published as part of the Nature Partner Journal series. Here, we present a brief summary report of the 2-day meeting including highlights from the oral presentations, poster presentations, workshops, poster prize-winners and comments from the distinguished scientists.

  8. The teaching of cellular and molecular biology: a survey of program directors in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Szerlip, H M

    1995-12-01

    Although there has been an explosion in our knowledge of cellular and molecular biology, it is unclear if medical students entering internal medicine residency programs have been adequately trained in these basic sciences. To ascertain the perceived importance of these subjects to the practice of medicine and to determine if medical schools are properly training their students, a survey was sent to internal medicine program directors. A survey was sent to 401 internal medicine program directors. Repeat questionnaires were sent if no response was received within 6 months. Questionnaires were returned by 309 program directors (77%). Only 41% of the program directors felt that their residents had received adequate training in cellular and molecular biology. Directors of university programs were significantly more likely to think that knowledge of these sciences was essential to the practice of medicine and that their residents were inadequately trained than directors from nonuniversity programs. Only 30% of programs offered any formal training in these sciences. Medical schools need to reevaluate their curricula in order to integrate the basic sciences into all 4 years. Training in these sciences, however, should not stop with graduation. The importance of a knowledge of these sciences should be emphasized at all training programs.

  9. The Development of a Medical Ethics Curriculum in a General Internal Medicine Residency Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartman, Steven A.; Brock, Dan W.

    1989-01-01

    A three-year curriculum in medical ethics operates at Rhode Island Hospital and Brown University as part of the general internal medicine residency program. The six major topics covered are co-taught as seminars by one or more members of the multidisciplinary ethics faculty (philosopher, internist, and communications specialist) and experienced…

  10. Year-End Clinic Handoffs: A National Survey of Academic Internal Medicine Programs.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Erica; Harris, Christina; Lee, Wei Wei; Pincavage, Amber T; Ouchida, Karin; Miller, Rachel K; Chaudhry, Saima; Arora, Vineet M

    2017-06-01

    While there has been increasing emphasis and innovation nationwide in training residents in inpatient handoffs, very little is known about the practice and preparation for year-end clinic handoffs of residency outpatient continuity practices. Thus, the latter remains an identified, yet nationally unaddressed, patient safety concern. The 2014 annual Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM) survey included seven items for assessing the current year-end clinic handoff practices of internal medicine residency programs throughout the country. Nationwide survey. All internal medicine program directors registered with APDIM. Descriptive statistics of programs and tools used to formulate a year-end handoff in the ambulatory setting, methods for evaluating the process, patient safety and quality measures incorporated within the process, and barriers to conducting year-end handoffs. Of the 361 APDIM member programs, 214 (59%) completed the Transitions of Care Year-End Clinic Handoffs section of the survey. Only 34% of respondent programs reported having a year-end ambulatory handoff system, and 4% reported assessing residents for competency in this area. The top three barriers to developing a year-end handoff system were insufficient overlap between graduating and incoming residents, inability to schedule patients with new residents in advance, and time constraints for residents, attendings, and support staff. Most internal medicine programs do not have a year-end clinic handoff system in place. Greater attention to clinic handoffs and resident assessment of this care transition is needed.

  11. Training Future Leaders of Academic Medicine: Internal Programs at Three Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morahan, Page S.; Kasperbauer, Dwight; McDade, Sharon A.; Aschenbrener, Carol A.; Triolo, Pamela K.; Monteleone, Patricia L.; Counte, Michael; Meyer, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews need for internal leadership training programs at academic health centers and describes three programs. Elements common to the programs include small classes, participants from many areas of academic medicine and health care, building on prior experience and training, training conducted away from the institution, short sessions, faculty…

  12. [Referral to internal medicine for alcoholism: influence on follow-up care].

    PubMed

    Avila, P; Marcos, M; Avila, J J; Laso, F J

    2008-11-01

    The problem of high rates of patient drop-out in alcohol treatment programs is frequently reported in the literature. Our aim was to investigate if internal medicine referral could improve abstinence and retention rates in a cohort of alcoholic patients. A retrospective observational study was conducted comparing 200 alcoholic patients attending a psychiatric unit (group 1) with 100 patients attending both this unit and an internal medicine unit (group 2). We collected sociodemographic and clinical variables and analysed differences regarding abstinence and retention rates by means of univariate and multivariate analysis. At 3 and 12 months follow-up, group 2 patients had higher retention and abstinence rates than group 1 patients. Multivariate analysis including potential confounding variables showed that independent predictors of one-year retention were internal medicine referral and being married. Independent predictors of one-year abstinence were being married, age > 44 years and receipt of drug treatment. The higher retention rate found among patients referred to Internal Medicine specialists, a result that has not been previously reported to the best of our knowledge, emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach in the treatment of alcoholism.

  13. The U.S. National Library of Medicine and International MEDLARS Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corning, Mary E.

    1972-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine has eight international MEDLARS quid-pro-quo arrangements with the United Kingdom, Sweden, France, West Germany, Japan, Australia, Canada and the World Health Organization. Policy aspects of these arrangements are discussed as well as the organizational and operational characteristics of the non-U.S. Medlars…

  14. Internal Medicine House Officers' Performance as Assessed by Experts and Standardized Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Judith G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Three chronically ill patients were trained to evaluate the performance of 31 second-year internal medicine house officers based upon: a checklist for the medical data elicited during the medical interview; the process of the interview; and the physical examination technique. (Author/MLW)

  15. Comparing Research Activities of Women and Men Faculty in Departments of Internal Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levey, Barbara A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study compared research activities of men and women from data obtained in a 1982-83 survey of 7,947 medical school faculty in departments of internal medicine. Among findings were that women researchers had significantly fewer National Institutes of Health grants as well as reduced laboratory space. (Author/DB)

  16. Determinants of internal medicine residents' choice in the canadian R4 Fellowship Match: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is currently a discrepancy between Internal Medicine residents' decisions in the Canadian subspecialty fellowship match (known as the R4 match) and societal need. Some studies have been published examining factors that influence career choices. However, these were either demographic factors or factors pre-determined by the authors' opinion as possibly being important to incorporate into a survey. Methods A qualitative study was undertaken to identify factors that determine the residents choice in the subspecialty (R4) fellowship match using focus group discussions involving third and fourth year internal medicine residents Results Based on content analysis of the discussion data, we identified five themes: 1) Practice environment including acuity of practice, ability to do procedures, lifestyle, job prospects and income 2) Exposure in rotations and to role models 3) Interest in subspecialty's patient population and common diseases 4) Prestige and respect of subspecialty 5) Fellowship training environment including fellowship program resources and length of training Conclusions There are a variety of factors that contribute to Internal Medicine residents' fellowship choice in Canada, many of which have been identified in previous survey studies. However, we found additional factors such as the resources available in a fellowship program, the prestige and respect of a subspecialty/career, and the recent trend towards a two-year General Internal Medicine fellowship in our country. PMID:21714921

  17. Determinants of internal medicine residents' choice in the Canadian R4 fellowship match: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Vijay J; Kassam, Narmin

    2011-06-29

    There is currently a discrepancy between Internal Medicine residents' decisions in the Canadian subspecialty fellowship match (known as the R4 match) and societal need. Some studies have been published examining factors that influence career choices. However, these were either demographic factors or factors pre-determined by the authors' opinion as possibly being important to incorporate into a survey. A qualitative study was undertaken to identify factors that determine the residents choice in the subspecialty (R4) fellowship match using focus group discussions involving third and fourth year internal medicine residents Based on content analysis of the discussion data, we identified five themes:1) Practice environment including acuity of practice, ability to do procedures, lifestyle, job prospects and income 2) Exposure in rotations and to role models 3) Interest in subspecialty's patient population and common diseases 4) Prestige and respect of subspecialty 5) Fellowship training environment including fellowship program resources and length of training There are a variety of factors that contribute to Internal Medicine residents' fellowship choice in Canada, many of which have been identified in previous survey studies. However, we found additional factors such as the resources available in a fellowship program, the prestige and respect of a subspecialty/career, and the recent trend towards a two-year General Internal Medicine fellowship in our country.

  18. Sex Differences in Rank Attainment among Radiology and Internal Medicine Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dial, Thomas H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges Faculty Roster System allows comparison of a cohort of faculty at any selected time following their first faculty appointments. Disparities between men and women in rank attained in radiology and internal medicine were examined. (Author/MLW)

  19. Internal Medicine House Officers' Performance as Assessed by Experts and Standardized Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Judith G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Three chronically ill patients were trained to evaluate the performance of 31 second-year internal medicine house officers based upon: a checklist for the medical data elicited during the medical interview; the process of the interview; and the physical examination technique. (Author/MLW)

  20. The Development of a Medical Ethics Curriculum in a General Internal Medicine Residency Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartman, Steven A.; Brock, Dan W.

    1989-01-01

    A three-year curriculum in medical ethics operates at Rhode Island Hospital and Brown University as part of the general internal medicine residency program. The six major topics covered are co-taught as seminars by one or more members of the multidisciplinary ethics faculty (philosopher, internist, and communications specialist) and experienced…

  1. Venous thromboembolism: the prevailing approach to diagnosis, prevention and treatment among Internal Medicine practitioners.

    PubMed

    Markel, Arie; Gavish, Israel; Kfir, Hila; Rimbrot, Sofia

    2017-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the third most common cause of death and the leading cause of sudden death in hospitalized medical patients. Despite the existence of guidelines for prevention and treatment of this disorder, their implementation in everyday life is not always accomplished. We performed a survey among directors of Internal Medicine departments in our country in order to evaluate their attitude and approach to this issue. A questionnaire with pertinent questions regarding prevention and treatment of VTE, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) was sent to each one of the directors of Internal Medicine Departments around the country. Sixty-nine out of 97 (71%) of the Internal Medicine departments directors responded the questionnaire. We found that several of the current guidelines were followed in a reasonable way. On the other hand, heterogeneity of responses was also present and the performance of current guidelines was imperfectly followed, and showed to be deficient in several aspects. An effort should be done in order to reemphasize and put in effect current guidelines for the prevention and treatment of VTE among hospitalists and Internal Medicine practitioners.

  2. Psychosocial Training in U.S. Internal Medicine and Family Practice Residency Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaufberg, Elizabeth H.; Joseph, Robert C.; Pels, Richard J.; Wyshak, Grace; Wieman, Dow; Nadelson, Carol C.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed directors of internal medicine (IM) and family practice (FP) residency programs regarding the format, content, and quantity of psychosocial training in their programs, their opinions on topics related to such training, and program demographics. Found considerable variation in content and time devoted to psychosocial training within and…

  3. Psychosocial Training in U.S. Internal Medicine and Family Practice Residency Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaufberg, Elizabeth H.; Joseph, Robert C.; Pels, Richard J.; Wyshak, Grace; Wieman, Dow; Nadelson, Carol C.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed directors of internal medicine (IM) and family practice (FP) residency programs regarding the format, content, and quantity of psychosocial training in their programs, their opinions on topics related to such training, and program demographics. Found considerable variation in content and time devoted to psychosocial training within and…

  4. Development and Implementation of a Web-based Evaluation System for an Internal Medicine Residency Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Mark E.; Watson, Kathleen; Paul, Jeevan; Miller, Wesley; Harris, Ilene; Valdivia, Tomas D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development and implementation of a World Wide Web-based electronic evaluation system for the internal medicine residency program at the University of Minnesota. Features include automatic entry of evaluations by faculty or students into a database, compliance tracking, reminders, extensive reporting capabilities, automatic…

  5. Sex Differences in Rank Attainment among Radiology and Internal Medicine Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dial, Thomas H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges Faculty Roster System allows comparison of a cohort of faculty at any selected time following their first faculty appointments. Disparities between men and women in rank attained in radiology and internal medicine were examined. (Author/MLW)

  6. Sepsis in Internal Medicine wards: current knowledge, uncertainties and new approaches for management optimization.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, Vincenzo; Tosoni, Alberto; Passaro, Giovanna; Vallone, Carla Vincenza; Impagnatiello, Michele; Li Puma, Domenica Donatella; De Cosmo, Salvatore; Landolfi, Raffaele; Mirijello, Antonio

    2017-05-27

    Sepsis represents a global health problem in terms of morbidity, mortality, social and economic costs. Although usually managed in Intensive Care Units, sepsis showed an increased prevalence among Internal Medicine wards in the last decade. This is substantially due to the ageing of population and to multi-morbidity. These characteristics represent both a risk factor for sepsis and a relative contra-indication for the admission to Intensive Care Units. Although there is a lack of literature on the management of sepsis in Internal Medicine, the outcome of these patients seems to be gradually improving. This is due to Internists' increased adherence to guidelines and "bundles". The routine use of SOFA score helps physicians in the definition of septic patients, even if the optimal score has still to come. Point-of-care ultrasonography, lactates, procalcitonin and beta-d-glucan are of help for treatment optimization. The purpose of this narrative review is to focus on the management of sepsis in Internal Medicine departments, particularly on crucial concepts regarding diagnosis, risk assessment and treatment. Key Messages Sepsis is a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. The prevalence of sepsis is constantly increasing, affecting more hospital patients than any other disease. At least half of patients affected by sepsis are admitted to Internal Medicine wards. Adherence to guidelines, routine use of clinical and lab scores and point-of-care ultrasonography are of help for early recognition of septic patients and treatment optimization.

  7. Comparing Research Activities of Women and Men Faculty in Departments of Internal Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levey, Barbara A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study compared research activities of men and women from data obtained in a 1982-83 survey of 7,947 medical school faculty in departments of internal medicine. Among findings were that women researchers had significantly fewer National Institutes of Health grants as well as reduced laboratory space. (Author/DB)

  8. Ultrasound for internal medicine physicians: the future of the physical examination.

    PubMed

    Dulohery, Megan M; Stoven, Samantha; Kurklinsky, Andrew K; Kurklinksy, Andrew; Halvorsen, Andrew; McDonald, Furman S; Bhagra, Anjali

    2014-06-01

    With the advent of compact ultrasound (US) devices, it is easier for physicians to enhance their physical examinations through the use of US. However, although this new tool is widely available, few internal medicine physicians have US training. This study sought to understand physicians' baseline knowledge and skill, provide education in US principles, and demonstrate that proper use of compact US devices is a skill that can be quickly learned. Training was performed at the Mayo Clinic in June 2010 and June 2011. The participants consisted of internal medicine residents. The workshop included didactics and hands-on US experiences with human and cadaver models in a simulation center. Pretests and posttests of residents' knowledge, attitudes, and skills with US were completed. We reassessed the 2010 group in the spring of 2012 with a long-term retention survey for knowledge and confidence in viewing images. A total of 136 interns completed the workshop. Thirty-nine residents completed the long-term retention survey. Posttest assessments showed a statistically significant improvement in the knowledge of US imaging, confidence in identifying structures, image identification, and image acquisition (P < .0001). In the long-term retention study, knowledge of US imaging and confidence in identifying structures did decline. This educational intervention resulted in improvement in US knowledge and image acquisition. However, the knowledge diminished over time, suggesting that further education is needed if US is to become an important component of internal medicine training and practice. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine Resident: competence acquisition and achievement of learning objectives.

    PubMed

    Oristrell, J; Oliva, J C; Casanovas, A; Comet, R; Jordana, R; Navarro, M

    2014-01-01

    The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine resident (CBIMR) is a computer program that was validated to analyze the acquisition of competences in teams of Internal Medicine residents. To analyze the characteristics of the rotations during the Internal Medicine residency and to identify the variables associated with the acquisition of clinical and communication skills, the achievement of learning objectives and resident satisfaction. All residents of our service (n=20) participated in the study during a period of 40 months. The CBIMR consisted of 22 self-assessment questionnaires specific for each rotation, with items on services (clinical workload, disease protocolization, resident responsibilities, learning environment, service organization and teamwork) and items on educational outcomes (acquisition of clinical and communication skills, achievement of learning objectives, overall satisfaction). Associations between services features and learning outcomes were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate analysis. An intense clinical workload, high resident responsibilities and disease protocolization were associated with the acquisition of clinical skills. High clinical competence and teamwork were both associated with better communication skills. Finally, an adequate learning environment was associated with increased clinical competence, the achievement of educational goals and resident satisfaction. Potentially modifiable variables related with the operation of clinical services had a significant impact on the acquisition of clinical and communication skills, the achievement of educational goals, and resident satisfaction during the specialized training in Internal Medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Defining a Universe of Expected Competencies: A Methodological Example for Internal Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashook, Philip G.; And Others

    This paper describes a method for defining the universe of competencies expected of a general internist. This was accomplished by defining the nature of the medical practice, describing the internal medicine content in terms of subspecialty divisions and general areas of competence, and defining a format for describing competencies. The format for…

  11. The Kaleidoscope of General Internist Careers: A Challenge for Internal Medicine Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parenti, Connie M.

    1995-01-01

    As internal medicine residency programs struggle to produce enough general internists adequately prepared for practice, the graduate medical education system must have a clear picture of what competencies these practitioners will need. It must constantly monitor the changing practice environment and its varied generalist career choices.…

  12. Resource Manual for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Education in Internal Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigby, JudyAnn, Ed.; England, Susan, Ed.

    The resource manual provides guidelines and resources for individuals interested in integrating a substance abuse curriculum into existing programs for medical students and residents in internal medicine. Materials and resources appropriate for practicing physicians are also included. Three sections are: (1) a statement of minimum knowledge and…

  13. Incoming interns' perspectives on the institute of medicine recommendations for residents' duty hours.

    PubMed

    Arora, Vineet M; Farnan, Jeanne M; Lypson, Monica L; Anderson, R Andy; Prochaska, Meryl H; Humphrey, Holly J

    2010-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has announced revisions to the resident duty hour standards in light of a 2008 Institute of Medicine report that recommended further limits. Soliciting resident input regarding the future of duty hours is critical to ensure trainee buy-in. To assess incoming intern perceptions of duty hour restrictions at 3 teaching hospitals. We administered an anonymous survey to incoming interns during orientation at 3 teaching hospitals affiliated with 2 Midwestern medical schools in 2009. Survey questions assessed interns' perceptions of maximum shift length, days off, ACGME oversight, and preferences for a "fatigued post-call intern who admitted patient" versus "well-rested covering intern who just picked up patient" for various clinical scenarios. Eighty-six percent (299/346) of interns responded. Although 59% agreed that residents should not work over 16 hours without a break, 50% of interns favored the current limits. The majority (78%) of interns desired ability to exceed shift limit for rare cases or clinical opportunities. Most interns (90%) favored oversight by the ACGME, and 97% preferred a well-rested intern for performing a procedure. Meanwhile, only 48% of interns preferred a well-rested intern for discharging a patient or having an end of life discussion. Interns who favored 16-hour limits were less concerned with negative consequences of duty hour restrictions (handoffs, reduced clinical experience) and more likely to choose the well-rested intern for certain scenarios (odds ratio 2.33, 95% confidence interval 1.42-3.85, P  =  .001). Incoming intern perceptions on limiting duty hours vary. Many interns desire flexibility to exceed limits for interesting clinical opportunities and favor ACGME oversight. Clinical context matters when interns consider the tradeoffs between fatigue and discontinuity.

  14. Incoming Interns' Perspectives on the Institute of Medicine Recommendations for Residents' Duty Hours

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Vineet M.; Farnan, Jeanne M.; Lypson, Monica L.; Anderson, R. Andy; Prochaska, Meryl H.; Humphrey, Holly J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has announced revisions to the resident duty hour standards in light of a 2008 Institute of Medicine report that recommended further limits. Soliciting resident input regarding the future of duty hours is critical to ensure trainee buy-in. Purpose To assess incoming intern perceptions of duty hour restrictions at 3 teaching hospitals. Methods We administered an anonymous survey to incoming interns during orientation at 3 teaching hospitals affiliated with 2 Midwestern medical schools in 2009. Survey questions assessed interns' perceptions of maximum shift length, days off, ACGME oversight, and preferences for a “fatigued post-call intern who admitted patient” versus “well-rested covering intern who just picked up patient” for various clinical scenarios. Results Eighty-six percent (299/346) of interns responded. Although 59% agreed that residents should not work over 16 hours without a break, 50% of interns favored the current limits. The majority (78%) of interns desired ability to exceed shift limit for rare cases or clinical opportunities. Most interns (90%) favored oversight by the ACGME, and 97% preferred a well-rested intern for performing a procedure. Meanwhile, only 48% of interns preferred a well-rested intern for discharging a patient or having an end of life discussion. Interns who favored 16-hour limits were less concerned with negative consequences of duty hour restrictions (handoffs, reduced clinical experience) and more likely to choose the well-rested intern for certain scenarios (odds ratio 2.33, 95% confidence interval 1.42–3.85, P  =  .001). Conclusions Incoming intern perceptions on limiting duty hours vary. Many interns desire flexibility to exceed limits for interesting clinical opportunities and favor ACGME oversight. Clinical context matters when interns consider the tradeoffs between fatigue and discontinuity. PMID:22132274

  15. How confident are internal medicine residents in rheumatology versus other common internal medicine clinical skills: an issue of training time or exposure?

    PubMed

    Katz, Steven J; Oswald, Anna E

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine self-confidence of internal medicine (IM) residents regarding rheumatology clinical skills and factors that may affect their confidence. Permission was sought to e-mail a web-based survey to IM residents at all 13 English language Canadian internal medicine programs. Residents were asked to rank self-confidence in rheumatology, cardiology, respirology, and gastroenterology skills. Further questions included site and year of training, career interests, rheumatology experiences, learning opportunities, and assessment frequency. These factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Two hundred sixteen residents (21.8%) from all 13 sites responded to the survey. Resident self-confidence in rheumatology diagnoses was 5.24/10, lower than all three comparator subspecialties. Increasing teaching exposure had a more significant impact on confidence in rheumatology than on comparator subspecialties. Increasing year of training had no association with higher self-confidence for rheumatology, in contrast to the increase in confidence seen with increased year of training for each comparator subspecialty. Further analysis demonstrated that the completion of a rheumatology rotation, increasing learning opportunities, annual assessment, and career interest were associated with greater resident self-confidence. Resident self-confidence for rheumatology skills is cautious at best and is lower than other common subspecialties. Self confidence improves with targeted rheumatology clinical experience and teaching, but does not improve solely with higher year of IM training. Furthermore, the impact of rheumatology teaching is greater than that of other common IM subspecialties. This information is critical to the planning and implementation of effective rheumatology curricula within internal medicine residency programs.

  16. A simulator-based curriculum to promote comparative and reflective analysis in an internal medicine clerkship.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Graham T; Monaghan, Colleen; Falchuk, Kenneth; Gordon, James A; Alexander, Erik K

    2005-01-01

    To develop and evaluate a novel curricular framework using high-fidelity patient simulation in an internal medicine clerkship. Two 90-minute simulator-based modules of ischemic heart failure and hypoxemic respiratory failure were developed from adult and experiential learning principles. Three short simulated cases focused on each pathophysiologic concept were intermixed with two short teaching sessions and a period of comparative analysis. In 2002-03, the program was piloted among 90 third-year medical students at Harvard Medical School assigned to complete their core internal medicine clerk-ship. An entry and two follow-up questionnaires were used to assess the process. The instructors conducted quantitative and qualitative data analysis and directly observed students' performances. Instructors consistently noted students' ability to appropriately extract a history, perform a basic examination, and order appropriate tests. However, students demonstrated repeated errors in the application of knowledge to the clinical circumstance. A final comparative discussion was essential to new learning and students recognized this integrative analysis as the most critical component of the exercise. Every student reported the experience as useful. Ninety-four percent (n = 85) felt the simulator should become a routine part of the clerkship and 68% (n = 71) desired three or more sessions during their internal medicine clerkship. Simulator-based curricular modules are feasible in an internal medicine clerkship and can successfully complement existing curricula. By comparing similar cases in a compressed time frame, students may achieve enhanced efficiencies in reflective and meta-cognitive learning. As medical simulation is increasingly available, such a curriculum may represent valuable additions to the internal medicine educational environment.

  17. Career interest and perceptions of nephrology: A repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Michael N; Maynard, Sharon; Porter, Ivan; Kincaid, Hope; Jain, Deepika; Aslam, Nabeel

    2017-01-01

    Interest in nephrology careers among internal medicine residents in the United States is declining. Our objective was to assess the impact of the presence of a nephrology fellowship training program on perceptions and career interest in nephrology among internal medicine residents. A secondary objective was to identify commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology among internal medicine residents. This was a repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents before (Group 1) and 3 years after (Group 2) the establishment of nephrology fellowship programs at two institutions. The primary outcome was the percentage of residents indicating nephrology as a career interest in Group 1 vs. Group 2. Secondary outcomes included the frequency that residents agreed with negative statements about nephrology. 131 (80.9%) of 162 residents completed the survey. 19 (14.8%) residents indicated interest in a nephrology career, with 8 (6.3%) indicating nephrology as their first choice. There was no difference in career interest in nephrology between residents who were exposed to nephrology fellows during residency training (Group 2) and residents who were not (Group 1). The most commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology were: nephrology fellows have long hours/burdensome call (36 [28.1%] of residents agreed or strongly agreed), practicing nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (35 [27.6%] agreed or strongly agreed), and nephrology has few opportunities for procedures (35 [27.3%] agreed or strongly agreed). More residents in Group 2 agreed that nephrology is poorly paid (8.9% in Group 1 vs. 20.8% in Group 2, P = 0.04), whereas more residents in Group 1 agreed that nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (40.0% in Group 1 vs. 18.1% in Group 2, P = 0.02). The initiation of a nephrology fellowship program was not associated with an increase in internal medicine residents' interest in nephrology careers. Residents endorsed several negative

  18. The Impact of Supervision on Internal Medicine Residents' Attitudes and Management of Depression in Primary Care: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milone, Jennifer M.; Gottumukkala, Aruna; Ward, Christopher P.; York, Kaki M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the effect of supervision on internal medicine residents' attitudes toward and management of depression. Method: Internal medicine residents completed a survey during preclinical conferences. The survey included a published, validated questionnaire, the Depression Attitude Questionnaire, and items developed by the…

  19. Physician Provider Profiling in Brooke Army Medical Center’s Internal Medicine Clinic: A Multiple Regression and Process Control Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-12-01

    in Brooke Army Medical Center’s Internal Medicine Clinic during the 3rd & 4th quarter of FY 1998. Data regarding 26,502 individual patient-provider...accomplished by selecting internists and internal medicine residents and a single primary diagnosis. Second level case mix adjustment accounted for other

  20. Chaplains on the Medical Team: A Qualitative Analysis of an Interprofessional Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents and Chaplain Interns.

    PubMed

    Hemming, Patrick; Teague, Paula J; Crowe, Thomas; Levine, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    Improved collaboration between physicians and chaplains has the potential to improve patient experiences. To better understand the benefits and challenges of learning together, the authors conducted several focus groups with participants in an interprofessional curriculum that partnered internal medicine residents with chaplain interns in the clinical setting. The authors derived four major qualitative themes from the transcripts: (1) physician learners became aware of effective communication skills for addressing spirituality. (2) Chaplain interns enhanced the delivery of team-based patient-centered care. (3) Chaplains were seen as a source of emotional support to the medical team. (4) The partnership has three keys to success: adequate introductions for team members, clear expectations for participants, and opportunities for feedback. The themes presented indicate several benefits of pairing physicians and chaplains in the setting of direct patient care and suggest that this is an effective approach to incorporating spirituality in medical training.

  1. Piloting a Structured Practice Audit to Assess ACGME Milestones in Written Handoff Communication in Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Martin, Shannon K; Farnan, Jeanne M; McConville, John F; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-06-01

    Written communication skills are integral to patient care handoffs. Residency programs require feasible assessment tools that provide timely formative and summative feedback, ideally linked to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestones. We describe the use of 1 such tool-UPDATED-to assess written handoff communication skills in internal medicine interns. During 2012-2013, the authors piloted a structured practice audit at 1 academic institution to audit written sign-outs completed by 45 interns, using the UPDATED tool, which scores 7 aspects of sign-out communication linked to milestones. Intern sign-outs were audited by trained faculty members throughout the year. Results were incorporated into intern performance reviews and Clinical Competency Committees. A total of 136 sign-outs were audited (averaging 3.1 audits per intern). In the first trimester, 14 interns (31%) had satisfactory audit results. Five interns (11%) had critical deficiencies and received immediate feedback, and the remaining 26 (58%) were assigned future audits due to missing audits or unsatisfactory scores. In the second trimester, 21 interns (68%) had satisfactory results, 1 had critical deficiencies, and 9 (29%) required future audits. Nine of the 10 remaining interns in the final trimester had satisfactory audits. Faculty time was estimated at 10 to 15 minutes per sign-out audited. The UPDATED audit is a milestone-based tool that can be used to assess written sign-out communication skills in internal medicine residency programs. Future work is planned to adapt the tool for use by senior supervisory residents to appraise sign-outs in real time.

  2. Piloting a Structured Practice Audit to Assess ACGME Milestones in Written Handoff Communication in Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Shannon K.; Farnan, Jeanne M.; McConville, John F.; Arora, Vineet M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Written communication skills are integral to patient care handoffs. Residency programs require feasible assessment tools that provide timely formative and summative feedback, ideally linked to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestones. Objective We describe the use of 1 such tool—UPDATED—to assess written handoff communication skills in internal medicine interns. Methods During 2012–2013, the authors piloted a structured practice audit at 1 academic institution to audit written sign-outs completed by 45 interns, using the UPDATED tool, which scores 7 aspects of sign-out communication linked to milestones. Intern sign-outs were audited by trained faculty members throughout the year. Results were incorporated into intern performance reviews and Clinical Competency Committees. Results A total of 136 sign-outs were audited (averaging 3.1 audits per intern). In the first trimester, 14 interns (31%) had satisfactory audit results. Five interns (11%) had critical deficiencies and received immediate feedback, and the remaining 26 (58%) were assigned future audits due to missing audits or unsatisfactory scores. In the second trimester, 21 interns (68%) had satisfactory results, 1 had critical deficiencies, and 9 (29%) required future audits. Nine of the 10 remaining interns in the final trimester had satisfactory audits. Faculty time was estimated at 10 to 15 minutes per sign-out audited. Conclusions The UPDATED audit is a milestone-based tool that can be used to assess written sign-out communication skills in internal medicine residency programs. Future work is planned to adapt the tool for use by senior supervisory residents to appraise sign-outs in real time. PMID:26221442

  3. Recruiting Quarterbacks: Strategies for Revitalizing Training in Primary Care Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Goroll, Allan H

    2016-02-01

    Current U.S. primary care workforce shortages and trainees' declining interest in primary care residency training, especially regarding primary care internal medicine, have many parallels with circumstances in the early 1970s, when modern adult primary care first emerged. Rediscovery of the lessons learned and the solutions developed at that time and applying them to the current situation have the potential to help engage a new generation of young physicians in the primary care mission.The author compares the internal medicine residency primary care track at the University of New Mexico, described by Brislen and colleagues in this issue, with the nation's first three-year primary care internal medicine residency track introduced at Massachusetts General Hospital in 1973. Strategies for addressing the challenges of primary care practice and improving learner attitudes toward the field are discussed. The author suggests that primary care physicians should be likened to "quarterbacks" rather than "gatekeepers" or "providers" to underscore the intensity of training, level of responsibility, degree of professionalism, and amount of compensation required for this profession. The advent of multidisciplinary team practice, modern health information technology, and fundamental payment reform promises to dramatically alter the picture of primary care, restoring its standing as one of the best job descriptions in medicine.

  4. Complementary and alternative medicine use by visitors to rural Japanese family medicine clinics: results from the international complementary and alternative medicine survey.

    PubMed

    Shumer, Gregory; Warber, Sara; Motohara, Satoko; Yajima, Ayaka; Plegue, Melissa; Bialko, Matthew; Iida, Tomoko; Sano, Kiyoshi; Amenomori, Masaki; Tsuda, Tsukasa; Fetters, Michael D

    2014-09-25

    There is growing interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) throughout the world, however previous research done in Japan has focused primarily on CAM use in major cities. The purpose of this study was to develop and distribute a Japanese version of the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q) to assess the use of CAM among people who visit rural Japanese family medicine clinics. Using a Japanese version of the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q), a cross-sectional survey was conducted in three rural family medicine clinics. All patients and those accompanying patients who met inclusion criteria were eligible to participate. Data were entered into SPSS Statistics and analyzed for use by age, gender, and location. Of the 519 respondents who participated in the project, 415 participants reported CAM use in the past 12 months (80.0%). When prayer is excluded, the prevalence of CAM use drops to 77.3% in the past year, or 403 respondents. The most common forms of CAM used by respondents were pain relief pads (n = 170, 32.8%), herbal medicines/supplements (n = 167, 32.2%), and massage by self or family (n = 166, 32.0%). Female respondents, individuals with higher levels of education, and those with poorer overall health status were more likely to use CAM than respondents without these characteristics. Only 22.8% of CAM therapies used were reported to physicians by survey participants. These data indicate that CAM use in rural Japan is common. The results are consistent with previous studies that show that Japanese individuals are more interested in forms of CAM such as pain relief pads and massage, than in mind-body forms of CAM like relaxation and meditation. Due to the high utilization of certain CAM practices, and given that most CAM users do not disclose their CAM use to their doctors, we conclude that physicians in rural Japan would benefit by asking about CAM use

  5. Views of new internal medicine faculty of their preparedness and competence in physician-patient communication.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Paul S; Barrier, Patricia A; Call, Timothy G; Duncan, Alan K; Hurley, Daniel L; Multari, Adamarie; Rabatin, Jeffrey T; Li, James T C

    2006-05-26

    We sought to assess self-rated importance of the medical interview to clinical practice and competence in physician-patient communication among new internal medicine faculty at an academic medical center. Since 2001, new internal medicine faculty at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine (Rochester, Minnesota) have completed a survey on physician-patient communication. The survey asks the new faculty to rate their overall competence in medical interviewing, the importance of the medical interview to their practice, their confidence and adequacy of previous training in handling eight frequently encountered challenging communication scenarios, and whether they would benefit from additional communication training. Between 2001 and 2004, 75 general internists and internal medicine subspecialists were appointed to the faculty, and of these, 58 (77%) completed the survey. The faculty rated (on a 10-point scale) the importance of the medical interview higher than their competence in interviewing; this difference was significant (average +/- SD, 9.4 +/- 1.0 vs 7.7 +/- 1.2, P < .001). Similar results were obtained by sex, age, specialty, years since residency or fellowship training, and perceived benefit of training. Experienced faculty rated their competence in medical interviewing and the importance of the medical interview higher than recent graduates (ie, less than one year since training). For each challenging communication scenario, the new faculty rated the adequacy of their previous training in handling the scenario relatively low. A majority (57%) said they would benefit from additional communication training. Although new internal medicine faculty rate high the importance of the medical interview, they rate their competence and adequacy of previous training in medical interviewing relatively low, and many indicate that they would benefit from additional communication training. These results should encourage academic medical centers to make curricula in physician

  6. Views of new internal medicine faculty of their preparedness and competence in physician-patient communication

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Paul S; Barrier, Patricia A; Call, Timothy G; Duncan, Alan K; Hurley, Daniel L; Multari, Adamarie; Rabatin, Jeffrey T; Li, James TC

    2006-01-01

    Background We sought to assess self-rated importance of the medical interview to clinical practice and competence in physician-patient communication among new internal medicine faculty at an academic medical center. Methods Since 2001, new internal medicine faculty at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine (Rochester, Minnesota) have completed a survey on physician-patient communication. The survey asks the new faculty to rate their overall competence in medical interviewing, the importance of the medical interview to their practice, their confidence and adequacy of previous training in handling eight frequently encountered challenging communication scenarios, and whether they would benefit from additional communication training. Results Between 2001 and 2004, 75 general internists and internal medicine subspecialists were appointed to the faculty, and of these, 58 (77%) completed the survey. The faculty rated (on a 10-point scale) the importance of the medical interview higher than their competence in interviewing; this difference was significant (average ± SD, 9.4 ± 1.0 vs 7.7 ± 1.2, P < .001). Similar results were obtained by sex, age, specialty, years since residency or fellowship training, and perceived benefit of training. Experienced faculty rated their competence in medical interviewing and the importance of the medical interview higher than recent graduates (ie, less than one year since training). For each challenging communication scenario, the new faculty rated the adequacy of their previous training in handling the scenario relatively low. A majority (57%) said they would benefit from additional communication training. Conclusion Although new internal medicine faculty rate high the importance of the medical interview, they rate their competence and adequacy of previous training in medical interviewing relatively low, and many indicate that they would benefit from additional communication training. These results should encourage academic medical centers

  7. Out of the wilderness: flipping the classroom to advance scholarship in an internal medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Dale S

    2014-11-01

    Residents in an internal medicine residency program "flipped the classroom" in a series of learner-centered activities which included the creation of a medical student interest group, a continuing medical education symposium, and a journal supplement focused on wilderness medicine topics in Hawai'i and Asia Pacific. The project encompassed both scholarly activities (discovery, integration, application, and teaching) as well as scholarship (writing for publication). The project advanced the professional formation of residents by developing competencies and producing outcomes that are key features of the ACGME Next Accreditation System.

  8. AIMECS 09--Seventh AFMC International Medicinal Chemistry Congress. 23-27 August 2009, Cairns, Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Danny

    2009-10-01

    The Seventh Asian Federation for Medicinal Chemistry (AFMC) International Medicinal Chemistry Congress (AIMECS) held in Cairns, Australia was co-hosted by the Royal Australian Chemical Institute Division of Biomolecular Chemistry and included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the fields of cancer, cardiovascular disease, anti-infectives and CNS disorders. This conference report highlights selected presentations on anticancer agents, including ALK5 inhibitors, PAR1 inhibitors, anticoagulants, iron chelators, anxiolytics and GABA receptor antagonists. Investigational drugs discussed include IN-1130 (SK Chemicals Co Ltd/In2Gen Co), SCH-530348 (Schering-Plough Corp), apixaban (Bristol-Myers Squibb Co/Pfizer Inc) and BNC-210 (Bionomics Ltd).

  9. Addressing the Primary Care Shortage on a Shoestring: A Successful Track in an Internal Medicine Residency.

    PubMed

    Brislen, Heather; Dunn, Angela; Parada, Alisha; Rendon, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Nationally, shortages of primary care providers are of major concern. Internal medicine programs, once the major supplier of primary care physicians, are no longer producing large numbers of primary care providers to help meet the needs of the growing patient population. In 2009, residents at the University of New Mexico created a resident-driven Primary Care Track (PCT) within the internal medicine residency, and after six years this track is thriving. The PCT allows residents to designate blocks of time specifically devoted to primary care training. Residents opt in to the track at the end of intern year and arrange their own schedules over large blocks of time in the last two years of training to allow for an individualized curriculum that prepares them for independent practice in primary care. Approximately 85% (11/13) of residents who have graduated from the track have gone on to practice in primary care after graduation, and the internal medicine residency program as a whole has also seen an increase in the fraction of residents pursuing primary care since the inception of this track. The PCT is currently at maximum capacity and may be forced to turn away applicants. To expand while still maintaining the core principles of the track, the PCT will strive to find additional ways to use New Mexico's existing resources and to develop a more robust mentoring structure and didactic programs. Formalized financial, faculty, and administrative support of the program also will be needed.

  10. Clinical preventive services in Guatemala: a cross-sectional survey of internal medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Corral, Juan E; Arnold, Lauren D; Argueta, Erwin E; Ganju, Akshay; Barnoya, Joaquín

    2012-01-01

    Guatemala is currently undergoing an epidemiologic transition. Preventive services are key to reducing the burden of non-communicable diseases, and smoking counseling and cessation are among the most cost-effective and wide-reaching strategies. Internal medicine physicians are fundamental to providing such services, and their knowledge is a cornerstone of non-communicable disease control. A national cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2011 to evaluate knowledge of clinical preventive services for non-communicable diseases. Interns, residents, and attending physicians of the internal medicine departments of all teaching hospitals in Guatemala completed a self-administered questionnaire. Participants' responses were contrasted with the Guatemalan Ministry of Health (MoH) prevention guidelines and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations. Analysis compared knowledge of recommendations within and between hospitals. In response to simulated patient scenarios, all services were recommended by more than half of physicians regardless of MoH or USPSTF recommendations. Prioritization was adequate according to the MoH guidelines but not including other potentially effective services (e.g. colorectal cancer and lipid disorder screenings). With the exception of colorectal and prostate cancer screening, less frequently recommended by interns, there was no difference in recommendation rates by level. Guatemalan internal medicine physicians' knowledge on preventive services recommendations for non-communicable diseases is limited, and prioritization did not reflect cost-effectiveness. Based on these data we recommend that preventive medicine training be strengthened and development of evidence-based guidelines for low-middle income countries be a priority.

  11. A qualitative study of work-life choices in academic internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Carol; Byars-Winston, Angela; McSorley, Rebecca; Schultz, Alexandra; Kaatz, Anna; Carnes, Mary L

    2014-03-01

    The high attrition rate of female physicians pursuing an academic medicine research career has not been examined in the context of career development theory. We explored how internal medicine residents and faculty experience their work within the context of their broader life domain in order to identify strategies for facilitating career advancement. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of 18 residents and 34 faculty members representing male and female physicians at different career stages. Using thematic analysis, three themes emerged: (1) the love of being a physician ("Raison d'être"), (2) family obligations ("2nd Shift"), and (3) balancing work demands with non-work life ("Negotiating Academic Medicine"). Female researchers and educators reported more strategies for multiple role planning and management than female practitioners. Interventions aimed at enhancing academic internists' planning and self-efficacy for multiple role management should be investigated as a potential means for increasing participation and facilitate advancement.

  12. Current situation of International Organization for Standardization/Technical Committee 249 international standards of traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Qi; Wang, Yue-Xi; Shi, Nan-Nan; Han, Xue-Jie; Lu, Ai-Ping

    2017-05-01

    To review the current situation and progress of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) international standards, standard projects and proposals in International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/ technical committee (TC) 249. ISO/TC 249 standards and standard projects on the ISO website were searched and new standard proposals information were collected from ISO/TC 249 National Mirror Committee in China. Then all the available data were summarized in 5 closely related items, including proposed time, proposed country, assigned working group (WG), current stage and classifification. In ISO/TC 249, there were 2 international standards, 18 standard projects and 24 new standard proposals proposed in 2014. These 44 standard subjects increased year by year since 2011. Twenty-nine of them were proposed by China, 15 were assigned to WG 4, 36 were in preliminary and preparatory stage and 8 were categorized into 4 fifields, 7 groups and sub-groups based on International Classifification Standards. A rapid and steady development of international standardization in TCM can be observed in ISO/TC 249.

  13. Developing Educators, Investigators, and Leaders During Internal Medicine Residency: The Area of Distinction Program

    PubMed Central

    Kohlwes, R. Jeffrey; Cornett, Patricia; Dandu, Madhavi; Julian, Katherine; Vidyarthi, Arpana; Minichiello, Tracy; Shunk, Rebecca; Jain, Sharad; Harleman, Elizabeth; Ranji, Sumant; Sharpe, Brad; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Hollander, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Background Professional organizations have called for individualized training approaches, as well as for opportunities for resident scholarship, to ensure that internal medicine residents have sufficient knowledge and experience to make informed career choices. Context and Purpose To address these training issues within the University of California, San Francisco, internal medicine program, we created the Areas of Distinction (AoD) program to supplement regular clinical duties with specialized curricula designed to engage residents in clinical research, global health, health equities, medical education, molecular medicine, or physician leadership. We describe our AoD program and present this initiative's evaluation data. Methods and Program Evaluation We evaluated features of our AoD program, including program enrollment, resident satisfaction, recruitment surveys, quantity of scholarly products, and the results of our resident's certifying examination scores. Finally, we described the costs of implementing and maintaining the AoDs. Results AoD enrollment increased from 81% to 98% during the past 5 years. Both quantitative and qualitative data demonstrated a positive effect on recruitment and improved resident satisfaction with the program, and the number and breadth of scholarly presentations have increased without an adverse effect on our board certification pass rate. Conclusions The AoD system led to favorable outcomes in the domains of resident recruitment, satisfaction, scholarship, and board performance. Our intervention showed that residents can successfully obtain clinical training while engaging in specialized education beyond the bounds of core medicine training. Nurturing these interests 5 empower residents to better shape their careers by providing earlier insight into internist roles that transcend classic internal medicine training. PMID:23205204

  14. Attitudes and perceptions of internal medicine residents regarding pulmonary and critical care subspecialty training.

    PubMed

    Lorin, Scott; Heffner, John; Carson, Shannon

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate the attitudes and perceptions of internal medicine residents regarding pulmonary and critical care medicine (PCCM) training. Prospective study. Three university hospitals. An eight-page survey was distributed and collected between March 1, 2002, and June 30, 2002. All internal medicine or internal medicine/pediatric residents training at the three institutions were eligible for the study. One hundred seventy-eight residents in internal medicine from an eligible pool of 297 residents returned the survey (61% response rate). PCCM accounted for only 3.4% of the career choices. Forty-one percent of the residents seriously considered a pulmonary and/or critical care fellowship during their residency. Of these residents, 23.5% found the combination of programs the more attractive option, while 2.8% found pulmonary alone and 14.5% found critical care alone more attractive. Key factors associated with a higher resident interest in PCCM subspecialty training included more weeks in the ICU (p = 0.008), more role models in PCCM (3.02 +/- 0.78 vs 3.45 +/- 0.78, p = 0.0004), and resident observations of a greater sense of satisfaction among PCCM faculty (3.07 +/- 0.82 vs 3.33 +/- 0.82, p = 0.04) and fellows (3.05 +/- 0.69 vs 3.31 +/- 0.86, p = 0.03) [mean +/- SD]. The five most commonly cited attributes of PCCM fellowship that would attract residents to the field included intellectual stimulation (69%), opportunities to manage critically ill patients (51%), application of complex physiologic principles (45%), number of procedures performed (31%), and academically challenging rounds (29%). The five most commonly cited attributes of PCCM that would dissuade residents from the field included overly demanding responsibilities with lack of leisure time (54%), stress among faculty and fellows (45%), management responsibilities for chronically ill patients (30%), poor match of career with resident personality (24%), and treatment of pulmonary diseases (16%). Internal

  15. A Program to Help Interns Cope with Stresses in an Internal Medicine Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Dale A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A program in personal and professional development for interns was developed at the University of Connecticut Affiliated Hospitals to reduce maladaptive responses to the stresses of medical training. The goals of the program are to provide a supportive atmosphere, build trust, and promote deeper self-understanding and sensitivity. (Author/MLW)

  16. Psychiatry Residents' Opinions of a Substance Abuse Rotation in a VA Hospital General Internal Medicine Unit.

    PubMed

    Khouzam, Hani Raoul

    2000-09-01

    Written optional evaluation forms were devised to gather psychiatry residents' opinions regarding their substance use disorder rotation in a general internal medicine unit. Over a 4-year period 24 residents completed that rotation and 83% (N = 20) completed the form. Of the responding residents, 95% (N = 19) rated an above-average satisfaction with the rotation and 90% (N = 18) would recommend the rotation to other residents. All respondents 100% (N = 20) reported that the rotation met its stated training objectives. Considering the recent changes in the delivery of health care with its focus toward primary care and away from specialty care, these findings raise the possibility of incorporating the substance abuse training of psychiatry residents into the primary care setting of general internal medicine.

  17. Chinese translation of English textbooks on internal medicine from the 1850s to the 1940s.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chuang-Ye; Wang, Fu-Mei

    2014-06-01

    During the 100 years from 1850 to 1949, six English textbooks on internal medicine were translated into Chinese and published. Publication of these books was a response to the increased demand for Chinese textbooks after the opening of several Western-style hospitals and medical schools in China where the instruction was in Chinese. Throughout this period, textbooks translated from English were regarded as symbols of mainstream and authority within medical communities in China. There was a shift of translators from British and American medical missionaries to Chinese medical elites. Publishers also changed from missionary hospitals or missionary organizations to the Chinese Medical Association, which was led by ethnic Chinese. After the 1950s, translation activity continued in Taiwan, but it was halted in China until after the Cultural Revolution. This paper provides bibliographic information about these books. The transition of medical authority in China during this 100-year period is also reviewed through the successive publication of translated textbooks on internal medicine.

  18. A commitment to high-value care education from the internal medicine community.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cynthia D; Levinson, Wendy S

    2015-05-05

    The Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), ABIM Foundation, and American College of Physicians are collaborating to enhance the education of physicians in high-value care (HVC) and make its practice an essential competency in undergraduate and postgraduate education by 2017. This article serves as the organizations' formal commitment to providing a foundation of HVC education on which others may build. The 5 key targets for HVC education are experiential learning and curriculum, environment and culture, clinical support, regulatory requirements, and sustainability. The goal is to train future health care professionals for whom HVC is part of normal practice, thus providing patients with improved clinical outcomes at a lower cost.

  19. Using lean methodology to teach quality improvement to internal medicine residents at a safety net hospital.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Charlene; Suen, Winnie; Gupte, Gouri

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of this initiative was to develop a quality improvement (QI) curriculum using Lean methodology for internal medicine residents at Boston Medical Center, a safety net academic hospital. A total of 90 residents and 8 School of Public Health students participated in a series of four, 60- to 90-minute interactive and hands-on QI sessions. Seventeen QI project plans were created and conducted over a 4-month period. The curriculum facilitated internal medicine residents' learning about QI and development of positive attitudes toward QI (assessed using pre- and post-attitude surveys) and exposed them to an interprofessional team structure that duplicates future working relationships. This QI curriculum can be an educational model of how health care trainees can work collaboratively to improve health care quality.

  20. Teaching internal medicine residents to sustain their improvement through the quality assessment and improvement curriculum.

    PubMed

    Oyler, Julie; Vinci, Lisa; Johnson, Julie K; Arora, Vineet M

    2011-02-01

    Although sustainability is a key component in the evaluation of continuous quality improvement (CQI) projects, medicine resident CQI projects are often evaluated by immediate improvements in targeted areas without addressing sustainability. AIM/SETTING: To assess the sustainability of resident CQI projects in an ambulatory university-based clinic. During their ambulatory rotation, all second year internal medicine residents use the American Board of Internal Medicine's Clinical Preventive Services (CPS) Practice Improvement Modules (PIM) to complete chart reviews, patient surveys, and a system survey. The residents then develop a group CQI project and collect early post data. Third year residents return to evaluate their original CQI project during an ambulatory rotation two to six months later and complete four plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles on each CQI project. From July 2006 to June 2009, 64 (100%) medicine residents completed the CQI curriculum. Residents completed six group projects and examined their success using early (2 to 6 weeks) and late (2 to 6 months) post-intervention data. Three of the projects demonstrated sustainable improvement in the resident continuity clinic. When residents are taught principles of sustainability and spread and asked to complete multiple PDSA cycles, they are able to identify common themes that may contribute to success of QI projects over time.

  1. BRIEF REPORT: Multiprogram Evaluation of Reading Habits of Primary Care Internal Medicine Residents on Ambulatory Rotations

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Cindy J; Aagaard, Eva; Brandenburg, Suzanne; Nadkarni, Mohan; Wei, Henry G; Baron, Robert

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the reading habits and educational resources of primary care internal medicine residents for their ambulatory medicine education. DESIGN Cross-sectional, multiprogram survey of primary care internal medicine residents. PARTICIPANTS/SETTING Second- and third-year residents on ambulatory care rotations at 9 primary care medicine programs (124 eligible residents; 71% response rate). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Participants were asked open-ended and 5-point Likert-scaled questions about reading habits: time spent reading, preferred resources, and motivating and inhibiting factors. Participants reported reading medical topics for a mean of 4.3 ± 3.0 SD hours weekly. Online-only sources were the most frequently utilized medical resource (mean Likert response 4.16 ± 0.87). Respondents most commonly cited specific patients' cases (4.38 ± 0.65) and preparation for talks (4.08 ± 0.89) as motivating factors, and family responsibilities (3.99 ± 0.65) and lack of motivation (3.93 ± 0.81) as inhibiting factors. CONCLUSIONS To stimulate residents' reading, residency programs should encourage patient- and case-based learning; require teaching assignments; and provide easy access to online curricula. PMID:16704393

  2. Mindfulness, burnout, and effects on performance evaluations in internal medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Sarah E; Auerbach, Stephen M; Rybarczyk, Bruce; Lee, Bennett; Call, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Burnout has been documented at high levels in medical residents with negative effects on performance. Some dispositional qualities, like mindfulness, may protect against burnout. The purpose of the present study was to assess burnout prevalence among internal medicine residents at a single institution, examine the relationship between mindfulness and burnout, and provide preliminary findings on the relation between burnout and performance evaluations in internal medicine residents. Methods Residents (n = 38) completed validated measures of burnout at three time points separated by 2 months and a validated measure of dispositional mindfulness at baseline. Program director end-of-year performance evaluations were also obtained on 22 milestones used to evaluate internal medicine resident performance; notably, these milestones have not yet been validated for research purposes; therefore, the investigation here is exploratory. Results Overall, 71.1% (n = 27) of the residents met criteria for burnout during the study. Lower scores on the “acting with awareness” facet of dispositional mindfulness significantly predicted meeting burnout criteria χ2(5) = 11.88, p = 0.04. Lastly, meeting burnout criteria significantly predicted performance on three of the performance milestones, with positive effects on milestones from the “system-based practices” and “professionalism” domains and negative effects on a milestone from the “patient care” domain. Conclusion Burnout rates were high in this sample of internal medicine residents and rates were consistent with other reports of burnout during medical residency. Dispositional mindfulness was supported as a protective factor against burnout. Importantly, results from the exploratory investigation of the relationship between burnout and resident evaluations suggested that burnout may improve performance on some domains of resident evaluations while compromising performance on other domains. Implications and

  3. Mindfulness, burnout, and effects on performance evaluations in internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Braun, Sarah E; Auerbach, Stephen M; Rybarczyk, Bruce; Lee, Bennett; Call, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Burnout has been documented at high levels in medical residents with negative effects on performance. Some dispositional qualities, like mindfulness, may protect against burnout. The purpose of the present study was to assess burnout prevalence among internal medicine residents at a single institution, examine the relationship between mindfulness and burnout, and provide preliminary findings on the relation between burnout and performance evaluations in internal medicine residents. Residents (n = 38) completed validated measures of burnout at three time points separated by 2 months and a validated measure of dispositional mindfulness at baseline. Program director end-of-year performance evaluations were also obtained on 22 milestones used to evaluate internal medicine resident performance; notably, these milestones have not yet been validated for research purposes; therefore, the investigation here is exploratory. Overall, 71.1% (n = 27) of the residents met criteria for burnout during the study. Lower scores on the "acting with awareness" facet of dispositional mindfulness significantly predicted meeting burnout criteria χ(2)(5) = 11.88, p = 0.04. Lastly, meeting burnout criteria significantly predicted performance on three of the performance milestones, with positive effects on milestones from the "system-based practices" and "professionalism" domains and negative effects on a milestone from the "patient care" domain. Burnout rates were high in this sample of internal medicine residents and rates were consistent with other reports of burnout during medical residency. Dispositional mindfulness was supported as a protective factor against burnout. Importantly, results from the exploratory investigation of the relationship between burnout and resident evaluations suggested that burnout may improve performance on some domains of resident evaluations while compromising performance on other domains. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  4. Pharmaceutical industry support and residency education: a survey of internal medicine program directors.

    PubMed

    Loertscher, Laura L; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Beasley, Brent W; Holmboe, Eric S; Kolars, Joseph C; McDonald, Furman S

    2010-02-22

    Interactions with the pharmaceutical industry are known to affect the attitudes and behaviors of medical residents; however, to our knowledge, a nationally representative description of current practices has not been reported. The Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine surveyed 381 US internal medicine residency program directors in 2006-2007 regarding pharmaceutical industry support to their training programs. The primary outcome measure was program director report of pharmaceutical financial support to their residency. Demographic and performance variables were analyzed with regard to these responses. In all, 236 program directors (61.9%) responded to the survey. Of these, 132 (55.9%) reported accepting support from the pharmaceutical industry. One hundred seventy of the 236 program directors (72.0%) expressed the opinion that pharmaceutical support is not desirable. Residency programs were less likely to receive pharmaceutical support when the program director held the opinion that industry support was not acceptable (odds ratio [OR], 0.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02-0.22). Programs located in the southern United States were more likely to accept pharmaceutical support (OR, 8.45; 95% CI, 1.95-36.57). The American Board of Internal Medicine pass rate was inversely associated with acceptance of industry support: each 1% decrease in the pass rate was associated with a 21% increase in the odds of accepting industry support (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.07-1.36). Although most of the program directors did not find pharmaceutical support desirable, more than half reported acceptance of industry support. Acceptance of pharmaceutical industry support was less prevalent among residency programs with a program director who considered support unacceptable and those with higher American Board of Internal Medicine pass rates.

  5. Student performance of the general physical examination in internal medicine: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Haring, Catharina M; Cools, Bernadette M; van der Meer, Jos Wm; Postma, Cornelis T

    2014-04-08

    Many practicing physicians lack skills in physical examination. It is not known whether physical examination skills already show deficiencies after an early phase of clinical training. At the end of the internal medicine clerkship students are expected to be able to perform a general physical examination in every new patient encounter. In a previous study, the basic physical examination items that should standardly be performed were set by consensus. The aim of the current observational study was to assess whether medical students were able to correctly perform a general physical examination regarding completeness as well as technique at the end of the clerkship internal medicine. One hundred students who had just finished their clerkship internal medicine were asked to perform a general physical examination on a standardized patient as they had learned during the clerkship. They were recorded on camera. Frequency of performance of each component of the physical examination was counted. Adequacy of performance was determined as either correct or incorrect or not assessable using a checklist of short descriptions of each physical examination component. A reliability analysis was performed by calculation of the intra class correlation coefficient for total scores of five physical examinations rated by three trained physicians and for their agreement on performance of all items. Approximately 40% of the agreed standard physical examination items were not performed by the students. Students put the most emphasis on examination of general parameters, heart, lungs and abdomen. Many components of the physical examination were not performed as was taught during precourses. Intra-class correlation was high for total scores of the physical examinations 0.91 (p <0.001) and for agreement on performance of the five physical examinations (0.79-0.92 p <0.001). In conclusion, performance of the general physical examination was already below expectation at the end of the internal

  6. Internal medicine residency training for unhealthy alcohol and other drug use: recommendations for curriculum design

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Unhealthy substance use is the spectrum from use that risks harm, to use associated with problems, to the diagnosable conditions of substance abuse and dependence, often referred to as substance abuse disorders. Despite the prevalence and impact of unhealthy substance use, medical education in this area remains lacking, not providing physicians with the necessary expertise to effectively address one of the most common and costly health conditions. Medical educators have begun to address the need for physician training in unhealthy substance use, and formal curricula have been developed and evaluated, though broad integration into busy residency curricula remains a challenge. Discussion We review the development of unhealthy substance use related competencies, and describe a curriculum in unhealthy substance use that integrates these competencies into internal medicine resident physician training. We outline strategies to facilitate adoption of such curricula by the residency programs. This paper provides an outline for the actual implementation of the curriculum within the structure of a training program, with examples using common teaching venues. We describe and link the content to the core competencies mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the formal accrediting body for residency training programs in the United States. Specific topics are recommended, with suggestions on how to integrate such teaching into existing internal medicine residency training program curricula. Summary Given the burden of disease and effective interventions available that can be delivered by internal medicine physicians, teaching about unhealthy substance use must be incorporated into internal medicine residency training, and can be done within existing teaching venues. PMID:20230607

  7. [2015 highlights in hospital-based internal medicine by chief residents].

    PubMed

    Baratali, Laïla; Gachoud, David; Aebischer, Oriane; Bastardot, François; Benmachiche, Malik; Fournier, Judith; Garnier, Antoine; Jaccard, Evrim; Pascual, Marie Mean; Metrailler, Pierre; Pagin, Monica; Voruz, Sophie; Sartori, Claudio

    2016-01-20

    The year 2015 gave us many scientific publications, among whom some will have an impact on our daily practice and some will influence our way of considering some well known diseases. Chief residents in the Service of internal medicine of the Lausanne University hospital, gathered like every year, to share their readings together in order to presentyou a small part of the many publications of 2015, which have been considered to have an impact on our future daily practice.

  8. Student performance of the general physical examination in internal medicine: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many practicing physicians lack skills in physical examination. It is not known whether physical examination skills already show deficiencies after an early phase of clinical training. At the end of the internal medicine clerkship students are expected to be able to perform a general physical examination in every new patient encounter. In a previous study, the basic physical examination items that should standardly be performed were set by consensus. The aim of the current observational study was to assess whether medical students were able to correctly perform a general physical examination regarding completeness as well as technique at the end of the clerkship internal medicine. Methods One hundred students who had just finished their clerkship internal medicine were asked to perform a general physical examination on a standardized patient as they had learned during the clerkship. They were recorded on camera. Frequency of performance of each component of the physical examination was counted. Adequacy of performance was determined as either correct or incorrect or not assessable using a checklist of short descriptions of each physical examination component. A reliability analysis was performed by calculation of the intra class correlation coefficient for total scores of five physical examinations rated by three trained physicians and for their agreement on performance of all items. Results Approximately 40% of the agreed standard physical examination items were not performed by the students. Students put the most emphasis on examination of general parameters, heart, lungs and abdomen. Many components of the physical examination were not performed as was taught during precourses. Intra-class correlation was high for total scores of the physical examinations 0.91 (p <0.001) and for agreement on performance of the five physical examinations (0.79-0.92 p <0.001). Conclusions In conclusion, performance of the general physical examination was already below

  9. Endangered Uyghur Medicinal Plant Ferula Identification through the Second Internal Transcribed Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Congzhao; Li, Xiaojin; Zhu, Jun; Song, Jingyuan; Yao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal plant Ferula has been widely used in Asian medicine, especially in Uyghur medicine in Xinjiang, China. Given that various substitutes and closely related species have similar morphological characteristics, Ferula is difficult to distinguish based on morphology alone, thereby causing confusion and threatening the safe use of Ferula. In this study, internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequences were analyzed and assessed for the accurate identification of two salable Ferula species (Ferula sinkiangensis and Ferula fukangensis) and eight substitutes or closely related species. Results showed that the sequence length of ITS2 ranged from 451 bp to 45 bp, whereas guanine and cytosine contents (GC) were from 53.6% to 56.2%. A total of 77 variation sites were detected, including 63 base mutations and 14 insertion/deletion mutations. The ITS2 sequence correctly identified 100% of the samples at the species level using the basic local alignment search tool 1 and nearest-distance method. Furthermore, neighbor-joining tree successfully identified the genuine plants F. sinkiangensis and F. fukangensis from their succedaneum and closely related species. These results indicated that ITS2 sequence could be used as a valuable barcode to distinguish Uyghur medicine Ferula from counterfeits and closely related species. This study may broaden DNA barcoding application in the Uyghur medicinal plant field. PMID:26120347

  10. Developing a high-performance team training framework for internal medicine residents: the ABC'S of teamwork.

    PubMed

    Carbo, Alexander R; Tess, Anjala V; Roy, Christopher; Weingart, Saul N

    2011-06-01

    Effective teamwork and communication can prevent error and mitigate harm. High-performance team training was developed in the aviation industry for flight crews and is being incorporated in health care settings, such as emergency departments, operating rooms, and labor and delivery suites. We translated and adapted high-performance teamwork and communication principles from other industries and other disciplines to an inpatient internal medicine environment. We selected key principles from aviation and anesthesia crew training programs in 2004 and organized them into the ABC'S of teamwork. These included appropriate Assertiveness, effective Briefings, Callback and verification, Situational awareness, and Shared mental models. Based on this content, we developed a training session for internal medicine residents and faculty, and evaluated learners' patient safety attitudes and knowledge before and after training with a written survey. More than 50 residents participated in the module. The percentage of correct answers on a question related to key teamwork principles increased from 35% before training to 67% after training (P = 0.03). Before training, 65% of the residents reported that they "would feel comfortable telling a senior clinician his/her plan was unsafe"; this increased to 94% after training (P = 0.005). After the training session, residents were able to provide examples from their clinical practice that emphasized all of the ABC'S of teamwork. Teamwork principles can be adapted from other disciplines and applied to internal medicine. After a single session, residents displayed greater knowledge of teamwork principles and reported changed attitudes toward key teamwork behaviors.

  11. An educational game for teaching clinical practice guidelines to Internal Medicine residents: development, feasibility and acceptability.

    PubMed

    Akl, Elie A; Mustafa, Reem; Slomka, Thomas; Alawneh, Alia; Vedavalli, Abhishek; Schünemann, Holger J

    2008-11-18

    Adherence to Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) remains suboptimal among internal medicine trainees. Educational games are of growing interest and have the potential to improve adherence to CPGs. The objectives of this study were to develop an educational game to teach CPGs in Internal Medicine residency programs and to evaluate its feasibility and acceptability. We developed the Guide-O-Game(c) in the format of a TV game show with questions based on recommendations of CPGs. The development of the Guide-O-Game(c) consisted of the creation of a multimedia interactive tool, the development of recommendation-based questions, and the definition of the game's rules. We evaluated its feasibility through pilot testing and its acceptability through a qualitative process. The multimedia interactive tool uses a Macromedia Flash web application and consists of a manager interface and a user interface. The user interface allows the choice of two game styles. We created so far 16 sets of questions relating to 9 CPGs. The pilot testing proved that the game was feasible. The qualitative evaluation showed that residents considered the game to be acceptable. We developed an educational game to teach CPGs to Internal Medicine residents that is both feasible and acceptable. Future work should evaluate its impact on educational outcomes.

  12. [Management of stroke in a ward of internal medicine. Limits and prospects].

    PubMed

    Negri, Monica; Martignoni, Alessandra; Baccheschi, Jordan; Santilli, Giovanna; Marchesi, Eugenia

    2004-03-01

    Precocious admission to specifically "dedicated" wards proved to improve reduction of mortality and degree of residual disability in patients with stroke, even if their inhomogeneous distribution gets most patients admitted to wards of Internal Medicine. We purposed to evaluate the importance of this problem, to check adhesion to the national guidelines and to show the main problems in management of patients with stroke in the Operative Unit of Internal Medicine, Vascular and Metabolic Diseases of the IRCCS S. Matteo Hospital of Pavia. 143 patients with stroke were admitted in 2001, 126 were ischemic, 17 hemorragic; the mean age was of 73. The most frequent risk factors were hypertension, diabetes, smoke and atrial fibrillation. 59% of patients were admitted within 6 hours from onset of symptoms. Within the ischemic subtypes, 17.5% were atherotrombothic, 16.7% cardioembolic, 23.8% lacunar and 42% with undetermined etiology. Lacunar syndromes were the most part. 80% of patients underwent computed tomography, 50% underwent epiaortic Doppler sonography, 38% echocardiography. 61% of ischemic subtypes underwent acute antiplatelet treatment. Complications were prevalent in oldest patients. Mortality of inpatients was 17%, influenced by age, hypertension, severe sensorial compromission at admission, cardioembolism and complications. This study proved leak of adhesion to national guidelines which brought to inadequate accuracy in diagnosis and difficulty in making correct and coherent therapeutic choices. At least in great hospitals, "dedicated" areas in wards of Internal Medicine with selected, trained and motivated staff should be desirable.

  13. Factors associated with onset of delirium among internal medicine inpatients in Spain.

    PubMed

    Díez-Manglano, Jesús; Palazón-Fraile, Claudia; Diez-Massó, Fabiola; Martínez-Álvarez, Rosa; Del Corral-Beamonte, Esther; Carreño-Borrego, Pilar; Pueyo-Tejedor, Pilar; Gomes-Martín, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Delirium increases mortality and length of stay among hospital inpatients. Little is known about the incidence of delirium among inpatients receiving care in internal medicine nursing units in Spain. The aim of this study was to estimate frequency of delirium onset among internal medicine inpatients and identify factors associated with delirium onset using nursing records and administrative databases. Retrospective cohort study of 744 patients hospitalized in an internal medicine department in October 2010 and January, May, and October 2011. Data concerning occurrence of delirium, age, gender, living in a nursing residence, Barthel Index of activities of daily living, Norton scale for pressure ulcer risk, intravenous fluid therapy, urinary catheterization, presence of pressure ulcers, major diagnostic category at discharge, length of stay, and mean weight in the diagnosis-related group were gathered for each patient. Backward stepwise logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with onset of delirium. Ninety-seven (13%) patients experienced delirium. Factors associated with delirium were age (OR = 1.03, 95% CI [1.01, 1.06]), Barthel Index (OR = 0.99. 95% CI [0.98, 0.99]), and urinary catheterization (OR = 2.00, 95% CI [1.19, 3.68]). Increased age and presence of a urinary catheter were associated with increased onset of delirium, whereas higher levels of independence in activities of daily living were protective.

  14. [Use of Twitter(®) in a congress: First experience for French internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Campagne, J; Galland, J; Mangin, O

    2016-07-01

    Twitter(®) is a social "microblogging" network in which users can send and receive updates of up to 140 characters. Nowadays its use in medicine has become common in the United Kingdom and in the USA, particularly in scientific meetings where attendees tweet relevant information from the various lectures. Then, the tweeted information is relayed by followers who may be present or not at the lectures. Using Twitter(®) on the 70th Congress of French Society of Internal Medicine with @MielLorraine and @secretaireMIEL accounts was the first time in internal medicine in France. In total, 825 tweets were posted by both accounts and 59% were original. The two accounts were followed by respectively 12 and 10 followers. People outside the congress were able to get information and to start discussion on many topics. This experience emphasizes the fact that Twitter(®) improves interactions during congresses. Therefore, we should continue on a going forward basis to develop this tool. Copyright © 2015 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding Resident Learning Preferences Within an Internal Medicine Noon Conference Lecture Series: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsky, Adam P.; Zickmund, Susan L.; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2014-01-01

    Background The lecture remains the most common approach for didactic offerings in residency programs despite conflicting evidence about the effectiveness of this format. Objective The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of internal medicine residents toward conferences held in the lecture format. Methods The investigators invited internal medicine residents (N  =  144) to participate in focus groups discussing their perspectives about noon conference lectures. The investigators used a semistructured guide to ask about motivations for attendance and effectiveness of noon conferences, transcribed the recordings, coded the discussions, and analyzed the results. Results Seven focus groups with a total of 41 residents were held. This identified 4 major domains: (1) motivations for attendance; (2) appropriate content; (3) effective teaching methods; and (4) perspectives on active participation. Residents' motivations were categorized into external factors, including desire for a break and balance to their workload, and intrinsic attributes, including the learning opportunity, topic, and speaker. Appropriate content was described as clinically relevant, practical, and presenting a balance of evidence. Identified effective teaching methods included shorter teaching sessions focused on high-yield learning points structured around cases and questions. While active participation increases residents' perceived level of stress, the benefits of this format include increased attention and learning. Conclusions This study furthers our knowledge of the learning preferences of internal medicine residents within the changing environment of residency education and can be used in conjunction with principles of adult learning to reform how we deliver core medical knowledge. PMID:24701307

  16. Understanding resident learning preferences within an internal medicine noon conference lecture series: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Zickmund, Susan L; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2014-03-01

    The lecture remains the most common approach for didactic offerings in residency programs despite conflicting evidence about the effectiveness of this format. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of internal medicine residents toward conferences held in the lecture format. The investigators invited internal medicine residents (N  =  144) to participate in focus groups discussing their perspectives about noon conference lectures. The investigators used a semistructured guide to ask about motivations for attendance and effectiveness of noon conferences, transcribed the recordings, coded the discussions, and analyzed the results. Seven focus groups with a total of 41 residents were held. This identified 4 major domains: (1) motivations for attendance; (2) appropriate content; (3) effective teaching methods; and (4) perspectives on active participation. Residents' motivations were categorized into external factors, including desire for a break and balance to their workload, and intrinsic attributes, including the learning opportunity, topic, and speaker. Appropriate content was described as clinically relevant, practical, and presenting a balance of evidence. Identified effective teaching methods included shorter teaching sessions focused on high-yield learning points structured around cases and questions. While active participation increases residents' perceived level of stress, the benefits of this format include increased attention and learning. This study furthers our knowledge of the learning preferences of internal medicine residents within the changing environment of residency education and can be used in conjunction with principles of adult learning to reform how we deliver core medical knowledge.

  17. Evaluation of an online program to teach microbiology to internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Jeannette; Burd, Eileen M; Kraft, Colleen S; Armstrong, Wendy S; Lenorr, Kenya; Spicer, Jennifer O; Martin, Donna; del Rio, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Microbiology rounds are an integral part of infectious disease consultation service. During microbiology rounds, we highlight microbiology principles using vignettes. We created case-based, interactive, microbiology online modules similar to the vignettes presented during microbiology rounds. Since internal medicine residents rotating on our infectious disease elective have limited time to participate in rounds and learn microbiology, our objective was to evaluate the use of the microbiology online modules by internal medicine residents. We asked residents to complete 10 of 25 online modules during their infectious disease elective. We evaluated which modules they chose and the change in their knowledge level. Forty-six internal medicine residents completed assessments given before and after accessing the modules with an average of 11/20 (range, 6 to 19) and 16/20 (range, 9 to 20) correct questions, respectively (average improvement, 5 questions; P = 0.0001). The modules accessed by more than 30 residents included those related to Clostridium difficile, anaerobes, Candida spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, influenza, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Neisseria meningitidis. We demonstrated improved microbiology knowledge after completion of the online modules. This improvement may not be solely attributed to completing the online modules, as fellows and faculty may have provided additional microbiology education during the rotation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. International perspectives on quality assurance and new techniques in radiation medicine: outcomes of an IAEA conference.

    PubMed

    Shortt, Ken; Davidsson, Lena; Hendry, Jolyon; Dondi, Maurizio; Andreo, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency organized an international conference called, "Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine" (QANTRM). It dealt with quality assurance (QA) in all aspects of radiation medicine (diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy) at the international level. Participants discussed QA issues pertaining to the implementation of new technologies and the need for education and staff training. The advantage of developing a comprehensive and harmonized approach to QA covering both the technical and the managerial issues was emphasized to ensure the optimization of benefits to patient safety and effectiveness. The necessary coupling between medical radiation imaging and radiotherapy was stressed, particularly for advanced technologies. However, the need for a more systematic approach to the adoption of advanced technologies was underscored by a report on failures in intensity-modulated radiotherapy dosimetry auditing tests in the United States, which could imply inadequate implementation of QA for these new technologies. A plenary session addressed the socioeconomic impact of introducing advanced technologies in resource-limited settings. How shall the dual gaps, one in access to basic medical services and the other in access to high-quality modern technology, be addressed?

  19. Use of Team-Based Learning Pedagogy for Internal Medicine Ambulatory Resident Teaching

    PubMed Central

    Balwan, Sandy; Fornari, Alice; DiMarzio, Paola; Verbsky, Jennifer; Pekmezaris, Renee; Stein, Joanna; Chaudhry, Saima

    2015-01-01

    Background Team-based learning (TBL) is used in undergraduate medical education to facilitate higher-order content learning, promote learner engagement and collaboration, and foster positive learner attitudes. There is a paucity of data on the use of TBL in graduate medical education. Our aim was to assess resident engagement, learning, and faculty/resident satisfaction with TBL in internal medicine residency ambulatory education. Methods Survey and nominal group technique methodologies were used to assess learner engagement and faculty/resident satisfaction. We assessed medical learning using individual (IRAT) and group (GRAT) readiness assurance tests. Results Residents (N = 111) involved in TBL sessions reported contributing to group discussions and actively discussing the subject material with other residents. Faculty echoed similar responses, and residents and faculty reported a preference for future teaching sessions to be offered using the TBL pedagogy. The average GRAT score was significantly higher than the average IRAT score by 22%. Feedback from our nominal group technique rank ordered the following TBL strengths by both residents and faculty: (1) interactive format, (2) content of sessions, and (3) competitive nature of sessions. Conclusions We successfully implemented TBL pedagogy in the internal medicine ambulatory residency curriculum, with learning focused on the care of patients in the ambulatory setting. TBL resulted in active resident engagement, facilitated group learning, and increased satisfaction by residents and faculty. To our knowledge this is the first study that implemented a TBL program in an internal medicine residency curriculum. PMID:26692979

  20. An Update on Travel Vaccines and Issues in Travel and International Medicine.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie; Bunn, William B; Connor, Bradley A

    2016-08-23

    The fields of travel and international medicine are rapidly changing and growing. The role of occupational and travel health nurses is expanding and should be a focus for the future. At the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses Annual meeting on March 24, 2015, in Boston, five presentations were included in the session, An Update on Travel Vaccines and Issues in Travel and International Medicine. This article summarizes three of the presentations and includes a portion of the information generated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) included in the fourth presentation. The first section focuses on the Essential Elements of Travel Medicine Programs including the pre-travel care assessment, trip research and risk identification, medication intervention review, non-pharmaceutical and prevention strategies, and post-travel care. The next section is an overview of key issues for business travelers. The growth in the number of international business travelers and unique aspects of business travel are emphasized in a comprehensive travel health program. This section also includes a discussion of expatriates and their special risks identified in recent literature (e.g., an assessment of the significant costs of health events and productivity losses by both business travelers and expatriates). The final section offers a specific example of a vaccine-preventable disease, namely, Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus, and needed changes in JE vaccine recommendations.

  1. [An intervention program to improve the quality of the medical records in an Internal Medicine Department].

    PubMed

    Wikman, A; Safont, P; Merino, J; Martínez Baltanás, A; Matarranz Del Amo, M; López Calleja, E

    2009-09-01

    The medical records are key documents for the patient's diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Thus, the clinical histories must be made with high technical quality. Although some studies relate the quality of the clinical history with better control of a disease, as far as we know, there are few that evaluate the quality of the medical record itself. This study aims to analyze the quality of the clinical histories of our Internal Medicine Department and then evaluate the improvement achieved. A descriptive and intervention study with a before and after design was conducted. It included 186 medical records elaborated by the physicians of our Internal Medicine Department. A 16-item Likert-like scale was designed for the evaluation. The items were analyzed item by item and a score combining them was elaborated. A baseline analysis and a second analysis 3 months after making several interventions were made. Weak points were detected in the baseline analysis (described) and after the interventions. There was an improvement in almost all the items, this being very significant in the recording of allergies and habits. The global score also improved significantly. CONCLUSION. The study has allowed us to learn our weak points in the elaboration of the medical records. We have improved their quality with the interventions. We estimate that this intervention has also been useful for the training of internal medicine physicians, residents and students.

  2. Development of emotional intelligence in a team-based learning internal medicine clerkship.

    PubMed

    Borges, Nicole J; Kirkham, Karen; Deardorff, Adam S; Moore, Jeremy A

    2012-01-01

    Although increasing number of articles have been published on team-based learning (TBL), none has explored team emotional intelligence. We extend the literature by examining changes in team emotional intelligence during a third year clerkship where TBL is a primary instructional strategy. We hypothesized that team emotional intelligence will change in a positive direction (i.e., increase) during the clerkship. With IRB approval, during the 2009-2010 academic year third-year students in their internal medicine clerkship (N = 105, 100% response rate) completed the Workgroup Emotional Intelligence Profile - Short Version (WEIP-S) at the beginning and at the end of their 12-week clerkship. TBL is an instructional strategy utilized during the internal medicine clerkship. Paired t-tests showed that team emotional intelligence increased significantly pre to post clerkship for three of the four areas: awareness of own emotions (p = 0.018), recognizing emotions in others (p = 0.031), and ability to manage other's emotions (p = 0.013). There was no change for ability to control own emotions (p = 0.570). In an internal medicine clerkship, where TBL is utilized as an instructional strategy, team emotional intelligence increases. This supports TBL as an adjunctive tool to traditional medical education pedagogy.

  3. Creating a reliable and valid blueprint for the internal medicine clerkship evaluation.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Kevin; Lemaire, Jane; Coderre, Sylvain

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this study was to design an examination blueprint for the Internal Medicine clerkship rotation that is congruent with both the learning objectives and delivered learning experiences and reflects the perceived importance of clinical presentations from both the students' and clinicians' perspectives. In this cross-sectional study 11 specialists in General Internal Medicine (GIM) and 11 clinical clerks at the University of Calgary were asked to score each of the 47 clinical presentations in the Internal Medicine clerkship rotation for 'impact' and 'frequency'. These attributes were used to provide an estimate of the relative importance of each clinical presentation. Statistical tests used were the Pearson's correlation coefficient and the Kappa statistic. Multi-attribute utility theory was applied to assess the best way of combining the variables of 'impact' and 'frequency'. The correlation between clerks and GIM specialists was 0.85 for the impact score and 0.86 for the frequency score (p < 0.001 for both). Corresponding Kappa values were 0.71 and 0.82, respectively (p < 0.001 for both). Combining impact and frequency as a multiplicative function produced a distribution that was positively skewed towards common, high impact presentations such as chest pain. We have created an examination blueprint that provides a realistic and objective measure of the relative importance of clinical presentations. Such a blueprint provides both face validity and content validity to the evaluation process.

  4. Use of Team-Based Learning Pedagogy for Internal Medicine Ambulatory Resident Teaching.

    PubMed

    Balwan, Sandy; Fornari, Alice; DiMarzio, Paola; Verbsky, Jennifer; Pekmezaris, Renee; Stein, Joanna; Chaudhry, Saima

    2015-12-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is used in undergraduate medical education to facilitate higher-order content learning, promote learner engagement and collaboration, and foster positive learner attitudes. There is a paucity of data on the use of TBL in graduate medical education. Our aim was to assess resident engagement, learning, and faculty/resident satisfaction with TBL in internal medicine residency ambulatory education. Survey and nominal group technique methodologies were used to assess learner engagement and faculty/resident satisfaction. We assessed medical learning using individual (IRAT) and group (GRAT) readiness assurance tests. Residents (N = 111) involved in TBL sessions reported contributing to group discussions and actively discussing the subject material with other residents. Faculty echoed similar responses, and residents and faculty reported a preference for future teaching sessions to be offered using the TBL pedagogy. The average GRAT score was significantly higher than the average IRAT score by 22%. Feedback from our nominal group technique rank ordered the following TBL strengths by both residents and faculty: (1) interactive format, (2) content of sessions, and (3) competitive nature of sessions. We successfully implemented TBL pedagogy in the internal medicine ambulatory residency curriculum, with learning focused on the care of patients in the ambulatory setting. TBL resulted in active resident engagement, facilitated group learning, and increased satisfaction by residents and faculty. To our knowledge this is the first study that implemented a TBL program in an internal medicine residency curriculum.

  5. An educational game for teaching clinical practice guidelines to Internal Medicine residents: development, feasibility and acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Elie A; Mustafa, Reem; Slomka, Thomas; Alawneh, Alia; Vedavalli, Abhishek; Schünemann, Holger J

    2008-01-01

    Background Adherence to Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) remains suboptimal among internal medicine trainees. Educational games are of growing interest and have the potential to improve adherence to CPGs. The objectives of this study were to develop an educational game to teach CPGs in Internal Medicine residency programs and to evaluate its feasibility and acceptability. Methods We developed the Guide-O-Game© in the format of a TV game show with questions based on recommendations of CPGs. The development of the Guide-O-Game© consisted of the creation of a multimedia interactive tool, the development of recommendation-based questions, and the definition of the game's rules. We evaluated its feasibility through pilot testing and its acceptability through a qualitative process. Results The multimedia interactive tool uses a Macromedia Flash web application and consists of a manager interface and a user interface. The user interface allows the choice of two game styles. We created so far 16 sets of questions relating to 9 CPGs. The pilot testing proved that the game was feasible. The qualitative evaluation showed that residents considered the game to be acceptable. Conclusion We developed an educational game to teach CPGs to Internal Medicine residents that is both feasible and acceptable. Future work should evaluate its impact on educational outcomes. PMID:19017400

  6. Geriatrics education is associated with positive attitudes toward older people in internal medicine residents: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Tufan, Fatih; Yuruyen, Mehmet; Kizilarslanoglu, Muhammet Cemal; Akpinar, Timur; Emiksiye, Sirhan; Yesil, Yusuf; Ozturk, Zeynel Abidin; Bozbulut, Utku Burak; Bolayir, Basak; Tasar, Pinar Tosun; Yavuzer, Hakan; Sahin, Sevnaz; Ulger, Zekeriya; Ozturk, Gulistan Bahat; Halil, Meltem; Akcicek, Fehmi; Doventas, Alper; Kepekci, Yalcin; Ince, Nurhan; Karan, Mehmet Akif

    2015-01-01

    The number of older people is growing fast in Turkey. In this context, internal medicine residents and specialists contact older people more frequently. Thus, healthcare providers' knowledge and attitudes toward older people is becoming more important. Studies that specifically investigate internal medicine residents' attitudes toward the elderly are scarce. We aimed to investigate the attitudes of internal medicine residents toward older people. This cross-sectional multicenter study was undertaken in the internal medicine clinics of six university state hospitals that provide education in geriatric care. All internal medicine residents working in these hospitals were invited to participate in this questionnaire study between March 2013 and December 2013. We recorded the participants' age, sex, duration of internal medicine residency, existence of relatives older than 65 years, history of geriatrics course in medical school, geriatrics rotation in internal medicine residency, and nursing home visits. A total of 274 (82.3%) of the residents participated in this study, and 83.6% of them had positive attitudes toward older people. A geriatrics rotation during internal medicine residency was the only independent factor associated with positive attitudes toward the elderly in this multivariate analysis. A geriatrics course during medical school was associated with positive attitudes in the univariate analysis, but only tended to be so in the multivariate analysis. Geriatrics rotation during internal medicine residency was independently associated with positive attitudes toward older people. Generalization of geriatrics education in developing countries may translate into a better understanding and improved care for older patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Redesigning the practice model for general internal medicine. A proposal for coordinated care: a policy monograph of the Society of General Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    2007-03-01

    General Internal Medicine (GIM) faces a burgeoning crisis in the United States, while patients with chronic illness confront a disintegrating health care system. Reimbursement that rewards using procedures and devices rather than thoughtful examination and management, plus onerous administrative burdens, are prompting physicians to pursue specialties other than GIM. This monograph promotes 9 principles supporting the concept of Coordinated Care--a strategy to sustain quality and enhance the attractiveness and viability of care delivered by highly trained General Internists who specialize in the longitudinal care of adult patients with acute and chronic illness. This approach supplements and extends the concept of the Advanced Medical Home set forth by the American College of Physicians. Specific components of Coordinated Care include clinical support, information management, and access and scheduling. Success of the model will require changes in the payment system that fairly reimburse physicians who provide leadership to teams that deliver high quality, coordinated care.

  8. [Highlights 2008 in a university hospital-based internal medicine: the point of view from the chief residents].

    PubMed

    Wilson, P; Bullani, R; Cosma, M; Deriaz, S; Donzé, J; Monney, C; Neuffer, N; Pantet, O; Roduit, J; Schwab, M; Méan, M

    2009-01-28

    Doctors must regularly adjust their patients' care according to recent relevant publications. The chief residents from the Department of Internal Medicine of a university hospital present some major themes of internal medicine treated during the year 2008, such as heart failure, diabetes, COPD, and thromboembolic disease. Emphasis will be placed primarily on changes in the daily hospital practice induced by these recent studies. This variety of topics illustrates both the broad spectrum of the current internal medicine, and the many uncertainties associated with modem medical practice based on evidence.

  9. Internal medicine and the training of international medical graduates: a time for open discussion and new approaches.

    PubMed

    Levey, G S

    1992-09-01

    The number of foreign national medical graduates entering internal medicine residency training programs in the United States has doubled since 1986. A rigorous, standardized preresidency evaluation of the basic clinical skills and language abilities of international medical graduates should be implemented. Those found to have significant deficits should undertake a preparatory curriculum designed to meet special educational needs before entry into the formal training program. A relevant curriculum might include formal lectures, reading assignments, physical diagnosis sessions, language classes, patient encounter sessions, and a tutorial on U.S medical culture that includes medical ethics and the basics of the our health care system. All or only some of these may be required for any given individual. The Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) could provide many of the methods needed for an evaluation program and work collaboratively with program directors. This new approach to training of international medical graduates will require an evaluation system to to measure its effectiveness. Important questions about the funding of graduate medical education for international medical graduates must also be addressed.

  10. An Interactive Ambulatory Nephrology Curriculum for Internal Medicine Interns: Design, Implementation, and Participant Feedback.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Alexis C; Warburton, Karen M; Miller, Rachel K; Negoianu, Dan; Cohen, Jordana B

    2017-09-01

    While diminishing nephrology fellow recruitment is a known issue, more work is needed to evaluate possible interventions to reverse this trend. We designed and implemented a curriculum to increase exposure to ambulatory nephrology among internal medicine interns. The curriculum focused on key aspects of outpatient nephrology practice, including supervised clinic visits, formal themed didactic content, and an online interactive forum with assigned evidence-based readings and small-group responses to relevant cases. We obtained postcourse surveys from all participating interns. Of the 43 interns who took part in the first year of the ambulatory nephrology curriculum, 100% reported a positive didactic experience and 91% reported a positive interactive online experience. 77% reported an improvement in their familiarity with clinical nephrology practice (median 2-point increase in familiarity score on a 7-point scale, P<0.001 by signed rank testing). Qualitative feedback included praise for the high-yield topics covered by the lectures and energizing teachers. In conclusion, we successfully implemented an ambulatory nephrology curriculum using a framework that integrated formal didactics, interactive online learning, and key clinical components of outpatient nephrology care. Future investigation will evaluate whether early implementation of this curriculum is associated with increased pursuit of nephrology as a career. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey.

    PubMed

    Akl, Elie A; Gunukula, Sameer; Mustafa, Reem; Wilson, Mark C; Symons, Andrew; Moheet, Amir; Schünemann, Holger J

    2010-03-25

    The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate), 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%). The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored.

  12. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Results Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate), 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%). The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Conclusions Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored. PMID:20338034

  13. Competency-Based Medical Education in the Internal Medicine Clerkship: A Report From the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine Undergraduate Medical Education Task Force.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Sara B; Ledford, Cynthia H; Aronowitz, Paul B; Chheda, Shobhina G; Choe, John H; Call, Stephanie A; Gitlin, Scott D; Muntz, Marty; Nixon, L James; Pereira, Anne G; Ragsdale, John W; Stewart, Emily A; Hauer, Karen E

    2017-09-14

    As medical educators continue to redefine learning and assessment across the continuum, implementation of competency-based medical education in the undergraduate setting has become a focus of many medical schools. While standards of competency have been defined for the graduating student, there is no uniform approach for defining competency expectations for students during their core clerkship year. The authors describe the process by which an Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine task force developed a paradigm for competency-based assessment of students during their inpatient internal medicine (IM) clerkship. Building on work at the resident and fellowship levels, the task force focused on the development of key learning outcomes as defined by entrustable professional activities (EPAs) that were specific to educational experiences on the IM clerkship, as well as identification of high-priority assessment domains. The work was informed by a national survey of clerkship directors.Six key EPAs emerged: generating a differential diagnosis, obtaining a complete and accurate history and physical exam, obtaining focused histories and clinically relevant physical exams, preparing an oral presentation, interpreting the results of basic diagnostic studies, and providing well-organized clinical documentation. A model for assessment was proposed, with descriptors aligned to the scale of supervision and mapped to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education domains of competence. The proposed paradigm offers a standardized template that may be used across IM clerkships, and which would effectively bridge competency evaluation in the clerkship to fourth-year assessment as well as eventual postgraduate training.Written work prepared by employees of the Federal Government as part of their official duties is, under the U.S. Copyright Act, a "work of the United States Government" for which copyright protection under Title 17 of the United States Code is not available. As

  14. Etiologies and Management of Aseptic Meningitis in Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Department.

    PubMed

    Jarrin, Irène; Sellier, Pierre; Lopes, Amanda; Morgand, Marjolaine; Makovec, Tamara; Delcey, Veronique; Champion, Karine; Simoneau, Guy; Green, Andrew; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have focused on the clinical and biological characteristics of meningitis in order to distinguish between bacterial and viral meningitis in the emergency setting. However, little is known about the etiologies and outcomes of aseptic meningitis in patients admitted to Internal Medicine.The aim of the study is to describe the etiologies, characteristics, and outcomes of aseptic meningitis with or without encephalitis in adults admitted to an Internal Medicine Department.A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Department of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, France, from January 2009 to December 2011. Clinical and biological characteristics of aseptic meningitis were recorded. These included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, results of polymerase chain reaction testing, final diagnoses, and therapeutic management.The cohort included 180 patients fulfilling the criteria for aseptic meningitis with (n = 56) or without (n = 124) encephalitis. A definitive etiological diagnosis was established in 83 of the 180 cases. Of the cases with a definitive diagnosis, 73 were due to infectious agents, mainly enteroviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, and Varicella Zoster Virus (43.4%, 16.8%, and 14.5% respectively). Inflammatory diseases were diagnosed in 7 cases. Among the 97 cases without definitive diagnoses, 26 (26.8%) remained free of treatment throughout their management whereas antiviral or antibiotic therapy was initiated in the emergency department for the remaining 71 patients. The treatment was discontinued in only 10 patients deemed to have viral meningitis upon admission to Internal Medicine.The prevalence of inflammatory diseases among patients admitted to internal medicine for aseptic meningitis is not rare (4% of overall aseptic meningitis). The PCR upon admission to the emergency department is obviously of major importance for the prompt optimization of therapy and management. However, meningitis due to viral agents or

  15. Etiologies and Management of Aseptic Meningitis in Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Department

    PubMed Central

    Jarrin, Irène; Sellier, Pierre; Lopes, Amanda; Morgand, Marjolaine; Makovec, Tamara; Delcey, Veronique; Champion, Karine; Simoneau, Guy; Green, Andrew; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have focused on the clinical and biological characteristics of meningitis in order to distinguish between bacterial and viral meningitis in the emergency setting. However, little is known about the etiologies and outcomes of aseptic meningitis in patients admitted to Internal Medicine. The aim of the study is to describe the etiologies, characteristics, and outcomes of aseptic meningitis with or without encephalitis in adults admitted to an Internal Medicine Department. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Department of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, France, from January 2009 to December 2011. Clinical and biological characteristics of aseptic meningitis were recorded. These included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, results of polymerase chain reaction testing, final diagnoses, and therapeutic management. The cohort included 180 patients fulfilling the criteria for aseptic meningitis with (n = 56) or without (n = 124) encephalitis. A definitive etiological diagnosis was established in 83 of the 180 cases. Of the cases with a definitive diagnosis, 73 were due to infectious agents, mainly enteroviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, and Varicella Zoster Virus (43.4%, 16.8%, and 14.5% respectively). Inflammatory diseases were diagnosed in 7 cases. Among the 97 cases without definitive diagnoses, 26 (26.8%) remained free of treatment throughout their management whereas antiviral or antibiotic therapy was initiated in the emergency department for the remaining 71 patients. The treatment was discontinued in only 10 patients deemed to have viral meningitis upon admission to Internal Medicine. The prevalence of inflammatory diseases among patients admitted to internal medicine for aseptic meningitis is not rare (4% of overall aseptic meningitis). The PCR upon admission to the emergency department is obviously of major importance for the prompt optimization of therapy and management. However, meningitis due to

  16. Career interest and perceptions of nephrology: A repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Michael N.; Porter, Ivan; Kincaid, Hope; Jain, Deepika; Aslam, Nabeel

    2017-01-01

    Background Interest in nephrology careers among internal medicine residents in the United States is declining. Our objective was to assess the impact of the presence of a nephrology fellowship training program on perceptions and career interest in nephrology among internal medicine residents. A secondary objective was to identify commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology among internal medicine residents. Methods This was a repeated cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents before (Group 1) and 3 years after (Group 2) the establishment of nephrology fellowship programs at two institutions. The primary outcome was the percentage of residents indicating nephrology as a career interest in Group 1 vs. Group 2. Secondary outcomes included the frequency that residents agreed with negative statements about nephrology. Results 131 (80.9%) of 162 residents completed the survey. 19 (14.8%) residents indicated interest in a nephrology career, with 8 (6.3%) indicating nephrology as their first choice. There was no difference in career interest in nephrology between residents who were exposed to nephrology fellows during residency training (Group 2) and residents who were not (Group 1). The most commonly endorsed negative perceptions of nephrology were: nephrology fellows have long hours/burdensome call (36 [28.1%] of residents agreed or strongly agreed), practicing nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (35 [27.6%] agreed or strongly agreed), and nephrology has few opportunities for procedures (35 [27.3%] agreed or strongly agreed). More residents in Group 2 agreed that nephrology is poorly paid (8.9% in Group 1 vs. 20.8% in Group 2, P = 0.04), whereas more residents in Group 1 agreed that nephrologists must take frequent/difficult call (40.0% in Group 1 vs. 18.1% in Group 2, P = 0.02). Conclusions The initiation of a nephrology fellowship program was not associated with an increase in internal medicine residents’ interest in nephrology

  17. Core addiction medicine competencies for doctors: An international consultation on training.

    PubMed

    Ayu, Astri Parawita; El-Guebaly, Nady; Schellekens, Arnt; De Jong, Cor; Welle-Strand, Gabrielle; Small, William; Wood, Evan; Cullen, Walter; Klimas, Jan

    2017-07-18

    Despite the high prevalence of substance use disorders, associated comorbidities, and the evidence base upon which to base clinical practice, most health systems have not invested in standardized training of health care providers in addiction medicine. As a result, people with substance use disorders often receive inadequate care, at the cost of quality of life and enormous direct health care costs and indirect societal costs. Therefore, this study was undertaken to assess the views of international scholars, representing different countries, on the core set of addiction medicine competencies that need to be covered in medical education. A total of 13 members of the International Society of 20 Addiction Medicine (ISAM), from 12 different countries (37% response rate), were interviewed over Skype, e-mail survey, or in person at the annual conference. Content analysis was used to analyze interview transcripts, using constant comparison methodology. We identified recommendations related to the core set of the addiction medicine competencies at 3 educational levels: (i) undergraduate, (ii) postgraduate, and (iii) continued medical education (CME). The participants described broad ideas, such as knowledge/skills/attitudes towards addiction to be obtained at undergraduate level, or knowledge of addiction treatment to be acquired at graduate level, as well as specific recommendations, including the need to tailor curriculum to national settings and different specialties. Although it is unclear whether a global curriculum is needed, a consensus on a core set of principles for progression of knowledge, attitudes, and skills in addiction medicine to be developed at each educational level amongst medical graduates would likely have substantial value.

  18. Point-of-care ultrasonography as a training milestone for internal medicine residents: the time is now

    PubMed Central

    Sabath, Bruce F.; Singh, Gurkeerat

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) ultrasonography is considered fundamental in emergency medicine training and recently has become a milestone in critical care fellowship programs as well. Currently, there is no such standard requirement for internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We present a new case and briefly review another case at our institution – a community hospital – in which internal medicine house staff trained in ultrasonography were able to uncover unexpected and critical diagnoses that significantly changed patient care and outcomes. We also review the growing evidence of the application of ultrasound in the diagnosis of a myriad of conditions encountered in general internal medicine as well as the mounting data on the ability of internal medicine residents to apply this technology accurately at the bedside. We advocate that the literature has sufficiently established the role of POC ultrasonography in general internal medicine that there should no longer be any delay in giving this an official place in the development of internal medicine trainees. This may be particularly useful in the community hospital setting where 24-h echocardiography or other sonography may not be readily available. PMID:27802866

  19. Point-of-care ultrasonography as a training milestone for internal medicine residents: the time is now.

    PubMed

    Sabath, Bruce F; Singh, Gurkeerat

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) ultrasonography is considered fundamental in emergency medicine training and recently has become a milestone in critical care fellowship programs as well. Currently, there is no such standard requirement for internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We present a new case and briefly review another case at our institution - a community hospital - in which internal medicine house staff trained in ultrasonography were able to uncover unexpected and critical diagnoses that significantly changed patient care and outcomes. We also review the growing evidence of the application of ultrasound in the diagnosis of a myriad of conditions encountered in general internal medicine as well as the mounting data on the ability of internal medicine residents to apply this technology accurately at the bedside. We advocate that the literature has sufficiently established the role of POC ultrasonography in general internal medicine that there should no longer be any delay in giving this an official place in the development of internal medicine trainees. This may be particularly useful in the community hospital setting where 24-h echocardiography or other sonography may not be readily available.

  20. Implementing a pilot leadership course for internal medicine residents: design considerations, participant impressions, and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Daniel M; Bernard, Ken; Fraser, Traci N; Bohnen, Jordan; Zeidman, Jessica; Stone, Valerie E

    2014-11-30

    Effective clinical leadership is associated with better patient care. We implemented and evaluated a pilot clinical leadership course for second year internal medicine residents at a large United States Academic Medical Center that is part of a multi-hospital health system. The course met weekly for two to three hours during July, 2013. Sessions included large group discussions and small group reflection meetings. Topics included leadership styles, emotional intelligence, and leading clinical teams. Course materials were designed internally and featured "business school style" case studies about everyday clinical medicine which explore how leadership skills impact care delivery. Participants evaluated the course's impact and quality using a post-course survey. Questions were structured in five point likert scale and free text format. Likert scale responses were converted to a 1-5 scale (1 = strongly disagree; 3 = neither agree nor disagree; 5 = strongly agree), and means were compared to the value 3 using one-way T-tests. Responses to free text questions were analyzed using the constant comparative method. All sixteen pilot course participants completed the survey. Participants overwhelmingly agreed that the course provided content and skills relevant to their clinical responsibilities and leadership roles. Most participants also acknowledged that taking the course improved their understanding of their strengths and weaknesses as leaders, different leadership styles, and how to manage interpersonal conflict on clinical teams. 88% also reported that the course increased their interest in pursuing additional leadership training. A clinical leadership course for internal medicine residents designed by colleagues, and utilizing case studies about clinical medicine, resulted in significant self-reported improvements in clinical leadership competencies.

  1. [Scientific production in clinical medicine and international collaboration networks in South American countries].

    PubMed

    Huamaní, Charles; González A, Gregorio; Curioso, Walter H; Pacheco-Romero, José

    2012-04-01

    International collaboration is increasingly used in biomedical research. To describe the characteristics of scientific production in Latin America and the main international collaboration networks for the period 2000 to 2009. Search for papers generated in Latin American countries in the Clinical Medicine database of ISI Web of Knowledge v.4.10 - Current Contents Connect. The country of origin of the corresponding author was considered the producing country of the paper. International collaboration was analyzed calculating the number of countries that contributed to the generation of a particular paper. Collaboration networks were graphed to determine the centrality of each network. Twelve Latin American countries participated in the production of 253,362 papers. The corresponding author was South American in 79% of these papers. Sixteen percent of papers were on clinical medicine and 36% of these were carried out in collaboration. Brazil had the highest production (22,442 papers) and the lower percentage of international collaboration (31%). North America accounts for 63% of collaborating countries. Only 8% of collaboration is between South American countries. Brazil has the highest tendency to collaborate with other South American countries. Brazil is the South American country with the highest scientific production and indicators of centrality in South America. The most common collaboration networks are with North American countries.

  2. Benchmarks for Support and Outcomes for Internal Medicine-Pediatrics Residency Programs: A 5-Year Review

    PubMed Central

    Aronica, Michael; Williams, Ronald; Dennar, Princess E.; Hopkins, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Combined internal medicine and pediatrics (medicine-pediatrics) residencies were Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited separately from their corresponding categorical residencies in June 2006. Objective We investigated how ACGME accreditation of medicine-pediatrics programs has affected the levels of support (both financial and personnel), the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) match rate, performance on the board examination, and other graduate outcomes. Methods From 2009 through 2013 we sent an annual SurveyMonkey online survey to members of the Medicine-Pediatrics Program Directors Association. Questions pertained to program characteristics, program director support, recruitment, ambulatory training, and graduate data. More than 79% of responders completed the entire survey for each year (sample size was 60 program directors). Results Compared to the time prior to accreditation of the specialty, there was an increase in program directors who are dually trained (89% versus 93%), an increase in program director salary ($134,000 before accreditation versus $185,000 in 2013, P < .05), and an increase in the average full-time equivalent support (0.32 before accreditation versus 0.42 in 2013, P < .05). There was also an increase in programs with associate program directors (35% versus 78%), programs with chief residents (71% versus 91%), and an increase in program budgets controlled by program directors (52% versus 69%). The 2013 NRMP match rates increased compared to those of 2005 (99% versus 49%). Performance on the American Board of Pediatrics examination was comparable to that for pediatrics residents. Since accreditation, a larger number of residents are choosing careers in hospital medicine. Conclusions Our data show widespread improved support for medicine-pediatrics programs since the 2006 start of ACGME accreditation. PMID:26692969

  3. Benchmarks for Support and Outcomes for Internal Medicine-Pediatrics Residency Programs: A 5-Year Review.

    PubMed

    Aronica, Michael; Williams, Ronald; Dennar, Princess E; Hopkins, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    Combined internal medicine and pediatrics (medicine-pediatrics) residencies were Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited separately from their corresponding categorical residencies in June 2006. We investigated how ACGME accreditation of medicine-pediatrics programs has affected the levels of support (both financial and personnel), the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) match rate, performance on the board examination, and other graduate outcomes. From 2009 through 2013 we sent an annual SurveyMonkey online survey to members of the Medicine-Pediatrics Program Directors Association. Questions pertained to program characteristics, program director support, recruitment, ambulatory training, and graduate data. More than 79% of responders completed the entire survey for each year (sample size was 60 program directors). Compared to the time prior to accreditation of the specialty, there was an increase in program directors who are dually trained (89% versus 93%), an increase in program director salary ($134,000 before accreditation versus $185,000 in 2013, P < .05), and an increase in the average full-time equivalent support (0.32 before accreditation versus 0.42 in 2013, P < .05). There was also an increase in programs with associate program directors (35% versus 78%), programs with chief residents (71% versus 91%), and an increase in program budgets controlled by program directors (52% versus 69%). The 2013 NRMP match rates increased compared to those of 2005 (99% versus 49%). Performance on the American Board of Pediatrics examination was comparable to that for pediatrics residents. Since accreditation, a larger number of residents are choosing careers in hospital medicine. Our data show widespread improved support for medicine-pediatrics programs since the 2006 start of ACGME accreditation.

  4. [Presence of Nuclear Medicine in the Spanish journals of Internal Medicine and other specialties (2000-2009)].

    PubMed

    Durán-Ferreras, A; Sabaté-Díaz, J; Espigares-Jiménez, M

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to provide a quantitative and qualitative description of the publications on Nuclear Medicine (NM) in journals from other disciplines, between 2000 and 2009. A retrospective descriptive study was carried out including the years 2000-2009 in three internal medicine journals (IM) and in three related specialty journals (RS). The criteria used are that some of the authors were located professionally in a Service, Unit or Central MN and/or that the title of the article or at least its content made a reference to some specific aspect of NM. Date of publication, the magazine section, thematic, data of the authors, province and referral hospital were collected. A total of 186 articles were found, 81 in IM journals and 105 in RS. The IM journal articles came from 43 different hospitals. Vall d'Hebron (Barcelona, Spain) was the hospital with the largest volume. Twenty-four provinces were identified, Barcelona and Madrid standing out among them with 20 and 17 articles, respectively. In the RS journals, 59 hospitals/centers had participated, Vall d'Hebron standing out with 51 articles. There were 9 foreign articles. The articles were distributed into 19 provinces, Barcelona and Madrid standing out with 32 papers and 20 papers, respectively. There are at least twice as many articles in the RS Journals than in the IM ones. «Original» articles are the most frequent. The Clinical and Translational Oncology journal in RS and Medicina Clínica in IM stand out with the highest number of articles. No specific topic prevailed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  5. Fulfilling outpatient medicine responsibilities during internal medicine residency: a quantitative study of housestaff participation with between visit tasks.

    PubMed

    Hom, Jason; Richman, Ilana; Chen, Jonathan H; Singh, Baldeep; Crump, Casey; Chi, Jeffrey

    2016-05-10

    Internal Medicine residents experience conflict between inpatient and outpatient medicine responsibilities. Outpatient "between visit" responsibilities such as reviewing lab and imaging data, responding to medication refill requests and replying to patient inquiries compete for time and attention with inpatient duties. By examining Electronic Health Record (EHR) audits, our study quantitatively describes this balance between competing responsibilities, focusing on housestaff participation with "between visit" outpatient responsibilities. We examined EHR log-in data from 2012-2013 for 41 residents (R1 to R3) assigned to a large academic center's continuity clinic. From the EHR log-in data, we examined housestaff compliance with "between visit" tasks, based on official clinic standards. We used generalized estimating equations to evaluate housestaff compliance with between visit tasks and amount of time spent on tasks. We examined the relationship between compliance with between visit tasks and resident year of training, rotation type (elective or required) and interest in primary care. Housestaff compliance with logging in to complete "between visit" tasks varied significantly depending on rotation, with overall compliance of 45% during core inpatient rotations compared to 68% during electives (p = 0.01). Compliance did not significantly vary by interest in primary care or training level. Once logged in, housestaff spent a mean 53 min per week logged in while on electives, compared to 55 min on required rotations (p = 0.90). Our study quantitatively highlights the difficulty of attending to outpatient responsibilities during busy core inpatient rotations, which comprise the bulk of residency at our institution and at others. Our results reinforce the need to continue development and study of innovative systems for coverage of "between visit" responsibilities, including shared coverage models among multiple residents and shared coverage models between residents and

  6. Publication of population data of linearly inherited DNA markers in the International Journal of Legal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Parson, Walther; Roewer, Lutz

    2010-09-01

    This manuscript extends on earlier recommendations of the editor of the International Journal of Legal Medicine on short tandem repeat population data and provides details on specific criteria relevant for the analysis and publication of population studies on haploid DNA markers, i.e. Y-chromosomal polymorphisms and mitochondrial DNA. The proposed concept is based on review experience with the two forensic haploid markers databases YHRD and EMPOP, which are both endorsed by the International Society for Forensic Genetics. The intention is to provide guidance with the preparation of population studies and their results to improve the reviewing process and the quality of published data. We also suggest a minimal set of required information to be presented in the publication to increase understanding and use of the data. The outlined procedure has in part been elaborated with the editors of the journal Forensic Science International Genetics.

  7. Selection criteria for internal medicine residency applicants and professionalism ratings during internship.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Michael W; Reed, Darcy A; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Wittich, Christopher M; Kreuziger, Lisa M Baumann; Keddis, Mira T; McDonald, Furman S; Beckman, Thomas J

    2011-03-01

    To determine whether standardized admissions data in residents' Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) submissions were associated with multisource assessments of professionalism during internship. ERAS applications for all internal medicine interns (N=191) at Mayo Clinic entering training between July 1, 2005, and July 1, 2008, were reviewed by 6 raters. Extracted data included United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, medicine clerkship grades, class rank, Alpha Omega Alpha membership, advanced degrees, awards, volunteer activities, research experiences, first author publications, career choice, and red flags in performance evaluations. Medical school reputation was quantified using U.S. News & World Report rankings. Strength of comparative statements in recommendation letters (0 = no comparative statement, 1 = equal to peers, 2 = top 20%, 3 = top 10% or "best") were also recorded. Validated multisource professionalism scores (5-point scales) were obtained for each intern. Associations between application variables and professionalism scores were examined using linear regression. The mean ± SD (minimum-maximum) professionalism score was 4.09 ± 0.31 (2.13-4.56). In multivariate analysis, professionalism scores were positively associated with mean strength of comparative statements in recommendation letters (β = 0.13; P = .002). No other associations between ERAS application variables and professionalism scores were found. Comparative statements in recommendation letters for internal medicine residency applicants were associated with professionalism scores during internship. Other variables traditionally examined when selecting residents were not associated with professionalism. These findings suggest that faculty physicians' direct observations, as reflected in letters of recommendation, are useful indicators of what constitutes a best student. Residency selection committees should scrutinize applicants' letters for strongly favorable

  8. Selection Criteria for Internal Medicine Residency Applicants and Professionalism Ratings During Internship

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Michael W.; Reed, Darcy A.; Halvorsen, Andrew J.; Wittich, Christopher M.; Kreuziger, Lisa M. Baumann; Keddis, Mira T.; McDonald, Furman S.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether standardized admissions data in residents' Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) submissions were associated with multisource assessments of professionalism during internship. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: ERAS applications for all internal medicine interns (N=191) at Mayo Clinic entering training between July 1, 2005, and July 1, 2008, were reviewed by 6 raters. Extracted data included United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, medicine clerkship grades, class rank, Alpha Omega Alpha membership, advanced degrees, awards, volunteer activities, research experiences, first author publications, career choice, and red flags in performance evaluations. Medical school reputation was quantified using U.S. News & World Report rankings. Strength of comparative statements in recommendation letters (0 = no comparative statement, 1 = equal to peers, 2 = top 20%, 3 = top 10% or “best”) were also recorded. Validated multisource professionalism scores (5-point scales) were obtained for each intern. Associations between application variables and professionalism scores were examined using linear regression. RESULTS: The mean ± SD (minimum-maximum) professionalism score was 4.09±0.31 (2.13-4.56). In multivariate analysis, professionalism scores were positively associated with mean strength of comparative statements in recommendation letters (β=0.13; P=.002). No other associations between ERAS application variables and professionalism scores were found. CONCLUSION: Comparative statements in recommendation letters for internal medicine residency applicants were associated with professionalism scores during internship. Other variables traditionally examined when selecting residents were not associated with professionalism. These findings suggest that faculty physicians' direct observations, as reflected in letters of recommendation, are useful indicators of what constitutes a best student. Residency selection committees should

  9. Dietary supplement consumption among cardiac patients admitted to internal medicine and cardiac wards.

    PubMed

    Karny-Rahkovich, Orith; Blatt, Alex; Elbaz-Greener, Gabby Atalya; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Golik, Ahuva; Berkovitch, Matityahu

    2015-01-01

    Dietary supplements may have adverse effects and potentially interact with conventional medications. They are perceived as "natural" products, free of side effects with no need for medical consultation. Little is known about consumption of dietary supplements by patients with cardiac diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate dietary supplement consumption among cardiac patients admitted to internal and cardiology wards. Potential drug-dietary supplement interactions were also assessed. During a period of 6 months, patients with cardiac disease hospitalized in the Internal Medicine and Cardiology Wards at Assaf Harofeh Medical Center were evaluated regarding their dietary supplement consumption. A literature survey examining possible drug-supplement interaction was performed. Out of 149 cardiac patients, 45% were dietary supplement consumers. Patients ad-mitted to the Internal Medicine Wards consumed more dietary supplements than those admit-ted to the Cardiology Division. Dietary supplement consumption was associated with older age (OR = 1.05, p = 0.022), female gender (OR = 2.94, p = 0.014) and routine physical activity (OR = 3.15, p = 0.007). Diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.68, p = 0.020), hematological diseases (OR = 13.29, p = 0.022), and the use of anti-diabetic medications (OR = 4.28, p = 0.001) were independently associated with dietary supplement intake. Sixteen potential moderate interactions between prescribed medications and dietary supplements were found. Consumption of dietary supplements is common among cardiac patients. It is more common in those admitted to Internal Medicine Departments than in those admitted to the Cardiology Wards. Due to the risk of various drug-supplement interactions consumed by patients with cardiac diseases, there is a need to increase awareness and knowledge among medical staff regarding the intake of dietary supplements.

  10. Teamwork assessment in internal medicine: a systematic review of validity evidence and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Havyer, Rachel D A; Wingo, Majken T; Comfere, Nneka I; Nelson, Darlene R; Halvorsen, Andrew J; McDonald, Furman S; Reed, Darcy A

    2014-06-01

    Valid teamwork assessment is imperative to determine physician competency and optimize patient outcomes. We systematically reviewed published instruments assessing teamwork in undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education in general internal medicine and all medical subspecialties. We searched MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-process, CINAHL and PsycINFO from January 1979 through October 2012, references of included articles, and abstracts from four professional meetings. Two content experts were queried for additional studies. Included studies described quantitative tools measuring teamwork among medical students, residents, fellows, and practicing physicians on single or multi-professional (interprofessional) teams. Instrument validity and study quality were extracted using established frameworks with existing validity evidence. Two authors independently abstracted 30 % of articles and agreement was calculated. Of 12,922 citations, 178 articles describing 73 unique teamwork assessment tools met inclusion criteria. Interrater agreement was intraclass correlation coefficient 0.73 (95 % CI 0.63-0.81). Studies involved practicing physicians (142, 80 %), residents/fellows (70, 39 %), and medical students (11, 6 %). The majority (152, 85 %) assessed interprofessional teams. Studies were conducted in inpatient (77, 43 %), outpatient (42, 24 %), simulation (37, 21 %), and classroom (13, 7 %) settings. Validity evidence for the 73 tools included content (54, 74 %), internal structure (51, 70 %), relationships to other variables (25, 34 %), and response process (12, 16 %). Attitudes and opinions were the most frequently assessed outcomes. Relationships between teamwork scores and patient outcomes were directly examined for 13 (18 %) of tools. Scores from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire and Team Climate Inventory have substantial validity evidence and have been associated with improved patient outcomes. Review is limited to quantitative assessments of teamwork in internal

  11. An Investigation of the Variety and Complexity of Statistical Methods Used in Current Internal Medicine Literature.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Roshni; Nugent, Rebecca; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-10-01

    Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education guidelines require internal medicine residents to develop skills in the interpretation of medical literature and to understand the principles of research. A necessary component is the ability to understand the statistical methods used and their results, material that is not an in-depth focus of most medical school curricula and residency programs. Given the breadth and depth of the current medical literature and an increasing emphasis on complex, sophisticated statistical analyses, the statistical foundation and education necessary for residents are uncertain. We reviewed the statistical methods and terms used in 49 articles discussed at the journal club in the Department of Internal Medicine residency program at Texas Tech University between January 1, 2013 and June 30, 2013. We collected information on the study type and on the statistical methods used for summarizing and comparing samples, determining the relations between independent variables and dependent variables, and estimating models. We then identified the typical statistics education level at which each term or method is learned. A total of 14 articles came from the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine, 11 from the New England Journal of Medicine, 6 from the Annals of Internal Medicine, 5 from the Journal of the American Medical Association, and 13 from other journals. Twenty reported randomized controlled trials. Summary statistics included mean values (39 articles), category counts (38), and medians (28). Group comparisons were based on t tests (14 articles), χ2 tests (21), and nonparametric ranking tests (10). The relations between dependent and independent variables were analyzed with simple regression (6 articles), multivariate regression (11), and logistic regression (8). Nine studies reported odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals, and seven analyzed test performance using sensitivity and specificity calculations

  12. Internal medicine specialists' attitudes towards working part-time: a comparison between 1996 and 2004

    PubMed Central

    Lugtenberg, Marjolein; Heiligers, Phil JM; de Jong, Judith D; Hingstman, Lammert

    2006-01-01

    Background Although medical specialists traditionally hold negative views towards working part-time, the practice of medicine has evolved. Given the trend towards more part-time work and that there is no evidence that it compromises the quality of care, attitudes towards part-time work may have changed as well in recent years. The aim of this paper was to examine the possible changes in attitudes towards part-time work among specialists in internal medicine between 1996 and 2004. Moreover, we wanted to determine whether these attitudes were associated with individual characteristics (age, gender, investments in work) and whether attitudes of specialists within a partnership showed more resemblance than specialists' attitudes from different partnerships. Methods Two samples were used in this study: data of a survey conducted in 1996 and in 2004. After selecting internal medicine specialists working in general hospitals in The Netherlands, the sample consisted of 219 specialists in 1996 and 363 specialists in 2004. They were sent a questionnaire, including topics on the attitudes towards part-time work. Results Internal medicine specialists' attitudes towards working part-time became slightly more positive between 1996 and 2004. Full-time working specialists in 2004 still expressed concerns regarding the investments of part-timers in overhead tasks, the flexibility of task division, efficiency, communication and continuity of care. In 1996 gender was the only predictor of the attitude, in 2004 being a full- or a part-timer, age and the time invested in work were associated with this attitude. Furthermore, specialists' attitudes were not found to cluster much within partnerships. Conclusion In spite of the increasing number of specialists working or preferring to work part-time, part-time practice among internal medicine specialists seems not to be fully accepted. The results indicate that the attitudes are no longer gender based, but are associated with age and work

  13. Medicare annual wellness visits conducted by a pharmacist in an internal medicine clinic.

    PubMed

    Warshany, Keith; Sherrill, Christina H; Cavanaugh, Jamie; Ives, Timothy J; Shilliday, Betsy Bryant

    2014-01-01

    The clinical and financial outcomes of an initial Medicare annual wellness visit (AWV) administered by a clinical pharmacist practitioner (CPP) in an academic internal medicine clinic are described. As a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Medicare Part B allows for coverage of an AWV at no cost to eligible beneficiaries. The AWV is directed at health prevention, disease detection, and coordination of screening available to beneficiaries. CPPs are pharmacists who are recognized as advanced practice providers in the state of North Carolina and are authorized to administer AWVs. Eligible Medicare beneficiaries at least 65 years of age in an academic internal medicine clinic were mailed invitations to schedule an AWV. Patients who scheduled an AWV were mailed a packet to complete before the visit. During the visit, the packet was reviewed and interventions were made based on prespecified criteria derived from evidence-based medicine recommendations. After completion of the AWV, patients were provided with a detailed and individualized prevention plan. Between August 2011 and May 2012, 98 patients attended an AWV, all performed by the same CPP. The average time from check in to checkout for all patients was 73 minutes. The CPP made 441 interventions during these 98 visits, averaging 4.5 interventions per AWV completed. All initial AWVs were reimbursable up to a maximum of $159.38 per visit. A Medicare AMV administered by a CPP resulted in a wide variety of patient interventions and reimbursement for services provided.

  14. The association between impact factors and language of general internal medicine journals.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Paul S; Murali, Narayana S; Cha, Stephen S; Erwin, Patricia F; Ghosh, Amit K

    2006-07-08

    We sought to determine the associations between journal country of origin and language and journal impact factor of general medicine journals. For each "Medicine, General and Internal" journal listed in the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Journal Citation Reports (JCR), the 2003 impact factor, language (ie, English, multiple languages [including English], or non-English), and country of origin (ie, US or non-US) were determined. The mean log impact factors of the journals by language, country of origin, and a combination of country of origin and language were compared. Of the 102 "Medicine, General and Internal" journals listed in the ISI JCR, 41 (40%) were published in the US and 83 (81%) were published in English. English-language journals had a significantly greater 2003 mean log impact factor than non-English journals and journals originating in the US had a significantly greater impact factor than journals originating elsewhere. However, the mean log impact factor of English-language journals originating in the US did not differ significantly from that of English-language journals originating elsewhere. Journal impact factor is more associated with journal language (ie, English versus non-English), rather than journal country of origin.

  15. Florida International University: development and accreditation of Miami's Public College of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Rock, John A; Simpson, Joe Leigh; Dambach, George; O'Leary, J Patrick; Markham, Sanford; Bagby, Larry; Seecharan, Khaleel; Berkman, Ronald M

    2009-10-01

    Anticipating pressing health care needs in the region, Florida International University (FIU) proposed the FIU College of Medicine (COM), which was approved by the Florida Board of Governors in March 2006. The FIU COM provides a program of study enabling graduates to pursue a wide spectrum of professional careers. This includes careers in general and subspecialty private practice, academic medicine, public service, health care, and public policy leadership. Irrespective of career choice, the special emphasis of the FIU COM mission is its focus on community health in a diverse metropolitan region. Clinical facilities are met through a public partner and multiple private hospital affiliations. Educational objectives are organized into five strands reflecting the breadth of medical education and running concurrently through the four-year curriculum: (1) human biology, (2) disease, illness, and injury, (3) clinical medicine, (4) professional development, and (5) medicine and society. Founding teaching faculty with expertise in the core basic sciences will not only introduce core scientific concepts during the initial seven months but reinforce these same concepts during organ system integrated courses and clerkships. The Neighborhood Health Education Learning Program is an FIU COM innovation in which each medical student is a member of a team that throughout the four-year curriculum identifies and addresses health care needs and factors affecting health outcomes. Preliminary approval of FIU COM was conferred in February 2008, with the first cohort of 40 students matriculating in August 2009.

  16. Report from the Second International Conference of Traditional and Complementary Medicine on Health 2015.

    PubMed

    Isidoro, Ciro; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The Second International Conference of Traditional and Complementary Medicine on Health was held from October 24th through 27th at the GIS National Taiwan University Convention Center in Taipei. Twenty-seven invited speakers, representative of fourteen Countries, delivered their lecture in front of an audience of more than two hundreds of attendees. In addition, a poster exhibition with seventy-two presenters completed the scientific sessions. The leitmotif of the Conference was to promote a common platform in which all medical knowledge is integrated to improve the health care system. Traditional medicine and complementary medicine are characterized by a holistic approach to prevent and cure diseases, making use of natural products and/or physical manipulations. In this context, the Conference emphasized the importance of the Quality Control and of standardized methods for the authentication, preparation and characterization of the herbal products and nutrient supplements, as well as the need for controlled clinical trials and for experimental studies to demonstrate the efficacy and to understand the underlying mechanisms of the preventive and curative treatments. In this report, we highlight the novel findings and the perspectives in Traditional and Complementary Medicine (TCM; chuán tǒng jì hù bǔ yī xué) that emerged during the conference.

  17. LATIN AS A LANGUAGE OF INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATIVE STATUS: MEDICINE OF THE 16TH-17TH CENTURIES.

    PubMed

    Bieliaieva, O; Lysanets, Yu; Melaschenko, M

    2017-01-01

    The research paper is of interdisciplinary nature, written at the crossroads of the history of medicine, functional stylistics and terminology science. The choice of the 16th century as a starting point of the study is due to the fact that quality changes in book and manuscript writing that took place during this period led to unprecedented development and dissemination of scientific knowledge, including biomedical. The 16th century embraces the life and work of such prominent figures in the history of medicine, as Andreas Vesalius, Gabriele Fallopian, Bartolomeo Eustachi, and Girolamo Fracastoro. The 17th century, which is called the century of "scientific revolution", left not less honourable names in the history of medicine - William Harvey, Marcello Malpighi, Thomas Willis, Jean Pecquet, Francis Glisson, Thomas Sydenham. In the context of this study, these prominent figures are interesting due to the fact that their works were written in Latin and constitute the prototypes of modern scientific style, in particular of such genres as thesis, monograph, scientific article, scientific report, polemic presentation, textbook. On the basis of extensive factual material, it has been demonstrated that during 16th-17th centuries, Latin acted as a fully developed language with a clearly oriented international status. As one of basic tools in scientific knowledge, Latin not only performed the epistemological function which was the priority for the development of medicine, but also served as a means of accumulation, reception, transmission and popularization of achievements in various areas of medical science.

  18. Price discrimination in essential medicines: evidence from International Drug Price Indicator Guide data.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Michael; Zhang, Raymond

    2013-03-01

    Few data are available on what donors, governments and other implementing organisations pay for the medicines they procure. To partly address this shortcoming, we analyse transactions of pharmaceuticals on the WHO's essential medicines list. Our objective was to identify the determinants of prices paid for these drugs. We used data from the 2008 version of the International Drug Price Indicator Guide. We normalised transactions by representing their value as a 'price per daily dose'. We used a mixed-effects regression model to quantify the impact of observable characteristics on prices paid. We present evidence of first-degree price discrimination in the market for essential medicines. We find that as a country's per capita wealth doubles, prices paid for the same pharmaceutical increase by 33%. These data indicate that purchasing agents from wealthier countries pay more for essential medicines, all factors constant. This behaviour is not a form of development assistance for health but rather is indicative of inefficient markets in which buyers' lack of information enables suppliers to charge higher prices than they could otherwise.

  19. Report from the Second International Conference of Traditional and Complementary Medicine on Health 2015

    PubMed Central

    Isidoro, Ciro; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The Second International Conference of Traditional and Complementary Medicine on Health was held from October 24th through 27th at the GIS National Taiwan University Convention Center in Taipei. Twenty-seven invited speakers, representative of fourteen Countries, delivered their lecture in front of an audience of more than two hundreds of attendees. In addition, a poster exhibition with seventy-two presenters completed the scientific sessions. The leitmotif of the Conference was to promote a common platform in which all medical knowledge is integrated to improve the health care system. Traditional medicine and complementary medicine are characterized by a holistic approach to prevent and cure diseases, making use of natural products and/or physical manipulations. In this context, the Conference emphasized the importance of the Quality Control and of standardized methods for the authentication, preparation and characterization of the herbal products and nutrient supplements, as well as the need for controlled clinical trials and for experimental studies to demonstrate the efficacy and to understand the underlying mechanisms of the preventive and curative treatments. In this report, we highlight the novel findings and the perspectives in Traditional and Complementary Medicine (TCM; 傳統暨互補醫學 chuán tǒng jì hù bǔ yī xué) that emerged during the conference. PMID:26870692

  20. Impact of Protected Sleep Period for Internal Medicine Interns on Overnight Call on Depression, Burnout, and Empathy

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Judy A.; Bellini, Lisa M.; Dinges, David F.; Curtis, Meredith L.; Tao, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Jingsan; Small, Dylan S.; Basner, Mathias; Norton, Laurie; Novak, Cristina; Dine, C. Jessica; Rosen, Ilene M.; Volpp, Kevin G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient safety and sleep experts advocate a protected sleep period for residents. Objective We examined whether interns scheduled for a protected sleep period during overnight call would have better end-of-rotation assessments of burnout, depression, and empathy scores compared with interns without protected sleep periods and whether the amount of sleep obtained during on call predicted end-of-rotation assessments. Methods We conducted a randomized, controlled trial with internal medicine interns at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center (PVAMC) and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) in academic year 2009–2010. Four-week blocks were randomly assigned to either overnight call permitted under the 2003 duty hour standards or a protected sleep period from 12:30 am to 5:30 am. Participants wore wrist actigraphs. At the beginning and end of the rotations, they completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-HSS), and Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). Results A total of 106 interns participated. There were no significant differences between groups in end-of-rotation BDI-II, MBI-HSS, or IRI scores at either location (P > .05). Amount of sleep while on call significantly predicted lower MBI-Emotional Exhaustion (P < .003), MBI-Depersonalization (P < .003), and IRI-Personal Distress (P < .006) at PVAMC, and higher IRI-Perspective Taking (P < .008) at HUP. Conclusions A protected sleep period produced few consistent improvements in depression, burnout, or empathy, although depression was already low at baseline. Possibly the amount of protected time was too small to affect these emotional states or sleep may not be directly related to these scores. PMID:24949128

  1. Innovative Ideas for Coordinating International Space Activities: International Center for Space Medicine, International Space Authority, and other Global Youth Space Initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, W.

    2002-01-01

    The Space Generation Forum SGF, at UNISPACE-III, as one of its ten formal recommendations to the United Nations in 1999, put forward the suggestion that the an international space authority should be created. Other recommendations were the establishment of an International Center for Space Medicine, creation of a global space exploration and development program, establishment of a global space (Nobel) prize, and a global space library. These projects are being further developed at the Space Generation Summit (SGS), an event at World Space Congress (WSC) which shall unite international students and young professionals to develop a youth vision and strategy for the peaceful uses of space. SGS, endorsed by the United Nations, will take place from October 11- 13th, during which the 200 delegates will discuss ongoing youth space activities, particularly those stemming from the UNISPACE-III/SGF and taken forward by the Space Generation Advisory Council. Delegates will address a variety of topics with the goal of devising new recommendations according to the theme, 'Accelerating Our Pace in Space'. The material presented here and in other technical sessions throughout WSC includes the findings of these discussions. In this paper, we present the International Space Authority idea together with recommendations on how that might be taken forward. The purpose of such an organization would be to allow: 1. Oversight and enforcement for the balanced regulation of multiple interests in space 2. Access for all peoples to the material benefits and knowledge and understanding enabled by the exploration and 3. Pooling of national and industry resources for the creation of space infrastructure, missions and enterprises for Operating principles: 1. The ISA regulatory regime would encourage commercialization and the harnessing of competitive market 2. Consistent with its charter to ensure access to all peoples, all UN member states and appropriate NGOs would 3. Close coordination with

  2. The International Federation for Emergency Medicine framework for quality and safety in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lecky, Fiona; Benger, Jonathan; Mason, Suzanne; Cameron, Peter; Walsh, Chris

    2014-11-01

    All emergency departments (EDs) have an obligation to deliver care that is demonstrably safe and of the highest possible quality. Emergency medicine is a unique and rapidly developing specialty, which forms the hub of the emergency care system and strives to provide a consistent and effective service 24 h a day, 7 days a week. The International Federation of Emergency Medicine, representing more than 70 countries, has prepared a document to define a framework for quality and safety in the ED. Following a consensus conference and with subsequent development, a series of quality indicators have been proposed. These are tabulated in the form of measures designed to answer nine quality questions presented according to the domains of structure, process and outcome. There is an urgent need to improve the evidence base to determine which quality indicators have the potential to successfully improve clinical outcomes, staff and patient experience in a cost-efficient manner--with lessons for implementation.

  3. Introduction to the 1st International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food (ISPMF 2015).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yafeng; Jassbi, Amir Reza; Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-03-30

    The 1st International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food (ISPMF 2015) was held in Shanghai, China, from June 26th to 29th, 2015. The 1st ISPMF was organized by the Phytochemical Society of Europe (PSE) and the Phytochemical Society of Asia (PSA). More than 270 scientists from 48 countries attended this meeting. The program of ISPMF 2015 consisted of 12 plenary lectures, 20 invited talks, and 55 short oral presentations in 16 sessions, including phytochemistry, phytomedicine, pharmacology, and application of phytochemicals in medicine and food. The 1st ISPMF has obtained support from Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, Food Chemistry, Phytochemistry Reviews, and Nutrients. As supported by Prof. Thomas F. Hofmann, a special issue on Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (ACS) for the 1st ISPMF was initiated in January 2015.

  4. Quality evaluation of health care offered by an Internal Medicine Department.

    PubMed

    Bilora, F; Petrobelli, F; Leo, T; Fioretti, M; Boccioletti, V

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the quality and patients satisfaction for given services in an Internal Medicine Department during three months. A questionnaire was given to all the patients admitted to our Medicine Department to evaluate our strength and to correct weakness. Our patients assessed doctors and nursing staff for skill and dedication. They gave suggestions about hotel management: bathroom cleaning and number of beds in the same room. They also asked for a pharmacy and a post office inside the hospital. It appears that our ward gives a satisfactory health care situation. Some of our patients suggestions can be put into practice in a short time, while others require longer, depending on public resources and not on private, such as happens, on the contrary, in the United States.

  5. Communication channels in general internal medicine: a description of baseline patterns for improved interprofessional collaboration.

    PubMed

    Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Lingard, Lorelei; Reeves, Scott; Miller, Karen-Lee; Russell, Ann; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2009-07-01

    General internal medicine (GIM) is a communicatively complex specialty because of its diverse patient population and the number and diversity of health care providers working on a medicine ward. Effective interprofessional communication in such information-intensive environments is critical to achieving optimal patient care. Few empirical studies have explored the ways in which health professionals exchange patient information and the implications of their chosen communication forms. In this article, we report on an ethnographic study of health professionals' communication in two GIM wards through the lens of communication genre theory. We categorize and explore communication in GIM into two genre sets-synchronous and asynchronous-and analyze the relationship between them. Our findings reveal an essential relationship between synchronous and asynchronous modes of communication that has implications for the effectiveness of interprofessional collaboration in this and similar health care settings, and is intended to inform efforts to overcome existing interprofessional communication barriers.

  6. Economic analysis of bedside ultrasonography (US) implementation in an Internal Medicine department.

    PubMed

    Testa, Americo; Francesconi, Andrea; Giannuzzi, Rosangela; Berardi, Silvia; Sbraccia, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The economic crisis, the growing healthcare demand, and Defensive Medicine wastefulness, strongly recommend the restructuring of the entire medical network. New health technology, such as bedside ultrasonography, might successfully integrate the clinical approach optimizing the use of limited resources, especially in a person-oriented vision of medicine. Bedside ultrasonography is a safe and reliable technique, with worldwide expanding employment in various clinical settings, being considered as "the stethoscope of the 21st century". However, at present, bedside ultrasonography lacks economic analysis. We performed a Cost-Benefit Analysis "ex ante", with a break-even point computing, of bedside ultrasonography implementation in an Internal Medicine department in the mid-term. Number and kind estimation of bedside ultrasonographic studies were obtained by a retrospective study, whose data results were applied to the next 3-year period (foresight study). All 1980 foreseen bedside examinations, with prevailing multiorgan ultrasonographic studies, were considered to calculate direct and indirect costs, while specific and generic revenues were considered only after the first semester. Physician professional training, equipment purchase and working time represented the main fixed and variable cost items. DRG increase/appropriateness, hospitalization stay shortening and reduction of traditional ultrasonography examination requests mainly impacted on calculated revenues. The break-even point, i.e. the volume of activity at which revenues exactly equal total incurred costs, was calculated to be 734 US examinations, corresponding to € 81,998 and the time considered necessary to reach it resulting 406 days. Our economic analysis clearly shows that bedside ultrasonography implementation in clinical daily management of an Internal Medicine department can produce consistent savings, or economic profit according to managerial choices (i.e., considering public or private targets

  7. Re-demonstration without remediation - a missed opportunity? A national survey of internal medicine clerkship directors.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Mary R; Chretien, Katherine C; Torre, Dario; Chheda, Shobhina G

    2014-01-01

    Background Many different components factor into the final grade assigned for the internal medicine clerkship. Failure of one or more of these requires consideration of remedial measures. Purpose To determine which assessment components are used to assign students a passing grade for the clerkship and what remediation measures are required when students do not pass a component. Methods A national cross-sectional survey of Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) institutional members was conducted in April 2011. The survey included sections on remediation, grading practices, and demographics. The authors analyzed responses using descriptive and comparative statistics. Results Response rate was 73% (86/113). Medicine clerkships required students to pass the following components: clinical evaluations 83 (97%), NBME subject exam 76 (88%), written assignments 40 (46%), OSCE 35 (41%), in-house written exam 23 (27%), and mini-CEX 19 (22%). When students failed a component of the clerkship for the first time, 55 schools (64%) simply allowed students to make up the component, while only 16 (18%) allowed a simple make-up for a second failure. Additional ward time was required by 24 schools (28%) for a first-time failure of one component of the clerkship and by 49 (57%) for a second failure. The presence or absence of true remedial measures in a school was not associated with clerkship director academic rank, grading scheme, or percent of students who failed the clerkship in the previous year. Conclusions Most schools required passing clinical evaluations and NBME subject exam components to pass the medicine clerkship, but there was variability in other requirements. Most schools allowed students to simply re-take the component for a first-time failure. This study raises the question of whether true remediation is being undertaken before students are asked to re-demonstrate competence in a failed area of the clerkship to be ready for the subinternship level.

  8. [Prevalence of delirium in hospitalized patients from an internal medicine service].

    PubMed

    González Pezoa, Ana Carolina; Carrillo Venezian, Bernardita Claudia; Castillo Rojas, Sandra

    2015-11-11

    Delirium is a common neurocognitive syndrome that takes place during hospitalizations, associated with worse global outcomes in patients who present it. Despite this, it is usually under-recognized as a disease that needs specific treatment. To determine the rate of prevalence of delirium in Internal Medicine Service patients and evaluate missed diagnosis of the syndrome made by attending physicians, medical residents or interns in charge. This is a descriptive observational study carried out in the Internal Medicine Service of Dr. Eduardo Pereira Hospital (April 12 - May 12, 2014) evaluating 125 patients who were admitted to this service. Through the Confusion Assessment Method Instrument, the prevalence of delirium disease and the number of missed diagnosis was established. One hundred and two (102) patients met the inclusion criteria. Nineteen (19) (18.6%) of them were diagnosed with delirium. In the diagnosed patient group, 13 (68.4%) were women. Delirium diagnosis was missed in eight patients (42.1%). The prevalence of delirium in this specific Hospital is as expected, according to the literature. Considering the diagnostic tools available, it is crucial to train health workers to improve recognition and management of this syndrome.

  9. Sherbrooke - Montevideo: a socially responsible international collaboration to foster family medicine.

    PubMed

    Morin, Martine; Grand'Maison, Paul; Henderson, Eduardo; Vignolo, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization advocates for faculties of medicine to orient health professional education toward the needs of the populations graduates are to serve and to include a greater emphasis on primary health care. It was in this framework that in 2007, the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at the Université de Sherbrooke (FMHS-UdeS) in Canada and the Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de la Republica (FMUdelaR) in Montevideo, Uruguay developed a comprehensive collaboration to sustain the development of family medicine in both universities through education, practice and research. ACTIVITIES AND OUTCOMES: In addition to information sharing through email and teleconferencing, this five year collaboration has included 28 bilateral visits by the two institutions' teachers and leaders. During these visits, Uruguayan members participated in workshops and benefited from exchanges during educational and clinical activities. Interactions led to the improvement of their skills as teachers of family medicine with an emphasis on clinical teaching, supervision, feedback to learners in clinical evaluations, use of various educational methods, use of standardized patients for teaching and evaluation, and research. FMHS-UdeS members learned about the community aspects of family medicine in Uruguay and reflected on how these could be implemented to the benefit of Canadians. The international collaboration forged between the FMHS-UdeS and the FMUdelaR represents a socially responsible endeavor that has been highly rewarding for all involved. It represents a significant learning opportunity for each group aiming to better prepare physicians to serve as primary health care providers in their communities.

  10. CONSORT and the internal validity of randomized controlled trials in Female Pelvic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marianne; Riss, Paul; Umek, Wolfgang; Hanzal, Engelbert

    2016-09-01

    To investigate authors' adherence to the CONSORT reporting guideline for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the sub-specialty Female Pelvic Medicine and to detect any changes in adherence between the years 2008 and 2013. Bibliometric study. We included Female Pelvic Medicine RCTs published in 2008 and 2012-2013 in 10 journals. Full-text versions of RCTs for the inclusion of the CONSORT checklist items Randomization, Allocation, Blinding, and Participants' flowchart were screened. Each CONSORT checklist item was categorized for each included RCT as either "complete reporting", "insufficient reporting", "no reporting," or "not applicable". We screened the "Instructions to authors" for the requirement to adhere to CONSORT. We included 94 Female Pelvic Medicine RCTs for analysis. Most RCTs in 2008, 2012, and 2013 were published by IUJ (n =n39), followed by NAU (n = 13), GREEN (n = 12), European Urology (n = 8), FMPRS (n = 6), AJOG (n = 4), Urology (n = 3), NEJM (n = 3), Lancet (n = 1), and BJOG (n = 1). Proportion of RCTs in the category "complete reporting" comparing 2008 and 2013 was (47 and 70%) for Randomization, (18 and 45%) for Allocation, and (29 and 52%) for Blinding; a flowchart was presented in (71 and 91%). The increase was not statistically significant in any of the investigated CONSORT items. Complete reporting of Female Pelvic Medicine RCTs has increased between 2008 and 2013. However, there are still a relevant number of published RCTs, which do not fulfill these criteria. Reporting according to the CONSORT guidelines should be further encouraged to improve internal validity of Female Pelvic Medicine RCTs. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:826-830, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Using death rounds to improve end-of-life education for internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Smith, Leah; Hough, Catherine L

    2011-01-01

    While internal medicine interns provide much of the care to patients dying in the hospital, few report that they have received adequate training in end-of-life care. To address this perceived lack of training, we undertook a study to evaluate Death Rounds as an educational tool in end-of-life care and to address the emotional needs of trainees providing care to dying patients. We used a behavioral interventional study using a pre-post study design. The study included all internal medicine interns at the University of Washington (n = 62) during the academic year 2007-08. Interns from the 2006-07 academic year (n = 64) received the survey and served as the control group. Death Rounds, a one-hour session dedicated to discussion of emotional reactions to patient death. We used a 14-item electronic measure with questions directed toward the impact of perceived insufficient end-of-life care and the role of Death Rounds in resident education. Results are drawn from a total of 39 surveys completed by the intervention group, for a response rate of 63%. Seventy-four percent (29) felt that Death Rounds contributed to their education in end-of-life issues. Seventy-two percent (28) reported that Death Rounds was "somewhat" or "very" helpful in improving their comfort with discussing end-of-life issues. Ninety-seven percent (38) of participants thought that having an opportunity to discuss the emotional aspects of patient death should be included in their training. This study suggests that learning to deal with the strong emotions that arise in the care of dying patients is an important part of physician training. Death Rounds provides an opportunity to explore these emotions with colleagues in a supportive environment and is a valuable addition to the resident curriculum.

  12. Text categorization models for high-quality article retrieval in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Aphinyanaphongs, Yindalon; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Statnikov, Alexander; Hardin, Douglas; Aliferis, Constantin F

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Finding the best scientific evidence that applies to a patient problem is becoming exceedingly difficult due to the exponential growth of medical publications. The objective of this study was to apply machine learning techniques to automatically identify high-quality, content-specific articles for one time period in internal medicine and compare their performance with previous Boolean-based PubMed clinical query filters of Haynes et al. DESIGN The selection criteria of the ACP Journal Club for articles in internal medicine were the basis for identifying high-quality articles in the areas of etiology, prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment. Naive Bayes, a specialized AdaBoost algorithm, and linear and polynomial support vector machines were applied to identify these articles. MEASUREMENTS The machine learning models were compared in each category with each other and with the clinical query filters using area under the receiver operating characteristic curves, 11-point average recall precision, and a sensitivity/specificity match method. RESULTS In most categories, the data-induced models have better or comparable sensitivity, specificity, and precision than the clinical query filters. The polynomial support vector machine models perform the best among all learning methods in ranking the articles as evaluated by area under the receiver operating curve and 11-point average recall precision. CONCLUSION This research shows that, using machine learning methods, it is possible to automatically build models for retrieving high-quality, content-specific articles using inclusion or citation by the ACP Journal Club as a gold standard in a given time period in internal medicine that perform better than the 1994 PubMed clinical query filters.

  13. Assessment of appropriate antibiotic prescribing for urinary tract infections in an internal medicine clinic.

    PubMed

    Sigler, Meredith; Leal, Julie Ehret; Bliven, Katherine; Cogdill, Brittany; Thompson, Amy

    2015-05-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common infections encountered in ambulatory care and inpatient settings. Although these infections are common, not all patients are prescribed an appropriate antibiotic or duration of therapy. The primary objective of this analysis was to evaluate the appropriateness of antibiotic selection and duration of therapy for patients in an adult internal medicine clinic diagnosed as having a UTI. We conducted a retrospective chart review (July 1, 2012-June 30, 2013) of adult patients in an internal medicine clinic who were diagnosed as having a UTI. Pediatric and pregnant patients were excluded from the analysis. Data pertaining to the classification of UTI, antibiotic regimen, urine culture, and renal function were collected. All of the data were analyzed to determine whether the prescribing habits at the internal medicine clinic aligned with Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for antibiotic selection and duration of therapy for acute uncomplicated cystitis, complicated cystitis, catheter-associated UTI, and pyelonephritis. There were 269 records available for the analysis, with the majority of the cases being uncomplicated and complicated UTIs. Of 128 cases of patients with uncomplicated UTIs and 116 cases of patients with complicated UTIs, 64.1% and 42.2%, respectively, were prescribed appropriate first- or second-line therapy, which aligned with the recommendations of the IDSA. Regarding the individual components of the UTI treatment regimen, antibiotic selection had the highest frequency of appropriateness, with 97.6% of uncomplicated UTI cases and 90.5% of complicated UTI cases having been treated with a recommended antibiotic. In contrast, the treatment duration for uncomplicated and complicated UTIs had the lowest frequency of appropriateness, at 71.9% and 58.6%, respectively. Receiving an adequate antibiotic regimen for a UTI is important to prevent treatment failure and the emergence of

  14. Effect of Weekend Admissions on the Treatment Process and Outcomes of Internal Medicine Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Che; Huang, Yu-Tung; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Shing; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many studies address the effect of weekend admission on patient outcomes. This population-based study aimed to evaluate the relationship between weekend admission and the treatment process and outcomes of general internal medicine patients in Taiwan. A total of 82,340 patients (16,657 weekend and 65,683 weekday admissions) aged ≥20 years and admitted to the internal medicine departments of 17 medical centers between 2007 and 2009 were identified from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis was used to compare patients admitted on weekends and those admitted on weekdays. Patients who were admitted on weekends were more likely to undergo intubation (odds ratio [OR]: 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16–1.39; P < 0.001) and/or mechanical ventilation (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.15–1.35; P < 0.001), cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (OR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.05–2.01; P = 0.026), and be transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) (OR: 1.16; 95% CI: 1.03–1.30; P = 0.015) compared with those admitted on weekdays. Weekend-admitted patients also had higher odds of in-hospital mortality (OR: 1.19; 95% CI: 1.09–1.30; P < 0.001) and hospital treatment cost (OR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01–1.06; P = 0.008) than weekday-admitted patients. General internal medicine patients who were admitted on weekends experienced more intensive care procedures and higher ICU admission, in-hospital mortality, and treatment cost. Intensive care utilization may serve as early indicator of poorer outcomes and a potential entry point to offer preventive intervention before proceeding to intensive treatment. PMID:26871788

  15. Assessing the effects of the 2003 resident duty hours reform on internal medicine board scores.

    PubMed

    Silber, Jeffrey H; Romano, Patrick S; Itani, Kamal M F; Rosen, Amy K; Small, Dylan; Lipner, Rebecca S; Bosk, Charles L; Wang, Yanli; Halenar, Michael J; Korovaichuk, Sophia; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Volpp, Kevin G

    2014-04-01

    To determine whether the 2003 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty hours reform affected medical knowledge as reflected by written board scores for internal medicine (IM) residents. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) Internal Medicine residents who started training before and after the 2003 duty hour reform using a merged data set of American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Board examination and the National Board of Medical Examiners (NMBE) United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 2 Clinical Knowledge test scores. Specifically, using four regression models, the authors compared IM residents beginning PGY-1 training in 2000 and completing training unexposed to the 2003 duty hours reform (PGY-1 2000 cohort, n = 5,475) to PGY-1 cohorts starting in 2001 through 2005 (n = 28,008), all with some exposure to the reform. The mean ABIM board score for the unexposed PGY-1 2000 cohort (n = 5,475) was 491, SD = 85. Adjusting for demographics, program, and USMLE Step 2 exam score, the mean differences (95% CI) in ABIM board scores between the PGY-1 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 and 2005 cohorts minus the PGY-1 2000 cohort were -5.43 (-7.63, -3.23), -3.44 (-5.65, -1.24), 2.58 (0.36, 4.79), 11.10 (8.88, 13.33) and 11.28 (8.98, 13.58) points respectively. None of these differences exceeded one-fifth of an SD in ABIM board scores. The duty hours reforms of 2003 did not meaningfully affect medical knowledge as measured by scores on the ABIM board examinations.

  16. Oxygen therapy multicentric study--a nationwide audit to oxygen therapy procedures in internal medicine wards.

    PubMed

    Neves, J T; Lobão, M J

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is a common and important treatment in Internal Medicine wards, however, several studies report that it isn't provided accordingly with the best of care. The goal of this work is to evaluate oxygen therapy procedures in Portuguese Internal Medicine wards, comparing them to the standards established by the British Thoracic Society (BTS) in its consensus statement "BTS guideline for emergency oxygen use in adult patients". Between September 3rd and 23rd 2010, each one of the 24 enrolled hospitals audited the oxygen therapy procedures for one randomly chosen day. All Internal Medicine inpatients under oxygen therapy or with oxygen prescription were included. Data was collected regarding oxygen prescription, administration and monitoring. Of the 1549 inpatients, 773 met inclusion criteria. There was an oxygen prescription in 93,4%. Most prescriptions were by a fixed dose (82,4%), but only 11,6% of those stated all the required parameters. Absence of oxygen therapy duration and monitoring were the most frequent errors. Oxygen was administered to only 77,0% of the patients with fixed dose prescriptions. FiO(2) or flow rate and the delivery device were the same as prescribed in 70,9 and 89,2% of the patients, respectively. Out of the 127 patients with oxygen therapy prescriptions by target SatO(2) range, 82,7% were on the prescribed SatO(2) objective range. Several errors were found in oxygen therapy procedures, particularly regarding fixed dose prescriptions, jeopardizing the patients. Although recommended by BTS, oxygen therapy prescriptions by target SatO(2) range are still a minority. Copyright © 2011 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. [Changes in knowledge and carrying out the advance directives of patients admitted to internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Pérez, M; Herreros, B; Martín, M D; Molina, J; Guijarro, C; Velasco, M

    2013-01-01

    Advance directives (ADs), are documents in which patients express in advance that their wishes are fulfilled when they are unable to communicate them. It is unknown whether patients admitted to internal medicine are more aware of and make ADs. To study the changes in the level of knowledge and implementation of AD among patients admitted to an internal medicine department of a hospital in Madrid since a specific regulation to implement them was introduced. A survey was conducted among patients admitted to internal medicine in two periods: 2008 and 2010. A total of 206 surveys were analysed (84 in 2008 and 122 in 2010). The mean age of the patients was 76.8 years, and 51.5% were women. More than two-thirds (69.4%) had a co-morbidity. and 4.4% had a terminal illness, with no statistical differences between the periods. Only 5.3% knew what ADs are, 1 had implemented ADs, and 46.1%, once informed, would like to implement them. There were no differences between 2008 and 2010 as regards knowledge and implementation of AD. In 2010 there was a greater interest to implement them (would like to implement them: 52.5 vs 36.9%), although in 2010 less respondents believe that AD would change the attitude of the doctor (not change the attitude: 92.6 vs. 69%, P<.001). Knowledge and implementation of AD did not change significantly in the years following the regulation (from 2008-2010). In both periods, their knowledge and implementation are scarce. Copyright © 2012 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Text Categorization Models for High-Quality Article Retrieval in Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Aphinyanaphongs, Yindalon; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Statnikov, Alexander; Hardin, Douglas; Aliferis, Constantin F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective Finding the best scientific evidence that applies to a patient problem is becoming exceedingly difficult due to the exponential growth of medical publications. The objective of this study was to apply machine learning techniques to automatically identify high-quality, content-specific articles for one time period in internal medicine and compare their performance with previous Boolean-based PubMed clinical query filters of Haynes et al. Design The selection criteria of the ACP Journal Club for articles in internal medicine were the basis for identifying high-quality articles in the areas of etiology, prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment. Naïve Bayes, a specialized AdaBoost algorithm, and linear and polynomial support vector machines were applied to identify these articles. Measurements The machine learning models were compared in each category with each other and with the clinical query filters using area under the receiver operating characteristic curves, 11-point average recall precision, and a sensitivity/specificity match method. Results In most categories, the data-induced models have better or comparable sensitivity, specificity, and precision than the clinical query filters. The polynomial support vector machine models perform the best among all learning methods in ranking the articles as evaluated by area under the receiver operating curve and 11-point average recall precision. Conclusion This research shows that, using machine learning methods, it is possible to automatically build models for retrieving high-quality, content-specific articles using inclusion or citation by the ACP Journal Club as a gold standard in a given time period in internal medicine that perform better than the 1994 PubMed clinical query filters. PMID:15561789

  19. Ambulatory care training during core internal medicine residency training: the Canadian experience.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, P J; Meagher, T W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of ambulatory care training of core internal medicine residents in Canada. DESIGN: Mail survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 16 program directors of internal medicine residency training programs in Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: The nature and amount of ambulatory care training experienced by residents, information about the faculty tutors, and the sources and types of patients seen by the residents. As well, the program directors were asked for their opinions on the ideal ambulatory care program and the kinds of teaching skills required of tutors. RESULTS: All of the directors responded. Fifteen stated that the ambulatory care program is mandatory, and the other stated that it is an elective. Block rotations are more common than continuity-of-care assignments. In 12 of the programs 10% or less of the overall training time is spent in ambulatory care. In 11 the faculty tutors comprise a mixture of generalists and subspecialists. The tutors simultaneously care for patients and teach residents in the ambulatory care setting in 14 of the schools. Most are paid through fee-for-service billing. The respondents felt that the ideal program should contain a mix of general and subspecialty ambulatory care training. There was no consensus on whether it should be a block or continuity-of-care experience, but the directors felt that consultation and communication skills should be emphasized regardless of which type of experience prevails. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is a widespread commitment to provide core internal medicine residents with experience in ambulatory care, there is little uniformity in how this is achieved in Canadian training programs. PMID:8324688

  20. Pressure ulcers in patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine: associated factors and mortality.

    PubMed

    Díez-Manglano, J; Fernández-Jiménez, C; Lambán-Aranda, M P; Landa-Santesteban, M C; Isasi de Isasmendi-Pérez, S; Moreno-García, P; Bejarano-Tello, E; Barranco-Usón, J; Munilla-López, E; Del Corral-Beamonte, E

    2016-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of pressure ulcers in patients hospitalized in internal medicine and the clinical factors and risk of death associated with its presence. Prospective cohort study with patients hospitalized in internal medicine. We recorded the age, sex, presence of pressure ulcers, degree of ulceration, Barthel index, Norton scale, major diagnostic category, length of hospital stay and weight of the diagnosis-related groups. We compared the clinical characteristics of the patients with or without ulcers and analysed the mortality after 3 years based on the presence of ulcers. The study included 699 patients, 100 of whom (14.3%) had pressure ulcers (27 with grade I, 17 with grade II, 21 with grade III, 25 with grade IV and 10 with unknown grade). The Barthel index (OR 0.985; 95% CI 0.972-0.998; p=.022) and Norton scale (OR 0.873; 95% CI 0.780-0.997; p=.018) are independently associated with ulcers. Twenty-three percent of the patients with ulcers died during hospitalization, 68% died within a year, and 83% died within 3 years. The presence of pressure ulcers was independently associated with mortality (HR, 1.531; 95% CI 1.140-2.056; p=.005). Pressure ulcers are common in patients hospitalized in internal medicine, and their presence is associated with higher short, medium and long-term mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  1. TIP list

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, M E

    2006-06-22

    Subcontractors and vendors providing services, including the installation of purchased goods, are required to complete a TIP List. This list does not include every Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) related concern at LLNL. It is intended to highlight major concerns common to most on-site service activities.

  2. Technology Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stohl, Hollylynne; Harper, Suzanne R.

    2004-01-01

    Some of the graphing capabilities of The Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP) in the "Technology Tips" are introduced. The new graphing features of GSP allow teachers to implement the software not only in geometry classrooms but also into their algebra, precalculus and calculus classes.

  3. Technology Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic program for geometry called Cabri Geometry II is used to examine properties of figures like triangles and make connections with other mathematical ideas like ellipse. The technology tip includes directions for creating such a problem with technology and suggestions for exploring it.

  4. Technology Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic program for geometry called Cabri Geometry II is used to examine properties of figures like triangles and make connections with other mathematical ideas like ellipse. The technology tip includes directions for creating such a problem with technology and suggestions for exploring it.

  5. Overspecialized and undertrained? Patient diversity encountered by medical students during their internal medicine clerkship at a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Melderis, Simon; Gutowski, Jan-Philipp; Harendza, Sigrid

    2015-03-31

    During the four-month internal medicine clerkship in their final year, undergraduate medical students are closely involved in patient care. Little is known about what constitutes their typical learning experiences with respect to patient diversity within the different subspecialties of internal medicine and during on call hours. 25 final year medical students (16 female, 9 male) on their internal medicine clerkship participated in this observational single-center study. To detail the patient diversity encountered by medical students at a university hospital during their 16-week internal medicine clerkship, all participants self-reported their patient contacts in the different subspecialties and during on call hours on patient encounter cards. Patients' chief complaint, suspected main diagnosis, planned diagnostic investigations, and therapy in seven different internal medicine subspecialties and the on call medicine service were documented. 496 PECs were analysed in total. The greatest diversity of chief complaints (CC) and suspected main diagnoses (SMD) was observed in patients encountered on call, with the combined frequencies of the three most common CCs or SMDs accounting for only 23% and 25%, respectively. Combined, the three most commonly encountered CC/SMD accounted for high percentages (82%/63%), i.e. less diversity, in oncology and low percentages (37%/32%), i.e. high diversity, in nephrology. The percentage of all diagnostic investigations and therapies that were classified as "basic" differed between the subspecialties from 82%/94% (on call) to 37%/50% (pulmonology/oncology). The only subspecialty with no significant difference compared with on call was nephrology for diagnostic investigations. With respect to therapy, nephrology and infectious diseases showed no significant differences compared with on call. Internal medicine clerkships at a university hospital provide students with a very limited patient diversity in most internal medicine

  6. Developing a Cultural Consensus Analysis Based on the Internal Medicine Milestones (M-CCA).

    PubMed

    Smith, C Scott; Hill, William; Francovich, Chris; Morris, Magdalena; Langlois-Winkle, Francine; Caverzagie, Kelly; Iobst, William

    2011-06-01

    A national task force identified domains and developmental milestones from the national competencies for resident training. Cultural Consensus Analysis (CCA) is a standard anthropological technique that can identify value conflicts. We created a CCA based on the internal medicine milestones (M-CCA) in 3 steps: converted the 38 domains into active statements; reduced the total number to 12 by summarizing and combining; and simplified the wording. This M-CCA needs further validation, after which it may be useful for assessing the 6-competency model.

  7. Emotional Intelligence in Internal Medicine Residents: Educational Implications for Clinical Performance and Burnout.

    PubMed

    Satterfield, Jason; Swenson, Sara; Rabow, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We measured emotional intelligence (EQ; the ability to perceive, understand, and manage emotions in the self and others) in a sample of 28 internal medicine residents at the beginning and end of an academic year. EQ scores increased significantly over the course of the year. Higher EQ scores at the end of the year were significantly related to higher ratings for overall clinical performance and medical interviewing. Higher EQ scores also correlated with lower levels of burnout. Results suggest that clinically significant changes in EQ can occur over the course of medical training. Further study should determine if and how educational interventions can affect EQ, EQ-related performance, and burnout.

  8. How are internal medicine residency journal clubs organized, and what makes them successful?

    PubMed

    Sidorov, J

    1995-06-12

    While there has been extensive research on interventions designed to increase knowledge of research methods in the setting of journal clubs, little is known regarding other features that are of potential importance. To my knowledge, no research to date has described the attributes of journal clubs associated with high resident attendance and the avoidance of periodic abandonment. I sought to determine how journal clubs in postgraduate programs in internal medicine are organized and to identify the features associated with high attendance and continuous existence. Mailed cross-sectional survey of the 208 accredited residency programs in internal medicine in the eastern United States. The surveys were mailed to the chief resident in internal medicine in August 1992. Data from 131 residency programs were available (response rate, 64.5%). Mean estimated attendance at the 124 programs with an active journal club was 58.5% (range, 7% to 100%); 86 (65.6%) of the clubs were in continuous existence for 2 years or longer. Fifty-two journal clubs (41.9%) were described as independent of any faculty clubs, and 62 (50.0%) emphasized original research. The number of articles reviewed per session ranged from one to six, but the majority reviewed two articles, usually during a 1-hour period, most often during the lunch hour. Seventy-two programs (58.1%) described club attendance as mandatory. The provision of food was a regular feature of 83 (66.9%) of the journal clubs, and the majority of clubs with food regularly rely on funding support for the food from pharmaceutical companies. Participation of faculty in the scheduling of the club, assigning articles, and overall coordination varied, but in 29 (22.1%) of the clubs, faculty provided formal teaching of critical appraisal skills, clinical epidemiology, and biostatistics. Fewer house staff, a mandatory attendance requirement, being independent of a faculty journal club, and formal teaching were associated with high attendance

  9. Impact of a competency based curriculum on quality improvement among internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Fok, Mark C; Wong, Roger Y

    2014-11-28

    Teaching quality improvement (QI) principles during residency is an important component of promoting patient safety and improving quality of care. The literature on QI curricula for internal medicine residents is limited. We sought to evaluate the impact of a competency based curriculum on QI among internal medicine residents. This was a prospective, cohort study over four years (2007-2011) using pre-post curriculum comparison design in an internal medicine residency program in Canada. Overall 175 post-graduate year one internal medicine residents participated. A two-phase, competency based curriculum on QI was developed with didactic workshops and longitudinal, team-based QI projects. The main outcome measures included self-assessment, objective assessment using the Quality Improvement Knowledge Assessment Tool (QIKAT) scores to assess QI knowledge, and performance-based assessment via presentation of longitudinal QI projects. Overall 175 residents participated, with a response rate of 160/175 (91%) post-curriculum and 114/175 (65%) after conducting their longitudinal QI project. Residents' self-reported confidence in making changes to improve health increased and was sustained at twelve months post-curriculum. Self-assessment scores of QI skills improved significantly from pre-curriculum (53.4 to 69.2 percent post-curriculum [p-value 0.002]) and scores were sustained at twelve months after conducting their longitudinal QI projects (53.4 to 72.2 percent [p-value 0.005]). Objective scores using the QIKAT increased post-curriculum from 8.3 to 10.1 out of 15 (p-value for difference <0.001) and this change was sustained at twelve months post-project with average individual scores of 10.7 out of 15 (p-value for difference from pre-curriculum <0.001). Performance-based assessment occurred via presentation of all projects at the annual QI Project Podium Presentation Day. The competency based curriculum on QI improved residents' QI knowledge and skills during residency

  10. [Eating disorders in obese individuals--a psychiatric or internal medicine issue?].

    PubMed

    Kravarová, E; Slabá, S; Svacina, S

    2010-10-01

    Many relations are connecting obesity and eating disorders--one disease is often modifying the other. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa are mostly treated by psychiatrists. Internal medicine specialists are mostly involved only in complications (e.g. malnutrition, ion disorders). Obesity is mostly treated only by internists. Psychiatrists are only involved in some depressive patients. Obese patients with eating disorders are mostly not sent to psychiatric diagnostics. In this article an overview of eating disorder symptoms and classification is given--binge eating disorder, night eating syndrome and grazing. These symptoms are defined and possibilities of diagnosis and treatment are described.

  11. Internal Medicine Residents' Perceived Responsibility for Patients at Hospital Discharge: A National Survey.

    PubMed

    Young, Eric; Stickrath, Chad; McNulty, Monica C; Calderon, Aaron J; Chapman, Elizabeth; Gonzalo, Jed D; Kuperman, Ethan F; Lopez, Max; Smith, Christopher J; Sweigart, Joseph R; Theobald, Cecelia N; Burke, Robert E

    2016-12-01

    Medical residents are routinely entrusted with transitions of care, yet little is known about the duration or content of their perceived responsibility for patients they discharge from the hospital. To examine the duration and content of internal medicine residents' perceived responsibility for patients they discharge from the hospital. The secondary objective was to determine whether specific individual experiences and characteristics correlate with perceived responsibility. Multi-site, cross-sectional 24-question survey delivered via email or paper-based form. Internal medicine residents (post-graduate years 1-3) at nine university and community-based internal medicine training programs in the United States. Perceived responsibility for patients after discharge as measured by a previously developed single-item tool for duration of responsibility and novel domain-specific questions assessing attitudes towards specific transition of care behaviors. Of 817 residents surveyed, 469 responded (57.4 %). One quarter of residents (26.1 %) indicated that their responsibility for patients ended at discharge, while 19.3 % reported perceived responsibility extending beyond 2 weeks. Perceived duration of responsibility did not correlate with level of training (P = 0.57), program type (P = 0.28), career path (P = 0.12), or presence of burnout (P = 0.59). The majority of residents indicated they were responsible for six of eight transitional care tasks (85.1-99.3 % strongly agree or agree). Approximately half of residents (57 %) indicated that it was their responsibility to directly contact patients' primary care providers at discharge. and 21.6 % indicated that it was their responsibility to ensure that patients attended their follow-up appointments. Internal medicine residents demonstrate variability in perceived duration of responsibility for recently discharged patients. Neither the duration nor the content of residents' perceived responsibility was

  12. Report of the International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food (ISPMF 2015).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-08-01

    The International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food (ISPMF2015) was held June 26-29, 2015, in Shanghai, China. This is the first time that a PSE meeting has been held in Asia and a PSE-PSA joint symposium provided an opportunity for communication between scientists from European and Asian countries. More than 270 scientists from 48 countries attended this meeting. ISPMF2015 assembled an exciting and diverse programme with 16 sessions, consisting of 12 plenary lectures, 20 invited talks, 55 short oral presentations, and in excess of 130 posters, dedicated to creating a podium for exchanging the latest research results on phytochemicals for food and human health.

  13. Advancing Systems Biology in the International Conference on Intelligent Biology and Medicine (ICIBM) 2015.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongming; Liu, Yunlong; Huang, Yufei; Huang, Kun; Ruan, Jianhua

    2016-08-26

    The 2015 International Conference on Intelligent Biology and Medicine (ICIBM 2015) was held on November 13-15, 2015 in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. ICIBM 2015 included eight scientific sessions, three tutorial sessions, one poster session, and four keynote presentations that covered the frontier research in broad areas related to bioinformatics, systems biology, big data science, biomedical informatics, pharmacogenomics, and intelligent computing. Here, we present a summary of the 10 research articles that were selected from ICIBM 2015 and included in the supplement to BMC Systems Biology.

  14. The first international workshop on the role and impact of mathematics in medicine: A collective account

    PubMed Central

    Artzrouni, Marc; Begg, Colin; Chabiniok, Radomir; Clairambault, Jean; Foss, AJE; Hargrove, John; Lee, Eva K; Siggers, Jennifer H; Tindall, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    The First International Workshop on The Role and Impact of Mathematics in Medicine (RIMM) convened in Paris in June 2010. A broad range of researchers discussed the difficulties, challenges and opportunities faced by those wishing to see mathematical methods contribute to improved medical outcomes. Finding mechanisms for interdisciplinary meetings, developing a common language, staying focused on the medical problem at hand, deriving realistic mathematical solutions, obtaining high quality data and seeing things through “by the bedside” are some of the issues discussed by the participants.

  15. Emotional Intelligence in Internal Medicine Residents: Educational Implications for Clinical Performance and Burnout

    PubMed Central

    Satterfield, Jason; Swenson, Sara; Rabow, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We measured emotional intelligence (EQ; the ability to perceive, understand, and manage emotions in the self and others) in a sample of 28 internal medicine residents at the beginning and end of an academic year. EQ scores increased significantly over the course of the year. Higher EQ scores at the end of the year were significantly related to higher ratings for overall clinical performance and medical interviewing. Higher EQ scores also correlated with lower levels of burnout. Results suggest that clinically significant changes in EQ can occur over the course of medical training. Further study should determine if and how educational interventions can affect EQ, EQ-related performance, and burnout. PMID:20407619

  16. Surveying the medical literature: five notable articles in general internal medicine from 2008 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alexander A; Ghali, William A

    2010-01-01

    Given the vast and growing volume of medical literature, it is essential to develop reliable strategies for identifying articles of importance and relevance. Here, we summarize 5 notable articles for general internal medicine published in 2008 and 2009. Clinical vignettes are presented to illustrate situations in which each study might apply, and each summary ends with a description of how a physician might use the study findings to resolve the vignette case. Finally, we describe a surveillance strategy that physicians can use to identify articles important to their own practices.

  17. A comparison of medical litigation filed against obstetrics and gynecology, internal medicine, and surgery departments.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Tomoko; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-10-24

    The aim of this study was to review the typical factors related to physician's liability in obstetrics and gynecology departments, as compared to those in internal medicine and surgery, regarding a breach of the duty to explain. This study involved analyzing 366 medical litigation case reports from 1990 through 2008 where the duty to explain was disputed. We examined relationships between patients, physicians, variables related to physician's explanations, and physician's breach of the duty to explain by comparing mean values and percentages in obstetrics and gynecology, internal medicine, and surgical departments with the t-test and χ(2) test. When we compared the reasons for decisions in cases where the patient won, we found that the percentage of cases in which the patient's claim was recognized was the highest for both physician negligence, including errors of judgment and procedural mistakes, and breach of the duty to explain, in obstetrics and gynecology departments; breach of the duty to explain alone in internal medicine departments; and mistakes in medical procedures alone in surgical departments (p = 0.008). When comparing patients, the rate of death was significantly higher than that of other outcomes in precedents where a breach of the duty to explain was acknowledged (p = 0.046). The proportion of cases involving obstetrics and gynecology departments, in which care was claimed to be substandard at the time of treatment, and that were not argued as breach of a duty to explain, was significantly higher than those of other evaluated departments (p <0.001). However, internal medicine and surgical departments were very similar in this context. In obstetrics and gynecology departments, the proportion of cases in which it had been conceded that the duty to explain had been breached when seeking patient approval (or not) was significantly higher than in other departments (p = 0.002). It is important for physicians working in obstetrics and gynecology

  18. Current Perspective in the International Trade of Medicinal Plants Material: An Update.

    PubMed

    Vasisht, Karan; Sharma, Neetika; Karan, Maninder

    2016-01-01

    The recent years have seen an increased interest in medicinal plants together with the therapeutic use of phytochemicals. Medicinal plants are utilized by the industry for the production of extracts, phytopharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals and cosmeceuticals and their use is expected to grow faster than the conventional drugs. The enormous demand of medicinal plant material has resulted in huge trade both at domestic and international levels. The trade data of medicinal plant material with commodity code HS 1211 (SITC.4, code 292.4) and their derived/related products which are traded under different commodity codes has been acquired from COMTRADE, Trade Map, country reports, technical documents etc for the period 2001 to 2014. The data was analyzed using statistical tools to draw conclusions. The significant features of the global trade; the leading source, consumer, import and export countries; and the striking trends are presented. The trade of the ten key countries and the selected important items is also discussed in detail. The conservative figure of trade of medicinal plants materials and their derived/related products including extracts, essential oils, phytopharmaceuticals, gums, spices used in medicine, tannins for pharmaceutical use, ingredients for cosmetics etc. as calculated from the global export data for the year 2014 is estimated at USD 33 billion. The average global export in medicinal plants under HS 1211 for the fourteen year period was USD 1.92 billion for 601,357 tons per annum and for the year 2014 it stood at 702,813 tons valued at USD 3.60 billion. For the studied period, an annual average growth rate (AAGR) of 2.4% in volumes and 9.2% in values of export was observed. Nearly 30% of the global trade is made up by top two countries of the import and export. China and India from Asia; Egypt and Morocco from Africa; Poland, Bulgaria and Albania from Europe; Chile and Peru from South America are important supply sources. The USA, Japan and Europe

  19. The International Atomic Energy Agency's activities in radiation medicine and cancer: promoting global health through diplomacy.

    PubMed

    Deatsch-Kratochvil, Amanda N; Pascual, Thomas Neil; Kesner, Adam; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Chhem, Rethy K

    2013-02-01

    Global health has been an issue of seemingly low political importance in comparison with issues that have direct bearing on countries' national security. Recently, health has experienced a "political revolution" or a rise in political importance. Today, we face substantial global health challenges, from the spread of infectious disease, gaps in basic maternal and child health care, to the globalization of cancer. A recent estimate states that the "overall lifetime risk of developing cancer (both sexes) is expected to rise from more than one in three to one in two by 2015." These issues pose significant threats to international health security. To successfully combat these grave challenges, the international community must embrace and engage in global health diplomacy, defined by scholars Thomas Novotny and Vicanne Adams as a political activity aimed at improving global health, while at the same time maintaining and strengthening international relations. The IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) is an international organization with a unique mandate to "accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health, and prosperity throughout the world." This article discusses global health diplomacy, reviews the IAEA's program activities in human health by focusing on radiation medicine and cancer, and the peaceful applications of atomic energy within the context of global health diplomacy. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Exporting the American (information) revolution: the international impact of the National Library of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith, E V; Janson, F S

    1986-10-01

    The National Library of Medicine has had an enormous impact on health information services all over the world. Although NLM is primarily a national institution, it has become an important international resource by responding to requests from the international community. NLM has been influential in three major ways. First, NLM has provided a model for other national and regional health information services. Second, it has been a catalyst, in that MEDLARS and other services it provides formed the nucleus of many regional networks. NLM helped such networks get started by giving advice on how to set up services and build collections and by "training the trainers" on the MEDLARS system. Third, NLM has supported national and regional operations by providing the additional training and materials needed for day-to-day service.

  1. Faculty staff-guided versus self-guided ultrasound training for internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Alba, George A; Kelmenson, Daniel A; Noble, Vicki E; Murray, Alice F; Currier, Paul F

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasonography is of growing importance within internal medicine (IM), but the optimal method of training doctors to use it is uncertain. In this study, the authors provide the first objective comparison of two approaches to training IM residents in ultrasonography. In this randomised trial, a simulation-based ultrasound training curriculum was implemented during IM intern orientation at a tertiary care teaching hospital. All 72 incoming interns attended a lecture and were given access to online modules. Interns were then randomly assigned to a 4-hour faculty-guided (FG) or self-guided (SG) ultrasound training session in a simulation laboratory with both human and manikin models. Interns were asked to self-assess their competence in ultrasonography and underwent an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) to assess their competence in basic and procedurally oriented ultrasound tasks. The primary outcome was the score on the OSCE. Faculty-guided training was superior to self-guided training based on the OSCE scores. Subjects in the FG training group achieved significantly higher OSCE scores on the two subsets of task completion (0.9-point difference, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27-1.54; p = 0.008) and ultrasound image quality (2.43-point difference, 95% CI 1.5-3.36; p < 0.001). Both training groups demonstrated an increase in self-assessed competence after their respective training sessions and there was little difference between the groups. Subjects rated the FG training group much more favourably than the SG training group. Both FG and SG ultrasound training curricula can improve the self-reported competence of IM interns in ultrasonography. However, FG training was superior to SG training in both skills acquisition and intern preference. Incorporating mandatory ultrasound training into IM residencies can address the perceived need for ultrasound training, improve confidence and procedural skills, and may enhance patient safety. However, the optimal

  2. Improving the National Board of Medical Examiners internal Medicine Subject Exam for use in clerkship evaluation.

    PubMed

    Elnicki, D Michael; Lescisin, Dianne A; Case, Susan

    2002-06-01

    To provide a consensus opinion on modifying the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Medicine Subject Exam (Shelf) to: 1) reflect the internal medicine clerkship curriculum, developed by the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) and the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM); 2) emphasize knowledge important for a clerkship student; and 3) obtain feedback about students' performances on the Shelf. Two-round Delphi technique. The CDIM Research and Evaluation Committee and CDIM members on NBME Step 2 Committees. Using 1-5 Likert scales (5 = highest ratings), the group rated test question content for relevance to the SGIM-CDIM Curriculum Guide and importance for clerkship students' knowledge. The Shelf content is organized into 4 physician tasks and into 11 sections that are generally organ system based. Each iteration of the Shelf has 100 questions. Participants indicated a desired distribution of questions by physician task and section, topics critical for inclusion on each exam, and new topics to include. They specified the types of feedback clerkship directors desired on students' performances. Following the first round, participants viewed pooled results prior to submitting their second-round responses. Of 15 individuals contacted, 12 (80%) participated in each round. The desired distribution by physician task was: diagnosis (43), treatment (23), mechanism of disease (20), and health maintenance (15). The sections with the most questions requested were the cardiovascular (17), respiratory (15), and gastroenterology (12) sections. The fewest were requested in aging/ethics (4) and neurology, dermatology, and immunology (5 each). Examples of low-rated content were Wilson's Disease, chancroid and tracheal rupture (all <2.0). Health maintenance in type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease all received 5.0 ratings. Participants desired feedback by: section (4.6) and physician task (3.9), on performances of the entire class (4

  3. Selected papers from the 7th International Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology (MMB 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Ellis; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-03-01

    In this special section of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering are a collection of the best microengineering papers presented at the 7th International Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology (MMB 2013) which took place in the seaside town of Marina del Rey, California, USA on 10-12 April, 2013. During the 3-day conference, participants enjoyed talks from 6 invited keynote speakers and 125 flash oral/poster presentations. The MMB conference is a biennial meeting with the primary purpose of fostering interactions between biologists and medical researchers, clinicians, chemists, physicists and engineers to enhance and strengthen the potential microtechnologies that will revolutionize the fields of medicine and biological sciences. The conference possesses a unique format where all poster presenters provide a brief 60 s oral presentation highlighting their research. This format was devised to provide training and exposure for young researchers, especially PhD students and postdocs, in the field and stimulate interdisciplinary exchanges. Therefore, MMB provides an intimate intellectual venue the facilitate discussions and collaborations to advance new research tools and technologies for medicine and biological sciences. The MMB conference series was co-founded by Professor David Beebe (University of Wisconsin—Madison) and Professor André Dittmar (University of Lyon) and was the first international meeting to provide a forum focusing on emerging applications of microtechnologies to unmet needs in medicine and biology. The series was held for the first time in 2000, in Lyon, France and followed by Madison, USA (2002), Oahu Island in Hawaii, USA (2005), Okinawa, Japan (2006), Québec City, Canada (2009), Lucerne, Switzerland (2011), and Marina del Rey, USA (2013). The next conference will be held in Seoul, Korea in 2015. This collection of articles highlights recent progress in microtechnologies with medical and biological applications. We are

  4. The pluralization of the international: Resistance and alter-standardization in regenerative stem cell medicine

    PubMed Central

    Rosemann, Achim; Chaisinthop, Nattaka

    2016-01-01

    The article explores the formation of an international politics of resistance and ‘alter-standardization’ in regenerative stem cell medicine. The absence of internationally harmonized regulatory frameworks in the clinical stem cell field and the presence of lucrative business opportunities have resulted in the formation of transnational networks adopting alternative research standards and practices. These oppose, as a universal global standard, strict evidence-based medicine clinical research protocols as defined by scientists and regulatory agencies in highly developed countries. The emergence of transnational spaces of alter-standardization is closely linked to scientific advances in rapidly developing countries such as China and India, but calls for more flexible regulatory frameworks, and the legitimization of experimental for-profit applications outside of evidence-based medical care, are emerging increasingly also within more stringently regulated countries, such as the United States and countries in the European Union. We can observe, then, a trend toward the pluralization of the standards, practices, and concepts in the stem cell field. PMID:26983174

  5. Maintaining a Twitter Feed to Advance an Internal Medicine Residency Program's Educational Mission.

    PubMed

    Bergl, Paul A; Narang, Akhil; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-07-10

    Residency programs face many challenges in educating learners. The millennial generation's learning preferences also force us to reconsider how to reach physicians in training. Social media is emerging as a viable tool for advancing curricula in graduate medical education. The authors sought to understand how social media enhances a residency program's educational mission. While chief residents in the 2013-2014 academic year, two of the authors (PB, AN) maintained a Twitter feed for their academic internal medicine residency program. Participants included the chief residents and categorical internal medicine house staff. At the year's end, the authors surveyed residents about uses and attitudes toward this initiative. Residents generally found the chief residents' tweets informative, and most residents (42/61, 69%) agreed that Twitter enhanced their overall education in residency. Data from this single-site intervention corroborate that Twitter can strengthen a residency program's educational mission. The program's robust following on Twitter outside of the home program also suggests a need for wider adoption of social media in graduate medical education. Improved use of data analytics and dissemination of these practices to other programs would lend additional insight into social media's role in improving residents' educational experiences.

  6. Barriers and facilitators of universal HIV screening among internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Meghan B; Kolehmainen, Christine; Barocas, Joshua; Isaac, Carol; Crnich, Christopher J; Sosman, James M

    2013-10-01

    Adoption of universal HIV screening has been low despite national recommendations. To describe the barriers and facilitators to adoption of universal HIV screening in a low-prevalence setting. Qualitative, thematic analysis of focus group discussions among internal medicine residents who introduced universal HIV screening into their primary care practice in Madison, Wisconsin. Deductive and inductive codes constructed a hybridized thematic analysis model. Deductive codes stemmed from a knowledge-attitude-behavior framework for physician nonadherence to guidelines. Inductive codes emerged from the focus group discussions and were embedded into broader deductive codes to provide an HIV-specific model. Residents were knowledgeable and had positive attitudes toward recommendations for universal HIV screening. Residents felt the majority of their patients were receptive to HIV screening, especially when introduced with normalizing techniques and reference to an expert authority such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). They still perceived patient discussions as challenging due to stigma surrounding HIV and patients' perceptions of being at low risk. Residents employed individualized electronic medical record cues as a memory aid to discuss the issue. This qualitative study of internal medicine residents training in an area with low HIV prevalence suggests that stigma and patient perception of being at low risk are barriers that should be addressed to effectively integrate universal HIV screening into primary care.

  7. Impact of pharmaceutical company representatives on internal medicine residency programs. A survey of residency program directors.

    PubMed

    Lichstein, P R; Turner, R C; O'Brien, K

    1992-05-01

    To survey internal medicine residency program directors regarding interactions between their residents and pharmaceutical company (PC) representatives (PCRs) a questionnaire was sent to the directors of all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved internal medicine residency programs. The survey included 444 program directors, of whom 272 (61.16%) responded. The majority of program directors, 228 (83.8%), allowed PCRs to meet with residents during working hours and 241 (88.6%) permitted PC sponsorship of conferences. About half of the program directors were "moderately" or "very" concerned about the potential adverse effects of PC marketing on resident attitudes and prescribing practices. Seventy percent "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that the benefits of PC sponsorship outweigh the adverse effects and 41.5% believed that refusal to allow PCRs to meet with residents would jeopardize PC funding of other departmental activities. Most program directors reported that alternate funds for conferences were available if PC support was withdrawn. "Unethical" marketing activities were observed by 14.3% of program directors and 37.5% reported that residents had participated in PC-sponsored trips during the 3 years prior to the survey. At the time of this survey, only 35.3% of programs had developed formal policies regulating PCR activities and 25.7% provided residents with formal instruction on marketing issues. Knowledge of the current extent of PCR interactions with residents may be helpful to program directors in developing policies regulating PC-marketing activities.

  8. Maintaining a Twitter Feed to Advance an Internal Medicine Residency Program’s Educational Mission

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Akhil; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-01-01

    Background Residency programs face many challenges in educating learners. The millennial generation’s learning preferences also force us to reconsider how to reach physicians in training. Social media is emerging as a viable tool for advancing curricula in graduate medical education. Objective The authors sought to understand how social media enhances a residency program’s educational mission. Methods While chief residents in the 2013-2014 academic year, two of the authors (PB, AN) maintained a Twitter feed for their academic internal medicine residency program. Participants included the chief residents and categorical internal medicine house staff. Results At the year’s end, the authors surveyed residents about uses and attitudes toward this initiative. Residents generally found the chief residents’ tweets informative, and most residents (42/61, 69%) agreed that Twitter enhanced their overall education in residency. Conclusions Data from this single-site intervention corroborate that Twitter can strengthen a residency program’s educational mission. The program’s robust following on Twitter outside of the home program also suggests a need for wider adoption of social media in graduate medical education. Improved use of data analytics and dissemination of these practices to other programs would lend additional insight into social media’s role in improving residents’ educational experiences. PMID:27731845

  9. Aging Q3: an initiative to improve internal medicine residents' geriatrics knowledge, skills, and clinical performance.

    PubMed

    Moran, William P; Zapka, Jane; Iverson, Patty J; Zhao, Yumin; Wiley, M Kathleen; Pride, Pamela; Davis, Kimberly S

    2012-05-01

    A growing number of older adults coupled with a limited number of physicians trained in geriatrics presents a major challenge to ensuring quality medical care for this population. Innovations to incorporate geriatrics education into internal medicine residency programs are needed. To meet this need, in 2009, faculty at the Medical University of South Carolina developed Aging Q(3)-Quality Education, Quality Care, and Quality of Life. This multicomponent initiative recognizes the need for improved geriatrics educational tools and faculty development as well as systems changes to improve the knowledge and clinical performance of residents. To achieve these goals, faculty employ multiple intervention strategies, including lectures, rounds, academic detailing, visual cues, and electronic medical record prompts and decision support. The authors present examples from specific projects, based on care areas including vision screening, fall prevention, and caring for patients with dementia, all of which are based on the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders quality indicators. The authors describe the principles driving the design, implementation, and evaluation of the Aging Q(3) program. They present data from multiple sources that illustrate the effectiveness of the interventions to meet the knowledge, skill level, and behavior goals. The authors also address major challenges, including the maintenance of the teaching and modeling interventions over time within the context of demanding primary care and inpatient settings. This organized, evidence-based approach to quality improvement in resident education, as well as faculty leadership development, holds promise for successfully incorporating geriatrics education into internal medicine residencies.

  10. Improving quality of NSAID prescribing by internal medicine trainees with an educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Bruce J; Singh, Ranjit; Wisniewski, Angela M; Singh, Gurdev; Anderson, Diana R

    2010-10-01

    Prescribing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for older adults is a safety concern. Education innovations in postgraduate training designed to improve patient safety should comply with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). The objective is to evaluate a seven-component education program for internal medicine trainees designed to change prescribing practices while addressing ACGME competencies. Pretest, posttest data collection. The baseline chart review found that 28.7% (79/275) patients age 70 or older were prescribed NSAIDs. Approximately 1 year later, the proportion of patients prescribed NSAIDs had declined to 16.4% (30/183; p= .002). The proportion of patients prescribed NSAIDs in conjunction with a diuretic similarly declined from 13.6% (38/278) to 7% (13/187; p= .024). A systematically applied education program targeted to a specific prescribing pattern produced significant improvement among internal medicine trainees. This model may assist training programs in reducing polypharmacy, or in other areas of trainee practice.

  11. Prevalence, risk factors and prognosis of hypernatraemia during hospitalisation in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Felizardo Lopes, I; Dezelée, S; Brault, D; Steichen, O

    2015-12-01

    Hypernatraemia in hospitalised patients is less common and less studied than hyponatraemia, although it also seems to be associated with a poor prognosis. The present study evaluates its prevalence, risk factors and prognosis in an internal medicine department. Full hospital stays over 28 months in a 36-bed internal medicine department were analysed retrospectively. Patients with at least one plasma sodium ≥ 150 mmol/l were compared first with all other patients and then individually with sex- and age-matched normonatraemic controls. Plasma sodium ≥ 150 mmol÷l was observed during 49÷1945 hospitalisations (2.6%); it was acquired during hospitalisation in 30 cases (61%). Hypernatraemic patients were significantly older with no gender difference. They were comparable with their matched normonatraemic controls regarding the Charlson comorbidity index, although individual comorbidities varied. They were bedridden in 45% vs 15% for controls (p = 0.001). Nearly one-third of hypernatraemic patients had an increased extracellular fluid volume. Hypernatraemia was associated with higher in-hospital mortality (43% vs 2%, p < 0.001) and longer hospitalisation (median 21 vs 10 days, p = 0.004). Hypernatraemia is more likely to occur in older and dependent patients and is associated with poor prognosis. Unlike classical teaching, it is often associated with increased extracellular fluid volume, even outside intensive care units.

  12. Innovative strategies for transforming internal medicine residency training in resource-limited settings: the Mozambique experience.

    PubMed

    Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Carrilho, Carla; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Funzamo, Carlos; Patel, Sam; Preziosi, Michael; Lederer, Philip; Tilghman, Winston; Benson, Constance A; Badaró, Roberto; Nguenha, A; Schooley, Robert T; Noormahomed, Emília V

    2014-08-01

    With approximately 4 physicians per 100,000 inhabitants, Mozambique faces one of the most severe health care provider shortages in Sub-Saharan Africa. The lack of sufficient well-trained medical school faculty is one of Mozambique's major barrier to producing new physicians annually. A partnership between the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane and the University of California, San Diego, has addressed this challenge with support from the Medical Education Partnership Initiative. After an initial needs assessment involving questionnaires and focus groups of residents, and working with key members from the Ministry of Health, the Medical Council, and Maputo Central Hospital, a set of interventions was designed. The hospital's internal medicine residency program was chosen as the focus for the plan. Interventions included curriculum design, new teaching methodologies, investment in an informatics infrastructure for access to digital references, building capacity to support clinical research, and providing financial incentives to retain junior faculty. The number of candidates entering the internal medicine residency program has increased, and detailed monitoring and evaluation is measuring the impact of these changes on the quality of training. These changes are expected to improve the long-term quality of postgraduate training in general through dissemination to other departments. They also have the potential to facilitate equitable distribution of specialists nationwide by expanding postgraduate training to other hospitals and universities.

  13. A core physical examination in internal medicine: what should students do and how about their supervisors?

    PubMed

    Haring, Catharina M; van der Meer, Jos W M; Postma, Cornelis T

    2013-09-01

    Performance of a focused physical examination will induce a high cognitive load for medical students in the early phase of the clinical clerkships. To come to a workable and clinically applicable standard physical examination for medical students to be used in every new patient in the daily clinical practice of internal medicine. A questionnaire held among physicians that supervise students during the clerkship of internal medicine in one Dutch training region. Of the complete list of physical examination 55 items were considered to be an integral part of the standard general physical examination for medical students. Most emphasized were elements of the physical examination aimed at general parameters, thorax and abdomen, vascular status, lymph nodes, spinal column, skin and some parts of the neurological examination. The standard physical examinations performed by supervisors themselves contain fewer items than they expected from the students. The expectations a supervisor has towards the student correlates with the frequency with which they apply the various components in their own physical examination. This study provides us with a 'core' physical examination for medical students that can be applied in the early phase of the clinical clerkships.

  14. [Nursing Internship Internal Medicine: Evaluation and Influences on the Attitude towards the Specialization].

    PubMed

    Wirkner, Janine; Stracke, Sylvia; Lange, Anja; Dabers, Thomas; Merk, Harry; Kasch, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Background German medical students have to perform a nursery internship of three month duration. While this internship is widely discussed, there is a lack of student evaluation data. Objectives Here, for the first time, student evaluation of a nursery internship in internal medicine (IM) is investigated. Moreover, the question was raised, whether the early experience during this internship may influence students' attitude towards the specialty. Methods In a nation-wide online-survey, 767 German medical students (mean age 22.8 years; 58 % female) evaluated a nursery internship on an IM ward concerning integration in medical teams, teachers, structure and quality of teaching, and satisfaction. Multivariate comparisons were conducted following the question, whether students could imagine choosing IM for a clinical elective after this nursery internship. Results 71 % of the students felt well integrated in the medical team, most was learned from the nurses, and most students indicated having acquired nursing skills. Only 19 % evaluated the structure of the internship as good, and 40 % indicated that they reached the learning goals. Students who could imagine performing an IM clinical elective (52 %) gave best evaluations on all items. Conclusions A successful nursery internship can promote students' interest in the specialty of internal medicine. But, there is a strong need for improvement in structure and content, including the, to date missing, definition of learning targets, regarding this first practical experience in medical studies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Internal medicine progress note writing attitudes and practices in an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Elizabeth; Kahn, Daniel; Lee, Edward; Simon, Wendy; Duncan, Mark; Mosher, Hilary; Harris, Katherine; Bell, John; El-Farra, Neveen; Sharpe, Bradley

    2015-08-01

    The electronic health record (EHR) has been viewed with both praise and skepticism. Multiple editorials have expressed concerns that EHR implementation and "efficiency tools" such as copy forward and auto population have resulted in a decrement in note accuracy, relevance, and critical thinking. To evaluate the perceptions of internal medicine housestaff and attendings on inpatient progress note quality at 4 academic institutions after the implementation of an EHR. Cross-sectional survey. We developed surveys that assessed housestaff and attendings opinion of current progress note quality, the impact of the EHR on quality, and the purposes of a progress note. We received 99 completed surveys from interns (66%), 155 from residents (49%), and 153 from attendings (70%) across 4 institutions. The majority of housestaff responded that the quality of notes was "unchanged" or "better" following the implementation of an EHR, whereas attendings believed note quality was "unchanged" or "worse." Attendings' perceptions of housestaff notes were significantly lower than housestaff perceptions of their own notes across all domains. With regard to the effect of copy forward and autopopulation, the majority of housestaff viewed these to be "neutral" or "somewhat positive," whereas attendings viewed these as "neutral" or "somewhat negative." Housestaff and attendings had nearly perfect agreement regarding the purpose of the progress note. Attendings and housestaff disagree on the current quality of progress notes and the impact of an EHR on note quality, but agree on the purpose of a progress note. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  16. Innovative Strategies for Transforming Internal Medicine Residency Training in Resource-Limited Settings: The Mozambique Experience

    PubMed Central

    Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Carrilho, Carla; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Funzamo, Carlos; Patel, Sam; Preziosi, Michael; Lederer, Philip; Tilghman, Winston; Benson, Constance A.; Badaró, Roberto; Nguenha, A.; Schooley, Robert T.; Noormahomed, Emília V

    2014-01-01

    With approximately four physicians per 100,000 inhabitants, Mozambique faces one of the most severe health care provider shortages in Sub-Saharan Africa. The lack of sufficient wel-trained medical school faculty is Mozambique’s major barrier to producing new physicians annually. A partnership between the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane and the University of California, San Diego, has addressed this challenge with support from the Medical Education Partnership Initiative. Following an initial needs assessment involving questionnaires and focus groups of residents, and working with key members from the Ministry of Health, the Medical Council, and Maputo Central Hospital, a set of interventions was designed. The hospital’s Internal Medicine Residency Program was chosen as the focus for the plan. Interventions included curriculum design, new teaching methodologies, investment in an informatics infrastructure for access to digital references, building capacity to support clinical research, and providing financial incentives to retain junior faculty. The number of candidates entering the Internal Medicine (IM) residency program has increased, and detailed monitoring and evaluation is measuring the impact of these changes on the quality of training. These changes are expected to improve the long-term quality of postgraduate training in general through dissemination to other departments. They also have the potential to facilitate equitable distribution of specialists nationwide by expanding postgraduate training to other hospitals and universities. PMID:25072585

  17. The resident scholar program: a research training opportunity for internal medicine house staff.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Abigail B; McCormack, Francis X; Diers, Tiffiny; Jazieh, Abdul-Rahman

    2007-01-01

    Housestaff research training is a challenging task that is complicated by the lack of a structured process and dedicated time. The Resident Scholar Program (RSP) at the University of Cincinnati, Department of Internal Medicine was created to overcome these challenges. Interested internal medicine house staff are required to submit an application to the residency research director including a project description signed by a faculty mentor. If the project is approved, a 4-month elective rotation is scheduled for the following year. Residents spend the first month on a consult service in the subspecialty area of their research and the remaining 3 months performing their research project. The RSP was launched in July 2003. The percentage of residents participating in research more than tripled. The subspecialty areas represented by RSP research were more diverse than those represented in prior years. Most participants participated in clinical research projects (84%), with 63% of projects being prospective in design. The RSP residents were twice as likely to obtain subspecialty fellowship positions compared to non-RSP residents (89% vs 46%, respectively). The RSP enables house staff to participate in research opportunities in their areas of interest. Development of a more systematic assessment method to study the impact of the program is underway, but the high participation rate reflects resident interest in such a program, particularly for residents with aspirations in pursuing fellowship training.

  18. Using television shows to teach communication skills in internal medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Wong, Roger Y; Saber, Sadra S; Ma, Irene; Roberts, J Mark

    2009-02-03

    To address evidence-based effective communication skills in the formal academic half day curriculum of our core internal medicine residency program, we designed and delivered an interactive session using excerpts taken from medically-themed television shows. We selected two excerpts from the television show House, and one from Gray's Anatomy and featured them in conjunction with a brief didactic presentation of the Kalamazoo consensus statement on doctor-patient communication. To assess the efficacy of this approach a set of standardized questions were given to our residents once at the beginning and once at the completion of the session. Our residents indicated that their understanding of an evidence-based model of effective communication such as the Kalamazoo model, and their comfort levels in applying such model in clinical practice increased significantly. Furthermore, residents' understanding levels of the seven essential competencies listed in the Kalamazoo model also improved significantly. Finally, the residents reported that their comfort levels in three challenging clinical scenarios presented to them improved significantly. We used popular television shows to teach residents in our core internal medicine residency program about effective communication skills with a focus on the Kalamazoo's model. The results of the subjective assessment of this approach indicated that it was successful in accomplishing our objectives.

  19. The relationship between mental healthcare utilization and criminal behaviors among internal medicine outpatients.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Lam, Charlene; Wiederman, Michael W

    2011-06-01

    According to the scant empirical literature, largely in studies of offenders, there appears to be a general but diffuse relationship between various psychiatric disorders and criminal behavior. In this study, we examined mental healthcare utilization, a general measure of psychiatric dysfunction, in relationship to a history of criminal behavior in a sample of internal medicine outpatients. In a consecutive sample of 376 internal medicine outpatients being seen predominantly by resident providers, we examined the relationship between 27 illegal behaviors (charges, not convictions) as delineated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation's crime cataloguing schema and four items related to mental healthcare utilization (i.e., ever been seen by a psychiatrist, ever been hospitalized in a psychiatric hospital, ever been in counseling, ever been on medication for your "nerves"). Twenty-two percent of the sample reported a history of having been charged with at least one criminal behavior. With the exception of ever having been on "nerve" medication, the remaining mental-healthcare-utilization variables demonstrated statistically significant relationships with the number of illegal behaviors reported. However, overall correlations were relatively weak. Using both a sample and methodology that is unique to the current literature, we found relationships between past mental health treatment and history of criminal behavior.

  20. [Criteria for a medical specialty in crisis: a case study of general surgery and internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Nirel, Nurit; Birkenfeld, Shlomo; Benbassat, Jochanan

    2008-06-01

    Several clinical specialties in Israel appear to be experiencing an ongoing crisis. Recently, a Public Committee addressed this problem and recommended its further study. In this paper, the authors report a pilot case study of general surgery and internal medicine, which have been identified as "clinical specialties in crisis" in the medical literature, in the testimonies presented to the Public Committee, and during our preliminary interviews. to identify (a) the criteria for a "medical specialty in crisis" and (b) measures for the assessment of the extent of the crisis. (a) Qualitative analysis of interviews and written testimonies of hospital directors, departmental heads of general surgery and internal medicine, and key personnel in the health care system; (b) Analysis of data derived from national administrative data databases and (c) Secondary analysis of data from a nationwide survey of board certified Israeli specialists. We identified five criteria of "medical specialties in crisis": shortage of "good" applicants for residency training; difficulties in filling vacant positions; excessive workload due to the limited number of staff physician and residents; a perceived low remuneration and limited opportunities for additional income; poor quality of professional working life. Some of these criteria can be used as a proxy for measuring the extent of the crisis. It is possible to identify criteria defining clinical specialties in crisis, as well as its extent, as a first step toward identification of possible ways of coping with it. The findings of this pilot study justify a broader survey of additional medical specialties and a larger number of physicians.

  1. The pluralization of the international: Resistance and alter-standardization in regenerative stem cell medicine.

    PubMed

    Rosemann, Achim; Chaisinthop, Nattaka

    2016-02-01

    The article explores the formation of an international politics of resistance and 'alterstandardization' in regenerative stem cell medicine. The absence of internationally harmonized regulatory frameworks in the clinical stem cell field and the presence of lucrative business opportunities have resulted in the formation of transnational networks adopting alternative research standards and practices. These oppose, as a universal global standard, strict evidence-based medicine clinical research protocols as defined by scientists and regulatory agencies in highly developed countries. The emergence of transnational spaces of alter-standardization is closely linked to scientific advances in rapidly developing countries such as China and India, but calls for more flexible regulatory frameworks, and the legitimization of experimental for-profit applications outside of evidence-based medical care, are emerging increasingly also within more stringently regulated countries, such as the United States and countries in the European Union. We can observe, then, a trend toward the pluralization of the standards, practices, and concepts in the stem cell field.

  2. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  3. Aerodynamic investigation of an air-cooled axial-flow turbine. Part 2: Rotor blade tip-clearance effects on overall turbine performance and internal gas flow conditions: Experimental results and prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, A.; Takahara, K.; Nouse, H.; Mimura, F.; Inoue, S.; Usui, H.

    1977-01-01

    Total turbine blade performance was investigated while changing the blade tip clearance in three ways. The internal flow at the moving blade outlet point was measured. Experimental results were compared with various theoretical methods. Increased blade clearance leads to decreased turbine efficiency.

  4. Sponsorship of Internal Medicine Subspecialty Fellowships Since 2000: Trends and Community Hospital Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Robert; Porto Carreiro, Fernanda; Camire, Lyn

    2009-01-01

    Background: Since 2002, market studies have predicted a physician shortage with an increasing need for future subspecialists. A Residency Review Committee (RRC) rule that restricted sponsorship of fellowships was eliminated in 2005, but the influence of this change on the number of fellowships is not known. We believed that the rules change might make it possible for community hospitals to offer fellowships. Our objectives were to determine the extent of change in the number of fellowships in university and community hospitals from 2000 through 2008, both before and after the RRC regulation change in 2005, and to determine whether community hospitals contributed substantially to the number of new fellowships available to internal medicine graduates. Methods: We used archived Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) data from July 2000 through June 2008. The community hospital category included multispecialty clinics, community programs, and municipal hospitals. Results: Of the 94 newly approved internal medicine subspecialty fellowships in this time period, 59 (63%) were community sponsored. As of 6/02/08, all were in good standing. Thirteen programs were started as a department of medicine solo fellowship since 2005. The number of new programs approved between 2005 and 2008 was roughly three times the number approved between 2000 and 2004. Conclusions: The number of subspecialty fellowship programs and approved positions has increased dramatically in the last 8 years. Many of the new programs were at community hospitals. The change in RRC rules has been associated with increased availability of fellowship programs in the university and community hospital setting for subspecialty training. PMID:20165522

  5. The multiple mini-interview for selection of international medical graduates into family medicine residency education.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Marianna; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Crutcher, Rodney

    2009-06-01

    The multiple mini-interview (MMI) was used to measure professionalism in international medical graduate (IMG) applicants for family medicine residency in Alberta for positions accessed through the Alberta International Medical Graduate (AIMG) Program. This paper assesses the evidence for the MMI's reliability and validity in this context. A group of 71 IMGs participated in our 12-station MMI designed to assess professionalism competency. A 10-point scale evaluated applicants on ability to address the objectives of the situation, interpersonal skills, suitability for a residency and for family medicine, and overall performance. We conducted generalisability and decision studies to assess the reliability of MMI scores. We assessed the validity by examining the differences in MMI scores associated with session, track and socio-demographic characteristics of applicants and by measuring the correlations between MMI scores and scores on compulsory examinations, including the AIMG objective structured clinical examination, the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination (MCCEE) and the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQE I). We measured the correlation between MMI and non-requisite MCCQE Part II (MCCQE II) scores that were provided. The reliability as indicated by the generalisability coefficient associated with average station scores was 0.70 with one interviewer per station. There were no statistically significant differences in total MMI scores or mean station sum scores based on session, track, applicant age, gender, years since medical school completion, or language of medical school. There were low, non-significant correlations with OSCE overall (r = 0.15), MCCEE (r = 0.01) and MCCQE I (r = 0.06) scores and a higher non-significant correlation with MCCQE II scores (r = 0.33). There is evidence that the MMI offers a reliable and valid assessment of professionalism in IMG doctors applying for Canadian family medicine residencies and

  6. Introduction of total quality management (TQM) into an internal medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Ellrodt, A G

    1993-11-01

    In spite of significant enthusiasm for the principles and methods of total quality management (TQM) in health care organizations, there have been only a few creative programs applying TQM to medical education. In addition, teaching programs are under significant pressure to teach and practice cost-effective medicine and to produce more sophisticated general internists. In July 1992, the governance and operation of the internal medicine training program at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center was restructured to integrate a TQM program with a health services research section and a resource management department. This restructured program transfers significant programmatic responsibility and power to houseofficers. Within the playing field defined through a housestaff values statement and requirements of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Internal Medicine, the housestaff have brought about substantial change. The first housestaff survey after the new program was operational for six months revealed that 68% of the 77 respondents felt the housestaff had greater programmatic influence, 68% felt that the rate of program change was "better," and 63% felt the overall training program had improved, while 3% felt it had worsened after the restructuring. Fifty-six percent of the housestaff felt the new program should be continued unchanged, and 29% felt it should be continued with changes. Housestaff teams have approached educational issues, quality-of-care problems, and resource management challenges through formal scientific problem-solving techniques. This article discusses the lessons learned in the first six months and the program improvements that will be attempted in the future.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Internal medicine resident knowledge, attitudes, and barriers to naloxone prescription in hospital and clinic settings.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J Deanna; Spicyn, Natalie; Matson, Pamela; Alvanzo, Anika; Feldman, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    The United States is facing an epidemic of opioid use and misuse leading to historically high rates of overdose. Community-based overdose education and naloxone distribution has effectively trained lay bystanders to recognize signs of overdose and administer naloxone for reversal. There has been a movement to encourage physicians to prescribe naloxone to all patients at risk of overdose; however, the rate of physician prescribing remains low. This study aims to describe resident knowledge of overdose risk assessment, naloxone prescribing practices, attitudes related to naloxone, and barriers to overdose prevention and naloxone prescription. The HOPE (Hospital-based Overdose Prevention and Education) Initiative is an educational campaign to teach internal medicine residents to assess overdose risk, provide risk reduction counseling, and prescribe naloxone. As part of a needs assessment, internal medicine residents at an academic medical center in Baltimore, Maryland, were surveyed in 2015. Data were collected anonymously using Qualtrics. Ninety-seven residents participated. Residents were overwhelmingly aware of naloxone (80%) and endorsed a willingness to prescribe (90%). Yet despite a high proportion of residents reporting patients in their panels at increased overdose risk (79%), few had prescribed naloxone (15%). Residents were willing to discuss overdose prevention strategies, although only a minority reported doing so (47%). The most common barriers to naloxone prescribing were related to knowledge gaps in how to prescribe and how to assess risk of overdose and identify candidates for naloxone (52% reporting low confidence in ability to identify patients who are at risk). Medicine residents are aware of naloxone and willing to prescribe it to at-risk patients. Due to decreased applied knowledge and limited self-efficacy, few residents have prescribed naloxone in the past. In order to improve rates of physician prescribing, initiatives must help physicians

  8. [Internal medicine and the holistic approach to the patient between globalization and advanced technologies].

    PubMed

    Dammacco, Franco

    2012-06-01

    Although Internal Medicine (IM) has played for many years a crucial role in the medical education and in the diagnostic framing of the most common diseases, starting from the beginning of the 70's the knowledge explosion, the recognition of the multidisciplinary nature of IM and the consequent impossibility for the Internist to master an ever growing array of notions have resulted in the development of specialized disciplines restricted to pathologies of single organs or apparatus. The parcelling out of medical knowledge has thus induced the onset of a number of specializations stemmed from IM and, as a direct consequence, an identity crisis of the same IM. Social transformations and variations in the epidemiology of several diseases have contributed to such crisis, including aging, frailty and disability, polypathology and chronicity. In the last few years, however, IM has regained a central role in medicine, in that the Internist is an expert of "medicine of complexity" and the only specialist able to envisage an holistic approach to the patient. The development of biotechnologies, characterized on one side by nanotechnologies and on the other by the instruments of diagnostic imaging, has provided an important contribution to make clinical medicine more and more precise and reliable. The genomic analysis of novel pharmacological targets has opened new therapeutic horizons, especially in the oncology field. A striking aspect of modern medicine, again based on unreasonable expectations of improvement and recovery, is the progressive increment of malpractice claims leading to an indemnity payment. Defensive medicine has been the answer to face this growing problem: physicians are in fact induced to prescribe a much higher number of often unnecessary examinations and laboratory tests, that result in a wasting rise of health costs. In view of the rapidly changing reality, it seems fair to ask the question as to whether in our country the medical education is abreast

  9. Racing Against the Clock: Internal Medicine Residents' Time Spent On Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Guo, Uta; Illipparambil, Lijo C.; Netherton, Matt D.; Sheshadri, Bhairavi; Karu, Eric; Peterson, Stephen J.; Mehta, Parag H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Since the late 1980s, resident physicians have spent increasing amounts of time on electronic health record (EHR) data entry and retrieval. Objective longitudinal data measuring time spent on the EHR are lacking. Objective We sought to quantify the time actually spent using the EHR by all first-year internal medicine residents in a single program (N = 41). Methods Active EHR usage data were collected from the audit logs for May, July, and October 2014 and January 2015. Per recommendations from our EHR vendor (Cerner Corporation), active EHR usage time was defined as more than 15 keystrokes, or 3 mouse clicks, or 1700 “mouse miles” per minute. Active EHR usage time was tallied for each patient chart viewed each day and termed an electronic patient record encounter (EPRE). Results In 4 months, 41 interns accumulated 18 322 hours of active EHR usage in more than 33 733 EPREs. Each intern spent on average 112 hours per month on 206 EPREs. Interns spent more time in July compared to January (41 minutes versus 30 minutes per EPRE, P < .001). Time spent on the EHR in January echoed that of the previous May (30 minutes versus 29 minutes, P = .40). Conclusions First-year residents spent a significant amount of time actively using the EHR, achieving maximal proficiency on or before January of the academic year. Decreased time spent on the EHR may reflect greater familiarity with the EHR, growing EHR efficiencies, or other factors. PMID:26913101

  10. Promoting Quality Care for Recently Resettled Populations: Curriculum Development for Internal Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    MacNamara, Marina; Wilhelm, April; Dy, Geolani; Andiman, Sarah; Landau, Carol; Poshkus, Michael; Feller, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Background Residents report they lack preparation for caring for an increasingly diverse US population. In response, a variety of curricula have been developed to integrate cultural competency into medical training programs. To date, none of these curricula has specifically addressed members of recently resettled populations. Methods A preliminary assessment was conducted among internal medicine (IM) residents at 1 program (N  =  147). Based on 2 conceptual frameworks and the survey results, a pilot curriculum was developed and integrated into the interns' ambulatory block education within the general IM track (n  =  9). It included (1) online information made available to all hospital staff; (2) 4 interactive didactic sessions; and (3) increased exposure to newly arrived patients. The curriculum was qualitatively evaluated through 2 focus groups. Results The preliminary assessment was completed by 101 of 147 residents (69%), with 61% of respondents indicating they felt that they received less than adequate education in this area. Eight of the 9 interns exposed to the new curriculum participated in the focus groups. Overall, respondents reported they thought patient care had improved for recently resettled populations and across their patient panels after exposure to the curriculum. Conclusions This study demonstrated that an intervention that included didactics and enhanced exposure to a diverse population improved IM interns' perceptions of care for all patients, including recently settled individuals. PMID:24949138

  11. Survey of Internal Medicine Physicians Trained in Three Different Eras: Reflections on Duty-Hour Reform

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Carolyn M.; Issa, Meltiady; Croghan, Ivana T.; Buechler, Tamara E.; Burton, M. Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To survey internal medicine physicians and residents who have completed residency in three different eras of medical training regarding their experiences during their intern year and their perceptions of duty-hour reform. Methods An online survey was administered to 268 residents, fellows, and staff physicians who had completed or were completing residency during one of three eras of training: before the 80-hour work week, after the 80-hour work week (instituted in 2003), and after the 16-hour limit on continuous shifts for interns (instituted in 2011). The survey assessed experiences during their intern year of residency and perceptions regarding resident duty-hour reform. Results The majority of respondents (n = 32; 54%) indicated that duty-hour restrictions would result in residents being less prepared for their future careers. In addition, 36% (n = 21) of respondents anticipated a decrease in the quality of patient care under the restricted duty hours. A total of 41% (n = 24) were undecided regarding the impact of duty-hour reform on patient care. Respondents reported time spent on independent study, research, and conference attendance did not increase following the institution of duty-hour restrictions. Conclusions Survey responses indicated that after 18 months of experience with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty-hour restrictions, physician opinions were mixed and a substantial number remain undecided regarding the impact of duty-hour restrictions on resident career preparedness and the quality of patient care. PMID:24945179

  12. [80 years' of internal medicine education at the medical school of the university in Belgrade (1922-2002)].

    PubMed

    Micić, Jovan; Micić, Dragan

    2003-01-01

    ORGANISATION OF TEACHING INTERNAL MEDICINE: The Department for Internal Medicine and Internal Clinics were founded in spring 1922. Dr. Radenko Stankovic and Dr. Dimitrije Antic were appointed as part-time Professors, while Dr. Aleksandar Ignjatovski, a former Full-time Professor of the Warsaw University, was appointed as professor under contract. A year later, Dr. Aleksandar Radosavljevic was appointed as Part-time Professor. In the General State Hospital and Military Hospital, certain wards were turned into clinics. II and III Internal Clinics were situated in the barracks, while the Propedeutic and I Internal Clinics were located in the Military Hospital. Upon the construction of the buildings of the Internal Clinic and General State Hospital, the Propedeutic and I Internal Clinics were permanently placed in the new building, and II and III Internal Clinics in the General State Hospital. Teaching of Internal Medicine started 31 October 1922. Dr. R. Stanko vic delivered a lecture in Propedeutics for students of the fifth term. This date marks the beginning of teaching internal medicine at the newly established School of Medicine, University of Belgrade. Dr. A. Ignjatovski started lecturing Internal medicine 23 March 1923, whereas Dr. D. Antic and and Dr. A. Radosavljevic also delivered lectures in the areas of Internal Medicine within their professional scope. At the beginning, the clinics belonged to the General State Hospital. It was impossible to teach successfully in hospital, therefore upon the professors' request, the clinics were separated and thus became the institutions belonging to the School of Medicine-educational institutions, while hospitals were health institutions. The rule was 'one professor--one clinic'. After the Second World War, teaching Internal Medicine was begun in demolished buildings in very difficult financial circumstances. The Propedeutic Internal clinic was renamed IV Internal Clinic, which continued dealing predominantly with

  13. Bedside ultrasonography (US), Echoscopy and US point of care as a new kind of stethoscope for Internal Medicine Departments: the training program of the Italian Internal Medicine Society (SIMI).

    PubMed

    Arienti, Vincenzo; Di Giulio, Rosella; Cogliati, Chiara; Accogli, Esterita; Aluigi, Leonardo; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, thanks to the development of miniaturized ultrasound devices, comparable to personal computers, tablets and even to smart phones, we have seen an increasing use of bedside ultrasound in internal medicine departments as a novel kind of ultrasound stethoscope. The clinical ultrasound-assisted approach has proved to be particularly useful in assessing patients with nodules of the neck, dyspnoea, abdominal pain, and with limb edema. In several cases, it has allowed a simple, rapid and precise diagnosis. Since 2005, the Italian Society of Internal Medicine and its Ultrasound Study Group has been holding a Summer School and training courses in ultrasound for residents in internal medicine. A national network of schools in bedside ultrasound was then organized for internal medicine specialists who want to learn this technique. Because bedside ultrasound is a user-dependent diagnostic method, it is important to define the limits and advantages of different new ultrasound devices, to classify them (i.e. Echoscopy and Point of Care Ultrasound), to establish appropriate different levels of competence and to ensure their specific training. In this review, we describe the point of view of the Italian Internal Medicine Society on these topics.

  14. Shoot-tip cryopreservation by droplet vitrification of Byrsonima intermedia A. Juss.: a woody tropical and medicinal plant species from Brazilian cerrado.

    PubMed

    Silva, L C; Paiva, R; Swennen, R; Andre, E; Panis, B

    2013-01-01

    Cryopreservation of plant species is poorly investigated in Brazil. The aim of this study was to cryopreserve Byrsonima intermedia shoot apical meristems through droplet vitrification. A culture medium for shoot-tips growth was established using the Woody Plant Medium supplemented with 2.22 uM 6-benzylaminopurine. Excised shoot-tips were subjected to pre-culture and/or post-culture treatments on Murashige and Skoog medium with 0.3 M sucrose for 24 h prior dehydration on PVS2 at 0°C for 15, 30 or 45 minutes prior to plunging in liquid nitrogen. The effect of 15 days of shoot pre-growth on a high osmotic medium (0.3 M sucrose or 0.21 M sorbitol + 0.09 M sucrose) prior to meristem excision and cryopreservation was also investigated. Pre-culturing shoot-tips on 0.3 M sucrose for 24 h prior to cryopreservation increased the regrowth level after thawing to 90%. Shoot-tips excised from shoots pre-grown on MS + 0.21 M sorbitol + 0.09 M sucrose for 15 days presented a satisfactory regrowth level (67%).

  15. The learners' perspective on internal medicine ward rounds: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad; Motiwala, Afaq; Ali, Syed Umer; Riaz, Mehmood; Awan, Safia; Akhter, Jaweed

    2010-07-09

    Ward rounds form an integral part of Internal Medicine teaching. This study aimed to determine the trainees' opinions regarding various aspects of their ward rounds, including how well they cover their learning needs, how they would like the rounds to be conducted, and differences of opinion between medical students and postgraduates. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a total of 134 trainees in Internal Medicine, comprising medical students, interns, residents and fellows, who were asked to fill in a structured, self-designed questionnaire. Most of the responses required a rating on a scale of 1-5 (1 being highly unsatisfactory and 5 being highly satisfactory). Teaching of clinical skills and bedside teaching received the lowest overall mean score (Mean +/- SD 2.48 +/- 1.02 and 2.49 +/- 1.12 respectively). They were rated much lower by postgraduates as compared to students (p < 0.001). All respondents felt that management of patients was the aspect best covered by the current ward rounds (Mean +/- SD 3.71 +/- 0.72). For their desired ward rounds, management of patients received the highest score (Mean +/- SD 4.64 +/- 0.55), followed by bedside examinations (Mean +/- SD 4.60 +/- 0.61) and clinical skills teaching (Mean +/- SD 4.50 +/- 0.68). The postgraduates desired a lot more focus on communication skills, counselling and medical ethics as compared to students, whose primary focus was teaching of bedside examination and management. A majority of the respondents (87%) preferred bedside rounds over conference room rounds. Even though the duration of rounds was found to be adequate, a majority of the trainees (68%) felt there was a lack of individual attention during ward rounds. This study highlights important areas where ward rounds need improvement in order to maximize their benefit to the learners. There is a need to modify the current state of ward rounds in order to address the needs and expectations of trainees.

  16. Nephrologists' and internal medicine physicians' expectations of renal dietitians and general clinical dietitians.

    PubMed

    Hart, J J; Hurley, R S; Garrison, M E; Stombaugh, I

    1997-12-01

    To document and compare nephrologists' and internal medicine physicians' expectations of renal dietitians and general clinical dietitians. Subjects completed a mailed survey. Respondents provided demographic information and used a 5-point Likert scale to note whether each of 14 job functions was appropriate for general clinical dietitians, renal dietitians, or both. Five hundred forty-one physicians registered with the Ohio State Medical Board (OSMB) were surveyed. Within this group were 283 nephrologists (the population of nephrologists registered with the OSMB) and 258 internal medicine physicians (selected randomly by the OSMB). A total of 133 physicians (25%) returned the survey; 119 surveys were usable: 70 from nephrologists and 49 from internists. A composite variable was created by coding and summing physicians' responses regarding dietitian job functions. This variable was averaged for both physician categories. A t test was conducted to compare composite variable results between the two physician groups. At least 50% of nephrologists and internists agreed that both types of dietitians should conduct nutrition assessments, determine patients' energy needs, evaluate medication-nutrient interactions, recommend diet and tube-feeding orders, instruct patients about physician-ordered diets, and teach nutrition concepts to hospital interns. Few physicians agreed that either type of dietitian should order diets, tube feedings, or diet instructions. Clinical dietitians can educate physicians about dietitians roles informally in their institutions and formally by supporting programs like The American Dietetic Association Physician Nutrition Education Program. In addition, dietetics educators can hone their students' communication and problem-solving skills to promote positive physician-dietitian interaction.

  17. A survey of internal medicine residents and faculty about the duration of attendings' inpatient rotations.

    PubMed

    Akl, Elie A; Maroun, Nancy; Klocke, Robert A; Schünemann, Holger J

    2004-11-01

    Some training programs are shortening the duration of attendings' rotations from 4 weeks to 2 weeks. Our objective was to determine the effect of 2-week inpatient rotation on self-reported impact on medical education, patient care practices, and faculty performance by internal medicine residents and teaching faculty. Cross-sectional study using an anonymous mailed and emailed survey. University-based internal medicine residency program in Buffalo, New York that recently introduced 2-week rotations. One hundred nineteen residents (99 responded, 83%) and 83 teaching faculty (76 responded, 92%). Perceived impact on medical education, patient care, and attending performance on 7-point Likert scales ranging from negative (-3) across neutral (0) to positive (+3) ratings. In general, residents and attendings felt that the short rotation negatively affects the attending's ability to evaluate residents and some aspects of patient care, but that it has no negative impact on residents' or medical students' learning. Attendings thought the 2-week rotation positively affects their private life and overall productivity. Subgroup analysis indicated that residents who graduated from U.S. medical schools were more pessimistic about the 2-week rotation compared to their international counterparts. Attendings who had completed at least one short rotation had consistently higher ratings of the 2-week rotation. Residents and attendings' perceptions suggest that the shorter attending inpatient rotation might have negative impact on medical education and patient care but positive effects on the attending's work productivity and private life. This tradeoff requires further evaluation including objective medical education and patient care outcomes.

  18. Association between periodontal diseases and systemic illnesses: A survey among internal medicine residents in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Umeizudike, Kehinde A; Iwuala, Sandra O; Ozoh, Obianuju B; Ayanbadejo, Patricia O; Fasanmade, Olufemi A

    2016-01-01

    To assess internal medicine residents' knowledge of associations between periodontal disease and systemic illnesses, and attitudes toward patients' periodontal health. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted among internal medicine residents attending the Faculty of Internal Medicine 2014 Update Course organized by the National Postgraduate Medical College of Nigeria. Participants came from all over the country. Data on respondents' demographic characteristics, periodontal disease knowledge, knowledge of associations between periodontal disease and systemic illnesses, and attitudes toward patients' periodontal health were collected. Data were analyzed using Epi INFO software. The Pearson chi square test was used to measure significant association between categorical variables such as the knowledge of periodontal disease and gender, age group and designation of the participants (p ⩽ 0.05). Of 150 questionnaires distributed, 123 were returned (82% response rate); 109 questionnaires were completed properly and included in the analysis. The most common source of residents' information on oral health was television (59.4%). Only 11.2% of respondents were aware that gingival bleeding was the earliest sign of periodontal disease. Respondents correctly identified periodontal disease as a risk factor for coronary heart disease (45.9%), stroke (43.5%), hospital-acquired pneumonia (53.2%), diabetes mellitus (13.8%), and preterm birth (11%). Increased age (p = 0.032) and male gender (p = 0.022) were associated significantly with knowledge of periodontal disease as a risk factor for stroke. Higher designation (p = 0.002) and longer duration in residency training (p = 0.004) were associated significantly with knowledge of periodontal disease as risk factor for peripheral arterial disease. The majority (90.9%) of respondents had positive attitudes toward the referral of their patients for regular periodontal care. Knowledge of

  19. Perception of Nigerian internal medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mbakwem, A C; Ajuluchukwu, J N A

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the perception of internal medicine residents on diagnosis and management of heart failure in Nigeria. A modified version of the Euro-F study questionnaire was administered to internal medicine residents (IMRs) from Nigeria who were attending the pre part I Fellowship examination of the Faculty of Internal Medicine of the National Postgraduate Medical College. Responses were compared with data from the Nigerian primary physicians (PCP) survey and the Euro-HF study. The commonest symptoms used by the IMRs in heart failure diagnosis were exertional dyspnoea 68.85%(42), pedal oedema 63.93%(39) and orthopnoea 50.82%(31), while the signs included elevated jugular venous pressure 50.82%(31), basal crepitations 47.50%(29) and a gallop heart rhythm 39.34%(24). Categorisation using the Framingham criteria for diagnosis showed that 52% of the IMRs knew three or more major signs of heart failure. The IMRs use of investigations in diagnosing heart failure was fair to good and was significantly higher than results from the Euro-F study and the primary care physicians (PCPs) in Lagos study; echocardiogram, (p=0.007and <0.00001); electrocardiogram, (p= 0.0002 and p=0.001); chest x-ray (p=0.05 and 0.5) respectively. However the mean proportion of IMRs that would rely on investigation to make a diagnosis was significantly lower than in the Euro-F study (p=0.0001) and in the PCPs (p = 0.02). Although the mean proportion of the IMRs patients using ACE-inhibitors was significantly higher than in the Euro-F survey (p<0.001) and the PCPs (p <0.00001), majority (93.94%) of the IMRs were using less than half the trial doses for treatment. On the other hand, the knowledge of survival benefits with the use of b-blockers was very poor in the all the groups, p>0.05. A substantial knowledge gap still exists among the IMRs as regards the diagnosis and management of heart failure and this need to be addressed by the trainers.

  20. Admission of nursing home residents to a hospital internal medicine department.

    PubMed

    Barba, Raquel; Zapatero, Antonio; Marco, Javier; Perez, Alejandro; Canora, Jesús; Plaza, Susana; Losa, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Hospitalization of nursing home residents is costly and potentially exposes residents to iatrogenic disease and psychological harm. In this study, we analyzed the data from the Basic Minimum Data Set of patients hospitalized from the nursing home who were discharged from all the internal medicine departments at the National Health Service hospitals in Spain between 2005 and 2008, according to the data provided by the Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs. Between January 2005 and December 2008, 2,134,363 patients were admitted to internal medicine departments in Spain, of whom 45,757 (2.1%) were nursing home residents. Overall, 7898 (17.3%) patients died during hospitalization, 2442 (30.91%) of them in the first 48 hours. The following variables were the significant predictors of in-hospital mortality in multivariate analysis: age (odds ratio [OR] 1.02, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.02-1.03), female gender (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.13-1.17), dementia (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.03-1.16), previous feeding tube (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.09-1.79), malignant disease (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.86-2.23), acute infectious disease (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.12-1.25), pressure sores (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.62-1.95), acute respiratory failure (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.90-2.10), and nosocomial pneumonia (OR 2.5, 95% CI 2.23-2.72). Two of every 100 patients admitted to internal medicine departments came from nursing homes. The rate of mortality is very high in these patients, with almost one third of patients dying in the first 48 hours, which suggests that many of these transfers were unnecessary. The cost of these admissions for 1 year was equivalent to the annual budget of a 300- to 400-bed public hospital in Spain. The mechanism of coordination between nursing homes and public hospitals must be reviewed with the aim of containing costs and facilitating the care of patients in the last days of life. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Association between periodontal diseases and systemic illnesses: A survey among internal medicine residents in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Umeizudike, Kehinde A.; Iwuala, Sandra O.; Ozoh, Obianuju B.; Ayanbadejo, Patricia O.; Fasanmade, Olufemi A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess internal medicine residents’ knowledge of associations between periodontal disease and systemic illnesses, and attitudes toward patients’ periodontal health. Methods A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted among internal medicine residents attending the Faculty of Internal Medicine 2014 Update Course organized by the National Postgraduate Medical College of Nigeria. Participants came from all over the country. Data on respondents’ demographic characteristics, periodontal disease knowledge, knowledge of associations between periodontal disease and systemic illnesses, and attitudes toward patients’ periodontal health were collected. Data were analyzed using Epi INFO software. The Pearson chi square test was used to measure significant association between categorical variables such as the knowledge of periodontal disease and gender, age group and designation of the participants (p ⩽ 0.05). Results Of 150 questionnaires distributed, 123 were returned (82% response rate); 109 questionnaires were completed properly and included in the analysis. The most common source of residents’ information on oral health was television (59.4%). Only 11.2% of respondents were aware that gingival bleeding was the earliest sign of periodontal disease. Respondents correctly identified periodontal disease as a risk factor for coronary heart disease (45.9%), stroke (43.5%), hospital-acquired pneumonia (53.2%), diabetes mellitus (13.8%), and preterm birth (11%). Increased age (p = 0.032) and male gender (p = 0.022) were associated significantly with knowledge of periodontal disease as a risk factor for stroke. Higher designation (p = 0.002) and longer duration in residency training (p = 0.004) were associated significantly with knowledge of periodontal disease as risk factor for peripheral arterial disease. The majority (90.9%) of respondents had positive attitudes toward the referral of their patients for

  2. Working Memory Capacity is Decreased in Sleep-Deprived Internal Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Ashraf; Adams, Alexander; Gertner, Elie; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda; Heitz, Richard; Engle, Randall; Haus, Erhard; Bijwadia, Jagdeep

    2009-01-01

    Background: Concerns about medical errors due to sleep deprivation during residency training led the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education to mandate reductions in work schedules. Although call rotations with extended shifts continue, effects on resident sleep-wake times and working memory capacity (WMC) have not been investigated. Objectives: The objective of this study was to measure effects of call rotations on sleep-wake times and WMC in internal medicine residents. Methods: During 2 months of an internal medicine training program adhering to ACGME work-hour restrictions (between April 2006 and June 2007), residents completed daily WMC tests, wore actigraphy watches, and logged their sleep hours. This observational study was conducted during a call month requiring 30-hour call rotations every fourth night, whereas the noncall month, which allowed sleep/wake cycle freedom, was used as the control. Main Outcome Measures: Sleep hours per night and WMC testing. Results: Thirty-nine residents completing the study had less sleep per night during their call month (6.4 vs 7.3 h per night noncall, p < 0.001) and sleep per night varied from 3.7 to 10.1 hours. Call rotation caused greater self-assessed sleepiness and reduced WMC recall scores (−2.6/test, p < 0.05), and more math errors occurred when on call (+1.07/test, p < 0.04). Full recovery of WMC did not occur until the fourth day after call. On-call rotation on the first month had a confounding detrimental effect on WMC. Conclusion: A month of call rotations reduced overall sleep per night; sleep hours per night were variable, and WMC was adversely affected. Decreased WMC could explain impaired judgment during sleep deprivation, although clinical error rates were not evaluated. Citation: Gohar A; Adams A; Gertner E; Sackett-Lundeen L; Heitz R; Engle R; Haus E; Bijwadia J. Working memory capacity is decreased in sleep-deprived internal medicine residents. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(3):191-197. PMID

  3. The 52(nd) International Conference on Medicinal Chemistry (RICT 2016) of the French Medicinal Chemistry Society (SCT) Held in Caen (Normandy).

    PubMed

    Sapi, Janos; Van Hijfte, Luc; Dallemagne, Patrick

    2017-06-21

    Outstanding Medchem in France: Guest editors Janos Sapi, Luc Van Hjfte, and Patrick Dallemagne look back at the 52(nd) International Conference on Medicinal Chemistry (RICT 2016) held in Caen, France. They discuss the history of the French Medicinal Chemistry Society (Société de Chimie Thérapeutique, SCT) and provide highlights of last year's events, including some key presentations now collected in this Special Issue. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Comprehensive Auditing in Nuclear Medicine Through the International Atomic Energy Agency Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM) Program. Part 1: the QUANUM Program and Methodology.

    PubMed

    Dondi, Maurizio; Torres, Leonel; Marengo, Mario; Massardo, Teresa; Mishani, Eyal; Van Zyl Ellmann, Annare; Solanki, Kishor; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Lobato, Enrique Estrada; Miller, Rodolfo Nunez; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    An effective management system that integrates quality management is essential for a modern nuclear medicine practice. The Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the mission of supporting nuclear medicine practice in low- and middle-income countries and of helping them introduce it in their health-care system, when not yet present. The experience gathered over several years has shown diversified levels of development and varying degrees of quality of practice, among others because of limited professional networking and limited or no opportunities for exchange of experiences. Those findings triggered the development of a program named Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM), aimed at improving the standards of NM practice in low- and middle-income countries to internationally accepted standards through the introduction of a culture of quality management and systematic auditing programs. QUANUM takes into account the diversity of nuclear medicine services around the world and multidisciplinary contributions to the practice. Those contributions include clinical, technical, radiopharmaceutical, and medical physics procedures. Aspects of radiation safety and patient protection are also integral to the process. Such an approach ensures consistency in providing safe services of superior quality to patients. The level of conformance is assessed using standards based on publications of the IAEA and the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and guidelines from scientific societies such as Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) and European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). Following QUANUM guidelines and by means of a specific assessment tool developed by the IAEA, auditors, both internal and external, will be able to evaluate the level of conformance. Nonconformances will then be prioritized and recommendations will be provided during an exit briefing. The

  5. PREFACE: International Conference on Image Optimisation in Nuclear Medicine (OptiNM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christofides, Stelios; Parpottas, Yiannis

    2011-09-01

    Conference logo The International Conference on Image Optimisation in Nuclear Medicine was held at the Atlantica Aeneas Resort in Ayia Napa, Cyprus between 23-26 March 2011. It was organised in the framework of the research project "Optimising Diagnostic Value in SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging" (YΓΕΙΑ/ΔYΓΕΙΑ/0308/11), funded by the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation and the European Regional Development Fund, to present the highlights of the project, discuss the progress and results, and define future related goals. The aim of this International Conference was to concentrate on image optimization approaches in Nuclear Medicine. Experts in the field of nuclear medicine presented their latest research results, exchanged experiences and set future goals for image optimisation while balancing patient dose and diagnostic value. The conference was jointly organized by the Frederick Research Centre in Cyprus, the Department of Medical and Public Health Services of the Cyprus Ministry of Health, the Biomedical Research Foundation in Cyprus and the AGH University of Science and Technology in Poland. It was supported by the Cyprus Association of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, and the Cyprus Society of Nuclear Medicine. The conference was held under the auspices of the European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. The conference scientific programme covered several important topics such as functional imaging; image optimization; quantification for diagnosis; justification; simulations; patient dosimetry, staff exposures and radiation risks; quality assurance and clinical audit; education, training and radiation protection culture; hybrid systems and image registration; and new and competing technologies. The programme consisted of 13 invited and keynote presentations as well as workshops, round table discussions and a number of scientific sessions. A total of 51 speakers presented their

  6. Citation analysis of The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine from KoMCI, Web of Science, and Scopus.

    PubMed

    Huh, Sun

    2011-03-01

    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine (KJIM) is the international journal published in English by the Korean Association of Internal Medicine. To understand the position of the journal in three different databases, the citation indicators were elucidated. From databases such as Korean Medical Citation Index (KoMCI), Web of Science, and Scopus, citation indicators such as the impact factor, SCImago journal rank (SJR), or Hirsch Index were calculated according to the year and the results were drawn. The KJIM 2010 impact factor increased to 0.623 in Web of Science. That of year 2009 in KoMCI was a 0.149. The 2009 SJR in Scopus was 0.073, with a ranking of 27/72 (37.5%) in the category of internal medicine and 414/1,618 (25.6%) in the category of medicine, miscellaneous. The Hirsch Index from KoMCI, Web of Science and Scopus were 5, 14, and 16, respectively. The KJIM is now cited more by international researchers than Korean researchers, indicating that the content of the journal is now valued at the international level.

  7. Citation Analysis of The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine from KoMCI, Web of Science, and Scopus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine (KJIM) is the international journal published in English by the Korean Association of Internal Medicine. To understand the position of the journal in three different databases, the citation indicators were elucidated. From databases such as Korean Medical Citation Index (KoMCI), Web of Science, and Scopus, citation indicators such as the impact factor, SCImago journal rank (SJR), or Hirsch Index were calculated according to the year and the results were drawn. The KJIM 2010 impact factor increased to 0.623 in Web of Science. That of year 2009 in KoMCI was a 0.149. The 2009 SJR in Scopus was 0.073, with a ranking of 27/72 (37.5%) in the category of internal medicine and 414/1,618 (25.6%) in the category of medicine, miscellaneous. The Hirsch Index from KoMCI, Web of Science and Scopus were 5, 14, and 16, respectively. The KJIM is now cited more by international researchers than Korean researchers, indicating that the content of the journal is now valued at the international level. PMID:21437155

  8. Animal-assisted interventions in internal and rehabilitation medicine: a review of the recent literature.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Lasa, S; Ferriero, G; Brigatti, E; Valero, R; Franchignoni, F

    2011-06-01

    While conventional wisdom has always affirmed the value of animals in promoting human well-being, only recently has their therapeutic role in medicine become the focus of dedicated research. Therapeutic modalities that use animals as a tool for improving the physical, emotional, cognitive and/or social functioning of humans are called animal-assisted interventions (AAI), and are classified into: animal-assisted activities (AAA); animal-assisted therapy (AAT); and service animal programs (SAP). The aim of this review is to analyze the papers published between 2001 and 2010 in the most influential medical journals dealing with AAI, and discuss their findings in the light of what may be of interest for internal medicine and rehabilitation. A total of 35 articles met the strict inclusion criteria for this review: 18 papers dealing with AAA, 8 with AAT, and 9 with SAP. The therapeutic outcomes associated with AAA are: enhancement of socialization; reduction of stress, anxiety and loneliness; improvement in mood and general well-being; and development of leisure/recreation skills. Regarding AAT, horses are often used as a complementary strategy to facilitate the normalization of muscle tone and improve motor skills in children with cerebral palsy and persons with lower limb spasticity. Finally, most SAP utilize dogs, that assist people with various disabilities in performing everyday activities, thus reducing their dependence on other persons. Further studies are needed to better define the fields and programs for the therapeutic use of animals and to increase their utilization in medicine, as a promising, complementary and natural means to improve both functional autonomy and quality of life.

  9. International Defensive Medicine in Neurosurgery: Comparison of Canada, South Africa, and the United States.

    PubMed

    Yan, Sandra C; Hulou, M Maher; Cote, David J; Roytowski, David; Rutka, James T; Gormley, William B; Smith, Timothy R

    2016-11-01

    Perception of medicolegal risk has been shown to influence defensive medicine behaviors. Canada, South Africa, and the United States have 3 vastly different health care and medicolegal systems. There has been no previous study comparing defensive medicine practices internationally. An online survey was sent to 3672 neurosurgeons across Canada, South Africa, and the United States. The survey included questions on the following domains: surgeon demographics, patient characteristics, physician practice type, surgeon liability profile, defensive behavior-including questions on the frequency of ordering additional imaging, laboratory tests, and consults-and perception of the liability environment. Responses were analyzed, and multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the correlation of medicolegal risk environment and defensive behavior. The response rate was 30.3% in the United States (n = 1014), 36.5% in Canada (n = 62), and 41.8% in South Africa (n = 66). Canadian neurosurgeons reported an average annual malpractice premium of $19,110 (standard deviation [SD] = $11,516), compared with $16,262 (SD = $7078) for South African respondents, $75,857 (SD = $50,775) for neurosurgeons from low-risk U.S. states, and $128,181 (SD = $79,355) for those from high-risk U.S. states. Neurosurgeons from South Africa were 2.8 times more likely to engage in defensive behaviors compared with Canadian neurosurgeons, while neurosurgeons from low-risk U.S. states were 2.6 times more likely. Neurosurgeons from high-risk U.S. states were 4.5 times more likely to practice defensively compared with Canadian neurosurgeons. Neurosurgeons from the United States and South Africa are more likely to practice defensively than neurosurgeons from Canada. Perception of medicolegal risk is correlated with reported neurosurgical defensive medicine within these countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An evaluation of articles in international peer-reviewed publications in Turkish family medicine.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Hakan; Kara, Ismail Hamdi

    2007-09-01

    Scientific publication in Turkish family medicine (FM) has currently increased and a systematic assessment of the quantity and quality of the published research is the aim of this study. The data were obtained from the Institute for Scientific Information Citation Databases (SCI, SCI-Expanded, SSCI, and A&HSCI) and the period between 1975-2005 was searched. Key words such as "family practice", "family medicine", "primary care", "primary medical care", and "Turkey" were used and publications were classified according to the type of research, the number of authors, first authorship, the number of citations, and address. The classification was performed by two investigators and the inter-rater-reliability was found to be Cramer's V=0.79 (p<0.05). One hundred five publications were found. Publications were evident since the year 1991 and showed an increase with the year 2001. The median number of authors of the publications was five (range 1-8), and family physicians were generally the second authors (range: 1-7). The predominant types of publication was research articles (n=72, 69%), and the leading types of research were surveys (n=29, 28%) and case-control studies (n=24, 23%). The median citation number of publications per article was 0.89 (range: 0-13). A recent increase in publication in international peer-reviewed journals was observed. Mostly research articles were published, but randomized controlled trials were in the minority. More emphasis on developing a research capacity in family medicine might help to optimize research activities in Turkey.

  11. [Introducing formative portfolio as a tool for Internal Medicine residents mentoring: review of a pilot project, 2005-2006].

    PubMed

    Arnau I Figueras, J; Torán Monserrat, P; Martínez-Carretero, J M; Forteza-Rey, J; Pinilla Llorente, B; Brailovsky, C A

    2008-10-01

    Recent educational projects in our country have been trying to introduce professional portfolios as assessment/learning tools on the undergraduate and specialized post-graduate education levels. The approval of a new formative program for the Internal Medicine specialty in an effort to adapt to the present health care needs offers an opportunity to apply these formative and evaluative methodologies in the learning process of future internists. During the 2005-2006 academic year, the Formative Work Group of the Spanish Internal Medicine Society (SEMI) developed a pilot study on portfolio application as a tool for formative assessment and mentoring. This article describes the project of designing, developing, applying and assessing an electronic portfolio for first year Internal Medicine residents. It presents an analysis of the SEMI Portfolio strengths and weaknesses and finally makes suggestions for future development.

  12. Overnight Hospital Experiences for Medical Students: Results of the 2014 Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine National Survey.

    PubMed

    Goren, Eric N; Leizman, Debra S; La Rochelle, Jeffrey; Kogan, Jennifer R

    2015-09-01

    Since the 2011 Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) work hour rules for residents were implemented, 24-30 h call for interns has been replaced by shift work, including night-float. The impact of these changes on undergraduate medical education experiences in internal medicine has not been described. We aimed to determine the current status of medical students' overnight experiences in Internal Medicine clerkships and sub-internships, and to assess internal medicine educators' perceptions of the importance of overnight work during internal medicine rotations. In May 2014, the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM) conducted its annual survey. Twenty-eight questions about student participation in overnight work and perceptions of the importance of overnight work (rated on 1-5 Likert scale, 1 = very unimportant and 5 =  ery important) were included. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize responses. Free text results were analyzed qualitatively. The response rate was 78 %. A minority of respondents reported students having any overnight experience during the clerkship (38.7 %) or the sub-internship (40.7 %). Only 5 % of respondents reported having students assigned to night-float rotations outside of clerkships or sub-internships. Respondents agreed that overnight experiences were more importan